Browse By

Close Facet Group

Collection

Close Facet Group

Date

Close Facet Group

Parliament No.



Search Results

     
Summary results: 121-135 of 3683 matches.
Email List Link   Print List   RSS Feed   CSV Metadata
First Page Previous Page
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Next Page Last Page

Loading Animation
Preparing your download. Please wait...
For this page            
  • Home » Transcripts » Budget 2014 28 May 2014 Program: Sky News, PM Agenda Interviewer: David Speers E&OE DAVID SPEERS: Back to the Budget though and a lot of the baÆ©le today and indeed through the course of this week has been about the tough changes for young jobseekers as announced on Budget night two weeks ago, the Government intends for those under the age of 30 to either make them earn or learn and if they’re not earning in a job or learning through some form of study, well they won’t receive unemployment benefits, the dole, for a six month period. Today they’ve announced Work for the Dole programs and we’ve shown you where those programs will iniƟally be implemented, in high unemployment areas of each state. This is what will happen, this is what will apply to those who’ve been out of work now for 12 months, so right now, if you’re out of work, from July this year, these changes will apply to you, but who will this six months of no dole at all apply to? I spoke to Kevin Andrews, the Minister for Social Services a liÆ©le earlier. Minister, thank you for your ÆŸme, I just want to go back to what you’ve announced in the Budget and explain clearly for us, the young unemployed, those under 30 who are currently unemployed, what happens to them under this change that you’ve proposed? MINISTER ANDREWS: It’s basically, as the name suggests, earn or learn, so what we want people to be doing is be in a job, or in training. So if you are capable of working for more than 30 hours a week, there’s exempƟons so if you can’t work that long, if you’re in a disability employment service, if you’re a parent with parenƟng responsibiliƟes then you’re exempted from this, but otherwise, if you don’t have a job then we’re expecƟng you to do some training. If you’re doing neither of those then you’ll have a six month waiƟng period in order to get the dole. DAVID SPEERS: And does that, that applies to those currently in that situaƟon? Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Budget 2014 | The Hon Kevin Andrews MP
    Date: 28/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240933 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Lateline 27 May 2014 Program: Lateline Interviewer: Emma Alberici E&OE EMMA ALBERICI: Returning to Federal poliƟcs now and the Government's aÆ©empts to sell the merits of its Budget against accusaƟons that the pain involved in bringing down the deficit isn't being spread around fairly. The Social Services Minister, Kevin Andrews, is responsible for the groups considered to be hardest hit by the Government's proposed spending cuts: families, children, seniors, people with disabiliƟes. The Minister joined me from our Parliament House studio. Kevin Andrews, welcome to Lateline. MINISTER ANDREWS: Thank you very much, Emma. EMMA ALBERICI: We hear today that the Government is about to launch a campaign to sell the Budget. What form is that likely to take? MINISTER ANDREWS: Well, as the Prime Minister pointed out in quesƟon ÆŸme today, that is simply not true. We are not launching some media campaign, mass‐market campaign, to sell the Budget. In fact, we believe that the Budget is being reasonably well received by people who understand that we've got a massive financial mess to clean up from the last Government and we've got a plan to do it. EMMA ALBERICI: I think his message today was that there would be no large campaign, which leŌ sort of the door open for some kind of message to be delivered via an adverƟsing blitz of some sort, perhaps pamphlets or something like that. Are you suggesƟng nothing at all is being considered? MINISTER ANDREWS: My understanding is: no, we're not going in for some mass‐markeƟng campaign. Obviously we will provide informaƟon to people who are affected by changes, such as pensioners about their pension arrangements in the future, people who are in receipt of family tax benefits, but that will be just done through the normal channels of the normal correspondence that people receive from Government agencies. Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Lateline | The Hon Kevin Andrews MP http://kevinandrews.dss.gov.au/transcripts/111
    Date: 27/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240935 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » 2G Breakfast with Chris Smith 26 May 2014 Program: 2GB Breakfast Interviewer: Chris Smith E&OE CHRIS SMITH: One of the more impressive aspects of the AbboÆ© Government’s first budget was the changes to unemployment benefits. Their philosophy is for Australia to be a work ready naƟon not a welfare naƟon which I think it’s fair to say we’ve almost become. They want young people either working or in educaƟon and training. Now the belief is some people have been relying on benefits for too long, if you give people an inch they will take a mile and the Treasurer made the point that the age of enƟtlement is over. It’s ÆŸme for us all to ÆŸghten our belts and it’s all on the back of empty promises from Labor who threw money around as bribes before the elecƟon. Kevin Andrews is the Minister for Social Services and he’s on the line right now. Minister good morning. MINISTER: Good morning Chris. CHRIS SMITH: The figures reported today, I made menƟon of them about 30 minutes ago, they are quite alarming. There were 734,866 people on Newstart or Youth Allowance, the junior version, in April.  But why do more than 50 per cent of them not have to look for work because of job search exempƟons, we’re giving them all the opportunity they need to not try and find a job. MINISTER: That’s true Chris, there’s been, I think, a fairly slack aÆ«tude taken in the past to say to young people in parƟcular who are capable of working give you all sorts of excuses not to go out and get a job and we’re saying to them now essenƟally you should get a job, if you’re not in a job then we’ll give you some assistance to get into training so you’ve got the skills for a job in the future. CHRIS SMITH: You’ve got 74,042 exempt because they had a doctor’s cerƟficate, you know it’s the same with the Disability Support Pension, don’t we need a tougher system of medical cerƟficates to ensure that legiƟmate Disability Support Pension recipients and those who are not working are able to get their payments but at the same ÆŸme get those who can work and get those who are able bodied back into contribuƟng to the country.   MINISTER: And that’s the approach we’re taking, for people under 30 there’s a new earn or learn approach. There are some exempƟons; if people aren’t capable of working more than 30 hours a week, if they’re principle carers of children or they’re somebody on disability employment services there are exempƟons, but where a person is essenƟally able bodied, able to work more than 30 hours then our aÆ«tude is that the best thing for that person and indeed for the whole community is they’re either working or geÆ«ng the skills Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen 2G Breakfast with Chris Smith |
    Date: 26/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240937 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Sky PM Agenda 22 May 2014 Program: Sky PM E&OE PRESENTER: One of the biggest gripes that Australians have with the Budget is they say it isn’t fair. But new modelling from the NaƟonal Centre for Social and Economic Modelling spells out, perhaps, why. It divided the community as you can see in this graphic into five segments based on disposable household income and then it tried to work out how much each segment was contribuƟng to the Budget. It found the boÆ©om segment, there on the leŌ of the Screen as Q1 Total, that’s the poorest 20 per cent of Australian households, will lose $2.9 billion over four years or 2.2 per cent of their disposable income. The top segment, the top earning segment, those with $88,000 or more aŌer tax and benefits will forego $1.78 billion but with the scrapping of the carbon tax and other measures, they’re actually .2 per cent beÆ©er off. To discuss this and other issues in the Budget, I spoke to the Social Services Minister, Kevin Andrews a short ÆŸme ago. Kevin Andrews, thank you for your ÆŸme. NATSEM modelling today shows that the poorest 20 per cent of households are contribuƟng over a billion dollars more to the Federal Government’s Budget savings than the richest 20 per cent of households. Is this Budget inherently unfair? MINISTER: There are very significant payments going to households at the low and middle levels of income. If you take a household that has an income of, say, $30,000, around about the minimum wage, then they are receiving by way of Government payments, somewhere between $20 and $30,000 dollars a year, depending on the number of children that they have. Even at the income levels of $50 and $60,000 people and families with children, can be earning by way of government addiƟonal support, some $10 to $20,000, so a very significant conƟnuing contribuƟon to families. PRESENTER: But the impact of any cuts or savings that the Government makes on lower income families is much greater proporƟonately, than those on higher income and this is only compounded by the fact that one of the key measures for higher income earners, the temporary debt tax is just that, temporary, whereas the changes to Family Tax Payments and other benefits for lower income families are permanent. MINISTER: Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Sky PM Agenda | The Hon Kevin
    Date: 22/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240969 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » ABC 936 Hobart 22 May 2014 Transcript LocaƟon: ABC 936 Hobart Program: Drive Program E&OE PRESENTER: With me from the Federal Government is the Minister for Social Services, Kevin Andrews, Minister good aŌernoon. MINISTER: Good aŌernoon Louise. PRESENTER: Do you think it’s fair the Prime Minister said that it’s not the worse thing if young people who can’t find jobs in Tasmania where the unemployment rate is higher than the rest of the naƟon, need to leave the State. MINISTER: Look many young people travel; go from one area to another in order to get a job. Many young people go from Northern Tasmania to Southern Tasmania to go to university or interstate to get training. So it’s not something which is unknown or unusual for many young people and the reality is we want to encourage as many people as possible to get into work, get training, get skills and have a beÆ©er life. PRESENTER: In an area though where the unemployment rate can be as high as 20 per cent, is it the best soluƟon though that it’s incumbent on the young people to move to find work rather than to be the beneficiaries of government sƟmulus programs to create employment? MINISTER: Well government sƟmulus programs have a very mixed result at the best. If there’s high levels of unemployment it usually reflects the state of business and industry and economic acƟvity in a parƟcular region and government sƟmulus programs over the years have been Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen ABC 936 Hobart | The Hon Kevin Andrews MP http://kevinandrews.dss.gov.au/transcripts/102
    Date: 22/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240973 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Bush Telegraph, ABC Radio NaƟonal, 20 May 2014 20 May 2014 Program: ABC Radio NaƟonal QUESTION: With me today is Kevin Andrews who’s the Federal Minister for Social Services. Thank you for joining us Minister. MINISTER: Good morning Cameron. QUESTION: Let’s start with the NaƟonal Rental Affordability Scheme, why was that cut? MINISTER: Well we looked at the NaƟonal Rental Affordability Scheme when we came into Government and there are very many deficiencies in the way in which it had been operaƟng and rolled out. This was aimed at providing within a relaƟvely short period of ÆŸme 50,000 new dwellings, currently there’s only about 20,000 aŌer a number of years that have been constructed. There’s about another 18,000 that are at different stages of construcƟon, or maybe not even construcƟon. On top of that there was inappropriate use of the incenƟves, housing for internaƟonal students at universiƟes rather than for local workers and poorer Australians, and there’s been a trading in the incenƟves. So much so that we know that some of these incenƟves have been traded on the open market for up to $20,000. So having looked at it… QUESTION: Are you scrapping the enƟre scheme because a few people rorted the system? MINISTER: Now we’re not. What we’re doing is that for the 38,000 that have either been built, or in the process hopefully of being built, we will maintain that scheme as long as the ÆŸmelines for geÆ«ng them built are in place. For the remaining 12,000 we’re not proceeding with it at this stage because of those problems. In addiƟon to that we will be looking at housing in a much more holisƟc way at the Commonwealth level over the next six months or so but this should be seen in the context of two things. Firstly that housing is primarily a state responsibility in Australia, but despite that the Commonwealth provides billions of dollars to the states for affordable housing. We provide, under the NaƟonal Affordable Housing Agreement, about $1.3 billion a year, we provide billions of dollars in rental assistance from the Commonwealth each year and specifically for homelessness we’ve rolled over $115 million for 12 months while we have this examinaƟon of housing more broadly. QUESTION: But do you agree with Ken Marchingo (CEO Haven Home Safe Bendigo) that this decision by the Federal Government will directly lead to more people homeless in regional areas, regional Victoria in parƟcular in this case? MINISTER: No I disagree with that because this was one measure, and a relaƟvely small measure in the total amount of money which the Commonwealth provides to the states and others for housing and all we’re not doing is proceeding with a measure. This is not going to lead to any further homelessness and indeed as I said we’ve rolled over $115 million that goes from the Commonwealth directly to Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Bush Telegraph, ABC Radio National, 20
    Date: 20/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3240995 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » ABC News Radio 20 May 2014 Program: ABC News Radio Interviewer: Marius Benson E&OE MARIUS BENSON: Kevin Andrews, polls have found a clear majority of voters think the budget is not just tough but unfair, and now professional studies have backed that up with staƟsƟcs saying that the people hardest hit are mid and low income earners, do you accept that? MINISTER: This is a budget which is really in the naƟonal interest and I think the interesƟng news this morning is that credit raƟngs are now saying that unless these measures are taken then they’re puÆ«ng up a real amber light to our credit raƟngs which means interest rates going up. So we have Labor having created the problem in just one term now being in denial about fixing it, what we’re trying to do is to ensure over the medium to long‐term we can get the budget back in the black and in that way ensure the prosperity of Australians. MARIUS BENSON: The Government says it needs a tough budget and you say the credit agencies are backing that up but the point being made by NATSEM and other analysts is it’s not fair the burden is falling disproporƟonately on low and middle income families but less on the rich. MINISTER: If you take single income families say with one child under six, if their earnings are around the minimum wage of $30,000 a year they’re geÆ«ng almost $20,000 in government benefits. Even when their earnings go up to $90,000 they’re sƟll geÆ«ng more than $6000 in government benefits and if that family has two or three children those benefits get increased to over $20,000.   MARIUS BENSON: But the benefits are lower NATSEM says, for example, 1.2 million families would be on average around $3000 a year worse off by 2017‐18. MINISTER: Well if there was concern from the Labor Party about families being worse off, the first thing they should do is get out of the way of the repeal of the carbon tax because that alone would bring in $550 extra to the ordinary family household.  MARIUS BENSON: Do you reject this NATSEM finding that the burden falls disproporƟonately on the less well‐off? MINISTER: What we’ve tried to do is to ensure that there is a contribuƟon to geÆ«ng us out of Labor’s financial mess by all Australians. Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen ABC News Radio | The Hon Kevin
    Date: 20/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241004 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Download File
    Date: 19/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241005 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Radio NaƟonal 16 May 2014 LISON CARABINE: Kevin Andrews good morning. MINISTER: Good morning Alison. LISON CARABINE: Kevin Andrews, the Senate will block about half of the $37 billion worth of savings announced on Tuesday night. Is your budget repair job now in taÆ©ers? MINISTER: Well these measures haven’t even gone through the House yet, let alone the Senate. So we will put the legislaƟon through as necessary and we will call upon the good sense of those in the House and the Senate to start the repair job to the mess that Labor leŌ us. LISON CARABINE: But isn’t the Budget reply speeches from both Bill Shorten and ChrisƟne Milne last night a preÆ©y good indicaƟon that your budget was simply too harsh, you went too far, your Budget is unacceptable to most of the country? MINISTER: Look frankly Mr Shorten is in total denial. Elisabeth Kubler‐Ross described denial as the first stage of grief and that’s obviously where Mr Shorten is. He offered no soluƟon to paying down Labor’s record debt; he offered no responsibility for the mess that the Commonwealth finances are in at the present ÆŸme. We will get on with the job. LISON CARABINE: But why should he have done that last night, we’re two and half years out from a normal elecƟon. Why should Labor be spelling out, at this stage, what it would be doing with the Budget if indeed it was in Government? MINISTER: Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Radio National | The Hon Kevin Andrews MP http://kevinandrews.dss.gov.au/transcripts/97 1 of
    Date: 16/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241012 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » ABC News 24 14 May 2014 LYNDAL CURTIS: Kevin Andrews welcome to Capital Hill. MINISTER: Thank you. LYNDAL CURTIS: Do you accept that some of the measures announced last night, making people under 30 wait for payments and those, I think, under 24 geÆ«ng lower payments will be very harsh? MINISTER: The aim of this is to ensure that we can get people into work. There are many young people who are working part‐Ɵme, I know of young people who are working a couple of part‐Ɵme jobs. It’s not fair to them when they’re puÆ«ng in the effort to get the training and the educaƟon and get themselves through university or tafe, or whatever, for someone to simply be lying around on the couch at home and being subsidised. LYNDAL CURTIS: But not everyone is what you would categorise as a dole bludger. There are those who for a range of reasons fall through the cracks, parƟcularly those who may have not had the educaƟon opportuniƟes who might live in rural or regional areas where it’s much tougher to find a job. MINISTER: And there’s a range of exempƟons for people, so if you can’t work for more than 30 hours a week, for example, then you’re exempted. If you are a principal carer, a parent, then you’re exempted. If you have some incapacity that puts you into strings three and four, then you’d be exempted. If you’re a disability support client then you’re exempted. So essenƟally what we’re trying to do is to say for those people who are capable of working, young people, then if you’re not working then you should be in training and... LYNDAL CURTIS: But can you guarantee that for those, parƟcularly in rural and regional areas, that those opportuniƟes to learn will be there? Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen ABC News 24 | The Hon Kevin Andrews MP
    Date: 16/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241013 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » ABC 774—Interview with Minister for Social Services Kevin Andrews 12 May 2014 Program: ABC 774, Mornings with Jon Faine Interviewer: Jon Faine E&OE. JON FAINE: Kevin Andrews is the Minister in charge of social security, the Social Services Minister in the AbboÆ© Federal Government.  Tomorrow night’s budget from Joe Hockey will announce a substanƟal change to the Disability Support Pension.  Mr Andrews, good morning to you. MINISTER: Good morning Jon. JON FAINE: What will the new guidelines be? MINISTER: Well, without going into all the detail which the Treasurer will announce tomorrow night, essenƟally there are two components relaƟng to the DSP.  The first is that for certain recipients who are under 35 years of age who were granted the DSP under less rigorous impairment tables between 2008 and 2011, there will be a reassessment and if they’re found capable of working then we will be requiring a program of support from them. The second relates to compulsory parƟcipaƟon acƟviƟes for DSP recipients under the age of 35, where they’ve got eight hours or more work capacity a week and that can include things like work experience, educaƟon and training, even Work for the Dole. JON FAINE: Implicit then in that review Minister is your view that presumably, that it’s too easy to get the pension and people who are on it, some of them ought not be on it. MINISTER: Look, there’s about 830,000 people on the DSP currently Jon, the numbers are increasing by over 1,000 a week.  Obviously, a lot of people on the DSP are genuine people who should be on the DSP, but the previous Government changed the impairment tables a couple of years ago, a few years ago, and what we’re looking at is a younger cohort where we think that with some support they may be able to actually parƟcipate in the workforce rather than being leŌ on what’s, for a long ÆŸme, been a set and forget payment, namely, the DSP. JON FAINE: Well the fact that there’s been an explosion in the number of people on, for instance, the Disability Pension, because of mental health issues is hardly surprising because it seems in our community we have an epidemic of mental illness, so, I mean to say Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen ABC 774—Interview with Minister for Social Services
    Date: 12/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241014 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Earn or Learn, DSP, Welfare Review 10 May 2014 MINISTER: Ladies and gentlemen I want to take the opportunity this aŌernoon to make a few comments about some speculaƟon about welfare in the forthcoming budget and to confirm a number of other proposals which the government will be taking in the budget on Tuesday night. The first is that we will be looking to a system of Earn or Learn for young Australians under 30. We believe that young people should either be working but if they’re not working then they should be in training, whether it’s a tafe college or a vocaƟonal cerƟficate, they should be working or in training to try and get themselves in a posiƟon to work, and earn or learn will be the Government’s approach for young people under 30. Secondly, in relaƟon to disability support parƟcipants, we will be making a couple of changes. The first is that those who have gone onto the DSP in the last five or six years who have not been assessed under the new impairment tables, that those people will be assessed under the new impairment tables to see whether or not they are capable of working and if they are capable of working, whether it be full ÆŸme or part‐Ɵme, then our expectaƟon is that they should working. And secondly for DSP recipients under the age of 35, currently there are some provisions that they have to go along and have an interview with a job service provider. We don’t think that is sufficient, we think there should be parƟcipaƟon requirements for people under 35 if they’re capable of working. Obviously if they are profoundly or severely disabled and not capable of working well then they shouldn’t be working but where there is a capability of working, they should not only have to go along and have an interview they should have some job search requirements like other young people do. The message out of this is simply this, the days of easy welfare for young people is over. We want a fair system, but we don’t think it’s fair that young people can just sit on the couch at home and pick up a welfare cheque and as I said those days are over. Secondly in terms of the progress of welfare review, what’s in the budget on Tuesday night is simply the first instalment of what the government is proposing. As many would know Patrick McClure has been working on a discussion paper and that has been completed. I’ve asked Mr McClure if he’d look at it again in light of the announcements made in the budget and then I intend in the week or two aŌer he’s looked at it again, the week or two aŌer the budget, to release the McClure discussion paper.  There’ll be a period of consultaƟon with the general public and others who have an interest in welfare reform in Australia, including those that are recipients and the advocates of the various welfare groups in the country. Mr McClure will then report back to me in August of this year and I will then look at the recommendaƟons that come from his second Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Earn or Learn, DSP, Welfare Review
    Date: 10/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241015 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » ABC AM—Interview with Minister for Social Services Kevin Andrews 9 May 2014 Program: ABC AM Interviewer: Chris Uhlmann E&OE. CHRIS UHLMANN: Kevin Andrews is the Minister for Social Services. Welcome to AM. MINISTER: Thank you Chris. CHRIS UHLMANN: Kevin Andrews, some research out today shows that half of Australian families receive more in welfare than they pay in income tax and it's your intenƟon to change that isn't it? MINISTER: Well, that will conƟnue to be largely the case. That research shows that when you take into account the tax that people pay and the benefits they receive in a variety of ways then many people actually receive more in benefits. Now whatever changes are made in the budget, that situaƟon is fundamentally one which will conƟnue for most people. CHRIS UHLMANN: But this will be the beginning of the change not the end of it in the budget in your view? MINISTER: We've got a very big task ahead of us. As everybody knows we face a very significant economic challenge with galloping deficits and Commonwealth debt running out in the years ahead, so we have to repair some of these budget problems if we're going to hand on to the next generaƟon the standard of living which this generaƟon has. So the budget will be the start of this process but it certainly won't be the end of it. CHRIS UHLMANN: And some of the family tax benefits that you will be cuÆ«ng are the same as ones that you supported when you were a member of the Howard government? MINISTER: Well, what we've got to do is to make sure as I said that we repair the budget and we've got to do that in a way which is as fair as possible to all Australians and we've been working on this for months now. The measures won't be singling out any one parƟcular part of the community. The measures when you look at the budget in totality on Tuesday night will be one which will be as best we can across the board. Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen ABC AM—Interview with Minister for Social Services Kevin Andrews...
    Date: 09/05/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241017 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » Welfare Review Press Conference 20 April 2014 Transcript LocaƟon: Melbourne Program: Press Conference E&OE QuesƟon: So Kevin what does this new overhaul include? Minister: What we’re concerned about is there are more than 1,000 people each week joining the Disability Support Group, that’s a large number in total it’s more than 800,000 now and we’re concerned that where people can work the best form of welfare is work, and so we want to help people to be able to stay in work wherever possible. QuesƟon: And what will the scheme involve if it’s implemented? Minister: We’re just waiƟng for advice at the moment from Patrick McClure and his group of experts which will give us some ideas about what we can do. We’ve been looking at various opƟons, and his report will come soon and we will publish it and then take further consultaƟon from the public. QuesƟon: But some of it does involve the people that are already on the pension being reassessed by independent doctors? Minister: What we want to ensure is that people who need a safety net get a safety net, and I can assure all people that need a safety net there will be one there but, by the same token, we know that if people can work that is the best thing for them individually, for their families and for the broader community. QuesƟon: Is this a cost saving measure? Minister: What we’re looking at is how we can keep more people in work. If they’re in work they’re likely to be earning more, they’re likely to be happier, they’re likely to contribute more to their own families and therefore to beÆ©er society. QuesƟon: What do we say to groups concerned that you’ll be targeƟng the most vulnerable Australians? Minister: People who need a safety net will conƟnue to have a safety net. People who are in need of a disability pension will conƟnue to get the disability pension. What we want to ensure is, parƟcularly for those who prospecƟvely might go onto the pension if we can help them to stay in work, even part‐Ɵme work, then that’s a beÆ©er outcome for them. Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Welfare Review Press Conference | The Hon Kevin
    Date: 20/04/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241019 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

  • Home » Transcripts » RelaƟonship Assistance, Age Pension, DSP 15 April 2014 Transcript LocaƟon: Adelaide Program: 5AA Breakfast Show E&OE David: One new thing which the Government will actually provide is free relaƟonship counselling for brides and grooms before they walk down the aisle. Joining us now is the Federal Minister for Social Services Kevin Andrews. Good morning Minister. Minister: Good morning David. David: What is the annual cost of divorce to the Australian economy? Minister: There was a study about a decade ago which put the direct cost, which is family court, welfare cost etc at over $3b and suggested that if you add in all the other indirect cost it is probably in the order of about $6b a year. That’s consistent with overseas studies, for example there was a study just recently in the UK which put the cost at £44b a year in that country Jane: Minister I feel a liÆ©le bit uncomfortable about the Federal Government kind of meddling in personal relaƟonships, is that a new role you’d be taking on? Minister: No it’s not a new role Jane. The Federal Government under both poliƟcal parƟes, Labor and the CoaliƟon, have for probably close to 50 years funded a range of organisaƟons that provide marriage educaƟon, counselling, parenƟng programs, mediaƟon. So in South Australia organisaƟons like RelaƟonships Australia, like Anglicare, the various church bodies and others provide these services, so this is just a new way to try and aÆ©ract more people to parƟcipate in them given that two thirds of couples geÆ«ng married in Australia today get married not in a religious ceremony, not in a church or synagogue or temple but indeed in a civil celebrant ceremony. Jane: Would it be compulsory to get your marriage license, would you have to do some sort of course leading up to the actual ceremony? Minister: No absolutely not, this is enƟrely voluntary. There was a small trial of this some years ago in Perth and Northern Tasmania and what that showed was that about 75% of couples actually took up the offer. Currently in Australia we think about 25‐30% of couples undertake some form of pre‐marriage educaƟon, lesser numbers do parenƟng courses and counselling if problems arise. Search   HOME   MEDIA RELEASES   SPEECHES   TRANSCRIPTS   EDITORIALS   BIOGRAPHY   CONTACT Listen Relationship Assistance, Age Pension, DSP | The Hon
    Date: 15/04/2014 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/3241028 - Source: MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SERVI... - Author: ANDREWS, Kevin, MP

Summary results: 121-135 of 3683 matches.
Email List Link   Print List   RSS Feed   CSV Metadata
First Page Previous Page
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Next Page Last Page

Loading Animation
Preparing your download. Please wait...
For this page            
Top