Browse By

Close Facet Group

Collection

Close Facet Group

Date



Search Results

     
Summary results: 46-60 of 356 matches.
Email List Link   Print List   RSS Feed   CSV Metadata
First Page Previous Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Next Page Last Page

Loading Animation
Preparing your download. Please wait...
For this page            
  • Date: 01/01/2013 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00541729 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  •    MEDIA RELEASE      Saturday, April 28, 2012    ACOSS welcomes roll back of Super tax breaks for very high income earners as a  step in right direction     ACOSS has backed the announcement by the Assistant Treasurer to limit the tax breaks on  super contributions for people earning more than $300 000 as a step in the right direction.  The change will mean that the tax breaks for people on very high incomes will be reduced  from 30 cents in the dollar to 15 cents in the dollar.    "Right now, the tax concessions on superannuation are manifestly unfair, and  disproportionately benefit people on higher incomes who are well placed to look after their  own retirement futures. With a total value of $32B per year in super tax concessions, it is  clearly unfair that over 50% of the breaks on concessional contributions are going to people  in the top 12% of income earners, and 20% is going to the top 2%. Yet, the bulk of people on  low and modest incomes are really struggling to secure the super savings they will need,"  said Dr Cassandra Goldie, ACOSS CEO.    ACOSS has been a strong and persistent advocate for super reform in this direction,  including through the Henry Tax Panel process, and more recently by calling for tax  concession reform as part of the move to increase the super guarantee from 9 â€ 12%. ACOSS  again called for reform last week with the release of its paper Waste not, want not: Making  room in the Budget for essential services.    "This announcement should be widely supported, and builds on the Government's positive  move to introduce the Government Contribution which ensures that people on low incomes  are now at least not penalised by paying more tax on their super than they would ordinarily  pay. We are now keen to see the Government reconsider the proposal to increase the cap  on concessional contributions from $25 000 to $50 000 for people with savings of less than  $500 000, as this is most likely to benefit the people who are already doing very well out of  the tax breaks on super," said Dr Goldie.    See also:    >> Media release: ACOSS Report identifies $8b in Budget savings    >> ACOSS Submission to the Senate Economics Committee on reform of the tax treatment  of super contributions    Media Contact: 0419 626 155
    Date: 30/04/2012 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/1601434 - Source: AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL OF SOC... - Author: Australian Council o...

  •   Australian Council of Social Service  Locked Bag 4777, Strawberry Hills, NSW, 2012  Ph (02) 9310 6200   Fax (02) 9310 4822  info@acoss.org.au  www.acoss.org.au  MEDIA RELEASE Wednesday February 15, 2012    ACOSS hails means testing of private health insurance rebate                                                                                                                                     The Australian Council of Social Service has warmly welcomed the passing of important legislation  through the House of Representatives today that will lead to means testing of the private health  insurance rebate. “This makes sense in terms of equity and the long term sustainability of our vital  health system,” said ACOSS CEO Dr Cassandra Goldie.     “We all want our tax dollars to be used in the most effective way possible â€ targeted to the services we  need as a community, as well as to those that most need it. Having low income earners, who can't  afford private health insurance themselves, subsidise the health insurance of those who can afford it is  unfair and unsustainable.     “ACOSS has long argued that the rebate disadvantages people on low incomes who can't afford the cost  of private health insurance, and diverts vital funding from general public services. It is an inefficient use  of Federal funds that runs counter to the principles of a universal health system, as well as a fair and  equitable tax system.      “We believe that health expenditure needs to be targeted to improving health and access to services  for those who are missing out. The reality is that private health is significantly more common for  residents of capital cities and the rebate has done nothing to alleviate the structural barrier to  affordable and timely health care in rural and regional areas with no or little access to GPs, specialists  and after‐hours care.     “At the same time, and contrary to popular wisdom, the rebate has failed in its aims to relieve pressure  on the public health system. Evidence shows that when people with private insurance have an acute  injury or illness, they will attend a publicly funded hospital for care.      “The rebate is a luxury we can no longer afford with the growing demands on the health system from  our aging population. We have to use public funding wisely, which is why ACOSS is calling for the  savings that will be made (around $2.4 billion over three years) to be redistributed to those currently  missing out on standards of health that others take for granted. We’ve identified oral health as one of  these crucial areas and we’ll scrutinise the overall package carefully to evaluate what’s been offered in  this area.     “ACOSS congratulates parliamentarians for taking this brave move in the national interest. We want to  ensure this extra money is used to help reduce inequities and improve health outcomes for all  Australians,” Dr Goldie said.     Media Contact: Fernando de Freitas 0419 626 155    See Opinion Piece by Dr Cassandra Goldie: ‘Should the private health insurance rebate be means‐
    Date: 15/02/2012 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/1423101 - Source: AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL OF SOC... - Author: Australian Council o...

  •   Australian Council of Social Service  Locked Bag 4777, Strawberry Hills, NSW, 2012  Ph (02) 9310 6200   Fax (02) 9310 4822  info@acoss.org.au  www.acoss.org.au  MEDIA RELEASE Wednesday February 15, 2012    ACOSS hails means testing of private health insurance rebate                                                                                                                                     The Australian Council of Social Service has warmly welcomed the passing of important legislation  through the House of Representatives today that will lead to means testing of the private health  insurance rebate. “This makes sense in terms of equity and the long term sustainability of our vital  health system,” said ACOSS CEO Dr Cassandra Goldie.     “We all want our tax dollars to be used in the most effective way possible â€ targeted to the services we  need as a community, as well as to those that most need it. Having low income earners, who can't  afford private health insurance themselves, subsidise the health insurance of those who can afford it is  unfair and unsustainable.     “ACOSS has long argued that the rebate disadvantages people on low incomes who can't afford the cost  of private health insurance, and diverts vital funding from general public services. It is an inefficient use  of Federal funds that runs counter to the principles of a universal health system, as well as a fair and  equitable tax system.      “We believe that health expenditure needs to be targeted to improving health and access to services  for those who are missing out. The reality is that private health is significantly more common for  residents of capital cities and the rebate has done nothing to alleviate the structural barrier to  affordable and timely health care in rural and regional areas with no or little access to GPs, specialists  and after‐hours care.     “At the same time, and contrary to popular wisdom, the rebate has failed in its aims to relieve pressure  on the public health system. Evidence shows that when people with private insurance have an acute  injury or illness, they will attend a publicly funded hospital for care.      “The rebate is a luxury we can no longer afford with the growing demands on the health system from  our aging population. We have to use public funding wisely, which is why ACOSS is calling for the  savings that will be made (around $2.4 billion over three years) to be redistributed to those currently  missing out on standards of health that others take for granted. We’ve identified oral health as one of  these crucial areas and we’ll scrutinise the overall package carefully to evaluate what’s been offered in  this area.     “ACOSS congratulates parliamentarians for taking this brave move in the national interest. We want to  ensure this extra money is used to help reduce inequities and improve health outcomes for all  Australians,” Dr Goldie said.     Media Contact: Fernando de Freitas 0419 626 155    See Opinion Piece by Dr Cassandra Goldie: ‘Should the private health insurance rebate be means‐
    Date: 15/02/2012 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/1479781 - Source: AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL OF SOC... - Author: Australian Council o...

  •   Australian Council of Social Service  Locked Bag 4777, Strawberry Hills, NSW, 2012  Ph (02) 9310 6200   Fax (02) 9310 4822  info@acoss.org.au  www.acoss.org.au  MEDIA RELEASE   EMBARGOED until 5am Saturday February 12, 2012    ACOSS urges parliament to means test the private health insurance rebate                                                                                                                                     The peak body for Australia’s community services, ACOSS, has today reiterated its call for support to  means test the private health insurance rebate.     “As a voice for the needs of people affected by poverty and inequality, we strongly support means‐ testing the private health insurance rebate”, said Dr Cassandra Goldie, ACOSS CEO. “Nearly two‐thirds  of those without insurance say they simply can’t afford it. Why should all taxpayers fund a rebate when  only 52% of the population has private health insurance?     “We know that affordability is a key factor in whether people take out private health insurance or not.  We also know that many people on low incomes struggle to make their household budgets meet health  care costs in the face of rising costs of living like housing, food and utilities.     “Asking people to foot the bill for a health insurance rebate when they might not be able to afford to fill  a prescription is simply a further kick to people on lower incomes struggling to meet costs.    “We also know that private health insurance is significantly more common for residents of capital cities  compared with those outside them. Beyond affordability, the rebate does nothing to alleviate the  structural barrier to affordable and timely health care in rural and regional areas with no or little access  to general practitioners, specialists and after‐hours care.    “ACOSS has long supported better targeting of tax arrangements, and this is clearly a rebate that runs  counter to the principle of a fair and equitable tax system. The rebate is an inefficient use of Federal  funds when health expenditure needs to be targeted on improving health and access to services for  those missing out.”    In comments made today ACOSS points out that, in the year to September 2011, private health  insurance providers made a $1.2 billion profit (before tax). Yet in 2010‐11, private health insurance cost  the Government $4.7 billion. Furthermore, contrary to popular wisdom, the rebate has failed in its aims  to relieve pressure on the public health system.     “While government funding for health must prioritise improving access to services and reducing  inequalities in both access and outcomes, the private health insurance rebate does neither. Means‐ testing the rebate is a crucial step to reducing inequalities in our health system, leaving us room to  improve health overall,” Dr Goldie says.   
    Date: 12/02/2012 - Collection: Media - ID: media/pressrel/1422004 - Source: AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL OF SOC... - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00360975 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/01174512 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/01174513 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/01174982 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/01185469 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/01194209 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00460140 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00380207 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00439895 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

  • Date: 01/01/2012 - Collection: Library - ID: library/lcatalog/00459926 - Source: Library Catalogue - Author: Australian Council o...

Summary results: 46-60 of 356 matches.
Email List Link   Print List   RSS Feed   CSV Metadata
First Page Previous Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Next Page Last Page

Loading Animation
Preparing your download. Please wait...
For this page            
Top