Title Workplace Gender Equality Agency—Report for 2018-19
Source Both Chambers
Date 03-12-2019
Parliament No. 46
Tabled in House of Reps 03-12-2019
Tabled in Senate 03-12-2019
Parliamentary Paper Year 2019
Parliamentary Paper No. 518
Paper Type Government Document
Disallowable No
Journals Page No. 1031
Votes Page No. 544
House of Reps DPL No. 802
System Id publications/tabledpapers/cc0f6e69-c05f-4d5c-8dc3-b80d010d15df


Workplace Gender Equality Agency—Report for 2018-19

Annual Report 2018 - 2019

ISSN: 2202-6355

Online ISSN: 2204-8774

© Commonwealth of Australia 2019

All material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (www.creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/3.0/au/deed.en) licence.

For the avoidance of doubt, this means this licence only applies to material as set out in this document. The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the links provided) as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode)

Use of the Coat of Arms The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the It’s an Honour website: www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm

Contact us Enquiries regarding the licence and any use of this document are welcome at:

Workplace Gender Equality Agency GPO Box 4917 Sydney NSW 2001 Telephone (02) 9432 7000 Fax (02) 9929 4383 wgea@wgea.gov.au www.wgea.gov.au

For any enquiries about the annual report, please contact:

Murray Black Media and Communications Manager murray.black@wgea.gov.au

An electronic copy of this report is available at: https://wgea.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/wgea-annual-report-18-19.pdf

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 1

GPO Box 4917 Sydney NSW 2001

www.wgea.gov.au

ABN 47 641 643 874

31 October 2019

Senator The Hon Marise Payne Minister for Women Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I have pleasure in presenting to you the annual report of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency for the 2018-19 year.

The report has been prepared in accordance with Part III, subsection 12(1) of the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, which requires the Agency to submit to the Minister a report on its operations for the year ending 31 May. The report must be submitted as soon as practicable, and in any event within six months after 31 May.

The report also contains the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019, as required by section 34(1) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015.

This annual report covers the period from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019, and also includes the Agency’s most current report assessment data from compliance reports for the 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 reporting period.

I certify that I am satisfied that for the financial year 2018-19 the Agency, in compliance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, has:

prepared fraud risk assessments and a fraud control plan put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the Agency and that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating

to the entity.

Yours sincerely

Libby Lyons Director

2 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Reader’s guide

This report informs the Minister for Women, Parliament, relevant employers and the public about the performance of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency in 2018-19.

This report has been prepared according to parliamentary reporting requirements.

The year in review Profiles the Agency’s year and includes a review by the Director.

Agency overview Provides an overview of the Agency and its functions, and a profile of the organisations that are covered by the Act.

Report on performance Provides specific information on the Agency’s performance in 2018-19.

Management and accountability Provides information on the Agency’s corporate governance, human resource management, financial management and other management areas.

Financial Statements Contains the Agency’s audited Financial Statements for 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 3

Contents

Annual Report 2018-19

Letter of transmittal 1

Reader’s guide 2

Contents 3

Glossary and acronyms 4

2018-19: Year in review 5

Review by the Director 6

2018-19 Highlights 8

Snapshot of reporting organisations 10

Agency overview 11

About the Agency 12

Report on performance 15

Annual Performance Statement 2018-19 16

Financial Performance 19

Key Agency activities 20

Management and accountability 23

Corporate governance 24

External scrutiny 24

Human resources management 24

Other mandatory information 29

Financial Statements 31

Independent auditor’s report 32

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager 34

Financial Statements 35

Notes to Financial Statements 40

Appendices 57

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations 58

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality 64

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors 66

Appendix 4: List of requirements 71

Index 76

4 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Glossary and acronyms

The Act Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

Agency Workplace Gender Equality Agency

APS Australian Public Service

ASX Australian Securities Exchange

Financial year 2018–19 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

Gender equality indicators Defined in section 3 of the Workplace Gender

Equality Act 2012

IPS Information Publication Scheme

IT Information technology

Legislative instrument The Workplace Gender Equality (Matters in relation

to Gender Equality Indicators) Instrument 2013 (No. 1)

NABERS National Australian Built Environment Rating System

PAES Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements

PBS Portfolio Budget Statement

Relevant organisations Employers that are covered under the Workplace

Gender Equality Act 2012 for reporting purposes

Reporting organisations Relevant employers that submit reports to the Agency,

sometimes on behalf of other subsidiary entities within their corporate structure

Reporting period 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019

WGEA Workplace Gender Equality Agency

WH&S Work, health and safety

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 5

2018-19: Year in review Review by the Director 6

2018-19 Highlights 8

Snapshot of reporting organisations 10

6 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Review by the Director In February this year, I was proud to present the Workplace Gender Equality Agency’s second biennial report to the Minister for Women. Despite slow progress in some areas, the many positive trends in our data continue to make me hopeful and optimistic about the ongoing momentum for gender equality in Australia’s workplaces.

The release of our fifth comprehensive dataset at the National Press Club in Canberra on 13 November 2018 generated significant media and public interest. It received substantial media coverage, with stories published in most major metropolitan newspapers and many TV, radio and online outlets reporting the key findings of the data. Over 1000 people attended the subsequent launch events across the nation where the results of our dataset were presented and discussed with great interest. We were also delighted to host Elysia McCaffrey, Deputy Head of the Government Equalities Office in the United Kingdom, who presented the findings of the first year of the UK’s Gender Pay Gap reporting requirements.

After five years of our data collection, we have developed a detailed picture of the state of gender equality in organisations across Australia. The results demonstrate the importance of measuring workplace gender equality. Our data shows change for the better is happening in Australian workplaces.

There has been a strong increase in employer action on gender equality. As employers have taken action, gender equality outcomes have improved and the gender pay gap has declined. There has been solid growth in the number of women moving into management roles (39.1%) with increases in the representation of women in all manager categories. Over seven in ten employers now have either a

strategy or policy in place to support gender equality or promote flexible work. These are important positive developments over a fairly short timeframe.

Our data also shows where more effort is needed. Men still out-earn women, on average, by 21.3% and pay gaps persist in every industry, occupation and manager category. Gender segregation remains deeply entrenched across Australian industries, occupations and workplaces and access to employer-funded paid parental leave has virtually stalled. Although the proportion of women in management has increased, most senior roles, especially at the CEO level, are still dominated by men. There has been virtually no improvement in the number of women around Australia’s boardroom tables.

During the reporting period, our research partnerships continued to deepen our understanding of how to achieve workplace gender equality in Australia. In March 2019, we released our fourth insight report with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC). This report examined the role of workplace environments and policy initiatives in improving the representation of women in the workforce and in narrowing the gender pay gap. In particular, it identified the importance of normalising flexibility and providing employer-funded paid parental leave to get more women into management and help them stay there.

The work of the Agency and Australia’s distinctive gender equality reporting and data collection model continued to receive significant international interest and recognition during 2018-19. The Agency worked closely with the Chilean government to assist it in its efforts to introduce a gender reporting scheme similar to the Australian model. I delivered a presentation at the UN Committee on the Status of Women in New

There has been a strong increase in employer action on gender equality. As employers have taken action, gender equality outcomes have improved and the gender pay gap has declined.

York and visited Argentina to attend the W20 Summit in October 2018. I also visited Japan in July 2018 to participate in the 23rd International Conference for Women in Business and Korea in the same month to help the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) with the work they are doing to promote gender equality in the region. It was once again a great honour for me to be included for a second successive year in the list of “100 most influential people in gender equality policy” by Apolitical, a global network of public servants. This is an important recognition of the international reach and impact of the Agency’s work.

Improving the reporting process for employers remains a high priority for the Agency. In November 2018, the Government announced additional funding of $8.1 million over four years to upgrade the Agency’s reporting and data management system. This new system will streamline and simplify the reporting process and expand our dataset by enabling voluntary reporting from the public sector. Our new website, which was launched in January 2019, improved access to reporting information which led to a reduction in telephone enquiries.

In February 2019, we announced our latest round of WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOGCE) citation holders. The number of citation holders increased yet again, up from 120 in 2017-18 to 141 in 2018-19. The Agency also continued to expand our engagement with our network of Pay Equity Ambassadors: a group of 166 directors and chief executive officers who are advocates for pay equity within their own organisations and the broader community. With their public commitment to promoting and supporting gender equality in their workplaces, these organisations are leading the way forward for other Australian employers to follow.

I would like to thank the outgoing Minister for Women, The Hon. Kelly O’Dwyer for her advocacy of our work and support for the increased funding. I would also like to welcome the incoming Minister for Women, Senator The Hon. Marise Payne and I look forward to working closely with her for the rest of my tenure. Finally, I want to pay tribute to my hard-working colleagues at the Agency. None of our achievements would have been possible without their enthusiasm, dedication, knowledge and good humour.

Libby Lyons Director

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 7

8 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Highlights

Increasing our global reach During the reporting period, the work of the Agency and Australia’s distinctive approach to workplace gender equality reporting continued to capture the attention of governments and civil society organisations around the world.

The Agency had significant engagement with the Chilean government throughout 2018-19. Chile is in the process of establishing its own workplace gender reporting scheme based on the Australian model. At the invitation of the Australian Embassy in Chile, Agency representatives visited Chile in September 2018 and May 2019 to meet with key gender equality stakeholders and provide assistance to the Chilean government as they developed the scheme.

Agency Director Libby Lyons was invited to deliver presentations at the UN Committee on the Status of Women in New York in March 2019. She visited Argentina in October 2018 to attend the W20 conference and Japan and South Korea in July 2018 to assist DFAT in promoting gender equality in the region. Agency representatives also visited Taiwan in June 2019 to attend the three-day EU-Taiwan Gender Equality and Human Rights Training Course – Gender Mainstreaming Workshop.

Representatives from many countries contacted the Agency for advice during the reporting period and Agency staff met with officials from Sri Lanka, the UK, New Zealand, Japan, Chile, Vietnam, Canada, South Korea, China and Mauritius in the past year.

In May 2019, Libby Lyons was once again recognised in the list of “100 most influential people in gender equality policy” by Apolitical, a global network of public servants. She was one of only four Australians to be included on this list.

Broadening debate and building evidence through data Over the annual reporting period, the Agency improved the public awareness and understanding of the issues surrounding workplace gender equality. The number of media mentions of the Agency increased by 53%, engagement levels grew across all of the Agency’s social media channels, website traffic to wgea.gov.au and the Data Explorer increased and we undertook 76 speaking engagements in Australia and internationally.

The Agency’s campaigns and activities received increased media attention, especially the release of the 2017-18 reporting dataset in November 2018, the announcement of the national gender pay gap and Equal Pay Day in August 2018 and the release of the 2019 Gender Equity Insights Report in March 2019. We also partnered with advocacy organisation Honour A Woman in a campaign linked to the Queen’s Birthday Holiday in June 2019 to highlight gender inequality in the Australian honours system.

The Agency’s research partnerships continued to drive national debates on the gender pay gap and other gender equality issues. Our ongoing partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC) saw the release of the fourth Gender Equity Insights Report in the series - Gender equity insights: Breaking through the glass ceiling. Its findings offered hard evidence of the importance of providing flexible work arrangements and paid parental leave in improving the representation of women in management. The report also showed that, on current trends, we are likely to reach gender parity at most management levels in 20 years but we will have to wait until the beginning of next century to see women reach equality at CEO level.

Awareness of our online interactive Data Explorer increased, attracting 20,053 people in 2018-19, which was an increase of 36% on the previous year.

Supporting employers and recognising best practice Making workplace gender equality reporting easier and more efficient for employers remains a high priority for the Agency.

In November 2018, the Government announced additional funding of $8.1 million over four years to upgrade the Agency’s reporting and data management system. The new reporting system will streamline the reporting process, thereby reducing the time and cost to organisations of reporting. It will also enable voluntary reporting from the public sector. A detailed discovery process with key stakeholder groups commenced in early 2019. These consultations will inform the design and build of the system, which will take place over the next two years.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 9

The Agency also enhanced the assistance provided to reporting organisations during 2018-19. We produced information videos, conducted live Q&A sessions and provided telephone support and a range of improved reporting resources. The user-friendly design and functionality of the new website, which was launched in January 2019, improved the ease of reporting and led to a significant reduction in telephone support enquiries.

In 2018-19, we accredited a record 141 organisations as WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders. This excellent result reflected a growing desire in the business sector to be recognised as a best-practice employer on this issue. Our network of Pay Equity Ambassadors expanded to 166 in the year reported. Many ambassadors played a high-profile role in promoting the issue of pay equity on Equal Pay Day (31 August 2018) through their social media and online channels.

WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality 141 employers of choice Reporting

information videos 2,660 views

Pay Equity Ambassadors 166 Ambassadors

Media mentions 1,425 nationwide

Sixth full year of data collected (2018-19) 4,841 reporting organisations

Website visits 399,111 unique visits

10 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Snapshot of reporting organisations

As at 25 September 2019, 4,841 reports had been assessed as compliant for the 2018-19 reporting period. These employers represented 4,341,295 employees, approximately 40% of employees in Australia.

Table 1: Reporting organisations by industry

Number of reporting organisations Number of

employees

%

Women

%

Men

Accommodation and Food Services 257 226,641 52.9 47.1

Administrative and Support Services 267 309,210 45.0 55.0

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 52 23,599 34.4 65.6

Arts and Recreation Services 107 91,770 50.6 49.4

Construction 209 129,979 18.3 81.7

Education and Training 534 441,565 63.4 36.6

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 49 50,321 24.6 75.4

Financial and Insurance Services 254 274,570 54.7 45.3

Health Care and Social Assistance 668 682,519 79.9 20.1

Information Media and Telecommunications 150 122,453 39.2 60.8

Manufacturing 598 352,754 27.3 72.7

Mining 150 161,870 17.0 83.0

Other Services 145 58,865 45.0 55.0

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 550 301,848 41.7 58.3

Public Administration and Safety 30 37,115 20.6 79.4

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 83 47,165 41.4 58.6

Retail Trade 296 694,211 57.7 42.3

Transport, Postal and Warehousing 192 201,892 27.2 72.8

Wholesale Trade 250 132,948 36.6 63.4

All reporting organisations 4,841 4,341,295 50.2 49.8

Table 2: Reporting organisations by size

Organisation size

Number of reporting organisations Number of

employees

%

Women

%

Men

0-249 2,137 327,714 47.5 52.5

250-499 1,158 405,576 47.6 52.4

500-999 713 500,763 46.1 53.9

1000 - 4999 692 1,428,474 48.7 51.3

5000+ 141 1,678,768 53.9 46.1

Detailed statistics on the 2018-19 reporting period results are available at data.wgea.gov.au.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 11

Agency overview About the Agency 12

12 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

About the Agency

Our purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency is charged with promoting and improving gender equality in Australian workplaces, including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data. It is established by the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012.

Our vision The Agency’s vision is for women and men to be equally represented, valued and rewarded in the workplace.

Our strategic priorities The Agency’s strategic mission is to lead, influence and inspire change to promote gender equality in Australian workplaces utilising our world-leading dataset. The strategic priorities until the year ending 30 June 2019 were to:

i ncrease our impact and reach

r ealise the potential of the data

d evelop the team.

Our role and functions The Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 outlines our role and functions as follows:

a dvise and assist employers in promoting and improving gender equality in the workplace

d evelop, in consultation with relevant employers and employee organisations, benchmarks in relation to gender equality indicators

i ssue guidelines to assist relevant employers to achieve the purposes of the Act

r eview compliance with the Act by relevant employers, review public reports lodged by relevant employers and deal with those reports in accordance with the Act

c ollect and analyse information provided by relevant employers under the Act to assist the Agency to advise the Minister in relation to legislative instruments made under the Act

u ndertake research, educational programs and other programs to promote and improve gender equality in the workplace

w ork with employers to maximise the effectiveness of the administration of the Act, including by minimising the regulatory burden on employers

p romote and contribute to understanding and acceptance, and public discussion, of gender equality in the workplace

r eview the effectiveness of the Act in achieving its purposes

r eport to the Minister on such matters in relation to gender equality in the workplace as the Agency thinks fit.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 13

Our objectives In order to achieve its purpose, the Agency has the following objectives:

promote, amongst employers, the elimination of discrimination on the basis of gender in relation to employment matters

foster workplace consultation between employers and employees on issues concerning gender equality in employment and in the workplace

improve the productivity and competitiveness of Australian business through the advancement of gender equality in employment and in the workplace

remove barriers to the full and equal participation of women in the workforce.

The Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 requires non-public sector employers with 100 or more employees (relevant employers) to report to the Agency annually against standardised gender equality indicators (GEIs) by completion of a workplace profile and a reporting questionnaire.

The GEIs relate to areas that are critical to gender equality:

GEI 1 – gender composition of the workforce

GEI 2 – gender composition of governing bodies of relevant employers

GEI 3 – equal remuneration between women and men

GEI 4 – availability and utility of employment terms, conditions and practices relating to flexible working arrangements for employees and to working arrangements supporting employees with family or caring responsibilities

GEI 5 – consultation with employees on issues concerning gender equality in the workplace

GEI 6 – any other matters specified by the Minister – sex-based harassment and discrimination.

14 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Organisational structure The Director of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency has overall accountability for management of the Agency and is appointed by the Governor-General of Australia. Libby Lyons was appointed as Director of the Agency on 17 September 2015 and commenced a five-year term on 19 October 2015.

The Agency is divided into four business units:

Program Delivery

Operations

Research and Analytics

Engagement

Workforce A breakdown of employees by ongoing and non- ongoing status, APS classification level, type of employment arrangement, salary range, performance pay and more information on the management of human resources is provided on pages 26-28.

Figure 1: Organisational structure of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency

Director

Program Delivery

Operations Research and

Analytics

Engagement

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 15

Report on performance

Annual Performance Statement 16

Financial Performance 19

Key Agency activities 20

16 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Annual Performance Statement 2018-19

Introductory statement The Annual Performance Statement for the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA, The Agency) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) for the 2018-19 financial year and accurately presents the Agency’s performance in accordance with section 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Entity purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency is charged with promoting and improving gender equality in Australian workplaces, including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data.

Results

Performance Criterion

Measuring the progress of gender equality in Australian workplaces through analysis of reporting data

Target: Movement in the gender pay gap

Target: Improved gender composition in leadership

Target: Increase in employer actions to address gender equality

Target: Analysis and publication of five-year trends

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2018-19 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency – Entity resources and plan performance 2018-19 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

The Agency reporting data collected on the Gender Equality Indicators shows that:

The gender pay gap has declined every year from 24.7% in 2013-14 to 21.3% in 2017-18.

The representation of women in leadership has grown consistently from 35.9% in 2013-14 to 39.1% in 2017-18.

The percentage of organisations with targeted policies and/or strategies to support gender equality has increased by 8.1 pp from 66.2% in 2013-14 to 74.3% in 2017-18.

The percentage of organisations that have conducted a gender pay gap analysis has increased by 17.6pp from 24.0% in 2013-14 to 41.6% in 2017-18.

The Agency’s five years of gender equality data was published in the annual gender equality scorecard and five-year key trends booklet.

Target met

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 17

Performance Criterion

Broadening the stakeholder base for promotion of gender equality in Australian workplaces

Target: Increase in the number of organisations participating in the Agency’s leading practice programs

Target: Identify funding for a new online reporting system to cater for changes such as voluntary reporting by the public sector

Target: Stakeholders use Agency tools and resources to promote gender equality in their own networks

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2018-19 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency – Entity resources and plan performance 2018-19 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

The Agency has implemented a communications strategy to drive an increase in recipients of the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation. The number of citation holders increased from 120 to 141. The number of Pay Equity Ambassadors has also increased from 141 to 166.

The Agency has secured funding through the Women’s Economic Security Package to develop and implement a replacement fit-for-purpose online reporting system. The project to design and build a new online system commenced in February 2019. A new system will have the capacity and flexibility for voluntary reporting (such as public sector organisations) and allow for a significant increase in the dataset.

The Agency developed a new website for easier access to educational tools and resources. There has been an increase in the number of people accessing our resources. The number of unique visitors to wgea.gov.au increased by over 5% and there was a 36% increase in the number of unique visitors to the interactive Data Explorer.

The Agency receives five research requests a week, on average, from academics, research institutions and other organisations, demonstrating that our data is widely used to promote gender equality across a range sectors and networks. The Agency’s media mentions increased by 53% from 927 in 2017-18 to 1,425 in 2018-19 representing significant coverage of and interest in gender equality across a broad audience.

Targets met

Performance Criterion

Increasing our impact and reach internationally.

Target: Visits to the Agency from international delegations

Target: Interviews with international media outlets

Target: Participation in international events

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2018-19 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency – Entity resources and plan performance 2018-19 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

The Agency has experienced increased engagement with government agencies of other countries to share the successful Australian model of data collection and measurement to improve gender equality outcomes in workplaces. The Agency has met with six international delegations and provided content to international media in Argentina, Chile, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. The Agency has participated in seven international events.

Targets met

18 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Analysis of performance against purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency has met all performance criteria in the 2018-19 year. A summary of the performance criteria is:

increasing the impact and reach of WGEA’s educational operations

utilising the value of collecting data on gender equality

communicating and adding to the gender equality narrative.

The Agency has now released five years of data and a sixth annual report submission period has closed. Capturing and reporting on workplace gender equality indicators is firmly established as a mainstream activity for Australian business. The Agency continues to streamline and enhance the collection processes and is developing a replacement online reporting and data management system to be launched for our eighth year of reporting.

The profile of the Agency and recognition of the value of the data continues to increase. WGEA data and the Agency’s Director are frequently quoted in the media. Agency staff are regularly invited to participate in a broad range of conferences, workshops, roundtables as well as national and international business and community discussions.

The Agency continued to produce research reports in collaboration and partnership with other organisations including universities, industry bodies, professional services firms and non-profit organisations. In February 2019, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC) and the Agency released the fourth Gender Equity Insights Report which provides a detailed analysis of the Agency’s data for pay equity insights. The findings of the report have been widely used in the Agency’s educational material, toolkits and resources, public speaking events, media interviews and on social media.

An increasing number of organisations not covered under the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, are seeking WGEA expertise, tools and resources. These include public sector agencies and small business.

In November 2018, the Agency secured funding through the Women’s Economic Security Package to develop and implement a replacement, fit-for-purpose online reporting and data management system. This system is being developed to ensure:

there is the capacity and flexibility to support voluntary reporting by organisations such as public sector employers

capability for a significant increase in the collection of data

an improved and streamlined user experience for our reporting organisations

improved delivery of data analysis and insights to both reporting organisations and the general public.

The Agency continues to review and refine communication channels. In January 2019, WGEA launched a new more user-friendly website which more effectively links people with best practice information, resources and case studies. These tools and resources help promote increased and improved positive gender equality outcomes in workplaces.

There has been an increase in Pay Equity Ambassadors and WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation recipients for 2018-19. An extensive review of the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation was completed in 2018. The eligibility criteria for the citation has been strengthened to recognise contemporary leading practice and drive improved gender equality outcomes in Australian workplaces. In addition, applicants are required to provide substantive evidence of the actions undertaken and their improved gender equality outcomes. The Agency anticipates that this may result in a reduced number of citation holders as employers will be responding to more rigorous eligibility criteria.

Advocates for the Agency, and gender equality more broadly, continue to amplify the ongoing public discussion on workplace gender equality. They reinforce the business case for taking proactive steps in support of equal representation and the recognition and reward of women and men.

Further discussion and statistics on key Agency activities aligned with our legislative mandate can be found on pages 20-22.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 19

Financial Performance

The total appropriation for the Agency in 2018-19 was $4,856,000. Additional funding of $961,000 was received through the Women’s Economic Security Package.

Expenditure in 2018-19 increased by 11% from the previous year to $6,578,747 due to the activities related to the Women’s Economic Security Package.

Expenditure on suppliers was $2,869,445 or 44% and included:

IT and office equipment

lease and other costs associated with premises

contractors

travel and training for staff

subscriptions, printing and publications.

Expenditure on employee benefits was $3,027,738 or 46% of total expenditure.

Table 3: Agency resource statement

Actual available appropriation for 2018-19 $’000

Payments made 2018-19 $’000

Balance remaining 2018-19 $’000

Ordinary annual services

Departmental appropriation (1) 7.12 5.98 1.14

Total resourcing and payments 7.12 5.98 1.14

2018-19 2017-18

Average staffing level (number) 32 30

(1) Appropriation Bill (No. 1), Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2018-19, prior year departmental appropriation and section 74 receipts.

20 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Key Agency activities The Agency undertook a range of activities in support of, and in alignment with, its legislative mandate.

Supporting employers to report In 2018-19, relevant employers reported on the six gender equality indicators outlined in the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012. The Agency continued its ongoing commitment to support, advise and educate relevant employers through the 2018-19 reporting period.

To help employers meet their reporting requirements under the Act, the Agency produced four information videos which received over 2,660 YouTube views (as at 28 August 2019). The Agency also conducted six live Q&A sessions during the reporting period to help key contacts complete their reports.

Improving the ease of reporting and level of service provided to employers remains a high priority for the Agency. In 2018-19, the Agency provided telephone support and a range of improved reporting resources.

Opening access to our knowledge In 2018-19, visitor numbers increased across the Agency’s digital platforms, including the website, Data Explorer and educational publications, helping to cement the Agency’s reputation as a trusted and respected source for gender equality statistics, research and resources.

The creation and development of a new website was a key project for the Agency during the 2018-19 financial year. Launched in January 2019, the new wgea.gov.au website has a more responsive, user-friendly design suitable for desktop and mobile devices. The website’s educational resources are now organised by topic area and are provided in different formats, including written toolkits, data collection spreadsheets, videos and recorded webinars.

The number of unique visitors to wgea.gov.au increased by over 5% on the previous year to more than 399,111 visitors and the number of users accessing our resources grew, with an increase in total page views of over 14%.

The Agency’s social media presence continued to expand significantly. In 2018-19 our Facebook followers increased by 11% to 3,765 and our Twitter followers increased by 18% to 7,519. The Agency’s LinkedIn account grew by almost 79% to 5,127 followers while our Instagram account, which was launched in June 2018, saw an increase of 273% solely through organic growth.

The Agency’s staff and in particular, its Director, Libby Lyons, continued to be in high demand for speaking engagements. In 2018-19, the Agency was represented at 76 speaking events.

Throughout the reporting period, the Agency participated in workshops and presentations on a range of topics including an overview of WGEA’s dataset, addressing pay equity, developing a gender equality strategy and enhancing parental leave programs alongside stakeholders including the NSW Equal Employment Opportunity Practitioners Association, Catalyst, Australian National University, Victorian Change our Game Champions program and the Australian Gender Equality Council.

The Agency also hosts biannual education roundtable sessions with key organisations in the gender equality education community. These roundtables were held in September 2018 and March 2019 and participants included representatives from federal and state government agencies and leading education institutions.

Building evidence through data In 2018-19, the Agency continued to ensure the data it collects is as accessible, useful and usable as possible, subject to relevant legislation. In November 2018, the fifth comprehensive set of workplace data was released, accompanied by a national roadshow of events beginning at the National Press Club in Canberra on November 13. These presentations were held across Australia, in partnership with the Australian British Chamber of Commerce and the University of Tasmania (Hobart). More than a thousand people attended the events, covering all states and territories apart from the Northern Territory.

The Agency’s online interactive Data Explorer featured new data in 2018-19 and attracted 20,053 unique users between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019. This represented an increase of 36% compared to the previous year. For the first time in 2018, the Data Explorer contains publicly available data about individual organisations. The availability of this data in a more accessible format has contributed to the attraction of over 96,000 unique page views, an increase of 51% compared to the previous year. The Agency’s public data is also accessible through data.gov.au.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 21

Supporting employers to report

Views of reporting information videos on YouTube 3,205

Page views of reporting-related resources 103,907

Building evidence through data

Employees covered by the 2018-19 dataset 4,341,295

Users of the online Data Explorer 20,053

Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports produced 5,370

Expanding our outreach

Page views of educational resources 459,515

Page views of gender pay gap statistics resources 79,525

Unique website visits 399,111

Generating national debate

Public speaking events by Agency staff 76

Increase in LinkedIn ‘likes’ 79%

Increase in Twitter followers 18%

Media mentions 1,425

Recognising leading practice

WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 141

Pay Equity Ambassadors 166

Pay Equity Official Supporters 35

The Agency continued its partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, releasing Gender Equity Insights 2019: Inside Australia’s Gender Pay Gap in March 2019. The fourth report in this series continued to deepen the insights about gender pay gaps and how they have changed over time across the nation’s workplaces. It also provided hard evidence that offering flexible work arrangements and paid parental leave improved the representation of women in management.

The Agency established a new partnership with the University of Queensland Business School to undertake specific analysis and research based on the WGEA

reporting data and the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality data for a joint report to be released in the 2019-20 financial year. Agency staff also worked in close partnership with KPMG and the Diversity Council Australia (DCA) during the first half of 2019 to develop the third report in the She's Price(d)less, the economics of the gender pay gap series which was released in August 2019.

The Agency once again produced customised and confidential Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports from the 2018-19 reporting data, which were made available for download through the data portal for compliant reporting organisations.

22 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Expanding our educational reach To fulfil its role as a promoter of workplace gender equality, the Agency continued to place significant importance on producing practical education materials, case studies, research and news.

Our comprehensive suite of gender equality resources and tools for organisations and individuals deliver innovative learning solutions that promote gender equality. These include written toolkits, data collection spreadsheets, videos and recorded webinars. They cover support for reporting, pay equity, flexibility, strategies for gender equality and the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality program. During the reporting period, total page views for the Agency’s educational resources grew by 18%, indicating that access to the Agency’s educational resources has increased.

A key focus for the Agency’s Education team in the 2018-19 financial year was reviewing and updating the gender strategy toolkit, which was launched in October 2019. New educational resources were also developed including a new business case for flexibility, a new insights paper on Gender and negotiation in the workplace and an updated fact sheet on International gender equality reporting schemes.

The Agency continued its strategy to deliver content across digital channels. In January 2019, it released a pay equity case study video called Addressing the gender pay gap: Viva Energy’s Journey. The Agency’s educational animation Pay gaps and life hacks: 5 ways you can tackle gender inequality, which was released in June 2018, had 3,991 views (as at 28 August 2019).

Raising national awareness The Agency continued to generate significant coverage and commentary about gender equality during 2018-19 and our reach to mainstream audiences increased with the Agency’s campaigns and activities receiving regular media attention.

The release of the 2017-18 reporting dataset in November 2018 attracted extensive media coverage, including mentions in most major Australian newspapers and a wide range of TV and radio outlets and online publications. The strong media coverage for the announcement of the national gender pay gap and Equal Pay Day in August 2018 and the release of the Gender Equity Insights 2019 Report also contributed to increased media interest in gender equality issues and the Agency’s world-leading dataset.

Global footprint During 2018-19, there was growing international interest in the Agency’s work and Australia’s approach to gender equality reporting and data collection. A number of countries and individual organisations contacted the Agency for information, advice and guidance.

The work of the Agency was highlighted at the United Nations 62nd Commission on the Status of Women in New York, in partnership with the United Kingdom and Chile. Agency representatives participated in other international conferences and fora in Chile, Argentina, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. The Agency also met with government officials and delegations from the UK, New Zealand, Japan, Chile, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Singapore, South Korea, Canada, China and Mauritius.

International access to the Agency’s resources also expanded, with people from 25 different countries accessing our resources, including the UK, USA, Brazil and Malaysia.

Recognising leading practice The Agency continued to actively invest time and resources to develop networks of leading practice employers focused on driving change across different industries.

In February 2019, the Agency released the list of successful applicants for our leading recognition program: the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOCGE) citation. The number of citation holders increased from 120 to 141, reflecting growing commitment to gender equality from the business community. The Agency recognised and celebrated the citation holders at fully-subscribed launch events in Melbourne and Sydney.

Throughout the year, we expanded our engagement with our Pay Equity Ambassadors, a network of 166 chief executive officers and directors who have committed to pay equity and working with the Agency to drive change. We hosted three CEO roundtables and public leadership forums, where our Ambassadors spoke publicly on the business case for equality and outlined the strategies they are implementing to address gender equality in their businesses.

On Equal Pay Day (31 August 2018), our network of Ambassadors posted items on social media in support of our campaign to educate the public and business community on the need for change.

EOCGE recipients are listed at Appendix 2 and Pay Equity Ambassadors at Appendix 3.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 23

Management & accountability Corporate governance 24

External scrutiny 24

Human resources management 24

Other mandatory information 29

24 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Management and accountability

Corporate governance During the 2018-19 year, the Agency operated under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The Director is the accountable authority of the Agency.

The Agency’s Corporate Governance Framework ensures that the Workplace Gender Equality Agency achieves its objectives, manages risks and uses resources responsibly and with accountability. The framework aligns legislative requirements with other Australian Public Service and internal policy requirements and promotes a level of governance and oversight commensurate with risk.

The Executive management of the Agency is active in the implementation of the framework including but not limited to strategic planning, policy development, review of controls and participation in project steering committees.

Executive management As at 30 June 2019, the Executive was comprised of five Executive Manager positions reporting to the Director.

Program Delivery Executive Manager Vanessa Paterson

Operations Executive Manager Anne Beath

Research and Analytics Executive Manager Janin Bredehoeft

Engagement Executive Manager Kate Lee

Executive Project Manager Mikhail Dudarenok

Fraud control and risk management During the financial year 2018-19, the Agency did not identify any fraud. The Fraud Control Plan is part of the Agency’s induction program and Fraud Awareness training is undertaken by all staff annually. The Agency’s Risk Management Policy, Fraud Control Plan, Business Continuity Plan and associated Risk Registers are reviewed regularly with oversight by the Audit Committee. The Agency has taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud by ensuring appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures and processes are in place.

The Agency integrates risk management into business planning and project management and incorporates the identification of risks and risk treatments into strategic planning. Managers undertake refresher training in Risk Management annually and all other Agency staff biennially. Risk management is a standing item at Executive meetings.

External scrutiny The Agency is subject to an annual statutory audit performed by the Australian National Audit Office. The outcomes of the 2018-19 audit were presented to the Audit Committee. The committee is chaired by an external member.

The members of the Audit Committee are:

Heather Watson (Chair) Sean Van Gorp Janin Bredehoeft

The role and responsibilities of the Audit Committee are set out in its Charter. The Committee provides independent assurance and assistance to the Director on the Agency’s governance framework and its financial statement responsibilities.

There have been no significant developments in external scrutiny of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency during 2018-19.

Human resources management

Assessment of effectiveness

The Agency has operated successfully under its organisational and staffing structure. The Agency continued to review and revise its people management policies as well as procedures, systems and documentation to reflect contemporary better practice and reduce redundant or overly prescriptive practices or procedures to enable staff to better deliver on the Agency’s strategic priorities.

Work is continuing in the Agency to create a flexible and agile workforce through cross-Agency project team work, the movement of staff on a short-term basis to work in different teams and the operation of a flat management structure. This is assisting with maximising the Agency's resources and skills, building capability, engaging employees, eliminating any operational silos and being more innovative and responsive to change.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 25

The Agency is implementing a project collaboration tool and is engaging with all staff to utilise its capability in the delivery of Agency-wide projects.

Information on enterprise bargaining

The WGEA Enterprise Agreement 2015-2018 came into effect on 29 December 2015 with a nominal expiry date of 21 December 2018.

A determination under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 was approved on 10 January 2019. This determination provided all employees with increases to their existing salary for which they are eligible under the terms of the Enterprise Agreement 2015-2018.

The determination provided a total 6% increase over three years with the first increase of 2% taking effect on 1 March 2019, the second increase of 2% on 1 March 2020 and the third increase of 2% taking effect 1 March 2021.

At 30 June 2019, 28 employees were covered by the Agency Enterprise Agreement and WGEA Determination 2019/01 under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 and one employee had an individual flexibility arrangement. The salary ranges available for employees by classification structure are outlined in Table 8.

Table 9 refers to the remuneration of key management personnel by the Agency.

Superannuation

The Agency pays employer superannuation contributions on behalf of employees during periods of unpaid leave for maternity or primary carer’s leave. The contributions are made for a period equal to a maximum of 52 weeks from the commencement of paid maternity or primary carer’s leave.

Non-salary benefits

The Agency provides the following non-salary benefits to its employees:

individual flexibility agreements health and wellbeing programs including Employee Assistance Program services learning and development opportunities study assistance (study leave and financial

assistance) access to salary packaging for a vehicle or laptop salary packaging of supplementary

superannuation contributions.

Flexible work practices

The Agency helps employees balance their work and personal lives by offering remote working arrangements, changed patterns of hours, flex-time, part-time work, and providing purchased leave, access to two paid volunteer days per year and other arrangements. Flexibility is vital to improving workplace gender equality and the Agency leads by example. The vast majority of staff, including the Executive (83%), take up flexible working arrangements.

Capability development

The Agency promotes and supports the development of its workforce to ensure the Agency has the capability to respond to the challenges of the changing workplace and deliver the Agency’s strategic priorities.

In 2018-19, a total of $44,130 was spent on external training and development activities to develop the capability of our workforce.

Development opportunities and upgrading of skills were provided through extension projects, formal training, temporary transfers to higher duties and short-term transfers to other teams. The Agency encouraged employees to attend conferences, seminars and other events, in addition to structured external training. Access was provided to a suite of e-learning courses with in-house sessions for all employees to promote and enhance understanding of respect and resilience in the workplace.

All employees received targeted training and development, including courses on agile working, organisational skills, leadership development, presentation and media skills, digital skills and legislative obligations, ensuring we can provide accurate information, advice and education on reporting compliance matters and gender equality initiatives.

The Agency also continues to support formal study through its Study Assistance Policy with two employees undertaking formal accredited courses.

Workforce profile and remuneration

The following tables provide a comparison of the Agency’s ongoing and non-ongoing staffing profile as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018. All staff are located in Sydney.

26 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Table 4: Ongoing staff as at 30 June 2019

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 8 1 2 7 0 2 0

APS Level 5 and 6 11 4 2 13 0 4 0

APS Level 2 to 4 1 0 1 1 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 21 5 5 21 0 6 0

Table 5: Non-ongoing staff as at 30 June 2019

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0

APS Level 5 and 6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 2 1 1 2 0 1 0

Table 6: Ongoing staff as at 30 June 2018

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 8 1 1 8 0 2 1

APS Level 5 and 6 7 3 1 9 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 16 5 2 19 0 3 1

Note: Includes ongoing staff on parental leave.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 27

Table 7: Non-ongoing staff as at 30 June 2018

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

APS Level 5 and 6 2 0 1 1 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 2 0 1 1 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 5 0 2 3 0 2 0

Table 8: Salary ranges by employment classification at 30 June 2019

Band Minimum ($) Maximum ($)

PEO Not applicable

EL 2 $121,344 $138,231

EL 1 $104,186 $112,427

APS Level 6 $80,555 $92,022

APS Level 5 $74,759 $79,214

APS Level 4 $66,720 $72,416

APS Level 3 $60,293 $65,026

APS Level 2 $52,979 $58,390

APS Level 1 $46,891 $51,552

Total

Key: PEO: Principal Executive Officer. Not covered by Enterprise Agreement or Individual Industrial Agreement. EL 1 and 2: Executive Level 1 and 2 APS 1–6: Australian Public Service Levels 1 to 6

Note: All figures reflect base salary only and exclude superannuation.

28 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Key Management Personnel Remuneration

During the reporting period ended 30 June 2019, the Agency had one executive who met the definition of key management personnel.

Table 9: Key Management Personnel Remuneration during FY 18-19

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination Benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits & allowances

Super- annuation contributions

Long service leave

Other

long-term benefits

Libby Lyons Director 237,941 0 0 24,024 0 18,306 0 280,271

Total 237,941 0 0 24,024 0 18,306 0 280,271

Performance pay

Progression through the available salary points is determined by the results of annual performance assessments. Eligible employees who have reached the top of their salary band may receive a bonus payment of 1.5% if they achieve a performance rating of fully effective or above. Table 10 outlines performance payment information for the 2018 performance cycle.

Table 10: Performance payments to staff during FY 18-19

Band

Number of staff who received performance pay

Aggregate of actual payments

Range

of payments

Average bonus payment

EL2 1 $2,765 $2,765 - $2,765 $2,765

EL1 3 $6,746 $2,249 - $2,249 $2,249

APS Level 6 4 $6,626 $1,472 - $1,840 $1,656

APS Level 5 2 $3,169 $1,584 - $1,584 $1,584

APS Level 4- Level 1 1 $1,340 $1,340 -$1,340 $1,340

All staff 11 $20,644

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 29

Disability reporting Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, entities are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level, two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. These progress reports can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

Work health and safety performance The Agency is committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, and meeting its respon-sibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

The Agency has a WH&S Officer to address issues and provide solutions to ensure the health, welfare, safety and wellbeing of staff. The officer consults with stakeholders at all stages of decision-making about WH&S in the workplace.

WH&S issues are discussed at Executive staff meetings and the Agency has a health and safety representative. All staff are required to undertake an annual refresher e-learning module on workplace health and safety.

As part of the induction program, new employees go through informal WH&S training and have an ergonomic assessment of their workstation by an occupational therapist. The Agency also carries out ergonomic workstation assessments for all staff with a remote working arrangement and refresher assessments as required.

The Agency has purchased additional sit-to-stand workstations to support a sit-to-stand work solution in the workplace, maintained a flu vaccination program for all staff and to help support a healthy workplace, maintained trained staff as mental health first aid officers and offered resilience awareness training to all staff.

Incidents

During the year, the Agency had no incidents or dangerous occurrences that arose from the conduct of its undertakings for which it would have been required to give notice under section 38 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Investigation

The Agency did not undertake any investigations or conduct any tests on any plant, substance or thing in the course of any such investigation. No notices were given to the Agency under sections 191, 195 or 198 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 during the 2018-19 financial year.

Other mandatory information

Purchasing

The Agency ensures that all purchasing is handled in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules as detailed in the Agency’s Accountable Authority Instructions and is in keeping with the principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical use of Commonwealth resources.

The Agency publishes planned procurements on AusTender in accordance with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. AusTender is regularly updated with a record of all procurements in excess of $10,000.

The Agency has access to whole-of-government purchasing arrangements in a range of areas including information and communications technology, travel and accommodation.

Consultants

The Agency adheres to the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and the Accountable Authority Instructions when engaging consultants and entering into contractual arrangements.

During the 2018-19 financial year, the Agency entered into two new consultancy contracts involving a total expenditure of $7,408. No ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.

30 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Support of small business

The Agency supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website at www.finance. gov.au/procurement/statistics-oncommonwealth-purchasing-contracts/.

The Agency has utilised the Digital Marketplace in 2018-19 for procuring digital skills and services. The Digital Marketplace is an open platform that makes it easier for SMEs to access government contracts. The Agency also ensures SMEs are included in the mix of organisations requested to provide quotes for provision of specific goods and services below the relevant procurement threshold. Procurement and contracting processes are frequently reviewed for clarity and ease of engagement.

The Agency recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website, www.treasury.gov.au.

Compliance

There were no significant issues of non-compliance with Finance law during 2018-19 and therefore no report was made to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act.

Advertising and market research

The Agency made no payments to advertising or market research organisations in 2018-19 which require disclosure under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

Ethical standards

The Agency is committed to the Australian Public Service (APS) Values and Code of Conduct. The Agency staff induction program draws attention to the APS Values and Code of Conduct, and these values are incorporated into the Agency’s daily management and operations.

Information Publication Scheme

Entities subject to the Freedom of Information Act, 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display a plan on its website showing what information it publishes in accordance with IPS requirements www.wgea.gov.au.

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

The following information is provided in accordance with section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The Agency’s management and staff are committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development. In accordance with government guidelines, the Agency once again participated in Earth Hour.

The Operations team has embedded the following initiatives to minimise the Agency’s environmental impacts:

non-essential lighting and appliances are turned off and sensor devices and timers are used to minimise electricity consumption throughout the office

the Agency uses water-saving facilities to help minimise water consumption

all office equipment conforms to environmental standards and the Agency uses information technology that abides by strict ecologically sustainable development guidelines

all printers are defaulted to print on both sides of the paper. Printer ink cartridges and toners are recycled

the Agency reduces waste generation by recycling paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and metals.

The Agency is a tenant in a non-Commonwealth-owned building, which has a National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) energy rating of 4.5 and a NABERS water rating of 3.5.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 31

Financial statements Independent auditor’s report 32

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager 34

Financial Statements 35

Notes to the Financial Statements 40

32 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Women

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (‘the Entity’) for the year ended 30 June 2019:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2019 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2019 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to the financial statements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and

other explanatory information.

Basis for Opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Director is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Director is also responsible for such internal control as the Director determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Director is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Director is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 33

Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• i dentify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

• o btain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control;

• e valuate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;

• c onclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and

• e valuate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Clea Lewis Executive Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra 23 August 2019

34 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2019 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Workplace Gender Equality Agency will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Libby Lyons

Director 23/08/2019

Anne Beath

Operations Executive Manager 23/08/2019

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 35

Financial Statements

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Original Budget ($)

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits (a) 3A 3,027,738 3,054,582 3,537,000

Suppliers (b) 3B 2,869,445 1,947,985 1,442,000

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 676,935 933,574 615,000

Finance costs - unwinding of discount 4,629 2,234 10,000

Total expenses 6,578,747 5,938,375 5,604,000

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Rendering of services (c) 4A 131,682 87,750 100,000

Other revenue 4B 49,100 46,600 33,000

Total own-source income 180,782 134,350 133,000

Gains

Gain on make good (d) 4C - 335,729 -

Total gains - 335,729 -

Loss on disposal 4D - 3,027 -

- 3,027 -

Net cost of services 6,397,965 5,471,323 5,471,000

Revenue from Government (e) 4E 5,817,000 4,875,000 4,856,000

Total comprehensive loss (580,965) (596,323) (615,000)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclasification to net cost of service Changes in asset revaluation reserve (f) 35,575 - -

Total other comprehensive income 35,575 - -

Total comprehensive loss (545,390) (596,323) -

36 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be 'major' when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a) Employee Benefits - the underspend is due to staff turnover and delay in recruitment.

b) Suppliers - the increase is attributed to the activities related to the measure Women's Economic Security Package that provides $0.96 million in 2018-19. The overspend was also funded by the underspend on employees' benefits. This includes use of short-term contractors to support backfill delays and deliver on projects. The increase is also attributed to the activities related to the measure Women's Economic Security Package that provides $0.96 million in 2018-19.

c) Rendering of Services - this item varies with the number of applicants for WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation and the level of in-kind support received by the WGEA.

e) Revenue from Government - Additional funding of $0.96 million was received through the measure Women's Economic Security Package.

f) Valuation has been conducted to ensure that the carrying amount of asset does not differ materially from the assets' fair value at the reporting date.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 37

Workplace Gender Equality Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Original Budget ($)

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 264,029 180,719 217,000

Trade and other receivables (a) 6B 988,713 781,334 944,000

Total financial assets 1,252,742 962,053 1,161,000

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 7 252,716 231,178 -

Plant and equipment 7 116,896 32,315 64,000

Intangibles (b) 7 143,090 645,650 296,000

Other non-financial assets - prepayments 41,709 4,592 6,000

Total non-financial assets 554,411 913,735 366,000

Total assets 1,807,153 1,875,787 1,527,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 8A 274,119 89,085 273,000

Other payables 8B 76,134 43,096 47,000

Total payables 350,253 132,181 320,000

Provisions

Employee provisions 9A 605,219 600,164 543,000

Provision for restoration obligation 9B 193,939 189,310 412,000

Total provisions 799,158 789,474 955,000

Total liabilities 1,149,411 921,655 1,275,000

Net assets 657,742 954,132 252,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity (d) 4,500,000 4,251,000 4,450,000

Reserves 35,575 - -

Accumulated deficit (3,877,833) (3,296,868) (4,198,000)

Total equity 657,742 954,132 252,000

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be 'major' when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a. Trade and other receivables - comprised mainly of unspent appropriations.

b. Intangibles - software development was less than originally planned.

d. Departmental capital budget $199,000. Additional funding of $50,000 received through the measure Women's Economic Security Package.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

38 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Statement of Changes in Equity as at 30 June 2019

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Original Budget ($)

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance 4,251,000 4,050,000 4,251,000

Departmental capital budget 249,000 201,000 199,000

Total transactions with owners 249,000 201,000 199,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 4,500,000 4,251,000 4,450,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance (3,296,868) (2,700,545) (3,583,000)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (a) (580,965) (596,323) (615,000)

Total comprehensive income (580,965) (596,323) (615,000)

Asset Revaluation Reserve

Other comprehensive income 35,575 - -

Total other comprehensive income 35,575 - -

Closing balance as at 30 June (3,842,258) (3,296,868) (4,198,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June 657,742 954,132 252,000

Budget variances

a) The $34,035 reduction in deficit for the period is explained in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 39

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Original Budget ($)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 5,683,827 5,042,000 4,856,000

Section 74 (a) 208,867 178,452 -

Sales of goods and rendering of services 144,850 96,470 100,000

Net GST received (b) 154,610 172,657 -

Other - - -

Total cash received 6,192,154 5,489,579 4,956,000

Cash used

Employees (c) 3,017,121 3,002,597 3,537,000

Suppliers (c) 2,886,938 2,345,250 1,419,000

Section 74 (a) 208,867 178,452 -

Total cash used 6,112,926 5,526,299 4,956,000

Net cash from operating activities 79,228 (36,720) -

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of plant and equipment 67,331 15,481 -

Purchase of leasehold improvement 76,258 75,372 -

Purchase of intangibles 101,330 109,767 199,000

Total cash used 244,919 200,620 199,000

Net cash (used) by investing activities (244,919) (200,620) (199,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Departmental Capital Budget 249,000 201,000 199,000

249,000 201,000 199,000

Net cash from financing activities 249,000 201,000 199,000

Net decrease in cash held 83,309 (36,340) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 180,720 217,060 217,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 264,029 180,720 217,000

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be 'major' when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a. Section 74 receipts and expenses - not included in budget.

b. Net GST received - not included in budget.

c. Employees and Suppliers - reflects the variance in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

40 W orkplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Notes to the Financial Statements

Note 1: Overview

1.1 O bjectives of the Workplace

Gender Equality Agency (WGEA)

The Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity.

WGEA is chartered through the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 with both regulatory and educative functions and responsibilities.

The continued existence of WGEA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for WGEA's administration and programs.

WGEA’s outcome is to promote and improve gender equality in Australian workplaces including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data. WGEA has only one outcome.

1.2 B asis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by Section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

b) A ustralian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar.

1.3 S ignificant Accounting Judgments and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, WGEA has not identified accounting assumptions or estimates that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the entity’s financial statements.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

WGEA will apply AASB 16 Leases from 2019-20. The standard requires the net present value of payments under most operating leases to be recognised as assets and liabilities for the period we have the right to use an asset, including optional periods when it is reasonably certain to extend a lease. WGEA has signed a lease agreement for the term of five years, commencing January 2018 and ending December 2022. An initial assessment indicates that the implementation of the standard will have a substantial impact on the financial statements. There will be also change to the expense character (rent expenses replaced with depreciation and interest expenses).

WGEA will apply AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers from 2019-20. The standard requires revenue from such contracts to be recognised as the entity transfers goods and services to the customer. The standard is not expected to have a material impact on the transactions and balances recognised in the financial statements.

AASB 1058 Income of Not-for-Profit Entities (NFP) will apply from 2019-20. The requirements of AASB 1058 more closely reflect the economic reality of NFP entity transactions that are not contracts with customers (as defined in AASB 15). The timing of income recognition depends on whether such a transaction gives rise to liability or other performance obligation (a promise to transfer a good or service), or a contribution by owners, related to an asset (such as cash or another asset) received by an entity. The standard is not expected to have a material impact on the financial statements.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 41

1.5 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

WGEA had no contingent assets and liabilities (2018: nil).

1.6 Taxation

WGEA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

b) for receivables and payables.

1.7 Comparative changes

Where required by accounting standards comparative figures have been adjusted to conform with changes to presentation for the current financial year. Expenses disclosed in note 3 were reviewed and reclassified where appropriate to better represent the nature of expenditure.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period There are no events after the reporting period which require disclosure.

42 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 3: Expenses

Note 3A: Employee Benefits

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Wages and salaries 2,400,842 2,309,008

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 290,783 317,245

Defined benefit plans 98,276 105,748

Leave and other entitlements 194,411 278,778

Other employee expenses 43,426 43,803

Total employee benefits 3,027,738 3,054,582

Refer to note 9A for accounting policies related to Employee Benefits

Note 3B: Suppliers

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Consultants and contractors 101,130 223,573

IT and office equipment 1,559,550 719,902

Travel related 206,529 146,873

Printing, stationery and publications 144,609 73,593

Minimum operating lease payments 420,448 399,994

Other Building related cost 173,750 200,481

Workers Compensation Expenses 5,736 6,968

Audit, legal, subscription, training and insurance 167,731 132,420

Other 89,962 44,181

Total goods and services 2,869,445 1,947,985

Goods and services are made up of:

Provision of goods 1,109,918 130,783

Rendering of services 1,759,527 1,817,202

Total goods and services 2,869,445 1,947,985

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

Within 1 year 420,322 430,213

Between 1 to 5 years 1,050,805 1,671,533

Total operating lease commitments 1,471,127 2,101,746

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 43

Note 3: Expenses (continued)

Accounting Policy

Lease payments are subject to an increase of 4% per annum as per the lease agreement which is for a 5 year term with no option to extend and will expire in December 2022.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Depreciation:

Leasehold improvements 54,720 119,504

Plant and equipment 18,325 73,131

Total depreciation 73,045 192,635

Amortisation:

Intangibles 603,890 740,939

Total depreciation and amortisation 676,935 933,574

44 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 4: Income

Note 4A: Rendering of Services

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Rendering of services 131,682 87,750

Total 131,682 87,750

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to services performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed.

Note 4B: Other Revenue

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Resources received free of charge

Related entities - Auditor's remuneration 39,500 37,000

External entities - in-kind support 9,600 9,600

Total 49,100 46,600

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature. Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Note 4C: Gains

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Gain on make good - 335,729

Total - 335,729

Note 4D: Loss on disposal

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Loss on asset disposal - 3,027

Total - 3,027

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 45

Note 4: Income (continued)

Note 4E: Revenue from Government

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Appropriations:

Departmental appropriation 5,817,000 4,875,000

Total revenue from Government 5,817,000 4,875,000

Amounts appropriated for departmental outputs for the year (adjusted to reflect formal additions, reductions and restructures) are recognised as revenue from government when the Agency gains control of the appropriation.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts (note 6B).

Amounts appropriated which are designated as equity injections (less any formal reductions) and the departmental capital budget are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year (statement of changes in equity).

46 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 5: Fair Value Measurement The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below. WGEA deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements, Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Category

(Level 1, 2 or 3)

Valuation techniques1

Non-financial assets:

Leasehold improvements 252,716 231,178 Level 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Plant and equipment 81,321 32,315 Level 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Plant and equipment 35,575 - Level 2 Replacement

Cost

Total non-financial assets 369,613 263,493

1 WGEA engaged Jones Lang LaSalle Advisory Services Pty Ltd (JLL) to perform a valuation of the assets for the purposes of financial reporting. The valuation has been conducted in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, including AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement and AASB 116 Property, Plant and Equipment, as well as with the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule.

There were no transfers between different levels.

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 47

Note 6: Financial Assets

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Cash on hand or on deposit 264,029 180,719

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount and is held with the Reserve Bank of Australia in a current account.

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Services 2.964 4,705

Appropriations receivable for existing programmes 878,173 745,000

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 107,576 31,629

Total trade and other receivables (net) 988,713 781,334

Receivables are expected to be recovered within 12 months and are not overdue. Credit terms are net 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment and carrying value of receivables approximates fair value. Receivables are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Appropriations receivable are undrawn appropriations controlled by the Agency but held in the Official Public Account under the Government's just in time drawdown arrangements.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments and that are not quoted in an active market are classified as "loans and receivables".

Categories of Financial Instruments

Notes

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 6A - 180,719

Trade and other receivables 6B - 4,705

Carrying amount of financial assets - 185,424

Financial Assets under AASB 9

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 264,029 -

Trade and other receivables 6B 2,964 -

Carrying amount of financial assets 266,993 -

The net fair values of the financial instruments approximate their carrying amounts.

48 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 6: Financial Assets (continued)

Note 6: Classification of Financial Assets on the Date of Initial Application of AASB 9 Note

AASB 139 original classification AASB 9 new

classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

Financial assets class

Cash and Cash Equivalents 6A Held-to-maturity Amortised Cost 180,719 180,719

Trade receivables 6B Held-to-maturity Amortised Cost 4,705 4,705

Total financial assets 185,424 185,424

Aggregate assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 1,294,451 966,646

More than 12 months 512,702 909,144

Total assets 1,807,153 1,875,789

Liability to be expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 799,460 565,472

More than 12 months 349,951 356,183

Total liabilities 1,149,411 921,655

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Financial liabilities

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 49

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

Note 7: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2018-19) Intangibles

($)

Leasehold improvements ($)

Plant and equipment ($)

Total ($)

As at 1 July 2018

Gross book value 2,923,537 262,447 484,876 3,670,860

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (2,277,887) (31,268) (452,561) (2,761,716)

Net book value 1 July 2018 645,650 231,178 32,315 909,144

Additions by purchase 101,330 76,258 67,331 244,919

Revaluation increment against Statement of Equity

- - 35,575 35,575

Depreciation expense (603,890) (54,720) (18,325) (676,935)

Net book value 30 June 2019 143,090 252,716 116,896 512,702

As at 30 June 2019

Gross book value 2,934,269 338,704 351,554 3,624,528

Accumulated depreciation (2,791,179) (85,988) (234,658) (3,111,826)

Net book value 30 June 2019 143,090 252,716 116,896 512,702

Acquisition of Assets

Purchases of non-financial assets are initially recognised at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000 (2018: $2,000), which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken.

Property, Plant and Equipment

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements and plant and equipment are carried at fair value. Carrying amounts are reviewed every year to determine if an independent valuation is required. The regularity of independent valuations depend upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increments are credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit.

Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Upon revaluation, any accumulated depreciation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy. An independent valuer (JLL) conducted the revaluations as at 30 June 2019. Revaluation increments for furniture and fittings were credited to the asset revaluation reserve included in the equity section of the Statement of Financial Position.

50 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (continued) Depreciation

Depreciable plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to WGEA, using in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvement or the lease term.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2019 2018

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Plant and equipment 3 to 9 years 3 to 9 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment during the current year.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

The Agency's intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Agency's software are five years (2018: Five years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2019.

Impairment tests were carried out during the year which resulted in no assets being impaired (2018: Nil).

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 51

Note 8: Payables

Note 8A: Suppliers

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Trade creditors 17,249 29,939

Accruals 256,870 59,146

Total supplier payables 274,119 89,085

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Note 8B: Other Payables

Salaries and wages 21,947 18,679

Superannuation 5,739 5,189

Fixed lease increase 48,448 19,228

Total other payables 76,134 43,096

Total other payables are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 76,134 43,096

More than 12 months - -

Total other payables 76,134 43,096

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon 'trade date'.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised amounts. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received, even if they have not yet been invoiced. Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

The net fair values of the financial instruments approximate their carrying amounts.

52 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 9: Provisions

Note 9A: Employee Provisions

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Leave - no more than 12 months 449,207 433,291

Leave - more than 12 months 156,012 166,873

Total employee provisions 605,219 600,164

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits ) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the entity is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the entity’s employer superannuation contribution rates, to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

Employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

WGEA's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) and various choice schemes.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance's administered schedules and notes.

WGEA makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation schemes at rates determined by the Entity's Enterprise Agreement. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 53

Note 9: Provisions (continued)

Note 9B: Provision for restoration obligation

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Obligation - more than 12 months 193,939 189,310

Total other provisions 193,939 189,310

Provision for restoration ($)

Carrying amount 1 July 2018 189,310

Unwinding of the discount 4,629

Closing balance 30 June 2019 193,939

WGEA currently has an agreement (2018: one) for the lease of premises which has a provision requiring WGEA to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. WGEA has made a provision to reflect the value of this obligation.

54 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Note 10 A: Key Management Personnel Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. WGEA has determined, in accordance with AASB 124, that the WGEA Director is the only position to meet the definition of Key Management Personnel. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

Short-term employee benefits 237,941 228,642

Post-employment benefits 24,024 29,052

Other long-term employee benefits 18,306 24,776

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 280,271 282,470

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table is 1 (2018:1)

1 The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the entity. In 2019, the actuarial changes to Long Service Leave (LSL) provisons are excluded from the KMP remuneration disclosures in the financial statements.

Note 10 B: Related party relationships Significant transactions with related parties can include:

• the payments of grants or loans; • purchases of goods and services; • asset purchases, sales transfers or leases; • debts forgiven; and • guarantees.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by WGEA, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 55

Note 11: Appropriations

Table A: Annual Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual Appropriations for 2019 Annual appropriation ($)

Adjustments to Appropriationb ($)

Total

appropriation ($)

Appropriation applied (current and prior years) ($)

Variancec ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

Ordinary annual services 5,817,000 131,682 5,948,682 5,736,280 212,402

Capital Budgeta 249,000 - 249,000 244,919 4,081

Total departmental 6,066,000 131,682 6,197,682 5,981,199 216,483

Annual Appropriations for 2018

Total

appropriation ($)

Adjustments to Appropriation ($)

Total

appropriation ($)

Appropriation applied (current and prior years) ($)

Variance ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

Ordinary annual services 4,875,000 87,750 4,962,750 5,166,471 (203,721)

Capital Budgeta 201,000 - 201,000 200,620 380

Total departmental 5,076,000 87,750 5,163,750 5,367,091 (203,341)

Notes

(a) Departmental and Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1 and 3). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

(b) These adjustments comprise PGPA Act Section 74 receipts.

(c) Variance reflects the movement in the cash held and the appropriation receivable over the year.

56 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Table B: Unspent Annual Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

Authority

2019 ($)

2018 ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

2017-18 Appropriation Act 1 - 745,000

2018-19 Appropriation Act 1 776,000 -

2018-19 Appropriation Act 3 102,173 -

Cash and cash equivalents 264,029 180,719

Total 1,142,202 925,719

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 57

Appendices Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations 58

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 2018-19 64

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors 66

Appendix 4: List of requirements 71

Alphabetical index 76

58 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations

The following is a list of organisations that have been assessed as not complying with the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012. Non-compliant organisations may not be eligible to tender for contracts under Commonwealth and some state procurement frameworks, and may not be eligible for some Commonwealth grants or other financial assistance.

This list was correct at time of printing. An up-to-date list of non-compliant organisations is available on the Agency’s website.

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

AI Topper & Co Pty Ltd

Alimfresh Pty Ltd

Alpha Services Australia Pty Ltd Alpha Nursing

ANL Container Line Pty Ltd

Aqseptence Group Pty Ltd

Aquatec Maxcon Group Ltd

Ararat Abattoirs Pty Ltd

Artcraft Proprietary Limited Artcraft Pty Ltd

Atlas Steels Pty Ltd Atlas Steels

Australian Commercial Catering Pty Ltd

Australian Community Support Organisation Ltd ACSO

Australian Country Spinners Pty Ltd ACS Nominees Pty Ltd

Australian United Retailers Limited

Bellrock Protective Services Pty Ltd Bellrock Protective Services

Berri Hotel Incorporated Berri Resort Hotel

Bindaree Beef Pty Limited Bindaree Beef

Bing Lee Electrics Pty Ltd

Borg Corporate Property Services Pty Ltd

Bretts Pty Limited Nutting Investments Pty Ltd

Brown-Forman Australia Pty Limited

Bulk Frozen Foods Pty. Ltd.

Caelli Constructions (Vic) Pty Ltd B. & P. Caelli Holdings Pty Limited

Cameron Interstate Pty Ltd

Campbelltown Anglican Schools Council

Cannon Hill Services Pty Ltd

Australian Country Choice Holdings Pty Ltd

Carlson Wagonlit Australia Pty Ltd Carlson Wagonlit Travel

Casual Dining Concepts (Trading) Pty Limited Bondi Pizza Bar and Grill

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 59

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

CEVA Logistics Australia Pty. Ltd.

Compasscorp Pty Ltd

Indigo Accident Solutions 1CAR1 Compass Claims Compasscorp

Dome Coffees Australia Pty Ltd Dome Cafe Be Our Guest Holdings Pty Ltd

Drake Trailers Pty. Ltd.

E & A Limited

E. C. Birch Proprietary Ltd Birch Haberdashery and Craft

ECL Group Australia Pty Ltd ECL Group

EFM Logistics Services Group Pty Ltd EFM Logistics Freight Management Holdings Pty Ltd

Electrical Home-Aids Pty Limited Godfreys Group Limited

Emeis Cosmetics Pty. Ltd. Aesop Emeis Holdings Pty Ltd

Enirgi Metal Group Services Australasia Pty Ltd Ramcar Australia And New Zealand

EP Management Pty Ltd Swissotel Sydney

Eudunda Farmers Limited

EVZ Limited

F. R. Ireland Pty Ltd Irelands of Cairns

Farm Pride Foods Limited

FDC Construction (NSW) Pty Ltd

FDC Construction & Fitout Pty Limited

Fenner Dunlop Australia Pty Ltd

Fenner Dunlop Engineered Conveyor Solutions

Ferrari East Pty Limited

Fircroft Australia Pty Ltd Fircroft

Focus on Furniture Pty Ltd

Focus on Hire & Commercial Focus on Furniture and Bedding Focus on Sleep Melbourne Furniture Depot Focus on Furniture

Form 700 Pty Ltd Form 700 Holdings Pty Ltd

GD Mitchell Enterprises Pty Ltd Mitchells Quality Foods Pty Ltd

Glen William Cameron Family Trust Glen Cameron Nominees

Healthy Life Resources Pty Limited Healthy Life Holdings Pty Ltd

Hosking's Jewellers Pty Ltd

Hospitality Employment Pty Ltd Nicks Restaurant Group

Hospitality Employment Pty Ltd Nicks Restaurant Group

60 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

IDK Pty Ltd

IJF Australia Pty Ltd

Inspired Management Pty Ltd

International Express Pty Ltd BCD Travel

Janagrom Nominees Pty Ltd

JMR Management Consultancy Services Pty Ltd

Joam Pty Ltd Wellness & Lifestyles Australia

JSPHR Pty Ltd

Jirsch Sutherland Insolvency Solutions

Kamb Investments Pty Ltd Kambo's Homemaker Superstore

Kelly Family Trust McDonald's Kew

Kellyco Restaurants Pty Ltd

McDonald's Chapel Street McDonald's Elsternwick McDonald's Malvern East McDonald's Ormond McDonald's St Kilda Road McDonald's Holmesglen

Kennards Storage Management Pty Ltd Kennards Self Storage

Kimberley Group Training Inc

KGT Employment Boab Lounge

Kirinari Community Services Ltd

Madill No 1 Pty Ltd

Maintenance Systems Solutions Pty Ltd

Manly Cove Unit Trust TMG Developments Pty Limited

MAXAM Australia Pty Ltd

McMahon Services Australia Pty Ltd McMahon Services Holdings Pty Ltd

Metro Property Development Pty Ltd

MiniMovers Pty. Ltd.

Mittagong RSL Club Ltd Mittagong RSL Club

Multiple Sclerosis Society Of Queensland (MS Queensland) MS Queensland

Nasdaq Pty Ltd

Navia Logistics Pty Ltd

Newcastle Jockey Club Ltd Newcastle Jockey Club Limited

Nobul Trades Pty Ltd

Nowra Coaches Pty Ltd

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 61

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

Nursing Group Pty Ltd

The Casey College Lifestyle Directions Counselling

Oakey Beef Exports Pty Ltd NH Foods Australia Pty Ltd

Ocean Capital Pty Ltd

Ostwald Bros Pty Ltd Ostwald Bros

Parkside Holdings Pty Ltd

Parkside Holdings Pty Ltd and Associated Entities Brooklea Village Tropical Homes (Townsville)

Port Hunter Conveyors Pty Limited

PPK Group Limited

Pronto Software Pty Ltd

Prysmian Australia Pty Limited

Pybar Mining Services Pty Ltd Pybar Holdings Pty Limited

Reading Entertainment Australia Pty Limited

Riverina Group Training And Employment Ltd GTES

Rohanna Pty Ltd Atf The Skippers Unit Trust John Hughes Group

Romaly Holdings Pty Ltd Jim Pearson Transport

Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals QLD Inc RSPCA QLD

Savanna Energy Services Pty Ltd Savanna Energy Services

Scenic Tours Pty Ltd. Scenic Luxury Cruises and Tours

Smit Lamnalco Towage (Australia) Pty Ltd

Smit Lamnalco Netherlands Holdings B.V Netherlands

Solstadfarstad Pty Ltd

Southern Restaurants Holdings Pty Ltd

Southern Suburbs Group Training Scheme Apprenticeship & Traineeship Employment Partners

Sparfacts Pty Ltd

Spastic Centres Of South Australia Incorporated SCOSA

Speciality Mens Apparel Pty Ltd Ed Harry Menswear

Superior Food Group Pty Ltd SFG Group Holdings Pty Ltd

TABMA Workforce & Career Development Pty Ltd

TABMA Apprentices and Trainees Timber & Building Materials Association (Aust) Ltd

Tasmania Hardware Pty Ltd Clennett's Mitre 10

Tasmanian Freight Services Pty. Ltd. Tas Freight

62 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

Tasmanian Redline Coaches Pty. Ltd. Tasmania's own Redline

Temperzone Australia Pty Ltd

The Mary Potter Nursing Home And The Ethel Forrest Day Care Centre Pty Limited The Forrest Centre

The Trustee for Barbagallo Investments Trust Barbagallo

The Trustee For Beaujolais Unit Trust APG and Co Pty Ltd

The Trustee for Bellivan Unit Trust

R A Bell & Company Pty Ltd Bell Fire & Rescue Modular Assembly Bell Pumps Bell Environmental Bell's Pumps

The Trustee for Breakwater Island Trust The Ville Resort-Casino The Trustee For Colonial & Empire Brewing Trust

The Trustee for C&F Commercial Discretionary Trust Pauls Warehouse

The Trustee For Laurent Bakery Unit Trust Laurent Bakery Pty Ltd

The Trustee for Marks Family Trust Marks Group Industries

The Trustee For Success Venture WA Unit Trust Pan Pacific Perth

The Trustee for T H E Discretionary Trust Oscars Hotels Pty Ltd

The Trustee For Tassie Motors Unit Trust Tassie Motors Pty Ltd

The Trustee For The Ezko Unit Trust Ezko Property Services (Aust) Pty Ltd

The Trustee for the Henry Schein Regional Trust Henry Schein Halas

The Trustee For The Marshall Care Providers Trust SACARE Lifestyle Support Services

The Trustee for The Polaris Media Trust Polaris Media Pty Ltd trading as The Australian Jewish News Manly Cove Unit Trust

The Trustee For The Wrightville Services Trust Jarvis Services

The Trustee for Ziday-Vom Family Trust

McDonald's Restaurant Diamond Creek McDonald's Restaurant Eltham McDonald's Restaurant Greensborough McDonald's Restaurant Greensborough Plaza

The West Australian Group Training Scheme Inc

TJM Products Pty Ltd Aeroklas Australia Pty Ltd

TMG Argyle Pty Limited and Amco Argyle Pty Ltd Harbour Rocks Hotel Manly Cove Unit Trust

Total AMS Pty Ltd TAMS Group

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 63

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting

Town Inn Pty Ltd Miss Maud Svea Pty Ltd

Weatherford Australia Pty Limited

Wests Tigers Rugby League Football Pty Ltd Wests Tigers

Whittens Pty Ltd Whittens Whittens Group Pty Ltd

Wideline Pty Ltd Wideline Windows and Doors

64 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 2018-19

AbbVie Pty Ltd Accenture Australia Pty Ltd AECOM Australia Pty Ltd Alcoa of Australia Limited Allens Allianz Australia American Express Australia Limited ARC@UNSW Arcadis Australia Pacific Pty Ltd Arup Pty Ltd Ashurst Australia ASX Limited Aurecon Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Australian Catholic University Australian Football League AustralianSuper Avanade Australia Pty Ltd B & McK Services Trust Baker McKenzie Baxter Healthcare Pty Ltd Becton Dickinson Pty Ltd Benetas Caltex Australia Limited carsales.com Ltd Cbus Challenger Limited Charles Sturt University Clayton Utz Cognizant Technology Solutions Cooper Grace Ward Lawyers Corrs Chambers Westgarth Credit Union Australia Ltd Curtin University Cuscal Limited Daimler Truck and Bus Australia Pacific Pty Ltd Deakin University Deloitte Australia Dexus Holdings Pty Limited Diageo Australia DLA Piper Australia Edith Cowan University EY

Frasers Property Australia FSS Trustee Corporation Genworth GHD Services Pty Ltd Gilbert + Tobin GM Holden Griffith University HESTA Hall & Wilcox Hatch Pty Ltd Herbert Smith Freehills Hilton Hotels of Australia Pty Ltd Holding Redlich HSBC Bank Australia Limited IRESS Limited Jacobs Group (Australia) Pty Ltd Johnson & Johnson Pty Ltd, ANZ K&L Gates King & Wood Mallesons Konica Minolta Solutions Australia Pty Ltd KPMG Australia Services La Trobe University Lauriston Girls' School LendLease Corporation Limited Lion Pty Ltd Little Company of Mary Healthcare Limited L’Oreal Australia Lyndoch Living Maddocks Maurice Blackburn Lawyers McCullough Robertson Lawyers McKinsey & Company Medibank Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Australia Pty Ltd Mercedes-Benz Australia/Pacific Pty Ltd MSD Mercy Health Merri Health Metcash Trading Limited MinterEllison Mirvac Limited MLC Life Insurance Monash University

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 65

Motorola Solutions ANZ My Pathway National Australia Bank Limited Norman Disney & Young Norton Rose Fulbright Australia Origin Energy Limited Peoplebank Australia Ltd PepsiCo Perpetual Ltd Philip Morris Limited Philips Electronics Australia Limited PPG Industries Australia Pty Ltd PwC Australia QinetiQ Queensland Country Credit Union Limited Queensland University of Technology Reckitt Benckiser (Australia) Pty Ltd RMIT University Russell Kennedy Lawyers SAP Australia Pty Ltd Scentre Group Sparke Helmore Lawyers St Barbara Limited Stockland Development Pty Limited Suncorp Group Swinburne University of Technology Tabcorp Assets Pty Ltd TAL Teachers Health Teachers Mutual Bank Limited Telstra Corporation Limited TelstraSuper Pty Ltd The Boston Consulting Group The GPT Group The Law Society of NSW The University of Newcastle ThoughtWorks Australia Pty Ltd Toyota Finance Australia Ltd Transdev Australasia Transurban Limited UBS AG Unilever Australia Ltd University of Canberra

University of Technology Sydney University of Wollongong UOW Global Enterprises Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd Victoria University Viva Energy Australia Pty Ltd VMware Australia Pty Ltd Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Limited Western Sydney University Westpac Group WSP Australia Pty Ltd YWCA Canberra

66 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors

Organisation Name Job title

AbbVie Pty Ltd Kirsten O'Doherty General Manager ANZ

Accenture Australia and New Zealand Robert Easton Chairman and Managing Director

Accuteque Natasha Norton CEO

Adecco (also known as Ajilon) Rafa Moyano CEO

Adobe Suzanne Steele Managing Director ANZ

AECOM Australia New Zealand Todd Battley Chief Executive

Alcoa Michael Parker Managing Director

Allens Richard Spurio Managing Partner

Altis Consulting John Hoffman CEO

American Express Corrina Davison Managing Director ANZ

Anglican Aged Care Services (Benetas) Sandra Hills CEO

Arc@UNSW Shelley Valentine CEO

Arnott’s Ümit Subasi President APAC

Arq Group Martin Mercer CEO

Arup Peter Chamley Chair

Ashurst Australia Paul Jenkins Global Managing Partner

Aurecon William Cox Global Chief Executive Officer

Aurizon Andrew Harding Managing Director and CEO

Australian Catholic University Greg Craven Vice-Chancellor and President

Australian National University Brian Schmidt Vice-Chancellor

AustralianSuper Ian Silk Chief Executive

BAE Systems Gabrielle Costigan CEO

Bain & Company David Zehner Vice President and Australian Practice Office Head

Baker & McKenzie Anthony Foley National Managing Partner

Bank of Queensland Jon Sutton CEO

Bankwest Rowan Munchenberg Managing Director

Barwon Water Tracey Slatter Managing Director

Becton Dickinson David Zilm Vice President/General Manager ANZ

BGC Contracting Greg Heylen CEO

Biarri Joe Forbes Managing Director and Co-Founder

BP Australia and New Zealand Andy Holmes President

Caltex Australia Julian Segal CEO and Managing Director

Calvery Health Care Martin Bowles National CEO

Cardno Ian Ball CEO & Managing Director

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 67

Organisation Name Job title

Carsales.com Ltd Cameron McIntyre CEO and Managing Director

Caterpillar of Australia Pty Ltd Andrew Ransley General Manager Asia Pacific

CBUS David Atkin CEO

Challenger Richard Howes CEO and Managing Director

Charles Sturt University Professor Andrew Vann Vice-Chancellor

Charter Hall David Harrison Managing Director and Group CEO

City of Sydney Monica Barrone CEO

Clayton Utz Robert Cutler Chief Executive Partner

Clicks IT Recruitment Ben Wood Managing Director

Cognizant Denham Pinder Head of Markets

Colin, Biggers & Paisley Nick Crennan Managing Partner

Cooper Grace Ward Lawyers Chris Ward Managing Partner

Corrs Chambers Westgarth Gavin MacLaren Partner and CEO

CPB Contractors Juan Santamaria Managing Director

CSEnergy Andrew Bills CEO

CUA Rob Goudswaard CEO

Curtin University Professor Deborah Terry Vice-Chancellor

Cuscal Craig Kennedy Managing Director

Deakin University Jane den Hollander Vice-Chancellor

Dexus Darren Steinberg CEO

DHL Express Australia Gary Edstein Senior Vice President

Dixon Advisory Australia Chris Brown Managing Director and CEO

DLA Piper Melinda Upton Co-Managing Partner

DLA Piper Jim Holding Co-Managing Partner

Dow Chemical Louis A Vega President DOW Australia and New Zealand and

Vice President, Olympic and Sports Solutions

Downer Group Steve Schofield Group Head of Human Resources and

Industrial Relations

Edith Cowan University Prof Steve Chapman Vice-Chancellor

EIC Activities Glen Mace Managing Director

ERM Power Ltd Jon Stretch Managing Director and CEO

EY Tony Johnson CEO and Regional Managing Partner Oceania

Fairfax Greg Hywood CEO and MD

First State Super Deanne Stewart Chief Executive Officer

Gadens – Brisbane Paul Spiro Partner

Gadens – Melbourne & Sydney Grant Scott-Hayward CEO

68 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Organisation Name Job title

Genworth Financial Mortgage Insurance Pty Ltd Georgette Nicholas CEO and Managing Director

Georgiou Rob Monaci CEO

GHD Pty Ltd Phil Duthie Executive General Manager Australia

Gilbert & Tobin Danny Gilbert Co-Founder and Managing Partner

GPT Group Bob Johnston CEO and MD

Greening Australia Brendan Foran CEO

Griffith University Professor Ian O’Connor Vice-Chancellor

Hatch Jan Kwak Regional Managing Director

Herbert Smith Freehills Andrew Pike Executive Partner Australia

HESTA Debby Blakey CEO

Hilton Hotels of Australia Heidi Kunkel Vice President Operations, Australasia

Hoban Recruitment Pty Ltd Alison Watts CEO

HSBC Martin Tricaud CEO

Investa Jonathan Callaghan CEO

ITEC Group Lynn Walker Managing Director

Jacobs Patrick Hill Senior Vice President and General Manager

- Asia Pacific

Janssen Bruce Goodwin Managing Director

JLL Stephen Conry CEO

John Holland Group Joe Barr CEO

Johnson and Johnson Pacific Doug Cunningham Managing Director

Jumbo Interactive Abby Perry Head of Human Resources

K&L Gates Nick Nichola Managing Partner

King & Wood Mallesons Sue Kench Global Managing Partner

King & Wood Mallesons Berkeley Cox Chief Executive Partner, Australia

Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia Pty Ltd Dr David Cooke Chairman and Managing Director

KPMG Gary Wingrove CEO

La Trobe University Professor John Dewar Vice-Chancellor

Laing O'Rourke Cathal O'Rourke Managing Director Australia

Law In Order Julian McGrath Managing Director

Lendlease Steve McCann CEO and MD

Lion Stuart Irvine CEO

L'Oreal Rodrigo Pizarro Managing Director

Maddocks Michelle Dixon CEO

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 69

Organisation Name Job title

Maurice Blackburn Lawyers Jacob Varghese CEO

McCullough Robertson Kristen Podagiel Managing Partner

McInnes Wilson Lawyers Paul Tully Managing Director

McKinsey & Company John Lydon Senior Partner

Medibank Craig Drummond CEO

Mercer Ben Walsh Managing Director & Market Leader – Pacific

Mercy Health Adj Prof Stephen

Cornelissen

Group CEO

Metcash Jeff Adams CEO

Mirvac Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz CEO and Managing Director

Monash University Professor Margaret

Gardner AO

Vice-Chancellor and President

Motorola Steven Crutchfield Regional Vice-President Asia-Pacific

My Pathway Paul Synnott CEO

MYOB Tim Reed CEO

Norton Rose Fulbright Australia Wayne Spanner Managing Partner

Pacific Partnerships Martin D'Uva Managing Director

Peoplebank Australia Limited Peter Acheson CEO

PepsiCo, Australia and New Zealand Danny Celoni CEO

Philips Ryan Atkins HR Director, Australia and NZ

PPG Industries Tim Welsh Vice President ANZ

Property Council Australia Ken Morrison Chief Executive

PwC Luke Sayers CEO

QIC Damien Frawley CEO

Qinetiq Greg Barsby Managing Director

Randstad Frank Ribuot CEO ANZ, SEA and India

REA Group Tracey Fellows CEO

Risesmart Alison Hernandez National Director

RMIT Martin Bean Vice-Chancellor

Robert Bird Group Jason Beutel CEO

Russell Kennedy Lawyers Paul Gleeson Principal and Managing Director

SAP Australia Damien Bueno President and Managing Director

Scentre Group Peter Allen CEO

Sedgman Ltd Grant Fraser Managing Director

SEEK Limited Andrew Bassat CEO and Co-Founder

70 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Organisation Name Job title

Seymour Whyte John Kirkwood CEO and Managing Director

Siemens Jeff Connelly Country CEO

SixPivot Faith Rees Co-Founder and CEO

Sparke Helmore Salem Phillip National Managing Partner

St Barbara Bob Vassie Managing Director and CEO

Stockland Property Group Mark Steinert Managing Director and CEO

Stockland Property Group Carol Schwartz Non-Executive Director of Stockland board,

Member of the Reserve Bank of Australia board

Suncorp Michael Cameron CEO and Managing Director

Swaab Mary Digiglio Managing Partner

Tabcorp David Attenborough Managing Director and CEO

TAL Group Brett Clark Group CEO and Managing Director

Telstra Super Chris Davies CEO

Thiess Douglas Thompson Managing Director

Thoughtworks Ange Ferguson Group Managing Director

Transurban Scott Charlton Chief Executive Officer

UGL Jason Spears Managing Director

Unilever Australia and New Zealand Clive Stiff Chairman and CEO

University of Canberra Deep Saini Vice-Chancellor

University of New South Wales Ian Jacobs President and Vice Chancellor

University of Southern Queensland Professor Geraldine MacKenzie Vice-Chancellor

University of Technology Sydney Professor Attila Brungs Vice-Chancellor and President

University of Wollongong Professor Paul Wellings CBE Vice-Chancellor

UOW College Marisa Mastroianni Group CEO and Managing Director

Vanguard Frank Kolimago Managing Director

Vicinity Centres Grant Kelley Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director

Viva Energy Scott Wyatt CEO

VMWare Alister Dias VP and Managing Director

Warrigal Mark Sewell CEO

Western Sydney University Professor Barney Glover Vice-Chancellor

Westpac Group Brian Hartzer CEO

WSP Guy Templeton President and CEO

YWCA Canberra Frances Crimmins Executive Director

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 71

Appendix 4: List of requirements

The list of annual report requirements in the table below is prepared in accordance with paragraph 17AJ(d) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule). Page references for WGEA’s compliance with these requirements are provided in the right-hand column of the table.

PGPA Rule Reference

Description Requirement Page

number

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by

accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory 1

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) Table of contents. Mandatory 3

17AJ(b) Alphabetical index. Mandatory 76

17AJ(c) Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory 4

17AJ(d) List of requirements. Mandatory 71

17AJ(e) Details of contact officer. Mandatory Inside front cover

17AJ(f) Entity’s website address. Mandatory Inside front cover

17AJ(g) Electronic address of report. Mandatory Inside front cover

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory 6-7

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory 12

17AE(1)(a)(ii) A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory 14

17AE(1)(a)(iii) A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory 16

17AE(1)(a)(iv) A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory 12

17AE(1)(aa)(i) Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority Mandatory 1, 14

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority Mandatory 1, 14

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period Mandatory 14

17AE(1)(b) An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio

departments mandatory

N/A

17AE(2) Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

72 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

PGPA Rule Reference

Description Requirement Page

number

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule. Mandatory 16

17AD(c)(ii) Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a) A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory 19

17AF(1)(b) A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory 19

17AF(2) If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

N/A

17AD(d) Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) Mandatory 1,24

17AG(2)(b)(i) A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. Mandatory 1

17AG(2)(b)(ii) A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory 1

17AG(2)(b)(iii) A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory 1

17AG(2)(c) An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. Mandatory 24

17AG(2) (d) – (e)

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy noncompliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

30

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny. Mandatory 24

17AG(3)(a) Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

Appendix 4: List of requirements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 73

PGPA Rule Reference

Description Requirement Page

number

17AG(3)(b) Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the AuditorGeneral (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

17AG(3)(c) Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory 24

17AG(4)(aa) Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and nonongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender (d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory 26

17AG(4)(b) Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and nonongoing basis; including the following:

· Statistics on staffing classification level; · Statistics on full-time employees; · Statistics on part-time employees; · Statistics on gender; · Statistics on staff location; · Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory 25, 26

17AG(4)(c) Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory 25

17AG(4)(c)(i) Information on the number of SES and nonSES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c). Mandatory 25, 27

17AG(4)(c)(ii) The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory 27

17AG(4)(c)(iii) A description of nonsalary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory 25

17AG(4)(d)(i) Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, Mandatory

28

17AG(4)(d)(ii) Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, Mandatory

28

17AG(4)(d)(iii) Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. If applicable, Mandatory

28

17AG(4)(d)(iv) Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, Mandatory 28

74 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

PGPA Rule Reference

Description Requirement Page

number

Assets Management

17AG(5) An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities If applicable, mandatory

N/A

Purchasing

17AG(6) An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory 29

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory 29

17AG(7)(b) A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]” .

Mandatory 29

17AG(7)(c) A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory 29

17AG(7)(d) A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory 29

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the AuditorGeneral with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

Appendix 4: List of requirements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19 75

PGPA Rule Reference

Description Requirement Page

number

Small business

17AG(10)(a) A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory 30

17AG(10)(b) An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. Mandatory 30

17AG(10)(c) If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

Financial Statements

17AD(e) Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory 31-56

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 23 of the Rule. Mandatory 28, 54

17AD(f) Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i) If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

17AH(1)(a)(ii) If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, Mandatory

30

17AH(1)(b) A statement that “Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”

If applicable, Mandatory

N/A

17AH(1)(c) Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. Mandatory 29

17AH(1)(d) Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. Mandatory 30

17AH(1)(e) Correction of material errors in previous annual report If applicable, mandatory N/A

17AH(2) Information required by other legislation Mandatory 30

76 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2018-19

Index A About the Agency, 3,12-14 Accountability, 2, 3, 14, 16, 23, 24, 32, 34, 40, 46, 72 Advertising and market research, 30 Agency overview, 2, 3, 11 Agency staff, 8, 18, 21, 24, 30, Annual Performance Statement, 3, 15, 16 Assessment of effectiveness, 24, 73 Analysis of performance against purpose, 18

B Bargaining, 25

C Capability development, 25 Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports, 21 Compliance, 1, 12, 25, 30, 72 Consultants, 29, 42, 65, 74 Contents, 3 Corporate governance, 2, 3, 23, 24, 72

D Data Explorer 8, 17, 20, 21 Director, 1-3, 5-8, 14, 18, 20, 22, 24, 28, 31-34, 54 Disability reporting, 29, 75

E Ecologically sustainable development, 30 Education, 10, 12, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 25 Entity purpose, 16 Environmental performance, 30 Ethical standards, 30, 32 Executive management, 24 External scrutiny, 3, 23, 24, 72

F Financial Performance, 3, 15, 19, 32, 71 Financial Statements, 1, 2, 3, 31, 32-56, 75 Flexible work practices, 25 Fraud control, 1, 24, 72

G Gender Equality Indicators, 4, 12, 13, 16, 18, 20 Gender pay gap analysis, 16 Glossary and acronyms, 3, 4

H Highlights, 3, 5, 9 Human resources, 3, 14, 23, 24, 67, 68, 73

I Independent auditor’s report, 3, 31, 32-33 Information Publication Scheme, 4, 30, 75 Introductory statement, 16

J Judicial decisions, 72

K Key Agency activities, 3, 15, 18, 20 Key Management Personnel (KMP), 25, 28, 54

L Libby Lyons,1, 7, 8, 14, 20, 28, 34 List of requirements, 3, 57, 71, 72, 74, 75 Letter of transmittal, 3, 71

M Management and accountability, 2, 3, 24, 72 Manager, 3, 6, 24, 31, 32, 34 Mandatory information, 3, 23, 29, 75 Media mentions, 8, 9, 17, 21

N Non-compliant organisations, 3, 57-63 Non-salary benefits, 25, 73

O Objectives, 13, 24, 40, 73 Organisational structure, 14, 71 Other mandatory information, 3, 23, 29, 75 Outcome, 6, 7, 17, 18, 24, 29, 40, 71

P Pay Equity Ambassadors, 3, 7, 9, 17, 18, 21, 22, 57, 66-70 Performance pay, 14, 28, 72 Purchasing, 29, 30, 73 Purpose, 4, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 33, 40, 46, 71, 74

R Relevant employers, 2, 4, 12, 13, 20 Remuneration, 13, 25, 28, 44, 52, 54 Report on performance, 2, 3, 15 Reporting organisations, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 18, 21 Research, 6, 8, 12, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 30 Review by the Director, 2, 3, 5, 6 Results, 6, 10, 16, 28, 30, 40, 71, 74 Risk management, 24

S Small business, 18, 30, 74 Snapshot of reporting organisations, 3, 5, 10 Superannuation, 25, 27, 42, 51, 52 Strategic priorities, 12, 24, 25

T Training and development, 25

W Website, Inside cover, 7, 8, 9, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 29, 30, 58, 74, 75 WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality 3, 7, 9, 17, 18, 21, 22, 36, 57, 65 Workforce, 6, 13, 14, 24, 25 Work health and safety, 4, 29 Workshops, 18, 20

Y Year in review, 2, 3, 5

www.wgea.gov.au