Title Australian National Audit Office—Report by Independent Auditor—Performance audit of internal budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, September 2020
Source Both Chambers
Date 06-10-2020
Parliament No. 46
Tabled in House of Reps 06-10-2020
Tabled in Senate 06-10-2020
Parliamentary Paper Year 2020
Parliamentary Paper No. 223
Paper Type Other Documents
Disallowable No
Journals Page No. 2353
Votes Page No. 1228
House of Reps DPL No. 412
System Id publications/tabledpapers/a2f79d90-d200-40e5-918e-afb49d6e86fd


Australian National Audit Office—Report by Independent Auditor—Performance audit of internal budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, September 2020

 

 

   

PPeerrffoorrm maannccee  aauuddiitt  ooff  iinntteerrnnaall  bbuuddggeettiinngg  aanndd   ffoorreeccaassttiinngg  pprroocceesssseess  aanndd  pprraaccttiicceess 

Australian National Audit Office 

Report by the Independent Auditor     September 2020   

 

1 

 

 

 

Tower 3

300 Barangaroo Avenue Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

24 September 2020

The Honourable the President of the Senate The Honourable the Speaker of the House of Representatives Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Mr President Dear Mr Speaker

As Independent Auditor, I have conducted a performance audit of the Australian National Audit Office, in accordance with the authority contained in section 45 of the Auditor-General Act 1997 (the Act).

The performance audit considered the Australian National Audit Office’s internal budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, and was conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards 2018.

I present the report of this audit to the Parliament. The report is titled Performance Audit of Internal Budgeting and Forecasting Processes and Practices — Australian National Audit Office.

Following its presentation and receipt, the report will be placed on the Australian National Audit Office’s website — http://www.anao.gov.au.

Yours sincerely

Eileen Hoggett Independent Auditor Appointed under Clause 1, Schedule 2 of the Auditor-General Act 1997

© Commonwealth of Australia 2020

ISBN 978-1-76033-587-8 (Print) ISBN 978-1-76033-588-5 (Online)

This document is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/.

 

1 

 

 

 

Tower 3

300 Barangaroo Avenue Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

24 September 2020

The Honourable the President of the Senate The Honourable the Speaker of the House of Representatives Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Mr President Dear Mr Speaker

As Independent Auditor, I have conducted a performance audit of the Australian National Audit Office, in accordance with the authority contained in section 45 of the Auditor-General Act 1997 (the Act).

The performance audit considered the Australian National Audit Office’s internal budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, and was conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards 2018.

I present the report of this audit to the Parliament. The report is titled Performance Audit of Internal Budgeting and Forecasting Processes and Practices — Australian National Audit Office.

Following its presentation and receipt, the report will be placed on the Australian National Audit Office’s website — http://www.anao.gov.au.

Yours sincerely

Eileen Hoggett Independent Auditor Appointed under Clause 1, Schedule 2 of the Auditor-General Act 1997

1

 

3 

 

Audit overview

 

Executive summary   

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBJECTIVE

 The budgeting process links to  organisational planning,  supports the achievement of the  identified purpose and  outcomes and future capability  needs, and considers external  factors and pressures; 

 There are appropriate  governance arrangements to  review, approve and oversee  internal budgeting and  forecasting; and 

 The internal budgeting  framework is appropriately  formalised, and operating  effectively.

CRITERIA

KEY FINDINGS AND OBSERVATIONS

1. The ANAO is managing its budgets within a challenging  environment, with a number of internal and external  pressures impacting on its budget position.    2. Overall, the ANAO was found to have mature and robust 

internal budgeting and forecasting processes, which align  with the organisation’s purpose and priorities.  3. Appropriate governance arrangements are in place to  oversee key internal budget processes.  4. There is an opportunity to take a longer term view to 

internal budgeting, and create a stronger alignment between  internal strategies and the internal budgeting process.  5. There is an opportunity to enhance and formalise aspects of  the internal budgeting process. 

The objective of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of  the Australian National Audit Office’s (ANAO) internal  budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, in  supporting the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

The following statistics highlight key aspects of the ANAO, based on 2019‐20 key performance  indicators, data and information. 

330

ANAO SNAPSHOT

Approximate  staff numbers  over the 2019‐ 20 period 

Performance  audit target

48 reports to  Parliament

Assurance  audits planned

199 contract‐ out audits

89 in‐house  audits

340

Key Audit Activity Targets for  2019-20 

$69,302M

Estimated revenue from Government

$45.32M Employee expenses

$25.88M Supplier expenses

$5.70M Depreciation expense

Estimated  Expenditure 

 

2 

 

Contents

Audit overview ........................................................................................................................... 3 

Executive summary ........................................................................................................................ 3 

 ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 

Executive Summary .................................................................................................................. 4 

1.  Background ......................................................................................................................... 7 

Internal Budget and Forecasting .................................................................................................... 7 

The Australian Government Budget process................................................................................. 7 

Funding within in the Commonwealth Public Sector .................................................................... 8 

The Budget process relative to the Australian National Audit Office .......................................... 8 

2.  Detailed Findings .............................................................................................................. 11 

Budget Process ................................................................................................................................. 11 

Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 11 

The ANAO’s purpose and outcomes ............................................................................................ 11 

The ANAO’s Internal Budgeting Process ...................................................................................... 12 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 13 

Budget alignment to overall purpose and outcomes: Entity level ............................................. 13 

Budget alignment to overall purpose and outcomes: Audit level .............................................. 14 

Consideration of future investment, capability needs, and external factors and pressures .... 14 

Governance Arrangements .............................................................................................................. 22 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 22 

Governance structures supporting the overall budgeting process ............................................ 22 

Governance Processes within AASG and PASG relating to Audit Level budgets ....................... 22 

Formalisation of Framework and its Operational Effectiveness .................................................... 24 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 24 

The ANAO’s Budget Framework and Supporting Documents .................................................... 24 

Operational effectiveness of budget approvals and monitoring at the Audit Level ................. 25 

Post budget review and approach to continual improvement ...................................................... 26 

Appendix A: Entity Response ........................................................................................................ 27 

 

2 

 

Contents

Audit overview ........................................................................................................................... 3 

Executive summary ........................................................................................................................ 3 

 ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 

Executive Summary .................................................................................................................. 4 

1.  Background ......................................................................................................................... 7 

Internal Budget and Forecasting .................................................................................................... 7 

The Australian Government Budget process................................................................................. 7 

Funding within in the Commonwealth Public Sector .................................................................... 8 

The Budget process relative to the Australian National Audit Office .......................................... 8 

2.  Detailed Findings .............................................................................................................. 11 

Budget Process ................................................................................................................................. 11 

Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 11 

The ANAO’s purpose and outcomes ............................................................................................ 11 

The ANAO’s Internal Budgeting Process ...................................................................................... 12 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 13 

Budget alignment to overall purpose and outcomes: Entity level ............................................. 13 

Budget alignment to overall purpose and outcomes: Audit level .............................................. 14 

Consideration of future investment, capability needs, and external factors and pressures .... 14 

Governance Arrangements .............................................................................................................. 22 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 22 

Governance structures supporting the overall budgeting process ............................................ 22 

Governance Processes within AASG and PASG relating to Audit Level budgets ....................... 22 

Formalisation of Framework and its Operational Effectiveness .................................................... 24 

Assessment against Criteria ............................................................................................................. 24 

The ANAO’s Budget Framework and Supporting Documents .................................................... 24 

Operational effectiveness of budget approvals and monitoring at the Audit Level ................. 25 

Post budget review and approach to continual improvement ...................................................... 26 

Appendix A: Entity Response ........................................................................................................ 27 

2

 

3 

 

Audit overview

 

Executive summary   

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBJECTIVE

 The budgeting process links to  organisational planning,  supports the achievement of the  identified purpose and  outcomes and future capability  needs, and considers external  factors and pressures; 

 There are appropriate  governance arrangements to  review, approve and oversee  internal budgeting and  forecasting; and 

 The internal budgeting  framework is appropriately  formalised, and operating  effectively.

CRITERIA

KEY FINDINGS AND OBSERVATIONS

1. The ANAO is managing its budgets within a challenging  environment, with a number of internal and external  pressures impacting on its budget position.    2. Overall, the ANAO was found to have mature and robust 

internal budgeting and forecasting processes, which align  with the organisation’s purpose and priorities.  3. Appropriate governance arrangements are in place to  oversee key internal budget processes.  4. There is an opportunity to take a longer term view to 

internal budgeting, and create a stronger alignment between  internal strategies and the internal budgeting process.  5. There is an opportunity to enhance and formalise aspects of  the internal budgeting process. 

The objective of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of  the Australian National Audit Office’s (ANAO) internal  budgeting and forecasting processes and practices, in  supporting the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

The following statistics highlight key aspects of the ANAO, based on 2019‐20 key performance  indicators, data and information. 

330

ANAO SNAPSHOT

Approximate  staff numbers  over the 2019‐ 20 period 

Performance  audit target

48 reports to  Parliament

Assurance  audits planned

199 contract‐ out audits

89 in‐house  audits

340

Key Audit Activity Targets for  2019-20 

$69,302M

Estimated revenue from Government

$45.32M Employee expenses

$25.88M Supplier expenses

$5.70M Depreciation expense

Estimated  Expenditure 

 

5 

 

      CCoonncclluussiioonn  

9 Overall, the ANAO was found to have effective internal budgeting and forecasting processes and  practices. 

10 The review noted that there is opportunity to enhance and further mature these practices  through:  

 commencing forward‐year internal budgeting and forecasting;  

 evidencing a clearer alignment of the budget process to key internal strategies and priorities;  and 

 incorporating a post budget review process, to encourage continual improvement within the  annual budget setting process, while also further formalising and enhancing other key  internal budget documentation. 

 

      SSuuppppoorrttiinngg  FFiinnddiinnggss  aanndd  O Obbsseerrvvaattiioonnss  

11 The ANAO is facing a number of internal and external challenges, and has demonstrated an  understanding of these in how it is managing its internal budget processes. The ANAO has advised  that these pressures have impacted on the number of performance audits it is able to deliver each  financial year.  

12 The ANAO has robust and mature annual budgeting and forecasting processes in place to  manage its budget within the current operating environment.  

13 At the entity and group levels, there is a clear alignment between budget setting and the ANAO’s  purpose, outcomes and outputs.  

14 There are appropriate governance mechanisms in place to support the development and  ongoing monitoring of internal budgets within the ANAO.  

15 There are opportunities to enhance existing processes by taking a forward‐year view on budgets,  and to assist in creating a clearer alignment between organisational strategies and the internal  budgeting process.

16 There are also opportunities to formalise the framework and enhance aspects of documentation  in some areas to better support and enhance the annual and forward year budget setting and  monitoring processes. 

RReeccoom mm meennddaattiioonnss  

The audit identified the following recommendations:

Recommendation No 1:   Setting the Internal Budget for  Forward Years 

The ANAO should consider extending its internal  budgeting to forward years, to provide greater alignment  to key corporate strategies and priorities, and to enable a  more strategic forward outlook to assist in managing  future risks and operational pressures.  

ANAO Comment  Agreed 

 

4 

 

Executive Summary

  BBaacckkggrroouunndd 

1 An effective process to support the development and ongoing management of internal budgets  is a critical component of any organisation’s financial management framework. Internal budgets  provide a means to align the use of available resources to organisational priorities and strategic  objectives, and a basis for key business decisions relating to business performance and investment. 

2 Once established, the ongoing and proactive management of internal budgets is a crucial  mechanism to enable organisations to identify risks, challenges and opportunities within their  operating environment, and respond accordingly.  

3 Commonwealth entities are provided with funding through the Australian Government’s Budget  process. This is a centrally managed process that provides entities with resources to deliver their  purpose and objectives. 

4 Within this overall funding framework, there are a number of internal and external pressures a  Commonwealth entity must manage, in order to operate within its budget. Having appropriate  internal budgeting and forecasting practices is therefore a key element to the ongoing responsible  fiscal management of Commonwealth entities.

O Obbjjeeccttiivvee  

5 The objective of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of the ANAO’s internal budgeting and  forecasting processes and practices.  

6 The review considered processes and practices used for entity‐level and audit‐level (i.e. financial  statement audit and performance audit groups) budgeting and forecasting.  

AAuuddiitt  ccrriitteerriiaa  aanndd  ssccooppee

7 The audit criteria considered whether:

 the budgeting process links to organisation planning, supports the achievement of identified  purpose and outcomes and future capability needs, and considers external factors and  pressures. 

 there are appropriate governance arrangements to review, approve and oversee internal  budgeting and forecasting at the group‐level and audit‐level. 

 the internal budgeting framework is appropriately formalised, and operating effectively at  entity and audit levels. 

8 The scope of the audit was limited to: 

 considerations of the 2019‐20 and 2020‐21 budgeting processes; and 

 assessment of audit‐level budgets within the Assurance Audit Services Group (AASG) and the  Performance Audit Services Group (PASG). 

 

4

 

5 

 

      CCoonncclluussiioonn  

9 Overall, the ANAO was found to have effective internal budgeting and forecasting processes and  practices. 

10 The review noted that there is opportunity to enhance and further mature these practices  through:  

 commencing forward‐year internal budgeting and forecasting;  

 evidencing a clearer alignment of the budget process to key internal strategies and priorities;  and 

 incorporating a post budget review process, to encourage continual improvement within the  annual budget setting process, while also further formalising and enhancing other key  internal budget documentation. 

 

      SSuuppppoorrttiinngg  FFiinnddiinnggss  aanndd  O Obbsseerrvvaattiioonnss  

11 The ANAO is facing a number of internal and external challenges, and has demonstrated an  understanding of these in how it is managing its internal budget processes. The ANAO has advised  that these pressures have impacted on the number of performance audits it is able to deliver each  financial year.  

12 The ANAO has robust and mature annual budgeting and forecasting processes in place to  manage its budget within the current operating environment.  

13 At the entity and group levels, there is a clear alignment between budget setting and the ANAO’s  purpose, outcomes and outputs.  

14 There are appropriate governance mechanisms in place to support the development and  ongoing monitoring of internal budgets within the ANAO.  

15 There are opportunities to enhance existing processes by taking a forward‐year view on budgets,  and to assist in creating a clearer alignment between organisational strategies and the internal  budgeting process.

16 There are also opportunities to formalise the framework and enhance aspects of documentation  in some areas to better support and enhance the annual and forward year budget setting and  monitoring processes. 

RReeccoom mm meennddaattiioonnss  

The audit identified the following recommendations:

Recommendation No 1:   Setting the Internal Budget for  Forward Years 

The ANAO should consider extending its internal  budgeting to forward years, to provide greater alignment  to key corporate strategies and priorities, and to enable a  more strategic forward outlook to assist in managing  future risks and operational pressures.  

ANAO Comment  Agreed 

5

 

7 

 

1. Background

IInntteerrnnaall  BBuuddggeett  aanndd  FFoorreeccaassttiinngg    

Methods and approaches to establishing internal budgets 

1.1. Organisations can adopt a number of approaches in developing their internal budgets and  monitoring processes. Better practice approaches ensure this process is tailored to the needs of the  organisation. The typical considerations in developing a budget include:  

 Whether the budget is determined through one of the following approaches.  

 

 

 

A ‘top‐down’ direction,  whereby decisions and  allocations of relevant  resources are made at the 

organisational level and  provided to areas of the  business.  

 

 

 

A ‘bottom‐up’ approach,  where business areas develop  their required resource needs.  

 

 

 

A ‘hybrid approach’, where  aspects of both ‘top‐down’ and  ‘bottom‐up’ are applied to  develop the overall budget.  Through this approach, goals and 

constraints are provided to  relevant areas of the business,  who are then responsible for the  allocation of resources within 

these goals and constraints. 

 How detailed budget costings will be built, which can follow various methods, such as: 

 

1.2. Within the Commonwealth Public Sector, there are no internal requirements which instruct  entities to develop and monitor their ongoing budget through a particular approach. However,  general principles of appropriate financial management should be applied, in line with requirements  of the PGPA Act for Accountable Authorities.  

TThhee  AAuussttrraalliiaann  GGoovveerrnnmmeenntt  BBuuddggeett  pprroocceessss  

1.3. The Australian Government has an established Budget process which is utilised to allocate  public resources to relevant Commonwealth entities. It is through this process that Commonwealth  entities may obtain access to relevant funding to enable delivery against their individual purpose and 

Whereby the  previous year’s  results, either  budget or  actual, form a  baseline for the  current year  budget build.  This base line is  adjusted for  known impacts  and changes.

Incremental

Through this  approach, the  current year  budget is built  from a zero  cost base,  where all costs  are justified.

Zero cost  base

Other  approaches  includes  methods such  as such as cost  inputs and  outputs, where   budgeting is  based upon  outputs or  activities of an  organisation.

Other  approaches

 

6 

 

Recommendation No 2:  Incorporate and evidence key  operational plans and strategies  into the budget setting process 

As part of the annual budget setting process, the ANAO  should:  

 identify key internal plans and strategies which  impact the internal budget; and    strengthen and evidence the alignment of key  internal plans and strategies to the internal budgeting 

and decision making processes. 

ANAO Comment  Agreed 

Recommendation No 3:  Review budget variation  processes within PASG 

PASG should review its internal processes relating to  budget overruns to ensure there is appropriate  monitoring and approval of variations to original baseline  budgets.   Consideration should also be given to providing  additional training or education to audit teams in relation  to expected requirements. 

ANAO Comment  Agreed 

Recommendation No 4:  Implement post budget review  process 

The ANAO should implement a post budget review as  part of its annual internal budget process. This should  consider the efficiency and effectiveness of processes 

undertaken, to encourage continual improvement in  future budget processes.  

ANAO Comment  Agreed 

      EEnnttiittyy  RReessppoonnssee  

17 The ANAO welcomes the performance audit report and its conclusion that the ANAO has  effective internal budgeting and forecasting processes and practices. The ANAO agrees that  implementation of the recommendations made will further improve the ANAO’s budgeting and  forecasting processes and practices. The ANAO accepts the insights and observations made in the  report and will consider these in its future budgeting and forecasting activities. 

6

 

7 

 

1. Background

IInntteerrnnaall  BBuuddggeett  aanndd  FFoorreeccaassttiinngg    

Methods and approaches to establishing internal budgets 

1.1. Organisations can adopt a number of approaches in developing their internal budgets and  monitoring processes. Better practice approaches ensure this process is tailored to the needs of the  organisation. The typical considerations in developing a budget include:  

 Whether the budget is determined through one of the following approaches.  

 

 

 

A ‘top‐down’ direction,  whereby decisions and  allocations of relevant  resources are made at the 

organisational level and  provided to areas of the  business.  

 

 

 

A ‘bottom‐up’ approach,  where business areas develop  their required resource needs.  

 

 

 

A ‘hybrid approach’, where  aspects of both ‘top‐down’ and  ‘bottom‐up’ are applied to  develop the overall budget.  Through this approach, goals and 

constraints are provided to  relevant areas of the business,  who are then responsible for the  allocation of resources within 

these goals and constraints. 

 How detailed budget costings will be built, which can follow various methods, such as: 

 

1.2. Within the Commonwealth Public Sector, there are no internal requirements which instruct  entities to develop and monitor their ongoing budget through a particular approach. However,  general principles of appropriate financial management should be applied, in line with requirements  of the PGPA Act for Accountable Authorities.  

TThhee  AAuussttrraalliiaann  G Goovveerrnnm meenntt  BBuuddggeett  pprroocceessss  

1.3. The Australian Government has an established Budget process which is utilised to allocate  public resources to relevant Commonwealth entities. It is through this process that Commonwealth  entities may obtain access to relevant funding to enable delivery against their individual purpose and 

Whereby the  previous year’s  results, either  budget or  actual, form a  baseline for the  current year  budget build.  This base line is  adjusted for  known impacts  and changes.

Incremental

Through this  approach, the  current year  budget is built  from a zero  cost base,  where all costs  are justified.

Zero cost  base

Other  approaches  includes  methods such  as such as cost  inputs and  outputs, where   budgeting is  based upon  outputs or  activities of an  organisation.

Other  approaches

7

 

9 

 

1.11. As the Accountable Authority for the ANAO, the Auditor‐General is responsible for the  financial management of the entity, per section 15 of the PGPA Act. These responsibilities include  the requirement to govern the entity, manage the operations and make decisions in a way that  promotes the: 

 proper use and management of public resources; 

 achievement of ANAO’s purpose; and 

 financial sustainability of the entity.  

1.12. The internal budgeting process is a key component of how an Accountable Authority  oversees and delivers on these responsibilities. 

Powers and mandate of the Auditor‐General 

1.13. The powers which are given to the Auditor‐General under the AG Act underpin the activities  of the ANAO, and form the basis for the funding it receives through the Government’s Budget  process. The AG Act provides the legislative authority for core activities undertaken, which primarily  relate to the delivery of financial statements audits and the delivery of performance audits. Of  particular note:  

 the delivery of financial statements audits is mandated, and as such, the ANAO must deliver  in line with these requirements within the funding model provided to it. 

 the delivery of audits of the performance of Commonwealth entities is not mandated, and  while the legislation provides the mechanism to undertake these engagements, there is not a  legislative obligation to do so. Accordingly, resourcing priority is given towards delivery of  financial statements audits, however, in order to meet its desired outcomes and program  objectives, these activities are given high importance within the ANAO. 

1.14. Furthermore, the Section 50 of the AG Act sets out some additional provisions which enable  the ANAO to retain accumulated prior year funding. Without this section, the ANAO would be  required to return unspent funds after a period of time, in line with the majority of other  Commonwealth entities. 

1.15. The Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit (JCPAA) also plays a role in the ANAO’s  budgeting process, through considering and making recommendations to the Parliament on the  annual draft budget estimates of the ANAO. The ANAO provides the JCPAA with a series of briefings  on the ANAO's expected requirements each year, and the Committee is required under it legislation  (Public Accounts and Audit Committee Act 1951) to consider the draft estimates of the ANAO and to  make recommendations to both Houses of the Parliament and to the Prime Minister on the ANAO’s  draft estimates.  

Funding received by the ANAO 

1.16. The ANAO, as a non‐corporate Commonwealth entity, as defined within the PGPA Act,  receives the significant portion of its funding through annual appropriations. Specific funding  received by the ANAO is included in the table below: 

Source  Description  

Departmental Annual  Appropriations  Funding for day‐to‐day operations. This amount also includes a capital budget for  specific capital expenditure. 

Special Appropriations  Funding provided in relation to the Auditor‐General’s salary and entitlements, as  determined under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973. 

Received Revenue  Retained revenues for the ANAO include: 

 

8 

 

objectives. This process occurs multiple times within any given financial year, and is underpinned by  the principles and requirements outlined within:  

 the Charter of Budget Honesty Act 1998, which establishes the relevant principles and  requirements that guide the Government’s management of fiscal policy; and  

 the Budget Process Operating Rules (BPORs), which outline the major operational  arrangements for managing the Australian Government Budget process.   

1.4. The primary annual mechanism for having the Budget process approved commences with  the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS), which typically occurs in May each year, and additional  Budget rounds can occur, where required, through additional budget review processes, such as the  Mid‐Year Economic Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) and the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements  (PAES). 

1.5. In addition to providing a means to have relevant funding approved for use, the Budget  process also outlines the anticipated forward year estimates for Commonwealth entities, to support  and enable relevant and appropriate planning processes.  

1.6. These amounts, including forward estimates, may be subject to specific savings measures at  any given time. One of the key measures which has been in place for a number of years, is the  Efficiency Dividend, which is a savings measure applied to all Commonwealth entities (unless specific  exemptions have been obtained)  to find efficiency improvements within the public service through  an annual percentage reduction applied to funding amounts.  

1.7. Once the Budget process is finalised through the passing of relevant legislation,  Commonwealth entities have a basis from which they can establish their internal budgets. The  internal budget setting process can also be used to inform the external budget process. 

FFuunnddiinngg  w wiitthhiinn  iinn  tthhee  CCoom mm moonnw weeaalltthh  PPuubblliicc  SSeeccttoorr  

1.8. Commonwealth entities receive funding through a number of sources. Whether they are  permitted to retain this funding for their own internal use is dependent upon the nature of amounts  received, as set out in the relevant sections of the Public Governance, Performance and  Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).  

1.9. The most common types of funding include: 

 annual ordinary appropriation funding, which is used to fund some or all of the day‐to‐day  operations of Commonwealth entities; 

 special appropriation funding, which is based upon specific other legislation and relates to a  specific purpose; 

 other relevant receipts, which are retainable under Section 74 of the PGPA Act; and 

Administered revenue, such as taxes, may also be collected, however must be returned to the  Commonwealth and cannot be retained for entity use. 

TThhee  BBuuddggeett  pprroocceessss  rreellaattiivvee  ttoo  tthhee  AAuussttrraalliiaann  N Naattiioonnaall  AAuuddiitt  O Offffiiccee   Responsibilities for the ANAO and its financial management 

1.10. The Auditor‐General is an independent officer of the Australian Parliament, whose mandate  and functions are set out in the Auditor‐General Act 1997 (the AG Act). The Auditor‐General is  assisted by the ANAO in delivering against this mandate, and in this capacity, the Auditor‐General is  the Accountable Authority of the ANAO, as established within the PGPA Act for heads of relevant  Commonwealth entities. The ANAO is located within the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio for  budgeting purposes. 

8

 

9 

 

1.11. As the Accountable Authority for the ANAO, the Auditor‐General is responsible for the  financial management of the entity, per section 15 of the PGPA Act. These responsibilities include  the requirement to govern the entity, manage the operations and make decisions in a way that  promotes the: 

 proper use and management of public resources; 

 achievement of ANAO’s purpose; and 

 financial sustainability of the entity.  

1.12. The internal budgeting process is a key component of how an Accountable Authority  oversees and delivers on these responsibilities. 

Powers and mandate of the Auditor‐General 

1.13. The powers which are given to the Auditor‐General under the AG Act underpin the activities  of the ANAO, and form the basis for the funding it receives through the Government’s Budget  process. The AG Act provides the legislative authority for core activities undertaken, which primarily  relate to the delivery of financial statements audits and the delivery of performance audits. Of  particular note:  

 the delivery of financial statements audits is mandated, and as such, the ANAO must deliver  in line with these requirements within the funding model provided to it. 

 the delivery of audits of the performance of Commonwealth entities is not mandated, and  while the legislation provides the mechanism to undertake these engagements, there is not a  legislative obligation to do so. Accordingly, resourcing priority is given towards delivery of  financial statements audits, however, in order to meet its desired outcomes and program  objectives, these activities are given high importance within the ANAO. 

1.14. Furthermore, the Section 50 of the AG Act sets out some additional provisions which enable  the ANAO to retain accumulated prior year funding. Without this section, the ANAO would be  required to return unspent funds after a period of time, in line with the majority of other  Commonwealth entities. 

1.15. The Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit (JCPAA) also plays a role in the ANAO’s  budgeting process, through considering and making recommendations to the Parliament on the  annual draft budget estimates of the ANAO. The ANAO provides the JCPAA with a series of briefings  on the ANAO's expected requirements each year, and the Committee is required under it legislation  (Public Accounts and Audit Committee Act 1951) to consider the draft estimates of the ANAO and to  make recommendations to both Houses of the Parliament and to the Prime Minister on the ANAO’s  draft estimates.  

Funding received by the ANAO 

1.16. The ANAO, as a non‐corporate Commonwealth entity, as defined within the PGPA Act,  receives the significant portion of its funding through annual appropriations. Specific funding  received by the ANAO is included in the table below: 

Source  Description  

Departmental Annual  Appropriations  Funding for day‐to‐day operations. This amount also includes a capital budget for  specific capital expenditure. 

Special Appropriations  Funding provided in relation to the Auditor‐General’s salary and entitlements, as  determined under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973. 

Received Revenue  Retained revenues for the ANAO include: 

9

 

11 

 

2. Detailed Findings

BBuuddggeett  PPrroocceessss   Criteria 1: The Budgeting process links to organisation planning, supports the achievement of identified purpose and outcomes and future capability needs, and considers external factors and pressures.

OOvveerrvviieeww   TThhee  AANNAAOO’’ss  ppuurrppoossee  aanndd  oouuttccoom meess  

2.1 The ANAO’s purpose, as documented in the annual PBS statements and the ANAO Corporate  Plan 2020‐21, is: 

To support accountability and transparency in the Australian Government sector  through independent reporting to the Parliament, and thereby contribute to  improved public sector performance.  

2.2 To support overall performance measures, all Commonwealth entities are required to define  relevant outcomes associated with their purpose, as well as the programs which are put in place to  achieve these outcomes.  

2.3 The ANAO has one outcome associated with this purpose, being: 

To improve public sector performance and accountability through independent  reporting on Australian Government administration to Parliament, the Executive  and the public.  

2.4 The ANAO has put in place two programs to deliver on this outcome, being: 

PPrrooggrraamm  11..11  ––  AAssssuurraannccee  AAuuddiitt  SSeerrvviicceess::    

2.5 This program contributes to the outcome through: 

 providing assurance on the fair presentation of financial statements of the Australian  Government and its controlled entities by providing independent audit opinions for the  Parliament, the Executive and the public; 

 presenting two reports annually addressing the outcomes of the financial statement audits  of Australian Government entities and the consolidated financial statements of the  Australian Government, to provide the Parliament with an independent examination of the  financial accounting and reporting of public sector entities; and 

 contributing to improvements in the financial administration of Australian Government  entities. 

PPrrooggrraamm  11..22  ––  PPeerrffoorrmmaannccee  AAuuddiitt  SSeerrvviicceess    

2.6 This program contributes to the outcome through: 

 audits of the performance of Australian Government programs and entities, including  identifying opportunities for improvement and lessons for the sector; and  

 other assurance reviews and information reports to Parliament. 

2.7 Through these programs, the ANAO provides support to the Parliament on its audit work  through submissions, appearances and briefings to committees and to individual Ministers. 

 

10 

 

 audit fees for audits undertaken by arrangement under section 20 of the  Auditor‐General Act 1997;   revenue receiving for specific projects from other Government agencies; and   Other ad‐hoc and recoverable revenue. 

1.17. The ANAO also receives administered revenues for conducting audit activities for corporate  Commonwealth entities. This revenue is returned to the Commonwealth and is not able to be  retained or spent by the ANAO. 

The ANAO’s Annual Expenditure 

1.18. The ANAO has a relatively simple operating model, with its purpose and outcomes largely  delivered through internal staffing, or contracted‐out arrangements. Accordingly, its annual  expenditure is primarily made up of employee and supplier expenses.  

1.19. Accordingly, within the ANAO’s operating model, only a small proportion of annual  expenditure would be considered discretionary. The following chart outlines the average proportion  of the ANAO’s internal budget by key category over the period 2017‐18 to 2018‐19. 

 Chart 1: Average expenditure between 2017‐18 and 2018‐19.   *Other expenses include items such as travel costs, ICT costs and investments.   ** Consultant and contractor expenditure is primarily directed to audit activity. 

10

 

11 

 

2. Detailed Findings

BBuuddggeett  PPrroocceessss   Criteria 1: The Budgeting process links to organisation planning, supports the achievement of identified purpose and outcomes and future capability needs, and considers external factors and pressures.

O Ovveerrvviieew w   TThhee  AAN NAAO O’’ss  ppuurrppoossee  aanndd  oouuttccoom meess  

2.1 The ANAO’s purpose, as documented in the annual PBS statements and the ANAO Corporate  Plan 2020‐21, is: 

To support accountability and transparency in the Australian Government sector  through independent reporting to the Parliament, and thereby contribute to  improved public sector performance.  

2.2 To support overall performance measures, all Commonwealth entities are required to define  relevant outcomes associated with their purpose, as well as the programs which are put in place to  achieve these outcomes.  

2.3 The ANAO has one outcome associated with this purpose, being: 

To improve public sector performance and accountability through independent  reporting on Australian Government administration to Parliament, the Executive  and the public.  

2.4 The ANAO has put in place two programs to deliver on this outcome, being: 

PPrrooggrraam m  11..11  ––  AAssssuurraannccee  AAuuddiitt  SSeerrvviicceess::    

2.5 This program contributes to the outcome through: 

 providing assurance on the fair presentation of financial statements of the Australian  Government and its controlled entities by providing independent audit opinions for the  Parliament, the Executive and the public; 

 presenting two reports annually addressing the outcomes of the financial statement audits  of Australian Government entities and the consolidated financial statements of the  Australian Government, to provide the Parliament with an independent examination of the  financial accounting and reporting of public sector entities; and 

 contributing to improvements in the financial administration of Australian Government  entities. 

PPrrooggrraam m  11..22  ––  PPeerrffoorrm maannccee  AAuuddiitt  SSeerrvviicceess    

2.6 This program contributes to the outcome through: 

 audits of the performance of Australian Government programs and entities, including  identifying opportunities for improvement and lessons for the sector; and  

 other assurance reviews and information reports to Parliament. 

2.7 Through these programs, the ANAO provides support to the Parliament on its audit work  through submissions, appearances and briefings to committees and to individual Ministers. 

 

10 

 

 audit fees for audits undertaken by arrangement under section 20 of the  Auditor‐General Act 1997;   revenue receiving for specific projects from other Government agencies; and   Other ad‐hoc and recoverable revenue. 

1.17. The ANAO also receives administered revenues for conducting audit activities for corporate  Commonwealth entities. This revenue is returned to the Commonwealth and is not able to be  retained or spent by the ANAO. 

The ANAO’s Annual Expenditure 

1.18. The ANAO has a relatively simple operating model, with its purpose and outcomes largely  delivered through internal staffing, or contracted‐out arrangements. Accordingly, its annual  expenditure is primarily made up of employee and supplier expenses.  

1.19. Accordingly, within the ANAO’s operating model, only a small proportion of annual  expenditure would be considered discretionary. The following chart outlines the average proportion  of the ANAO’s internal budget by key category over the period 2017‐18 to 2018‐19. 

 Chart 1: Average expenditure between 2017‐18 and 2018‐19.   *Other expenses include items such as travel costs, ICT costs and investments.   ** Consultant and contractor expenditure is primarily directed to audit activity. 

11

 

13 

 

The budget approach adopted: Audit level 

2.16 Within AASG, there is an established annual process which is undertaken to review ‘baseline’  budgets for each financial statement audit engagement. Through this process, engagement  executives must have any changes to audit level budgets approved. This process also balances the  external supplier budget requirements for contacted‐out engagements, through which a competitive  market tender process is undertaken to determine individual and forward year budgets for these  engagements.  

2.17 Within the ANAO, there is an annual process to develop the Annual Audit Work Program,  including the identification of potential performance audit topics for the upcoming financial year.  Through this planning process, a preliminary budget setting process is overseen and approved by  senior members of PASG and is built and phased in TM1. Decisions surrounding individual budgets  are made at the time of scoping, with approvals sought over the audit work plan at the Senior  Executive level and subsequently by the Auditor‐General. Quarterly meetings are also held with the  Auditor‐General to provide a program update, covering discussion items such as scheduling,  budgets, scopes and teams. This is also overseen and approved by senior members of PASG as well  as the Auditor‐General.   

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa  

BBuuddggeett  aalliiggnnmmeenntt  ttoo  oovveerraallll  ppuurrppoossee  aanndd  oouuttccoom meess::  EEnnttiittyy  lleevveell  

2.18 In developing its annual internal budget, the ANAO was found to have a clear alignment  between its overall budget process and its corporate planning, purpose and outcomes. 

2.19 The ANAO adopts a hybrid approach to budget development, with a combination of top‐ down and bottom‐up methodologies applied in formulating the overall budget. Through this  approach, broad goals, parameters, guidance and instructions are provided to each of the relevant  groups within the ANAO, which build their budgets accordingly. 

2.20  It is through this approach that there is a clearly demonstrated linkage between purpose  and outcomes and the budgeting process. Through this approach, it was also observed that  appropriate stakeholders in the organisation are involved through the budgeting process. 

2.21 The review observed that the internal allocation of resources aligned to the ANAO’s  priorities and required outputs for a given financial year, with a clear focus on the mandated  requirements under the AG Act. Furthermore, the Auditor‐General, through the corporate planning  process, has established a number of performance measures and targets that are considered when  prioritising resources and developing internal budgets between the various groups. 

2.22 It was however noted that the ANAO’s internal budget is not multi‐year focused. A better  practice approach to internal budgeting looks beyond the current financial year and into forward  periods, to enable detailed planning in parallel with key organisational strategies, such as workforce  planning and investment strategies.  

2.23 Discussions with the ANAO outlined that there is an intention to move to this approach in  the future, and to align future budgets to the ANAO’s PBS, which provides a four‐year forecast.  

 

12 

 

2.8 The ANAO’s Corporate Plan outlines its performance measures an targets, which have been  developed to measure overall performance against these program objectives. These KPIs provide a  range of benchmarks through which internal budgets can be established. 

TThhee  AAN NAAO O’’ss  IInntteerrnnaall  BBuuddggeettiinngg  PPrroocceessss  

The ANAO’s Budget Framework 

2.9 Overall, the budget process adopted by the ANAO was found to be mature and robust. The  process is supported by a documented framework, which is underpinned by the following key  documents: 

 Financial and Budget Strategy;  

 2019‐20 Internal Budget Process document; and  

 Internal Budgeting Guiding Principles. 

2.10 Providing further support to these documents are a number of other guidance and  instructional materials, including the Auditor‐General’s Instructions and the Financial Management  Procedures.  

2.11 An integrated software tool, TM1, is used to conduct the end‐to‐end budgeting process. The  use of a budgeting tool supports the consistency and integrity of the overall process, through a  number of in‐built system controls, reporting and workflows.  

2.12 Further analysis of the ANAO’s Budget Framework is included in the Formalisation of  Framework and its Operational Effectiveness section of this report. 

The budget approach adopted: Entity level 

2.13 As detailed in the Background section of this report, the ANAO is provided with the majority  of its funding through the Government’s annual Budget Process. This process provides the ANAO  with a baseline from which internal budgeting can be established. 

2.14 In developing operational‐area budgets, there is a clear alignment to the required outputs of  the organisation, and budgets are built on this basis before being aggregated and assessed at the  overall entity level. The following diagram outlines the key steps undertaken in this process: 

 

2.15 The Governance Arrangements section of this report provides further detail relating to the  governance and oversight mechanisms put in place to support the internal budgeting process.  

12

 

13 

 

The budget approach adopted: Audit level 

2.16 Within AASG, there is an established annual process which is undertaken to review ‘baseline’  budgets for each financial statement audit engagement. Through this process, engagement  executives must have any changes to audit level budgets approved. This process also balances the  external supplier budget requirements for contacted‐out engagements, through which a competitive  market tender process is undertaken to determine individual and forward year budgets for these  engagements.  

2.17 Within the ANAO, there is an annual process to develop the Annual Audit Work Program,  including the identification of potential performance audit topics for the upcoming financial year.  Through this planning process, a preliminary budget setting process is overseen and approved by  senior members of PASG and is built and phased in TM1. Decisions surrounding individual budgets  are made at the time of scoping, with approvals sought over the audit work plan at the Senior  Executive level and subsequently by the Auditor‐General. Quarterly meetings are also held with the  Auditor‐General to provide a program update, covering discussion items such as scheduling,  budgets, scopes and teams. This is also overseen and approved by senior members of PASG as well  as the Auditor‐General.   

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa  

BBuuddggeett  aalliiggnnm meenntt  ttoo  oovveerraallll  ppuurrppoossee  aanndd  oouuttccoom meess::  EEnnttiittyy  lleevveell  

2.18 In developing its annual internal budget, the ANAO was found to have a clear alignment  between its overall budget process and its corporate planning, purpose and outcomes. 

2.19 The ANAO adopts a hybrid approach to budget development, with a combination of top‐ down and bottom‐up methodologies applied in formulating the overall budget. Through this  approach, broad goals, parameters, guidance and instructions are provided to each of the relevant  groups within the ANAO, which build their budgets accordingly. 

2.20  It is through this approach that there is a clearly demonstrated linkage between purpose  and outcomes and the budgeting process. Through this approach, it was also observed that  appropriate stakeholders in the organisation are involved through the budgeting process. 

2.21 The review observed that the internal allocation of resources aligned to the ANAO’s  priorities and required outputs for a given financial year, with a clear focus on the mandated  requirements under the AG Act. Furthermore, the Auditor‐General, through the corporate planning  process, has established a number of performance measures and targets that are considered when  prioritising resources and developing internal budgets between the various groups. 

2.22 It was however noted that the ANAO’s internal budget is not multi‐year focused. A better  practice approach to internal budgeting looks beyond the current financial year and into forward  periods, to enable detailed planning in parallel with key organisational strategies, such as workforce  planning and investment strategies.  

2.23 Discussions with the ANAO outlined that there is an intention to move to this approach in  the future, and to align future budgets to the ANAO’s PBS, which provides a four‐year forecast.  

13

 

15 

 

2.27 In assessing the ANAO’s organisational planning, there are a number of key strategies which  inform future operational direction. These include the Capital Management Plan, Workforce Plan  and other Operational Plans at the entity and group level.  

2.28 Overall, the review noted the alignment between how internal budget decisions are made  and the direction of the various strategies within the ANAO. However, in review of relevant  documentation supporting the budget process, it was noted that there is an opportunity to enhance  how these are built into the budget setting process, and evidenced in decisions made.  

Capital management plan  

2.29 The ANAO is provided funding for capital purposes through its annual appropriation, which  includes a departmental capital budget component. This funding is also supplemented, when  required, through the ANAO’s accumulated reserves, which are made up of prior years’ unspent  funding. The ANAO has an internal policy in place which determines how accumulated reserves can  be used 

2.30 While the ANAO does not have a high proportion of capital expenditure, it has recently  undertaken significant capital investment, primarily in relation to the office relocation and  refurbishment. Other key capital considerations include its IT and other technology related holdings.  

2.31 In undertaking this review, the capital management plan used for 2019‐20 and earlier  financial years could not be located, and there was not a clearly demonstrated linkage in how this  was utilised to align capital planning with the internal budget process. Whilst noting this, evidence of  planning and executive monitoring was provided in relation to major expenditures for the 2019‐20  period, including some consideration through the Financial and Budget Strategy. 

2.32 The ANAO is currently developing its three‐year forward Capital Management Plan, and  there may be an opportunity to better integrate capital planning and capital budgeting processes  into future budget periods.  

Internal investment 

2.33 The ANAO’s Corporate Plan outlines a number of capability investments that will be required  to support the achievement of the ANAO’s purpose in the current environment. The key areas  outlined include: 

 data analytics uplift, which is supported by a Data Analytics (DA) Strategy; 

 growing and maintaining a skilled and professional workforce;  

 supporting contemporary communication, particularly with the Parliament; and 

 ensuring quality in its audit work. 

2.34 Discussions with key stakeholders within the ANAO in the budgeting process have  highlighted that the savings benefits from these investments are currently being realised through  offsetting increased costs from the external pressures facing the organisation. Refer to consideration  and understanding of external factors and pressures in the section below for further detail relating  to these pressures.  

2.35 In reviewing the internal budgeting process for current and prior years, while there are links  to the above areas of investment, there is an opportunity to better integrate these existing and  planned investments into the budgeting process and more specifically, forward year estimates.  Intended benefits from these investments should be more readily quantified and factored into the  budgeting process to support decision making for current and forward years.   

Workforce planning 

 

14 

 

Recommendation 1 – Setting the Internal Budget for Forward Years 

The ANAO should extend its internal budgeting to forward years, to provide greater alignment to  key corporate strategies and priorities, and to enable a more strategic forward outlook to assist in  managing future risks and operational pressures.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

BBuuddggeett  aalliiggnnm meenntt  ttoo  oovveerraallll  ppuurrppoossee  aanndd  oouuttccoom meess::  AAuuddiitt  lleevveell  

2.24 The Assurance Audit Services Group (AASG) and the Performance Audit Services Group  (PASG), which are responsible for the delivery of audits, were able to demonstrate a clear link  between their organisational objectives and requirements and the establishment of their group level  budgets, which then flows down to setting their individual audit level budgets.   

2.25 It was also noted that decisions around budget setting within both AASG and PASG are made  giving consideration to the ANAO’s broader KPIs, as established by the Auditor‐General, which  establish relevant benchmarks relating to areas such as the overall number of engagements and  average costs per engagement. As detailed above, decisions relating to the number of these  engagements directly relate to the ANAO’s mandated requirements under the AG Act. 

CCoonnssiiddeerraattiioonn  ooff  ffuuttuurree  iinnvveessttm meenntt,,  ccaappaabbiilliittyy  nneeeeddss,,  aanndd  eexxtteerrnnaall  ffaaccttoorrss  aanndd  pprreessssuurreess  

Link to the ANAO’s operational model and strategies 

2.26 As outlined in Section 1: Introduction, there is an important linkage between an  organisation’s internal budget setting process, and organisational planning. The following diagram  illustrates the synergies and relationship between the two processes: 

 

Source: ANAO Better Practice Guide: Developing and Managing Internal Budgets p10 

14

 

15 

 

2.27 In assessing the ANAO’s organisational planning, there are a number of key strategies which  inform future operational direction. These include the Capital Management Plan, Workforce Plan  and other Operational Plans at the entity and group level.  

2.28 Overall, the review noted the alignment between how internal budget decisions are made  and the direction of the various strategies within the ANAO. However, in review of relevant  documentation supporting the budget process, it was noted that there is an opportunity to enhance  how these are built into the budget setting process, and evidenced in decisions made.  

Capital management plan  

2.29 The ANAO is provided funding for capital purposes through its annual appropriation, which  includes a departmental capital budget component. This funding is also supplemented, when  required, through the ANAO’s accumulated reserves, which are made up of prior years’ unspent  funding. The ANAO has an internal policy in place which determines how accumulated reserves can  be used 

2.30 While the ANAO does not have a high proportion of capital expenditure, it has recently  undertaken significant capital investment, primarily in relation to the office relocation and  refurbishment. Other key capital considerations include its IT and other technology related holdings.  

2.31 In undertaking this review, the capital management plan used for 2019‐20 and earlier  financial years could not be located, and there was not a clearly demonstrated linkage in how this  was utilised to align capital planning with the internal budget process. Whilst noting this, evidence of  planning and executive monitoring was provided in relation to major expenditures for the 2019‐20  period, including some consideration through the Financial and Budget Strategy. 

2.32 The ANAO is currently developing its three‐year forward Capital Management Plan, and  there may be an opportunity to better integrate capital planning and capital budgeting processes  into future budget periods.  

Internal investment 

2.33 The ANAO’s Corporate Plan outlines a number of capability investments that will be required  to support the achievement of the ANAO’s purpose in the current environment. The key areas  outlined include: 

 data analytics uplift, which is supported by a Data Analytics (DA) Strategy; 

 growing and maintaining a skilled and professional workforce;  

 supporting contemporary communication, particularly with the Parliament; and 

 ensuring quality in its audit work. 

2.34 Discussions with key stakeholders within the ANAO in the budgeting process have  highlighted that the savings benefits from these investments are currently being realised through  offsetting increased costs from the external pressures facing the organisation. Refer to consideration  and understanding of external factors and pressures in the section below for further detail relating  to these pressures.  

2.35 In reviewing the internal budgeting process for current and prior years, while there are links  to the above areas of investment, there is an opportunity to better integrate these existing and  planned investments into the budgeting process and more specifically, forward year estimates.  Intended benefits from these investments should be more readily quantified and factored into the  budgeting process to support decision making for current and forward years.   

Workforce planning 

15

 

17 

 

been adopted by Commonwealth entities during the 2019‐20 financial year, and  there is a necessary increase in the audit effort required to be applied.     It is also acknowledged that, whilst the ANAO looks to invest in data analytics  and other technology capabilities, the ongoing cost of investment and the  skillsets needed limit efficiencies obtained, however these initiatives contribute  to a higher quality audit overall.  

Staffing salary  increases and  CPI increases  in the market   

The ability to attract and retain high quality audit staff is an issue for the  auditing profession both in Australia and globally. The ANAO, like other auditing  professional firms, is facing challenges relating to increasing salary costs, as well  as general market increases, such as CPI.   Staff at the ANAO, through their enterprise agreement negotiations, have  received salary increases averaging 2 per cent over recent years, which has a  significant impact on the ANAO given the high proportion of annual employee  costs compared to total expenditure1.   Furthermore, while supplier costs are not as high as employee costs  proportionally, the ANAO is exposed to any market increases through general  supplier costs, including the cost of out‐sourcing the delivery of financial  statements audits to the private sector. For the 2020‐21 budget it is estimated  that approximately 42 per cent of audit fees relate to out‐sourced  arrangements.   As highlighted overleaf, these increases are being experienced in a period where  the ANAO’s funding is declining.  

 

1  The ANAO, in accordance with the directions made within the Australian Public Service, did not pay the  scheduled pay rise in April 2020. 

 

16 

 

2.36 The ANAO has workforce planning strategies, with key stakeholders involved in developing  such strategies involved in the budgeting process. It is therefore acknowledged that aspects of  workforce planning are considered in setting the internal budgets. There is however an opportunity  to more clearly demonstrate integration and consideration of workforce planning in the budgeting  process. For example, the linkage between capability and development needs to key components of  the budget. 

Recommendation 2 – Incorporate and evidence key operational plans and strategies into  the budget setting process.  

As part of the annual budget setting process, the ANAO should:  

 identify key internal plans and strategies which impact the internal budget; and    strengthen and evidence the alignment of key internal plans and strategies to the internal  budgeting and decision making processes.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

Consideration and understanding of external factors and pressures  

2.37 From review of documentation and interviews with senior stakeholders within the ANAO,  there is clear evidence that both internal and external environmental pressures are both known and  understood throughout the organisation. 

2.38 The key internal and external factors and pressures which have been noted through the  internal budget process include the following: 

External Factor  or Pressure  Detail 

Ongoing audit  quality  requirements 

The ANAO’s core business is providing audit reports to the Parliament. Audits  are delivered under the ANAO Auditing Standards. These standards establish a  baseline by which auditing services must be delivered, and there is a necessary  and ongoing focus on quality when delivering services under these standards.  Given these requirements, efficiency gains in delivery of these services are  limited, as there are minimum expected requirements in how these standards  must be adhered to. In addition, these expectations and requirements to  enhance audit quality have been increasing substantively over the last five 

years, and will continue to in the foreseeable future. There are a range of  quality standards which must be maintained, and requirements to have both  internal and external quality programs, which assess relevant compliance with  these frameworks and standards. The ANAO is subject to both an internal  quality assurance program, as well as externally through reviews of financial  statements audits by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission  (ASIC), and for performance audits, peer review by the Office of the Auditor  General, New Zealand.  Furthermore, audits of financial statements require conclusions to be made  against a number of other standards and frameworks in the public sector,  primarily being the Australian Accounting Standards (AAS) and the PGPA  (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR).   These standards are also subject to changes periodically, and when this occurs,  there are additional cost associated with the adoption of these changes. Two 

recent examples of this include the introduction of AASB 16 – Leases, and AASB  15 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Both of these standards have 

 

15 

 

2.27 In assessing the ANAO’s organisational planning, there are a number of key strategies which  inform future operational direction. These include the Capital Management Plan, Workforce Plan  and other Operational Plans at the entity and group level.  

2.28 Overall, the review noted the alignment between how internal budget decisions are made  and the direction of the various strategies within the ANAO. However, in review of relevant  documentation supporting the budget process, it was noted that there is an opportunity to enhance  how these are built into the budget setting process, and evidenced in decisions made.  

Capital management plan  

2.29 The ANAO is provided funding for capital purposes through its annual appropriation, which  includes a departmental capital budget component. This funding is also supplemented, when  required, through the ANAO’s accumulated reserves, which are made up of prior years’ unspent  funding. The ANAO has an internal policy in place which determines how accumulated reserves can  be used 

2.30 While the ANAO does not have a high proportion of capital expenditure, it has recently  undertaken significant capital investment, primarily in relation to the office relocation and  refurbishment. Other key capital considerations include its IT and other technology related holdings.  

2.31 In undertaking this review, the capital management plan used for 2019‐20 and earlier  financial years could not be located, and there was not a clearly demonstrated linkage in how this  was utilised to align capital planning with the internal budget process. Whilst noting this, evidence of  planning and executive monitoring was provided in relation to major expenditures for the 2019‐20  period, including some consideration through the Financial and Budget Strategy. 

2.32 The ANAO is currently developing its three‐year forward Capital Management Plan, and  there may be an opportunity to better integrate capital planning and capital budgeting processes  into future budget periods.  

Internal investment 

2.33 The ANAO’s Corporate Plan outlines a number of capability investments that will be required  to support the achievement of the ANAO’s purpose in the current environment. The key areas  outlined include: 

 data analytics uplift, which is supported by a Data Analytics (DA) Strategy; 

 growing and maintaining a skilled and professional workforce;  

 supporting contemporary communication, particularly with the Parliament; and 

 ensuring quality in its audit work. 

2.34 Discussions with key stakeholders within the ANAO in the budgeting process have  highlighted that the savings benefits from these investments are currently being realised through  offsetting increased costs from the external pressures facing the organisation. Refer to consideration  and understanding of external factors and pressures in the section below for further detail relating  to these pressures.  

2.35 In reviewing the internal budgeting process for current and prior years, while there are links  to the above areas of investment, there is an opportunity to better integrate these existing and  planned investments into the budgeting process and more specifically, forward year estimates.  Intended benefits from these investments should be more readily quantified and factored into the  budgeting process to support decision making for current and forward years.   

Workforce planning 

16

 

17 

 

been adopted by Commonwealth entities during the 2019‐20 financial year, and  there is a necessary increase in the audit effort required to be applied.     It is also acknowledged that, whilst the ANAO looks to invest in data analytics  and other technology capabilities, the ongoing cost of investment and the  skillsets needed limit efficiencies obtained, however these initiatives contribute  to a higher quality audit overall.  

Staffing salary  increases and  CPI increases  in the market   

The ability to attract and retain high quality audit staff is an issue for the  auditing profession both in Australia and globally. The ANAO, like other auditing  professional firms, is facing challenges relating to increasing salary costs, as well  as general market increases, such as CPI.   Staff at the ANAO, through their enterprise agreement negotiations, have  received salary increases averaging 2 per cent over recent years, which has a  significant impact on the ANAO given the high proportion of annual employee  costs compared to total expenditure1.   Furthermore, while supplier costs are not as high as employee costs  proportionally, the ANAO is exposed to any market increases through general  supplier costs, including the cost of out‐sourcing the delivery of financial  statements audits to the private sector. For the 2020‐21 budget it is estimated  that approximately 42 per cent of audit fees relate to out‐sourced  arrangements.   As highlighted overleaf, these increases are being experienced in a period where  the ANAO’s funding is declining.  

 

1  The ANAO, in accordance with the directions made within the Australian Public Service, did not pay the  scheduled pay rise in April 2020. 

17

 

19 

 

Government  changes   

encountered through the identification of audit issues on specific engagements.  Identification of issues, and particular audits, may also result in additional  efforts relating to Parliamentary enquiries and other Government briefings.  Within its existing model, these impacts are not planned for within the internal  budget, and there are limited means by which the ANAO may recover any of this  additional effort through additional funding.  Impact of changes to Commonwealth entities  The Government may make decisions relating to the creation, abolishment or  merging of specific Commonwealth entities in order to deliver on its broader  policies.   Under the AG Act, the ANAO is required to undertake financial statements  audits of Commonwealth entities. Accordingly, any changes to this listing of  entities in any given year can have a flow on impact to the number of audits  required to be delivered by AASG.   Under the ANAO’s funding model, it does not receive any additional funding to  deliver on these changes, and similarly, does not have budget removed should  an entity be abolished.   In recent years, the ANAO has seen a net increase in entities and costs  associated with changes in machinery of government. In instances where  Government entities are merged, these can also create additional short and  longer term increases in costs, depending on complexities within these  agencies.  Specifically, audits of new agencies, whether achieved through outsourced  arrangements or through in‐house resources, must be absorbed within the  current budget.  Between 2017‐18 and 2019‐20, the number of new and ceased entities  (excluding non‐mandated audits) was 28 and 15 respectively, seeing an increase  entities requiring audit activities increasing by 13 over this time.  

 

The ANAO’s overall funding model and ability to manage external pressures 

2.39 The ANAO’s funding model is relatively set, in that it is appropriated monies to deliver on its  outputs, and has limited means through which additional funding can be obtained to deal with  various circumstances as they arise.  

2.40 While in other private sector practices, additional fees could be charged or obtained from  relevant clients, this is not an option for the ANAO, as additional monies received would typically be  required to be returned to the Commonwealth under provisions of the PGPA Act. 

2.41 The primary means by which Commonwealth entities are able to obtain additional funding is  through New Policy Proposals (NPPs), however there are a number of criteria that must be met in  order to obtain such funding, in line with the Government’s forward fiscal policies. This includes that  any NPPs must be offset by other savings within the portfolio.  

2.42 The impact of pressures identified above can differ across the ANAO, depending on where  they are experienced: 

 within PASG, additional time and effort spent does not result in additional costs to the  organisation, however impacts the timelines and timeframes available to deliver on the  desired performance audit outputs; 

 

18 

 

Efficiency  dividends and  staffing level  caps   

As highlighted in Section 1: Background, the ANAO, along with other  Commonwealth entities, is subject to an efficiency dividend, which is in place as  a Government saving measure to encourage efficiencies in the operations of  Commonwealth entities. For the 2020‐21 financial year, this efficiency dividend  is set at one percent.  With this savings measure being in place for a number of years, the ANAO has  seen a consistent reduction in funding available to deliver its services, with an  overall reduction in appropriation revenue since the 2013‐14 financial year2.  

 

This reduced funding creates a number of challenges which must be managed  by the ANAO, given its delivery requirements and overall purpose.   The external pressures within the ANAO’s market, combined with the reducing  funding model available to it, creates a number of risks and challenges to its  forward position and over recent years, the ANAO has experienced a number of  operating losses.   It is noted that this has also been impacted by recent capital investment  undertaken by the ANAO. As highlighted in Link to the ANAO’s operational plan  and strategies above, the ANAO has put in place a budget policy which enables  it to draw upon reserves to fund capital investment and other initiatives.   Per broader government requirements, the ANAO is also subject to an average  staffing level (ASL) cap, which determines the total number of full time staff  they can be funded across a financial year. This limits the ANAO’s ability to bring  additional audits in‐house in place of contract‐out arrangements.  

The impact of  audit issues  identified and  

Other costs and requirements associated with the ANAO  As with any organisation, the ANAO is also subject to unplanned disruptions  relating to its core operations. In relation to audit activities, this is often 

 

2  This analysis only includes departmental revenues. 

18

 

19 

 

Government  changes   

encountered through the identification of audit issues on specific engagements.  Identification of issues, and particular audits, may also result in additional  efforts relating to Parliamentary enquiries and other Government briefings.  Within its existing model, these impacts are not planned for within the internal  budget, and there are limited means by which the ANAO may recover any of this  additional effort through additional funding.  Impact of changes to Commonwealth entities  The Government may make decisions relating to the creation, abolishment or  merging of specific Commonwealth entities in order to deliver on its broader  policies.   Under the AG Act, the ANAO is required to undertake financial statements  audits of Commonwealth entities. Accordingly, any changes to this listing of  entities in any given year can have a flow on impact to the number of audits  required to be delivered by AASG.   Under the ANAO’s funding model, it does not receive any additional funding to  deliver on these changes, and similarly, does not have budget removed should  an entity be abolished.   In recent years, the ANAO has seen a net increase in entities and costs  associated with changes in machinery of government. In instances where  Government entities are merged, these can also create additional short and  longer term increases in costs, depending on complexities within these  agencies.  Specifically, audits of new agencies, whether achieved through outsourced  arrangements or through in‐house resources, must be absorbed within the  current budget.  Between 2017‐18 and 2019‐20, the number of new and ceased entities  (excluding non‐mandated audits) was 28 and 15 respectively, seeing an increase  entities requiring audit activities increasing by 13 over this time.  

 

The ANAO’s overall funding model and ability to manage external pressures 

2.39 The ANAO’s funding model is relatively set, in that it is appropriated monies to deliver on its  outputs, and has limited means through which additional funding can be obtained to deal with  various circumstances as they arise.  

2.40 While in other private sector practices, additional fees could be charged or obtained from  relevant clients, this is not an option for the ANAO, as additional monies received would typically be  required to be returned to the Commonwealth under provisions of the PGPA Act. 

2.41 The primary means by which Commonwealth entities are able to obtain additional funding is  through New Policy Proposals (NPPs), however there are a number of criteria that must be met in  order to obtain such funding, in line with the Government’s forward fiscal policies. This includes that  any NPPs must be offset by other savings within the portfolio.  

2.42 The impact of pressures identified above can differ across the ANAO, depending on where  they are experienced: 

 within PASG, additional time and effort spent does not result in additional costs to the  organisation, however impacts the timelines and timeframes available to deliver on the  desired performance audit outputs; 

 

18 

 

Efficiency  dividends and  staffing level  caps   

As highlighted in Section 1: Background, the ANAO, along with other  Commonwealth entities, is subject to an efficiency dividend, which is in place as  a Government saving measure to encourage efficiencies in the operations of  Commonwealth entities. For the 2020‐21 financial year, this efficiency dividend  is set at one percent.  With this savings measure being in place for a number of years, the ANAO has  seen a consistent reduction in funding available to deliver its services, with an  overall reduction in appropriation revenue since the 2013‐14 financial year2.  

 

This reduced funding creates a number of challenges which must be managed  by the ANAO, given its delivery requirements and overall purpose.   The external pressures within the ANAO’s market, combined with the reducing  funding model available to it, creates a number of risks and challenges to its  forward position and over recent years, the ANAO has experienced a number of  operating losses.   It is noted that this has also been impacted by recent capital investment  undertaken by the ANAO. As highlighted in Link to the ANAO’s operational plan  and strategies above, the ANAO has put in place a budget policy which enables  it to draw upon reserves to fund capital investment and other initiatives.   Per broader government requirements, the ANAO is also subject to an average  staffing level (ASL) cap, which determines the total number of full time staff  they can be funded across a financial year. This limits the ANAO’s ability to bring  additional audits in‐house in place of contract‐out arrangements.  

The impact of  audit issues  identified and  

Other costs and requirements associated with the ANAO  As with any organisation, the ANAO is also subject to unplanned disruptions  relating to its core operations. In relation to audit activities, this is often 

 

2  This analysis only includes departmental revenues. 

19

 

21 

 

Chart 2: Performance audit volumes per ANAO’s Annual Tabling Schedule Reports  

2.48 While the scope of this review has not considered the efficiency and effectiveness in the  individual delivery of audits, other internal approaches observed through this review to demonstrate  the actions the ANAO has undertaken to identify budget related efficiencies. These include: 

 an efficiency review undertaken within AASG to review relevant risk and materiality levels of  its audits, to identify areas where savings could be made; 

 ongoing benchmarking activities undertaken by the ANAO over costs of assurance audit  activities; 

 implementation of varying types of performance audits, included some limited scope  reviews, and reviews with a smaller scope; 

 for outsourced financial statements audits, tendering processes which test market prices  amongst other considerations. This also includes consideration of whether audits should be  delivered in‐house or contracted out; and 

 ongoing investment in areas of audit efficiency, such as data analytics capabilities. 

 

 

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

2016‐17 2017‐18 2018‐19 2019‐20

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCE AUDITS

 

20 

 

 within AASG, given the nature of the significant body of its work in financial statements to be  delivered within Commonwealth reporting deadlines, there are varied impacts. Delays and  overruns in relation to AASG can have the following impacts: 

o for in‐house engagements, additional hours required to be worked by ANAO staff.  o the need to bring in additional contract resources to supplement audit activity due  to reporting deadlines.  o The need to utilise resources from PASG, which can impact on performance audit 

outcomes.  o for out‐sourced audits, contractual obligations may enable external providers to  request additional funding from the ANAO in instances where there is a reasonable  change in scope. These costs, when approved, must be absorbed by the ANAO 

within its existing budget. 

2.43 The section below outlines the various activities undertaken by the ANAO in response to  these pressures.   

The ANAO’s response to Internal and External Budget Pressures 

2.44 ANAO’s prioritisation of internal resources within these constraints and in response to the  aforementioned pressures is embedded in the budgeting process.  

2.45 As highlighted within Section 1: Introduction, under its enabling legislation, there are specific  mandated requirements which the ANAO must fulfil relating to financial statements audits.  

2.46 This prioritisation is evidenced through the annual budgeting process, and consideration is  given to where and how resources are allocated to meet overall objectives, based on particular  priorities. These priorities consider: 

 areas of discretionary spending, which are limited given the ANAO’s operating model; and 

 outputs which are a mandated requirement, which prioritises the delivery of the ANAO’s  financial statements audit functions over other activities, such as performance audits. 

2.47 As highlighted in Chart 2 below, the ANAO has responded to budget pressures in recent  years through a reduction in performance audit activity. Specifically, the number of performance  audits has declined from 59 to 44 between 2016‐17 and 2019‐203. The ANAO has predicted that this  number may fall to 38 by 2023‐24. 

 

3  Source: PASG annual tabling schedule reports 

20

 

21 

 

Chart 2: Performance audit volumes per ANAO’s Annual Tabling Schedule Reports  

2.48 While the scope of this review has not considered the efficiency and effectiveness in the  individual delivery of audits, other internal approaches observed through this review to demonstrate  the actions the ANAO has undertaken to identify budget related efficiencies. These include: 

 an efficiency review undertaken within AASG to review relevant risk and materiality levels of  its audits, to identify areas where savings could be made; 

 ongoing benchmarking activities undertaken by the ANAO over costs of assurance audit  activities; 

 implementation of varying types of performance audits, included some limited scope  reviews, and reviews with a smaller scope; 

 for outsourced financial statements audits, tendering processes which test market prices  amongst other considerations. This also includes consideration of whether audits should be  delivered in‐house or contracted out; and 

 ongoing investment in areas of audit efficiency, such as data analytics capabilities. 

 

 

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

2016‐17 2017‐18 2018‐19 2019‐20

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCE AUDITS

 

20 

 

 within AASG, given the nature of the significant body of its work in financial statements to be  delivered within Commonwealth reporting deadlines, there are varied impacts. Delays and  overruns in relation to AASG can have the following impacts: 

o for in‐house engagements, additional hours required to be worked by ANAO staff.  o the need to bring in additional contract resources to supplement audit activity due  to reporting deadlines.  o The need to utilise resources from PASG, which can impact on performance audit 

outcomes.  o for out‐sourced audits, contractual obligations may enable external providers to  request additional funding from the ANAO in instances where there is a reasonable  change in scope. These costs, when approved, must be absorbed by the ANAO 

within its existing budget. 

2.43 The section below outlines the various activities undertaken by the ANAO in response to  these pressures.   

The ANAO’s response to Internal and External Budget Pressures 

2.44 ANAO’s prioritisation of internal resources within these constraints and in response to the  aforementioned pressures is embedded in the budgeting process.  

2.45 As highlighted within Section 1: Introduction, under its enabling legislation, there are specific  mandated requirements which the ANAO must fulfil relating to financial statements audits.  

2.46 This prioritisation is evidenced through the annual budgeting process, and consideration is  given to where and how resources are allocated to meet overall objectives, based on particular  priorities. These priorities consider: 

 areas of discretionary spending, which are limited given the ANAO’s operating model; and 

 outputs which are a mandated requirement, which prioritises the delivery of the ANAO’s  financial statements audit functions over other activities, such as performance audits. 

2.47 As highlighted in Chart 2 below, the ANAO has responded to budget pressures in recent  years through a reduction in performance audit activity. Specifically, the number of performance  audits has declined from 59 to 44 between 2016‐17 and 2019‐203. The ANAO has predicted that this  number may fall to 38 by 2023‐24. 

 

3  Source: PASG annual tabling schedule reports 

21

 

23 

 

Assurance Audit Services Group 

2.56 Within AASG, there is an established annual process which is undertaken to set ‘baseline’  budgets for each financial statement audit engagement. Through this process, any changes to the  prior year budgets must be reviewed and approved by the relevant executive as well as the Senior  Executive Director and Group Executive Director. 

2.57 In addition to this, other periodic exercises to review the overall baseline to find potential  efficiencies were observed, with this process overseen and approved by the relevant group head. 

2.58 On an individual audit basis, there are established governance and approval processes in  place to monitor ongoing audit progress, forecast any budget related issues and to approve changes  in budget scope and overruns.  

2.59 No observations have been made in relation to the governance arrangements in place to  approve and monitor individual audits within AASG.  

Performance Audit Services Group 

2.60 Within PASG, a preliminary budget setting process is overseen and approved by senior  members of PASG, and quarterly meetings are then held to provide program level updates to the  Auditor‐General. The budget setting process for individual audits is overseen and approved by senior  members of PASG as well as the Auditor‐General.   

2.61 On an individual audit basis, there are established governance and approval processes in  place to monitor ongoing audit progress, forecast any budget related issues and to approve changes  in budget scope and overruns.  

2.62 Further analysis and discussion on the operational effectiveness of approvals and monitoring  is included in the Formalisation of Framework and its Operational Effectiveness section of this  report. 

 

 

22 

 

G Goovveerrnnaannccee  AArrrraannggeem meennttss  

Criteria 2: There are appropriate governance arrangements to review, approve and oversee internal budgeting and forecasting at the group-level and audit-level

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa   G Goovveerrnnaannccee  ssttrruuccttuurreess  ssuuppppoorrttiinngg  tthhee  oovveerraallll  bbuuddggeettiinngg  pprroocceessss  

2.49 The ANAO has put in place a number of key governance and oversight mechanisms, each  with clearly defined roles and responsibilities throughout the budgeting process. Furthermore, there  are clearly defined roles and responsibilities for key personnel within the ANAO who play a part in  the development of the budget. 

2.50 The key governance and oversight bodies with budget responsibilities include: 

 the Executive Board of Management (EBOM): EBOM has overall responsibility for budget  related decisions and final approval of the internal budget.  

 the Finance Committee: The Finance Committee supports EBOM, by making  recommendations on annual and mid‐year budgets and through coordinating with key areas  of ANAO’s business to provide constructive review and challenge at key points in the process. 

 the People and Change Committee: The People and Change Committee supports EBOM by  managing the ANAO’s Learning and Development strategy and training budget, which forms  part of the budget setting process as a key area of both internal investment, and  discretionary spending within the ANAO’s annual budget. 

2.51 The roles and responsibilities for each of these committees is documented within their  respective Terms of Reference. 

2.52 Budgeting roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders within the organisation, including  those in service groups, are documented through the 2019‐20 Internal Budget Process document,  and these were found to be well understood throughout the organisation. These roles and 

responsibilities outline the various decision makers within the overall process, and the roles of the  key governance bodies, as outlined above. The review also found that decision makers within the  organisation were at an appropriate level.  

2.53 Further supporting the strength of the overall governance processes is the use of TM1 in  setting the overall process. As outlined in Section 2.1 of this report, this provides confidence in the  information and approvals underpinning this process.  

2.54 Overall, the ANAO was able to demonstrate a clear process over how these governance  arrangements support the delivery on its responsibilities and through key decision making and  approvals. The broader process, which is led by the CFO, was found to be clear, and provide an  appropriate structure and framework to develop and deliver the annual internal budget.  

G Goovveerrnnaannccee  PPrroocceesssseess  w wiitthhiinn  AAAASSG G  aanndd  PPAASSG G  rreellaattiinngg  ttoo  AAuuddiitt  LLeevveell  bbuuddggeettss  

2.55 Each of AASG and PASG were found to have established internal processes relating to the  review, oversight and approval of audit level budgets. As highlighted in the Overall Budget Processes  section of this report, this process gives consideration to organisational priorities and objectives, as  well as KPIs for the ANAO.  

22

 

23 

 

Assurance Audit Services Group 

2.56 Within AASG, there is an established annual process which is undertaken to set ‘baseline’  budgets for each financial statement audit engagement. Through this process, any changes to the  prior year budgets must be reviewed and approved by the relevant executive as well as the Senior  Executive Director and Group Executive Director. 

2.57 In addition to this, other periodic exercises to review the overall baseline to find potential  efficiencies were observed, with this process overseen and approved by the relevant group head. 

2.58 On an individual audit basis, there are established governance and approval processes in  place to monitor ongoing audit progress, forecast any budget related issues and to approve changes  in budget scope and overruns.  

2.59 No observations have been made in relation to the governance arrangements in place to  approve and monitor individual audits within AASG.  

Performance Audit Services Group 

2.60 Within PASG, a preliminary budget setting process is overseen and approved by senior  members of PASG, and quarterly meetings are then held to provide program level updates to the  Auditor‐General. The budget setting process for individual audits is overseen and approved by senior  members of PASG as well as the Auditor‐General.   

2.61 On an individual audit basis, there are established governance and approval processes in  place to monitor ongoing audit progress, forecast any budget related issues and to approve changes  in budget scope and overruns.  

2.62 Further analysis and discussion on the operational effectiveness of approvals and monitoring  is included in the Formalisation of Framework and its Operational Effectiveness section of this  report. 

 

 

22 

 

GGoovveerrnnaannccee  AArrrraannggeemmeennttss  

Criteria 2: There are appropriate governance arrangements to review, approve and oversee internal budgeting and forecasting at the group-level and audit-level

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa   GGoovveerrnnaannccee  ssttrruuccttuurreess  ssuuppppoorrttiinngg  tthhee  oovveerraallll  bbuuddggeettiinngg  pprroocceessss  

2.49 The ANAO has put in place a number of key governance and oversight mechanisms, each  with clearly defined roles and responsibilities throughout the budgeting process. Furthermore, there  are clearly defined roles and responsibilities for key personnel within the ANAO who play a part in  the development of the budget. 

2.50 The key governance and oversight bodies with budget responsibilities include: 

 the Executive Board of Management (EBOM): EBOM has overall responsibility for budget  related decisions and final approval of the internal budget.  

 the Finance Committee: The Finance Committee supports EBOM, by making  recommendations on annual and mid‐year budgets and through coordinating with key areas  of ANAO’s business to provide constructive review and challenge at key points in the process. 

 the People and Change Committee: The People and Change Committee supports EBOM by  managing the ANAO’s Learning and Development strategy and training budget, which forms  part of the budget setting process as a key area of both internal investment, and  discretionary spending within the ANAO’s annual budget. 

2.51 The roles and responsibilities for each of these committees is documented within their  respective Terms of Reference. 

2.52 Budgeting roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders within the organisation, including  those in service groups, are documented through the 2019‐20 Internal Budget Process document,  and these were found to be well understood throughout the organisation. These roles and  responsibilities outline the various decision makers within the overall process, and the roles of the  key governance bodies, as outlined above. The review also found that decision makers within the  organisation were at an appropriate level.  

2.53 Further supporting the strength of the overall governance processes is the use of TM1 in  setting the overall process. As outlined in Section 2.1 of this report, this provides confidence in the  information and approvals underpinning this process.  

2.54 Overall, the ANAO was able to demonstrate a clear process over how these governance  arrangements support the delivery on its responsibilities and through key decision making and  approvals. The broader process, which is led by the CFO, was found to be clear, and provide an  appropriate structure and framework to develop and deliver the annual internal budget.  

GGoovveerrnnaannccee  PPrroocceesssseess  wwiitthhiinn  AAAASSGG  aanndd  PPAASSGG  rreellaattiinngg  ttoo  AAuuddiitt  LLeevveell  bbuuddggeettss  

2.55 Each of AASG and PASG were found to have established internal processes relating to the  review, oversight and approval of audit level budgets. As highlighted in the Overall Budget Processes  section of this report, this process gives consideration to organisational priorities and objectives, as  well as KPIs for the ANAO.  

23

 

25 

 

where all approved assumptions, priorities and principles should be documented and  evidenced.  Consideration should also be given to making key documentation available to all stakeholders  involved in the budgeting process. 

  Operational Effectiveness of Budget Approvals and Monitoring and the Entity Level 

2.68 The review was able to confirm the operational effectiveness of internal approvals and  oversight relating to the approval of internal budgets for the 2019‐20 and 2020‐21 financial years,  noting complexities in the provision of funding for the 2020‐21 financial year due to delays in the  Government’s budget processes due to the global pandemic. 

2.69 Ongoing monthly monitoring and periodic reviews of the overall budget were also  consistently undertaken and reported to the ANAO’s relevant governance bodies.  

2.70 No issues were noted at the Group or ANAO level regarding oversight, quality assurance and  approvals for group and entity level budgets. It was noted that the use of TM1 supported the quality  and consistency of this process.  

2.71 Sample testing undertaken confirmed that commentary is provided by all groups to explain  budget versus actual figures. Instances were also noted where follow up activity was requested by  EBOM, and appropriate follow‐up activity was undertaken through the Finance Committee and by  relevant stakeholders.  

2.72 While testing undertaken confirmed the consistency of reporting in line with internal  requirements, detailed sampling of monthly budget monitoring and forecasting noted that  commentary provided in relation to budget to actuals was not always comprehensive.  

2.73 There is an opportunity to develop and provide further formal guidance which outlines  expectations for monthly reporting to support the quality and consistency of agency‐wide analysis.  

Improvement Opportunity –Formalise expectations, guidance and requirements for  monthly budget reporting and variance analysis. 

To support stakeholders within the organisation, the ANAO could consider developing formal  guidance materials which outline relevant requirements, including examples, to assist in  enhancing the quality and consistency of monthly analysis.   This could include: 

relevant thresholds for reporting;  detail of analysis and supporting information provided; and  expectations for follow up activity. 

OOppeerraattiioonnaall  eeffffeeccttiivveenneessss  ooff  bbuuddggeett  aapppprroovvaallss  aanndd  mmoonniittoorriinngg  aatt  tthhee  AAuuddiitt  LLeevveell  

2.74 At the group level, both AASG and PASG were found to have established processes to  develop and approve individual audit budgets, as well as monitor and forecast expenditure.  

2.75 To assess the effectiveness of budget approvals and monitoring at the audit level, a sample  of five audits was selected from both AASG and PASG to assess: 

 approval of the initial budget, including assumptions applied in development for in‐house  audits; 

 approval of budget revisions (where applicable); 

 regular monitoring of budgets; and 

 

24 

 

FFoorrm maalliissaattiioonn  ooff  FFrraam meew woorrkk  aanndd  iittss  O Oppeerraattiioonnaall   EEffffeeccttiivveenneessss 

Criteria 3: The internal budgeting framework is appropriately formalised, and operating effectively at entity and audit levels

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa   TThhee  AAN NAAO O’’ss  BBuuddggeett  FFrraam meew woorrkk  aanndd  SSuuppppoorrttiinngg  D Dooccuum meennttss  

2.63 The ANAO’s budget framework is set out through a number documents. The key documents  which outline the budget process are the Financial and Budget Strategy, the 2019‐20 Internal Budget  Process document and the Internal Budgeting Guiding Principles document. 

2.64 Providing further support to these documents are a number of other guidance and  instructional materials, including the Auditor‐General’s Instructions and the Financial Management  Procedures. 

2.65 As outlined within Section 2.2: Governance Arrangements, roles and responsibilities within  the ANAO were found to be clearly defined for stakeholders within the budget process. Key  governance and oversight bodies, such as EBOM and the Finance Committee, have terms of  reference which clearly outline responsibilities in relation to ANAO financial and budgeting matters. 

2.66 Key assumptions and priorities are understood across the organisation with key decisions to  prioritise mandated requirements made by the Finance Committee. Budget assumptions and  priorities are communicated to groups by the CFO during the commencing stages of the internal  budget process via email. 

2.67 The review found that there was an appropriately formalised framework to support the  overall budget process, but also that documentation could be improved and made more readily  available to key stakeholders within the ANAO. It was identified that:  

 some aspects of the framework were not reviewed on an annual basis, and the documents  themselves do not define requirements for periodic review and refresh;  

 key documentation was not readily accessible to key stakeholders, such as staff involved in  the development of group level budgets, with these documents found only within the  Executive Board of Management meeting papers; and 

 some key elements relating to key assumptions and priorities within the organisation to  support groups in the development and ongoing management were not included within the  documents underpinning the framework. Instead, agreed assumptions and priorities are  currently communicated to groups via email as part of a broader set of instructions. 

There would be benefit in including additional guidance materials to key groups within the ANAO to  outline expectations around monthly variance reporting. This is discussed further below. 

Improvement Opportunity – Review, update and formalise framework documentation 

To support more timely, accessible and relevant supporting documentation, the ANAO should  consider reviewing its key budget documentation. This review could include consideration of the  following areas to enhance and formalise the existing framework: 

required timeframes for document review; and 

24

 

25 

 

where all approved assumptions, priorities and principles should be documented and  evidenced.  Consideration should also be given to making key documentation available to all stakeholders  involved in the budgeting process. 

  Operational Effectiveness of Budget Approvals and Monitoring and the Entity Level 

2.68 The review was able to confirm the operational effectiveness of internal approvals and  oversight relating to the approval of internal budgets for the 2019‐20 and 2020‐21 financial years,  noting complexities in the provision of funding for the 2020‐21 financial year due to delays in the  Government’s budget processes due to the global pandemic. 

2.69 Ongoing monthly monitoring and periodic reviews of the overall budget were also  consistently undertaken and reported to the ANAO’s relevant governance bodies.  

2.70 No issues were noted at the Group or ANAO level regarding oversight, quality assurance and  approvals for group and entity level budgets. It was noted that the use of TM1 supported the quality  and consistency of this process.  

2.71 Sample testing undertaken confirmed that commentary is provided by all groups to explain  budget versus actual figures. Instances were also noted where follow up activity was requested by  EBOM, and appropriate follow‐up activity was undertaken through the Finance Committee and by  relevant stakeholders.  

2.72 While testing undertaken confirmed the consistency of reporting in line with internal  requirements, detailed sampling of monthly budget monitoring and forecasting noted that  commentary provided in relation to budget to actuals was not always comprehensive.  

2.73 There is an opportunity to develop and provide further formal guidance which outlines  expectations for monthly reporting to support the quality and consistency of agency‐wide analysis.  

Improvement Opportunity –Formalise expectations, guidance and requirements for  monthly budget reporting and variance analysis. 

To support stakeholders within the organisation, the ANAO could consider developing formal  guidance materials which outline relevant requirements, including examples, to assist in  enhancing the quality and consistency of monthly analysis.   This could include: 

relevant thresholds for reporting;  detail of analysis and supporting information provided; and  expectations for follow up activity. 

O Oppeerraattiioonnaall  eeffffeeccttiivveenneessss  ooff  bbuuddggeett  aapppprroovvaallss  aanndd  m moonniittoorriinngg  aatt  tthhee  AAuuddiitt  LLeevveell  

2.74 At the group level, both AASG and PASG were found to have established processes to  develop and approve individual audit budgets, as well as monitor and forecast expenditure.  

2.75 To assess the effectiveness of budget approvals and monitoring at the audit level, a sample  of five audits was selected from both AASG and PASG to assess: 

 approval of the initial budget, including assumptions applied in development for in‐house  audits; 

 approval of budget revisions (where applicable); 

 regular monitoring of budgets; and 

 

24 

 

FFoorrmmaalliissaattiioonn  ooff  FFrraammeewwoorrkk  aanndd  iittss  OOppeerraattiioonnaall   EEffffeeccttiivveenneessss 

Criteria 3: The internal budgeting framework is appropriately formalised, and operating effectively at entity and audit levels

AAsssseessssm meenntt  aaggaaiinnsstt  CCrriitteerriiaa   TThhee  AANNAAOO’’ss  BBuuddggeett  FFrraam meew woorrkk  aanndd  SSuuppppoorrttiinngg  DDooccuum meennttss  

2.63 The ANAO’s budget framework is set out through a number documents. The key documents  which outline the budget process are the Financial and Budget Strategy, the 2019‐20 Internal Budget  Process document and the Internal Budgeting Guiding Principles document. 

2.64 Providing further support to these documents are a number of other guidance and  instructional materials, including the Auditor‐General’s Instructions and the Financial Management  Procedures. 

2.65 As outlined within Section 2.2: Governance Arrangements, roles and responsibilities within  the ANAO were found to be clearly defined for stakeholders within the budget process. Key  governance and oversight bodies, such as EBOM and the Finance Committee, have terms of  reference which clearly outline responsibilities in relation to ANAO financial and budgeting matters. 

2.66 Key assumptions and priorities are understood across the organisation with key decisions to  prioritise mandated requirements made by the Finance Committee. Budget assumptions and  priorities are communicated to groups by the CFO during the commencing stages of the internal  budget process via email. 

2.67 The review found that there was an appropriately formalised framework to support the  overall budget process, but also that documentation could be improved and made more readily  available to key stakeholders within the ANAO. It was identified that:  

 some aspects of the framework were not reviewed on an annual basis, and the documents  themselves do not define requirements for periodic review and refresh;  

 key documentation was not readily accessible to key stakeholders, such as staff involved in  the development of group level budgets, with these documents found only within the  Executive Board of Management meeting papers; and 

 some key elements relating to key assumptions and priorities within the organisation to  support groups in the development and ongoing management were not included within the  documents underpinning the framework. Instead, agreed assumptions and priorities are  currently communicated to groups via email as part of a broader set of instructions. 

There would be benefit in including additional guidance materials to key groups within the ANAO to  outline expectations around monthly variance reporting. This is discussed further below. 

Improvement Opportunity – Review, update and formalise framework documentation 

To support more timely, accessible and relevant supporting documentation, the ANAO should  consider reviewing its key budget documentation. This review could include consideration of the  following areas to enhance and formalise the existing framework: 

required timeframes for document review; and 

25

 

27 

 

Appendix A: Entity Response 

 

 

26 

 

 regular forecasting.  

Assurance Audit Services Group 

2.76 Within AASG, the annual process is also driven through key performance indicators as  established by the Auditor‐General. These indicators set a baseline for setting budgets relating to the  delivery of financial statements and other assurance audits within AASG.  

2.77 There are established processes in place to approve any changes to prior year budgets, and  evidence was found to be maintained for these changes.  

2.78 From sample testing undertaken, no observations were noted from the five samples  reviewed and evidence reviewed was in accordance with the AASG Flashsheet – Baselining and  Project Budgets.  

Performance Audit Services Group 

2.79 From sample testing undertaken, the following observations were noted from the five  samples reviewed: 

 Necessary budget variation requests were not approved in relation to overruns on three  audits, relating to overruns of 55%, 13% overrun and 4% respectively for the samples  reviewed.    It should be noted that PASG’s internal process requires approval of variations, with the 

required approver determined by the extent of the overrun.  

2.80 It is acknowledged that at the time of the review, PASG were in the process of enhancing its  monitoring and variance approval processes.  

Recommendation 3 – Review budget variation processes within PASG 

PASG should review its internal processes relating to budget overruns to ensure there is  appropriate monitoring and approval of variations to original baseline budgets.   Consideration should also be given to providing additional training or education to audit teams in  relation to expected requirements.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

PPoosstt  bbuuddggeett  rreevviieew w  aanndd  aapppprrooaacchh  ttoo  ccoonnttiinnuuaall  iim mpprroovveem meenntt  

2.81 As part of ongoing monitoring and effectiveness of the overall budget process, a better  practice approach should information an element of continual improvement and review.

2.82 In reviewing the ANAO’s annual processes, it was found that there is an opportunity to  enhance the continuous improvement culture with respect to benchmarking, reflection and lessons  learnt following the internal budgeting process. 

2.83 It is understood that plans are in place to progress this, which would include seeking and  acting upon feedback from stakeholders. 

Recommendation 4 – Implement post budget review process 

The ANAO should implement a post budget review as part of its annual internal budget process.  This should consider the efficiency and effectiveness of processes undertaken, to encourage  continual improvement in future budget processes.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

26

 

27 

 

Appendix A: Entity Response 

 

 

26 

 

 regular forecasting.  

Assurance Audit Services Group 

2.76 Within AASG, the annual process is also driven through key performance indicators as  established by the Auditor‐General. These indicators set a baseline for setting budgets relating to the  delivery of financial statements and other assurance audits within AASG.  

2.77 There are established processes in place to approve any changes to prior year budgets, and  evidence was found to be maintained for these changes.  

2.78 From sample testing undertaken, no observations were noted from the five samples  reviewed and evidence reviewed was in accordance with the AASG Flashsheet – Baselining and  Project Budgets.  

Performance Audit Services Group 

2.79 From sample testing undertaken, the following observations were noted from the five  samples reviewed: 

 Necessary budget variation requests were not approved in relation to overruns on three  audits, relating to overruns of 55%, 13% overrun and 4% respectively for the samples  reviewed.    It should be noted that PASG’s internal process requires approval of variations, with the 

required approver determined by the extent of the overrun.  

2.80 It is acknowledged that at the time of the review, PASG were in the process of enhancing its  monitoring and variance approval processes.  

Recommendation 3 – Review budget variation processes within PASG 

PASG should review its internal processes relating to budget overruns to ensure there is  appropriate monitoring and approval of variations to original baseline budgets.   Consideration should also be given to providing additional training or education to audit teams in  relation to expected requirements.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

PPoosstt  bbuuddggeett  rreevviieew w  aanndd  aapppprrooaacchh  ttoo  ccoonnttiinnuuaall  iim mpprroovveem meenntt  

2.81 As part of ongoing monitoring and effectiveness of the overall budget process, a better  practice approach should information an element of continual improvement and review.

2.82 In reviewing the ANAO’s annual processes, it was found that there is an opportunity to  enhance the continuous improvement culture with respect to benchmarking, reflection and lessons  learnt following the internal budgeting process. 

2.83 It is understood that plans are in place to progress this, which would include seeking and  acting upon feedback from stakeholders. 

Recommendation 4 – Implement post budget review process 

The ANAO should implement a post budget review as part of its annual internal budget process.  This should consider the efficiency and effectiveness of processes undertaken, to encourage  continual improvement in future budget processes.  

ANAO Comment: Agreed 

27

 

28 

 

 

28