Title Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee—Report on annual reports referred to legislation committees—No. 1 of 2022, dated June 2022
Source Senate
Date 26-07-2022
Parliament No. 47
Tabled in Senate 26-07-2022
Parliamentary Paper Year 2022
Parliamentary Paper No. 185
Paper Type Committee Document
Disallowable No
Journals Page No. 30
System Id publications/tabledpapers/678b2bf1-a3a8-497f-84a5-e5cbf997aeb1


Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee—Report on annual reports referred to legislation committees—No. 1 of 2022, dated June 2022

June 2022

The Senate

Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee

Annual reports (No. 1 of 2022)

© Commonwealth of Australia 2022

ISBN 978-1-76093-372-2 (Printed Version)

ISBN 978-1-76093-372-2 (HTML Version)

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License.

The details of this licence are available on the Creative Commons website: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

Printed by the Senate Printing Unit, Department of the Senate, Parliament House, Canberra

iii

Contents

Abbreviations ...................................................................................................................................... v

Members ............................................................................................................................................ vii

Chapter 1—Introduction .................................................................................................................... 1

Terms of reference ................................................................................................................................ 1

Allocated portfolios ............................................................................................................................. 2

Performance reporting framework .................................................................................................... 2

Requirements for annual reports ....................................................................................................... 2

Reports examined ................................................................................................................................ 3

Timeliness of reports examined ......................................................................................................... 5

Bodies which have not presented annual reports to the Parliament ............................................ 6

Annual reports referred to in the Senate .......................................................................................... 6

'Apparently satisfactory' ..................................................................................................................... 7

Chapter 2—Annual reports of departments ................................................................................... 9

Attorney-General's Department ........................................................................................................ 9

Department of Home Affairs including the Australian Border Force ........................................ 14

Chapter 3—Annual reports of agencies ........................................................................................ 19

Office of the Australian Information Commissioner .................................................................... 19

Office of Parliamentary Counsel ...................................................................................................... 23

Appendix 1—Reports tabled during the period 1 May 2021 and 31 October 2021 and referred to the committee ..................................................................................................... 27

Appendix 2—Reports tabled during the period 1 November 2021 and 30 April 2022 and referred to the committee ..................................................................................................... 47

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Abbreviations

ABF Australian Border Force

AFP Australian Federal Police

AGD Attorney-General’s Department

AGLS Australian Government Legal Service AGS Australian Government Solicitor

AHRC Australian Human Rights Commission ASIO Australian Security Intelligence Organisation CII Commissioner-initiated investigations

the committee Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee FEG Fair Entitlements Guarantee

Finance Department of Finance

Home Affairs Department of Home Affairs IC Information Commissioner

KPI Key Performance Indicator

NSBs Non-statutory bodies

OAIC Office of the Australian Information Commissioner OPC Office of Parliamentary Counsel

PBS Portfolio Budget Statement

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 PGPA Rule Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

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Members

Chair Senator the Hon Sarah Henderson LP, VIC

Deputy Chair Senator the Hon Kim Carr ALP, VIC

Members Senator Raff Ciccone ALP, VIC

Senator Paul Scarr LP, QLD

Senator Lidia Thorpe AG, VIC

Senator David Van LP, VIC

Secretariat Ms Sophie Dunstone, Committee Secretary Dr Ash Clements, Principal Research Officer Ms Sofia Moffett, Senior Research Officer Mr Mervyn Piesse, Research Officer Ms Liana Tenace, Administrative Officer

Suite S1.61 Telephone: (02) 6277 3560

Parliament House Email: legcon.sen@aph.gov.au

CANBERRA ACT 2600

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Chapter 1 Introduction

1.1 The Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee (the committee) is responsible for examining the annual reports of the departments and agencies in the Attorney-General's and Home Affairs portfolios.

1.2 This report on annual reports (No. 1 of 2022) provides an overview of the committee's examination of annual reports presented to the Parliament between 1 May 2021 and 30 April 2022.1

Terms of reference 1.3 Under Standing Order 25(20), the annual reports of certain departments and agencies stand referred to committees for examination and assessment. Each committee is required to:

(a) examine each annual report referred to it and report to the Senate whether the report is apparently satisfactory; (b) consider in more detail, and report to the Senate on, each annual report which is not apparently satisfactory, and on the other annual reports which

it selects for more detailed consideration; (c) investigate and report to the Senate on any lateness in the presentation of annual reports; (d) in considering an annual report, take into account any relevant remarks

about the report made in debate in the Senate; (e) if the committee so determines, consider annual reports of departments and budget-related agencies in conjunction with examination of estimates; (f) report on annual reports tabled by 31 October each year by the tenth sitting

day of the following year, and on annual reports tabled by 30 April each year by the tenth sitting day after 30 June of that year; (g) draw to the attention of the Senate any significant matters relating to the operations and performance of the bodies furnishing the annual reports;

and

(h) report to the Senate each year whether there are any bodies which do not present annual reports to the Senate and which should present such reports.2

1 Standing Order 25(20)(f) requires the committee to report on annual reports tabled between

1 May and 31 October by the tenth sitting day of the following year, and report on annual reports tabled between 1 November and 30 April by the tenth sitting day after 30 June of that year. Due to the nature of the 2022 parliamentary sitting pattern, the committee has decided to present its report on all 2020–21 annual reports together.

2

Allocated portfolios 1.4 The Senate allocated departments and agencies to committees on 4 July 2019.3 In accordance with that resolution, the committee has responsibility for the oversight of the following:

 Attorney-General's portfolio (excluding industrial relations);4 and  Home Affairs portfolio.

Performance reporting framework 1.5 The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) established a performance reporting framework for all Commonwealth entities and companies. Section 38 of the PGPA Act requires all Commonwealth

entities to measure and assess their performance.

1.6 Section 39 of the PGPA Act requires all Commonwealth entities to prepare an annual performance statement and include those statements in their annual reports. Entities use annual performance statements to report on the results achieved against the targets, goals and measures established at the beginning of a reporting year in the relevant corporate plan and Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

1.7 These documents are an essential part of the accountability system. They provide the minister, the Parliament, and the public with detailed information about the actual financial and non-financial performance of entities in each reporting period and facilitate the examination of public resources to achieve the intended results for a Commonwealth body.

1.8 The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) supports the implementation of the PGPA Act and outlines the requirements of annual reports for Commonwealth entities.

Requirements for annual reports 1.9 Annual reports place a great deal of information about government departments and agencies on the public record. Accordingly, the tabling of annual reports is an important element of accountability to the Parliament, as

2 The Senate, Standing Orders and other orders of the Senate, July 2021, SO 25(20).

3 Journals of the Senate, No. 3, 4 July 2019, p. 83.

4 The Administrative Arrangements Order of 29 May 2019 assigned responsibility for workplace

relations, including work health and safety, rehabilitation, and compensation functions to the Attorney-General's Department. However, the Department of Finance issued an instrument on 21 June 2019 which assigned responsibility for the preparation of the 2018–19 annual report and annual performance statements for those functions to the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business. In addition, by virtue of a motion of the Senate dated 4 July 2019, the responsibility for industrial relations was allocated to the Senate Standing Committee on Education and Employment. As such, matters relating to those functions, including reporting on annual reports, are considered by that committee.

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the information provided in annual reports assists in the effective examination of the performance of departments and agencies, and the administration of government programs.

1.10 Different types of Commonwealth bodies have separate provisions for annual reporting which affect content and preparation requirements. Legislative provisions for Commonwealth bodies include:

 Non-corporate Commonwealth entity—section 46 of the PGPA Act and Subdivision A of Division 3A of Part 2–3 of the PGPA Rule;  Corporate Commonwealth entity—section 46 of the PGPA Act and Subdivision B of Division 3A of Part 2–3 of the PGPA Rule;  Commonwealth company—section 97 of the PGPA Act, which refers to

additional requirements under the Corporations Act 2001 and Part 3–3 of the PGPA Rule;  Statutory office holders and statutory bodies—statutory office holders are engaged or employed under an Act, which may prescribe annual reporting

requirements pursuant to the office. It should be noted that there may be reporting requirements in the enabling legislation for statutory bodies (which may also be a Commonwealth entity); and  Non-statutory bodies (NSBs)—NSBs are established by a minister and are not pursuant to a statute. Guidelines for the preparation of annual reports for NSBs are contained in the government response to the Senate Standing Committee on Finance and Public Administration report on non-statutory bodies.

1.11 In addition to legislative requirements, the Department of Finance (Finance) provides guidance material for Commonwealth entities and companies which sets out further detail on the content requirements for annual reports under the Commonwealth performance framework in accordance with the PGPA Act and PGPA Rule.5 Material available from the Finance website includes the following guides which apply to the reports being examined:

 Resource Management Guide No. 135—Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities; and  Resource Management Guide No. 136—Annual reports for corporate Commonwealth entities.

Reports examined 1.12 In accordance with Standing Order 25(20)(f), this report examines annual reports tabled in the period 1 May 2021 to 30 April 2022. In this period, 23 annual reports of Commonwealth entities and statutory office holders were

5 Department of Finance, List of Resource Management Guides,

https://www.finance.gov.au/publications/resource-management-guides (accessed 17 May 2022).

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tabled and referred to the committee. The annual reports examined in this report are categorised as follows:

 Attorney-General's portfolio:

− Administrative Appeals Tribunal—annual report 2020–21; − Attorney-General’s Department—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity—annual report of the Integrity Commissioner 2020–21;

− Australian Financial Security Authority—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Law Reform Commission—annual report 2020–21; − Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions—annual report 2020–21; − Commonwealth Ombudsman—annual report 2020–21; − Family Court of Australia—annual report 2020–21; − Federal Circuit Court of Australia—annual report 2020–21; − Federal Court of Australia—annual report 2020–21, including the report

of the National Native Title Tribunal; − Independent National Security Legislation Monitor—annual report 2020–21; − Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security—annual report 2020–21; − National Archives of Australia and National Archives of Australia

Advisory Council—annual report 2020–21; − Office of the Australian Information Commissioner—annual report 2020–21; − Office of Parliamentary Counsel—annual report 2020–21;

 Home Affairs portfolio:

− Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Federal Police (AFP)—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Institute of Criminology—annual report 2020–21; − Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO)—annual report

2020–21; − Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre—annual report 2020–21; − Department of Home Affairs—annual report 2020–21; and − Office of the Special Investigator—annual report 2020–21.6

1.13 The committee is not obliged to examine reports on the operation of Acts, policy papers, budget documents or corporate plans. A list of all reports referred to the committee, including those not examined in this report, can be found in Appendices 1 and 2.

6 The structure of these portfolios reflect the Administrative Arrangements Order made on

18 March 2021.

5

Timeliness of reports examined 1.14 Standing Order 25(20)(c) requires the committee to report to the Senate on the late presentation of annual reports. The committee considers the timely presentation of annual reports to be an important element in accountability to

the Parliament and reiterates its preference of having annual reports available before Supplementary Budget Estimates hearings.

1.15 Section 46 of the PGPA Act requires Commonwealth entities (corporate and non-corporate) to prepare annual reports and for such reports to be provided to the responsible minister by the 15th day of the fourth month after the end of the reporting period for the entity.7 The PGPA Act does not provide a timeframe for presentation to the Parliament. The minister is, however, obliged to present the report within 15 sitting days upon receiving it.8

1.16 Appendices 1 and 2 list the reports referred to the committee over the two reporting periods (1 May 2021 to 31 October 2021 and 1 November 2021 to 30 April 2022, respectively). The appendices include the dates the reports were tabled in the Senate (or received by the President out of session) and the House of Representatives. For the purposes of the committee’s examination of timeliness, the earlier date is taken as the presentation date to the Parliament. The table also includes the dates the reports were submitted to, and received by, the minister, if available.

1.17 The committee notes that the AHRC failed to submit its annual report to the responsible minister by the prescribed date of 15 October 2021.

1.18 Where an entity is unable to meet the submission deadline, an extension of time to report may be sought under the provisions of subsections 34C(4)–(7) of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901.9 The relevant minister may then grant an extension, provided that there are reasonable grounds to do so.10 If an extension is granted, the relevant minister is required to present before each House of Parliament a copy of the written statement seeking an extension to present the annual report and a statement that specifies the extension granted and the reasons for granting that extension.11

1.19 The committee notes that Emeritus Professor Rosalind Croucher AM, President of the AHRC, sought an extension of time to present the annual report on 7 October 2021. The Attorney-General extended the time to present

7 Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, s. 46.

8 Acts Interpretation Act 1901, ss. 34C(3).

9 Acts Interpretation Act 1901, s. 34C.

10 Acts Interpretation Act 1901, ss. 34C(5).

11 Acts Interpretation Act 1901, para. 34C(6)(a).

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the annual report until 29 October 2021, pursuant to sections 34C(4) and (5) of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901.

1.20 The committee understands that neither the request for an extension to present the AHRC’s annual report to the Attorney-General nor a statement specifying the extension granted were tabled in each House of Parliament pursuant to subsection 34C(6)(a) of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901.

1.21 The AHRC submitted its annual report to the Attorney-General on 1 February 2022. The report was subsequently tabled in the Senate out of session on 24 February 2022.

1.22 All other Commonwealth entities over which the committee has oversight submitted their annual reports by the prescribed date.

Bodies which have not presented annual reports to the Parliament 1.23 In accordance with Standing Order 25(20)(h), the committee is required to report on bodies that do not present an annual report to the Senate and which should present such a report.

1.24 On this occasion, the committee is unaware of any other body required to table an annual report for 2020–21 which has failed to do so.

Annual reports referred to in the Senate 1.25 Under Standing Order 25(20)(d), the committee is required to take into consideration any remarks made in the Senate about each annual report.

1.26 The committee identified four occasions on which an annual report was remarked upon during debate in the Senate during the period between 1 May 2021 and 30 April 2022.

1.27 The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) Annual Report 2020–21 was remarked upon during debate in the Senate on 21 October 2021. The Attorney-General, Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash, referred to the Director-General of Security’s review contained in ASIO's annual report, which stated that espionage could supplant terrorism as the principal threat to Australia’s national security.12

1.28 Senator James Paterson and Senator the Hon Anne Ruston also remarked upon the ASIO annual report during debate in the Senate on 22 November 2021. While speaking on the Security Legislation Amendment (Critical Infrastructure) Bill 2021, Senators Paterson and Ruston noted that the Director-General of Security indicated that Australia faces the risk of foreign state actors using the cyber-realm to undermine Australia’s national interests.13

12 Senate Hansard, 21 October 2021, p. 6299.

13 Senate Hansard, 22 November 2021, pp. 6448 and 6453.

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1.29 While discussing the Parliamentary Joint Committee on the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity's examination of the Annual Report of the Integrity Commissioner 2020–21 on 30 March 2022, Senator Perin Davey remarked upon the Annual Report of the Integrity Commissioner 2020–21.14

1.30 The committee notes the remarks made by the Attorney-General, Senator Paterson, Senator Ruston, and Senator Davey.

'Apparently satisfactory' 1.31 Standing Order 25(20)(a) requires the committee to report to the Senate on whether the annual reports referred to it in the relevant period were 'apparently satisfactory'. In assessing these reports, the committee has taken

into consideration the status of the annual reports within the Commonwealth performance framework, the legislative requirements for the reports, and guidance for best practice issued by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet's Tabling Guidelines, and the resource management guides issued by the Department of Finance. The committee considers all reports examined to be 'apparently satisfactory' and continues to encourage Commonwealth entities to aim for standards of best practice in preparing annual reports.

14 Senate Hansard, 30 March 2022, p. 521.

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Chapter 2

Annual reports of departments

2.1 The annual reports of the following departments for the financial year 2020–21 (the reporting period) were referred to the committee for examination and report:

 Attorney-General's Department (AGD); and  Department of Home Affairs (Home Affairs), including the Australian Border Force (ABF).

Attorney-General's Department

Tabling of report 2.2 The Attorney-General's Department Annual Report 2020–2021 was tabled in the House of Representatives and the Senate on 20 October 2021. The report was submitted to the minister on 29 September 2021, meeting the requirements

under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

Secretary’s review 2.3 In her review for 2020–21, the Secretary of AGD, Ms Katherine Jones PSM, acknowledged Mr Chris Moraitis PSM, who concluded his time as Secretary on 3 January 2021. She also thanked Mr Iain Anderson, who served as Acting

Secretary for the remainder of the 2020–21 financial year.

2.4 Ms Jones noted that, through the Australian Government Solicitor (AGS) Group, the department continued to support components of the Australian government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. AGS lawyers provided legal advice relating to public health measures, economic support, and the vaccination rollout.1

2.5 The Secretary also highlighted several of AGD's achievements and priorities during the reporting period, which included the:

 provision of support to the government to enact legislation that brings together the Federal Circuit Court and the Family Court of Australia;2  development of draft legislation that aims to strengthen protections for victims of family violence in the family law system;3

1 Attorney-General’s Department (AGD), Annual Report 2020–21, p. 3.

2 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 3.

3 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

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 coordination of the development of the response to the Australian Human Rights Commission’s Respect@Work: National Inquiry into Sexual Harassment in Australian Workplaces report;4  provision of support for the establishment, operation, and decommission of

royal commissions;5  provision of advice to government on draft legislation to implement the government’s response to the Religious Freedom Review;6  review of the Privacy Act 1988 to inform the future direction of privacy law

reform in Australia;7 and  implementation of measures that contribute to achieving the justice, and land and water targets under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap.8

Performance reporting 2.6 AGD's reporting framework is set out in the Attorney-General's 2020–21 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and the 2020–24 Corporate Plan (corporate plan). The PBS sets out AGD's outcomes, and the programs

administered underneath them. It also sets out high-level performance measures, using the standards of 'effectiveness' and 'efficiency' to measure success in meeting AGD’s outcomes.9

2.7 The outcomes outlined in the PBS are reflected by the two purposes set out in the corporate plan, which are:

 Achieve a just and secure society through the maintenance and improvement of Australia's law, justice, security, and integrity frameworks; and

 Facilitate jobs growth through policies and programs that promote fair, productive, and safe workplaces.10

2.8 AGD reported that the performance criteria and targets that were presented in the PBS were reset by a new suite of performance measures and targets contained in the corporate plan.11 AGD updated its performance framework in

4 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

5 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

6 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

7 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

8 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 5.

9 AGD, Portfolio Budget Statements 2020–21, pp. 29–38.

10 AGD, Corporate Plan 2020–24, p. 6. The Administrative Arrangements Order of 29 May 2019

incorporated responsibility for industrial relations into the Attorney-General’s portfolio. The Senate has agreed that oversight for the Attorney-General’s Department’s industrial relations responsibilities is to be undertaken by the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee and, therefore, the second purpose will not be considered here.

11 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 13.

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the corporate plan by moving away from the concept of strategic priorities, which the department has historically used to define its areas of work.12 The corporate plan listed five key activities that assist in achieving the purposes set out in the corporate plan. These activities are:

 provide legal services and policy advice and oversee legal services across government;  manage casework;  administer and advise on legal and policy frameworks;  administer and implement programs and services; and  establish and support Royal Commissions and other bodies.13

2.9 The performance of the department is measured through 22 performance measures that are composed of 63 performance targets that relate to these five activities.14

2.10 In the reporting period, AGD achieved or partly achieved all of its performance measures, with 82 per cent achieved or exceeded (18 measures) and 18 per cent partly achieved (four measures). Of its 63 performance targets, 87 per cent were achieved or exceeded (55 targets) and 11 per cent were partly achieved (seven targets). Two per cent of the targets were not achieved (one target). This compares to the previous reporting period, during which 75 per cent of targets were achieved, seven per cent were partly achieved and 18 per cent were not achieved.15

2.11 The one target that was not achieved pertained to lower than anticipated satisfaction of government lawyers with initiatives provided by the Australian Government Legal Service (AGLS).16 The results of a survey of 344 government lawyers indicated that 32 per cent were 'somewhat satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with the AGLS, while five per cent of respondents were 'somewhat' or 'very unsatisfied'. The remaining respondents (63 per cent) were 'neutral' or believed that it was 'too early to tell' their level of satisfaction with the services provided by AGLS.17 AGD suggested that these results 'provide room to improve over the coming years' and that '[t]he results will assist us to devise and prioritise initiatives'.18

12 AGD, Corporate Plan 2020–24, p. 18.

13 AGD, Corporate Plan 2020–24, p. 6.

14 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 13.

15 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, pp. 13–14.

16 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 21.

17 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 23.

18 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 23.

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2.12 The seven targets that were partly achieved were as follows:

 Target 2.1.4—Qualitative analysis shows that advice to decision-makers on extradition, mutual assistance, international transfer of prisoners, federal offender and international family law casework is timely and legally robust. A panel considered four pieces of advice across different casework types and applied qualitative assessment criteria that measured timeliness and legal robustness. The panel deemed that three of the four casework matters met the qualitative assessment criteria and therefore this target was partly achieved.19

 Target 3.1.1—Stakeholder and client satisfaction greater than 80 per cent in relation to: effectiveness (expertise and quality of relationship) and efficiency (timeliness and responsiveness). In responses to the department's stakeholder survey, 82 per cent of respondents rated AGD's effectiveness positively and 72 per cent of respondents rated AGD's efficiency positively. As the efficiency measure was below 80 per cent, the target was partially achieved.20  Target 3.6.4—Simplification of the Personal Property Securities Act 2009 leads

to increased usability of the Personal Property Securities Register. The target required exposure draft legislation to be completed and submitted to the Assistant Minister by 30 June 2021. The exposure draft legislation was not submitted by that date. However, AGD reported that progress has been made on tranches of draft legislation that will ultimately form the exposure draft. As a result, the target was partially achieved.21  Target 4.1.1—Provision of funding to states and territories, legal assistance

providers and individuals, in line with agreed timeframes and subject to third parties meeting relevant obligations and requirements. AGD provides funding and assessments of grant applications and progress reports for the National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020–25, legal assistance bushfire support, and COVID-19 legal assistance support and activities. The department explained that the target was partially achieved, as three payments were not made within the expected timeframes.22  Target 4.1.3—Stakeholder and client satisfaction greater than 80 per cent in

relation to the effectiveness (expertise and quality of relationship) and efficiency (timeliness and responsiveness) of the legal assistance grant programs, the National Legal Assistance Partnership, COVID-19, and bushfires programs. In response to the department’s stakeholder survey, 85 per cent of respondents rated effectiveness positively and 63 per cent

19 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 26.

20 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 27.

21 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 41.

22 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 42.

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rated efficiency positively. As the performance measure for efficiency was below 80 per cent, the target was partially achieved.23  Target 4.3.1—Amounts recovered by the Fair Entitlements Guarantee (FEG) Recovery Program achieve the estimated recoveries forecast to the

Department of Finance. The department estimated that the FEG Recovery Program would recover $37.94 million in 2020–21. AGD reported that during the reporting period it recovered $20.15 million. The variance was attributed to slower progress of matters before the courts due to the COVID-19 pandemic and a reduction in insolvencies due to government

stimulus measures.24  Target 5.2.2—Timeliness and appropriateness of responses to requests for access to royal commission records. In some cases, the timeframes for responses to requests for access to records were not met and, as a result, the

target was partially achieved.25

Financial performance 2.13 The AGD recorded a surplus of $7.351 million during the reporting period, compared to a deficit of $7.612 million the previous year.26 After adjustment for unfunded depreciation of $14.449 million, the result is a surplus of

$21.8 million. AGD attributed this surplus to a strong performance by the Australian Government Solicitor Group and lower than anticipated demand for major departmental demand-driven programs.27

2.14 The total administered expenses for the reporting period were $713.490 million, compared to $897.952 million in the previous year, including $289.294 million grant payments, $139.610 million in special appropriation payments to the Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation, and $104.889 million for the royal commissions, including legal assistance for witnesses. 28

2.15 The total administered revenue for the reporting period included levies of $139.610 million collected by the Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation and personal benefit recoveries of $47.234 million under the Fair Entitlements Guarantee Act 2012. Both functions fall under the department’s industrial relations responsibilities.29

23 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 44.

24 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 48.

25 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 55.

26 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 84.

27 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 84.

28 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 84.

29 AGD, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 84.

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Conclusion 2.16 The committee considers the report to be 'apparently satisfactory'.

Department of Home Affairs including the Australian Border Force

Tabling of report 2.17 The Department of Home Affairs 2020–21 Annual Report was tabled in the House of Representatives and the Senate on 19 October 2021. The report was submitted to the Minister for Home Affairs on 20 September 2021, meeting the

requirements under section 46 of the PGPA Act.

Secretary's and Commissioner's reviews 2.18 The Secretary of Home Affairs, Mr Michael Pezzullo AO, and the Commissioner of the ABF, Mr Michael Outram APM, provided individual reviews for the annual report.

2.19 Mr Pezzullo stated that the COVID-19 pandemic continued to affect Home Affairs' work during the reporting period. While most international travellers continued to face unprecedented travel restrictions during the reporting period, Mr Pezzullo noted that the department effectively balanced genuine grounds for exemption against biosecurity and public health risks. That included processing more than 565,000 travel exemption requests for inbound or outbound travel, including individuals with specialist medical skills and skilled migrants to fill critical labour shortages. Visa policy settings were also adapted to support critical industries and economic recovery.30

2.20 In addition to the challenges associated with COVID-19, Mr Pezzullo reported that the department continued to confront many existing and evolving threats in 2020–21, including:

 the threat of cyber-attacks, including ransomware, against critical infrastructure and systems of national significance;31  serious and organised criminal activity, including criminal actors circumventing revenue collection at the border and profiting from illegal

trade;32 and  criminal offenders utilising anonymising technologies, including the dark web.33

30 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 13.

31 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 14.

32 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 15.

33 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 15.

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2.21 Mr Pezzullo identified several initiatives that had progressed during the period, including:

 initiatives to improve the security of digital and trusted identities;34  reforms to the Adult Migrant English Program that enable eligible migrants to access unlimited hours of government-funded English language tuition;35  a partnership with the ABF to progress measures that modernise trade and

customs arrangements to make it easier for businesses to engage in international trade;36  the examination of options for the graduated and biosecure re-opening of Australia's international border by following expert public health advice

and collaborating with Commonwealth agencies and state and territory partners;37  further implementation of the 2020 Cyber Security Strategy, with more than half of the key initiatives progressed or delivered in full;38  publication of a voluntary Internet of Things (IoT) Code of Practice;39 and  support for efforts to enhance the national emergency management

continuum by preparing for an enhanced Emergency Management Australia and working towards the establishment of a National Situation Room.40

2.22 In his review, ABF Commissioner Outram noted that travel restrictions and border controls enforced by the ABF were one of the key factors in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in Australia. The Commissioner also indicated that the ABF would play an important role in the post-COVID-19 recovery, through the facilitation of trade and the gradual re-opening of Australia's borders.41

2.23 The Commissioner highlighted that the ABF would extend the tariff concession for certain medical and hygiene goods, including face masks and other personal protective equipment, until 30 June 2022.42

34 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 13.

35 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 14.

36 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 14.

37 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 14.

38 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 15.

39 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 15.

40 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 15.

41 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 24.

42 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 25.

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2.24 Commissioner Outram outlined other aspects of the ABF's work during the reporting period, including:

 participating in Operation Ironside, which culminated in a large-scale global operation against transnational serious and organised crime;43  the establishment of Operation Jardena, which aims to identify and combat criminal infiltration of the Australian supply chain;44  maintaining the COVID-free status of Australia's immigration detention

centres;45  the delivery of the initial components of the Simplified Trade System in line with project milestones;46 and  the facilitation of the entry into force of the Indonesia-Australia

Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement and the Pacific Agreement on Closer Economic Relations Plus free trade agreements.47

Performance reporting 2.25 Home Affairs' performance framework is set out in the 2020–21 Home Affairs Portfolio Budget Statements (Home Affairs PBS) and the 2020–21 Corporate Plan – Variation published December 2020 (corporate plan).48 The Home Affairs

PBS outlines the department's three outcomes and the programs related to each of them, as well as several performance criteria.49 The corporate plan highlighted three purposes, each of which reflect the outcomes in the PBS:

 national security: protect Australia from national security and criminal threats through effective national coordination, policy and strategy development, emergency management, and regional cooperation;

 prosperous and united society: support a prosperous and united Australia through effective coordination and delivery of immigration and social cohesion policies and programs; and

 border and customs operations: advance a prosperous and secure Australia through trade and travel facilitation and modernisation, and effective

43 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 25.

44 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 25.

45 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 26.

46 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 26.

47 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 27.

48 Given the delay of the 2020–21 Budget until October 2020, the original 2020–21 Corporate Plan was

aligned to the 2019–20 PBS. The December 2020 variation aligns the 2020–21 Corporate Plan to the Outcomes and Programs from the 2020–21 PBS and reflects additional funding for particular programs.

49 Department of Home Affairs, Portfolio Budget Statements 2020–21, pp. 25–60.

17

customs, immigration, maritime and enforcement activities across the border continuum.50

2.26 Each purpose contains several activities and measures by which Home Affairs assesses its performance. The performance statement in the annual report clearly sets out the relationship between the outcomes and programs under the PBS, and the purposes and activities of the corporate plan. The performance framework, as set out in the annual report, provides a 'clear read'.

2.27 Home Affairs met or partially met most of its performance measures. The performance measures not met were as follows:

 Measure 1.1.1.2—Transport security in key regional partners is improved through delivery of all scheduled activities in line with Capacity Building Plan targets. Home Affairs reported that it completed 25 of the 33 scheduled projects across Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Sri Lanka. The annual report explained that due to surging COVID-19 case numbers across South-East Asia and Mekong region countries, lock downs, and on-going international travel restrictions, a number of scheduled projects were required to be substituted, cancelled, or re-phased.51  Measure 1.2.1.3—Eligible non-financial disaster assistance requests are

approved within six hours of an agreed request received. One request was not approved within six hours during the reporting period due to external factors outside of the department's control. However, the request for assistance was completed within the requesting agency's timeframe.52  Measure 3.1.1.1—Facilitation in trade, cargo, and traveller streams is

maintained or improved compared to previous reporting periods. Home Affairs reported that during the reporting period, COVID-19 impeded the ABF's ability to optimally use automation and deliver streamlined facilitation processes across trade, cargo, and traveller streams.53 The annual report stated that the greatest impacts were experienced in the traveller domain due to ongoing travel restrictions that necessitated manual processing and health and hygiene measures at the border.54 In 2020–21, the average clearance time for inbound travellers increased to 65.7 seconds, compared to 65.4 seconds in 2019–20. In 2020–21, the average clearance time for outbound travellers increased to 52.8 seconds, compared to 39.4 seconds in 2019–20.55 Air cargo clearance times also rose,

50 Department of Home Affairs, 2020–21 Corporate Plan – Variation Published December 2020, p. 12.

51 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 46.

52 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 73.

53 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 127.

54 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 127.

55 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 128.

18

due to an approximately 25.6 per cent increase in total air cargo consignments and a 50.4 per cent increase in the volume of air cargo consignments discharged in Sydney in 2020–21 compared to 2019–20.56 While additional staff were redeployed to the cargo environment from the aviation travellers stream in 2020–21, COVID-19-related health requirements slowed cargo clearance times.57 While total sea cargo consignments increased by 97.9 per cent compared to 2019–20, and the volume of containers increased by approximately 11.4 per cent over that time, sea cargo clearance times improved during the reporting period, compared to the previous reporting period.58

Financial performance 2.28 The total departmental operating result for 2020–21 was a $322.9 million operating deficit compared with the $424.5 million operating deficit recorded in the previous reporting period. After accounting for $606.4 million in

depreciation and amortisation expenses (including for right-of-use leased assets) and $259.5 million in principal repayments for leased assets, the 2020–21 operating result is a surplus of $23.9 million. This surplus also includes approximately $18 million as a result of the changes in government bond rates on the valuation of employee leave provisions.59

2.29 During the reporting period, Home Affairs reported that its administered expenses were $2.60 billion, compared to $2.58 billion in 2019–20. The report attributed this variance to lower expenses on the Refugee Humanitarian and Settlement program due to the combined effect of border closures and COVID-19 restrictions, which were largely offset by increased Disaster Recovery payments.60

2.30 Home Affairs reported that its net asset position is $1.2 billion (assets minus liabilities), which is consistent with the net asset position of $1.2 billion reported in 2019–20.61

Conclusion 2.31 The committee considers the report to be 'apparently satisfactory'.

56 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 128.

57 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 129.

58 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 129.

59 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 160.

60 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 160.

61 Department of Home Affairs, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 160.

19

Chapter 3

Annual reports of agencies

3.1 The annual reports for the 2020–21 financial year (the reporting period) from the agencies with the Attorney-General's and Home Affairs portfolios were referred to the committee for examination and report between 1 May 2021 to 30 April 2022 are set out in paragraph 1.12.

3.2 On this occasion, the committee has examined in more detail the reports of the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) and the Office of Parliamentary Counsel (OPC).

Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

Tabling of the report 3.3 The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner Annual Report 2020–21 was tabled in the Senate on 23 November 2021, after having been tabled in the House of Representatives on 21 October 2021. The annual report was

presented to the Attorney-General on 8 October 2021, meeting the requirements under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

Commissioner's review 3.4 In her review, Privacy Commissioner Angelene Falk noted that the COVID-19 pandemic continued to dominate the work of the OAIC during 2020–21.1 The pandemic was a key theme of new OAIC guidance and advice to agencies

and organisations. During the reporting period, the OAIC released two reports and the first of five assessments on the COVIDSafe app.2

3.5 Ms Falk reported that during the reporting period, the OAIC:

 issued a record number of determinations in relation to complaints alleging breaches of the Australian Privacy Principles;3  finalised 10 privacy Commissioner-initiated investigations (CIIs);4 and  established the Regulatory Action Committee, an internal governance

mechanism to assist the OAIC in assessing regulatory options for responding to emerging privacy risks.5

1 Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC), Annual Report 2020–21, p. 8.

2 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 9.

3 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 8.

4 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 8.

5 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 8.

20

3.6 Ms Falk also provided an update on the OAIC's delivery of core services during the reporting period. She reported that applications for Information Commissioner (IC) reviews increased by 15 per cent and privacy complaints declined by seven per cent. While the number of closed IC reviews increased by 23 per cent compared to 2019–20, a gap between incoming freedom of information work and finalisation rates remained. The Commissioner stated that the appointment of a new Freedom of Information (FOI) Commissioner will assist the OAIC to manage this growing workload.6

Performance reporting 3.7 The Attorney-General’s Portfolio Budget Statements 2020–21 (PBS) outlined the OAIC’s outcome and program and set out six outcomes-based key performance indicators (KPIs).7 The Corporate Plan 2020–21 (corporate plan)

identified four strategic priorities:

 advance online privacy protections for Australians;  influence and uphold privacy and information access rights frameworks;  encourage and support proactive release of government-held information; and

 contemporary approach to regulation.8

3.8 The corporate plan also set out 25 performance indicators and corresponding measures to evaluate success. It indicated which of these measures incorporate the six outcome-based KPIs from the PBS.9

3.9 The performance statement in the annual report evaluated the agency's performance against the measures included in the corporate plan.10 Read together, the PBS, corporate plan, and annual report provide a 'clear read' of the OAIC's performance.

3.10 During the reporting period, the OAIC achieved 19, partially achieved one, and did not achieve four of the 25 performance indicators.11 The OAIC indicated that one further performance indicator did not apply during the reporting period because the legislation to support the Online Privacy Code was delayed.12

6 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 9.

7 Attorney-General’s Department (AGD), Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-21, pp. 292–296.

8 OAIC, Corporate Plan 2020–21, p. 7.

9 OAIC, Corporate Plan 2020–21, pp. 23, 29–30, 34, 38.

10 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 18.

11 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 18.

12 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 20.

21

3.11 The performance indicators not achieved were:

 indicator 2.2: finalise 90 per cent of written privacy and information access enquiries from the public within ten working days;13  indicator 2.6: finalise 80 per cent of CIIs within eight months;14  indicator 2.7: complete 80 per cent of IC reviews within 12 months;15 and  indicator 4.6: recruitment and training aligned to staff capability map.16

3.12 The OAIC reported that 65 per cent of written enquiries from the public were finalised within 10 working days in 2020–21. The OAIC explained that this result was caused by an increase in the number of enquiries and changes to procedures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 17

3.13 During the reporting period, the OAIC finalised 11 CIIs, with two of those finalised within the eight-month target.18

3.14 The OAIC explained that a significant increase in the number of IC review applications and a focus on reducing the number of cases over 12 months resulted in it finalising 73 per cent of IC reviews within 12 months. The OAIC reported that the number of IC review applications received during the reporting period increased by 15 per cent compared to the previous reporting period. Over the same period, the number of IC reviews finalised by the OAIC increased by 23 per cent compared to the previous reporting period.19

3.15 The OAIC reported that it was prevented from developing a staff capability map due to resourcing challenges. The OAIC aims to develop a revised capability approach in 2021–22 to ensure that recruitment and training in areas of emerging technical capability requirements are met.20

Other matters 3.16 While the annual report largely meets the requirements of the PGPA Act and Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) (collectively referred to as the Commonwealth performance framework) for

annual reports, this report appears to be lacking with respect to five mandatory requirements, including:

 a direct electronic address for the report (PGPA Rule 17AJ(g));

13 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 20.

14 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 21.

15 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 21.

16 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 22.

17 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 31.

18 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 38.

19 OAIC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 42.

20 OAIC, Annual Report 2020-21, p. 67.

22

 statistics on the number of employees at the end of the previous reporting period (PGPA Rules 17AG(4)(aa) and 17AG(4)(b));  statistics on staff location (PGPA Rules 17AG(4)(aa) and 17AG(4)(b));  an outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity

support small and medium enterprises (PGPA Rule 17AG(10)(b)); and  a statement that information on advertising campaigns is available in the reports on Australian government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance and that those reports are available on the Department of

Finance’s website (PGPA rule 17AH(1)(a)(i)).

3.17 The committee notes that the OAIC's electronic address for the report appears to have been omitted from the report. While the committee commends the OAIC for including its website address in the report (as required by PGPA Rule 17AJ(f)), the committee encourages adherence to the Commonwealth performance framework, which requires explicit reference to both addresses.

3.18 The committee commends the OAIC for including employment statistics for the 2020–21 reporting period. However, to fully comply with PGPA Rules 17AG(4)(aa) and 17AG(4)(b), statistics from the previous reporting period must also be included.

3.19 While the committee understands that the OAIC may be based in one location, it encourages the agency to include a statement to this effect, or an outline of staff locations in its staffing profile in order to comply with all requirements in PGPA Rules 17AG(4)(aa) and 17AG(4)(b).

3.20 The OAIC's annual report does not appear to outline the ways in which the procurement practices of the agency support small and medium enterprises. The committee encourages the OAIC to include this information to the extent possible in order to comply with the mandatory obligations under PGPA Rule 17AG(10)(b).

3.21 While the committee notes that an electronic address to the OAIC's advertising website is included in the report, to fully comply with PGPA Rule 17AH(1)(a)(i) agencies must also include a statement that further information on the agency's advertising campaigns is available in the reports prepared by the Department of Finance.

Conclusion 3.22 While the committee has identified a number of shortcomings with the OAIC's report, on balance it considers the report to be 'apparently satisfactory'. The committee encourages the OAIC to address the matters outlined above in

order to comply to the fullest extent possible with the requirements of the annual reporting framework under the PGPA framework.

23

Office of Parliamentary Counsel

Tabling of the report 3.23 The Office of Parliamentary Counsel Annual Report 2020–21 was tabled in the House of Representatives and the Senate on 20 October 2021. The report was presented to the Attorney-General on 28 September 2021, meeting the

requirements under section 46 of the PGPA Act.

Review by the Acting First Parliamentary Counsel 3.24 In her annual review, the Acting First Parliamentary Counsel, Ms Meredith Leigh, reflected on the retirement of the First Parliamentary Counsel, Mr Peter Quiggin PSM QC, after 17 years in the role.21

3.25 Ms Leigh's review highlighted the development of a new performance program to be launched during the 2021–22 financial year. She noted that the program aims to modernise staff development, with a strong focus on technical and people skills.22

3.26 Ms Leigh reported that significant progress was made on the redevelopment of the Federal Register of Legislation during the reporting period. It is anticipated that the new Register will be launched during 2021–22. During the reporting period, OPC also completed a project that it began in 2015 to ensure that every Act made since 1901 is on the Legislation Register in an accessible format.23

Performance reporting 3.27 The relevant Attorney-General's Portfolio Budget Statements 2020–21 (PBS) outlined the OPC's outcome and program.24 The OPC Corporate Plan 2020–24 set out two purposes that support the outcome contained in the PBS:

 to enable government to carry out its legislative program by drafting bills, legislative instruments to be made or approved by the Governor-General (Federal Executive Council instruments), and a range of other instruments; and  to ensure Commonwealth laws are freely available and accessible to

everyone by publishing those laws and instruments on the Federal Register of Legislation website.25

3.28 In the annual report, OPC reported that it achieved six of its seven performance criteria.26 The one criterion that was not met related to the time

21 Office of Parliamentary Counsel (OPC), Annual Report 2020–21, p. 3.

22 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 4.

23 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 7.

24 AGD, Portfolio Budget Statements 2020–21, pp. 354–355.

25 OPC, Corporate Plan 2020–24, p. 3.

24

taken to register Act and legislative and notifiable instrument compilations that are required to be prepared by the OPC on the Legislation Register. OPC set a target of 90 per cent of those compilations being registered on the Legislation Register 28 days after commencement of the prospective amendments.27 The OPC failed to reach its target and achieved a result of 68 per cent. The annual report explained that this result was due to an increase in the agency's workload, an increase in demand for user-pays compilations, and an influx of Acts at the end of the Spring 2020 sitting period.28

3.29 The committee acknowledges OPC's strong performance against its targets and encourages it to continue its efforts in meeting them.

Other matters 3.30 While OPC's annual report largely met the requirements of the Commonwealth performance framework, it appears to omit:

 the electronic address of the report (PGPA Rule 17AJ(g));  a certification by the accountable authority in respect of the OPC's fraud systems (PGPA Rules 17AG(2)(b)(i), (ii) and (iii));  a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the

OPC's audit committee (PGPA Rule 17AG(2A)(a); and  a website reference to where the OPC's Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of the FOI Act can be found (PGPA Rule 17AH(1)(d)).

3.31 While the report contained instructions on how to locate the annual report on the OPC website, the Commonwealth performance framework requires an explicit reference to the electronic address of the report.29

3.32 The committee acknowledges that the annual report outlined the mechanisms in place for risk management and fraud control, and includes statements that reflect the substance of the information required under the Commonwealth performance framework.30 The report does not, however, make explicit reference to a certification from the accountable authority as to the existence of fraud processes. The committee encourages OPC to be fully compliant with the requirements of the Commonwealth performance framework.

3.33 While the report contained instructions on how to locate the OPC's Audit and Risk Committee Charter on the OPC website, to comply with the requirements

26 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, pp. 13–14.

27 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 14.

28 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 30.

29 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 50.

30 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 34.

25

of the Commonwealth performance framework a direct electronic address of the charter is required.31

3.34 The OPC annual report stated that each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the requirements of the Information Publication Scheme.32 To fully comply with the requirements of the Commonwealth performance framework, however, a direct electronic address to that plan must be included in the annual report. The committee encourages OPC to address this omission in its subsequent annual reports.

Conclusion 3.35 While the committee acknowledges that the annual report appears to omit information required under the PGPA framework, these omissions are not substantial. Therefore, the committee considers the OPC's annual report to be

'apparently satisfactory'.

Senator the Hon Sarah Henderson Chair

31 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 33.

32 OPC, Annual Report 2020–21, p. 50.

27

Appendix 1

Reports tabled during the period 1 May 2021 and 31 October 2021 and referred to the committee

Table 1.1 Reports tabled during the period 1 May 2021 and 31 October 2021 and referred to the committee

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Attorney-General’s Portfolio

Department/authority — Report

Administrative Appeals Tribunal — Annual Report 2020–21 28 September 2021/

30 September 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Attorney-General’s Department — Annual Report 2020–21 29 September 2021/

15 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity — Annual Report of the Integrity Commissioner 2020–21 29 September 2021/ 8 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Australian Financial Security Authority — Annual Report 2020–21 5 October 2021/

15 October 2021

22 November 2021 25 October 2021

Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) — Annual Report 2020–21 27 September 2021/

30 September 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

28

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions (CDPP) — Annual Report 2020–21 30 September 2021/ 4 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Commonwealth Ombudsman —Annual Report 2020–21 1 October 2021/

1 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Family Court of Australia —Annual Report 2020–21 27 September 2021/

15 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Federal Circuit Court of Australia — Annual Report 2020–21 27 September 2021/

28 September 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Federal Court of Australia —Annual Report 2020–21 28 September 2021/

15 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security (IGIS) — Annual Report

2020–21

7 October 2021/

8 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

National Archives of Australia and National Archives of Australia Advisory Council — Annual Report 2020–21 27 September 2021/ 15 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Office of the Australian Information Commissioner — Annual Report 2020–21

8 October 2021/

15 October 2021

23 November 2021 21 October 2021

Office of Parliamentary Counsel — Annual Report 2020–21

28 September 2021/

11 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

29

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Other Act/program

Annual Report on the Operation of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme: 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019 — Section 69 of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Act 2018 — Replacement pages

7 May 2021/

25 May 2021

15 June 2021 3 June 2021

Australian Government response to the Independent National Security Legislation Monitor 2018–19 Annual Report N/A 22 November 2021 21 October 2021

Australian Government response to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security report: Review of ‘Declared Areas’ Provisions — Sections 119.2 and 119.3 of the Criminal Code Act 1995

N/A 3 August 2021

(8 July 2021)

3 August 2021

Australian Human Rights Commission Human Rights and Technology Final Report 2021* N/A 15 June 2021 27 May 2021

Australian Human Rights Commission — Report No. 140 — QA v Commonwealth (Department of Home Affairs) 7 June 2021/ 7 July 2021

3 August 2021

(8 July 2021)

3 August 2021

Australian Human Rights Commission — Report No. 141 — Immigration detention following visa refusal or cancellation under section 501 of the Migration Act 1958

7 June 2021/

7 July 2021

3 August 2021

(8 July 2021)

3 August 2021

Interim National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide Prevention — Preliminary interim report*

13 September 2021/

17 September 2021

18 October 2021

(29 September 2021)

19 October 2021

30

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

National Security Information (Criminal and Civil Proceedings) Act 2004 — Annual Report 2020–2021 — Section 47 of the National Security Information (Criminal and Civil Proceedings) Act 2004

5 July 2021/

11 July 2021

3 August 2021

(22 July 2021)

3 August 2021

Replacement pages — Annual Report on the Operation of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme: 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019 — Section 69 of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Act 2018

7 May 2021/

25 May 2021

15 June 2021 3 June 2021

Royal Commissions

Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse — Royal Commission — Report of Case Study No. 44 — The response of Catholic Diocese of Armidale and Parramatta to allegations of child sexual abuse against a priest, dated November 2017*

N/A 3 August 2021

(22 July 2021)

3 August 2021

Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability Report on Public Hearing 12: The experiences of people with disability in the context of the Australian Government’s approach to the COVID-19 vaccine rollout*

N/A 22 November 2021

(29 October 2021)

22 November 2021

Home Affairs Portfolio

Department/authority — Report

Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission — Annual Report 2020–21

16 September 2021/

21 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

31

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Australian Federal Police — Annual Report 2017–18 — Replacement page 15 April 2021/

15 April 2021

11 May 2021

(6 May 2021)

11 May 2021

Australian Federal Police — Annual Report 2018–19 — Replacement page 15 April 2021/

15 April 2021

11 May 2021

(6 May 2021)

11 May 2021

Australian Federal Police — Annual Report 2019–20 — Replacement page 15 April 2021/

15 April 2021

11 May 2021

(6 May 2021)

11 May 2021

Australian Federal Police —Annual Report 2020–21 24 September 2021/

24 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

Australian Institute of Criminology —Annual Report 2020–21 16 September 2021/

21 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

Australian Security Intelligence Organisation —Annual Report 2020–21 14 September 2021/

16 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre — Annual Report 2020– 21 15 September 2021/ 16 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

Department of Home Affairs — Annual Report 2020–21 20 September 2021/

21 September 2021

19 October 2021 19 October 2021

Office of the Special Investigator — Report for 2020–21 30 September 2021/

1 October 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

32

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Reports under the Migration Act 1958

Assessments by the Commonwealth and Immigration Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 21 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002176-O3, 1003029-O1, 1003258-O, 1003274-O, 1003285-O, 1003286-O, 1003287-O, 1003293-O, 1003294-O, 1003296-O.] - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

19 March 2021/

2 June 2021

15 June 2021 15 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessments made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 - Statement to Parliament - No. 21 / 2021 – Sections 486P of the Migration Act 1958

3 May 2021/

2 June 2021

15 June 2021 15 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth and Immigration Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 22 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001678-O5, 1002509-O4, 1002605-O4, 1002720-O3, 1003342-O, 1003409-O, 1003414-O, 1003426-O, 1003532-O, 1003543-O.] - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

30 March 2021/

9 June 2021

15 June 2021 15 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessments made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 - Statement to Parliament - No. 22 / 2021 – Sections 486P of the Migration Act 1958

19 April 2021/

9 June 2021

15 June 2021 15 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 23 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000030-O4, 1003156-O1, 1003262-O, 1003301-O, 1003306-O, 1003315-O, 1003316-O, 1003317-O, 1003355-O, 1003360-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

6 April 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

33

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 23 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 24 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1003323-O, 1003325-O, 1003374-O, 1003388-O, 1003394-O, 1003397-O, 1003404-O, 1003442-O, 1003474-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 April 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 24 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

10 May 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 25 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001929-O4, 1002274-O5, 1002806-O2, 1002864-O1, 1003311-O, 1003324-O, 1003373-O, 1003387-O, 1003411-O, 1003622-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

13 April 2021/

9 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 25 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

20 May 2021/

9 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 26 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1003157-O1, 1003280-O, 1003295-O, 1003297-O, 1003299-O, 1003335-O, 1003347-O, 1003348-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

19 April 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

34

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 26 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

14 May 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 27 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002794-O3, 1003126-O1, 1003129-O1, 1003300-O, 1003313-O, 1003326-O, 1003331-O, 1003333-O, 1003389-O, 1003423-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

20 April 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 27 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 28 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002903-O3, 1003104-O1, 1003109-O1, 1003117-O1, 1003120-O1, 1003302-O, 1003332-O, 1003334-O, 1003340-O, 1003341-O.]– Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 April 2021/

16 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 28 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

1 June 2021/

16 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

35

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 29 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002672-O4, 1002854-O3, 1002916-O3, 1003128-O1, 1003146-O1, 1003147-O1, 1003165-O1, 1003381-O, 1003443-O, 1003457-O, 1003497-O, 1003510-O, 1003556-O, 1003567-O, 1003568-O, 1003592-O, 1003600-O, 1003605-O,

1003651-O, 1003660-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 April 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 29 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

10 May 2021/

2 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 30 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002544-O4, 1003013-O2, 1003027-O2, 1003100-O1, 1003121-O1, 1003255-O, 1003410-O, 1003425-O, 1003427-O, 1003430-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

29 April 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 30 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 31 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001534-O5, 1002799-O3, 1002813-O4, 1002905-O3, 1003130-O1, 1003188-O1, 1003314-O, 1003352-O, 1003353-O, 1003435-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

30 April 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

36

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 31 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 32 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001037-O6, 1002918-O3, 1002923-O3, 1002930-O2, 1003023-O2, 1003025-O2, 1003094-O1, 1003122-O1, 1003127-O1, 1003132-O1.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

5 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 32 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

1 June 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 33 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000854-O4, 1001519-O6, 1002247-O5, 1002270-O5, 1002855-O2, 1002897-O2, 1002919-O2, 1003359-O, 1003361-O, 1003424-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

5 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 33 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

3 June 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

37

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 34 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001513-O6, 1001588-O, 1002286-O5, 1002332-O5, 1002499-O4, 1002920-O2, 1002941-O2, 1003074-O2, 1003223-O1, 1003228-O1.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 34 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

15 June 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessments by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 35 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002331-O4, 1002351-O5, 1002473-O4, 1002479-O4, 1002507-O4, 1002510-O4, 1002597-O3, 1002766-O2, 1002841-O3, 1002856-O2, 1002963-O2, 1003209-O1, 1003338-O1, 1003385-O, 1003512-O, 1003523-O, 1003534-O, 1003553-O, 1003563-O, 1003564-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 May 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 35 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 June 2021/

17 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 36 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001501-O5, 1001613-O4, 1002558-O4. 1002559-O4, 1002758-O3, 1002939-O2, 1003021-O2, 1003139-O1, 1003366-O, 1003451-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

24 May 2021/

2 August 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

38

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 36 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 July 2021/

2 August 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 37 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001618-O5, 1002810-O4, 1002979-O2, 1003371-O, 1003380-O, 1003446-O, 1003448-O, 1003449-O, 1003455-O, 1003470-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

25 May 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 37 / 2021 - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 38 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002255-O5, 1002353-O5, 1002443-O5, 1002528-O4, 1002530-O4, 1002632-O4, 1002869-O3, 1002885-O3, 1002969-O2, 1003207-O1, 1003268-O1, 1003350-O1, 1003356-O1, 1003358-O1, 1003428-O1, 1003554-O, 1003569-O, 1003635-O, 1003638-O, 1003655-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

25 May 2021/

17 June 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 38 / 2021 - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 June 2021/

17 June 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

39

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 39 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001666-O5, 1002585-O1, 1002792-O3, 1003028-O2, 1003141-O1, 1003339-O1, 1003447-O, 1003450-O, 1003454-O, 1003463-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 May 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 39 / 2021 - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 -No. 40 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000966-O5, 1001665-O5, 1001676-O5, 1002570-O4, 1002819-O3, 1002826-O3, 1003033-O2, 1003098-O1, 1003133-O1, 1003135-O1.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

2 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 40 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 41 / 2021 [Personal identifiers: 1002371-O5, 1002527-O5, 1002880-O2, 1003034-O3, 1003277-O1, 1003289-O1, 1003298-O1, 1003310-O1, 1003376-O1, 1003458-O1, 1003459-O1, 1003460-O1, 1003471-O1, 1003566-O, 1003573-O, 1003583-O, 1003584-O, 1003636-O, 1003656-O, 1003657-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

40

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 41 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 42 / 2021 [Personal identifiers: 1002287-O6, 1002304-O6, 1002376-O5, 1002453-O5, 1002458-O5, 1002460-O5, 1002596-O4, 1003168-O3, 1003290-O1, 1003291-O1, 1003320-O1, 1003482-O1, 1003487-O1, 1003488-O1, 1003504-O1, 1003589-O, 1003590-O, 1003639-O, 1003640-O, 1003686-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

10 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 42 / 2021 - Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 June 2021/

27 July 2021

4 August 2021 4 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 43 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000894-O4, 1001341-O2, 1001758-O5, 1002904-O3, 1002932-O3, 1002940-O2, 1003140-O1, 1003142-O1, 1003406-O, 1003441-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

18 June 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 43 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

20 July 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

41

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 44 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001645-O4, 1002438-O4, 1002356-O5, 1002569-O4, 1002714-O4, 1002715-O3, 1003415-O, 1003467-O, 1003468-O, 1003475-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

21 July 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 44 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 July 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 45 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002314-O6, 1002386-O6, 1002471-O5, 1002550-O5, 1002609-O4, 1002991-O2, 1003173-O2, 1003279-O1, 1003319-O1, 1003337-O1, 1003345-O2, 1003444-O1, 1003453-O1, 1003484-O1, 1003503-O1, 1003511-O1, 1003513-O1, 1003591-O, 1003593-O, 1003682-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 June 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 45 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 July 2021/

5 August 2021

30 August 2021 30 August 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 46 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000967-O4, 1001818-O4, 1002463-O5, 1002576-O4, 1002701-O3, 1002724-O1, 1002929-O2, 1003018-O2, 1003396- O, 1003469-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

29 June 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

42

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 46 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

19 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 47 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002205-O6, 1002404-O5, 1002614-O4, 1002666-O4, 1002668-O4, 1002846-O3, 1003001-O2, 1003070-O3, 1003236-O1, 1003318-O1, 1003535-O1, 1003536-O1, 1003545-O1, 1003551-O1, 1003552-O1, 1003604-O, 1003608-O, 1003699-O, 1003710-O, 1003712-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

2 July 2021/

5 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 47 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

3 August 2021/

5 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 48 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002572-O4, 1002578-O4, 1002831-O3, 1002938-O3, 1003043-O2, 1003151-O1, 1003161-O1, 1003329-O, 1003436-O, 1003489-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

9 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 48 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

19 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

43

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 49 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000857-O5, 1000934-O5, 1001202-O4, 1003119-O1, 1003149-O1, 1003162-O1, 10034131-O, 1003681-O, 1003713-O, 1003757-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

12 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 49 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

11 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 50 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002322-O5, 1002902-O3, 1003066-O2, 1003260-O1, 1003363-O1, 1003383-O1, 1003392-O1, 1003398-O1, 1003399-O1, 1003400-O1, 1003407-O1, 1003412-O1, 1003413-O1, 1003416-O1, 1003418-O1, 1003419-O1, 1003527-O1, 1003585-O1, 1003609-O, 1003614-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

14 July 2021/

5 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 50 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

3 August 2021/

5 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 51 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002581-O4, 1002937-O2, 1003037-O2, 1003038-O2, 1003150-O1, 1003437-O, 1003479-O, 1003480-O, 1003491-O, 1003685-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

16 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

44

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 51 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

11 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 52 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002294-O6, 1002439-O5, 1003114-O2, 1003172-O2, 1003174-O1, 1003206-O1, 1003283-O1, 1003388-O1, 1003401-O1, 1003456-O, 1003501-O, 1003576-O, 1003587-O, 1003618-O, 1003619-O, 1003663-O, 1003667-O, 1003670-O, 1003695-O, 1003725-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

28 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 52 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

11 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 53 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001581-O4, 1002553-O5, 1003178-O1, 1003184-O1, 1003237-O1, 1003496-O, 1003611-O, 1003625-O, 1003633-O, 1003697-O, 1003714-O, 1003761-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

29 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 53 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

11 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

45

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 54 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001062-O4, 1002397-O5, 1003154-O1, 1003166-O1, 1003182-O1, 1003490-O, 1003494-O, 1003500-O, 1003521-O, 1003529-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

29 July 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 54 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

16 August 2021/

30 August 2021

19 October 2021 2 September 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 55 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000319-O3, 1002588-O4, 1002835-O3, 1002935-O3, 1002952-O2, 1003045-O2, 1003134-O1, 1003673-O, 1003716-O, 2000005-O3.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 August 2021/

10 October 2021

22 November 2021 27 October 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 55 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

27 September 2021/

10 October 2021

22 November 2021 27 October 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 56 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002595-O4, 1003032-O2, 1003049-O2, 1003190-O1, 1003192-O1, 1003492-O, 1003518-O, 1003542-O, 1003698-O, 1003733-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 August 2021/

10 October 2021

22 November 2021 27 October 2021

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 56 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

7 September 2021/

10 October 2021

22 November 2021 27 October 2021

46

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to

minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Other Acts/programs

Board of the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Chair Annual Report 2019–20 Section 61(6) of the Australian Crime Commission Act 2002 4 June 2021/ 4 June 2021

3 August 2021 24 June 2021

Commonwealth Ombudsman Report on Agencies Compliance with the Surveillance Devices Act 2004 — For the Period of 1 July to 31 December 2020 — Section 61 of the Surveillance Devices Act 2004

7 June 2021/

7 June 2021

22 June 2021 22 June 2021

Department of Home Affairs — Authorities for assumed identities — Report for 2019–20 — Section 15LD of the Crimes Act 1914 13 September 2021/ 21 September 2021

22 November 2021

(29 October 2021)

22 November 2021

Department of Home Affairs — Witness identity protection certificates — Report for 2019–20 — Section 15MU of the Crimes Act 1914 13 September 2021/ 21 September 2021

22 November 2021

(29 October 2021)

22 November 2021

Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018 2020–21 Annual Report — Section 60 of the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018 20 September 2021/ 21 September 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms 2020–21 Annual Report — Section 315J of the Telecommunications Act 1997 20 September 2021/ 21 September 2021

20 October 2021 20 October 2021

*There is no legislative requirement to table this report.

47

Appendix 2

Reports tabled during the period 1 November 2021 and 30 April 2022 and referred to the committee

Table 1.2 Reports tabled during the period 1 November 2021 and 30 April 2022 and referred to the committee

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Attorney-General’s Portfolio

Department/authority — Report

Administrative Appeals Tribunal — Annual Report 2020–21 — Correction 3 December 2021/ 7 December 2021

8 February 2022

(10 December 2021)

8 February 2022

Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity — Annual Report 2020–21 — Addendum 8 November 2021/ 22 November 2021

29 November 2021 29 November 2021

Australian Human Rights Commission — Annual Report 2020–21 1 February 2022/

1 February 2022

28 March 2022

(24 February 2022)

29 March 2022

High Court of Australia — Annual Report 2020–21 — Section 47 of the High Court of Australia Act 1979 19 November 2021/ 19 November 2021

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Independent National Security Legislation Monitor (INSLM) — Annual Report 2020–21 — Section 29(5) of the Independent National Security Legislation Monitor Act 2010

21 December 2021/ 22 December 2021 8 February 2022 (14 January 2022)

8 February 2022

48

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Operation of an Act/program

Attorney-General’s Department — Annual Report on the Operation of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme — 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 — Section 69 of the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Act 2018

2 December 2021/

9 December 2021

8 February 2022

(14 December 2021)

8 February 2022

Australian Law Reform Commission’s Interim Report A, Financial Services Legislation — Section 23 of the Australian Law Reform Commission Act 1996

18 November 2021/ 18 November 2021 30 November 2021 30 November 2021

Australian Law Reform Commission’s Interim Report A Summary, Financial Services Legislation — Section 23 of the Australian Law Reform Commission Act 1996

18 November 2021/

18 November 2021

30 November 2021 30 November 2021

Commonwealth Ombudsman — Activities in monitoring controlled operations conducted by the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission and the Australian Federal Police — Annual Report for the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 — Section 15HO of the Crimes Act 1914

15 December 2021/

9 February 2022

28 March 2022

(3 March 2022)

29 March 2022

Set the Standard: Report on the Independent Review into Commonwealth Parliamentary Workplaces — Section 46 of the Australian Law Reform Commission Act 1996

29 November 2021/

29 November 2021

30 November 2021 30 November 2021

49

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Royal Commissions

Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse — Royal Commission — Implementation of recommendations from the final report — Annual progress report for 2021*

N/A 8 February 2022

(14 December 2021)

8 February 2022

Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability Report on Public Hearing 12: The experiences of people with disability in the context of the Australian Government’s approach to the COVID-19 vaccine rollout*

N/A 22 November 2021

(29 October 2021)

22 November 2021

Home Affairs Portfolio

Department/authority — Report

Australian Security Intelligence Organisation — Annual Report 2020–21 — Replacement page

29 October 2021/

29 October 2021

24 November 2021 24 November 2021

Reports under the Migration Act 1958

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 1 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1000880-O5, 1001250-O4, 1002480-O4, 1003379-O, 1003579-O, 1003647-O, 1003675-O, 1003741-O, 1003747-O, 1003764-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 October 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

50

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 1 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

21 December 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 2 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1002848-O3, 1002950-O3, 1002975-O3, 1003053-O2, 1003055-O2, 1003516-O, 1003549-O, 1003689-O, 1003727-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

26 October 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 2 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

24 January 2022/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 3 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1000109-O5, 1001280-O4, 1002747-O4, 1002834-O3, 1003067-O2, 1003095-O2, 1003107-O1, 1003220-O1, 1003225-O1, 1003476-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 November 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 3 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

28 January 2022/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

51

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 4 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1000023-O5, 1001947-O4, 1002162-O5, 1002685-O3, 1002756-O4, 1002851-O3, 1002957-O2, 1003169-O1, 1003200-O1, 1003204-O1.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

17 November 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 4 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

23 December 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 5 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1000875-O5, 1001247-O4, 1002212-O5, 1002767-O4, 1002976-O3, 1003097-O2, 1003229-O1, 1003595-O, 1003693-O, 1003694-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

13 January 2022/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 17 February 2022

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 5 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

4 January 2022/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 17 February 2022

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 6 / 2022 – [Personal identifiers: 1000997-O3, 1002200-O7, 1002215-O4, 1002732-O4, 1002867-O3, 1003210-O1, 1003214-O1, 1003558-O, 1003560-O, 1003598-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

30 November 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 17 February 2022

52

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 6 / 2022 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

31 December 2021/

7 February 2022

29 March 2022 17 February 2022

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 57 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001237-O5, 1001272-O4, 1003058-O2, 1003193-O1, 1003231-01, 1003505-O, 1003509-O, 1003514-O, 1003559-O, 1003720-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

2 September 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 57 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

9 November 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 58 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002229-O6, 1002392-O4, 1003197-O1, 1003343-O1, 1003378-O1, 1003417-O1, 1003420-O1, 1003517-O, 1003528-O, 1003582-O, 1003594-O, 1003596-O, 1003652-O, 1003677-O, 1003705-O, 1003759-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

13 September 2021/

10 October 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 58 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

24 September 2021/

10 October 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

53

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 59 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002955-O2, 1002956-O2, 1002959-O2, 1003069-O2, 1003091-O1, 1003466-O, 1003502-O, 1003519-O, 1003637-O, 1003687-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

15 September 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 59 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

9 November 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 60 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000373-O5, 1002933-O3, 1002970-O2, 1003054-O2, 1003080-O2, 1003473-O, 1003540-O, 1003557-O, 1003634-O, 1003708-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

22 September 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 60 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

8 November 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 61 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1001232-O6, 1001257-O4, 1001953-O5, 1002727-O3, 1003167-O1, 1003186-O1, 1003478-O, 1003493-O, 1003615-O 1003621-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

29 September 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

54

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 61 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

15 November 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 62 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1002536-O3, 1003061-O2, 1003063-O2, 1003176-O1, 1003195-O1, 1003377-O1, 1003499-O, 1003565-O, 1003588-O, 1003674-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

8 October 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 62 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

2 November 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Assessment by the Commonwealth Ombudsman, under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – No. 63 / 2021 – [Personal identifiers: 1000880-O5, 1001250-O4, 1002480-O4, 1003379-O, 1003579-O, 1003647-O, 1003675-O, 1003741-O, 1003747-O, 1003764-O.] – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

8 October 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Response to Ombudsman’s Assessment made under section 486O of the Migration Act 1958 – Statement to Parliament – No. 63 / 2021 – Section 486P of the Migration Act 1958

28 October 2021/

23 November 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

55

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Other Acts/programs

Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission — 2020–2021 Assumed Identities Annual Report — Section 15LD of the Crimes Act 1914 29 September 2021/ 29 September 2021

23 November 2021 23 November 2021

Australian Federal Police — Assumed identities and witness identity protection certificates — Annual Report for 2020–21 — Sections 15LD and 15MU of the Crimes Act 1914

8 December 2021/

10 December 2021

8 February 2022

(14 December 2021)

8 February 2022

Commonwealth Ombudsman — Monitoring agency access to stored communications and telecommunications data under Chapters 3 and 4 of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 — Annual Report for the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 — Section 186J of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979

29 October 2021/

13 December 2021

28 March 2022

(24 February 2022)

29 March 2022

Commonwealth Ombudsman Report to the Minister for Home Affairs on agencies’ compliance with the Surveillance Devices Act 2004 for the period 1 January to 30 June 2021 — Section 61 of the Surveillance Devices Act 2004

22 September 2021/

29 October 2021

1 December 2021 1 December 2021

Controlled Operations Annual Report 2020–21 — Section 15HN of the Crimes Act 1914 18 March 2022/ 18 March 2022

30 March 2022 30 March 2022

Department of Home Affairs — Authorities for Assumed Identities 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 — Section 15LD of the Crimes Act 1914

13 December 2021/

20 December 2021

8 February 2022

(20 January 2022)

8 February 2022

56

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Department of Home Affairs — Witness identity protection certificates — Report for 2020–21 — Section 15MU of the Crimes Act 1914 13 December 2021/ 20 December 2021

8 February 2022

(20 January 2022)

8 February 2022

Control Orders, Preventative Orders, Continuing Detention Orders, Temporary Orders, and Powers in Relation to Terrorist Acts and Terrorism Offences — Annual Report 2020–21 — Sections 104.29, 105.47 and 1055A.22 of the Criminal Code Act 1995, Section 31 of the Counter-Terrorism (Temporary Exclusion Orders) Act 2019 and Section 3UJB of the Crimes Act 1914

26 November 2021/

26 November 2021

8 February 2022

(16 December 2021)

8 February 2022

Department of Home Affairs — Authorities for assumed identities — Report for 2020–21 — Section 15LD of the Crimes Act 1914 13 December 2021/ 20 December 2021

8 February 2022

(20 January 2022)

8 February 2022

Department of Home Affairs — Witness identity protection certificates — Report for 2020–21 — Section 15MU of the Crimes Act 1914 13 December 2021/ 20 December 2021

8 February 2022

(20 January 2022)

8 February 2022

Implementing the Modern Slavery Act 2018 — The Australian Government’s Annual Report 1 January 2020–31 December 2020 — Section 23A of the Modern Slavery Act 2018

2 November 2021/

2 November 2021

23 November 2021 23 November 2021

Surveillance Devices Act 2004 — Annual Report 2020–21 — Section 50 of the Surveillance Devices Act 2004 30 September 2021/ 1 October 2021

23 November 2021 23 November 2021

Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 — Annual Report 2020–21 — Section 104 of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979

15 December 2021/

15 December 2021

29 March 2022 14 February 2022

57

Department/authority/operation of an Act or program Submitted to minister/received by minister

Tabled in Senate (presented out of session)

Tabled in the House of Representatives

Trafficking in Persons — the Tenth Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Human Trafficking and Slavery* N/A 23 November 2021 23 November 2021

*There is no legislative requirement to table this report.