Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Fisheries Administration Act - Australian Fisheries Management Authority - Report - 1992-93


Download PDF Download PDF

/ m A

AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY

ANNUAL REPORT 1992-93

A U S T R A L IA N FISH ERIES M A N A G E M E N T AUTH ORITY

Board of D irectors as a t 30 June 1993

M r Jim McColl (Chairman)

M r Stuart Richey (Deputy Chairman)1

M r Max Ball2

M r Bernard Bowen1 AM

M r Russell Higgins4·2,3

M r Robert S eldon2,3

M r Richard Stevens (Managing Director)1·2·3·5

Dr Peter Young1

M r Frank Meere (Executive Secretary to the Board,)2

Senior M an ag em en t

M r Richard Stevens1,2·3·5

Mr Martin Exel

Mr Graham Peachey2·6

M r Geoff Rohan

D r Bruce Phillips1

M r Barry' Kaufmann1

A ddress

The Burns Centre National Circuit FORREST ACT 2603

Enquiries

Telephone : (06) 272 5029 Facsimile: (06) 272 5175

1 Member, Research Committee

2 Member, Planning Committee

3 Member, Audit Committee

1 Mr Russell Higgins replaced Dr Meryl Williams as the Government Director with effect from 8 February 1993.

s Mr Geoff Gorrie, Acting Managing Director 3.2.92 to 7.8.92, was replaced by Mr Richard Stevens, Managing Director on 10 August 1992.

6 Mr Graham Peachey resigned from AFMA with effect from 28 July 1993.

Directors terms of appointment are set out in Appendix 7.

Managing Director

General M anager N orthern and Pelagic Fisheries

General M anager Operations & Corporate Services

General M anager Southern Fisheries

Chief Scientist

C hief Economist

Postal

PO Box 7051 CANBERRA MAIL CENTRE ACT 2610

A U S T R A L I A N F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T A U T H O R

The Australian Fisheries M anagem ent A uthority (AFMA) is a Com m onw ealth statutory authority responsible for the management o f fisheries under C om m onw ealth ju risd ic tio n . A FM A m anages fisheries within the Australian fishing zone (AFZ)

and, in some cases, with agreement with States to the low water mark.

ENABLING LEGISLATION AFMA’s e n a b lin g le g is la tio n is th e Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991. AFM A adm inisters a range o f o th e r legislation w hich is listed u n d er Appendix 1.

AFMA'S MISSION

To create conditions which ensure the long term sustainability o f Australia’s fish resources, while allowing for the efficient exploitation o f these resources and an equitable sharing o f them am ong all user

groups.

CO RPO RA TE G O A LS GOAL 1. FISHERIES MANAGEMENT

To develop and implement:

• fisheries m anagem ent program s w hich will result in the conservation and sustainable use o f all fisheries within its control, including the recovery o f depleted fisheries; and • fisheries m anagem ent program s w hich will

encourage the efficient exploitation o f fisheries resources.

GOAL 2. COMMUNICATION

• To increase the level o f awareness o f fisheries resource issues within the broader community, w ith p a r tic u la r em p h asis on th e fish in g

industry and other users o f marine resources.

GOAL 3. POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND EFFICIENT ADMINISTRATION

• To improve the efficiency, effectiveness, focus and balance o f fisheries m an ag e m en t and actively p articip a te in the d evelopm ent o f fishery policy.

The responsible M inister for AFMA’s operations changed during the year. Up to 4 May 1993, the M inister for Primary Industries and Energy, the H o n . S im on C re a n M P w as th e r e s p o n s ib le

M inister for fisheries m atters. Subsequently, the responsibility passed to his colleague, the Minister for Resources, the H on. Michael Lee MP.

Section 91 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A ct 1991 provides that the Minister may give directions to AFMA in exceptional circumstances and details a comprehensive process to be followed.

U n d e r this sectio n th e M in ister m ay give written directions to the Authority concerning the performance o f its functions and the exercise o f its powers, and the Authority must comply with those

directions.

N o M in isteria l d ire c tio n s w ere issu ed to AFMA tinder section 91 during the year.

Published by the Australian Fisheries Management A u th o rity , Burns C e n tre, 28 N ational C ircu it, Forrest ACT 2603.

D esigned by The Artworks 931 4 8 , Im ageset by MacW orks M acbureau C olour Prepress H o u se, Printed by Microdata Canberra.

ISSN 1039-3099

A U S T R A L I A N S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T T H O R

INDEX OF C O M PL IA N C E W ITH REPO RTIN G REQUIREM ENTS:

Enabling leg islation u n d er w hich AFMA o p e ra te s 2, 66

Responsible M inister

■ sta tu to ry p o w ers o f directio n h eld by th e M inister 2, 9

Reports and Financial S ta te m e n ts (section 63H o f th e A udit Act 1901) 69

(a) extent to which operations o f AFMA have contributed to:

(i) the objectives set out in section 6 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991;

(ii) the goals set out in the Corporate Plan; and (iii) the objectives set out in the annual Operational plan; 7-13, 1 8 ,2 0 , 23, 30, 3 3 ,4 0 , 57, 58

and

(b) particulars of:

(i) any variations to the Corporate Plan and the annual Operational Plan; 7, nil

(ii) significant purchases and dispositions o f real property' by the Authority; nil

(iii) borrowings made by the Authority'; nil

(iv) significant changes to plans o f m anagem ent and introduction o f new plans o f management; 7, 8 ,1 5 ,1 6 , 2 0 ,2 3 ,2 4 , 30, 33-44

(v) the effectiveness o f the operation o f plans o f management; and 15-44

(vi) any directions given to the A uthority by the Minister; and 2 ,9

(vii) action taken by AFMA to develop and implement its hum an resources development program; and 49-53

(c) an evaluation o f AFMA’s overall performance against performance indicators set out in the Corporate Plan and the Operational Plan 7-14

Powers, Functions an d O bjectives 66, 67, 86

M em bership an d S taff

- list o f AFMA Directors and their terms o f appointm ent inside cover, 91

- how Directors are appointed 91

- list o f senior executive staff inside cover, 5 1 ,5 3

- total num ber o f staff employed by AFMA 53

- basis for staffing the organisation 49

contact officer information inside cover, 1 9 ,2 1 ,2 3 ,2 5 ,2 6 ,3 0 , 33, 36, 3 7 ,4 0 ,

4 3 ,4 4 ,4 7 ,4 8 ,4 9 , 54, 55, 5 7 ,5 9 ,6 0 ,6 7

September 1993

The Hon Michael Lee MP

Minister for Resources

Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I p re se n t th e se c o n d A n n u a l R e p o rt o f th e

A ustralian F ish e rie s M a n a g e m e n t A u th o r ity (AFMA) pursuant to Section 88 o f the Fisheries Administration A ct 1991 and covering the period 1 July 1992 to 30 June 1993.

I w ould like to com m ence th is r e p o rt by

commenting on the extent to which the operations of the Authorin' have contributed to the objectives set out in AFMA’s governing legislation and to the goals se t o u t in th e C o r p o r a te a n d A n n u a l

Operational Plans.

During 1992-93, AFMA operated for the first time against an interim Corporate Plan approved by the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy. In developing the Plan, the AFMA Board sought to avoid a simple restatement o f the objectives o f its g o v e rn in g le g is la tio n . In s te a d , th e B o a rd

endeavoured to translate those requirem ents into operational goals to ensure a real com m itm ent was clearly established. The interim Corporate Plan was supplem ented by an A nnual O p eratio n al Plan which was also approved by the Minister. This Plan included indicative staffing and budget allocations, together with performance indicators.

The Interim Corporate Plan for 1992-93 was subsequently distributed widely to AFMA’s main clients and to relevant Com m onwealth and State ag en cies a n d re c e iv e d fa v o u ra b le c o m m e n t. Following this detailed consultation, a new three

year Corporate Plan was developed and submitted to you for approval.

T hroughout this report, AFMA has sought to provide details o f the actions AFMA has taken th r o u g h o u t th e r e p o r tin g year to achieve its

legislative and corporate objectives.

D uring the reporting period, the A uthority again focused on the need to im plem ent fisheries management arrangements as outlined in AFMA’s charter and in accordance with the Governm ent’s desire for biologically sustainable and economically efficient fisheries as required un d er the Fisheries A d m in is tr a tio n A c t 1991 a n d th e Fisheries M anagement A c t 1991.

In ta k in g o v er fish e rie s m a n a g e m e n t

responsibilities from the former Australian Fisheries S ervice w ith in th e D e p a rtm e n t o f P rim ary

Industries and Energy (D P IE ), AFMA inherited M a n a g e m e n t P lan s fo r th e n o r th e r n p ra w n ,

southern bluefin tu n a and the south east trawl fisheries established under the Fisheries A c t 1952.

AFMA is in the process o f replacing these Plans w ith M a n ag e m en t P lans d ev elo p ed u n d e r th e Fisheries M a n a g em en t A c t 1991. In a d d itio n , A FM A to o k over a larg e n u m b e r o f fisheries

w ithout plans o f management, which now require su c h p la n s to be d e v e lo p e d . A FM A aim s to

complete this process for all major fisheries by mid- 1994. T his tim e fram e recognises th e n ee d to consult with industry and the general public before A FM A m ay su b m it p lan s o f m a n a g e m e n t fo r Ministerial acceptance. A summary- o f progress in the development o f M anagement Plans is covered later in this report (Appendix 9).

A n u m b e r o f th e se ex istin g plans rely on

jurisd ictio n al arran g em en ts w ith various S tate Governm ents under the Offshore C onstitutional Settlement (OCS), so that the Commonwealth can manage within a State 3-mile limit. The States are in the process o f changing th e ir legislation to enable the C om m onw ealth to properly m anage these fisheries under the Fisheries M anagement A ct

1991.

I am pleased to r e p o r t th a t c o n s tru c tiv e

discussions have been u nderw ay b etw e en th e Commonwealth (represented by DPIE and AFMA) a n d th e S ta te s an d th e N o r th e r n T e r r ito r y

regarding rationalisation o f jurisdictions generally under the OCS. At this stage, AFMA is confident that a revised package o f arrangements can be put to Ministers and the fishing industry later this year. We anticipate that drafting o f the changes can be

com pleted to enable the new arrangem ents to come into effect in January 1994. This tim ing is critical to the im plem entation o f new plans o f management and, to the extent that is not realised, it will p u t pressure on A FM A ’s tim e ta b le . In

su m m a ry , A FM A sees th e ra tio n a lis a tio n o f jurisdictional arrangements and the development o f M anagem ent Plans as going hand in hand with efficient and cost effective fisheries management.

AFMA is firmly com m itted to the principles a n d p ra c tic e o f e c o lo g ic a lly su sta in a b le

development. It has set in place processes to ensure th a t th e n ec essary re se a rc h is id e n tif ie d and

im p le m e n te d to ac h ie v e fish e rie s ec o sy ste m management.

AFMA is already working closely with research organisations in a num ber o f areas to minimise and m o n ito r th e im p acts o f fishing o p e ra tio n s on e c o lo g ic a lly r e la te d sp e cie s. F o r e x a m p le ,

c o n s id e ra b le p ro g re s s has b ee n ac h ie v e d in

reducing the incidental catch o f seabirds in tuna longline operations through the use o f “tori poles” a n d d e v e lo p m e n t o f b a it c a stin g e q u ip m e n t.

F ishing m eth o d s are designed to m inim ise the talcing o f baits by seabirds during longline setting operations, and results have been encouraging. Similarly, the “Convention for the Conservation o f Southern Bluefin T u n a” contains provisions for m easures to be ta k en to m inim ise im pacts on

ecologically related species.

Additionally, research is being undertaken in evaluating the im pact of, and m odifying fishing e q u ip m e n t to take a c c o u n t o f th e im pacts of,

fishing operations on the marine environment. For example, research on the use o f “environmentally f rie n d ly ” p ra w n an d fish tra w l n e ts aim s to

minimise disturbance o f the sea bed during trawl o p e ra tio n s a n d red u c e by catch o f n o n - ta r g e t species.

AFMA is aware o f concerns expressed by some g ro u p s over ce rtain species (such as so u th e rn b lu e fin tu n a ) , b u t we are c o n f id e n t th a t all

a p p ro p ria te a c tio n s to e n s u re th e lo n g te rm

economic and environmental sustainability o f these species are being undertaken.

Over the year, the AFMA Board undertook m ajor review s o f su ch issues as A F M A /S ta te arrangem ents for th e com pliance and observer p ro g ra m an d A F M A /in d u s tr y f u n d in g

C H A I R M A N ' S R E P C

arrangements. In addition, the Board established specific policies covering:

• the operation o f M anagement Advisory Committees; • monitoring and investigating reports o f illegal fishing activity; • exploration and development o f a new fishery; • foreign fishing vessels, gear and catch disposal;

and

• granting o f fishing permits and fishery' specific licences.

Although M anagement Advisory' Com mittees (MACs) have been in existence in m ost m ajor Com m onw ealth fisheries since the m id -1 9 8 0 s, AFMA is in the process o f restructuring MACs for all major fisheries in accordance with the provisions of the Fisheries A dm inistration A c t 1991 and the MAC Policy Paper developed by AFMA. We are seeking to appoint com p eten t and in d e p en d e n t Chairpersons to the major fisheries MACs. This has already been do n e for th e n o rth e rn praw n, the south east, east coast tuna and the southern shark fisheries and will be co m pleted sho rtly for the southern bluefin tuna fishery'. At the same tim e, we are restructuring membership to better reflect the

balance o f interests in each particular fishery' and to provide the necessary' expertise.

M ACs e s ta b lis h e d u n d e r th e Fisheries A d m inistration A c t 1991 play a pivotal role in p roviding in p u t to A FM A ’s d e c isio n -m a k in g process. AFMA requires each MAC to h o ld an annual public m eeting to rep o rt on progress in

managing particular fisheries.

A FM A , as r e q u ir e d u n d e r th e Fisheries A dm in istra tio n A c t 1991 , held its first A nnual Public M eeting in M elbourne in March 1993. To date, annual public m eetings or conferences for MACs have been held for the southern bluefin tuna fishery' (in P ort Lincoln in July 1992); the south east trawl fishery' (in Bendigo in O ctober 1992);

the northern prawn fishery (in Cairns in February 19 9 3 ); the east coast tu n a fishery (in E den in

March 1993); and the southern shark fishery (in M e lb o u rn e , in A p ril 1 9 9 3 ). F ro m A F M A ’s

viewpoint, it is im portant for operators in these fisheries to take the time to attend these annual conferences and public meetings to enable matters r e la tin g to p o lic y , re se a rc h an d fish erie s

management to be aired.

It has also become the practice for meetings of the MACs to take place immediately following their public meetings or conferences. This ensures that major issues can be dealt with expeditiously by the MAC and any recommendations forwarded to the AFMA Board.

N aturally, AFMA inherited a few problem s. P ossibly th e m o st ch a lle n g in g was th e q u o ta

management system introduced into the south east fishery' in 1991. AFMA is however confident that th e se a r r a n g e m e n ts can be m a d e to w ork

effectively.

D uring 1992-93, no directions were given to the Authority by the Minister under Section 91 of the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991.

The AFMA Board m et on 11 occasions during the year and continued to deal with a challenging p ro g ra m o f b u sin e ss in v o lv in g th e review o f

a d m in istra tiv e su p p o rt system s, sta ffin g , and financial m a n ag e m en t, in ad d itio n to fisheries management issues. The expertise-based nature o f the B oard has w orked extrem ely w ell, and the w illin g n e ss o f D ir e c to rs to ag ain c o m m it

considerable effort and time to Authority business during the reporting period is greatly appreciated. The three Board Committees (Audit, Planning and Research) also operated effectively dealing with a ran g e o f a c tiv itie s necessary fo r th e effective operation o f the Board and AFMA as a whole.

D uring the year, the G overnm ent D irector, Dr Meryl Williams, was appointed to the position

Jim

A G E

o f Director, Australian Institute o f Marine Science (AIM S) and resigned from th e D ep a rtm e n t o f Primary Industries and Energy. She was replaced

on the Board by M r Russell H iggins, Executive D ir e c to r , M in e ra ls a n d F ish e rie s G ro u p ,

Department o f Primary Industries and Energy. The Board appreciates the excellent contribution to its deliberations provided by Dr Williams.

While AFMA was established in a climate o f h ig h e x p e c ta tio n s , it w ill ta k e som e tim e to

substantially realise those expectations. However, I believe that AFMA has the flexibility and capacity to tackle this challenging task. There is now a far greater appreciation by the States and N orthern Territory, the fishing industry and other resource

users, and AFMA, o f the need for a responsible corporate approach to fisheries management.

W ith respect to the o p era tio n o f the new

institutional arrangements, AFMA has provided a subm ission to, and appeared before, the Senate R eview o f th e A d e q u a c y o f C o m m o n w e a lth Fisheries Legislation. AFMA is also reviewing the legislation as it is applied for the first time. As I am sure you will u n d ersta n d , th ere are som e areas w hich have re q u ire d c o n sid erab le th o u g h t to

ensure management arrangements meet objectives. A FM A m ay n e e d to seek y o u r a s sista n c e in

am ending certain provisions o f the legislation to ensure this occurs.

In conclusion, I would take this opportunity to record my appreciation to the members o f the A FM A B o a rd , m a n a g e m e n t an d s ta ff o f th e

A u th o r ity , an d all th o s e in v o lv e d in th e

d e lib e ra tio n s o f th e M a n a g e m e n t A d v iso ry

Committees during 1992-93 for their contribution to AFMA. Substantial progress has been made in esta b lish in g an e fficien t o rg a n is a tio n , a n d in developing M anagem ent Plans for fisheries for which AFMA has legislative responsibility. In this

regard, it is pleasing to report your acceptance of

the M anagem ent Plan for the G reat A ustralian Bight trawl fishery in June this year. This represents a significant milestone for AFMA, and augurs well fo r th e d e v e lo p m e n t an d im p le m e n ta tio n o f

M anagem ent Plans in all o th e r C om m onw ealth fisheries.

Yours sincerely JC McCOLL Chairman

M A N A G I N G D I R E C T O R ' S R E P O R

M A N A G IN G DIRECTOR'S REPORT T h e c r e a tio n o f th e A u stra lia n F ish e rie s

Management A uthority (AFMA) in February 1992 was accompanied by high industry expectations o f a fresh approach, a new organisation more attuned to th e n e e d s o f th e fish in g in d u s try a n d , m o st

im p o rta n tly , an o rg a n isa tio n able to resp o n d prom ptly and efficiently to the many and varied issues which affect fishermen on a day-to-day basis. While some in the industry would like to have seen

m o re ra p id p ro g re s s in a c h ie v in g th e se

expectations, the A uthority has m ade significant advances over the past 12 months in establishing an o r g a n is a tio n a l an d c u ltu ra l fra m e w o rk m ore receptive to th e n eed s o f its m ajor clien t, the

Australian fishing industry.

During 1992-93, the AFMA Board and senior M anagem ent have critically reviewed nearly all o f the administrative support systems so essential to th e p r o p e r r u n n in g o f an o r g a n is a tio n , w ith

particular emphasis on the key areas o f financial and personnel management.

To enhance AFMA’s financial accountability to G o v e rn m e n t an d in d u stry , a new financial m a n ag e m en t system was im p le m e n te d d u rin g 1992-93 to facilitate more timely and better quality financial inform ation. AFMA now operates under full accrual accounting arrangem ents which will more fully reflect costs and ensure greater financial control overall. The Board reviewed and approved new financial delegations, and new procedures were implemented for purchasing and accounts payable.

Importantly, the new financial management system w ill p ro v id e g r e a te r d e ta il o n a ttr ib u ta b le

management costs upon which the levies charged to the industry are based.

In a d d itio n to its fish erie s m a n a g e m e n t

functions, public good and Com monwealth policy related functions, AFMA administers the National F isheries A d ju stm e n t P ro g ra m , th e N o rth e rn Prawn Fishery Voluntary Adjustm ent Scheme and

th e m o n ie s re m a in in g fro m th e n o w d e fu n c t

Fisheries Development Trust Account. AFMA also adm in isters funds received from th e F isheries Resources Research Fund for allocation to research projects in accordance with Ministerial guidelines.

In 1992-93, AFMA received $24.9 million as a p p ro p ria tio n s an d g ran ts to u n d e rta k e th e se activities. The appropriations comprised an Annual A p p ro p ria tio n o f $ 1 0 .8 m illion an d a Special A ppropriation, w hich is equivalent to levies, o f

$ 1 1 .6 m illion w hile th e g ra n t o f $2.2 m illion

rep rese n ts am o u n ts received in resp e ct o f the Fisheries Resources Research Fund.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , A FM A e x p e n d ed $ 5 .4 million on domestic fisheries m anagem ent, $3.9 m illion on m anaging the operations o f licensed foreign vessels in the Australian fishing zone and $8.3 million on public good o r Com m onw ealth policy related activities. These included the Torres

Strait Protected Zone, the Australian fishing zone program and the apprehension o f foreign fishing vessels. The difference between levies received by AFMA through the Special Appropriation and the

a m o u n t ex p e n d e d o n fish e rie s m a n a g e m e n t functions relates to o th e r activities such as the N o rth ern Prawn Fishery V oluntary A djustm ent Scheme and timing differences in the collection of

levies.

At 30 June 1993 AFMA held a cash balance o f $8.6 million. This balance represents funds held on behalf o f the activities which AFMA adm inisters a n d o f w h ich $ 7 .1 m illio n is a p p ro v e d fo r

distribution in respect o f projects to be undertaken in future. It also includes funds within the National Fisheries Adjustment Program which are yet to be allocated.

Over the past 12 months, AFMA has settled its o r g a n is a tio n a l s tr u c tu r e an d fin a lise d

a p p o in tm e n ts to key m a n a g e m e n t p o sitio n s. AFMA’s staffing establishment as at 30 June 1993

was 98 full-tim e positions. This com pares with sta ffin g n u m b e rs in th e p re v io u s A u stra lia n

Fisheries Service (AFS) o f 125 positions as at 30 June 1991 (w hich included the now separately established Fisheries Policy Branch w ith in the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy),

In comparing AFMA’s staffing levels with the former AFS, it should be noted that AFS had access to Finance, H um an Resources and other corporate support sendees from D PIE, and that AFMA has been able to accommodate these functions within its to tal staffing establishm ent o f 98. W ith the restructuring o f M anagement Advisory Committees including the appointm ent o f Executive Officers a n d th e d e v e lo p m e n t an d im p le m e n ta tio n o f

M a n ag e m en t Plans d u rin g 1 9 9 3 -9 4 u n d e r the Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991 , the B oard and M anagement are continually reviewing the staffing r e q u ir e m e n ts , to m e e t th e n e e d s o f th e

o rg a n isa tio n , w ith a view to fu rth e r re d u c in g staffing over time.

D uring th e la tte r half o f 199 2 -9 3 , AFMA m anagem ent and representatives o f Public Sector U nions participated in negotiations to establish new term s and c o n d itio n s o f em p lo y m e n t for AFMA staff in accordance with Section 68 o f the

Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991. By the end o f June 1993, the AFMA Board and the Public Sector U nion (PSU) reached agreement on a short-term C ertified A greem ent which w ould provide for a salary increase o f 3.5 per cent, the implementation o f Performance Agreements for Senior Officers as from 1 July 1993, and a com mitm ent to reach an agreed positio n on perform ance m a n ag e m en t, re m u n e ra tio n and classification arran g e m en ts w ith in a lo n g e r term C e rtified A g re e m e n t by March 1994.

T h e im p le m e n ta tio n o f P e rfo rm a n c e

Agreements for senior management within AFMA w ill p rovide clear an d p o sitiv e links b etw e en

AFMA’s goals an d objectives as set o u t in its Corporate and Annual Operational Plans, and the resources available (both staffing and financial) to the Authority to m eet those goals and objectives.

A th o ro u g h au d it o f all p erso n n el related functions was completed by 30 June 1993 together w ith a rev ie w o f c o rr e s p o n d e n c e a n d file

management procedures. The AFMA B oard has approved a C o d e o f C o n d u c t fo r A FM A

employees, and im plemented a new Systems Plan covering the collection and analysis o f information by AFMA.

The Board also approved a com m unications strategy designed to accentuate the positive aspects of AFMA’s fisheries management role, and to raise the aw aren ess o f in d u s try a n d th e g e n e ra l

co m m unity o f fish eries specific m a n a g e m e n t arrangements. AFMA takes its communications role seriously and, to this end, the outcom e o f Board meetings is made available through the publication

o f News fr o m the B o a rd , w h ile M a n a g e m e n t Advisory Com mittee Newsletters are in the process of being provided to operators in specific fisheries. These two publications com plem ent the m onthly

issue of Australian Fisheries which contains a cross­ section o f articles o f general industry' interest.

In June 1993, AFMA com m enced a m ajor review o f the licensing and entitlements system, the overall aim b e in g to c ritic a lly ex a m in e th e

administrative and legislative arrangements which su p p o rt th e S ystem , an d to en su re a d e q u a te

procedures and controls are in place to enable the System to provide a timely and accurate sendee to the fishing industry and fishery managers. Input has been s o u g h t fro m peak in d u s try b o d ie s , th e

Management Advisory Committees and individual fishermen. In addition, the AFMA Review Group will include representatives from the industry to provide practical advice from a user perspective.

AFMA is also in the process o f conducting a

review o f the logbook system involving the use o f logbooks in both major and developing fisheries, the cost o f logbooks in each fishery, the nature o f inform ation collected and the use to w hich the

information is put. It is anticipated that this review will be com pleted during 1993-94.

In looking back over 1992-93, the staff o f the A u th o r ity have w o rk e d h a rd to e s ta b lis h an

organisation that is responsive, helpful, positive and constructive in its relations with its major clients. I would com mend the staff for their efforts over the p a s t 12 m o n th s ; I w o u ld also ex p re ss my

appreciation to the AFMA Board for their support in im p le m e n tin g ch a n g es to a w ide ran g e o f

adm inistrative systems designed to make AFMA more accountable and open in its operations.

BA Stevens Managing Director September 1993

A U S T R A L I A N F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T A U T H O R I T Y

M a n ag e m en t A dvisory C om m ittees

Chief S cientist Dr Bruce Phillips

Chief Econom ist Mr Barry Kaufmann

Executive S ecretary Frank Meere

M anager Policy C o-ordination Frank Meany

M anaging D irector Richard Stevens

A U S T R A L I A N F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T A U T H O R I T Y

AFM A BOARD

General M anager Corporate Services Graham Peachey

General M anager Southern Geoff Rohan

General M anager N orthern & Pelagic Martin Exel

Principal Legal Officer Bill Palmer

Finance

Systems

Observer Program

Licensing

Compliance

AFMA State arrangements

South east fishery

Scallop fishery

Southern shark fishery

Joint Authority S/west gillnet & line fishing

Great Australian Bight trawl fishery

Monitoring

Logbooks

Northern prawn fishery

Southern bluefin Tuna fishery

East coast tuna fishery

Jack mackerel fishery

Torres Strait fisheries

Other northern fisheries

Legal Drafting

Litigation

Prosecutions

Legal Advisings

Australian Fisheries Communications Public Relations

FISHERIES M A N A G EM EN T

SOUTHERN FISHERIES

O verview by G e o ff R o h a n , G eneral M a n a g er, Southern Fisheries.

1 9 9 2 -9 3 was a ch a lle n g in g year for S o u th ern Fisheries with the main fisheries either under major rev iew o r s u b je c t to in te n s e m a n a g e m e n t

discussions.

The south east fishery was characterised by dissatisfaction over quota allocations, legal action and protest fishing over reduced total allowable catches for eastern gemfish. While undertaking the day-to-day running o f the fishery, the Branch was heavily c o m m itte d to p ro c e ssin g review s and re so lv in g key issu e s fo r in c lu s io n in a d ra ft

M anagement Plan for the south east fishery under the Fisheries M anagement A c t 1991.

S im ilarly, th e so u th e rn shark fishery was subject to intense discussion on the state o f key shark stocks as well as the extent and nature of reductions in effort.

The task o f resolving m anagem ent issues in m ajor fisheries was com plicated by the need to reso lv e ju r is d ic tio n issues b e tw e e n th e

Com m onw ealth and the States and to bring the line fishing sectors un d er fisheries m anagem ent regimes.

By the en d o f June 1993 the co-operative efforts o f State agencies, through working groups a n d r e s tr u c tu r e d M a n a g e m e n t A d visory

Committees, resulted in progress on several fronts. The implementation o f a M anagement Plan for the G re a t A u stra lia n B ig h t traw l fish ery an d th e

achievement o f broad agreement on approaches to the m anagem ent o f m ajor and m inor fisheries in southern Australia was an encouraging conclusion to the year.

S O U T H E A S T F I S H E R Y

SOUTH EAST FISHERY Principal species: Dories, morwong, flathead, blue grenadier, orange

roughy, redfish, gem- fish, warehou, school whiting and ling.

Number of boats: 124 (as at 30 June 1993)

Annual catch (1992-93) Quota species: 24 600 tonnes

Non-quota species: 6700 tonnes

Estimated value (1992-93) Quota species: $52 million

Non-quota species: $9 million

Total value: $61 million

Main markets: Domestic, USA, Japan

Fishing techniques: O tter trawling, Danish seining

OCS jurisdiction: Com monwealth and States

T he so u th east fishery (SEP) is a m ulti-species fishery situated off the south east o f Australia in w aters u n d e r C om m onw ealth jurisdiction. The fishery extends southwards from Barrenjoey Point, n o rth o f Sydney, aro u n d Victoria and Tasmania and west to Cape Jervis in South Australia. The m ain h a rv e stin g m e th o d is b o tto m tra w lin g ,

a lth o u g h a D anish seine fleet o p eratin g o u t o f Lakes Entrance also forms part o f the fishery.

The fishery is a major supplier o f fresh fish to the Sydney and Melbourne markets. It is also the main source o f deepwater species, such as orange roughy and blue grenadier, that are processed in onshore facilities and provide significant export

revenue.

On 1 January, 1992 new (quota) management arrangements for the SEP came into operation with the intention o f providing protection for specific species and to address over-capacity in the fishery. Sixteen o f the m ajor species in the SEP are now covered by total allowable catches (TACs) and each eligible o p era to r in th e fishery has received an individual quota for some or all o f these species.

Initial q u o ta allocations were viewed w ith concern by the majority o f the fishing industry and were the subject o f a court challenge by Austral Fisheries in early 1992. An AFMA co m m ittee,

headed by AFMA Chairman, M r Jim McColl, was formed at the request o f the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy, the H o n Simon Crean, MP to review the management arrangements, including allocations, and tabled its report in April 1992. A separate audit o f the allocation systems and internal reviews were also con d u cted during 1992. The Federal C ourt decision handed down in September

1992 and later upheld at appeal in early 1993, found th a t th e a llo c a tio n s u n d e r th e 1 991

Management Plan, as applied in 1992, were invalid.

In light o f the various reviews, and taking account o f the court decision, the Minister agreed to am end q u o ta allocations on a “w in n e r s /n o losers” basis for 1992. Those who w ould benefit from th e h ig h e r a llo c a tio n s u n d e r th e new

“averaging” m e th o d w ere g ra n te d th e revised allocations in O ctober 1992. Q uota allocations to those w ho w o u ld have received less w ere left unchanged for the remainder o f the 1992 calendar year only.

The revised allocation m ethod was applied to the fishery for the allocation o f quotas for 1993. Following expiration o f the 1991 M anagem ent Plan on 31 December 1992, the quota allocations were reflected in Fishing Permits granted to eligible

operators u n d e r th e Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991. Fishing Permits will continue to be used to manage the fishery until Statutory Fishing Rights are granted under the new Management Plan being developed under this Act.

The first half o f 1993 saw a period o f intense consultation with industry, through the South East Traw l M a n a g e m e n t A dv iso ry C o m m itte e

(S E T M A C ), to d e v e lo p m e a su re s to be

im plemented in a new M anagem ent Plan. While

discussion focused on allocations, atten tio n was also given to o th e r issues such as carryovers,

bycatch, m in im u m /m a x im u m q u o ta h o ld in g s, p e n a lties a n d m e th o d s fo r d e a lin g w ith n o n ­

reporting o f catch, catch over-runs and catches of n o n-quota species. In order to develop the new SEF M a n ag e m en t P lan, SETM A C estab lish ed several new w orking g roups, in ad d itio n to its

existing sub-committees, to address specific aspects o f the new plan.

D u rin g early 1 9 9 3 , th e S o u th E ast Traw l

M anagement Advisory Com mittee (SETMAC) was restructured. Its current membership consists o f an in d e p en d e n t C h a irp erso n , an AFM A M anager, scientific member, one State Government member

and four industry members (see Appendix 6). The industry members were nom inated by each State peak commercial fishing industry body. SETMAC is AFMA’s main source o f advice on management

o f the fishery. It is the forum where issues relating to the fishery are discussed, problems identified and p ossible so lu tio n s d ev e lo p e d . T h e M A C also p rovides an avenue fo r c o n s u lta tio n betw een

researchers and the industry.

A package o f Offshore C onstitutional Settlem ent (OCS) measures in the SEF is being discussed with re le v a n t S ta te g o v e rn m e n ts . W h ile b ro a d

agreement was reached at oE cer level on the trawl fishery, there are some details yet to be resolved. No agreement was reached on the management of

th e n o n - tra w l s e c to r an d n e g o tia tio n s are

continuing. This m atter is being treated as urgent because o f its impact on quota management. In the m eantim e, agreem ent was reached with Victoria and NSW to introduce prohibitions on the taking

o f certain quota species from State waters.

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

• COMPLIANCE

1992-93 was a difficult year for compliance in the SEF as a r e s u lt o f th e n ew q u o ta sy stem ,

d issatisfactio n over q u o ta allo catio n s an d the resultant impact o f the Federal C ourt decision in the Austral Fisheries case on potential prosecutions. H ow ever, progress was m ade in developing and im p le m e n tin g a new sy stem o f q u o ta

docum entation, which took effect in early 1993, and in reviewing and u p g rading the system for providing catch status reports.

• TOTAL ALLOWABLE CATCHES (TACs)

A process was put in place for determining TACs in the SEF in 1992. An integral part o f that process was th e in a u g u ra l SEF W o rk sh o p and p u b lic m eeting held in Bendigo in N ovem ber, 1992 at w hich in d u stry , m anagers an d scien tists cam e

together to discuss the fishery. TACs were varied as a result o f discussions during 1992 and new TACs were applied for some species in 1993.

While TACs for some species were increased in 1993 (over original 1992 allocations) the TACs for orange ro ughy w ere red u ced from 17 500 tonnes in 1992 to 13 000 tonnes in 1993, and

eastern gemfish from 200 tonnes to zero over the same period. Both species are currently the subject o f surveys being conducted as a result o f industry initiatives to improve knowledge o f the biomass and productivity o f the stocks.

• NON-TRAWL SECTOR

O ne o f the m ajor challenges in the SEF is the

development o f management arrangements for the non-traw l sector. AFMA is o f the view th a t the fishery should be managed by species, rather than by m ethod, if the current quota arrangements are to be effective. N egotiations currently underway w ith the States are seeking the developm ent o f

co m p lem en ta ry m a n ag e m en t arran g e m en ts to ensure that effort does n o t increase in the non­ traw l s e c to r w h ile th e tra w l s e c to r is being

co n stra in e d by in d iv id u al tra n sfe ra b le quotas (IT Q s). At the same tim e, AFMA is seeking to develop formal managem ent arrangements for the n o n -tra w l s e c to r o f th e fish ery u n d e r

Commonwealth jurisdiction.

M EETING OBJECTIVES • Conservation and sustainable use o f fishery resources.

A FM A s o u g h t to im p ro v e th e

effectiveness o f its individual transferable quota system to ensure the sustainable harvesting o f the resource. It also worked to w a rd s im p ro v in g m a n a g e m e n t

arrangements by:

• developing a form al M anagem ent Plan, initially for the trawl sector;

• d ev eloping access criteria for the

non-trawl sector;

• addressing OCS issues as a m atter or urgency;

• o v e rc o m in g th e le g isla tiv e

d e fic ie n c ie s in th e Fisheries M anagement A c t 199fi and • re v ie w in g T A C s a n n u a lly an d

adjusting where necessary.

• Efficient exploitation o f resources

AFM A w o rk ed closely w ith in d u stry th r o u g h th e S o u th E a st T raw l

M anagem ent Advisory C om m ittee and its sub-com m ittees to develop a draft p la n o f m a n a g e m e n t. T his in c lu d e d resolving allocation and other issues to achieve the advantages o f adjustment and efficiency available to an output control system.

• Consultation and communication

M anagem ent Advisory C om m ittees are AFMA’s main point o f contact to ensure effective co-operation with industry. It is the forum w here issues are discussed, p ro b lem s id e n tif ie d a n d s o lu tio n s

developed. SETMAC held its inaugural public m e e tin g in B e n d ig o la st y ear

where a report was given on the status o f the stocks and discussions were held on issues affecting the m anagem ent o f the fisher}'.

AFMA contacts:

Kim Parkinson, M anager (06) 272 5381

Nick Rayns, Asst Manager (06) 272 5266

A n n a W illock, S en io r M a n a g e m e n t O ffic e r (06)272 5179

G eoff R ic h a rd so n , A sst M a n a g er, S o u th e rn Management & M onitoring (06) 272 5032

SO U T H E R N SH A R K FISHERY Principal species: G u m m y sh a rk and school shark.

Number of boats: 131 gillnet (at June 1993) 96 hook

1991-92 catch: 2 9 5 5 to n n e s (school and gummy)

9 4 8 to n n e s ( o th e r

sharks)

Estimated value of catch: $15.2 million

Main markets: Domestic

Fishing techniques: D em e rsal g illn e ts , demersal hook fishing, some incidental catches by trawlers

OCS jurisdiction: C o m m o n w e a lth and State Governments

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

The southern shark fisher)', located in the waters adjacent to Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia, primarily targets school and gummy shark which are sold as filleted flake in the local retail markets.

During 1992-93, AFMA undertook extensive consultation with industry aimed at developing new management arrangements for the fishery. This led to the release o f two discussion papers (July and N o v em b er 1 9 92) w hich reflec te d co n cern s o f senior scientists over the state o f stocks for the two m a in c o m m e rc ia l sp e cie s o f sh a rk s a n d

recom m ended very tight catch restrictions. These were largely resisted by industry on the grounds that recommended catch levels were too low and th e sc ie n tific sto c k a sse ssm e n t w as u n d u ly

pessimistic.

Between February and April 1993 scientists revised their assessment o f shark stocks and advised that gummy sharks, while depleted and capable o f producing higher yields if allowed to rebuild, were more resilient to fishing pressure than previously

believed. However, the outlook for school sharks remained unchanged.

In February 1993, the Southern Shark Fishery M a n ag e m en t A dvisory C o m m ittee (SSFM A C ) fo rm e d fo u r w o rk in g g ro u p s to disc u ss th e

managem ent options for closures, input controls, output controls and buyback. Each o f the working groups presented their findings at the Inaugural Southern Shark Fishery A nnual Conference and public meeting held in April, 1993 in M elbourne,

attended by 120 people.

O n the basis o f the reports o f the w orking g ro u p s, revised scientific assessm ents and the d iscussions at th e co n fe re n ce , SSFM AC th e n p re s e n te d th e A FM A B oard w ith a set o f 31

recommendations. The Board agreed to implement the majority o f these recom m endations in a new M a n a g e m e n t P lan fo r th e fish ery u n d e r th e

Fisheries M anagement A ct 1991.

AFMA also com m enced discussions on the m an ag em en t o f the h o o k sector o f the fishery during 1992-93 which is n o t included in a formal M anagem ent Plan under the Fisheries A c t 1952. During 1993-94, AFMA will continue to consult with hook fishermen with the view to developing

management arrangements for this sector.

In early 1 9 9 3 , th e AFM A B oard in itiated a c tio n to r e s tr u c tu r e SSFM A C to p ro v id e a

balanced membership between fishing sectors and regions. The B oard appointed new' m em bers to SSFMAC in June 1993 which is now comprised of an independent Chairperson, the AFMA manager for the fishery, a scientific member, one m em ber representing the three State Governments involved in th e fisher)' and five in d u stry m em bers. T he restructured SSFMAC (see Appendix 6) will meet for the first time in July 1993.

AFMA also held four meetings o f SSFMAC, th r e e p u b lic f o ru m s , a series o f p o r t v isits

throughout South Australia, Victoria and Tasmania in 1992-93 to inform industry o f progress in the developm ent o f new m anagem ent arrangem ents and facilitate discussion o f the issues facing the fishery.

M EETING OBJECTIVES A FM A is d e v e lo p in g an in fo rm a tio n paper on the future management o f the fishery based on consultation held over the past year and the recom m endations o f SSFMAC. This paper will form the

basis o f drafting instructions for a new- M anagem ent Plan. C o n su ltatio n w'ith industry, scientists and State governments w'ill continue over the next six m onths w ith a view to im p le m e n tin g a new

Management Plan for the fishery in early 1994.

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E Μ E N

• Conservation and sustainable use o f fisheries resources.

A 30 per cent reduction in the length o f gillnets in the southern shark fishery was formalised to assist in reducing fishing p ressu re o n th e sto c k s in lig h t o f

scientific concerns. Additionally, AFMA liaised w ith in d u stry to develop new m anagem ent arrangem ent in line w ith the principals o f ecologically sustainable

fishing. T hese new arran g em en ts will include:

• bringing the hook sector o f the fishery under formal management arrangements;

• reducing wastage by discouraging fishermen from leaving their fishing gear unattended for long periods o f time;

• introducing a rolling seasonal closure to protect migrating pregnant school sharks;

• reducing the num ber o f fishermen dependent on the resource, thereby reducing fishing pressure;

• encouraging industry to develop a Code o f Conduct on sound fishing practices (for example, avoiding known aggregating areas for pregnant sharks, releasing female

sharks over a certain size undam aged); and

• encouraging a research program relevant to the management o f the fishery7.

• Efficient exploitation o f resources.

The fishery7 is currently managed by input controls w hich attem pt to co n tro l the catch by limiting fishermen’s inputs, in

this case the am ount o f gear used. These controls im pose some inefficiencies on the operations o f fishermen.

It is intended to provide a stable fishery w ith lo n g e r te rm p la n n in g h o riz o n s

th ro u g h th e in tro d u c tio n o f a lo n g e r

te rm M a n a g e m e n t P lan th a t has

industry’s broad agreement and support.

T h is w ill e n a b le fish e rm e n to m ake

r a tio n a l d e c is io n s , in a sta b le

environm ent, on how to maximise their returns. It is also envisaged that a longer term stable M anagement Plans will result in a reduction in management costs.

The Southern Shark Fishery7 M anagement Advisory C om m ittee, recognising th a t output controls may lead to some future benefits, will examine the pre-conditions

associated with these controls. This will p ro v id e an o p tio n for m o v in g to an

output control system.

• Consultation and communication.

In 1992-93 AFMA undertook extensive consultation w ith the fishing industry and the w ider com m unity on m anagem ent issues for the southern shark fishery. This has le d to a revised M AC s tr u c tu re ,

d e v e lo p m e n t o f a re se arch p rio ritie s forum, establishment o f working groups, culminating in an annual public meeting, and improvement o f information transfer to operators through fishery newsletters.

AFMA Contacts:

Mrs h js h Stone, Asst Manager (06) 272 5394

M r Antonio Mozqueira, Senior M anagement Officer (06)272 3367

M iss M e la n ie B urke, M a n a g e m e n t O ffic er (06) 272 5183

G R E A T A U S T R A L I A N B I G H T T R A W L F I S H E R Y

A - Commonwealth control

B - West Australian control C - South Australian control

GREAT A U S T R A L IA N BIGHT TRAW L FISHERY Principal species: D e e p w a te r fla th e a d , B ight redfish, orange

roughy.

Number of boats: 10

1992-93 catch: 1300 tonnes

Estimated value of catch: $3.8 million

Main markets: Export (mainly Europe) and domestic

Fishing techniques: D em ersal o tte r board trawling; lim ited m id­ water trawling

OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth

The Great Australian Bight trawl fishery extends from Cape Leeuwin, Western Australia in the west to Cape Jervis, S outh Australia in the east. The fish ery is p rim a rily a d em ersal ( b o tto m ) an d

developm ental m id-w ater trawl fishery based on regular traw ling o f inshore species and periodic traw ling for the deeper dwelling species such as orange roughy. The fishery excludes State (South Australia and Western Australia) Continental Shelf waters to the extreme east and west w hich have

traditionally been fished by State based line, trap and inshore trawl fishermen.

C atches o f 1300 to n n e s in 1 9 92-93 w ere co m p rised o f som e 4 0 d iffe re n t species. T he m ajority, however, was deepw ater flathead (442 tonnes), orange roughy (398 tonnes) and Bight re d fish (1 1 5 to n n e s ). A p re lim in a ry sto c k

assessm ent o f th e fish e ry ’s kno w n re so u rc e s, in c lu d in g e s tim a te s o f su s ta in a b le y ie ld o f

deepw ater flathead and B ight redfish, suggests there is room for only limited increases in fishing effort on inshore or ‘shelf species compared with 1991 and 1992 levels. H ow ever, th e re is still

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

potential for new deepwater resources to be found, in particular by m id-w ater traw ling, a m e th o d which has been little utilised to date.

In May 1 9 9 3 , a fte r som e 12 m o n th s o f

developm ent an d c o n s u lta tio n w ith in d u s try members, interested organisations and the general public, AFMA determined a new M anagement Plan for the fishery in accordance with the requirements of the 1991 Act. The new M anagement Plan was subsequently a c c e p te d by th e M in is te r fo r

Resources and commenced in June 1993.

The M anagem ent Plan aims to m anage the fishery by r e s tr ic tin g tra w lin g in th e G re a t

Australian B ight to th e holders o f transferable S tatutory F ish in g R ights for th e fishery. T he eligibility criteria for S tatu to ry F ishing R ights contained in th e P lan are d e sig n e d firstly to

recognise th o se ex istin g traw l o p e ra to rs w ho contributed to the development o f the fisher)' and secondly to hold fishing effort at or near current stabilised levels.

The G reat A ustralian B ight Traw l Fishery Management Advisor)' Committee (GABMAC) will be e s ta b lis h e d in A u g u s t, 1 9 9 3 a n d w ill be

comprised o f industry, scientific and governm ent members. GABMAC will be the principal forum for c o n s u lta tio n a n d d isc u ssio n on o n g o in g

management issues in the fisher)'.

M EETING OBJECTIVES • Conservation and sustainable use o f fishery resources.

The biological assessment o f the GAB trawl fishery stocks formed the basis for the m anagem ent arrangements included in the new M anagement Plan. The plan is

d e s ig n e d to lim it th e n u m b e r o f

participants in the fishery to a level which allows the sustainable exploitation o f the known resources. The plan also allows for . th e s e ttin g o f catch lim its an d o th e r

conditions to reduce fishing pressure on stocks where considered necessary.

• Efficient exploitation o f resources The fleet is relatively unconstrained in terms o f gear and fishing methods which provides for flexibility and versatility.

T h e in tr o d u c tio n o f th e new

M anagem ent Plan later this year should reduce uncertainty and conjecture which will allow o p e ra to rs in th e fishery to

e ffic ie n tly p la n th e ir fu tu re fish in g

operations and to reduce costs. As well, th e new p lan p ro v id es A FM A w ith a

more stable management base, reducing the need for o n g o in g developm ent o f management arrangements thus reducing management levies on fishermen.

• Consultation and communication.

T he GAB Traw l Fishery M anagem ent Plan was developed through the year in close c o n su lta tio n w ith peak industry organisations and individual fishermen.

Members o f the general public also had the opportunity to discuss managem ent issues relating to the fishery during two periods (Septem ber 1992 and January

1993) when drafts o f the plan was made available for comment.

T h e GAB T raw l F ish e ry

C o n su ltativ e C o m m itte e , com p risin g traw l o p e ra to rs , a S tate G o v ern m e n t m e m b e r, a s c ie n tis t an d an A FM A

representative, was the principal forum fo r th e d isc u ssio n o f th e d r a f t

M anagem ent Plan. This group will be replaced la ter th is year w ith a form al M a n a g e m e n t A d v iso ry C o m m itte e

e s ta b lis h e d u n d e r th e Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991.

AFMA contacts: Geoff Richardson, Asst Manager (06) 272 5032 L yn M e la n d ri, S en io r M a n a g e m e n t O ffic er (06) 272 5178 Megan Scott, M anagement Officer (06) 272 4447

Principal species:

Number of boats as at 30 June 1992:

1992-93 catch:

Estimated value of catch:

Main markets:

Scallops.

165 (Central Zone)

42 000 kilograms (Central Zone)

$360 000 (Central Zone)

France, H ong Kong, USA and domestic market

Fishing techniques: Dredging

OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth and States

The Bass Strait scallop fishery is divided into three zones. Zone O ne, which is generally 20 miles off the coast o f Victoria, is managed by Victoria under an O ffshore C o n s titu tio n a l S e ttle m e n t (O C S) agreement; Zone Two, which is generally 20 miles off the Tasmanian coast, is managed by Tasmania under OCS. A Central Z one, is m anaged under

Com m onw ealth jurisdiction, in accordance with p o lic ie s d e v e lo p e d by A FM A fo llo w in g

co n su lta tio n w ith T asm ania and V ictoria. The major scallop beds are located in areas under State jurisdiction.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , as a r e s u lt o f a

re c o m m e n d a tio n from th e Bass S tra it Scallop Consultative Com m ittee, AFMA agreed to amend the M anagement Plan to allow for the transfer o f Central Zone entitlements where they are linked to a State scallop licence or w here a C entral Zone

en title m e n t is to be am algam ated w ith a State scallop licence.

The Commonwealth has agreed to hand-over management o f the Central Zone to Victoria and

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E Μ

Tasmania. G overnm ent officials held talks during the year to d e v e lo p a jo in t m a n a g e m e n t

arrangement for the fishery and these negotiations are proceeding. Until agreement is reached, AFMA will continue to manage the Central Zone o f the fishery by fis h in g p e rm it u n til a new O C S

agreement is in place. The conditions on the perm it reflect th e key e le m e n ts o f th e p re v io u s

Management Plan.

A project to investigate an alternative design for a m ore e fficien t an d less en v iro n m e n ta lly damaging scallop dredge continues. Several designs were tria led in P o rt P hillip Bay and o ff Lakes Entrance. The netv designs are m ore efficient and reduce in cid en tal breakage o f scallops on new ground. F u rth e r w ork is needed by industry to enable these harvesters to match the catch rate o f the existing tooth dredge.

AFMA contacts:

Geoff Richardson, Asst Manager (06) 272 5032

Lyn M e la n d ri, S en io r M a n a g e m e n t O ffic e r (06)2725178

O T H E R S O U T H E R N F I S H E R I E S

• King (or g ia n t) crab fishery

T he kin g crab fishery is lo c a te d in w aters o ff

southern Australia generally outside the 3 nautical mile State limit.

A lthough the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent currently has sole jurisdiction over the crab fishery, A FM A an d th e S ta te s are in v o lv e d in O CS

negotiations aimed at rationalising jurisdiction for th e tra p fish e ry in lin e w ith e x is tin g O C S

arrangements relating to the State controlled rock lobster fisheries. AFMA’s preferred option is to pass responsibility for th e crab fishery to the States because o f the similarity in the catching methods

b e tw e e n th e ro c k lo b s te r a n d th e k in g crab

fisheries. A sim ilar approach is bein g taken to o c to p u s an d o th e r species tak en by th e same

method.

AFMA has held preliminary discussions with th e S ta te s o n th e n e e d fo r d e v e lo p m e n t o f

management arrangements designed to protect the resource because o f heightened interest in the king crab fishery over the past 12 months.

• Squid fishery

The squid fishery is located in southern Australian waters off the coasts o f Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and NSW. Two species are commercially

targeted - southern calamari ( Sepioteuthis australis) and G o u ld ’s sq u id (N o to to d a r u s g o u ld i), also know n as arrow o r to rp ed o squid. Com m ercial catches o f squid are taken using the jigging method and demersal trawling. M ore recently some m id­ water trawling has been undertaken.

The fishery is currently not subject to an OCS agreem ent and remains a status quo fishery with

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

Thursday Is.

W eipa

Darwin

Kurumba

| Papua New Guinea

Cape Londonderry

Cairns

N O R T H E R N P R A W N F I S H E R Y

fishery, northern finfish trawl and northern shark fisheries. Proposed new management arrangements for many o f these fisheries w ere d istributed for in d u s try c o m m e n t d u r in g 1 9 9 2 -9 3 an d

restructuring in other fisheries (notably the south east fishery) has resulted in increased interest to operate in these regions. In ad d itio n , fisheries su rro u n d in g C hristm as Island and the C ocos- Keeling Islands were formally closed, with a limited num ber o f permits provided to control expansion in these regions.

A FM A also p a r tic ip a te d in O ffsh o re

C o n s titu tio n a l S e ttle m e n t d isc u ssio n s w ith Q u ee n sla n d , W este rn A ustralia an d N o rth e rn T erritory fisheries agencies in Darwin on future m an ag em en t o f n o rth e rn fisheries. A series o f options for future jurisdictional arrangements were prepared for Ministerial consideration and should form the basis o f more cost effective and efficient management o f these fisheries.

NORTHERN P R A W N FISHERY Principal species: Banana, tiger and endeavour prawns.

Number of boats as at 30 June 1993:125

1992-1993 catch: 8500 tonnes

Estimated value of catch: $120 million

Main markets: Japan, Europe

Fishing techniques: O tter trawling

OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

The northern prawn fishery (NPF) extends from Cape York Peninsula, Q ueensland in the east to Cape Londonderry, Western Australia, in the west, with banana and tig er praw ns being th e m ajor targeted species.

Boat numbers in the NPF reached a peak o f 302 in the m id-1980s. W hen it was realised this level of effort was excessive, management strategies were introduced to reduce b o at num bers. This included a b o at replacem ent policy th a t carried forfeiture provisions along w ith a series o f input controls to address the effort problem. To speed up the reduction in effort, and ensure the conservation and sustainable use o f the resource, a voluntary adjustment scheme (VAS - buy-back o f units o f fishing capacity) was ado p ted in 1990, funded mainly by levies on operators.

A G o v ern m e n t g ra n t o f $5 m illion an d a

Government guaranteed commercial loan o f up to $40.9 m illion, o f w hich $20 million was drawn down, ensured the scheme was adequately funded. This loan is serviced by levies on the rem aining

operators and is to be paid o u t by 2001.

A lth o u g h th e VAS g radually re d u c e d the num ber o f b o a ts , th e re w ere still 171 b o a ts

operating in the fishery and a total o f 76 032 units of fishing capacity in June 1992.

The VAS ceased in December 1992 and on 1 April 1993 a com pulsory su rren d er o f un its o f fishing capacity across the rem aining o perators reduced boat numbers to 125 and units o f fishing

capacity to 53 842. T he purpose o f this m ajor restructure was to prom ote efficient exploitation o f the resource. While the compulsory surrender was challenged by several fisherm en in th e Federal

Court, an am endm ent to the N PF M anagem ent Plan allowed the surrender to proceed, providing compensation is paid if it is ultimately found that NPF units o f fishing capacity are property, which were a c q u ired on o th e r th a n ju st te rm s. T he

question o f whether the compulsory surrender was an acquisition o f p ro p erty is currently awaiting decision by the full bench o f the Federal C ourt of Australia.

Progress towards a co-operative management approach ensuring accountability to the fishing in d u stry an d to th e A u stralian c o m m u n ity is

continuing. Major steps in this direction included the appointm ent o f a restructured M anagem ent A d v iso ry C o m m itte e ( N O R M A C ), a new

Chairperson and soon to be appointed independent Executive Officer. (The NORM AC membership is listed in Appendix 6.)This will provide scope for stronger links between industry, N O RM A C and AFMA and will improve the efficiency, effectiveness

and focus o f management. These initiatives will also ensure that a balance o f views are included in the d e v e lo p m e n t o f fu tu re p o lic ie s. N O R M A C

c o n sid e re d a d ra ft in fo rm a tio n p a p e r for th e

implementation o f a new' M anagement Plan for the NPF under the fisheries M anagement A c t 1991 and discussions will continue in 1993-94.

In February, 1993 a public meeting was held to hear the new s o f NPF unit holders and skippers on m anagem ent issues. T he public m eeting was held in conjunction with the traditional pre-season

workshop w here inform ation on catch, research and CSIRO predictions for the coming season was disseminated.

A workshop was held in Darwin in June, 1993 w h ere u n it h o ld e rs a n d sk ip p e rs lo o k e d at

operational aspects o f the fishery. The focus o f this workshop, and a two day workshop based on round table discussions planned for Cairns in July 1993, was on seasonal and perm anent closures, season

opening and closing dates, daylight trawling bans and many other associated issues.

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

M EETING OBJECTIVES • Conservation and sustainable use o f fishery resources.

The voluntary adjustment scheme (enhanced buyback), designed to reduce effort in the fishery, was continued through to December 1992 to allow operators time to take foil advantage o f the scheme.

On April 1 1993 a compulsory reduction o f units o f capacity was activated across the whole fishery to address economic efficiency and to ensure more sustainable use o f the resource.

The current system o f input controls is being continually refined to keep pace with the dynamics o f sustainable fisheries resource management.

• Efficient exploitation o f fisheries resources The com pulsory reduction o f units o f fish in g ca p a c ity le d to a sig n ific a n t

re d u c tio n in b o a t n u m b e rs w h ich is

e x p e cted , ov er tim e, to en h an ce th e

profitability o f the remaining operators.

A FM A c o n tin u e s to in v e stig a te alternative management arrangements to in p u t co n tro ls th a t w ould encourage m ore efficient p ro fit m axim isation by operators.

A F M A ’s r e s tr u c tu r e o f th e

m an ag em en t advisory com m ittee and m oves to a p p o in t an in d e p e n d e n t

executive officer will ensure management a c c o u n ta b ility to th e in d u s try a n d

p ro m o te e ffic ie n t and effectiv e

management o f the resource.

• Consultation and communication

The restructured m anagem ent advisory committee will contribute to better two­ way com m unication betw een industry and AFMA.

C o n tin u a tio n o f th e an n u al p r e ­ season workshop and a more innovative w o rk sh o p p la n n e d fo r July 1 9 9 3 to

ad d re ss sp e cific m a n a g e m e n t issues ensures that a wide and balanced view is so u g h t from industry. The w orkshops also provide a forum where management s tr a te g ie s a n d te c h n iq u e s can be

effectively communicated.

A FM A re g u la rly tra n sfe rs

information to industry through circulars and its annual information booklet.

AFMA contacts:

Steve Bolton, Asst M anager (06) 272 5039

Dave Johnson, Executive Officer (06) 272 5511

F I S H A G

SOUTH ERN BLUEFIN T U N A FISHERY Principal species: Southern bluefin tuna.

Number of boats as at 30 June 1993: 94 (dom estic/joint ventures)

1992-93 Quotas: 11 750 tonnes (global)

5265 tonnes (Australia)

6065 tonnes (Japan)

420 tonnes (New Zealand)

Estimated value of catch: $53.5 million (Australia)

Main markets: Japan

Fishing techniques: Pole and line, purse seine (mainly for catching SET for farming), pelagic longline, trolling

OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth (except NSW state waters)

The Australian southern bluefin tuna (SET) fishery is m a n a g e d u n d e r a system o f in d iv id u a l

tra n sfe ra b le q u o ta s (IT Q s) w here each q u o ta holder is entitled to take a certain percentage o f a total allowable catch (TAG).

T h e fish e ry is g lo b a l, m a n a g e d u n d e r

v o lu n ta ry a rra n g e m e n ts by a trila te ra l g ro u p com prising A ustralia, Japan and N ew Z ealand. There have been severe reductions in the TAG over past years introduced by the trilateral partners who

hold annual meetings o f scientists and managers to assess th e sta te o f th e sto c k s a n d a g re e on

im p le m e n ta tio n o f a p p r o p r ia te m a n a g e m e n t arran g em en ts. O th e r nations are b eg in n in g to ta rg e t SET o u tsid e th e trila te ra l m a n ag em en t framework, which has caused serious concern for

the trilateral partners.

The trilateral countries are formalising global m anagem ent o f the stock and th e setting o f the to ta l g lo b a l c a tc h . T h e C o n v e n tio n fo r th e

Conservation o f SET was signed in Australia on 10 M ay 19 9 3 . T his C o n v e n tio n will have T reaty

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

sta tu s, a lth o u g h it is yet to be ratified. O th e r

countries th a t catch SET, or have SET in their fishing zones, are being encouraged to join the Convention and work within the framework o f its commission.

The majority o f the Australian SET quota is presently held by operators from P ort Lincoln in S o u th A ustralia w ith sm aller am o u n ts held by fisherm en in W estern A ustralia, T asm ania and southern NSW.

The Australian SET fishery is undergoing a transition where an increasing proportion o f the TAG is being taken by pelagic longlining or being caught and placed in cages for fattening (grow- out). Traditionally, the Australian catch has been taken using the p o le -a n d -lin e and purse seine fishing methods which target the smaller and thus lower valued SET. Pelagic longlining is a method which targets ad u lt SET destined for th e high priced Japanese sashim i m arket. This m ove to pelagic longlining follows on from efforts made by industry to “value ad d ” the product available to Australian operators. Farming or “grow -out” is a

new concept in the SET fishery. In 1993, about 700 tonnes o f SET, mainly caught by purse seining and poling, will be placed in m oored cages and f a tte n e d o v er a 2 -6 m o n th p e r io d b e fo re

harvesting. This form o f value adding to relatively small fish is p ro d u c in g h ig h retu rn s from the

market place. This trend is expected to continue in the next few years as the SET fishery stabilises.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , fo llo w in g sim ilar

arrangem ents for previous years, Australian and Japanese ind u stry en tered in to a jo in t ven tu re arrangem ent w hich allow ed up to 52 Japanese pelagic longliners to fish for up to 2720 tonnes of Australian quota. The income generated from this v en tu re has h elp ed th e A ustralian in d u stry to restructure and convert a num ber o f pole and purse seine vessels to pelagic longliners. In late 1992,

Federal C abinet su p p o rted the co n tin u atio n of joint ventures as a medium term strategy to further develop the fishery. Additional benefits from the jo in t ven tu re arrangem ents include training of Australians in pelagic longlining techniques, monies

for SET research, and fu rth e r assistance in the developm ent o f value adding techniques such as SET farming.

AFMA also participated in negotiations for the annual bilateral agreement with Japan which allows fishing access to different areas o f the Australian fishing zone. As part o f this bilateral agreement, up to 400 tonne o f Japanese SET quota is allowed to

be fished in waters around Tasmania, outside 12 nautical miles.

A SET M a n ag e m en t A dvisory C o m m ittee (SBTMAC) was formed in 1985 to give input to the m anagem ent o f this fishery. Members on the MAC include industry representatives, scientists, Com m onwealth and State fisheries managers and recreational fishing representatives. This committee meets three or four times per year to discuss issues o f importance to the SET fishery. Restructuring of this MAC, in line with the Fisheries Adm inistration A ct 1991 was progressed in 1992-93, with the new MAC and independent Chairperson expected to be announced early in August 1993.

During 1992-93, SBTMAC administered over $400 000 to research projects including archival and ultrasonic tagging o f SET; development o f a fish ery in d e p e n d e n t in d e x fo r ju v e n ile SET

(through an aerial survey); a report on Japanese tu n a fish eries to th e year 2 0 0 0 ; an d an SET

monitoring program. It is expected that SBTMAC will administer similar funds for SET research in 1993-94.

AFMA has commenced the development o f a new M anagement Plan for the SET fisher)' under the Fisheries M anagem ent Act 1991, which will g r a n t S ta tu to ry F is h in g R ig h ts to c u r r e n t

permanent quota holders. Substantial progress has been made with port visits to gather industry views, draft policy b ac k g ro u n d p ap ers p ro d u c e d for SBTMAC’s consideration and input and approval by the AFMA B oard o f th e revised inform ation paper. The new M anagement Plan is scheduled to

be implemented early in 1994.

Two su c ce ssfu l m e e tin g s o f s c i e n t i s t s /

industrv/managers (SIM ) were held in 1992-93. Port L in co ln in S o u th A u stra lia h o s te d th e

inaugural SIM workshop in Australia in June 1992. The second trilateral SIM m eeting was held in Japan in June 1993 w hen all aspects o f the SBT fishery in clu d in g stock statu s an d c u rre n t and future research and m anagem ent were discussed. Both meetings attracted a broad cross-section of participants contributing to the discussions. Similar meetings are scheduled for 1993-94.

• Conservation and sustainable use of the fishery resources AFMA took part in the formalisation o f global managem ent o f SBT by Australia,

Japan a n d N ew Z ealan d th ro u g h the

Convention for the Conservation o f SBT w hich was signed in A ustralia in May 1993. I t also to o k p art in the annual

m eeting in Japan o f scientists, industry' a n d m a n a g e rs to d isc u ss g lo b a l

managem ent o f SBT stocks.

• Efficient exploitation o f fisheries resources R esearch by A ustralian, Japanese and New Zealand scientists into ageing and

re c ru itm e n t fo r th e fishery c o n tin u ed t h r o u g h o u t th e y ea r w h ile , o n th e

dom estic front, industry driven research into value-adding in the form o f tuna fa rm in g v e n tu re s p ro v e d h ig h ly

successful.

• Consultation and communication A FM A p r o d u c e d a d r a f t p o lic y

b a c k g ro u n d p a p e r fo r th e n ew SBT

M anagem ent Plan follow ing extensive co n sultation w ith the industry'. I t also re stru c tu re d its m an ag em en t advisory

com m ittee to provide a greater level o f industry' representation and to improve communications links.

AFMA contacts: M r Lindsay Chapman, Asst Manager, SBL and Jack Mackerel Fisheries (06) 272 4812.

E S M A N A G E M E N T

Principal species: Yellowfin and bigeye Principal species: Skipjack tuna

Number of boats

tuna. Number of boats

as at June 1993: 18

as at June 1993: 200 1992-93 catch: 3700 tonnes

1992-93 catch: 490 tonnes (yellowfin) Estimated value 10 tonnes (bigeye) of catch: $2.6 million

Estimated value Mam markets: Domestic canning

of catch: $4.1 million Fishing techniques: Purse seining

Main markets: Japanese sashimi OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth and

Fishing techniques:

OCS jurisdiction:

markets and domestic (Sydney) market

Pelagic longline

Commonwealth and NSW Governments

NSW Governments

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M

The east coast tuna fishery covers waters from the tip of Cape York to the southern-m ost point o f the Australian fishing zone (AFZ) at 146°E, covering waters off the States o f Queensland, NSW, Victoria and Tasmania. Many o f the species also occur in other areas o f the AFZ and in the broader western and central Pacific.

The longline and purse seine sectors o f the fishery are being m anaged un d er lim ited entry arrangements. O ther commercial methods used to take tuna include rod and reel, poling, trolling,

beach hauling and handlining. There is also a major recreational and charter boat fishery for tuna and billfish, especially black marlin. The fishery targets mainly yellowfin, bigeye and skipjack tuna, w ith a developing fishery for albacore tuna.

In 1992-93 approxim ately 2 000 to n n es o f yellowfin tu n a w ere taken by all sectors o f the fishery ( b o th d o m e stic a n d f o re ig n o ffsh o re longliners).

The annual yellowfin tuna longline catch by foreign operations off the east coast averages 1200 tonnes and generated an access fee o f $2.21 million in 1992-93. AFMA participates in these foreign

access negotiations as part o f the Com monwealth delegation. In 1 9 9 2 -9 3 th e foreign fleet w ere subjected to further restrictions, due largely to the expansion o f the domestic fleet, with the maximum number o f Japanese vessels permitted to fish off the east coast reduced to 55. The m axim um effort levels were set at 7.5 million hooks (a reduction of

1.5 million hooks since 1991-1992).

T h ere has b ee n a g rad u al increase in the

am o u n t o f skipjack ta k e n o ff th e e a st c o a st,

although seasonal fluctuations are com mon for this species. In 1992-93 approximately 3700 tonnes o f skipjack, which is primarily purse seined or poled, were landed.

In 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , AFM A c o m m e n c e d th e

developm ent and im plem entation o f a fisheries

m anagem ent program for the fishery. East coast tu n a m anagem ent is currently based on fishing methods for an interim period. This arrangem ent was extended under Fisheries Notice in June 1993

to allow sufficient time to implement management arrangements under the Fisheries M anagement Act 1991. Formal arrangements, in the form o f an East Coast Tuna and Billfish M anagement Plan, are due

to be introduced in 1993-1994, under the Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991. O ffshore C onstitutional Settlement (OCS) arrangements covering all tuna species are still being finalised, with a view to being

resolved by 1 January 1994. An information paper on the proposed future management arrangements, which will form the basis o f the new Management P la n , was c o n s id e r e d by th e E ast C o a st

T u n a M a n a g e m e n t A d v iso ry C o m m itte e

(EC TU N A M A C ) and the AFMA Board in June 1993 before being publicly released for broader industry comments.

AFM A actively p u rsu e d its goal o f policy developm ent and efficient adm inistration in the east coast tuna fishery through the restructuring o f E C T U N A M A C , th e p rin c ip a l b o d y fo r

m anagem ent advice. The restructure occurred in December 1992, and is based on the AFMA policy o f an expertise based MAC structure. T he new membership is composed o f a Chairperson, AFMA m a n a g e r, s c ie n tific m e m b e r, r e c re a tio n a l

sector m em ber, State G overnm ent m em ber and fo u r in d u s try m e m b e rs. M r D avid B a te m a n , G eneral M anager o f H e in z G reenseas at Eden was a p p o in te d as C h a irm a n o n 12 F e b ru a ry

1 9 9 3 . E C T U N A M A C w as th e f irs t o f th e

M ACs to be r e s tr u c tu re d u n d e r th e Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991 and the membership is at Appendix 6. In line with AFMA’s stated goal o f improved

com munication, the first annual East Coast Tuna Industry, Research and M anagem ent W orkshop was held at the Eden Fishermen’s Club from 23 to

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T

24 March 1993. Participants included commercial and recreational fishermen, charter boat operators, processors, scientists and m anagers. A range o f topics was covered including marketing, Japanese c a tc h /e f f o r t d a ta , sto ck assessm en t, in d u s try developm ents, future m anagem ent and research findings.

AFMA contacts:

M a rtin Exel, G eneral M anager, N orthern a n d Pelagic Fisheries (06) 272 3260

Dorothea Huber, Asst Manager, East Coast Pelagics (06)2755282

Steve Jackson, Executive Officer, E C T U N A M A C (06)272 4846

JA CK M ACKEREL FISHERY Principal species: Greenback, yellowtail and Peruvian jack mackerels (bvcatch

species also included inthe fisher}' are blue mackerel and redbait).

Number of vessels: 28 purse seine, 3 mid­ water trawl

1 9 9 2 /9 3 catch: 15 000 tonnes

Estimated value of catch: $3 million

Main Markets: Fishmeal, bait

Fishing techniques: Purse seining, m id­ water trawling

OCS jurisdiction: Commonwealth and States - status quo

Jack mackerel stocks extend from north o f Perth in Western A u s tra lia , s o u th a ro u n d th e G re a t

Australian B ight, S outh Australia, Tasm ania and Victoria, and north to Goffs H arbour in NSW.

The fishen,' is com prised o f three species o f jack mackerel - greenback, yellowtail and Peruvian - and includes a significant bycatch o f redbait and blue mackerel in some regions.

Difficulties rem ain w ith resolving jurisdictional arrangements for the Tasmanian region, known as Zone A. The purchase o f the local fishmeal plant

and associated fishing rights, com bined w ith a greater offshore m ovem ent o f mackerel surface schools led to a reduced total catch off Tasmania in the 1992-93 season.

The fishery' is considered fully developed in eastern Tasmania with approximately 18 vessels currently licensed in this region. A Tasmanian Governm ent Jack Mackerel M anagement Plan has been in force for the purse-seine fishery in Tasm anian coastal waters since 1988. In areas outside Tasmania, the fisher)' is considered only lightly exploited.

In April 1992, due to increasing interest in the fisher)', AFMA called for registrations o f interest in the purse-seine and mid-water trawl fishery for jack mackerel. This Register closed on 31 D ecem ber,

1992 when registrations for over 90 vessels had been received.

T h e re is c o n tin u e d d e b a te s u r r o u n d in g

jurisdiction o f the fisher)· in the Tasmanian region. Interim m anagem ent arrangem ents w ere agreed during April 1993 to enable the “elimination” o f the 3 nautical mile line off eastern Tasmania, and

im plem entation o f a com petitive total allowable catch (TAG) for this region. This arrangement will cease at the end o f the current season (that is, 31

August 1993).

The Jack Mackerel Working Group (JMWG), comprising scientists and Commonwealth and State

G o v e rn m e n t r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s , m e t o n several occasions th ro u g h o u t 1992-93, and is proposing interim m anagem ent arrangem ents for the purse se in e fish e ry c o v e rin g all w a te rs , w ith

im plem entation planned for the 1993-94 season (that is, 1 September 1993 to 31 August 1994). It is also proposed that management will be extended to cover all m ethods, including mid-water trawling,

as soon as possible.

AFMA contacts:

C laire Fell, M anagem ent Officer, S B T a nd Jack Mackerel fisheries (06) 272 4740

M A N A G E M E N T

TORRES STRAIT PROTECTED ZONE Principal species: Multi-species - prawns, tropical rock lobster,

Spanish mackerel, pearl shell, trochus and reef fish. Protected species include dugong and turtle.

Number of boats as at 30 June 1993:105 (prawn)

62 (mackerel)

58 (lobster)

7 (pearl shell)

253 (combinations of mackerel, lobster and pearl shell)

Catch: 2000 tonnes (prawns)

200 tonnes (rock lobster)

100 tonnes (Spanish mackerel)

Estimated value

of catch: $17 million (prawns)

$5 million (rock lobster)

$1 million (Spanish mackerel)

Main markets: Japan, USA, and domestic

Fishing techniques: O tter trawl (prawn), troll (mackerel) and diving (lobster)

OCS jurisdiction: Joint Authority (Commonwealth and Queensland)

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G

Torres S trait fisheries are m anaged u n d e r th e Torres Strait Treaty by the Torres Strait Protected Zone Jo in t A u th o rity (T S P Z JA ). T h e T re aty between Australia and Papua New Guinea (PNG) is

concerned w ith s o v e re ig n ty a n d m a ritim e

boundaries in the area between the two countries and the protection o f the way o f life and livelihood of tr a d itio n a l in h a b ita n ts an d th e m a rin e

environment. It also establishes the Torres Strait Protected Z one (TSPZ) in w hich each country exercises sovereign jurisdiction for swimming fish and sedentaiy species on the respective sides o f the agreed jurisdiction lines.

The management o f Torres Strait fisheries in the A ustralian section o f the TSPZ is the joint re sp o n sib ility o f th e C o m m o n w e a lth a n d

Queensland Governments.

M a n a g e m e n t co sts a s so c ia te d w ith th e

enforcement o f the Treaty are split on a 5 0 /5 0 basis between the Queensland and Com monwealth Governments, with all initial capital items funded by the Commonwealth.

New management arrangements for the 1993 season were introduced for the Torres Strait prawn fishery in March 1993. U nder these arrangements, each licensed vessel was allocated a n u m b e r o f

operational days in the Torres Strait (the allocations are based on fishing history in this region by each boat). The m anagem ent regime, designed to cap effort in th e fishery, had b ro ad s u p p o rt from

m anagem ent and consultative com m ittees, the fishing in d u stry and th e T orres S trait islander communities. Fishing under the new arrangements was closely m onitored and the system is reported to be w o rk in g w ell. L o n g e r te rm m a n a g e m e n t

arrangements for the prawn fishery' were developed throughout the remainder o f 1992-93.

In late March 1993 meetings were held with fishermen on Boigu, Dauan, Saibai, M abuiag, St Pauls, Kubin, Badu, Yam, Sue, Coconut, Murray,

Darnley and Yorke Islands. The meetings were well attended and involved lengthy discussion o f a wide range o f local fisheries m anagem ent issues. The fisherm en w elc o m e d th e o p p o rtu n ity to m eet

m anagers an d learn a b o u t A FM A ’s role in the Torres Strait.

W orking G roup meetings were held on pearl shell, Spanish mackerel and tropical rock lobster fisheries in June 19 9 3 . T hese m eetings, which b r o u g h t t o g e th e r G o v e rn m e n t m a n a g e rs,

fish e rm e n a n d c o m m u n ity r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s ,

considered a range o f current issues in each o f these fisheries. T he Licensing W orking G roup m et in April and June 1993 to consider the broader aspect o f licensing policy in the region. Recommendations

from these W orking Groups will be considered by the T orres S trait Fishing In dustry and Islander C onsu ltativ e C o m m ittee and the T orres S trait Fisheries M anagement Committee at their 1993-94

meetings.

A new three-year catch sharing agreement was n e g o tia te d b e tw e e n P N G a n d A u stra lia and

subsequently approved by the respective Ministers. U nder this agreement a num ber o f fishing vessels will be endorsed to operate in the o ther’s waters within the Protected Zone.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 -9 3 , a to tal o f $ 676 000 was

s p e n t by A FM A on th e fo llo w in g rese a rc h

programs in the Torres Strait

• Research for management o f the tropical ornate rock lobster.

• M onitoring o f critical fisheries habitats.

• Genetic variation in dugong populations.

• Traditional fishing.

• Assessment o f heavy metal levels in commercial fishery' species.

I

• Conservation and sustainable use of

the fishery resources AFMA in tro d u c e d new m an ag em en ts arrangem ents for the prawn fishery for the 1993 season to ensure sustainable and efficient fishing.

• Efficient exploitation of fisheries

resources The new management regime is designed to cap effort in the fishery and to provide greater flexibility for the industiy.

• Consultation and communication

AFMA m oved to increase the level o f awareness o f fisheries resource issues, particularly am ong the fishing industry, and other users o f the marine resources,

th ro u g h a series o f m e etin g s h eld in

March and June 1993.

AFMA contacts:

M ick Bishop, R e g io n a l M anager, Torres S tr a it Fisheries (070) 691307

V iki O ’B rien, E xe cu tive O fficer, Torres S tr a it Fisheries (06) 272 4281

OTHER NO RTHERN FISHERIES In December 1992 the AFMA Board approved the rollover o f all d evelopm ent plans covering the northern developmental fisheries. There was no call for new applicants for the 1992-93 fishing year and generally permits were issued to those who held a permit or licence endorsement in 1991-92. These fisheries will be review ed d u rin g 1 9 9 3 -9 4 and m anagem ent arrangem ents developed un d er the

Fisheries M anagement A c t 1991. The development o f new management arrangements is taking place in the co n tex t o f AFM A’s corporate goals, w hich em p h asise th e n e e d to im p le m e n t p ro g ra m s

resulting in the conservation and sustainable use o f fisheries, and encourage the efficient exploitation o f these resources.

M anagement o f these fisheries in 1992-93 was affected by the transition from the Fisheries A ct 1952 to the Fisheries Management A c t 1991 in that d evelopm ent plans w ere no lo n g er p a rt o f the legislative framework. AFMA started work on the development o f M anagement Plans under the new legislation in 1992-93 and will continue in 1993­ 94.

The A uthority’s corporate goals include the requirem ent to increase the level o f awareness o f fisheries resource issues w ithin the industry and broader com m unity. C ontact was m ade w ith all resource users in these developing fisheries to provide the opportunity for their involvement in th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f new m a n a g e m e n t

arrangements. The restructuring that has occurred within AFMA will also contribute to more efficient and cost effective management o f these fisheries.

A summary o f the management status for each developing fishery follows. With the exception of fisheries which have been subject to jurisdictional uncertainty, th e objectives set in th e 1992-93 Operational Plan were met.

F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N

• North west slope trawl fishery (adjacent to Western Australia) The n o r th w e st slo p e fish ery is a d e e p w a te r

crustacean traw l fishery ta rg e tin g scam pi an d prawns an d for w hich 11 p erm its w ere issued during 1992-93. The 1992-93 objective for this

fishery was to move from a development plan to a M a n a g e m e n t P lan , an d to d e te r m in e fish in g capacity and access rights. An inform ation paper on longer term management, which will form the basis

for a draft M anagem ent Plan for the fishery, was considered by the AFMA Board in June 1993. This paper will be distributed to all interested parties for comment in early 1993-94.

• Western deepwater trawl fishery (adjacent to Western Australia) The western deepwater trawl fishery is a deepwater finfish fishery. T arget species are orange roughy and d o ry a lth o u g h no s u b s ta n tia l sto c k s o f

commercial species were found in 1992-93. There were eight perm its issued in 1992-93 although there is little activity7 in the fishery. It is proposed to continue m anaging this fishery as developm ental

and to encourage exploration. The issues o f fishing capacity an d a llo c a tio n o f access r ig h ts w ere difficult to resolve given the lack o f activity and d a ta c o lle c tio n . An in f o rm a tio n p a p e r , th e

forerunner o f a draft M anagem ent Plan, will be developed and circulated for public com m ent in the first half o f 1993-94.

there is little known activity' in this fisherv. The lack o f data and active participants has prevented a productive review. To partly address this problem, a logbook was designed for data collection from

o p e r a to rs . A d isc u ssio n p a p e r a d d re ssin g

management options has been drafted and will be distributed to permit holders and others interested in the fishery' early in 1993-94.

• East coast (seamounts) demersal line fishery (adjacent to NSW and southern Queensland) The east coast demersal line fishery, which is just so u th o f Fraser Island, is also predom inantly a dropline fishery. The main target species are blue- eye trevalla and lapuka. Eighty' three permits were valid tor this fishery in 1992-93, primarily for tuna

longline boats, although few o f these fishermen actually fish on the seam ounts. Inform ation has been collected on operations in this fishery since the mid-eighties. N o further permits for this fishery

will be issued u n til lo n g e r te rm m a n ag em en t arrangements are determined.

Two issues have a major influence on future management directions - the existence of the north east demersal line fishery' immediately above this fishery and a quota managed fishery immediately

south which targets the same species o f fish.

• East coast trawl fishery (in deep water, adjacent to Queensland and northern NSW' Ten fish trawl and six prawn trawl permits were issued d u rin g 1 9 9 2 -9 3 . Five of th e fish trawl

permits were issued specifically for exploration of new deepw ater trawl resources o ff NSW. These tra w le rs are m a in ly s o u th ea st traw l vessels

se a rc h in g fo r n ew o ra n g e r o u g h y a n d dory-

resources. New resources were not found in 1992­ 93.

• North east demersal line fishery (adjacent to Queensland) The n o rth east dem ersal line fishery occurs on seam ounts in w aters deeper than 4 0 0 0 m. T he

major fishing m ethod used is dropline although o th e r dem ersal line m eth o d s are used. T arg et species are d ee p w ate r sn ap p ers an d re e f fish. Fourteen permits were issued in 1992-93 although

A discussion paper on fu tu re m anagem ent options for the fisher)' was prepared and distributed to industry and State governm ents in early May 1993. C om m ents received will be considered by A FM A w h e n d r a f tin g an in f o rm a tio n p a p e r

o u tlin in g p ro p o s e d lo n g e r te rm m a n a g e m e n t arrangements.

The Broome prawn trawl fisher)' is a six week ‘trial’ fisher)' that occurs in the mid-season closure o f the northern prawn fishery. Five vessels operated in the 1992-93 season with ab o u t 98 tonnes o f prawns

caught. The operational m anagem ent o f this fishery is largely undertaken by th e W estern A ustralian Fisheries D epartm ent on behalf o f AFMA.

There has been no move towards developing lo n g e r te rm m a n a g e m e n t a r r a n g e m e n ts as

discussions are being held w ith W estern Australia to transfer the jurisdiction o f this fishery to th a t State. Resolution o f this issue should occur in late 1993.

• Northern shark fishery (off northern

Territory and in the Gulf Of

The northern shark fishery is a gillnet and longline fishery targeting shark and mackerel with a bycatch o f other finfish. Fourteen permits were issued for this fisher)' in 1992-93.

D e v e lo p m e n t o f th is fish e ry is b e in g

m o n ito re d by AFM A in c o -o p e ra tio n w ith the N orthern Territory Government to assess the size o f the stocks and the appropriate level o f fishing.

Management ot this fishery is complicated by jurisdictional arrangements. Discussions between the Commonwealth and appropriate State and

Territory Governments in May 1993 addressed the need for m anagem ent by species rather than by m e th o d s o f fish in g a n d d e v e lo p e d

recommendations for Ministers to consider at the Australian Fisheries Council meeting later in 1993.

• Northern fish trawl fishery (off northern Western Australia, Northern Territory and in the Gulf of Carpentaria) T he n o rth e rn fish traw l fishery is a tw o zoned fishery. O ne zone is no rth o f W estern Australia

(T im o r Z o n e) w hile the o th e r is n o rth o f the

N orthern T erritory and the G ulf o f C arpentaria (Arafura Z one). There is minimal activity in this fishery, with effort in 1992-93 concentrating on the Arafura Zone. The future o f this fishery will be considered at th e A ustralian F isheries C ouncil meeting.

• Western Australia trap and pot fishery (mainly deepwater crab) W estern A ustralian fisherm en, w'ho hold State entitlem ents to take crab and lobster or to catch finfish by trap or pot, operate in this fisher)'. Bv ag reem en t, AFM A issues these fisherm en w ith permits to use traps and pots in offshore waters, and 18 such p erm its w ere issued in 1 9 9 2 -9 3 .

Jurisdiction o f this fishery will be discussed at the Australia Fisheries Council meeting.

• Norfolk Island deepwater line and trawl fisheries The deepwater fisheries off Norfolk Island are not extensively fished, although one application was received by AFMA in June 1993. N o commercial fish resources have been identified in these waters.

A m e e tin g o f th e N o rfo lk Islan d F ish in g

Consultative Com mittee was held in March 1993,

involving lo c al fis h e rm e n , N o rf o lk I s la n d

Government representatives and AFMA, to discuss options for this fishery. It was decided n o t to move to a M anagem ent Plan for these fisheries at this stage, and th a t applications for access w ould be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

The restricted area o f 30 by 50 nautical miles s u r ro u n d in g th e I s la n d , w h ic h allow s local

fishermen on Norfolk Island exclusive access to the demersal fish resources, will remain in force. It was in te n d ed in 1 9 9 2 -9 3 to lo o k at an O C S -style

agreem ent w ith N orfolk Island to m anage the resources within this region, but it was decided that the cost o f such management would be prohibitive for the Norfolk Island Government. It also would have required a change to the cu rren t fisheries legislation.

T h e tria l C h ristm a s Isla n d lin e fish e ry was

advertised in D ec em b e r 1992 an d led to five

permits being issued in June 1993, primarily to Island residents. These permits allow the taking of finfish, by longline, handlinc and trolling, within a 25 nautical mile radius o f C hristm as Island, for local consumption only. D uring the 12 m onth trial, information will be collected on the resource and the scale o f operations and the suitability o f existing arrangements reviewed.

The trial Cocos (Keeling) Islands line fishery was also advertised in June 1993. Interest in this fishery by Australian fishermen increased during 1 9 9 2 -9 3 . T h re e p e rm its are av ailab le for

commercial line fishing under similar conditions to those operating in the Christmas Island line fishery.

D isc u ssio n s in M arch 1 9 9 3 w ith Isla n d

A uthorities, the Australian N ature C onservation A g en c y , an d th e D e p a rtm e n t o f S p o rt, th e

E n v iro n m e n t, and T e rrito rie s fo cu se d on the

development o f longer term management options for both o f these fisheries.

A FM A C ontacts:

Jane Fowler, Asst Manager, Northern Fisheries (06) 272 4614.

T u n a are h ig h ly m ig ra to ry species an d travel th r o u g h o u t w ate rs in th e s o u th , c e n tra l and

western Pacific, including Australian waters. The relationship between the adult breeding stocks in the western Pacific and recruitm ent o f juveniles and adults into the Australian east coast fishery is as yet

u n c e rta in . A u stralia, th r o u g h AFM A and the F isheries Policy B ranch o f th e D e p a rtm e n t o f Primary Industries and Energy, aims to ensure that these stocks are m anaged on a sustainable basis

throughout the region. This is in line with AFMA’s sta te d goal o f im proved fisheries m anagem ent through greater liaison with fisheries management b o d ie s and th e active p u rs u it o f g lobal stock

knowledge.

D uring 1992-93 AFMA officers attended a num ber o f regional Pacific meetings:

• Eighth Regional Fisheries Surveillance M eeting held in Suva, Fiji during March 1993.

• Fifth Annual Consultation o f the Parties to the US Multilateral Fisheries Treaty with Pacific Island Parties in Nadi, Fiji during April 1993.

• 12th Annual Meeting o f the parties to the Naru Agreement (PNA) in Koror, Palau during May 1993.

• 23rd Annual Meeting o f the Forum Fisheries Committee (FFC) in Koror, Palau during May 1993.

The level o f regional enforcement and a range o f surveillance projects were determ ined during these meetings. To maximise benefits tram such

E S M A N A G E M E N T

operations, a co-ordinated approach was advocated b etw een th e defence forces o f A ustralia, N ew Zealand and France and the patrol vessels o f Pacific Island Countries. The need for enhanced regional communication, improvements to the operations o f the regional register and an increase in the level o f surveillance training w ere identified as p riority areas. The in tro d u c tio n o f a vessel m o n ito rin g

system, which utilises Inmarsat and is compatible w ith the pro p o sed A ustralian system , is a new initiative for the region and liaison has occurred between Forum Fisheries Agenqr (FFA) and AFMA

officers.

A 10-vear extension to the multilateral treaty with the U nited States and certain Pacific Island Parties, o f which Australia is a member, was agreed to. This treaty covers operations o f the U nited States purse seine fleet in the Western Pacific. In the Australian fishing zone it provides access to US purse seiners in limited areas o f the Coral Sea off north eastern Australia. To date there has been little or no fishing in this region and this situation is unlikely to change while there are high catch levels o f skipjack tuna in other parts o f the Pacific.

Australia is in the top bracket o f foreign aid donors to the FFA and the western Pacific Islands in general. At the Parties to N auru A greem ent (PNA) and the Forum Fisheries Com mittee (FFC) annual m eetings, discussions centred on future financial support to the region. Decisions were

reached on m an ag em en t arrangem ents for the w estern Pacific tu n a fishery and vessel caps for distant water fishing fleets. PNA member countries were particularly interested in gaining higher access

fees from their bilateral access arrangements with d is ta n t w a te r fish in g n a tio n s an d lo o k e d to

Australia to provide assistance on how to achieve this. Harmonised minimum terms and conditions were agreed to for all foreign fleets operating in the re g io n . A ban on tr a n s h ip m e n t at sea, th e

enforcement o f better quality high seas catch/effort data and the implementation o f a cost neutral and m ore effic ie n t re g io n a l re g is te r w ere fu rth e r positive outcomes o f the meetings.

AFMA contacts:

M artin Exel, General Manager, (06) 272 3260

Dorothea Huber, Asst Manager (06) 275 5282

O P E R A T I O N S A N D C O R P O R A T E S E R

OPERATIONS A N D CORPORATE SERV ICES Overview by Graham Peachey,1 General M anager Operations and Corporate Services.

O perations and Corporate Services is responsible fo r th e fin an c ial m a n a g e m e n t, lic e n s in g and surveillance, the observer program, and systems and hum an resources m anagem ent. As a result, the

branch provides support services to AFMA and is ac tiv e ly in v o lv e d in th e d e v e lo p m e n t and

im p le m e n ta tio n o f fish e rie s m a n a g e m e n t

arrangements.

T he F inancial, System s and H u m an Resources M anagement Sections provide support for AFMA’s financial m anagem ent, inform ation technology requirem ents, and staffing arrangements. In each

case there is a close working arrangement with the fisheries management areas within AFMA as well as consultation with industry on budgeting issues.

T he O p eratio n s S ection is resp o n sib le for the d e v e lo p m e n t an d c o -o r d in a tio n o f licen sin g , su rv eillan ce an d co m p lia n ce p ro g ra m s for all fisheries managed by AFMA and for the fisheries

elements o f the civil coastal surveillance program. O bserver program staff work closely with fishery m anagers and scientists to determ in e observer

p rio ritie s an d to o rg an ise th e d e p lo y m e n t o f

observers on foreign fishing vessels operating in the A u s tra lia n fis h in g z o n e (A F Z ). B o th th e

O perations and O bserver Sections w ork closely with industry and the State fisheries agencies.

D uring 1992-93 there were a num ber o f notable achievem ents in the O perations and C orporate Sendees area. These are detailed as follows:

FIN A N C IA L M A N A G E M E N T D uring 1992-93, AFMA received revenue o f $24.9 m illion, being $1 0 .8 m illion from the Annual A p p ro p r ia tio n , $ 1 1 .6 m illio n from Special

Appropriation and $2.5 million in grants and other incom e. T he A nnual A p p ro p ria tio n represents

funding for the functions performed by AFMA on b e h a lf o f th e C o m m o n w e a lth G o v e rn m e n t

In c lu d in g m a n a g e m e n t o f th e T o rre s S tra it

Protected Zone and apprehension and prosecution o f fo re ig n fish in g vessels illeg a lly fish in g in A ustralian waters. A m ounts collected from the fishing industry as levies and fees are paid to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and appropriated to AFMA through the Special Appropriation.

AFMA o p era tes in an accrual a c c o u n tin g environm ent w ith the transition to full accrual accounting completed by 30 June, 1993. The final transfer o f financial activities perform ed by the

Department o f Primary' Industries and Energy on behalf o f AFMA also occurred during 1992-93. Financial m anagem ent procedures were reviewed and revised to reflect the environm ent in which AFMA operates. A small professional team was recruited to undertake the activities o f the section.

A new financial management system, Finance One, was selected and implementation o f the first phase (the General Ledger, Accounts Payable and P urchasing m odules) o cc u rre d in A pril 1993. Further development in 1993-94 will include the implementation of an Assets M anagement module, an interface with the pay-roll processing system and the im plem entation o f an A ccounts Receivable m odule which will be interfaced w ith AFM A’s Licensing System.

The in tr o d u c tio n o f F in an c e O n e has

enhanced financial m anagem ent w ithin AFMA through the production o f more timely and better quality management reports. The fishing industry

has also b enefited from the provision o f m ore d etailed and tim ely in fo rm atio n . An extensive restructure of the Chart o f Accounts has enhanced the flexibility o f reporting.

Increased participation in the Finance S ub­ c o m m itte e s of th e M a n a g e m e n t A dv iso ry

Committees has generated a greater understanding

and acceptance o f the process for determination of the co n trib u tio n by the fishing industry to the directly attributable costs o f fisheries management.

1 Resigned from AFMA effective 28July 1993.

M ajor compliance program s were developed and im plem ented in the south east, southern shark, northern prawn, east coast tuna and the southern bluefin tu n a fisheries during 1992-93. R egular inspections were conducted o f boats, unloading of catch, compliance with entitlem ent conditions, as well as the co n d u ct o f regular at-sea and aerial patrols. Fisheries officers attended M anagem ent Advisory C om m ittees (MACs) and rep o rted on compliance activities in fisheries, and gave expert advice o n s tr u c tu rin g p ro g ra m s to m axim ise effectiveness at minimum cost.

A m ajor review o f A FM A /State compliance an d o b se rv e r p ro g ra m s m ade w id e - r a n g in g

recommendations for the re-structuring o f services around Australia. Significant initiatives included greater decentralisation o f certain functions to key centres, more focus on outcomes and effectiveness

o f programs, attention to funding arrangements, a p ro p o s e d su b m issio n on c o s t rec o v ery

arrangem ents, and national program s covering prosecutions and training.

Im provem ents to service delivery by State agencies on behalf o f AFMA were achieved with an in creased focus on tra in in g an d a m ove to a

regional approach. In the south east fishery, officers were trained in AFMA quota arrangem ents with attention to cost effectiveness. Two enforcem ent

exercises involved extensive investigations into abuses o f the q u o ta system and will result in a n u m b e r o f p e rs o n s b e in g c h a rg e d w ith 361

offences. O th e r train in g exercises covered the Crimes (Investigation o f Commonwealth Offences)

Act 1991 , workshops and meetings with Australian and Papua New Guinea (PNG) officers over Torres Strait P rotected Zone fisheries enforcem ent, and officer-exchange arrangements between States. The increased understandings from these exercises has enhanced th e p ro d u c tiv ity o f agency services. AFMA seminars covering the full range o f fisheries subjects were attended by 40 Royal Australian Navy officers destined for vessels involved in fisheries enforcem ent. The expertise o f these officers has

been c e n tra l to th e effec tiv e n ess o f fisheries

compliance operations in the AFZ.

AFMA w orked closely w ith the Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol on a range o f Federal and State matters within the Torres Strait Protected Zone. A total o f 31 boats, comprising 26 banana

boats and five outriggers, were apprehended with 123 persons cited for alleged breaches. Prosecution action for 39 persons from six boats covering 130 charges was finalised in Australia, with the six boats

being forfeited. Papua New Guinea prosecuted 13 persons and is expected to launch prosecutions against the rem aining offenders who returned to PNG from Australia.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , A FM A rev ie w e d an d

form alised its policy on th e disposal o f fishing vessels, gear and catch. The new policy allows the sale o f b o a ts w h e re a clea r p r o f it to th e

Commonwealth can be dem onstrated and the sale will n o t com prom ise the surveillance effort. The review fo llo w e d re q u e sts fro m th e p u b lic to

purchase forfeited Indonesian fishing vessels.

AFMA continued to develop close w orking relations with nearby fishing nations with regular exchanges o f inform ation and close consultation and liaison on matters o f m utual interest. AFMA was active in Forum Fishing Agency activities and w orked closely on the developm ent o f uniform

regional standards for vessel trac k in g systems. A FM A also in tr o d u c e d tria l s a te llite d a ta

tra n sm issio n a rra n g e m e n ts w ith th e licen sed Japanese longline fleet in 1993.

Surveillance o f foreign fishing vessel activity within the AFZ continued through the Coastwatch o r g a n is a tio n in c o n ju n c tio n w ith th e Royal

A u stralian Navy and A irforce. As a resu lt 26

unlicensed foreign fishing boats were apprehended and AFM A initiated 26 prosecutions covering a total o f 71 charges. Twenty two prosecutions were successful with four cases pending. Boats, gear and catch forfeited as a result o f successful prosecutions included 18 Indonesian type 111 vessels and a New Zealand dropline boat, with catch and gear only forfeited on a Taiwanese longliner. The pending p rosecutions relate to tw o In donesian and two Taiwanese pair trawlers. The New Zealand dropline

boat forfeited is under appeal to the High Court.

In addition to these offences, three licensed Japanese longline vessels were prosecuted for five charges relating to licence and logbook offences. Two o f these prosecutions resulted in forfeiture of

tu n a catch to the C om m onw ealth w ith a value around $4 million, with one matter currently under appeal. Prosecution action against the third tuna longline vessel is pending. A surveillance database

was established to su p p o rt th e effectiveness of foreign compliance programs.

AFMA contacts: Peter Venslovas, Manager, Operations (06) 272 5682

S tu a r t F itch, A sst M a n a g er, C om pliance (06) 272 5482

ο A T I O N S A N D C O R P O R A T E S E R V I C E S

LICENSING

During 1992-93, AFMA introduced new licensing arrangements which will lead to the establishment o f longer term access rights and fishery specific permits, This will ensure greater security' for those

in the fishing industry and provide AFMA with detailed in fo rm atio n on w hich to base fu tu re fisheries management decisions.

AFMA moved to integrate the licensing and u n it re g is te r system s by tr a n s f e rr in g th e

responsibility for m aintaining m any o f the u nit registers to the Fishing Operations Section. This will lead to cost savings and provide the base for establishing a Register o f Statutory Fishing Rights w hen they are in troduced. M ajor fisheries now

c o v e re d by th e r e g is te rs m a in ta in e d by th e

Operations Section include the south east fishery, southern bluefin tuna fishery, southern shark gillnet and hook fisheries, Bass Strait scallop fishery and the Great Australian Bight trawl fishery Statutory Fishing Rights are expected to be issued in the G reat A ustralian B ight traw l fishery in A ugust

1993.

AFMA continued to maintain systems to deal with the licensing requirements o f the Fisheries A ct 1952 and th e Fisheries M ana g em en t A c t 1991. AFMA issued 474 C om m onw ealth Fishing Boat

Licences under the Fisheries A c t 1952 and 1041 Fishing Permits under the Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991 in respect o f domestic fishing vessels. In addition, 236 licences were issued authorising the operation o f foreign fishing boats in the AFZ.

AFMA contacts:

Peter Vensloms, Manager, (06) 272 5682

Paul Ryan, Asst Manager (06) 272 5284

AFZ O B SE R V E R P R O G R A M D uring 1992-93, the Observer Program covere approximately 1800 sea days on commercial fishin vessels. This included coverage o f approximately 1 per cent o f the Japanese tuna longline effort an

100 per cent o f foreign trawl operations in th AFZ. The Program successfully m et all coverag objectives including m o n ito rin g tu n a longline deepw ater trawl, prawn trawling operations am two special projects related to high seas monitorin; o f SET tuna and deepw ater trawl fishing vessel adjacent to the AFZ by the former Soviet Union.

Observer coverage provides m onitoring ani compliance o f operations, biological data collectioi a n d d o c u m e n ta tio n o f fish in g te c h n o lo g y

Observers also note interaction with other marim and environmental issues such as marine mamma conservation and marine pollution controls. Whili on board, the observers work closely with the crev during fishing and processing operations, whili maintaining the independence and quality o f dat; AFMA and scientists demand.

T h e d e s ig n an d im p le m e n ta tio n o f the

O bserver Program is co-ordinated by AFMA ir consultation with various government and researcf organisations th ro u g h an annual m e etin g o f t working group. AFMA directly manages the dats

collected and is required to ensure it is o f good quality and disseminated in a timely fashion to ail legitimate users.

To m eet technology transfer objectives, four o f the seasonal observers were drawn from the dom estic industry. To further facilitate industry particip atio n and to im prove dissem ination of acquired knowledge, the Program initiated industry participation in the annual review group. It also conducted a number o f seminars and talks to local industry groups, as well as developing a concept of providing industry input to the placement o f their

nominees as observers.

Since 1 9 9 1 , th e P ro g ra m h as p r o v id e d

consolidated reports to address m anagem ent and research officers difficulties in absorbing the vast number o f reports submitted. In 1992-93 this was in excess o f 100. This process is seen as an efficient device to provide an objective consolidation o f reports.

T h e P r o g r a m ’s a b ility to a d e q u a te ly

d issem inate d a ta w as vastly im p ro v e d by th e appointment o f a database co-ordinator in 1992. The c o - o r d in a to r is re s p o n s ib le fo r th e

development o f the observer database system first implemented in 1991, reviewing and enhancing the observer logbooks to standardise data received and developing procedures to ensure the integrity o f the c o lle c te d d a ta . T he P ro g ra m has fu rth e r

developed the pre- and post-season debriefings to assist ongoing quality and relevance o f the work performed.

T he d atabase system was fully d ev e lo p e d during 1992-93 and is proving an invaluable tool in providing sum m arised data to the P rogram , fisheries m anagers and research o rg an isa tio n s.

D u rin g th e im m e d ia te f u tu r e , s ta n d a r d is e d

summary reports will be developed for attachment to cruise reports and audit reports for validating data sets. Historical data from 1991 and prior is being systematically added w here possible. The

P ro g ram also in itia te d lia iso n w ith re g io n a l

Observer Programs in the South Pacific

AFMA Contacts:

Mr Peter Cassells, Program Manager (06) 272 5648.

Sub-Section 68(2) o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991 provides for AFMA to determine terms and conditions o f employment for employees and c o n s u lta n ts . A s ig n ific a n t n u m b e r o f AFM A employees were transferred to the Authorin' from the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy on its establishment in February 1992. Sub-Section

10 o f th e Fisheries L egislation (C onsequential Provisions) A ct 1991 , provides for those employees transferred to AFMA from D PIE to continue to be employed under the Public Service A ct 1922 until

new te rm s an d co n d itio n s o f em p lo y m e n t arc determ ined by the A uthority. Staff recruited to AFMA since its establishment have been employed on equivalent terms and conditions. AFMA is in

th e p ro c e ss o f d e v e lo p in g new te rm s and

conditions o f employment pursuant to Sub-Section 68(2) o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991. It is ex p ected th a t these will be im p lem en ted in 1993-94.

H um an Resources issues were addressed as a priority throughout 1992-1993. Recruitm ent was undertaken to appoint Hum an Resources staff with expertise in organisational and staff development, personnel, recruitm ent, support services, records

management, and policy development.

H um an Resources functions previously carried out by the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy (for example, payroll processing, personnel, and securitv) were taken over by AFMA during the year. A m ajor in ternal au d it of all records and

processes was undertaken and action is now being taken to bring all processing w ork and record keeping up-to-date, and to develop appropriate and useful policies and procedures.

O P E R A T I O N S A N D C O R P O R A T E S E R V I C E S

Terms and Conditions of Employment • A Terms and Conditions Working Group was established in February, 1993 and facilitated negotiation between AFMA and the Public

Sector U nion (PSU), on behalf o f all union members within AFMA, on possible terms and conditions o f employment. Agreement was reached on the introduction o f a short term closed Certified Agreement which will be presented to the Australian Industrial

Relations Commission during early 1993­ 1994 for certification. Negotiations on a further long term agreement will continue.

• As part o f the negotiation process, an internal Working Party was established to make recommendations on the following:

- arrangements for performance management for all AFMA employees; - remuneration and classification arrangements;

implementation o f individual employment contracts at Senior Officer level; and

associated issues.

• An organisational structure was established.

• Staffing philosophy was developed.

• Substantial recruitm ent action was completed to meet AFMA’s staffing structure which was in line with its staffing philosophy.

• Movements within the structure were facilitated in order to meet work demands.

• A range o f H um an Resources polities was dev eloped, approved by the AFMA Board and the Minister for Resources, and implemented (for example, Equal Employment Opportunity', Industrial Democracy, and Human Resource Development).

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) In 1992-93 AFMA developed and approved an E EO Plan w hich will ensure th a t all decisions r e la tin g to e m p lo y m e n t are b ased o n th e

application o f m erit. T he Plan will be formally introduced during 1993-94.

AFMA is com m itted to fostering a working environment that enables all employees to work in an atmosphere free from all types o f discrimination, and to affirm the concept that merit is the basis o f d e c isio n m a k in g o n all m a tte rs r e la tin g to

employment.

A FM A , th r o u g h th e d e v e lo p m e n t an d

im plem entation o f its EEO program , will ensure that all current, prospective and future employees are given an equal chance to operate and compete in an environm ent that provides a consistent and fair approach in all aspects o f its practices and procedures.

While organisational responsibility' for the effective m a n a g e m e n t o f E E O lies w ith th e H u m a n

R esources M anager, all m anagers and staff are responsible for su p p o rtin g and p ro m o tin g the principles and practices o f EEO in the workplace.

E E O , as p a r t o f th e m a n a g e m e n t and

workplace culture, will be achieved and maintained through the following objectives:

• Achieving and maintaining awareness and compliance with EEO principles throughout AFMA.

• Reviewing, developing and m onitoring all employment related policies and practices and integrating the principles o f EEO into the management framework.

• Introducing and analysing a broad based statistical representation o f the organisation.

• Maintaining an effective and professional service in the operation o f EEO and the compilation o f EEO reports.

EEO is an im portant element in organisational management and, as such, is enhanced through an evolving process o f reviewing and updating staffing and em p lo y m e n t p ractices to e n su re A FM A ’s requirements are met.

During 1992-93, AFMA sought inform ation on a program which will enhance the developmental and career prospects o f Aboriginal and T orres Strait Islanders th r o u g h clear an d sp ecific tra in in g ac tiv itie s. T w o p o s itio n s w ere id e n tif ie d as

designated p o sitio n s. O th e r p o sitio n s will be considered in 1993-94.

EEO BY CLASSIFICATION AS AT 30 6 93 Classification(l) Male Female ATSI NESB

Cats1&2

Senior Executive 7 0

Senior O fficer g ra d e A 2 0

Senior O fficer g ra d e B 4 3

S enior O fficer g ra d e C 15 3

ASO g ra d e 6 13 5

ASO g ra d e 5 6 6

ASO g ra d e 4 1 7

ASO g ra d e 3 0 6

ASO g ra d e 2 0 6

ASO g ra d e 1 1 2

TOTAL NOTES:

49 38 1 3 2

Table relates to Permanent staff only and excludes vacancies, temporaries and contractors. Classification includes equivalent

classifications.

ATSI - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.1

NESB - Non English Speaking Background.1

DIS - Disability.*

1 Definitions contained within the Public Service Commission document entitled EEO Program Guidelines I and 2 Updated.

Industrial Democracy within AFMA is based on the u n d ersta n d in g th a t em ployees should have the opportunity' to participate in, and be involved with, the decisions which effect them at work.

A FM A re c o g n ise s th e c o n tr ib u tio n o f

employees in the realisation o f organisational goals an d o b je ctiv es an d , as su ch , is c o m m itte d to

ensuring th a t em ployees are o p era tin g at their m a x im u m p o te n tia l. I n d u s tr ia l D em o c racy r e in fo rc e s th is th r o u g h th e p rin c ip le s o f

p a r tic ip a tiv e d e c isio n m a k in g , em p lo y ee

consultation and information sharing. Through the development o f these principles AFMA will achieve the following goals:

• improved productivity and efficiency; • increased performance by all staff through improved communication channels and a

greater awareness o f organisational requirements; • recognition o f the contributions made by employees; • prom otion o f organisational goals and

objectives; and • decision m ating which takes account of employee concerns. D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , s ta ff w ere in v ite d to

c o m m e n t on a n u m b e r o f im p o r ta n t issues

including the negotiation o f a Certified Agreement, th e C o rp o ra te an d A n n u al O p e ra tio n a l P lan, H um an Resources D evelopm ent Plan, the EEO Plan, and the Studies Assistance Plan as well as a num ber o f operational and fisheries M anagement Plans. Many com m ents were received and taken into account in the finalisation and implementation o f these programs.

D uring 1993-94, Industrial Dem ocracy will play an im portant part in the developm ent and im p ro v e m e n t o f A F M A ’s p e rfo rm a n c e and productivity through participative decision making, employee consultation and information sharing.

OH&S aims to ensure a safe, healthy and satisfying w ork e n v iro n m e n t. W ith in A FM A all office furniture and inform ation technology purchases w ere assessed o n th e basis o f e rg o n o m ic

effectiveness and OH& S and Australian standards. In the absence o f a formal OH&S process, which is currently being developed, all OH&S issues raised were dealt with and addressed, to the satisfaction of both M anagement and employees. D uring 1992­ 93 two reports o f injury were notified, one relating to an ankle injury, the o th e r to a back injury.

Following an investigation a num ber o f measures were recommended.

A review o f cu rren t personal and building security arrangements is currently being investigated w ith a view to u p g rading and review ing access

arrangements for both employees and visitors. T1 review will also take into account aspects such as II drills and other personal safety' arrangements.

Considerable emphasis was placed on the trainii and developm ent o f employees and a num ber ac tiv itie s to o k p lace d u rin g 1 9 9 2 -9 3 . In tl

absence o f a form al train in g and developm ei p ro g ra m , w hich is c u rren tly bein g developei training activities included conducting an inductic session in February 1993 to cover all new AFM ( a p p ro x im a te ly 3 0 ) staff. T h is se ssio n w;

comprehensive and covered the full am bit o f tl organisation’s operations.

T w enty em ployees atten d ed the ‘Fisheric A d m in is tra to rs C o u r s e ’ c o n d u c te d by th

Australian Maritime College in Launceston whic provides a com prehensive course into fisherie management. Employees also attended training i time management, financial management, security su stain ab le d ev e lo p m e n t, an ti-d iscrim in atio n report writing and public administration.

C u r r e n tly , A FM A has e ig h t e m p lo y ee

u n dertaking higher education courses at eithe D eg ree , G ra d u a te D ip lo m a o r M a sters level During the year a Studies Assistance Program wa

developed to assist employees who wish to obtaii h ig h e r q u a lific a tio n s th a t are r e la te d to tin

organisation’s objectives. The Studies Assistance program has the following positive attributes:

• AFMA is able to develop as a professional organisation; • employees are able to develop professionally in order to assist in the achieving o f

organisational goals; • current and future job performance is enhanced through increased knowledge and

skills; and • com mitm ent and co-operation can be established among AFMA employees.

lis re

!g of 1C

It d,

in A is e

:s e h

s

"

s r

s 1

AFMA STAFFING AS AT 3 0 6 93 Branch Established Permanent Temporary/ Total

Positions Staff Contract

Management & Policy Executive 4 4 - 4

Policy/R&D 4 4 - 4

Legal 4 3 - 3

C o m m u nicatio ns 3 3 - 3

Sub-total 15 15 - 14

Operations & Corporate Services G eneral M a n a g e r 1 1 - 1

O p eratio n s Licensing 9 8 Ί 9

O p eratio n s 7 5 - 5

Surveillance O b serv er P rogram 3 2 1 3

Financial M a n a g e m e n t 7 8 - 8

H um an R esources 4 4 1 5

R ecords M a n a g e m e n t 2 2 - 2

System s 6 5 2 7

S ub-total 39 3 5 5 40

Southern Fisheries G en eral M an a g e r 1 1 - 1

M a n a g e m e n t A ssistant 1 1 - 1

S hark/G illnet/H ook 3 3 3

SEF/Scallops 6 5 1 6

GAB/Perm its 3 3 - 3

L og bo ok s/M on ito ring 6 3 4 7

S ub-total 20 16 5 21

Northern & Pelagic Fisheries G en eral M an a g e r NPF a n d o th e r T orres S trait

East C oast Pelagics SBT/Jack M ackerel

Sub-total

1 1 - 1

12 11 1 12

4 3 - 3

3 3 - 3

4 4 - 4

24 22 1 23

98 TOTAL 98 87

AFM A’s co rresp o n d e n ce and file m an ag em en t procedures were developed and im plem ented to streamline and maximise information recording and re trie v a l a rra n g e m e n ts t h r o u g h o u t th e

organisation. These new arrangem ents provide strict requirem ents on correspondence m atters ensuring that AFJV1A operates at a level consistent with both external and internal needs.

AFMA undertook a num ber o f initiatives in the area o f energy efficiency which included the use of fuel efficient four cylinder vehicles in its day-to-day operations and the purchase and use o f recycled paper. Separate waste bins are located throughout th e b u ild in g an d A FM A o p e n ly e n c o u ra g e s

recycling initiatives. Additionally, AFMA operates in a modern energy efficient building which makes effective use o f natural light. All external windows are “tinted” and double glazed which enhances the efficiency o f the air conditioning system. Office areas are arranged for effective use o f available space and facilities. AFMA will continue to m onitor and review its energy efficiency to ensure cost effectiveness and proper use o f its resources.

AFMA Contact:

Ms Margaret Harper, H um an Resources M anager (06) 272 4761.

A review o f the functions o f the Systems Section was com pleted and a Systems Plan developed. The Plan identifies the Systems Section’s clients, and the

roles o f an In fo rm a tio n T e c h n o lo g y S tee rin g Com mittee, various managers and the section itself in developing systems and providing services. The objectives and strategies to be pursued were also documented.

As p a rt o f th e System s review , a new staffing

structure was p u t in place w ith the objective o f reducing costs and achieving a greater degree of control and continuity. A team o f five permanent staff is now in place with a sixth and final position to be filled in July 1993.

Assistance was provided to the Finance Section with the implementation o f the new Finance One a c c o u n tin g p ac k ag e . W ork on th e lic e n s in g , en titlem ents, and logbooks systems centred on maintenance and m inor enhancements. A project to review the licensing and entitlements system was commenced with a view to improving its efficiency and audit-worthiness. This project will also include integration with the new accounting package to provide a greater degree o f financial control.

Vessel tracking systems Im p le m en ta tio n o f a satellite based system for m onitoring the position o f vessels and receiving more timely catch data progressed significantly. A trial o f receiving catch and p o sitio n d ata from Japanese vessels was agreed and negotiations to

enable this to proceed are nearing com pletion. A system for receiving and analysing this information is in place on an evaluation basis. This system is expected to be operational in July 1993 for use with both the Japanese vessels and selected vessels

in the domestic fleet.

The issue o f the type o f satellite system was also resolved. Japanese vessels w ill re p o rt via Inmarsat A. Where satellite m onitoring is used for dom estic vessels, In m a rsa t C w ill be used in

accordance w ith a preference expressed by the S o u th E a st T ra w l M a n a g e m e n t A d v iso ry

Committee and to meet AFMA requirements.

early in 1993-94 and should significantly improve the security and integrity o f the systems.

AFMA contacts: M r Phil Marshall, Systems Manager (06)272 5576.

Several personal computers (PCs) were replaced by more powerful models with 486 processors. This will continue to be done on a needs basis. PC usage and the sophistication o f th a t use continues to

grow.

Standard M icrosoft PC application products continue to be used with upgrades being applied as th ey b e c o m e av ailab le th r o u g h a d is c o u n t

arrangement retained through the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy.

T h e A FM A m ove to n e w p re m ise s

necessitated the im plem entation o f a new Local Area N etw ork. This was im plem ented sm oothly and a p ro g ra m is n o w u n d e rw a y to p ro v id e

network access to printers which will reduce their number and cost.

Operations A number o f projects were commenced to address deficiencies in the procedures for operating, the AFM A c o rp o ra te app licatio n s. T h ese p ro jec ts

include implementation o f tighter change control and security procedures. They will be completed

The Communications Section has a broad agei which covers a range o f public relations fu n d i as well as a regular publishing p ro g ram wh advances AFMA’s com munications and corpor objectives.

O ne o f A FM A’s strategic com m unicatic objectives for 1992-93 was to review Austral·, Fisheries magazine with the key purpose o f furtl enhancing its appearance, to expand its coverage fisheries m anagem ent issues and to encompas wide range o f m atters o f interest to the fishi industry.

As part o f this review, the Com m unicatic S e c tio n u n d e r to o k a sam p le te s tin g o f t

m agazine’s readership. A total o f 36 readers Australian Fisheries (including State Governme D epartm ents, peak industry bodies and resear institutions) w ere canvassed for opinions o f t magazine, as were AFMA staff members.

W hile the review provided m ainly positi feedback on Australian Fisheries, it also identified num ber o f issues which needed to be addresse These included:

• a firm policy on free issue o f Australian Fisheries, particularly as it is applied to commercial fishermen and Commonwealth and State Government organisations and agencies;

• identification o f current readership by category; and

• a full scale readership survey.

The AFMA Board clearly identified a need fc a ‘new look’ Australian Fisheries as well as a shift 1 editorial policy to provide a major focus on fisheric management policy and issues.

Accordingly, the Communications Section wa set the task o f bringing about these changes with

target date set for the July issue o f the magazine. This target date was met.

The Board also agreed to a com prehensive readership survey before addressing o th e r issues raised during the Australian Fisheries review. The survey, which will be conducted during the 1993­ 94 fin a n c ia l y ea r, w ill aim to q u a n tif y th e

magazine’s readership, gauge reader satisfaction with th e c o n te n t o f the m agazine and identify possible future directions.

T h e C o m m u n ic a tio n s S e c tio n was also

involved in the editing and publishing o f the first fisheries sp ecific n e w s le tte r fo llo w in g th e

restructure o f the East Coast T una M anagem ent Advisory C o m m ittee. The n ew sletter was w ell received by industry and is expected to be the forerunner o f others as the restructuring process for

each o f the M anagem ent Advisory C om m ittees (MACs) is completed. Fisheries specific newsletters provide stakeholders in a specific fishery w ith a reg u la r a c c o u n tin g o f how th e ir in te re sts are

represented on the MAC.

AFM A’s initiative in the previous financial year, News front the Board , a monthly publication which tables the decisions taken by the Board and is published following each meeting, is the second

step in the process o f keeping AFMA’s stakeholders fully informed. This is further enhanced through Australian Fisheries and its com m itm ent to provide com p reh en siv e articles d e ta ilin g m a n a g e m e n t

decisions and outcomes and to report on a range of issues o f interest to the fishing fraternity and the com m unity at large. T he S ection also to o k an active ro le in th e e d itin g a n d p r o d u c tio n o f

AFMA’s first Annual Report and Corporate Plan.

D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , th e C o m m u n ic a tio n s

S e c tio n b r o a d e n e d its d a ta b a s e fo r th e

d issem in atio n o f in fo rm atio n to th e m edia to include industry and other interest groups.

It also developed an information brochure on AFMA and its role which will be published in the 1993-94 financial year. This brochure will be the f o re ru n n e r o f o th e r in fo rm a tio n le aflets for

distribution to the broader community.

A further initiative o f the Com m unications Section was the introduction o f fortnightly lunch time briefings. Run over a 30-minute time slot, the b rie fin g s p ro v id e a fo ru m fo r th e in te rn a l

dissemination o f information to AFMA staff as well as giving staff the opportu n ity to improve their presentation skills through critical appraisal by their peers.

A FM A contacts: M argaret Macreadie, C om m unications M anager (06) 272 5187

A n g e la B ird , C o m m u n ic a tio n s C o -o rd in a to r (06)272 5182

Strategies were adopted by the Legal Section in 1992-93 to ensure that it complies with the goals o f AFMA’s Corporate Plan. These are:

1. Ensure that all subordinate legislative instruments prepared by or on AFMA’s behalf are in accordance with the requirements o f the Fisheries Acts.

2. Ensure AFMA’s objectives are given effect to in legislation.

3. Ensure that all instruments issued by AFMA are in accordance with the requirements of the legislation and conform to administrative law principles.

4. Provide ad-hoc oral and written advice in respect o f the implementation and operation o f legislation relating to fisheries management.

V E M A N A G E M E N T G R O U P

Goal 3 (C om m unication)

1. Disseminate information on fisheries management legislation.

2. Ensure that adverse court or tribunal decisions are not based on faulty drafting or legal defects in policy.

3. Conduct seminars on legal aspects o f fisheries management and administration.

Goal 4 (Policy D evelopm ent an d Efficient A dm inistration)

1. Review all M anagement Plans to ensure conformity to legislation and policy.

In p u rsu it o f th e se strateg ie s th e B ranch

performs the following functions:

• advises on the interpretation, implementation and am endment o f legislation and instruments affecting AFMA;

• drafts instruments and liaises with the Attorney-General’s Department for legislation drafted externally; • has the carriage o f all civil litigation in which

AFMA is involved including litigation arising from the Fisheries A c t 1952 and its continued application;

• adv ises and assists in compliance issues including liaison with the Australian Federal Police and the Department o f Public Prosecutions;

• provides legal policy and general legal advice; and

• represents AFMA at meetings, conferences and enquiries.

In addition, the Section has an im portant role in the provision o f seminars and training sessions for AFMA staff on aspects o f fisheries legislation, th e o b je c t of w h ich is to in c re a se sta ff

understanding of the legislation and thus enable them to provide a b e tte r service to the fishing

industry. Further, the Section recognises that early involvement o f legal staE in fisheries management d eterm in atio n s and notices assists in d etecting avoidable legal and procedural complications and th u s lessens th e possib ility o f successful legal challenges.

D uring 1992-93, all the Southern Fisheries cam e u n d e r th e p ro v isio n s o f th e Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991 (The 1991 Act) and the focus o f the Section has been increasingly directed to the application o f that Act. N orthern Fisheries including the n o rth e rn praw n (N P F) and tuna fisheries remain under the Fisheries A c t 1952.

The NPF has drawn heavily on the resources o f th e L eg a l S e c tio n esp ec ially d u r in g th e

im p le m e n ta tio n o f th e fis h e ry ’s c o m p u lso ry reduction scheme. Challenges associated with the im p lem e n ta tio n o f th a t schem e, in c lu d in g the defence o f Federal C ourt challenges to its validity and the requirem ent for am ending legislation, is outlined below. Briefly, the Section:

• liaised with industry and government representatives to prepare and implement the detailed policy for the compulsory reduction;

• liaised with the Office o f Legislative Drafting, (“O L D ” ) Attorney-General’s D epartm ent to prepare amendments (known as “NPF 10” ) to the N orthern Prawn Fishery7 M anagement Plan and subsequent determination by the Minister and commencement o f NPF 10; • when NPF 10 was successfully challenged in

the Federal Court, liaised with senior AFMA management, external consultants and OLD to prepare a “saving” am endment (known as NPF 11), which addressed the issues raised by the C ourt in its decision on NPF 10; and • the Section was also active in running AFMA’s

defence o f the NPF 10 and subsequent appeals on NPF 10 and a new challenge to NPF 11.

E X E C U E Μ Α Ν Α

A decision is yet to be handed down on all o f the appeals.

The Legal Section is also com m itted to the program o f determining M anagement Plans under the 1991 Act. Although these plans are drafted by the Office o f Legislative Drafting, it is the Section's function to ensure that the instructions given are comprehensive, precise and are in accordance with AFMA policy.

AFMA contacts:

Bill Palmer, Principal Legal Officer (06) 272 5129

Tony Pintori, Legal Officer (06) 272 5632

Matthew Walsh, Legal Officer (06) 272 4591

RESEARCH A N D POLICY C O -O RD IN A TIO N D u rin g 1 9 9 2 - 9 3 , A FM A c o n tin u e d its

com mitm ent to the identification o f research needs and th e c o -o rd in a tio n o f m an ag e m en t rela ted re se a rc h in th o s e fish e rie s fo r w h ic h it has

resp o n sib ility . T h e C h ie f S c ie n tist, D r B ruce Phillips and Chief Economist M r Barry Kaufmann are mainly responsible for this function.

M anagem ent Advisory C om m ittees (MACs) have b e e n giv en p rim e r e s p o n s ib ility fo r

determining management related research priorities within each fishery. AFMA has appointed a research member to each MAC and MACs are encouraged

to establish research sub-comm ittees to assist the research m em ber in recom m ending appropriate research priorities for each fishery.

AFM A’s Research Com m ittee, o f which the Chief Economist and Chief Scientist are members, is responsible for advising AFMA on the relative re se a rc h p r io ritie s b e tw e e n fish e rie s a n d on

priorities where research has application to two or m ore fisheries. T he Research C om m ittee is also req u ire d to ensure th a t th e relative econom ic

benefits are taken in to acco u n t to ensure that

m a x im u m r e tu r n is o b ta in e d fro m rese arch

expenditure.

Funds directly available to AFMA for research are lim ited. Levies paid by fishermen fund some- research, however, this is in the main limited to m o n ito rin g o f fish in g ac tiv ity , in c lu d in g tlie- co lle c tio n an d analysis o f daily lo g b o o k s and landings data. Additional funding is provided by the Com monwealth through an allocation from the F ish e rie s R e so u rce s R esearch F u n d (F R R F ).

R esearch p ro jec ts fu n d ed by AFM A from this source from the 1991-92 allocation are listed in Table 1. Because these allocations were not made

until after AFMA was established (February 1992) m ost o f this research was undertaken during the 1992-93 financial year. A list o f projects for which FRRF funding was provided from the 1992-93

allocation is at Table 2.

AFMA, through the Chief Scientist and Chief E c o n o m is t, has e s ta b lis h e d close w o rk in g

relationships with research organisations and the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation. T he o b je c t is to ensure th a t A FM A ’s research priorities are given due recognition in the planning

and funding o f research and that research programs undertaken are appropriate to AFMA’s needs.

AFMA was also active in developing policy approaches to a num ber o f issues that extend across fisheries (see A ppendix 8). In m ost cases draft p o licy papers w ere m ade available fo r public co m m en t before AFM A finalised its approach. These ‘Policy Papers’ are publicly available. The main elements o f each are as follows:

• AFMA’s approach to MACs, their structure and role and the role o f the chairperson and executive officer o f a MAC.

• The Government’s cost recovery policy that applies to AFMA; AFMA’s approach to consultation with MACs in determining

fishery specific budgets; and the process for collecting payments from individual lew payers.

• The transition from fishing boat licences under the Fisheries A ct 1952 which, except for limited entry fisheries, permitted fishing anywhere in the Australian fishing zone

(AFZ), to area and fishing m ethod specific fishing permits under the Fisheries Management A ct 1991.

• AFMA’s approach to exploratory and developmental fishing outlined its process for controlling fishing operations from the outset, with preferential future access available to those involved in actively developing new fisheries.

• The process for dealing with applications for the re-grant o f expiring fishing permits including the requirement to pav fees and levies.

• The process to be followed in dealing with the disposal o f fishing boats and gear, forfeited to the Commonwealth by order o f a court.

AFMA has also established an internal Task F o rc e to c o - o r d in a te th e d e v e lo p m e n t and

implementation o f plans o f management. It is the Task F o rc e ’s role to en su re th a t a c o n siste n t

approach is followed and that there is a rigorous internal review at all stages in the development o f new plans.

AFMA contacts:

B a m K aufm ann, Chief Economist (06) 272 5063

Bruce Phillips, Chief Scientist (06) 272 5184

F rank M eany, M a n a g e r Policy C o -o rd in a to r (06) 272 5388

TABLE 1 1 9 9 1 -9 2 FRRF PROJECTS Project

An in fo rm a tio n b ase fo r th e A ustralian fishing industry.

Risk assessm en t fo r ex p lo ra to ry fishing in A u stralian w aters.

Foreign in v o lv em e n t in th e A u stralian fish in g industry.

Im proved sto ck assessm en t o f s o u th e rn b lu efin tu n a (SBT).

Fisheries reso urces p u b licatio ns.

M o n ito rin g o f Russian fishing o u tsid e o f AFZ.

M esh selectivity an d p o p u la tio n e stim a te s fo r w a re h o u .

S o u th e rn sh ark research p ro g ra m .

D ev elo p m e n t o f a b e n e v o le n t p ra w n traw l.

A ssessm ent o f im p act on T orres S trait fish eries of P ap ua N ew G u inea m ining.

A u stralian /In d o n esia n w o rk sh o p on fish stocks in t h e A rafu ra Sea.

M o n ito rin g SBT catches o ff Ind on esia.

S ou th e a s t traw l research.

C o n so lid ated SBT d a ta b a s e .

Fundings Investigator

A u stralian B u reau o f

43 500 A g ricultural an d

R esource Econom ics (ABARE)

99 000 ABARE

121 000 ABARE

88 000 CSIRO

1 4 5 0 0 0 B u reau o f Rural

R esources (BRR)

65 700 AFMA

51 000 D e p a rtm e n t o f

C o nserv ation & E nv iron m en t, V ictoria

150 000 D e p a rtm e n t of

C o nserv ation & E nv iron m en t, V ictoria

81 900 D e p a rtm e n t o f Prim ary

Industries, Q u een slan d

50 000 CSIRO

36 250 BRR

123 000 CSIRO

150 000 Fisheries R esearch

In stitu te, NSW

80 000 CSIRO

A N A G E M E N T G R O U P

TABLE 1 19 9 1 -9 2 FRRF PROJECTS (c o n t) Project Fundings Investigator

D ev elo p m e n t o f a b io -eco no m ic risk assessm en t m o del. 47 000 CSIRO

A cquisition o f a tra n s p o rta b le aco ustic system . 290 000 CSIRO

Field surveys o f th e o ra n g e ro u g h y an d b lu e g re n a d ie r. 39 900 CSIRO

S o u th ern sh ark w o rk sh o p . R esearch in to u tilisatio n o f 16 000 AFMA

GPS as a m a n a g e m e n t an d an alytical to o l. 101 943 A u space Ltd.

D eterm in in g a system o f d e e m e d v alu es fo r bycatch p ro p o sal fo r th e so u th e a s t

fishery (SEF). 30 227 ABARE

A lb atross b ra n ch line d e p lo y m e n t m achin e. 77 000 M un ro E ngineers

Pilot stu d ies on th e feasibility o f tra p p in g p e n a e id p raw ns. 6 444 D e p a rtm e n t of

Prim ary Industry & Fisheries, N o rth ern T erritory

A ssessm ent o f th e d em ersa l fish stocks in n o rth e rn A u stralia w aters . 153 900 D e p a rtm e n t o f

Prim ary Industry & Fisheries, N o rth ern T erritory

Russian fishing o b serv atio n o u ts id e AFZ. 21 648 AFMA

SEF fish ery rese arch - recre atio n al fishing im pact. 96 800 Fisheries R esearch

In stitu te, NSW

P o p u latio n dynam ics fo r s o u th e rn sh ark fishery. 105 000 CSIRO

Notes: BRR is now the Bureau of Resource Sciences.

TABLE 2 19 9 2 -9 3 FRRF PROJECTS Project Funding $ Investigator

Research in to u tilisatio n o f GPS as a m a n a g e m e n t an d an alytical to o l. D ev elo p m e n t o f a b a it castin g 21 000 A uspace Ltd.

m achine. 43 000 M un ro E ng ineers

Foreign in v o lv em e n t in th e A u stralian fishing industry. 10 000 ABARE

S o u th ern sh ark research p ro g ra m . 250 000 D e p a rtm e n t o f

C o nserv ation & E nv iron m en t, V ictoria

D ev elo p m e n t o f a fishery in d e p e n d e n t ind ex fo r ju v en ile SET. 88 000 CSIRO S paw nin g s tra te g y o f SET fro m catch m o n ito rin g o ff Ind on esia. 101 800 CSIRO

D ev elo p m e n t o f m e th o d s fo r risk analysis in fishery assessm ent. 94 800 CSIRO

D ev elo p m e n t o f a d a ta b a s e n e tw o rk f o r th e use in th e

assessm en t o f SET. 87 516 CSIRO

P o p u latio n dynam ics fo r th e s o u th e rn sh ark fishery. 110 000 CSIRO

W o rk sh o p o n p o p u la tio n dynam ics. 27 649 A u stralian Society fo r

Fish Biology

A ssessm ent o f o ra n g e ro u g h y a g e co m p o sitio n in th e e a s te rn an d s o u th e rn zones. 13 220 M arine Science

L ab orato ries, V ictoria

In v estig atio n of school an d g um m y sh ark n ursery areas. P ub lication costs fo r a b o o k 76 955 CSIRO

on t h e n o rth e rn p raw n fishery. E nv iron m en tal effec ts o f p ra w n tra w lin g in th e fa r n o rth e rn sectio n

20 000 CSIRO

o f th e G rea t B arrier Reef. 100 000 CSIRO & D e p a rtm e n t

o f Prim ary Industries, Q u e e n sla n d

TABLE 2 19 9 2 -9 3 FRRF PROJECTS (c o n t) Project Funding $ Investigator

C ollation an d analysis o f fishery d a ta from A u stralian an d In d on esian sectors o f th e A rafu ra Sea. 30 935 B ureau o f R esource

Sciences (BRS) & D e p a rtm e n t o f Prim ary Industry & Fisheries,

N o rth ern T erritory

Stock s tru c tu re an d species id e n tificatio n o f school an d g um m y sh arks in A u stralasian w aters. 61 672 CSIRO Field Species G u ide fo r S o u th ern A u stralian Traw l Species. 25 500 BRS

An analysis o f stock sta tu s in th e Bass S trait g u m m y sh ark fishery. 5 000 J. Prince

Trial stu d ies o f a lte rn a tiv e te c h n iq u e s f o r stock d e lin e a tio n o f o ra n g e rou gh y. 58 812 CSIRO

Size S tru ctu re in e a s te rn A u stralian g em fish . 100 000 J. Prince

D ev elo p m e n t o f ind u stry b ased m e th o d s f o r aco ustic surveying o f d e e p w a te r fish stocks in th e SEF.120 895 S ou th East Trawl

Fishing Industry A ssociation

R eassessm ent o f historical catch a n d e ffo rt d a ta in th e s o u th -e a s te rn A u stralian o ra n g e ro u g h y fishery an d th e synthesis o f ind ustry k n o w le d g e o f o ra n g e ro u gh y fisheries b iology 42 500 S ou th East Trawl

Fishing Industry A ssociation

R esolution o f ta x o n o m ic p ro blem s an d p re p a ra tio n o f a u ser friendly id e n tificatio n g u id e t o w h o le fish an d fillets fo r SEF q u o ta species. 101 121 CSIRO

TABLE 2 1 9 9 2 -9 3 FRRF PROJECTS (c o n t) Project Funding $ Investigator

E stablishm ent o f a sm all g ro u p to consider q u e stio n s raised in respect o f th e co llapse o f g em fish . 10 000 AFMA

C onduct w o rk sh o p in m id-1993 to ex am in e all d a ta av ailab le on b lu e g re n a d ie r. 7 150 BRS & CSIRO

S ou thern sh ark ta g g in g . 63 353 M arine Science

L ab orato ries, V ictoria

B io-econom ic assessm en t of closures in th e n o rth e rn p ra w n fishery. 117 480 ABARE

Analysis o f q u o ta s u b s titu tio n as a bycatch m a n a g e m e n t o p tio n . 114011 ABARE

Scientific m o n ito rin g o f fisheries. Funds fo r re se a rc h -re la te d 174 500 BRS

w orksh op s. A d m in istratio n o f FRRF. 20 000 13 224

AFMA AFMA

A P P E N D I C E 5

A PPE N D IC E S

A PP E N D IX 1 - FU N C TIO N S, PO W ER S A N D LEGISLATION A D M IN IST E R E D

FUNCTIONS Section 7 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991 describes the functions o f the Authority as:

• devising fisheries management regimes, fisheries adjustment and restructuring programs and exploratory and feasibility fishing programs for Commonwealth fisheries; • consulting and co-operating with industry and members o f the public on AFMA’s activities;

• consulting and negotiating with foreign governments and foreign business interests on foreign fishing vessel access to Australian fisheries and Australian ports;

• consulting and exchanging information with overseas fisheries agencies; • establishing research priorities for fisheries managed by the Authority and arranging for research to be undertaken;

• undertaking general consultation as specified in the legislation;

• developing Corporate and Annual Operational Plans and Annual Reports in accordance with the Act; and

• such other functions as are conferred on the Authority by or under this Act or an associated law.

PO W ER S AFMA has wide-ranging powers set o u t in Section 8 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A C T 1991. U nder the legislation AFMA can:

• enter into agreements and contracts;

• acquire, hold and dispose o f real and personal property;

• collect information and data relevant to the management o f fisheries; • charge such fees and impose such charges as are reasonable in respect o f work done, services provided or information given by the Authority;

• accept gifts, grants, bequests and devises made to it, and act as trustee o f money or other property vested in it on trust; and

• do anything incidental to any o f its powers.

LEGISLATION A D M IN ISTE R E D The two main Acts which govern the operations o f AFMA are:

• Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991; and • Fisheries Management A ct 1991.

The Authority administers a range o f other fisheries legislation which includes:

• Fisheries A ct 1952;

• Continental Shelf (Living N a tu ra l Resources) A ct 1968;

• Torres Strait Fisheries A ct 1984;

• Foreign Fishing Boats Levy A c t 1981;

• Fisheries Levy A c t 1984;

• Fisheries Legislation (Consequential Provisions) A c t 1991;

• Fishing Levy A c t 1991;

• Foreign Fishing Licences Levy A c t 1991;

• Statutory Fishing Rights Charge A ct 1991; and

• Fisheries Agreements (Payments) A c t 1991.

The Fisheries A c t 1952 and the Continental Shelf (Living N atural Resources) A c t 1968 remain in place by way o f saving provisions (transitional arrangements) contained in the Fisheries Legislation (Consequential Provisions) A c t 1991. These provisions provide continuity for the plans o f management formalised under the earlier legislation until new M anagem ent Plans can be implemented under the Fisheries M anagement A ct

1991.

Under the provisions o f Section 6 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991 , AFMA must pursue the following objectives:

• to implement efficient and cost-effective fisheries management on behalf o f the Commonwealth;

• to ensure that the exploitation o f fisheries resources and the carrying on o f any related activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the principles o f ecologically sustainable development, in particular the need to have regard to the impact of fishing activities on non-target species and the marine environment;

• to maximise economic efficiency in the exploitation o f fisheries resources; • to ensure accountability to the fishing industry and to the Australian community in the Authority's management o f fisheries resources; and

• to achieve government targets in relation to the recovery o f AFMA’s costs.

A PPEN D IX 4 - FIN A N C IA L STATEM ENTS

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

Centenary House 19 National Crt Barton ACT 2600

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

To the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy

Scope

I have audited the financial statements of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority for the year ended 30 June 1993. The statements comprise:

. Balance Sheet

. Operating Statement

. Statement of Cash Flows

. Certificate by Directors, and

. Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements.

The directors of the Authority are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial statements and the information contained therein. I have conducted an independent audit of the financial statements in order to express an opinion on them to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards, to provide reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence

supporting the amounts and other disclosures in the financial statements, and the evaluation of accounting policies and significant accounting estimates. These procedures have been undertaken to form an opinion wnether, in all material respects, the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance with Australian

accounting concepts and standards and statutory requirements so as to present a view which is consistent with my understanding of the entity’s financial position, the results of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

G P O Box 707 C an b erra A ustralian C apital Territory 2601 T ele p h o n e (06) 203 7300 Facsim ile (06) 203 7777

D I C E S

Audit Opinion

In accordance with sub-section 63H(2) of the Audit Act 1901, I now report that the statements are in agreement with the accounts and records of the Authority, and in my opinion:

(i) the statements are based on proper accounts and records;

(ii) the statements show fairly in accordance with Statements of Accounting Concepts and applicable Accounting Standards the financial transactions and cash flows for the year ended 30 June 1993 and the state of affairs of the Authority as at that date

(iii) the receipt, expenditure and investment of moneys, and the acquisition and disposal of assets, by the Authority during the year have been in accordance with the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, and

(iv) the statements are in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities.

2 ^ 5 - S .

D.S. Lennie Executive Director Australian National Audit Office

Canberra

10 September 1993

A P P E N D

A U STRALIAN FISHERIES M A N A G E M E N T AUTH ORITY CERTIFICATE BY AUTHORITY DIRECTORS

The financial statem ents and notes thereon, have been prepared in accordance w ith the Guidelines for Financial Statements o f Public Authorities and Commercial Activities which incorporate compliance with the Statements o f Accounting Concepts and applicableaccounting standards, and in our opinion:

- show fairly the operating result o f the Authority for the year ended 30 June 1993;

- show fairly the financial position o f the Authority' as at 30 June 1993;

- show fairly the cash flows o f the Authority' for the year ended 30 June 1993; - there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Authority' will be able to pay its debts as and when they

Signed this 8 th day o f September 1993 in accordance with a resolution o f the Authority'.

tall due.

CHAIRMAN

MANAGING D IR ECTO R

Note: In this report cash flows to or from Government are identified as separate classes in each case.

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Inflows:

1992 /9 3 ($’000)

3 /2 /9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000)

Parliamentary Appropriations Received 24,008 18,339

Interest Received 331 64

Levies and O ther Receipts (a) 0 7,081

Total Inflows 24,339 25,484

Outflows:

Operating Expenditure 24,784 11,409

Interest and O ther Costs o f Finance 26 9

Payments To Consolidated Revenue Fund (a) 0 5,181

Total Outflows 24,810 16,599

Net cash (used in) or provided by operating activities. (471) 8,885

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD. (471) 8,885

Cash at the beginning o f the reporting period 9,059 174

Cash at the end o f the reporting period.

(a)

8,588 9,059

Levies and o ther receipts collected and paid to the Consolidated Revenue Fund were disclosed in the 1991/92 AFMA financial statements as cash at bank. These amounts have not been included in the 1 9 9 2 /9 3 financial statements as cash at bank, rather, they have been disclosed as a note to the accounts.

Operating Result

3 /2 /9 2

1 9 9 2 /9 3 to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000) ($’000)

2,284 489

Increase (Decrease) In Non-Cash Liabilities/Provisions

Depreciation

Creditors (2,002)

Provisions 6

649

(1,347)

3,483

(23)

262

3,722

(Increase) Decrease In Non-Cash Assets

Prepayments

Debtors

90 62

(977) (887) 5,127 5,189

(Increase) Decrease in Fixed Assets

Funds from Operations

(521) (515)

(471) 8,885

For the purposes o f the above Statem ent o f Cash Flows, cash is comprised o f cash at bank and cash on hand.

Fisheries Resources Research F und The Fisheries Resources Research Fund (FRRF) contains hinds provided to AFMA by the Commonwealth Government for allocation by AFMA in accordance with Ministerial Guidelines.

As at 30 June 1993, a balance o f $2,086,931 was held in the account all o f which is approved for expenditure on specific projects.

Under Section 83 o f the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, AFMA may borrow funds for the performance of its functions with the authority o f the Treasurer being required should the total borrowed exceed $500,000.

Section 86 allows the Authority to give a security over the whole or part o f its assets. No borrowings were made by AFMA during the accounting period nor was any security given over the Authority’s assets.

AFMA receives funding from the Commonwealth Government by way o f both a Special Appropriation and an Annual Appropriation. During the 1 9 9 2 /9 3 Financial Year funding was also received to meet redundancy costs associated with the establishment o f AFMA, along with supplementation o f legal costs provided by the Attorney General. This funding for the period 1 July 1992 to 30 June 1993 am ounted to:

1992 /9 3

3 / 2 / 9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000) ($ ’000)

Special Appropriation 11,586 7,397

Annual Appropriation 10,382 3,815

Redundancy Payments 225 0

Legal Costs Supplementation 234 0

Total Commonwealth contribution 22,427 11,212

4 GRANTS

1 9 9 2 /9 3

3 / 2 / 9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000) ($’000)

Fisheries Resources Research Fund 2,166 2,047

1992 /9 3

3 / 2 / 9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000) ($’000)

Bank Interest 344 276

Other Income 0 17

Total 344 293

The following expenses were incurred by the Authority for research into matters relevant to AFMA’S enabling legislation

1 9 9 2 /9 3

3 / 2 /9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($’000) ($’000)

FRRF Grants 280 2,091

Torres Strait Research 584 47

Tuna Research 638 308

N orthern Prawn Fishery Research 210 0

Orange Roughv Research 69 21

O ther 255 0

TOTAL 2,036 2,467

Reimbursements to the States represent the total paid to State G overnm ent agencies for the provision of services such as surveillance, compliance, etc.

1 9 9 2 /9 3

3 /2 /9 2

to 3 0 /6 /9 2

($ ’000) ($’000)

Salaries 5,740 1,374

Consultants and Contractors 1,565 818

General Administration Costs 4,318 2,751

Com puter Services 451 447

Depredation 649 262

NPF Restructuring Loan Repayment 3,680 2,560

Total 16,403 8,212

Transfer of Assets

During the stocktake completed as at 30 June 1993, several assets were identified which were transferred from the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy at the com m encem ent o f AFMA but were not included in the opening balance o f Fixed Assets as at 3 February 1992. These assets have been taken onto AFMA’s asset register at a w ritten down value comparable to equivalent assets o f a similar age and usage pattern. The total o f these assets is $98,087.

τ

A Ρ Ρ Ε Ν D I C Ε S

13 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

1993 1992

($’000) ($ ’000)

Plant & Equipm ent at Cost 266 254

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 62 61

Furniture & Fittings at Cost 42 23

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 2 3

Com puter Equipment at Cost 1,682 1,952

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 747 749

M otor Vehicles at Cost 37 141

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 23 62

Land & Buildings at Valuation 2,938 2,916

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 109 34

Leasehold Improvements at Cost 458 44

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 56 1

Guide Systems at Cost 6 37

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 2 20

Vessels at valuation 1,291 1,321

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 151 63

N et Property, plant and equipm ent 5,568 5,695

Both Land & buildings and Vessels are recorded at market value. Independent valuations were obtained from Baillieu Knight Frank Ptv Ltd for Land & Buildings, and by Markwell Marine for Vessels 1992.

as at 31 January

14 CREDITORS

1993 1992

($’000) ($’000)

Trade Creditors 185 4

Accrued Expenses 1,533 1,033

O ther Creditors 195 2,878

Total Creditors 1,913 3,915

1

15 PROVISIONS

The Authority has made provision for liabilities assumed at the commencement o f AFMA and accruing to employees since the establishment o f the Authority.

CURRENT PROVISIONS

Provision for Annual Leave 1993 1992

($ ’000) ($ ’000)

Opening Balance 311 401

Amounts Accrued To (Paid From) Provision 88 (90)

Closing Balance 399 311

Provision for Long Service Leave - Current

O pening Balance 73 95

Amounts Accrued To (Paid From) Provision (11) (22)

Closing Balance 62 73

Total Current Provisions 461 384

NON-CURRENT PROVISIONS

Provision for Long Service Leave - N on-C urrent

Opening Balance 514 536

Amounts Accrued To (Paid From) Provision (71) (22)

Closing Balance 443 514

Total Non-Current Provisions 443 514

TOTAL PROVISIONS 904 898

16 SUPERANNUATION

The Authority is an approved authority under the Superannuation Act, 1976 and the Superannuation Act, 1990.

Authority staff are contributors to either the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS) or the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS). The A uthority meets its liability by payments to the Retirements Benefits Office (RBO) in accordance with Section 159 (2) o f the Superannuation Act, 1976 and Section 15 of

the Superannuation A ct,1990.

The Authority makes contributions based on the rate determined by the Government Actuary, currently 20% for CSS members and 12.4% for PSS members with respect to superannuation salaries. These payments am ounted to $460,378 in 1 992/93.

The A u th o rity also p aid a sep arate p ro d u c tiv ity b en e fit to its em ployees in acco rd an ce w ith the Superannuation (Productivity' Benefit) Act, 1988. This am ounted to $99,906 for the period ended 30 June 1993.

17 Authority activity involves the im plem entation and adm inistration o f fisheries m anagem ent arrangements which reflect its charter as set out in the Fisheries Administration Act 1991. As the A uthority operates predominantly for the fishing industry', the financial statem ents have n o t been dissected into industry

segments.

During the period ended 30 June 1993, the Authority utilised payroll facilities provided by the Departm ent of Primary' Industries and Energy which were valued at $20,000. AFMA im plem ented an autonom ous payroll system via an external bureau on 25 February' 1993.

The Authority maintains an indemnity insurance cover in respect o f certain o f its employees and members. Fixed and current assets are covered against damage and loss.

Assets which were purchased under the Torres Straight Protected Zone arrangem ent are Com monwealth assets and as such are covered by the Com monwealth self insurance program.

The Authority' has no commitments for material capital expenditure.

OPERATING LEASE BURNS CENTRE

AFMA is currently located at the Burns Centre. The lease for the Burns Centre commenced on 1 September 1992 and has a six year term.

($’0 00)

Lease Commitments

- N o t later than one year

- later than one year and not later than two years

- later than two years and not later than five years

- Later than five years

615

652

2,201

0

Total Lease Commitments 3,468

A P P E N D I C E S

21 CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

AFMA has the right to exercise an option to take over a loan from the Queensland Treasury Corporati which is currently held by the Queensland Fisheries Management Authority. As at 30 June 1993 the Loan a book value o f $17,708,889. The purpose o f the loan was to purchase units o f capacity in the North* Prawn Fishery under the N orthern Prawn Fishery restructuring program . The D epartm ent o f Prim;

Industries and Energy holds a guarantee from the Commonwealth Government in respect o f the loan, wh: AFMA would seek to transfer should it exercise the option to take over the loan.

AFMA has been involved in litigation prior to 30 June 1993, the resolution o f which is uncertain at t time o f preparation o f the Financial Statements. Although these cases are responsibilities which AFMA assisting with, the Commonwealth is ultimately responsible for any possible liabilities arising therefrom, ai there is no liability attributable to AFMA.

The Authority has no other contingent liabilities o f which it is aware as at 30 June, 1993.

22 AUDIT FEES

The audit o f the AFMA Financial Statements was carried out by the Australian National Audit Office. TJ cost o f this audit am ounted to $26,400. No other sendees were provided to AFMA by the Australian Nation. Audit Office during the 1 9 9 2 /9 3 financial year.

23 MEMBERS OF THE AUTHORITY, REMUNERATION & EXPENSES

The part-time members and Chairman o f the Authority receive such fees and allowances as are determined b the Remuneration Tribunal. The M anaging Director is the only full-time m em ber o f the A uthorin' am receives such remuneration and allowances as determined by the A uthority and approved by the Minister fo; Primary Industries and Energy.

Total remuneration paid to the directors o f AFMA for 1 9 9 2 /9 3 am ounted to $194,693. Payment: into a superannuation fund by AFMA on behalf o f the AFMA directors am ounted to $27,666.

24 DIRECTORS

The following persons were the Directors o f the Australian Fisheries M anagement Authority for the period ending 30 June 1993.

Mr. James McColl ( Chairman) Mr. Richard $tevens (Managing Director) Mr. Russell Higgins (Government Director) Mr. Maxwell Ball Mr. Bernard Bowen Mr. Stuart Richey Mr. Robert Seldon

Dr. Peter Young On the 7th o f August 1992, Mr. Geoff Gorrie retired from the Authority as Acting Managing Director and returned to the D epartm ent o f Primary Industries and Energy on the appointment o f Mr. Richard Stevens to this position.

On the 8th o f February 1993, Dr. Meryl Williams resigned as Government Director and was replaced by Mr. Russell Higgins.

5 DIRECTORS BENEFITS No d irec to r o f th e A u th o rity has rec eiv e d o r becom e e n title d to receive a b en e fit ( o th e r th a n a

remuneration benefit) because o f a contract made by the A uthority w ith the director, or with a firm o f which the director is a member, or with a company in which the director has a substantial financial interest.

A P P E N D I C E S

A PPE N D IX 5 - FR EED O M OF IN FO R M A TIO N ACT STATEMENT FR EED O M OF IN FO RM A TIO N

Summary

There were three requests received under the Freedom o f Information A ct 1982 between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993.

Section 8 Statement This statement is published in accordance with Section 8 o f the Freedom o f Information A c t 1982.

Structure of AFMA The structure o f AFMA is set out in the report o f the Managing Direction which is within the annual report.

Functions of AFMA The functions o f AFMA are set out in Section 7 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A ct 1991 as follows:

• to devise management regimes in relation to Australian fisheries;

• to devise fisheries adjustment programs and fisheries restructuring programs; • to consult and co-operate with the industry and members o f the public generally in relation to the activities o f AFMA;

• to devise exploratory and feasibility programs relating to fishing;

• to establish priorities for fisheries research for fisheries managed by AFMA and arrange the undertaking o f such research.;

• to consult and negotiate with foreign governments and foreign business interests on access by foreign fishing vessels to Australian fisheries and Australian ports;

• to consult and exchange information with overseas bodies with functions similar to AFMA’s;

• to consult other persons on the performance o f AFMA; • development o f Corporate and annual Operational Plans;

• the functions specified in section 63H o f the A u d it A ct 1901, and in Part 1 o f the Fisheries Administration A c t 1991, relating to reporting: and • as provided by an associated law:

- to establish and allocate fishing concessions;

- to establish and maintain a register o f fishing rights; - functions relating to plans o f management;

- functions relating to recreational fishing;

- to undertake, on behalf o f the Commonwealth, responsibilities for fisheries management arrangements entered into with the States and Territories; - to collect, on behalf o f the Commonwealth, a payment in the nature o f a community return payable by persons exploiting fisheries resources; and

- such other functions conferred on ΑΡΜΑ by or under this Act or an associated law.

Decision making and other powers AFMA makes decisions under the following primary legislation:

• The Fisheries A c t 1952.

• The Torres Strait Fisheries A c t 1984.

• The Fisheries M anagement A c t 1991.

• The Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991.

The Fisheries M anagement A c t 1991 replaced the Fisheries A c t 1952 with the establishment o f AFMA in February 1992. H ow ever, certain powers under the 1952 Act w ere “saved” by virtue o f the Fisheries Legislation (Consequential Provisions) A c t 1991.

In addition to the above m entioned primary legislation, there are Acts for the im position o f levy, regulations and plans o f management for specific fisheries.

Decisions made by AFMA include:

• the granting and transfer o f fishing concessions such as licences, Statutory Fishing Rights, permits and units under plans o f management; and

• the suspension and cancellation o f fishing concessions.

A rrangem ents for external participation

AFMA’s policy is to consult with the fishing industry, and the general community, in the development of fisheries management arrangements. The consultation process also involves the consideration o f views from:

• State G overnm ent/Territory agencies responsible for fisheries management;

• M anagement Advisor)' Committees;

• recreational fishing interests;

• environmental protection organisations; and • others whose interests may be affected or whose views may usefully contribute to effective fisheries management.

In the making o f plans o f managem ent and the allocation o f Statutory Fishing Rights, the legislation requires public notice to be given o f the availability o f a draft plan or intention to grant Statutory Fishing Rights, and inviting public comment. In other cases where major decisions are to be made, those directly affected are informed individually and invited to com m ent and, where appropriate, public meetings are held,

notice o f those meeting being published in newspapers and Australian Fisheries magazine.

C ategories of documents

1. Files AFMA keeps files in the names o f particular persons, names o f particular boats or particular subjects. Subjects covered include:

• management;

• information technology';

A P P E N D I C E S

• human resources;

• finance; and

• litigation.

The files may contain:

• correspondence and minutes; • reports and submissions;

• com puter printouts; and • briefing papers.

2. Mailing lists

Mailing lists are held for sending information to AFMA’s clients.

3. Databases

AFMA maintains a num ber o f databases for purposes associated with its specified functions.

4. Registers

In specific managed fisheries a register is kept o f holders o f fishing rights in that fishery. In the case o f a fishei where a statutory M anagement Plan is in force, maintenance o f a register is mandatory.

5. Documents available free of charge from AFMA (or subject to postage) • Media releases; and

• Fisheries specific newsletters, News from the Board , bulletins and public information papers.

6. Documents available for purchase from AFMA

• Australian Fisheries magazine; and • Management plans.

Facilities fo r access to d o cu m en ts

Following written advice that access to a docum ent, or other material, has been granted, and any appropriati fees have been paid, the material will be either mailed to the applicant, o r can be perused at AFM A’i headquarters at:

28 National Circuit

Forrest ACT 2603.

Special arrangements may be made where access to original material is required interstate.

Procedures fo r access to d o cu m en ts

Requests for access to docum ents may be made to:

Australian Fisheries Management Authority PO Box 7051

Canberra Mail Centre ACT 2610.

Attention: Principal Legal Officer.

Enquiries can be made by phoning (06) 272 5632, or facsimile (06) 272 3087.

A P P E N D

APPENDIX 6 - M E M B E R S OF M A N A G E M E N T A D V ISO R Y COMM ITTEES A S AT 3 0 JU N E 1 9 9 2

South East Trawl Management Advisory Bass S tra it Scallop C onsultative Committee C o m m ittee

The Hon John BennettChairperson M r Kim Parkinson Chairperson

Mr Geoff Rohan AFMA member M r Alex Schaap State Government

Mr Paul Crew State Government member

member D r David Molloy State Government

Dr Russell Reichelt

Mr Peter Bell

Mr Tom Davies

Mr Les Scott

Research member

Industry member

Industry7 member

Industry member

Dr Richard M cLoughlin

M r John H am m ond

M r Greg Rainbird

Mrs Melita Proebstl

member

Scientific member

Industry member Industry member

Industry member

Ms Gail H ewitt Executive Officer Mr Chris Fenner Industry member

Mr Chris Djirkallis Industry member

Southern Shark Fishery Management Advisory Committee G reat A ustralian Bight C onsultative

Mr Norman Gilberthorpe

Mr Geoff Rohan

Chairperson

AFMA m em ber

C om m ittee

Mr Michael Thomas Chairperson

Ms Geraldine Gentle State Government M r Geoff Richardson AFMA member > member Ms Lyn Melandri Secretary

Dr John Wallace Research m em ber D r Gina Newton Scientific member

. Mr Richard Davidson Industry memberMr Darby Ross Industry member

Mr Adrian Fletcher Industry member M r Jim Raptis Industry member

Mr Greg Rainbird Industry member

Jo and Marcia Valente Industry member

)

Mr David Sharp Industry member

Ms Gail Hewitt

M r Keith Chiswell

Industry member

Industry member

Mr Robert Wilson

Mr Antonio Mozqueira

Industry member

Secretary Northern Praw n Fishery M a n ag e m en t

A dvisory C om m ittee

Dr Kevin Foley

Mr M artin Exel

M r Bob Densley

Dr Burke Hill

Mr Murray France

Mr Efrem Gamba

Chairperson AFMA member

State Government member Scientific member

Industry member

Industry member

Southern Bluefin Tuna Management Advisory Committee

Mr Urs Felix

Mr Bill Fitti Mr Steve Bolton

Mr David Bateman

Mr Martin Exel

M r John Diplock

Dr Keith Sainsbury

Mr Bruce Downie

Mr Brian Jeffriess

Mr Terr}' H orton

Mr Jim Uttlevmoore

Mr Peter Spinner

Mr Steve Jackson

Industry member

Industry member

Secretary'

Chairperson

AFMA member

State member

Research member

Recreational member

Industry member

Industry member

Industry' member

Industry' member

Executive Officer

Mr Martin Exel

Dr Keith Sainsbury

M r Paul Crew

Mr John Johnson

Ms Barbara Richardson

Mr Peter Rogers

Mr Brian Jeffriess

Mr Mario Valcic

M r Greg Honeychurch

Mr Wes Samuel

Mr Peter Neave

Chairperson

Research member

Tasmanian Government member

South Australian Government member

NSW Government member

Western Australian Government member

Industry' member

Industry' member

Industry' member

Industry'

Secretary'

East Coast Tuna Management Advisory Committee

A P P E

A PPEN DIX 7 - A F M A D IR ECTO RS, T E R M S O F A PPO IN TM EN TS The Fisheries A dm inistration A c t 1991 provides for AFMA D irectors to be appointed using an objective selection process, based on expertise. The Act establishes the Australian Fisheries M anagem ent Authority Selection Com m ittee consisting o f two industry representatives, nom inated by the peak industry body (the National Fishing Industry Council); two community7 representatives; a nominee o f the Australian Fisheries Council and a Presiding M ember w ho is selected by the Minister. The Com m ittee selects and nominates five Directors for appointm ent by the M inister. The M inister selects and appoints the C hairperson and the Government Director.

The selection process used in the Act is similar to that used for Statutory M arketing Authorities and Research and Development Corporations established within the Primary Industries and Energy portfolio. There are however some im portant differences. The most im portant is the role that industry' plays in the process. AFMA is a regulator)' body and has (am ong other things) to enforce arrangements which will prevent

fisheries from being over-exploited or over-capitalised. At times the collective interest o f all fishermen in a fishery and o f the broader community may be at odds with the self interest o f individual fishermen. In these circumstances it w ould be in appropriate for industry to have a d o m in a n t influence on the selection committee.

The selection committee is required to nominate persons with expertise in one or more o f the following fields; commercial fishing, fishing industry' operations, fisheries science, natural resource management, marine ecology7, economics, business managem ent and any other fields as are prescribed. The Com mittee must ensure that as far as practicable the directors collectively possess expertise in all o f these fields. N o more than two

Directors with a fishing industry background are to be nominated for appointment.

Directors are appointed by the Minister for terms not exceeding three y'ears except for the Government Director who is appointed at the M inister’s pleasure.

From To

Mr Jim McColl (Chairman) 3.2.92 2.2.95

Mr Stuart Richey (Deputy' Chairman) 3.2.92 2.2.95

Mr Max Ball 3.2.92 2.2.95

Mr Bernard Bowen 3.2.92 2.2.95

Mr R obert Seldon 3.2.92 2.2.95

Dr Peter Young 3.2.92 2.2.95

Mr Russell H iggins1 8.2.93 at the Minister’s pleasure

Mr Richard Stevens2 10.8.92 at the Authority’s pleasure

1 Dr Meryl Williams was replaced by

Mr Russell Higgins with effect from 8.2.93 3.2.92 7.8.92

; Mr Geoff Gorrie (Acting Managing Director) 3.2.92 7.8.92

A P P E N D I C E S

A PPE N D IX 8 - A F M A PUBLICATIONS Australian Fisheries magazine 12 issues, July 1992 to June 1993.

News From the Board , July, August, September, December 1992 and January, February, March, April, Ma; June 1993.

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Annual Report 1991-1992, November 1992.

AFMA Interim Corporate Plan 1992-93 to 1994-95.

Southern shark fisher)’ newsletter:

• N um ber 14, August 1992.

• Number 15, March 1993.

• Number 16, June 1993.

E C T U N A M A C newsletters:

• March 1993.

• May 1993.

Fisheries Policy P apers

N um ber 1, A FM A /Industry funding arrangements, November 1992.

N um ber 2, Process for Dealing with Expiring Licenses for Fishing O perations not covered by formal M anagement Plans, February 1993.

N um ber 3, Exploration and Development o f a New Fishery, April 1993.

N um ber 4, Grant o f Fishing Permits and Fishery Specific Commonwealth Fishing Boat Licenses authorising access to fisheries not subject o f specific management arrangements, June 1993.

N um ber 5, Disposal o f Fishing Vessels Gear and Catch, June 1993.

Public do cu m en ts

Great Australian Bight Trawl Fishery Draft Plan o f M anagement and Explanatory Paper, January 1993.

Great Australian Bight Trawl Fishery M anagement Plan, June 1993.

Future M anagement o f the Southern Shark Fishery: A Discussion Paper from AFMA, July 1992.

Future M anagement o f the Southern Shark Fishery: A Supplementary Discussion Paper o f the Australian Fisheries Management Authority, November 1992.

N orthern Prawn Fisher;7 Data Summary 1992, February 1993.

N orthern Prawn Fishery 1993 Information Booklet for masters and owners o f NPF trawlers and carrier boats, March 1993.

Monitoring and Investigating Reports o f Illegal Fishing Activity, September 1992.

Review o f Compliance and Observer Programs, March 1993.

East Coast Deepwater Trawl Discussion Paper, May 1993.

Future Management o f the Torres Strait Prawn Fisher;7: Discussion Paper, December 1992.

Summary o f the AFZ Observer SBT Cruise Reports for the 1992 Tasmanian Tuna Season May-September 1992, 29 September 1992.

A Consolidation o f Observer Data From A Series o f Russian Trawl Cruises W ithin and Adjacent to the AFZ, January to July 1992 General Report, December 1992.

Summary o f the AFZ Observer Program Cruise Reports: Japanese Style Longline T una Fishing in the Australian fishing zone, East Coast, G reat Australian Bight and W est Coast o f Tasmania Summer Fishery (excluding May-September 1992), N ovem ber 1991-October 1992, 30 March 1993.

Annual Summary o f the AFZ Observer Program Cruise Reports: Japanese Style Longline Tuna Fishing in the Australian fishing zone November 1991- O ctober 1992 ,2 8 April 1993.

Equal Employment O pportunity, April 1993.

Industrial Democracy, April 1993.

Human Resource Development Plan, May 1993.

Studies Assistance Program, June 1993.

A F M A

N P F S E F S S F E C T S B T E C D T E C D L W D T N W S T W C T

In te r n a l A F M A r e v ie w

o f in f o r m a t io n p a p e r

a J u ly J u ly J u ly a A u g O c t S e p t a D ec

B o a rd c le a ra n c e o f

in f o r m a t io n p a p e r

a S e p t J u ly J u ly a A u g O c t O c t a Jan

In f o r m a t io n p a p e r

t o in d u s tr y

J u ly S e p t A u g J u ly A u g S e p t O c t O c t J u ly

C o n s u lta tio n w it h

in d u s tr y o n

in f o r m a t io n p a p e r

J u ly O c t S e p t S e p t J u ly S e p t O c t O c t A u g

In itia l d r a f t in g

in s tr u c tio n s t o O LD

A u g O c t A u g A u g A u g — — O c t A u g Jan

R esolve a n y o u t s ta n d in g

p o lic y issues

— — — O c t — — O c t —

F in a l d r a f t in g

in s tr u c tio n s t o O LD

— N o v S e p t N o v S e p t O c t N o v N o v

In te r n a l A F M A r e v ie w

o f d r a f t p la n

S e p t D ec — Jan O c t D ec Jan M a r O c t M a r

B o a rd a p p r o v a l

o f d r a f t p la n

S e p t Jan S e p t Jan O c t D ec Jan M a r O c t M a r

D r a f t p la n re le a s e d

f o r p u b lic c o m m e n t

O c t Jan O c t Feb O c t D ec Feb M a r O c t M a r

B o a rd D e t e r m in a tio n

o f p la n

D ec M a r D ec A p r D ec Jan M a r M a y D ec J u n e

M in is te r ia l a c c e p ta n c e

o f p la n

Feb A p r D ec M a y D ec Feb A p r J u n e D ec J u n e

G a z e tta l o f p la n Feb A p r D ec M a y D ec Feb A p r J u n e Jan J u n e

C all f o r a p p lic a tio n s

u n d e r p la n

M a r A p r D ec M a y D ec M a r M a y J u n e Jan J u n e

A b b r e v i a t i o n s

a C o m p le te d as a t 3 0 ju n e 1993

ECDL East c o a s t d e e p w a t e r lin e fis h e r y

ECT East c o a s t t u n a fis h e r y

NPF N o r t h e r n p r a w n fis h e r y

N W 5 T N o r th w e s t s lo p e t r a w l fis h e r y

ECDT East c o a s t d e e p w a t e r t r a w l fis h e r y

SSF S o u th e r n s h a rk fis h e r y

O LD O f fic e o f L e g is la tiv e D r a f tin g

W D T W e s te r n d e e p w a t e r t r a w l fis h e r y

SBT S o u th e rn b lu e fin t u n a fis h e r y

SEF S o u th e a s t fis h e r y

W C T W e s t c o a s t tu n a fis h e r

Γ υ ERM

Access fees Fees charged for the right to fish in Australian waters.

Access right A right to cart)' out specific fishing activities.

AFMA Australian Fisheries M anagement Authority.

Annual Appropriation The am ount o f public monies authorised by Parliament for expenditure from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for a particular year.

Special Appropriation A paym ent o f a specified am o u n t separately identified from an Annual Appropriation, such as the provision contained in Section 80 o f the Fisheries Adm inistration A c t 1991.

Australian fishing zone (AFZ)

Beach hauling

Bilateral agreement

Boat replacement policy

Bottom or demersal trawling

Buyback

Bycatch

Carryovers

Catch over-runs

Waters adjacent to Australia and its external territories which extend from defined baselines to 200 nautical miles seawards. Where these zones intersect the 200 mile zones o f the other nations agreed boundaries apply. Within the AFZ, Australia exercises jurisdiction over all Australian and foreign fishing.

A fishing m ethod that targets pelagic fish swimming in waters close to the beach. A net is set around a school o f fish and hauled or winched from the shore into shallow water.

This is a G overnm ent to G overnm ent agreem ent between Australia and another nation allowing vessels o f that nation to fish within the Australian fishing zone.

Is a set o f rules applying within a fishery that must be complied with when an existing boat is replaced.

These are trawls designed to work on or near the sea bed. They are used for taking o f demersal species o f fish and prawns.

A m echanism for rem oving fishing capacity from a fishery. Buybacks generally operate through a ‘pool’ o f funds, established through a grant, loan o r levies paid by fishermen. Fisherm en may sell or surrender their fishing entitlements in return for an agreed payment.

N on-target species taken incidentally during fishing activity.

Additional ‘top-up’ quota was allocated to operators o f the south east fishery (SEF) on 15 O ctober 1992, as a result o f the application o f the revised quota allocations for the SEF. Top-up quota which remained uncaught at the end o f 1992 for nine species was allowed to be carried over into the

1993 season, at 1992 tonnage values.

Seasonal over quota catch.

Competitive total allowable catch (TAG)

Compulsory surrender

Danish seining

Demersal fish

Demersal gillnets

Demersal line/hook fishing

Fisheries Notice

Fishing capacity

Fishing permits

Gillnet fishermen

Handlining

Individual Transferable

Quotas (ITQs)

Input controls

G L O S S A R Y OF T E R M S

The TAG where there is no limit on the am ount o f catch perm itted to b taken by each participant (th at is, no allocations), the catches from al participants are summed, and the fishery closed once the sum o f all catche reaches the TAG.

The surrender o f defined and equal amounts o f fishing capacity across a licensed operators to reduce the level o f fishing capacity in a fishery.

Danish seining is a trawling m ethod used by relatively small boats in shallot waters (up to about 200 metres). Lengths o f weighted ropes o f up to 2801 metres are laid out on the sea floor in a diamond pattern with the boat a one end o f the diamond and the net at the other. As the boat moves forwar the diamond becomes elongated allowing the fish to be herded into the pat o f the net.

Fish that normally are caught on the seabed.

A mesh net, also known as a gillnet, tangle net or graball net, anchored t the seabed but kept upright by floats.

Fishing using a line and baited hooks in which weights hold the line on th sea floor so that hooks are set close to the bottom .

A gazetted notice under Section 8 o f the Fisheries A c t 1952. A Fisherie Notice generally closes a fishery or sets conditions o f access.

The am ount o f fishing effort that a fishing boat, or a fleet o f fishing boat; could exert if utilised to its full potential.

A fishing permit is a type o f fishing concession issued under Section 32 c the Fisheries M anagem ent A c t 1991 to authorise the use o f a specific Australian boat for fishing in aspecified area o f a fishery' or the Australia! fishing zone for specific species using specific equipment.

Fishermen who use demersal gillnets.

A fishing m eth o d w here one or m ore lures or baits are attached to

handline.

ITQs refer to individual portions o f a total allowable catch (TAG) - units o quota - and allow the holder to catch that portion o f that TAG each season The weight value o f the ITQs change proportionately to changes in th TAG set for a species each season. ITQ s are fully tradeable and can be soli or leased to other fishermen.

Restrictions placed on effort input in a fishery. For example, types and siz< o f fishing gear and boats and the am ount o f fishing time em ployed b; fishermen.

G L O S S A R Y O F T E R M S

Joint venture

Limited entry arrangements

Longline fishing

Mid-water trawling

Offshore Constitutional

Settlement (OCS)

Pelagic fish

Pelagic longlining

Poling (pole-and-line fishing)

Purse seining

Quota holders

Q uota holdings

In the southern bluefin tuna fishery, the Com monwealth o f Australia has entered into a joint venture agreement with an Australian company allowing that com pany to bring into the Australian fishing zone, foreign fishing vessels (in this case Japanese) through an Australian industry to Japanese

industry arrangement. The Japanese vessels working under the joint venture a rra n g e m e n t are allow ed to catch A ustralian q u o ta u n its w ith in the Australian fishing zone.

M anagem ent arrangements whereby only a fixed num ber o f operators are allowed to fish. N ew operators may only gain access to the fishery by purchasing an existing right.

A m ethod o f fishing that can be either surface set (pelagic) or bottom set (demersal) line fishing. Both m ethods comprise a main line to which are attached branch lines, each fitted with one or more baited hooks or artificial

lures.

Is a form o f trawling in which the net is off the sea bottom at all times. Such nets have large mouths and are used for targeting pelagic and semi-pelagic

fish schools.

An agreement between the State(s) and the Com m onwealth whereby the State or the Com monwealth (or in some cases a Joint Authority) is given jurisdiction for a particular fishery. W hen no OCS agreem ent has been reached the fisher)' is under jurisdiction o f the State out to 3 nautical miles,

and the Com monwealth from 3 to 200 nautical miles.

Fish that are normally caught on the sea surface or in the water column.

A fishing m e th o d th a t targets pelagic fish species. A pelagic longline comprises a mainline to which are attached branch lines, each fitted with one or more baited hooks or artificial lures. A pelagic longline is set so that the mainline, branch lines and hooks are suspended above the seabed by floats at

the sea surface.

A fishing m ethod where fishermen on the boat use a short fibreglass pole with a barbless lure or baited barbless hook attached to a short trace to hook and swing (pole) the targeted fish onto the boat.

A method used for the capture o f schooling pelagic fish by which an area of water is surrounded by a net set at the surface which is then pursed at the base to enclose that area from beneath.

People that permanently hold units of quota (ITQs) or seasonal!)' lease units o f quota from a permanent holder.

Individuals or com panies th a t hold units o f q u o ta (IT Q s) in a quota

managed fisher)'.

G L O S S A R Y OF T E R M S

Quota (ITQ ) management

Statutory Fishing Rights

Sustainable yield

Torres Strait Protected Zone

Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority'

Torres Strait Treaty

Tori poles

Total Allowable Catch (TAC)

Treaty' status

Trilateral partnership/ management

Trolling

Units o f fishing capacity

A m ethod o f m anagem ent based on o u tp u t controls w hereby the total allowable catch is allocated am ong eligible operators and allocated as shares in the annual TAC.

Statutory Fishing Rights are rights granted under Section 21 o f the Fisheries Management A ct 1991. The nature o f Statutory' Fishing Rights in a fishery is detailed in the plan o f management which creates those rights. A statutory fishing right may be a right to use a boat, a unit o f fishing gear, or a quantity o f catch, or other rights identified in the plan.

Maximum catch that can be taken from a fishery over an indefinite period w ithout causing the stocks to be depleted.

A region o f the Torres Strait, established under the Torres Strait Treaty, in which Australia and Papua New Guinea each exercise sovereign jurisdiction for swimming fish and sedentary species on their respective sides o f agreed

jurisdiction lines.

This A u thority com prises the C om m onw ealth M inister for Resources (C hairperson) and the Q ueensland M inister for Prim ary Industry. The Authority' is responsible for m onitoring the condition o f the jointly managed fisheries and for the formulation o f policies and plans for their management.

Is the Treaty' between Australia and Papua New Guinea concerned with sovereignty, management and maritime boundaries in the area between the tw o countries and the p ro tec tio n o f the way o f life and livelihood o f traditional inhabitants and the marine environment.

A pole that has attached to it a main line from which streamers are hung at regular intervals and aims to scare seabirds away from baits as a pelagic longline is set.

The total commercial catch o f one or more species for a particular area o f a fishery' that is permitted to be taken in a particular season.

Anything that has treaty' status is binding under international law as a treaty, that is, an internationally legally binding instrument.

The trilateral partnership / management refers to the joint efforts o f Australia, Japan and New Zealand working together as a group in managing the global stock o f southern bluefin una.

A fishing m ethod where lures or baits attached to lines are towed behind a slowly moving boat.

A single part o f an applicable number o f units held by licensed fishermen to o p erate a boat in a fishery based on the sum o f ‘engine horsepow er

kilowatts’ and ‘boat hull size’.

A U S T R A L I A N F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T A U T H O R I T Y

HENRY BOSCH A.O.

22 Myrnong Crescent TOORAK VIC 3142

Tel: (03) 822 3806 Fax: (03) 822 4152

The Hon. Michael Lee MP The Minister for Resources Room MF26, Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY SELECTION COMMITTEES

I have pleasure in providing to you the attached report of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority Selection Committees for the 1992/93 financial year as required by the Fisheries Administration Act 1991.

The report relates to the nomination of the membership for the Statutory Fishing Rights Allocation Review Panel (SPRARP). As this task is now complete, I now propose to abolish the SFRARP Selection Committee in accordance with the legislative requirements.

Yours sincerely

Henry Bosch

9.1 September 1993

A U S T R A L I A N F I S H E R I E S M A N A G E M E N T A U T H O R I T Y

SELECTION C O M M ITTEE REPORT In accordance with section 42 o f the Fisheries A dm inistration A c t 1991, I, H enry Bosch A .O ., subm it th following report on the operations o f the Selection Committees established by me, as Presiding M ember, durin the 1992-93 financial year.

On 23 O ctober, 1992, the Minister for Primal)' Industries and Energy requested that I establish a Selectio Committee to nominate members o f the .Statutory Fishing Rights Allocation Review Panel (SFRARP). I sougl nominations for members o f the Selection Com mittee from the peak industry body and the Australian Fisherii Council as required by section 140 o f the Fisheries Management A c t 1991, and sought nominations for the Pan through an advertisement placed in major newspapers in each State on 7 November 1992.

An informal meeting o f the Selection Committee was held on 18 February 1993 to make initial assessmen o f the applications. Following the formal appointm ent o f the members o f the Selection Com m ittee by tl Minister for Resources on 26 March 1993, the Committee considered thirty-seven applications for membersh o f SFRARP. Thirteen applicants were interviewed by the Selection Com mittee in Melbourne on 6 and 7 Api

1993.

The recommendations o f the Selection Com mittee were forwarded to you on 3 May 1993.

The total administrative cost, including sitting fees and travel costs for the members o f the Selectic Committee and applicants for membership o f SFRARP, for the 1992-93 financial years was $18,176.00.