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Remuneration Tribunal Act - Remuneration Tribunal - Review - 1993


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Rate per annum of Fee T ra v e llin g

A u th o rity Chairperson

$

D eputy Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

Allowance per over-night stay

$

Commonwealth Funds Management Ltd3 42,155 17,163 Capital City - 300

Commonwealth Superannuation Board of Trustees No.1 42,155 - 17.1634 5 6

Other than a Capital City - 155

Commonwealth Superannuation Board of Trustees No.2 42,155 -

17.1634 13,7905

Military Superannuation and Benefits Scheme - Board of Trustees 42,155 - 13,790

Administrative Review Council 42,155 - * *

Australian Science and Technology Council 42,155 25,714 17,163s

3 Com m onwealth Funds Managem ent L td B o a rd M em bers who are members o f the A u d it Com m ittee w ill receive an

a d d itio n a l fee o f $3,000 p e r annum.

4 This fee applies only to persons appointed as office holders o f both the Com m onw ealth S uperannuation B o a rd o f

Trustees N o .l and the Com m onwealth Superannuation B o a rd .o f Trustees N o.2. Such persons are only e n title d to receive one specified fee in respect o f these offices.

5 This fee applies to persons who are appointed as office holders o f the Com m onwealth Superannuation B o a rd o f Trustees

No.2 but not the Com m onwealth S uperannuation B oard o f Trustees N o .l.

6 A member o f the A u s tra lia n Science and Technology C oun cil who is also C hairperson o f the T echnological Change

Committee sh a ll receive a fee o f $25,715 p e r annum.

Rate per annum of Fee T ravellin g

A u th o rity Chairperson

$

D eputy Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

Allowance per over-night stay

$

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission * 24,088

Capital City - 300 Other than a

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation 35,287 - 17,163

Capital City - 155

Australian Defence Industries Pty Ltd 30,893 20,656 13,790

Australian Maritime Safety Authority 30,893 20,656 13,790

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation 30,893 20,656 13,790

Commonwealth Serum Laboratories Limited7 30,893 20,656 13,790

Export Finance and Insurance Corporation 30,893 20,656 13,790

Federal Airports Corporation 30,893 20,656 13,790

7 Com m onwealth Serum Laboratories L im ite d B oard Members appointed to a 'Due D ilig e n c e ' Com m ittee established in association w ith the sale o f Com m onwealth Serum La bo ratorie s L im ite d s h a ll receive an a d d itio n a l d a ily fee

o f $326 and tra ve llin g allowance p e r overnight stay o f $300 C a p ita l C ity $155 Other than a C a p ita l City.

Rate per annum of Fee T ra v e llin g

A u th o rity Chairperson

$

D eputy Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

Allowance per over-night stay

$

Foreign Investment Review Board 3 0 ,8 9 3 2 0 ,6 5 6 1 7 ,1 6 3 Capital City - 300

Textiles, Clothing and Footwear Development Authority 3 0 ,8 9 3 2 0 ,6 5 6 1 3 ,7 9 0

Other than a Capital City - 155

Special Broadcasting Service 3 0 ,8 9 3 2 0 ,6 5 6 1 3 ,7 9 0

Aerospace Technologies of Australia Pty Limited 3 0 ,8 9 3 - 1 3 ,7 9 0

Australian Heritage Commission 3 0 ,8 9 3 - 1 3 ,7 9 0

Co-opted Commissioner - - 1 3 ,7 9 0

Australian Electoral Commission 3 0 ,8 9 3 - -

Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 3 0 ,8 9 3 - -

Australian Tourist Commission 2 7 ,4 0 0 1 5 ,4 1 6 1 3 ,7 9 0

Rate per annum of Fee T ra v e llin g

A u th o rity Chairperson D ep u ty M e m b e r

Chairperson

Allowance over-night per stay

$ $ $ $

Tourism Forecasting Council 25,714

Trade Practices Tribunal *

Stevedoring Industry Finance Committee

Australian Statistics Advisory Council

Purchasing Complaints Commissioner

OTC Ltd

13.790

13.790

10,358 plus 373 per diem for any work in excess of 25

days

10 1 0

- Capital City - 300

Other than a

10,358 Capital City - 155 + 434 per diem

1 0

Council of the Australian National Maritime Sydney - 230

Museum 13,790 - 6,986 Other Capital

Member of a Committee of the Australian 326 Cities - 190

National Maritime Museum per diem Other than a

Capital City - 145

Rate per annum of Fee T ra v e llin g

A u th o rity Chairperson D ep u ty M e m b e r

Chairperson

Allowance over-night per stay

$ $ $ $

Community Cultural Development Committee 10,358 of the Australia Council

Disability Services Advisory Committee 10.35810

National Health and Medical Research Council 10,358

Port Conciliator 1,385

+217 per diem

Part-time Offices Not Listed

5.2 The remuneration of a part-time holder of a public office on annual fees not specifically listed shall continue unchanged.

Sydney - 230 Other Capital Cities - 190 Other than a

Capital City - 145

The ho ld er o f this office s h a ll also receive a d a ily fee o f $205 when attending meetings o f the D is a b ility A dvisory

C oun cil o f A u s tra lia , subject to a m inim um annual payment o f $2,050

(a) the chairperson, or nominated presiding officer, shall in each case certify whether the period of 3 hours has elapsed and in so certifying may have regard to reasonable travelling time incurred by an office-holder away from the metropolitan area of the capital city or the environs of the town in which he or she lives; and

(b) the maximum payment in respect of any one day shall be the appropriate daily fee.

6.3 An office-holder may be paid in respect of formal meetings of less than three hours subject to the following conditions:

(a) for formal meetings aggregating less than two hours, an amount equal to two-fifths of a daily fee;

(b) for formal meetings, or formal meetings and business of the authority on the day of a formal meeting, of two hours or more, but less than three hours on any one day, an amount equal to three-fifths of a daily fee;

(c) the maximum payment in respect of any one day shall be the appropriate daily fee;

(d) eligibility for each payment shall be certified by the chairperson or nominated presiding officer and in so certifying the chairperson may have regard to reasonable travelling time in accordance with 6.2; and

(e) preparation time shall only be included in accordance with 6.1.

6.4 An office-holder may also be paid a daily fee in respect of aggregates of periods of business of the authority of less than three hours undertaken on behalf of the authority, subject to the following conditions:

* Full-time Office β Annual Fees (Part 5)

6.5 Fees and Allowances - Specified Offices

A uthority/O ffice

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

__________________________ Allowance

Chairperson Member per overnight stay

_____$_____________ $__________________ $________

Security Appeals Tribunal President Deputy President

Companies Auditors and Liquidators Disciplinary Board

Corporations and Securities Panel

Council for the Order of Australia

5421 4821 2 3

4253

Capital City - Other than a Capital City -

300

155

542 plus

5,405 p.a.

434 plus

1,622 p.a.

542 plus

5,405 p.a.

434 plus

1,622 p.a.

no fee payable

no fee payable

1 Subject to a m inim um paym ent o f $5,420 p.a.

2 Subject to a m inim um paym ent o f $4,830 p.a.

3 Subject to a m inim um paym ent o f $4,340 p.a.

Rate per diem of Fee

A uthority/O ffice

International Air Services Commission

Resource Assessment Commission

Trade Practices Commission

National Road Transport Commission

Australian Broadcasting Authority

Committee on Employment Opportunities

Chairperson M em ber

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$ $ $

60% of the basic rate of salary payable from

time to time to a Secretary of a

Department of State in the Australian

Public Service

482

434 Capital City - 300

Other than a Capital City - 155

434

434

434

409

4 0 9

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

per overnight stay

$

Family Law Council 482 409 Capital City - 300

Industry Commission * 409

Other than a Capital City - 155

National Investment Council - 409

National Legal Aid Advisory Committee 482 409

National Legal Aid Representative Council 482 409

Murray-Darling Basin Commission 482 -

Shipping Industry Reform Authority 482 -

Albury-Wodonga Development Corporation Deputy Chairperson Member

Waterfront Industry Reform Authority 482

386 326

National Board of Employment, Education and T raining 482 386

Panel to Review Part X of the Trade Practices Act 482 386

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson M e m b e r per overnight stay

$ $ $

National Food Authority * 386 Capital City - 300

Other than a

Pharmaceutical Benefits Remuneration Tribunal No fee payable 386 Capital City - 155

Asian Studies Council 434 326

Australian Geological Survey Organisation Advisory Council 434 326

Business Skills Assessment Panel 434 + 326

$6,986 p.a.

National Petroleum Advisory Committee 434 326

Official Establishments Trust 434 326

Professional Committees - Health Portfolio6 434 326

Australian Rail Industry Advisory Council 434 _

6 P rofessional Com m ittees - refers to those a u th o ritie s o f a m ed ica l o r related nature w ith in the H e alth P o rtfo lio w hich

the T rib u n a l determ ines fro m time to time as a p p ro p ria te f o r in clu sio n in this category.

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson M e m b e r per overnight stay

$ $ $

Pharmaceutical Benefits Pricing Authority 434 326 Capital City - 300

Other than a

Quarantine and Inspection Advisory Council 434 326 Capital City - 155

Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme Review Authority 434 -

Vocational Registration Eligibility Committees 434 326

Vocational Registration Appeal Committee 434 326

Australian National Council on AIDS -

Deputy Chairperson Chief Commonwealth Medical & Scientific 386 326

Advisor 326

Australian Water Research Advisory Council 386 326

Committee of Review of Migrant and Multicultural Programs and Services 386 326

Committee to Advise on Australia's Immigration Policies 386 326

Rate per diem of Fee

A uthority/O ffice Chairperson M e m b e r

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$ $ $

Drought Review Task Force

Endangered Species Advisory Council (including service on the Endangered Species Scientific Subcommittee)

Exotic Animal Disease Preparedness Consultative Council

Multifunction Polis - Adelaide Community Consultation Panel

Non-Government Schools Funding Review Committee

Quarantine and Inspection Advisory Council Selection Committee

Innovative Agricultural Marketing Program Committee

386 326 Capital City -

Other than a 300

Capital City - 155

386 326

386 326

386 326

386 326

386 No fee

payable

276

Rate per diem of Fee

A uthority/O ffice Chairperson M em ber

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$ $ $

Redeployment and Retirement Appeals Committees Merit Protection and Review Agency 3869 .

Sydney - 230 Other Capital

Tenure Appeal Board, Australian Broadcasting Corporation 386 -

Cities - 190 Other than a Capital City - 145

Advisory Council on Cultural Policy - 326

Australian Council for Employment and Training β 326

Australian Council for Women10 β 326

Committee of Review of Aboriginal Employment and Training Programs* 326

Co-operative Research Centres Committee 386 326

Home and Community Care Program Negotiating Team - 326

Merit Protection and Review Agency * 326

9 Subject to a m inim um paym ent o f $1,928 p.a.

10 T ra ve llin g allow ance p e r ove rnight stay c a p ita l c ity $300, o th er than a c a p ita l c ity $155.

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson M e m b e r per overnight

$ $ $

Music Industry Advisory Council 386 276 Sydney - 230

Other Capital

Pharmacy Restructuring Authority 386 276 Cities - 190

Other than a

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 6 276 Capital City -

Council of the Australian Institute of Marine Science β 276

Veterans' Review Board Senior member - 326

Member - 276

Medical member Sessional fees

payable from time to time to senior medical

specialists visitin g Repatriation Institutions

Advisory Council on Australian Archives 326 276

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

per overnight stay

$

Australian Broadcasting Corporation Advisory Council 326 276

Sydney - 230 Other Capital

Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research 326 276

Cities - 190 Other than a Capital City - 145

Board of Management of the Australian Institute of Criminology 326 276

Centenary of Federation Advisory Committee11 326 276

Committee for Quality Assurance in Higher Education 326 276

Commonwealth AIDS Research Grants Committee 326 -

Immigration Review Panel 326 276

Industry Task Force on Leadership and Management S kills 326 276

11 T ra v e llin g allow ance p e r o ve rnight stay c a p ita l c ity $300, o th er than a c a p ita l city $155.

100

Rate per diem of Fee

A uthority/O ffice Chairperson M em ber

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$ $ $

Board of Management of the Australian Institute of Sydney - 230

Family Studies - 276 Other Capital

Cities - 190

Councils of the National Board of Employment, Other than a

Education and Training Capital City - 145

Deputy Chairperson - 326

Member - 276

Committees of the Australian Science and Technology Council13 326 276

Australian Sports Drug Agency 276 205

Deputy Chairperson - 253

International Year of the Family National Council 276

Deputy Chairperson 276

Religious Advisory Committee to the Services 276 276

Rural Industries Business Extension Service Board 276

1 3 A member o f the A u s tra lia n Science and Technology C o u n cil who serves on a com m ittee o f the A u s tra lia n

Science and Technology C o un cil s h a ll receive no a d d itio n a l rem uneration.

101

Rate per diem of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson

$

M e m b e r

$

per overnight stay

$

Promotions Appeal Boards: Australian Broadcasting Corporation 276

Sydney - 230 Other Capital

Australian National Railways Commission 276 - Cities - 190

Committees for the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation 276 253

Other than a Capital City - 145

Republic Advisory Committee14 No fee 276

payable

Rural Adjustment Scheme Advisory Council Specialist Committees - 276

Advisory Committees of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation 253 205

Co-operative Research Centres Committee Assessment Panels 253 205

Torres Strait Islander Advisory Board 253 205

14 T ravellin g allow ance p e r overnight stay cap ital city $300,, other than a c a p ita l c ity $155.

102

Rate per diem of Fee T ra v e llin g

A llow ance

A u th o rity /O ffic e Chairperson M e m b e r per overnight stay

$ $ $

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Sydney - 230

Regional Councils Other Capital

Deputy Chairperson 205 168 Cities - 190

Member, Executive Business 168 Other than a

Member, General Business 120 Capital City - 145

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Advisory Committees - 120

Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Research Advisory Committee - 205

Disability Advisory Council of Australia β 2051 5

Military Superannuation and Benefits Scheme Reconsideration Advisory Committee - 205

Central Trades Committee - No fee

payable

Local Trades Committee - No fee

payable

^ M em bers who serve as C h airp erso n, D is a b ility Services A d viso ry Com m ittees, s h a ll receive a m inim um a n nu al paym ent

o f $2,050.

104

PART 7

PART-TIME HOLDERS OF PUBLIC OFFICES IN PRIMARY INDUSTRY STATUTORY MARKETING AUTHORITIES - FEES Full-time Office

Note: Paragraphs 6.1 to 6.4 and paragraph 6.9 shall apply to office holders in receipt of daily fees under this Part.

A uthority

Chairperson

$

Rate of Fee

Deputy Chairperson $

Member

$

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$

Australian Meat and Live-stock Corporation 48,176 36,132 24,088 Capital City - 300

per annum per annum per annum Other than a Capital City - 155

Australian Wool Research and Promotion 48,176 36,132 24,088

Organisation1 per annum per annum per annum

1 Members o f the A u s tra lia n W ool Research and P ro m o tio n O rgan isa tion who are also members o f W ool In te rn a tio n a l

sh a ll be rem unerated f o r that membership a t the base rate and not the a d d itio n a l p e r annum rate.

105

Rate of Fee Travelling

Allowance

Chairperson Deputy M e m b e r per overnight

A u th o rity Chairperson stay

$ $ $ $

Wool International 48.1762

per annum 36,1323 per annum

24.0884 per annum Capital City - 300 Other than a

Capital City - 155

Australian Wheat Board * 36,132 24,088

per annum per annum

Australian Dairy Corporation 42,155 24,088 18,066

per annum per annum per annum

Australian Fisheries Management Authority 42,155 24,088 18,066

per annum per annum per annum

Australian Horticultural Corporation 42,155 24,088 18,066

per annum per annum per annum

2 Plus $23,224 p e r annum

3 Plus $10,840 p e r annum

4 Plus $7,227 p e r annum

Rate of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity

Chairperson

$

D eputy Chairperson $

M e m b e r

$

per overnight stay $

Meat Research Corporation 25,714 13,790 Capital City - 300

per annum per annum Other than a

Board members appointed to the board of: Capital City - 155

Australian Meat Technology Pty Ltd 6,429 p.a. - 3,448 p.a.

Fututech Pty Ltd 6,429 p.a. - 3,448 p.a.

Pipsyl Pty Ltd 6,429 p.a. - 3,448 p.a.

Dairy Research and Development Corporation 25,714 - 13,790

per annum per annum

Energy Research and Development 25,714 13,790

Corporation per annum per annum

Fisheries Research and Development 25,714 13,790

Corporation per annum per annum

Grains Research and Development 25,714 13,790

Corporation per annum per annum

Horticultural Research and Development 25,714 13,790

Corporation per annum per annum

108

Rate of Fee T ravellin g

A llow ance

Chairperson D eputy M e m b e r per overnight

A u th o rity Chairperson stay

$ $ $ $

Cotton Research and Development 20,656 - 10,358 Sydney - 230

Corporation per annum per annum Other Capital

Cities - 190

Grape and Wine Research and Development 20,656 - 10,358 Other than a

Corporation per annum per annum Capital City - 145

Sugar Research and Development Corporation 20,656 per annum - 10,358

per annum

Pig Research and Development Corporation 20,656 per annum - 10,358

per annum

Fishing Industry Policy Council 18,066

per annum

- No fee

payable

Australian Pig Industry Policy Council 15,054

per annum

- No fee

payable

Australian Tobacco Marketing Advisory Committee 15,054 per annum

- -

1 0 9

A u th o rity

Chairperson

$

Rate of Fee

Deputy Chairperson $

M e m b e r

$

T ra vellin g A llow ance per overnight stay

$

Northern Prawn Fisheries Management Advisory Committee

South East Trawl Management Advisory Committee

10.358 per annum

10.358 per annum

Sydney - 230 Other Capital Cities - 190 Other than a

Capital City - 145

Australian Dairy Corporation Selection 386 - No fee Capital City - 300

Committee per diem payable Other than a

Capital City - 155

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Selection Committee 386 per diem

No fee5 payable

Australian Horticultural Corporation Selection Committee 386 per diem

- No fee

payable

Australian Meat and Live-stock Industry Selection Committee 386 per diem

- No fee

payable

Australian Wheat Board Selection Committee 386 per diem - No fee

payable

5 A member o f the A u s tra lia n Fisheries M anagem ent A u th o rity S election Com m ittee ap pointed under section 2 9 (b ) o f

the Fisheries A dm inistra tion A ct 1992 shall be p a id a fee o f $276 p e r diem.

no

Rate of Fee Travelling

Allowance

A u th o rity

Chairperson

$

Deputy Chairperson $

M e m b e r

$

per overnight stay $

Australian Wool Industry Selection 386 1996 Capital City - 300

Committees per diem per diem Other than a

Capital City - 155

Research and Development Corporations Selection Committees 386 per diem

No fee payable

Research and Development Councils Selection Committees 386 per diem

- No fee

payable6 7

Australian Pork Corporation Selection Committee 386 per diem

- No fee

payable

Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation Selection Committee 386 per diem

- No fee

payable

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Selection Committees 386 per diem

- No fee

payable

6 This fee is to be p a id f o r only two years fro m date o f establishm ent o f the in itia l Selection Com m ittee.

7 A member o f a Selection Com m ittee f o r a Research and Developm ent C o u n cil appointed under section 126 (2)(b) o f the

P rim a ry Industries and Energy Research and Developm ent A ct 1990 sh a ll be p a id a fee o f $276 p e r diem.

112

Rate of Fee

Chairperson Deputy M e m b e r per overnight

A u th o rity Chairperson stay

$ $ $ $

Travelling Allowance

Tobacco Research and Development Council 326 per diem

Southern Shark Fishery Management Advisory 326 Committee per diem

Other Management Advisory Committees, Fisheries Administration Act 19919 Category A 253 p.d

Category B Nil.

Rural Industries State Research Committees 243 per diem

276 Sydney - 230

per diem Other Capital Cities - 190 - Other than a

Capital City - 145

205

per diem

9 The category o f fee to be p a id s h a ll be determ ined by the M in is te r w ith in whose p o rtfo lio re s p o n sib ility

the p u b lic office is located.

PART a

FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME HQ1.DFRS OF PUBLIC OFFICES IN ADMINISTRATIVE APPFALS TRIBLJNAI S

8.1 Fees and Allowances

O ffice Full-tim e Part-tim e

Annual salary per diem fee

President (see Determination Number 15 of 1993 Judicial and Related Offices - Remuneration and Allowances)

Deputy President (non-judicial) 82% of salary payable from time to time to

President.

Senior Non-Presidential Member 72% of salary payable from time to time to

President.

Member 60% of salary

payable from time to time to

President.

Registrar $78,929

President, ACT* Deputy President (non-judicial), 482

Commonwealth Senior Non-Presidential Member,

482

Commonwealth 482

Other Member, Commonwealth 434

Member, ACT 434

Member, ACT and Commonwealth 434

* I f the P resident is a member o f both the Com m onw ealth A dm inistra tive

A ppeals T rib u n a l and the A C T A d m in is tra tiv e Appeals T rib u n a l, on ly one d a ily

fe e is to be p a id in respect o f fo rm a l m eetings o f both trib u n a ls held on the

same day.

113

Fees Payable to Part-time Office Holders 8.2 In this Part, unless the sense otherwise requires:

(a) a reference to 'business of the tribunal' means any business of the tribunal conducted by a member of the tribunal with the approval of the tribunal, other than attendance at a formal hearing; and

(b) the daily fee for a formal hearing includes a component to cover normal preparation time, but where the president of the tribunal considers the period of preparation time involved is so unusual as to warrant recognition that period may be included as business of the tribunal.

8.3 A part-time holder of a public office in the tribunal shall be paid a daily fee in respect of such period, not less than three hours, on any one day on which he or she attends a formal hearing of the tribunal, and/or is engaged on business of the tribunal, subject to the following conditions:

(a) the president, or nominated presiding officer, shall in each case certify whether the period of 3 hours has elapsed and in so certifying may have regard to reasonable travelling time incurred by an office-holder away from the

metropolitan area of the capital city or the environs of the town in which he or she lives; and

(b) the maximum payment in respect of any one day shall be the appropriate daily fee.

8.4 An office-holder shall be paid in respect of formal hearings, or formal hearings and business of the tribunal on the day of a formal hearing, less than three hours on any one day, an amount equal to three-fifths of a daily fee, subject to the following conditions:

(a) the fee shall be payable even if on arriving for a meeting the hearing is subsequently cancelled;

(b) the maximum payment in respect of any one day shall be the appropriate daily fee;

114

Travelling Allowance

8.7 Travelling allowance at the rate of $300 Capital city and $155 other than a capital city shall apply to all office holders in this Part, except for the holder of the office of Registrar who shall be entitled to the rates and conditions of travelling allowance determined from time to time for holders of offices in the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

8.8 All other conditions specified in Part 10 of this Determination shall apply.

116

PART 9

FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME HOLDERS OF PUBLIC OFFICES IN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISI ANDFR COMMISSION

9.1 Fees and Allowances

O f f i c e F ull-tim e P art-tim e Travel Allowance

Annual oer diem oer overnioht stav salary fee

($) ($) ($)

Board of Commissioners Chairperson 126,760 Capital City - 300

Other than a capital city - 155

Deputy Chairperson 78,9291

Commissioner 62,3541

Commission Advisory Committees Sydney - 230

Member 205 Other Capital

Cities - 190 Other than a Capital City - 145

Torres Strait Islander Advisory Board Chairperson Member

253 205

Regional Council Chairperson 56,3232

Deputy Chairperson 168

Member 120

Regional Council Advisory Committee Member 120 1

1 E ffe ctive fro m date o f appointm ent as a fu ll-tim e office holder.

2 E ffe ctive im m ediately a fte r the f ir s t election o f a person as the

C h airp erso n o f th a t R egional C ouncil a fte r the end o f the round o f

R e g io n a l C o u n c il elections f o r 1993.

117

Office Rate per annum Travelling Allowance

of salary per over-night stay.

($ ) 1$ )

Officers of the Commission Chief Executive Officer

Director, Office of Evaluation and Audit

120,000

86,435

Capital City - 300 Other than a Capital City - 155

Rates and conditions determin from time to time for holders of offices in the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

Conditions of Payment of Travelling Allowance

Within Australia

9.2 Travelling allowance shall be payable in accordance with the following conditions:

(a) Where an office holder stays overnight at a locality on official business, the office holder is entitled to be paid travelling allowance at the rate specified:

(i) in the case of a full-time office holder - for each overnight stay away from headquarters; and

(ii) in the case of a part-time office holder - for each overnight stay away from home.

(b) An allowance of $45 shall be payable where travel involves an absence from home of at least 10 hours, but does not involve an overnight stay.

(c) Where the absence specified in paragraph (a) exceeds a multiple of 24 hours by at least 10 hours, an extra $45 shall be payable in addition to the appropriate overnight stay payments.

(d) Where the Government meets the travel cost of a spouse accompanying an office holder, the additional cost of

118

( iii) for formal meetings and/or business of the Council or Committee aggregating less than 3 hours on any one day - 40% of the daily fee; and

(iv) eligibility for each payment shall be certified by the chairperson or nominated presiding officer and in so certifying the chairperson may have regard to reasonable travelling time incurred by an office-holder away from the metropolitan area of the capital city or the environs of the town in which the office holder

lives.

Annual Leave Loading 9.7 An annual leave loading shall be payable to holders of full­ time Public Offices, on the same terms and conditions applying to officers of the Australian Public Service.

District Allowance 9.8 Where a Commissioner of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission holds an office located in a region or district which is classified for the purposes of District Allowance, the

holder of the office shall also be paid a District Allowance at the rates and on the conditions prescribed for officers Australia Public Service. Additionally, a Commissioner holding an office in one of the following locations shall also be paid district allowance as if the Commissioner were an officer of the Australia Public Service

residing at a locality of the district allowance grade specified opposite the location:

HopeVale, Queensland - Grade C, Brewarrina, New South Wales- Grade A.

Recreation Leave 9.9 With effect from date of appointment as a full-time office holder, a Commissioner of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Commission holding an office in one of the following locations, shall accrue in addition to the recreation leave the otherwise applicable under Determination 20 of 1991, a credit at an annual rate equal to the sum of the credit otherwise applicable and the number of days specified opposite the location:

HopeVale, Queensland - 5 days, Brewarrina, New South Wales - 2 days.

120

121

PART 10

CONDITIONS OF PAYMENT OF TRAVELLING ALLOWANCE

Within Australia

10.1 Offices specified in Part 1, Part 2, with salaries of $108,050 p.a. or more in Part 3, Part 5, Part 6, and Part 7 of this determination, Administrator, Christmas Island, Administrator of Cocos (Keeling) Island and Administrator, Norfolk Island, shall be paid travelling allowance in accordance with the following:

(a) Where an office holder stays overnight at a locality on official business, the office holder is entitled to be paid travelling allowance at the rate specified:

(i) in the case of a full-time office holder - for each overnight stay away from headquarters; and

(ii) in the case of a part-time office holder - for each overnight stay away from home.

(b) An allowance of $45 shall be payable where travel involves an absence from home of at least 10 hours, but does not involve an overnight stay.

(c) Where the absence specified in paragraph (a) exceeds a multiple of 24 hours by at least 10 hours, an extra $45 shall be payable in addition to the appropriate overnight stay payments.

122

(d) Where the Government meets the travel cost of a spouse accompanying an office holder, the additional cost of double room over single room accommodation shall be added to the rate of overnight stay. Such additional cost shall be assessed at $10 unless vouched.

(e) Where the costs of accommodation are met, travelling allowance of $70 per diem only shall be payable.

10.2 Offices specified in Part 3 with salaries at or between $62,354 p.a. and $104,418 p.a., other than Administrator, Christmas Island, Administrator, Cocos (Keeling) Island and Administrator, Norfolk Island, shall be entitled to the rates and conditions of travelling allowance determined from time to time for officers of the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

10.3 Offices specified in Part 3 with salaries at or below $56,323 p.a. shall be entitled to the rates and conditions of travelling allowance determined from time to time for officers of the Senior Officer structure of the Australian Public Service.

Overseas

10.4 A Secretary of a Department and a holder of a full-time or part-time public office who is entitled to receive travelling allowance within Australia at a capital city rate of $300 per overnight stay shall be entitled to receive travelling, equipment and other overseas allowances at the rates and on the conditions determined under section 82D of the Public Service Act 1922 for Secretaries of

Departments.

10.5 A Secretary of a Department and a holder of a full-time or part-time public office who is entitled to receive travelling allowance within Australia at a Sydney rate of $230 per overnight stay or at rates determined for the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service shall be entitled to receive travelling, equipment and other overseas allowances at the rates and on the conditions

determined under section 82D of the Public Service Act 1922 for the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

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REMUNERATION TRIBUNAL

Determination Number 20 of 1993

REMUNERATION AND ALLOWANCES FOR HOLDERS OF PUBLIC OFFICES

Pursuant to sub-sections 8(1), 7(3) and 7(4) of the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973, the Remuneration Tribunal has inquired into the remuneration to be paid to holder of the public offices of Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson and Member of the Australian Securities Commission, and other matters signficantly related thereto, and determines as set out hereunder, with effect from the date of this determination:

1. Chairperson, Mr Allan Cameron

(i) Salary at the rate of $144,860 per annum;

(ii) An allowance of $14,120 per annum for expenses of o ffice ;

( iii) Travelling allowance at the same rate and under the same conditions of payment as determined from time to time for Secretaries of Departments;

2. Deputy Chairperson, Ms Lynn Ralph

(i) Salary at the rate of $135,131 per annum;

(ii) An allowance of $8,649 per annum for expenses of o ffice ; (iii)

( iii) Travelling allowance at the same rate and under the same conditions of payment as determined from time to time for Secretaries of Departments;

125

3. Member, Mr William John Robinson

(i) Salary at the rate of $118,916;

(ii) An allowance of $6,486 per annum for expenses of office;

(iii) Travelling allowance at the same rate and under the same conditions of payment as determined from time to time for Secretaries of Departments;

Dated this twenty-first day of December one thousand nine hundred and ninety-three.

Stuart Harris Chair

K.D. Marshall Member

Gerald Gleeson Member

126

Travelling

Rate of Salary Allowance per

O ffice or Fee overnight stay

$ $

Member If engaged on general Not exceeding 11

Council business 120 per diem#

If engaged on business of Not exceeding 11

the Executive 168 per diem#

Central Land Council

Chairman If engaged full-time on 54,471 β

the functions and duties of the office per annum

β

If engaged part-time on the functions and duties 276 per diem of the office

# Rates p e r diem o f fe e s h a ll be a t the discretion o f the Land C o u n c il but

s h a ll n o t exceed the amounts shown.

H Rates o f tra v e llin g allow ance payable s h a ll be a t the discretio n o f the

C o u n c il b u t s h a ll n o t exceed the general rates determ ined fro m tim e to

tim e f o r o ffic e rs o f the S enior O ffic e r structure o f the A u s tra lia n P u b lic

Service. The conditions o f paym ent o f tra v e llin g allow ance s h a ll be

those de term in ed fr o m time to tim e f o r o ffic e rs in the various Senior

O ffic e r G rades in the A u s tra lia n P ub lic Service.

β Rates o f tra v e llin g allow ance payable s h a ll be a t the discretion o f the

C o u n c il but s h a ll not exceed the rate determ ined fro m time to tim e f o r

o ffic e rs o f the S enior E xecutive Service o f the A u s tra lia n P u b lic

Service. The con ditions o f paym ent o f tra v e llin g allow ance s h a ll be

those determ ined fro m tim e to tim e f o r office rs o f the Senior Executive

S ervice o f the A u s tra lia n P u b lic Service.

128

O ffice

Rate of Salary or Fee

$

Travelling Allowance per overnight stay

$

Anindilvakwa Land Council 36,679 β

Chairman per annum

Member Not exceeding 11

120 per diem#

Dated this twenty-first day of December one thousand nine hundred and ninety-three.

Stuart Harris Chair

K.D. Marshall Member

Gerald Gleeson Member

.-y a ^ S

130

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units (EFTSU), where a student undertaking a standard annual program for a course generates one EFTSU, in accordance with the following table:

Category EFTSU

more than 16,000 Category 1 Category 2 Category 3 Category 4

8,001 - 16,000 4,000 - 8,000 less than 4,000

3. Notwithstanding the above, the University of Tasmania should be categorised at Category 2.

4. A deputy, however described, of an office referred to in paragraph 1. above, should be paid salary calculated as a percentage of the rate of salary of the relevant office referred to in paragraph 1. in accordance with the following table:

(a) if a sole deputy 85%

(b) if one of a number of 80%.

Dated this twenty-first day of December one thousand nine hundred and ninety-three.

deputies

Stuart Harris Chair

K.D. Marshall Member

Gerald Gleeson Member

134

2. Additional Salary

O ffice

Rate per annum of Additional Salary $

Chief Minister 32,053

Deputy Chief Minister 26,702

M inister 24,040

Leader of the Opposition 24,040

Presiding Officer 21,369

Deputy Leader of the Opposition 18,030

Deputy Presiding Officer 6,678

Chairperson, Public Accounts Committee 4,407

Chairperson, Scrutiny of Bills and Subordinate Legislation Committee 4,407

Chairperson of a Committee not otherwise specified herein 2,203

3. General Allowance

O ffice

Rate per annum of General Allowance $

Chief Minister 5,628

Deputy Chief Minister 4,417

M inister 4,417

Leader of the Opposition 4,417

Presiding Officer 4,417

Other Members 3,205

136

6.4 When used for private purposes the vehicle is to be driven only by:

• the member, or

• a person nominated by the member.

Dated this twenty-first day of December one thousand nine hundred and ninety-three.

M e m b e r

Gerald Gleeson M e m b e r

138

O ffice Rate per annum

of Salary $

Associate Head of Administration,known as: Secretary, Attorney-General's Department Secretary, Department of Education and Training Secretary, Department of Environment, Land and Planning Secretary, Department of Health Secretary, Department of Urban Services Under Treasurer.

Chief Executive Officer, A.C.T. Electricity and Water Authority

Auditor-General

Director, Canberra Institute of Technology

A.C.T. Chief Planner

Chief Executive Officer, Legal Aid Commission (A.C.T.)

Fire Commissioner

ACT Community Advocate

Assistant Executive Officer, Legal Aid Commission (A.C.T.)

Deputy Fire Commissioner

104,418

104.418

104.418

96,304

86,435

78,929

70,017

62.354

62.354

62.354

140

Authority

Rate of Fee

Chairperson Member

Travelling Allowance per over­ night stay

$ $ $

Construction Industry Long Service Leave Board

A.C.T. Gas Authority

10,358 205 Sydney-230

per annum per diem Other Capital Cities - 190 Other than a Capital 386 per diem provided

the

Authority consists of no more than 1

member

City - 145

Milk Authority of the A.C.T. 326 6,986

A.C.T. Department of per diem per annum

Health Staff Appeal 386 -

Boards per diem2

A.C.T. Credit Tribunal 386 per diem -

S ubject to a m inim um paym ent o f $1,928 per annum .

1 4 2

PART 4

Specified Offices

4.1 In this Part, unless the sense otherwise requires:

(a) a reference to an 'authority' is a reference to a commission, board, committee, tribunal or other body or office, the member or members of which are entitled to be paid daily fees referred to in this determination;

(b) a reference to 'business of the authority' means any business of the authority conducted by a member of the authority with the approval of the authority, other than attendance at a formal

meeting; and

(c) the daily fee for a formal meeting includes a component to cover normal preparation time, but where the chairperson of the authority considers the period of preparation time involved is so

unusual as to warrant recognition that period may be included as business of the authority.

4.2 A part-time holder of a public office in an authority shall be paid a daily fee in respect of such period, not less than three hours, on any one day on which he or she attends a formal meeting of the authority, and/or is engaged on business of the authority, subject to the following conditions:

(a) the chairperson, or nominated presiding officer, shall in each case certify whether the period of 3 hours has elapsed and in so certifying may have regard to reasonable travelling time incurred by an office-holder away from the metropolitan area of the capital city or the environs of the town in which he or she lives; and

(b) the maximum payment in respect of any one day shall be the appropriate daily fee.

CONDITIONS OF PAYMENT OF DAILY FEES

144

PART 5

CONDITIONS OF PAYMENT OF TRAVELLING ALLOWANCE

Within Australia

5.1 Offices specified with salaries of $120,000 p.a. or more in Part 1 and offices specified in Part 2 of this determination shall be paid travelling allowance in accordance with the following:

(a) Travelling allowance at the rate specified shall be payable in respect of each overnight stay away from headquarters for full-time and away from home for part-time office holders occasioned primarily by official business.

(b) An allowance of $45 shall be payable where travel involves an absence from home of at least 10 hours, but does not involve an overnight stay.

(c) Where the absence specified in paragraph (a) exceeds a multiple of 24 hours by at least 10 hours, an extra $45 shall be payable in addition to the appropriate overnight stay payments.

(d) Where the Government meets the travel cost of a spouse accompanying an office-holder, the additional cost of double room over single room accommodation shall be added to the rate of overnight stay. Such additional cost shall be assessed at $10 unless vouched.

(e) Where the costs of accommodation are met, travelling allowance of $70 per diem only shall be payable.

5.2 Offices specified in Part 1 with salaries below $120,000 p.a. shall be entitled to the rates and conditions of travelling allowance determined from time to time for holders of offices in the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

146

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( ii) . On the first day of January in each year (commencing with the year commencing on the first day of January 1992) there shall accrue to each relevant officer a recreation leave credit which the relevant officer would have if that officer was an officer of the Senior

Executive Service of the Australian Public Service with an entitlement within the terms of sections 68, 68A, 68B, 68C, 68E, and 68F of the Public Service Act 1922, and Regulation 53A of the Public Service

Regulations, and that those sections and regulation applied, mutatis mutandis, to that officer.

( iii) . In addition to the recreation leave credit which accrues pursuant to clause (ii) of this determination, the relevant officer shall be deemed on the date of this determination to have an additional accrued recreation leave credit which the relevant officer would have had if that officer had been an officer of the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service with an entitlement within the terms of sections 68(4) and 68F of the Public Service Act 1922 and Regulation 53A of the Public Service Regulations, and that section and regulation had, mutatis mutandis, applied to that officer; less:

the period of leave taken by the officer which, had the officer been an officer within section 68 of the Public Service Act 1922 as amended, would have been taken into account in calculating the recreation leave entitlement credit of that officer.

This determination commences on the day on which paragraphs 28(b), (c), (d) and (e) of the Industrial Relations Amendment Act 1991 commence.

152

5. Subsequently, the Tribunal made Determination No 20 on 22 November 1991 providing for office-holders within the Tribunal's jurisdiction generally recreation leave entitlements equivalent to officers of the Public Service. The Tribunal stated at the time that this Determination was made on an interim basis. The determination has been made upon the basis that, in due course, appropriate amendments will be made to the terms of the determination to accommodate special cases and particular provision will be made, by separate determination or otherwise, in respect of special cases.

6. The determination of recreation leave entitlements for the full-time public office-holders who require special consideration is presently the subject of consideration in Government. It is envisaged that a determination or determinations in respect of those office holders will be made in due course.

7. The Tribunal has made a determination in respect of compensation for loss of office for full-time public office­ holders. That determination is in general form. It is intended to apply to full-time public office-holders: the public office-holders affected are, of course, limited to those to whom the jurisdiction of the Tribunal extends.

8. It is the intent of the determination that the compensation provided is to be determined by reference to the remuneration of the public office-holder as fixed by the Tribunal and applying at the date of the retirement of that office-holder. The remuneration is that fixed by the Tribunal in its relevant determination: it does not include other entitlements such as superannuation. In calculating the "minimum payment" and the "maximum payment" for the purposes of the Determination, the amount is to be fixed by reference to the amount which would be paid pursuant to the entitlement of the office holder to that remuneration if paid on an ordinary fortnightly or monthly basis.

9. The entitlement to compensation does not arise unless "the Commonwealth has not made the office-holder an offer of suitable alternative employment". The phrase "suitable alternative employment" has been adopted as the phrase which in the past has been conventionally used in this regard. It is a phrase of necessary generality. It is the intention of the determination that the suitability of the alternative employment offered is to be judged by taking into account the nature of the duties of the office from which the office-holder has retired, the remuneration of that office, and the place or places in which the

158

'

incorporated company, all the stock or shares in the capital of which is, or are, beneficially owned by the Commonwealth or by a public statutory corporation.

3. Where a holder of a public office on a full-time basis serves the full term of appointment, no entitlement to a payment under this determination arises.

Dated this day of April one thousand nine hundred and

ninety two.

Mr Justice Mahoney Chairman

L J Mangan Member

162

2

WAGES SYSTEM DEVELOPMENTS SINCE 1987

There have been extensive developments in the industrial relations system since 1987 which the Tribunal has applied to the remuneration of offices within its jurisdiction as they have occurred.

Australia's traditionally centralised and regulated industrial relations system, based on the direct involvement of industrial tribunals in the relationship between employers and employees with a uniform set of rules for the determination of salary

and wages, has been progressively reformed since 1987.

This move to a more decentralised system has involved an enterprise focus to remuneration increases, reflecting productivity and efficiency gains from workplace reform and other changes.

Starting with the second tier restructuring and efficiency principle, introduced in 1987, the wages system has evolved to expand the scope for the parties at enterprise level to relate improvements in pay and conditions to work reform initiatives. Under the second tier, particular emphasis was placed on abolishing

restrictive work and management practices at the enterprise level. Subsequently, the structural efficiency principle, introduced in 1989, concentrated on reducing structural impediments to efficiency in awards. There was scope for productivity gains through the introduction of classification structures linked to multi-skilling, improved work organisation and working patterns.

The October 1991 National Wage Case decision extended the greater workplace and productivity focus in the industrial relations system with the introduction of the new Enterprise Bargaining Principle. This principle recognised the primary responsibility of the direct parties concerned to negotiate a satisfactory outcome to salary and conditions without arbitration. The Government subsequently amended the Industrial Relations Act to stimulate this development. Since that time the new

Division 3A of the Act has become a major avenue for enterprise bargaining.

Under the new arrangements the focus has shifted to increasing workplace flexibility through changes negotiated at the enterprise level, addressing such matters as employment conditions, work patterns, employee mobility, education and training, and by taking into account the particular features of workplaces. The

underlying tenet of the new arrangement is to promote efficiency and competitiveness by linking changes in remuneration to the implementation of measures designed to increase productivity.

State industrial tribunals have adopted enterprise bargaining principles with varying degrees of modification to suit their own legislative frameworks.

The Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC) has recently completed a review of wage fixing principles. In its submission to this review, the Commonwealth identified two key objectives for wages policy

4

minimum award classification structure in a way which would not detract from the trend towards enterprise agreements.

REMUNERATION TRIBUNAL DEVELOPMENTS

The productivity and efficiency aspects of the general industrial framework applying to the broader community have been extended by the Tribunal to the offices in its jurisdiction. It is required, by its enabling legislation, to have regard to the national

wage principles determined by the AIRC.

In explanatory material accompanying decisions the Tribunal has indicated that it has applied the developments in the wage fixing principles. It has also noted without detracting from their relevance that the principles and decisions are not always literally applicable to the individual offices and groups within its jurisdiction.

During the period of major change between 1987 and 1990 the Tribunal continued to have regard to the prevailing national wage principles and a number of increases were granted to office holders within the spirit and intent of those principles. For example, in 1989, members of the Tribunal prepared a special report on the remuneration of the judiciary to address the inequities clause of the principles applying at that time; the process parallelled the special inequities conference that applied under the AIRC.

In 1990 the Tribunal relied on work value and structural changes to determine increases in remuneration. The Government decided not to accept the Tribunal's increases and introduced lesser increases in the Remuneration and Allowances Act 1990. This decision reflected the restraint shown in the wider community but also recognised the substantial changes over the previous few years in the nature and extent of the responsibilities of judges, senior staff of the APS and authorities and MPs.

In increasing the remuneration of offices within its jurisdiction by 2.5% in August 1991, the Tribunal acknowledged the Government's submission to that review that, while there was no direct scope for structural change in terms of award variation for these groups, the process of reform which has resulted in changes in the nature and extent of the responsibilities of public office holders, departmental secretaries and the judiciary is continuing.

The Tribunal recently granted an interim adjustment of 3.4% effective from 19 May 1993. Given the complex issues to be addressed by the Tribunal and the extensive changes in the community generally and the public sector, the Government in May 1993 supported the Tribunal's proposal for an interim adjustment.

In its explanatory statement outlining the reasons for its decision, the Tribunal noted that the first part of its 1993 review needed to consider the developments in wage fixation since the April 1991 National Wage Case decision, and their immediate impact on offices in the Tribunal's jurisdiction. The Tribunal acknowledged the

6

from private consumption, public final demand, and to a lesser extent net exports and stocks. Recent partial indicators are consistent with these forecasts.

Employment has generally increased modestly since January 1993, and further employment growth is forecast during the remainder of 1993-94. Recent increases in job vacancies and the high levels of overtime also suggest that the labour market may be picking up. Nevertheless, unemployment remains high and the unemployment rate is not expected to fall significantly in the short term.

A more detailed review of the economy and the major economic indicators are included in Attachment 2.

RECENT WAGES DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SECTORS

Productivity related wage increases and enterprise based agreements are an increasingly prominent feature of the industrial framework.

The spread of enterprise agreements to date has not been as extensive as may have been anticipated at the time of the October 1991 National Wage Case decision. This has been due, amongst other factors, to the economic situation, the novelty and time consuming nature of the process for many parties, and to the uncertainty which prevailed in the lead up to the 1993 Federal election.

After a slow start, the rate at which agreements were made accelerated from May 1992. From just over 100 agreements in April 1992 (covering less than 100 000 employees) agreements implemented have now reached over 1 300, covering an estimated 789 000 federal award employees in both the public and private sectors. By mid-November 1993, enterprise bargains covered some 38% of the work force under federal awards, with 15.9% of ratified agreements being in the public sector.

The varying nature and scope of agreements registered to date reflects the devolved bargaining process

. 52% of agreements (25% in the service sector) are for a duration of 1 year or more, and

. 77% of agreements (73% in the service sector) incorporate wage increases of 4% - 6%.

An updated version of the report provided to the AIRC's Review of the Wage Fixing Principles summarising the main features of all enterprise agreements negotiated to date has been made available to the Tribunal's secretariat.

The developments in the Commonwealth public sector affecting the staff of organisations headed by office holders whose remuneration is in the Tribunal's jurisdiction have particular relevance. The APS framework agreement, "Improving Productivity, Jobs and Pay in the Australian Public Service", covering some 150

000 staff, was concluded in December 1992. It provided salary increases of 4.9%

8

. to encourage and reward excellence, and

. to encourage increased individual accountability as an integral part of management.

There are, however, features of the offices within the Tribunal's jurisdiction that require special consideration before there could be direct application of performance based pay. There is recognition that empirical, objective and measurable performance indicators on which the performance of senior public sector executives can be assessed are not always available. Indicators such as sales, profit, share price and market share do not apply and the output of the organisation often takes forms which are difficult, if not impossible, to quantify.

An essential feature of any performance pay arrangement is performance appraisal. The mechanisms for performance appraisal which have been implemented in the APS do not lend themselves readily to the offices which fall within the Tribunal's

jurisdiction. There are limitations arising from the inherent nature of each of the main groups of offices in the Tribunal's jurisdiction which inhibit its direct application.

In the case of Judges, the concept of performance appraisal and performance based pay is inconsistent with the notion of judicial independence. Effective performance appraisal involves documentation and discussion about responsibilities and performance between managers and subordinates. This is inconsistent with the underlying concept of the judiciary under the Constitution whereby individual judges are not accountable for their decisions save for appeals to higher courts and

the possibility of dismissal moved by the Parliament. Any measure of performance appraisal would also introduce some degree of supervisory relationship between the judge and the appraiser which would not be appropriate in the judicial context, even if the appraiser were to be another judge.

Department Secretaries have a relationship with the Government through their Minister which militates against the application of performance based pay. The determination of their pay levels by politicians, including performance based pay, could lead to a perception that the public service is open to political influence and thus compromise the fundamental task of a Department Secretary to provide "frank

and fearless" advice.

The position of office holders also warrants special consideration. Generally, statutory offices are established by legislation which distances the performance of a function from the immediate purview of the relevant Minister. The legislation creates reporting and other supervisory processes to the extent the Parliament considers necessary with many office holders needing to be able to demonstrate freedom from political influence in order to carry out their statutory duties satisfactorily. The introduction of performance based pay would detract from the independence of such offices.

The introduction of performance pay would affect the nature of the offices and their relationship with Ministers and, in the case of statutory office holders, the

10

The valuation of total package is used to advertise vacancies in the Australian Public Service (APS); the methodology for these valuations is set out in Attachment 4. The attachments setting out the considerations relevant to each group of offices in the Tribunal's jurisdiction indicate the current value of the

remuneration package for each group and the basis of that valuation.

There is broad consistency in the range of additional benefits available to office holders in each of the groups in the Tribunal's jurisdiction but there are variations in the scale of benefits, eg the rate of accrual for long leave for Judges differs from long service leave available to Department Secretaries and statutory office holders.

There is, however, no flexibility in the remuneration arrangements which apply in the APS or to offices in the Tribunal's jurisdiction to trade off salary for additional benefits or, if the additional benefits are not availed of, to take additional salary within an overall cash limit. The Government is developing revised arrangements that will allow the option of cashing out the additional benefits without extending the quantum or range of benefits available. Appropriate submissions will be made to the Tribunal if it is necessary to seek changes to determinations of the Tribunal to implement the arrangements at a future time.

The Tribunal should focus on the overall value of the remuneration package for each of the offices it has under review. It will be necessary to avoid misinterpretation in adopting this approach. Special attention will be required to

ensure that comparisons between salary and remuneration package are not inadvertently portrayed as increases in remuneration.

A number of public offices are entitled to additional allowances to compensate for particular features of the office. It would be appropriate for the Tribunal to defer any review of the extension of such allowances until there has been more detailed consideration of the totality of the remuneration package.

T enure

Tenure is the third element of the wider community developments affecting the remuneration of senior executives.

There have been significant changes in tenure for senior executives in the public sector, except for Judges whose constitutional position places them above such changes. The extent of the change differs between the States and the nature of the offices.

The common practice in public services has been for appointments to be made until retiring age subject to dismissal by due process for cause eg misconduct, inefficiency. Statutory office holders have been subject to similar arrangements but the period of the engagement was frequently limited to a fixed term.

In 1984, as part of a extensive reform package, the Government introduced provisions which allowed for Department Secretaries to be appointed from outside the APS for specific periods. There have been no appointments made under these

12

and other features affecting each of the groups is canvassed in the relevant attachment to this submission.

At present there are, however, broader considerations which must also be taken into account. The state of the economy, the stage reached in the significant industrial relations reform process and the need to demonstrate equity in the

context of increases accessible to the general salary and wage earning community outweigh the more specific considerations which may arise for each group of offices.

Against this background it is proposed that adjustment should be limited to an immediate increase of 2% followed by two further 2% annual adjustments for all office holders. This would be in addition to the interim increase of 3.4% determined by the Tribunal in May 1993. It is considered that these adjustments take proper account of the range of competing factors which are relevant to the determination of the level of adjustment.

A central element of the proposed increases is that there would be no further general adjustments before 1996 and it is desirable that the determination of the Tribunal should on this occasion include the rates that would apply prospectively. The Tribunal, however, cannot avoid the need to examine remuneration issues during this period because the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973 requires it to make determinations and reports at least annually. It is, however, open to the Tribunal to indicate that unless there are significant presently unforeseeable developments it would not intend to make any changes to these rates.

Other changes are sought for specific groups within the Tribunal's jurisdiction.

Members of Parliament

Although an MP's salary has been linked by legislation since 1990 to Band 1 of the SES and is therefore not currently within the Tribunal's jurisdiction, the linkage has become distorted by

. the differences in the arrangements for providing private plated cars, and

. the introduction of performance pay for the SES.

At the time of the introduction of the revised arrangements, and anticipating the imminent introduction of performance pay for the SES, the Tribunal endorsed in principle a "dislocation allowance" for MPs, without setting a quantum.

In 1990, the Government proposed to the Tribunal that MPs be given the option of the use of private plated cars on the same basis as the SES with an appropriate adjustment of any allowance. This was accepted by the Tribunal with MPs being subject to a reduction of $6 000 in electorate allowance (which ranges from about $23 000 to $34 000 depending on electorate size).

14

. a limited tenure loading of 20% of salary for removal of any right to remain in the APS,

. superannuation retrenchment benefits in the event of termination (other than for misconduct of inefficiency) or failure to renew appointment, and

. premature termination benefit on the same basis as for statutory office holders under Remuneration Tribunal Determination 11 of 1992.

Under the arrangement a fixed term appointee would not be entitled to a benefit under section 76F or 76FA of the Public Service Act 1922 as applies to officers who remain on a tenured basis.

A key consideration in judging the appropriateness of the level of benefits is the balance between immediate rewards such as salary, longer term benefits such as superannuation and contingent benefits such as redundancy benefits or compensation for loss of expected employment.

The most effective package will provide an appropriate outcome for the individual and minimise the cost to the employer. The level of the proposed salary loading has been assessed on the basis of providing fair compensation for the loss of tenure taking into account the level of superannuation and other benefits that would be available. The loading would need to be larger to ensure that there was some value attached to tenure if these benefits were not available.

This arrangement will be extended to some statutory office holders. Initially it is intended that it apply to 6 specific statutory offices while extension to other offices is being examined.

The Tribunal's determination for Department Secretaries should include provision for the salary loading. Compensation for premature termination of appointment would be provided by determination of the Governor-General under section 37 of the Public Service Act 1922 in conjunction with the appointment. Attachment 6 provides further detail on these issues and on the proposed approach.

Judges

Judicial remuneration, like that for other groups in the Tribunal's jurisdiction, has particular features which should be recognised. There is sufficient scope within the new industrial relations framework for proper recognition of the role of an independent judiciary and its relationship with the community generally and the legal profession in particular. These views are developed in detail in Attachment 7 and it is desirable that the Tribunal should address them as part of this review.

On this occasion, it is considered that in the interest of maintaining restraint in executive salaries, the judiciary should receive the same level of adjustment as that being sought for other offices.

16

UST OF ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1 Adjustments in salaries for selected offices since 1990

Attachment 2 Economic background

Attachment 3 Developments in the Commonwealth public sector

Attachment 4 Valuation of remuneration packages

Attachment 5 Members of Parliament

Attachment 6 Department Secretaries

Attachment 7 Judges

Attachment 8 Other office holders

17

ATTACHM ENT 1

ADJUSTMENTS IN SALARIES FOR SELECTED OFFICES SINCE 1990

Office Salary as Adjustments Salary after

adjustments at July 1990 April 91 National Wage

Case

Dec 92 APS Agreement Mar 93 APS May 93

Agreement Remuneration Tribunal Interim Decision

Mar 94 APS Agreement

SES $57 679 to

$96 590

2.5% 2.0% 1.4% - 1.5% $62 064 to

$103 935

MR $58 300 2.5% 2.0% 1.4% - 1.5% $69 693

Minister $99 332 2.5% 2.0% 1.4% - 1.5% $118 741

Judge, Federal Court $131 734 2.5% - - 3.4% - $147 995

Secretary, Middle Level $117 258 2.5% - - 3.4% - $124 275

Other SES equivalent statutory offices

$57 679 to $99 949 2.5% - - 3.4% - $61 131 to

$105 931

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A T TA C H M E N T 2

ECONOMIC BACKGROUND

OUTUNE

This attachment outlines those aspects of the general economic background that are relevant to the Tribunal's consideration of public sector executive remuneration.

It summarises the state of the economy and includes some current information on major economic indicators covering

. economic growth and activity,

. labour market,

. prices,

. labour costs, and

. private sector executive remuneration.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS AND THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

The economy emerged from recession in the September quarter 1991. It has been growing modestly for seven consecutive quarters and is now firmly on a path of moderate and steady growth. The rate of economic growth is expected to be

slightly faster in 1993-94 than in 1992-93 and to accelerate during the year.

The trend in employment has been to increase since January 1993, and employment growth is expected to accelerate somewhat in 1993-94. While the unemployment rate is unlikely to fall significantly in the short term, the recent increases in job vacancies and high levels of overtime are encouraging.

The outlook for prices is favourable, with inflation in 1993-94 now expected to be slightly lower than the 1993-94 Budget forecast of 3Vz%.

Wage outcomes have been very moderate in recent periods, and are likely to remain moderate in the light of the AIRC's decision in the Review of Wage Fixing Principles 1993.

Economic Growth and Activity

National accounts show that trend GDP(A) grew by 0.6% in the June quarter 1993 and 2.8% over the year to the June quarter

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Australia's net foreign debt increased by $12.Ob in the September quarter 1993 to $172.3b.

The Labour Market

Notwithstanding this moderate and steady economic growth, employment growth remains modest and unemployment remains high.

Trend employment has increased since January 1993 by 107 000 (1.4%): 46 600 full-time (0.8%) and 60 300 part-time (3.4%). The trend unemployment rate stood at 11.1% in October 1993, only slightly below the peak of 11.2% recorded in

November and December 1992: the slight increase since July 1993 largely reflects an increase in the trend participation rate.

Employment growth is forecast in the 1993-94 Budget to be around %% in 1993­ 94 in year average terms, and 1!4% over the year to the June quarter 1994.

Unemployment was forecast to remain at around 10%% in the June quarter 1994.

Job vacancy data suggest that the labour market may be picking up, with trend growth rates in the ABS job vacancies series, the ANZ job advertisement series and the Department of Employment, Education and Training skilled vacancy survey all increasing relatively strongly in recent months.

Prices

Inflation has fallen sharply since early 1991 and remains at moderate levels, with CPI growth of 0.5% in the September quarter 1993 and 2.2% over the year to the September quarter

. the underlying rate was 2.3% over the year to September 1993 (as estimated by Treasury),

. it remains consistent with that of our five major trading partners (estimated at around 2.2% over the year to the September quarter 1993), and

. it is likely to increase slightly in coming quarters as a result of increases in indirect taxes and in the price of imported items.

Nevertheless, the outlook for inflation is favourable, with inflation in 1993-94 now expected to be slightly lower than was forecast in the 1993-94 Budget. Following the release of the estimates for the September quarter, the Treasurer announced that consumer price inflation was likely to be closer to 3%, rather than to 31 /a% forecast in the Budget.

Labour Costs

Earnings growth slowed markedly around mid 1991, reflecting the impact of the recession and the subdued economic outlook

22

Private sector executive remuneration

The Noble Lowndes Cullen Egan Dell survey of executive remuneration suggests that growth in executive remuneration slowed considerably since 1992-93

. total remuneration for the senior management group increased by 4.0% over the year to September 1993, the second lowest increase since this series began in 1983, and

. base salaries increased by 3.8% over the year to September 1993, the second lowest increase since this series began in 1968.

Nonetheless executive remuneration continues to rise at a faster rate than Average Weekly Earnings or Average Weekly Ordinary Time Earnings.

Over the period since the last increase in public sector executive remuneration of 2.5% in August 1991, the growth in total remuneration for the senior management group has been 9.2%.

Graph 2 shows this movement compared with price and labour cost indicators over the period from August 1991:

COMPARISON OF PRICES & LABOUR COSTS (Period from Aug/Sep 1991 to Aug/Sep 1993)

Dec 1991 Mar 1992 Jun 1992 Sep 1992 Dec 1992 M ar 1993 Jun 1993 Sep 1993

QUARTER

B CPI O AWOTE *■ Private Sector Executives f

Graph 2

24

Service-wide economic adjustments of 1.4% (from 11 March 1993) and 1.5% (from 10 March 1994),

periodic reviews, including three months prior to the expiry of the Agreement for the purposes of negotiating a replacement agreement,

- in this context, consideration will be given to adjusting base rates of pay involving absorption of a proportion of productivity pay under agency agreements; this depends on the size of the Commonwealth's share of funds generated by agency bargains for this purpose, and

implementation of outstanding Structural Efficiency initiatives such as the Senior Officers' package and performance based pay for the Senior Officer Group and the SES.

PERFORMANCE PAY

The 1989 and 1990 general APS Structural Efficiency agreements, and the 1989 SES agreement, provided for the introduction of performance appraisal and performance based pay, which became available under the APS Agreement from 1 July 1993. Productivity pay under subsequent agency agreements will not encompass SES officers, or Senior Officers in Departments paying performance pay to them.

The performance pay scheme has been established under Public Service Commission guidelines with supplementation being provided on the basis of 50% of the maximum achievable performance payments.

The Secretary of each Department (and the heads of authorities with APS staff) determines the amount of performance pay for each officer based on the performance appraisal of each SES officer. Officers can be regressed to a lower rate of salary or a lower band on the basis of the appraisal.

Similar arrangements are made for performance pay for Senior Officers with maximum amounts of $8 000 for Senior Officers Gr A and Gr B and $3 000 for Senior Officers Gr C.

COMMONWEALTH PUBUC SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

Workplace bargaining in other areas of Commonwealth public sector employment is well advanced with approximately 95% of employees in Commonwealth GBEs and independently staffed statutory authorities covered by workplace agreements. The Defence Force is also covered by a similar arrangement.

Senior Executive Band 1 Senior Executive Band 2 Senior Executive Band 3

$10 000 $12 500 $15 000

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A TTA C H M EN T 4

VALUATION OF REMUNERATION PACKAGES

OUTUNE

This attachment outlines the methodology used to assess the annual value of the benefits provided by the Commonwealth to senior officers

. motor vehicle

. car parking

. spouse travel

. telephone

. annual leave loading

. superannuation

. fringe benefits tax

REMUNERATION PACKAGE COMPONENTS - NOTIONAL VALUE

The Commonwealth provides a number of benefits in addition to salary to its full­ time office holders. Details of the benefits are set out below along with an assessment of their notional values: generally these values are based on an estimate of the cost to the employer of providing the benefit, including superannuation benefits. The alternative of attempting to estimate the potential value of the package to an employee presents difficulties, not least of which is the obvious variation between individuals. For this reason, it has become common

practice to include in the value of a package the estimated annual cost of the employer's superannuation contribution under the terms of the scheme concerned.

Fringe Benefits Tax is valued as a separate item.

Motor Vehicle

The net value of this entitlement is approximately $8 000

Office holders are entitled to the provision of a self-drive vehicle in accordance with administrative guidelines. The office holder is required to make an annual contribution (payable fortnightly) of $500 for use of a 4 cylinder vehicle and $700 for a 6 cylinder vehicle. The office holder may select from a range of Australian

28

The notional value of for one trip is $4 000 based on the approximate cost of one round world ticket and a nominal amount for accommodation.

Telephone

On 1993 figures - $165

Under agency administration arrangements the Telecom rental charge of $165 for a standard phone is an official charge.

Reimbursement is made for an estimated 240 work related local calls annually with claims in excess of this amount for work related interstate and overseas calls requiring substantiation.

Annual Leave Loading

On 1993 figures - $598

APS officers are entitled to annual leave loading as an award condition based on 17.5% of weekly salary for each week of leave accrued, subject to a maximum payment, currently $598. The maximum payment is based on an Australian Bureau of Statistics estimate of Average Weekly Earnings.

The Tribunal has determined that Department Secretaries and holders of full-time public offices are entitled to annual leave loading on the same terms and conditions as officers of the APS. Department Secretaries and office holders are entitled to the maximum amount.

Superannuation

CSS Scheme - based on 23% of final annual salary, ranging from $27 059 for base level Secretary, $28 583 for middle level, and $30 921 for top level Secretary or equivalent.

PSS Scheme - based on 15.4% of annual salary, ranging from $18 118 for base level Secretary, $19 138 for middle level, and $20 704 for top level Secretary or equivalent.

Superannuation is calculated using Department of Finance estimates of the notional annual employer contribution that would be required on a fully funded basis to provide the level of benefits under the CSS and PSS schemes. The Australian Government Actuary has provided advice for this purpose

. the approach adopted is to estimate the percentage of salaries which, when accumulated with interest over the working life time of the employee, would be sufficient to provide the benefit under the scheme,

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A T T A C H M E N T S

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT

OUTUNE

This attachment deals with issues affecting the remuneration and entitlements of Members of Parliament

. the general remuneration arrangements for MPs, in particular the existing relationship with remuneration of officers of the SES,

. the need for a separate review to examine the overall structure and level of entitlements of MPs, to improve the transparency of total entitlements and to re-establish the linkage with SES salaries on a sound footing, and

. a number of specific entitlements which should be changed to improve their effectiveness.

REMUNERATION ARRANGEMENTS

In 1990, the Government introduced legislation to link MPs' salaries to those of the SES of the APS. This linkage applied in three stages with effect from 1 July 1990, 1 January 1991 and 1 July 1991. Since then, salaries for MPs have increased as follows

15 August 1991 2.5% 17 December 1992 2.0% 11 March 1993 1.4%

There will be a further salary increase for MPs of 1.5% in March 1994 as a result of the linkage to SES Band 1 salary.

At the time of the introduction of the revised arrangements, and anticipating the imminent introduction of performance pay for the SES, the Tribunal endorsed in principle a "dislocation allowance" for MPs, without setting a quantum. Performance pay became available for the SES in July 1993. This has distorted the linkage between MPs and SES Band 1.

Performance pay as applied to the SES is not appropriate for MPs with any judgement of performance ultimately being exercised through the electoral process.

Another factor has weakened the relationship established in 1990 between SES and MPs1 remuneration. The privately plated motor vehicle for MPs is currently subject to a reduction of $6 000 in electorate allowance (which ranges from about

32

commercial nature. Any perception of abuse reflects on the integrity of the Parliament and its members, and it is important to avoid this implication. The general restraint across the community tends to heighten awareness of any potential misuse.

A limit should be placed on the use of the Life Gold Pass. The most practical approach would be to limit the number of trips available to pass holders and it is proposed that a maximum of 25 return trips a year be permitted at the same class

of travel as applies to current MPs from time to time.

Travel to Norfolk Island

The Norfolk Island (Electoral and Judicial) Amendment Act 1992 amended the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 to provide that Norfolk Island residents of 18 years of age or more could enrol to vote in federal elections if they wished. Enrolment can be in an Electoral Division with which a connection can be established, other than the Divisions of the Northern Territory or Fraser, ACT, such as by way of next of kin or formerly resident or enrolled. Alternatively, enrolment can be registered in the Division of Canberra.

The new enrolment provisions came into effect on 17 October 1992 and, according to the Australian Electoral Commission, some 200 Norfolk Island residents, the majority of those enrolled, have enrolled in the Division of Canberra.

Current travel entitlements do not make provision for a Senator or Member to travel to an external territory on electorate business except in the case of the Senators and Member for the Northern Territory who are able to travel to the Cocos

(Keeling) Islands and Christmas Island. All Senators and Members are able to travel to the external territories, including Norfolk, on parliamentary business but this does not enable travel to be undertaken to meet the needs of constituents who, whilst resident on Norfolk Island, derive their parliamentary representation from the Member for Canberra and the ACT Senators.

The Government submits therefore that it would be desirable that the travel entitlements for the Member for Canberra and for ACT Senators be extended so that they may travel to Norfolk Island for electorate purposes.

Travelling Allowance for Opposition Shadow Ministers

Senators and Members who are Shadow Ministers are currently entitled to be paid travelling allowance in respect of more than 50 overnight stays annually when travelling in the performance of duties or functions connected with the office of Shadow Minister. The travel is limited to travel outside the electorate of a Member and for Senators, outside the electoral Division of the House of Representatives which contains their home base.

The current determination also provides that the number of Shadow Ministers (including the Leaders of the Opposition) qualifying for the entitlement shall at no stage exceed the number of Ministers (ie 30).

34

In the performance of their parliamentary or electorate business, Senators and Members have a need to deal with organisations based in other countries. It is also important that they establish and maintain overseas contacts as part of their own continuing development in their contribution to the work of the Parliament. This is implicit in the entitlement to overseas study travel determined by the Tribunal and the lack of any overseas prohibition in the postage entitlement. The overseas telephone calls should be for parliamentary or electorate business only.

In recent years, the restriction on overseas telephone calls from electorate office telephones has been lifted. This has been achieved without an appreciable increase in expenditure. It is appropriate therefore that the FMA Card (as detailed above) and home telephones be provided with international access for the performance of parliamentary and electorate business.

FORM OF DETERMINATION

The determination to be made to implement these changes should be limited to the amendments which are necessary at this time. All Tribunal determinations are subject to disallowance in the Parliament. This approach will not provoke a debate about wider issues that will be the subject of the further review. The Tribunal may wish to separately publish a consolidation of the various determinations affecting Members of Parliament.

36

. more stringent accountability measures through program management, administrative law mechanisms and annual reports,

. developing better senior management arrangements with greater emphasis on performance assessment and management flexibility, and

. more effective management in a climate of very tight resource constraints involving the need to meet specific efficiency dividends and to respond to a range of external examinations of agency operations.

The Tribunal proposed to increase the remuneration of Department Secretaries and equivalent office holders by 31%.

The Government did not accept the Tribunal's determination at that time. This decision reflected the restraint shown by other groups in the community, although recognition was given to the substantial changes over the preceding years in the nature and extent of the responsibilities of Department Secretaries.

The Government decided to apply the same increase to Department Secretaries which had been granted by the AIRC to the top levels of the SES. Expenses of Office Allowance was subsumed in Department Secretaries' salary and the total

remuneration increased by 19%.

The Government also indicated that the introduction of performance pay for SES officers would be the appropriate occasion for the Tribunal to consider how this and similar issues might best be reflected for groups within its jurisdiction.

Department Secretaries' remuneration was increased by 2.5% in August 1991 in line with the National Wage Case, but no increase was granted in the Tribunal's 1992 Review. The Tribunal did indicate, however, that "the remuneration level of Secretaries is ... now substantially less than, on proper principles, it should be".

CURRENT RATES OF REMUNERATION

The rates of salary which applied from 15 August 1991 were:

Level Annual Salary

Basic Level $113 779

Middle Level $120 189

Top Level $130 019

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. An appropriate remuneration structure must be sufficient to ensure the Commonwealth has the ability to attract and retain staff of the highest calibre, commensurate with the importance to the nation of the policy advising and management roles performed by Department Secretaries.

. The current remuneration levels remain significantly below those determined by the Tribunal as appropriate in 1990 and thus do not fully reflect the changes in the role of Department Secretaries as a result of earlier public service reforms.

Nonetheless continuing restraint needs to be shown in the adjustment of public sector salaries to assist in achieving continued low inflation and a basis for sustained economic recovery and employment growth.

TENURE

The submission refers to the public service reforms that were commenced in 1984 and the appropriateness of providing a limited tenure arrangement for Department Secretaries.

It is intended to make the option of fixed term appointments to the offices of Department Secretaries a practical possibility and the Government is therefore seeking to introduce an appropriate salary loading. The current tenured arrangements allow for appointments on terms which provide the opportunity for a continuing employment relationship if the Commonwealth terminates the appointment to a particular office. Without an adequate loading on remuneration to accompany a move to contract employment, there would be little incentive for the

use of this provision.

The factors that need to be considered in determining the quantum of the loading are

. the immediate rewards such as salary and other benefits

. longer term benefits such as superannuation, and

. contingent benefits such as current redundancy entitlements and compensation for early termination of employment.

The value of tenure varies with the circumstances of individuals; but the most effective arrangement will provide an appropriate outcome for the individual and minimise the cost to the employer. It is therefore proposed that a new contract

arrangement would be established for Secretaries providing the option, at the discretion of the Government, of a fixed term appointment of up to 5 years, under the Public Service Act 1922. The same appointment and termination procedures would apply as at present, with

40

CONCLUSION

The body of the submission seeks a uniform increase in remuneration for all officer holders. It recognises the role of Department Secretaries in the process of reform and increasing productivity, but also recognises the predominant consideration in the present economic circumstances of continued restraint in executive salaries.

The Government intends to introduce limited tenure for Secretaries and 6 specific statutory offices, and seeks a limited tenure loading of 20% of salary for relinquishing any right to remain in the APS. This option would generate greater employment flexibility and bring practice more into line with modern contract employment arrangements in both the public and private sectors.

SECRETARIES (Current Benefits)

$200

$150

$100

$50

$0

Basic Level Top Level

Middle Level

■ Salary

B C a r (includes parking)

S Spouse travel

US Leave loading, telephone, FBT

H Long Service Leave

B Superannuation

Graph 3

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remuneration. It recommended increases in judicial remuneration of around 80%, which would have brought the salary for the Chief Justice of Australia to $230 000 per year.

In the light of the restraint that had been exercised by the rest of the community and the economic climate of the time, the Government did not accept the level of increases recommended. Individual members of the Tribunal were asked to provide a special report within the context and timing constraints of the then current principles of wage fixation.

The members of the Tribunal, in presenting their special report, recommended

. the application of the National Wage Case 3% and $10 per week increases,

. a 16% inequity increase in salaries, in line with the Government recommendation, and

. the incorporation of expenses of office allowance into salary.

This report was accepted by the Government and legislation was subsequently passed (Judicial and Statutory Officers Remuneration Legislation Amendment Act 1989) to implement the recommended increase of about 21% with effect from 1 March 1989.

With the introduction of the Structural Efficiency Principle, the Government submitted to the Tribunal in December 1989 that there be phased increases for the judiciary to take account of major changes in the responsibilities of the Federal courts. The increase of 12% was in two stages: 6% from 1 January 1990 and 6% from 1 July 1990. The Tribunal accepted the Government's submission

(Determination No. 11 of 1990).

After detailed consideration the Government decided not to accept in its entirety the Tribunal's determination issued at the time. In the Remuneration and Allowances Act 1990 it provided two increases for the judiciary, 6% from 1 July 1990 and 6% from 1 January 1991. The Government's public statement at the time indicated

"These changes reflect the increasingly complex nature of matters coming before the Courts, the need for greater flexibility in meeting the demands of the legal system and in improving the efficiency of that system.

"There is an important public interest issue at stake in this. The Remuneration Tribunal has drawn attention to the fact of resignations from the judiciary and the evidence of difficulty in recruiting appropriate people to the Bench. Proper remuneration for Judges is essential if the administration of justice is not to be harmed.

"The Government believes that the changes in function and operation of the Courts that have already taken place or are under way continue to

44

Long Leave 14 800

(6 months after each 5 years of service) Superannuation 91 757

(a non-contributory pension under the Judges' Pensions Act 1968 equal to 62% of salary on retirement at age 60 years or later with at least 10 years' service) Total: $123 722

Justices of the Federal and Family Courts are entitled to spouse accompanied travel when they are required to be absent from their principal Chambers for at least five days, and Justices of the High Court are entitled to spouse accompanied travel at the discretion of the Chief Justice.

Justices of the High Court who do not establish a home in Canberra are also entitled to Canberra Allowance of $18 103 a year.

A notional employer contribution of 62% of salary a year has been used to value the pension entitlement under the Judges' Pension Act 1968. It reflects the present average length of service of members of the judiciary of approximately 15 years. The contribution rate is based on advice from the Australian Government Actuary which assumes that members of the judiciary are appointed at approximately 50 years of age and retire after an average of 15 years' service. This percentage of salary would increase if the prospective service was less than 15 years and decrease if retirement occurred later. The Actuary also advises that this rate is an estimate, and is accurate only to the extent that the underlying assumptions are borne out in actual experience. Full details of the actuarial assumptions have been provided by the Actuary to the Tribunal's secretariat.

The basis of these estimates is the same as used elsewhere in this submission to value PSS and CSS benefits at 15.4% and 23% of superannuation salary respectively.

The significance of pension benefits as a proportion of the total remuneration package is shown in Graph 4.

THE INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS FRAMEWORK

The body of this submission outlines the background to the industrial relations framework and its development from a traditionally centralised and regulated system to a more decentralised system with the emphasis upon flexibility and

productivity improvement.

The centralised wage fixing principles

As mentioned in the submission, the centralised wages system provided for a uniform set of rules to apply in the determination of salary and wages. The

46

Wage increases and productivity

The underlying basis of enterprise bargaining is to promote efficiency through links between changes in remuneration and increases in productivity. This linkage is critical for all groups within the community.

In the case of the judiciary, it is notable that there have been substantial changes in the nature and extent of the work of federal courts which have improved productivity and efficiency. As mentioned above, these have been recognised by the Government and the Tribunal in earlier cases. Changes in more recent times include

. significant extensions in the jurisdiction of the Federal Court eg under the Corporations law,

. with the introduction of self-administration in 1990, the Federal Court and the Family Court now have budgetary responsibilities for their operations and must oversee administrative functions previously performed by the Attorney- General's Department,

. extension of the jurisdiction of the Family Court with greater flexibility in the use of judges in the Appeal Division of the Family Court,

- there have been substantial increases in judicial work loads, with minor judicial functions now the responsibility of Judicial Registrars and Registrars, leaving the Judges involved in a considerably higher proportion of complex matters,

. continued expansion of the work of judges as designated persons in the issue of interception and other warrants, and

. ongoing innovations such as better case flow management through court- annexed Assisted Dispute Resolution.

These changes reflect the increasingly complex nature of matters coming before the Courts. The initiatives being taken by the judiciary to meet the demands of increased complexity and workload through greater flexibility to improve the efficiency of the legal system justify consideration of additional remuneration under the new wage fixing principles.

ISSUES BEARING ON JUDICIAL REMUNERATION

There are two important considerations in looking at the remuneration of the federal judiciary

. the specific concerns relating to the judiciary, and

48

scheme providing a substantial continuing pension, long leave and access to various transport benefits.

Comparisons have also been drawn between the remuneration of the judiciary and that of the heads of Government Business Enterprises, but a major factor influencing the remuneration of the latter since the restructuring of these organisations commencing in 1987 has been their transfer from tenured employment to the current contractual arrangements.

CONCLUSION

In recent years there have been substantial changes in the nature and extent of the work of the Courts which have contributed to improved productivity. The application of the new wage fixing principles supports the case that there should be an increase in judicial remuneration.

The Government considers that it is appropriate that the Tribunal should have regard to a range of matters when considering judicial remuneration. These factors would include

. the fundamental importance of an independent judiciary,

. the need to ensure that remuneration levels are adequate to allow recruitment and retention of quality appointees consistent with that importance,

. improvements in productivity with the justice system generally and within the court system in particular,

. appropriate comparisons with private practice earnings after making due allowance for the full value of enhanced tenure of judicial office and all the benefits of that office (pension, other terms, conditions and allowances), and

. any overriding considerations related to current economic circumstances, including movements in remuneration levels in the community generally and any need for restraint in the public interest.

The predominant consideration from the point of view of the Government in the present economic circumstances is in encouraging restraint in executive salaries, with any increases taking into account improved productivity. Given the overriding interest of the community at large in the implications of the current economic situation, and recognising the way in which the significant recent developments in

wage fixing principles might impinge upon the remuneration levels and structure of the judiciary, the Government urges the Tribunal to consider increases for judges consistent with those granted for other Commonwealth executives.

49

JUDGES (Current Benefits)

H IG H C O U R T FED ER A U FA M ILY C O URT

Chief Justice Justice Chief Justice Justice

Salary $191 550 $174 122 $161 538 $147 995

Canberra Allowance $18 103 $18 103

Long Leave $19 155 $17 412 $16 154 $14 800

Car $8 000 $8 000 $8 000 $8 000

Estimated other entitlements (based on Department Secretary) $9 165 $9 165 $9 165 $9 165

TOTAL $54 423 $52 680 $33 319 $31 965

Cost of pension (15 years' service - 62%)

$118 761 $107 956 $100 154 $91 757

TOTAL PACKAGE $364 734 $334 758 $295 010 $271 716

DOLLARS PER YEAR

50

FEDERAL JUDICIARY (Current Benefits)

$400

■ Salary

B Canberra Allowance

US Long Leave

■ Car

■ Other benefits

EO Superannuation

Chief Justice High Court Chief Justice Federal/Family Justice High Court Justice Federal/Family

CATEGORY

Graph 4

52

The remuneration for all office holders was increased by 2.5% in August 1991 in line with the National Wage Case, but no increase was granted in the Tribunal's 1992 Review.

The remuneration of part-time office holders takes different forms. In some cases it is an annual fee, and in other cases it is a daily fee with provision for payment for certain additional work. The level of remuneration for this category has in the past been varied in a manner broadly comparable with that of full-time offices.

CURRENT RATES OF REMUNERATION

There are a large number of salary rates applying to public office holders; the major levels as at 19 May 1993 are

$61 131 $68 644 $77 381 $84 740 $85 475 $94 416 $102 371 $105 931

Part-time directors of the Australian and Overseas Telecommunications Corporation receive annual fees ranging from $36 190 to $103 400. For other part-time office holders the annual fees range from $1 358 to $47 231. Daily fees of $118 to $531 are paid to some office holders.

OTHER BENEFITS

The extent to which full-time office holders receive other benefits is a matter which is dealt with by the statutory and other authorities with which these offices are associated. It is likely that there will be some differences in approach in these circumstances but it is understood that most offices have a similar range of benefits to those applying in the APS.

The arrangements which should apply will be examined by the Government as part of its review of remuneration packaging.

PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT

Wages outcomes for the staff of authorities whose chief executives are public office holders have varied widely between organisations, but some consistency in the remuneration relationships between these office holders should be retained in the interests of fairness, personnel management and mobility.

'

Members of the House of Representatives

Mr J Anderson MP Mr A. Bevis, M.P. Mr E Cameron, MP The Hon J Child, AO (former MP) Mr D Connolly MP, on behalf of the Liberal and National

Parties Ms M Deahm, MP Mr T Fischer, MP, Leader of the National Party of Australia Dr R E Klugman (former MP) Mr B LLoyd MP Mr L McLeay, MP Mr T Mack MP The Hon S Martin, MP, Speaker Mr G Prosser, MP Mr W Snowdon MP Mr J Snow, MP, Chair, Caucus Liaison Committee on behalf

of the Australian Parliamentary Labor Party

Judges

The Hon Mr Justice Μ E Black, Chief Justice, Federal Court of Australia The Hon Mr Justice C A Sweeney, CBE, Acting Chief Justice, Federal Court of Australia The Hon Mr Justice Jeffrey Miles, Chief Justice, Supreme

Court of the Australian Capital Territory The Hon Mr Justice A Nicholson Chief Justice, Family Court of Australia on behalf of the Chief Executive Officer, and Registrar, Family Court of Australia The Hon Mr Justice A J Barblett, Acting Chief Justice,

Family Court of Australia The Hon Justice D F O'Connor, President, Administrative Appeals Tribunal The Hon Justice D F O'Connor, President, on behalf of the

Registrar, Administrative Appeals Tribunal Mr J Coombs, QC, President, Australian Bar Association on behalf of judges

2 2 4

Professor P J Drake, Vice-Chancellor, Australian Catholic University Mr B Egan, Member, Veterans Review Board Mr G Evans, Secretary, Department of Transport and

Communications Mr H Evans, Clerk of the Senate Mr H Evans, Clerk of the Senate, re Senate Committees Mr I N Ferres, Chairman, Commonwealth Funds

Management Limited Mr W D Ferris, Chairman, Australian Trade Commission Ms A Forward, Director, Merit Protection & Review Agency Mr L Glare, Chief Executive Officer, Family Court of A ustralia

Mr G Griffith and others, Members of the Film Censorship Board Mr M Grimes, Administrator Christmas Island Mr R Hall, Chairperson, Australia Council Mr A E Harris, Chairman, Australian Sports Commission Mr S Haynes, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Sports

Drug Agency Mr J T Howard, Registrar, Federal Court of Australia Mr I F Hueston, Secretary, Defence Force Remuneration Tribunal Mr B. Johns, Chairman, Australian Broadcasting Authority Mr G Kelleher, Chairman, Great Barrier Reef Marine

Park Authority Dr S Kenny, President, Administrative Review Council Mr P Langhome, Executive General Manager, Corporate Affairs, Australian Trade Commission Ms K Loder, Convenor, Women's Consultative Council Mr K McKenry, Assistant Commissioner, Australian

Taxation Office, on behalf of Tax Agents Boards Mr F W Millar, Chairman, Health Insurance Commission Mr D Minniss, Chairman Horticultural Research & Development Corporation Mr P Moore, Director, Telecommunications Section,

Department of Industry, Technology & Regional Development, on behalf of the Chair and Members, Telecommunications Industry Development Authority Mr T R Morling, Chairperson, Australian Electoral Commission Professor R Mortley, Vice-Chancellor, University of

Newcastle Ms J Neary, Chief Executive Officer, Commission for the Safety, Rehabilitation & Compensation of Commonwealth Employees

2 26

Mr B Valadian, Chairman, Aboriginal Hostels Limited Ms S Walpole, Sex Discrimination Commissioner Mr W R Widerberg, Chairman, Fisheries Research & Development Corporation

Mr M J Williams, Chairman Australia Post Professor G V H Wilson, Vice-Chancellor, University of Central Queensland Mr B G Young, Australian Electoral Officer for Western

Australia & Mr I T Spencer, Australian Officer for South Australia

ACT Assembly - ACT Public Office Holders

ACT Head of Administration Mr R Cahill, Chief Magistrate, Law Courts of the Australain Capital Territory Mr T Connolly MLA, Attorney-General re ACT Magistrates

and Master of the Supreme Court. Mr T Connolly, MLA, Minister for Urban Services on behalf of the Chair and Deputy Chair, ACTEW Mr T De Domenico, MLA, Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party Ms Rosemary Follett MLA, Chief Minister Mr A E Hogan, Master Supreme Court, Australian Capital

Territory (2) Ms R McRae OAM Speaker MLA Mr M Moore MLA Independent Mr B J Salmon, President, Australian Capital Territory

Bar Association on behalf of Master of the Supreme Court Mr D W Smith, Special Magistrate, Law Courts of the Australian Capital Territory Ms H Szuty MLA

Private Individuals

Mr T W Adams Mrs J A Andre' Mrs B Best Mr R K Brownie Mr S P K Brown Mr C Bucknell A H Buttfield Mr V Cheadle R G Colman Mr J W Daley

228

F Wankiewicz W C Wentworth Joe Weston, President, NSW Council of Senior Citizens Association

E & D Wilson M & A Wilson Rev Fr W G C Winsall-Hall J W Wright

Note: Numbers in ( ) refers to number of submissions lodged.

2 3 0

Aston Ballarat Batman Bendigo Bruce Burke

Calwell

VICTORIA (Cont'dl

Casey Chisholm Corangamite Corinella Corio Deakin Dunkley Flinders Gellibrand Gippsland Goldstein

Higgins

QUEENSLAND (25)

Bowman Brisbane Capricornia Dawson Dickson Fadden Fairfax Fisher Forde G riffith Groom Herbert Hinkler

WESTERN AUSTRALIA (141

Holt 106

Hotham 62

Indi 18709

Isaacs 69

Jagajaga 68

Kooyong 45

Lalor 1366

La Trobe 699

McEwan 20495

McMillan 5217

Mallee 63149

Maribyrnong 64

Melbourne 53

Melbourne Ports 44

Menzies 62

Murray 15486

Scullin 1 14

Wannon 28836

W ills 44

Kennedy 688394

Leichhardt 151974

L ille y 136

McPherson 377

Maranoa 619908

Moncrieff 205

Moreton 80

Oxley 2198

Petrie 174

Rankin 4977

Ryan 320

Wide Bay 28848

103 7680 46 11912

56

3096 185

2607 45

8348 1666 277 61

77

907 73

35679 40 37

617 66

114829 47272 2976 522

2025 8086 161 111 5135 6449 41395

2 3 2

, .

Page

Administrators (vide) - Christmas Island 64

- Cocos (Keeling) Islands 65

- Norfolk Island 6 7

- Northern Territory 58

Advisory Committees of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Chairman 101

Part-time Member 101

Advisory Council on Australian Archives Chairperson 97

Part-time Member 97

Advisory Council on Cultural Policy Part-time Member 9 6

Aerospace Technologies of Australia Pty Limited Chairperson 74

Part-time Member 74

Albury-Wodonga Development Corporation Chairman 75

Deputy Chairman 8 9

Part-time Member 89

Anti-Dumping Authority Member 6 2

Arbitrator, Christmas Island 9 5

Army and Air Force Canteen Service Board of Management Chairman 80

Deputy Chairman 80

Part-time Member 80

Managing Director 66

Asian Studies Council Chairman 92

Part-time Member 9 2

Associate Director of Public Prosecutions 56

Auditor-General for Australia 55

Australia Council Chairman 77

Deputy Chairman 77

Part-time Member 7 7

Chairman of Boards 81

Part-time Members of Boards 81

General Manager 58

Community Cultural Development Committee of the Australia Council Chairperson 82

236

Australian Decorations Advisory Committee Chairman 8 7

Part-time Member 8 7

Australian Defence Industries Pty Ltd Chairman 73

Deputy Chairman 73

Part-time Director 73

Australian Dried Fruits Corporation Chairman 107

Part-time Member 107

Australian Electoral Commission see Electoral Commission Australian Federal Police Commissioner 56

Australian Film Commission Chairman 75

Deputy Chairman 75

Member 66

Part-time Member 7 5

Australian Film Finance Corporation Pty Ltd Chairperson 7 5

Deputy Chairperson 75

Part-time Member 7 5

Australian Film, Television and Radio School D irector 61

Australian Film, Television and Radio School, Council for Chairman 81

Part-time Member 81

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Chairperson 105

Deputy Chairperson 105

Part-time Member 105

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Selection Committee Chairperson 109

Part-time Member 109

Australian Geological Survey Organisation Advisory Council Chairman 92

Part-time Member 9 2

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238

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Australian Maritime Safety Authority Chairperson 73

Deputy Chairperson 73

Member 73

Australian Meat and Live-stock Corporation Chairman 104

Deputy Chairman 104

Part-time Member 104

Australian Meat and Live-stock Industry Policy Council Chairman 107

Part-time Member 107

Australian Meat and Live-stock Industry Selection Committee Chairman 109

Part-time Member 109

Australian National Council on AIDS Chairperson 93

Deputy Chairperson 93

Chief Commonwealth Medical and Scientific Advisor 93

Australian National Gallery D irector 61

Australian National Gallery, Council of Chairman 81

Part-time Member 81

Australian National Line Chairman 71

Deputy Chairman 71

Part-time Member 71

Australian National Maritime Museum D irector 63

Australian National Maritime Museum, Council of Chairperson 78

Part-time Member 78

Part-time Member of a Committee 78

Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service Director 61

Australian National Railways Commission Chairman 71

Deputy Chairman 71

Part-time Member 71

Chairman, Disciplinary Appeal Board 95

Chairman, Promotions Appeal Board 101

240

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Australian Science and Technology Council Chairman 72

Deputy Chairman 72

Part-time Member 72

Chairman of a Committee 100

Member of a Committee 100

Australian Security Intelligence Organization Director General 57

Australian Sports Commission Chairman 77

Deputy Chairman 77

Executive Director 60

Part-time Member 77

Australian Sports Drug Agency Chairperson 100

Deputy Chairperson 100

Part-time Member 100

Chief Executive Officer 65

Australian Statistician 56

Australian Statistics Advisory Council Chairman 78

Australian Telecommunications Authority Chairperson 55

Member 62

Part-time Member 87

Australian Tobacco Marketing Advisory Committee Chairman 108

Australian Tourist Commission Chairman 74

Deputy Chairman 74

Part-time Member 74

Managing Director 60

Australian Trade Commission Chairperson 71

Deputy Chairperson 71

Part-time Member 71

Managing Director 55

Deputy Managing Director 57

Australian Trade Union Training Authority Executive Officer 66

242

Business Skills Assessment Panel Chairperson 92

Part-time Member 92

Canberra Institute of the Arts Executive Chairperson 79

Cash Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre D irector 59

Centenary of Federation Advisory Committee Chairperson 98

Part-time Member 98

Central Trades Committee Part-time Member 102

Chemicals Notification & Assessment D irector 65

Chicken Meat Research & Development Council Chairperson 111

Part-timeMember 111

Chief of the Defence Force 55

Chief of Naval Staff 57

Chief of the Air Staff 57

Chief of the General Staff 57

Christmas Island Administrator (see Administrators) A rb itra to r 95

Christmas Island Casino Surveillance Authority Chairperson 76

Part-time Member 76

Civil Aviation Authority Chairperson 71

Deputy Chairperson 71

Part-time Member 71

Clerk of the High Court 62

Clerk of the House of Representatives 54

Clerk of the Senate 54

Cocos (Keeling) Islands Administrator (see Administrators)

Page

2 4 4

Page

Commonwealth Funds Management Ltd Chairperson 72

Part-time Member 72

Commonwealth Grants Commission Chairman 57

Part-time Member 70

Commonwealth Ombudsman 56

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Chairman 73

Chief Executive 55

Part-time Member 73

see also - Advisory Committees of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Commonwealth Serum Laboratories Ltd

Chairman 73

Deputy Chairman 73

Part-time Member 73

Commonwealth Superannuation Board of Trustees No. 1 Chairperson 72

Part-time Member 72

Commonwealth Superannuation Board of Trustees No. 2 Chairperson 72

Part-time Member 72

Community Cultural Development Committee of the Australia Council (see Australia Council) Companies Auditors and Liquidators Disciplinary Board

Chairperson 86

Part-time Member 8 6

Comptroller General of Customs 56

Construction Industry Development Agency Chief Executive Officer 70

Co-operative Research Centres Committee Chairperson 9 6

Part-time Member 96

Co-operative Research Centres Committee Assessment Panels Chairperson 101

Part-time Member 101

Page

246

Page

Defence Housing Authority Chairperson 91

Part-time Member 91

Managing Director 60

Departments of State - Secretary Arts and Administrative Services 52

Environment, Sport, Tourism and Territories 52

Attorney-General's 52

Defence 52

Employment, Education and Training 52

Finance 52

Foreign Affairs and Trade 52

Health, Housing and Community Services 53

Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic A ffa irs 53

Industrial Relations 53

Industry, Technology and Commerce 53

Primary Industries and Energy 53

Prime Minister and Cabinet 52

Social Security 53

Tourism 53

Transport and Communications 53

Treasury 53

Veterans' Affairs 53

Deputy Commonwealth Ombudsman 63

Director of Affirmative Action Agency 64

Director of Safeguards 64

Director of War Graves 67

Disability Advisory Council of Australia Chairman 79

Deputy Chairman 79

Part-time Member 102

Disability Discrimination Commissioner 61

Disability Services Advisory Committee Chairperson 82

Dried Fruits Research and Development Council Chairperson 111

Part-time Member 111

Drought Review Task Force Chairman 94

Part-time Member 94

248

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Federal Airports Corporation Chairperson 73

Deputy Chairperson 73

Part-time Member 73

Federal Court of Australia Registrar 63

Federal Police Disciplinary Tribunal Part-time Member 91

Film Australia Pty Ltd Chairperson 76

Part-time Director 76

Managing Director 62

Film Censorship Board Chief Censor 63

Deputy Chief Censor 66

Senior Censor 68

Member 68

Film and Literature Board of Review Chairman 81

Deputy Chairman 81

Part-time Member 81

First Parliamentary Counsel 56

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Chairperson 106

Part-time Member 106

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Selection Committees Chairperson 110

Part-time Member 110

Fishing Industry Policy Council Chairperson 108

Part-time Member 108

Foreign Investment Review Board Chairman 74

Deputy Chairman 74

Part-time Member 74

Grains Industry Council Chairperson 107

Part-time Member 107

Grains Research and Development Corporation Chairperson 106

Part-time Member 106

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Indicative Planning Council for the Housing Industry Chairman 76

Industrial Mobilisation Courses 99

Industry Commission Chairperson 56

Executive Commissioner 58

Commissioner 59

Associate Commissioner 62

Associate Commissioner Part-time 89

Industry Research and Development Board Chairperson 77

Part-time Member 77

Industry Task Force on Leadership and Management S k ills Chairperson 98

Part-time Member 9 8

Information Industries Board Part-time Member 76

Innovative Agricultural Marketing Program Committee Part-time Member 94

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security 58

Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Principal 63

Chairperson 99

Deputy Chairperson 99

Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Research Advisory Committee Member 102

Insurance and Superannuation Commissioner 58

International Air Services Commission Chairperson 87

Part-time Member 8 8

International Year of the Family National Council Chairperson 79

Deputy Chairperson 100

Part-time Member 1 00

2 52

Military Superannuation and Benefits Scheme Reconsideration Advisory Committee Part-time Member 102

Multifunction Polis International Advisory Board Adelaide Chairperson 80

Deputy Chairperson 80

Multifunction Polis Adelaide Community Consultation Panel Chairperson 94

Part-time Member 94

Murray-Darling Basin Commission President 89

Music Industry Advisory Council Chairperson 9 7

Part-time Member 9 7

National Better Health Program Management Committee Chairperson 76

National Board of Employment, Education and Training Chairperson 56

Part-time Chairperson 89

Deputy Chairperson 58

Member 62

Part-time Member 89

Higher Education Council Chairperson 59

Australian Research Council Chairperson 59

Councils of the National Boards Deputy Chairperson 100

Part-time Member 100

Counsellors category 1 65

category 2 67

National Capital Planning Authority Chairman 77

Member 77

Chief Executive 61

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Bags

National Parks and Wildlife - see Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service National Petroleum Advisory Committee

Chairman 92

Part-time Member 92

National Registration Authority for Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Chief Executive officer 64

Chairperson 77

Deputy Chairperson 77

Part-time Member 77

National Road Transport Commission Chairperson 88

Part-time Member 88

Chief Executive Officer 62

National Road Trauma Advisory Council Chairperson 91

Part-time Member 91

National Standards Commission Executive Director 66

Chairman 79

Part-time Member 103

Non-Government Schools Funding Review Committee Chairperson 94

Part-time Member 94

Norfolk Island Administrator (see Administrators) Northern Prawn Fisheries Management Advisory Committee

Chairperson 109

Northern Territory Administrator (see Administrators) Nuclear Safety Bureau D irector 61

Nursing Homes Advisory Committees Chairman 99

Part-time Member 99

Nursing Homes Fees Review Committees of Inquiry Chairman 99

Part-time Member 99

256

Pooled Development Funds Program Registration Board Chairperson 77

Part-time Member 7 7

Port Conciliator 82

Prices Surveillance Authority Chairman 58

Member 64

Part-time Member/Associate Member 91

Principal Parliamentary Reporter 54

Privacy Commissioner 60

Private Health Insurance Administration Council D irector 66

Chairperson 95

Part-time Member 95

Professional Committees - Health Portfolio Chairman 92

Part-time Member 92

Public Lending Right Committee Chairman 81

Part-time Member 103

Public Service Commissioner 56

Purchasing Complaints Commissioner 78

Quarantine and Inspection Advisory Council Chairperson 9 3

Part-time Member 9 3

Quarantine and Inspection Advisory Council Selection Committee Chairperson 94

Part-time Member 94

Race Discrimination Commissioner 63

Refugee Review Tribunal Principal Member 62

Religious Advisory Committee to the Services Chairman 100

Part-time Member 100

Repatriation Commission Deputy President 62

Commissioner 64

Page

258

Security Appeals Tribunal President 86

Deputy President 86

Part-time Member 86

Sex Discrimination Commissioner 63

Shipping Industry Reform Authority Chairman 89

Shoalwater Bay Inquiry Chairperson 91

Part-time Member 91

Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation Chairman 90

Part-time Member 90

Social Security Appeals Tribunal National Convenor 64

Senior Member 67

Member 6 8

Chairperson of a Tribunal 99

Part-time Senior Member 99

Part-time Member 99

Part-time Medical Member 99

South East Trawl Management Advisory Committee Chairperson 109

Southern Shark Fishery Management Advisory Committee Chairperson 112

Special Broadcasting Service Chairman 74

Deputy Chairman 74

Part-time Member 74

Executive Director 57

Spectrum Manager 60

Stevedoring Industry Finance Committee Chairman 78

Part-time Member 103

Student Assistance Review Tribunal Chairperson 99

Part-time Member 99

Sugar Research and Development Corporation Chairperson 108

Part-time Member 108

Supervising Scientist 63

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