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Australian National Training Authority Act - Australian National Training Authority - Report - 1993-94


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A n n u a l P e r f o r m a n c e R e p o r t

Australian N ational Training Authority

© Commonwealth of Australia

ISSN 1322-8609

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the Australian Government Publishing Service. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be directed to

the Manager, AGPS Press, Australian Government Publishing Services, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601.

The contact officer for this report is the Director, Corporate Development and Secretariat, Australian National Training Authority, Telephone (07) 246 2400 or Fax (07) 221 4355.

Designed By Art Projects Creative Pty Ltd

Printed by Inprint Ltd

Australian N ational Training Authority

14 October 1994

The Hon Simon Crean, MP Minister for Employment, Education and Training Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

As required by subsection 25(6) of the Public Service Act 1922, and in accordance with requirements referred to in subsection 25(7) of this Act, I have pleasure in providing the Annual Performance Report of the Australian National Training Authority for the year 1993-94.

Sincerely

T B Finn, AO Chairman

AMP Place, 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane 4000 G.P.O.Box 3120, Brisbane 4001 Telephone: (07) 246 2300 Facsimile: (07) 246 2490

C o n t e n t s

P age

B

1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 2 A b o u t A N T A

The ANTA Agreement State Legislative and Financial Arrangements Highlights for 1993-94 Organisational Structure Corporate Mission Priorities Program Structure National Training Reform Agenda The National Strategy Advice from Industry

Research and Statistics Measures for Maintenance of Effort

3 A N T A ’s P r o g r a ms 3.1 Vocational Education and Training System Sub-programs:

3.1.1 -Technical and Further Education and Training Provision: State Training Profiles National Projects Skills Centres Adult and Community Education

through the TAPE system

4 5 5 6 7 8

11 I I 12 13 15

16 16 17 20

P age

3.3 ANTA Operations Our Staff Social Justice, Industrial Democracy and Equal Employment Opportunity Occupational Health and Safety

Internal and External Scrutiny Financial and Accounting Services Office Services and Accommodation Library Management Information Technology Records Management Office Equipment and Purchasing Environmental Matters

4 G l o s s a r y 5 C o m p l i a n c e I n d e x

6 A p p e n d i c e s

Appendix I Publications Appendix 2 Membership and Functions of Consultative Structures Appendix 3 Program Structure Appendix 4 Financial Statements Appendix 5 Reconciliation of Appropriations

and Program Elements

Appendix 6 Staffing Overview Appendix 7 Staff Training Expenditure Appendix 8 Consultants Appendix 9 Media Advertising Organisations,

29 29

31 31 32 32 33 34 34 34 35 35

37

38

40 42 43

60 61 63 64

3.1.2 -Systemic Support: 20 Advertising, Market Research

Training Needs, Curriculum and & Direct Mail 66

Materials 21 Appendix 10 Contacts 67

Innovative Projects 21 7 . I n d e x 69

3.1.3 -Organisational Support: 22 L i s t O f T a b l e s

Industry Training Advisory Bodies Table 1 State Legislative Arrangements 4

and Project Teams 22 Table 2 Program Resources 9

Workskill Australia 23 Table 3 Expenditure by Program 10

Australian Training Awards 24 Table 4 Summary Listing of National Projects 18

Institutional Development Grants 24 Table 5 Equal Employment Opportunity

Adult and Community Education 25 Profiles 32

Group Training Arrangements 26 Table 6 Performance Bonus Payments 62

3.2 Workforce Development Table 7 List of Consultants 64

Sub-program: 26

L i s t O f D i a g r a m s

3.2.1 -Entry Level Training: Diagram 1 Organisational Structure 6

Special Equity Measures 27 Diagram 2 ANTA s Funding to ITABs and

Evaluation Grants 27 Project Teams 23

Adult Language and Literacy 28 Diagram 3 Employees by Previous Employment

Australian Traineeship System 28 Category at June 30 1994 31

Access and Equity 28 Diagram 4 ANTA Staffing Classification

Structure 31

Diagram 5 ANTA s EEO Profile 32

1 . I n t r o d u c t i o n

The Australian National Training Authority was established because of a recognition by the governments of Australia for the need to improve the quality and skills of our workforce to enable Australian enterprises and industry to compete more effectively in an international economic context.

As a result ANTA - as the Authority is better known - was established in 1992, and was given the task of ensuring our vocational education and training system reached high levels of relevance, quality, efficiency and effectiveness.

The Authority believes that all Australians will benefit from a workforce which is highly skilled and productive.

Apart from this report, other documents which will provide a further understanding of the Authority s operations include:

► Priorities for 1994

► About Us in 1994

► Australian Training

H

A more detailed list of the Authority s publications can be found at Appendix I. Copies may be obtained from the Authority s Office on telephone (07) 246 2300.

A b o u t A N T A 2 .

T he A N T A A greement

On 21 July 1992, the Prime Minister announced the agreement by Heads of Government to establish a new authority to advise State/Territory and Commonwealth

Ministers on appropriate policies and mechanisms to move towards a more national focus for vocational education and training.

The Australian National Training Authority was established by the Federal Parliament under the Australian National Training Authority Act 1992. A Planning Group with

representatives from all governments was formed in December 1992 to establish the Authority’s offices in Brisbane.

The Authority reports to a Ministerial Council that consists of the relevant Minister from each State and Territory, and the Commonwealth Ministers for Employment, Education and Training, and Schools, Vocational Education and Training. The Commonwealth chairs the Council. Membership of the Ministerial Council is provided at Appendix 2.

The Authority is overseen by an industry- based Board which is closely involved in setting and executing ANTA’s priorities and direction. The Board was appointed in December 1992 on a part-time basis for a

period of three years. It is responsible for the development of, and advice on, national policy and the development of a national strategy on vocational education and training, within the framework of national goals, objectives and

priorities established by the Ministerial Council and for endorsement by the Ministerial Council.

The members of the ANTA Board at 30 June 1994 were:

► T.B. Finn, AO, Chairman, IBM Australia Ltd (Chair)

► Anne Rein, Assistant Director-General, Office of Public Management, NSW Premier’s Department (Deputy Chair)

► Dr Michael Deeley, Chairman, North Broken Hill Peko Ltd

► Stuart Hornery, AO, Chairman, Lend Lease Corporation Ltd

► Bill Mansfield, Assistant Secretary, Australian Council of Trade Unions

The Authority is charged with developing and implementing:

► a national vocational education and training system with agreed goals and priorities;

► close interaction between industry and vocational education and training providers;

► an effective training market;

► an efficient and productive network of publicly funded providers;

► increased opportunities and improved outcomes; and

► improved cross-sectoral links between schools, higher education and vocational education and training.

The ANTA Board.

From Left: Anne Rein (Deputy Chair), Bill Mansfield, Brian Finn (Chairman), Stuart Hornery, Michael Deeley.

ANTA will effect these enhancements to the vocational education and training system through:

► the preparation of draft national strategic plans for approval by the Ministerial Council;

► providing advice and making recommendations to the Ministerial Council on the funding needed for allocation by the Authority each year;

► recommending to the Ministerial Council the principles to be applied by the Authority in the allocation of funds;

► joining with State/Territory Training Agencies in the development of State/Territory Training Profiles;

► making recommendations for more effective and efficient means of delivering vocational education and training;

► promoting and facilitating the maintenance of comprehensive national data on vocational education and training.

ANTA is in many ways a catalyst, helping to direct training reform and development. It has been given a specific task by the heads of government to co-ordinate, plan and allocate

monies for publicly funded vocational education and training across the nation. ANTA is seen as an example of Federalism in an Australian context, working to improve opportunities for individual Australians in vocational education and training on a nationally consistent basis, and to be more

responsive to industry.

Australian governments direct their financial resources to ANTA. ANTA oversees the expenditure of more than $2.6 billion each year on TAFE colleges and institutes, training

centres, and skill programs to ensure that the objectives of the national vocational education

New South Wales The New South Wales Board of Vocational Education & Training Act 1994.

Victoria Vocational Education & Training (Amendment) Act 1994.

Queensland Vocational Education, Training & Employment Act 1991.

Reprinted as in force 21 April 1994.

Western Australia Draft legislation is being developed.

South Australia The Vocational Education, Employment and Training Bill is due to be introduced to the Parliament in the Spring session.

Tasmania Tasmanian State Training Authority Act 1994.

Australian Capital Territory The Vocational Education and Training Authority Bill is due to be introduced to the Assembly in November.

Northern Territory The Northern Territory Employment & Training Authority Act 1991. Amended in February 1994.

TABLE 1 - State /Territory Legislative Arrangements

and training system are being met. ANTA allocates these funds after negotiations with the State and Territory bodies responsible for training.

S tate L egislative A nd F i nanci al A rrangements

The ANTA Agreement requires each State/Territory to have appropriate legislative arrangements which acknowledge the national role played by the Authority and designate a

State/Territory body as the State Training Agency for the purposes of the Agreement. Table I above lists the relevant State/Territory legislation.

The Agreement also provides that States/Territories pay funds to ANTA for the purposes of their own vocational education and training systems, with such funds then

being returned directly.

The Ministerial Council has agreed that such arrangements are cumbersome and that the intent of the Agreement can be implemented

in other ways. The Authority has been asked to develop and implement arrangements whereby State/Territory funds for vocational education and training can be identified without actual cash transfers to and from the Authority.

H i ghli ghts Fo r I 9 9 3 - 9 4

In accordance with the ANTA Act, ANTA assumed the full range of its responsibilities from I January 1994, although substantial work was commenced by a Planning Group throughout 1993.

The major work of the ANTA Board in the first six months of 1993-94 was the development of its Priorities for 1994, a

document outlining ANTA s role and objectives. This document, approved by the Ministerial Council, forms the basis of States/Territories planning for vocational education and training provision for 1994.

In O ctober 1993, the ANTA Ministerial Council asked the ANTA Board to consider strategies for simplifying the national training reform agenda. Since then, the Authority has been reviewing the implementation of the national training reforms agreed by Ministers since 1989, and will be putting final

recommendations to Ministers in September 1994. (For further information refer to page 11.)

The Authority commenced a major recruitment campaign in early October 1993 in line with full operational status from I January 1994. At I July 1993, the Authority had a total of 34 staff; by 30 June 1994 this figure had risen to 95.

After several months in temporary accommodation, in December 1993 ANTA moved to its permanent offices to Levels 10 (part only), I I and 12 of AMP Place, 10 Eagle

Street, in the Central Business District of Brisbane.

From early 1994, ANTA has been working on the development of a National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training. The strategy will set firm goals, objectives and

priorities for the vocational education and training system. Extensive consultation with governments, industry, training providers and community groups has taken place during the

development of the Strategy. The final draft of this document will be tabled at the meeting of the Ministerial Council in September 1994.

(For more information refer to pages 11 & 12.)

In 1993-94, ANTA also carried out a review on the boundaries and management of Industry Training Advisory Bodies (ITABs), which provide advice to the Authority on

industry needs and priorities. A report on the proposed new structure for the ITAB network was considered by the ANTA Board in early 1994, and the proposals will be considered for

implementation by Ministers in September 1994. (For more information refer to pages 12 & 13 .)

O ther matters dealt with by the Board in 1993-94 included:

► a review of Group Training Schemes; and

► the establishment of a labour market data base.

O rgani sati onal S tructure

ANTA s organisational structure provides senior management support to a number of critical areas of our operations. The Chief Executive Officer and two General Managers

are supported by eight Senior Executive Directors. O ther staff work on a project team basis under ANTA s matrix operations and are allocated to one or more projects on the basis of priorities determined by the Authority and the Chief Executive Officer.

Diagram I represents ANTA s senior staff as at 30 June 1994.

: C hief Executive O fficer

3 Terry Moran

General Manager

Don B rew ster

G eneral Manager

P eter Noonan

Directors

C o rp o rate D evelopm ent and Secretariat: Bonita Matijevic Finance: David W o rth y Industry Liaison: G raham Jones Profile Planning: Jan Johnman Project Management: Liz Roadley Research and Information: Jessie Borthwick Strategic Planning: Chris Eccles Training Reform: Marie Persson

__________________________________________________________ I

DIAGRAM 1 - Organisational Structure

C orp orate M i ssi on

ANTA’s corporate mission is:

“To help Australia to improve its international economic competitiveness by developing a national vocational education and training system which is responsive to the needs of

industry and individuals”.

The Authority is to:

► Develop, with governments and industry, strategies to improve the relevance of our vocational education and training system to the skill needs of Australian industry;

► W ork co-operatively with governments and industry to develop a framework which will improve the consistency and accessibility of vocational education and training throughout Australia;

► Encourage improved performance, educational innovation, quality and best practice in the provision of training through the development of performance

measures and goals; and

► Develop strategies and programs to enhance the status of vocational education and training in our community.

P ri orities

ANTA has been given the task of ensuring that Australia’s vocational education and training system reaches high levels of relevance, efficiency and effectiveness.

In an effort to enhance the VET system, the ANTA Board identified and established four priority areas for the Authority to work towards in 1994. The four areas, set down in the document Priorities for 1994, have been

established with the hope that in the near future almost all Australians will be encouraged to undertake training which will enhance and develop their current skills and

knowledge.

The priorities take into account national goals such as building a more effective, efficient and collaborative training system, and increasing public recognition of the value of vocational education and training. O ther major factors taken into consideration included reforms already underway in the training system, changes taking place in industry and new training needs, participation trends, the special

needs of various groups, and workplace reforms expected to affect the way training is developed and delivered.

► The first priority for ANTA is to build a client-focussed culture. The Board has developed a number of strategies aimed at making the vocational education and training system more responsive to its clients’ needs. They include establishing a more competitive and diverse training market, ensuring better information is provided on client needs and attitudes, developing appropriate quality measures, strengthening VET management practices, and ensuring high quality staff training and development at a national level.

► The second priority is to create and promote opportunities for lifelong learning. Under this priority, ANTA will ensure there is growth within all client areas, and that more people will be encouraged to participate in the vocational education and training system. This priority is aimed at

several specific groups, including school leavers, people presently in the workforce and disadvantaged groups. Strategies to target these groups have included the development of clear and accessible pathways through the vocational education

and training system, especially for 15 to 19 year-olds; ventures and studies aimed at training and re-training the current workforce; and the upgrading and

monitoring of programs aimed specifically at improving adult language, literacy and numeracy skills.

The Board hopes that with this priority all Australians will gain considerable benefit from a labour market which is highly skilled, productive and efficient, and one which

contributes to the international competitiveness of the Australian economy.

► The third priority is to develop a national identity for the vocational education and training system. Strategies set by the Board to reach this goal include the effective implementation of the National Framework for the Recognition of Training (NFROT),

and the development of a national strategy to promote open learning and flexible delivery methods in the vocational education and training system. A national framework for the entire sector will be established to

incorporate the development of nationally consistent standards, training methods, and curricula; and the development of a national system which recognises prior learning and qualifications.

► The fourth priority for the Authority to reach is to reward innovation and best practice approaches. Both industry and enterprises will be encouraged to adopt

innovative approaches and initiatives, and also strive for best results.

Strategies for ANTA to achieve this aim include developing a scheme for rewarding individual providers who develop innovative practices, and establishing a range of best practice strategies to ensure the system is at the leading edge of vocational education and training delivery.

An important issue which is reflected in all four priorities is the need to improve the status of the vocational education and training system and promote its benefits to potential clients. ANTA strongly

believes that enhancing the status of vocational education and training will improve participation rates, workforce skills, and as a result the economic competitiveness of Australia as a whole.

P rogram S tructure

The Authority administered, in whole or part, sub-programs which were part of the Vocational Education and Training Program, which is Program 3 of the Employment, Education and Training (EET) Portfolio.

A description of the structure of the Vocational Education and Training Program for 1993-94, and administrative responsibilities, is given in Appendix 3.

On I January 1994 responsibility for the following sub-program components from the 1993-94 program structure was transferred to ANTA from the Department of Employment,

Education and Training:

From Sub-program 3.1

3.1.1 TAPE and Training Provision - Skill Centres

3.1.2 Systemic Support - Training Needs Curriculum and Materials (except funds related to AVCTS) - Innovative Projects

3.1.3 Organisational Support - ITABs/Project Teams - Competency Standards Bodies - Workskill Australia - Institutional Development Grants

(except funds related to AVCTS) - Adult and Community Education - Group Training Arrangements (operational assistance only)

From Sub-program 3.2

3.2.1 Entry Level Training - Support for Traineeships (Evaluation Grants only) - Special Trade Training (Special

Equity Measures only)

From 1994-95 these program elements, which the Ministerial Council designated as National Programs, will be incorporated in sub-program 3.3, the Australian National Training Authority.

Table 2 provides an overview of the financial and staffing resources applied to the sub­ programs administered by ANTA and Table 3 gives details of expenditures by program

element for 1993-94, with regard to Commonwealth funding.

Objectives, descriptions and performance information for each of these program elements are outlined in section 3, ANTA s Programs.

Program Component Notes Appropriation

1993-94

Expenditure 1993-94 1992-93

$(000) $( 000) $( 000)

F i n a n c i a l *

Program Expenditure

Vocational Education and Training Funding Act 1992 1 333,587 333,125 -

National Programs (Payments under Section 11, ANTA Act, 1992) 2 21,904 18,891 -

Total Program Expenditure 355,491 352,016 -

Running C osts 3 8,892 8,904 1,604

S t a f f i n g

Average Staffing Level 4 75 62 34

*This information is provided as per the Program Structure for Program 3 and is on a cash basis. The Financial statements for the Authority (Appendix 4) provide detailed information on an accrual basis.

Notes

( 1) VET Act funding is appropriated for a Calendar Year and the above information represents expenditure January to June 1994 with total Calendar Year funding for VET Act totalling $673,612 million.

(2) 1993-94 Appropriation includes Additional Estimates of $ 1.964 million.

(3) Expenditure of $0.017 million was sourced from interest received on running costs. The Authority operates its own bank accounts.

(4) 1992-93 staffing level represents the number of staff as at 30 June 1993.

Table 2 - Program Resources

E x p e n d i t u r e B y P r o g r a m

Program Component Notes Appropriation

1993-94

$(‘000)

Expenditure 1993-94 1992-93

$(‘000) $(‘000)

Sub-program 3.1 Vocational Education and Training System

Payments to the States and Territories under the Vocational Education and Training Funding Act 1992 1

- recurrent 228,074 227,612 -

- capital 105,513 105,513 -

Total Sub-program 3.1

Sub-program 3.3 Australian National Training A uthority

National Programs

(Payments under Section 11, ANTA Act 1992) 2

333,587 333,125

- Skill Centres 1,433 1,403 -

- Training Project Grants 4,837 2,332 -

- Organisational Support Grants 9,748 9,405 -

- Adult and Community Education 429 394 -

- Grants in aid AAACE 100 100 -

- Entry Level Training - Private providers 3,786 3,741 -

- Entry Level Training - Payments to States 1,571 1,516 -

ANTA Running Costs

21,904 18,891 _

- Salaries 3,580 3,575 569

- Specific Administration 3,465 3,473 561

- General Administration 1,847 1,856 474

8,892 8,904 1,604

Total Sub-program 3.3

Notes

30,796 27,795 1,604

(1) VET Act funding is appropriated for a calendar year and the above information represents expenditure January to June 1994 with total Calendar Year funding for VET Act totalling $673,612 million. (2) 1993-94 Appropriation includes Additional Estimates of $ 1.964 million. Expenditure relates

to the period January to June 1994.

Table 3 - Expenditure By Program

N ati onal T rai ni ng R eform A genda

Reforms to the national training system have :>een in progress for some five years as a [ co-operative venture between the ‘Commonwealth, the States and Territories,

and industry. The paper, Description of the National Training Reform Agenda (NTRA), which contains details of the agenda and a (breakdown of its components, was released by

ANTA in March 1994.

Included in the reforms is a greater emphasis on competency-based training and the further development of the National Framework for the Recognition of Training (NFROT). Furthermore, reforms will also apply to curriculum development, accreditation processes, the National Qualifications Framework and the Australian Vocational Certificate training system.

Despite the general acceptance of the reforms, ANTA became aware of a level of concern from industry about the complexity of their implementation. In its report to Ministers in

O ctober 1993, ANTA noted that although there was broad support for existing national training reforms, their implementation needed review. Ministers agreed.

Accordingly, ANTA began a process of consultation with industry, the Commonwealth, the States and Territories, the providers and regulators of training, and

community organisations. The purpose of these consultations was to examine the nature of the problems and the options available to establish approaches and arrangements for continuing the reforms. These approaches and arrangements would aim for higher levels of industry commitment to training reform.

ANTA engaged The Allen Consulting Group to undertake research, case studies and consultations, which were needed to ensure the nature of the problem and the options for action were fully considered.

Using the outcomes of the consultants work, a series of workshops will be undertaken in August 1994 with representatives of industry, enterprises, government and community

organisations. Based on the outcomes of these workshops, ANTA will finalise its advice and present this to Ministers at the September 1994 meeting of the Ministerial Council.

The outcomes from this process are also to be reflected in the National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training.

T he N ati onal S tratergy

The National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training is a central planning instrument which is required under the Australian National Training Authority Agreement, and will be presented to the Ministerial Council

meeting in September 1994. It will set broad strategic directions for vocational education and training through to the year 2001 and outline specific outcomes for 1995-97. The Strategy is to build upon the foundation provided by the common and agreed goals for vocational education and training. These goals were determined by Commonwealth, State and Territory Ministers in 1992. The Strategy will also follow from the Authority s Priorities for 1994 document.

The development of the Strategy has been overseen by a reference group with membership drawn from industry, unions and

State and Territory systems. Extensive consultation has taken place with the States/Territories, the Commonwealth,

national Industry Training Advisory Bodies (ITABs) and community groups in developing the Strategy.

The Strategy will be used to:

► set the scene for the future development of vocational education and training and provide a yardstick against which progress can be measured;

► raise the general skills profile of the labour force to equip the nation to adjust to change and to increase our general level of international economic competitiveness;

► assist those working in the system and their clients to participate and benefit from the new directions;

► negotiate State Training Profiles with the States and Territories which set out a comprehensive plan for the provision of vocational education and training for the

year ahead; and

► underpin the development of Industry Vocational Education and Training Plans by Industry Training Advisory Bodies.

The Strategy will also take into account advice on the national training reforms from industry, enterprise, government and community

organisations. This advice will be collected at the consultative forums to be conducted in August 1994.

The National Strategy will provide a framework within which the many interest groups can work together to achieve an increase in the skill levels of all Australians.

A dvice F rom I ndustry

Increasing attention has been paid to the quality of industry advice required by the VET system to fulfil its objective of becoming more

relevant to the priorities of industry. The ANTA legislation nominates Industry Training Advisory Bodies (ITABs) as a key source of

industry advice to the VET system in the development of policy and priorities.

ANTA is seeking high quality strategic advice from ITABs to ensure that the National Strategy and the delivery of training outcomes through the State and Territory Training

Profiles reflect industry needs and priorities.

The current advisory network comprises a mixture of ITABs, shorter term Project Teams and Competency Standards Bodies that have been established for the specific purpose of

developing competency standards for their industries. The network is a mixture of broadly based industry bodies such as the Tourism and Hospitality ITAB, more narrowly focussed advisory bodies such as the Meat sector project and occupationally based bodies such as the Electrical/Electronics body.

Despite the proliferation of bodies there are substantial gaps in ITAB coverage, such as those in the State public sector and the

banking and finance industries. In addition, there have been some unresolved overlaps in coverage, and variations in the degree of support that ITABs were able to gain from their industries.

Following agreement by Commonwealth and State Ministers late in 1993 on the roles of National and State/Territory ITABs, ANTA undertook an extensive review of ITAB boundaries and the management of ITAB funding. The objective of the review was to

come as close as possible to ensuring universal industry coverage by the ITAB network and the highest quality industry advice to the system.

The Chairman of the Queensland Vocational Education and Training Commission, Mr Bill Siganto, was asked by the ANTA Board to carry out the review of ITAB boundaries in September 1993. Following an extensive consultative process a report was considered by the ANTA Board early in 1994 and the new ITAB structure is due to be finalised by the

Ministerial Council in September 1994.

Among the recommendations to be considered by the Ministerial Council are that the ITAB structure should be reduced from its current forty-three bodies to eighteen broad industry-based bodies. The new structure is designed to overcome the current incompatible mix of industry and occupational bodies and to alleviate problems of gaps and overlaps in industry coverage. The September

Ministerial Council meeting will also consider proposals for a more equitable and effective distribution of funding to ITABs.

In pursuing its objective of ensuring that the training system operates within a strategic plan that reflects industry s needs and priorities, ANTA has developed, in consultation with

ITABs, guidelines to assist them in developing Industry Vocational Education and Training Plans for their industries. These Industry VET Plans, to be submitted to ANTA in January

1995, will be used in the subsequent review of the National VET strategy and in negotiation with the States/Territories over the delivery of training places.

Each National ITAB is being asked to supply ANTA with a plan covering the years 1995-97. This plan will be the primary source of advice about the development and delivery of vocational education and training for these years. National ITABs will be asked to review and update this plan annually.

The VET Plans will focus on advice that is strategic in nature and which addresses future directions in the development and delivery of vocational education and training, rather than operational or administrative details such as student numbers and details of individual course provision.

R esearch A nd S tatistics

Statistical information is vital to ANTA s operations. The Authority participates in the Australian Committee on Vocational Education and Training Statistics (ACVETS) and the

implementation of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard (AVETMISS). AVETMISS will result in the provision of nationally consistent statistical data on a range of indicators such as student numbers, staff numbers, student contact hours and costs. This information on the vocational education and training system will underpin planning activities both for ANTA and for each State and Territory system.

A project was set up in March 1994 to establish a base set of data tables on the ANTA network to allow all areas of the organisation to have access to commonly used

information. An ANTA information users group has also been formed to facilitate a communication channel for statistical information needs across the organisation.

During the development of the National Strategy, industry analysis and qualification level analysis was provided to support the establishment of appropriate objectives for the future. Technical advice was also provided to the National Strategy reference group and to the States and Territories on request.

Staff from the National Office Skills Formation Advisory Body (NOSFAB) launching their National Training Plan with Minister fo r Schools, Vocational Education and Training, The Hon. Ross Free MP.

m

The Authority is currently involved in several research projects.

At present there is no nationally consistent data on the employment destinations of VET students. A post-completion survey will be piloted in 1995 to find out where graduating TAPE students get jobs, their starting salaries and the relevance of the course undertaken to the position obtained. New surveys or studies are also planned to ascertain employer satisfaction with graduates of TAPE, student

satisfaction levels with VET studies, and workplace decision making processes regarding training to be undertaken.

Policy oriented research on questions such as the likely implications of an expanded training market is also in progress.

In 1994 the first in a series of occasional papers was published to enhance the quality of informed debate within the VET sector.

The first paper summarised research on the level and type of qualifications found within each major industry group. This provided a background for work on matching the demand and supply of training.

The second paper of the series reviewed the literature and data relating to the economics of vocational education and training in Australia - specifically labour market issues, efficiency, financing and equity. This provided

an assessment of existing methodologies and data, identified issues in overseas literature relevant to Australia, and indicated priority areas for further research. (For details on these documents refer to Appendix I.)

More occasional papers will be published during 1994.

M easures F or M ai n t e nanc e O f E ffort

In July 1993, the Ministerial Council agreed on the indicators to be used when determining whether the States and Territories had maintained their training efforts during 1994. It was agreed that financial measures should form the basis of maintenance of effort in

1994 in conjunction with planned activity levels based on annual student contact hours and student numbers.

As a result of Ministers decisions in October and December 1993, a working party was established to progress the issue of measures for maintenance of effort, emphasising the need for a co-operative and collaborative approach to the development of such measures. The working party was chaired by the Director of the Office of Training and Further Education, Victoria, Mr Peter Harmsworth, and included representatives from all States and Territories (except the Northern Territory), ANTA and the Department of Employment, Education and Training.

At their meeting in May 1994, Ministers endorsed the Working Party s recommendations, which principally argued that the following measures be used to

monitor maintenance of effort from year to year on an intra-state basis:

► expenditure

► enrolments

► annual student contact hours

► module load completion rate.

3 . A N T A ’ s P r o g r a m s

Innovation and change within the labour market will depend on the success of vocational education and training and the development of the Australian workforce. The programs administered by ANTA are designed to assist this success.

In 1993-94, ANTA s program structure was aligned with Program 3 of the EET portfolio, with three key activity areas:

Sub-program 3.1: Vocational Education and Training System

Sub-program 3.2: Workforce Development

Sub-program 3.3: ANTA Operations

Expenditure incurred by ANTA fell into sub­ programs 3.1 and 3.3.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION A N D TRAINING SYSTEM

Objective: To support a vocational education and training system which is efficient, nationally consistent, equitable and relevant to the economic needs of the nation.

3. 1. 1 T echni cal A nd F urther E ducat i on A nd T rai ni ng P rovi si on

Under this sub-program element ANTA provides grants to States and Territories for the provision and support of vocational

education and training places through the TAPE system.

State Training Profiles

State and Territory Training Profiles are required under the Australian National Training Authority Act 1992. They are intended to provide a single and comprehensive plan for

the provision and support of vocational

education and training for the immediate year ahead and indicative estimates for the following two years. To facilitate the process for the development of profiles and to ensure consistency in their preparation, guidelines have been developed in consultation with the States/Territories.

At its meeting in July 1993, the Ministerial Council approved the guidelines for State Training Profiles for 1994. On the basis of these, States and Territories prepared their State Training Profiles and, following negotiations between officers of the Authority and representatives of the States and Territories, the ANTA Board formulated its advice to the Ministerial Council.

As a result of this advice, the 1994 State Training Profiles were approved by the Ministerial Council at its meeting in October 1993.

Following approval of the Profiles, the States/Territories have the responsibility to implement the profiles. Implementation of the profiles is monitored throughout the year with variances being explained through this process.

States/Territories are required to report against their profile in the Annual National Report which the Authority is required to compile in respect of each calendar year. (The first such report will be available by July 1995

in respect of 1994.)

The State Training Profile is viewed as both a planning and a resource allocation document. In the profile, States/Territories are required to:

► discuss the major demographic, economic and labour market factors affecting the provision of vocational education and training;

► describe the planning process they have followed including input from industry, disadvantaged groups and other stakeholders;

► outline the initiatives they intend to undertake to achieve each of the priority areas agreed by Ministers;

► show how they intend to allocate funds for vocational education and training to meet the needs of industry, disadvantaged groups and other stakeholders; and

► provide activity tables showing the types of courses and levels of those courses to be provided from public funds.

The Ministerial Council at its meeting in October 1993 agreed to review the Profile Guidelines for 1995. The revised guidelines were approved by the Ministerial Council at

its meeting in May 1994.

The profiles are currently being developed for 1995. They will concentrate predominantly on all Government funded activity and fee-for- service activities being undertaken within the States and Territories. This incorporates information regarding public funding of private providers. It is intended that the profiles will incorporate information about all private provider activity as systems are able to provide the information.

National Projects

Part of the funding provided under the Vocational Education and Training Act is allocated to National Projects. In 1994, this allocation totals $25 million. Most projects are managed by one State/Territory authority on behalf of the system as a whole. The objective of each project is to enable resources to be shared between State/Territory systems and to

develop a national approach in areas such as statistics, curriculum, staff development and quality improvement.

Table 4 provides a list of the projects which had been agreed at 30 June 1994.

A number of projects funded in 1994 specifically focus on the area of innovation and best practice. Some of these are discussed below:

► The Assessment and Reporting Mechanisms for the Language, Literacy and Numeracy project are designed to improve accountability and provide benchmarks for assessment and reporting against the National Language, Literacy and

Numeracy Competency Framework. They are also used to assist in developing a national reporting system which provides the basis for moderation of assessments across training sectors and providers.

► The Benchmarking/Best Practice project defines benchmarking processes in a range of VET providers as part of a program of management development, with an emphasis on client service and improving the quality of outcome. The project will deliver several case studies of

benchmarking in the VET system including private providers; a report on applicability of the pilots to the wider VET system and

draft guidelines for the development of benchmarking and best practice in the VET system.

► The Quality Management Review is examining a selection of major approaches to the implementation of quality in order to identify approaches taken and processes and techniques utilised that are relevant to TAPE and other providers of VET in the

Assessment and Reporting Mechanisms for Language, Literacy and Numeracy 200,000

Australian Committee for Training Curriculum (ACTRAC) 6,000,000

Benchmarking/Best Practice 250,000

Developing the Training Market 100,000

Flexible Delivery 1,000,000

Improving Planning Practices in the National VET System 130,000

Industry Studies (including simplifying training reform) 600,000

International Forum and Network 155,000

Interstate Co-operative Delivery Projects Infrastructure Support 100,000

Joint Developments in Capital W orks Projects 22,250

Marketing (implementation activities associated with TAFE National Marketing Strategy) 260,000

Marketing the New Qualifications Framework 150,000

National Management Information and Statistical System (ACVETS) 5,300,000

National Plan of Action for Women in TAFE (NPAWT) 200,000

National Research Advisory Council 1,500,000

National Staff Development Committee 6,000,000

National Training Strategy for Small Firms, Stage 2 100,000

Quality Management Pilot 350,000

Quality Management Review 100,000

Review of National VET System Capital Assets 180,000

TAFE-Specific Projects 1,600,000

University to TAFE Credit Transfer 50,000

TABLE 4 - Sum m ary Listing o f N ational Projects

area of program delivery. The outcomes of the study will provide TAFE and other vocational education and training providers with a detailed analysis of these approaches

and guidelines for their implementation.

The issue of access and equity in vocational education and training has also been recognised. The Flexible Delivery project and the women s participation in TAFE projects are of particular significance, and are discussed overleaf:

All fem ale gang o f carpenters who com pleted housing units a t Loganlea, south o f Brisbane, dubbed “The House th at Jill B uilt”. From Left. Sonja May, Suellen Blanco, Lucinda Smith, supervisor Karen Stuart, Kerri Sengelman an d Radmila Masonicic

► The Flexible Delivery project is aimed at increasing access and participation for larger numbers of learners, providing a greater choice of programs and flexibility

in systems of delivery as well as removing barriers and impediments to learning and improving the effectiveness and productivity of learning. Flexible delivery offers benefits to all clients of VET including those who are limited or disadvantaged in their access to learning institutions; those who enrol and attend on-campus; and those who require learning at their place of work. It offers a range of client oriented learning strategies which allow training systems to become

more customer driven, to expand co­ operative links with industry and to respond more rapidly to client need.

► A project on women’s participation in TAFE is working on improving participation and outcomes for women, both as students and as staff. The project is evaluating the National Plan of Action for Women in TAFE (NPAWT) and,

depending on the evaluation, seeks to expand the Plan into the wider VET sector.

During 1994, the process for allocating National Projects is being reviewed. New guidelines will be prepared for the project development and management of 1995 National Projects.

Skills C entres

This component was transferred from DEET to the Authority in January 1994. It provides infrastructure support to assist industry to meet increased demand for quality vocational education and training places.

The component achieves these objectives through the provision of seed funding to establish or expand industry or enterprise- based training facilities or skills centres. No recurrent funding is provided, but support is available for the purchase of machinery and other capital equipment, centre establishment costs, and appropriate course development costs.

The amount of Commonwealth funding support made available for each project is dependent on substantial commitment from industry towards set-up costs, as well as industry being prepared to meet the recurrent costs associated with the centre, usually through fee-for-service arrangements.

The majority of Skills Centre projects funded during 1993-94 were approved by DEET prior to ANTA taking responsibility for the program on I January 1994. DEET made commitments towards seven new projects in 1993-94 in a

range of industry sectors, and these contracts, together with 78 contracts for projects approved in previous years by DEET, were subsequently transferred to ANTA for management and monitoring.

From the funds remaining, ANTA approved contributions towards the establishment of two Retail Skills Centres in Tasmania and Queensland and the cost of a development officer position with a joint industry/group scheme advisory group to co-ordinate the development of a network of retail skills centres around Australia.

Following from the success of pilot retail skills centres in NSW in 1993, there is every indication that a network of such centres will increase the level and standard of retail industry training in facilities accessible to the workplace and linked to targeted career

opportunities for participating trainees.

In addition, ANTA committed funds towards the preparation of a feasibility study for a Skills Centre in the area of Community Services and Health in South Australia.

Adult and Com m unity Education through th e TAFE system

The activities of the Authority in relation to Adult and Community Education (ACE) are described on page 25 of this Report.

In each State and Territory some of the provision of ACE is conducted by TAFE colleges.

3 . 1 . 2 S ystemic S upport

This sub-program element covers funds provided to the Authority through the Appropriation Acts for expenditure pursuant to Section I I of the Australian National Training Authority Act 1992. Under this component, funds are available for projects which contribute to improvements in the operation of the vocational education and training system. This is achieved by assisting both institutional and non-institutional training agencies to meet the rapidly increasing training

needs of industry, as well as providing catalytic funding for a variety of measures which address emerging issues in the development and implementation of a national, competency- based training system.

Training N eeds, Curriculum and Materials

The objective of this element is to accelerate the development of curricula and training materials necessary to deliver competency-

based training by funding the co-operative development of curriculum and training materials. The highest priority for funding is towards projects which develop material that

is national, generic and based on endorsed industry standards.

The Australian Committee for Training Curriculum (ACTRAC) is provided with financial assistance to undertake the major part of national curriculum development. In addition, financial assistance is available to

other organisations, such as Industry Training Advisory Bodies, to support the development of innovative curriculum and materials projects.

In 1993-94, prior to the transfer of the program to ANTA, DEET gave a commitment to ACTRAC to develop curriculum for 2 1

projects in a range of industries and occupations, including the Sugar Milling, Furnishings, Vehicle Body Building, Bakery, Chemical Plant Operations, Forensic Science,

National Accounting, Building and Construction and National Fires industries.

DEET also approved a contribution to the development of curriculum and training materials through seven Industry Training Advisory Bodies in the Automotive, Building, Maritime, Tourism, Forestry and Local Government areas.

From the funds remaining, ANTA approved contributions to the development of competency-based curriculum and training materials in three projects in the Automotive

and Fire Protection (Bush Fires rural and volunteer requirements) industries and in the management of community projects.

Innovative Projects

This program element aims to provide grants towards innovative projects which facilitate the development and implementation of competency-based approaches to vocational training. The major part of the funding is

directed towards the development of industry endorsed competency standards.

The program element achieves this through funding projects which:

► allow organisations to undertake industry­ wide analysis of the need for and the development of Competency Standards; and

► allow for the development and evaluation of innovative approaches to training and its delivery. For example, strategies which identify best practice, facilitate credit transfer, promote improved equity and access, or progress training reform through linkages between industry and

education providers.

DEET approved 28 individual Competency Standards Development projects, through a wide range of Industry Training Advisory Bodies and other bodies endorsed by the

National Training Board (NTB).

From the funds remaining, ANTA approved funds for seven projects with Industry Training Advisory Bodies and other industry based organisations endorsed by the NTB to develop

standards. This will result in the analysis and development of industry wide competency standards, including those in Steel Production, off-site fabrication in the Building industry, and the Fire Protection industry.

Under the Innovative Approaches element, DEET approved one project for innovative training in the tourism industry and subsequently transferred 33 contracts to ANTA which included projects approved in

previous years. ANTA approved funds for six projects which demonstrate innovative ways in which vocational education and industry training practices can be improved. These

included the development of an international marketing course for the food industry, the identification of best practice approaches in the Rural Sector and the further development of a mobile computer-based plant operation simulator in the building industry.

Of particular importance in this area was the ANTA contribution to a joint employer/employee project in the metals and engineering industries, which will see the

implementation of standards in the workplace through a large number of selected companies and the identification of a ‘best practice’ model for implementation on a wider industry basis.

3 . 1 . 3 O rgani sati onal S up p ort

Under this component, funds are available to support national agencies and peak organisations to assist with the provision of advice on the vocational education and training needs of industry and in the promotion of training reform generally.

Industry Training Advisory Bodies and Project Teams

This program element provides operational support for the establishment, co-ordination and improvement of training in all industry sectors. It achieves this through support for the operations of ITABs and Project Teams.

ITABs are industry-based bodies, incorporated as companies or associations. Project Teams are established along the same principles as ITABs and perform similar functions.

However, their funding support is for a defined period, usually one or two years, while specific projects, such as standards development and industry training analysis, are carried out.

The key function of national ITABs and Project Teams is to develop a national VET plan for vocational education and training within their industry which incorporates input from State/Territory ITABs. The purpose of these VET plans is to help ensure the National

Strategy for vocational education and training and the State Training Profiles are consistent with industry needs and priorities.

State/Territory ITABs provide industry advice to be incorporated into the State Training Profiles. They also contribute to the national VET plan for training within their industry and

play a major role in accreditation and recognition processes within their State/Territory.

There are currently a total of 20 National ITABs, 106 State/Territory ITABs, 15 National Projects and 7 State/Territory Projects. In the six months to 31 December 1993, DEET provided a total of $11.36 million for the support of National, State and Territory

ITABs and Projects. Since I January 1994 ANTA has provided a further $9.49 million. Diagram 2 represents the breakdown of these funds.

Arising from recommendations of a joint ANTA/VEETAC review of ITABs in 1993, Ministers requested that ANTA examine the structure of the national ITAB network to determine the most appropriate ITAB

boundaries to achieve outcomes. Following extensive consultation with industry, recommendations on an appropriate structure have been submitted to Ministers for consideration at their meeting in September

1994. The recommendations, if accepted, will result in a smaller number of more strategic, industry based bodies with a more complete coverage of industry.

Guidelines have been developed and distributed to national ITABs and Project Teams for the development of high quality

national industry VET plans. The plans will be the primary vehicle through which ANTA will receive industry advice to be incorporated

into the National VET Strategy, and also into negotiations with the States and Territories over the delivery of training places.

Workskill Australia

The aims of this program element are to assist in raising the standards and status of vocational education and training through skills competitions which provide best practice

examples of skills training and assessment. The program element is also intended to assist in forging closer links between industry and

public education and to promote knowledge of, and access to, vocational training within the schools system.

It is hoped this will be achieved through a two year contract for financial support to the Workskill Australia Foundation, which is matched by the States and Territories.

Industry also contributes towards the cost of these competitions. The current contract, which ANTA took responsibility for in January 1994, concludes in December 1995.

Workskill Australia was established in 1982 as an initiative under the auspices of the Evatt Foundation, with the specific aim of promoting

A N T A s F un di ng to I TAB s

and P roj ect teams

| State/Territory ITABs - 63%

□ National ITABs - 24%

| National and State/Territory Projects - 13%

Diagram 2.

Funding Breakdown-Funds to National ITABS: $2.26 million Funds to State/Territory ITABS: $5.95 million Funds to State/Territory Project Teams: $1.27 million

excellence in skill development. It is based on a national network of volunteer regional committees which conduct skills competitions for apprentices and trainees. Placegetters compete in a national final which, in turn, determines a team to represent Australia at the biennial International Skills Olympics.

The Foundation s nation­ wide program of skill competitions has provided added impetus to the training reform process

by increasing awareness among educators, employers and young people of the value of vocational training and the increasing skill standards around the world. In the most recent Skills Olympics, Australia s team of thirty-five people, all winners in their national

category, finished in tenth place overall with four Bronze Medals and thirteen Diplomas.

Australian Training Awards

In May 1994, the Ministerial Council agreed that ANTA should be responsible for the Australian Training Awards, which incorporate the Apprentice, Trainee and Aboriginal Trainee of the year awards, as well as a number of

new categories.

The aim of the awards is to enhance the status of vocational education and training by recognising and rewarding excellence in training across Australia.

The Australian Training Awards will demonstrate to the community that vocational education and training is an important and worthwhile educational sector which provides individuals with enhanced employment opportunities, and Australian business with a skilled and efficient workforce.

In 1995, the Board is looking to bring the Australian Training Awards and the Workskill Australia competitions into the one process.

Institutional D evelopm ent Grants

This program element aims to promote training reform and assist with the implementation of the Australian Vocational Certificate (AVC) training system. This is achieved through the provision of grants to peak employer and employee bodies, to enable them to employ Training Liaison or Field Officers. These officers facilitate training reform in their respective areas and assist with the introduction of new entry level training arrangements, such as Career Start Traineeships and pilot AVC projects.

DEET approved fifteen grants to a range of employer and employee bodies, covering the promotion of training reform in industries as diverse as building and construction, forestry, meat, restaurants and catering, construction and metals and engineering up to the end of December 1993. ANTA took responsibility for the management and monitoring of the

relevant contracts in January 1994.

Cooking up a storm fo r the 1994 A ustralian Training Awards are apprentice chefs (from left) Sudha Saini, M ark Petroff, Annette Opray,

Bernic Morgan, Elaine Gleeson and D avid Judges.

For its part, ANTA approved a contribution towards the employment of sixteen Training Liaison or Field Officers over the next twelve months. This related to the placement of six

positions with employer organisations and ten with employee organisations. Of particular importance was the contribution towards a joint employer/employee standards

implementation project in the metals and engineering industries, which includes the employment of four Field Officers to assist individual enterprises with the implementation of standards.

Adult and Com m unity Education

The Adult and Community Education (ACE) program provides opportunities to improve the knowledge, skills and quality of life for adult Australians. ACE aims to meet the

diverse lifelong learning needs of adults to enable them to participate confidently in society. It contributes to Australia s development as a creative, skilled, flexible and cultured society and in so doing enhances the capacity of local communities to provide educational opportunities for their members.

The ACE program elements aim to assist the adult and community education sector to become more effective and ensure that its outcomes are consistent with reforms to the

national training system.

In response to the 19 9 1 Report of the Senate Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training - Come in Cinderella: The Emergence of Adult and Community Education, the Commonwealth increased its support in this area. Since 1992-93 it has provided

$450,000 per year for the ACE sector for projects that would assist the sector increase its efficiency and effectiveness; for example,

networking, researching, strengthening

management capacity and curriculum review. In addition $185,000 was provided for the Australian Association of Adult and Community Education (AAACE) to assist it in strengthening its organisation and role as a peak body in the sector, and to provide a focal point for government consultations with the sector.

A National Policy for Adult and Community Education was endorsed by Ministers at their December 1993 meeting. This policy provides a framework for government action, with

implementation to take place at the National, State and Territory levels.

The ACE program and the AAACE grant-in-aid was administered by DEET until 31 December 1993.

In December 1993, DEET called for expressions of interest for the funding of projects to develop the profile of the adult and community education sector and people s participation in it. ANTA continued this work, and the successful proponents for 1993-94 funding were:

► AAACE Resource kit on disability access and integration for ACE providers: to equip managers and staff of ACE providers with the tools and encouragement to achieve

integration.

► NSW Board of Adult and Community Education Tor the development of a management competencies framework and to develop advice on an optimal approach

to systematic development of a national competency standards framework within the ACE sector.

► Victorian Council of Adult Education :funded to workshop the national competency based learning implementation project as originally funded by DEET.

► AAACE/UTS: Competency Standards in ACE: To proceed with standards development work for managers and administrators within the ACE sector.

► Centacare Family Services:to develop, market and distribute parent education manuals and materials.

► Mary Graham and Associates: finalise a project to assist Aboriginal and non­ Aboriginal people to understand and benefit from both cultures.

Group Training A rrangem ents

This program element provides support for group training companies and for national activities related to group training.

Group training companies are independent 1 -,j enterprises, nearly all established as incorporated bodies, supported by industry and their local communities. They employ

apprentices and trainees and manage their placement with a range of host employers. They also arrange structured on-the-job training with those host employers and off-

the-job training through the TAFE sector or with private training providers. Group training companies receive the major part of their operational costs through charge-out fees to host employers.

Group training companies are provided with recurrent funding from governments under joint policy arrangements, as a contribution towards the cost of their operations. A small number of the over 100 existing group training companies are, by choice, outside the joint government funding arrangements and rely

solely on industry contributions and fee-for- service activities for their operational support.

In 1993-94, DEET provided half of the full year s recurrent funding to group training companies. The contracts for 97 group

training companies were transferred to ANTA for payment of the commitment which remained. In addition, ANTA approved a contribution towards the operations of the national representative body, Group Training Australia, and towards the development of a

National Strategic Plan for the group training network. It also paid an insurance premium which indemnifies the directors of all participating companies from liability.

In April 1993, the Ministerial Council asked ANTA to undertake a review of the policy on the provision of government funds to group training companies. The Report which

resulted from that review process was endorsed by Ministers in May 1994, and will result in continued financial support for group training companies in return for their focus on a number of core activities.

From I July 1994, State and Territory Training Authorities will administer the Commonwealth contribution on behalf of ANTA, through individually negotiated contracts with companies under their jurisdiction.

New funding arrangements, relating to performance agreements with individual group training companies, are to be developed by ANTA in conjunction with the States/Territories and will be implemented in July 1995. ANTA will match the

State/Territory contributions on a dollar-for- dollar basis.

Sub-program 3.2: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Objective: To encourage and assist individuals and industry to improve the productivity and skills of the workforce through participation in, and contribution to, vocational eudcation and training opportunities.

3. 2. 1 E ntry L evel T RAINING

Under this sub-program element, ANTA provides assistance which encourages individuals and industry to improve the productivity and skills of the workforce, and access to vocational education and training opportunities. It achieves this through a range of measures which include Special Training or Equity Measures and through Evaluation

Grants.

Special Equity Measures

This program element aims to improve women’s access to training in areas of non- traditional employment, through two components:

► Tradeswom en on the Move projects, which promote non-traditional occupations as career options for young women; and

► Special Preparatory C ourses for W om en, in TAFE colleges, schools and with private training providers.

Tradeswomen on the Move projects are a jointly-funded initiative with the States and Territories. The projects market non- traditional occupations by using qualified tradeswomen as role models, and other

speakers and presenters at information sessions and workshops for young women in schools and colleges.

Special Preparatory Courses for Women are funded through ANTA by way of a wide range

of courses submitted by the States and Territories and other training providers. The courses which are selected for funding support are generally one-semester in

length and provide special introductory training modules linked to trade based pre-vocational courses.

In 1993-94, ANTA approved a contribution towards Tradeswomen on the Move projects in all

States and Territories and 37 Special Preparatory Courses, providing 495 places for women in introductory training. These courses articulate with pre-apprenticeship or apprenticeship programs or lead directly into

employment.

Evaluation Grants

This program element aims to assist with the monitoring and evaluation of entry level training arrangements.

It achieves this through the provision of grants to organisations or individuals to undertake research and evaluation studies.

In 1993-94, ANTA approved a contribution towards three projects, including the evaluation and review of a competency based training pilot project in printing and machining,

an evaluation of destination outcomes of TAFE graduates, and an evaluation of the impact that different types of education and training have on the ability of individuals to obtain employment.

Chair o f ANTA M inisterial Council, The Hon. Simon Crean, MP

Adult Language and Literacy

Activities undertaken within this component aim to facilitate increased opportunities and improved outcomes for those people without adequate social and functional literacy skills.

The Authority provided $7 million to the States and Territories through the State Training Profiles to support adult literacy programs. In addition, the Authority is

involved in other activities that aim to achieve improved outcomes, including the provision of $200,000 for the development of a National Reporting System through a joint national project with DEET.

The Authority expects to be able to identify the complete range of client language and literacy needs through future Profiles, and also see more details of State/Territory initiatives to meet those needs.

The National Reporting System national project is progressing well, and the Authority expects to receive a report by the end of the year that details a comprehensive system for describing student language and literacy outcomes. It should also allow for improved planning to meet identified competence requirements.

Australian Traineeship System

The objective of this program element is to provide broad-based and structured entry level training for young people in non-trades occupations.

Efforts to achieve this objective are assisted through grants to training providers for the off-the-job training element of the Australian Traineeship System and Career Start Traineeships. Training can be undertaken through either TAFE Colleges or private providers.

Ministers agreed in December 1993 that the States/Territories would accept responsibility for funding the off-the-job training for trainees under this program. As part of this

agreement, the States/Territories agreed that a once-only payment of $23.5 million (the equivalent of 12,000 trainees) for off-the-job training, and $2.4 million for monitoring resources, would be added to the ANTA funding base with effect from I January 1994. As a transitional arrangement, the Commonwealth is also providing an additional $20.4 million in 1994 and $10 million in 1995. Ministers subsequently agreed on the distribution of these funds between the States/Territories.

These funds have now been included in the Vocational Education and Training and Funding Act and progress is being monitored through the profile process.

A ccess and Equity

The Authority has a legislated responsibility to promote increased opportunities and improved outcomes for individuals and target groups to enhance their employment

outcomes.

The philosophy behind the Authority s approach to access and equity is that the clients of the national system benefit from training delivery that incorporates the needs, aspirations and strengths of individual clients from target groups.

In establishing the planning instruments for the national vocational education and training system, the Authority has included an access and equity focus within the National Strategy, the Guidelines for the State Training Profiles and the project briefs for National and Inter­ State Co-operative Projects.

The Authority provided resources to the Australian Committee on Vocational Education and Training Statistics (ACVETS) in 1994, and through the Committee also provided

resources to enable the States and Territories to implement a national training data collection system, the National Management Information and Statistics System (NATMISS). The national system will allow VET participation rates and outcomes to be identified for people from non-

English speaking backgrounds (NESB) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Data will be available in 1995 for TAFE activity in 1994, and ACE and private providers will be added to the system in 1996 and 1997 respectively.

ANTA has held an initial consultative forum with peak bodies representing people from non-English speaking backgrounds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other target client groups to consider the National Strategy. The Authority has established an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Training Advisory Forum as an ongoing source of expert advice on VET issues for indigenous people.

ANTA will continue to consult with peak forums such as the Federation of Ethnic Communities Councils of Australia and the Australian Non-English Speaking Background Women s Association on key issues. The Authority will also convene a community workshop in August 1994 to discuss and

obtain input on the issues arising from the review of the implementation of the training reform agenda.

Sub-program 3.3: ANTA OPERATIONS

Objective: To develop and maintain, in conjunction with the States and Territories, a national vocational education and training

system which has nationally-agreed objectives, strategies and planning processes aimed at meeting the needs of industry, supporting an effective training market which includes public and private providers, promoting an efficient

network of publicly-funded providers, increasing opportunities and outcomes for individuals, and improving links with other education sectors.

Our Staff

Up to the end of 1993 most of the staff working with the Authority were seconded from other organisations.

The Chief Executive Officer, Mr Terry Moran, took up duty in May 1993 and some other senior appointments were made in June 1993.

From October to November 1993, the Authority advertised a broad range of positions in major Australian newspapers. The campaign featured illustrations, an example of which appears on page 30, by cartoonist

Gary Leunig.

An overwhelming response was received from these advertisements, with the number of applicants greatly outweighing the number of positions available. Applicants were evenly distributed between private sector and public sector backgrounds.

The major component of the recruitment activity occurred between October 1993 and January 1994, with 88 employees appointed under the Australian National Training Authority Act. Further recruitment action throughout

the remainder of 1993-94 resulted in an additional twelve employees by the end of June 1994.

The recruitment activity also saw the beginning of a graduate trainee program. At the end of June 1994 there were seven

Example o f Advertisement. Illustration by Gary Leunig

participants in the program. The program is scheduled to run for twelve months, with trainees being introduced to three project groups within the Authority, each for a four

month rotation.

As a result of both the recruitment campaigns and natural attrition rates, the Authority s 30 June 1994 staffing was 95.

Diagram 3 details the previous employment categories of the Authority s current employees.

The Authority has a broadbanded five classification structure below the Senior Executive Service:

Salary Range

► Principal Project Officer $47,500 to $57,247

► Senior Project Officer $38,500 to $47,107

► Project/Administrative Officers $22,650 to $37,520

(Grades 1,2 & 3)

Diagram 4 shows the breakdown of staff by each classification.

Social Justice, Industrial D em ocracy and Equal Em ploym ent Opportunity

As part of the continuing process of developing industrial democracy in the Authority, a Joint Consultative Committee has been established.

The Authority has a responsibility under the Equal Employment Opportunity (Statutory Authorities) Act 1987 to develop and implement an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)

Management Plan. Work on this plan is currently underway and is expected to be implemented during the first quarter of 1994-95. Critical activities in the Authority s

EEO strategy will include the development and dissemination of a policy statement, establishment of an appropriate consultative forum and monitoring and evaluation of the strategy. An SES manager in the Authority has

been appointed to oversee and co-ordinate these activities.

E mployees by previous EMPLOYMENT CATEGORY at 30 June 1994

" | State and Territory Departments - 40%

| Commonwealth departments - 28%

| I Private sector - 25%

| Graduates and trainees - 7%

Diagram 3.

Diagram 5 gives details of the Authority s current EEO profile. Table 5 provides an analysis of the EEO Profile against classification.

O ccupational Health and Safety

The Authority is currently consulting with the Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU) in the development of an Occupational Health and Safety plan and the establishment of an Occupational Health and Safety committee.

Training in workplace occupational health and safety matters has been conducted for three employees of the Authority, and a further two

employees will also receive training.

The Authority contracted an Occupational Therapist to conduct detailed assessments of each employee in the workplace. A number of recommendations concerning individual employees have been implemented.

A N T A S taffing C lassi fi cati on S tructure

| | Project/Administration Officers - 51%

H Principal Project Officers - 20%

| | Senior Project Officers - 17%

■ SES - 12%

Diagram 4.

A N T A S EEO P R OF I L E

Breakdown of EEO Target Groups

■ Other - 86% g NESB - 7%

□ PWD - 6% □ ATSI - I %

Diagram 5.

At 30 June 1994 women constituted a b o u t 57% o f the Authority’s staff. Women also m ade up about 57% o f the Non-English Speaking Background group. Women were not represented

in either o f the Aboriginal an d Torres Strait Islander or People with a D isability groups.

Equal Em ploym ent Opportunity Profiles

Class SES PPO SPO Other Total

Number 6 10 9 16 41

NESB - - 1 2 3

PWD - 2 1 3 6

ATSI - - 1 1

Men

Class SES PPO SPO Other Total

Number 5 9 7 33 54

NESB 1 - 1 2 4

PWD - - - -

ATSI - - - -

W omen

T erms NESB: Non-English Speaking Background PWD: People with a Disability ATSI: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander SES: Senior Executive Service PPO: Principal Project Officer SPO: Senior Project Officer Other: Project/Admin. Officers (Grade 1,2 &3)

Internal and External Scrutiny

In June 1994, the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) audited ANTA s management of the consultancy associated with the review of the implementation of the national training reform agenda. The audit focussed on the procedures and practices followed by ANTA in letting the contract and the related payments.

The ANAO found that the process for the engagement of the consultant and related payments was satisfactory. There were some matters relating to the procedures followed which indicated there was a need for more precise directions to be issued on the engagement of consultants.

ANTA has taken the following action to assist staff with procedural issues for future consultancies:

► Guidelines on the Engagement of Consultants have been issued to staff which, amongst other things

- require that work not begin until contracts have been exchanged, and

- vest clear responsibility for the management of a consultancy in the hands of one nominated officer.

► ANTA s financial management information system has been enhanced to allow the full cost of consultancies (and other projects ) to be identified and managed against approved limits.

Financial and Accounting Services

1993-94 saw the establishment of ANTA s basic financial and accounting systems and the implementation of a number of reports and controls to support ANTA decision makers.

Table 5

In August 1993, ANTA purchased the Sunsystems accounting package for its financial management information system (FMIS). The accounting system was successfully

implemented within three weeks of purchase. It is capable of reporting from multiple ledgers and databases and is extremely flexible through its multidimensional reporting capabilities and the fact that it provides data in a format which identifies funding sources.

The establishment of the system involved the development of a Chart of Accounts and transaction analysis codes to enable responsibility centre reporting. A suite of financial reports has been developed to service the needs of ANTA.

In addition, Reservelink software was purchased from the Reserve Bank of Australia and implemented in O ctober 1993.

Reservelink enables ANTA to facilitate Electronic Funds Transfer payments for VET Funds, some National Programs Funds payments and the State and Territory payments. It also provides on-line reporting capabilities of account details.

A responsibility centre based budget process has been developed and work is well advanced on the development of a project costing system to enable project managers to measure the full cost of projects and monitor costs against approved limits.

A management information system is being developed for National Programs to provide reporting capabilities on financial commitments and obligations as well as providing flexible

reporting for other reference data.

Financial policies and procedures have been drafted and will be included in the Administrative, Executive, Secretariat and Operational Policies (AESOP) manual, which is

to be finalised by August 1994. A Fringe Benefits reporting framework has been developed to provide data for the tax return as well as for budget planning purposes.

The Asset Register and Attractive Items Register were established and are fully operational. This will enable ANTA to track all assets and attractive items and will provide

information to ensure efficient asset management.

Australian Government Corporate Card facilities were established and cards issued to the Office Manager and Purchasing Officer only. This enables a streamlined purchasing and payment method for certain types of

purchases.

All payments of Commonwealth sourced funds to the States/Territories and transfers of State/Territory sourced funds functioned smoothly in the first six months of ANTA s

operations (from January 1994).

From January 1994 to June 1994, $333.1 million was paid to the States/Territories under the Vocational Education and Training Funding Act.

Office Services and A ccom m odation

In late 1993, ANTA moved out of temporary accommodation and into AMP Place at 10 Eagle Street in the commercial centre of Brisbane.

A staff accommodation committee selected the site on the basis of advice from the Australian Property Group. The re-furbishment of ANTA s new

accommodation on levels 10, I I and 12 was a major task for which the Ministerial Council had approved a budget from ANTA s operating costs of $ 1.0 million. ANTA s premises are owned by the Australian Mutual Provident

Society and the Authority is under a three year lease, with an option to extend this for a further three years. ANTA s office space covers an area of 2,258 square metres and also has 30 carparks on basement levels of the

building. Office hours are from 8.00am to 6.00pm (and to 6.30pm during daylight saving).

Library M anagem ent

The ANTA Library is managed by a Librarian through the Corporate Development and Secretariat Unit. Library hours are 9.00am to 5.00pm, with staff having full access to Library materials and facilities at other times.

Through its Library, ANTA is establishing an effective information resource centre which provides access to national and international data, lithographs and journals on vocational education and training. This is being achieved through the purchase of specialised materials, and the utilisation of on-line database and search facilities with other general and specialist Libraries. During 1993-94 the Library made around 600 acquisitions.

Information Technology

In November 1993, Coopers and Lybrand were contracted to develop an Information Technology Strategic Plan to support the establishment and growth of ANTA and provide a framework for meeting the evolving information technology needs of the Authority. This plan was finalised in May 1994 and is the basis for both the implementation of information technology in the Authority and the preparation of an operational plan.

Key features of the plan include the establishment of a local area network, and the introduction of office productivity software.

Along with the move to full operations from January 1994, ANTA has seen a growth in the

use and functionality of information technology. Acquisitions have been made to equip new staff members and to establish linkages between equipment. The use of high speed network printers has enabled access to

high quality and high speed laser printing. The Authority moved from 40 standalone computers to 100 networked workstations during 1993-94. The existing workstations have been upgraded to a level to enable the running of standard Authority software. The rationalisation of equipment, along with better storage, and the sharing and security of information, has been achieved through the implementation of the local area network.

Electronic mail has become an integral part of the Authority. It provides staff with a rapid communication process which can transfer documents easily from one officer to another. The introduction has been of great assistance and investigations are under way to use electronic mail to enhance the flow of information between the ANTA office, the Board and ANTA s key clients.

The Authority has adhered to relevant government Information Technology Purchasing Guidelines.

Records M anagement

During February 1994 a correspondence tracking system was introduced to monitor and track documents received by ANTA. An average of 450 documents per month are registered on the computerised correspondence tracking system before being distributed for appropriate action.

During the preparation of the Information Technology Strategic Plan, it became apparent that there was a need for improved access to the Authority s files and documents. In May

1994, the Authority invited proposals on the

supply of services to implement a computerised records management application on the local area network at the Authority s premises. This system is to provide the means by which documents and files within ANTA will be managed.

Office Equipment and Purchasing

A range of general and audiovisual equipment has been acquired to equip the Authority s Office, including Board and meeting rooms for presentations and training. All assets and general equipment are recorded in appropriate

registers.

Purchasing of goods and services is conducted by a Purchasing Officer who has been trained in purchasing practices and policies of the Commonwealth Government. Formal request and approval procedures have been designed and implemented in accordance with

Purchasing Guidelines.

Environm ental Matters

In accordance with responsible environmental practice, ANTA has adopted a policy of paper recycling on all floors, and promotes to all staff the efficient use of consumables such as paper, printing and stationery.

W here practicable, recycled paper and paper goods are preferred, as are Australian-made goods and services.

sa

T erm M e a n i n g T erm M e a n i n g

AAACE Australian Association of Adult MINCO Ministerial Council and Community Education NATMISS National Management ACE Adult and Community Education Information and Statistics System

ACTRAC Australian Committee for NESB Non-English Speaking Background Training Curriculum NFROT National Framework for the ACVETS Australian Committee on Recognition of Training

Vocational Education and Training NPAWT National Plan of Action for

Statistics Women in TAPE

AESOP Administrative Executive Secretariat and Operational NTB National Training Board Policies NTRA National Training Reform Agenda

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

Australian National Training

NVETS National Vocational Education and Training System

ANTA

Authority PPO Principal Project Officer

ATSI Aboriginal or Torres Strait PWD People with Disabilities

Islander SES Senior Executive Service

AVC Australian Vocational Certificate SPO Senior Project Officer

AVCTS Australian Vocational Certificate Training System TAPE Technical and Further Education Vocational Education, VEETAC AVETMISS Australian Vocational Education

and Training Management Information and Statistical Standard VET

Employment and Training Advisory Committee

Vocational Education and Training

CPSU Community and Public Sector Union

DEET Department of Employment, Education and Training (Commonwealth)

EEO Equal Employment Opportunity

FMIS Financial Management Information System

ITABs Industry Training Advisory Bodies

LAN Local Area Network

L o c a t i o n I tem L o c a t i o n

Letter o f Transmission Page iii

Aids to A ccess Contents Page iv

Alphabetical Index Page 69

Glossary Page 37

Introduction Page 1

Contact Officers Page 67

Corporate O verview

Structure and Senior Management Page 5-6

Social Justice and Equity Page 31 Equal Employment Opportunity Page 3 1

Internal and External Scrutiny Page 32 Auditor-Generals Reports Page 32 Australian National Audit Office Page 32

Inquiries by Parliamentary Committees N/A

Comments by the Ombudsman N/A

Decisions by Courts and Tribunals N/A

Freedom of Information N/A Other Industrial Democracy Page 31 Occupational Health and

Safety Page 3 1

Advertising and Market Research Appendix 9

Program Performance Reporting

Program Structure Appendix 3

Financial Staffing and Resources Data Tables 2&3

Reconciliation between Appropriations and Program Elements Appendix 5

I t e m

Program Descriptions and Information (including program objectives & results) Pages 16-35

Staffing Overview Appendix 6

General Information including: Total number of Employees Full-time/Part-time staff numbers Number employed under Public

Service Act Number of men and women Number in various employment categories Performance Pay

Senior Executive Service Information including:

Levels Genders Gains and Losses Intra-Agency Mobility

Staff Training Appendix 7

Consultants Appendix 8

Financial Statem ents Appendix 4

O ther

Access and Equity Page 28

Environmental Matters Page 35 Information Technology Page 34 Major Documents Appendix 1

Property Usage Page 33

Purchasing Page 35

Reporting Bodies and Committees Appendix 2

A p p e n d i c e s 6 .

A P P E N D I X I

P u b l i c a t i o n s

1. Vocational Education and Training - Directions and Resource Allocations for 1994 - Report of the Australian National Training Authority to Minister for Vocational Education and Training - 83pp - O ctober 1993

2. Australian National Training Authority Annual Report 1992 -93 - 42pp - 1993

3. Description of the National Training Reform Agenda: 31 December 1993 - 30pp and attachments. March 1994.

4. National Vocational Education and Training System - Priorities for 1994 - 243pp - 1994

5. ITABs” (Industry Training Advisory Bodies) & CSBs (Competency Standards Bodies) Network Index - 54pp - April 1994

6. Australian National Training Authority About us in 1994 - 4pp - 1994

7. The Impact of Mass Post-Secondary Education and Training on Employment in Australia: An Analysis of qualifications profles in Australian Industry - Occasional Paper 94/1 - Cullen - 1994. Summary Paper - 18pp. Technical Paper - 93pp and appendices.

8. The Economics of Vocational Education and Training in Australia :A Review of Recent Literature - Occasional Paper 94/2 - G Burke, P McKenzie, L Maglen, C Selby Smith, F Ferrier and J Selby Smith - 80pp - 1994

9. australiAN TrAining -12 pp - Volume I Issue I - June 1994

10. Successful Reform -Report to the Australian National Training Authority -Competitive Skills for Australians and Australian Enterprises - 157pp - June 1994 - The Allen Consulting Group

APPENDI X 2

A N T A M i n i s t e r i a l C o u n c i l

ANTA reports to the ANTA Ministerial Council which consists of the Minister from each State and Territory responsible for vocational education and training and the relevant Commonwealth Ministers. It is chaired by the senior Commonwealth Minister, currently the Minister for Employment, Education and Training, the Hon Simon Crean, MP. The New Zealand Minister for

Education has observer status.

The ANTA Ministerial Council, unlike most Ministerial Councils, is established under legislation via the ANTA Act 1992.

The Ministerial Council meets three-to-four times per year to consider and endorse recommendations from the ANTA Board. The functions of the Ministerial Council include:

► to determine national goals, objectives and priorities for vocational education and training

► to determine a national strategic plan on training policy based on advice from the ANTA Board, consistent with agreed national goals, objectives and priorities

► to determine, in the context of the national strategy, the principles to be applied for the allocation of funding between States/Territories and for any national programs

► to provide annual advice to assist the Commonwealth Minister in Commonwealth decisions on growth funding requirements

► to agree to planning parameters and profiles for the delivery of vocational education and training nationally

► to ensure that ANTA operates in an effective and efficient manner.

Membership at 30 June 1994 comprised:

C om m onw ealth The Hon S Crean, MP, Minister for Employment, Education and Training (Chair) The Hon R Free, MP, Minister for Schools, Vocational Education and Training

N ew South W ales The Hon K Chikarovski, MP, Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment The Hon VA Chadwick, MLC, Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs

Victoria The Hon H Storey, QC, MLC, Minister for Tertiary Education and Training

Queensland The Hon MJ Foley, MLA, Minister for Employment, Training and Industrial Relations3

W estern Australia The Hon N Moore, MLC, Minister for Education, Minister for Employment and Training

APP ENDI X 2 ( c o n t i n u e d )

South Australia The Hon Dr R Such, MP, Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education

Tasmania The Hon RJ Beswick, MHA, Minister for Education and the Arts, Minister for Industrial Relations and Training

Australian Capital Territory Mr B Wood, MLA, Minister for Education and Training

Northern Territory The Hon F Finch, MLA, Minister for Education and Training

New Zealand The Hon Dr L Smith, Minister of Education

APPENDI X 3

P r o g r a m S t r u c t u r e : Employment, Education and T raining Portfolio 1993-94 Vocational Education and Training Program

Sub-program 3.1 Vocational Education and T raining System

Component 3.1.1 Technical and Further Education and Training Provision +

3.1.2 Systemic Support *

3.1.3 Organisational Support *

Sub-program 3.2 W orkforce Development

Component 3.2.1 Entry Level Training *

3.2.2 Skills Enhancement *

3.2.3 Training Guarantee *

Sub-program 3.3 Australian National Training Authority

National Programs (Payments under si 1, ANTA Act 1992) #

ANTA Running Costs

+ Partly administered by ANTA, and partly by DEET

* Administered by DEET

# Programs formerly administered by DEET under sub-programs 3.1 and 3.2, and transferred to ANTA on I January 1994

AP PENDI X 4

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

Centenary House 19 National Crt Barton ACT 2600

I N D E P E N D E N T A U D I T R E P O R T

T o th e M in is te r f o r E m p lo y m e n t, E d u c a tio n a n d T ra in in g

S c o p e

1 h a v e a u d ite d th e f in a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts o f th e A u s tr a lia n N a tio n a l T r a in in g A u th o r ity f o r

th e y e a r e n d e d 3 0 J u n e 1 9 9 4 . T h e s ta te m e n ts c o m p r is e :

• O p e ra tin g S ta te m e n t

• S ta te m e n t o f F in a n c ia l P o s itio n

• S ta te m e n t o f C a s h F lo w s

• N o te s to a n d f o rm in g p a r t o f th e F in a n c ia l S ta te m e n ts

• S ta te m e n t b y C h a ir a n d D e p u ty C h a ir

T h e m e m b e rs o f th e A u th o r ity a r e r e s p o n s ib le f o r th e p r e p a r a tio n a n d p r e s e n ta tio n o f th e

fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts a n d th e in f o rm a tio n c o n ta in e d th e r e in . I h a v e c o n d u c te d an

in d e p e n d e n t a u d it o f th e f in a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts in o r d e r to e x p r e s s a n o p in io n o n th e m to th e

M in is te r f o r E m p lo y m e n t, E d u c a tio n a n d T ra in in g .

T h e a u d it h a s b e e n c o n d u c te d in a c c o r d a n c e w ith A u s tr a lia n N a tio n a l A u d it O ffic e

A u d itin g S ta n d a r d s , w h ic h in c o r p o ra te th e A u s tr a lia n A u d itin g S ta n d a r d s , to p r o v id e

r e a s o n a b le a s s u r a n c e a s to w h e th e r th e fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts a r e fre e o f m a te ria l

m is s ta te m e n t. A u d it p r o c e d u r e s in c lu d e d e x a m in a tio n , o n a te s t b a s is , o f e v id e n c e

s u p p o r tin g th e a m o u n ts a n d o th e r d is c lo s u r e s in th e fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts , a n d th e

e v a lu a tio n o f a c c o u n tin g p o lic ie s a n d s ig n if ic a n t a c c o u n tin g e s tim a te s . T h e s e p r o c e d u r e s

h a v e b e e n u n d e r ta k e n to f o rm a n o p in io n w h e th e r , in a ll m a te ria l r e s p e c ts , th e fin a n c ia l

s ta te m e n ts a r e p r e s e n te d f a irly in a c c o r d a n c e w ith A u s tr a lia n a c c o u n tin g c o n c e p ts a n d

s ta n d a rd s a n d s ta tu to r y re q u ire m e n ts so a s to p r e s e n t a v ie w w h ic h is c o n s is te n t w ith m y

u n d e r s ta n d in g o f th e A u t h o r i ty 's fin a n c ia l p o s itio n , th e re s u lts o f its o p e r a tio n s a n d its

c a s h flo w s.

T h e a u d it o p in io n e x p re s s e d in th is re p o rt h a s b e e n f o r m e d o n th e a b o v e b a s is .

APPENDI X 4 ( c o n t i n u e d )

A u d it O p i n i o n

In a c c o r d a n c e w ith se c tio n 2 3 o f th e A ustralian N ation al T raining A u th ority A ct 1992, I

n o w r e p o rt th a t th e s ta te m e n ts a r e in a g r e e m e n t w ith th e a c c o u n ts a n d re c o rd s o f th e

A u th o r ity , a n d in m y o p in io n :

(i) th e s ta te m e n ts a r e b a s e d o n p r o p e r a c c o u n ts a n d r e c o r d s

(ii) th e s ta te m e n ts s h o w f a ir ly in a c c o r d a n c e w ith S ta te m e n ts o f A c c o u n tin g

C o n c e p ts a n d a p p lic a b le A c c o u n tin g S ta n d a r d s th e f in a n c ia l tra n s a c tio n s f o r

th e y e a r e n d e d 3 0 J u n e 1 9 9 4 a n d th e s ta te o f a f f a ir s o f th e A u th o rity a s a t

th a t d a te

(iii) th e r e c e ip t, e x p e n d itu r e a n d in v e s tm e n t o f m o n e y s , a n d th e a c q u is itio n a n d

d is p o s a l o f a s s e ts b y th e A u th o rity d u r in g th e p e r io d h a v e b e e n in

a c c o r d a n c e w ith th e A u stralian N ational Training A u th ority A c t 1992, a n d

(iv ) th e s ta te m e n ts a r e in a c c o r d a n c e w ith th e G u id e lin e s f o r F in a n c ia l

S ta te m e n ts o f P u b lic A u th o r itie s a n d C o m m e r c ia l A c tiv itie s .

D .S . L e n n ie

E x e c u tiv e D ir e c to r

A u s tra lia n N a tio n a l A u d it O ffic e

C a n b e rra

23 S e p te m b e r 1 9 9 4

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l

T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

S t a t e m e n t B y C h a i r A n d D e p u t y C ha i r

F or T he Y ear E n d e d 3 0 J u n e 1 9 9 4

In our opinion the financial statements presented herewith are drawn up to show fairly:

(a) the Authority s operating result for the financial year ended 30 June, 1994

(b) the Authority s financial position as at 30 June, 1994, and

(c) the Authority s cash flows for the financial year ended 30 June, 1994.

The statements have been made out in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities issued by the Minister for Finance and applicable accounting standards.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of the Australian National Training Authority

%

Ms A Rein - Deputy Chair

Date Date

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

O p e r a t i n g S t a t e m e n t

F o r T he Y ear E nde d 30 J une I 994

21 D ecem ber 1992

N otes 1993-1994 to 30 June 1993

$ $

COST OF SERVICES

Operating expenses 2

Operating 8,586,505 1,526,525

National Programs 18,897,003 -

VET Funding Act 333,149,508 -

State Government Sourced Vocational Education and Training* 3 269,860,803 -

Total operating expenses 630,493,819 1,526,525

Operating revenues from independent sources 4

Interest 305,298 -

State Government Sourced Vocational Education and Training* 269,860,803 -

Other 223,500 -

Total operating revenues from independent sources 270,389,601

N et cost of services 360,104,218 1,526,525

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT 5

Operating Funds - Parliamentary Appropriation 8,891,742 1,669,484

National Programs Funds - Parliamentary Appropriation 19,308,127 -

VET Funding Act Funds - Parliamentary Appropriation 333,587,174 -

Total revenue from governm ent 361,787,043 1,669,484

Change in net assets resulting from operations 1,682,825 142,959

Accumulated results of operations at the beginning of the financial period 142,959 -

Accum ulated results of operations at the end of the financial period 1,825,784 142,959

Additional funds were expended by State Governments on vocational education and training which did not pass through the Authority s accounts. See note 3.

The above operating statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

S t a t e m e n t O f F i n a n c i a l P o s i t i o n

F o r T he Y ear E nde d 30 J une I 994

N otes 1994 1993

$ $

CURRENT ASSETS 7

Cash Receivables O ther

1,21 1,951 5,288 128,605 100,139

Total current assets 1,345,844 100,139

NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

8

1,764,924 240,057

Total non-current assets 1,764,924 240,057

Total assets 3,110,768 340,196

CURRENT LIABILITIES Creditors Provisions

9

407,206 371,192

197,237

Total current liabilities 778,398 197,237

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions

10

506,586 -

Total non-current liabilities 506,586 -

Total liabilities 1,284,984 197,237

N et assets 1,825,784 142,959

EQUITY Accumulated results of operations 1,825,784 142,959

Total Equity 1,825,784 142,959

The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunaion with the accompanying notes.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

S t a t e m e n t O f C a s h F l o w s

F o r T he Y ear E nde d 30 J une I 994

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Inflows: Parliamentary Appropriation State Government Sourced Vocational Education and Training Funds Received

Interest Received Australian Training Awards Trust Account - Salaries Other Revenue

Outflows: Payments to suppliers and employees Payments of State Government Sourced Vocational Education and Training Funds

N et Cash provided by O perating activities

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Payment for plant and equipment

N et Cash used in investing activities

Net increase (decrease) in cash held

Cash at the beginning of the reporting period

Cash at the end o f the reporting period

21 D ecem ber 1992

N otes 1993-1994 to 30 June 1993

$ $

361,787,043 1,669,484

269,860,803 -

305,298 -

23,500 -

22,260 (65,528)

200,000 “

(359,260,117) (1,338,055)

(269,860,803) -

16(a) 3,077,984 265,901

(1,866,033) (265,901)

(1,866,033) (265,901)

1,211,951

16(b) 1,211,951 -

The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

30 J une 1994

I SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities issued by the Minister for Finance in January 1994 which incorporate the Australian Accounting Standards. The accounts and records have been kept in accordance with the Audit Act 1901.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention. The accounting policies have been consistently applied.

C om paratives

Comparatives have been shown where available. The 1992/93 financial year information is for the period from when the Authority was established on 21 December, 1992. During the 1992/93 financial year the Authority did not receive National Program Funds or VET Funding Act Funds.

Acquisition of A ssets

The historical cost method of accounting is used for all acquisitions of assets. Cost is determined as the fair value of the assets given up at the date of acquisition plus costs incidental to the acquisition. All items with an acquisition cost of less than $2,000 are expensed at the time of acquisition.

D epreciation

Depreciation is calculated on a straight line basis so as to write off the net cost of each item of property, plant and equipment over its expected useful life.

E m ployee Entitlem ents

Salaries and related costs

An accrual is made for salaries and related costs and is measured as the amount unpaid at balance date in respect of employees and secondees services up to that date. This amount is included in accrued expenses.

Annual Leave

Annual leave is provided for those employees who have an entitlement at balance date. The provision includes a leave loading component.

Long Service Leave

Long Service leave is provided for those employees with 5 years or more service including the recognition of prior service with other government organisations. Employees become entitled to long service leave following 10 years service.

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une 1994

Insurance

The Authority has taken out commercial insurance to cover a wide range of risk to the Authority s property and public liability.

The Authority s workers compensation insurance is provided through Comcare.

Taxation

Under the current provisions of the Income Tax Assessment Act, the Authority is not liable to Income Tax. However, it is subject to Fringe Benefits Tax. The Authority s liability for State Payroll Tax is yet to be resolved.

Cash

For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash includes cash at bank. The Authority s cash on hand at the end of the financial year is shown within the Statement of Cash Flows.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f T h e

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 99 4

2 OPERATING EXPENSES

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

Operating

Salaries and Related Costs Employee Entitlements*

Advertising Audit Fees Board Meetings

Communications Contractors and Consultants Depreciation Electricity Employee Housing Assistance Freight and Storage Fringe Benefits Tax Information Technology Insurance Legal Services Library Other

Motor Vehicle Expenses Office Requisites Operational Travel Premises Repairs and Maintenance Staff Development Staff Recruitment

Prior Service Employee Entitlements**

2 1 D ecem b er 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993 $ $

3,542,934 657,822

208,700 -

7,024 -

54,700 22,000

38,254 20,582

138,91 1 20,429

692,457 56,610

341,167 25,844

13,140 -

104,792 21,369

9,480 2,556

99,269 -

232,393 39,600

753 -

7,968 -

43,422 6,503

144,315 43,734

101,473 34,929

193,040 17,045

732,811 312,414

668,623 140,665

12,105 -

60,367 17,688

469,329 86,735

669,078 -

Total Operating Funds Expenses 8,586,505 1,526,525

* This expense recognises the costs of Long Service Leave and Annual Leave accumulated by staff since their commencement with the Authority.

** This expense recognises the liabilities assumed by the Authority for employees who had the right to carry over prior Long Service and Annual Leave entitlements on commencement with the Authority.

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 994

2 OPERATING EXPENSES (continued)

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

National Program s#

Grants Travel Attendance costs Conference costs Consultants Printing Sponsorship

Insurance

21 D ecem b er 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993

$ $

18,689,753 -

48,427 -

24,211 -

15,580 -

5,642 -

29,640 -

5,000 -

78,750 -

Total National Programs Expenses 18,897,003

VET Funding A ct#

Funds specified in the ANTA Agreement for direct proportional allocation to the States:

Recurrent General Purpose General Recurrent 108,926,491

Special Recurrent 49,050,000

Specific Purpose ATS Training Provider Assistance 12,950,003

Adult Literacy 7,000,000

Staff Development 1,312,506

Funds allocated by direction of the Ministerial Council:

Recurrent General Purpose Growth Funds 32.500,004

Specific Purpose National Projects 13,023,004

Interstate Co-operative Projects 2,875,000

Capital* Buildings 87,075,000

Equipment 16,700,000

Child Care 1,737,500

Total VET Funding Act Expenses 333,149,508

# These expenditures relate to the period January 1994 to June 1994.

* Approximately 75% of these funds represent commitments entered into in previous years.

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 9 9 4

3 OPERATING EXPENSES (continued)

State G overnm ent Sourced Vocational Education and Training Funds

The following amounts were received from the States shown below and immediately returned for expenditure by those States:

21 D ecem b er 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993

$ $

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

Australian Capital Territory 20,615,80

Victoria 75,000,001

Queensland 135,701,001

Western Australia 38,544,000

Total State Sourced VET Funds 269,860,803

In addition, the following States advised that they had set aside the amounts shown below for vocational education and training purposes:

New South Wales Victoria South Australia Western Australia Tasmania

Northern Territory

683,963,000

368.600.000 120.827.000 61.736.000 38.544.000

47.056.000 47.200.000

These funds relate to the period I January, 1994 to 30 June, 1994.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une 1994

4 OPERATING REVENUES FROM INDEPENDENT SOURCES

21 D ecem ber 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993 $ $

Interest

Operating 23,101

National Programs 130,539

Vet Funding Act 15 1,658

305,298

State G overnm ent Sourced Vocational Education and Training 269,860,803

O ther

Other Revenue 200,000

National Training Awards 23,500

223,500

Total Operating Revenues from Independent Sources 270,389,601

5 REVENUE RECEIVED FROM GOVERNMENT

Operating Funds - Gross Parliamentary Appropriation

less unexpended funds returned to Consolidated Revenue Fund

Operating Funds - Net Parliamentary Appropriation

National Programs Funds - Parliamentary Appropriation

VET Funding Act Funds - Parliamentary Appropriation

Total Revenue From G overnm ent

6 AUDIT FEES

The Authority’s financial statements are audited by the Australian National Audit Office and the estimated cost of auditing the statements for the period ended 30 June 1994 is $54,700. This amount has been included in operating expenses.

8.891.742 2,190,000

- (520,516)

8.891.742 1,669,484

19,308,127 -

333,587,174 -

361,787,043 1,669,484

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 9 9 4

7 CURRENT ASSETS

Cash

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

1994 1993

$ $

Petty Cash 1,000 -

Bank Accounts - Operating Funds 26,500 -

National Programs Funds 546,627 -

VET Funding Act Funds 614,324 -

Australian Training Awards 23,500 -

Total 1,21 1,951 -

Receivables 5,288 -

O ther

Trust Account - Salaries 43,268 65,528

Prepayments 85,337 34,61 1

128,605 100,139

8 NON-CURRENT ASSETS - Property, Plant and Equipment

Land and Buildings - -

Plant and Equipment:

Information Technology 71 1,635 189,334

Less: Accumulated Depreciation (158,969) (21,168)

552,666 168,166

Office Equipment 212,181 43,008

Less: Accumulated Depreciation (23,201) (3,573)

188,980 39,435

Motor Vehicles 33,559 33,559

Less: Accumulated Depreciation (9,089) (1,103)

24,470 32,456

Furniture & Fittings 1,174,560 -

Less: Accumulated Depreciation (175,752)

998,808 -

Total Plant and Equipm ent 1,764,924 240,057

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 9 9 4

9 CURRENT LIABILITIES

Creditors

1994 1993

$ $

Trade Creditors Operating Funds 36,969 7,140

O ther Creditors Operating Funds 28,685 -

National Programs Funds 458 -

29,143 -

Accrued Expenses Operating Funds 311,588 190,097

National Programs Funds 4,506 -

VET Funding Act Funds 25,000 -

341,094 190,097

Total Creditors 407,206 197,237

Provisions

Employee Entitlements Annual Leave 314,905 -

Long Service Leave 56,287 -

371,192 -

10 NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Provisions

Employee Entitlements Long Service Leave 506,586

I I CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

Under the ANTA Act, the Authority is not specifically exempted from State Payroll Tax. An application to the relevant authorities for exemption has been made. However, the m atter is still unresolved. Should exemption not be granted, the estimated liability is $269,000.

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

3 0 J u n e I 9 9 4

12 COMMITMENTS

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

O perating Funds

(a) Lease C om m itm ents

Commitments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases:

Not later than one year Later than one year but not later than 2 years Later than 2 years but not later than 5 years

(b) O ther C om m itm ents

21 D ecem b er 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993

$ $

702,205 686,422 281,250

1,669,877

Commitments for outstanding orders for goods and services at balance date but not provided for in the accounts:

N ot later than one year ______ 140,747

National Program s Funds*

Total expenditure commitments under National Programs funding at balance date but not provided for in the accounts:

N ot later than one year 28,660,714

Later than one year but not later than 2 years 22,498,160

Later than 2 years but not later than 5 years 22,254,271

73,413,145

VET Funding A ct Funds

(a) Capital Funding

Total capital expenditure appropriated under the Act as amended for 1994-1995 and 1995-1996 at balance date but not provided for in the accounts. These amounts are subject to adjustment in later years for movements in

relevant cost indices:

N ot later than one year 2 18,378,000

Later than one year but not later than 2 years 109,189,000

327,567,000

* These commitments represent, in the main, forward funding commitments for projects extending into future years. These commitments are subject to the grantee continuing to meets its obligations under contracts entered into with the Authority. These contracts provide that the Authority, subject to prior written notice, may cease the funding arrangements at any time.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c

30 J une I 9 9 4

12 COMMITMENTS (continued)

(b) O ther funding 21

Total recurrent expenditure appropriated under the Act 1993-1994 as amended for 1994-1995 and 1995-1996 at balance date $ but not provided for in the accounts. These amounts are subject to adjustment in later years for movements in

relevant cost indices:

Not later than one year Later than one year but not later than 2 years

13 SUPERANNUATION

The Authority contributes to both the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS) and the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) for employee benefits relating to superannuation. Contribution rates are

12.4% (PSS) and 20% (CSS) of salary, in addition to the 3% to 5% contribution under the Superannuation (Productivity) Act.

14 REPORTING BY SEGMENTS

The Authority operates in one industry. The sole activity is to promote the development of a national vocational education and training system. The Authority operates

only in Australia.

15 EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

The number of executive officers whose total remuneration falls within the following bands:

$’000 $’000

1 10 - 120 2

170 - 180 1

Remuneration received, or due and receivable, by Board members of the Authority: 16 ,150

460.972.500 250.681.500

711,654,000

τ O f

: o n t ’ d )

D ecem ber 1992

to 30 June 1993 $

6,570

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l T r a i n i n g A u t h o r i t y

N o t e s T o A n d F o r m i n g P a r t O f

T h e F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s ( c o n t ’ d )

30 J une I 9 9 4

16 (a) RECONCILIATION OF NET CASH USED IN OPERATING

ACTIVITIES TO OPERATING RESULT

21 D ecem b er 1992

1993-1994 to 30 June 1993 $ $

Results of operations 1,682,825 142,959

Depreciation 341,167 25,844

Prior Service Employee Entitlements 877,778 -

Change in operating assets and liabilities Increase in operating liabilities 209,969 197,237

Increase in current assets (33,754) (100,139)

N et cash inflow from operating activities

16(b) RECONCILIATION OF CASH

3,077,984 265,901

F:or the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash includes cash at bank and on hand. ICash at the end of the reporting period as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to the

r elated items in the statement of financial position b s follows:

Petty Cash 1,000 -

Cash at Bank - Operating Funds 26,500 -

- National Program Funds 546,627 -

- VET Funding Act Funds 614,324 -

- Australian Training Awards 23,500 -

1,21 1,951 -

17 RELATED PARTIES

Board M embers

The names of persons who were members of the Board of the Australian National Training Authority at any time during the financial period are as follows:-T B Finn; A Rein; M Deeley; S Hornery; and W Mansfield

R e m un e ra ti on

Information on remuneration to Board members is disclosed in note 15.

APPENDI X 5

RECONCILIATION OF APPROPRIATIONS A N D PROGRAM ELEMENTS

1993-94 1993-94 1992-93

Program Element Estimate Outcom e Outcome

Number and Description $(000) $(000) $(000)

Appropriation Bill No I

Division 233 - AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL TRAINING AUTHORITY

I For expenditure under the Australian National Training Authority Act 1992 3.3 Australian National Training Authority

2 For expenditure under Section 11 3.3 Australian National of the Australian National Training Training Authority Authority Act 1992(1)

Vocational Education and Training Funding Act 1992(1)

NOTES

3.1 Vocational Education and Training System

8,892 8,904 1,604

21,904 18,891 -

333,587 333,125 -

(I) 1993-94 Appropriation includes Additional Estimates of $1,964 million. Expenditure relates to the period January to June 1994.

(2) VET Act funding is appropriated for a Calendar Year and the above information represents expenditure January to June 1994 with total Calendar Year funding for VET Act totalling $673,612 million.

AP P E NDI X 6

STAFFING OVERVIEW

Staffing at 30 June 1994: 95

Number per classification: I Chief Executive Officer 2 Senior Executive Service officer, Level 2 8 Senior Executive Service officer, Level I 19 Principal Project Officers

16 Senior Project Officers 22 Project Officers, Grade 3 16 Project Officers, Grade 2 I I Project Officers, Grade I

All employees are located in the Authority’s Brisbane office.

Full-time employees: 94 Part-time employees: I Employees employed under the Public Service Act: 6 Temporary employees: Nil

Male, fem ales per category o f em ploym ent:

E m ployee category Male Fem ale Total

ANTA Act employees 36 52 88

Secondment 5 2 7

Total em p loyees 41 54 95

Senior Executive Service officer em p loym ent details:

Total SES employees: 1 1

Level o f Em ploym ent Male Fem ale Total

Chief Executive Officer 1 - 1

Senior Executive Service 2 2 - 2

Senior Executive Service 1 3 5 8

Total SES em ployees 6 5 1 1

The Chief Executive Officer is on secondment from the Victorian Department of Education. One SES level 2 and two SES level I employees are employed from Commonwealth agencies, under the Australian Public Service Mobility provisions.

Performance Appraisal and Bonus Paym ents

The Authority currently has two systems of performance appraisal in operation. The first of these is for employees at the SES level. The second is an interim scheme for Senior and Principal Project Officers. The interim scheme applied only to those Senior and Principal Project Officers employed by the Authority prior to I January 1994.

Table 6 details the performance bonus payments paid by the Authority for the period to 30 June 1994. The performance bonus payments reflect the full period of entitlement, particularly in respect of those employees of the Planning Group stage of the Authority (ie prior to I January 1994).

Classification N um ber o f em ployees assessed

Senior Project Officer 7

Principal Project O fficer 11

SES 6

-------------- — ------------------- -— -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total 24

TABLE 6 - Performance Bonus Payments

The total funds paid for performance bonuses to 30 June 1994 was $90,300. This represents 7.1% of the total salary paid to the officers receiving the bonuses.

The Authority is currently negotiating with the Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU) to develop and implement various performance appraisal and bonus arrangements. It is intended that the negotiated schemes will apply to all employees of the Authority.

Those employees recruited to the Authority after I January 1994 will be subject to an annual performance review and their initial assessment period will cease on 3 1 December 1994.

APP ENDI X 7

STAFF TRAINING EXPENDITURE

The staff training budget for 1993-94 totalled around $100,000. This represented 3.1% of the total direct staffing costs.

As could be expected in the establishment phase of a new organisation, the Authority placed an emphasis on Information Technology training.

Next year, in line with staff development and training plans, the focus will shift to cater more for individual staff member needs and priorities.

B

APPENDI X 8

CONSULTANTS

Consultants are used where expertise is not available in the Authority at the required time for resource-intensive initiatives such as large surveys or where it is more appropriate to engage independent researchers or investigators.

Consultancies for 1993-94 valued at more than $2,000 are provided in Table 7. Information about consultancies valued at less than $2,000 is available from the Authority.

The list includes information about projects undertaken as part of the Authority’s research program This program involves in-house activities and work by external researchers.

TABLE 7 - List o f Consultants

Accommodation Haysom Group, Architects Midland Mitropoulous Consulting Engineers

Fitout of ANTA offices Fitout of ANTA offices

44,021 18,794

Advertising and Public Relations Millenium Group, The Specialist press relations support, including the preparation of

speeches and press releases

66,377

The Rowland Company Development and advice on overall strategic direction for communications/public relations strategy

22,535

Human Resources John J. Lawson Associates Industrial negotiations 13,815

Employee Assistance Programs

Employee assistance/counselling 3,366

Information Technology Coopers & Lybrand Information Technology Strategic Plan 22,500

O rganisational Development Hay Group Pty Ltd Development of ANTA classifications 26,644

TABLE 7 - List o f Consultants (continued)

Studies (Other) MJM Consulting Feasibility study and report for a 4,000

proposed Australia Training Foundation

Performance Management Solutions Vocational Education and Training Target Project and Qualifications

Profiles Project

52,816

Prof. Richard Johnson Prioritising second round 1994 project proposals for Adult and Community Education

2,500

Training Reform Allen Consulting Group, The Review of the implementation of the National Training Reform Agenda 345,000

Kaye Schofield and Associates

Assistance with the above 37,326

APPENDI X 9

MEDIA ADVERTISING ORGANISATIONS, ADVERTISING, MARKET RESEARCH AND DIRECT MAIL

Media Advertising Organisations

Description Expenditure

Neville Jeffress Recruitment advertising $16,813.72

J Walter Thompson Recruitment advertising $ 174,452.84

Mirror Australia Advertising (Records Managment and Library Systems Tenders) $725.40

John Fairfax Group Advertising (as above) $468.00

Advertising and Market Research

The Authority has used advertising agencies for the purpose of staff recruitment only.

Direct Mail

Direct mail services were not used in 1993-94.

APP ENDI X I 0

LIST OF OTHER MATERIAL AVAILABLE O N REQUEST A N D CONTACTS

PORTFOLIO BODIES

- Portfolio Legislation and Statutory Authorities - Non-Statutory Authorities - Government Companies

Bonita Matijevic Director - Corporate Development and Secretariat Ph - (07) 246 2400 Fax - (07) 221 4355

SOCIAL JUSTICE A N D EQUITY

- EEO (internal) Chris Eccles

Director - Strategic Planning Ph - (07) 246 2450 Fax - (07) 226 2493

- Social Justice - Access and Equity

Matt Davies Principal Project Officer Project Co-ordinator - Access and Equity Strategy Ph - (07) 246 2435 Fax - (07) 246 2493

- Status of Women Sophia Poppe

Project Officer - Access and Equity Strategy Ph - (07) 246 2439 Fax - (07) 246 2493

STAFFING MATTERS

- Staffing Overview - Performance Pay - Training - Interchange Program

Liz Roadley Director - Project Management Ph - (07) 246 2344 Fax - (07) 246 2490

FINANCIAL MATTERS

- Claims and Losses David Worthy

Director - Finance Ph - (07) 246 2413 Fax - (07) 246 2490

Jane Stelfox Manager - Finance Ph - (07) 246 2402 Fax - (07) 246 2490

A P P E N D I X 10 ( c o n t i n u e d )

LIST OF OTHER MATERIAL AVAILABLE O N REQUEST AND CONTACTS

FINANCIAL MATTERS continued

- Purchasing

- Information Technology

- Payment of Accounts

- Consultancy Services

- Capital Works Management

Shane Dunstan Purchasing Officer Ph - (07) 246 2420 Fax - (07) 221 4355

David Eddey Information Technology Manager Ph - (07) 246 2404

Fax - (07) 221 4355

Michael Besgrove Project Officer - Finance Ph - (07) 246 2417 Fax - (07) 246 2490

Bonita Matijevic

Kathy Hubinger Office Manager Ph - (07) 246 2401 Fax - (07) 221 4355

) Bonita Matijevic )

INTERNAL A N D EXTERNAL SCRUTINY

- Inquiries by Parliamentary Committees - Comments by Ombudsmen ) - Decisions of Courts and )

Tribunals

- Reports by the Auditor-General ) David Worthy - Fraud Control )

PRIVACY Bonita Matijevic

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS Kathy Hubinger

OTHER MATTERS

- Property Usage

- Business Regulations

Kathy Hubinger

David Worthy

I n d e x 7 .

Page

-A-

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People 29

Access and Equity 28-29

Accounting Services 32-33

Accommodation 33

Adult and Community Education (ACE) 20, 25-26

Adult Language and Literacy 28

Advertising and Market Research 66

Annual National Report 16

Apprentices and Apprenticeships 24, 26

Assessment and Reporting Mechanisms for Language, Literacy and Numeracy 17

Auditor-General’s Reports 32, 43

Australian Association of Adult and Community Education (AAACE) 25

Australian Committee on Training and Curriculum (ACTRAC) 21

Australian Committee on Vocational Education and Training Statistics (ACVETS) 13, 29

Australian Government Corporate Cards 33

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) 32,43

Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) Act, The 2

Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) Agreement, The 2-4

Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) Board, The 2, 5

Membership Responsibilities Role

Page

-A-

Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) Planning Group

Australian Training Awards

Australian Traineeship System (ATS)

Australian Vocational Certificate Training System (AVCTS)

Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard (AVETMISS)

-B-

Best Practice and Benchmarking

Board, The Membership Responsibilities Role

-C-

Chief Executive Officer

Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU)

Compliance Index

Competency-based training

Competency Standards

Consultants

Contacts

Contents

Curriculum - development

-D-Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET) 14

2

24

28

24-25

13

17

2.5 Q

6

31

38

27

12 , 21

64-65

67-68

iv

21

Directors 16

Page Page

-E- -1-

Employment Destinations of Vocational Education and Training Students Industry - needs and priorities 12

Post-Completion Survey 14 Industry Liaison 12

Employment, Education and Training (EET) Portfolio 16

Industry Training Advisory Bodies - Review of 22-23

Entry Level Training 27 Industry Vocational Education and

Environmental Matters 35

Training Plans 12

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) 31 Information Technology 34

Act Management Plan

Innovative Projects 21

Strategy Internal and External Scrutiny 32

Evaluation Grants 27 -L-

Expenditure by Programs 10

Language, Literacy and Numeracy 7

-F- Letter of Transmission iii

Financial and Accounting Services 32-33 Library 34

Financial Management Information System 32

-M-

Financial Statements 43-59 Marketing 66

Fitout of ANTA offices 33-34 Measures for Maintenance of Effort 15

Flexible Delivery 19 Media Advertising Organisations and

Direct Mail 66

Funding 8-10,20

Ministerial Council (MINCO) 40

-G- Meetings

Membership

General Managers 6 Responsibilities

Role

Glossary 37

Ministers 40

Graduate Trainee Program 29

Group Training 26

-N-

National Framework for the Recognition

-1-

of Training (NFROT) 1 1

Industrial Democracy 31

Agreement Implementation

Page Page

-N-

National Management Information and Statistics System (NATMISS) 28-29

National Plan of Action for Women in TAFE (NPAWT) 19

National Programs 8

National Projects 17

National Qualifications Framework I I

National Research Advisory Council 18

National Staff Development Committee 18

National Strategy, The I I

National Training Board (NTB) 21

National Training Reform Agenda I I

Consultant Consultative Forums Policies Review

Non-English Speaking Background, people of 28-29

- O -

Occasional Papers 13

Occupational Health and Safety 3 1

Office Equipment and Purchasing 35

Organisational Structure 5-6

Organisational Support 22

Open Learning 7

-P-

Performance Appraisal and Bonus Payments (for ANTA Staff) 62

-P-

Previous Employment Categories (for ANTA staff) 31

Priorities for 1994 7-8

Program Expenditure 10

Program Resources 9

Program Structure 8

Programs 16-35

Project Teams 6

Publications 39

Purchasing 35

-Q-

Quality Management Review 17-18

-R-

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) 7-8

Recognition of Training 7-8

Reconciliation of Appropriations and Program Elements 60

Records Management 34

Recruitment (of ANTA staff) 5

Reporting Bodies/Committees 40

Research and Statistics 13-14

-S-

Senior Executive Service 61-62

Skills Centres 20

Skills Competitions 23-24

Special Equity Measures 27

Page Page

- s - -W -

Special Preparatory Courses for Women 27 Workforce Development 26

Special Trade Training 8 Workskill Australia Foundation 23-24

Social Justice 31

Women 19

Staff (in ANTA) 29-32, 61-63

Distribution of Training Funds Performance Appraisal and Bonus Payments Previous Employment Recruitment Staffing Overview Training Expenditure

State Legislature and Financial Arrangements 4

State Training Profiles 16-17

for 1995 Guidelines for Requirements of Review of

Statistics 13

Systemic Support 20

-T-

Target Groups 28-29

Tradeswomen on the Move 27

Trainees and Traineeships 28

Training Needs, Curriculum and Materials 21

-V-

Vocational Education and Training Funding Act 33

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

PARLIAMENTARY PAPER No. 261 of 1994 ORDERED TO BE PRINTED

ISSN 0727-418