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Australian Federal Police Act - Australian Federal Police - Report - 1993-94


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Australian Federal Police Annual Report 1993-94

© Commonwealth of Australia

ISSN 0728 - 4691

This work is copyright. Apart from any use a permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be repro­ duced by any process without prior written permission from the Australian Federal Police. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Director, Media and Publications Branch, PO Box 401, Canberra, ACT, 2601.

The contact officer for any enquiries reqardinq the content of this annual report is Ms Annette Douch, (06) 275 7715.

Second edition.

This is th e s ec o n d printing of the A FP A nnual R eport 1993-94. T he first edition of 5 00 copies w as produced to m e e t parliam entary tabling requirem ents. The s e c o n d edition is for general distribution a n d v a rie s from th e tabled edition in th e following w ays. P a g e 1 - parag rap h 2 , line 7 th e word ‘a r e ’ h a s been included after ‘m e m b e rs’.

line 9 h a s T h e A FP’ replacing the w ord ‘It’.

P a g e 2 - parag rap h 2, line 6, the w ord ‘n e e d s ' h a s b e en rep laced with ‘n e e d ’. P a g e 4 - A FP T op Structure - sm all parallel vertical lines h ave b e e n a d d e d to better s h o w th e relationship betw een P erso n n el & Ind. R eis and P&IRD Projects; Training a n d MOSC Project; and S trategic Intelligence a n d T elecom . Interception. P a g e 12 - Financial and Staffing R e s o u rc e s Sum m ary ( P rogram 1). Total outlays for th e 1993-94 BUDGET (a) has

b e en revised from $88,271 to $88,065

P a g e s 98-99 - A tw o-page letter of certification from th e A ustralian Audit Office h a s b e e n included.

The cover design represents the emerging importance of DNA analysis in police investigations.

φ .

Office of the Commissioner of PoliceG.P.O. Box 401 C anberra A.C.T. 2601

Telephone (06) 249 7444

The Hon Duncan Kerr MP Minister for Justice Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

In accordance with section 67 of the Australian Federal Police Act 1979, I have pleasure in submitting the Annual Report of the Australian Federal Police for the year 1 July 1993 to 30 June 1994.

The report has been prepared in accordance with the guidelines issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet on 'Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports', and includes information required under Section 18(2) of the Complaints (Australian Federal Police) Act 1981 and Section 8 of the Freedom of

Information Act 1982.

Yours sincerely

M J Palmer Commissioner of Police

18 October 1994

OVERSEAS POSTS As at Ju n e 30 1994

1 London LO X 2 NCIS x 1 6 Bangkok LO x 4 Analyst x1 12 Hong Kong LO x 2 17 Solom on Islands Adviser x 1

2 Lyon Interpol rep. x 1 7 C hiang Mai LO x 1 13 Manila L O x 2 18 Los A ngeles LO x 2

3 R om e LO x 2 8 U N O SO M x1 14 Ja k a rta LOx1 19 W ashington LO x 2

4 N icosia L O x 1 9 K uala Lumpur LO x 1 15 PNQ Aid Project x 4 20 B uenos Aires LO x 2

UNCIVPOL x 20 10 S in gapore LO x 1 Port M oresby LO x 1

5 Islam abad LO x 2 11 M ozam bique ONUMOZ x 16 16 V anuatu Adviser x 1

LO (Liaison Officer) UNCIVPOL (United N ations Civilian Police)

UNOSOM (United N ations O peration in Som alia) NCIS (National Criminal Intelligence Service) ONUMOZ (United Nations O peration in M ozam bique) * Note: 10 AFP m em bers a re a lso deployed to C hristm as Island, 3 to Norfolk Island an d 1 to C ocos (Keoling) Islands.

Contents

Chapter 1 Corporate Overview 1

Chapter 2 Program 1: Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth 11

Chapter 3 Program 2: ACT Community Policing 25

Chapter 4 Program 3: Strategic Intelligence 32

Chapter 5 Program 4: International Obligations and Protection 37

Chapter 6 Program 5: Joint Police Services 40

Chapter 7 Program 6: People 43

Chapter 8 Program 7: Planning and Management 51

Chapter 9 Program 8: Science and Technology 56

Appendixes 59

List of Abbreviations 136

Index 137

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Chapter 1 Corporate Overview 1

Introduction The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the principal law enforcement agency through which the Commonwealth pursues its law enforcement interests. The AFP is unique in Australian law enforcement in that its functions relate to both

community policing and to investigations of offences against Commonwealth law which involve law enforcement nation wide. It also has an important role with law enforcement agencies overseas.

The AFP’s headquarters is located in Canberra. In addition there are regional commands in every Australian state and territory, including a community policing structure which serves the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) under an arrangement with the ACT Government. The AFP currently has liaison posts in

13 overseas countries as well as an Australian based liaison officer responsible for South Pacific island countries. A representative is attached to the International Criminal Police Organisation (Interpol) in France and members are attached to United Nations operations in countries such as Cyprus and Mozambique. The AFP provides police services for the Commonwealth Territories in the Indian Ocean, for Norfolk Island and Jervis Bay.

This annual report complies with the “Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports” issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. These guidelines were approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts under subsection 25(7) of the Public Service Act 1922 on 17 March 1994. The new

guidelines have reduced the information required to be included in annual reports and this is reflected in the smaller size of this document compared to previous years. However, all information provided in previous years is still collected and contact officers in the AFP for further information not provided in this report are listed at Appendix 2. Also listed in that appendix are the names of further documents that contribute to an understanding of the operations of the AFP and the environment in which it operates.

The AFP’s program stmcture is divided into nine programs. The first eight programs each have a dedicated chapter in this Report. Resource and performance information relevant to each program is provided. Program 9 is not discussed in this report as it relates to the Australian Bureau of Criminal

Intelligence which produces its own annual report. More information about Program 2, community policing in the Australian Capital Territory, is also available in the ACT Region Annual Report tabled separately each year in the ACT Legislative Assembly.

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With regard to the AFP’s 1992-93 Annual Report, the Scrutiny of Annual R eports stated “th ere do not ap p e ar to be any actual m easures of the effectiveness of activities undertaken, but some results in those activities are included”. The chief quantitative measure of AFP activities is provided at Appendix 3 which provides statistical information under the headings drugs, fraud, currency and general crim e for 1993-94 com pared to the 1992-93 financial year. Qualitative interpretation is provided in the narrative contained in the body of the report.

It is difficult in an organisation such as the AFP to measure performance in purely economic terms. However, measuring the impact of AFP operations on society presents even more difficulties. In addition, over time, acceptable

scientific m easures relating to the efficiency and effectiveness of AFP operations may vary with shifts in government and community expectations. These factors need to be considered in any evaluation of AFP performance.

Authority and Legislation

The AFP is a Commonwealth Statutory Authority brought into existence by the Australian Federal Police Act 1979, which was proclaimed on 19 October 1979. On 12 December 1991, under section 13(2) of that Act, the then Minister for Justice and Consumer Affairs tabled a new Ministerial Direction in Parliament.

This Ministerial Direction is the driving force of the AFP’s Corporate Plan and, in particular, the operational priorities which help formulate the AFP’s goals and strategies. Those priorities are to:

• provide the best in prevention, detection and investigation o f criminal offences against the laws of the Commonwealth, with emphasis on:

- providing effective strategic intelligence on criminal matters;

- attacking the financial base of criminal activity; and

- assisting in the maintenance of the integrity of financial institutions and their trading activities;

• provide a quality community policing service for the ACT;

• enhance the A F P ’s cap ab ility to support our div erse international obligations; and

• provide leadership in the Australian law enforcement effort.

The AFP has incorporated these priorities into its Corporate Plan for the 1992-95 triennium.

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AFP Mission

To safeguard the interests of the Commonwealth and the Government and people of the ACT by the prevention, detection and investigation of crime, the preservation of good order and the protection of life and property.

Goals

• To prevent, detect and investigate criminal offences committed against Commonwealth laws, revenue and expenditure.

• To provide a professional police service which works with the ACT Government and community to preserve the peace, reduce the incidence of crime and protect life and property.

• To provide timely and accurate strategic assessments on criminal threats and trends, and advice on law enforcement needs and strategies.

• To support the Commonwealth’s international obligations and protection responsibilities with an effective and professional policing service.

• To provide leadership in a cooperative, national law enforcement effort to protect the Australian community from criminal threat.

• To maintain operational excellence by developing, retaining and attracting the highest quality members and staff members with a commitment to the high ethical standards of the organisation.

• To ensure the best management of AFP resources.

• To ensure the most appropriate application of science and technology, as determined by corporate needs, is used throughout the organisation now and in the future.

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AFP TOP STRUCTURE

As at 30 Ju n e 1994 L. WORTHY ARM

Intoll & Drug Operations

P. BAER ARM Eastern Region

Science & Technology J . ALLEN ARM

R. LEFFERS ARM W estern Region

B. MATSON

A. HOITINK

J . ROBERTSON

D. McCULLOCH Central Region

A. BROWN H.Q. Fraud & G eneral Crime

J . BERRY A/g

R. WOOD Information Technology

M. HANSON PSM Planning & Development

S . GAVIN Corporate Services

F. BALLARD Commissioner's Office

D. BLIZZARD

P . DAWSON ARM ACT Region

D. SCHRAMM ARM

R. NINNESS ARM

W. ANTILL ARM Northern Region

M. VINCENT AM

W. SPURLING ARM Operations

A. WELLS OAM Fraud & General Crime

N. HADGKISS

P. BROWN ARM A/g Ops Policy & Support

A. MILLS AM Investigations

M. KEELTY Intelligence

J . VALENTIN Southern Region

M. BLAYLOCK Training

M. GARRETT Personnel & Industrial Relations

H. BRYANT P&IRD Projects

J . McFARLANE AE Strategic Intelligence

B. BROWN Telecom. Interception

Deputy Comm issioner B. BATES ARM

OPERATIONS

Deputy Com m issioner A. WHIDDETT ARM

ADMINISTRATION

M. PALMER ARM Commissioner of Police

J . IRELAND PSM General Policing Policy & Arrangements

R. MCDONALD Drug O perations

A. BIRD A.C.T Operations

G. DAVIDSON QPM Internal Investigations

J . DAU

Internal Security & Audit

M. NAVIN

Environment

The AFP’s multifaceted role requires it to know the criminal environment at the local, national and international levels. In the ACT, the AFP is in close contact with the community it serves which is integral to an effective community policing role. In its national role, the AFP addresses the multi-jurisdictional nature o f crim inal activities and works closely with other national law enforcem ent agencies and state police services. Internationally, the AFP provides Australia with its law enforcement links and enables cooperation at a global level to address the increasing multinational face of crime.

The increasing globalisation and sophistication of criminal activity demands an ap p ro p riate law en fo rce m e n t response. R esponsiveness to changing environments, identification of emerging trends, sophisticated intelligence systems, and state of the art technology are all factored into the AFP’s law enforcement strategy.

Two major reviews were finalised during the report period that will effect the future operations of the AFP.

In November 1993, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Banking, Finance and Public Administration finalised its report on the inquiry into fraud on the Commonwealth titled Focusing on Fraud (the Elliot Report). The AFP is finalising its response to the Government on the recommendations contained in the report. The report noted that while “the AFP has improved its handling of fraud cases, including through refinement of its National Priority

System, agencies are seeking a more service-oriented approach from the AFP in its task. Improved consultation and accountability are sought”.

Changes in the criminal environment in recent years have placed a greater emphasis on Commonwealth law enforcement arrangements. In August 1993, Cabinet agreed that a review of these arrangements was required to ensure that

needs were being met and resources were being effectively utilised. The review analysed the roles of the various Commonwealth law enforcement agencies to ensure there was no unnecessary duplication and that the role of each agency was clearly defined. The R eport of the Review o f Com monwealth Law Enforcement Arrangements (CLER) was finalised in February 1994.

The CLER recommended redefined priorities and values for the AFP to ensure it continues to meet emerging national law enforcement challenges as Australia moves into the 21st century. This new focus should include serious fraud, fraud

liaison, new forms of international crime and organised crime in addition to existing areas. The review emphasised the need for the AFP to foster strategic alliances with specialist agencies. While the recommendations of the CLER did not impact directly on the AFP for the entire reporting period, this report considers many aspects of the recommendations in the context of the AFP’s performance during the year.

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Towards the end of the reporting period, work commenced on a new Ministerial Direction under section 13 of the Australian Federal Police Act 1979. The new direction will reflect the findings of the above reviews.

A number of legislative changes and developments made and proposed during 1993-94 have affected or will affect the AFP. Some exam ples of more significant matters are outlined below:

• The ability of the AFP to obtain evidence under search warrants has been limited following a decision by the Full Bench of the Federal Court. As part of an investigation, the AFP sought and attempted to execute a search warrant under section 10 of the Crimes Act 1914 on a State government department. A legal challenge was mounted by the State as to the legality of executing such a warrant. The Federal Court indicated that section 10 of the

Crimes Act 1914 does not display any intention on the part of the Parliament to create a power to issue a warrant to authorise entry upon premises in w hich the affa irs of E x ec u tiv e G overnm ent are co n d u cted , either Commonwealth or State. A High Court decision on this matter may not be handed down until next year.

• The introduction of Sentence Indication Hearings in the New South Wales Court system has expedited a number of potentially drawn out trials.

• The number o f offenders utilising the provisions o f section 21E of the Crimes Act 1914 in respect of assistance to police for the purpose of a reduced sentence has also assisted in expediting court hearings.

• Members of the AFP's Southern Region have relied on the provisions of the Crimes (Fingerprinting) Act 1988 and the Crimes Act 1958, both Victorian Acts, to obtain fingerprints from suspects and offenders. On 5 May 1994, Judge Kelly, in the Victorian County Court, mled that a magistrates’ court did not have the power to make an order for the taking of fingerprints in relation to Commonwealth offences. The decision not only adversely

affected future investigations, but a number of matters pending before the courts w here fin g erp rin t ev id en ce had been p re sen ted in sim ilar circum stances. A m agistrate in another case ruled that there was no con stitu tio n al im pedim ent to the V ictorian regim e applying to the in v estig atio n o f C om m onw ealth offences. The co rrec tn e ss of the magistrate’s mling is the subject of an application before the Federal Court. The application was heard by Mr Justice Einfeld in March, 1994, with his judgment not being handed down in this reporting period. On 1 June 1994

am endm ents to the fingerprint regim e brought about by the Crimes (Amendment) A ct 1993 (Victorian) became operative. This amendment provides for “a member of the police force” to take fingerprints in certain circumstances, thereby precluding reliance on a court order. Advice has been received indicating that the provisions would be available to the AFP, although challenges should be expected. Once the Crimes (Search Warrants and Powers o f Arrest) Amendment Act 1994 (Commonwealth) comes into force in December 1994, however, these uncertainties will be addressed.

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• In 1994, the High Court allowed an appeal against a conviction of official corruption. In 1989, the AFP had been issued with an approval to use a listening device pursuant to State legislation by a Queensland Supreme Court judge. Evidence obtained by the AFP acting under that approval was used to

secure the conviction. On appeal, the Full Bench of the High Court found that the issuing justice had erred in issuing the approval rendering the evidence illegally obtained and therefore inadmissible. The High Court ordered a new trial. Consequently, all charges against the person, and an

alleged co-accused, were withdrawn by the Director of Public Prosecutions. Amendment to the Crimes Act incorporating listening device provisions has largely overcome this problem.

• The im plem entation of the Industrial Relations Reform A ct 1993 has impacted on AFP employment policies, particularly in relation to maternity leave and termination of employment. This resulted in the commencement of a m ajor review of the AFP’s m aternity and parental leave policies. Extensive negotiation has also been held with the Department of Industrial

Relations to ensure that the Industrial Relations Reform Act termination provisions recognise the AFP’s legislatively established employment regime.

Reports concerning the AFP tabled by parliamentary committees and the Auditor-General during the year are listed at Appendix 7.

Performance Highlights

A particularly significant area of AFP performance during 1993-94 was the contribution it made to the CLER. An AFP Deputy Commissioner was a mem ber o f the Review Steering Committee and two AFP members were involved in the working party. Presentations, submissions and advice were

provided by various areas of the AFP and the value of these contributions was acknowledged in the CLER.

Cooperation was highlighted at all levels of AFP activities. Ongoing liaison with Commonwealth and State law enforcement agencies has improved the effectiveness of interagency operations. This improved liaison has contributed to better quality fraud referrals and investigations enabling the AFP to focus its

energy on larger scale crime involving substantial amounts of money.

The trend identified in earlier years of larger quantities of illicit drugs being detected at or near the point of entry continues and is evidenced by several significant seizures. These successes are largely attributable to the AFP’s increasing emphasis on international liaison enabling development of high quality intelligence and cooperation with the Australian Customs Service (ACS)

in the detection and investigation of drag offences.

Another significant development is the enhanced ability of the AFP to attack the financial base o f criminal networks. Significant assets resulting from

7

criminal activity were seized during the year substantially threatening the power base from which criminals operate.

In the ACT, closer working links with the community were established. This resulted in positive feedback being received from a community opinion survey.

Details relating to AFP perform ance during 1993-94 are provided against individual programs in the following chapters.

Social Justice and Equity

The AFP provided a report for 1993-94 to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet addressing implementation of the recommendations of the 1992 Evaluation of the Commonwealth Access and Equity Strategy. Access and Equity and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) outcomes are reported against appropriate programs. Contact officers are included at Appendix 2. Information relating to appointm ents to EEO target groups is included at Appendix 5.

Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (ALL PROGRAMS)

1992-93 ACTUAL $’000

1993-94 BUDGET (a) $’000

1993-94 ACTUAL $’000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of ADDrooriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 9,305 14,084 9,382

Running costs 216,688 231,127 227,697

Total appropriations 225,993 245,211 237,079

Less: adjustments 52,529 53,194 57,941

Total outlays 173,464 192,017 179,138

Total revenue (b) 78 52 54

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 3,108 3,045 2,985

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3). (c) The above figures include ABCI data details of which are included in the ABC I annual report.

8

SUMMARY TABLE OF RESOURCES RECONCILIATION OF PROGRAMS AND APPROPRIATION ELEMENTS FOR 1993-94

Program Number

A

Approp. Bills Nos, 1 and 3

+ B +

Approp. Bills Nos, 2 and 4

$ OOOs

C +

Special Approps.

D =

Annotated Approps.

E

Program A pprops.

- F =

Adjustments (1)

G

Program Outlays

1 91,667 1,058 92,725 1,241 91,484

2 3,860 49,086 52,946 49,086 3,860

3 7,583 365 7,948 365 7,583

4 8,118 2,708 10,826 2,972 7,854

5 1,988 1,424 3,412 1,424 1 ,988

6 13,066 744 13,810 744 13,066

7 32,178 855 1,600 34,633 1,763 32,870

8 14,066 2,292 69 16,427 69 16,358

9 4,351 1 4,352 277 4,075

TOTAL 176,877 3,147 0 57,055 237,079 57,941 179,138

(·) A nnotated Appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a D epartm ent a c c e s s to the m oney it earns.

(1 ) A djustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt item s classified a s outlays, net m ovem ents in trust account b a la n ce s, etc

The AFP is striving to meet the evolving demands outlined above against a backdrop of increasing fiscal constraints. A continuing theme that became apparent in the examination of performance reports from AFP areas was the

constant additional pressure on operations caused by decreasing resources. In last year’s annual report the then Commissioner, in his letter of referral, discussed the negative effect of the Government’s efficiency dividend in real terms.

A subm ission was made on this subject during the year to the House of R epresentatives S tanding C om m ittee on B anking, Finance and Public Administration. The submission stressed that while the AFP supported the need for Commonwealth agencies to operate efficiently, the application of an across-

the-board cut like the efficiency dividend should not be applied to the AFP. It was argued that it was not reasonable to apply the penalty to the point where an agency’s capacity to achieve its strategic objectives, and in the AFP’s case to

comply with its legislative responsibilities to protect the laws, revenue and property of the Commonwealth, is reduced.

In its response to the C om m ittee’s report, the Governm ent accepted its recommendations that existing efficiency dividend arrangements continue until agencies have effected a Property Resource Agreement with the Department of Finance. At that time, the dividend will be reduced from 1.25 per cent of running costs to 1 per cent of running costs plus property operating expenses. This change will have a near negligible impact on the $1.7 million reduction that the efficiency dividend makes to AFP funds each year. The efficiency dividend arrangements are to be further reviewed after the 1996-97 budget.

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Program Structure 1993-94

1 Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth

2 ACT Community Policing

3 Strategic Intelligence

4 International Obligations & Protection

5 Joint Police Services

6 Personnel Services

7 Planning 4 Management

8 Science 4 Technology

Sub-Program

Criminal Target Development Tactical Data Base (Information Supply) Criminal Investigations Asset Forfeiture Prosecution Activities O verseas Liaison Network Liaison - Other Agencies

Interpol

General Policing Criminal Investigations Administration Government Relations

Intelligence Policy Intelligence Management Systems Intelligence Programs and Co-ordination Strategic Information Australian Bomb Data Centre

VIP Protection and Witness Protection O verseas Advisers, Mutual Assistance and External Territories Family Courts Protection Protection of Commonwealth Interests

Telecommunications Interceptions Division National Common Police Services (NEPI, NPRU, APSC, ABCI, NIFS, NCSU) National Crime Authority Joint Task Forces and Other Joint Police Services Australian Securities Commission

Australian Transactions Reports and Analysis Centre National Crime Prevention

Human Resource Management Security Conduct of AFP Personnel

General Policy Advice 4 Co-ordination Government Liaison Financial Management 4 Program Evaluation Property Management

Logistic Support Planning 4 Development Public Information 4 Marketing

Scientific 4 Technological Operational Assistance Information Technology Scientific 4 Technological Planning 4 Research

Organisation Unit(s) Chiefly Responsible

Headquarters Investigations Department, Operations Policy 4 Support Division, Northern Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, Central Region, Western Region

ACT Region

Headquarters Investigations Department, Strategic Intelligence Division, Northern Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, Central Region Western Region

Protection Division General Policing Policy 4 Arrangements Division

Science 4 Technology Department Briefing 4 Policy Co-ordination Branch Commissioners Executive Office

Personnel 4 Industrial Relations Division, Training Division, Health Services Division, Internal Investigation Division, Internal Security 4 Audit Division

Corporate Services Department, Planning 4 Development Division Commisioner's Executive Office

Science 4 Technology Department

Chapter 2 Program 1 - Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth

Objective

To prevent, detect and investigate crim inal offences committed against Commonwealth laws, revenue and expenditure.

Description

This program incorporates the AFP’s major operational activities concerned with investigations into fraud, drug trafficking, organised crime and other crimes committed against Commonwealth law. The AFP has a national head­ quarters in Canberra and six regional headquarters in Canberra (ACT Region),

Sydney (Eastern Region), Melbourne (Southern Region), Brisbane (Northern Region), Perth (Western Region) and Adelaide (Central Region). Regional offices are also maintained at Hobart, Geelong, Darwin, Newcastle, Cairns, Coolangatta and Townsville and officers are outposted to Broome, Albany,

Port Hedland, Geraldton, and Mackay. Police liaison officers are located in 13 overseas countries. The AFP’s national headquarters meets Australia’s commitment to Interpol.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Investigations Department, Operations Policy and Support Division, Northern Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, Central Region and Western Region (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

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Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 1)

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

ACTUAL BUDGET (a) ACTUAL

$’000 $'000 $'000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Components of Appropriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 5,337 4,463 4,946

Running costs 79,877 84,341 87,779

Total appropriations 85,214 88,804 92,725

Less: adjustments 794 739 1,241

Total outlays 84,420 88,065 91,484

Total revenue (b) 77 52 54

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 1,444 1,387 1,376

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 1. The critical success factors identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relate to the objectives of this program are:

• implement strategies and operations that successfully combat crime and bring offenders before the courts;

• reduce the impact of crime on the community by recovering the proceeds of crime and eliminating or reducing opportunities for committing crimes; and

• responsiveness and appropriateness of response.

Performance highlights reflecting the AFP’s success against these factors are presented under the headings fraud, drugs, organised crime, general crime, spe­ cial references, currency, emerging offences, and international liaison.

The overall indication of performance against this program during 1993-94, is that there has been a decrease in the number of smaller scale individual investi­ gations. This is because there has been a greater focus on more significant investigations into crime that will have a greater detrimental effect on society if not prevented.

12

There was a focus on cooperation with other agencies, identification of the pro­ ceeds of crime in order to attack the financial base of criminal activity, and international liaison to address the growing global base of criminal networks. The AFP’s international role is highlighted as one of the AFP’s most valuable tools. Technological and communication advancements are identified as ele­ ments aiding the spread of crime as well as primary tools utilised by the AFP to

fight crime.

Performance

Elements o f the program made a substantial input to the CLER during the reporting period. Presentations were provided by several Regions and examples of best practice were highlighted by the CLER.

Reflective of recommendations made in the CLER and the Elliot Report, the AFP recognises that quality interagency cooperation and coordination are vital to successfully combat crime against the Commonwealth. Such interaction enables the development of effective strategies that will bring offenders before the courts and eliminate or reduce opportunities for committing crimes. In recognition of this, AFP Regions successfully committed themselves to more regular and open communication with client agencies during 1993-94. In the following description of performance highlights against this program, many case

studies are presented that highlight AFP cooperation with other agencies.

During 1993-94, particular emphasis was placed on increasing the potential for recovery action of the proceeds of crime, recognising that attacking the financial base of criminal activity reduces the impact of crime on the community. Efforts were made to ensure Criminal Assets Investigation Units (CAIUs) in each Region were involved as early as possible in investigations. As a result, CAIUs experienced an increase in referrals over the reporting period with a significant increase in the total value of assets involved. For example, a confiscation order issued by the Eastern Region CAIU against a drug offender related to assets with an estimated value of $76 million.

Assets worth $950 473 from 13 cases were seized under proceeds of crime legis­ lation in 1993-94. Under currency legislation $586 936, US$16 303, and $616 539 in other currency was seized under customs legislation. Narcotic relat­

ed property seizures included 14 motor vehicles, one ship, and 14 mobile phones. A Beechcraft Baron aircraft, seized by Western Region in the 1992-93 reporting period, was transferred to the Western Australia Police as a part of an equitable sharing agreement between the AFP and other law enforcement agen­

cies.

Another major focus area relevant to achievement of this program was the fur­ ther development of the AFP’s Management of Serious Crime (MOSC) training program. AFP MOSC training challenges the way law enforcement managers

13

undertake major criminal investigations. Emphasis is placed on the use of multi­ disciplinary teams in the investigation of major criminal activity, highlighting the coordination role of the investigation manager. A number of members from other agencies have attended the course. An important aspect of this training is the development of document management processes vital to following the com­ plicated paper trail usually involved with fraudulent criminal activity.

Fraud

Throughout the reporting period, Regions worked towards better liaison with client agencies with a view to improving the quality of referrals and interagency efficiency and to ensure client agencies were kept informed of recent develop­ ments. Memoranda of Understanding between the AFP and a number of exter­ nal Departments/Agencies were further developed or reviewed during the reporting period. Other initiatives to improve liaison included regular meetings, distribution of publications containing trend information, and outposting of AFP officers to work with agencies.

The overall number of fraud referrals to the AFP in 1993-94 decreased from the total number in 1992-93. This partially reflects implementation of the National Priority System that aims to utilise AFP resources on more significant investiga­ tions and reduce the number of minor referrals being investigated. For example, one Division experienced a large increase in the number of high value taxation matters which resulted from improved liaison between the Division and the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

Highlights of the A F P ’s perform ance in investigating fraud against the Commonwealth are outlined below. These highlights reflect the significance of cases being investigated and the importance of quality interaction with other Commonwealth agencies.

• ATO auditors worked closely with the AFP on protracted inquiries into the alleged avoidance of $6.5 million in income tax by 15 licensed abalone divers.

• A referral from the ATO led to a joint operation in which it was alleged a solicitor, a financial adviser and a business man cooperated to disguise the ownership of funds in false bank accounts resulting in avoidance of $1 mil­ lion in income tax.

• An investigation involving members of the AFP, New South Wales Police and Queensland Police resulted in a man being arrested by the AFP and charged with defrauding the Com m onw ealth Bank of approxim ately $800 000. This is the largest known fraud committed on the Commonwealth Bank.

• An Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC) refer­ ence led to an investigation that revealed a solicitor had been allegedly ille­ gally drawing on funds from deceased estates. He was arrested and charged

14

with illegally obtaining $460 000. He was also charged with forgery regard­ ing two other cases where, it is alleged, he stood to acquire a further $500 000.

• A cooperative investigation led by the AFP with Department of Foreign A ffairs and T rade (D F A T ), D e p artm en t o f Social Security (D SS), Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs (DIEA), Health Insurance Commission (HIC) and the NSW Registrar General led to the prosecution of 51 overstayed visitors and the detention by immigration authorities of a fur­ ther seven.

• An AFP member travelled to Japan twice in response to a Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters Treaty request to undertake inquiries into a large scale taxation fraud. The investigation required the identification of a vast quanti­ ty of documentary evidence and the interview of potential witnesses. As a result of this inquiry, in excess of 50 000 documents were seized as exhibits

and returned to Australia in AFP custody.

Overall, 1 529 fraud referrals were investigated during the year, resulting in the identification of 7 042 offences. A total of 3 754 offences were cleared and 1 655 convictions were obtained, including 546 jail terms (not number of persons).

Drugs

Similar to the trend in fraud investigations, there were fewer but more complex criminal investigations involving larger quantities of drugs. Successful negotia­ tions with state police services are ongoing or completed in relation to the hand­

over of minor drug seizures from domestic mail, freeing AFP resources to con­ centrate on more significant drug investigations with national and international implications.

Results of long term AFP investigations commenced in earlier reporting periods included sentences being handed down of: life imprisonment for importation of 50kg of heroin, 25 years for conspiring to import 20kg of both heroin and cocaine, 25 years for importing 12.96kg of heroin, 22 years for importing traffi-

cable quantities of heroin in the international parcel post, 17 years for complicity in the importation of 21kg of heroin, and 15 years for conspiring to import 10 tonnes of cannabis resin and money laundering.

In May 1994, eight people were sentenced in the Brisbane Supreme Court and given sentences ranging from eight to 15 years imprisonment relating to the importation of approximately 1.3 tonnes of cannabis on the Queensland central coast. The drug importation plans began in early 1992 when the AFP com­

menced monitoring the activities of an international syndicate planning an importation of cannabis by sea from Thailand. The plan had involved the delib­ erate sinking of a yacht to allow divers to recover the drugs which were securely wrapped in waterproof material in the cement hull. The investigation eventually

involved almost 100 AFP, ACS and other related agency officers. In sentencing the key offenders, Justice de Jersey said in part: “The tenacity and patience of

15

the police surveillance fortunately brought you down, and your cleverness was no match for the ingenuity of the Australian Federal Police and the Australian Customs Service”.

The Operations Policy and Support Division provided a high level of support to AFP activities related to the processing of seized narcotics and narcotic related goods. Memoranda of Understanding were developed with the ACS and the Royal Australian Air Force for the release of seized drugs for the training of drug detector dogs. A memorandum was also negotiated for the transfer of seized drugs for Quality Assurance Testing and the development of Reference Standards by Australian Government Analytical Laboratories. The division assisted with the development o f procedures and mechanisms for an AFP Forensic Services project on cannabis profiling.

Case examples, again illustrating the significant and complex nature of AFP drug investigations and the high level o f liaison with other agencies, are outlined below.

• In January 1994, as a result of protracted AFP investigations and information received from US law enforcement authorities, search warrants were executed on two separate locations in Sydney’s North Shore. The searches resulted in the seizure of 270kg of cocaine. The cocaine is believed to be part of the same importa­ tion as the 272kg seized during 1992-93 for which 10 people were arrested.

In January, 1994, search warrants were executed in two separate locations on Sydney's North Shore, resulting in the seizure of270kg of cocaine.

16

In January, 1994, four people were arrested in Sydney, following a con­ tro lled delivery o f 8.8kg o f heroin that had been sm uggled into Australia in a man 's luggage.

• In 1992, four men in possession of 8kg of heroin were arrested by the AFP. The ensuing investigation centred in Sydney and the Southern Tablelands but reached as far as Hong Kong, Singapore and Vanuatu. It was revealed that one of the men had substantial assets. Subsequent proceeds of crime recovery action, international negotiations and close cooperation with the Insolvency Tmstee Service Australia (ITSA) and the ATO led to the recov­ ery of US$1.35 million in Hong Kong (which will most likely be forfeited to

Hong Kong authorities), $630 000 to ITS A, $218 000 seized by the ATO and $400 000 restrained under proceeds of crime legislation. About $5 million worth of assets were returned to the man’s wife as the Commonwealth was unable, under present legislation, to prove he had effective control over it.

The man was convicted and sentenced to nine years jail in April 1994.

• An operation, conducted in a remote area of Western Australia, resulted in the interception of 12.5kg of high grade heroin which had been imported on board a visiting iron ore ship. The ship’s visit was one of about 700 such visits through the port each year. Four people were arrested.

• In January 1994, four people were arrested in Sydney following a controlled delivery of 8.8kg of heroin that had been smuggled into the country in a man’s luggage. Electronic and physical surveillance was integral to the suc­ cess of this investigation.

17

Cannabis resin weighing 31kg was located concealed in a shipment of 600 tins of green olives consigned from Syria to a Melbourne company in July, 1993.

• In February 1994, a man was arrested at Melbourne Airport as a result of information received from the overseas liaison officer network. An x-ray examination of the man revealed he had swallowed 180 capsules containing about 900g of heroin prior to boarding a flight to Australia. Two other men were arrested in Australia as a result of a controlled delivery. This was one of the largest importations of heroin by internal concealment.

• In July 1993, 31kg of cannabis resin was located concealed in a shipment of 600 tins of green olives consigned from Syria to a Melbourne company. Two men were arrested after a controlled delivery and a warrant has been issued for the arrest of a third man who has fled Australia.

• In May 1994, a woman from the United States of America imported 2.2kg of methylene dioxymethamphetamine, more commonly known as “Ecstasy”, into Sydney. The total number of tablets came to 10 600 and were concealed within her undergarments.

During the year, there was a total of 2 500 drug seizures involving 3 686kg of cannabis, 39kg of cannabis resin, 282kg of cocaine, 52kg of heroin and 107kg of other illicit drugs. Convictions totalled 97 of which 33 resulted in jail terms (not number of persons).

18

Organised Crime

The CLER defined organised crime as a systematic and continuing conspiracy to commit serious offences. Organised crime involves fraud, extortion, drug traf­ ficking, and money laundering. Technological, political and economic factors that have enhanced the growth of legitimate businesses have also aided the growth of organised crime. Organised crime has taken advantage of technologi­ cal change, the globalisation of the world’s economy, and the larger movement of people, cash and goods around the world. Criminal networks are not inhibit­ ed by rules, protocols, or political borders.

Expanding heroin and cocaine markets and the subsequent laundering of the proceeds have caused substantial growth in the economic power of organised criminal networks. Many networks operate under the guise of successful and legitimate businesses.

Organised crime networks generally take advantage of substantial overseas con­ tacts and frequently have an ethnic base. The AFP recognises the power some organised crime groups have overseas and that it is essential to prevent the infil­ tration of these groups into Australia.

The impact of crime of this scale on society is difficult to measure but some overseas examples show the effects can be devastating. The cost of crime on society is far greater than the direct costs associated with provision of a law enforcement service. An estimate of the total cost of crime on society needs to

consider the secondary costs of many other government services including a large proportion of the health and social welfare system and loss of revenue from avoided tax.

The AFP is emerging as a world leader in criminal investigation methodology, particularly in relation to large scale, long term, complex inquiries and has established excellent working relationships with investigative agencies world

wide. This type of liaison has been crucial to the investigation of organised criminal networks that operate on a global level. Much of the work conducted by the AFP in this area has a strategic focus and is long term.

Keeping in mind the need to avoid alerting the criminal element, certain suc­ cesses achieved during the year cannot be highlighted in this report. However, some examples of successful investigations that involved organised networks are provided below.

• Officers of the AFP and the DIEA cooperated to develop a dedicated opera­ tion which investigated the illegal immigration of prostitutes into Australia. The investigation has resulted in substantial success during 1993-94 includ­ ing the detainment of 59 people and charges being laid against 19 people.

• Intelligence developed by the AFP Liaison Officer in Jakarta resulted in the arrest of seven people and the seizure of 3.3 tonnes (of 13 tonnes) of com­ pressed cannabis in Western Australia along with cash, vehicles and vessels.

19

Three people believed to be the part-bulk distributors for the importation were subsequently arrested in Sydney. Two further arrests were made in Victoria, one for possession of cannabis and another for firearms offences and possessing amphetamines. The investigation was particularly difficult and resource intensive given that information relating to the matter was not obtained until six weeks after the importation had taken place.

• Since the beginning of 1993 there has been a considerable increase in the incidence of counterfeit credit cards being manufactured overseas and imported into Australia for the purchase of high value goods and cash advances. Such a manifestation of organised crime is potentially very seri­ ous. AFP investigations have resulted in two arrests and the recovery of a considerable number of imported counterfeit credit cards. Cooperation with overseas law enforcement agencies was integral to this success. The AFP is consulting other law enforcement agencies on the need to seek legislative changes to deal with the importation of counterfeit credit cards.

General Crime

A range of investigations is grouped under this category. One example includes an investigation into offences under the Bankruptcy Act which resulted in a per­ son being arrested and charged in relation to obtaining goods and services worth $4.35 million, both in Victoria and New South Wales.

Referrals involving investigations under the Family Law Act continue to involve a substantial amount of AFP resources. In Northern Region, family law matters represent the third largest source of referrals behind ACS and DSS referrals. In Southern Region, the Family Law and Warrants Squad facilitated the return of

139 children to their legal guardians.

One successful AFP investigation resulted in the return of a child to his mother after his father abducted him while exercising access rights and travelled over­ seas. The investigation was extensive and highly publicised and involved coop­ eration with the Attorney-General’s Department and authorities around the world. In March 1994 the man was arrested in the United States of America and the child was located and placed into care. In June 1994, the child’s mother was granted custody and both mother and child have returned to Australia.

Special References

The term ‘Special R eferences’ refers to investigations involving other Commonwealth agencies and which may be considered politically sensitive. Some of the matters investigated as “special references” during the financial year included:

• an investigation into allegations that the telephone services of a number of individuals were unlawfully intercepted and the details of the conversations were disclosed to third parties; and

20

• investigations conducted into allegations of unlawful disclosures of informa­ tion from various government departments.

Currency

The AFP is responsible for coordinating and investigating offences which fall within the provisions of the Crimes (Currency) Act 1981. During 1993-94, Southern and Eastern Regions conducted seminars on counterfeit currency

recognition. The Southern Region seminar was attended by 37 representatives of the banking industry and included a presentation by a member of the United States Secret Service.

• Following an ACS intuitive search, AFP officers at Perth Airport made the world’s largest seizure of counterfeit Visa traveller’s cheques. The cheques are believed to have been produced in Malaysia and identical cheques have been passed throughout Europe since around 1988. A man has been sen­

tenced in relation to this offence.

Emerging Offences

The AFP is being challenged to keep abreast of new trends in the criminal envi­ ronment. Legislative initiatives reflecting advances in technology, communica­ tion and travel constantly place new demands on the AFP. Other emerging trends relate to environmental issues and human rights concerns.

During the year the Southern Region Computer Crime Section worked towards improving the AFP’s national capacity to investigate computer crimes. National working guidelines on the investigation of computer crimes were issued. During the period, summonses were issued to the main suspects who had allegedly unlawfully accessed thousands of commercial and military computer networks in Australia and the United States of America.

There was an increase in the reported incidence of telephone “phreaking”, the slang for making telephone calls, usually ISD, by manipulating telephone carrier exchange equipment, PABX equipment installed by government and commer­ cial organisations, and voice mail box systems. In one case, the Eastern Region

Computer Crime Unit discovered that a company suffered a loss of approxi­ mately $50 000 when a large group of individuals based in New South Wales and South Australia used the company’s telephone system to make ISD calls. Six individuals in New South Wales have been prosecuted. The Australian

‘phreaking’ trend can be expected to follow that of the United States of America and Canada. Bell Canada recently estimated that voice-mail pirates are respon­ sible for between $5 million to $10 million of fraud in Quebec and Ontario provinces alone with the defrauded customer’s bill usually in the range of

$30 000 to $100 000. The AFP alerted Commonwealth agencies to the danger.

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A referral by the Australian Nature Conservation Agency resulted in the first successful prosecutions under the Whale Protection Act o f 1980. Two people were convicted of illegally killing dolphins and of other illegal fishing activities and had their vessels and catches seized.

International Liaison

The AFP continues to support and enhance the international obligations of the Commonwealth and maintains a high profile in the international law enforce­ ment arena. This role is becoming more significant as more crime has overseas origins. The AFP Liaison Officer network comprises 29 members stationed in

13 countries throughout the world (see chart at page iv). The work of the net­ work is managed and coordinated by the International Division. The AFP’s national headquarters also meets Australia’s commitment to Interpol which directs and coordinates inquiries related to mutual assistance and overseas enquiries for Australian police services.

International Division increased its involvement in a range of Australian-based criminal investigations and law enforcement activities while maintaining the more traditional areas of activity (such as developing drug related intelligence of interest to Australia).

The International Division contributes to the AFP’s intelligence role through the identification of criminal activity directed at Australia from abroad, particularly the traffic of illicit drugs. As a result of intelligence developed at liaison posts and passed to host country agencies, over 30 people were arrested overseas and around 387kg of heroin, 37kg of cannabis resin and approximately 160 litres of acetic anhydride (used in the manufacture of heroin) were seized.

The exchange of information between the AFP and overseas countries has assisted in identifying organised crime groups, individuals and their activities resulting in law enforcement action being directed at these areas.

The Division increased participation in and support for the activities of Australian based officers attending conferences and increased involvement in financial investigations and mutual assistance matters. A total of 33 overseas conferences were attended by AFP staff during the year, providing the opportu­ nity to monitor international trends in law enforcement. During the year some 50 Australian law enforcement officers travelling overseas on official duties were facilitated by the Division.

The Division, in furtherance of international liaison, coordinated the visits into Australia of law enforcement personnel from several countries including major delegations from Italy, China, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines.

Areas of cooperation with Singapore and Pakistan authorities have significantly increased during the period and steps were taken to further develop cooperation with Italian law enforcement agencies. The new post established in Papua New Guinea made good progress during the year. A further development was the

22

creation of a sergeant’s position in Washington. The Jakarta post, opened in December 1992, produced valuable intelligence during 1993-94, particularly in the identification of persons involved in the importation/transit of drugs through Indonesia. A traffic in illegal immigrants between Kupang and the Northern Territory was also detected.

The Rome post commenced liaison with the countries of Eastern Europe and the London post undertook a liaison visit to Moscow and Vladivostok, Russia, as part of an ongoing drug related inquiry from Australia. Formal liaison has been further developed with law enforcement agencies in China, Burma, Vietnam,

and Laos with liaison officers visiting these countries and in some cases provid­ ing practical assistance.

As part of the network, a South Pacific Islands liaison officer operates from AFP Headquarters. Significant effort has been devoted to supporting law enforce­ ment agencies in the South Pacific region. The officer maintained regular con­ tact with the region and identified a range of criminal and dubious business activities in a number of countries.

The network is generally highly regarded by host countries. During this report­ ing period, the chair of the Foreign A nti-N arcotics Com munity in both Islamabad and Bangkok was held by the AFP senior liaison officer. Another senior liaison officer was elected to chair two Interpol Conferences, one con­ cerning outlaw motor cycle gangs and the other concerning narcotics.

The efforts of the AFP liaison officer network complement the activities of the Interpol National Central Bureau based at AFP Headquarters which handles the more formal exchange of police information at the international level. The feed­ back from AFP Regions, the National Crime Authority (NCA) and other Australian law enforcement agencies has been positive, and their expectations

appear to have been met.

During the year, measures were taken to improve the flow of relevant and timely information between law enforcement agencies through Interpol and the AFP’s overseas liaison networks. Communication procedures were reviewed in the Interpol National Central Bureau resulting in equipment being obtained to pro­ vide further integration with the Interpol communications system. During the year communications to and from the area increased.

A major threat to the security of the communication processes involved in the collection and dissemination of classified material was identified. Confiscated Assets Trust Fund (CATF) money was appropriated to implement a network of

secure facsimile machines to enable rapid transmission of classified intelligence between AFP overseas liaison officers and International Division in AFP Headquarters.

On a monthly basis there were on average some 50 separate pieces of new infor­ mation (as distinct from ongoing information/intelligence) forwarded to liaison posts for the information of, and action by, overseas law enforcement agencies. Conversely each month saw on average some 33 separate pieces of new infor­

23

mation (again distinct from ongoing information/intelligence) received from liai­ son posts for information and action by law enforcement agencies in Australia.

The Division sought to promote with Australian law enforcement agencies and government departments, the availability and effectiveness of the AFP liaison officer network. Officers from the division regularly lectured on the DFAT familiarisation course which reaches all Australian Government employees on pre-embarkation for overseas duty. A divisional officer addressed a NCA White C ollar Crim e C onference in G oulburn in April 1994. The publication “International Division and other Overseas Commitments” now receives wide distribution.

The network provides Australian law enforcement bodies with information on policing technology and advancements and facilitates the exchange of criminal intelligence with foreign law enforcement agencies. The network is well posi­ tioned to meet A ustralia’s law enforcem ent needs and has been regularly accessed by agencies such as the NCA. It will continue to be enhanced to meet emerging needs such as those detailed in the CLER. Many of the case examples discussed in this report involved liaison with overseas agencies via the AFP’s liaison officer network or were the result of information received via the net­ work.

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Chapter 3 Program 2 - Community Policing 3

Objective

To provide a professional police service which works with the ACT Government and community to preserve the peace, reduce the incidence of crime and protect life and property.

Description

The AFP’s ACT Region provides policing services in the ACT. In accor­ dance w ith the A rrangem ent betw een the C om m onw ealth and ACT Governments, the ACT Government funds the community policing compo­ nent of ACT Region resources (estimated at 86.4 per cent in 1993-94) while

the Commonwealth is responsible for funding the balance of the Region’s resources that contribute to a national service. The services provided by ACT Region include: the maintenance of peace and good order, the protection of

people and property, crime reduction and detection and the enforcement of the Territory’s laws. The Arrangement requires the AFP to develop and maintain community participation in the provision of police services, and to be respon­ sive to community needs in providing those services.

Organisational Element Chiefly Responsible

ACT Region (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

25

Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 2)

1992-93 ACTUAL $’000

1993-94 BUDGET (a) $'000

1993-94 ACTUAL $’000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of AooroDriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 351 1,117 1,082

Running costs 48,759 52,499 51,864

Total appropriations 49,110 53,616 52,946

Less: adjustments 47,069 48,576 49,086

Total outlays 2,041 5,040 3,860

Total revenue (b) 1 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 838 836 805

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures In that statement do not include Additional Estimates. (b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 2. The critical success factors identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relate to the objectives of this program are the people and services

factors of:

• integrity;

• responsiveness and appropriateness of response;

• accountability; and

• client satisfaction.

With enhanced community policing strategies in place, the objectives of this program were largely achieved during the reporting period.

The Region operated within its $52,898 million budget. A further $820 000 was granted during the year to conduct overseas inquiries requested by the pros­ ecutor of a murder investigation.

Appendix 4 presents data relevant to the ACT Region.

26

During the year the number of reported offences increased by 9.79 per cent and the number of cleared offences increased by 25 per cent. There was a 12 per cent increase in the overall incidence of reported crime, and of all offences recorded almost 90 per cent were property-related: 68 per cent theft and 19 per

cent property damage.

As a result of an ACT Government budget decision, agreed running costs decreased by 2 per cent. This decrease represented approximately $900 000 which was largely met through the transfer of the road rescue function to the ACT Fire and Emergency Services Group.

More information on the activities of the ACT Region during 1993-94 can be obtained from the ACT Region Annual R eport that is tabled in the ACT Legislative Assembly.

Performance

The ACT Region maintained its focus on community based, preventive style policing. Community consultation was a key factor in this strategy. Feedback resulting from community opinion surveys reflected that police were “doing a

good job” in the categories of property crime, public order and violent crime. The surveys revealed that community perceptions about police success have increased favourably since the early 1990s.

These positive changes reflect the success of AFP efforts over the last few years to address earlier declines in trends in public perceptions of police effectiveness. These changes are consistent with a successful community policing strategy.

Some significant strategies undertaken with community cooperation were the Safety House Scheme, the Safer Civic Program, Operations Noah and Paradox and a safe recreational alcohol-free concert for 12 to 16-year-olds.

A scheme has been introduced aimed at reducing recidivism rates by diverting offenders away from the criminal justice system. The Police Court Diversionary Scheme is particularly targeted at, but not restricted to, young offenders. Approximately 50 offenders participated in the scheme during the reporting period. Another initiative involved the AFP organising a visit to Goulbum Gaol by a group of young men who had been identified as likely repeat offenders

who may receive custodial sentences. The group was given a two-hour guided tour of the prison complex and spoke to prison staff and inmates. The visit “opened the eyes” of the young men who have not come to adverse police notice since.

Police targeted shopping centres, licensed premises at closing time and areas where young people tend to gather and a history of trouble exists. Bicycle and foot patrols were well utilised. In Woden District, the focus was on the Bus Interchange which was a gathering point for young people after school.

27

Problems had been experienced around the interchange and were addressed by the assistance of the schools, beat policing, and redesigning the interchange. Belconnen District conducted several operations to deal with social disorder at licensed premises and public places within suburban areas and shopping centres.

One operation resulted in a brief of evidence being prepared against the propri­ etor of a tavern in relation to underage drinking.

During Operation Safe City, 27 boys and 21 girls were taken into police custody for underage drinking or possessing alcohol. Ten received official cautions in the presence of a parent or guardian, 37 were released into the custody of a par­ ent or guardian to be cautioned at a later date, and one was summonsed for his

second underage drinking offence within six months.

A computerised geographic information system for Canberra streets, Mapinfo, became fully operational in early 1994. The program enables incident data from the AFP’s operational data base to be graphically represented which allows for trends in various categories of offences to be analysed and “hot spots” to be identified. The system has already led to the identification and arrest of offend­ ers.

Various task forces were successfully used during the year with approximately 200 people being charged and about $275 500 in stolen property being recov­ ered. Some examples of the more significant operations conducted during the year are outiined below.

• An operation resulted in 76 people being charged with more than 520 offences including burglary, theft and drug offences and the recovery of more than $180 000 worth of stolen property.

• A Woden District task force increased the number of people arrested for bur­ glary in the January-April quarter compared to the September-December quarter, by 84 per cent. In total, 35 people were arrested (9 relating to the above operation) and the number of offences cleared increased by 166 per cent.

• A Tuggeranong District task force reduced burglaries in the district from over 100 per month to 50 to 60 per month.

The AFP continued its “Fraudstop” seminars which aim to raise the awareness of fraud within the financial and business community and encourage preventive m easures. This year “Fraudstop” was expanded to include some ACT Government agencies and programs and included the Office of Rental Bonds and the ACT Housing Trust. This resulted in an increase in referrals from these agencies.

The AFP presented a number of complicated matters to the ACT Magistrates Court and Supreme Court using graphs to visually summarise financial transac­ tions involving large quantities of documents. This was favourably received by

28

the judiciary, prosecutors and defence counsel and enhanced the understanding of the nature and substance of fraudulent schemes.

A total of $186 319 was forfeited under ACT proceeds of crime legislation as a result of drug investigations. There was an increase in the availability and puri­ ty of heroin in Canberra during the year, coupled with a decrease in prices and

an increase in overdoses and accidental deaths.

High quality pink rock heroin was being sold in a Belconnen suburb. The hero­ in was analysed and shown to be 70 per cent pure: heroin normally found in Canberra is between 6 and 12 per cent pure. Search warrants were executed and a small amount of heroin was found, $80 000 of stolen property was recovered,

and five people charged. Four months later two of those charged were again found to be in possession of 28g of heroin.

On 29 November 1993, a man drove his vehicle into the Jolimont Centre in Civic where an explosion set the building on fire. Officers from the AFP, Fire Brigade, and Ambulance responded professionally to the incident and the Chief Minister awarded the three services with certificates and commended the excep­ tional degree of cross service cooperation.

In late November, 1993, a man deliberately drove his vehicle into the Jolimont Centre in Civic. His vehicle exploded and set the building on fire causing an extensive amount of damage.

29

The ACT Attorney-General appointed the Chief Police Officer for the ACT, the Assistant Commissioner in charge of the ACT Region, to the Community Law Reform Committee. The AFP is also represented on various other government and com m unity forums including the ACT Social Justice Committee, the Criminal Law Consultative Committee and the Community Safety Committee.

A superintendent was awarded a fellowship by the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust for a ten-week study tour of police departments in Singapore, England. Scotland, Ireland and the United States of America. The fellowship was granted to study “police services which have been successful in using community involvement to reduce crime and enhance community confidence”. The report has been forwarded to the Attorney-General’s Community Safety Committee for examination.

On 20 June 1994 the Winchester Police Centre was opened. The centre cost $8 million to build and enabled previously separated areas of the ACT Region to be located in the one building.

On 20 June 1994, the ACT Attorney-General, Terry Connolly, officially opened the Winchester Police Centre.

30

The ACT Region continued to work with indigenous groups in the community to improve relations. Ongoing initiatives included AFP representation on the A boriginal Police L iaison C om m ittee which worked on establishing the Aboriginal Friends Call-Out Roster and an ongoing indigenous cultural aware­

ness training package endorsed by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC). About 70 police attended the course during the year. The Aboriginal Liaison Officer attended various workshops during the year including a Critical Issues Sem inar on A boriginal Nationalism , the first

Indigenous Alcohol and Drug Free Conference, and the Second National Aboriginal Justice Issues Conference. The City Police Station is being com­ pletely refurbished and the Aboriginal Police Liaison Committee was consulted on the redesign of the watch house.

The Om budsm an released her report on the com plaints arising from the Australian International Defence Exposition demonstrations and the AFP has addressed her recommendations through various strategies including a review of certain procedures and guidelines and enhanced training regarding compliance holds. The Ombudsman’s findings accorded with her statutory role to investi­

gate complaints about the conduct of police but were limited by her inability to comment on the conduct of civilians involved. Accordingly, her findings did not take account of certain mitigating circumstances relevant to the many com­

plaints she investigated.

31

Chapter 4 Program 3 - Strategic Intelligence

Objective

To provide timely and accurate strategic assessments on criminal threats and trends, and advice on law enforcement needs and strategies.

Description

This program reflects the emphasis placed on strategic intelligence in the 1991 Ministerial Direction. The AFP was directed to “maintain and continu­ ally develop its criminal intelligence capability so it can best assess the crimi­ nal threat in relation to its statutory functions, with a view to taking effective preventive and enforcement action, and to provide regular advice to the Government on its law enforcement needs. The Government expects that the AFP will consult with other agencies, as appropriate, in performing this piv­ otal role”. Effective criminal intelligence and assessments underpin consider­ ation o f the m ost efficient and effective strategies to m eet em erging Commonwealth law enforcement needs.

The AFP’s activities are directed by consideration of information contained in assessments as to:

• the n ature o f crim inal a c tiv itie s and the th reat they pose to the

Commonwealth’s interests;

• the capability required to meet that threat; and

• who is best placed to deliver that capability and how best it is applied.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Headquarters Investigations Department, Strategic Intelligence Division, Northern Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, Central Region, and Western Region (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

32

Resources FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 3)

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

ACTUAL BUDGET (a) ACTUAL

$’000 $1000 $’000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Components of Appropriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 0 0 0

Running costs 7,829 8,292 7,948

Total appropriations 7,829 8,292 7,948

Less: adjustments 331 331 365

Total outlays 7,498 7,961 7,583

Total revenue (b) 0 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 141 140 140

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3)._________

Overview

This chapter considers overall ATP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 3. The critical success factor identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relates to the objectives of this program is:

• Lead other agencies in the identification and timely reporting of emerging crime trends.

The performance information provided against this program highlights the AFP’s leading role in this area and the high level of cooperation and coordina­ tion achieved between the AFP and other agencies.

Performance

The Strategic Intelligence Division (SID) is located in the Investigations Department in national headquarters. The SID made a sizeable contribution to the AFP’s input into the CLER which noted the AFP’s progress towards a quali­ ty strategic intelligence capacity and significant expertise in strategic intelli­

gence analysis. In line with recommendations of the CLER, SID undertook to develop closer involvement with the NCA Strategic Intelligence Unit. A number of significant and ongoing intelligence projects were undertaken,

33

achieving very encouraging developments. Intelligence relating to a particular style of organised criminal activity resulted in 33 arrests and 23kg of heroin being seized. Members of the SID participated in a national reference on organ­ ised crime coordinated by the NCA. Members were also involved in a Heads of Commonwealth Operational Law Enforcement Agencies (HOCOLEA) working group on cocaine trafficking which has resulted in the SID now managing a national intelligence project and coordinating a national operation involving major cocaine importations into Australia.

There has been a continued strengthening of the A FP’s liaison with the Australian intelligence community through ongoing meetings and exchange of relevant material. Closer, more significant, relationships have been developed with the Royal Papua New Guinea Constabulary and the Australian Defence Force. SID produced assessments relating to significant criminal activity within Australia, as well as on law enforcement issues in countries in the Asia-Pacific region impacting on Australia.

The SID is formulating an AFP intelligence policy. This policy will be refined, further developed and disseminated during 1994-95. Following the further development of the intelligence policy, an intelligence manual will be formulat­ ed.

The AFP Criminal Activity Model (AFP CAM) will provide a mechanism to understand the complexity of the criminal environment by identifying and manipulating data held on the AFP mainframe. Limited resources have impeded

the design and implementation of the project but funds have now been provided by the CATF to assist in the development of the AFP Criminal Activity Model. This will enable development of better threat assessments, more effective target vulnerability analyses, and improved operational targeting. The system will also aid long term planning, decisions on resource allocations and priority setting.

The SID has produced 15 Investigation Department digests in the period under review. These digests have been widely circulated to law enforcement and relat­ ed agencies in Australia and overseas. Client feedback has generally been very positive about the value of the reports. Since January 1994, a new monthly pub­ lication has been produced titled International Crime Trends. It widely dissemi­ nates a summary of current issues of international law enforcement concern. It draws heavily on information supplied by the AFP’s Liaison Officer network and provides them with feedback on those areas of strategic interest to the AFP.

The Division provided reports and briefings to senior officers of DFAT, ACS, Australian Defence Forces and DIEA concerning organised crime and drug smuggling in their geographic areas of responsibility. A timely collection, coor­ dination and dissemination of protective and security intelligence was main­ tained. This intelligence was primarily directed at preventing violence and is reflected in the very low level of Federal prosecution. SID also represents the AFP on a number of interdepartmental committees where law enforcement issues may be relevant to the policy issues under consideration.

34

The SID incorporates the Australian Bomb Data Centre (ABDC). The ABDC produced and distributed four Q uarterly Bomb Summaries, 34 Technical Intelligence Newsletters, one Special Report, one Technical Bulletin and seven Bomb Safety Program publications. As a result of demand resulting from the

NCA Adelaide bombing, the ABDC distributed 1 240 Bomb Safety Program packages throughout Australia.

Two AFP analysts were placed on a full time Graduate Program in Strategic Studies at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. The SID had six analysts attend the National Strategic Intelligence Course jointly sponsored by the NCA and the ABCI and provided a senior mem­ ber to participate on the Directing Staff.

Regional intelligence units have stationed analysts and intelligence officers with operational teams during critical stages of major investigations. The regional intelligence focus has been on development of targets and identification of assets.

In Eastern Region, cross operational referencing has enabled the identification of common factors existing in numerous fraud and drug importation matters. The essence of cross operational referencing is attaching intelligence analysts to operational units in either Fraud and General Crime or Drug Operations

Divisions for the duration of a series of investigations. Through the use of recently acquired analytical software, analysis of all such investigations is undertaken. The benefits resulting from this process are the identification of

suspects suitable for AFP investigation. The process has contributed to a num­ ber of AFP investigations including the identification of a significant Australian crime syndicate following one of this country’s largest cocaine seizures in 1993. The Region has developed a program for dealing with intelligence probes into a

number of organised crime groups, mostly based overseas. Meetings are held fortnightly with the NCA to discuss and share information relating to this sub­ ject. The Division has identified a number of groups and referred 66 for opera­ tional investigation.

During 1993-94 the Southern Region Target Development Unit refined a num­ ber of procedures which have assisted in the evaluation and collection of fraud intelligence. This resulted in several major investigations including:

• a scheme involving a travel agent who was involved in supplying false travel documents; • a corruption matter involving a member of the ATO; • the issuing of false Australian passports; and • alleged fraud committed by a drug rehabilitation centre.

Changes within the Northern Region Target Identification Section and resulted in a substantial increase in the number of targets identified. An intelligence pro­ ject involving drug traffickers not only led to the arrest of two people in Brisbane on heroin importation charges but also produced seizures and arrests in

Eastern and Southern Regions. Intelligence gathered on the Gold Coast identified three people who were later arrested together with another person in Southern Region in pos-

35

session of 4kg of cocaine. Where a target had unusual wealth and it was not possible to establish acquisition of assets through the proceeds of crime facility, liaison with other authorities took place. One instance resulted in the ATO tak­ ing recovery action for $600 000 from a target developed from AFP informa­ tion.

The AFP is represented at Port Law Enforcement Consultative Committees and Port Security meetings in every state. A joint strategic intelligence assessment of crime at the Port of Brisbane by AFP, ACS and Queensland Police Service officers was completed. During the course of this project, contact was made with and information obtained from stevedores, im port and export agents, unions, port management authorities and security agents.

The deployment of members as resident agents in remote areas o f Western Australia has already proved successful. Community awareness o f the AFP increased and cooperation with the ACS continued to develop. The timely receipt and dissemination of intelligence by these officers allowed for a regional response to matters, which, in the past, may have not previously been brought to notice. A recent drug operation involving a significant seizure of heroin and the arrest of offenders in Perth and the north-west of Australia, may not have been accomplished without intelligence being received by a resident agent.

A feasibility study for a resident agents post on the Central Queensland Coast was nearly completed. The interaction with law enforcement agencies in Mackay, Rockhampton and the surrounding areas has developed excellent work­ ing relationships.

36

Chapter 5 Program 4 - International Obligations and Protection

5

Objective

To support the Commonwealth’s international obligations and protection responsibilities with an effective and professional policing service.

This program provides for: • the close protection of VIPs; • the safeguarding of witnesses for the AFP and other law enforcement agencies;

• the provision of police services to the Family Court of Australia; • the provision of policing expertise to meet the Commonwealth’s United Nations’ commitments and international law enforcement interests; and • the provision of police services to the Territories o f Norfolk Island,

Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands and to Jervis Bay.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Protection Division, General Policing Policy and Arrangements Division (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

Description

37

Resources FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 4)

1992-93 ACTUAL $1,000

1993-94 BUDGET (a) $’000

1993-94 ACTUAL $'000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of AoDroDriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 418 426 410

Running costs 9,378 9,317 10,416

Total appropriations 9,796 9,743 10,826

Less: adjustments 2,170 1,703 2,972

Total outlays 7,626 8,040 7,854

Total revenue (b) 0 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 122 128 133

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures will not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3).____________

Overview

This chapter considers overall APT performance in meeting the objectives of Program 4. The critical success factors identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relate to the objectives of this program are:

• acknowledged leadership in concert with other national and international law enforcement efforts; and

• client satisfaction.

The AFP has met these critical success factors as evidenced by the performance highlighted below and the positive feedback received from overseas agencies and Australian VIPs.

Performance

The AFT’s Protection Division is comprised of the Prime Minister’s Branch, VIP Protection Branch and Witness Protection Branch.

The Prime Minister’s Branch has seen a sharp increase in the number of over­ seas visits as the Government pursues its policy of building closer ties with Asia. This was reflected in eight overseas visits to 18 different countries.

38

The VIP Branch has continued to provide full-time protection to the Governor- General and to nominated Ambassadors deemed at risk from criminal attack. There was an increase of just under 100 per cent in the number of VIP visitors requiring close personal protection. There were 48 major visits opposed to 25 in the previous year. Close personal protection was provided to Australian Office

Holders at specific venues and occasions. A close personal protection officer accompanied the official Australian delegates to Pretoria for the South African Presidential Inauguration.

The Witness Protection Branch ensures protected witnesses are free from intimi­ dation or criminal attack and be available to give evidence without fear of retri­ bution. The continued success achieved by the AFP and other law enforcement agencies in combating crime throughout Australia has resulted in investigators

recognising the need for and value of the Witness Protection Program. The effectiveness of the program is attested to by an 88 per cent conviction rate which resulted in an average jail term of 13 years for convicted principals.

The reporting year saw the successful conclusion of the participation of AFP personnel in the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia and the deployment of 16 personnel to the United Nations Operation in Mozambique. Submissions were made by the AFP to the Minister for Foreign Affairs in his

review of United Nations (UN) peacekeeping activities. Selection criteria incor­ porating the inventory of skills required for peacekeeping operations were estab­ lished, based on UN requirements, and a core set of conditions established.

AFP members deployed to Australia’s external territories continued to provide an effective and responsive police service and regulatory services (eg customs and immigration services) to the community. Officers at Norfolk Island placed

particular focus on traffic awareness and road safety education for children.

The AFP continued to support the development of South Pacific police services. Training advisers were provided to Vanuatu and Solomon Islands’ police under AIDAB sponsored projects. The AFP coordinated and assisted in provision of intelligence training to the Royal Papua New Guinea Constabulary and Fiji

Police, investigation training to members of the Indonesian Police, and MOSC training to police officers from South East Asian and South Pacific countries.

Following a request from DFAT, a commander and a superintendent were deployed to South Africa to monitor the elections, and assist the Goldstone inquiry and the National Peacekeeping Force.

Summary information regarding AFP personnel seconded or attached to an over­ seas police service or agency, a UN project, Jervis Bay or one of Australia’s external territories is included in the information at Appendix 5.

39

Chapter 6 Program 5 - Joint Police Services 6

Objective

To provide leadership in a cooperative, national law enforcement effort to protect the Australian community from criminal threat.

Description

This program is concerned with establishing and maintaining effective work­ ing relationships with other Australian police services and Commonwealth agencies. The elements covered by this program include telecommunications interception, the National Common Police Services, other services to assist police services and law enforcement agencies, and national crime prevention.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Commissioner’s Executive Office, Corporate Services Department, Science and Technology Department (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4)

40

Resources FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY(PROGRAM 5)

1992-93 ACTUAL $’000

1993-94 BUDGET (4) $’000

1993-94 ACTUAL $’000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of Aoorooriations

Program costs (excL running costs) 2 2 0

Running costs 4,274 3,810 3,412

Total appropriations 4,276 3,812 3,412

Less: adjustments 774 826 1,424

Total outlays 3,502 2,986 1,988

Total revenue (b) 0 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 61 67 66

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates. (b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1. page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 5. The critical success factor identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relates to the objectives of this program is acknowledged leadership in concert with other national and international law enforcement efforts.

The performance report against this program clearly shows the amount of coop­ erative activity being undertaken by the AFP and other Australian law enforce­ ment agencies.

Performance

Telecommunications Interception is the responsibility of the AFP under the Telecommunications (Interception) Act 1979. The AFP cooperated with those law enforcement agencies authorised to seek warrants which permit lawful inter­ ception. As a result of changes to the Telecommunications (Interception) Act

1979 increased telecommunications interception capabilities were granted to several states and the requirement for the AFP to maintain all the functions of a dedicated Telecommunications Interception Division ceased. The recent intro­ duction into the AFP of state-of-the-art telecommunications interception equip­

41

ment has given the AFP a compatibility with new telecommunications services using modem digital audio storage methods as well as a capability beyond the year 2000.

As part of a wider examination of the efficiency and effectiveness of Ministerial Councils, the C ouncil of A ustralian Governm ents decided to establish a Ministerial Council on the Administration of Justice. This Council includes the Australasian Police M inisters’ Council (APMC), the Corrective Services Ministers’ Conference and the Inter-Governmental Committee of the National Crime Authority. While these Councils have maintained their individual identi­ ties, meetings are held consecutively to encourage cooperation and the efficient use of resources.

The AFP participated in the work undertaken by the six national common police services which have been established under the auspices of the APMC. These bodies are: the ABCI, the A ustralian Police Staff C ollege, the National Exchange of Police Information, the National Institute of Forensic Science (NIFS), the National Police Research Unit and the National Crime Statistics Unit. These agencies provided an important service to all Australian police ser­ vices. The use of these facilities by the AFP enabled expertise to be shared with other services and ensured scarce resources were better utilised to the benefit of both the AFP and other Australian police services.

In November 1993, the APMC endorsed the development of an Australasian Policing Strategy. The Ministers consider that the Strategy ‘Directions in Australasian Policing’ is the key to improving the direction of police services in a cooperative way and will enhance the quality of the policing service provided to the community. The Strategy’s vision is that by the year 2000, Australia will have a safer and more secure community. Each year police services will focus on similar issues and consider cooperative implementation strategies.

The AFP hosted the 1994 Australasia and South West Pacific Region Police Commissioners’ Conference in Canberra from 14-18 March 1994. The theme of the Conference was ‘Finding the Money’. The Conference focused, on the one hand, on issues related to finding and following the criminal asset trail, and, on the other, on the efficient use of police resources. The Conference was consid­ ered highly successful based on outcomes achieved and feedback from partici­ pants.

The AFP contributed to the work o f the National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau. The Bureau produced two documents, one titled “Policing in a C ulturally D iverse S ociety” and the other “R ecru itm en t from Ethnic Communities”. The principles contained in these documents were endorsed by the AFP.

Summary information regarding AFP personnel seconded or attached to other Australian law enforcement agencies during the year is included at Appendix 5.

42

Chapter 7 Program 6 - People

Objective

To maintain operational excellence by developing, retaining and attracting the highest quality members and staff members with a commitment to the high ethical standards of the organisation.

Description

This program incorporates those functions related to the input and mainte­ nance of human resources in the AFP.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Personnel and Industrial Relations Division (P&IRD), Training Division, Health Services Division, Internal Investigations Division, Internal Security and Audit Division (ISAD) (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

43

Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 6)

1992-93 ACTUAL $'000

1993-94 BUDGET (a) $'000

1993-94 ACTUAL $'000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of ADDrooriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 0 0 181

Running costs 13,186 14,666 13,629

Total appropriations 13,186 14,666 13,810

Less: adjustments 693 460 744

Total outlays 12,493 14,206 13,066

Total revenue (b) 0 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 187 186 182

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BPt, page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 6. The critical success factors identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relate to the objectives o f this program are the people and services

factors of:

• integrity;

• employee performance; and

• accountability.

The following performance report highlights achievements against these factors and reflects a positive result against each.

Performance

Highlights in performance for 1993-94 against this program are reported against the following headings: personnel, training, health, anti-corruption, and com­ plaints.

44

Personnel

In recent years, the AFP has undergone major structural and industrial reform resulting in a more flexible, adaptable and responsive workforce. The reforms have provided the AFP with the ability to quickly and efficiently accommodate the changing demands of Commonwealth law enforcement and have provided an excellent base to effectively implement recommendations arising from the CLER.

The main areas of focus for Personnel and Industrial Relations Division during 1993-94 included continued work on an integrated human resource management framework, consolidation of the workplace reforms, preparation for the first m ajor round o f elec tio n s for fixed term reappointm ent and fu rth er development/implementation of recruitment strategies.

Since 1990, the AFP has taken major steps towards implementing a coordinated and systematic human resource management framework. In 1993-94, P&IRD continued to integrate a range of competency based programs and initiatives to complement the fixed term appointment (FTA) arrangements and provide the means by which the AFP’s core employment suitability criteria of competence, industry and honesty can be assessed. The framework has also been designed to balance the needs of management and staff while contributing to the quality of working life and providing an avenue of attracting and retaining high calibre

staff. Progress during the reporting period included the development of a draft Human Resource Plan critical to realisation of an integrated and systematic human resource management framework. It is expected that the Plan will also encourage a synergistic approach to the management of people in the AFP. In

addition, work commenced on a Human Resource Development Plan which will link together AFP training, career development and succession planning initia­ tives.

Major organisation reviews conducted during the year. They included the Investigations Department and the corporate service areas of Northern, Eastern, Southern, Central and ACT regions. The review of corporate support is consid­ ered essential to the development of an organisational template and the determi­

nation of best practice.

In September 1993, and as part of the industrial democracy process, working parties were established through the Regional Consultative Councils, as required by the AFP Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 1993. The working parties were tasked with identifying efficiency measures and productivity savings and have produced a wide range of proposed productivity measures/savings which are being considered by the parties for implementation. Any savings realised will be distributed throughout the AFP.

Under the AFP Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 1993, the flexible working arrangements allowed a variety of shift and working hour patterns to be devel­ oped specifically suited to the workplace in question (initiated by the employees and/or their supervisors). “Family Leave” has been utilised by employees with

45

family responsibilities where they can use existing sick leave provisions beyond normal special leave provisions to care for ill family members.

A number of key employment policies were reviewed during the year with a view to maximising the efficiency and effectiveness of the AFP’s unique fixed term and devolved employment regim e. Notably the FT A and temporary employment policies were finalised and implemented. The FTA policy docu­ ment is pivotal for processing the 1,100 reappointments scheduled to take place in 1995. The FTA policy document was reviewed (at the initiation of the AFP) by Freehill, Hollingdale and Page, Barristers and Solicitors, who concluded that the “content and structure (of the document) are of a high quality ... (and it) is clear, (it) includes all the information required by members and staff members to understand the principles and procedures and is consistent with the AFP’s statu­ tory and other obligations”.

The AFP has significantly reduced the per capita cost of recruitment by resum­ ing full responsibility for its recruitment program. The overall cost of recruit­ ment for 1993-94 was $291 800 associated with the appointment of 59 staff members and two police members, and involved:

• the utilisation of consultancy firm Morgan & Banks to assist in identifying and selecting senior and specialist personnel (at a cost of $145 004); and

• the assistance of Neville Jeffress Advertising in the development of visually distinctive press advertisements which have been successful in attracting quality applicants (at a cost of $50 005).

The effectiveness of the AFP’s EEO Program received favourable recognition when the organisation was invited to discuss various strategies for combating sexual harassment before the Senate Hearing Committee ‘Sexual Harassment in the Defence Forces’. The AFP continues to address sexual harassment through various management initiatives. Articles appeared in the AFP’s internal publi­ cations encouraging people to report unacceptable behaviour. There were 13 sexual harassment complaints registered by EEO contact officers in the APT during 1993-94. One sexual harassment complaint has been lodged through external avenues. While any complaints indicate unacceptable incidents, the AFP also believes that the mechanisms in place to prevent/detect this type of behaviour are working effectively.

In conjunction with the Department of Employment Education and Training, tenders were sought from various consultancies to develop an AFP Aboriginal Employment Strategy (similar to the Aboriginal Employment Development Policy that is currently in operation in the APS). Groundwork Development of

Melbourne was chosen to assist, research and analyse Aboriginal recruitment strategies for the AFP. A temporary Aboriginal Liaison Officer position has been approved to assist in the development of the strategy.

46

Training

The AFP’s continued high commitment to the training of members and staff members has enabled the AFP to exceed its statutory requirements under the Training Guarantee (Administration) Act 1990. Eligible training expenditure in 1993-94 was $6.5 million. This figure consisted of expenditure on course par­ ticipants, external providers, travel and accommodation, meals, administration

and other expenditure directly attributable to training programs. Against the AFP’s annual payroll of $147 million (including salaries and related expendi­ ture), the figure considerably exceeds the Government’s minimum requirement of 2.35 per cent ($4.4 million).

The AFP remains committed to providing on-the-job and formal training to its employees. High participation rates continue. During 1993-94, 46 142 days were spent by 1 959 members and staff members on formal internal training pro­ grams, for a total work force of 2 947.

The AFP has progressed with training reforms, taking training activity closer to the workplace by developing training responsibility to regional centres and fur­ ther adopting competency based training approaches.

Collaborative arrangements with operational divisions and regional commands continue in the delivery of training to the workplace. These arrangements are supported by a trained network of 390 ‘registered’ part-time trainers around Australia. This development of training has allowed full time training commit­ ments to be substantially reduced.

The extension of competency standards for investigations, administration, and trainer training was examined. Advances in competency based curricula for investigations training have led to the development and accreditation of an Advanced Certificate and Associate Diploma in Investigations.

The AFP has achieved National Provider Status to deliver these programs as recognised national awards to its own employees. A Certificate Investigations (Government Agencies) has been accredited to cater for the needs of other gov­ ernment agencies with compliance, regulatory or law enforcement roles.

The move to become an accredited institution, which is sensitive to develop­ ments within the National Police Education Standards Council (the police indus­ try competency standards body) will place the AFP at the forefront of national law enforcement training.

During the year specialised leadership and team building workshops were deliv­ ered in support of AFP contingents to UN peacekeeping forces proceeding to Cambodia and Mozambique.

The AFP College continues to support and train other government agencies involved in law enforcement and/or regulatory compliance activities. It is antic­ ipated that the outcome of the Elliott Report and CLER recommendations will

47

be increased use of AFP training services, particularly in the area of fraud inves­ tigations. Research has indicated that at least 1 000 staff are involved in the broad range of fraud prevention, detection, and investigational type duties at the Commonwealth level. (The numbers at the State level would of course increase this amount.) This in effect represents the number of staff that will possibly require training by the AFP. During the year the AFP created a separate Branch with a full time manager to be solely responsible for the external agency training program.

Under the sponsorship of the AFP Undergraduate Scheme initiated in 1991, there were 54 graduates in Police Studies and Justice Administration from vari­ ous Australian Universities commenced with the AFP in the first half of 1994. The recruits, destined for the ACT, Eastern, Northern, and Western Regions, will complete an 18 week course, including Core Investigator Training, before

undertaking regional specific training.

In response to the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the AFP initiated a revised Aboriginal awareness program endorsed by ATSIC. These courses were conducted in all regional centres for members of the AFP and provided information on the High Court’s Mabo decision and Aboriginal reconciliation.

The MOSC Course (discussed in Chapter 2) was recognised as a peak Australian law enforcement senior management course. During 1993-94, MOSC courses conducted were attended by state police from all jurisdictions. International police who attended the courses included senior officers from New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong and Malaysia. Senior officers from the ATO and the ACS also attended the courses.

Refurbishment of Barton College commenced in May 1994 and is scheduled for completion in October 1995 at a cost of $10.5 million. The refurbishment will support the marketing of AFP investigations training to a wider national and international market on a cost recovery basis.

Health

The AFP operates fully in accord with the spirit and requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991. The policy previously agreed between the AFP and the Australian Federal Police Association remained in force during the year.

There were no directions under section 45 or notices under sections 30, 46 and 47 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act during the year. There was no accident or dangerous occurrence during the year that required the provision of notice to Comcare under section 68 of the Act. A more aggressive review of all AFP Comcare cases resulted in the organisation maintaining its premium cost close to the previous year.

Processes preparing staff for long term postings were improved. Contingents

48

leaving fo r and re tu rn in g from overseas obligations in C am bodia and Mozambique received appropriate medical attention.

Anti-corruption

ISAD is the AFP’s anti-corruption body. ISAD’s combination of audit, security and investigations functions is unique in Australian law enforcement circles. The bulk of ISAD’s activities are preventative in nature.

ISAD’s multifaceted response to security concerns included development of an Information Security Policy and circulating a range of information technology security memoranda; delivering inform ation technology security training;

upgrading warnings on computer screens; and initiating criminal and discipli­ nary prosecutions.

Other security initiatives completed during the year included:

• producing security plans for two major, national AFP drug operations, aimed at significantly reducing the risk of unauthorised interference;

• completing 90 high level security clearances;

• providing security awareness training on 44 New Member, Federal Agency and other formal courses, including seminars in Eastern and Southern Regions and presentations on three MOSC courses; and

• providing security advice to CLEB Support Group and a range of other Commonwealth Law Enforcement bodies including HOCOLEA and AUS- TRAC.

The division is actively pursuing strategic alliances with its counterparts in these agencies with a view to increasing security awareness in the Commonwealth arena. ISAD enjoyed a high level of cooperation in both security and other mat­ ters with its State counterparts.

The scale and complexity of audits undertaken has increased markedly. The Security and Audit Committee considered and completed 12 audits which made 229 recommendations (up 139 per cent). O f these, 215 were accepted for imple­ mentation. A performance audit of the AFP’s national drug function was com­ menced and, following an extensive review, significant savings were made with

respect to the catering service at the AFP Training College, Barton.

During the past 12 months, the division has narrowed the focus of investigations referred, primarily investigating only allegations of serious criminal conduct against AFP personnel. A number of these investigations involved the unautho­ rised access and release of official information.

The rationalising of referrals has raised the quality of allegations forwarded for

49

investigation. A total of 108 matters were investigated, 57 having been carried over from the previous year. O f these, 77 were completed and either submitted for adjudication or found to be unsubstantiated. The introduction of a brief man­ agement system utilising MOSC methodologies, has improved both the timeli­ ness and quality of briefs prepared. A change in the burden of proof in AFP dis­ ciplinary matters from that of ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ to one based on the

‘balance of probabilities’ is expected to increase the number of successful disci­ plinary prosecutions against AFP personnel.

ISAD has assumed a sponsorship role for ethics training within the AFP. Under ISAD’s guidance, a three day ethics package has been developed for both New Member and Investigator Courses. Additionally, advantage was taken of the visit to Australia of Professor John Kleinig - an authority on police ethics - to provide three ethics seminars for middle and senior AFP managers.

Complaints

During 1993-94, the Internal Investigation Division recorded a total of 810 com­ plaints made by 542 complainants. This represents a slight reduction on the pre­ vious year. About 60 per cent were made directly to the AFP, with most of the others arriving via the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

Reflecting their community policing role, the ACT Region attracted 391 com­ plainants, a slight reduction, with no significant trend in the categories of com­ plaint. Incivility, harassment and neglect of duty categories remained promi­ nent. Overall, there was a sharp reduction in complaints about ΑΠ’ practices and procedures.

Of the 810 complaints finalised by the Ombudsman, 54 or 6.7 per cent were sub­ stantiated and 37.4 per cent unsubstantiated. Of the remainder, 42.3 per cent were reconciled, withdrawn or otherwise did not require a full investigation. The high proportion of incapable of determination findings, of concern to the Ombudsman, was reduced from 20.6 per cent last year to 13.5 per cent.

A total of 115 allegations were made under the provisions of General Order 6, representing a slight decrease from the previous year. Of the 123 allegations finalised, (including those carried over from 1992-93), 45 were substantiated.

Further details are at Appendix 6.

50

Chapter 8 Program 7 - Planning and Management 8

Objective

To ensure the best management of APP resources.

Program Description

The key strategies of this program are focused on ensuring that the AFP improves and maintains high quality resource management and monitors the corporate goals and strategies of the organisation to ensure their continued rel­ evance and appropriateness.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

C orporate Services D epartm ent, Planning and D evelopm ent Division, Commissioner’s Executive Office (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4).

51

Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 7)

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

ACTUAL BUDGET (a) ACTUAL

$'000 $’000 $'000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Comoonents of AoDrooriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) 1,026 4,137 1,000

Running costs 33,865 29,403 33,633

Total appropriations 34,891 33,540 34,633

Less: adjustments 173 176 1,763

Total outlays 34,718 33,364 32,870

Total revenue (b) 0 0 o

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 114 112 108

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates. (b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g. 1993-94 BP1, page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 7. The critical success factors identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relate to the objectives o f this program are:

• external recognition of our knowledge and expertise in combating crime: and

• producing the best product for the price.

AFP resources continued to be managed efficiently and effectively during the year with continual enhancem ents being made to m anagem ent reporting processes and employee performance reports.

Performance

Resources and Services

This area of the AFP is responsible for the provision and monitoring of financial resources, building services, accommodation, central stores, logistics, and trans­ port as well as relevant policy development.

Funds available to the AFP in 1993-94 totalled $244.8 million compared to

52

$226.4 million in 1992-93. In the main the differences related to inclusion of provision for an additional pay in 1993-94 ($5.4 million); upgrading of telecom­ m unications fa cilities ($2.2 m illion); im plem entation o f an E nterprise Bargaining Agreement and wage adjustments ($3.5 million); carry forward of

funds for refurbishment of the Barton Training College ($3.9 million); a budget neutral transfer of $2.2 million from the ACT to Commonwealth Government to more accurately reflect apportionment of ACT policing costs; increases in anno­ tated appropriations arising from the sale of housing and additional vetting of

immigration applications ($2.1 million); and price adjustments to administrative funding ($1.1 million) which were offset by application of the efficiency divi­ dend ($1.7 million) and the net impact of other between year adjustments (­ $0.3 million).

This area maintains a register of consultants used by the AFP. During the reporting period, 29 consultants were utilised at a total cost of $1 620 330. A contact for further information regarding consultants is attached at Appendix 2. During the year considerable effort was directed at improving and developing resource information and associated procedures for senior and line managers to

assist them in decision making on the deployment of resources. These initia­ tives included:

• introduction of formal monthly forecasting procedures and revision of pre­ sentation of financial information to allow easier interpretation;

• development of guidelines for costing activities to assist in establishing a standard across the AFP for costing of all activities;

• redrafting and updating the A ccounting Procedures M anual and the Commissioner’s Financial Directions;

• completion of a comprehensive instructional package providing detailed guidelines for the preparation of financial statements under modified accrual accounting guidelines required to meet the requirements of section 50 of the Audit Act; and

• implementation of a range of system enhancements to the AFP’s financial processing and monitoring system (FINEST) to meet user requirements and enhance data handling.

Expenditure for 1993-94 was within funding allocations and consistent with forecasts provided to AFP management.

The Building and Accommodation Branch was responsible for coordinating arrangements for a major refurbishment of the Barton Training College. Cabinet approval was obtained on 1 November 1993 and the Parliamentary Works Committee report was accepted by the Parliament in May 1994. The area also implemented procedures to review and rationalise energy usage across the AFP, which should deliver significant efficiencies.

53

The AFP M useum was officially opened by the M inister for Justice on 19 October 1993 and the event received much media interest.

Government and Public Relations

Media inquiries received a maximum six-hour response time and information on AFP activities was supplied on a regular basis for segments on television, radio and in the print media.

A new approach to promoting the AFP was developed during the reporting peri­ od. Its principal feature is the design and production of a multi media package to enhance the corporate image of the organisation in the eyes of the public and the key stakeholders.

A telemovie “The Feds” was produced by Crawfords Australia with assistance from the AFP, and following its success, six more were commissioned and the AFP provided advice throughout the production process.

Staging the A ustralasian and S outh W est P acific P olice Photographic Competition at the National Science and Technology Centre in Canberra was a notable achievement for the AFP. The quality of photographs submitted by many police organisations was praised by the judges and by the public who attended.

The area drafted a submission to a parliamentary inquiry into the rights and obligations of the media which argued that, inter alia, to provide the media industry with legal privilege to protect their sources o f information would extend the power of the media to the detriment of Australia and society general­ ly.

The number of briefs provided to the Minister rose by 17 per cent from 1992-93.

Language training scholarships were funded by the CATF to the value of $270 000. This money will be used to provide intensive, full-time training to some of the AFP’s best officers in languages identified as important to success­ ful AFP operations in the future. This money supplements ongoing AFP lan­ guage training programs.

Planning and Development

A review of AFP performance reports against 1993-94 Strategic Management Plans (SMP) has revealed the value of the whole SMP process. There is evi­ dence of improved management practices with a better focus on results and accountability of resources.

Following the presentation of the CLER Report, advice on a new Ministerial

54

Direction under section 13(2) of the Australian Federal Police Act was prepared by the Planning and Development Division. That document had not been finalised for submission to the Minister by the end of the reporting period.

The Discipline Unit handled 100 disciplinary matters compared to 53 in the pre­ vious year. Of these, 31 were carried over from 1992-93. At the end of the year, 46 matters had been completed and 54 remained current. Five members appeared before the Federal Police Disciplinary Tribunal to answer 13 charges; two charges were withdrawn by the Commissioner, four were dismissed and

seven resulted in findings of guilt. Criminal charges were laid against eight members and six staff members. One staff member was convicted and resigned. Eight members and six staff members were suspended from duty. At the end of the reporting period six members and six staff members remained suspended

from duty.

A report highlighting information management issues was produced and led to the establishment of an Operations Information Manager. Andersen Software Services Pty Ltd provided programming expertise to enable more sophisticated data analysis at a cost of $74 206.

55

Chapter 9 Program 8 - Science and Technology 9

Objective

To ensure the most appropriate application of science and technology, as determined by corporate needs, is used throughout the organisation now and in the future.

Program Description

This program provides for the specialist scientific and technical support need­ ed for the effective operation of the AFP.

Organisational Elements Chiefly Responsible

Science and Technology Department (refer to Organisation Chart on page 4)

56

Resources

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY (PROGRAM 8)

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

ACTUAL BUDGET (a) ACTUAL

$'000 $'000 $'000

BUDGETARY (CASH) BASIS

Components of Appropriations

Program costs (excl. running costs) Running costs 2,168 14,512

3,610 20,939

1,760 14,667

Total appropriations 16,680 24,549 16,427

Less: adjustments 83 87 69

Total outlays 16,597 24,462 16,358

Total revenue (b) 0 0 0

STAFFING

STAFF YEARS (ACTUAL) 166 156 142

(a) Budget figure amended to include Additional Estimates. These figures may not reconcile to Budget figures in the Program Statement as figures in that statement do not include Additional Estimates.

(b) See Budget Paper 1 for a description of items included in revenue (e.g.1993-94 BP1, page 8.3).

Overview

This chapter considers overall AFP performance in meeting the objectives of Program 8. The critical success factor identified in the Corporate Plan that pre­ dominantly relates to the objectives of this program is:

• acknowledged leadership in concert with other national and international law enforcement efforts.

A high level of national and international liaison is highlighted below.

Performance

The Electronic and Technical Division (ETD) changed its focus from a mainte­ nance and installation role to that of services provider to special operations involving complex electronics equipment. Areas being addressed include crimi­ nal use of computers, digital and mobile telecommunications, and covert surveil­

lance involving land, sea and air transport.

A comprehensive review of the Police Technical Units found that they were

57

highly effective in carrying out covert technical installations. A total of 82 rec­ ommendations were made to improve the performance and accountability of the Units and were directed towards ensuring a responsive and efficient service is provided to the AFP and other specialised law enforcement agencies. Grants

have been received from the CATF for upgrading the equipment used for vehi­ cle tracking, audio monitoring and the reduction of extraneous noise from recordings.

Officers from the Department attended Interpol technical conferences in Dusseldorf and Canada. Arrangements were set in place to exchange technolo­ gy and to share research and development findings with the FBI and the United States Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI). High level discussions between AFP officers and other agencies addressed future technical training for

selected ETD staff and negotiations began with OSI on possible training initia­ tives.

The AFP played an active role in most NIFS sponsored activities and received a number of NIFS research grants.

International relationships were further strengthened through AFP membership of the Senior Managers Australia and New Zealand Forensic Laboratories and by the presentation of papers at the International Association of Forensic Scientists. Officers provided specialist training in fingerprint enhancement tech­ nology to Australian and overseas agencies and were involved in developing and presenting courses sponsored by A ustralian International Development Assistance Bureau in Vanuatu, one on crime scenes investigation, the other on fingerprinting.

Construction of a DNA testing laboratory was completed during the period. CATF money was obtained and will assist in the implementation of DNA testing and associated staff training. AFP personnel provided operational forensic sup­ port to NSW Police in the areas o f hair, fibres, fingerprint enhancement and

firearms examination.

The first group of AFP personnel graduated from the Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Forensic Investigation. This course commenced in 1990 through a partnership betw een the AFP and the C anberra Institute of Technology. Members of other police services are undertaking the course.

The new ACT Region Headquarters building placed a significant drain on ETD and Information Technology Division resources with the installation of a state- of-the-art communications control room and extensive voice/data networks.

Science and Technology Department contributed significantly to several major national operations including an operation that resulted in the arrest of a former Australian Security Intelligence Organisation employee on espionage charges and an operation which resulted in a large quantity of cannabis being seized during an illegal importation attempt.

58

Appendixes

Appendix Contents

1. Compliance with Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports 62

2. Further Information 63

3. Crimes Against the Commonwealth 65

3.1 National Criminal investigations 1993-94 3.1.1 Number and value of matters referred for investigation in 1993-94 and 1992-93 3.1.2 Number of Offences identified for all Regional Offices July 1993 to June 1994 3.2 Drug Seizures, Federal Agencies 1993-94, 1992-93 3.3 Offences reported or becoming known in Jervis Bay 1993-94

4. Policing in the Australian Capital Territory 76

4.1 Offences reported of becoming known in the Australian Capital Territory 4.2 Drug Seizures ACT Region - 1993-94, 1992-93

5. Human Resources 81

5.1 Overview of Staffing Levels 5.1.1 AFP Workforce by Employment Status 5.1.2 AFP Senior Executive Group 5.1.3 Geographical Distribution 5.1.4 Workforce Composition 5.2 Appointments 1993-94 - Staff Members and Police Members 5.3 Secondments/Attachments to Other Agencies/Police Services

6. Complaints 84

6.1 Complaints (AFP) Act 19981 Form A - Source of Complaints 1993-94 6.2 Complaints (AFP) Act 19981 Form B - Results of Investigations Completed and Reviewed by the Ombudsman 1993-94 6.3 Allegations (General Order 6) Reported to IID 1993-94 - Form C 6.4 Allegations (General Order 6) Results of Completed Investigations 1993-94 - Form D

6.5 Geographical distribution of complaints and allegations received 1993-94 - Form E

7. External Scrutiny 89

7.1 Reports by the Auditor-General 7.2 Reports by Parliamentary Committees

8. Statement in accordance with section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 91

9. Annual Financial Statement in accordance with section 50 97

61

Appendix 1 - Compliance with Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports

REQUIREMENT PAGE(S)/APPENDIX

Letter of Transmittal (iii)

Aids to Access Table of Contents (v)

Alphabetical Index p 128

Compliance Index p 62

Glossary p 127

Contacts for Attachment 3 Information p 63

Corporate Overview P i

Social Justice and Equity p 8, App 2

Internal and External Scmtiny p 5, pp 49-50, App 7

Industrial Democracy p 45

Occupational Health and Safety p 48

Freedom of Information App 8

Advertising and Market Research na

Program Performance Reporting pp 11-58

Staffing Overview Performance Pay na

Staff Training p 47, App 2

Consultants p 53, App2

Resources Summary/Program Information pp 8, 9, 12, 26, 38,41,44,52,57

Financial Statements 97

62

Appendix 2 - Further Information

Attachment 3 to the Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports details the information that no longer has to be included in annual reports but must be readily available upon request. Details of the appropriate contact officers for the various categories of information are pro­ vided below. All the contact officers can be written to c/- Australian Federal Police, GPO

Box 401, Canberra City, ACT, 2601. Switchboard for general enquiries: (06) 256 7777

Equal Employment Opportunity/Status of Women

Assistant Secretary Personnel and Industrial Relations Division Telephone: (06)275 7245

Access and Equity/Reports by the Auditor-General/Inquiries by Parliamentary Committees/Comments by the Ombudsman

Assistant Secretary Government and Public Relations Division Telephone: (06)275 7518

Training

Commander Training Division Telephone: (06) 287 0616

Financial matters/Environmental matters/Property Usage/Business Regulations/Consultants

Assistant Secretary Resources and Services Division Telephone: (06)275 7262

Fraud Control

Commander Internal Security and Audit Division Telephone: (06)275 7176

Decisions of Courts and Tribunals/Privacy

Assistant Secretary Planning and Development Division Telephone: (06)275 7572

63

Other documents that may aid in an understanding of the operations of the AFP are listed below. Copies of these documents can be provided by contacting the relevant area of the AFP indicated in brackets. The main switchboard number provided above can transfer callers to an officer in the relevant area.

AFP’s 1991-94 Corporate Plan (Planning and Development Division)

Ministerial Direction (Planning and Development Division)

Directions in Australasian Policing (Government and Public Relations Division)

ACT Region Annual Report (Office of the Assistant Commissioner, ACT Region).

64

Appendix 3 - Crimes against the Commonwealth

3.1 NATIONAL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS1 1993-94 3.1.1 Number and value of matters referred for investigation 1993-94 & 1992-93

1993-94

Number Value

$M2

1992-93

Number Value

$M2

Drugs Demand New matters referred 2 419 na 3 457 na

Workload Total matters initiated^ 2 445 na 3 467 na

Total matters on hand as at 30 June 1 285 na 2 625 na

Output Total matters completed 3 759 na 4 933 na

Number of offences detected 1 989 na 2 946 na

Number of offences cleared 486 na 812 na

Number of arrests and summonses 302 na 461 na

Outcome Convictions^ Jail term 33 na na na

Other 64 na na na

Total convictions 97 na na na

Fraud Demand New matters referred over $500,000 26 79.45 22 366.07

$1-$500,000 691 22.99 932 23.03

value not determined 754 na 882 na

Total matters referred 1 471 102.44 1 836 389.10

Workload New matters initiated over $500,000 25 77.95 22 366.07

$1-$500,000 728 23.87 1 068 24.36

value not determined 776 na 951 na

Total matters initiated^ 1 529 101.82 2 041 390.43

Total matters on hand as at 30 June 1 462 496.19 2 882 na

continued over

65

3.1.1 continued 1993-94 1992-93

Number Value Number Value

$M2 $M2

Output Matters completed over $500,000 41 85.65 29 602.81

$1-$500,000 1 629 44.70 1 535 26.97

value not determined 1 221 na 1 590 na

Total matters completed 2 891 130.34 3 154 629.78

Number of offences detected 7 042 80.91 11 157 111.58

Number of offences cleared 3 754 na 6 300 na

Number of arrests and summonses 936 na 757 na

Outcome Convictions'* Jail term 546 na na na

Other 1 109 na na na

Total convictions 1 655 na na na

Currency Demand New matters referred Australian currency 684 2.00 773 1.90

Overseas currency 216 1.46 175 5.86

Other: not elsewhere classified^ 141 1.09 110 0.53

Total new matters referred 1 041 4.55 1 058 8.29

Workload New matters initiated Australian currency 695 1.99 773 1.90

Overseas currency 224 1.46 170 5.91

Other: not elsewhere classified^ 141 1.09 109 0.53

Total matters initiated^ 1 060 4.54 1 052 8.34

Matters on hand as at 30 June 275 0.54 782 na

Output Matters completed 1 548 12.55 1 064 17.17

Number of offences detected 4 880 1.65 1 670 0.28

Number of offences cleared 318 na 244 na

Number of arrests and summonses 40 na 61 na

Outcome Convictions'* Jail term 3 na na na

Other 10 na na na

Total convictions 13 na na na

continued over

66

3.1.1 continued 1993-94 1992-93

Number Value Number Value

$M2 $M2

General Crime Demand New matters referred Bankruptcy 305 3.80 315 14.37

Criminal Assets 392 na 305 na

Family Law 1 298 0.01 1 414 0.09

Other 1 873 666.45 1 864 74.99

Total new matters referred 3 868 670.26 3 898 89.45

Workload New matters initiated Bankruptcy 315 4.05 323 14.28

Criminal Assets 397 na 309 na

Family Law 1 316 0.01 1436 0.09

Other 1 901 675.71 1 927 77.52

Total matters initiated^ 3 929 679.77 3 995 91.89

Total matters on hand as at 30 June 1 786 60.89 3 083 na

Output Matters completed Bankruptcy 355 14.18 179 1.22

Criminal Assets 438 na 147 na

Family Law 1 991 0.00 1 220 0.00

Other 2 381 1 046.12 2 256 130.22

Total matters completed 5 165 1060.30 3 802 131.44

Number of offences detected 3 984 534.55 3 809 145.00

Number of offences cleared 2 451 na 2 545 na

Number of arrests and summonses 450 na 435 na

Outcome Convictions* Jail term 231 na na na

Other 627 na na na

Total convictions 858 na na na

1 Excludes ACT Community Policing matters. 2 Values are approximate and expressed in Australian dollars where applicable. 3 Work commenced on matters from both current and previous financial years. 4 Number of convictions, not number of persons.

5 eg. bullion. na = not available/not applicable

67

3.1.2 Number of Offences identified for all Regional Offices July 1993 to June 1994

Offences Number of Offenders by Sex

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated

Offences against the person Homicide - - - - - ·

Assaults (excluding sexual) 15 8 12 1 - ·

Sexual assault/offences 4 2 3 - - -

Other offences against the person 6 5 2 - -

Kidnap and abduction - - 1 - -

Other acts endangering life 3 1 2 -

Total offences against the person 28 16 20 1 -

Total

13 3 2 1

2

21

Robbery and extortion Robbery - - 1 - - - 1

Extortion 1 2 1 - - - 1

Property Value $A

11 000

Total robbery and extortion 2 2 2 11000

Burglary, fraud and other offences of theft Burglary 7 - 5 - -

Fraud and misappropriation Fraud 6 498 3 562 913 368 1

Misappropriation 544 192 40 20 -

Counterfeiting 4 880 318 68 13 2

5 1 500

1 283 79 302 068

60 1 610 042

83 1 645 082

Total fraud and misappropriation 11 922 4 072 1 021 401 3 1 1 426 82 557 193

continued next page

3.1.2 continued Property

Offences Number of Offenders by Sex

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated Total

Value $A

Receiving, unlawful possession 29 8 15 1 - - 16

Motor vehicle theft 1 1 1 - - - 1

1 454 334

Other theft 31 17 10 - - - 10 37 032

Total burglary, fraud and other offences of theft 11 990 4 098 1 052 402 3 1 1 458 90 050 059

Property damage and environmental offences Arson - . . . . - -

Other property damage 38 20 15 7 - - 22

Environmental offences 3 1 2 - 2 - 4

173 804

50 Total property damage and environmental offences 41 21 17 7 2 - 26 173 804

Offences against good order Government security/operations 61 31 21 6 - - 27

Justices procedures 277 174 76 7 - - 83

Other offences against good order 33 29 26 15 - - 41

200 180 230 614 507

Total offences against good order 371 234 123 28 - - 151 431 301

Motor traffic offences 8 3 5 - - - 5 -

continued next page

3.1.2 continued

Offences Number of Offenders by Sex Value

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated Total $A

Property

Other offences (not elsewhere classified) Company legislation 3 6 2 - -

Banking/insurance 551 275 193 48 -

Taxation, stamp duties 147 25 5 1 -

Post, Telecom 1 366 1 083 75 43 -

Customs 14 6 11 - -

Immigration 72 48 31 20 -

Electoral 25 8 3 - -

Air navigation and operations 44 42 29 1 -

Health 92 90 5 5 -

Bankruptcy 368 202 71 6 -

Copyright and patents 597 247 12 2 -

Other offences(not elsewhere classified) 188 117 27 15 1

Total other offences (not elsewhere classified) 3 467 2 149 464 141 1

All offences 15 906 6 523 1683 579 6

- 2 -

- 241 8 238 114

- 6 792 500

- 118 8 200

- 11 1 282 310

- 51 171 500

- 3 -

- 30 20

- 10 1 954

- 77 515 379 296

- 14 410 061

- 43 161 931

- 606 526 445 887

1 2 269 617112 053

Note: Offence classifications are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics ANCO (1985), Catalogue No 1234.0 Offences investigated by the AFP office in the Australian Capital Territory are excluded, as are drug offences. Offences cleared do not necessarily relate to those offences reported in the time period. Agency = not an individual ie. public, private or government organisation.

Unstated = undetermined sex. Source: COPS

3.2 DRUG SEIZURES, FEDERAL AGENCIES1 1993-94, 1992-93 (Does not include seizures involving the National Crime Authority)

Type of Drug

1992-93

Number of Drugs Seized

Weight2 gms

1993-94

Number of Weight^

Drugs Seized gms

Amphetamine 112 4 609.602 96 167 564.909

Cannabis 2 262 1 682 769.165 1 660 3 685 816.495

Cannabis Resin 481 3 037 046.450 308 39 736.461

Cocaine 88 301 677.107 65 281 556.616

Heroin 182 55 904.244 204 52 344.106

LSD 49 542.391 24 349.927

No Prohibited Substance Detected 121 145 420.967 98 13 251.634

Other 68 51 411.216 45 23 802.561

Total 3 363 5 279 381.142 2 500 4 264 422.709

Footnote 1 The Figures are correct to 1 July 1994 and include seizures awaiting analysis to confirm both weights and presence of the illegal substance. Recorded weights and drug types may vary from those previously reported. Footnote 2 Net weight ‘confirmed’ has been used where available, otherwise net weight ‘estimated’ has been used.

71

3.3 Offences reported or becoming known in Jervis Bay

Property value

Offences Number of Offenders Stolen Recovered

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated Total $A $A

Offences against the person Homicide and related offences Murder Attempted murder

Conspiracy to murder Manslaughter Driving causing death Homicide (unspecified)

Total homicide and related offences - - - - - - -

Assaults (excluding sexual) - - . . . . .

Assaults causing grievous bodily harm - - . . . . -

Assaults causing actual bodily harm . . . . . . -

Assaults other 2 1 1 - - - 1

Total assaults (excluding sexual) 2 1 1 - - - 1

Sexual assaults/offences . . . . . . .

Sexual assault 1st, 2nd & 3rd degree . . . . . . -

Sexual intercourse, no consent . . . . . . .

Sexual intercourse, person < 16 years - - . . . . .

Indecent act, assault - - . . . . .

Indecent act, no consent . . . . . . .

Indecent act, person <16 years . . . . . . .

Incest . . . . . . .

Abduction (sexual intent) . . . . . . .

Total sexual assaults/offences

continued over

continued over

3.3 continued

Offences Number of Offenders

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated Total

Property value Stolen Recovered $A $A

Property damage and environmental offences Property damage Arson 1 . . . . . -

Other property damage 65 5 9 - - - 9

25 000 10 079

Total property damage 66 5 9 - - - 9

Environmental offences Pollution - - . . . . -

Flora and fauna - - . . . . -

Other environmental offences - - . . . . .

Total environmental offences . . . . . . -

35 079

Total property damage and environmental offences 66 5 9 - - - 9

Offences against good order Government security operations . . . . . . .

Justice procedures 2 2 1 1 - - 2

Firearms and weapons - - . . . . -

Indecent exposure - - . . . . .

Other - - . . .

Total offences against good order 2 2 1 1 - - 2

Other offences (not elsewhere classified) - - . . . . .

35 079

All offences 160 17 22 6 - - 28 87 949 7 156

Note: Offence classifications are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics ANCO (1985), Catalogue No 1234.0 Offences cleared do not necessarily relate to those offences reported in the time period. Agency = not an individual ie. public, private or government organisation. Unstated = undetermined sex. Source: COPS

Appendix 4 - Policing in the Australian Capital Territory July 1993 to June 1994 4.1 Offences reported or becoming known in the Australian Capital Territory

Property value Stolen Recovered $A $A

260 100

360

continued over

Offences Number of Offenders

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated Total

Property value Stolen Recovered $A $A

Other offences Kidnap 15 12 11 1 - - 12

Other 91 55 44 2 - - 46 6 050

Total other offences 106 67 55 3 - - 58 6 050

Total offences against the person 1616 949 785 112 - - 897 6 410

Robbery and extortion Robbery Armed robbery 48 21 22 4 - - 26

Other robbery 94 19 22 2 - - 24

92 544 11 015

31 286 636

Total robbery 142 40 44 6 - - 50

Blackmail and extortion 2 2 2 1 - - 3

123 830 11 651

Total robbery and extortion 144 42 46 7 - - 53

Burglary, fraud and other offences of theft

123 830 11 651

Burglary Burglary dwellings 3 714 358 454 79 - - 533

Burglary shops 851 83 120 4 - - 124

Burglary other 1 005 96 143 10 - - 153

1 209671 60 242

348 657 9 226

438 770 32 877

Total burglary 5 570 537 717 93 - - 810 1 997 098 102 345

Fraud and misappropriation Fraud 1 878 1 580 240 109 - - 349

Misappropriation 356 220 46 7 - - 53

Counterfeiting 38 1 - - - - -

408 980 93 110

1 279 443 107 445

Total fraud and misappropriation 2 272 1 801 286 116 - - 402 1 688 423 200 555

continued over

Offences Number of Offenders

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated

Handling stolen goods Receiving 129 115 98 26 - -

Unlawful possession 41 36 32 9 - -

Other 110 105 50 10 “

Total handling stolen goods 280 256 180 45 - -

Theft or illegal use of vehicle Motor vehicle theft 1 657 285 307 12 1 -

Bicycle theft 1 132 45 48 1 - -

Boat theft 16 - - - - -

Aircraft theft - - - - - -

Other vehicle theft 34 2 1 - - -

Unspecified vehicle theft 4 - - - - -

Total theft or illegal use of vehicle 2 843 332 356 13 1 -

Other theft Stealing from a person - . . . . .

Stock theft 6 . . . . .

Shopstealing 1 270 1 091 601 532 - 1

Other theft______________________ 10 604________ 883 960_______128_________ -_______

Total other theft 11 880 1 974 1 561 660 - 1

Total burglary, fraud and other offences of theft 22 845 4 900 3 100 927 1 1

Property damage and environmental offences Property damage Arson 249 36 32 7 - -

Other property damage 6 118 607 639 54 1 -

Total property damage 6 367 643 671 61 1 -

Environmental offences

Property value Stolen Recovered

Total $A $A

124 32 552 29 320

41 3 353 908

60 4214 1 523

225 40 119 31 751

320 8 510 503 5 567 214

49 463 499 43 264

- 17 359 -

1 82 530 21 750

- 38 000 38 000

370 9 111 891 5 670 228

3 460 2400

1 134 154 187 63 987

1 088 8 720 563 668 943

2 222 8 878 210 735 330

4 029 21 715 741 6 740 209

39 3 559 226 100

694 2 231 963 12 193

733 5 791 189 12 293

continued over

Offences Number of Offenders

Offence Reported Cleared Male Female Agency Unstated

Pollution - . . . . .

Flora and fauna - . . . . .

Other environmental offences___________ 3__________ 2________ 2_________ :_________ :________ -

Total environmental offences 3 2 2 - - -

Total property damage and environmental offences 6 370 645 673 61 1 -

Offences against good order Government security operations 3 - 1 - - -

Justice procedures 346 302 234 42 - -

Firearms and weapons 186 155 110 8 4 -

Indecent exposure - - - - - -

Other 806 383 392 48 3 -

Total offences against good order 1 341 840 737 98 7 -

Other offences (not elsewhere classified) 762 296 242 30 1

Property value Stolen Recovered

Total SA $A

_____2_________________________: ______________________ -

2

735 5 791 189 12 293

1

276 122

443

842 7 151 6 051

273 21 552 10 000

6 351 6 051

800

All offences 33 078 7 672 5 583 1235 10 1 6 829 27 665 873 6 780 204

Note: Offence classifications are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics ANCO (1985), Catalogue No 1234.0 Offences cleared do not necessarily relate to those offences reported in the time period. Agency = not an individual ie. public, private or government organisation. Unstated = undetermined sex.

* Offences reported in Jervis Bay are excluded. Source: COPS

4.2 DRUG SEIZURES ACT REGION1 — 1993-94, 1992-93

Type of Drug

1992-93

Number of Drugs Seized

Weight^ gms

1993-94

Number of Weightβ

Drugs Seized gmS

Amphetamine 20 1 688.350 28 580. 965

Cannabis 321 323 441.010 400 370 889.948

Cannabis Resin 13 153.300 3 7.900

Cocaine 1 0.001 2 23.993

Heroin 33 536.994 32 129.247

LSD 2 0.002 3 0.003

No Prohibited Substance Detected 23 596.109 43 3 222.980

Other 4 160.631 — —

Total 417 326 576.397 511 374 855.036

Footnote 1: The figures are correct to 1 July 1994 and include seizures awaiting analysis to confirm both weights and presence of the illegal substance. Recorded weights and drug types may vary from those previously reported. Footnote 2: Net weight ‘confirmed’ has been used where available, otherwise net weight ‘estimated’ has been used.

80

Appendix 5 — Human Resources

5.1 OVERVIEW OF STAFFING LEVELS

At 30 June 1994 the Australian Federal Police had a workforce of 3042 which comprised 2302 police members and 740 staff members. The entire workforce is employed under the provisions of the Australian Federal Police Act 1979 as amended.

The following tables provide information on the composition and geographical distribution of the AFP’s workforce at 30 June 1994.

5.1.1. AFP Workforce by Employment Status

Category June 1993 June 1994 % Change

Full time Staff 3 008 2 962* -1.40%

Part time Staff 31 40 +29.03%

Temporary Staff 21 40 +90.48%

Totals 3 060 3 042 -0. 59%

* Includes Fifty-three (53) Undergraduate Recruits

5.1.2. AFP Senior Executive Group

Level Positions Staff Gains Losses

Deputy Commissioner 2 2 _

Assistant Commissioner 6 6 1 1

Senior Executive Level 2 1 1 - -

Commander 20 20 1 2

Senior Executive Level 1 12 11 3 1

Totals 41 40 5 4

81

5.1.3. Geographical Distribution (Does not include Temporary Staff (40) or Undergraduate Recruits (53))

State / Territory Female

Police Male

Staff

Female Male

Both

Female Male

Total

Australian Capital Territory 161 882 246 212 407 1 094 1 501

New South Wales 104 335 32 36 136 371 507

Victoria 65 277 31 16 96 293 389

Queensland 28 160 14 21 42 181 223

South Australia 8 73 11 6 19 79 98

Western Australia 10 89 12 3 22 92 114

Tasmania 1 10 2 - 3 10 13

Northern Territory 1 16 2 - 3 16 19

Overseas 7 75 - 3 7 78 85

Total 385 1917 350 297 735 2 214 2 949

5.1.4. Workforce Composition (Does not include Temporary Staff (40) or Undergraduate Recruits (53))

Rank/Work Level

Police

Female Male

Staff

Female Male

Both

Female Male Total

Commissioner/ . 3 . 0 3 3

Deputy Commissioner Assistant Commissioner/ 6 1 0 7 7

Senior Executive Level 2 Commander/Senior 20 1 10 1 30 31

Executive Level 1 Superintendent/ 2 139 6 41 8 180 188

Work Level 4 Sergeant/ 62 546 36 126 98 672 770

Work Level 3 Constable/ 321 1 203 141 72 462 1 275 1 737

Work Level 2 Work Level 1 na na 166 47 166 47 213

Total 385 1 917 350 297 735 2 214 2 949

82

5.2. Appointments 1993-94 - Staff Members & Police Members Total appointments - 50 (25 Female & 25 Male)

EEO Target Group Female Male Total % of Intake

Women 25 . 25 50.00%

NESBI 1 2 3 6.00%

NESB II 4 1 5 10.00%

Aboriginal & TSI’s 0 0 0 0.00%

Disabled Persons 0 0 0 0.00%

5.3. Secondments/Attachments to Other Agencies/Police Services

Agency/Police Service Level 4/5 Level 3 Level 2 Totals

National Crime Authority Adelaide 1 1

Brisbane 3 3

Melbourne 2 2

Sydney 3 7 10

Sub-total 6 10 16

Australian Securities Commission Adelaide 1 1 2

Brisbane 1 3 4

Canberra 1 1 2

Hobart 1 1

Melbourne 1 2 3

Perth 2 2 4

Sydney 2 2 4

Sub-total 9 11 20

ABC1 2 2

PSCC 1 1

Parliament House Security Co-ord. 1 1

United Nations 0

Cyprus 3 5 12 20

Mozambique 1 5 10 16

Somalia 1 1

Solomon Island Police Project 1 1

Vanuatu Police Project 1 1

PNG Police Project 1 4 5

Office of Minister of Justice 1 1

Norfolk Island Policing 1 2 3

Christmas Island Policing 1 2 7 10

Cocos (Keeling) Islands Policing 1 1

Jervis Bay Policing

1 3 4

Total 10 38 55 103

83

Appendix 6 - Complaints 6.1 Complaints (AFP) Act 1981 Form A - Source of Complaints 1993-94

Files completed (returned from Omb) P.A. Stats - or UD completed, with

Individual complaints Non-complaints Ombudsman for

by Category (see report) (see Form B) Review (P.A. Ombs)

Source 1 Public to Police 322 59.4% A. Incivility 67 29

Source 2 Ombudsman to IID 200 36.9%

B. Assault 29 15

C. Excess Force 8 7

Source 3 Ministerials 15 2.8% D. Entry Search 15 12

Source 4 Commonwealth Dept 3 0.5%

E. Property 36 19

F. Harassment 54 19

Source 5 State Police 2 0.4% G. Neglect Duty 82 35

Source 6 H. Traffic 8 6

Other - 0%

I. Misuse Authority 45 16

Matters referred 71(3) Reg. 4(2)(a)(ii) - 0% J. Criminal 10 2

K. Practices Procedures 25 9

L. Miscellaneous 32 15

M. Arrest/Detention 10 5

N. Non-complaint 18 -

Total Complainants TOTAL: 439 189

Files Reg 4(2)(a)(i) 542

TOTAL COMPLAINANTS: 328 102

Outstanding - still under investigation

35

20

10

10

14

25

21

3

25

3

10

6

182 = 810

112

ρ -Π m σ η ro >

6.3 Allegations (General Order 6) Reported to IID 1993-94 - Form C

Categories Number of Allegations Investigation Completed Outstanding

Failure to give prompt attention to matters within the scope of his duties 4 3

Failure to promptly carry out duties 2 2

Failure to comply with General Orders and/or instructions 4 4

Absence from duty without permission 2 1

Disobey lawful instruction or order 1 1

Omit to make an entry in official book, document or record 3 3

Make false or misleading entry in official book, document or record 4 2

Destroy or mutilate any official book, document or record 1 1

Make written or oral statement that is false or misleading 4 3

Failure to account for money received 3

Failure to account for property in his possession 2 2

Improper use of firearms 1 1

Obtaining personal advantage 4 4

Improper use of property 6 6

Waste or damage to property 2 2

Drink liquor, take drugs (render himself unfit to perform duties) 2 2

Drink liquor or take drugs during the hours of duty 1 1

Whilst off sick, delay return to duty 1 1

Communicate information 5 4

Make anonymous communication to Commissioner or Deputy 1 1

Engage in remunerative employment 5

Negligent or careless in the discharge of duty 2 2

Disgraceful or improper conduct 12 8

Act in a disorderly manner - act in manner unbecoming of a member of the AFP 2 2

Act in manner prejudicial to good order & discipline of AFP 4 4

Bring discredit to reputation of AFP 6 3

Found guilty by a court 1 1

Involvement in any criminal activity 18 11

Miscellaneous 9 6

Non Allegation 3 3

Totals 115 84

1

1

2

1 3

1

5

4

3

7 3

31

6.4 Allegations (General Order 6) - Form D

Results of Completed Investigations 1993-94

Findings on completion of investigations

Categories Number of Allegations A B C D E F G H

00

Discourtesy to the public 1

Failure to give prompt attention to matters within scope of duties 3 Failure to promptly carry out duties 3

Failure to comply with General Orders and Instructions 6

Absence from duty without permission 1

Disobey lawful instruction or order 1

Omit to make an entry in official book, document or record 3

Make false or misleading entry in official book, document or record 3 Destroy or mutilate any official book, document or record 1

Make oral or written statement that is false or misleading 4

Obtaining personal advantage 4

Improper use of property 10

Waste or damage to property 3

Drink liquor, take drugs (render himself unfit to perform duties) 3 Drink liquor or take drugs during the hours of duty 1

Whilst off sick, delay return to duty 1

Communicate information 13

Make anonymous communication to Commissioner or Deputy 1 Negligent or careless in the discharge of duty 3

Disgraceful or improper conduct 10

Act in a disorderly manner - unbecoming a member of the AFP 2 Act in manner prejudicial to good order & discipline of AFP 6 Bring discredit to reputation of AFP 6

Found guilty by a court 1

Involvement in any criminal activity 18

Miscellaneous 10

Non Allegation 5

Totals 123

1 2

1 2

5 1

1

1 3 1 1 1

1

2 2

1 3

7 1 2

1 1

2 1

1

4 7 2

1

2

5 2 2

1 1

2 1 3

1 2 3

1 1 5 3

3 6

45 40 18

1

1

1 * * 1 *

1 1

3* 1 1*

5

1 5 i 5

I

5 1

6

Key A. Substantiated B. Unsubstantiated C. Incapable of Determination D. Withdrawn E. Member resigned F. Allegation merged with complaint G. Member charged with criminal offence H. Non-allegation I. Referred to ISAD * One member resigned and was criminally charged in relation to take drugs and a criminal offence

6.5 Geographical distribution of complaints and allegations received 1993-94 - Form E

Complaints ACT NSW Vic/Tas Qld/NT WA SA Overseas Totals

July 38 3 2 1 1 1 1 47

August 39 2 3 1 1 2 1 49

September 20 8 5 - 2 3 - 38

October 19 1 2 1 - - - 23

November 31 4 9 1 3 2 - 50

December 19 2 3 1 - 3 - 28

January 30 7 7 1 2 1 - 48

February 38 2 2 2 1 - - 45

March 47 5 4 1 1 2 - 60

April 29 8 1 2 1 1 - 42

May 46 4 6 4 1 1 - 62

June 35 5 1 2 5 2 - 50

TOTALS 391 51 45 17 18 18 2 542

Allegations

July 4 3 - 1 - - - 8

A ugust 2 1 3 - - - - 6

S eptem ber 4 1 2 - - - - 7

O ctober 3 1 5 - - - - 9

N o v em b er 4 2 2 - - - - 8

D ecem b er 1 3 - 1 - - 1 6

January 4 4 1 - - - - 9

F ebruary 4 - 2 1 - - - 7

M arch 2 2 1 - - - - 5

A pril 4 4 - - - - - ■ 8

M ay 4 1 2 - - - - 7

June 5 " - 1 - - - 6

T O T A L S 41 22 18 4 - - 1 86

88

Appendix 7 - External Scrutiny

7.1 Reports by the Auditor-General

Audit Report Number 1 1993-94: Report on Ministerial Portfolios, Budget Sittings 1993, The Year in Focus

Audit Report Number 18 1993-94: Aggregate Financial Statement prepared by the Minister for Finance year ended 30 June 1993

Audit Report Number 21 1993-94: Efficiency Audit, Department of Finance, The Australian Government Credit Card - its debits and credits

Audit Report Number 27 1993-94: Report on Ministerial Portfolios, Autumn Sittings 1994

Audit Report Number 32 1993-94: Efficiency Audit - Accrual Accounting - Are Agencies Ready?

Audit Report Number 41 1993-94: The Australian Government Credit Card - Some Aspects of Its Use

7.2 Reports By Parliamentary Committees

Senate Select Committee on Public Interest Whistleblowing - Inquiry into Whistleblowing

Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs - Inquiry into Gender Issues and the Judiciary

Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade - Inquiry into Sexual Harassment in the Royal Australian Navy

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology - Inquiry into Commonwealth Government purchasing policies and the promotion of Australian made goods and services

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Banking, Finance and Public Administration - Efficiency Dividend Arrangements

Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade - Inquiry into Australia’s participation in peacekeeping

89

Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade - Australian Government’s international efforts to promote and protect human rights

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs - Inquiry into effects of the Commonwealth’s Access and Equity strategy on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

90

Appendix 8 - Statement in accordance with section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982

This statement is published to meet the requirements of section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982. The following information should be read in conjunction with the information provided in Chapter 1 of this Report regarding the administrative framework of the AFP and its Ministerial Direction under section 13(2) of the Australian Federal Police Act 1979.

Establishment

The AFP was established in 1979 as a result of recommendations made by Sir Robert Mark in 1978 in his “Report on the Organisation of Police Resources in the Commonwealth Area”. When it was created, the AFP incorporated the Commonwealth Police Service and the ACT Police and,

shortly after, absorbed the drug enforcement functions of the Federal Narcotics Bureau, until then an element of the Department of Customs and Excise.

Decision Making Powers

The decision making powers that directly affect the public are vested in the office of constable, an office held by all sworn members of the AFP, regardless of their administrative rank. The powers and duties of AFP members are prescribed in section 9 of the Australian Federal Police Act 1979.

A police officer in the exercise of his/her decision making power may affect members of the public in the following areas:

(a) the protection of life and property; (b) the preservation of peace and good order; (c) the prevention and detection of offences against the common and statute law; and

(d) matters that may be incidental to the performance of law enforcement generally.

Under the Administrative Arrangements Order, the Australian Federal Police Act 1979 and the Complaints (Australian Federal Police) Act 1981 are the responsi­ bility of the Attorney General and are administered by the Attorney-General’s Department. The Minister for Justice has portfolio responsibility for the

Australian Federal Police.

In addition, AFP members have powers applying to various other pieces of ACT and Commonwealth legislation. It is not practical to include that list in this docu­ ment but it is readily available upon request.

91

Arrangements for Outside Participation

Australasia and South W est Pacific R egion Police Com m issioners’ Conference

This annual conference is attended by the Commissioners of all Australian police services with the Police Commissioners of New Zealand, Fiji and Papua New Guinea. The Conference contributes to cooperative operational arrangements between the services represented and coordinates the policies and programs of common concern to policing within the South West Pacific Region.

Australasian Police Ministers’ Council

The Council is a consultative body of the Police M inisters of the Commonwealth, States and Territories, together with New Zealand, which considers matters of national law enforcement concern, particularly in rela­ tion to the development, provision and use of national common police ser­ vices by Australian Commonwealth, State and Territory police services. The Council currently meets at least twice a year. The Secretariat for the Council is contained within the portfolio of the Minister for Justice. Draft resolutions are submitted to the Council by the Australasian Police Ministers’ Council Senior Officers’ Group, which is comprised of the Police Commissioners of the States and Territories and includes the Commissioner of the AFP.

National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau

The Bureau commenced operations in April 1993 and is a joint initiative of the A ustralian Police C om m issioners’ Conference, the Australian Multicultural Foundation and the Commonwealth Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs. The Bureau acts as a national agency for receipt and dis­ semination of information, suggestions, recommendations and concerns regarding delivery of police services in a multicultural Australia. The National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau is located on the 4th floor, 235 Queen Street, GPO Box 2763Y, M elbourne, V ictoria, telephone (03)603 8341.

92

Categories of documents

The categories of documents that are maintained by the AFP include:

• policy documents, including recommendations and decisions • general correspondence and files • control registers concerning purchasing, official telephones, stores, assets, travel and internal services • subject indexes, nominal indexes and inwards correspondence registers relat­

ing to departmental files • accounting and budgetary records, including estimates, claims, payment records etc. held on files, in folders, on cards and in computer readable form • personal records for all officers for whom standard personnel services are

provided

• staff recruitment campaign records • organisation and staffing records, both manual and computerised, including organisation proposals, organisation charts, duty statements, lists of staff and establishment, position occupancy records • internal control records, including working statistics and monthly reports

• internal working papers • register of relevant Cabinet decisions and submissions • reports and associated working papers resulting from internal audit reviews

• annual plans for internal audit activity • manuals for computer operations standards and procedures • copies of computer hardware and software purchase and maintenance con­ tracts

• computer software and hardware product evaluations • source listings of computer programs developed for the AFP’s use • briefing papers and correspondence in relation to the Australasian Police Ministers’ Council and the common police services, the Australasian and

South West Pacific Region Police Commissioners’ Conference and South Pacific Chiefs of Police Conference • briefing papers and submissions prepared for the Attorney General and Minister for Justice

• correspondence received including ministerials • correspondence on questions asked in Parliament, together with related replies • criminal investigation reports and associated documents

• press statements and media releases • procedures, instructions and guidelines • operational records covering infringement notices, statistics and associated reports

• reports to the Coroner (death and fire) • forensic analysis reports (fingerprints, document examination and scientific) and associated documents • lost property reports and associated documents • crime statistics • court documents and associated statements

93

Documents available free of charge upon request:

• Australian Federal Police (information brochure) • AFP Bicycle Identification Form • Drinking and Driving - It’s Your Choice • Is There a Gun in Your House? • Let’s Beat Crime • Constable Kenny’s Safety Colouring Book • Constable Kenny’s Safety Activity Book • What is the Legal Limit in the ACT • Why You Shouldn’t Drink and Drive

Documents available on payment of a fee

• Search of AFP records for any information of convictions for offences by a person and reporting on the result of that search - $19.00 • Search of AFP records for any information of convictions for offences by a person against the following legislation of the Australian Capital

Territory: Motor Omnibus Regulations - Motor Omnibus Services Regulations - Motor Traffic Act 1936

- Motor Traffic Regulations - Motor Traffic (Alcohol and Drugs) Act 1977 - Roads and Public Places Act 1937 - Traffic Act 1937

and reporting on the results of the search - $19.00 • Check of fingerprints against AFP records of fingerprints, search of AFP records for any information on convictions for offences by a person and reporting on the result of the check and the search - $86.00 • Check of fingerprints against AFP records of fingerprints and reporting on the

result of the check - $40.00 • Providing a copy of a black and white photograph - $17.00 • Providing a colour copy of a colour photograph - $ 14.00 • Providing a copy of road accident report where the accident involved injury

or death - $8.00 • Providing a copy of a road accident report where the accident did not involve injury or death - $6.00 • Providing a copy of a road accident particulars - $5.00 • Providing a copy of a medical report - $25.00 • Search of AFP records for incidents reported by a person over a period of

twelve months regarding alleged harassment of that person and reporting on the results of the search - $25.00 • Search of AFP records by a member for research purposes and reporting on the result of the search - cost to the AFP for the member’s time • Providing a copy of a lost property report, a stolen property or a malicious or

criminal damage report - $42.00 • Providing a copy of a fire or death report - $19.00 • Providing a copy of an industrial accident report - $ 19.00 • Providing a mechanical check of a motor vehicle in Australian Federal Police

custody and reporting on the result of the check - $19.00

94

In accordance with the ACT Weapons Act 1991 the AFP issues the fol­ lowing licences and maintains associated documentation:

• Dangerous Weapons Licence

• Restricted Weapons Licence

• Dealers Licence

FOI Procedures and Initial Contact Points

All requests for FOI access to documents, and appeals against decisions not to grant access to documents, should be addressed to:

The Commissioner

Australian Federal Police

GPO Box 401

Canberra ACT 2601

AFP Freedom of Information request forms are available at regional offices and police stations within the ACT. Completed forms can be left w ith an AFP regional o ffice or forw arded to the above address.

Applicants are not obliged to use the request form, but its use may expe­ dite the request. To enable a comprehensive search of holdings to locate personal details, the AFP requires the full name, date of birth and address of the applicant. A fee of $30.00 will be charged for all requests made

under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and a fee of $40.00 is payable to have a decision reviewed. Payment may be made to the Receiver of Public Moneys.

Processing of all Freedom of Information requests is conducted by Legal Branch, Planning and Development Division, Canberra. The Officer in Charge of that Branch, a Superintendent, is authorised pursuant to section 23 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982, to make decisions concern­

ing release under that Act. Should a person apply to view original docu­ ments held by the AFP, facilities will be made available where possible at the regional AFP office closest to the applicant’s residential address.

For further information regarding matters discussed above, members of the AFP’s Legal Branch may be contacted on the following telephone numbers: (06) 275 7249, 275 7537 and 275 7529.

95

Alternatively, interested persons may wish to contact the AFP offices located in the state capital cities. Addresses and telephones numbers are as follows:

Sydney

110 Goulbum Street Sydney South NSW 2000 Tel: (02) 286 4000

Melbourne 383 Latrobe Street Melbourne VIC 3002 Tel: (03) 607 7777

Brisbane Cnr Marie and Graham Sts Milton QLD 4064 Tel: (07) 368 5888

Δ π ρ Ι h i H p

129-130 Greenhill Road Eastwood SA 5063 Tel: (08)274 8811

Perth

619 Murray Street West Perth WA 6000 Tel: (09) 320 3444

Hobart 22 Liverpool Street Hobart TAS 7000 Tel: (002)31 0166

Darwin Cnr Witte and Albatross Sts Winnellie NT 5789 Tel: (089) 47 2288

96

Appendix 9 - Annual Financial Statement in accordance with section 50

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1993-94

SUB-CONTENTS

Audit Certificate 98

Certification of the Financial Statements 100

Aggregate Statement of Transactions By Fund 101

Detailed Statement of Transactions by Fund 102

Program Summary 107

Program Statement 108

Statement of Supplementary Financial Information 118

Notes to the Financial Statements 119

Glossary of Terms 130

97

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

A

Centenary House

19 National Crt Barton ACT 2600

our ref;

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

Scope

I have audited the financial statement of the Australian Federal Police for the year ended 30 June 1994.

The statement comprises:

. Aggregate Statement of Transactions by Fund

. Detailed Statement of Transactions by Fund

. Program Summary

. Program Statement

. Statement of Supplementary Financial Information

. Certificate by the Commissioner and the Assistant Secretary, Resources and Services, and

. Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statement.

The Commissioner and the Assistant Secretary, Resources and Services are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial statement and the information contained therein. 1 have conducted an independent audit of the financial statement in order to express an opinion on it.

The Australian Federal Police employs the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statement.

GPO Sox 707 C an b e rra A ustralian C apital Territory 2601 T elephone (06) 2 0 3 7300 F acsim ile (06) 203 7777

98

The audit has been conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards, to provide reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statement is free of material misstatement. Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence supporting the amounts and other disclosures in the financial statement, and the evaluation of accounting policies and significant accounting estimates. These procedures have been undertaken to form an opinion whether, in all material respects, the financial statement is presented fairly in accordance with Australian accounting concepts and standards applicable to public sector reporting entities employing a cash basis of accounting, and

statutory requirements, so as to present a view which is consistent with my understanding of the Australian Federal Police’s operations and certain assets and liabilities.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

Audit Opinion

In accordance with sub-section 51(1) of the Audit Act 1901, I now report that the financial statement, in my opinion:

. is in agreement with the accounts and records kept in accordance with section 40 of the Act,

. is in accordance with the financial statements guidelines made by the Minister for Finance, and

. presents fairly, in accordance with Statements of Accounting Concepts and applicable Accounting Standards and with the Financial Statement Guidelines for Depanmental Secretaries (Modified Cash Reporting), the transactions of the Australian Federal Police for the year ended 30 June 1994 and certain assets and

liabilities as at that date.

'B. A. Kaufmann Acting Executive Director

CANBERRA

23 September 1994

99

S T A T E M E N T BY T H E C O M M IS S IO N E R

AND

PR IN C IPA L A CCO U N TIN G O F F IC E R

CER TIFIC A TIO N

W e certify that, in o u r opinion, th e financial s ta te m e n ts for th e y e a r e n d e d 3 0 J u n e 1994 a re in a g re e m e n t with th e A u stra lia n F e d e ra l P o lice a c c o u n ts a n d re c o rd s a n d th e s ta te m e n ts h a v e b e e n p re p a re d in a c c o r d a n c e with th e d is c lo su re re q u ire m e n ts of th e F inancial S ta te m e n ts G u id e lin e s for D e p a rtm e n ta l S e c re ta rie s (M odified C a s h R eporting) is s u e d in J a n u a ry 1994.

S ig n e d D ated

(A. M. W HIDDETT) D eputy C o m m issio n e r (A dm inistration) F or a n d on b e h alf of th e C o m m issio n e r A ustralian F e d e ra l Police

(A. HOITINK) A ssista n t S e c re ta ry R e s o u rc e s a n d S e rv ic e s Division

100

AUSTRALIAN F E D E R A L PO L IC E A G G R E G A T E STA TEM EN T O F T R A N SA C T IO N S BY FUND F O R T H E YEAR EN D ED 3 0 JU N E 1994

This s ta te m e n t s h o w s a g g r e g a te c a s h tra n s a c tio n s , for w hich th e A F P is re sp o n sib le , for e a c h of th e th re e F u n d s co m p risin g th e C o m m o n w e alth Public A cco u n t (CPA).

1 9 9 2 -9 3 ACTUAL $

C O N SO LID A T ED R EV EN U E FUND (C R F)

1 9 9 3 -9 4 B U D G E T $

1 9 9 3 -9 4 ACTUAL $

5 2 .6 0 7 .4 2 6 * R e c e ip ts (N ote 2) 5 3 .2 4 6 .0 0 0 5 7 ,9 9 5 ,1 5 8

2 2 5.993,831 * ( E x p e n d itu re from A nnual A ppropriations ( E x p e n d itu re from A ppropriations - S e c tio n 35 ( of th e A udit A ct 1901

1 8 9 ,1 9 9 ,0 0 0 )

)

5 2 ,6 4 0 ,0 0 0 )

2 3 7 ,0 7 8 ,6 0 0

225.993.831 E x p e n d itu re 2 4 1 ,8 3 9 .0 0 0 2 3 7 ,0 7 8 ,6 0 0

LOAN FU N D

NIL NIL NIL

T R U S T FU N D

3 ,2 2 6 ,3 7 0 1 ,3 8 8 ,1 7 3 2 ,7 8 7 ,9 3 3

B a la n c e 1 Ju ly 1993 R ec e ip ts E xpenditure

1 .5 5 0 .0 0 0 1 .5 5 0 .0 0 0

1,826,610 5 ,5 5 9 ,6 8 6 1,980,156

1,826 ,6 1 0 B a la n c e 3 0 J u n e 1994 5 .4 0 6 .1 4 0

R e p r e s e n te d by:

1 ,8 2 6 .6 1 0 NIL

C a s h In v e s tm e n t

5,40 6 ,1 4 0 NIL

1 .8 2 6 .6 1 0 5 .4 0 6 .1 4 0

* 1 9 9 2 -9 3 figures h a v e b e e n a d ju sted to include A u stra lia n B ureau of Criminal Intelligence (ABCI) w hich w e re p re v io u sly included in th e A tto rn e y -G e n e ra l's d e p a rtm e n ta l financial s ta te m e n ts .

N ote: T h e a c c o m p a n y in g n o t e s form a n in te g ra l p a r t o f th is s ta t e m e n t.

101

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE DETAILED STATEMENT O F TRANSACTIONS BY FUND FOR THE YEAR ENDED 3 0 JUN E 1994

This Statem ent show s details of c a s h transactions, for which the AFP is responsible, for the C onsolidated Revenue Fund and the Trust Fund.

CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND (CRF)

RECEIPTS TO CRF

The C R F is the main working fund of the Commonwealth an d c onsists of all current m oneys received by the Commonwealth (excluding loan raisings and m oneys received by the Trust Fund). The AFP is responsible for the following receipt items.

1992-93 PROGRAM 1993-94 1993-94

ACTUAL * BUDGET ACTUAL

$ $ $

76,624 Fines, Licences & Seizures 1 52,000 53,993

697,933 O ther M iscellaneous Revenue 1 , 4 8 9 504,000 723,169

1,085 Traffic Infringements 2 0 0

3,169 R evenue R etained by Dept, of Finance 7 0 44,579

54,068 Appropriation Former Years 7 50,000 118,304

032.879 606,000 940.045

Section 35 of the Audit Act 1901 -to be credited to Running Costs 535,967 Sub-D ivision 137-01: } 1 521,000 1,058,334

46,441,581 } 2 47,726,000 48,304,141

330,729 > 3 331,000 365,139

2,170,233 > 4 1,703,000 2,707,570

774,344 } 5 826,000 1,424,378

693,171 } 6 460,000 743,984

115,745 > 7 126,000 1,600,753

83,155 > 8 87,000 68,651

1,922 Sub-D ivision 153-01 9 10,000 1,163

Section 35 of the Audit Act 1901 - to be credited to C om pensation & Legal Expenses 627,700 Item 1 3 7-02-04: 2 850,000 782,000

51,774,547 Total Section 35 Receipts 52,640,000 57,056,113

52,607,426 TOTAL RECEIPTS TO CRF 53.246.000 57,995,158

* 1992-93 figures have b een adjusted to include Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence (ABCI) (Program 9) which were previously included in the A ttorney-G eneral's departm ental financial statem ents.

N ote: T h e acc o m p a n y in g n o te s form a n integral p a rt of this sta te m e n t.

102

EX P E N D IT U R E FR O M C R F

The Constitution requires that an appropriation of m oneys by the Parliam ent is required before any expenditure can b e m ad e from the CRF. Appropriations follow two forms - special (or standing) appropriations and annual appropriations. T he A FP is responsible for the following ex p en se items.

1992-93 ACTUAL $

Annual Appropriations

1993-94 APPROPRIATION $

1993-94 ACTUAL $

223,070,154 * (Appropriation Act No 1 (Appropriation Act No 3 (Section 3 5 Receipts

181,707,000) 3 ,372,000) 57,056,113 )

233,931,554

2,923,677 (Appropriation Act No 2 (Appropriation Act No 4

7,492,000 ) )

3,147,046

Total Expenditure from Annual

225,993,831 Appropriations 249,627,113 237.078,600

225.993.831 TOTAL EXPENDITURE FROM C RF 237.078.600

* 1992 -9 3 figures have b e e n adjusted to include A ustralian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence (ABCI) which w ere previously included in the A ttorney-G eneral's departm ental financial statem ents.

Note: T h e accom panying notes form a n integral part of this statem ent.

103

T R U S T FU N D

This Section d isc lo se s details of e a c h H ead of th e T ru st Fund and Trust A ccount a dm inistered by the AFP w hich a re within the C om m onw ealth Public A ccount. II provides a b reak -d o w n of the information relating to the T rust Fund contained in the A ggregate S ta te m e n t of T ra n sa c tio n s by Fund.

O ther T rust M oneys (A ustralian F e d e ra l Police)

1 9 9 2 -9 3 ACTUAL $

3,123,805 242,107

3,365,912 1,664,689

Legal Authority - Audit Act 1901 sectio n 60 P u rp o se s - for the receipt of m o n e y s tem porarily held in trust for other p e rs o n s

1993 -9 4 BUDGET $

R eceip ts and ex p en d itu re -C a s h b a la n c e at 1 July R eceipts 600,000

Expenditure 600,000

1.701,223 C a s h b a la n ce al 30 J u n e

S e rv ic e s for O ther G o v ern m en ts and N o n -D epartm ental B odies

. Legal Authority - Audit Act 1901 sectio n 60

. P u rp o se s - p a y m e n t of m oneys in connection

with serv ices perform ed on behalf of other g o v ern m en ts a n d non -de p a rtm e n ta l bodies

1 9 9 2 -9 3 1 9 9 3 -9 4

ACTUAL BUDGET

$ $

. R eceip ts and e xpenditure -

102,565 C a s h b a la n ce al 1 July

___930,675 R eceipts 900,000

1,033,240

9 07,853 Expenditure 900,000

125,387 C a s h b a la n ce at 30 J u n e

Note: T h e acco m p an y in g notes form a n integral part of this statem ent.

1993-94 ACTUAL $

1,701,223 1,695,649

3,396,872 391,734

3.005.138

1993-94 ACTUAL $

125,387 L 358.406 1,483,793

1,468,842

14,951

105

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE PROGRAM SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1994

This Statement shews the outlays for each program administered by the AFP and reconciles the AFP's total outlays to total expenditure from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF). "Expenditure* refers to the actual amount of resources consumed by a program w hereas "outlays" refers to the "net" amount of resources consumed, after offsetting associated receipt and other items.

The Statement also reconciles the total receipts classified as revenue (ie receipts not offset within outlays or classified as financing transactions) for each program, with "Receipts to "CRF".

1992-93 ACTUAL $'000

1993-94 1993-94

BUDGET ACTUAL $000 $'000

EXPENDITURE

Outlays

1. Investigation of Crimes Against

84,420 the Commonwealth 88,065 91.484

2,041 2. Community Policing 5,040 3,860

7,498 3. Strategic Intelligence 7,961 7,583

7,626 3,502

4. 5.

International Obligations and Protection Joint Police Services 8,040 2,986

7,854 1,988

12,493 6. Personnel Services 14,206 13,066

34,718 7. Planning and Management 33,364 32,870

16,597 8. Science and Technology Services 24,462 16,358

4,569 9. Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence 4,521 4,075

173,464 Total Outlays 188.645 179.138

Plus Receipts Offset Within Outlays

1. Investigation of Crimes Against

794 the Commonwealth 739 1,241

47,069 2. Community Policing 48,576 49.086

331 3. Strategic Intelligence 331 365

2,170 4. International Obligations and Protection 1,703 2,972

774 5. Joint Police Services 826 1,424

693 6. Personnel Sen/ices 460 744

173 7. Planning and Management 176 1,763

83 6. Science and Technology Services 87 69

442 9. Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence 296 277

52,529 53,194 57,941

225,993 TOTAL EXPENDITURE FROM CRF 241.839 237.079

RECEIPTS

Revenue

1. Investigation of Crimes Against

77 the Commonwealth 52 54

1 2. Community Policing 0 0

78 Total Revenue 52 54

52,529 Plus Receipts Offset Within Outlays 53,194 57,941

52,607 TOTAL RECEIPTS TO CRF 53,246 57,995

Note: The accompanying notes form an integral part of this statement.

107

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE PROGRAM STATEMENT FO R THE YEAR ENDED 3 0 JU N E 1994

This statem ent show s details of expenditure from annual appropriations for each program adm inistered by the AFP. T he program s have been num bered 1 to 9 to align with the A F P s program structure. T h e s e correspond to com ponents 6.1.1 to 6.1.8 and 6.3.1 of the Attorney G eneral's Portfolio Program P erform ance Statem ents 1993-94. E ach 'annual' appropriation item contributing to a program is identified by its description followed by its appropriation code in brackets. Partial allocations of appropriation item s to program s are indicated by ’(p)' following the item. With respect to those program s for which expenditure from appropriations and 'outlays' differ, the S tatem ent d iscloses information reconciling th e am ounts concerned. T he Statem ent also show s details of revenue for e a c h program (where applicable).

1992-93 ACTUAL $'000

PROGRAM

1993-94 BUDGET $'000

1993-94 ACTUAL $'000

1. INVESTIGATION O F CRIMES AGAINST THE COMMONWEALTH [6.1.1)

Objective: To enhance the C om m onw ealth's ability to prevent, detecL investigate and p re sen t for prosecution, criminal offences com m itted against its laws, revenue, and expenditure.

66,915

Running C osts S a la rie s (137.1)(pj 70,266 74,519

12,887 Administrative E x p en ses (137.1)(p) 13,952 13,097

75

Legal Services provided by the A ttorney-G eneral's D epartm ent (137.1 )(p) 123 163

500

O ther S ervices International Police C om m ission - m em bership (137.2.02) 548 558

4,837 C om pensation & Legal E xpenses

(137.2.04)(p)

3,915 4,388

85,214 Expenditure from Appropriations 88,804 92,725

108

1 9 9 2 - 9 3 A C T U A L $ 0 0 0

P R O G R A M

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 B U D G E T $'000

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 A C T U A L $ '0 0 0

2 5 8 5 3 6

L e s s R e c e ip ts O ffset W ithin O u tla y s O th e r M isc e lla n eo u s R e v e n u e S e c tio n 3 5 R e c e ip ts 2 1 8

521

183

1,058

7 94 7 3 9 1,241

8 4 ,4 2 0 O u tla y s 8 8 .0 6 5 9 1 .4 8 4

77

R e v e n u e C u sto m s S e iz u re s / S a le s of S e iz e d G o o d s

5 2 54

77 5 2 54

8 5 .2 1 4

TO T A L IN V ESTIG A TIO N S O F C R IM E S A GAINST T H E COM M O N W EA LTH PR O G R A M

E X PEN D ITU R E FR O M A PP R O P R IA T IO N S 8 8 ,8 0 4 9 2 ,7 2 5

8 4 ,4 2 0 OUTLAYS 8 8 .0 6 5 9 1 ,484

77 REV EN U E 5 2 5 4

109

1 9 9 2 - 9 3 A C T U A L $'000

P R O G R A M

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 B U D G E T $'000

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 A C T U A L $ 0 0 0

2. COM M UNITY PO U C IN G [6.1.2) *

O bjective: T o continue to im prove th e quality an d re s p o n s iv e n e s s of police s e r v ic e s p ro v id e d to the co m m u n ity o f the A ustralian C apital Territory.

3 8 ,5 1 9

R u n n in g C o s ts S a la rie s (137.1)(p) 3 9 ,8 4 9 4 1 ,3 8 7

9 ,7 2 6 A dm inistrative E x p e n s e s (137.1)(p) 9 ,4 3 8 9 ,8 0 3

199

L egal S e rv ic e s provided by th e A tto rn e y -G e n e ra l's D e p a rtm e n t (137.1)(p) 3 2 9 4 1 0

3 1 5

P ro p e rty O perating E x p e n s e s - C u rre n t (137.1) (p) 2 ,8 1 5 26 4

0 - C apital (137.1)(p) 68 0

16

O th e r S e rv ic e s S u p e ra n n u a tio n P e n s io n s (1 37.2.03) 18 7

3 02 C o m p e n sa tio n & Legal E x p e n s e s 1,064 5 0 8

0

(137.2.04MP)

P la n t a n d E quipm ent (811.2.01)(p) 0 5 3 2

33

P a y m e n ts u n d e r s u b - s e c tio n 34(A)(i) of th e A udit A ct 1901 (137.2.05) 35 3 5

4 9 ,1 1 0 E x p e n d itu re from A ppropriations 5 3 ,6 1 6 5 2 ,9 4 6

4 7 ,0 6 9

L e s s R e c e ip ts O ffset W ithin O u tla y s S e c tio n 3 5 R eceipts 4 8 ,5 7 6 4 9 ,0 8 6

2.041 O u tla y s 5 .0 4 0 3 ,8 6 0

1

R e v e n u e Traffic Infringem ents 0 0

1 0 0

4 9 .1 1 0

TO TA L COM M UNITY PO U C IN G PR O G R A M *

E X PEN D ITU R E FROM A P P R O P R IA T IO N S 5 3 .6 1 6 5 2 .9 4 6

2.041 O UTLAYS 5 .0 4 0 3 .8 6 0

1 R EV EN U E 0 0

* P ro g ra m 2 in c lu d e s re s o u r c e s relating to N ational Policing fu n c tio n s which a r e e x c lu d e d from th e c o stin g s for policing the A C T com m unity.

110

1 9 9 2 -9 3 ACTUAL $ '0 0 0

PR O G R A M

1 9 9 3 -9 4 B U D G E T $ '0 0 0

1 9 9 3 -9 4 ACTUAL $ '0 0 0

7 ,2 4 0

3. ST R A T EG IC IN TELLIG EN C E [6.1.3]

O bjective: T o pro v id e tim ely a n d a c c u ra te s tra te g ic a s s e s s m e n t s on criminal th r e a ts a n d tre n d s , a n d a d v ic e o n law e n fo rc e m e n t n e e d s a n d s tra te g ie s .

R unning C o s ts S a la rie s (137.1)(p) 7 ,6 6 5 7,4 8 5

589 A dm inistrative E x p e n s e s (137.1)(p) 62 7 463

7 ,8 2 9 E x p en d itu re from A ppropriations 8 ,2 9 2 7,9 4 8

331

L e ss R e c e ip ts O ffset W ithin O utlays S e c tio n 3 5 R e c e ip ts 331 3 65

7 .4 9 8 O utlays 7.961 7.5 8 3

7 .8 2 9

TO T A L ST R A T EG IC IN TELLIG EN CE PR O G R A M

EX PEN D ITU R E FR O M A PP R O P R IA T IO N S 8 ,2 9 2 7.9 4 8

7 ,4 9 8 OUTLAYS 7.961 7,5 8 3

111

1 9 9 2 - 9 3 A C T U A L $ '0 0 0

P R O G R A M

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 B U D G E T $ '0 0 0

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 A C T U A L $ '0 0 0

4. INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATIONS AND PR O T E C T IO N [6.1.4]

O bjective: To im prove th e quality of p olice s e rv ic e s re q u ire d to protect o th e r C o m m o n w e alth in te re sts.

7 ,8 3 6

R unning C o sts S a la rie s (137.1)(p) 7 .3 6 0 8,291

1,539 A dm inistrative E x p e n se s (137.1 )(p) 1,951 2 ,1 2 5

3

L egal S e rv ic e s provided by th e A tto rn e y -G e n e ra l's D e p artm e n t (137.1)(p) 6 0

3 6 3

5 5

O th e r S e rv ic e s P e a c e - k e e p in g Force - C yprus (137.2.01) C o m p e n sa tio n & Legal E x p e n s e s

(137.2.04)(p)

3 7 3

53

401

9

9 ,7 9 6 E x p en d itu re from A ppropriations 9 ,7 4 3 1 0 ,8 2 6

0

2 .1 7 0 2 .1 7 0

L e ss R e c e ip ts O ffset Within O utlays O th e r M iscellaneous R e v e n u e S e c tio n 3 5 R eceipts

0

1.703 1.703

2 6 4

2 ,7 0 8 2 ,9 7 2

7 ,6 2 6 O utlays 8 ,0 4 0 _ 7 ,8 5 4

TOTAL INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATIONS A ND PRO TECTIO N PROG RA M

9 ,7 9 6 EX PEN D ITU RE FROM A PPR O PR IA T IO N S 9 ,7 4 3 1 0 .8 2 6

7 .6 2 6 OUTLAYS 8 .0 4 0 7 .8 5 4

112

1992-93 ACTUAL $ 0 0 0

PROGRAM

1993-94 BUDGET $'000

1993-94 ACTUAL $'000

5. JOIN T POLICE SERVICES [6.1.5]

Objective: To provide leadership in developing effective relationships with other police services, law enforcem ent and related ag en cies to ensure a cohesive and coordinated effort countering criminal threats and activities against the A ustralian community.

3,051

Running C osts Salaries (137.1)(p) 3,443 2,453

1,223 Administrative E xpenses (137.1 )(p) 367 959

2

O ther S en/ices C om pensation & Legal E xpenses (137.2.04)(p)

2 0

4,276 Expenditure from Appropriations 3,812 3,412

774

L ess Receipts O ffset Within O utlays Section 35 R eceipts 826 1,424

3,502 O utlays 2.986 1.988

TOTAL JOINT POLICE SERV ICES PROGRAM

4.276 EXPENDITURE FROM APPROPRIATIONS 3.812 3.412

3.502 OUTLAYS 2,986 1.988

113

1992-93 ACTUAL $ 0 0 0

PROGRAM

1993-94 BUDGET $'000

1993-94 ACTUAL $'000

4,334

7. PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT [6.1.7]

Objective: To e n su re the best m anagem ent of A FP resources.

Running Costs S alaries (137.1)(p) 4,671 4,889

6.088 Administrative E x p en ses (137.1 )(p) 1,511 5,778

22,689

Property O perating E xpenses - Current (137.1)(p) 20.889 22,626

572 - Capital (137.1)(p) 2,030 335

182

Legal Services provided by the Attorney G eneral's D epartm ent (137.1 )(p) 302 5

271

O ther Services C om pensation & Legal E xpenses 255 145

755

(137.2.04)(p)

A FP Building an d Works (811.2.02) 3,882 855

34,891 Expenditure from Appropriations 33,540 34,633

116

L ess R eceipts O ffset Within O utlays Section 35 R eceipts 126 1,600

54 Appropriation Form er Y ears 50 118

3 R evenue R etained by D epartm ent of Finance 0 45

173 176 1,763

34.718 O utlays 33.364 32.870

TOTAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

34.891 EXPENDITURE FROM APPROPRIATIONS 33.540 34.633

34.718 OUTLAYS 33,364 32.870

115

1 9 9 2 - 9 3 A C T U A L $ '0 0 0

P R O G R A M

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 B U D G E T $ '0 0 0

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 A C T U A L $ '0 0 0

8. S C IE N C E AND TEC H N O L O G Y S E R V IC E S [6.1.8]

O bjective: T o e n s u re th e m o s t a p p ro p ria te application of s c ie n c e a n d technology, a s d e te rm in e d by c o rp o ra te n e e d s , is u s e d th roughout th e o rg a n is a tio n now a n d

7 ,0 8 2

in th e future.

R unning C o s ts S a la rie s (137.1)(p) 7 ,6 3 5 4 ,3 9 6

7 ,4 3 0 A dm inistrative E x p e n s e s (137.1 )(p) 1 3 ,304 10,268

0

L egal S e rv ic e s p rovided by th e A ttorney G e n e r a l's D ep artm en t (137.1 )(p) 0 3

2,1 6 8

O th e r S e rv ic e s P la n t a n d E quipm ent (811.2.01 )(p) 3 ,6 1 0 1,760

16,680 E x p e n d itu re from A ppropriations 2 4 ,5 4 9 1 6 ,427

83

L e s s R e c e ip ts O ffset Within O utlay s S e c tio n 3 5 R ec e ip ts 8 7 69

1 6 .597 O u tlays 2 4 .4 6 2 1 6 .358

1 6 ,680

TO TA L S C IE N C E AND T E C H N O L O G Y S E R V IC E S PR O G R A M

E X PEN D ITU R E FROM A P P R O P R IA T IO N S 2 4 ,5 4 9 16.427

1 6 ,597 OUTLAY S 2 4 .4 6 2 16,358

116

1 9 9 2 - 9 3 A C T U A L $'000

P R O G R A M

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 B U D G E T $ '0 0 0

1 9 9 3 - 9 4 A C TU A L $ '0 0 0

9. A U ST R A U A N BUREAU O F CRIMINAL IN T E L U G E N C E [6.3.1]

O b jectiv e: To provide national facilities for th e collection, collation, an aly sis a n d d is se m in a tio n of crim inal intelligence.

1,235

R u n n in g C o sts S a la rie s (153.1 )(p) 1,326 1,296

2 ,9 1 2 A dm inistrative E x p e n s e s (153.1 )(p) 2 ,5 5 4 2,238

8 6 0

P ro p e rty O peratin g E x p e n s e s - C u rre n t (153.1 )(p) 86 9 750

0 - C a p ita l (1 5 3 .1)(p) 63 61

1

L egal S e rv ic e s p ro v id e d by th e A ttorney G e n e ra l’s D e p artm e n t (153.1 )(p) 2 4

3

O th e r S e rv ic e s C o m p e n sa tio n & Legal E x p e n s e s (153.2.01) 3 3

5,011 E x p e n d itu re from A ppropriations 4,8 1 7 4,352

2

L e s s R e c e ip ts O ffset Within O u tla y s S e c tio n 3 5 R e c e ip ts 10 1

4 4 0 O th e r O ffsetting R e v e n u e 2 86 27 6

4 42 2 96 277

4 .5 6 9 O u tla y s 4,521 4.075

TO T A L A U STR A U A N BU REAU O F CRIMINAL IN T ELU G E N C E PR O G R A M

5.011 EX PEN D ITU R E FR O M A P P R O PR IA T IO N S 4,817 4.352

4 .5 6 9 O U TLA Y S 4.521 4.075

117

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE N O TE S TO TH E FINANCIAL STATEM ENTS FO R THE YEAR END ED 30 JU N E 1994

NOTE 1

STATEM ENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING PO LICIES

(a) B a sis of A ccounting Policy

T h e financial s ta te m e n ts h a v e been p re p a re d in a c c o rd a n c e with the 'F inancial S ta te m e n ts G uidelines for D epartm ental S e c re ta rie s (Modified C a s h R eporting)' is su e d by the M inister lor Finance in Ja n u a ry t9 9 4 .

T he financial s ta te m e n ts h a v e b e en p re p a re d on a c a s h b a sis with th e exception of the S ta te m e n t of S upp lem en tary Financial Information which includes certain a c c ru a l-ty p e inform ation.

T he financial s ta te m e n ts h a v e b e en p re p a re d in a c c o rd a n c e with th e historical c o st convention a n d d o not take a cc o u n t of changing m oney v alues e x ce p t for certain a s s e ts w hich a re at valuation.

(b) N o n -C u rre n t A ss e ts

V aluations of land and buildings w ere perform ed by the A ustralian V aluation Office at D ecem b er 1993, at m arket value a p art from o n e property valued a t A ugust 1992. All o th e r n o n -c u rre n t a s s e ts held a s a t 30 J u n e 1994 a re recorded on th e b a sis of historical cost.

All d e p re ciab le n o n -c u rre n t a s s e ts a re written off over their e stim ated useful lives. D epreciation is calcu lated using the straight line m ethod which is c o n siste n t with the pattern of u s a g e a n d ra te of loss of v a lu e of the A F P 's depreciable n o n -c u rre n t a s s e ts . This is th e first y e a r for reporting depreciation.

(c) Minor A sse ts

Minor a s s e ts , o th e r th a n receivables, a d v a n c e s a n d prepaym ents, having a unit valu e of le ss than $2,000, have not b e e n a cc o u n te d for in the S ta te m e n t of S u p p lem en tary Financial Information.

(d) R ounding

A m ounts show n in the A ggregate S ta te m e n t of T ran sa ctio n s by Fund a n d the D etailed S ta te m e n t of T ran sactio n s by Fund (and related notes) h a v e b e e n rounded to the n e a re s t dollar. A m ounts in the o th e r S ta te m e n ts h a v e been ro unded to the n e a r e s t th o u san d dollars.

(e) E m ployee Entitlem ents

All vesting em p lo y ee entitlem ents (including an n u al leave, long serv ice leave and A ustralian F ed eral Police A djustm ent S c h e m e [AFPAS]), a re reco g n ised a s liabilities for the first tim e this year (19 9 3 -9 4 ) a s required by the a b o v e m entioned guidelines.

Provision is m a d e for long service le a v e an d a n n u al le a v e estim ated to b e p ayable to e m p lo y e es. A m ounts a cc ru e d for a n n u al leave a re sh o w n a s current liabilities. E m p lo y ees a re entitled to long serv ice after 10 y e a r s service. Long service leave

is a lso a cc ru e d in re s p e c t to all e m p lo y e es with m ore th a n 5 y e a rs serv ice on the b a sis that th e A FP is m o re likely than not to b e required to pay su ch a m o u n ts in the future. Long serv ice le a v e is apportioned be tw ee n cu rre n t a n d n o n -c u rren t on the b a sis of historical d ata. T h e cu rre n t portion is b a s e d on p a y m e n ts m a d e in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 .

119

T h e A F P 's liability for A F P A S is a c c ru e d in re s p e c t of all m e m b e rs a n d staff m e m b e rs of th e A FP. A s few , if an y , e m p lo y m e n t c o n tra c ts will b e re n e w a b le in 1 9 9 4 - 9 5 th e a m o u n ts a re pred o m in an tly sh o w n a s n o n -c u rr e n t liabilities.

The above employment liabilities have been calculated using probability factors determined by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Liabilities relating to s u p e ra n n u a tio n with re s p e c t to m e m b e rs a n d staff m e m b e rs of th e A F P h a v e b e e n e x c lu d e d from th e s e financial s ta te m e n ts .

(f) Foreign Currencies

A m o u n ts p a y a b le to a n d by th e A F P in foreign c u rre n c ie s h a v e b e e n tra n s la te d to A ustralian c u rre n c y a t r a te s of e x c h a n g e prevailing a t 3 0 J u n e 1994, or, w h e re forw ard e x c h a n g e c o v e r h a s b e e n o b ta in e d , a t s e ttle m e n t date. M onetary a s s e t s a n d liabilities held o v e r s e a s a n d w hich h a v e b e e n d is c lo se d in th e s ta te m e n ts h a v e b e e n tra n s la te d to A ustralian c u rre n c y a t ra te s of e x c h a n g e prevailing a t 3 0 J u n e 1994. T ra n s a c tio n s o ccurring d uring th e y e a r h a v e b e e n c o n v e rte d a t th e ra te of e x c h a n g e prevailing a t th e d a te of e a c h tran sactio n .

(g) Corporate On-costs

W ith th e e x ce p tio n of p ro g ram 2, w hich in c lu d e s a c o m p o n e n t re p re sen tin g c o rp o ra te o n - c o s ts relating to th e ACT C om m unity Policing function, e x p e n d itu re fig u res s h o w n in th e P rogram S ta te m e n t a n d S u m m ary reflect only d ire c t c o s ts o f e a c h p ro g ram a n d d o not include a n y portion of c o rp o ra te c o s ts w hich m a y re la te to th a t program .

(h) U n re c o g n ise d Liabilities

In 1 9 9 2 -9 3 th e A F P re p o rte d o u tsta n d in g legal m a tte rs a s C on tin g en t Liabilities. For 1 9 9 3 -9 4 the A F P h a v e u s e d SA C 4 c o n c e p ts for th e identification of liabilities. U n re c o g n ise d liabilities a r e th o s e w h e re it is n o t p ro b a b le th a t a future sac rific e of s e rv ic e potential o r future b e n e fits will be required o r th e y c a n n o t b e m e a s u re d

reliably. T h e y will n o t b e c o n ta in e d in the S ta te m e n t of S u p p le m e n ta ry F inancial Inform ation but in c lu d e d by w a y of note.

(i) D oubtful D eb ts

W ith th e e x ce p tio n of a m o u n ts ow ing from b u d g e t d e p e n d a n t C om m o n w ealth G o v e rn m e n t D e p a rtm e n ts a n d A g e n c ie s a n d A F P m e m b e rs a n d staff m e m b e rs, a m o u n ts owing for m o re th a n 9 0 d a y s have b e e n c o n s id e re d a s doubtful.

(j) C o m p u te r S o ftw are

C o m p u te r so ftw a re - th e F in a n c ia l S ta te m e n t G u id e lin e s for D epartm ental S e c re ta rie s (M odified C a s h R eporting) require for 1 9 9 3 -9 4 th e reporting of so ftw a re a s a n a s s e t in s o fa r th a t it m e e ts th e definition of a n a s s e t. H o w ev er so ftw a re h a s

n o t b e e n brought to a c c o u n t a s a n a s s e t in th e s e financial s ta te m e n ts b e c a u s e

p ro c e d u re s w ere n o t in p la c e to c ollect inform ation for p u r c h a s e s of so ftw are from third p a rtie s o r colla te c o s tin g s on in -h o u s e d e v e lo p e d so ftw are.

(k) Intangibles

F IN E S T - is a m a n a g e m e n t inform ation s y ste m th e copyright of which is jointly o w n e d by the A ustralian F e d e ra l P olice an d M a n a g e m e n t S o lu tio n s Pty Ltd.

A v a lu e h a s not b e e n b ro u g h t to a c c o u n t for th is copyright b e c a u s e of difficulties in s u b sta n tia tin g d e v e lo p m e n t c o s ts .

120

ΝΟΤΕ 2

ANNOTATED APPROPRIATION

The Appropriations for Running Costs and Compensation and Legal Expenses were annotated pursuant to Section 35 of the Audit Act 1901 to allow crediting of certain receipts.

Agreements were made with the Department of Finance to allow monies recovered from:

* the sale, leasing or hiring out of, or other dealing

with, goods or personal property:

* the sale of real property used for the purpose of

providing staff accommodation or from leasing of real property for that purpose; or

* the provision of services.

Specific Section 35 agreements as to oediting of other moneys to Section 35 accounts have been made for AFP (DIV 137) and ABCI (DIV 153) as detailed below:

DIVISION 137

* witness protection;

* the provision of Community Policing to the Australian Capital

Territory;

* hire of the Southern Region weapons range;

* contributions from participants towards the cost of conducting

training courses and the provision of publications;

* contributions from AIDAB towards the costs of providing training

in the South Pacific region;

* external territories policing;

* contributions from officers towards the prevision of staff housing;

* Territories operations;

* ACT redundancies;

* fees for special projects support services;

* CMTS project;

* NCA funding;

* Parliament House Security,

* Chinese immigration vetting;

* proceeds from sale of staff housing; and

* voice services.

to be credited to the A FPs Section 35 receipts, and retained by the AFP.

Also included in this agreement were receipts which were subject to cost sharing arrangements. These were categorised as tollows:-

* sale of surplus assets;

* the provision of services including telephone interception.

Freedom of Information requests, police reports, false alarm attendances, court attendances of police officers in civil matters and character checks;

* proceeds from cafeteria sales at AFP College, Barton and

City Police Station;

* contributions from SES officers towards the

provision of motor vehicles: and

* TID charges.

Moneys received from the above were credited to Section 35 receipts to the extent of $1.592 million. Receipts in excess of this amount were shared, up to a $ 1.950 million limit on the basis that 80% was credited to Section 35 receipts and 20% to Miscellaneous Receipts. All additional receipts were also credited to Miscellaneous Receipts.

DIVISION 153

officer contributions from semi-official telephone connections; sale/disposal of assets; and sale of mementos.

to be credited to the ABCFs Section 35 receipts, and retained by the ABO.

The annotated a|bpropriations operated were as follows -

Description Annotated

Appropriation $

Receipts

$

Appropriation

$

Expenditure

$

137.1

Division 137 Running costs

(1)

174,532,000

(2)

56,272,950

(1) ♦ (2)

230,804,950 223,347,994

137.2.04 Compensation & Legal costs 4,699,000 782,000 5,481,000 5,230,745

153.1

Division 153 Running costs

179,231,000

4.804,000

57,054,950

1,163

236,285,950

4,805,163

228.578,739

4,349,544

4,804,000 1,163 4,805,163 4,349,544

121

N O T E 7

P R O P E R T Y , PLA NT AND EQ U IPM EN T

1 9 9 2 -9 3 1 9 9 3 -9 4

$'000 $ '0 0 0

L and a n d B uildings

4,225 At in d e p e n d e n t valuation ** 1075

0 At c o st 2 8 5

4,225 1 ,3 6 0

N/A * L e s s a c c u m u la te d d e p re ciatio n 34

4 .2 2 5 1,326

L e a se h o ld Im p ro v em en ts

12,013 At c o st 1 3 ,0 6 0

N/A * L e s s a c c u m u la te d am o rtisatio n 4 ,0 7 4

12,013 8 ,9 8 6

P la n t a n d E q u ip m en t

2 7 ,8 8 0 At c o st 3 2 ,8 4 2

N/A * L e s s a c c u m u la te d d e p re ciatio n 1 7 ,365

2 7 ,8 8 0 1 5 ,4 7 7

4 4 ,1 1 8 T otal P ro p erty , P la n t and E q u ip m en t 2 5 .7 8 9

* D e p re cia tio n is provided for buildings, le a s e h o ld im p ro v em en ts, plant a n d e q u ip m e n t for th e first tim e in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 . D epreciation h a s b e e n c a lc u la te d from th e d a te of p u rc h a s e o r v a lu a tio n a n d in c lu d e s a c c u m u la te d d epreciation.

** V a lu atio n s w e re for 1 9 9 2 -9 3 (30/6/92 : $ 4 ,2 2 5 ,0 0 0 ) a n d for 1 9 9 3 -9 4 (31/8 /9 2 : $ 2 9 0 ,0 0 0 an d 3 1 /1 2 /9 3 : $ 7 8 5 ,0 0 0 ).

124

NOTE 8

CREDITORS - TRADE

Trade creditors a s at 30 June 1994 totalled $2,715,369 (1993 $5,676,073).

Trade creditors have been classified as follows:

1992-93 1993-94

$'000

Other Other Mon-

$000

Commonwealth Commonwealth Commonwealth Total

Departments Controlled Entities Entities $'000 $'000 $000 $'000

5,676 635 292 1.788 2.715

Of the total amount of $2,715,369 unpaid a s at 30 June the following amounts w ere overdue for:

Other Other Non-

Commonwealth Commonwealth Commonwealth Total

Departments Controlled Entities Entities $'000 $000 $000 $000

125 Less than 30 days 0 0 28 28

0 30 - 60 days 0 0 2 2

5 More than 60 days 0 0 2 2

130 0 0 32 32

CREDITORS -OTHER

Other creditors at 30 June 1994 totalled $1.143.344 (1993 $81,085).

The amount shown as other creditors consists o f :

1992-93 $000

Other Other Non-

Commonwealth Commonwealth Commonwealth Total

Departments Controlled Entities Entities $000 $000 $'000 $000

1 Traffic Infringement Notices 0 0 0 0

80 Other Advances 0 0 0 0

N/A Accrued salaries and wages 0 0 881 881

N/A Legal Uabilities 0 0 262 262

81 0 0 1.143 1.143

There were no overdue amounts for Other Creditors.

NOTE 9

PROVISIONS - CURRENT

Employee Entitlements Provision for annual leave Provision for long service leave AFPAS

1993-94 $000

19,559 2.105 380 22.044

125

N O T E 14

U N REC OG N ISED LIABILITIES

T h e re w e re in e x c e s s of 100 un reso lv ed legal c a s e s outstanding a t 30 J u n e 1994 for which th ere m ay or m a y not be a resulting liability a n d /o r for which a n am ount of liability c a n n o t be reliably e stim ated.

NOTE 15

G U A RANTEES AND UNDERTAKINGS BY THE COMMONWEALTH

T h e M inister for Ju stic e h a s given a n undertaking in relation to the m urder of A ssistant C o m m issio n er W inchester that he m ay give a rew ard totalling $250 ,0 0 0 for information leading to th e arrest a n d conviction of th e offender/s. T h e A FP h a s not provided any

g u a ra n te e nor d o e s it adm inister any g u a ra n te e s on b ehalf of the C om m onw ealth.

NOTE 16

ACT O F G R A C E PAYMENTS

T h e re w a s one paym ent, totalling $34,691, m a d e during the year p u rsu a n t to an authorisation given u n d e r section 34A of the Audit A ct 1901. (1 9 9 2 -9 3 : $33,143)

NOTE 17

WAIVER OF RIG H TS TO PAYMENT O F MONEYS

T h e total num ber of p a y m e n ts w aived during the financial y e a r u n d e r th e A ustralian F ederal Police Act 1979 w ere:

1 9 9 2 -9 3 $'000

N um ber 1 9 9 3 -9 4

$'000

3 - A FP R egulation 48 52 4

NOTE 18

AMOUNTS WRITTEN O FF

T h e following details a re furnished in relation to a m o u n ts written off during the y e a r under s u b -s e c tio n 70C (1) of the Audit Act 1901.

199 2 -9 3 $'000

N um ber 1 9 9 3 -9 4

$'000

7 (i) L o s s e s or deficiencies of public m oneys 3 0

1,704 (ii) Lost, deficient, co n d em n ed , u nserviceable or obsolete sto re s 687 18

0 (iii) Irrecoverable d e b ts a n d overp ay m en ts 1 3

0 (iv) Irrecoverable a m o u n ts of rev e n u e 0 0

0 (v) Am ounts of rev en u e, d e b ts or overpaym ents,

the recovery of which w ould, in the opinion of the Minister, b e u neconom ical to recover.

0 0

1.711 691 21

127

N O T E 2 2

UNACQ U ITTED A D V A N C E S

U n a c q u itte d a d v a n c e s w e re a s follows:

1 9 9 2 -9 3 $'000

1 9 9 3 -9 4 $'000

jL O v e r s e a s travel a d v a n c e s

N O TE 2 3

A U D ITO R 'S REM U N ER A TIO N

A m o u n ts re c eiv ed , o r d u e a n d re c e iv a b le , by the A u d ito r- G e n e ra l fo r auditing th e financial s ta te m e n ts of th e A FP.

1 9 9 2 -9 3 $'000

1 9 9 3 -9 4 $'000

110 119

N O TE 24

AUSTRALIAN BU REA U O F CRIMINAL INTELLIG EN CE (ABCI)

F in an cial d etails of th e ABCI h a v e b e e n d isclo se d in th e S ta te m e n t of T ra n s a c tio n s by F und a n d P ro g ra m S ta te m e n t o n a d v ic e re c e iv e d by th e D e p a rtm e n t of F in a n c e . In 1 9 9 2 -9 3 th e inform ation w a s included in th e financial s ta te m e n ts of A tto rn e y -G e n e ra l's D e p artm e n t, h o w e v er,

c o m p a ra tiv e s h a v e b e e n c h a n g e d to include th e s e figures.

129

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Above the Line/Below the Line Transactions

The 'line' is the Budget balance (ie surplus or deficit). The level of revenue and outlays determine the level of the Budget balance and are therefore referred to as 'above the line' transactions. Financing transactions involve the investment of Budget surpluses or the financing of Budget deficits and are therefore referred to as "below the line' transactions.

Act of Grace Payments

Section 34A of the Audit Act 1901 provides that, in special

circumstances, the Commonwealth may pay an amount to a person

notwithstanding that the Commonwealth is not under any legal liability to do so.

Administrative Expenses

Includes not just expenditure on office based activities but ajl operational expenditure (excepting salaries). The item includes both direct costs and overhead expenditure: it includes, inter alia, minor capital expenditure which is considered part of ordinary annual services; it does not include, inter alia, major capital expenditure, grants, loans or subsidies.

Advance to the Minister for Finance (AMF)

The contingency provisions appropriated in the two Supply Acts and the two annual Appropriation Acts to enable funding of urgent expenditures not foreseen at the time of preparation of the relevant Bills. These funds may also be used in the case of changes in expenditure priorities to enable 'transfers' of moneys from the purpose for which they were originally appropriated to another purpose pending specific appropriation.

Annual Appropriations

Acts which appropriate moneys for expenditure in relation to the Government's activities during the financial year.

Appropriation

Authorisation by Parliament to expend public moneys from the Consolidated Revenue Fund or Loan Fund for a particular purpose, or the amounts so authorised. All expenditure (ie outflows of moneys) from the Commonwealth

130

Public Account must be appropriated ie authorised by the Parliament. The authority for expenditure from individual trust accounts is provided under the Audit Act 1901 or an Act establishing the trust account and specifying its purposes. See also "Annual Appropriations' and Special Appropriations'.

Appropriation Act (No. 1)

An Act to appropriate moneys from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the ordinary annual services of Government.

Appropriation Act (No. 2)

An Act to appropriate moneys from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for other than ordinary annual services. Under existing arrangements between the two Houses of Parliament this Act includes appropriations in respect of new policies (apart from those funded under Special Appropriations), capital works and services, plant and equipment and payments to the States and the Northern Territory.

Appropriation Acts (Nos 3 and 4)

Where an amount provided in an Appropriation Act (No. 1 and 2) is insufficient to meet approved obligations falling due in a financial year, additional appropriation may be provided in a further Appropriation Act (No. 3 or No. 4). Appropriations may also be provided in these Acts for new expenditure proposals.

Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 1) and Bill (No. 2) Acts to appropriate moneys from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the Parliamentary Departments.

Appropriations Classified as Financing Transactions

Refers to appropriations which are classified as financing transactions rather than outlays because they are considered to be closely or functionally related to the repayment of loans or comprise transactions involving financial assets or liabilities. They are also referred to as "below-the-line' transactions. They mainly comprise repayments of principal on loans (the interest repayments on loans are "above the line' and are classified as outlays). See also "Financing Transactions'.

Appropriations Classified as Revenue

Refers to Appropriations which are netted against receipts. They do not form part of outlays because they are considered to be closely or functionally related to certain revenue items or relate to refunds of receipts and are therefore

131

shown as offsets to receipts eg refunds of PAYE tax instalments, working capital advance to the Government Printer.

Audit Act 1901

The principal legislation governing the collection, payment and reporting of public moneys, the audit of the Public Accounts and the protection and recovery of public property. Finance Regulations and Directions are made pursuant to the Act.

Below the Line Transactions

See Above the line' transactions.

Commonwealth Public Account (CPA)

The main bank account of the Commonwealth, maintained at the Reserve Bank in which are held the moneys of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, Loan Fund and Trust Fund (other than the National Debt Sinking Fund).

Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF); Loan Fund: Trust Fund

The three Funds comprise the Commonwealth Public Account (CPA).

CRF The principal working fund of the Commonwealth mainly financed by taxation, fees and other current receipts. The Constitution requires an appropriation of moneys by the Parliament before any expenditure can be made from the CRF. These follow two forms:

(i) annual appropriations consisting of Supply Acts (Nos 1

and 2), the Supply (Parliamentary Departments) Act, the Appropriations Acts (Nos 1-4) and the Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Acts (Nos 1 and 2) (the Supply Acts relate to the first five months of the financial year and are subsumed by the corresponding

Appropriation Acts); and

(ii) special or standing appropriations.

Loan A uthority for its establishm ent comes from the Audit

Fund Act. All moneys raised by loan on the public credit of the

Commonwealth are credited to the Loan Fund. Expenditures from the Loan Fund require an appropriation by Parliament and are limited to the purpose(s) for which moneys were originally raised as specified.

132

Trust Essentially comprises trustee funds (termed "Heads of Trust') Fund established under S.60 of the Audit Act (ie moneys held in trust for the benefit of persons or bodies other than the Commonwealth); trust accounts established under S.62A of the Audit Act (ie working

accounts covering certain government agencies and certain other accounts in the nature of "suspense accounts'); and trust accounts established under other Acts to meet future expenditure.

Payments into the Trust Fund may be way of appropriation from the CRF or Loan Fund or direct credit of private moneys. Expenditure from the Trust Fund is appropriated for (and limited to) the specific purposes of each trust account, or head of trust, by the Audit Act or the Act establishing the trust account or head of trust. Unlike the unused portion of annual appropriations, trust account balances - as with "special1 or "standing1 appropriations - do not lapse at the end of the financial year.

Legal advice is to the effect that investments, and the liquidation of those investments, involve "expenditure' and "receipts' for the purposes of subsection 50(2) of the Audit Act and that the balances of the Trust Fund should be reduced by the amount of investments outstanding at 30 June. In the interests of informative reporting, the financial statements have been designed so as to include explicit

investment information. In particular, information concerning expenditure and receipts has been split as between investment and non-investment activities so as to provide "notional1 balances taking into account the value, investments, and a "cash' balance after account is taken of investment transactions.

Expenditure

The total or gross amount of money spent by the Government on any or all of its activities (ie the total outflow of moneys from the Commonwealth Public Account) (c.f. "Outlays'). All expenditure must be appropriated ie authorised by the Parliament, (see also "Appropriations').

Every expenditure item is classified to one of the economic concepts of outlays, revenue (ie offset within revenue) or financing transactions.

Financing Transactions

Relate to the raising and repayment of loan principal or transactions involving financial assets or liabilities (eg changes in investments or holdings of cash). They represent the difference between outlays and revenue and hence involve the investment of Budget surpluses or the financing of Budget deficits. As such they are referred to as "below the line' transactions. See also "Appropriations classified as financing transactions'.

133

Loan Fund

See "Consolidated Revenue Fund'.

Outlays

An economic concept which shows the net extent to which resources are directed through the Budget to other sectors of the economy after offsetting recoveries and repayments against relevant expenditure items ie outlays consist of expenditure net of associated receipt items. Outlays are "above the line" transactions. The difference between outlays and revenue determines the Budget balance (ie surplus or deficit). See also "Appropriations'; "Appropriations classified as revenue'; "Appropriations classified as financing transactions'; and "Receipts offset within outlays'.

Receipts

The total or gross amount of moneys received by the Commonwealth (ie the Commonwealth Public Account). Every receipt item is classified to one of the economic concepts of revenue, outlays (ie offset within outlays) or financing transactions.

Receipts not Offset within Outlays

Receipts classified as "revenue1 . See also Revenue'.

Receipts Offset within Outlays

Refers to receipts which are netted against certain expenditure items because they are considered to be closely or functionally related to those items eg receipts from computer hire charges are offset against the running costs of the department's accounting and management information systems.

Revenue

Items classified as revenue are receipts which have not been offset within outlays or classified as financing transactions. The term "revenue1 is an economic concept which comprises the net amounts received from taxation, interest, regulatory functions, investment holdings and government business undertakings. It excludes amounts received from the sale of government services or assets (these are offset within outlays) and amounts received from loan raisings (these are classified as financing transactions). Some expenditure is offset within revenue eg refunds of PAYE tax instalments and the operating expenditure of budget sector business undertakings. See also Receipts'.

134

Special (Standing) Appropriation

Moneys appropriated by a specific Act of Parliament for a specific purpose (eg unemployment benefits, grants to States for schools). They may or may not be for a specific amount of money or particular period of time. Special Appropriations do not require annual spending authorisation by the Parliament as they do not lapse at the end of each financial year. A distinction is sometimes

made between Standing and Special Appropriations. Standing Appropriations refer to an open-ended appropriation of the Consolidated Revenue Fund by the enabling Act of a legislatively-based program: the amount appropriated will depend on the demand for payments by claimants satisfying program eligibility criteria specified in the legislation. Special Appropriations can be regarded as somewhere between Standing and Annual Appropriations: while a specified amount is provided, it is

included in a separate Bill authorising the particular program and can be specified for any number of years.

Trust Account Transactions Affecting Outlays

Refers to the movement in trust account balances. Outlays measure the net extent to which resources are directed from the Commonwealth Public Account (ie through the Budget) to other sectors of the economy. Accordingly, the transactions of the CRF, the Trust Fund and the Loan Fund are consolidated and

inter-fund transfers disregarded. Thus expenditure from the CRF under an appropriation to a trust account would not in itself contribute to outlays, but the expenditure undertaken from the trust account would. Consequently, in reconciling the level of outlays to the level of appropriations, it is necessary to adjust the latter for the movements in trust account balances which are classified to outlays.

Trust Fund

See 'Consolidated Revenue Fund1 .

135

List of Abbreviations

ABCI Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence

ABDC Australian Bomb Data Centre

ACS Australian Customs Service

ACT Australian Capital Territory

AFP Australian Federal Police

APMC Australian Police Ministers’ Council

ATO Australian Tax Office

AUSTRAC Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre

CAIU Criminal Assets Investigation Unit

CATF Criminal Assets Trust Fund

CLER Report of the Review of Commonwealth Law Enforcement Arrangements

DFAT Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

DSS Department of Social Security

EEO Equal Employment Opportunity

Elliot Report

FTA

Report on the Inquiry into Fraud on the Commonwealth Focusing on Fraud

Fixed Term Appointment

HOCOLEA Heads of Commonwealth Operational Law Enforcement Agencies

Interpol

ISAD

International Criminal Police Organisation

Internal Security and Audit Division

ITSA Insolvency and Trustee Service, Australia

MOSC Management of Serious Crime

NCA National Crime Authority

NIFS National Institute of Forensic Science

P&IRD Personnel and Industrial Relations Division

UN United Nations

136

Index

A

abduction and kidnap, 20, 68, 76 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff mem­ bers and police member appointments, 83 Aboriginal awareness program, 48 Aboriginal Employment Strategy, 46 Aboriginal Friends Call-Out Roster, 31 Aboriginal Liaison Officer, 31

temporary position, 46 Aboriginal Police Liaison Committee, 30-1 access and equity, 8

contact officer for further information, 63 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42, 92 see also Equal Employment O pportunity

Program accidents and dangerous occurrences, 48 Accounting Procedures Manual, 53 accrual accounting instruction package, 53 acetic anhydride seizures, 22 ACT Ambulance Service, 29 ACT Fire Brigade and Emergency Services Group,

27, 29

ACT Housing Trust, 28 ACT Office of Rental Bonds, 28 ACT Region, 5, 25-31,53 community opinion survey, 27

complaints and allegations, 50, 88 corporate service area review, 45 drug seizures, 80 Headquarters, 58 offences reported or becoming known, 76-9 police and staff members, 82 Advanced Certificate in Investigations, 47 advertisements (recruitment), 46 AFP Aboriginal Employment Strategy, 46

AFP Criminal Activity Model (AFP CAM), 34 AFP Enterprise Bargain Agreement 1993, 45-6, 53 AFP Museum, 54 AFP Training College, Barton, 47-8

catering service, 49 refurbishment, 48, 53 AFP Undergraduate Scheme, 48 AIDEX demonstrations, 31 allegations and complaints against AFP personnel,

49-50, 84-8 disciplinary matters, 55 Ambassadors, protection of, 39 amphetamines, 20, 71, 80

Andersen Software Services Pty Ltd, 55 annual report, 1 compliance with requirements, 62 contact officer, ii

1992-93 Scrutiny, 2 anti-corruption, 49-50 appointments (staff members and police members), 83 armed robbery, 77 arson, 69, 79 assaults, 68, 72, 76-7

complaints against AFP, 84, 85 Associate Diploma in Investigations, 47 Associate Diplom a of Applied Science and Forensic Investigation, 58 attachment/secondments to other agencies/police

services, 82-3 attempted murder, 76 Attorney-General’s Department cooperation with, 20

senior officer training, 48 Auditor-General reports, 89 contact officer for further information, 63 audits (internal), 49

AUSTRAC, reference from, 14-15 Australasia and South West Pacific Regional Police Commissioners’ Conference, 42, 92, 93 A ustralasian and South West Pacific Police

Photographic Competition, 54 Australasian Police Ministers’ Council (APMC), 42, 92, 93 Australasian Policing Strategy, 42 Australian Bomb Data Centre, 35 A ustralian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence

(ABCI), 42 National Strategic Intelligence Course, 35 secondments/attachments to, 83 Australian Capital Territory, 5, 25-31, 53

community opinion survey, 27 complaints and allegations, 50, 88 corporate service area review, 45 drug seizures, 80

Headquarters, 58 offences reported or becoming known, 76-9 police and staff members, 82 Australian Customs Service (ACS) cooperation with, 7, 15-16, 36 Memorandum of Understanding with, 16 senior officers: reports and briefings, 34; train-

137

ing, 48

Australian Defence Force, 34 Australian Federal Police Act 1979, 2, 91 Australian Government Analytical Laboratories, Memorandum of Understanding with negotiat­

ed with, 16 Australian International Defence Exposition (AIDEX) demonstrations, 31 Australian National University Graduate Program

in Strategic Studies, 35 Australian Nature Conservation Agency, referral from, 22 Australian Police Staff College, 42 A ustralian Securities Commission,

secondments/attachments to, 83 Australian Taxation Office (ATO) cooperation and liaison with, 14, 17, 36 corruption involving a member of, 35 authority of the AFP, 2 awards

Jolimont Centre incident, 29 Winston Churchill Memorial Trust fellowship, 30

B

Bangkok post, 23 Bankruptcy Act offences, 20, 66, 67 Barton College, 47-8 catering service, 49

refurbishment, 48, 53 bicycle theft, 74, 78 blackmail and extortion offences, 77 boat theft, 78 Bomb Data Centre, 35 Bomb Safety Program packages, 35 Building and Accommodation Branch, 53 Burma, 23 burglary, 68

Australian Capital Territory, 28, 77 Jervis Bay, 73 business regulations, contact officer for informa­ tion about, 63

c

Cambodia, United Nations Transitional Authority in, 47, 49 Canberra, see ACT Region Canberra Institute of Technology, 58 cannabis and cannabis resin, 15-16, 18, 19-20, 22,

58 seizures, 71, 80 cash transaction reports (AUSTRAC) reference, 14-15 Central Region (South Australia)

complaints and allegations, 88 corporate service area review, 45 police and staff members, 82 Certificate Investigations (Government Agencies), 47 child abduction, 20 China, 22, 23 Christmas Island Policing, 83 City Police Station (ACT), 31 client agencies, communication and liaison with, 7,

13, 14 in the ACT, 28, 29, 30 Internal Security and Audit Division, 49 Memoranda of Understanding, 16 client feedback

ACT community, 27 International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation Department digests, 34 liaison officer network, 23 cocaine, 15, 16, 18

intelligence activities and assessments, 34, 35, 36 seizures, 71, 80 Cocos (Keeling) Islands Policing, 83 Comcare cases, 48 Commissioner’s Financial Directions, 53 common police services, 42, 93 Commonwealth Bank, fraud against, 14 Commonwealth Law Enforcement Arrangements

(CLER), 5,7, 13, 33 Commonwealth offences, investigation of (Program 1), 11-24 reconciliation of program and appropriation

elements, 9 statistics, 65-74 communication facilities upgrade, 53 communication overseas, 22-4 communication and liaison with client agencies, 7,

13, 14 in the ACT, 28, 29, 30 Internal Security and Audit Division, 49 Memoranda of Understanding, 16 community awareness (Western Region), 36 community cooperation and involvement, 27

study tour, 30 community forums in the ACT, AFP representation on, 30 Community Law Reform Committee, 30 community opinion survey (ACT), 27 community policing, 5, 25-31, 39 Community Policing (Program 2), 25-31

reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 statistics, 76-80 competency based training, 47

138

complaints and allegations, 49-50, 84-8 discipline, 55 sexual harassment, 46 Complaints (Australian Federal Police) Act 1981,

91

computer crimes, 21 computers and computerised systems AFP Criminal Activity Model (AFP CAM), 34 FINEST, 53

Mapinfo, 28 security, 49 conferences, 22, 24, 31, 42, 58 see also seminars; workshops Confiscated Assets Trust Fund money, 23, 34, 54,

58

conservation prosecutions, 22 conspiracy to import drugs, 15 consultants, 46, 53, 55 contact officer for further information about,

63

consultation arrangements for outside participation, 92 contact officers, 63-4 annual report enquiries, ii

Freedom of Information requests, 95-6 convictions, 65, 66, 67 appeals against, 7

effectiveness of Witness Protection Program, 39 cooperation (interagency), 7, 13, 14 in the ACT, 29

Memoranda of Understanding, 16 see also communication with client agencies corporate overview, 1 -9 Corporate Plan, 2 Corrective Services Ministers’ Conference, 42 corruption (official), 7

intelligence activities, 35 cost savings in recruitment, 46 costing activity guidelines, 53 Council of Australian Governments, 42

counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 counterfeiting offences, 68, 78 credit cards, 20 traveller’s cheques, 21

court decisions, 64 admissibility of evidence, 6,7 court hearings, expedition of, 6 Crawfords Australia, 54 credit cards (counterfeit), 20

Crimes Act 1914, 6 Crimes Act 1958 (Victoria), 6 crimes against the Commonwealth, investigation of (Programyl), 11-24

reconciliation of program and appropriation

elements, 9 statistics, 65-75 Crimes (Fingerprinting) Act 1988 (Victoria), 6 Crimes (Search Warrants and Powers of Arrest) Amendment Act 1994, 6 Criminal Activity Model (AFP CAM), 34 criminal assets, recovery of, 13,17, 36

in the ACT, 29 number and value of matters referred for inves­ tigation, 66, 67 Criminal Assets Investigation Units, 13 crim inal conduct complaints and allegations

against AFP personnel, 49-50, 84-7 discipline, 55 criminal environment, 5-7, 21-2 criminal intelligence, 32-6 cross operational referencing, 35 cultural awareness training package, 31 currency offences, 13, 21, 66 customs legislation, seizures under, 13 Cyprus peacekeeping force, 83

D

dangerous occurrences, 48 decision making powers affecting the public, 91 Departm ent of Employment, Education and Training, 46

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) cooperative investigation with, 15 familiarisation course, 24 reports and briefings to, 34 Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs

(DIEA) cooperative investigations with, 15, 19 reports and briefings to, 34 Department of Industrial Relations, negotiation

with, 7

Department of Social Security, cooperative investi­ gation with, 15 diplomatic personnel, protection of, 39 ‘Directions in Australasian Policing’ Strategy, 42 disabilities, appointment of staff members and

police members with, 83 Discipline Unit, 55 DNA testing laboratory, 58 documents held by the AFP, 92-5

aids to understanding operations, 64 dolphins, convictions for illegally killing, 22 drinking offences (underage) in the ACT, 28 Drug Detector Dogs, training of, 16 drugs, 7, 15-18, 19-20, 58

in the ACT, 29, 80 intelligence activities and assessments, 34, 35, 36

139

matters referred for investigation, 65 overseas liaison post intelligence results, 22 property seizures, 13 performance audit of national function, 49 seizures, 71, 80

E

Eastern Region complaints and allegations, 88 corporate service area review, 45 cross operational referencing, 35 counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 drug operations, 17, 18 police and staff members, 82 security awareness training, 49 Sentence Indication Hearings, 6 telephone “phreaking”, 21 “Ecstasy”, 18 efficiency dividend, 9

ACT Government, 27 efficiency measures, working parties tasked with identifying, 45 Electronic and Technical Division, 57-8 employment, terms and conditions of, 7, 45-6 energy usage review, 53 enquiries, contact officers for, 63-4

annual report, ii see also parliamentary inquiries inquiries from the media, 54 Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 1993,45-6, 53 environmental matters, 53

contact officer for further information about, 63 environmental offences, 22, 69, 79 Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Program, 46 appointments, 83 contact officer for further information, 63 equity, 8 contact officer for further information, 63 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42, 92 establishment of the AFP, 91 ethics training, 50 ethnic communities, 42 evaluation of performance, 2 evidence admissibility of, 6 obtained using listening devices, 7 expenditure, 53 on training, 47 see also program costs; running costs external agencies training program, 47-8 external territories, police services in, 39, 83 extortion offences, 68, 77

F

Family Law Act referrals, 20, 67 “Family Leave”, 45-6 FBI, technology exchange arrangements with, 58 Federal Agency course, 49 Federal Court decisions, 6

contact officer for further information about, 64 Federal Police Disciplinary Tribunal, 55 “The Feds” (telemovie), 54 female members and staff members, 82

female offenders, 68-70 Australian Capital Territory, 76-9 Fiji Police, intelligence training to, 39 financial management, 51-4 financial resources, 8-9, 52-3

Community Policing, 25, 26 contact officer for further information about, 63

International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation of Crimes Against the

Commonwealth, 12 Joint Police Services, 41 People, 44 Planning and Management, 52 Science and Technology, 57 Strategic Intelligence, 33 financial transaction reports (AUSTRAC) refer­

ence, 14-15 Financial Statements, 97 FINEST, 53 fingerprints, 6

training courses, 58 firearms offences, 20, 79 fishing offences, 22 fixed term appointment (FTA) arrangements, 45,

46

flexible working arrangements, 45 Focusing on Fraud, 5 forecasting procedures (financial), 53 Foreign Anti-Narcotics Community, 23 forensic science, 58 forgery, 14-15 fraud, 14-15

in the ACT, 77: presentation of complicated matters to Magistrates and Supreme Courts, 28-9 AFP training services into prevention, detec­ tion and investigation, 48 intelligence activities and assessments, 35 matters referred for investigation, 65-6 offences identified, 68, 77 telephone “phreaking”, 21 fraud control (AFP), 49

140

contact officer for further information about, 63 fraud on the Commonwealth inquiry, 5 “Fraudstop” seminars, 28 Freedom of Information statement, 91-6 Freehill, Hollingdale and Page, 46 full time staff, 81

G

gaol (jail) terms, 65, 66, 67 effectiveness of Witness Protection Program, 39 general crime, 20, 66-7 goals of the AFP, 3 good order, offences against, 69, 79 Government and Public Relations, 54 Governor-General, protection of, 39

graduate recruits, 48 Graduate Program in Strategic Studies, 35 Groundwork Development, 46

H

handling stolen goods, 69, 78 harassment (sexual), strategies for combating, 46 Headquarters, 11 Interpol National Central Bureau, 23

health and safety, 48-9 Health Insurance Commission, cooperative investi­ gation with, 15 heroin, 15, 17-18

in the ACT, 29, 80 intelligence activities and assessments, 22, 34, 35, 36 seizures, 71, 80 High Court decisions, 7 House of Representatives Standing Committee on

Banking, Finance and Public Administration, 5 submission to, 9 Human Resource Development Plan, 45 Human Resource Plan, 45 human resources, see staffing resources

I

immigration offences, 15, 19, 23 income tax avoidance, 14 indigenous groups, liaison with, 30-1 Indonesia (Jakarta) post, 23 industrial democracy, 45 industrial relations, 7, 45-6 Industrial Relations Reform Act 1993,1

information management report, 55 Information Security Policy, 49 inquiries, contact officers for, 63-4 annual report, ii

see also parliamentary inquiries

inquiries from the media, 54 Insolvency Trustee Service Australia, cooperation with, 17 intelligence, 32-6 intelligence policy, 34 Inter-Governmental Committee of the National

Crime Authority, 42 interagency cooperation, 7, 13, 14 in the ACT, 29

Memoranda of Understanding, 16 see also communication with client agencies internal audits, 49 Internal Investigation Division, 50 Internal Security and Audit Division, 49-50

international activities ACT Region, 26 intelligence assessments, 34 International O bligations and Protection

Program, 39 Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters Treaty request, 15 Science and Technology Department, 58 secondments/attachments, 82-3 study tour, 30 International Association of Forensic Scientists, 58 international conferences, 22, 42, 58 international cooperation, 20 International Crime Trends (publication), 34 International Crim inal Police O rganisation

(Interpol), 22, 23 conferences, 58 International Division, 22-4 “International D ivision and other Overseas

Commitments", 24 international liaison, 22-4 International Obligations and Protection (Program 4), 37-9

reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 Interpol, 22, 23 conferences attended, 58 Interpol National Central Bureau, 23 Investigation of Crimes Against the

Commonwealth (Program 1), 11-24 reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 statistics, 65-75 investigations

criminal conduct allegations against AFP per­ sonnel, 49-50 training, 47, 48, 50 Investigations Department

digests, 34 review, 45 Islamabad post, 23 Italy, 22, 23 141

J

jail terms, 65, 66, 67 effectiveness of Witness Protection Program, 39 Jakarta post, 23 Japan, 15, 22 Jervis Bay police services, 83

offences reported or becoming known, 72-4 Joint Police Services (Program 5), 40-2 reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 Jolimont Centre incident, 29

K

kidnap and abduction offences, 20, 68, 77 Kleinig, Professor John, 50

L

language training scholarships, 54 Laos, 23 law enforcement arrangements review (CLER), 5, 7, 13, 33 legislation, 2, 6-7, 41,91 Liaison Officer network, iv, 22-4, 34 liaison with Commonwealth and State law enforce­

ment agencies, 7, 13, 14 in the ACT, 29 Memoranda of Understanding, 16 see also communication with client agencies liaison with indigenous groups, 30-1 listening devices, 7 London post, 23 LSD, 71, 80

M

Malaysia, 22 male members and staff members, 81-2 male offenders, 68-70 Australian Capital Territory, 76-9

Jervis Bay, 72, 75 management, 43-55 Management of Serious Crime (MOSC) training program, 13-14, 39, 48, 49 Mapinfo, 28 maternity and parental leave policies, 7, 45-6 media relations, 54 members, 81-2

discipline, 55 see also staff and member training and devel­ opment Memoranda of Understanding, 16 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 18

Minister for Foreign Affairs review of UN peace­ keeping activities, 39 Minister of Justice office attachment/secondment, 83 Ministerial briefs, 54 M inisterial Council on the Administration of

Justice, 42 Ministerial Direction, 2 new, 6, 54-5

strategic intelligence emphasis in, 32 misappropriation offences, 68, 73, 78 mission of the AFP, 3 money laundering, 15 Morgan & Banks, 46 motor traffic offences, 69 motor vehicle theft, 69, 74, 78 Mozambique, United Nations Operation in, 47, 49,

83

murder, 76 Museum, 54 Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters Treaty request, 15

N

narcotics, see drugs National Crime Authority (NCA) cooperation with, 33, 34, 35 Inter-Governmental Committee, 42

liaison officer network feedback, 23 National Strategic Intelligence Course, 35 secondments/attachments to, 83 Strategic Intelligence Unit, 33 White Collar Crime Conference, 24 National Crime Statistics Unit, 42 National Exchange of Police Information, 42 National Institute of Forensic Science, 42 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42, 92 National Police Research Unit, 42 National Priority System, 14 National Provider Status, 47 National Strategic Intelligence Course, 35 Neville Jeffress Advertising, 46 New Member Course, 49, 50 New South Wales (Eastern Region)

complaints and allegations, 88 corporate service area review, 45 cross operational referencing, 35 counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 drug operations, 17, 18 police and staff members, 82 security awareness training, 49 Sentence Indication Hearings, 6 telephone “phreaking", 21 New South Wales Police

142

operations with, 14 forensic support, 58 New South Wales Registrar General, cooperative investigation with, 15

Non-English speaking backgrounds, people from appointment of staff members and police mem­ bers, 83 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42 Norfolk Island police services, 39, 83 Northern Region (Queensland/Northem Territory)

complaints and allegations, 88 corporate service area review, 45 Family Law Act referrals, 20 intelligence activities and assessments, 35-6 police and staff members, 82 Target Identification Section, 35 Northern Territory

illegal immigrants between Kupan and, 23 police and staff members, 82

o

occupational health and safety, 48-9 offences against the person, 68, 72, 76-7 official corruption, 7 intelligence activities, 35

Ombudsman Australian International Defence Exposition (AIDEX) demonstrations report, 31 comments, contact officer for further informa­ tion about, 63 complaints finalised by, 50: results, 85 complaints through, 84 Operation Safe City, 28 operational priorities, 2 Operations Information Management, 55 Operations Policy and Support Division, 16 organisation chart, 4 organisational reviews, 45 organised crime, 19-20

intelligence activities and assessments, 34, 35 outside participation, arrangements for, 92 overseas complaints, 88 overseas posts (Liaison Officer network), iv, 22-4,

34

overseas travel by law enforcement officers, 22

P

Pakistan, 22 Papua New Guinea, 22 Constabulary, 34, 39, 83 parental leave policies, 7, 45-6 Parliamentary House Security Co-ordination, 83 parliamentary inquiries, 46

contact officer for further information, 63 reports, 5, 89-90 submissions to, 9, 54 part time staff, 81 People (Program 6), 43-50 reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 performance evaluation, 2 personal protection, 38-9 Personnel and Industrial Relations Division, 45-6 Philippines, 22 photographic competition, 54 Planning and Development, 54-5 Planning and Management (Program 7), 51-5 reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 Police Court Diversionary Scheme, 27 police ethics, 50 police members, 82 Police Technical Units, 57-8 politically sensitive investigations, 20-1 Port Law Enforcement Consultative Committees, 36 Port Security meetings, 36 powers affecting the public, 91 Prime Minister’s Branch, 38 priorities (operational), 2 Privacy, contact officer for information about, 64 proceeds of crime, see criminal assets, recovery of productivity measures/savings, working parties tasked with identifying, 45 program costs, 8 Community Policing, 26 International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth, 12 Joint Police Services, 41 People, 44 Planning and Management, 52 Science and Technology, 57 Strategic Intelligence, 33 programs, reconciliation of appropriation elements and, 9 promotion of the AFP, 54 property damage offences, 27, 29, 69, 79 see also theft property seizures, 13 property usage, contact officer for information about, 63 prostitutes, illegal immigration in Australia of, 19 Protection Division, 38-9 protective security, 37-9 intelligence, 34 public relations, 54

143

publications Australian Bomb Data Centre, 35 “International Division and other Overseas Commitments”, 24 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42 Strategic Intelligence Division (SID), 34 see also documents held by the AFP

Q

Queensland (Northern Region) complaints and allegations, 88 corporate service area review, 45 Family Law Act referrals, 20 intelligence activities and assessments, 35-6 police and staff members, 82 Target Identification Section, 35 Queensland Police Service, operations with, 14, 36

R

receiving stolen goods, 69, 78 recidivism rates, ACT schemes aimed at reducing, 27 recruitment, 46

AFP Undergraduate Scheme, 48 Regional Consultative Councils, 45 regional headquarters, 11 Criminal Assets Investigation Units, 13

intelligence units, 35-6 reporting requirements, compliance with, 62 resident agents, 36 resources, 8-9

Community Policing, 25, 26 International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth, 12 Joint Police Services, 41 People, 44 Planning and Management, 52 Science and Technology, 57 Strategic Intelligence, 33 Resources and Services, 52-4 revenue, 8

Community Policing, 26 Investigation of Crimes Against the Commonwealth, 12 Review of Commonwealth Law Enforcement Arrangements (CLER), 5, 7, 13, 33 reviews, 5, 49 Comcare cases, 48 energy usage, 53 fixed term appointment policy document, 46 Interpol National Central Bureau communica­ tion procedures, 23

maternity and parental leave policies, 7 organisational, 45 performance reports, 54

Police Technical Units, 57-8 United Nations peacekeeping activities, 39 road rescue function (ACT), 27 road safety education (Norfolk Island), 39 robbery, 68, 77 Rome post, 23 Royal Australian Air Force, Memorandum of

Understanding with, 16 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody recommendations, responses to, 31, 48 Royal Papua New Guinea Constabulary, 34, 39, 83 running costs, 8

Community Policing, 26, 27 International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation o f Crim es Against the

Commonwealth, 12 Joint Police Services, 41 People, 44 Planning and Management, 52 Science and Technology, 57 Strategic Intelligence, 33

s

safety (from bombs), 35 safety (occupational), 48-9 safety (VIPs), 38-9 salary and wage costs, 53 savings

productivity, 45 recruitment, 46 Science and Technology (Program 8), 56-8 reconciliation of program and appropriation

elements, 9 search warrants, 6 secondments/attachments to other agencies/police services, 82-3 security (internal), 49-50 Security and Audit Committee, 49 security intelligence, 34 seminars

attended by Aboriginal Liaison Officer, 31 counterfeit currency recognition, 21 “Fraudstop”, 28 on police ethics, 50 Senior Executive Group, 81 Senior Managers A ustralia and New Zealand

Forensic Laboratories, 58 Sentence Indication Hearings, 6 sexual assault/offences, 68, 76-7 sexual harassment, strategies for combating, 46

144

Singapore, 22 social justice and equity, 8 contact officer for further information, 63 National Police Ethnic Advisory Bureau, 42,

92 see also Equal Em ploym ent O pportunity Program Solomon Island Police training, 39, 83

Somalia, United Nations operations in, 83 South Africa, officers deployed to, 39 South Australia complaints and allegations, 88

corporate service area review, 45 police and staff members, 82 South Pacific Islands liaison officer, 23 South Pacific police services, support for develop­

ment of, 39, 83 Southern Region (Victoria/Hobart) complaints and allegations, 88

Computer Crime Section, 21 counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 corporate service area review, 45

court decisions affecting operations, 6 drug operations, 18 Family Law and Warrants Squad, 20 police and staff members, 82

security awareness training, 49 Target Development Unit, 35 special references, 20-1 staff and member training and development, 47-8 accrual accounting instruction package, 53

DNA testing, 58 ethics, 50 forensic investigation, 58 Human Resource Development Plan, 45

language training scholarships, 54 security, 49 Strategic Intelligence Division (SID), 35 staff discipline, 55

staff management, 43-50 staff members, 82 staffing resources, 8, 81-3 Community Policing, 26

International Obligations and Protection, 38 Investigation of Crimes Against the

Commonwealth, 12 Joint Police Services, 41 People, 44 Planning and Management, 52

Science and Technology, 57 Strategic Intelligence, 33 Status of Women, contact officer for information about, 63 Strategic and Defence Studies Centre Graduate

Program in Strategic Studies, 35

Strategic Intelligence (Program 3), 32-6 reconciliation of program and appropriation elements, 9 Strategic Intelligence Division (SID), 33-5 structure of the AFP, 4

organisational reviews, 45 submissions by AFP parliamentary inquiries, 9, 54 review of United Nations peacekeeping activi­

ties, 39

surveys of community opinion (ACT), 27

T

Tasmania, see Southern Region taxation fraud, 14, 15 technology, 21, 57-8 telecommunication facilities upgrade, 53 telecommunications interception, 41-2

Telecommunications (Interception) Act 1979, 41 telemovies, 54 telephone “phreaking”, 21 temporary employment policy, 46 temporary staff, 81 territory police services, 39, 83

see also ACT Region Thailand, 22, 23 theft, 68, 69, 78 in the ACT, 27, 28, 29, 77

Jervis Bay, 73, 74 timeliness of media inquiries responses, 54 traffic aw areness and road safety education (Norfolk Island), 39

training, 47-8, 63 Asia-Pacific region countries, 39, 58, 83 Bomb Safety Program packages, 35 counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 crime scenes investigation and fingerprinting,

58 “Fraudstop” seminars, 28 Drug Detector Dogs, 16 Management of Serious Crime (MOSC), 13­

14, 39 traffic awareness and road safety education (Norfolk Island), 39 see also staff and member training and devel­

opment

training expenditure, 47 tribunal decisions, contact officer for information about, 64 Tuggeranong District (ACT) burglaries, 28

u

underage drinking (ACT), 28

145

Undergraduate Scheme, 48 United Nations peacekeeping activities, 39 AFP contingents, 47, 49, 82-3 U nited States Air Force Office of Special

Investigations, technology exchange arrange­ ments with, 58 unlawful possession, 69, 78

V

Vanuatu police training, 39, 58, 83 vehicle theft, 69, 74, 78 Victoria (Southern Region) complaints and allegations, 88

Computer Crime Section, 21 counterfeit currency recognition seminars, 21 corporate service area review, 45 court decisions affecting operations, 6 drug operations, 18 Family Law and Warrants Squad, 20 police and staff members, 82 security awareness training, 49 Target Development Unit, 35 Vietnam, 23 VIP Branch, 39 VIP protection, 38-9 voice-mail pirates, 21

w

wage and salary costs, 53 Western Region (Western Australia) Beechcraft Baron aircraft seizure, 13 complaints and allegations, 88

drug operations, 17, 19-20 intelligence activities and assessments, 36 police and staff members, 82 Whale Protection Act o f 1980, prosecutions under,

22

White Collar Crime Conference, 24 wildlife conservation prosecutions, 22 Winchester Police Centre, 30 Winston Churchill Memorial Tmst fellowship, 30 Witness Protection Branch, 39 Woden Bus Interchange, 27-8 Woden District (ACT), 27-8

burglaries, 28 working parties, 45 workshops

attended by Aboriginal Liaison Officer, 31 leadership and team building, 47

Y

young offenders (ACT), 27-8

146

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

P A R L I A ME N T A R Y PAPER No. 252 of 1994 ORDERED TO BE PRINTED

ISSN 0727-418