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Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act - Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Report - 1993-94


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Australian Broadcasting C orporation

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I Contents

1 Corporate Profile

I · Corporate Objectives 1 -i

I · ABC Services 2

1 · Highlights 4 1

I · ABC Organisation 6 :

1 · Board of Directors 8 ‘

1 · Financial Summary 10 :

I Statement by the Board of Directors 1 i ■

I R eview o f O p e ra tio n s 16 ■:

I Programs And Services 1 7 - 6 6

I · Radio 17 h

I · Television 31 ;■

1 · Australia Television 45 /

I · Radio Australia 51 "

I · Concerts 5 6 ;

1 · Enterprises 61

1 Corporate Support 6 7 -8 8 1

1 · Corporate and Technical Support 6 7

I · Strategic Development 78 ■

1 Financial Statements 89 1

Program Performance Statement 105

Appendices 112

· List of Tables and Graphs 134

· Index 135 :

ABC Charter inside back cover V

Corporate Objectives

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The Australian Broadcasting Corporation is an independent statutory authority established by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. The basic functions and duties which Parliament has given to the ABC are set out in the Charter of the Corporation — section 6 of the ABC Act.

The ABC has developed the following principal objectives derived from its Charter to guide its activities:

The ABC's objectives a re to

1. provide the best programs, performances, products and services it possibly can to all the people of

Australia and to our target audiences overseas;

2. be identifiably and proudly Australian, developing and enriching Australian culture through our

domestic and international radio and television services, orchestral and other music performance, and

allied marketing activities.

W e w ill do this by

3. being a distinctive and innovative broadcaster, with a mix of broad appeal and specialist programs

not generally developed or provided by other Australian broadcasters;

4. providing the best, most reliable and independent coverage and analysis of contemporary issues,

ideas and international, national and regional events;

5. providing programming reflecting awareness of the changing social, economic and demographic

circumstances of the Australian population;

6. being a leader in the broadcasting and marketing of authoritative, quality educational programs,

including English language teaching programs, within and outside Australia;

7. developing the natural specialised strengths which States and Territories can contribute to national

diversity;

8. developing a totally integrated approach to all our programs, performances, products and services;

9. ensuring that Australia can project a contemporary image in the Asia-Pacific regions, through

development of ABC international broadcasting and other services;

10. harnessing the opportunities presented by the emerging multi-channel, multimedia environment to

respond to new audience needs and to extend the impact of programs;

11. achieving international best-practice for the use of its resources so the Australian public receives

maximum value for its investment in national broadcasting.

1

ABC Services

Radio

• Six main radio services broadcasting across Australia on over 5 0 0 transmitters:

- Metropolitan Radio stations in all State capitals, Canberra, Darwin and Newcastle. - Regional Radio with 34 full-sized stations and 14 smaller studios throughout Australia.

- Radio National, a specialist spoken word network with studios and production units in every State - ABC Classic FM, a national network devoted to music (particularly classical music), performance, audio arts and features. - Triple J, an FM youth network which reaches all. State capitals, Canberra, Darwin and

Newcastle. - Parliamentary and News Network (PNN), live broadcasts of Parliament and NewsRadio, a continuous news service broadcast when Parliament is not sitting, to be introduced in July 1994.

Television

• A national television service carried on over 5 0 0 transmitters, with production and transmission centres in all State capitals, Canberra and Darwin.

• Australia Television, an international satellite television service transmitted to 1 8 countries and territories in South-East Asia.

• Subscription Television, a two channel television service planned to commence operation in 1 9 9 4 -9 5 .

News & Current Affairs

• Australia's most extensive and authoritative independent news service:

- More than 9 0 television and radio newsrooms in Australia and overseas. - More than 4 5 0 separate local, regional, State and national news bulletins on radio every day.

- Separate 7.00pm TV news bulletins produced in each State and the Northern Territory. - Separate 7.30pm TV current affairs programs every weeknighf in each State and the Northern Territory.

- Australia's most expensive network of overseas correspondents reporting major world events through Australian eyes.

Radio Australia

• An international radio service broadcasting by shortwave and satellite, in English and eight other languages, to the Asia-Pacific regions and worldwide; and television news headlines in three languages for Australia Television.

Concerts

• Six Symphony Orchestras employing over 4 5 0 musicians and giving more than 7 5 0 performances a year to over 9 0 0 0 0 0 people.

Marketing

• Marketing operations including:

- 19 ABC Shops and over 1 30 ABC Centres and a mail and telephone order service for schools. - Production of books, classical and contemporary recordings, audio tapes, videos, licensed products, and music and magazine publishing. - Marketing of ABC production facilities, program sales and the development, marketing and

licensing of technology and information services. - International consultancy services providing technical services, development planning, and management and staff training.

2

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M etropolitan Services ▲ ABC—TV production and transmission facilities

▼ Metropolitan Radio

♦ Radio National

■ f Triple J youth network

• ABC Classic FM

★ Parliamentary Broadcasting network

❖ State Symphony Orchestra

0 ABC Shop

♦ Radio Australia

* Australia Television

Regional Services

• Regional Radio Studios

1 Regional Studio outposts

A ABC—TV News crew

♦ Radio Australia Transmitters

3

Highlights 1 993-94

ε ξ ® • Edo de W aart conducts his first concert as Chief Conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

• Liwei Qin awarded Young Performer of the Year at the Final Concert of the 1993 ABC Young Performers Awards in Perth.

K l C T f i i

• Results of the first annual ABC Radio audience appreciation survey released indicating high levels of appreciation on all networks.

• David Porcelijn appointed Chief Conductor of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra.

• Radio Australia increases Tok Pisin broadcasts to Papua New Guinea from two to three hours a day.

• Voices of the Land concert featuring indigenous artists broadcast on all Metropolitan and Regional stations to celebrate the International Year of the World's Indigenous People.

• Expansion of Triple J network announced with forty-four new transmitters to be installed by the end of 1996.

(2 3 2 2 3 1 • ABC submits major funding submission, Towards 2000, to the Federal Government, seeking a further three years of indexed funding.

• M ajor international sales of Bananas in Pyjamas television programs and appointment of licensing agents following the Annual MIPCOM meeting.

• Radio Australia begins telecast of nightly news updates in Bahasa Indonesia, Cantonese and Standard Chinese on Australia Television.

• Radio Australia begins satellite transmission of English language programs into South-East Asia, Western Europe and Japan.

• ABC signs five year contract with Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB) to provide equipment and training for the national broadcasters of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.

(2 2 2 2 3 3 8 • Sydney's 2BL, which began life as 2SB, celebrates 7 0 years of broadcasting.

• La Boheme CD and video launched to coincide with a simulcast on ABC Radio and ABC-TV.

• Entombment of the Unknown Soldier shown nationwide on 1 1 November.

Deci

• News Bureau opened in Hanoi, Vietnam.

• Vernon Handley appointed Chief Conductor of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra.

• Radio National's Radiothon for South Asia raises $400 000.

• ABC Radio wins four W alkley Awards for outstanding journalism.

• 1 9 9 3 -9 6 EEO plan is tabled in Parliament.

January

• Outstanding coverage of the N SW bushfire emergency by Metropolitan and Regional stations and ABC-TV. ABC Shops conduct Red Cross Bushfire appeal.

• Radio National begins Radio National Breakfast with Peter Thompson and increases coverage of the arts.

• Broadcast News Australia (BNA) commences operations as a text and audio service to the Australian media.

4

ABC CM

• The ABC Country Music label wins seven Golden Guitar Awards at the Tamworth Country Music Festival.

• Open weekend at Ultimo Centre in Sydney attracts 7 0 0 0 0 visitors; 35 0 0 0 attend Perth's open day. Open days and ABC Picnics were also held in Townsville, Cairns, W agga W agga, Shepparton, Newcastle, Canberra,

Launceston and Alice Springs during the year.

• International Year of the Family marked with a television series of Australian family dramas, Family Album.

» Tenth anniversary of Mother and Son.

• Australia Television celebrates its first year of transmission.

• Contract signed with AIDAB to provide training and advisory services for the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

• The coverage of the 1994 Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade attracts a record Sunday night audience.

• Screening of Heartland, a series about Aboriginal Australia. For the first time Aboriginal actors and culture are given centre stage in prime time drama.

■2ΞΞ1 • Launch of ABC Classic FM, introducing major changes to presentation and programming.

• Opening of relocated ABC Shop in Melbourne.

E S I • NewsRadio — a new continuous news service proposed as part of a Parliamentary and News Network (PNN) and subsequently approved by

the Minister for Communications and the Arts.

• ABC Radio gains a national audience reach of six million for the first time, an increase of ten per cent in six months.

• Radio Australia begins satellite transmission of English language programs to the United States.

• Opening of new ABC Shop at Ringwood in Melbourne.

• The Queensland Symphony Orchestra tours China.

June

• Handover for final fitout of the ABC Southbank Centre in Melbourne.

• ABC Radio inaugurates the national Rural W oman of the Year Award.

• Triple J's weekend Real Appeal raises $335 0 0 0 for Austcare.

• BTN IBehind the News) celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary.

• Radio Australia, Australia Television, the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra and D-Cart participate in the major trade and cultural expo, 'Australia Today Indonesia 9 4 ' in Jakarta.

• ABC Board approves 1 9 9 4 -9 7 Corporate Plan.

From left: Edo de Woart conducting his first concert os Chief Conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Ernie Dingo (Vincent Burunga) ond Cate Blanchett (Beth Ashton) in Heartland.

B1 ond B2, stars of ABC—TV's Bananas in Pyjamas, in London for their UK launch. Bushfires in NSW in January 1994.

5

ABC Organisation

Television

Director T elevision Paddy Conroy

Production Head Nick Collis-George (o)

• Documentaries & Features

• Drama

• Children's & Education

• Arts & Entertainment

• Comedy

News & I nformation Head Chris Anderson· • News and Current Affairs • In form ation Programs

•fort ______ ____

Resources & S ervices G eneral M anager Ian McGarrity

Network P rogrammer Bob Donoghue

State B ranch Managers NSW: Sue Chappie V ic Robbie Weelces Qio: Jon McGrath SA: Lynton Franzi WA: Robert W ilkox Tas: Don Stanley NT (Hd TV Res): Tony Bowden

Australia Television General Manager

Dominic Slone (a)

Subscription TV General Manager

Kim Williams

National Advisory C ouncil

E fficiency Review & A udit Ma n a g e r : Peter Bell

Director Peter Loxton

Metropolitan Radio General Manager

Barry Chapman (a)

Regional R adio General Ma nager

Andrew Buchanan

Radio National General Manager

Peter Manning

ABC Classic FM General Manager

Peter James

Trifle J General Manager

Stuart Matched (a)

Information P rograms General Manager

Susan Kodar

Radio Resources General Ma nager

Ada Hulshoff

Radio B usiness & S upport General Manager

David Sharland

Program Development Manager

Dr. Ian Wolfe

Senior P olicy Adviser Anne Dunn (a)

State B ranch Managers NSW: Role M iller Vic: M urray Green Qid: Bob Wurth SA: Jon Cassidy

WA: Glenn Darlington F as: Rob Batten NT: Lesley W hitteker ACT: Philip Koch

Radio Australia

G eneral M anager Derek White*

Depuiy G eneral M anager Terry Brown

South & S outh -East Asia Manager Suzanne Stamen

North Asia Manager

John Crone

Pacific & E nglish L anguage Programs M a nager

Roger Btoadbenl

News & C urrent Affairs Edito r

Tony Hastings

6

ABC DM

Director Music Na th a n Wales

General Manager Ju lie Steiner

Adelaide S ymphony Orchestra G eneral M anager Michael Elwood

Retail Sales & M arketing Head Doug Walker

Melbourne S ymphony Orchestra G enbal M anages Steven Porter

B ooks P ublishes John Kerr

C ontemporary Musk & M usic Pubushing Head Meryl Gross

Queensland S ymphony Orchestra G eneral M anages Mary Lyons

Classics Head Mathew Freeman

Sydhey S ymphony Orchestra General M anages Mary Vallentine Licensing , S ales &

Distribution Manager Grohame Grasshy

Tasmanian S ymphony Orchestra G eneral M anage Julie Warn

Video H ead Jonine Burdeu

West Australian S ymphony Orchestra G eneral M anages Henrik Smit Audio

M anager Bernadette Neubecker

Magazine Pubushing P ublisher Sue Short

Minister F or C ommunications & the Arts The Hon Michael Lee, MP

Director Rosemary Sinclair G eneral M anager W al Lyneham

C orporate R elations G eneral M anager Roger Grant

Information Technology G eneral M anager (vacant)

Accounting Operations C orporate C hief A ccountant George Meredith

Corporate Policy & P lanning General M anager Pauline Garde (a) Administrative S ervices

C ontroller (vacant) International D evelopment General M anager Jane Smith Management S ervices

Head Lucille Coward Technology S trategy S atellites : Dick Winston S tandards : Dilip Jadejo

Corporate Treasury C orporate T reasurer Eugene Remedies

Legal & C opyright S ervices Head Judith Walker

■ Programs and Services

■ Corporate and Technical Support

■ Subsidiaries

• also Managing Editor

· · also General Manager International Broadcasting

A t 3 0 Jun e 1 9 9 4

N.B. This is a bro a d g u ide , it does no t ind icate salary scale n o r id e n tify all m ain positions a n d a ll line s o f resp on sib ility.

( a ) m eans actin g

7

Board of Directors M e m b e rs as at 3 0 June 1 9 9 4

Mark Armstrong BA, ILM

Appointed Chair for a five-year term from 24 July 1991.

Professor Armstrong is Director of the Centre for Media and Telecommunications Law and Policy at the University of Melbourne and editor of Communications Law and Policy in Australia.

Lyndsay Connors BA, Dip Ed, Hon. Doctorate

Appointed Deputy Chair for a four-year term from 9 June 1991.

Ms Connors is Director of Schools for the Port Jackson area, N SW Department of School

Education and a Director on the Boards of the Australian Children's Television Foundation and the Open Learning Technology Corporation.

David Hill BEc, MEc

Re-appointed Managing Director for a second five-year term from 30 November

1991.

M r Hill is ABC Managing Director, a position he has held since 1986. He is a

member of the International Council of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, N ew York, a Trustee of Reuters Television, a Member of the Executive of the Asia-Pacific

Broadcasting Union, and a member of the Executive of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association.

Rodney Cameron BA

Appointed a Director for a five-year term from 24 July 1991.

M r Cameron is the proprietor and Managing Director of ANOP Research Services Pty Ltd.

8

Quentin Dempster AM

Elected to the position of staff-elected Director for a two-year term from 1 5 June 1 992 and re-elected for a two year term in June

1994.

Mr Dempster was formerly presenter of ABC-TV's 7 .3 0 Report in Queensland and

now presents the N SW 7 .3 0 Report.

Leonard Hingley BA, AM

Appointed a Director for a three-year term from 22 January 1993.

M r Hingley is a Senior Executive Search and Employee Relations

Consultant with W ard Howell International, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and Fellow of

the Australian Institute of Management.

Michael Terlet AO

Appointed a Director for a three-year term from 24 July 1991.

He is Deputy Chairman of AW A Defence Industries Ply

Ltd and a Director of a number of other companies.

He is Treasurer and Past President of the Engineering Employers' Association in South Australia, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a Fellow of the Institute of Directors of Australia.

Janine Walker Grad Dip Bus

Appointed a Director for a three-year term from 9 June 1991 and re-appointed for a three year term from July 1994.

Ms Walker is the Acting General Secretary of the State Public Service

Federation, Queensland, a Board member of the Australia New Zealand Foundation, and a Commissioner of the Vocational

Education, Training and Employment Commission, Queensland.

Retiring Mem ber Incoming Members

Richard Harding, LLB, LLM Wendy Silver, BA, B Soc W k

Served as a Director for a five-year term from 1 Ms Silver has been appointed a Director for a August 1988. His term expired on 31 July five year term to begin from 1 July 1994.

1993.

Hon. J.C. Bannon, BA, LLB M r Bannon has been appointed a Director for a five year term to begin from 24 July 1994.

9

Financial Summary

Five Year Analysis

1994 1 9 93 1992 1991 1 9 90

$ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0

OPERATING

Cost of services” 6 8 8 180 6 7 0 9 4 3 671 198 6 5 3 8 9 7 6 0 5 351

Operating revenue 100 9 5 9 9 0 0 6 7 85 981 71 2 7 7 5 2 031

Net cost of services 1 5 8 7 221 5 8 0 8 7 6 5 8 5 2 1 7 5 8 2 6 2 0 5 5 3 3 2 0

Revenue from Govt" 6 0 2 220 5 7 5 6 6 8 5 6 9 318 5 7 8 105 5 3 6 235

FINANCIAL POSITION

Current assets 111 451 1 2 7 5 3 0 86 7 6 2 83 6 9 6 83 0 9 7

Non-current assets 4 6 7 142 4 3 6 6 8 0 5 2 6 155 5 4 7 715 4 7 0 2 9 0

Total assets 5 7 8 593 5 6 4 2 1 0 6 1 2 9 1 7 631 411 5 5 3 3 8 7

Current liabilities 9 4 415 135 113 171 6 6 9 9 9 903 102 581

Non-current liabilities 2 2 9 4 8 7 187 6 9 8 110 6 2 0 1 84 981 133 0 1 3

Total liabilities 3 2 3 902 322 811 282 2 8 9 2 8 4 884 2 3 5 5 9 4

Total equity 2 5 4 691 241 3 9 9 3 3 0 6 2 8 3 4 6 5 2 7 3 1 7 7 9 3

RATIOS

Current ratio1 ” 1.18 0 .9 4 0.51 0 .8 4 0.81

Equity” 44% 43% 54% 55% 57%

(a) Includes transmission services supplied by National Transmission Agency.

(b) Net cost of services is total operating expenses, including transmission services, less operating revenue.

(c) Current assets divided by current liabilities.

(d) Equity as a percentage of total assets.

N et cost of Services

1994 1993

($ 'm ) ($ 'm l

Television 3 1 9 3 2 2

Radio 208 198

Concerts 31 30

Radio Australia 29 31

10

Statement by the Board of Directors

The Corporation is closer than at any time since it was established to fulfilling the complex and wide ranging

ideals set out in the Charter.

The Charter requires the ABC to offer a range of programs that make a contribution to Australian culture and society. We are obliged to make provision for all Australians and, at the

same time, not compromise the quality of our programs and services.

The balancing of demand and quality pose a constant challenge for the Corporation.

The central reason for the ABC's success has been the dedication of a management and staff with the ability and

motivation to excel. Their commitment to quality and excellence is recorded in this Annual Report. The Board is

proud of their achievements.

In pursuit of excellence

All areas of the ABC's operations performed strongly.

Domestic Services The ABC's domestic services — ABC-TV, the national and local radio networks and the State symphony orchestras — provide a diverse range of programs and performances of cultural value and intellectual integrity.

The long list of awards at the conclusion of this Annual Report is testament to the continued pursuit of excellence by ABC program makers and

management.

ABC Radio expanded the reach of its networks, improved network formats to meet audience needs better and introduced innovative programs. More Australians listened to ABC Radio than ever before. Virtually all Australians are now able to receive one or more ABC radio networks and nearly six million people listen every week.

ABC-TV maintained its position as the pre-eminent provider of reliable independent television news and current affairs through refining its comprehensive line-up and introducing new programs. The emphasis on quality Australian programs was evident throughout ABC-TV's schedule, from novel children's programs to challenging drama series.

ABC Concerts, through the six ABC Symphony Orchestras, produced performances of consistently high standards, performing with a range of outstanding international conductors and soloists.

The quality of the Orchestras' performances was recognised in critical reviews, which were a major factor in the increased levels of paid attendances

achieved in 1993-94.

ABC Enterprises recorded excellent trading results this year, opened new outlets and continued to diversify its range of products.

ABC retail operations provide valuable additional funds for programming activity. Consistent with the ABC's Charter, they extend the life of ABC-TV, Radio and Concerts activity and provide an accessible service to the ABC's audience.

12

The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra rehearsing in the concert hall of the new ABC Southbank Centre.

ABC KM

Board Statement

International Services It is pleasing to report that the ABC is fulfilling its obligation as expressed in its Charter to 'transmit to countries outside Australia broadcasting programs

of news, current affairs, entertainment and cultural enrichment...'.

Australia Television the ABC's international television service to South-East Asia completed its first full year of operation. Launched in February 1993 the service has quickly established itself in the region with a mix of quality Australian information and entertainment programs, as well as regionally focussed news programs.

In providing establishment funding for Australia Television, the Federal Government stipulated that the ABC accept limited corporate sponsorship to cover on-going operating costs.

The Board agreed to the Government's proposal so that the service could showcase Australian endeavour and achievements within our region.

Several major companies have supported the fledgling service and other corporations and institutions are showing interest in reaching a vast audience through sponsorship of Australia Television.

W hile the Board is confident of the service's success and long term financial viability, it will continue to monitor all areas of operations closely.

Radio Australia is providing an enhanced service with increased Australian content through its new English language format and news bulletins. Its language services continue to win audience support. Audience reach was extended through

new program delivery methods.

International Development and Technology Sales The ABC's reputation as a developer and marketer of sophisticated broadcasting technology and provider of quality training and consultancy services continued to grow this year.

There were further major international sales of the ABC's D-Cart system and projects currently under development include O-Radio — a digital radio console.

A range of training programs and revenue generating projects for broadcasters in Africa, Asia and the Pacific is being implemented. These include major programs of assistance to national

13

broadcasters in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and South Africa.

The ABC, with its focus on quality program production, use of appropriate technology and reputation for cultural sensitivity, is increasingly

recognised as one of the most significant broadcasters in the Asia-Pacific regions.

ABC funding

This year was the final year of the second triennial funding agreement with the Federal Government.

The stability of the first two agreements gave the ABC the flexibility to plan strategically and commit to new programming, invest in new technology and implement efficiency reforms. Despite an overall decline in the ABC's appropriation, and declining

staff numbers, the Corporation today offers an increased range of services that are well patronised by the overwhelming majority of Australians. Virtually all citizens, wherever they live, now have access to a range of ABC services.

In October the Board approved a major funding submission, Towards 2000. The ABC sought a further three year term of indexed funding and a continuation of the prohibition of advertising and on-air sponsorship for domestic radio and television services and Radio Australia.

The Government agreed to maintain ABC funding at current levels. This will mean the continuation of tight budgetary control, but it will enable the maintenance of current activities. Due to budget constraints, the Government did not support the ABC's request for additional funding for new activities. However, it is anticipated that some components of the ABC's request would be re­ examined in the context of the major Cultural Policy

Statement to be issued by the Government later this year.

Communicating our culture

As the communications environment becomes more extensive and complicated, the ABC's role in developing Australia's national identity, fostering cultural diversity and encouraging cultural expression will be more important than at any time in the history of broadcasting.

The vitality and diversity of contemporary Australian cultural expression is, in part, a result of the existence of a strong public broadcasting sector. As Australia's publicly owned national broadcaster and major cultural institution, the ABC plays a special role in Australian cultural life.

From the broadcasting and performance of contemporary Australian music on Triple J, Classic FM and by the Symphony Orchestras, to the making of challenging Television dramas such as Heartland, the ABC's generative role in Australian cultural expression was again clear this year.

The Board welcomes the Government's initiative to stimulate an environment conducive to the development of arts and cultural expression in Australia through the Cultural Policy Statement and looks forward to participating in and contributing to initiatives that emerge from the Statement.

Plans and prospects

The Board's major role is to ensure that the ABC meets the complex demands of its Charter and that its independence and integrity are maintained. W e

have spent much time this year refining corporate planning processes and developing strategies for the future.

Corporate Planning A new Corporate Plan was adopted and this Annual Report describes progress against its objectives.

The Plan represents a practical and contemporary statement of the ABC Charter and builds on the significant achievements of the ABC over the last few years. It reflects a confident and forward looking corporation, keen to take up the opportunities emerging from the changing media environment. The emphasis is on quality program production and broadcasting. Although the Plan covers the three financial years 1 9 9 4 -9 7 , it has been developed to lead the ABC confidently into the anticipated media environment at the end of the century.

Subscription Television W e have only a few years to ensure Australia's unique broadcasting system can make a viable

14

ABC 603

Board Statement

transition to the new deregulated and multi-channel environment.

The Board believes that without a strong ABC presence the new media environment will be dominated by foreign programming and commercial imperatives. It is for this reason that the

Board has argued that the Corporation should endeavour to play a prominent role in Subscription Television. The involvement of the ABC will add to

the quality, diversity and range of programs available.

A primary concern for the Board is to ensure that ABC participation is on a financially viable basis that will not expose the Corporation to financial risk. The Board must be satisfied there will be no

negative financial or editorial impact on the quality and diversity of the ABC's services.

Conclusion

Today, the ABC plays a vital role in the lives of most Australians. That position has been attained through an absolute commitment to providing quality Australian programs that cater for the diverse and changing needs of our audiences.

Building on our broadcasting experience and technical expertise, the ABC is well positioned to increase service to the public by taking the

opportunities available to us to participate in the new era of broadcasting.

It is the Board's role to determine the most cost effective, publicly accessible distribution of its services. This freedom to choose how the ABC Charter is interpreted and delivered, is necessary to ensure that the ABC has unqualified editorial

independence.

The ABC's independence carries with it a high degree of accountability to Government and demands openness to the public. The ABC welcomes scrutiny and feedback. Central to this is a willingness to examine critically, and where

necessary reform our operations so that they better fulfil the ABC's central objectives as Australia's national public broadcaster and major cultural

institution.

The obligations of the Charter demand that the ABC must continually strive to enhance its package of services and reflect more adequately the Australian population's composition and nature.

The Board will work to ensure that the ABC remains relevant and at the forefront of innovative change.

Mark Armstrong Lyndsay Connors Rodney Cameron Quentin Dempster

David Hill Leonard Hingley Michael Terlet Janine Walker

15

The Programs and Services section reviews the operations of each of the ABC's major operating divisions — ABC-TV, Radio, Radio Australia, Australia Television, Concerts and Enterprises.

Each chapter contains a Performance Summary which outlines the Corporate Plan objectives, performance indicators and the outcome for 1993-94. A financial summary for each division is also included.

The programs and services section is followed by a review of the activities of the ABC's central Corporate Support areas.

16

Radio

The mission for ABC Radio is 'to be the best in broadcasting for all Australians'. To achieve this goal ABC Radio operates six distinctly targeted radio networks and complementary audience services.

Local Services • Metropolitan Radio in all State capitals, Darwin, Canberra and Newcastle.

• Regional Radio with 34 full-sized stations and 14 smaller studios in regional areas.

National Networks • Radio National — Australia's specialist spoken word network.

• ABC Classic-FM which provides fine music and performance.

• Triple], an FM youth network featuring new, especially Australian music.

• Parliamentary and News Network — live broadcasts of both houses of Parliament and NewsRadio, a continuous news service to be introduced in 1994-95.

Special Audience Services • Aboriginal broadcasting — working closely with independent broadcasters and providing transmission outlets for Aboriginal programming.

• Other services which complement broadcast activity -— 24 Hours, the magazine and program guide; ABC recorded information services; radio tape sales; facilities hire; and Broadcast News Australia (BNA), the text and audio service.

Producing Quality Programs

Leadership in News and Information ABC Radio provides the country's most comprehensive coverage and analysis of national and international events and issues. This was exemplified in the January bushfires in N S W when ABC Radio was the community's key source of vital

information.

ABC Regional Radio and Sydney's 2BL acted as a lifeline to city and country dwellers. Around the clock emergency broadcasts were mounted in major trouble spots to ensure listeners were kept fully informed. These reports complemented

dedicated Statewide bushfire coverage on 2BL, 2N C and all N S W Regional stations. ABC Radio's coverage drew widespread praise and reinforced ABC Radio's pre-eminence as an information provider in times of crisis. Highlighting this was the Silver Award won by 2BL at the New York International Radio Awards.

Reporting on Asia was given greater emphasis, with the opening of the Hanoi Bureau and the appointment of a correspondent in Singapore to specialise in ASEAN regional affairs. A special team provided listeners with detailed coverage of the first democratic elections in South Africa. Other highlights included comprehensive coverage of the M abo debate, the live special on the Sydney

18

Hanoi Correspondent, Christopher Kremmer and camera operator, David Brill with General Vo Nguyen Giap. The combined Radio and Television bureau wos opened in December.

ABC B O O

Olympic Games decision from Monaco, the opening of the Friendship Bridge between Thailand and Laos and the D-Day anniversary ceremonies in England

and France.

Sporting coverage included the domestic cricket tests, one day internationals and cricket tours of England and South Africa. The weekend Grandstand

program continued its news breaking role while maintaining its coverage of major and minor sports events. ABC Radio won the broadcast rights for the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Canada.

Triple J The success of the Triple J network has been built on a commitment to new music, particularly Australian music. Its diverse music mix, together

with specialist information programming, is unique on Australian radio.

This year, Triple J's Morning program expanded coverage of news and current affairs and continued as a forum for young Australians to debate issues. Information programs produced by specialist teams

included the retrospective, 10 0 0 0 Days that Shook the W orld; the Drugs series; and Great Moments in Science.

Triple J was involved in several major community events:

• The Real Appeal, a weekend long radiothon which raised over $335 0 0 0 to aid the global refugee crisis.

• A celebration of W orld Environment Day in cooperation with the Federal Department of Environment, Sport and Territories using comedy to address environmental issues.

• Live outside broadcasts of This Sporting Life and the Breakfast program.

Top: Adrian Thirsk, ABC Radio finance reporter and his son, os the fire advances on his street in Wheeler Heights, Sydney. Right: The encroaching bushfire at Pittwoter. Photo token by Tracey Holmes, ABC sports reporter, while reporting live on Crandstand.

19

ABC Radio — Content Analysis

Metropolitan Radio

-News 14.3%

-A rts Talk 3.6% - Economics 3.6%

- Politics 7.7%

- Social issues 13.1%

- Recorded music 19.0%

- Comedy 2.4%

-S port 11.9%

_ - Health 3.6% S - Science 2.4%

| - Leisure 8.3%

I - Quiz/Competition 5.3% | - Other:

Live Music 0.6% Arts Performance 0.6% Religious 1.2% History 1.8% Rural 0.6%

Regional Radio

1 - News 12.5%

J- Arts Talk 3.0%S - Economic 2.4%■ - Politic 5.4%I- S o c ia l issues 8.9% 1 - Recorded music 32.1%

B - Sport 8.9%

Rural 6.5%

Leisure 8.3%

8 - Quiz/Competition 4.2

Ϊ - Other: Arts performance 0.6% Comedy 1.8% Religious 0.6% Health 2.4% History 1.2% Science 1.2%

Radio National -N ew s 8.9%

- Rural 3.6% - Economic 6.5%

-P olitics 11.3%

- Science 2.4%

-Social issues 17.8%

- Religious 3.6%

- Recorded music 23.8%

-A r ts Performance 2.4%

-A rts talk 10.1%

- Open Learning 2.4%

- Other: live music 1.2% Comedy 1.2% Health 1.8% History 1.8% leisure 1.2%

ABC Classic FM

ϋ ϋ - News 4.8%

! - Arts Talk 3.6%

- Recorded music 82.7%

I - Live musk 7.1%

-Arts Performance 1.8%

ABC Classic FM ABC Classic FM — formerly ABC Fine Music — is Australia's only national stereo radio network dedicated primarily to classical music.

Extensive audience research was undertaken and a new strategic plan implemented in April. The changes, including the change of name, clarified the role of ABC Classic FM as an essentially classical music network.

Broadcasters Christopher Lawrence and Margaret Throsby now present the Breakfast a nd Morning programs, joining Charles Southwood and Geoff Bennett as the key daytime voices. The presentation of Evening programming was shared by Colin Fox, Bob Maynard and Simon FJealy, and new programs such as New Releases and N ew Music Australia began.

Weekend programs were restructured. The accessibility of Saturday and Sunday Morning programs was enhanced. Presentations of complete operas introduced by Marian Arnold were

introduced on Saturday Afternoons. Sunday Afternoons now include Young Australia which profiles Australia's young musicians. Jim McLeod’s popular Jazztrack continued its support of emerging and established Australian jazz musicians.

ABC Classic FM's strong commitment to Australian composition and performance continued with regular broadcasting of concerts from music festivals. Sunday Live presented a further series of free live concerts. The best in national and international acoustic art and drama also regularly featured.

Radio National Program improvements included a new earlier edition of AM at 7am during Radio National Breakfast with Peter Thompson; the integration of separate programs about the arts into Arts Today with David Mart; the return of Music Deli to the network; and the launch of Radio Eye on Sunday nights, which showcases quality documentary and feature programs.

20

ABC CM

Radio

Triple J

- News 4.8%

- A r ts Talk 7.7%

- Recorded music 72.0%

- liv e Music 2.4% - Comedy 3.5% - Leisure 4.8% -O th e r:

Economics 0.6% Politics 0.6% Social issues 0.6% Sport 1.2% Health 0.6% Science 0.6% Quiz/Competition 0.6%

Program Source

Metropolitan Stations

Local ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 5 2 %

State ■ ■ ? %

National · Ι · · · · · ^ · · 4 ΐ %

0 20 40 60 80 100

Hours per week

Regional Stations

National n M · · · · · · · · sst.

0 20 40 60 80 100

Hours per week

Australian Music Content

Metropolitan ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Regional S B O W H B S e S B W e H H S B ·

Radio National ; 2 ^ P g p ^ | p f j M K Q

Triple J $ · Ώ 3 β 8 β · Κ Η ^ · 8 Η 8 Î’ 5 ί § Η @ Ι

Classic FM* ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

0 10 20 30 40

Per Cent

'Classic FM: P e rform ance* Composition ■

Live performance, including drama, poetry and music, on programs such as Drive with Ramona Koval, Late Night Live and Arts Today was increased.

Religious programs continued to broaden with increased participation of non-Christian religions. A series of Encounters was recorded by Florence Spurling in Western Queensland, one of which won a Silver Medal at the 1994 N ew York

International Radio Festival.

In conjunction with the Open Learning Agency and a number of universities, Radio National produced and broadcast four new university units on religion, Australian political history, American music and

popular culture, and Asian politics. Radio National participated in a major program exchange of documentaries, Crossing Boundaries, with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Ireland's

Radio Telefis Eireann, American National Public Radio, and the BBC.

A number of special radio events was presented. In December, a Radiothon to raise money for Community Aid Abroad projects in South Asia attracted donations of over $ 4 0 0 000. During the Christmas school holidays, a special daily program called K-Radio was presented and produced by young people for young people; and in April, a week of information and analysis led up to the first

democratic elections in South Africa. Another special week of broadcasting was the presentation of Australia Talks Back by five prominent Queenslanders. A national radio competition on film called Favourite Flicks was held.

The network strengthened community links with a program of outside broadcasts in places ranging from Melbourne University to Alice Springs.

Metropolitan Stations Increased profile and participation in local and community based events, while maintaining a unique mix of local and networked programs, has consolidated the position of ABC Metropolitan

21

Triple J's Real Appeal — o weekend long rodiothon which raised over $335 000 to aid the global refugee crisis. From le ft Bronwyn McConville (Resources Manager), Andy Glitre (Afternoon presenter), Ian Rogerson (Drive presenter) and Angela Catterns (Morning presenter).

Darwin listener Bernice McLaughlin, winner of the ABC Classic FM Ultimate CD Collection Competition, with from left: Christopher Lawrence, Geoff Bennett, Felix Hoyman and Phillip Carrick.

Stations as prime providers of news, talk and information programming.

Changes to nationally networked programs included the introduction of the Peter Couchman program on 6WF, 3LO, 2BL, 2N C and 7ZR.

Drama Development

A new Drama Development Fund was established. The fund allows Radio National, ABC Classic FM and Triple J to commission new works by the best Australian radio drama writers as well as new writers. A single broadcast of a play on ABC Radio is likely to be heard by more people than would ever see a play produced for the Australian stage. The networks bring theatre to people in remote and regional areas where plays are rarely staged.

This year the Ian Reed Bequest, established by radio writer Ian Reed for the ABC to encourage aspiring writers of radio drama, provided support for the Third International Women Playwright's Conference to be held in July 1994. The Bequest is sponsoring the visit to Australia of a prominent overseas woman drama writer and financially supporting the attendance of an apprentice woman playwright at the conference.

New and reformatted line-ups with high profile announcers provided more responsive and entertaining radio. 3LO's breakfast team was joined by Bev O'Connor; and Ernie Sigley joined Clarke FTansen on Saturday Grandstand to present the AFL; Michael Mackenzie presented SDDD's morning program, while M ai Honess presented the Territory's Sunday Country; Lisa Forrest presented the Radio Quiz which is networked to 2N C

Newcastle and throughout N SW and Ffaydn Sargent, Carolyn Tucker and Andrew Lofthouse joined 4QR.

Open days, picnics in the park, literary lunches and multicultural festivals continued to bring listeners in contact with the stations. Community activities which emphasised the International Year of the Family included 7ZR's role in Tasmania's largest single charity event, the Christmas Giving Tree, and 3LO's three month job campaign to assist the unemployed.

Regional Stations Regional Radio stations maintain a strong local identity based on news, information, and entertainment relevant to their particular audiences.

New programs included the popular 'domestic comedy' of Fiona O'Loughlin, based in Alice Springs. FHer weekly comedy series is now syndicated on Metropolitan and Regional stations.

The Open Garden Scheme continued to flourish with ABC Radio's support. Over 3 0 0 0 0 0 people

22

Florence Spoiling ond Peter McMurray interviewed rock art expert Grohome W otii (centre) at Carnarvon Gorge in central

Queensland during the making of the award winning Encounter program, A Hod and a Hurd Place. The panels are among the most

important stencil art in the world, ond were discussed in the program.

John Nutting, (and Bonzo) host of Saturday Night Country, broadcast from Townsville on Saturday nights on all ABC Metropolitan stations and Regional stations. The program features the best in Australian ond overseas country music, ond interviews with leading country music performers.

have visited 6 0 0 gardens in five States in the last two years.

The Country Hour established the Rural Woman of the Year award to recognise the contribution of women to primary industry and rural life. Begun in Queensland, the award was held in all

States and culminated in a national award ceremony held during the International Women in Agriculture Conference.

Veteran regional broadcaster Paul Thompson was honoured for 25 years service to rural and regional broadcasting at a testimonial dinner held at Mullewa in Western Australia.

ABC Radio N ew England North West inaugurated the Don Carr Brown Memorial Scholarship to honour the man who was the station's manager for twenty years. The annual scholarship of $3 0 0 0

will be awarded to a tertiary m edia/ communications student with a link to the region.

Regional Radio is an active participant in the lives of country Australians. For example: in South Australia the Royal Flying Doctor Appeal, the Sports Achiever of the Year Awards, the Admella Regional

Radio Writers Awards and writers workshops, and the Women's Forum Luncheons were ways in which Regional Radio contributed to community life. The Royal Flying Doctor Appeal in South

Australia helped raise $330 0 0 0 .

Other significant community events included 4RK Rockhampton's first multicultural fair which attracted a crowd of 2 0 0 0 0 . Representatives from 23

Verity James, presenter of AWF'smid- moming program.

nationalities participated in open celebration of multiculturalism through dance, music, and theatre.

N ew Services and Program Development N ew audio services are designed to ensure ABC Radio responds to emerging audience needs and

demands and takes a leading role in radio industry development.

Plans for the continuous news service, NewsRadio, were developed. Following approval by the Minister for Communications and the Arts on 28 June, NewsRadio will begin broadcasting on the

Parliamentary and News Network (PNN) early in 1 9 9 4 -5 . As well as live broadcasts from both houses of Parliament, when Parliament is not sitting NewsRadio will provide a continuous flow of news, news analysis and features. NewsRadio will feature material from ABC Radio's network of newsrooms and overseas correspondents. It will also include some information from Radio Australia's English

language service.

Projects under development include a pilot multi­ channel music-based subscription audio service.

23

All ABC Radio — Audience Reach ABC Radio — Audience Share

1994 m 1993 ■

1992 ■

4 4.5 5 5 .5 6

Audience lmillionsI

Networks — Audience Reach

Sydney

Melbourne

Metropolitan

Brisbane

Regional

Radio National

Adelaide

Classic FM

Triple J

0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500

Audience (OOOs)

AUDIENCE REACH: Number of listeners who listen at least once a week to at least one ABC Radio network in nine major cities and regional areas.

All ABC Radio results ore based on o combination o f internal surveys {conducted by ABC Audience Research) for regional areas and A68iMcNair surveys fo r nine major cities.

AUDIENCE SHARE: Average percentage o f all hours spent listening to ABC Radio during a week.

Hobart

Canberra

Newcastle

Darwin

1994 ■ 1993 B 1992 ■ 1991 1990

0 10 20 3 0 40 50

Per Cent

24

Linking With Our Audiences

Audience Growth Audience surveys during 19 9 3 -9 4 confirm that ABC Radio continued to build upon the record audience growth of recent years.

The national audience reach of ABC Radio's combined services has increased strongly to an average of 5 971 0 0 0 listeners each week — an increase of 6.5 per cent over last year. The most significant factor was a rise of 2 1 9 0 0 0 listeners, or 19.5 per cent, in Triple Js average weekly audience.

The combined audience share of ABC Radio services increased in the nine major cities surveyed.

In the final survey for 1 9 93-94 Triple J s national audience reached a peak of 1.5 million listeners. The expansion of the network to 4 4 regional centres beginning in January 1995 will enable the

network to reach the large youth audience in regional Australia.

Radio National continued to produce award winning programs for a national audience of 913 0 0 0 listeners each week. Following major

changes to the weekday Breakfast format in January, audiences have shown growth in several areas. In Sydney, for example, a morning audience reach of 68 0 0 0 was achieved, the highest in

twelve years; Melbourne experienced the best evening audience in seven years; Brisbane had the best Breakfast and Drive audiences in seven years; and Perth attracted its largest audience in eight

years.

Metropolitan stations maintained the high levels of listenership gained over the last four years: 3LO Melbourne's audience reach exceeded 600 0 0 0 for the fourth year in succession with an

average audience share of 11.2 per cent. 4QR Brisbane's audience share of 13.1 per cent made it consistently the number three station in Brisbane. 7ZR Hobart has now maintained its market leadership for four years. 2BL Sydney achieved a peak audience share of 8.6 per cent, the highest recorded for 1 2 years. 2C N Canberra maintained a 19 per cent audience share. SAN Adelaide and 6WF Perth maintained audience shares of 1 1 per cent and 1 2 per cent respectively. 8DDD Darwin

improved its position as the leading information

Deborah Theile, of South Australia, the winner of ABC Radio's inaugural Australian Rural Woman of the Year Award. An initiative of Regional Radio's Country Hour, the Award recognises the contributions and achievements of women in primary industry.

station maintaining a 20 per cent share. 2N C Newcastle had 1 1 per cent audience share and increased its audience reach to a peak of 86 000.

Improved program delivery To extend and improve the technical quality of services, ABC Radio's National Communication

Unit liaised with the National Transmission Agency which manages and maintains the ABC's transmission facilities.

Radio National, ABC Classic FM and Regional Radio services were extended to 35 new locations increasing the full range of all ABC Radio services in regional Australia to 2.163 million listeners, a ten per cent increase.

Planning commenced for the extension of the TripleJ Network to 4 4 regional centres. It is hoped that up to 2 0 of the new TripleJ services will be completed by January 1995.

25

Efficient Use of Resources

Program distribution infrastructure was redesigned. Satellite interchange circuits will be replaced by a combination of satellite, terrestrial lines and ISDN, known as the Delta System. The new system

provides greater flexibility, reliability and considerable cost efficiencies.

To improve resource planning, technical support services were reorganised into a national business unit — Alphatec. Projects exploiting the potential of

Radio — Performance Summary

Objectives

• Continually improve the qualify, relevance, authority, ·

accessibility and entertainment value of ail

programs.

• Be the leader in news, information, music, arts and

cultural programming. ·

• Establish and maintain a supportive, creative and

productive workplace. ·

• Establish distinctive and complementary content, and

market positions, for each ABC Radio service.

• Deliver and promote the full range of ABC Radio

services to all Australians.

• Be recognised as a driving force in radio industry

development, including development of technology

by ABC Radio. ·

• Establish and develop new forms of access to the

audience, including subscription and open narrow

casting services. ·

new technologies to minimise program production and distribution costs included a studio to transmitter link.

Strategic property development plans are being implemented to further the rationalisation of accommodation in capital cities and to allow continued relinquishing of leased properties (see page 77).

Performance Indicators

Audience response to qualitative issues as measured

by altitudinal research. National Advisory Council

and other community feedback, and recognition of

excellence by competitive awards.

Reduction in faults affecting audience perception of

the quality and reliability of ABC Radio services.

Audience measures of size, diversity and

appreciation for information programs and coverage

of Australian arts and culture.

Adherence to workplace agreements including

regular processes of staff assessment and appraisal.

Levels of staff participation in development and

assistance programs.

Achievement of audience reach a n d /o r share

targets for each network and station, and for ABC

Radio overall.

Mutual benefits of strategic relationships and co­

productions.

The establishment of new products and services and

the net revenue performance of established business

ventures.

Progress in achieving Australia-wide coverage for

the package of ABC Radio services.

ABC Radio support for high quality Australian

production, performance, composition and writing.

Expansion of new broadcasting technologies

available to domestic and international markets.

26

ABC C O O

Radio

Staff and Skills Development

The job design process of the 1992 Radio Broadcaster Structure Agreement was implemented. This will become an annual process requiring management and staff to consult and prepare work area plans and job designs. The process is

designed to link the goals of ABC Radio with career aspirations of staff.

A Technical Service Officer Agreement integrated engineering, technical and related classifications

Outcome 1993-94

• Received five major international awards and 15 major Australian awards including four Walkley awards.

• Major qualitative audience survey indicates a high level of audience appreciation for programming on all networks.

• Increased average weekly reach by 366 000 new listeners bringing ABC Radio to a new peak of six million listeners each week.

• The number of on-air faults originating from within ABC Radio decreased by almost 20 per cent.

• Strengthened arts broadcasting and maintained high levels af Australian music performance and composition.

• Extended Regional Radio, Classic FM and Radio National transmission network to 35 new locations and planned the extension of Triple J to 44 regional centres.

• Completed major sales of D-Cart in Europe,

America and Asia and developed D-Radio, the first

fully digital audio system. .

• Initiated NewsRodio service (to be bunched in

i 9 9 4 -9 5 ) and developed a pilot multi-channel

subscription audio service.

• Delivered extensive specialist broadcasting and

management training.

Audience Appreciation

ABC Radio commenced the regular tracking of audience appreciation in a benchmark survey of 2 6 0 2 ABC Radio listeners. Responses to some of the qualitative issues included:

86% feel that ABC Radio has the best coverage of

news and current affairs;

82% feel ABC Radio has the best range of talk and

information programs;

86% feel ABC Radio offers good value for money;

86% o f listeners to an ABC local station [Metro or

Regional/ feel that it provides the best balance

o f local, state, national and international

events coverage;

92% o f ABC Classic FM listeners feel that it

provides a very enjoyable selection of

classical music;

88% feel that ABC Classic FM makes a significant

contribution to the artistic life o f Australia;

89% o f Triple J listeners say it has a good mix of

new and unfamiliar music;

83% agree that Triple J is a strong supporter o f

Australian music;

87% o f Radio National listeners feel that it gives a

stimulating and entertaining mix of information

on a wide range o f subjects;

85% agree that Radio National provides the best

in-depth analysis of important events that are

happening around the world.

Radio — Financial Summary

For the year ended 3 0 June 1994

1994 7993

$ m $m

Operating expenses 2 3 7 .4 2 2 5 .6

Operating revenue 2 9 .6 27.3

N et cost of services 2 0 7 .8 198.3

This summary includes attributed revenue and expenditure from Corporate Division and ABC Enterprises, together with costs of transmission from National Transmission Agency.

New logos were designed for Regionol Radio stations based on an identifying symbol for their region.

Population Covered by ABC Radio

Metropolitan & Regionol Stations

NSW* Vit Old I

SA WA Tcs NT

0 20 40 60 80 100

Per Cent

Radio National

Vic Qid SA WA Tos i

NT i 0 20 40 60 80 100

Per Cent

Classic FM

NSW* smmemmmmmmmmmm Vic e S M H H e H H B · · ·

Old sammmmammmm sa ■ » « ■ ■ ■ ■

WA .................... ...... .. . . . . . . .

Tos Î’ ^ Î’ Î’ Î’ Î’ Μ Î’ Μ Î’ Η Î’ Î’ Î’ Î’ Î’ Î’ Μ Î’ Î’

NT B a M H H · · ·

0 20 40 60 80 100

Per Cent

Triple J

0 20 40 60 80 100

Per Cent

■ Increase front 1 9 9 2-9 3

* «dudes ACT

28

into a single career stream. The new structure will remove demarcation lines and create a more flexible work environment with greater access for

EEO targeted groups.

ABC Radio developed and delivered a comprehensive range of broadcast and management courses, conducting over

900 course sessions for 3800 participants. Training activities comprised Core Broadcasting Skills, Journalism, Craft Excellence, Senior

Broadcasters Forum, Presentation Skills, Management Skills and Cultural Diversity. Core Skills training, which is provided for all staff with broadcasting

functions, was accredited by Charles Sturt University and the University of Western Sydney towards Graduate Certificates and Diplomas in Communications.

Senior Broadcasters participated in Craft Excellence training and forums designed to enable peer review and critical examination of their work.

Participation in AIDAB training projects in Indo-China and South Africa provided career development opportunities for many staff. Alphatec also undertook several

international projects and is providing technical training as part of the Indo-China project (see page 88).

0-R adio, the ABC-developed digital on-air system.

interface that allows linking of multiple D-Cart systems — a major advantage for large broadcasters with many sites. D-Cart's new telephone interface offers remote access to D-Cart

Business Opportunities

ABC Digital Technology Marketing This year ABC Radio's Technology Research and Development Department's focus has been on the development of the D-Radio system. D-Radio is an

integrated digital on-air system which combines a powerful scheduling, messaging and networked information system with a fully digital signal path. This fusion of the latest advances in information technology and digital audio processing will be at the core of the new South bank complex in Melbourne.

D-Cart the ABC's digital audio editing system has been further enhanced by the addition of an

Radio Business Units

Financial Summary The following is a summary of financial activity for the Radio Business Units for the year ended 30 June.

1994 1993

$'000 $'000

Operating revenue 5 831 4 855

Operating expenses 5 785 4 228

Operating contribution 4 6 6 2 7

Radio Business Units comprise program and technology sales, 2 4 H o u rs magazine, Broadcast News Australia

and facilities hire.

29

from anywhere in the world, simply by dialling a phone.

D-Cart continues to be successfully marketed around the globe, with new customers in Mexico, Canada, Germany and Hong Kong. D-Cart has now been accepted by, and is in daily use with, BBC News and Current Affairs in London and the American Broadcasting Company in N ew York.

Bilingual D-Cart systems are now available to German, French, Chinese and Spanish users.

Technical and policy planning for the future introduction of Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) ensured that ABC Radio is at the forefront of developments in Australia. A DAB industry conference will be held in July 1994.

Broadcast News Australia (BNA) BNA was launched in January. It markets news copy and audio services to commercial media, private enterprise, government departments and tertiary institutions.

The service was established at the invitation of the Federation of Australian Radio Broadcasters (FARB) to provide commercial radio stations with a

competitive wire news text service.

Located in Brisbane, BNA's editorial staff receive ABC Radio news copy through the national news computer system. This is then tailored for the commercial wire service. Short news bulletins are also generated and are heard on 35 commercial stations nationally.

BNA's services were purchased by a number of commercial radio and television outlets.

Indigenous Broadcasting

Special programs and activities to celebrate the International Year for the W orld's Indigenous People included the Boyer Lectures on Radio National which were delivered by seven indigenous Australians.

A major IYWIP initiative was the Voices of the Land Concert featuring Kev Carmody, Toni Janke, Tiddas and Mixed Relations which was broadcast on all Metropolitan and Regional stations in September.

ABC Radio continued to assist many indigenous media associations with advice and training in technical, broadcast, management, transmissions and developmental areas.

A unique program and cooperative venture between Regional Radio and Charles Sturt University is providing Aboriginal undergraduates

with specialist broadcast training as part of a cultural heritage studies course. Coordinated by former Speaking Out producer Joel Wright, the project is based at the ABC's Goulburn Murray CO- FM station. Undergraduates will be able to gain experience by working with ABC staff during studio

down time.

ABC Radio's Wayne Coolwetl met American Indian US Senator, Ben Nighthorse Campbell in Washington DC, during an International Year of the World's Indigenous People study trip to North America. Interviews recorded on the trip were featured on Speaking Out.

30

Television

P I

.......

' ........ '

ilillliliillllll'lliilHIIliiiilllililjiEH Η :ί!1 !Ιί^ ', Ί ! ’ !ί!!Π ;!!

| | ......... :.... ; | ] ....

!|||H!!ll!lll(!i{l!ll

!!:!!!ϋ!!!!Η ’Ι!ϋ!ΐΙ !ίί!Ι!ϋϋ!Ιίϋ!Η1Π!

Jenny Brockie, producer/director with Paul Costello, camera operator and Mario Pellegrino, sound recordist, filming So Help Me God, an exploration of the workings of a local magistrate's court a t Campbelltown in Sydney.

31

Television

ABC-TV provides a non-commercial, independent, and comprehensive television service with a balance of wide appeal and special interest

programs. ABC-TV is committed to providing a service that is uniquely Australian and distinctly different from those of the commercial sector.

Since the late 1980s there has been a continuing effort to raise Australian content on ABC-TV. Australian content levels are now higher than ever before. On a regular basis the percentage of Australian programs shown in the evening exceeds 75 per cent. In the 6am to midnight period, well over half of all programming is locally produced.

In recent years there has been a deliberate shift in ABC-TV's schedule from entertainment to information programs and a significant expansion of news and current affairs, the cornerstone of ABC-TV.

Producing Q uality Programs

ABC-TV operates a comprehensive and authoritative news and current affairs television service with a balanced mix of local, national and international coverage. To ensure ABC-TV has a diverse range of programs that meets the needs of

its diverse audiences, ABC-TV produces and purchases quality programs in the areas of drama; comedy; primary, secondary and tertiary education; children's; sport; visual and performing arts; documentaries and other information based programming.

Key measures of ABC-TV's performance in achieving its goals are the range and mix of programs and the extent to which quality and innovation is acknowledged through the media, critical review, peer awards and audience feedback. The success of many of this year's programs is reflected in the variety of awards for excellence (see Appendix 5).

This year the level of Australian content increased markedly during the full day (6am to midnight) and was marginally less in the evening, being close to 58 per cent. The ratio of first-run programs to repeat programs was maintained in the 6am to

midnight period and continued to increase during prime time. ABC-made transmission hours increased by 6 per cent. However, the overall percentage of purchased programs also increased. This was largely in the midnight to 6am time band and reflected the first full year of 24-hour transmission.

The ABC's Television Services

The ABCs television services now consists of three components:

• ABC-TV — Australia's national non­ commercial network.

• Australia Television — an international satellite service to 18 countries and territories in South-East Asia (see pages 45-50).

• Subscription Television — a two channel television service planned to commence operation in 1 9 9 4 -9 5 .

i t

32

ABC 003

News and Current Affairs

ABC-TV News and Current Affairs continued to build on its reputation for responsive and authoritative coverage of daily news and major current

affairs. The through-the-day news service was reinforced with the reformatting of the morning news program, First Edition to complement

World at Noon, the 7pm News and the Late News.

A growing range of current affairs programs complements news programming. A new weekly program, Bottom Line hosted by M ax

Walsh and Maxine McKew, examines business, the economy and investment issues.

The 7 .3 0 Report remained a strong State-based current affairs program.

From Monday to Thursday Lateline continued to focus on a national or international story expanding on earlier news reports with analysis and

interviews. Attitude, the innovative weekly current affairs program for young people, began its second season. Four Comers continued its outstanding tradition of investigative

journalism and Foreign Correspondent presented a window on the world through reports from the ABC's network of overseas correspondents.

Landline, with new host Judy Kenny, continued to examine rural matters of interest to both urban and rural Australia.

Highlights of domestic coverage included the Mabo debate, the lead up to the change in federal Liberal Party leadership and the dramatic around-

the-clock reporting of the N SW bushfires. International coverage included the most dramatic breaking story of the past year, the abortive October coup in Russia, and, the transition to

majority rule in South Africa. Other vivid images in this year's overseas reports were from the Sudan, Bosnia, Rwanda, Kashmir, Somalia and Kabul.

Above, Foreign Correspondents Dominique Schwartz joins the Philippines Marines on a patrol of Job Island. Left, Maxine McKew presenter and reporter on Bottom Line, a new weekly program examining

business, the economy and investment issues.

33

Drama The drama highlight of the year was the screening of Heartland, a thirteen part series about Aboriginal Australia. For the first time Aboriginal actors and culture were given centre stage in a prime time drama. Heartland received critical and popular acclaim from indigenous people and the wider community.

Top: from left, Vincent (Ernie Dingo), Clorrie (Aoron Pedersen), Phil (Steve Vidler) and Millie (Justine Saunders) in the Declaimed dromo Heartland. Centre: Harvey (Aoron Blobey) visits his mother Monica (Monico Maughan) in The Damnation of Harvey McHugh. Bottom: The 1994 cast of G.P., from left, Michael Craig as William Sharp, Denise Roberts as nurse Julie Winters, Damian Rice as Dr Martin Dempsey, Janelle Owen as Zoe Browning, Tony llewelyn-Jones as psychiatrist Ian Browning, Dominic Elmologlou os Peter Browning, Marilynne Pospoley os Dr Tessa Korkidos and Trocie Sammut as Donna Browning.

In 1993-4 ABC-TV Drama produced 78 hours of quality Australian drama and provided employment for 718 performers, 3961 extras, 4 6 writers, 30 directors and seven composers.

Television — Performance

Objectives

• Meet the diverse range of audience needs and interests.

• Maintain an independent and authoritative news and current affairs service.

• Ensure a distinctive mix of programs which challenge as well as inform, entertain and educate.

• Support production of Australian programs.

• Establish the most effective balance between in-house, co-produced, purchased and commissioned programs.

• Explore opportunities to reach new audiences nationally and internationally.

• Pursue high quality transmission to all Australians.

• Support Australian Caption Centre in seeking to increase the hours of subtitled programs for hearing-impaired people.

34

ABC C O O

Television

A varied slate of drama programs was produced including: The Damnation o f Harvey McHugh, a 1 3 part comedy series about a lowly public servant; a second series of the police drama Phoenix; and Secrets which focused on Australian intelligence services. Police Rescue made the move to the big screen with the production and release of

Police Rescue — The Movie. G. P., one of the longest running dramas produced by ABC-TV, began its sixth year.

Children and Education Children's Television continued to be enormously popular. Production highlights of the year include;

The Ferals, Loud, Bananas in Pyjamas, Play School, Vidiot, and M r Squiggle, which brought 65 hours of delight to younger viewers. ABC-produced children's programs now cover a wide range of

program styles, including puppetry, a magazine program, suited characters and a game show.

The International Year of the Family was marked with a Saturday night series of Australian family dramas, Family Album, and International Children's Day of Broadcasting with an afternoon of special

programs.

The ABC Schools Television service continues to be broadcast between 1 Oam and 1 2 noon during

Summary

—-

Performance Indicators Outcome 1993-94

• Maintenance of audience reach and share.

• Mix of programs measured as percentage of transmission hours.

• ABC-produced first-run programs as percentage of transmission hours.

• Australian content as percentage of transmission hours.

• First-run programs as percentage of transmission hours.

• Acknowledgment of quality and innovation through audience feedback, the media, critical review grid peer awards.

• Improved transmission performance, better signal quality and reception levels.

• Number of hours subtitled, including 'live' broadcasts.

• Maintained average audience reach at 70 per cent and achieved evening audience share between 12.6 to 16.1 per cent in capital cities surveyed.

• Strengthened morning news bulletins and introduced new current affairs programs. Broadcast a diverse range of quality programs including 140 hours of ABC-produced drama and 6 5 hours of ABC-produced children's

programming.

• Transmitted 2255 hours of ABC made first-run programs, an increase of nine per cent.

• Increased Australian content to 5 5 .7 per cent during the day (6am to midnight) and held Australian content during the evening at close to 58 per cent.

• Increased first-run material in the evenings to 86.8 per cent and maintained first-run material during the day at 5 6 per cent.

• Received many awards for excellence including ten Logies and 1 2 AFI awards.

• Liaised with the National Transmission Agency to minimise transmission faults. Sydney transmitter tower refurbished and 11 new transmitters installed.

• Broadcast approximately 4 0 hours of sub-titled programs each week, including two and a half hours of live captioning.

35

school term. The multi award-winning Behind the News celebrated its twenty-fifth season of providing background information to news stories for ten to 1 2 year olds.

For adults, Open Learning programming expanded from 17 to 22 hours per week. ABC-TV completed three co-productions with the Open Learning Agency of Australia during the year: Aboriginal

Studies, Everybody's Business— Management in Action; and Growing Awareness— Factors in Plant Production.

In April, an adult literacy series. The Reading Writing Roadshow, commenced. The series teaches a variety of literacy skills and was co­ produced with the Commonwealth Department of Employment, Education and Training and in cooperation with N S W TAFE.

Documentaries and Features Science programs included a ninth season of Quantum which brought the best of Australian and international science television to our screens. Two specials were made by the Science Unit: The N ew

Australian Content ABC Made Programs-First Run

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

n e e ·

40 50

Per Cent

6 a m to m idnight I 6 p m to m id n ig h t

500 1000 1500 2000 2500

Hours Broadcast

6am to m id n ig h t B 6pm to m id n ig h t

First Run Programs

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

40 60

Per Cent

80 100

i 6 a m to m id n ig h t I 6 p m to m id n ig h t

Source of ABC-TV Programs

ABC

O ther Aust UK USA ■ ■ ■ 14.6%

O th e r O'seas ■ ■ 6.3%

151.9 %

0 1000 2 00 0 3000 4000 5000

Hours Broadcast

36

ABC DM

Television

Genesis a documentary questioning the ethics of genetic engineering and Racing On The Sun which profiled the 1993 Solar Car Challenge. A new series, Hot Chips explored developments in

information technology and their potential impact.

Compass covered aspects of faith and belief. The Sunday morning series Worship, was renamed Belief and revised to incorporate a multicultural approach.

Major outside broadcast events included: the Entombment of the Unknown Soldier which was

Television Program Analysis

C hildren's

D ram a

Education, Arts & R eligion

In fo rm a tio n

lig h t E n te rta in m en t

Q uiz, Panel a n d Gam e

Music

News, ( / A f fa ir s f t Docs

P olitical

Sport

O ther

P rom otions

0 500 1 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 5 0 0

H ours Broadcast

A u s tra lia n productions O ther p roductions

1. Based on Appendix 1 — Television Program Analysis. Program categories largely defined

by the Australian Broadcasting Authority.

2. Data is based on full-day Sydney transmission

Transmission by Program Strand

News & C urrent A ffa irs I

D ra m a I

C hildren & Education

D ocum entaries

Features

S port

A rts & E n te rta in m en t

Com edy

O ther

1000 2000

Hours Broadcast 3 0 0 0

ABC M ade Purchased

1. Based on output of ABC—TV production departments.

2. ABC Mode figures include local and network hours (eg News and 7.30 Report) which count os seven hours each weeknight. Hence the percentages of Australian content from any one transmitter cannot be derived from the above table.

Top: The Vietnom Peace, a three part documentary series. Centre: Archbishop Desmond Tutu with Blackout presenter Aaron Pedersen. Bottom: The adult literacy series, The Reading Writing Roadshow.

37

broadcast live from the National W a r Memorial on 1 1 November; and a one hour of edited highlights of the 1994 Sydney G ay and Lesbian M ardi Gras which drew a record audience for a Sunday evening.

Coverage of indigenous culture and politics included a seventh season of Blackout with new reporters Michelle Tuahini and Aaron Pedersen.

The highlight of NAIDO C (National Aboriginal and Islander Day of Celebration) W eek was a two hour documentary, Exile and the Kingdom which profiled the history of Aboriginal communities in north-west Australia.

Gardening Australia each week maintained its reputation as Australia's premier gardening program. A third series of All In A Day's Work was co-produced with the Department of Employment, Education and Training and explored problems associated with unemployment and job seeking. In its tenth year, The Investigators continued its role as national watch-dog on consumer issues.

The ABC looked at itself through Backchat and the media in general through Media Watch. Long term host of Backchat, Tim Bowden retired from the program in mid 1 9 9 4 and the program is now produced from Brisbane.

Top: Elle McFeast, presenter of Sex, Guys and Videotape— a celebration of male sexuality. Centre: Frontline host Mike Moore (Rob Sifch) with the Senator Cheryl Kemot, Leader of the Australian Democrats. Bottom: Andrew Denton and camera operator Brendan Show travelled to isolated Casey Island in Antarctica to find out how 19 Australians survive the Antarctic winter in The Money or the Gun on tee— Antarctica.

A new program was the interview series In Company With Cruickshank. Hosted by Sue Cruikshank the eight part series featured interviews with prominent Australians.

For the first time since the end of w ar in Vietnam, a western documentary crew was granted access to Vietnam to film The Vietnam Peace. The three part series was co-produced with Maryland Public Television. So Help M e God, by award-winning documentary maker Jenny Brockie, won critical acclaim and industry awards for its exploration of the workings of a local magistrate's court.

Arts, Entertainment and Comedy Many performances were telecast including: coverage of the inaugural Sydney Opera House Awards, the Young Performers Awards, and Once

in a Blue Moon, a tribute to the Australian musical theatre. These were complemented by telecasts from the Wangaratta Jazz Festival and the Australian String Quartet performing at the Adelaide Arts Festival. Other highlights were:

Positive Art, which explored the response of the arts

38

ABC CM

Television

world to the ravages of AIDS; the Brisbane Asian Pacific Arts Festival; and the Summer Stereo Special series. The Sydney Symphony Orchestra, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the West

Australian Symphony Orchestra and the Australian Youth Camerata all appeared in concert.

Two new music programs were introduced: Kate Ceberano and Friends, a six part half hour series

ABC-TV — MOST POPULAR PROGRAMS

1993 1 994 (to mid-June)

Program 5 Cities Program 5 Cities

Audience Audience

'000 '000

1. Budget 1993 1426 • 1. G ay and Lesbian M ardi Gras 1452

2. M r Bean 1390 2. M r Bean 1388

3. Clive James on 92 1322 • 3 . Mother and Son 1305

4. Stork-Part 1 1226 4. Keeping Up Appearances 1301

5. The Investigators 1207 5. Clive James on ’93 1231

6. W olves of the Sea 1 166 • 6, Sex, Guys and Videotape 1173

6. Movie-Five Fingers 1 166 • 7. The Investigators 1116

8. 7 Deadly Sins: Lust 1131 8. One Foot in the Grave 1113

9. The Big W et 1130 • 9. ABC News Monday-Friday 1092

10 The Great Debate-No 1 1122 10 The Bill 1081

1 1 Mysteries of Ocean Wanderers 1 102 • 1 1 Budget 1994 1064

12 Annus Horribilis 1076 • 1 2 Money or the Gun-Antarctica 1039

1 3 News Special: Verdict '93 1070 1 3 Shirley Temple America's Little Darling 1000

14 Police Rescue 1066 14 Clive James Postcard Cairo 9 9 0

15 Movie-Adventures of Robin Hood 1061 15 Rumpole of the Bailey 9 8 9

16 Lifesense 1055 15 M ovie-W orking Girl 9 8 9

17 Stark-Part 2 1016 • 17 The Best of The Late Show 9 8 7

18 W orld Series Debating 1013 • 18 Frontline 9 5 7

19 Quantum 1007 • 19 Holiday 9 4 9

20 Last Man Hanged 1006 • 20 Police Rescue 9 2 4

21 Great D ebate-No.2 1003 20 Middlemarch 924

22 ABC News (Monday-Friday) 1002 22 Wildscreen 9 2 0

23 Outback Story 994 • 23 The 7 .3 0 Report 908

24 Gumshoe 982 • 2 4 Quantum 896

125 So Help Me God 976 25 House of Eliott 895

• ABC produced programs

The Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Mr Bean Absolutely Fabulous

39

Jhe Ferals, a new series about a group of four devious puppet animals. Front row, from left: Mixy and Deryn. Bock row, from left: Joe (Miguel Ayesa), Modigliona, Robbie (Kylle Hogart), Rottus and Leonard (Brian Rooney).

featuring Kate Ceberano and her band with special guests; and a 1 3 part country music program Stampede. Rage, the overnight weekend rock music program, continued to provide a wide range of popular music.

Review covered arts events and performances around the nation and Sunday Afternoon with Peter Ross provided five hours of arts programming every week.

world. 'That sex has killed romance', 'That C od has no sense of humour' were some of the topics debated in a second series of W orld Series Debating. A second series of Kitson and Fahey, with two of Australia's top comic actors, Jean Kitson and Maryanne Fahey was screened and Australia's most acclaimed situation comedy Mother and Son, celebrated its tenth anniversary. Written and performed by The D-Generation, The Late Show maintained a significant cult audience with its live and anarchic style.

A new series Frontline began in M ay and has ensured that Australians will never look at current affairs in the same way. It quickly won critical acclaim and a devoted audience with its satirical view of the world of current affairs.

Two comedy specials were broadcast to large audiences: M oney or the Gun on Ice — Antarctica, and Sex, Guys and Videotape a safe sex comedy, presented by Libby Gore — alias Elle McFeast.

ABC-TV has a strong commitment to innovative Australian comedy. Live and Sweaty, hosted by Elle McFeast; and Roy and HG's This Sporting Life returned to take a satirical look at the sporting

Audience Composition

By age & gender

0 - 1 7 years

1 8 -3 9 years .

4 0 - 5 4 years

5 5 + years

0 10 20 30

Per Cent

■ Females IS Males

By gender

Females 51.2% .

Males 48.8%

Source: five cities metropolitan data, A.C. Nielsen Pty Ltd, Copyright

Sport Growing competition for sports programming has pushed up costs. As a result the ABC has reassessed its sport priorities resulting in coverage of a more diverse range of sports. This has benefited emerging sporting codes which previously received little television exposure. This year they included: the Paralympics, volleyball, soccer, field hockey, golf, lawn bowls and tennis. The ABC is the leading Australian broadcaster of women's sport with coverage of netball, basketball, golf and gymnastics.

ABC-TV was host broadcaster for major sporting events including the Women's W orld Basketball Championships and the World Gymnastic Championships.

Saturday Afternoon Sport and Sports News provide quality information and up-to-date sports results as well as live football in all States. School Sport, which is screened during Saturday Afternoon Sport, continued to showcase school athletes.

jP r -A. Ji

Over the past five years ABC-TV's reach and average audience share have increased

40

Approximately 4 0 hours per week of captioned programs are broadcast.

Im proving Transmission Q uality Transmission errors are a critical factor affecting ABC viewers and the Corporation aims to minimise the number of transmission errors and faults within

its control.

The ABC continued to liaise closely with the National Transmission Agency (NTA), Telecom and Optus to identify a comprehensive list of transmission faults. The ABC does not own, operate or maintain its transmitters. These are maintained by Telecom under the management of the NTA.

The ABC remains concerned with the relatively high incidence of faults in Hobart and Canberra, presumably due to the age of the transmitters in these cities. During the early part of 1994, the Sydney transmitter tower was refurbished with a resulting increase in transmission problems during that period.

Television — Financial Summary

For the year ended 30 June 1994

1994 1993

5m 5m

Operating expenses 373.1 367.6

Operating revenue 53.7 45.3

Net cost of services 319.4 322.3

This summary includes attributed revenue and expenditure from Corporate Division and ABC Enterprises, together with costs of transmission from N ational Transmission Agency.

Television Business Units Financial Summary for the year ended 30 June

The following is a summary of financial activity for the

Television Business Units for the year ended 3 0 June.

1994 1993

$m 5m

Operating revenue 11 0 7 9 9 5 ! 1

Operating expenses 7 161 6 0 1 5

Operating contribution 3 9 1 8 3 4 9 6

Television Business Units comprise sales of programs and stock footage, and facilities hire.

The transmission network was extended with 1 1 new services introduced. Upgrades were implemented at many sites, including the TV transmitting tower refurbishment in Sydney. VHF

and UHF channel changes were made in eight locations in Tasmania, and in several locations in the other states.

Efficient Use of Resources

ABC-TV continued to improve efficiency in production in order to optimise the number and quality of ABC-produced programs. The cost per

transmission hour, including ABC made and purchased material, decreased from $28 3 9 7 per hour in 1 9 9 2 -9 3 to $ 2 6 421 in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 . This was largely a result of the first full year of 24-hour transmission, with the cost per hour of programs

transmitted between midnight and 6am reducing the average.

ABC-TV operates production facilities in each capital city which range from major studio and post-production facilities in Sydney and Melbourne to small, local operations such as Darwin. There was an increase in utilisation of facilities in most areas this year. Studio facilities were upgraded in Perth and Canberra.

A production costing system developed over the last three years charges out the internal labour of production support departments to program production departments. Chargeable ordinary hours per employee in production departments have increased by 1 1 per cent since 1 9 9 0 -9 1 .

Digital technologies offering improved production qualities, reliability and operational economy, are being introduced progressively. Digital video post­ production suites were established in Sydney and Melbourne and new character generators were introduced into State branches for improved quality and flexibility. A transportable TV outside broadcasting system, which replicates the functions of an outside broadcasting van but offers greater mobility and flexibility, was developed in-house.

ABC-TV actively participated in international technical committees evaluating possible use of Compressed Digital Video (CDV) systems in Asia and the Pacific. CDV is the most significant recent technological development in television as it offers a reduced transmission bandwidth per channel,

42

ABC B O O

Television

O K a n

▼

Camera Operator, Dick Bond, filming Bananas in Pyjamas. Photo by Gory Johnston.

hence a more efficient utilisation of satellite capacity and an increased number of channels.

Business Opportunities

ABC-TV pursues revenue generating opportunities, which are consistent with its role and responsibilities. The revenue from these activities provides an important level of support for ABC-TV's

capacity to make programs.

They included:

• facilities hire; • corporate video production; • inflight video services; and • program sales — under the banner of ABC

International.

During the year, ABC-TV Marketing won contracts from Federal Government Departments seeking video production, teleconferencing and other services. Government business, together with

corporate production, represent an important component of ABC-TV's capacity to generate revenue. ABC-TV continued to provide Qantas domestic inflight video services, together with a

number of other airlines in the region. Gardening Australia's associated magazine remains the highest distribution gardening magazine in Australia, with an audited circulation of 92 0 0 0 per month.

Staff and Skills Development

The number of opportunities available for indigenous people and people from non-English speaking backgrounds continued to increase. There has been a general increase in representation of

people in EEO target groups across all occupational groups.

Expenditure on staff training exceeded the minimum requirement under the Training Guarantee Act 1990 to expend 1.5 per cent of the payroll on eligible training programs. Approximately 53 0 0 0 participant hours of training were provided.

43

Subscription Television

Since 1990 the ABC Board has been examining options and proposals for involvement in subscription television.

The Board resolved that 'the ABC will not proceed with an application for a pay television licence unless and until it is satisfied as to the commercial and technological viability of pay television on all relevant issues and unless it is satisfied that there will be no negative financial or editorial impact on the quality and diversity of ABC free-to-air services'.

The Federal Government allocated the two commercial satellite television subscription broadcast Licences A and B. Licence C, the two channel service licence nominated in the legislation for the ABC, is in the process of allocation. The allocation process is governed by the Minister for Communications and the Arts and required submissions to the Australian Broadcasting Authority and the Trade Practices Commission.

In March the Minister for Communications and the Arts approved the corporate structure for delivery of ABC services. That structure nas established a holding company — Arnbridge Ply Ltd — which is owned by the ABC and will retain Licence C. A separate operational company — Arnbridge Australia Ply Ltd — has been incorporated and will be the vehicle for the delivery of services via Licence C.

The Government allocated $12.5 million in the 19 9 3 -9 4 budget to assist with the establishment of the new subscription services. That funding will help meet capitalisation costs with the balance coming from the private sector, whose investment will be governed by criteria set out in the Approval Instrument issued by the Minister for Communications and the Arts.

Extensive research was conducted into audience attitudes to assist in determining priorities for programming and work began on cataloguing the accumulated body of ABC-TV's programming. The catalogue will provide a central resource in the programming of the new services.

Construction of a purpose built facility at Gore Hill, Sydney, to accommodate the new services commenced.

Arnbridge Australia Rty Ltd concluded an Enterprise Agreement with the M edia Entertainment and Arts Alliance for coverage of and working conditions applying to employees in the new enterprise.

Negotiations continued with potential private sector investors and it is anticipated that financing and operational arrangements for the new services will

be concluded before the end of 1994. The delivery of new services should begin in early 1995 and will contribute depth, diversity and quality Australian programming to Australia's subscription television services.

44

Australia Television

45

Australia Television

Launched in February 1993, Australia

Television has quickly established itself

as a unique international television

service.

Australia Television fulfils an important

part of the ABC's Charter to deliver

television programs outside Australia

which reflect Australia's image,

capabilities and perspectives.

A free-to-air service, Australia

Television is transmitted to 1 8 countries

and territories in South-East Asia by

the Indonesian satellite, Palapa B2P.

The service is delivered either direct-to-

home or through rebroadcast

arrangements with local television

stations, cable networks and hotels

within the satellite footprint.

Australia Television carries sponsorship messages on a commercial basis within guidelines set by the Board to protect the editorial independence of its programming. The Service's Foundation Sponsors are Telstra, Qantas and Digital. New sponsors in

19 9 3 -9 4 included, Fosters Brewing, Lincoln Electric, Done Art and Design, A W A and Coca Cola.

Producing Q u ality Programs

From July 1993, the service doubled its output to 16.5 hours daily of quality news and current affairs, children's, educational and general entertainment programming. Editorial guidelines recognise the cultural sensitivities within the Asian region while maintaining the integrity of programming.

To meet the needs of local audiences, specialised news and current affairs programming was introduced. News presentation was enhanced by the inclusion of nightly foreign language updates with English sub-titles in Bahasha Indonesia, Standard Chinese and Cantonese.

In September Australia Television and the Open Learning Agency of Australia announced an agreement to broadcast Open Learning programs on Australia Television. Education programs from the SBS are also screened.

Andrew Rhodes, assistant producer News, and Rosemary Church, presenter, at the Australia Television transmission centre in Darwin.

46

ABC CM

Australia Television

NEW CALEDtimA

M I C R O N E S I A

Japan AUSTRALIA TELEVISION

Satellite Coverage

e ra * · Primary Area (2—3.5m Dish)

Secondary Area (3.5—7.0m Dish)

Sports programs from SBS and commercial Australian networks include: the AFL, the Melbourne Cup, Australian Soccer and Basketball, Motor Racing and Tennis. The schedule is reinforced with a wide range of documentaries, dramas and comedies.

Linking W ith O ur Audiences

According to independent consultants over 24 million people in the region are able to receive Australia Television direct via satellite.

Many individual programs reach tens of millions more through arrangements with local TV and cable networks which allow the transmission of the whole service or individual programs, including sponsor messages, in the Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. First class hotels in ten countries make available the Australia Television service to guest rooms.

Recognising special training needs in some countries, the ABC initiated operational and technical training for local broadcasters to enable them to use Australia Television more readily.

In June Australia Television participated in 'Australia Today Indonesia '9 4 ', the largest trade and cultural promotion ever undertaken by Australia in

Indonesia. Rosemary Church, Australia Television News Presenter and Annette Shun W ah, Network Presenter travelled to Jakarta for the promotion.

O f the 30 0 0 0 attendees to the Australian trade exhibition in Jakarta, organised as part of Australia Today Indonesia '94, approximately 10 000 visitors completed questionnaires distributed by the exhibition organisers. O f these, 20 per cent confirmed that they viewed Australia Television for five to six hours per week.

Audience Response The introduction of a viewer response service in M ay was most successful. Viewer feedback increased dramatically. When the service first

47

Australia Television — Performance Summary

Objectives

• Enhance Australia's profile in the Asia-Pacific regions by delivering a television service to the area, which reflects Australia's image, capabilities and

perspectives.

• Provide the highest quality Australian programming including an ABC-produced regionally focused news service.

• Enhance the ABC's image in the region by applying appropriate editorial policies to programs, by working cooperatively with regional broadcasters and by developing relationships with regional government authorities.

• Operate a service which is finonciafly sustainable.

• Participate in the developing global market for international television services.

Performance Indicators

• Growth in audience reach across geographic and demographic markets.

• Qualitative feedback on the services from government, business and tourist sources, local broadcasters and cable operators.

• Percentage of news and information programming and percentage of Australian produced programming from all sources, including Open Learning, SBS and commercial networks.

• Increased number of rebroadcast agreements.

• Meeting revenue and expenditure budget targets.

Outcome 1993-94

• Increased audience reach through direct-to- home transmission, rebroadcast arrangements with local TV and cable networks and hotels. Rebroadcasting arrangements allow the transmission of the whole service or individual programs to tens of millions of people. Australia Television is now available in over 100 first class hotels in ten countries.

• Viewer mail doubled and program guide circulation expanded rapidly. Over 20 major publications in seven countries also list the program schedule.

• Doubled programming from 8 to over 16 hours per day. Introduced a second evening news bulletin; news updates in Bahasha Indonesia, Cantonese and Standard Chinese; a regionally focused current affairs program; Open Learning courses; and secured rights to Australia's premier sporting events.

• Secured a program exchange agreement with China. Negotiated rebroadcast arrangements with local TV and cable networks as well as to hotel rooms in the Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and China.

• Australia Television operating successfully within tight budget constraints. W hile corporate sector support for the service is growing, revenue targets from this source have not yet been achieved.

48

ABC C O O

Australia Television

began over 75 per cent of all viewer mail related to program guides and technical information. With an improved awareness campaign, this dropped to 15 per cent of all mail. By June letters

predominantly contained comments about programs and praise for the service.

Circulation of monthly program guides which are distributed to hotels, Australian diplomatic and trade missions and business associations throughout the region increased from 2 0 0 to 3000. Over 20

major publications in seven countries now list the program schedule.

Reports from rebroadcasting partners, Australian diplomatic representatives, expatriates, Australian officials and business visitors to the region, and regional officials visiting Australia indicate a

growing awareness of and positive feedback on the service.

Financial Summary

A summary of the financial position for the year ending 3 0 June 1994 is set out on page 50.

In June 1 9 9 4 the Federal Government announced its intention to review the management and financial arrangements for Australia Television. The Review is to be completed early in 1994-95.

To date, sponsorship of the service by private companies and government agencies has been encouraging but not sufficient to meet revenue targets. The shortfall has been met through a temporary line of credit from the ABC to the Australia Television subsidiary.

Australia Television presenter Annette Shun Wah signing autographs at

Australia Today - Indonesia 94, in Jakarta.

49

Australia Television International Pty Ltd - Financial Sum mary

For the 1 2 months to 3 0 June 199 4 Australia Television incurred a loss of $ 2 ,9 0 5 million. This loss is determined

after drawing the balance of the Establishment grant $2,491 million.

Total operating expenses for the year amounted to $10.41 8 million which includes resources and services

provided by the Corporation at no charge to the value of $ 4 ,0 6 7 million. The resources provided are those which

resulted in no additional cost to the Corporation and would not have been otherwise utilised. They are stated at a

fair market value.

O perating Statement for the year ended 3 0 June 1994 1994 1 9 9 3

$ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0

Operating Revenue

Sales revenue 955 126

Establishment grant 2 491 2 9 0 9

3 446 3 0 3 5

Resources and services 4 067 1 9 1 0

Total revenue 7513 4 9 4 5

Operating Expenses

Production and transmission 4 664 1 802

Facilities 559 4 3 3

Management and marketing 1 128 8 0 0

6 351 3 0 3 5

Resources and services (a) 4 067 1 9 1 0

Total expenses 10418 4 9 4 5

Net operating loss (2 905) —

(a) In accordance with the Guidelines lor Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities issued by the Minister for Finance, resources provided without charge are

shown as both an operating revenue and expense.

Balance Sheet for the year ended 3 0 June 1994

1 9 94 1 9 9 3

$ '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0

CURRENT ASSETS 8 8 3 154

CURRENT LIABILITIES 3 7 8 8 154

Net assets |2 905) —

EQUITY (2 905) —

Included in current liabilities is an amount of $3,571

million provided by the Corporation to the Company as

an interest bearing infernal line of credit, repayable

from future profits.

Establishment G ran t The Parliamentary appropriation of $5 4 0 0 0 0 0

provided in 1993 for the establishment of the service is

now fully expended. In the terms of the letter from the

Minister for Transport and Communications of

9 October 1992 the Australian Broadcasting

Corporation was required to 'agree that the

$5 4 0 0 0 0 0 grant be converted to a loan if the

service starts to generate profits'.

$'000

Parliamentary appropriation 5 4 0 0 _______

Utilised 1993 2 9 0 9 _______

Utilised 1994 2 491

Balance —

50

d

Ε π * ϋ

b J

J J

w Ms»- g fiiiiti

Radio Australia

International broadcasting, through Radio Australia, has long been an important Charter function of the ABC.

Radio Australia broadcasts in nine languages to a worldwide audience of millions. Its priority target areas are South and South-East Asia, North Asia and the Pacific.

Producing Q u ality Programs

A major development this year has been the expansion of Radio Australia into the production of television segments.

In October, Radio Australia began producing foreign language news bulletins for broadcast on Australia Television. The nightly news updates are broadcast live in Bahasa Indonesia, Cantonese and Standard Chinese with English subtitles.

In April, a new half-hour current affairs television program, Asia Focus providing a weekly review of current issues in Asia, was produced by Radio Australia and ABC-TV for broadcast on Australia Television and ABC-TV.

Pacific During 19 9 3 -9 4 , the Papua New Guinea Service ceased broadcasting the one hour Pacific English program and increased Tok Pisin output from two to three hours a day. The Papua New Guinea Unit also began a transcription service of six programs

per fortnight which are distributed to 1 5 provincial radio stations in Papua N ew Guinea.

The French Unit continued to play an important role in the Pacific region through its popular transcription service, local rebroadcasts and participation in key events. The Australian High Commission in Vanuatu assisted Radio Australia

during its coverage of the South Pacific Mini Games and made possible the five week

In October, Radio Australia began producing foreign language news bulletins for broadcast on Australia

Television. From left, news presenters: Esther Wong (Cantonese), James Chong (Standard Chinese), Enny

Wibowo (Indonesian), Hidayot Djajomihardia (Indonesian) and Luo Yi (Standard Chinese).

52

ABC 608

Radio Australia

secondment of a senior member of the Radio Vanuatu newsroom. Radio Australia staff conducted a media training workshop for senior government

officials in Port Vila.

English Language Service In August, a new format with greater emphasis on news and information programs was introduced. Network Asia Inews and sport) and International

Report now form a two-hour block, which is updated and repeated to serve morning audiences across Asia.

Other initiatives included the introduction of a half­ hour feature called Arts Australia; Asia Focus, a weekday magazine program; and Charting Australia, which is designed to introduce listeners in India to Australian issues. The number of domestic programs was also increased. Apart from a two hour live relay of Australia All Over, international listeners can now hear Australia Talks Back, The

National Country Hour, The Science Show, Talking History and The Europeans.

Sports coverage included broadcasts from the Micronesian Games and the Oceania/South Pacific Weight-lifting Championships.

News and Current Affairs Radio Australia's newsroom draws on its own specialist reporters and the ABC's network of correspondents to provide 3 0 world, regional and Australian news bulletins each day. Current affairs programs includes; Report from Asia, Network Asia, International Report, Indian Pacific,

Background Report and Correspondents' Report.

In August, the service introduced an hourly ten- minute news bulletin and specialist bulletins for the South Pacific. The number of Australian news bulletins was also increased. Approximately 7 0 per cent of Radio Australia's bulletins are now

rebroadcast by local radio stations throughout the Pacific.

South and South-East Asia Radio Australia participated in the 'Australia Today' promotion held in Jakarta. Live coverage of events in Bahasa Indonesia and English was provided from an outside broadcast studio.

The Cambodian service, established last year, will soon be extended from five to seven days a week. Feedback from the region has been positive.

Radio Australia — Performance Summary

Objectives

• Develop Radio Australia's position as the most authoritative independent provider of international news and current affairs specialising in the Asia-Pacific regions.

• Reach new audiences and increase target audiences.

• Provide high quality news, information, cultural and entertainment programs to target audiences in Asia and the Pacific in English and local languages.

• Diversify Radio Australia's methods of international broadcasting additional to short­ wave radio.

Performance Indicators

• Audience response to Radio Australia as indicated by research, correspondence and expert opinion.

• Hours broadcast according to program and language mix.

• Enhanced range of delivery mechanisms, including satellite delivery and rebroadcasting.

Outcome 1993-94

• Increased audience reach in Papua New Guinea with 39 per cent of respondents listening at least once a week.

• Increased Tok Pisin output to three hours a day.

• Introduced a new format for English language service with a greater emphasis on news and information programs.

• Planned expansion of Cambodian service from five to seven days.

• Introduced foreign language news bulletins on Australia Television.

• Began transmission of English language programs via satellite to South-East Asia, Western Europe, the United States and Japan.

• Completed upgrade of transmission facilities at Shepparton and at Cox Peninsular.

53

Development of an English for Cambodia teaching series funded by the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB) is well advanced and the half-hour lessons will go to air in

1 9 9 4 -5 . A linguistic adviser from Radio Cambodia was seconded to Radio Australia to assist with production of the project.

Radio Australia — Program Mix

Spoken Word 4 1 .7 * _

News & Current Affairs 3 4 .3 % .

Music & Entertainment 2 4 % .

Radio Australia — Language Mix

North Asia

Standard Chinese 4 1 2 % .

English 4 5.4 % _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Cantonese 11.4% .

South-East & South Asia

English 5 8.3 % __

Khmer 2 % ____

Vietnamese 6.3% _

Indonesian 2 9 .2 % .

Thai 4 .2 % _ _ _ _ _

Pacific

English 7 4 .1 % .

Tok Pisin 2 2 .2 % .

French 3 .7 % __

A broadcaster from the Vietnamese Service travelled to Vietnam in March to report on Prime Minister Keating's discussions with Vietnam's Prime

Minister Kiet.

The Thai service has been sending a range of its programs to the Australian Embassy in Bangkok for distribution to local radio stations throughout

Thailand. Arrangements have also been made with a number of Thai language newspapers and magazines to transcribe and print feature stories based on Thai information programs.

North Asia A major effort was put into placement of program material on local A M and FM radio stations in China.

The English from Australia for Chino courses began on Henan Provincial Radio in May 1993, and Radio Australia's English language teaching consultant participated in a two-week 'English from Australia in China' Summer School at the Dalian Foreign languages Institute.

In April, the North Asia unit acquired the Xinhua Newsagency's Database which gives broadcasters immediate access to China's domestic and international news services, biographical details on Chinese and foreign personalities and information on government organisations.

A program, produced by Winnie Tang, which was entered in the Shanghai International Radio Music Festival, won a Nominee Award. .

Linking W ith O u r Audiences

To attract new audiences and to provide better services to existing listeners, Radio Australia continued to exploit advances in telecommunications technology.

English language programs are now broadcast into South-East Asia on the Palapa B2P satellite, into Western Europe via the Astra satellite, into the United States via the ASC-1 satellite, and into Japan on the Cable Audio Network System via the

Intelsat and Superbird B satellites.

Results of a survey in Papua New Guinea revealed that 39 per cent of respondents had listened to Radio Australia at least once a week. This figure represents 8 5 0 0 0 0 listeners — a significant

54

ABC KXI

increase over 1990 survey results of 28 per cent (650 0 0 0 listeners).

To increase links between staff and external communities, Radio Australia journalists were seconded to the Pacific News agency, PACNEWS, in Vanuatu, and to a UNICEF

workshop in Manila.

Transmission The upgrading of transmitter sites by the National Transmission Agency was completed. Two additional transmitters at Cox Peninsula, Darwin,

will improve reception in Asia and a new aerial system at Shepparton, Victoria, will enhance coverage of the Pacific. In May, the Shepparton transmitter celebrated its fiftieth anniversary of

operation.

Participation in international forums has made clear the continual need to review transmission strategies, particularly the system under which funding for

Radio Australia

Financial Sum m ary for the y e a r ended 3 0 June 1994 1993

$m $m

Operating expenses 30.1 31.3

Operating revenue 0 .6 0 .7

Net cost of services 29.5_______ 3 0 .6

This summary includes attributed revenue and expenditure from Corporate Division and ABC Enterprises, together with costs of transmission from National Transmission Agency.

1 ''W ^i^W t^ K H a s K S U K m S ^*' ■

Radio Australia

Radio Australia broadcasters Oska Setyona and Nuim Khoiyath at Australia Today Indonesia 94 in Jakarta.

transmission is provided through the National Transmission Agency.

As the future of international radio broadcasting is likely to be in the development of direct satellite to radio receiver systems, it is essential that transmission funding takes account of new transmission technology.

Efficient Use o f Resources

Radio Australia's news room converted to full digital recording, editing and replay through the ABC- designed and developed D-Cart system which was introduced to the division in 1992. The same system is being expanded to serve all Radio Australia's language units.

A joint review of the North Asia department by Radio Australia management and Public Sector Union representatives was undertaken. Recommendations from the review will form the basis of measures to streamline operations and maximise the use of existing resources.

55

ίι,τ·â„¢ ι7Τ<ϊΤίΤΐί

Concerts

ABC 003

Concerts

ABC Concerts manages the network of the six State symphony orchestras, making it the largest orchestral organisation in the world.

The diverse activities of the orchestras reach into Australian life in many ways: through live concert presentations in major venues, free open-air

performances, regional touring, opera and ballet, compact disc and audio cassette recordings, and broadcasts and simulcasts on ABC Radio and ABC-TV.

Producing Q uality Performances

ABC Concerts strives to maximise the Orchestras' musical standards. This effort is reflected in the quality of conductors and soloists who work with the orchestras, and the performance of major repertoire demonstrates their performing excellence.

The role of Chief Conductor in guiding the artistic advancement of the orchestras is crucial: the appointment of internationally respected conductors to these key roles indicates the growing international stature of the ABC orchestras, and promises to stimulate significant musical progress in future years.

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra (SSO) celebrated the commencement of its relationship with its new Chief Conductor, Edo de W aart, with a major concert featuring The Warriors by Grainger and a symphonic adaptation of music from W agner's

Ring cycle. The West Australian Symphony Orchestra (WASO) appointed the renowned British conductor Vernon Handley as Chief Conductor in

December, with Vladimir Verbitsky continuing as Principal Guest Conductor. The Adelaide Symphony Orchestra (ASO) announced the appointment of David Porcelijn as its Chief Conductor in August: Mr Porcelijn is also Principal Conductor and Artistic Adviser to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra.

Attracting visiting soloists and conductors to Australia is a continuing challenge. Prestigious

visitors this year included the conductors Van Pascal Tortelier, Eduardo Mata, Gianluigi Gelmetti, En Shao, Hans Vonk, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Gilbert Varga and Yakov Kreizberg. An impressive

list of international soloists included the baritone O laf Baer, pianists Andras Schiff, Richard Goode, Imogen Cooper, Peter Serkin and Roger W oodw ard; violinists Frank Peter Zimmermann and

Christian Tetzlaff, and cellist Truls Mark.

An increasing number of guest soloists and conductors established regular touring relationships with the Orchestras, reflecting the level of musical satisfaction and stimulation which they derive from their concerts in Australia.

The Orchestras' concerts in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 featured many repertoire highlights. The diversity of concerts is demonstrated by three selected performances:

• Mahler's Symphony No. 2, Resurrection performed by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra (MSO), under Gilbert Kaplan;

• the first Australian performance and one of the first performances in the world of Messiaen's Eclairs sur I'au-dela, by the SSO under David Porcelijn. The work is notable for its references to Australian nature and birdsong which Messiaen experienced during his visit in 1988; and

• the ASO's participation in the Two Worlds Music Festival at the 1994 Adelaide Festival of the Arts. The Festival explored contemporary Japanese and Australian music, and the

interaction between Asian and Western musical traditions.

Australian Performance and Composition The ABC actively supports the development of Australian creative and performing artists through

the National Development Programs of ABC Concerts.

The Young Performers Awards, a long-established ABC program, celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 1994. The Awards promote Australia's most promising talent among instrumentalists and singers

under the age of 30. Heats are conducted in all States and culminate in the selection of four finalists. This year's final was held in Perth with the W A SO conducted by Jorge Mester and featured

performances by Emma Lysons, soprano; Rebecca Chambers, piano; Sarah Warner, bassoon; and

57

Liwei Qin, cello. The final was broadcast live across Australia with the Young Performer of the Year Award presented to Liwei Qin.

ABC Concerts concentrated efforts in extending its young artist development activities in partnership with Youth Music Australia. N ew projects included orchestral fellowships and conductor training workshops. The Orchestras also supported conductor development through appointment of Ron Spigelman as Conductor-in-Training with the ASO and Graham Abbott as Associate Conductor with the MSO.

In partnership with the Australian Music Centre, ABC Concerts hosted the National Orchestral Composers School. Four outstanding young composers were given the opportunity to workshop their compositions with one of the Orchestras under the guidance of a professional tutor and a specialist conductor. This year the ASO hosted the School, with composer Roger Smalley and conductor David Porcelijn.

The School complements ABC Concerts extensive commissioning program. M ajor additions to the Australian repertoire which received their premieres

Concerts — Performance Summary

Objectives

• Consolidate ABC Concerts as a leader in Australian musical culture.

• Present live musical performances of the highest possible standard.

• Increase the recognition and profile of the orchestras at the international level.

• Develop and promote Australian contemporary composers and composition.

• Identify and encourage talented Australian performers and conductors.

• Reach new, especially young, audiences.

• Enhance access to symphonic music — live, recorded, broadcast and in future via new technology opportunities.

Performance Indicators

• Extent to which quality is acknowledged through critical review and awards, nationally and internationally.

• Numbers of — new Australian works commissioned — Australian works performed — Australian soloists and conductors engaged in concerts, broadcasts and recordings.

• Attendances, renewed subscriptions and recording sales.

• Listening and viewing figures for orchestral music.

Outcome 1993-94

• Presented over 7 5 0 performances to audiences in excess of 9 0 0 000.

• Presented over 130 performances of 91 works by Australian composers, historical and contemporary, including 19 specially commissioned works.

• Presented 39 performances of 26 contemporary overseas works, including 15 receiving their first Australian performance.

• Participated in innovative Television presentations of orchestral music and released compact disc recordings for domestic and international distribution.

• Undertook activities to increase access, including 61 concerts in regional and outer- metropolitan venues and 22 free concerts.

• Appointed new Chief Conductors to the Sydney, Adelaide and West Australian Symphony Orchestras, and established Artistic Adviser or Administrator positions to the Tasmanian, Melbourne and Queensland orchestras.

• Presented over 180 concerts targeted at families, youth, students and children.

• Undertook tours to Indonesia by the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, and to China by the Queensland Symphony Orchestra.

58

• ipBKj j ββ*&\

in 1 993-4 include Refer Sculthorpe's Memento Mon Nigel Butlerley's The Woven Light and Richard Meale s Symphony.

Linking W ith O u r Audiences

Since the establishment of a centralised ABC Concerts division in 1986, a major increase in audience numbers reached by the Orchestras has

been achieved. The successful effort to introduce and involve more people demonstrates the Orchestras’ relevance as cultural institutions valued

by the community.

To extend the audience reach of their activities, the ABC orchestras undertook a full range of access programs including: free open-air concerts in all States; a wide range of concerts for families, youth,

schools and children; and extensive regional, outer- metropolitan and interstate touring.

Audience reach is also extended through broadcasts of the Orchestras' concerts and recordings on ABC Radio and ABC-TV and by compact disc recordings.

The development of innovative forms of televisual presentation was demonstrated in three outstanding productions:

• the Dance project Sensing, choreographed by Graeme Murphy to a score by Ross Edwards and performed by the Queensland Symphony Orchestra (QSO) with the Sydney Dance Company;

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra with its new Chief Conductor, Edo de Woort.

• the Once in a Blue Moon celebration of Australian musicals on ABC-TV, featuring the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra (MSO); and

• the program The Art o f de W aart with the SSO under its new Chief Conductor in concert at the Sydney Opera House. Parts of this concert were recorded for a special Television presentation.

M ajor CD releases included:

• the QSO's W orld Premiere recording of works by Benjamin Frankel, which was highly praised in international reviews;

• the SSO's world premiere recording of works by Sir Eugene Goossens, the famous composer and conductor who led the Orchestra from 1947 to 1955;

Concerts

Financial Summary for the year ended 30 June 1994 1993

$m $m

Operating expenses 4 7 .5 46.5

Operating revenue 17.0 16.7

Net cost of Services 30.5 29.8

This summary includes attributed revenue and expenditure from Corporate Division and ABC Enterprises.

59

Concert Attendances 1990-94

I Paid

4 0 0 600 8 0 0 1000

Attendances ('000)

' Schools ■ Free

Concerts 1990-94

I Paid

2 0 0 4 0 0 600

Ho. o f Concerts

M Schools

800

I Free

Performance Activities 1994

Major Subscription

C ontem porary Series §£ 11

Popular Program ming E E i 26

Special Events

Opera, Ballet & Hirings

D evelopment Activities $ 8 1 20

Access Activities

International 3 12

Recordings w E H 27

185

Artist and Repertoire Analysis 1993

Overseas Conductors 38

300

Australian Conductors 30

247

Soloists Overseas 32

167

Soloists Australian 197

237

Australian Composers, 52

C ontem porary* 163

Australian Composers, 22 H istorical** 57

Overseas Composers, 19

Contemporary 59

Artists Performances

Based on 1993 calendar year. 'Includes Aussie Fanfare project.

" Reflects the introduction of the Composing Australia series.

• the third volume in the QSO's acclaimed series of recordings of the music of Franz Waxman, conducted by Richard Mills;

• the ISO 's recording of works by Peggy Glanville-Hicks and Don Kay;

• the ABC Classics recording of concertos for trombone performed by the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra (ASO) with the Orchestra's principal trombonist, W arw ick Tyrrell; and

• the MSO's recording of concert arias with soprano Rosamund tiling, conducted by Heribert Esser.

Maximising Income Generation

The majority of the ABC Orchestras' funding is allocated from the ABC's overall appropriation. However, the potential for growth of the Orchestras and their ability to continue to stimulate Australian cultural development requires that they attract and generate substantial additional income.

The Orchestras generate revenue from ticket sales, sponsorships, donations, grants from State and other government arts funding agencies, commercial ventures and hirings.

Highlights of revenue generating performances included: the engagement of the ASO to accompany the W orld Festival Choir in Verdi's Requiem featuring Luciano Pavarotti; and the W ASO accompanying Julia Migenes at the

renowned Leeuwin Estate concert in Western Australia.

60

ABC Enterprises

V ID E O

iAU**1’

Enterprises

ABC Enterprises produces and markets a variety of consumer products in the form of books, music, audio tapes, video cassettes, clothing, toys, manchester and stationery.

ABC Enterprises aims to fulfil Charter responsibilities of encouraging and promoting the arts in Australia as well as fostering Australian industry through the manufacture, distribution and promotion of quality ABC products.

Products are primarily sourced and developed from ABC-TV, ABC Radio and ABC Concerts activities. They are marketed through ABC Shops, ABC Centres, the general retail trade and direct marketers. Profits generated are redirected to other output divisions of the ABC for production and programming activity.

Producing Q u ality Products

ABC Books Seventy new titles were released this year.

In children's publishing, leading books included a range of Bananas in Pyjamas, Play School and Johnson and Friends titles and for older children, Hot Jokes for Kool Kids.

Other leading titles included the most recent of the three 'Working Dogs' books, Working Dog Stories From All Round Australia', Yarns! From All Round Australia; The Stockmarket, a Guide; Bizarre Moments in Science; The ABC Cricket Almanac

1994 and The ABC Guide to Australian Test Cricketers.

ABC Audio Tapes Over 40 titles were released this year. Highlights included Readings from Manning Clark's History of Australia by John Bell and a highly successful range of comedy titles.

Leading children's titles included Bananas in Pyjamas, Cafe Rat, Stories from Blinky Bill and Hot Jokes for Kool Kids. ABC Audio collaborated with Radio National in the pilot of the Kids Radio

program, K-Radio. Home Run by Paul Jennings was featured on K-Radio and was awarded the Gold Medal at the N ew York Radio Festival for Children's drama.

ABC Video ABC Video maintained its position as the largest producer of Australian made videos. In its third year with distribution partner, Roadshow Entertainment,

62

ABC CM

Enterprises

52 titles were released. Sales increased significantly with over one million videos sold and ABC Video

received numerous industry awards (see Appendix 7).

Continued expansion into video production included new titles such as Don Spencer's Australia and the

best selling Nature's Landscapes which was sourced from the archives of ABC-TV's Natural History Unit.

ABC Classical Music ABC Classics produced 1 3 titles featuring the ABC's Orchestras and Australian composers and artists.

The Wiggles, performing with Dorothy the Dinosaur ot the opening of the ABC Shop in Ringwood, Victoria.

The ABC for Kids label dominated the children's market with the release of 32 new titles and the launch of the ABC for Kids Junior Classic range.

Highlights were Trombone Concertos with the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra and Australian Trombonist, W arwick Tyrrell; a recording of Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov showcasing the talents of Duncan Gifford; and David Drury's Pomp

and Circumstance, a recording of organ music played on the spectacular Sydney Town Hall organ.

ABC Classics month in M ay was celebrated with the release of four double CD sets including an ABC Classics sampler. This sold over 1 2 0 0 0 copies.

Opportunities to expand the international distribution of ABC Classics continued to be explored. A recording of Takemitsu with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra was released in Japan in October. The ABC Classics catalogue is

now distributed in the USA by Albany Music and within Australia by PolyGram.

ABC Contemporary Music ABC Music released over 5 0 recordings in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 . The range includes children's, country, TripleJ, soundtrack, jazz, soundscape and adult contemporary music.

ABC Music enjoyed industry recognition as Australia's major producer of Country Music recordings, winning several major awards including seven at the Tamworth Country Music

festival (see Appendix 7).

ABC Music Publishing In 1993, ABC Music established a publishing arm to complement its recording labels. In 1993-94, the publishing arm acquired the rights to music by

Enterprises Revenue Activities (Accrued) * *

Retail soles & m arketing 76%

Trade & children's publishing 10%

Spoken word 3 % _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Contemporary music 5 % - - - - - - - - - -

Video 5 % _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Licensing 1%

The above graph shows I he proportion of Enterprises gross revenues contributed by each o f the division's main revenue generating activities.

* Revenue includes retail sales from ABC Shops, fees from ABC Centres, the wholesale soles o f books and spoken word cassettes to ABC Centres and the trade and the royalty return from ABC Music, Video and licensed product on sales mode by distributors of

Enterprises product.

63

Mic Conway; the Australasian rights to the Postman Pat theme; all music released through the ABC on the ABC for Kids music label; and world-wide rights for Bananas in Pyjamas music.

ABC Licensing The Licensing area continued its rapid growth.

Bananas in Pyjamas remains the leading property. In Australia there are now over 25 licensees releasing over 2 5 0 Bananas in Pyjamas products.

Licensing agents were appointed in the United Kingdom and South Africa and Bananas in Pyjamas products are proving popular in New Zealand.

Play School licensed products remain popular in the pre-school market, while sales of Triple J products, especially clothing, were excellent.

ABC Magazine Publishing ABC Magazines is developing a portfolio of specialist one-off titles based on ABC-TV and

Radio programming. The ABC magazine publishing list for 1 9 9 3 -9 4 included Australia Today, Bon Appetit and The ABC Cricket Book 9 3 -94.

The distribution base for ABC Magazines titles includes newsagents, ABC Shops and ABC Centres and selected speciality outlets and bookshops nationally.

Retail and Distribution

ABC Shops The number of ABC Shops increased to 19 with the opening of a new Shop at Ring wood in

Enterprises — Performance Summary

Objectives

• Provide products which will extend the role of the ABC while at the same time balancing cultural, corporate and commercial imperatives.

• Promote the talents of creative Australian writers, illustrators, producers, musicians, composers and performers to create products that provide a permanent record of ABC programs, thereby extending their intellectual life.

• Continue to be a vigorous, creative and commercial partner to all aspects of ABC-TV, ABC Radio and ABC Concerts activities.

• Increase return to the Corporation while continuing to provide some break-even products.

• Enhance domestic distribution and develop overseas distribution for ABC products.

• Research and develop new products through technological developments in the areas of music, video and interactive media.

Performance Indicators

• Growth in the range of ABC consumer products.

• Opportunities created for Australian artists and industries.

• Integrated, productive relationships with output divisions.

• Increase return to the Corporation.

• Extended distribution network within Australia and overseas, specifically in the Asia-Pacific regions.

• Increase in the number and profile of ABC Shops and ABC Centres.

• Investment in the research and development of new business opportunities, including multimedia products.

64

ABC 603

Enterprises

M elbourne. The Melbourne Shop w as relocated to

larger premises which feature a dedicated arts

section. The Chadstone shop in suburban

M elbourne w as refurbished.

Due to a strong product and marketing base, sales

continued to grow despite an uncertain economy.

ABC Centres There are now 1 3 3 ABC Centres, including ABC

for Kids Centres located in toy shops and ABC

Education Cenires located in university campus

book shops.

The location of the majority of ABC Centres in

regional areas is an adjunct to the Regional Radio

network, providing an on-going ABC presence as

well as access to a diverse range of AB C based

consumer products for the community. * •

Outcome 1993-94

• Produced more than 5 0 0 ABC consumer

products.

• Received 3 3 Australian industry aw ards and

one international aw ard.

• Released products to complement and

coincide with A B C -TV and ABC Radio

broadcasts including La Boheme C D and

Video and 1993 Boyer Lectures audio tape

and book.

• Increased revenue from the ABC Shops and

Centres by 18 .5 per cent and product areas

by 1 1 per cent.

• Established distribution for selected products

in Asia, the Pacific and Europe and

appointed licensing agents for the

manufacture and distribution of licensed

product in five countries.

• O pen ed one new ABC Shop and

refurbished/relocated tw o. M aintained a

network of ABC Centres and expanded the

distribution network for AB C consumer

products in the retail trade.

• Appointed a N e w M e d ia Project M a n a g e r to

explore opportunities for the development of

multimedia products.

Trade and Overseas ABC books, music and video distribution

agreements were renegotiated with Allen and

Unwin (books] and Roadshow (video] being

reappointed. From July 1 9 9 4 , AB C Contemporary

Music will be distributed in Australia and N e w

Zealand by EMI Music. A B C Audio are distributed

by Allen and Unwin within the book trade and to

department stores and video outlets through

Roadshow Entertainment.

STY Video was appointed as the ABC Video

distributor in M alaysia and Singapore. Distributors

in Papua N e w Guinea, Singapore and Hong Kong

w ere appointed to distribute ABC for Kids products.

Readers Digest in Hong Kong are distributing a

selection of ABC Video and AB C Music products

throughout South-East Asia.

Public Events AB C Enterprises participated in numerous public

events including: A B C O pen Days and Picnics;

Play School Concerts; Triple J's Big Day Out; Sydney's Royal Easter Show; and the Melbourne

and N ew castle Shows. ABC Centres were

represented at regional shows and education

expositions.

The AB C for Kids concerts have continued to grow

in popularity. Concerts featuring artists such as The

W ig gles, M ic C onw ay, Colin Buchanan and

M o n ica Trapaga w ere held in regional areas

throughout Victoria and N e w South W ales and

attracted large audiences. Aimed at children from

three to ten years of age, the concerts are supported

by a quarterly newsletter and a 0 0 5 5 concert hotline.

Efficient Use of Resources

In O ctober a new point-of-sale system was installed

in A B C Shops. The new system provides faster

processing of transactions and more accurate retail

information.

In early 1 9 9 4 ABC Enterprises appointed a N e w

M e d ia Project M an a g e r to assess opportunities for

the development of multimedia products.

65

ABC Enterprises

Operating Statement for the year ended 30 June 1994

7994 1993

ί'ΟΟΟ $000

Operating revenues from independent sources Sales and royalties 39 865 34 006

G ain on sale of non-current assets 1 —

Interest 21 16

Incidental 410 581

Total operating revenues from independent sources 40 297 3 4 6 0 3

Operating expenses Cost of sales 24 346 2 0 9 8 6

Employee related 6 845 5 2 3 5

Bad and doubtful debts — 18

Depreciation and amortisation 708 5 6 7

Loss on sale of non-current assets 74 —

Materials and minor items 508 3 4 9

Operating leases and occupancy 2 916 3 2 2 4

Incidental 2 869 2 4 6 2

Total operating expenses 38 266 32 841

Operating result (deficit) 2 031 1762

Accumulated operating results at beginning of financial year 4 528 4 5 8 6

Less: contribution to Corporation 2 881 1 8 2 0

Accumulated operating results a t end of financial year 3 678 4 5 2 8

Statement of Financial Position as at 3 0 June 1994

7994 1993

$'000 $'000

CURRENT ASSETS Receivables 2 094 2 142

Inventories 5 332 5 173

Other 22 3

Total current assets 74 48 7 3 1 8

NONCURRENT ASSETS Receivables 10 12

Properly plant and equipment 2 164 2 0 2 5

Total non-current assets 2 174 2 0 3 7

Total Assets 9 622 9 3 5 5

CURRENT LIABILITIES Creditors 3 981 3 5 2 2

Provisions 955 6 2 9

Total current liabilities 4 936 4 151

N O N CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions 1 008 6 7 6

Total Non-current liabilities 1 008 6 7 6

Total liabilities 5 944 4 8 2 7

Net Assets 3 678 4 5 2 8

EQUITY N et Equity 3 678 4 5 2 8

Total Equity 3 678 4 5 2 8

66

Corporate and Technical Support

In the studio in the new ABC Southbonk Centre, Melbourne.

Corporate and Technical Support

The ABC's strategy in recent years has been, where possible, to devolve administrative functions to the operating divisions and to establish self-funded business units to provide other specialist services on a competitive basis.

Major support functions undertaken centrally include:

• Human resource policy coordination and implementation;

• Financial services and management;

• Legal and copyright services;

• Information technology management;

• Administrative services;

• Property management.

In 1 993-94, a Corporate Services Division was established to coordinate corporate support and management services (see ABC Organisation page 6).

Human Resources

In September, following the devolution of centralised human resources and industrial relations management to divisional level, a Human Resources Board of Management was established.

The Board of Management chaired by the Deputy Managing Director and with divisional representation, provides a regular forum to ensure coordination of industrial relations and human resource management, and provides consistency in application of human resource policy.

Senior Executive Service The Senior Executive Performance Planning and Review System was introduced as part of the ABC Senior Executives Agreement 1993. It provides the review mechanism to determine eligibility for performance pay. For the first period of review from

1 July to 31 December 1993, Senior Executives were rated:

• Outstanding 1 per cent

• Superior 17 per cent

• Fully Effective 74 per cent

• Adequate/Unsatisfactory 8 per cent

The average performance payment was $ 2 9 2 9 for the six month review period.

Equal Employment Opportunity The ABC presented its 1 9 9 3 -9 6 Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) program to Parliament in December. EEO has been ABC policy since 1980 and action programs have been implemented since 1988.

The following targets have been set for achievement by August 1 996:

• Women in Senior Executive— 35 per cent (currently 24 per cent);

• People of Non-English Speaking Background— 1 8 per cent (currently 9 per cent);

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People— 2 per cent (currently 1.5 per cent);

• People with Disabilities (target to be set in 1994).

Major activities this year included:

• the fifth ABC Women in Management training course;

68

ABC ON

Corporate and Technical Support

• appointment of two women to fellowships in ABC-TV — a Sports Broadcaster fellowship and a non-English speaking background Early Childhood Education Adviser fellowship;

• forums organised by ABC-TV's Network 99, including Promoting Women On-Air in the '90s and Creative Women in the ABC;

• continued provision of traineeships, scholarships and industry experience for women in technical operations areas in ABC-TV;

• development of detailed cultural diversity strategy plans and holding of cultural diversity training workshops in ABC Radio;

• establishment by ABC Radio of a working party to develop strategies to increase the number of women in management;

• development of a training strategy with the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service focusing on provision of career development, physical access, training and recruitment for people with disabilities.

A boriginal Employment and Development Program The ABC has participated in the Federal Government's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Employment and Development initiative for six years. During that period, employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff has grown from three to 82, representing 1.5 per cent

of staff. The ABC aims to achieve and maintain a

The ABC supported the annual Young Women in Physics Residential School at Macquarie University for the second time. The school encourages girls to continue with physics to senior high school and beyond. Forty-five girls participated in the School, which included a tour o f ABC-TV and ABC Radio studios ond demonstrations of new technology. From left: Melissa Cheung of Donebonk High School and Michelle Francis of Byron Bay High School.

level of employment of indigenous staff at two per cent. This target reflects the percentage of indigenous people in the Australian community.

Women and Engineering

Eight scholarships were awarded this year to young women enrolled in the final year of the Associate Diploma of Electrical Engineering

course at TAFE colleges. The scholarships are worth $ 1200 each and include industry experience in ABC-TV and Radio. Two of last year's scholarship applicants were

subsequently appointed to positions in ABC Radio's technical services department.

Lis Rust, ABC Radio EEO Advisor ond George Boaocha, National Business Manager, Alphatec, at the St George College o f TAFE Graduation Ceremony in May, with M irA Ho, one o f the winners of

the joint ABC-TV and ABC Radio Women in Technology Scholarship

69

Corporate and Technical Support — Performance Summary

Objectives

Human Resources

• Coordinate and improve Corporation-wide human resource management.

• Maintain and improve the ABC's position as a

responsible employer.

Financial Management

• Promote and implement the efficient management of

financial resources through quality advice and

service to management, the Board and external parties.

• Ensure financial statements are produced on a

timely and accurate basis, with a minimum o f audit criticism.

Legal Services

• Maintain the highest standards of practice and

education in all areas of law pertaining to broadcasting, to minimise the risks of liability from defamation and contempt, without impact on the

quality of news and current affairs coverage.

• Protect ABC intellectual property and discharge the ABC's copyright obligations.

Information Technology

• Develop, maintain and operate information systems integral to the activities of the ABC.

• Develop and provide reliable and cost effective

communications network, using advanced technology.

Administrative Services

• Provide quality cost-effective administrative services to the Corporation.

Property Management

• Continue implementation of the Strategic Property Development Plan to improve accommodation and

production facilities.

Performance Indicators

Human Resources

• Provision of specialist human resource management

advisory services.

• Coordinated human resource policy and strategies.

• Provision of information systems which meet internal

and external reporting requirements.

• Statutory human resource responsibilities met by the

ABC.

• Payment of staff accurately and on time.

Financial Management

• Provision of accurate and timely financial advice, maximise ABC funding, and manage its cash appropriation.

• Production of financial statements on time and with

minimum audit criticism.

Legal Services

• Availability and timeliness of legal and copyright

advice.

• Range of training sessions and educational material delivered.

• Cost savings, compared with contracting out legal

services.

Information Technology

• Successful implementation of systems O n time and

within budget.

• Appropriate exploitation of new technology resulting in improved productivity and reduced

costs.

• Meeting availability targets and customer support service agreements.

• Recognition as a leader in information technology within the broadcasting industry.

Administrative Services

• Reduction in proportion of resources going to administration.

Property Management

• Completion of major property projects on time,

within budgets and to user satisfactory standards.

• Efficiency and cost savings achieved from

accommodation projects.

70

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Corporate and Technical Support

Outcome 1993-94

Human Resources

• Established Human Resource Board of Management to improve policy coordination.

• Reviewed payroll administration.

• M et statutory human resource reporting

requirements including presentation of 1 9 9 3 -9 6 EEO program to Parliament in December.

• Efficiently administered payroll for ABC staff and

artists.

Financial Management

• Provided wide ranging advice and reports on

budget management and successfully renegotiated the ABC's triennial funding

agreement.

• Tabled audited financial statements, unqualified by Australian National Audit Office, in Budget

sitting of Parliament.

Legal Services

• Provided round-the-clock legal advisory service.

• Provided comprehensive legal and copyright

training for journalists and program makers.

• Internal legal service provided for $2 million less

than costs of equivalent external services.

Information Technology

• Introduced new and enhanced existing

information technology systems in ABC-TV, Radio

and Enterprises.

• Began upgrade of the ABC's telephone network.

• Provided improved services at reduced costs by

exploiting new technologies.

• Developed innovative systems for.the ABC South bank Centre.

Administrative Services

• Continued reduction in administration costs

resulting from introduction of business units.

Property Management

• The ABC Southbank Centre in Melbourne nearing

completion, on time and within budget.

• Reduced costs by relinquishing leased properties

in Melbourne and Sydney.

ABC-TV employs 3 7 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff. Thirty-five staff are employed in program related areas and two are administrative staff. Eleven staff are currently trainees. Trainee Camera Operator, Lorena Browning, was the

1994 N S W Aboriginal Trainee of the Year. This award is open to all Aboriginal people in training in N S W , both in the private and public sectors.

ABC Radio employs 32 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, almost two per cent of total radio staff. Two-thirds are employed as broadcasters and journalists. Employment initiatives this year included the appointment of a management trainee, three trainee broadcasters and a news cadet. Three cadet journalists and a broadcast trainee completed training and attained

mainstream employment. An indigenous journalist was also employed on The Country Hour. Twenty-five of ABC Radio's indigenous staff attended the second Indigenous Staff Conference in June.

Thirteen Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff are employed in other areas of the ABC. This represents over one per cent of staff employed in ABC Corporate, Concerts, Radio Australia and

Enterprises. Five of the thirteen are trainees. New staff were engaged by Radio Australia, ABC Concerts and Corporate Finance.

Occupational Health and Safety The Occupational Health and Safety section provides an advisory and consultancy service to all

areas of the Corporation on occupational health and safety, workers' compensation and rehabilitation case management.

Projects during the year included:

• Participation in the Southbank Health and Safety Working Group;

• Cornea re re-accreditation of the ABC Health and Safety Representatives' Training Course;

• Development of a Supervisors' Manual;

• Provision of training courses for Health and Safety Representatives, supervisors and individual work areas;

• Reviews and assessments of particular work areas.

There were 340 incidents reported during the year. Eleven incidents were notified to Comcare under

71

Section 68 of the Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employees) Act, 1991. Four Notices were issued by Health and Safety Representatives under Section 29 of the Act. There were 225 workers' compensation claims costing approximately $602 000.

Staff Development Staff and skills development remain a priority for all ABC Divisions. They are integral to achieving the common objective of recruiting, developing and retaining capable, creative and committed staff. To maximise productivity and efficiency, the ABC has developed flexible styles of training tailored to work place needs.

Training has been directed to support three main areas:

• development and maintenance of core skill levels;

• assistance for staff to develop new or broader skills to adapt to changing technologies and working environments;

• implementation of the Corporation's EEO Management Plan 1 9 9 3 -1 9 9 6 .

The Corporation again exceeded its minimum requirement under the Training Guarantee Act, 1990 to expend 1.5 per cent of payroll on eligible training programs.

Industrial Relations A substantive change in industrial relations management has occurred through the devolution of centralised industrial relations management to the divisional level. Specialist industrial relations practitioners located in output divisions have provided the capacity for more responsive support to operational management.

An Enterprise Agreement with the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) covering journalists and reporters was ratified by the Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC) in August.

In November, an Enterprise Agreement was ratified by the AIRC with the ABC Senior Executives Association.

In June, the AIRC handed down a decision on the ABC Part Time Work Award. When ratified, this award will provide greater flexibility in methods of employment.

Staff Profile

ABC Staff 1990-94

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

4 5 6

Staff (HOOsl

Staff by Gender

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

50%

Males Females

Staff by Location

— NSW 49%

- A C T 2%

— Victoria 20%

— Queensland 8%

— South Australia 7% — Western Australia 7% — Tasmania 5% — Northern Territory 2% 1

Staff by Division

— Radio 33%

Televison 47%

Radio Australia 4%

Concerts 12%

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Corporate and Technical Support

Staff by Job Group

Management

Admin & other program staff

Radio Broadcasters

Broadcast offkers/BPO

TV Producers/Directors

TV production support & transmission

Joumohsts/Reporfers

Musicians 4 conductors

Engineering 4 technical

Production operations

TV production services

600 900

* o o f Staff

ABC Staff 1993-94

Staff at Radio Television Radio < Coneertsintmrises Corporate Tarot

30 June Australia

ΐίφ-'

New South Wales 1993 783 1453 5 ATS 95 136 2647

1 9 9 4 8 4 0 1477 5 1 7 8 9 4 111 2705

Victoria 1993 200 . 521 187 122 10 ?' 8 1108

199 4 241 513 195 122 19 8 1098

Queensland 1993 205 > . 146 - GO

00

8 4 451

1 9 9 4 199 140 9 0 12 0 441

South Australia 1993 179 139 ϊ ZSe S ssI .86 ■· .. 4 412

1 9 9 4 169 140 9 0 i t ; .? 0 402

Western Australia 1993 161 125 '·: "'S*·; 105 V 4 ’ 'm m 397

199 4 148 121 1 0 7 4 0 380

Tasmania 1993 94 . 124 ' I?*/B 61 rr: V - 3 :fA :"· 3 285

1 9 9 4 9 3 128 6 3 3 O 287

Northern Territory 1993 57 49 - 2 f; ' 109

199 4 55 56 | | | | | | ^ 3 0 114

ACT ' 1993 56 33 i 1 >95 1 9 9 4 59 3 4 JT..V; 3 0 96

Total 1993 1795 ; 2590 192 637 A 131 159 5504

199 4 1 8 0 4 26 0 9 2 0 0 6 5 0 141 5523

73

Child-care and the ABC

In November 1983 the ABC Board adopted a policy to provide child-care facilities in new ABC premises.

In line with this policy an area of the ABC Ultimo Centre in Sydney was dedicated for this purpose and named the W endy McCarthy Child-care Rooms, after the former Deputy Chair of the ABC Board. Inner City Care, a community- based child-care group, began operating the facility in July 1991. The Centre

provides up to 39 full-time places during the day and up to 10 full-time places at night.

In 1992, ABC-TV management established an independent, long day care centre at the ABC-TV complex at Gore Hill in Sydney. The Centre is currently licensed for 38 children and may be extended to 5 0 places to meet demand. The Centre won a special award from the Department of Community Services, during Children's Week in 1993 for Providing a High Quality Work-Based Centre.

In Melbourne, the ABC and the Department of

Elso Mousse! and Eugene Kirkwood, both oged three, ot the ABC-TV Child-core Centre ot Gore H i! in Sydney.

Defence have jointly established a long day care centre for the children of parents employed by both organisations, to coincide with the move to the new ABC Southbank Centre. The Centre is the first jointly established child-care centre for the Corporation and in June 1994, the Department of Defence won a Victorian Children's Services Industry Award for their contribution to its establishment. The 35 place centre is located in the historical Victoria Barracks complex, and is expected to be fully utilised by the end of the year.

Extensive consultation with staff and relevant unions was undertaken to ensure smooth transition to new facilities at the ABC Southbank Centre in Melbourne.

Legal and Copyright Services

The Legal and Copyright Department maintained its consistent record of efficiency and cost-effectiveness while continuing to expand the range of services it provides to the Corporation.

A survey of the costs of legal services indicated that the ABC saves at least $2 million compared to the costs of acquiring equivalent services externally. Damages and costs paid out in relation to defamation judgments and settlements remained relatively low, reflecting the effectiveness of both the round-the-clock legal advice service and the

comprehensive media law training program for ABC journalists and program makers.

N ew programming ventures by the ABC including Australia Television, subscription television as well as the diverse activities of ABC Enterprises and other business units have increased demand for the department's services. To ensure that the Corporation is well-placed to take advantage of

Legal and Copyright Litigation

Contempt

F in a lise d

T

A ctive

]

D o rm a n t

Defamation 20 25 106

Personal Injuries 1 8 2

Other 5 4 -

Total 2 7 38 108

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Corporate and Technical Support

developments in information technology, staff have kept abreast of and advised on the legal and intellectual property issues involved in emerging technologies such as multimedia.

Copyright staff managed clearance of material for inclusion in ABC programs and merchandise, administered the ABC's major rights agreements, trained ABC production staff on copyright matters and monitored proposed changes to the Copyright Act as a result of the convergence of technology and the possible introduction of legislation to create

moral rights.

Inform ation Technology

The Information Technology Department aims to enhance the ABC's ability to broadcast quality radio and television programs. Systems were developed to improve work methods, increase efficiency and lower costs during 1 9 9 3 -9 4 .

Upgrades to the ABC's mainframe computer have resulted in reduced maintenance costs, better response times and increased reliability.

A new system, FOCUS, was developed to improve the utilisation of resources by ABC-TV program departments. TROVE, a system to maintain information about broadcast rights for programs

was developed.

In Radio, a system was introduced to improve the administration of 24 Hours subscription renewals, banking and subscriber special offers.

The News and Current Affairs production system (NewsCaff) now has more than two thousand users. Despite an increase of more than two hundred users, cost per user decreased by 14 per cent. NewsCaff was installed in Bottom Line, the new weekly Television business program, enabling staff to produce their scripts electronically, as well as providing ready access to the latest financial

information. The use of information available through the NewsCaff system has enabled ABC Radio to market its news services to commercial organisations through Broadcast News Australia

(BNA). Access to NewsCaff was extended to ABC Radio rural program staff and to the proposed 24- hour news service — NewsRadio.

A new point of sale system was installed in ABC Shops in time for the 1993 Christmas trading

period. ABC Enterprises financial and administrative systems were also upgraded.

The latest computer-based multimedia technology has been developed to enable the audience to interact with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra during the forthcoming Planet of Doom concert. Digitised video and animation will be used to create a simulated computer game in which the audience make choices influencing the course of the concerts.

Use of innovative technology has improved telephone communication within the ABC. Successful negotiations with suppliers and

refinements to the internal network resulted in a large reduction in mobile phone and network costs. The ABC's internal telephone network is being progressively upgraded. To date, Radio and

ABC-TV sites in Sydney and Perth and the ABC-TV site in Melbourne have been upgraded with plans to upgrade the rest of the telephone network in the new financial year.

A key consideration in planning for the voice and data services for the Southbank project in Melbourne was a flexible infrastructure to allow the ABC to respond to changes in technology without major capital investment. Cabling was installed to

meet the requirements of new applications, including multimedia and video conferencing. Telephone facilities will be installed to enable a high quality talkback system.

Financial M anagem ent

The Corporation aims for excellence in proper financial management and control. Regular reporting to the Board on financial activities of the Corporation is a regular feature. Quality and timely financial services are provided to all divisions by Corporate Treasury and Accounting Operations.

Corporate Treasury Corporate Treasury provides advice and services on budget management, building projects and capital investment. Other activities include

borrowings, foreign exchange and general funds management.

During the past financial year Corporate Treasury:

75

• assisted with the successful negotiation of the ABC's third triennial funding agreement with the Government ensuring stable funding until June 1997-98;

• raised a $40 million (ten year) loan through a private placement;

• refined the Corporation's risk management program which encompasses Cornea re, insurance, borrowings and general risk management principles;

• helped establish two new business units, namely Accounting Operations and International Operations; and

• provided wide ranging advice and reports on budget management, building projects, capital investments and a number of other financial issues some of which included borrowings, foreign exchange, funds management, staff costs, superannuation, various costs and policy issues.

Accounting Operations Once again Accounting Operations completed the Corporation's financial statements on time and without audit criticism. In addition, Accounting Operations:

• implemented systems for electronic foreign currency transactions through the Bank of America's MicroExchange systems;

• simplified domestic banking activities through additional use of the Reserve Bank ReserveLink system;

• provided simple guidelines on financial management to the overseas news bureaus;

• continued to streamline general accounting activities;

® simplified fax gathering routines.

Administrative Services

Administrative Services provides specialist services through its Business Units and departments.

Fleet M anagem ent The Fleet Management Unit provides cost-effective services in passenger and heavy vehicle fleet management, competitive internal leasing rates and computerised fleet management information. A Driver Awareness program to reduce accidents was introduced.

76

ABC KM

Operating costs were contained below target in spite of significantly higher turnover of vehicles, while the average passenger vehicle trade-in for the year exceeded targets.

M ail and Distribution The high standard of service maintained by the Mail and Distribution Unit has been consistently acknowledged. Effective cost control resulted in

reduced labour costs despite an increased output of 12 per cent.

Printing The Printing Services Unit provides a wide range of products for departments in all divisions. Competitive pricing has been achieved by keeping operating costs down, and at the same time,

providing an emergency printing service for program departments.

Supply The Supply Unit has undergone substantial review prior to becoming a business unit. A new computer system will improve materials handling and supply administration. As a result, investment in inventory will be reduced by over 1 2 per cent.

Corporate and Technical Support

The new ABC Southbonk Centre in Melbourne will be officially opened by the Prime Minister in November 1994.

Document Archives The Document Archives Unit continues to provide an effective service to all divisions. A new storage system is being installed to improve space

utilisation and retrieval of information for program research and to assist the Unit meet its statutory requirements.

Property M anagem ent

The process of consolidating activities into owned property continued. This has seen leasing costs in capital cities reduced by over 80 per cent since 1985.

In Sydney, the one remaining leased property south of the harbour was relinquished and staff relocated to the ABC Ultimo Centre. At the ABC-TV site in Sydney, a multi-storey carpark which includes office accommodation and a platform for satellite dishes was completed.

The construction of the ABC South bank Centre in Melbourne is within budget and on schedule for completion in late 1994. The Centre, which will overcome severe accommodation problems and

consolidate Radio, Concerts and Radio Australia staff onto one site, will be staffed progressively from July 1994. Remaining surplus properties in Melbourne were sold to assist in repaying

borrowings for the South bank Centre.

The process of upgrading or constructing purpose- built Regional Radio studios also continued. In Mackay, development approval was granted for the establishment of modern, compact, purpose- built studios which are planned for completion by mid 1995. In Orange, the existing studios were sold and land purchased to allow the construction of more suitable studios which are scheduled for completion in early 1995. Both the Orange and Mackay studios will be built with minimal additional costs and are largely being funded through the proceeds of land sales.

77

Inctnllntinn nf cntollito Hich nt the ARC liltim n fpntm

ABC KM

Strategic Development's role is to monitor and advise the ABC about developments in a range of external environments including:

• the Australian community, defined at its broadest;

• policy and regulatory developments as they affect the ABC's role;

• international broadcasting with particular focus on the Asia-Pacific regions;

• rapidly developing and converging technologies of broadcasting, telecommunications and computing, with particular attention to satellite and standards issues.

In the first full year of its operation, Strategic Development has been successful in its goals agreed as part of the ABC Corporate Plan and detailed in the sections to follow.

Policy and Planning

Corporate Policy and Planning works to represent and protect the ABC's interests. It keeps abreast of domestic and international industry developments to assist planning for and participation in the evolving

media environment.

Corporate Plan After extensive consultation, the Corporate Plan for the financial years 1 9 9 4 -9 7 inclusive was developed and adopted by the Board in accordance with sections 31A and 31B of the ABC Act. The Plan covers the Corporation and its two subsidiaries, Australia Television and

Subscription Services.

All divisions regularly report to the Board against the Plan and this Annual Report for the first time uses the Plan as its basis.

The Board intends reviewing the three year plan annually.

Reviews and Inquiries The Division coordinated the ABC's input to a number of reviews and inquiries and contributed to others. For example, Corporate Policy and

Planning:

• contributed to the ABC's submission to Government on the third triennial funding agreement;

• monitored and analysed digital transmission policy;

• developed submissions to the Broadband Services Expert Group, the Communications Futures Project and the Copyright Convergence Group (with regard to retransmission issues];

• contributed to development of the ABC's proposals regarding the Government's forthcoming Cultural Policy Statement;

• participated in the Review of Parliamentary Broadcasting which preceded the conversion of the Parliamentary Broadcasting Service to the Parliamentary and News Network which made

possible the future commencement of a 24-hour radio news service;

• participated in the Department of Communications and the Arts reviews of Transmission Policy for the Extension and Maintenance of National Broadcasting Sen/ices

and Remote Area Broadcasting Services.

79

Strategic Development — Performance Summary

10^232531 Policy and Planning • Ensure ABC interests and opportunities are represented and protected in development of

Government policy and regulation, in broadcasting and related industries.

Community Relations • Ensure the ABC understands and is understood by the wider Australian community.

Technology Strategy • Ensure the ABC can take advantage of technological changes and opportunities in audio visual, information, entertainment and

related services.

International Development • Develop a viable and well regarded unit specialising in international consulting on broadcasting, training and related matters.

Performance Indicators

Policy and Planning • Monitoring and analysis of policy developments which impact on the ABC s role as a national broadcaster.

• Representation of ABC interests to government, political parties, bureaucracy and industry groups.

Community Relations • Inter-divisional coordination of Publicity and Promotion, Audience Research and Complaints Handling.

• Presentation of ABC as an innovative organisation through a range of information sources.

• Good relations between ABC and external stakeholders.

Technology Strategy • Recommendations for satellite development strategies for domestic and international sen/ices.

• Development of policies with technology policy bodies, standards bodies, technology and service providers.

International Development • Signed contract and establishment of Indochina project.

• Identification of funding sources and organisations to partner ABC in international activities.

ABC KM

Strategic Development

Outcome 1 9 9 3 -9 4

Policy and Planning • Developed ABC Corporate Plan.

• Lodged submissions to major Government and industry reviews and inquiries and represented the ABC's policy positions.

• Contributed to development of ABC editorial policies and industry codes.

• Created a specialist information resource to assist policy formulation and planning.

Community Relations • Continued interdivisional coordination of ABC Open Days and public events.

• Established interdivisional working party to examine methods of measuring audience appreciation.

• W idely advertised ABC Code of Practice and for new members of the National Advisory Council.

• Received Silver Award for 1993 Annual Report.

Technology Strategy • Developed options for international satellite television service.

• Coordinated ABC position and submissions to SMA, ITU, industry groups and committees.

• Participated in industry groups monitoring technology and standards developments.

• Managed interdivisional Technology Planning Group and Multimedia Working Group.

International Development • Contract to deliver five year Indochina project signed in October.

• Contract to deliver South Africa project signed.

• Developed proposals and won contracts for development projects with AIDAB, UNICEF and the ITU.

• Managed ABC International Relations with, for example, ABU, IIC and PTC.

Corporate Policy and Planning also coordinated the Corporation's input to the Spectrum Management Authority regarding regulation of spectrum used by broadcasters and to the Australian Broadcasting Authority on the planning of broadcasting services and program complaints

matters. It has responsibility for preparation for the Review of the National Transmission Agency planned to take place during the next year.

Industry Policy Throughout the year, Corporate Policy and Planning has liaised closely with the Broadcasting

Policy Division and the Australian Cultural Development Office of the Department of Communications and the Arts on policy issues and legislative developments such as the

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Bill 1994. Liaison has continued with the Special Broadcasting Service on matters of mutual interest.

The ABC's views have been provided to assist the work of the Audiovisual Taskforce of the Department of Industry, Science and Technology and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

regarding Australian relations with Thailand.

The Division provided secretariat support for the Broadcasting Industry Advisory Council and its policy and technical working group.

Industry Codes The Division has contributed to amendments to the ABC's Editorial Policies and Code of Practice, the

review of the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (AJA) Code of Ethics and the development of the Confederation of Subscription Television (CAST) Code of Practice.

Industry Information This year saw the establishment and maintenance of a specialist information resource and database

on national and global broadcasting, electronic media trends and new technologies, and media regulation and legislation with special emphasis on its impact on national broadcasters.

The purpose is to assist formulation of policy and strategies to position the Corporation to take advantage of appropriate opportunities. Background information has been provided on domestic, regional and international trends in

broadcasting, particularly in relation to ABC

81

international radio and television services and consultancies.

Particular attention has been paid to the ways in which other national broadcasters have been affected by and responded to the changing broadcasting environment, while remaining true to their national broadcasting goals.

Aboriginal Programming and Employment Committee

A review of the ABC's services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders was conducted by the Aboriginal Programming and Employment Committee (APEC) in 1993. The aim of the Review was to determine whether to continue current strategies or to develop new directions to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the population in general.

Former ABC Director, Neville Bonner, acted as consultant to the Committee. He travelled to all State Branches to consult widely. Submissions to the Review were made by staff and management from many ABC program and administrative areas.

Submissions were also received from relevant outside organisations such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, the National Indigenous Media Association of Australia, the Department of Education Employment and Training, the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association and remote area

indigenous media associations.

The Review found that the current ABC strategies for Aboriginal employment and programming were appropriate and no major reforms were proposed.

The ABC Board adopted the Committee's recommendations at its March meeting. Most recommendations called for refinement of current programs or additional activities to enhance existing practices.

Government an d Community Relations

Community Relations The ABC wants to learn more about the needs of its different audiences.

The successful series of ABC community events, studio open days and public orchestral concerts has been an important way to do this.

This year ABC Picnics and Open Days were held in every State and Territory. Hundreds of thousands of Australians attended these free events. Their value is two-fold: the community understands and feels more involved in the operation of 'their ABC' and the ABC meets its diverse users and receives direct community feedback.

Besides coordinating many of these community events, ABC Corporate Relations provided a range of services to encourage public involvement and ensure proper accountability. These included:

• liaison with and servicing of the ABC's National Advisory Council;

• relevant and well-presented information on key ABC activities to Parliament, the general public and the media;

• development of new audience measures to reflect more genuinely audience need, involvement and reaction;

• improvements in ABC complaints handling procedures and better public awareness of the ABC's editorial policies and practices;

• provision of advice to ABC program makers and management on community reaction to programs and services.

N ew ABC Code o f Practice During the year, the ABC's Code of Practice was amended to reflect repeal of section 82 of the ABC Act. The existence of the updated Code was widely promoted on ABC-TV and viewers were

invited to obtain copies from ABC Corporate Relations. The Code appears at Appendix 4.

Listener and V ie w e r Satisfaction Listeners and viewers continued to provide an immense amount of feedback about the ABC's performance. On average, over one thousand people contact the ABC each day. Telephone comments and complaints are logged, summarised

82

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Strategic Development

and circulated to senior management and program makers. Many thousands also write to the ABC each year. ABC Corporate Relations received 16 691 letters directed to the ABC's head office.

M ajor matters of concern to callers and correspondents included:

• enquiries about sporting broadcasts;

• the telecast of the 1994 Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras;

• ABC-TV and ABC Radio transmission faults;

• changes to the programming of ABC Classic FM;

• praise for coverage of the January bushfires in N S W and Anzac Day marches;

• ABC open days and picnics;

• enquiries about the Triple J 'Big Day Out' concert.

As in previous years, the largest number of calls and letters concerned ABC coverage of sporting events, especially on television.

The decision to screen 5 0 minutes of edited coverage of the 1994 Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras at 8 .3 0 p.m. on Sunday, 6 March led to considerable public interest.

During the year there were over 1 3 0 0 complaints recorded about radio and television transmission failure, a matter over which the ABC has no direct control. The National Transmission Agency (NTA) operates the transmitters that carry ABC programs. Major problems were encountered in northern Tasmania during the first half of 1994 as the NTA prepared to convert ABC-TV transmission from VHF to UHF. Nearly 1000 viewers contacted the ABC after transmission was lost or when they experienced severe interference from new radio and television sen/ices introduced in the Launceston area.

Errors of Fact and Invasion of Privacy Legislation repealing section 82 of the ABC Act which provided for allegations of errors of fact or invasion of privacy to be referred to the Principal

Community Affairs Officer received assent on 1 8 January 1994. The ABC's Code of Practice was subsequently amended to encompass issues of privacy — it already covered alleged errors of fact.

Audiences

At the request of the Board, management has begun looking at measures of audience appreciation and involvement. It is time to

establish alternative audience measures which emphasise the public's involvement, interest, appreciation and reaction to radio and television programs.

The Board believes there is currently sufficient emphasis in public comment on audience measurement as given by ratings. To supplement this information the Board wants more qualitative measures to capture audience appreciation and

involvement.

As a public corporation with a legislative Charter to provide a comprehensive range of programs transmitted to all Australians, the ABC needs to judge from a different and broader

perspective whether public expectations have been met.

A cross-divisional management group has developed a three year strategy to examine research measurements, which go beyond the recording of whether television and radio sets

are turned on, to analysis of the impact of programs and the reaction of viewers and listeners to them.

Launceston Open Day

83

Prior to amendment of the ABC Act the Principal Community Affairs Officer received eleven complaints alleging error of fact or invasion of privacy. In nine cases the PCAO decided that the complainants did not have 'sufficient interest' or the complaint was not covered by section 82. One

allegation of error of fact was investigated and not upheld. An allegation of invasion of privacy by Mr. Richard Guscott regarding the filming of his father by the South Australia 7 .3 0 Report was not upheld. This complaint was then referred by Mr. Guscott to the Australian Broadcasting Authority.

On 25 September 1994, as this Annual Report was in final production, it was learnt that Mrs Kath French had passed away. Mrs French was Convenor of the ABC National Advisory Council and Chair of the Advisory Board of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra. She didd after a short illness. The ABC has lost a great friend.

N ational Advisory Council

The National Advisory Council is established under section 11 of the ABC Act to provide advice to the Board on matters relating to programs. Twelve members are appointed by the ABC Board to reflect a broad representation of the community.

Response to the annual advertisement for replacement members of the National Advisory Council was overwhelming. There were 2 5 0 0 enquiries resulting in over 1000 applications for four vacancies. Selection criteria were designed to attract a wide cross section of different community, ethnic and geographical interests.

The Council held three meetings during the year. In October, the National Advisory Council held a community consultation in Melbourne which resulted in a series of recommendations on how the ABC should reflect and respond to the emerging Australian identity with justice and equity. In February the Council included programming for the International Year of the Family as part of its work plan for the year Several ideas were adopted by ABC program makers. In June, the National Advisory Council met in Perth, Western Australia for the first time.

The ABC Board

Council s advice on programs and from left: Petor Ojurichkovic, Peg Havnen, Thong Phoumirath, David Roberts, Paulo Fraser, Robin feedback from the community. (See Stuort-Harris, Mary Anne Taylor, Katherine Koesosi, Gilbert Hanson. Front row, from left: Koth French Appendix 9 ) . (Convenor), Joseph O'Reilly and Evo Nogy.

yularly considered Tko ARf Nntinnnl Adwicnn; fnitnril mootinn in Fonmmv n tifio ARf Ultima fantra in Cx/rlnav Rnrl· raw/

84

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Strategic Development

Independent Complaints Review Panel The Independent Complaint Review Panel (ICRP) reviews written complaints of serious bias, lack of balance or unfair treatment arising from ABC

broadcasts. Complainants may seek a Panel review, once the ABC's normal complaints procedures have been completed and if the complainant is dissatisfied with the ABC's response. The Managing Director may also initiate a review if a complaint is of sufficient seriousness or public notoriety to warrant such a review.

The ICRP consists of Ted Thomas Convenor, Margaret Jones Deputy Convenor, Professor Michael Chesterman, Julie Flynn and new Panel member Stepan Kerkyasharian who was appointed to replace former Panel member, Fred Brenchley who resigned last year. Members of the Panel have

been appointed for their knowledge of, or experience in, journalistic ethics and practice, media operations and program production, complaints handling and other review processes.

In its third year of operation, the ICRP received 23 requests to review complaints. Many of the requests did not meet the Panel's criteria as they had not been dealt with by the ABC or they involved matters outside the Panel's area of responsibility.

ICRP acted on three requests for review, none of which was completed by 30 June. M r Ali Kazak of Canberra sought review of his complaint alleging

biased reporting in favour of Israel on ABC Radio programs; Mrs Patricia L. Ryan of Cooparoo sought review of her complaint about an item concerning

Prince Charles on the Queensland edition of the 7 :3 0 Report; and Mr Des Houghton, Editor of the Courier-Mail, sought review of a complaint about a M edia Watch item which he alleged treated one of his columnists unfairly.

The Panel completed review of a complaint by Mr W alter Hamilton, an ABC-TV journalist, regarding remarks made on Media Watch about his economic reporting. Mr Hamilton alleged that the

remarks constituted an unfair and damaging attack on his reputation as a journalist.

The Panel found that the scheduling of two of the stories compiled by Mr Hamilton on successive nights at a crucial time in the Federal election campaign was a serious professional misjudgment by ABC-TV News. It found that Mr Hamilton had to bear some responsibility for that but concluded

that he was not guilty of bias during the election campaign.

The Panel further found that a serious imputation was conveyed by the Media Watch comments which was not warranted by the evidence, and constituted unfair treatment of M r Hamilton's performance as a reporter.

A statement setting out the Panel's findings was broadcast by Media Watch on 1 3 September (repeated 14 September).

A review of a complaint by M r Michael Kroger in December 1992 was completed in early 1993. However, at his request, the Panel agreed to delay release of the report pending the outcome of a related defamation action by M r Kroger against a Melbourne newspaper. That action has not yet

been concluded and the Panel's report has therefore not been made public.

ICRP findings are carefully considered by the ABC and referred to when updated editions of the ABC Editorial Policies are prepared.

Australian Broadcasting Authority A complaint by Gordon Guscott regarding the 7 .3 0 Report in South Australia and a complaint by Dr Alan Lane regarding the Four Corners program

Blinded by the Light, both alleging breach of the ABC Code of Practice, have been investigated by the Australian Broadcasting Authority (ABA).The ABC has not yet been advised of the final outcome of these investigations.

Relations with Government Senior ABC executives appeared regularly before Senate Estimates Committees and other

Parliamentary Committees to provide information about the ABC's procedures and performance. In addition, ABC Corporate Relations provided Parliamentarians and departmental officers with extensive information to answer Parliamentary Questions and for Ministerial and other briefings.

Freedom of Information The Freedom of Information Act 19 9 2 gives the public the right to access documents held by the ABC. Schedule 2 Part 1 1 gives the ABC exemption

in relation to program material.

During 1 9 9 3 -9 4 the ABC received 13 requests for access to documents. Access in full was granted in one case. Access in part was granted in seven

85

cases. A request for access to tender documents was refused on the grounds that the documents were commercial in confidence. Documents were

released outside the Freedom of Information legislation in one case. An appeal to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal led to a decision regarding the exemption of ABC program related material being upheld. One request has been refused under the Freedom of Information legislation and the applicant has requested a review. One

request lapsed.

Categories o f Documents The ABC holds documents under three broad categories.

• General records, including: correspondence reports and minutes of meetings relating to ABC policy, program development, external relations and internal management; program transmission documents; reports on audience reaction to ABC programs; and publicity on programs and ABC activities.

International Y ear o f the Family

Many ABC initiatives were produced to celebrate 1994 —- the International Year of the Family (IYF). The series of special ABC community events and family concerts has been a highlight.

ABC-TV presented The Family Album, a one hour drama series shown at 6pm on Saturdays and produced in association with the Australian Children's Television Foundation. Other ABC-TV programs looked at changing family

life and produced segmen's on the International Year. Extensive coverage was given to IYF issues in ABC News and the 7 .3 0 Report.

In conjunction with the Japanese national broadcaster, Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK), the ABC hosted a successful international co­ production workshop on children's programs in Melbourne in May.

Radio National covered the IYF on many of its specialist programs, especially Life Matters, The Health Report, Australia Talks Back and various religious programs. Metropolitan Stations and Regional

Stations produced features looking at local events and family-related issues. The Triple J network ran a series of special reports looking at the International Year from the perspective of teenagers and younger listeners.

Early in 1994 the National Advisory Council explored ways in which the ABC might recognise the IYF and a great many of their recommendations were used during the year.

Families make up o surprisingly number of ABC staff. Here are just three examples: Top: From left, Jill Haynes,

Lorhmond Haynes, Joan Wright, Jim Mann, Dorothy Ford, and John Ford. Centre: Samuel and Sandra Chung met and married a t the ABC. In January fellow staff rolled to their aid when their house was destroyed in the bushfires. Samuel, retired after 35 years was a technical producer w ith Television. Sandra works with Training in TV. The children, not ABC staffers, are Christopher and Olivia. Bottom: The Comilleris, Sue and Peter, are based in the Darwin studios. Sue is Community Officer with 8DDD and Peter works in Radio Production Operations.

86

ABC Ο

Strategic Development

• Records subject to copyright including: scripts and transcripts of programs (also subject to availability]; recorded programs and other recordings.

• Articles available for purchase, including: merchandise from ABC Shops; and selected ABC program material.

Requests for Access Written requests for access to material under the Freedom of Information Act, including the $30 application fee, should be addressed to:

The Managing Director Australian Broadcasting Corporation GPO Box 9 9 9 4 in your State capital.

Requests can also be addressed to the Managing Director and lodged at the nearest ABC office (details of which can be found in Appendix 19).

Formal requests under the Freedom of Information Act will be acknowledged within 14 days of receipt, and applications will be processed in 30 days.

If a decision is made to deny or defer a request, or set a charge for the provision of a document, the applicant will be given formal notification of the reasons for the decision, and will be advised of procedures for lodging an application for review of the decision by the Managing Director or the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

Facilities for Access Facilities will be made available at each capital city official address for an applicant to be given access to a document in a reading room. Copying facilities will be made available in accordance with prescribed procedures and charges.

Technology Strategy

The Technology Strategy Department was established in 1993 to:

• position the ABC to take advantage of technological change and opportunities;

• develop and coordinate ABC strategies for domestic and international satellite services;

• coordinate and strengthen ABC participation in policy development and technical standards;

• identify new opportunities emerging through technological advancements such as multimedia, convergence technologies and interactivity.

A cross-divisional multimedia forum was established to protect and exploit the ABC's intellectual property in the emerging multimedia industry.

Options for Australia Television to expand coverage in Asia and the Pacific were evaluated. The introduction of new regional satellites will make this possible in 19 9 4 - 9 5 . The choice of digital video technology and a correctly managed

migration path are of importance for Australia Television.

Better utilisation of domestic and international satellite resources is crucial to the efficiency and the quality of ABC services. The pattern of usage is changing with an increase in ABC owned equipment and establishment of new services. The ABC's domestic satellite services are being carefully

monitored in an environment of increasing demand resulting from the failed launch of the Optus B2 satellite and the introduction of new services, such as subscription television. An industry group examined options for changing south east zone ABC services in NSW , Victoria and Tasmania to ensure they continue in a reliable manner.

Submissions and policy inputs were prepared for:

• Apparatus Licence Review Inquiry of the Spectrum Management Agency; • Intelsat Access Centre and Private Satellite Earth Station Policy Review of the Department of

Communications and the Arts; • International Radio Communications Advisory Council of Australia; • W orld Radio Communications Conference; • Olympics 2000 Communications Facilities Inquiry; • Filing of DAB satellite interest with the

International Telecommunications Union; • Pacific television service options — for consideration by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; • Radio Communications Council advisory

groups; • Broadcasting Industry Advisory Council (BIAC) Technical Groups.

87

International Development

The ABC's reputation as a broadcaster of international standing has increased over the last year with the successful implementation of a number of development assistance projects.

Indochina In October, the ABC signed a five year contract with the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB) to provide equipment and training for the national broadcasters of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.

An in-region manager was posted to Hanoi and the first course was conducted in December. Studio equipment for radio and television was installed in Hanoi and Vientiane. It is not expected that the Cambodian component will start until 1 995-96.

In Laos at the conclusion of a technical training course and as part of the Indochina project, ABC Radio's technical services department — AlphaTec — provided technical assistance to overcome a

long-standing problem of poor signal reach for the high-powered transmitter serving Vientiane and surrounding areas.

South Africa In September, ABC-TV ran a three month training course, partly funded by AIDAB, at the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism in Johannesburg.

The ABC hosted a two week tour by the new Chairperson of the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), Dr Ivy Matsepe-Casaburri in October. She was given a comprehensive view of ABC operations and visited Aboriginal

broadcasters in the Kimberley.

AIDAB organised a Media Study Mission to South Africa in November involving two executives from ABC Radio. The mission assessed the SABC's

media and organisational development needs.

A contract was signed with AIDAB in March for the South African Broadcasting Development Project. The project aims to assist with the election coverage, provide training in journalism and technical skills, particularly for people from disadvantaged groups, and assist media organisations. Nine assignments have been

completed including consultancies on a review of SABC Radio News, a review of the format of SABC's Radio South Africa, policy advice to the Chair of the SABC Board and assistance to the newly created Independent Broadcasting Authority.

O ther International Projects The ABC and Radio Netherlands are developing Media Training Workshops for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) staff.

In Vietnam, UNICEF organised for an ABC broadcaster to train local broadcasters in making radio programs about health issues. A two week technical consultancy was provided to the Voice of Vietnam under the auspices of the Asia-Pacific

Broadcasting Union to assist in developing plans for the establishment of a new News Production Centre in Hanoi.

Staff from All India Radio received training on ABC Radio's archiving system, CEDAR.

In conjunction with Telstra Australia, radio broadcasting facilities are being supplied to the Papua New Guinea National Broadcasting Commission's Radio North Solomons provincial station. This is part of the AIDAB-funded

Bougainville restoration project being undertaken by the Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation.

The ABC was asked to tender for a W orld Bank project for early childhood development using the Nigerian Television Authority. A detailed submission was provided.

International Relations More than twenty delegations from international broadcasters and heads of government visited the ABC during the year. They included the

Honourable, M r Zhu Senlin, Governor of Guandong Province, China; His Excellency, M r Khamtay Siphondone, the Prime Minister of Laos; delegations from the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation; Beijing Broadcasting Institute; Independent Broadcasting Authority South Africa; Voice of Vietnam; Planning and Reconstruction Committee, Cambodia; Ho Chi Minh Youth Union, Vietnam; International Technology and Economy

Institute, China; and eighty economics students from Indonesia.

The Corporation is an active member of a range of international bodies including:

• Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union;

• Commonwealth Broadcasting Association;

• International Institute of Communications;

• European Broadcasting Union;

• National Association of Broadcasters (USA);

• International Telecommunications Union.

88

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Financial Statements 3 0 June 1994

Page

Independent audit report 90

Statement by directors 91

Operating statement 92

Statement of financial position 93

Statement of cash flows 94

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

1 Statement of significant accounting policies 95

2 Expenses and revenues 9 7

3 Remuneration 98

4 Superannuation 98

5 Receivables 99

6 Inventories 99

7 Other current assets 100

8 Controlled entities 100

9 Property plant and equipment 100

10 Creditors and borrowings 101

11 Financing arrangements 101

12 Provisions for employee entitlements 102

13 Reserves 102

14 Reconciliation of operating result with cash flows from operations 102

15 Commitments and contingencies 103

16 Related party and other disclosures 103

17 Economic dependency 104

18 Trust funds 104

Independent audit report

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

Level 7

1 3 0 Elizabeth Street

Sydney N ew South W ales 2 0 0 0

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

To the Minister for Communications and the Arts

Scope

I have audited the financial statements of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for the year ended

30 June 1994. The statements comprise:

•Operating Statement

•Statement of Financial Position

•Statement of Cash Flows

•Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements, and

•Director's Statement.

The Directors are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial statements and the

information contained therein. I have conducted an independent audit of the financial statements in order to

express an opinion on them to the Minister for Communications and the Arts.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards,

which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards, to provide reasonable assurance as to whether the

financial statements are free of material misstatement. Audit procedures included examination, on a test

basis, of evidence supporting the amounts and other disclosures in the financial statements, and the

evaluation of accounting policies and significant accounting estimates. These procedures have been

undertaken to form an opinion whether, in all material respects, the financial statements are presented fairly

in accordance with Australian accounting concepts and standards and statutory requirements so as to

present a view which is consistent with my understanding of the Corporation's financial position, the results

of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

A u d it O p in io n

In accordance with Section 7 2 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983, I now report that the

statements are in agreement with the accounts and records of the Corporation, and in my opinion:

(i| the statements are based on proper accounts and records

(ii) the statements show fairly in accordance with Statements of Accounting Concepts and applicable

Accounting Standards the financial transactions and cash flows for the year ended 30 June 1994 and

the state of affairs of the Corporation as at that date

(iii| the receipt, expenditure and investment of moneys, and the acquisition and disposal of assets, by

the Corporation during the year have been in accordance with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Act, and

(iv) the statements are in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities

and Commercial Activities.

M — -

L M O'Brien

Acting Executive Director

Australian National Audit Office

Sydney

3 0 September 1994

Statement by directors

A u stra lia n Broadcasting C orp ora tion

In our opinion the statements show fairly the Corporation's,

(a) operating result for the financial year ended 3 0 June 1994;

(b) financial position as at 30 June 1994; and

(c) cash flows during the financial year ending 3 0 June 1994.

The statements have been made out in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities issued by the Minister for Finance.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

MARK ARMSTRONG DAVID HILL

Managing Director

27 September 1994

Operating Statement for the year ended 30 June 1994

1994

N ote $ '0 0 0

COST OF SERVICES

O p e ra tin g expenses

Television

Radio

Concerts

Radio Australia

Total o p e ra tin g expenses 2

O p e ra tin g revenues fro m inde pen den t sources

Television

Radio

Concerts

Radio Australia

Total o p e ra tin g revenues fro m inde pen den t sources 2

N e t cost o f services

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT

Parliamentary appropriations received

Division 652-1Ό1 Domestic service - operating

Division 971-1-01 - capital

Division 652-1 -02 Radio Australia

Division 974-1Ό1 International services

Division 974-2-01 Subscription services

Resources received free of charge 1,2

Total revenue fro m governm ent

O p e ra tin g result (deficit) 2

Accumulated operating results at beginning of financial year

A ccum ulated op e ra tin g results a t end o f fin a n cia l y e a r

373 120 237 430 47 544 30 086

688 180

53 710 29 588 17015 646

100 959

587 221

497 442 7 500 14 095

12 500

531 537

70 683

602 220

14 999

124 893

139 892

1993

$000

3 6 7 563

2 2 5 605

4 6 448

31 3 2 7

6 7 0 943

4 5 303

2 7 283

16 7 4 6

7 3 5

9 0 0 6 7

5 8 0 876

4 7 9 781

9 216

13 6 9 6

5 4 0 0

5 0 8 093

6 7 5 7 5

5 7 5 6 6 8

(5 208)

130 101

124 893

The accom panying notes form on integral port o f these statements.

Financial Statements 1 9 9 3-9 4

Statement of Financial Position as a t 30 June 1994

1994 1 9 9 3

N o te $ '0 0 0 $ 0 0 0

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash 9 38 5 21 9 2 9

Receivables 5 57 2 5 5 5 4 4 3 4

Inventories 6 39 3 5 4 4 4 9 3 0

Other 7 5 4 5 7 6 2 3 7

Total current assets 111 451 1 2 7 5 3 0

NON-CURRENT ASSETS

Receivables 5 12 678 3 885

Property plant and equipment 9 4 5 4 4 6 4 4 3 2 7 9 5

Total n o n -cu rre n t assets 4 6 7 142 4 3 6 6 8 0

Total assets 5 7 8 59 3 5 6 4 2 1 0

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Creditors 10 51 4 9 9 5 4 5 2 3

Borrowings 10 5 4 9 3 4 5 175

Provisions 12 3 7 4 2 3 3 5 4 1 5

Total c u rre n t lia b ilitie s 9 4 41 5 135 113

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Borrowings 10 190 02 8 149 6 4 0

Provisions 12 3 9 4 5 9 38 0 5 8

Total n o n-curren t lia b ilitie s 2 2 9 4 8 7 187 6 9 8

Total lia b ilitie s 3 2 3 90 2 322 81 1

N e t assets 2 5 4 691 241 3 9 9

EQUITY

Reserves 13 114 7 9 9 116 5 0 6

Accumulated operating results 139 89 2 124 893

Total e q u ity 2 5 4 691 241 399

l i M v

M

-

The accom panying notes form an integral part o f these statements.

93

Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 30 June 1 994

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Inflows:

Parliamentary appropriations

Receipts from user charges

Interest received

N o te

1994 1 9 9 3

S '0 0 0 $ '0 0 0

Inflo w s

(O utflow s)

531 5 3 7 5 0 8 0 9 3

91 3 0 8 81 705

6 3 0 6 5 196

Outflows:

Interest

Payments to suppliers and employees

6 2 9 151

(18 43 2)

(567 343)

5 9 4 9 9 4

(17 920)

(542 727)

N et cash p ro v id e d b y op e ra tin g activities 14 43 3 7 6 34 3 4 7

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Inflows:

Proceeds from sale of property plant and equipment

Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes

4 8 0 8

5 6 8 6

4 0 1 0

Outflows:

Investments

Property plant and equipment

10 4 9 4

(11 227)

(55 692)

4 0 1 0

(21 097)

(32 382)

N et cash used in investing activities (56 425) (49 469)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Inflows:

Proceeds from borrowings 5 0 5 33 781

N et cash p ro v id e d b y fina ncing activities 50 5 33 781

N e t (decrease) increase in cash held

Cash at beginning of reporting period

(12 544)

21 9 2 9

18 6 5 9

3 2 7 0

Cash a t end o f re portin g p e rio d 9 3 8 5 21 9 2 9

The accom panying notes form an integral part o f these statements.

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 1994

1. Statement of significant accounting policies

Basis of accounting The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities issued by the Minister for Finance, and comply with statements of accounting concepts and

applicable accounting standards.

W ith the exception of those non-current assets which are stated at valuation, the financial statements are prepared on an

accrual basis using historical costs. Accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous year.

Parliamentary appropriations Parliamentary appropriations are brought to account in the operating statement.

Foreign currency Revenues and expenditures relating to overseas transactions are converted to Australian currency at the exchange rates

prevailing at the date of transaction, or at the hedged rate.

Exchange gains and losses and hedging costs arising on contracts entered into as hedges of specific revenue or expense transactions are deferred until the date of such transactions at which time they are included in the determination of such

revenues or expenses.

Open hedge contracts relating to all other revenue and expenditure transactions are converted at the applicable exchange

rate at balance date with exchange gains or losses being included in the operating statement.

All foreign currency balances are converted to Australian currency at the exchange rate prevailing at balance date, except for liabilities which are subject to currency swap contracts for which an Australian dollar currency repayment schedule has been adopted, and such liabilities are brought to account at contract rates. Monetary assets and liabilities of overseas

branches and amounts payable to or by the Corporation in foreign currencies are translated into Australian currency at the

applicable exchange rate at balance date. Non-monetary items of overseas branches are translated at exchange rates

current at the transaction date.

Currency gains and losses are reflected in the operating statement.

Interest rate swaps Interest rate swaps are entered into for the purpose of managing the Corporation's interest liability. Gains or losses on interest rates are included in the measurement of interest payments on the transactions to which they relate.

Interest capitalisation Interest relating to the financing of major projects is capitalised up to the date of commissioning and subsequently amortised

over the useful life of the asset.

Resources received free of charge Resources received free of charge are included in the operating statement, as both an operating expense and revenue from government. The National Transmission Agency has provided resources for operating and maintaining radio and television

transmitters, ancillary buildings and technical equipment. Details of the values for resources received free of charge

(excluding depreciation) are shown in note 2.

Valuation of non-current assets The amounts at which non-current assets are stated in the accounts are regularly reviewed. Land and building revaluations

are undertaken every three years.

Depreciation and amortisation of non-current assets Depreciation is calculated on a straight line basis to amortise the cost or valuation of each non-current asset over its expected useful life. Non-current assets are depreciated from the commencement of the monthly accounting period subsequent to the date of receipt. The cost or valuation of leasehold land, buildings and improvements is amortised over the

shorter of the unexpired lease period or over its expected useful life.

Inventories Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realisable value. Programs produced and work in progress for television include direct salaries and expenses; fixed production overheads are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. The costs of television program inventory are expensed after the first transmission. Engineering inventory items with a value less

than $1 0 0 0 are not included in annual valuations. The costs of programs produced for radio are expensed as incurred.

Such programs are normally broadcast soon after production, stock on hand at any time being minimal.

3. Remuneration

Executives included in employee related expenses is total remuneration received

or due and receivable — performance pay $ 15 6 2 5 (1993 Nil)

1994 1993

$000 ίΌ Ο Ο

1 399 1 144

Executives whose remuneration was between

$

100 0 0 0 - 109 9 9 9

1 10 0 0 0 - 1 19 9 9 9

1 20 0 0 0 - 1 2 9 9 9 9

130 0 0 0 - 139 9 9 9

1 40 0 0 0 - 149 9 9 9

150 0 0 0 - 159 9 9 9

1 60 0 0 0 - 1 69 9 9 9

1 70 0 0 0 - 179 9 9 9

1 90 0 0 0 - 199 9 9 9

2 0 0 0 0 0 - 2 0 9 9 9 9

1994 Number 1

1993 Number

4

2 1

2 1

1

1

2 1

1

1 —

4. Superannuation (a) The Corporation is required to meet its employer superannuation liability in respect of eligible employees under section

159 of the Superannuation Act 1976, and the Superannuation Act 1 9 9 0 (Public Sector Superannuation Scheme). Employer contributions were also made under the Superannuation (Productivity Benefit) Act 1988 and the

Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act 1992.

(b) The Corporation makes payments as a percentage of the salaries of eligible employees salaries, estimated by the Commonwealth Superannuation Administration sufficient to meet the Corporation's share of the full accrued cost of

benefits.

(c) In 1985 with the approval of the Minister for Finance, special superannuation arrangements were made for senior

executives employed under fixed term contracts.

Summary of employer contributions

1994 1993

$'000 i'ooo

Commonwealth superannuation scheme 13 526 14 091

Public sector superannuation scheme 9 665 8 9 4 6

Superannuation guarantee and productivity benefit 7 682 6 7 5 9

Senior executive scheme 165 2 2 9

31 038 3 0 0 2 5

17. Economic dependency

The Corporation is dependent upon the provision of appropriations of moneys by Parliament. In excess of 87% of normal activities are funded in this manner, and without these appropriations the Corporation would be unable to meet the terms of its Charter. (Refer operating statement for details of revenue from government).

18. Trust funds

1994 1993 1994 '993

s $ s $

The Corporation is trustee for foundations Ian Reed Sir Charles Moses

with accumulated funds at 3 0 June as follows: Foundation Foundation

Revenues 32 555 3 3 8 3 8 49 6 9

Expenses (26 075) (28 0 44) — —

Surplus for year 6 480 5 7 9 4 49 6 9

Fund opening balance 367 009 361 2 1 5 3 022 2 9 5 3

Fund closing balance 373 489 3 6 7 0 0 9 3 071 3 0 2 2

The foundations funds are held in authorised trustee investments.

Program structure

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Being Sub-Program 1.2 within the Portfolio for Communications and the Arts

Sub-Program Component

TELEVISION

1.2.1 (b) Subscription Television

RADIO AUSTRALIA

RADIO

Australia Television

CONCERTS

106

Resources summmaty by program output strand (Net expenditure — indicative)

1 TELEVISION News and current affairs Drama Children's education

Documentaries Features Sport Arts and entertainment

Comedy Other programs Total television division

Corporate and technical support Total television program

1(a) AUSTRALIA TELEVISION

1 (b) SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

2 RADIO News and current affairs Talk Music (recorded live] Rural and overseas Arts, religion and documentaries Sport

Education, sciences and history W om en's and aboriginal Total radio division Corporate and technical support Total radio program

3 CONCERTS M ajor subscription series 20th century Popular programming/family Special events O pera, ballet and pit

Development activities Public access activities Recordings Other Total concert division Corporate and technical support Total concert program

4 RADIO AUSTRAUA News and current affairs English language programs Papua N e w Guinea service French service Standard Chinese service Cantonese service Indonesian service Vietnamese service

Khmer service Thai service Total Radio Australia division

Corporate and technical support

Total Radio Australia program

Negative rollover

TOTAL NET EXPENDITURE

Cash on hand

1993/94 C A S H S 000

107 167 47 633 29 719 16 586

15 167 17 077 18 263 16 000

9 840 277 452 11 599 289 051

2 505

3 232

57 549 23 715 34 931 6 977

18 197 4 241 4 146 472 150 228

22 545 172 773

5 870 2 394 2 193 2 528 3 563

1 757 5 037 3 386 2 233 28 961

4 026 32 987

4 284 2 435 825 418

1 423 778 2 072 526

358 465

13 584 1 436

15 020

6 200

521 768

9 769

TOTAL APPROPRIATION 531 5 3 7

1992/93 C A S H S '000

101 128 4 8 6 4 4

3 0 9 7 0

1 7 9 1 2 15 5 2 5 16 3 9 6

18 2 83 15 0 9 6

1 1 4 4 0 2 7 5 3 9 4

1 1 132

2 8 6 5 2 6

2 8 9 5

5 4 5 8 4

22 8 2 9

3 4 8 7 4

6 371

17 146

4 2 7 0

4 0 8 8

4 4 2

144 6 0 4 2 0 4 3 7

165 041

5 189

2 0 7 6 1 9 4 6 2 5 9 5 3 6 3 2

1 2 9 7 4 9 3 0 2 9 8 4

1 2 9 7 25 9 4 6 3 7 8 5

2 9 731

4 9 0 9

1 7 0 8

1 0 0 9

4 6 0

1 5 4 4

7 6 9

1 6 9 3

5 6 8 2 9 4 5 0 0

13 4 5 4 1 2 7 0

14 7 2 4

6 5 0 0

5 0 5 4 1 7

2 6 7 6

5 0 8 0 9 3

Resources Summary

By Program

1993/94 '994 95

CASH CASH

ACTUAL BUDGET

S' 000 $ 0 0 0

1 Television 289 051 2 8 9 167

1 (a) Australia Television 2 505 —

1 (b) Subscription services 3 232 9 2 68

2 Radio 172 773 172 4 1 7

3 Concerts 32 987 3 4 6 2 9

4 Radio Australia 15 020 16 3 8 0

Negative rollover 6 200 6 0 0 0

TOTAL NET EXPENDITURE 521 768 5 2 7 861

Adjustment for cash on hand 9 769 |1 2 7981

TOTAL APPROPRIATION 531 537 5 1 5 0 6 3

By Appropriation

1993/94 1994/95

CASH CASH

ACTUAL BUDGET

S 000 $ ‘0 0 0

Division 151-01-01 General activities - domestic 497 442 4 9 3 561

Division 151-01Ό 2

General activities - Radio Australia 14 095 14 195

Division 81 1Ό1Ό1

Capital works and services - domestic 7 500 7 3 0 7

Division 8 1 2-other services Subscription television broadcasting services 12 500

TOTAL APPROPRIATION 531 537 5 1 5 0 6 3

Funding Reconciliation

$ 0 0 0 $00 0

1993- 94 APPROPRIATION ADD 1 9 9 4 - 9 5 price adjustment 11 197

1 9 9 4 -9 5 negative rollover 6 (XX)

Other one off net adjustments 5 9 3 6

LESS Subscription services 1 2 5 0 0

27th pay funding 1 1 0 0 0

Repayment of 27th pay loan 1 4 7 5

Overfunding repayments/deflator adjustments to base 8 4 3 2 Repayment of 1 9 9 3 -9 4 negative rollover 6 2 0 0

531 5 3 7

23 133

(39 607)

1 9 9 4 -9 5 APPROPRIATION 5 1 5 0 6 3

Program Performance Statement

Resources by appropriation

Division 151-01-01 General activities - domestic services

1993/94 CASH ACTUAL $ '000

1993/94 CASH BUDGET $ '000

l 9 9 2 /9 3

CASH ACTUAL $ O 0 0

Running costs

Receipts

591 482 (96 522)

588 495 (90 886)

561 805 (81 955)

N et expenditure Bill 1 494 960 497 609 479 850

Cash on hand Bill 1 2 482 (167) (69)

Appropriation - general activities domestic 497 442 497 442 479 781

Division 151-01-021 General activities - Radio Australia

Running costs

Receipts

14418 (834)

14 685 (323)

14 040 (586)

N et expenditure Bill 1 13 584 14 362 13 454

Cash on hand Bill 1 511 (267) 242

Appropriation - Radio Australia 14 095 14 095 13 696

Division 811-01-01 Capital works and services - domestic

Net expenditure Bill 2 7 487 7 590 9 218

Cash on hand Bill 2 13 (90) (21

Appropriation - capital works and services 7 500 7 500 9216

Division 812 - other services Payment to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for establishment of subscription television broadcasting services

N et expenditure 3 232 12 500 0

Cash on hand 9 268 0 0

Appropriation — subscription services 12 500 12 500 0

Other services — Payment to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for Australian Television service to South-East Asia

N et expenditure 2 505 2 505 2 895

Cash on hand (2 505) (2 505) 2 505

Appropriation — Australia Television 0 0 5 400

TOTAL APPROPRIATION 531 537 531 537 508 093

For Staffing information refer to pages 7 2 -7 3 .

109

Resources by program

1 TELEVISION Running costs

Receipts

N et expenditure Bill 1 Cosh on hand

Appropriation Bill 1

N et expenditure Bill 2 Cash on hand

Appropriation Bill 2

Television program appropriation

1(a) AUSTRALIA TELEVISION N et expenditure

Cash on hand

Australia Television appropriation

1(b) SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES N et expenditure

Cash on hand

Subscription services appropriation

2 RADIO Running costs

Receipts

N et expenditure Bill 1

Cash on hand

Appropriation Bill 1 N et expenditure Bill 2

Radio program appropriation

3 CONCERTS Running costs

Receipts

N et expenditure Bill 1

Cash on hand

Appropriation Bill 1

N et expenditure Bill 2

Concerts program appropriation

4 RADIO AUSTRAUA Running costs

Receipts

N et expenditure Bill 1

Cash on hand

Appropriation Bill 1

N et expenditure Bill 2

Radio Australia program appropriation Negative rollover

TOTAL APPROPRIATION

1993/94 19 9 3 /9 4 / 9 92/ V 3

CASH CASH CASH

ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL

$'000 $'000 } 0 0 0

335 168 333 509 321 7 0 4

(51 350) (47 596) (41 802)

283 818 285 913 2 7 9 9 0 2

1 453 (97) (41)

285 271 285 816 2 7 9 861

5 233 5 241 6 6 2 4

13 (90) 121

5 246 5 151 6 6 2 2

290 517 290 967 2 8 6 4 8 3

2 505 2 505 2 8 9 5

(2 505) (2 505) 2 5 0 5

0 0 5 4 0 0

3 232 12 500 0

9 268 0 0

12 500 12 500 0

198 548 197 844 1 86 7 6 2

(27 902) (26 316) (24 248)

170 646 171 528 162 5 1 4

754 (51) (22)

171 400 171 477 162 4 9 2

2 127 2 209 2 5 2 7

173 527 173 686 165 0 1 9

50 011 49 385 4 5 5 0 9

(17 119] (16 866) (15 798)

32 892 32 519 2 9 71 1

205 (14) (4)

33 097 32 505 2 9 7 0 7

95 104 20

33 192 32 609 2 9 7 2 7

15 973 16 242 15 3 7 0

(985) (431) (693)

14 988 15 811 14 6 7 7

581 (272) 2 4 0

15 569 15 539 1 4 9 1 7

32 36 4 7

15 601 15 575 14 9 6 4

6 200 6 200 6 5 0 0

531 537 531 537 5 0 8 0 9 3

Appendices

Contents P a g e

1. Television Program Analysis 113

2. Radio Program Analysis 1 14

3. Concerts and Attendances 1 15

4. ABC Code of Practice 116

5. Television Awards 118

6. Radio Awards 1 19

7. Enterprises Awards 120

8. National Advisory Council Membership 120

9. National Advisory Council Recommendations 121

10. Television Transmitters 124

11. Radio Transmitters 126

12. Radio Australia Transmitters 129

13. Consultants 129

14. Ministerial Powers 129

15. Reports on Particular Matters 130

16. Advertising and Market Research 130

17. Social Justice Overview 130

18. Audit Subcommittee 130

19. ABC Offices 131

20. ABC Shops 133

112

Appendices

Appendix 1

Television Program Analysis

A ustralian Productions An Productions

Hours Transmitted Hours Transmitted

P ZlOther Total

Aust Ρ Ϊ!Ζ

Other Total Per cent o f

total

Children' s

Pre-school 0 2 62 2 6 2 8 5 .3 0 3 0 7 3 07 3.5

Drama 3 2 5 3 .8 19 112 131 1.5

Cartoons 0 6 6 2 .3 18 238 2 56 2 .9

Other 0 115 1 15 5 0 .2 13 2 1 6 2 29 2.6

Drama

Docu-drama 0 0 0 0 2 3 5 0.1

Episodic/serial 73 61 134 5 4 7 134 1 1 1 245 2.8

Feature Films 5 6 11 2.1 7 2 4 4 7 5 19 5 .9

Mini-series 6 0 6 1 0 0 .0 6 0 6 0.1

Serial 3 3 6 2 .4 6 9 179 248 2 .8

Situation Comedy 10 0 10 3 .8 157 106 263 3 .0

Short 2 1 3 7 5 .0 2 2 4 0.1

Telemovies 10 0 10 2 1 .3 14 33 4 7 0.1

Education, A rts & Religion

Education 0 5 9 0 5 9 0 3 3 .2 0 177 6 1776 2 0.2

Arts 12 65 7 7 3 8 .7 22 177 199 2.3

Religion 2 2 7 29 3 3.3 2 85 87 1.0

Information 111 175 2 8 6 9 0 2 120 197 317 3 .6

Light Entertainment

Sketch Comedy 9 55 6 4 56.1 4 4 7 0 114 1.3

Talk Shows 2 0 15 35 5 0 .0 22 4 8 7 0 0.8

Variety 0 1 1 2 5 .0 0 4 4 0.1

Specials 1 6 7 6 3 .6 3 8 1 1 0 .2

Quiz Panel & Game 7 6 0 7 6 1 00 .0 7 6 0 7 6 1.0

M usic

Music 0 19 19 6 7 .9 0 28 28 0 .3

Music Video

N ews, Current A ffairs

& Documentaries

1 871 8 7 2 1 00 .0 1 871 872 9 .9

News 2 0 6 5 3 8 7 4 4 1 00 .0 2 0 6 5 3 8 7 44 8.5

Current Affairs 139 3 0 4 4 4 3 9 4 .7 151 3 1 7 468 5.3

Specialist Current Affairs 28 100 128 9 8 .5 28 102 130 1.5

Documentaries 61 1 15 176 3 7 .0 167 3 0 9 4 7 6 5 .4

Political 2 147 149 1 00 .0 2 147 149 1.7

Sport 30 3 98 4 2 8 6 9 7 3 0 5 8 4 6 1 4 7 .0

Presentation, Standby

Programs & Test Pattern 20 27 4 7 7 7 .0 23 38 61 0 .7

Promotions 5 7 2 8 0 3 3 7 1 00 .0 5 7 2 8 0 337 3.8

Total Less Promotions 8 3 0 3 9 0 9 4 7 3 9 5 6 .0 1403 7 0 5 3 8456 9 6.2

Grand Total 887 4189 5076 57.7 1460 7333 8793 100.0

Notes 1. Prime Time is defined as 6 .00pm to 10.00pm 2. Program Categories largely defined by the Australian Broadcasting Authority

113

Appendix 2

Radio Program Analysis

Hours per week 1993-94

Metros Regional RN ABC Classic FM Triple J Total

News 24 21 15 8 8 7 6

Arts Talk 6 5 17 6 13 4 7

Economics 6 4 11 1 22

Politics 13 9 19 1 4 2

Social Issues 22 15 3 0 1 6 8

Recorded Music 32 5 4 4 0 139 121 3 8 6

Live Music 1 2 12 4 19

Arts Performance 1 1 4 3 9

Comedy 4 3 2 6 15

Religious 2 1 6 9

Sport 2 0 15 2 3 7

Health 6 4 3 1 14

History 3 2 3 8

Rural 1 11 6 18

Science 4 2 4 1 1 1

Open Learning 4 4

Leisure 14 14 2 8 38

Quiz/Com petition 9 7 1 17

Notes Each network broadcasts 108 hours per week.

114

Appendices

Appendix 3

^ M · 1 ! *

1993-94 1992-93

Total Average Total Average

Concerts Attendances Attendance Concerts Attendances Attendance

N ew South W ales and ACT

Paid Orchestral Concerts 112 194 2 1 4 1 7 3 4 1 15 2 13 285 1 8 5 5

School Concerts 24 24 7 9 9 1 0 3 3 35 15 804 4 5 2

Free Concerts 1 100 0 0 0 1 00 0 0 0 2 180 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0

Total 137 3 1 9 0 1 3 152 4 0 9 0 8 9

Victoria

Paid Orchestral Concerts 85 117 2 6 2 1 3 8 0 92 133 583 1 4 5 2

School Concerts 41 26 7 9 5 6 5 4 37 2 0 2 1 6 5 4 6

Free Concerts 5 59 7 1 5 11 9 4 3 6 7 2 4 0 0 12 0 6 7

Total 131 203 7 7 2 135 2 2 6 199

Q ueensland

Paid Orchestral Concerts 5 6 6 6 6 6 5 1 190 43 4 9 5 0 6 1 151

School Concerts 2 9 18 7 2 4 6 4 6 35 2 6 174 7 4 8

Free Concerts 4 21 5 0 0 5 3 7 5 11 2 0 6 6 6 1 8 7 9

Total 8 9 106 8 8 9 89 9 6 346

South A ustraua

Paid Orchestral Concerts 88 70 6 0 6 8 0 2 64 5 5 5 5 0 8 68

School Concerts 22 9 0 5 7 4 1 2 31 3 4 29 11 1

Free Concerts 1 30 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 625 11 125

Total 11 1 109 6 6 3 100 114 6 0 4

W estern A ustraua

Paid Orchestral Concerts 9 7 107 5 9 0 1 109 6 0 7 4 197 1 2 3 7

School Concerts 10 2 5 1 8 2 5 2 5 6 7 7 135

Free Concerts 9 25 4 2 7 2 8 2 5 1 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Total 116 135 5 3 5 6 6 8 4 874

Tasmania

Paid Orchestral Concerts^ 4 7 32 8 7 7 7 0 0 48 51 250 1 0 6 8

School Concerts 43 5 6 6 1 132 43 6 248 145

Free Concerts 2 23 9 1 4 11 9 5 7 8 17 0 24 2 128

Total 9 2 62 4 5 2 9 9 7 4 522

Totals for A ustraua

Paid Orchestral Concerts 4 8 5 5 8 9 2 1 4 1 2 1 5 4 2 2 5 7 7 371 1 3 68

School Concerts 169 87 5 5 4 5 1 8 186 7 2 548 3 9 0

Free Concerts 22 2 60 5 5 6 1 1 8 43 33 3 5 5 715 10 7 7 9

Grand Total 676 937 324 641 1 005 634

Notes 1. 1 9 9 2 -9 3 includes 1992 Parramatta Picnic in the Park Concert.

2. 1 9 9 2 -9 3 includes the TSO's performances in the Festival of Perth, the Celebration of Orchestras and performances accompanying the Bolshoi Ballet.

3. Only concert attendances in Australia have been included.

115

Appendix 4

ABC Code of Practice

1 Preamble The ABC's place in the broadcasting system is distinctive because of its Charier, which gives the Corporation unique responsibilities, and because of other provisions under the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act. / 9 8 3 which give the Corporation particular responsibilities, for example, the provision of an independent news service.

The ABC Act guarantees the editorial independence of the Corporation s programs. The ABC holds its power to make programming decisions on behalf of the people of Australia, for which it is accountable to Parliament, but in which by law and convention neither the Government nor Parliament seeks to intervene.

2 General Program Codes The guiding principle in the application of the following general program codes is context. W hat is unacceptable in one context may be appropriate and acceptable in another. However the use of language and images for no other

purpose but to offend is not acceptable. The code is not intended to ban certain types of language or images from bona fide dramatic or literary treatments nor is it intended to exclude such references from legitimate reportage, debate or documentaries. W here appropriate, audiences will be given advance notice of the content of the program.

2.1 Violence The presentation or portrayal of violence must be justifiable, or else the material should not be presented. Particular attention should be paid to the portrayal of violence against women.

In news and current affairs programs, violent events should never be sensationalised or presented for their own

In drama programs, the aim is not to see how much violence will be tolerated, but how little is necessary to achieve honest ends without undue dramatic compromise.

2.2 Language Variations of language favoured by different groups of Australians — young or old, well educated or less educated, migrants. Aborigines and others — are equally valid and have their place in programs. O n occasions, the language of one group may be distasteful to another.

Use of such language is permitted provided it is not used gratuitously and provided the language can be justified in the context of. for example, fiction, documentary, dramatisation, comedy and song lyrics.

2.3 Sex and Sexuality Provided it is handled with integrity, any of the following treatments of sex and sexuality may be appropriate and necessary to a program:

♦ if can be discussed and reported in the context of news, information or documentary; ♦ it can be referred to in drama, lyrics or

fictional programs; ♦ it can be depicted, implicitly or explicitly.

2.4 Discrimination The presentation or portrayal of people in a w ay which is likely to encourage denigration of or discrimination against any person or section of the community on account of race, ethnicity, nationality, sex age physical or mental disability occupational status, sexual preference or the holding of any religious, cultural or political belief will be avoided. The requirement is not intended to prevent the broadcast of material which is factual, or the expression of genuinely-held opinion in a news or current affairs program, or in the legitimate context of a humorous, satirical or dramatic work.

2.5 Privacy The rights of individuals to privacy should be respected in all ABC programs. However, in order to provide information which relates to a person's performance of public duties or about other matters of public interest, intrusions upon privacy may, in some circumstances, be justified.

3 Specific Program Codes 3.1 Children's Programs W hile the real world should not be concealed from children, special care will

be taken to ensure programs children are likely to watch unsupervised will not cause alarm or distress.

3.2 Religious Programs Religious programs may cover Christianity, other traditional religions and new religious movements, as well as analysis and discussion of religious issues from non-religious points of view.

3.3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Programs Program makers and journalists should respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. Particular care should be exercised in traditional matters such as the naming or depicting of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people after death.

3.4 Portrayal of Women and Avoidance of Gender Stereotyping Programs will take care to acknowledge the full range of roles now performed by women.

Programs should not promote or endorse inaccurate, demeaning or discriminatory stereotypes of women or men.

Irrelevant references to a woman's physical characteristics, marital status or maternity will be avoided.

In producing programs using experts interviewees and other talent, program makers will ensure that there are opportunities for both women and men to present viewpoints.

3.5 Closed Captioning for Hearing Impaired and Deaf People Closed caption programs will be dearly marked when program information is provided to the press or when captioned programs are promoted. Open captioned advice will be provided if technical problems prevent scheduled closed captioning.

Addresses to the notion and events of national significance will be transmitted with closed captioning. The ABC will endeavour to increase the amount of

closed-captioning programming as funds permit.

4 News and Current Affairs (a) Every reasonable effort must be made to ensure that the content of news and current affairs programs is accurate

impartial and balanced.

(b) Demonstrable errors will be corrected in a form most suited to the circumstances.

(c) Impartiality does not require editorial staff to be unquestioning; nor should all sides of an issue be devoted the same amount of time.

(d) Balance will be sought through the presentation, as far as possible, of principal relevant viewpoints on matters of importance. The requirement may not always be reached within a single program or news bulletin, but will be achieved within a reasonable period.

(e) Editorial staff will not be obliged to disclose confidential sources which they ore entitled to protect at all times.

(f) Re-enactments of events will be clearly identified as such and presented in a w ay which will not mislead audiences.

(g) If reported at all, suicides will be reported in moderate terms and will usually avoid details of method.

(h) Sensitivity will be exercised in broadcasting images of or interviews with bereaved relatives and survivors or witnesses of traumatic incidents.

4.1 News Flashes Care w ill be exercised in the selection of sounds and images and consideration given to the likely composition of the audience.

4.2 News Updates and News Promotions N ew s updates and news promotions will not appear during obviously inappropriate programs, especially programs directed at young children. Due to their repetitive nature, there will be very little violent material included in them, and none at all in the late afternoon and early evening.

116

Appendices

5 Promotions for Programs Program promotions will be scheduled so as to be consistent with the nature of surrounding programs.

6 Warnings W here appropriate, the audience will be given advance notice of programs or program segments which some viewers or listeners could find distressing or disturbing.

7 Television Program Classifications This system of television program classification applies the Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Videotapes

issued by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Programs having a particular classification under the O ffice of Film and Literature Classification Guidelines may be modified so that they are suitable for

broadcast or suitable for broadcast at particular times.

7.1 Classifications • G — Genera! (suitable for all ages) G programs, which include programs designed for pre-school and school

age children:

- are suitable for children to watch on their own; - may be shown at any time.

• PG — Parental Guidance (parental guidance recommended for persons under 1 5 years) PG programs:

- may contain adult themes and concepts which, when viewed by those under 15 years, may require the guidance of an adult; - may be shown between

8 .3 0 a.m. and 4 .0 0 p.m. on weekdays 7 .3 0 p.m. and 6 .0 0 a.m. on any day of the week.

• M — Mature Audience programs and • M A — Mature Adult Audience programs - are programs which, because of the

matter they contain or because of the w ay it is treated, are recommended for viewing only by persons aged 15 years or over.

M programs may be shown between: noon and 3 .0 0 p.m. on weekdays that are school days 8 .3 0 p.m. and 5 .0 0 a.m. on any day of the week.

M A programs may be shown between:

9 .0 0 p.m. and 5 .0 0 a.m. on any day of the week.

W hile most adult themes may be dealt with, the degree of explicitness and intensify of treatment w ill determine what can be accommodated in the M and M A classifications — the less explicit or less intense material will be

included in the M classification and the more explicit or more intense material, especially violent material, will be included in the M A classification.

• X programs and unmodified R programs (not suitable for television) - contain material which cannot appropriately be classified as G. PG.

M or AAA because the material itself or the way it is treated renders them unsuitable for television; - must not be shown at all.

7.2 Implementation Guidelines The time zones for each program classification are guides to the most likely placement of programs within that classification. They are not hard and fast

rules and there will be occasions on which programs or segments of programs appear in other time-slots, for example, a

PG program or segment of a program designed for teenage viewers could appear before 7 .3 0 p.m. if that is the time most suitable for the target audience, or a PG segment in an arts program could appear during a weekend daytime

program.

There must be sound reasons for any departure from the time zone for a program classification.

In the case of programs which are serious presentations of moral or social issues, they may appear outside their normal classification period provided that a clear indication of the nature and content of the program is given both in advance of and at the commencement of the program.

7.3 Television Classification Symbols. The classification symbol of the PG, M or AAA program (except news, current affairs, general information and sporting programs) being shown w ill be displayed at the commencement of the program.

The classification symbol of the PG, M or AAA program (except news, current affairs, general information and sporting programs) being promoted will be displayed during the promotion.

7.4 Consumer Advice Audio and visual consumer advice on the reasons for an M or AAA classification will be given prior to the commencement of an M or AAA program. The advice will be

in a style consistent with the guidelines on consumer advice published by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

8 Complaints Complaints that the ABC has acted contrary to this C ode of Practice should be directed to the ABC in the first .

instance. Phone complainants seeking a response from the ABC w ill be asked to put their complaint in writing. All such written complaints will receive a response from the ABC within 6 0 days from receipt of the written complaint.

The ABC w ill make every reasonable effort to resolve complaints about Code of

Practice matters, except where a complaint is clearly frivolous, vexatious or not made in good faith.

8.2 Independent Complaints Review Panel The ABC has established an Independent Complaints Review Panel (ICRP) to review written complaints which relate to allegations of serious bias, lack of balance or unfair treatment arising from an ABC broadcast or broadcasts.

If a complainant making such an allegation does not receive a response from the ABC within 42 days or is not satisfied with the response, the complainant may ask the Convenor of the

ICRP to accept the complaint for review. Further information can be obtained from the Convenor. Independent Complaints Review Panel, GPO Box 6 8 8 , Sydney, N S W 2001 or by phoning (02) 333 5 6 3 9 .

If the Convenor rejects the complaint or if the complainant is dissatisfied with the outcome of the review and the complaint is covered by the ABC Code of Practice, the complainant may make a complaint to the Australian Broadcasting Authority about the matter.

8.3 Australian Broadcasting Authority If a complainant:

- does not receive a response from the ABC within 6 0 days; or - the complainant is dissatisfied with the ABC response; or - the complainant is dissatisfied with the

outcome of the ICRP review (as mentioned above); and - the complaint is covered by the ABC Code of Practice;

the complainant may make a complaint to the Australian Broadcasting Authority about the matter.

Contact Addresses • Australian Broadcasting Corporation GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , in the capital city of your State or Territory • Independent Complaints Review Panel

GPO Box 6 8 8 , Sydney. N S W , 2001 • Australian Broadcasting Authority PO Box Q 5 0 0 , Queen Victoria Building, N S W 2000

117

Appendix 5

Television Awards

International Awards International Emmy Awards

Winner • Outstanding News and Documentary: Kangaroos-Foces in the M o b *

Finalist • Round The Twist

New York Film and TV Festival 1993

Gold Medal • Science Documentary: ET Please Phone Earth

Silver M edal • Entertainment Program Promo Series: The Burning Piano— A Portrait o f Patrick White • Best Editing: Wolves o f the S ea* • Educofional/lnstructional Television: A ll

In a Day's Work

Bronze Medal • Coverage of an on-going News Story: Armenia Blockade • Best Camera work: Wolves o f the

Sea*

Finalists • Entertainment Program Promo Series: This Sporting Life • Information/Magazine Opener and

Titles: Positive Art • The Arts: The Burning Piano— A Portrait o f Patrick White • Nature and W ildlife: Wolves o f The

Sea*

• Children's Program: Bananas In Pyjamas, Series 2 - 6 • Best Editing: The Burning Piano— A Portrait o f Patrick W hite

Banff Television Festival 1993-94

Selected for Competition • Quantum—After The Flood

Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival USA 1993 • Best Film of the Festival— Delegates Choice: Wolves o f the Sea *

1993 Progetta Natura— Stambecca D'oro (International Nature Film Festival) • Best Film— Absolute: Wolves o f The

Sea*

• Prize of the Italian Association of Scientific Film Makers:

Kangaroos-Faces In the M o b *

International Festival of Documentaries of the Sea, San Teodoro, Italy 1993 • Best Film of The Festival: Wolves O f The Sea *

Festival International du Film Ornitholigue, Menigoute, France 1993 • Credit Agricole for Best Natural History Film— Non Ornithological:

Wolves O f The Sea *

20th Festival Mondial de I'image Sous-Marine, Antibes France 1993 • Palme D'Or— Film and Video Grand Format: Wolves O f The Sea *

ABU Prize Contest • Hoso Bunka Aw ard For Best Drama: GP— Crossroads

20th Japan Prize International Educational Program Contest, Tokyo 1993

• Hoso Bunka Foundation Prize: Play School— Dinosaurs

Prix Jeunesse • Fiction 7 - 1 2 year olds: Round The Twist— Little Squirt

Prix Leonardo '93 Film Festival, Parma, Italy • M agna Cum Laude— Program, Script and Direction: Quantum—

Cholesterol-Sex, Lies and Coronaries • M agna Cum Laude— Direction, Editing, Photography, Special Effects: Quantum— ET Please Phone Home

10th International Science Television Festival, Paris, France • Mention Speciale du Jury: Quantum— Ancient Whispers

National Awards Australian Film Institute Awards • Best Children's Drama: Round The Twist • Best Achievement in Editing— N on­

Feature Film: Gumshoe* • Best Achievement in Cinematography— Non-Feature: Kangaroos-Foces In The M ob * • Best TV Mini-series: The Leaving o f

Liverpool • Best Screenplay in a TV Drama: The Leaving o f Liverpool • Best Episode in a TV Drama Series:

Phoenix— Under Siege • Best Achievement in Direction in a TV Drama: Police Rescue— W hirlwind • Best Performance by an Actor in a TV

Drama: Peter Phelps, GP—Exposed • Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Drama: Denise Roberts, GP—Alone • Best TV Documentary: W ho Killed

M alcolm Smith * • Best Achievement in a non feature film: Exile an d the Kingdom * • Best Screenplay adapted from another

source: Blackfellas

Australian Institute of Management Northern Territory • Inaugural Excellence In Management Award: Australia Television

1993 TV Week Logie Awards

Silver Logies Publicly Voted Categories • Most Popular Actress: Sonia Todd, Police Rescue • Most Popular Actor: Gary Sweet,

Police Rescue • Most Popular Drama: Police Rescue

• Most Popular Comedy: The Late Show • Most Popular Comedy Performer G arry McDonald, Mother and Son • Most Outstanding Actress: Ruth

Cracknell, Mother and Son Industry Voted Categories • Most Outstanding Drama: Phoenix II.

• M ost Outstanding Documentary Labour in Power • Most Outstanding Comedy: The Late

• Most Outstanding Actor: Garry McDonald, Mother and Son and Eggshells

1993 Australian Writers Guild Awards • Dorothy Crawford Award, for outstanding contribution to the profession: Penny Chapman • Television Series: Katherine Thomson,

GP— Shaking Hands W ith Time • Best Original Script: Ian David, Joh's Jury • Situation Comedy: Geoffrey Afherden

Eggshells— H appy Birthday Jill • Contribution to Comedy: John Doyle and Greg Pickhaver, This Sporting Life • Children's Adaptation: Paul Jennings

and Esben Storm, Round The Twist— Nails

1993 Media Peace Awards • Special International Year of the W orld's Indigenous Peoples Award: Blackout (Series 5)

Special Mention • Exile and the Kingdom * • Foreign Correspondent, Report by Dominic Schwartz

• 7 .3 0 Report, Toomelah story, Justin M urphy and Iris Mackler • GP— Crossroads

1993 Clear Speech Awards A w arded by Better Hearing • Angela Pearman, ABC-TV News, Sydney • Narelle Matlin, ABC-TV News,

Brisbane

Australian Caption Centre Poll • Most Popular Actor: G ary Sweet

Multicultural Arts Trust, South Australia • M edia Award: The Afternoon Show

People's Choice Awards • Favourite TV Drama or Serial: Police Rescue • Favourite M ale TV Dram a/Serial Star:

G ary Sweet, Police Rescue • Favourite Australian Comedy Star:

G arry McDonald, M other and Son • Favourite Comedy Show: M other and Son

1993 Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM)

Winner • G old Atom: GP— Exposed • Best TV Serial/Series: G P — Exposed • Childrens TV: Round The Twist— Little

Black Balls • In Context: Lift O ff to Music

118

Appendices

Finalist • Instructional Training/Secondary Student Judging Panel: Body Beat— Girts • Childrens TV: Round The Twist —

G randad's Gift • Children's TV/Primary Student Judging Panel: Round The Twist— Little Squirt • Children's TV/TV Series/Primary

Student Judging Panel: The W eb • Science & Environment: The Big W et • Short Fiction: M r Electric • Documentary: The Tenth Dancer • Documentary: Loaded*

1993 Grenfell Henry Lawson Festival of the Arts • Best Produced Single TV Drama: Job's Jury

Australian Society of Cinematographers Awards

Golden Tripod Award • Newsgathering: Andrew Taylor, M oscow Uprising • Dramatised Documentaries: Paul

Costello, The Burning Piano— A Portrait o f Patrick White • W ildlife and Nature Films: David Hannan, Sex on the Reef • Current Affairs: John Benes, ABC

London, Prague Culture • Specialised Cinematography: David Parer, Mysteries o f the Ocean Wanderers

Highly Commended • Newsgathering: Andrew Taylor, M ay Day Riots M oscow • Newsgathering: Peter Curtis, Moscow

Omon • Telefeatures and Fiction Drama Shorts: Brendan Shaw, Sensing • Documentaries, Cinema and

Television: David Maguire, The Returned Sword • W ildlife and Nature Films: Mark Lamble, The Big W et • W ildlife and Nature Films: David

Parer, Mysteries o f the Ocean Wanderers • Current Affairs: Medley Trigge (Middle East), Lot's Cave • Specialised Cinematography: Mark

Lamble, The Big Wet • Specialised Cinematography: David Hannan, Sex O n The Reef

Golden Quill Awards, Law Society of NSW Television For excellence in Legal Journalism • So Help M e God, produced by Jenny

Brockie • Highly Commended: Four Corners— Excuse For Murder

Kellogs Excellence Award in Nutrition Journalism • First Prize: Quantum— Cholesterol-Sex, Lies and Coronaries

Australian Video Awards • Highest Selling Special Interest Sell- Through Video: Wolves O f The Sea*

Australian Country Music Awards

Golden Guitar A w ard • Video Track of the Year: Julian Mather, Landline

1993 Childrens Week Awards • Gore Hill Child Care Centre

NSW Aboriginal Trainee of the Year • Lorena Browning, Trainee Camera Assistant • Documentary pre-purchases from

independent producers

Appendix 6

Radio A w ards

International Awards Shangai 4th International Radio Music Festival • Golden Chime Award: Australia

Today, produced by Penny Smith and presented by Charles Southwood for ABC Classic FM.

New York International Radio Festival

Gold Medal • Children/Young Adult section for Radio Drama: the drama series Home Run produced by Sarah M ogeridge of

Radio Drama for K-Radio.

Silver Medal • Best Coverage of an O ngoing Story: 2BL Sydney— Bushfire coverage.

• Religious Category: Florence Spurting, The Composition o f Souls.

Commonwealth Relations Trust Travelling Bursary 94 • Travelling Bursary to Britain: Joe Gelonesi, Radio National

National Awards Walkley Award • Best International Report: Liz Jackson, Background Briefing— Somalia-Dying

for Relief.

• Best Investigative Award: Sharon Davis, Background Briefing— Playing with Fire. Highly Commended:

Stephen McDonnell and Matthew Brown for their contribution to the program.

• Best Coverage of a Current Story: Rob Raschke's reporting of the Ciskei Massacre on AM .

• Best Application of the Radio Medium

to Journalism: Sarah Armstrong,

Diggers Depart.

• Highly Commended: Rebecca

Gorman, for her stories on mental

health.

MBF Awards for Excellence in Journalism in Health and Well-being • Best Metropolitan Radio Report: In N ew South W ales, Jackie Bowmer,

presenter of Radio National's Saturday National. • Best Regional Radio Report: In N ew South W ales, N ick Talbot, ABC,

Newcastle, for his report on fake vaccines and HIV.

• Best Metropolitan Radio Report: In Victoria, Radio National's Suzanna Yanko for her story on epilepsy surgery.

• Best Regional Radio Report: In Victoria, Penny Johnston, ABC Sale, for her story on HIV.

United Nations Association of Australia Media Peace Awards • M ajor Aw ard for Radio: Liz Jackson, Background Briefing— Somalia-Dying

for Relief.

• Letter of Special Commendation: Radio National and Community Aid Abroad for December 1992 's Radiothon.

1993 Michael Daley Awards for Science, Technology and Engineering Journalism

• Best Radio Entry: Radio National freelance journalist Sharon Carleton, Science Show on Dr Miriam Rothschild. Highly Commended: John Merson, The Second Green

Revolution.

Women and the Media Award • The Radio Award: The Coming Out Show production team of Pam Verrall, Kathy Flynn, Fiona Martin and Judy

Rapley, for Running Up a Frock.

Australian-American Educational Foundation • Fulbright Postgraduate Student Award for Journalism: Anne Delaney, first

recipient of this Award.

1994 Australia Day Media Awards • Best Radio Feature Story: Richard Forbes, for his program on the views of Victorian farmers.

• Best Radio News Story: ABC Radio News in Victoria, for efforts in raising awareness of Australia Day.

National Landcare Awards • Special award for coverage of Landcare issues: ABC Radio.

Better Hearing Australia's Clear Speech Award • Julia Lester, 5 A N presenter.

Rolling Stone Magazine • Best Radio Station 1993 and 1994: Triple J

State A w ards Darwin Media Awards • Northern Territory Radio Journalist of the Year: Nikki Gemmell, Alice

Springs.

Queensland Landcare Media Award • Country Hour, Queensland

Western Australian Equal Opportunity Media Awards • Best Radio Report. Geraldine Mel left and Karen Buck, 6WF.

119

Western Australia Stage Awards • Year's Outstanding Playwright (Golden Swan): David Britton, Executive Producer Radio Drama, for his stage

play Cargo.

Rural Media Association Awards (WA) • Best Electronic Rural News Story: Deb Rice • Best Electronic Rural Feature Story: Deb

Rice

Pastoralists and Graziers Association of WA • Order of the Quart Pot: Bill McCutcheon of Rural in W A , for 30

years of dedicated service to agriculture in the media in W A .

Premier's West Australian History Prize • Highly Commended: W A Regional Radio team, The Great Convoy.

Dalgety Awards for Excellence in Rural Journalism 1993 • Victoria: Richard Forbes, Melbourne Rural Reporter

• South Australia: Sarina Locke, Regional Radio Broadcaster.

• Western Australia: M ichael Harris • Queensland: Brendan Egan, former Rockhampton reporter

Victorian Rural Journalism Awards • Best Feature, Electronic M edia: (joint winner) John Henwood, Victoria's Country Hour.

Victorian Tourism Awards • Electronic Media Aw ard: Victorian Regional Radio

Deafness Foundation's Gippsland Clear Speech Award • Richard Peach, Regional Program M anager Sale

Greyhound Racing Board of Victoria • Aw ard of Excellence in Radio M edia: Peter Eustace

Royal Adelaide Show 1994 • Best Rural Award: M ary Keilly

NSW Youth Media Awards 1993 • Outstanding Documentary on Young People and Youth Issues: Tim Benjamin, Regional Radio Journalist.

• Outstanding Current Affairs report on Young People and Youth Issues on Regional Radio: Jane Munro, Regional Radio, Kempsey

Law Society of NSW • Golden Quill, Radio: Sharon Davis, for her report on the Kings Cross Backpacker Hostel fire.

• Highly Commended. Radio: Liz Jackson's report on the High Court.

Drum Media Magazine Readers' Poll 1993 • Best Radio Station: Triple J • Best Radio DJ: Richard Kingsmill

Appendix 7

Enterprises Awards

International Awards New York Radio Festival • G old Aw ard for Children’s Drama Home Run, Paul Jennings

National Awards Music Industry Awards G old records are for sales of 3 5 000. Platinum Records are for sales o f 7 0 00 0 .

Gold Record • The W iggles, The W iggles • The Outback Club, Lee Kernaghan • Three Chain Rood, Lee Kernaghan

Country Music Association Awards 1994 • Best Female Vocal: Gina Jeffreys • Best M ale Vocal: Lee Kernaghan • Best Album: Lee Kernaghan • Best Song: Lee Kernaghan • Best Group or Duo: Lee Kernaghan

and Slim Dusty • Best Producer: Garth Porter, Three Chain Road • Best Video: G reg Champion

APRA 12th Annual Music Awards • Children's Song of the Year: M onica Trapaga, Tigers • Country Song of the Year: Lee

Kernaghan and Garth Porter, Boys from the Bush • Contemporary Classical Composition of the Year: Symphony Da Pacem

Domine, Ross Edwards • Television or Film Theme of the Year: Phoenix, Series 2, Paul Grabowsky

Australian Country Music Magazine People's Choice • Most Popular M ale: Lee Kernaghan • Entertainer of the Year: Lee Kernaghan • Most Popular Female: Anne Kirkpatrick

ARIA Awards • Best Country Album: Lee Kernaghan, Three Chain Road • Best Jazz Album: M ike Bukovsky,

Wanderlust • Best Children's Album: M ic Conway, W hoopee • Best Australian Classical Record:

Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Ross Edwards Orchestral Works

Video Industry Awards G o ld awards are for sales o f $ 2 5 0 00 0 . Platinum Awards are for wholesale sales o f $ 5 0 0 000. Double Platinum Awards for wholesale sales in excess of $1 0 0 0 00 0 .

Gold Awards • Wolves of the Sea • La Boheme • Brides of Christ • Australian O pera Favourites

• Best o f the Late Show, Volume 2

Platinum Awards • Bananas in Pyjamas— Show Business • The Best o f the Late Show, Volume 1 • Stairways to Heaven • A BC for Kids

Double Platinum Awards • Bananas in Pyjamas— Birthday Special

Australian Video Awards • Highest Selling Non-Animated Children's Sell-Through Video: ABC Video, Bananas in Pyjamas Birthday

Special • Highest Selling Special Interest Sell- Through Video* ABC Video, Wolves of the Sea

Appendix 8

Notional Advisory Council M em bership

Membership for year to 3 0 June 1994

Continuing Kath French (WA) Convenor, Petar Djurichkovic (NSW ), Katherine Koesasi (Vic), Robin Stuart-Harris (NSW ), Gilbert Hanson (NSW ), Peg Havnen (*N T /A C T ), David Roberts (Tas), M ary Anne Taylor (* W A /N S W )

Appointed From I January 1994 Paula Fraser (Qld), Eva N agy (SA), Joseph O'Reilly (Vic), Thong Phoumirath (ACT)

Terms Expired 3 Ί December 1993 Sir Nicholas Parkinson (ACT) Deputy Convenor, Rosa Colanero-Lean (SA), Stephen Jolley (Vic), M a ry W agner (Qld) Lindsay Croft (NSW ) resigned from the N ational Advisory Council on 1 3 August

1993.

* These N A C members moved inter-State during the year.

120

Appendices

Appendix 9

National Advisory Council Recommendations

Pronunciation — Aboriginal Places and Names The issue of pronunciation of Aboriginal places and names was brought to the attention of the National Advisory Council The ABC response to this issue was encouraging. Council suggests the production of an audio tape covering Aboriginal places, names and common sounds. The cooperation of local language centres and the ABC's Standing Committee on Spoken English would enable a comprehensive audio tape to be produced for use at a national level.

Aboriginal Broadcasting Services The Council notes the Aboriginal Broadcasting Units have an existing database of information on community

spokespersons and sensitivity on reporting issues. The Council encourages other ABC services to seek the advice of the Units using this data base and expanding it.

Promotion of ABC Programs Council has noted that the ABC has used promotions on commercial radio stations to advertise various programs, for example, Police Rescue. Some of these have been in a similar style to commercial advertisements. Although these promotions can be useful in informing listeners of the availability of ABC programs, it could be argued that these represent advertising by

the ABC and might be used to argue for commercial advertising on the ABC. This risk would be lessened to the ABC if the style of these promotions were more in

keeping with that of a non-commercial broadcaster.

Diversity The Council commends the ABC for its positive attempts to provide a w ide range of programs to various interest groups.

The Council encourages the ABC to continue to produce programs which attract diverse groups of people and dispel perceptions of an 'elite' broadcaster servicing a minority group.

Family programs — Subscription Television The Council, while commending the ABC's decision to broadcast family and children's television programs of a very

high standard on its proposed subscription service, is concerned that programming in these areas may gradually cease to be a priority on free-to- air television and so disadvantage those people unable to afford subscription television. The N A C seeks assurance that this w ill not happen.

Evening Program Run-Down The Council is aware of the early evening program run-down and is in favour of an

additional program run-down of evening television programs. A suitable time for this might be immediately before the 8.30pm News update.

Evening Program Run-Down Council notes the Executive response to its recommendation regarding an evening

program run-down. The Council still believes that a run-down of programs following later in the evening would be useful for viewers. This could also be useful as a program 'filler'.

Evening Program Run-Down The Council notes the Executive response concerning its suggestions for an evening

program run-down. However, the N A C believes that a run-down would be more informative than the current 'tonight' promotions.

Saturday Evening Programs The Council notes that several British programs are televised in a single two and a half hour block on a Saturday evening. As one of the functions of the ABC, in its role as the national

broadcaster, is to represent those characteristics which are uniquely Australian, the Council suggests that these programs are not broadcast 'en bloc'.

ACT/Northern Territory The Council has noted that both ABC Radio and ABC-TV consistently omit references to the Northern and Australian

Capital Territories from news reports and current affairs analyses of major national economic figures and indicators such as unemployment, price and w age variations, housing figures etc. Both Territories are significant political and economic entities and should be treated separately from the States. The ACT in

particular, is not part of N S W and much more care should be exercised (in the ABC's own interest) not to offend the nearly 3 0 0 0 0 0 Australians w ho live and work there.

Food and Wine Program and Money Program The Council has suggested a food and wine television program on several occasions. Council was informed that the feasibility of such a program would be investigated and would welcome details of progress.

Council also suggested a money program previously and such a program is now available on a commercial station.

Captioning— News and Current Affairs Programs Following the N A C meeting with the Minister for Communications, David

Beddall on 1 3 October 1 993, Council has been made aware that representation should be made to the Hon. Brian Howe, Minister for Housing, Local Government and Community Services on this matter. The NAC requests that it be advised on the status of potential funding so that concerned members of the public may be

kept informed of the progress in captioning news and current affairs programs.

0055 Services In order that users of 0 0 5 5 sporting information services can make convenient and efficient use of this facility, each message should be preceded with an announcement that indicates if it is live or the date and time it was updated.

Attitude The National Advisory Council commends the continual evolution of Attitude. The program's ongoing development of its style, presentation and subject matter is appreciated. It is hoped that Attitude will continue its exploration of youth culture.

Attitude As part of Attitude's ongoing development the Council urges that it encompass youth Australia w ide in its 1994 programs. Given that it is the International Year of

the Family, the Council encourages Attitude to incorporate a youth perspective on the family in its programming.

Weather Photographs The Council commends ABC-TV in South Australia for the development of the weather photos concept. The calendar and exhibitions of prints has heightened audience awareness and participation in ABC activities. Whilst acknowledging that Tasmania has embraced the concept, the N A C encourages other States to

investigate the possibility of pursuing similar activities.

Mabo Decision— Programs The Council has been made aware of considerable confusion and concern in the community concerning the implications of the M a b o decision. Council recommends that a documentary or series

is urgently commissioned to examine the issues in connection with this decision.

This subject should be examined in the context of the historical process and in the light of similar experience in other countries (for example, N ew Zealand and Canada).

BBC World Service Each morning Daybreak crosses to the BBC W o rld Service for W orld Roundup, between 7 .4 0 am and 7 .5 0 am. The Council suggests that the cross is fixed at a specific time, such as 7 .4 5 am.

Unemployment In recognition of the number of people affected by the current unemployment rate of 1 1 per cent and bearing in mind that unemployment will continue to be high, the N A C recommends that the ABC consider developing a television program which addresses the concerns of the unemployed. The program should deal with survival skills for people existing on a

low income, for example, the setting up of bulk buying and distribution routes, low- cost cooking courses, examples of small

121

business enterprise, gardening for low income households, community resources, training courses and job interview skills. The Council suggests that the Attitude style of program might be appropriate.

Regional Transmitters Acknowledging that large portions of Australia are serviced by ABC Radio and Television and that minimal commercial broadcasts reach these areas, the importance of information and news to remote rural communities is vital. O f equal importance is a sense of belonging to a local community. Accordingly, the N A C recommends that communities currently receiving transmissions from a distant regional base that are considered inappropriate to their needs, be investigated to determine if a more appropriate transmission is possible. Examples of this are:

1. Mildura 104.3 FM — limited signal so most rural communities receive Horsham 3 W V 5 94 .

2 . Townsville 4 Q N 6 3 0 — broadcast via satellite to S W Queensland

Regional Radio W ith regard to Regional Radio broadcasts by satellite (February 1994), the N A C recommends that the ABC reconsider linking Western Queensland to 4QL Longreach. This request stems from listeners of 4QL experiencing difficulties with local reception. Also, information currently received from 4 Q N Townsville is not considered relevant in many aspects to the huge audience in Western Queensland.

Television News Several Council members commented that they preferred the News available on Australia Television to the ABC-TV News. Council recommends that the format and content of the ABC-TV News be reviewed with particular regard to the News Service available on Australia Television.

Television News The Council is pleased to hear that ABC-TV management is working towards a more comprehensive late night evening news. In view of the previous comments concerning ABC-TV News (October

1994) the National Advisory Council recommends that the late evening bulletin adopts a different emphasis to the 7pm News, for example, a greater emphasis on international events.

Triple J — Cross Promotion The National Advisory Council believes that Triple J has a unique opportunity to make young people aware of the variety of services the ABC has to offer. Triple J is on excellent medium for cross-promotion of: the orchestras and their achievements; and ABC services, and other ABC

networks.

The Council feels that Triple J is a useful tool for initiating youth into areas of the

ABC, traditionally the realm of other groups.

The N A C recommends that the ABC use Triple J to cross-promote and broaden the participation of youth in the ABC.

EEO—Arts and Music In recognition of the ABC's role in encouraging employment in the fields of arts and music, and of the multicultural nature of Australian society, the Council urges that greater efforts be undertaken to promote and support the arts and music of various ethnic groups.

Documentaries— Commendation The Council commends the purchase of consistently high quality documentaries for example: Wolves o f the Seo and Mysteries o f the Ocean Wanderers

produced by David and Elizabeth Parer- Cook. The N A C encourages the acquisition and or commissioning of programs that aspire to this exceptional standard.

International Year of the Family

Triple J The Council commends the efforts of Triple J in the area of documentaries such as the Living in the Cities series, which notably resulted in a recently published book.

W ith 1994 being the International Year of the Family (IYF) the N A C encourages Triple J to explore this theme. Council also suggests that Australia's increasing multiculturalism be combined with this family theme.

Migrant Families In view of the fact that this year is the IYF and of the multicultural nature of Australia, the Council recommends that the ABC produce a program on migrant families in Australia. Particular aspects which could be highlighted include: changes in life­ style, changes in allegiance, differences between parents and the children and whether the family and Australia have benefited.

Children's Rights The Council recommends that the ABC utilise the IYF to focus on the position of Australia's children, in particular with

regard to Australia's compliance with the International Convention on the Rights of the Child. A television or radio program undertaking an audit of children's rights would serve to prompt action on key elements of the Convention and ultimately improve the status of children.

Family Lifestyles During the IYF a television or radio series which examines the differences in family lifestyles and the values of various cultural groups could promote mutual understanding and respect. In particular, programs which develop a better understanding of a kinship family system in the traditional and urban context would

be an acknowledgment of the contribution of indigenous Australia to IYF

Family Viewing In recognition of the United Nations IYF, it is hoped that the ABC w ill endeavour to provide programs that encourage viewing by the family as a whole unit in a regular timeslot.

Family Album The Council requested the ABC in recognition of the United Nations IYF provide, in a regular timeslot, programs that encourage viewing by the family as a whole unit. Whilst the ABC considers Family Album addresses this request members of the Council question its appeal to the whole family, given the range of ages of family viewers. The Council commends those episodes of Family Album that appeal to families with older children but seeks the possible screening of some Family Album episodes suitable for viewing by younger children with their family.

Isolated Children's Parents' Association In recognition of the United Nations IYF, the N A C recommends ABC-TV (in association with the Isolated Children's

Parents' Association national conference to be held in Alice Springs in August) produce a program featuring the education problems facing remote and rural families.

Seven Little Australians In recognition of the IYF the National Advisory Council queries the possibility of re-screening Seven Little Australians.

It's Your ABC The Council believes that It's Your A BC is an important concept and recommends

that the ABC produce a series of Television promotions using the It's Your A B C concept and depicting the multicultural nature of Australian society.

Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras The Council has received criticism concerning the recent screening of the G ay and Lesbian M ardi Gras. A large proportion of complaints related to the w ay in which the commentators presented the broadcast. The Council recommends that when the G ay and Lesbian M ardi Gras is screened in future, commentators adopt a more objective approach.

History of Comedy Following the recent showing of Punch Lines — A Seriously Funny History which looked at the history of Melbourne comedy, the N A C recommends that a similar program be made on Sydney's comedy history.

Also under the banner of Australiana, the N A C recommends the presentation of a series of one-off, best of episodes such as Flash N ick forjindavick, Australia, You're Standing In It and even those comedies not produced by the ABC such as M y Name's McGooley, W h a t’s Yours?

122

Appendices

Landline The Council commends the Landline program for its informative value to rural communities. It is an invaluable means of notifying Australians of changing trends, new technologies and alternative land management uses.

Due to the unscheduled seven days a week operation of a large proportion of those viewers most likely to benefit directly from Landline, its initial daytime telecast and subsequent repeat at approximately the same time are considered to be

inappropriate. Council understands that this has been mentioned before by the N A C but as the timeslot for Landline continues to be raised with Council

members, it is obviously an ongoing community concern.

The N A C recommends that one of the broadcasts be maintained and the other transferred to an evening timeslot.

Rural Woman of the Year The N A C commends the ABC for participating in the Rural W om an of the Year Award.

This is a positive step towards recognition of the valuable contribution of rural women to our nation. However, the Council believes that it is also important to recognise the role of strong women in rural areas, whose work is not necessarily directly connected to the land. Council therefore encourages the ABC to promote the expansion of the award to include these women.

Bretton Woods Institutions In 1 994, the Bretton W oods Institutions (The W orld Bank, the IMF and by extension the GATT) will be 5 0 years old. These institutions could arguably be identified as the most influential international institutions of the last one hundred years.

The N A C recommends that the ABC take the opportunity provided by the anniversary to produce a television/radio program on the history, evolution and the role of the institutions and their affect on the global economy, with a focus on developing countries.

Centenary of Federation In the lead up to the Centenary of Federation, the N A C recommends that

ABC-TV produce a series on the developments in policy and provision of services since Federation in areas including welfare, education,

broadcasting, health, industrial relations, the arts and international relations.

History of Australia Recent political debate has demonstrated the lack of knowledge concerning the development of the Constitution and the history of Australia. The N A C believes there is a need to educate about the history of Australia. This need is likely to be highlighted by forthcoming events such as the centenary of Federation, the push

for a Republic and the Olympics. The N A C recommends that the ABC commission a documentary series. The scope of such a project is potentially broad as it might include the history of

Aboriginal Australia, European settlement, colonisation of separate States, Federation of the States, the Australian Constitution, the Australian flag, the role of Australia in W orld W ars 1 and 2, Australia and the United Nations, the W hite Australia Policy, dismissal of the W hitlam Government and multicultural Australia. It might be necessary to divide

such a project into several separate projects.

Canberra Television News Canberra is the national capital and a thriving metropolis. The coverage of local issues and news is vital to a sense of

belonging to a community, if also has national implications. Noting the lack of such coverage, the Council recommends that ABC-TV resume the provision of local news and current affairs content for the region.

Heartland The Council commends the pioneering and enterprising spirit in tackling the Aboriginal issue through the series

Heartland. In recognition of the success of Heartland the N A C recommends that the ABC explore avenues to showcase the talents that exist in the Aboriginal community.

Heartland The presentation of Heartland dealt successfully with many important themes in the lives of Aboriginal Australians and contributed to an improved understanding of these issues in the general community. The involvement of Aboriginal consultants

in Heartland resulted in a culturally authentic production. It also provided an excellent showcase for Aboriginal dramatic talent. The N A C commends the ABC for its initiative and hopes that further similar productions will be undertaken.

UN Fiftieth Anniversary 1995 is the fiftieth Anniversary of the establishment of the United Nations (UN). Australia made an important contribution to the UN in its early days and in the formulation of its major mechanisms,

including the U N Declaration of Human Rights.

In recognition of the importance of the occasion, the Federal Government has established a national committee to plan the celebration.

The N AC recommends that the ABC cooperate with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in producing a series of television documentaries and radio

programs dealing with Australia's involvement in the U N on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations in 1995. Planning for the year is underway so a

commitment from the ABC during the . second half of .1994 would be necessary.

D-Day -

The Council commends the ABC on· the material broadcast on ABC-TV and Radio to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the D-Day landings.

Fridge Door The Council commends the initiative in producing the Fridge Door, the local arts program for Television in Tasmania. Council urges the development of the concept in other States.

South African Elections The Council commends Radio National on its week of programming during and in the lead up to the South African elections.

Sports Coverage on ABC-TV The Council commends the ABC on the recent coverage of women's sport, especially the Women's Basketball W orld Championship. The NAC urges that similar coverage, especially of minority sports be undertaken.

123

Appendix 10

Seymour South Yarra

5 5 61

Swifts Creek Upper Murray

5 9 1

Upwey 39

W alw a/Jingellic* 5 6

New South Wales Quirindi 5A Warburton 61

Armidale 5 A & 33 Richmond/Tweed 6 Warrnambool 2

Ashford 5A Stanwell Park 33 Western Victoria 5 A

Ba Ira no Id 3 9 S W Slopes/E Riverina 0 Yea 33

Batemans Bay/M oruya 9 Sydney 2 Queensland

Bathurst 6 Tam worth 2 & 55 Airlie Beach 4 9

Beg a /C oo m a 8 Tenterfield 2 9 Alpha 8

Bona 1 bo 55 Thredbo 34 Aramac 11

Bourke/Brewarrina 4 Tottenham 10 Augathella 1 1

B o w ra l/ Mittagong 33 Tumbarumba* 6 6 Aurukun* 6 9

Braid w ood 5 7 Tumut* 5 7 Ayr 6 3

Broken Bay 6 7 Ulladulla 33 Babinda 1

Broken Hill 2 Upper Hunter 8 Bamaga* 6 9

Captains Flat* 55 Upper Namoi 7 Ballard 33

Central Tablelands 1 W a g g a W a g ga 5 6 Barcaldine 10

Central Western Slopes 11 W alcha 6 Bedourie 7

Cobar 2 W algett 6 9 Birdsville 8

Coffs Harbour 6 0 W eilm oringle* 6 9 Blackall 9

Collarenebri 29 W hite Cliffs* 6 9 Blackwater 8

Condobolin 65 W ilcannia 8 Bollon* 6 9

Coolah 5 6 W ollongong 35 Boulia 8

Cooma 0 & 5 6 W yong 42 Bowen 5 A

Crookwell 4 5 Young 11 Boyne Island 5 7

Deniliquin 9 Victoria Brisbane 2

Dubbo 5 7 Alexandra 5 A & 5 9 Burdekin Falls* 6 9

Eden 1 Bairnsdale 5 7 Burketown* 6 9

Emmaville 55 Ballarat 11 Cairns 9

Enngonia* 6 9 Bendigo 1 Cairns East 41

Glen Innes 0 Bonnie Doon 5 8 Cairns North 4 & 5 6

Gloucester 4 2 Boolarra 5 6 Camooweal 8

G oodooga 8 Bright 32 Capella 5 A

Gosford 4 6 Bruthen 53 Charleville 9

Goulburn 5 5 Conn River 11 Charters Towers 4 4

Grafton/Kempsey 2 Casterton 55 Chillagoe* 6 9

Hay 11 Churchill 5 5 Chinchilla* 5 6

lllawarra 5 6 Cobden 8 Clairview* 6 9

Inverell 2 Colac 5A Clermont 10

Ivan hoe 6 Coleraine 2 Cloncurry 7

Jerilderie 10 Corryong 9 Coen 8

Jindabyne 6 0 Eildon 33 Collinsville 55

Kandos 0 Fern tree Gully 5 6 Cooktown 8

Khancoban 6 0 Foster 1 1 Corfield 10

Kings Cross 4 6 Genoa 31 Croydon 8

Kotara 58 Gisborne* 5 6 Cunnamulla 10

Kyogle 5 7 Goulburn Valley 4 0 Currumbin 33

Laurieton 4 4 Hopetoun* 29 Dajarra* 6 9

Lightning Ridge 10 Horsham 45 Darling Downs 32

Lithgow 32 Howqua* 5 7 Dimbulah 4 6

Lithgow East* 5 5 Jamieson* 5 8 Dirranbandi 7

M a n ly / Mosman 4 2 Lakes Entrance 32 Doomadgee* 6 9

M anning River 6 Lalrobe Valley 4 0 Dysart 2

Menindee 9 M a llacoota 5 7 Eidsvold 5 7

Merewether 35 Mansfield 5 0 Emerald 1 1

M erriwa 8 Marysville 4 6 Eulo* 6 9

M udgee 55 Melbourne 2 Georgetown 7

M ungindi 10 Mildura 6 Gladstone East 32

Murrumbidgee IA 7 Murray Valley 2 Gladstone W est 55

Murrurundi 6 Myrtleford 2 Glenden* 2 9

Murwillumbah 6 0 Nhill 9 Gold Coast 4 9

Narooma 0 N ow a Nowa 55 Goondiwindi 6

Newcastle/Hunter 5 A & 4 8 Omeo 32 Gordonvale 5 5

N ow ra North 32 Orbost 2 Greenvale 8

Nym agee* 6 6 Portland 6 0 Gunpowder* 6 9

Nyngon 3 Safety Beach 61 Gununa* 6 9

Portland/W ailerawang 5 7 Selby 5 7 Gympie 4 5

Gympie Town Herberton Hope Vole* Hughenden

Injune Isisford Jackson O il Field* Jericho Julia Creek Jundah*

Karumba Kowanyama * Laura Lockhart River* Long reach M ackay Mareeba Meandarra Middlemounf

Miles Millmerron* Miriam Vale Mission Beach Mitchell Monto Moore Moran bah Moranbah Town Morven Mossman Moura M t Garnet M f Isa M t M ol b y Murgon * Muitaburra

Nambour Nebo N onda* Noosa/Tewantin Normanton Numinbah Prison* Palen Creek Prison* Pentland Pormpuraaw* Port Douglas Proserpine .

Quilpie Ravenshoe Richmond Rockhampton Roma

Shute Harbour Southern Downs Springsure St George Stuart Sunshine Coast Surat Tambo Tara* Taroom

Thargomindah* The Monument* Theodore Thursday Island Tieri* Toowoomba Townsville Townsville North

5 7 6 0 6 9

1 8 8

5 9

4 0

1 1 6

5 7

11

11

6 9

6 9 58

8

6 9 5 6 3 55

124

Appendices

Tully 8

Tully Falls 4 6

W andoan 5A

W arw ick 55

W e i pa 7

W id e Bay 6

W indorah* 6 9

W inton 8

W irrolie* 6 9

W ujal W u ja l* 6 9

W yandra* 6 9

Yarrabah* 6 9

Yeppoon 5 6

South Australia Adelaide 2

Adelaide Foothills 4 6

Andamooka 8

Angaston * 58

Arkaroola* 6 9

Barton* 6 9

Bordertown 2

Burra 5 6

Caralue Bluff 5 9

Carrickalinga* 55

Ceduna/Sm oky Bay 9

Chandler* 68

Coffin Bay 4 5

Coober Pedy 8

C ook* 6 9

Cowell 6

Elliston* 6 9

Glendam bo* 6 9

Hawker 48

Indulkana* 6 9

Keith 4 2

Kenmore Park* 6 9

Lameroo 5 7

Leigh Creek South 9

Lyndhurst* 6 0

M anguri* 6 9

M arla * 6 9

Marree 8

M intabie* 6 4

M oom ba* 6 9

Nepabunna* 6 9

Normanville* 5 7

O odnadatta* 6 0

Parachilna* 6 9

Penong* 6 9

Peterhead * 5 6

Pinnaroo 5 6

Pipalyatjara* 6 9

Port Lincoln 6 0

Quorn 4 7

Renmark/Loxton 3

Roxby Downs 5 6

South East 1

Spencer Gulf North 1

Streaky Bay 10

Tarcoola* 6 9

Tumby Bay 32

Umuwa* 6 9

Victor Harbor 55

W atson* 68

W irrulla 8

W oomera 7

W udinna 30

Yankalilla* 5 6

Yunta* 6 9

Western Australia Albany 7

Argyle* 6 9

Augusta 5 6

Badgingarra* 6 8

Bamboo Creek* 6 4

Bayulu 4 5

Beacon * 6 9

Bellevue M ine * 6 9

Bencubbin* 68

Blackstone* 6 9

Boddington* 6 8

Bremer Bay* 6 9

Bridgetown 5 6

Broads Dam* 6 9

Broome 8

Bunbury 5

C allion* 6 9

Carnarvon 7

Central Agricultural 5 A

Cervantes 4 6

Cockatoo Island 9

C ondingup/H ow ick 6

C oorow * 6 7

Cue 10

Dalwallinu 4 6

Dampier 2 9

Denham 8

Derby 8

Eneabba 4 6

Esperance 10

Eucla* 6 9

Exmouth 8

Fitzroy Crossing 5 8

Forrest* 6 9

Gairdner* 6 8

Geraldton 6

G nowangerup* 6 9

Golden Grove M ine* 68 Goodwyn * 68

Green H ead* 51

Halls Creek 8

hopetoun* 6 5

Hyden * 2 9

Jamieson* 6 9

Jerramungup* 6 9

Jurien 5 5

Kalbarri 9

Kalgoorlie 6

Kambalda 5 & 5 5

Karratha 5 4

Katanning 7

Kojonup 6 9

Kondinin* 6 9

Koolan Island 6

Koolyanobbing 1 1

Koorda * 5 2

Kulin* 31

Kununurra 9

Kununurra East 68

Lagrange* 6 7

Lake Grace 33

Lake King* 6 9

Laverton 10

Leeman 5 A

Leinster 10

Leonora 8

M arble Bar 8

Meekatharra 8

Menzies 10

Merredin 8

M oora 6 0

M oraw a 8

M t M agnet 8

M ukinbudin* 31

M ullewa 9

M unglinup* 6 9

Nannup 32

Narembeen 6 4

Narrogin 5 7

Newman 7

Norseman 7

Northampton 8

North Rankin* 6 7

N ullagine* 5 0

O ne Arm Point* 6 9

O ngerup* 6 7

O nslow 8

Pannawonica 11

Paraburdoo 6

Pemberton 33

Perth 2

Phillip Point* 6 8

Pingrup* 6 7

Pink Hills* 6 9

Port Hedland 7

Ravensthorpe 11

Rawlinna* 6 9

Roebourne 9

Roleystone 5 7

Salmon Gums 8

Shay G a p * 2

Southern Agricultural 2

Southern Cross 9

Tjirrkarli* 6 9

Tom Price 10

Toodyay 4 0

Trayning* 6 9

Vlaming Head* 6 9

W a g in 8

W angkatjunka* 6 9

W arakurna* 6 9

W arburton* 6 9

W a ve Rock* 6 9

W eeli W o lli Creek* 6 9

W estonia* 6 5

W ilun a * 6 9

W ittenoom * 6 6

W ongan Hills 6

W yndham 10

Yalgoo 10

Yandicoogina* 68

Yiyili* 6 9

Zanthus* 6 9

Tasmania Acton Road* 55

Bicheno 10

Binalong Bay 33

Burnie 58

Devonport/Ulverstone 48 East Devon port 5 7

Hobart 2

King Island 11

Launceston 5 6

Lileah 8

M aydena * 58

M ole Creek* 5 7

NE Tasmania 3 & 32

Penguin 31

Queenstown/Zeehan 56 Rosebery 33

Savage River 4

Smithton 32

St Helens 31

St Marys 5 6

Strahan 5 7

Strathgordon 43

Swansea 5 7

Taroona 4 6

Ulverstone 5 9

W aratah 5 7

W ynyard 33

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 3

Tuggeranong 6 0

Weston C reek/W oden 55

Northern Territory Adelaide River 1 1

Alice Springs 7

Bathurst Island 1 1

Beswick* 6 0

Borroloola 6

Bulman* 68

Cattle Creek* 6 8

Daguragu* 6 6

Daly River 10

Darwin 6

Darwin North 55

Galiwinku 8

Groote Eylandt 7

Haasts Bluff* 6 9

Helen Springs* 68

Hermannsburg * 6 6

Jabiru 8

Jim Jim* 6 9

Kalkaringi* 5 7

Katherine 7

Kings Canyon Resort* 6 9 Kulgera* 6 9

Mataranka 8

Newcastle Waters 8

Nhulunbuy 1 1

Numbulwar* 6 9

Peppimenarti* 6 9

Pine Creek 10

Port Keats* 6 9

Pularumpi* 6 9

Robinson River* 5 9

Santa Teresa* 6 8

South Alligator* 6 5

Tennant Creek 9

Ti Tree* 6 7

Urapunga* 68

W arrego 10

W arruwi * 6 9

W ave Hill* 68

Yirrkala* 9

Yulara* 6 7

Total Television Transmitters: 531

* SBRS — The Australian Broadcasting Authority has issued a licence to rebroadcast the ABC service indicated under the Self-help Broadcasting Reception Scheme. Transmission facilities are provided by the licensee (not the National Transmission Agency).

125

Appendix 11

Radio Transmitters

Metropolitan Radio Adelaide 5 A N 891

Brisbane 4QR 6 1 2

Canberra 2 C N 6 6 6

Darwin 8DDD 1 0 5 .7

Hobart 7ZR 9 3 6

Melbourne 3 1 0 7 7 4

Newcastle 2 N C 1233

Perth 6W F 7 2 0

Sydney 2BL 7 0 2

Regional Radio New South Wales Armidale 2 N W R A 1 01 .9

Batemans Bay 2 B A /T 103.5

Bega 2BA 8 1 0

Bomba la 2 Î’ Α Λ 94.1

Broken Hill 2N B 9 9 9

By rock 2BY 6 5 7

Cobar 2ABC RR 106.1

Coffs Harbour 2MRR 9 2 .3

Cooma 2CP 1602

Corow a 2 C O 6 7 5

Dubbo 2WPR 107.1

Eden 2B A /T 1 06 3

Glen Innes 2GL 8 1 9

Gloucester 2MRR/T 100 9

G oodooga 2ABC RR 9 9 3

Grafton 2NR 7 3 8

Griffith 2RVR 100.5

Hay 2RVR/T 88.1

Ivanhoe 2ABC RR 106.1

Jindabyne 2C P /T 9 5 5

Kempsey 2KP 6 8 4

Khancoban 2ABC RR 8 9 .7 *

Lightning Ridge 2ABC RR 92.1 Lithgow 2LG 1395

Lismore 2NN R 9 4 .5

Menindee 2ABC RR 9 1 .7

M erriwa 2HVR/T 101 9

M udgee 2W PR/T 9 9 .5

Murrurundi 2HVR/T 102.5

Murwillumbah 2ML 7 2 0

Muswellbrook 2UH 1044

Nyngan 2ABCRR 95.1

Orange 2CR 5 4 9

Portland 2CR /T 94.1

Riverina 2RVR 1 01 .9

Upper Hunter 2HVR 1 05 .7

Talbingo 2ABC RR 8 9 .7 *

Tamworth 2N D 6 4 8

Taree 2TR 7 5 6

Taree 2MRR/T 9 5 .5

Thredbo 2ABC RR 8 8 .9

Tottenham 2ABC RR 9 9 .3

Tumbarumba 2RVRA 9 2 .5 *

Upper Namoi 2NW R 99.1

W a g g a W agga 2RVRA 9 0 .3

W alcha 2 N W R A 8 8 .5

W algett 2ABC RR 105 9

W ilcannia 2 W A 1584

W ollongong 2ILA 9 7 3

Young 2RVRA 9 6 .3

Victoria Albury 3MRR 106.5

Ballarat 3CRRA 107 9

Bendigo 3CRR 91.1

Bright 3MRRA 8 9 .7

Conn River 3 G IR A 106.1

Corryong 3MRR/R 9 9 .7

Goulburn Valley 3GVR 9 7 7

Hamilton 3 S W R A 9 0 9

Horsham 3VW 5 9 4

Latrobe Valley 3GIR 1 0 0 .7

M allacoota 3GLR 104 9

Mansfield 3GVR/T 103.7

Mildura 3MIL 104.3

Myrtleford 3MRRA 9 1 .7

Omeo 3MT 7 2 0

Orbost 3GLRA 97.1

Portland 35WR 9 6 9

Sale 3GI 8 28

Swan Hill 3 M IIA 102.1

W arrnambool 3WL 1602

Queensland Airlie Beach 4QAA 8 9 9

Alpha 4 Q D A 1 05 .7

Atherton 4AT 7 2 0

Bedourie 4ABC RR 106.1

Birdsville 4ABCRR 106.1

Boulia 4ABC RR 106.1

Burdekin Falls 4ABCRR 107.5

Cairns 4Q C C 1 06 .7

Cairns 4QY 801

C a mooweal 4 ABC RR 106.1

Charleville 4CH 6 0 3

Chillagoe 4ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 ’

Coen 4ABC RR 105.9

Collinsville 4ABC RR 106.1

Cooktown 4 Q C C A 1 05 .7

Croydon 4ABC RR 105.9

Cunnamulla 4 C H A 106.1

Dimbulah 4 Q C C A 9 1 .7

Doomadgee 4ABC RR 9 7 .5 *

Dysart 4 Q A A A 9 1 .7

Eidsvold 4 Q O 8 55

Emerald 4QD 1548

Georgetown 4ABC RR 106.1

Gladstone 4R K A 9 9 1

G old Coast 4GCR 9 1 .7

Goonyella 4ABC RR 8 9 7 *

Greenvale 4ABCRR 1 0 5 9

Gunpowder 4ABC RR 1 06 1*

Gununa 4ABCRR 9 2 7 *

Gympie 4G M 1566

Hope Island Res. 4 G C R A 9 1 .7 *

Hughenden 4HU 1485

Injune 4ABCRR 105.9

Jackson O il 4ABC RR 1 0 7 .7 *

Julia Creek 4JK 5 6 7

Karumba 4 ABC RR 106.1

Kowanyama 4ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Laura 4ABC RR 106.1

Lockhart River 4 ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Long reach 4QL 5 4 0

M a c kay 4Q AA 101.1

Maryborough 4QB 8 5 5

Mitchell 4 Q W A 106.1

Moranbah 4 Q A A A 104 9

Mossman 4MS 6 3 9

Mount Isa 4MI 1080

Nambour 4SCR 9 0 .3

Normanfon 4 ABC RR 1 05 .7

Pentland 4ABC RR 1 06 1

Q uilpie Red Dome Mine Rockhampton Roma St George

Tambo Toroom Thargomindah Theodore

Pormpuroow 4ABCRR 1 0 6 .1 *

4ABCRR 1 06 1

4ABCRR 1 0 5 .7 *

4RK 8 3 7

4ABCRR 1 05 .7

4 Q W 711

4ABCRR 1 05 .9 4 ABC RR 4ABC RR 4 ABC RR

1 06 1 1 06 1*

1 05 .9

Thursday Is 4TI1 1062

Toowoomba 4QSi 7 4 7

Townsville 4 Q N 6 3 0

W andoan 4ABC RR 9 8 1

W arw ick 4 Q S A 104.9

W e i pa 4W P 1044

South Australia Andamooka 5 ABC RR 105 9

Coober Pedy 5 ABC RR 106.1

Cook 5ABC RR 1 0 7 .7 *

Glendambo 5 ABC RR 106 1*

Leigh Creek Sth 51C 1602

Lyndhurst 5 ABC RR 88 7 *

M arla 5 ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

M arree 5 ABC RR 1 05 .7

M intabie 5 ABC RR 8 8 .7 *

Moomba 5 ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

M t Gombier 5 M G 1584

Naracoorte 5PA 1161

Oodnadafto 5 ABC RR 9 5 3 *

Port Lincoln 5LN 1485

Port Pirie 5CK 6 3 9

Renmark 5M V 1305

Roxby Downs 5ABC RR 1 02 .7

Streaky Boy 5SY 6 9 3

W oomera 5 W M 1584

Yalata 5ABC RR 1 0 5 .9 *

Western Australia Albany 6AL 6 3 0

Argyle 6 K W A 1 0 5 .9

Augusta 6ABC RR 9 8 .3

Blackstone 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Bow River Mine 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .3 *

Bridgetown 6BR 1044

Broome 6BE 6 7 5

Busselton 6BS 6 8 4

Carnarvon 6C A 8 4 6

Cue 6ABC RR 106.1

Dalwallinu 6DL 531

Da riot 6ABC RR 1 0 5 .9 *

Derby 6DB 8 73

Esperance 6ED 8 3 7

Exmouth 6XM 1188

Fitzroy Crossing 6ABC RR 106.1 Geraldton 6 G N 8 28

Golden Grove 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .3 *

Goldsworthy 6ABC RR 107 3 *

Halls Creek 6ABC RR 106.1

Jamieson 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Kalbarri 6ABC RR 106 1

Kalgoorlie 6GF 6 4 8

Karra tha 6KP 7 0 2

Koolan Is 6ABC RR 106.1

Kununurra 6 K W 7 5 6

Laverton 6ABC RR 106 1

Leinster 6ABC RR 106 1*

Leonora 6ABC RR 105 7

Manjimup 6MJ ;738

M arble Bar 6ABC RR 1 0 5 9

Meekatharra 6ABC RR 106 3

126

Appendices

Menzies 6ABC RR 106.1

M t M agnet 6ABC RR 105.7

M t W haleback 6ABC RR 1 0 5 .7 *

Nannup 6ABC RR 98.1

Newman 6 M N 5 6 7

Norseman 6ABC RR 105.7

Northam 6ΝΛΛ 1215

Nullagine 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .3 *

Pannawonica 6PN 5 6 7

Paraburdoo 6PU 5 6 7

Port Hedland 6PH 6 0 3

Ravensthorpe 6ABC RR 105.9

Shay G ap 6ABC RR 1 0 7 .9 *

Southern Cross 6ABC RR 106.3 Tjirrkarli 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Tom Price M ine 6ABC RR 9 9 .3 *

Tom Price Town OTP 5 6 7

Warakurna 6ABC RR 1 0 1 .9 *

Warburton 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

W agin 6 W A 558

W iluna 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Wyndham 6 W H 1017

Yaigoo 6ABC RR 106.1

Yandicoogina 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Yiyili 6ABC RR 1 0 6 .1 *

Tasmania Bicheno 7 N T /T 8 9 .7

Burnie 7 N T /T 102.5

East Devenport 7 N T /T 100.5

Fingal 7FG 1161

Launceston 7N T 711

Lileah 7 N T /T 9 1 .3

Queenstown 7 Q N 6 3 0

Rosebery 7 Q N /T 106.3

Savage River 7 Q N /T 104.1

St Helens 7 Ν Τ Λ 96.1

St Marys 7 Ν Τ Λ 102.7

Strahan 7 Q N A 107.9

W aratah 7 N T /T 103.3

Zeehan 7 Q N /T 104.7

Northern Territory Adelaide River 8ABC RR 9 8 .9

Alice Springs 8AL 7 83

Bathurst Island 8ABC RR 9 1 .3

Borroloola 8ABC RR 106.1

Daly River 8ABC RR 106.1

Galiwinku 8ABC RR 105.9

Groote Eylandt 8ABC RR 106.1

Haasts Bluff 8ABC RR 1 0 5 .9 *

Jab'ru 8JB 7 4 7

Jim Jim Rgr Stn 8ABC RR 1 0 5 .9 *

Katherine 8ABC RR 106.1

Kings Canyon 8ABC RR 8 9 .1 *

Mataranka 8ABC RR 106.1

Nabarlek 8ABC RR 1 0 7 .0 *

Newcastle Waters 8ABC RR 106.1 Ngukurr 8ABC RR 1 0 4 .5 *

Nhulunbuy 8 G O 9 9 0

Pine Creek 8ABC RR 106.1

South Alligator 8ABC RR 8 8 .9 *

Tennant Creek 8ABC RR 106.1

Ti Tree 8ABC RR 1 0 7 .7 *

Yulara 8ABC RR 9 9 7 *

Radio National Metropolitan Adelaide 5RN 7 2 9

Brisbane 4RN 7 92

Canberra 2RN 8 46

Darwin 8RN 6 5 7

Hobart 7RN 5 8 5

Melbourne 3RN 621

Newcastle 2RN 1512

Perth 6RN 8 1 0

Sydney 2RN 5 7 6

New South Wales Armidale 2 A N 7 2 0

Batemans Bay 2ABC RN 105.1

Bathurst 2ABC RN 9 6 7

Bega 2ABC RN 100.9

Bonalbo 2ABC RN 92.1

Broken Hill 2ABC RN 102.9

Caffs Harbour 2ABC RN 9 9 .5

Cooma 2ABC RN 9 5 .3

Deniliquin 2ABC RN 9 9 .3

Dubbo 2ABC RN 107.9

Eden 2ABC RN 107.9

Emmaville 2ABC RN 93.1

Gloucester 2ABC RN 102.5

G oodooga 2ABC RN 100.9

Goulburn 2RN 1098

Griffith 2ABC RN 9 8 .9

Ivanhoe 2 ABC RN 107.7

Jerilderie 2ABC RN 94.1

Jindabyne 2ABC RN 97.1

Khancoban 2ABC RN 9 1 .3 *

Lightning Ridge 2ABC RN 9 3 .7

Lismore 2ABC RN 9 6 .9

Lithgow 2ABC RN 92.1

Menindee 2ABC RN 90.1

Merriwa 2ABC RN 103.5

Murrurundi 2ABC RN 104.1

Nowra 2RN 6 0 3

Orange 2ABC RN 104.3

Portland 2ABC RN 9 2 .5

Riverina 2ABC RN 101.1

Tolbingo 2ABC RN 91 3 *

Tam worth 2ABC RN 104.7

Taree 2ABC RN 97.1

Thredbo 2ABC RN 9 0 .5

Upper Namoi 2ABC RN 100.7

W agga W a g g a 2ABC RN 9 4 3

W alcha 2ABC RN 90.1

W algett 2ABC RN 107.5

W ilcannia 2RN 1485

W ollongong 2RN 1431

Victoria A lbury/W odonga 3RN 9 9 0

Bairnsdale 3GLR 106.3

Conn River 3ABC RN 107.7

Corryong 3ABC RN 98.1

Mallacoota 3ABC RN 103.3

Mansfield 3ABC RN 105.3

Mildura 3ABC RN 105.9

Omeo 3 ABC RN 9 9 .7

Orbost 3ABC RN 9 8 .7

Portland 3ABC RN 9 8 .5

Swifts Creek 3ABC RN 103.5

W angaratta 3RN 7 5 6

W armambool 3SWR 101.7

Queensland Airlie Beach 4ABC RN 93.1

Alpha 4ABC RN 107.3

Aramac 4ABC RN 107.9

Augathella 4ABC RN 107.7

Barcaldine 4ABC RN 107.3

Bedourie 4ABC RN 107.7

Birdsville 4ABC RN 107.7

Blackall 4ABC RN 107.9

Blackwater 4ABC RN 9 4.3

Boulia 4ABC RN 107.7

Cairns 4ABC RN 105.1

Camooweal 4ABC RN 107 7

Capella 4ABC RN 107.3

Charleville 4ABC RN 107.3

Charters Towers 4ABC RN 97.5 Clermont 4ABC RN 107.7

Cloncurry 4ABC RN 107.7

Coen 4ABC RN 107.5

Collinsville 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Cooktown 4ABC RN 107.3

Corfield 4ABC RN 107.3

Croydon 4ABC RN 107.5

Cunnamulla 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Dimbulah 4ABC RN 9 3 .3

Dirranbandi 4ABC RN 107.3

Dysart 4ABC RN 9 3 .3

Emerald 4ABC RN 9 3 9

Georgetown 4ABC RN 107.7

Gladstone 4ABC RN 9 5 .9

G old Coast 4ABC RN 90.1

Goondiwindi 4ABC RN 9 4 .3

Greenvale 4ABC RN 101.9

Gunpowder 4ABC RN 107 7 *

Herberton 4 ABC RN 93.1

Hughenden 4ABC RN 107.5

Injune 4ABC RN 107.5

Isisford 4ABC RN 107.7

Jericho 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Julia Creek 4ABC RN 107.5

Karumba 4ABC RN 107 7

Laura 4ABC RN 107.7

Longreach 4ABC RN 99.1

M ackay 4ABC RN 102.7

Meandarra 4ABC RN 104.3

Miles 4ABC RN 92.1

Mitchell 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Monto 4ABC RN 101.9

M oranbah 4ABC RN 106.5

Morven 4ABC RN 107.5

Mossman 4ABC RN 90.1

M t Isa 4ABC RN 107.3

Muttaburra 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Nonda 4ABC RN 1 0 0 .9 *

Normanton 4ABC RN 107.3

Pentland 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Quilpie 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Richmond 4ABC RN 107.7

Rockhampton 4ABC RN 103.1

Roma 4ABC RN 107.3

Springsure 4ABC RN 100.9

St George 4ABC RN 1 07 .7

Surat 4ABC RN 107.5

Tambo 4ABC RN 107.5

Taroom 4ABC RN 107.7

Theodore 4ABC RN 107.5

Thursday Is 4ABC RN 107.7

Toowoomba 4ABC RN 105.7

Townsville 4ABC RN 1 04 .7

W andoan 4ABC RN 9 8 .9

W arw ick 4ABC RN 106.5

W e i pa 4ABC RN 107.3

W id e Bay 4ABC RN 104.1

Winton 4A8C RN 107.9

South Australia Andamooka 5ABC RN 107.5

Ceduna 5ABC RN 1 07 .7

Coober Pedy 5 ABC RN 107.7

Hawker 5ABC RN 107.5

Keith 5ABC RN 9 6 .9

Leigh Creek Sth 5ABC RN 106.1

127

Marree 5ABC RN 1 07 .3

Port Pirie 5ABC RN 106.7

Quorn 5ABC RN 1 07 .9

Roxby Downs 5 ABC RN 1 01 .9

Streaky Bay 5 ABC RN 1 00 .9

Tumby Bay 5 ABC RN 1 01 .9

W irrula 5ABC RN 107.3

W oom era 5 ABC RN 105 7

W udinna 5ABC RN 1 07 7

Western Australia Argyle 6ABC RN 1 0 7 5

Augusta 6ABC RN 99.1

Broome 6ABC RN 107 7

Carnarvon 6ABC RN 1 07 .7

Cue 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Dalwallinu 6ABC RN 6 1 2

Dampier 6ABC RN 107.9

Denham 6ABC RN 107.5

Derby 6ABC RN 107.5

Eneabba 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Esperance 6ABC RN 106 3

Exmouth 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Fitzroy Crossing 6ABC RN 1 07 .7 Geraldton 6ABC RN 9 9 .7

Goldsworthy 6ABC RN 105 7 *

Halls Creek 6ABC RN 1 07 .7

Jurien Bay 6ABC RN 1 07 .9

Kalbarri 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Kalgoorlie 6ABC RN 97.1

Karratha 6ABC RN 1 00 .9

Koolan Is 6ABC RN 1 0 7 7

Kununurra 6ABC RN 107.3

Laverton 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Leeman 6ABC RN 107.3

Leinster 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7 *

Leonora 6ABC RN 107.3

M arble Bar 6ABC RN 107.5

M ee katharra 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .9

Menzies 6ABC RN 1 07 .7

Merredin 6ABC RN 107.3

M t M agnet 6ABC RN 1 07 3

M t W haleback 6ABC RN 104.1 *

Nannup 6ABC RN 9 8 .9

Newman 6ABC RN 9 3 7

Norseman 6ABC RN 107.3

Onslow 6ABC RN 107.5

Pannawonica 6ABC RN 1 07 .7

Paraburdoo 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Pt Hedland 6ABC RN 9 5 .7

Ravensthorpe 6ABC RN 107.5

Roe bourne 6ABC RN 107.5

Salmon Gums 6ABC RN 1 00 .7

Shay G a p 6ABC RN 1 0 6 .3 *

Southern Cross 6ABC RN 107 9

Tom Price 6ABC RN 107.3

W yndham 6ABC RN 1 07 7

Yalgoo 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Yandicoogina 6ABC RN 1 0 7 .7 *

Tasmania Bicheno 7ABC RN 9 1 .3

Li lea h 7ABC RN 8 9 .7

St Helens 7SH 1584

St Marys 7ABC RN 101.1

W aratah 7ABC RN 1 04 .9

Northern Territory Adelaide River 8ABC RN 100.5

Alice Springs 8ABC RN '9 9 .7

Bathurst Island 8ABC RN < 9 2.9 Borroloola 8 ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Daly River 8ABC RN 1 0 7 .7

Galiwinku 8ABC RN 107 5 Western Australia

Groote Eylandf 8ABC RN 107.7 Albany 6ABC FM 9 4 .5

Jabiru 8ABC RN 107 7 Bunbury 6ABC FM 9 3 .3

Kalkaringi 8ABC RN 1 0 7 .7 * Esperance 6ABC FM 104.7

Katherine 8RN 6 3 9 Geraldton 6ABC FM 9 4 9

Mataranka 8ABC RN 107 7 Kalgoorlie 6ABC FM 9 5 .5

Newcastle W aters 8ABC RN 1 07 .7 Koolan Is 6ABC FM 104.5

Ngukurr 8ABC RN 1 0 7 .7 * Leinster 6ABC FM 1 0 4 .5 ’

Nhulunbuy 8 ABC RN 107 7 M awson 6ABC FM 9 8 9

Pine Creek 8ABC RN 1 07 .7 Perth 6ABC FM 9 7 7

South Alligator 8ABC RN 8 8 .1 *

Tasmania

Tennant Creek 8RN 6 8 4

Hobart 7ABC FM 9 3 9

Urapunga 8ABC RN 1 0 7 .5 * Launceston 7ABC FM 9 3 3

ABC Classic FM New South Wales & Australian Capital Territory Armidale 2ABC FM 103.5

Bega 2ABC FM 9 9 3

Broken Hill 2A B C F M 103 7

Canberra 2ABC FM 102.3

Coffs Harbour 2ABC FM 9 7 9

Dubbo 2 ABC FM 105 5

Griffith 2ABC FM 9 7 .3

Khancoban 2ABC FM 8 8 .1 *

Lismore 2 ABC FM 9 5 .3

Newcastle 2ABC FM 106.1

Orange 2ABC FM 1 02 .7

S W Slopes 2ABC FM 105.7

Sydney 2ABC FM 9 2 .9

Talbingo 2ABC FM 8 8 1 *

Tamworth 2ABC FM 103.1

Taree 2ABC FM 9 8 7

Upper Nam oi 2ABC FM 9 6 .7

W a g g a W a g g a 2 ABC FM 8 8 .7

W ollongong 2ABC FM 9 5 .7

Victoria Albury 3 ABC FM 104.1

Ballarat 3 ABC FM 105.5

Bendigo 3ABC FM 9 2 .7

Bright 3ABC FM 88.1

Goulburn Valley 3ABC FM 96.1 Hamilton 3ABC FM 9 2 .5

Latrobe Valley 3 ABC FM 101.5

Melbourne 3 ABC FM 1 05 .9

Mildura 3ABC FM 1 0 2 7

Swan Hill 3 ABC FM 1 03 .7

Queensland Airlie Beach 4ABC FM 9 5 .5

Brisbane 4ABC FM 106.1

Cairns 4ABC FM 105.9

Clermont 4ABC FM 104.5

G old Coast 4ABC FM 8 8.5

M ackay 4ABC FM 9 7 .9

Maryborough 4ABC FM 9 2 .5

M t Isa 4ABC FM 1 01 .7

Nambour 4ABC FM 88 7

Rockhampton 4ABC FM 106 3

Toowoomba 4ABC FM 107.3

Townsville 4ABC FM 101.5

W arw ick 4ABC FM 101.7

South Australia Adelaide 5 ABC FM 1 03 .9

Adelaide Foothills 5 ABC FM 9 7 .5 M t Gambier 5ABC FM 104.1

Port Pirie 5ABC FM 104.3

Renmark 5ABC FM 105.1

Roxby Downs 5 ABC FM 103.5

W oom era 5 ABC FM 103.3

Northern Territory Alice Springs 8ABC FM 9 7 .9

Darwin 8ABC FM 107.3

Triple J Adelaide 5J1IFM 105.5

Adelaide Foothills 5J1) FM 9 5 .9 Brisbane 4JU FM 1 07 .7

Canberra 2UJ FM 101.5

Darwin 8JU FM 103.3

Hobart 7)11 FM 9 2 .9

Melbourne 3JU FM 107.5

Newcastle 21U FM 102.1

Perth 6JU FM 9 9 3

Sydney 2JU FM 1 05 .7

Parliamentary Broadcasting Network Adelaide 5PB 9 7 2

Brisbane 4PB 9 3 6

Canberra 2PB 1440

Hobart 7PB 7 2 9

Melbourne 3PB 102 6

Newcastle 2PB 1458

Perth 6PB 5 8 5

Sydney 2PB 6 3 0

Community Facilities' Queensland Aurukun 1 07 7

Badu Is 107.5

Bamaga 1 06 7

Boigu Island 106.1

Coconut Island 1 05 .7

Darn ley Island 106.1

Dauan Island 1 05 .7

Doomadgee 1 07 .7

Gununa 1 0 7 .7

Hope Vale 1 0 7 .7

Injinoo 107.1

Kowanyama 107.7

Kubin Island 105.9

Lockhart River 107 7

M abuiag 106.3

M urray Island 106.1

N e w M apoon 107.5

Pormpuraaw 107.7

Saibai Island 106.1

Seisia 106 3

St Pauls Island 1 06 ,7

Stephens Island 105.9

Sue Island 1 05 .9

Umagico 105 9

W oorabinda 106.1

W u jal W ujal 107.7

Yam Island 106.1

128

Appendices

Yorke Island 106.1

South Australia Amato 106.1

Ernabella 106.1

Fregon 106.1

Indulkana 106.1

Western Australia Balgo 106.1

Beagle Bay 106.1

Djarindjin 106.1

Jigalong 106.1

Kalumburu 106.1

Kiwirrkurra 1 06.1

lagrange 106.1

Looma 106.1

Oombulgurri 106.1

Tjukurla 106 1

W armun 106.1

W ingellina 106.1

Yandeyarra 106.1

Yungngora 106.1

Northern Territory Ali-Curung 1 06.1

Barunga 106.1

Beswick 105.7

Bulman 106.1

Daguragu 106.1

Finke 106.1

Galiwinku 106.7

Hermannsburg 106.1

Imanpa 106.1

Kintore 106.1

Lajamanu 106.1

M aningrida 106.1

M ilikapiti 9 9 .3

M ilingim bi 106.1

M injilang 106.1

Nguiu 9 8 .9

Ngukurr 106.1

Nturiya 105.9

Numbulwar 106.1

Oenpelli 106.1

Palumpa 106.1

ABC Radio — Network Analysis

Radio National 20

M etropolitan Radio 8

Regional Radio 73

ABC Classic FM -

Triple J -

Parliamentary Radio 8

Shortwave Radio 3

Total ABC Τ Ϊ 2

Community Facilities -

Grand Total 112

Papunya 106.1

Peppimenarti 106.1

Pmara Jutunta 106.1

Pularumpi 9 8 .5

Ramingining 105.7

Santa Teresa 106.1

Umbakumba 106.3

W adeye 106.1

W arruwi 106.1

W illow ra 106.1

Yirrkala 105.3

Yuelamu 105.9

Yuendumu 106.1

Domestic Shortwave Alice Springs VL8A 2 3 1 0

3 2 3 0 4 8 3 5

Katherine VL8K 248 5

3 3 7 0 5 0 2 5

Tennant Creek VL8T 2 3 2 5

3 3 1 5 4 9 1 0

The frequencies on which shortwave stations transmit are varied as required to obtain optimum results.

Notes *SBRS — The Australian Broadcasting Authority has issued a licence to rebroadcast the ABC service indicated under the Self-help Broadcasting

Reception Scheme. Transmission facilities are provided by the licencee (not the National Transmission Agency). tCommunity Facilities — Formerly known as Broadcasting for Remote Aboriginal Communities Scheme (BRACS). Communities with such facilities have a transmitter which allows rebroadcasting of either Regional Radio, Radio National, ABC Classic FM or broadcasting of local

programming.

Transmitters

FM Total

201 221

1 9

175 248

6 2 6 2

10 10

- 8

- 3

4 4 9 561

8 0 80

529 641

Appendix 12

Radio Australia Transmitters

Carnarvon 3

Darwin 3

Shepparton 6

Townsville 2

Total 14

Note Unless otherwise stated transmitters for Television, Radio and Radio Australia are owned and operated by the National Transmission Agency. The value of these services is shown in the Financial Statements.

Appendix 13

Consultants

Expenditure on consultants in 1 9 9 3 -9 4

was $ 1 9 5 6 8 55 , a decrease of $ 2 7 8 1 2 9 on the previous year.

Divisional breakdown is:

• Radio $481 197

• Television $ 5 5 9 3 0 7

• Concerts $ 1 9 6 991

• Radio Australia $ 123 6 0 4

• Enterprises $ 1 2 0 0 0

• Corporate $ 5 8 3 7 5 6

Appendix 14

Ministerial Powers

Under section 7 8 of the ABC Act the Minister responsible for the ABC has the power to require the ABC to broadcast

any particular matter if the Minister believes it to be in the national interest. Such direction must be in writing, must be tabled in both Houses of Parliament within seven sitting days, and must be included in the ABC's Annual Report. N o such directions were received during the year. Section 78(6) states 'Except as provided by this section, or as expressly provided by a provision of another Act, the Corporation is not subject to direction by or on behalf of the Government of the Commonwealth'.

129

Appendix 15

Reports on Particular Matters

Under section 8 0 of the ABC Act, the Corporation is required to report upon a number of particular matters.

• Directions from the Minister relating to broadcasts pursuant to section 7 8 or other than under the Act. — There were no directions from the Minister.

Φ Gifts or Donations within the meaning of section 80(f) of the Act — The Corporation received gifts totalling $ 3 2 8 .7 0 .

• Advice received by the ABC Board from the NAC is detailed in Appendix 9.

• A summary of action taken os o result of complaints to the ABC under section 82 of the Act is detailed on pages 8 3 -8 4 .

In January, section 8 2 was repealed.

Appendix 16

Advertising and M arket Research

Expenditure on market research organisations and advertising agencies for 1 9 9 3 -9 4 was $ 4 901 0 2 0 . The Corporation utilises advertising agencies and market research organisations predominately to promote Symphony Orchestra concerts and television programming.

Advertising $3 4 8 9 7 6 2

Market Research $1 3 7 5 5 3 6

Direct M a il $ 3 5 7 2 2

Appendix 17

Social Justice Overview

The ABC's social justice initiatives and evaluation procedures accord with the Department of Communications Access and Equity strategy.

Much of the ABCs output contributes indirectly to the Commonwealth's access and equity strategy through the fulfilment of the Corporation's Charter obligations. Specifically the ABC Act obliges the Corporation to:

• contribute to a sense of national identity; • reflect the cultural diversity of the Australian community; • take into account the multicultural

character of the Australian community.

Programs and services which fulfil these charter functions are not practicably distinguishable from access and equity activities and are dealt with in various

sections of this report. W hile these functions account for significant expenditure, they are not accounted for separately.

The ABC has developed an Equal Employment Opportunity management plan that seeks to hove ABC staff reflect the cultural diversity of the Australian population, with particular emphasis on increasing the numbers of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders and people of non- English speaking background. There are recruitment and training campaigns to increase the number of women in senior management positions across the Corporation, in editorial positions in News and Current Affairs and in non- fraditional areas, (see page 68)

Appendix 18

Audit Subcommittee

The following is a summary of the

activities of the Audit Subcommittee during

1 9 9 3 -9 4 .

Background In November 1992 the Board received a paper which recommended that on annual report of Audit Subcommittee activities would be prepared and presented to the Board for inclusion in the annual report.

The subcommittee is responsible for matters relating to the finance and audit requirements of the Corporation. It receives reports about internal and external audit, fraud control and finance matters. The subcommittee has a key role in decisions about financial and audit strategy and monitors progress in these

1993-94 Meetings The Subcommittee met four times in 1 9 9 3 -9 4 .

Meeting N o. 3 Meeting N o. 4 Meeting N o. 1 Meeting N o. 2

13 July 1993 5 October 1993 1 February 1994 19 April 1994

The Subcommittee's members were: M ark Armstrong Chair

David Hill M anaging Director

M ichael Terlet Director

Janine W alker Director

Peter Lidbetter, Deputy Managing Director, attended all meetings as d id the M anager, Efficiency Review and Audit (Ross Smith 1 3 July 1993, Peter Bell all others). Other Directors attended meetings from time to time.

Strategic Audit Plan The Subcommittee monitored progress in meeting the objectives of the Strategic Audit Plan and received reports on the implementation of the plan each meeting.

Financial Compliance Audits and Efficiency Reviews The Efficiency Review and Audit Unit (ERA) has a small team of specialist staff w ho undertake efficiency reviews of the organisation The Subcommittee noted that Efficiency Reviews have been undertaken on the following activities during 1 9 9 3 -9 4 Southbonk July 1993

Energy Management July 1993

Sick Leave August 1993

Queensland Branch Sepr 1993

3LO Sept 1993

Concert Music Admin O ct 1993

Security — Gore Hill N ov 1993

South Australia Branch April 1994 Tender Handling and Evaluation April 1994

Staff Numbers June 1994

Stationery Contract June 1994

The reviews identified potential savings of $ 3 7 0 0 0 0 through recommendations agreed with management. The Subcommittee monitored the implementation of these recommendations.

In addition, the Subcommittee discussed and noted progress in meeting the compliance audit schedule. The achievement of the compliance audit program was contracted to Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu which did not report any matters of significance for the attention of the Subcommittee during

1 9 9 3 -9 4 .

Reports completed by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu during the year were as follows: Accts Payable-TV February 1994

Accts Payable-Radio April 1994

Payroll-Radio and TV June 1994

Sales and Debtors-TV June 1994

Cash Imprests-Radio June 1994

Australian National Audit Office The external audit is carried out by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). The Subcommittee monitored and reviewed correspondence from the A N A O in relation to financial and performance audits. It also met with senior officers of the A N A O .

The A N A O again gave an unqualified opinion on the financial statements of the Corporation. It reported also that the

matters arising from the 1 9 9 2 -9 3 audit had been satisfactorily dealt with by the ABC.

130

Appendices

Appendix 19

ABC Offices

ABC Head Office Australian Broadcasting Corporation ABC Ultimo Centre, 7 0 0 Harris Street, Ultimo, 2 0 0 7 ; G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2 00 1 ; Phone (02) 333 1500; Fax (02) 3 3 3 5 305, M anaging Director: David Hill ABC Radio ABC Ultimo Centre, 7 0 0 Harris Street, Ultimo, 2 0 0 7 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2 0 0 1 ;

Phone (02) 3 3 3 1500; Fax (02) 3 3 3 2603; Director Radio: Peter Loxton M anager N S W : Kate Miller ABC Television: 221 Pacific Highway, G ore Hill 2 0 6 5 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2 00 1 ; Phone (02) 4 3 7 8000; Fax (02) 9 5 0 3055; Director Television: Paddy Conroy M anager N S W : Sue Chappie Enterprises John Mellion Building,

10 a Campbell Street, Artarmon N S W 2 065; G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2001 ; Phone (02) 9 5 0 3999; Fax (02) 9 5 0 3867; General Manager: Julie Steiner ABC Concerts ABC Ultimo Centre, 7 0 0 Harris Street, Ultimo 2 0 0 7 ; G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2 0 0 1 ; Phone (02) 3 3 3 1500; Fax (Q2) 3 3 3 1678; Director of Music: Nathan W aks

New South Wales Sydney Symphony Orchestra ABC Ultimo Centre, 7 0 0 Harris Street, Ultimo 2 0 0 7 ; G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Sydney N S W 2 00 1 ;

Phone |02) 3 33 1500; Fax (02) 3 3 3 1601 General Manager: M ary Vallentine Albury-Wodonga: (administered by the Victorian Branch) see Victoria

Bega: Auckland Chambers, Auckland St; PO Box 3 36 , Bega N S W 2 5 5 0 ; Phone (064) 9 2 1900.

Fax (064| 9 2 3163 Broken Hill: (administered by SA Branch) see South Australia Dubbo: 4 5 W ingewarra Street; PO Box 9 8 5 , Dubbo N S W 2 83 0 ; Phone (068) 84 1518; Fax (068) 8 4 1051 Grafton: 5 0 Victoria Street;

PO Box 4 3 5 , Grafton N S W 2 46 0 ; Phone (066) 4 2 2 977; Fax (066) 4 2 7701 Lismore; 61 High Street, Lismore Heights; PO Box 9 0 8 , Lismore N S W 2 48 0 ; Phone (066) 25 1188; Fax (066) 25 1073

Mid North Coast 18 Kemp Street, W est Kempsey; PO Box 7 6, W est Kempsey N S W 2 4 4 0 ; Phone (065) 6 2 6 3 8 8 ;

Fax (065) 6 2 8 4 1 3 Muswellbrook: Market Street, Muswellbrook N S W 2 3 3 3

Phone (065) 4 3 4 6 9 5 ; Fax (065) 4 3 4651 Newcastle: Cnr W o o d and Parry Streets, Newcastle West, 2 3 0 2 ; PO Box 2 2 0 5 , Danger N S W 2 3 0 9 ; Phone (049) 2 2 1 200; Fax (049) 2 2 1222 Nowro: 5 9 A Kinghorn Street; PO Box 1 071, N ow ra 2 5 4 1 ; Phone (044) 2 3 2 2 7 7 ; Fax (044) 23 2 5 2 7 Orange 29 Sale Street; PO Box 8 63 , O range N S W 2 8 0 0 ; Phone (063) 6 2 1033, Fax (063) 61 3 0 6 2 Tamworth Parry Shire Building, 4 7 0 Peel Street; PO Box 5 5 8 , Tamworth N S W 2 34 0 ; Phone (067) 6 6 5611 ; Fax (067) 6 6 6131 Wagga Wagga 1 00 Fitzmaurice Street

POBox 1019, W agga W a g g a N S W 2 6 5 0 ; Phone (069) 21 3 7 3 4 ;

Fax (069) 21 1716 Wollongong: Unit 6 -7 /7 4 , Kembla St W ollongong, N S W 2 5 0 0 PO Box 9 7 3 , W ollongong East N S W 2 5 2 0 ;

Phone (042) 28 0 0 3 3 ; Fax (042) 2 9 2 9 5 2

Australian Capital Territory Canberra Cnr Norfhbourne and W akefield Avenues, Dickson; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Canberra ACT 2601 ;

Phone (06) 2 7 5 4 5 5 5 ; Fax (06) 2 7 5 4601 General M anager: Philip Koch Parliament House Bureau

Rhone (06) 2 7 5 4 6 4 0 ; Fax (06) 2 7 5 4641

Victoria Radio ABC South bank Centre, South bank Boulevarde, South Melbourne, Vic 3 2 0 5 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Melbourne, Vic 3001; Phone (03) 6 2 6 1600; Fax (03) 6 2 6 1601 Manager: M urray Green Television: 8 Gordon Street, Elsternwick, Vic, 3 18 5 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Melbourne, 3 00 1 ; Phone (03) 5 2 8 4 4 4 4 ,

Fax (03) 5 2 4 2 5 0 4 Manager: Robbie Weekes Radio Australia: ABC Southbank Centre, South bank Boulevarde, South Melbourne, Vic 3 2 0 5 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Melbourne, Vic 3 001;

Phone (03) 6 2 6 1 800; Fax (03) 6 2 6 1899; General Manager: Derek W hite

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra: ABC Southbank Centre, Southbank Boulevarde, South Melbourne, Vic 3 20 5 ; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Melbourne, 3 001;

Phone (03) 6 2 6 1 100; Fax (03) 6 2 6 1101; General M anager: Steven Porter Albury-Wodonga: Cnr O live & Wilson Streets, Albury; PO Box 3 21 , Albury N S W 2 6 4 0 ; Phone (060) 21 3444; Fax (0 6 0 )4 1 1849 Bendigo: 2 7 8 Napier Street; GPO Box 6 3 7 , Bendigo,Vic 3 5 5 0 Phone (0 5 4 )4 1 8 572 Fax (054) 41 8 573 Horsham: Shop 3, 150 Baillie St; PO Box 5 0 6 , Horsham, Vic 3 400; Phone (0 5 3 )8 2 0152; Fax (0 5 3 )8 2 0 9 1 3 Mildura: 7 3 a Pine Avenue; PO Box 2 2 3 7 , Mildura, Vic 3 500, Phone (050) 21 1620; Fax (050) 21 1664 Sale 3 4 0 York Street; PO Box 3 3 0 , Sale, Vic 3 8 5 0 ; Phone (0 5 1 )4 4 3980; Fax (0 5 1 )4 4 3920; Shepparton: 265 a M aude Street; PO Box 1 922, Shepparton, Vic 3 63 0 ; Phone (058) 31 2144; Fax (058) 31 2 1 4 0 Traralgon: Suite 2, 41 Breed Street, Traralgon, Vic 3488; Phone (0 5 1 )7 4 0433; Fax (0 5 1 )7 4 0 1 0 9 Warmambool: 1 st Floor, 5 6 Kepler Street, W armambool, Vic 3 28 0 ; Phone (055) 61 1141; Fax (055) 6 2 5 2 4 9

Queensland Brisbane: Middenbury, Broadcast House, Cnr Coronation & Archer Streets, Toowong; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Brisbane, O ld 4001 ; Phone (07) 3 7 7 5222; Fax (07) 3 7 7 5 464; Telex 4 2 1 7 6 M anager Radio: Robert Wurth Acting M anager Television: Clyde Riches Queensland Symphony Orchestra 51 Ferry Road, West End,

Brisbane, O ld 4 101; Phone (07) 3 7 7 5000; Fax (07) 3 7 7 5001 General Manager: Mary Lyons Bundaberg: 5 8 W oongarra Street; P.O. Box 1 152, Bundaberg, O ld 4 6 7 0 ; Phone (0 7 1 )5 3 2855; Fax (0 7 1 )5 1 6 805; Telex 4 9 7 0 6 Cairns: Cnr Sheridan and Upward Street;

P.O Box 9 3 2 , Cairns, O ld 4 8 7 0 ; Phone (070) 31 3677; Fax (070) 51 8368; Telex 4 8 0 8 0 Gladstone: Dahl's Building, 4 3 Tank Street, Gladstone, Old 4 6 8 0 ; Phone (079) 7 2 3812;

Fax (079) 72 2650; Telex 4 6 9 6 5

131

Gold Coash Cnr G old Coast Highway and Francis Street; PO Box 217 Mermaid Beach. Old 4218;

Phone 1075) 72 9 9 1 7 ; Fax (075) 72 6 4 7 7 Long reach: Duck Street PO Box 318, Longreach, O ld 4 7 3 0 ; Phone (0 7 6 )5 8 3 60 1 ; Fax (076) 58 3 605; Telex 4 9 9 6 0 Mackay: Third floor. Suncorp Building,

1 23 Victoria Street; PO Box 1 27, Mackay. O ld 4 7 4 0 " Phone (0 79 )5 1 3 3 6 6 Fax (0 7 9 )5 1 273 8 Telex 48161 Maroochydore: Shop 3A. Dolphin Centre, 159 Aerodrome Rd, Maroochydore. O ld 4 5 5 8 ; Phone (074) 43 7 8 7 8 Fax (074) 43 6 5 2 4 Maryborough: 4 6 Bazaar Street; P.O. Box 276, Maryborough. O ld 4 6 5 0 ; Phone (0 71 )2 1 3 95 2 ; Fax; (071) 22 3 7 5 0 Telex 4 9 7 4 2 Mount Isa: 1 14 Camooweal Street, Mt. Isa, O ld 4 82 5 ; Phone (077) 43 9 0 0 0 ; Fax(077) 43 5 61 9 ; Telex 146855 Rockhampton: 2 38 Q uay Street PO Box 9 1 1 . Rockhampton, Q ld 4 7 0 0 ; Phone (079) 27 3 66 6 , Fax (079) 27 4 1 3 7 ; Telex 4 9 0 0 0 Toowoomba: ABC Radio Centre. 2 9 7 Margaret Street; PO Box 358. Toowoomba. Q ld 4 3 5 0 ; Phone (076) 39 2 878, Fax (076) 32 1904; Telex 4 0 0 6 9 Townsville: 8 -1 0 W ickham Street; PO Box 6 9 4 Townsville, Q ld 4 8 1 0 ; Phone (077) 71 5 0 5 2 ; Fax (077) 72 5 3 2 2 Telex 4 7 0 4 0

South Australia Adelaide: 85 North East Road. Collinswood, SA 5 0 8 1 ; GPO Box 9 994, Adelaide SA 5001 Phone (08) 343 4 0 0 0 ; Fax (08) 3 43 4 4 0 2 M anager Radio; Jon Cassidy M anager Television: Lynfon Franzi Adelaide Symphony Orchestra: 85 North East Road, Collinswood; GPO Box 2121, Adelaide SA 5001 ; Phone (08) 343 4 8 2 0 ; Fax (08) 3 43 4 80 8 ; General Manager: M ichael El w ood Broken Hill: (administered by the SA Branch) 4 5 4 Argent Street; PO Box 315, Broken Hill N S W 2 8 8 0 ; Phone (080) 88 3 99 9 ; Fax (080) 88 5 1 3 6

Mount Gambler: Penola Road; PO Box 1448, M f Gambier SA 5 2 9 0 : Phone (087) 25 1 101; Fax (087) 25 6 2 2 7 Port Augusta: Church Street.

PO Box 2 1 4 9 Port Augusta SA 5 7 0 0 ; Phone (0 8 6 )4 2 2 8 48 Fax (086) 4 2 2 8 3 8 Port Lincoln: 2 / 8 Eyre Street; P.O. Box 6 7 9 , Port Lincoln SA 5 6 0 6 Phone (086) 8 2 651 1; Fax (086) 82 6 5 3 8 Port Pirie: 85 Grey Terrace PO Box 2 8 9 Port Pirie SA 5 5 4 0 Phone (086) 33 0 5 0 0 ; Fax (086) 32 2301 Renmark: Ral Ral Avenue; PO Box 20, Renmark SA 5341; Phone (085) 8 6 6 5 0 0 ; Fax (085) 8 6 5 8 9 0

Western Australia Perth: 191 Adelaide Terrace: PO Box 9 9 9 4 . Perth W A 6 0 0 1 ; Phone (091 2 2 0 2 7 0 0 :

Fax (09) 2 2 0 2 8 7 9 M anager Radio: Glenn Darlington M anager Television: Robert W illcox West Australian Symphony Orchestra:

191 Adelaide Terrace; PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Perth W A 6 0 0 1 ; Phone (09) 2 2 0 2 6 0 4 :

Fax (09) 221 2 3 7 5 General M anager: Hendrik Smil Albany: 2 2 0 York Street; PO Box 4 8 9 , Albany W A 6 33 0 ; Phone (0 9 8 )4 1 2 1 1 1 ; Fax (0 9 8 )4 1 7 8 5 1 ; Broome: 1 /1 4 N apier Terrace, PO Box 2 1 7 Broome. W A 6 7 2 5 :

Phone (091) 9 3 5 5 9 7 ; Fax (0 9 1 )9 3 5 6 0 9 Bunbury 7 2 W ittenoom Street; PO Box 2 42 , Bunbury, W A 6 2 3 0 ; Phone (097) 21 4 6 2 2 ; Fax | 0 9 7 ] 21 4 8 5 1 ; Geraldton: 2 4 5 M arine Terrace; PO Box 2 11 , Geraldton, W A 6 5 3 0 ; Phone (099) 21 1477; Fax (099| 21 2 1 8 3 ; Kalgoorlie: Commonwealth Offices, Cnr Porter and Brookman Streets; PO Box 125, Kalgoorlie, W A 6 4 3 0 ; Phone (090| 21 2 4 3 3 ; Fax (090) 21 6 5 9 2 ; Karratha: Degrey Place; PO Box 9 9 4 , Karratha W A 6 71 4 ; Phone (0 9 1 )4 4 1911; Fax (0 9 1 )4 4 1856 Kununurra: Lot 1 899, Sandalwood Street; PO Box 9 8 4 Kununurra W A 6 7 4 3 Phone (0 9 1 )6 8 2 7 7 3 Fax (0 9 1 )6 9 1 102

Tasmania Hobart: Broadcasting Centre, Cnr Brooker Ave and Tasman Highway, G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , Hobart, Tas 7 0 0 1 , Phone (02) 35 3 3 3 3 ; Fax (002) 35 3 4 0 7 Manager Radio: Robert Batten M anager Television: Don Stanley Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra: ABC O deon Theatre, 167 Liverpool Street, Hobart Tas 7 0 0 0 ; Phone (002) 35 3 64 6 .

Fax (002) 35 3651 General Manager: Julie W arn Bumie: 8 1 Mount Street: PO Box 533, Burnie, Tas 7 3 2 0 ; Phone (004) 31 5 4 6 6 Fax (004) 31 8 0 6 9 Launceston: 45 Ann Street: PO Box 201, Launceston, Tas 7 2 5 0 ; Phone (003) 32 4 2 2 2 ; Fax (003) 32 4 2 5 5

Northern Territory Darwin: 1 Cavenagh Street; GPO Box 9 9 9 4 , Darwin, NT 0801 Phone (0 8 9 )4 3 3 22 2 ; Fax (0 8 9 )4 3 3 1 2 5 Manager Radio: Lesley Whitteker Alice Springs: Cnr G a p Road & Speed Street; PO Box 1 144 Alice Springs NT 0871 ; Phone (089) 5 2 3 4 3 3 , 5 2 6 6 3 9 Fax (089) 52 2 0 9 3 ;

Overseas Offices Amman: 4 /F Ahmad Abu Nemeh Building, Zahran Street, Amman, Jordan; Phone (9 62 -6 ) 61 6 1 3 0 ; Fax (9 6 2 -6 ) 61 6131 Bangkok: 2 09 Soi Hufayana, (Off Soi Suan Plu) South Sathorn Road, Bangkok 10120, Thailand; Phone (66-2) 2 8 7 1200, Fax (6 6 -2 ) 2 8 7 2 0 4 0 Beijing 8 /1 2 1 Q i Jia Yuan, Beijing, 1 00600, China; Phone (8 6 -1 )5 3 2 2 41 0 , Fax (8 6 -1 )5 3 2 2 5 1 4 Berlin: Contact via ABC London Brussels: International Press Centre, Post Box 1,1 Boulevard Charlemagne,

1041, Brussels, Belgium; Phone (32-2) 2 3 0 6 0 1 6 ; Fax (3 2 -2 ) 2 38 0 8 3 9 Buenos Aires: Av. Corrientes 456, 74;

1043 Buenos Aires, Argentina Phone (5 4 1 )3 2 6 7 2 0 4 ; Fax (5 4 1 )3 9 4 7 6 9 6 Hanoi: 6th Floor, V N A Building 8 Tran Hung Dao Hanoi, Vietnam Phone (844) 25 0 7 0 0 /1 Fax (844) 2 6 6 3 3 0 Hong Kong: Room 1003, 10th floor, Hong Kong Arts Centre, 2 Harbour Road, W anchai, Hong Kong; Phone (852) 8 2 4 0 8 1 2 /3 ; Fax (8 5 2 )8 2 4 2 1 3 9

132

Appendices

Jakarta: jalan Indramayu 1 8. Jakarta Pusat 103 1 0 . Indonesia:

Phone (6 2 -2 1 ) 3 9 0 8 1 2 3 /4 ; Fax (6 2 -2 1 ) 3 9 0 812 4 Jerusalem: Room 314, JCS 2 0 6 Jaffa Road Jerusalem 91 131, Israel

Phone (9722) 37 3557. 3 7 2908 Fax (9722) 3 7 3 3 0 6 Johannesburg: 1 Park Road, 3rd Floor, Richmond, Johannesburg 2 09 2 , South Africa; Phone (2711) 7 2 6 8 6 1 6 Fax (271 1) 7 2 6 863 6 London: 5 4 Portland Place, London W IN 4DY, United Kingdom; Phone (4 4 -7 1 ) 631 4 4 5 6 ; Fax (4 4 -7 1 ) 3 2 3 0 0 5 9 , 3 2 3 1 125 Moscow: Radio: Rublevskoye Shosse 26, KV 19, Moscow 121467, Russia; Phone (7 -09 5 ) 4 1 5 4 0 1 5 , 4 1 5 4 242; Fax ( 7 - 0 9 5 )4 1 5 2904; TV: Radisson-Slavyanskaya Hotel Berezhkovskaya N ab 2 M oscow 1 2 1 0 5 9 , Russia Phone (7095) 941 8 5 8 4 /5 Fax (7095) 941 858 6

Nairobi: PO Box 4 5 0 4 7 N airobi, Kenya; Phone (2542) 7 2 1862; Fax (2542) 7 2 1862 New Delhi A-l 1 Top Floor, W est End Colony, N e w Delhi, 1 10 0 2 1 . India; Phone (91-1 1 )6 8 7 2 1 5 3 , 6 8 7 2 33 7 ; Fax (91-1 1 )6 8 7 2153 New York: Room 2 260, 6 3 0 Fifth Ave, N ew York, NY 10111, USA; Phone (1 -2 1 2 ) 332 2 54 0 ; Fax (1-21 2) 3 3 2 2 5 4 6 Port Moresby: Airvos Avenue; GPO Box 7 79 , Port Moresby, Papua N e w Guinea; Phone (675) 21 2666; Fax (675) 21 2131 Singapore: 170 Bukit Timah Road,

1 7 -0 3 Bukit Timah Shopping Centre, Singapore 2 15 8 ; Phone (65) 4 6 7 1722; Fax (6 5 )4 6 9 0 3 1 6 Tokyo: NHK Hoso Centre, Jinnan, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150, Japan;

Phone (8 1 -3 ) 3 4 6 9 8 08 9 , 3 4 6 5 11 11 ext 2867; Fax (8 1 -3 ) 3 4 6 8 8445 Washington: Suite 5 04 , 2 0 3 0 M Street N .W . Washington DC 2 0 0 3 6 , USA; Phone (1 -2 0 2 ) 4 6 6 8 5 7 5 ; Fax (1 -2 0 2 ) 7 7 5 9 3 0 8 Zagreb/Rovinj Contact via ABC London

Appendix 20

ABC Shops

New South Wales Brookvale Shop 1 10, Level 1 W arringah M all Shopping Centre Phone (02) 9 0 5 375 8 Fax (02) 9 0 5 7 1 9 8 Chats wood Shop 350, Level 3 Westfield Shopping Town Phone (02) 9 5 0 314 8 Fax (02) 9 5 0 3 1 4 9 Miranda Shop 1 0 8 7 -8 8 Westfield Shopping Town Phone (02) 5 2 4 4 2 8 9 Fax (0 2 )5 2 4 8 1 5 3 Newcastle Shop 205, Upper Level. Charlestown Shopping Square Phone (049) 4 3 9 7 63 Fax (049) 4 3 8 4 6 0 Parramatta Shop 21 2A Ground Floor Westfield Shopping Town Phone (02) 6 3 5 9 9 2 2 Fax (02) 891 5 6 6 8 Penrith Shop 37, M all Level Penrith Plaza Phone (047) 21 8 2 9 9 Fax (047) 21 8 1 5 9 Sydney Shop 4 8, The Albert W a lk Queen Victoria Building Phone (02) 3 3 3 1635 Fax (02) 261 4 3 4 7 Ultimo ABC Ultimo Centre, 7 0 0 Harris Street Phone (02) 3 3 3 205 5 Fax (02) 261 4 3 4 7

Australian Capital Territory Canberra Shop CF 1 2, Canberra Centre Phone (06) 2 4 7 2941 Fax (06) 2 7 5 4 5 6 7

Victoria Chadstone Shop B53, Lower M all, Chadstone Shopping Centre Phone (03) 5 2 4 314 8 Fax (03) 5 6 3 3 5 1 0 Melbourne Shop 34, G alleria Level Galleria Shopping Plaza Phone (03) 6 4 0 334 5 Fax (03) 6 0 2 5221 Ring wood Shop L60 Eastland Shopping Centre Phone (03) 8 7 9 5 0 9 4 Fax (03) 8 7 9 5 6 2 6

Tasmania Hobart Shop 206 Cenlrepoint Rhone (002) 3 5 3 6 4 8

Fax (002) 3 5 3 6 4 9

South Australia Adelaide Shop 3 1 0 Level 3, The Myer Centre Phone (0 8 )4 1 0 0 5 6 7 Fax (0 8 )4 1 0 0 5 8 5

Western Australia Perth Shop 4 3 -4 4 Hay Street Level The Carillon Arcade Phone (09) 321 685 2 Fax (09) 481 7 8 5 8

Northern Territory Darwin Shop 55 Casuarina Shopping Square Phone (089) 2 78 788 Fax (089) 271 291

Queensland Broadbeach, Shop 354. Level 1. The Arcade Pacific Fair Shopping Centre Phone (075) 7 5 4 231 Fax (075) 7 2 0 0 8 4 Brisbane Shop 240, Level 2 The Myer Centre Phone (07) 3 7 7 545 5 Fax (07) 221 1516 Carindale Shop 163, Level 2 Carindale Shopping Centre Phone (07) 3 9 8 1606 Fax (07) 8 4 3 1534

133

List of tables and graphs

Tables Financial Summaries Five Year Analysis 10

Radio 27

Radio Business Unit 29

TV — Financial Summary 42

TV Business Units. Financial Summary 42 Australia Television. Financial Summary 5 0 Radio Australia. Financial Summary 55 Concerts Financial Summary 5 9

Enterpiises. Financial Summary 6 6

ABC-TV— Most Popular Programs 39

Staff 1 9 9 3 -9 4 73

Legal and Copyright Litigation 74

Organisation Chart 6 - 7

Performance Summaries Radio 2 6 -2 7

ABC-TV 3 4 -3 5

Australia Television 48

Radio Australia 53

Concerts 58

Enterprises 6 4 -6 5

Corporate & Technical Support 7 0 -7 1

Strategic Development 80

Maps ABC Services 3

International Bureaus 3

Australia Television. Service Areas 4 7

Graphs Radio Metropolitan Radio. Content Analysis 20

Regional Radio. Content Analysis 20

Radio National, Content Analysis 20

ABC Classic FM, Content Analysis 20

Triple J Content Analysis Program Source, Metropolitan stations Program Source, Regional stations Australian Music Content Audience Reach & Shore 24

Population Covered 28

ABC-TV Australian Content 3 6

First Run Programs 36

ABC M a d e Programs. First Run 36

Source of ABC-TV Programs 36

Program Analysis 3 7

Transmission by Program Strand 3 7

Audience Composition 4 0

Average W eekly Reach 41

Evening Audience Share 41

Radio Ausf Program M ix 54

Language M ix 54

Concerts Attendances 6 0

Concerts 1 9 9 0 -9 4 6 0

Performance Activities 6 0

Artist and Repertoire Analysis 1993 6 0

Enterprises Products 6 2

Cash Contribution to ABC 63

Revenue Activities (Accrued) 63

Staff 1 9 9 0 -1 9 9 4 7 2

by G ender 7 2

by Location 72

by Division 7 2

by Job G roup 73

1 9 9 3 -1 9 9 4 73

134

(N CN CM CM

Index

A ABC Act. 1. 7 9. 8 2 — 8 4

ABC Board. 5. 7. 8 -9 . 11. 15. 4 4. 4 6 . 7 0. 7 1 . 7 4 . 7 5. 7 9 .

8 2. 83. 84

ABC Centres, 2, 6 2, 6 4 -6 5

ABC Classic FM. 2. 5. 6. 16. 17. 20. 2 2. 25. 27. 83

ABC C ode of Practice, 8 1 -8 3 , 85

ABC designed/developed. 2 9 , 55,

ABC Enterprises. 12. 27, 4 2 . 5 5. 5 9. 6 1 - 6 2 , 6 5 -6 6 , 7 4 -7 5

ABC International, 43

ABC objectives. 1. 26. 3 4. 4 8 . 5 3. 5 8. 6 4 . 7 0 . 80

ABC Orchestras, 2. 4, 5. 7. 12. 39. 5 6 -6 0 . 6 3 . 75. 84

ABC Organisation, 6 - 7

ABC Shops. 2, 4. 5. 6 2 . 6 4 - 6 5 . 7 5 . 8 7

Aboriginal broadcasting. 18, 30. 88

Aboriginal employment, 6 8 . 6 9 , 7 1, 82

Aboriginal programs. 5, 34, 36. 38

Advertising, 14

AJA. 81 (see also MEAA)

Arts programs & products, 2, 4, 20. 2 1, 2 6 , 2 7, 32, 38, 4 0 ,

53

Asia Pacific region, 1, 2. 6, 8, 13, 14. 4 2 . 5 2 , 5 3, 55. 6 4 ,

6 5 . 7 9 , 8 7, 88

Assistance to overseas broadcasters, 4, 13. 5 4, 88

Audience reach, 5, 13, 2 5, 2 6 , 35, 4 1 , 4 8 , 5 3 , 59

Audience research, 20, 2 6, 4 4 , 5 3, 6 4 , 8 0, 83

Audience share, 25, 35, 4 0 -4 1

Australia Television 2, 4 -6 , 13, 16, 3 2, 4 5 - 5 0 , 52, 53, 7 4,

7 9 , 8 7

Australian Broadcasting Authority. 4 4, 8 1. 84, 8 5

Australian composers, 5 8 , 6 3

Australian content, 13, 32, 35

Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB),

4. 5, 2 9. 54. 88

Australian music, 14, 1 8 -1 9 , 2 7, 5 7 -5 8

Awards. 4 - 5 . 12. 18. 23. 2 6 -2 7 , 3 2, 3 5 , 3 8, 5 7 -5 8 . 6 3 .

6 5

B Business activities and units. 1. 2 6, 29, 4 2 , 4 3 . 6 4 , 68. 7 1,

7 4 . 7 6 , 7 7

C Chair, ABC, 7, 8

Charier. ABC, 1 ,6 . 1 1. 12, 1 3, 14, 15, 4 6, 5 2. 62. 83

C hild-care. 7 4

Children's programs & products, 12, 3 5, 6 2 . 6 4 , 65, 86

Co-productions, 26, 34, 3 6, 38. 86,

Comedy programs, 6, 19, 2 2 , 32, 35, 3 8, 4 0

Commonwealth Government, 4, 7, 13. 14, 2 0 , 33, 43, 4 4,

4 9 , 6 9

Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU), 55

Complaints, 8 0 -8 5

Compressed digital video, 4 2

Consultants, 4 7

Copyright. 7. 6 8 . 7 0 - 7 1 .7 4 - 7 5 . 79. 8 7

Corporate Objectives, 1

Corporate Plan, 5, 14, 16, 7 9 . 81

Corporate Policy & Planning, 7 9 -8 1

Corporate Relations. 7, 8 2 -8 3 . 85

Correspondence, 5 3, 8 6

Cost of Services, 10, 14, 26. 27. 4 2 . 5 5, 59

Current affairs. 2. 6 . 1 2 -1 3 19. 2 7. 30. 3 2 -3 5 , 4 0 - 4 1 .4 6 .

4 8 . 5 2 -5 3 , 7 0 . 7 5

D D -C ort, 5. 13. 27, 2 9 - 3 0 55

D-Radio. 13. 27, 2 9

Defamation, 70, 7 4, 85

Department of Community Services. 74

Department of Defence, 9 4

Department of Employment, Education & Training, 3 6, 38, 82

Deportment of Foreign Affairs & Trade. 81, 87

Department of Communications and the Arts, 79, 8 1, 8 7

Deputy M anaging Director, 7. 6 8

Digital audio broadcasting. 30

Directors, Board of - see ABC Board

Documentaries. 6, 2 1 , 3 2, 36. 4 7

Drama programs & products, 12, 2 6. 35. 62. 6 4 - 6 5 . 7 7

E Editorial Policies, 4 8 , 8 1, 82, 85

Editorial independence, 1 5 .4 6

Education programs & products. 1-2, 30, 35, 36. 4 6 . 6 5

Electoral matters. 85

Entertainment programs, 1 3. 53

Equal Employment Opportunity, 4, 2 9. 4 3, 6 8 -6 9 , 7 1 -7 2

F Financial Management & Efficiency, 6, 14, 42, 7 0 - 7 2 , 7 4 -7 6 ,

8 7

First run programs. 32, 35

Freedom of Information. 8 5 -8 7

Funding, 4. 13. 14, 4 4 . 55. 6 0. 7 0 -7 1 , 76. 7 9 , 8 0

H Highlights 1 9 9 3 -9 4 , 4

I Independent Complaints Review Panel. 85

Industrial relarions, 7 4 , 75

Information technology, 7, 29, 37. 6 8 . 7 0 -7 1 , 75

Information programs. 6. 19. 2 6 -2 7 . 32, 5 3 -5 4

International broadcasting, 1, 7, 5 2 -5 3 , 7 9

International consultancies, 88

International correspondents and bureaus, 2 -4 , 18, 23. 33, 5 3,

7 6

International Year of the Family, 5, 22. 35, 84, 8 6

L Legal & Copyright Deportment, 7, 6 8 . 7 0 -7 1 , 7 4 -7 5

M M anaging Director, 7 -8 , 85. 87

Marketing, 1-2, 7, 2 9, 43, 5 0. 6 5

M edia, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) 4 4, 7 2, 81

Metropolitan radio, 2, 6, 18, 21

M inisterial Directions, 129

Multicultural programs. 3 7

Music, 1 -2 , 5. 7, 14. 1 8-2 1 . 23. 2 6 -2 7 . 38. 3 9 -4 0 . 54.

5 7 - 6 0 . 6 2 -6 5

135

N N otional Advisory Council, 6, 26, 8 1 -8 2 , 84, 8 6

N ews. 2. 4 -6 1 2 -1 3 , 1 8 -1 9 , 2 2 -2 3 , 2 6 -2 7 , 2 9 -3 0 ,

3 2 -3 6 , 3 9 - 4 1 ,4 6 - 4 8 , 5 2 - 5 5 , 7 0 -7 1 , 7 5 -7 6 , 79,

8 5 -8 6 , 88

O Occupational health & safety, 7 1 - 7 2

Open Learning project, 8, 2 1, 36, 4 6, 48

Optus. 4 2 , 87

Outside broadcasts, 19, 21

Overseas correspondents & bureaus, 2, 23, 33, 7 6

P Parliament, 1-2, 4, 7, 18. 2 3 , 6 8 , 7 1 . 82

Parliamentary broadcasts, 2 -3 , 18, 7 9

Pay TV, (see Subscription Television)

Payroll system, 71

Plans and prospects. 14, 23, 2 6 - 2 7 , 6 9, 75, 88

Principal Community Affairs Officer, 8 3 -8 4

Production costing, 42

Program sales, 2. 4 3

Property, 26, 64. 6 6, 6 8 . 7 0 - 7 1 , 7 5 . 77, 87

Public accountability, 15, 82

Public Sector Union, (see Community and Public Sector Union)

R Radio Australia. 2, 4 -6 . 10, 1 3 -1 4 , 16, 23, 5 1 -5 5 , 7 1 , 7 7

Radio National. 2, 4. 6, 18, 2 0 -2 2 , 25, 27, 30, 6 2 , 8 6

Recordings, 2, 5 7 -6 0 , 6 3 , 8 7

Regional radio, 2. 6. 18, 2 2 -2 3 , 2 5. 2 7 -2 8 . 30, 6 5 , 7 7

Religious programs, 2 1, 8 6

Research and development, 2 0 , 2 6, 29, 44, 5 3, 6 4 , 7 7 , 80,

83

Resource management, 6 8 , 7 0

Risk management, 7 6

Rural programs 5. 23, 25, 3 3, 75

s Satellites, 2, 4 -5 7, 26, 32, 4 3 - 4 4 , 4 6 -4 7 , 5 3 -5 5 , 7 7 -8 1 ,

8 7

Schools concerts, 5 9

Science programs. 3 6

Section 8 2 (ABC Act) see Complaints, 8 2 -8 4

Short-wave transmission, 2, 53

Simulcasts, 5 7

Soulhbank Centre, 5, 12, 6 7 , 7 1, 74, 7 7

Special Broadcasting Service (SBS), 4 6, 4 7, 4 8 , 81

Sponsorship, 13, 14, 2 2, 4 6 , 4 7, 4 9

Sport, 6, 19, 32, 4 0 , 5 3 '

Staff, statistics, 7 2 - 7 3

Staffing levels, 14, 6 9 , 71

Strategic development, 7, 7 8

Studios, 2, 18, 6 9 , 7 7 , 8 6

Subscription audio, 2 3 , 2 7

Subscription television, 2, 6, 14, 15, 32, 4 4 , 7 4, 81, 8 7

Sub-titled programs, 35

T Technology, 2. 7 - 8 , 1 3 -1 4 , 26. 29. 37, 5 4 -5 5 . 5 8, 6 8 -7 1 ,

7 5, 8 0 -8 1 , 8 7 -8 8

Telecommunications, 8, 5 4, 7 9, 8 7 -8 8

Training, for conductors, 5 7 - 5 9

Training, staff, 29, 4 3 , 6 8 , 6 9 , 71, 72, 7 4

Transmitters, 2, 4, 2 5 , 35, 4 2 , 53, 55, 83

Triennial Funding Agreement, 14, 71, 7 6 , 7 9

TripleJ, 2. 4 - 6 , 14, 1 8 -1 9 , 22, 25. 2 7, 6 3 -6 5 , 83. 8 6

U Ultimo Centre, 5, 7 4 , 7 7 -7 8 , 84

w Women, portrayal of, 6 9

Women in M anagem ent training program, 6 8

Women in sport, 4 0

Women and engineering, 6 9

Y Youth, 2, 18, 25, 3 9 , 5 8 -5 9 , 88

Published by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation National Library of Australia card number and ISSN 0 8 1 6 827X Designed and typeset by ABC Corporate Relations Printed by Superfine Printing Co. Pty. Ltd.

For information regarding this Annual Report please contact the: M anager Corporate Publications, ABC Corporate Relations G PO Box 9 9 9 4 , in your capital city, telephone (02) 3 3 3 5 3 1 3

136

The functions which Parliament has given to the ABC are set out in the Charter of the Corporation (s.6| 1) and (2) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983).

(1) The functions of the Corporation are—

(a) to provide within Australia innovative and comprehensive broadcasting services of a high

standard as part of the Australian broadcasting system consisting of national, commercial and community sectors and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, to provide—

(i) broadcasting programs that contribute to a sense of national identity and inform and entertain, and reflect the cultural diversity of, the Australian community;

(ii) broadcasting programs of an educational nature;

(b) to transmit to countries outside Australia broadcasting programs of news, current affairs, entertainment and cultural enrichment that will—

(i) encourage awareness of Australia and an international understanding of Australian attitudes

on world affairs; and

(ii) enable Australian citizens living or travelling outside Australia to obtain information about Australian affairs and Australian attitudes on world affairs; and

(c) to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts in Australia.

(2) In the provision by the Corporation of its broadcasting and television services within Australia—

(a) the Corporation shall take account of—

(i) the broadcasting services provided by the commercial and community sectors of the Australian broadcasting system;

(ii) the standards from time to time approved by the Australian Broadcasting Authority in respect

of broadcasting services;

(iii) the responsibility of the Corporation as the provider of an independent national broadcasting service to provide a balance between broadcasting programs of wide appeal and specialised broadcasting programs;

(iv) the multicultural character of the Australian community; and

(v) in connection with the provision of broadcasting programs of an educational nature — the

responsibilities of the States in relation to education; and

(b) the Corporation shall take all such measures, being measures consistent with the obligations of the Corporation under paragraph (a), as, in the opinion of the Board, will be conducive to the full development by the Corporation of suitable broadcasting programs.

In January 1994, when bushfires erupted across NSW, ABC Radio and ABC-TV suspended normal programming.

On-the-spot accounts by ABC reporters and graphic images from the ABC helicopter and news crews were broadcast around Australia and across the world.

On Saturday 8 January, as the crisis deepened, Radio's sport program, G ra n d s ta n d , switched to

covering the fires as they swept through suburban

T H E P A R L IA M E N T O F T H E C O M M O N W E A L T H O F A U S T R A L IA

PARLIAMENTARY PAPER No. 2 4 8 o f 1 9 9 4 O R D E R E D T O BE P R IN T E D

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