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Australian National University Act - Council of Australian National University - Report - 1993


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T h e A u stra lia n N a t io n a l U n iv ersity

■yWAVAVAVASy,

ANNUAL REPORT 1993

Cover photograph by Irene Lorbergs

Edited by Public Affairs Division T he Australian National University

Produced by Publications Office Public Affairs Division T he Australian National University

Printed by Pirie Printers

ISSN 0572-1318

The Australian National University

1993 Annual Report

The Australian National University

Report of the Council for the period 1 January 1993 to 31 December 1993

T o T he Honourable Simon Crean, M.P. Minister for Employment, Education and Training

W e have the honour to transmit the Report o f the Council o f T he Australian National University for the period 1 Jam m y 1993 to 31 December 1993 furnished in compliance with Section 49 o f The Australian National University Act 1991.

Sir Geoffrey Yeend Chancellor

R.D. Terrell Vice-Chancellor

July 1994

Contents

T he Australian National University 1

Members 2

Objectives 5

1993 Highlights 6

T he Year in Review 8

Institute o f Advanced Studies 16

Research School o f Biological Sciences 17 Research School o f Chemistry 18

Research School o f Earth Sciences 20 John Curtin School o f Medical Research 22 M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring 23

Observatories Research School o f Pacific and 24

Asian Smdies Research School of Physical Sciences 26 and Engineering Research School of Social Sciences 28 National Centre for Epidemiology 29

and Population Health

T he Faculties 32

Buildings and renovations 32

New initiatives 32

Cooperation with the University of 35 Canberra Faculty of Arts 35

Faculty o f Asian Smdies 37

Faculty of Economics and Commerce 38 Faculty of Law 39

Faculty o f Science 41

Institute of the Arts 42

Centres and Bridging Structures 44

Centre for Information Science Research 44 Centre for Molecular Structure 45

and Function Centre for Resource and Environmental 46 Studies Centre for Visual Sciences 47

Humanities Research Centre 47

N H M R C Social Psychiatry Unit 49

School o f Mathematical Sciences 49 T he Graduate School 50

The Library 51

University House 52

University Resources and Services 54

Building and Grounds Division 54

Centre for Continuing Education 55

Centre for Educational Development 55 and Academic Methods Computer Services Centre 56

Finance and Accounting Division 57

Management Information Systems 58 Division Planning Unit 58

Public Affairs Division 59

Registrar’s Division 62

Secretary’s Division 65

Smdent Services 74

ANU Students Association 74

Postgraduate and Research Students 74 Association ANU Union 75

Sports Union 75

ANUTECH 78

Research at the Australian National University 81

Staff 99

Appendices 105

University Statistics 106

Cooperation with government and 113 other public institutions Joint research projects with universities, 144 CSIRO and other institutions

Degrees and diplomas conferred 196

Prizewinners 218

University Public Lectures 221

Principal Grants and Donations 223

Freedom o f Information A ct 1982 236 Statement Auditor-General’s report 241

Financial Statements 246

ANUTECH Pty Ltd Report and 270 Financial Statement Academic Governance Senior administrative structure

The Australian National University

The Australian National University

t ■ th e Australian National University (ANU) 1 is am ong the world’s leading academic Λ . research institutions.

For nearly 50 years the ANU has produced renowned scientists, economists, historians, jurists, geographers, linguists and mathematicians. It has more members o f the academies than any other Australian university. A NU staff are engaged in fundamental research in areas such as

medicine, physics, astronomy, chemistry, biologs', the earth sciences, information science and engineering. T he high quality o f A N U ’s contributions to the social sciences and the

humanities is also widely acknowledged.

A NU was established by the Commonwealth Parliament in 1946 as Australia’s only research-oriented university without undergraduate facilities to undertake postgraduate

research and study at the highest levels on subjects o f national importance to Australia. A N U was to become an institute o f international standing which would attract prominent Australian

scientists and scholars back from overseas. It’s charter was to strengthen the nation’s research effort and to set new standards for research in Australia.

In I960 undergraduate teaching was added to ANU’s role through amalgamation with the Canberra University College. In 1992 the Canberra Institute o f the Arts, with its Schools of Art and Music, became part o f T he Faculties.

The University has eight Research Schools: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Information Science and Engineering, Pacific and

Asian Smdies, Physical Sciences and Engineering Social Sciences, and The John Curtin School of Medical Research. ANU’s M ount Stromlo and

Siding Spring Observatories are recognised as world leaders in astronomical research.

Undergraduate degree courses are offered through the Faculties o f Arts, Asian Studies, Economics and Commerce, Engineering and Information Technology, Law, and Science, and through the

Schools o f Art and Music.

T he Graduate School coordinates 37 graduate smdies programs provided through T he Faculties and the Institute of Advanced Studies.

Staff in the Institute of Advanced Smdies and The Faculties collaborate on major research with a wide range o f Australian and overseas universities and instimtions.

A NU has a total student population o f more than 10,000 o f whom approximately 2,000 are postgraduates. About one in 10 smdents come from overseas and are drawn from 60 countries. T he University has about 1,100 academic staff

and 2,300 general staff.

For more information about The Australian National University, contact:

For course and other academic information T he Registrar T he Australian National University CANBERRA ACT 0200 Telephone: 06 249 5111; Fax: 06 248 9062

For general information Fhe Head Public Affairs Division The Australian National University

CANBERRA ACT 0200 Telephone: 06 249 2229; Fax: 06 249 5568

1

The Australian National University

The Council

Members of the Council as at 31 December 1993

M em bers E x-O fficio

Sir Geoffrey (John) Yeend, AC, CBE, BCom Melb., FA IM — Chancellor

Pauline Marcus Griffin, AM BA DipSocStud Syd., H onDLitt Macq. — Pro-Chancellor

Lawrence Walter Nichol, BSc PhD DSc Adel., FRACI, FAA— Vice-Chancellor

John William White, CM G, MSc Syd, MA DPhil Chef., FRSChem, FRACI, FAPS, FAA — Chairperson ofthe Board o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies

David Michael Griffin, MA PhD ScD Camb., FRSA— Chairperson ofthe Board o f The Faculties

Caitlin W yndham — President o f The Australian National University Students’ Association

Subho Banerjee, BSc — President o f the Postgraduate and Research Students 'Association Inc

M em b ers ap p oin ted b y th e G overnor-G eneral

Professor T he H on Peter Erne Baume, AO, MD BS Syd, FRACP, FAFPHM (Hon), FRACGP

Robin Margaret Gibson, BA LLB

Ian Francis Grigg, AM, BA

Richard Emanuel Klugman, BSc MB BS Syd.

M em b er o f P arliam ent a p p oin ted by the G overnor-G eneral o n the n om in ation o f the P rim e M inister

Senator Malcolm Arthur Colston, BA BEd PhD Q ld

M em ber o f P arliam ent app oin ted by the G overnor-G eneral o n th e n om ination o f the Leader o f the O p p o sitio n in the H ou se o f R epresentatives

Philip Maxwell Ruddock, BA LLB Syd., MP

M em bers ap p oin ted b y the C h ief M inister o f the Australian C apital T erritory

N ot yet appointed

M em ber chosen b y H eads o f th e Research S ch ools in th e Institute o f Advanced Studies and D eans o f the F aculties in T he Faculties

Desmond Francis Nicholls, BSc NT, MSc PhD

M em ber elected b y th e academ ic staff in the Institute o f A dvanced Studies

Adrian John Gibbs, BSc ARCS, PhD Land

M em bers elected b y the academ ic staff in T h e Faculties

Ian Robert Hancock, BA Melb., BPhil Oxf.

M em bers elected b y C on vocation

Mary Philomena Edmunds, BA Qld DipEd CanberraCAE, MA PhD

David Harris Solomon, BA LLB, Barrister-at-Law

M em ber elected b y th e general staff o f the

U niversity

Katrina Denise Ord, BSc

M em ber appointed by th e C ouncil

J F Muir, AO

Secretary to th e C ou n cil

The Registrar

The Council

University officers

C h an cellor

YEF.ND, Sir Geoffrey (John), AC, CBE, BCom Melb., FAIM

P ro -C h a n cello r

GRIFFIN, Pauline Marcus, AM BADipSocStud Syd, H onLittD Macq.

V ice-C h a n cello r

N IC H O L , Emeritus Professor Lawrence Walter, BSc PhD DSc Adel., FRACI, FAA

A ctin g D e p u ty V ice-C h an cellor and D irecto r, In stitu te o f A dvanced Studies

CARVER, John Henry, AM MSc Syd., PhD ScD Camb., FAJP, FAA, FTS

D e p u ty V ice-C h an cellor

TERRELL, Professor Richard Deane, BEc Adel., PhD

P ro-V ice-C h an cellor, C hair o f the B oard o f th e In stitu te o f A dvanced Studies

W H IT E , Professor John William, CM G , MSc Syd, M A D Phil O xf, FRSChem, FRACI, FAPS

P ro-V ice-C h an cellor, C hair o f the B oard o f T h e F aculties

GRIFFIN, Professor David Michael, MA PhD ScD Camb., FRSA

P ro -V ice-C h an cellor (P la n n in g and A d m in istration )

SELTH, Philip Alan, BA LLB, Barrister-at-Law NSW , Barrister & Solicitor A C T

P ro -V ice-C h an cellor (F inance and Fabric)

BARTON, Professor Allan Douglas, BCom Melb., PhD Camb., FASA

D ea n , G raduate School

SPEAR, Raymond Harold, PhD DSc Melb., FAPS, FAIP

D ea n o f S tudents

CO R N ISH , Selwyn Harcourt, BEc WAust.

Registrar

ARTHUR, Robert Hugh, BA

Secretary

WILLIAMS, Warwick Raymond, BSc N S W

M aster o f U niversity H o u se

de CRESPIGNY, Richard Rafe Champion, BA Camb., Melb.&ANU, MA(OrientalSmdies), PhD, FAHA

Librarian

STEELE, Colin Robert, MA Liv., GradDipLib Lend, ALA, AALIA, KtCrossSpain

D irector, C om p u tin g Services

ERSKINE, Robin, BSc PhD Glas.

H ead , B u ild in gs and G rounds

HARDMAN, Donald, BA(Admin) CanberraCAE, FIMLS

H ead , F inance and A ccou n tin g

BUNSELL, Alan Raymond, BAppSc CanberraCAE, FCPA

H ead, M anagem ent Inform ation System s

McLAUGHLIN, George Miller, CChem, FRSChem

H ead, P u b lic Affairs D iv isio n (A cting)

MAHONEY, James, BA, MPRIA

D irector, C entre for C o n tin u in g Education

CALDWELL, Geoffrey Thomas, BA Syd., MA Calg., PhD

3

The Australian National University

Officers for ceremonial occasions

M a rs h a l

RICKARD, Michael John, BSc ARCS D IC Lend., FAIG

Esquire B edell

DELVES, Angela Christine, BSc DipEd Bath. PhDC Hull

Objectives

Objectives

t ■ ^he fundamental objective o f The I Australian National University is to be one -M- o f the world’s great research institutions, distinguished also by outstanding teaching, guiding students to the frontiers o f knowledge

and the best standards of scholarship. Specifically, it aims to:

■ engage in research, scholarship and teaching at the highest international standards;

■ foster critical inquiry and an environment that strengthens Australia’s capacity to undertake fundamental research and research on subjects o f importance for Australia;

■ provide postdoctoral, graduate and honours education at the highest international standards in all areas o f the University’s research activity;

■ provide outstanding higher education courses and other courses in the visual and performing

arts which promote the highest standards of practice;

■ sustain international links, and encourage collaborations which enable Australia to benefit from research in other countries and which make the scholarship and unique

research resources of the University, and the expertise o f its members, available to other universities and research institutions in Australia and overseas;

■ encourage links which make the scholarship and research resources o f the University accessible to the Australian community, industry and government; and

■ contribute to education, culture, welfare and economic development both within Australia generally and in the Australian Capital Territory and surrounding areas.

The Australian National University

1993 Highlights

■ Professor Deane Terrell was appointed A N U ’s ninth Vice-Chancellor from 1 January 1994.

■ Professor J.W. White, Research School of Chemistry and Chair, Board of the Institute o f Advanced Studies, was elected a Fellow o f the Royal Society.

■ Six members o f the academic staff were elected as Fellows o f the Australian Academies.

■ Five members o f the academic staff won major prizes.

■ A N U won 19 ARC research fellowships— the largest number o f any university. For 1994, A N U will have 12 Postdoctoral Research Fellows, four Queen Elizabeth II Fellows, two

Research Fellows and one Senior Research Fellow.

■ A N U has received 15 of the total 26 Pawsey Medals awarded to date. Fhe medal is awarded annually by the Australian Academy o f Science to an Australian scientist under the age o f40 for distinguished research in experimental physics.

■ Ehe Research School o f Biological Sciences and the Research School o f Chemistry each celebrated 25 years o f their establishment.

■ T he President o f the Senate and the Speaker of the House o f Representatives announced an agreement between the Commonwealth Parliament and the ANU for a Parliamentary Internship Program.

■ The Centre for Middle Eastern and Central Asian Smdies was established.

■ Professor Paul Bourke, History Program, Research School o f Social Sciences, was elected President, Academy o f Social Sciences in Australia.

■ A new Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology was inaugurated.

■ Council approved a new Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering.

■ ANU astronomers discovered evidence o f dark matter thought to account for the “missing” 90 per cent o f matter in the universe.

■ Professor Sue Serjeantson was appointed Director of the Institute o f Advanced Smdies and Deputy Vice-Chancellor.

■ ANU graduates Jeremy Kirk and Matthew Lobb were awarded Rhodes Scholarships.

■ An innovative Master o f Business Administration course was introduced.

■ The Faculties attracted more than $4.1 million in ARC research grants.

■ A SUS3.2 million contract was signed between a research group in the John Curtin School o f Medical Research and Progen Industries to produce radical new forms of treatment for cancer and other diseases.

■ The University broadened its commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smdies.

■ Chief executives from 17 Asian, Pacific and North American universities attended the Fourth Pacific Rim Public University Presidents’ Conference at ANU.

■ A high-level Chinese delegation attended a two-day workshop at the National Centre for Development Smdies, ANU, on issues related to the development, funding and management o f large infrastructure projects.

■ The Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering, became involved in a multinational collaborative agreement on research in nuclear fusion.

■ The Governor-General, M r Bill Hayden, addressed the October Conferring ofDegrees Ceremony.

1993 Highlights

■ Three academic staff received Vice Chancellor’s Awards for Teaching Excellence.

■ Canberra Critics Circle gave its annual award to the Manager, ANU Drill Hall Gallery and the Curator, A N U Art Collection for their contributions to the visual arts in Canberra.

■ Joint A N U - University o f Queensland research project found new material which may prove to be a cheap and easy solution to the worldwide problem o f toxic metal pollution o f water.

■ Judith Wright-McKinney donated more than 500 volumes o f her private collection of Australian poetry to the A N U Library.

■ An A N U research program which will put within reach the safest and most accurate diagnosis o f life-threatening illnesses was announced.

■ An A N U Law lecturer developed the first stage o f a new computer-based teaching system which represents an evolutionary leap in both teaching methods and in the concept o f the

book.

■ An A NU systems engineer developed a method o f reducing the hazards of underground coal mining.

■ Japanese Nobel Laureate, Professor Leo Esaki, visited Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering.

■ The first ANU Chess Festival became second biggest in Australia.

■ A team o f A NU scientists representing Australia negotiated an international agreement on DNA technology which will help prevent the theft o f intellectual property o f the world’s plant breeders.

■ An ANU biological anthropologist rediscovered a species o f Saudi Arabian gazelle.

■ More than 100 international astronomers attended an active galaxies conference organised by Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories.

■ ANITs Warramunga Seismic Array in the Northern Territory became one o f the world’s foremost ground stations in international monitoring of underground nuclear tests.

■ RSES scientists uncovered evidence that more than 95% o f species on Earth perished 250 million years ago because o f giant volcanic explosions in Siberia.

■ The A N U ’s AIDS Education Program was launched.

7

The Australian National University

The Year In Review

f ■ th e Australian National University has ξ. completed yet another year of major -M- achievement.

Despite severe financial constraints, the University continued its outstanding record in research and teaching. It has met the academic challenge o f the growing focus on the disciplines of information technology and engineering by creating a new Research School and a new Faculty. ANU research and teaching staff continued collaborations with a wide range of Australian and international institutions.

1993 saw the further implementation o f administrative and organisational efficiencies resulting from changes brought about by the Australian National University A ct 1991■

Em eritus Professor Laurie N ichol

The Vice-Chancellorship

'■ 1 merims Professor L W Nichol retired as Vice-Chancellor on 31 December. At the JL ^ D e c e m b e r Council meeting the Chancellor, Sir Geoffrey Yeend, said that Professor Nichol had faced unprecedented challenges during his six years as Vice-Chancellor. Under his leadership the University had made great strides on many fronts despite many external pressures. Professor Nichol had been active in all aspects o f the University’s life and his term had seen the establishment o f a new Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, a new Research School o f Information Sciences and Engineering and successful amalgamation with the Canberra Institute o f the Arts. Senior University staff and former colleagues attended a farewell for Professor and Mrs Nichol when he unveiled a portrait by Brian Seidel. In November, Council appointed Professor Nichol as an

Honorary Fellow o f University House.

Professor R D Terrell has been appointed Vice-Chancellor from 1 January 1994. Professor Terrell, who has a distinguished research and teaching background, was previously Deputy Vice-Chancellor and has been Chair, The Board o f The Faculties and Dean, Faculty of Economics and Commerce.

Senior appointments

"W"n December, Professor S W Serjeantson was ■ appointed Director o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies and Deputy Vice-Chancellor to succeed Professor M Neutze. Professor Serjeantson was formerly in the Division o f Clinical Sciences, John Curtin School o f Medical Research and had been the School’s Acting Director.

Council appointed M r R B Lansdown as Chair, Building and Grounds Committee in March following the resignation o f M r G Wilkinson. In December M r F M uir was reappointed as Chair,

The Year In Review

Professor D eane Terrell

Professor Sue Serjeantson

Finance Committee and as the coopted member o f Council.

O ther senior appointments during the year included the reappointment o f Professor A D Barton as Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Finance and

Fabric) and the extension o f Professor D M Griffin’s appointment as Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Chair, Board of The Faculties to 30 June 1994. Emeritus Professor P H Karmel’s appointment as Chair, Board of the Institute o f the Arts was

Professor Kevin Lafferty

extended for a further three years until 31 December 1996. Mr S H Cornish was appointed as Dean o f Students for three years.

Three new Directors o f Research Schools were appointed during the year. Professor K Lafferty, Director o f the Barbara Davis Centre for Childhood Diabetes at the University of

Colarado, USA, became Director o f the John Curtin School o f Medical Research; Professor J Mould, Professor of Astronomy at the Henry Robinson Laboratory o f Astrophysics, California

Instimte o f Technology, USA, became Director of the M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories; and Professor D Green, Chief

9

The Australian National University

Professor Jeremy M o u ld

Science Advisor in the Commonwealth Department o f Environment, Sport and Territories, was appointed Director of the Research School o f Earth Sciences. Professor H Nix was reappointed as Director of the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies.

New Deans were also elected for three Faculties. Professor R B Stanton became Dean of the new Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology. Professor T Campbell was elected

Professor Robin Stanton

Dean of the Faculty o f Law and Professor J C Turner was elected Dean o f the Faculty o f Science

University Fellowships are awarded by Council on the recommendation o f the Honorary Degrees Committee to distinguished retired members of the University who wish to continue their work within the University. In December the Council offered Fellowships to Professors J C Caldwell and L R Zines.

Achievements

TE f T ajor honours were bestowed on | % / l members o f the University’s academic Λ . Y -M-stafF during the year.

Professor J W White, Research School o f Chemistry and Chair, Board o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies, was elected a Fellow o f the Royal Society.

Adjunct Professor R D Ekers, Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, and Professor A J Gibbs, Research School o f Biological Sciences, were elected Fellows o f the Australian Academy o f

Science. D r B J Chapman, and D r G R H McNicoll, both o f the Research School o f Social Sciences, were elected Fellows o f the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Professor J M D Elvin, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies and D r A Rosenfeld, Faculty o f Arts, were elected Fellows o f the Australian Academy o f the Humanities. The Academy o f the Social Sciences in Australia elected Professor P F Bourke as its President.

ANU academic staff continued to win prestigious academic prizes. Professor B K Selinger, Faculty o f Science, was chosen as the ANZAAS Medallist for 1993. D r G B Cox, John Curtin School of Medical Research, was awarded the Lemberg Medal, the most prestigious award of the Australian Society for Biochemistry and

Molecular Biology Inc. D r S T Hyde, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, was the 1993 recipient of the Pawsey Medal awarded annually by the Australian Academy o f Science to an Australian scientist under the age of 40 for distinguished research in experimental physics. O f the 26 Pawsey Medals to date, 15 have been awarded to members o f the ANU. Professor A C Wierzbicka, Faculty o f Arts, was awarded the

The Year In Review

Alexander von H um boldt Research Award for her achievements in the field o f linguistics. D r S R Taylor, a Visiting Fellow in the Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, received the

1993 Goldschmidt Medal o f the Geochemical Society.

Former members o f the staff also received prestigious awards for work wholly or partly done at ANU. These included Emeritus Professor P O Bishop who was co-winner o f the Australia Prize

for 1993 for his work on sensory perception; Emeritus Professor H A Buchdahl who was awarded the 1993 C.E.K. Mees Medal from the Optical Society o f America for his contributions to physical and geometrical optics; and Emeritus Professor G A H orridge who was invited to present the Bidder Lecture to the Society for

Experimental Biology.

Among other notable awards were the naming of D r D H Broom, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, as 1993

ACT W om an o f the Year and Christopher Lyndon Gee, Canberra School o f Music, as 1993 Canberra Times Artist of the Year.

A major source o f research income for T he Faculties comes from the ARC competitive research grant process. For 1994, The Faculties will receive close to $3.17m for major research

grants and $1.013m for small grants. This totals some $4.18m or 4 per cent o f the total funds allocated, an increase on the allocation made last

year. T he am ount o f $548,000 received for 1993 from the Research Infrastructure Block G rant (Mechanism A) also represents an improved performance over last year and reflects the

research strength o f The Faculties. It is noted that the Institute is not eligible for most ARC grants. The ARC also administers the ARC Research

Fellowship scheme. Consistent with previous years, A N U is to host the greatest number o f new successful applicants. For 1994, there will be 12 Postdoctoral Research Fellows, four Queen

Elizabeth II Fellows, two Australian Research Fellows and one Senior Research Fellow. This success is the more outstanding when it is recalled that the Government has rendered the Institute

ineligible to receive new Research Fellows and Senior Research Fellows in 1994 and beyond. T he University continues to protest this decision in the belief that research fellowships should be

tenable at the institution o f the successful applicant’s choice.

Three grants were also received from the ARC to support joint research work with industry. More specialised grants have been obtained in the following priority areas o f Government. The

Faculty o f Asian Studies became a participating member o f the National Centre for South Asian Studies and received a 1993 UMAP grant to enable a total o f 30 ANU undergraduate students to smdy for part o f their course in either Japanese or Thai universities. In the scientific area, the University received $490,000 for Greenhouse Research, two grants from the International Science and Technology Program to promote access to the Photon Factory and the Hubble Space Telescope and two grants from the National H eart Foundation o f Australia.

In the area o f teaching, two projects “Learning from Ethnographic Film” and “Exploring Demographic Concepts and Data’’ have been funded from the National Teaching Development Grants Scheme, while the National Priority Reserve Fund has provided support for the University’s National Parliamentary Internship

Program. CA U T has funded a national university teaching workshop. The University itself awarded three Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for excellence in teaching to M r G E Fry, Research School of Pacific Studies, D r C Jones, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce and Dr R Martin, Faculty of Science.

Winners o f the Vice-Chancellor's Awards fo r Excellence in Teaching (left to right) M r Greg Fry, Research School o f Pacific Studies, D r Rosemary M artin, Faculty o f Science, a n d D r Chris Jones, Faculty o f Economics a n d Commerce

In previous years it has been reported that external organisations have entered agreements with the University and ANU 1ECH Pty Ltd to fund a total of twelve major research projects in

biological, medical and physical sciences and

1 1

The Australian National University

engineering. This year a $4.8m Research and Development Agreement extending over five years has been signed to further work in the John

Curtin School o f Medical Research.

University initiatives

"W" n September, the Minister for Science and 1 Small Business spoke at the ceremony held to -M-mark the inauguration o f the new Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology. In October, Council gave approval for the establishment o f T he Research School o f Information Sciences and Engineering from 1 January 1994. T he name o f the Research School

o f Pacific Studies was changed to the Research School o f Pacific and Asian Snidies to reflect more accurately the scope o f the work being done and planned in the school.

Senator Chris Schacht, M inister fo r Science a nd S m all Business a t the opening o f the new Faculty o f Engineering an d

Inform ation Technology

In October, the Federal Minister for Health launched a new endeavour entitled, The National Quality of Life Foundation, formed as a trust o f A N UTECH Pty Ltd. It will investigate life-style factors that influence human health and longevity. Since a wide range o f disciplines will be involved, collaboration will be encouraged with other institutions, such as The Australian Institute o f Sport.

T he Faculties significantly increased the scope o f combined degrees that are on offer by introducing the combinations Engineering/Information Technology; Commerce/Economics; four years specialist Asian smdies with Commerce, Economics, Laws or Science. Two new Masters

degrees were also introduced in, Music, Arts (Electronic Arts).

The Centre for Middle Eastern and Central Asian Smdies was established in April.

In June, the President o f the Senate and the Speaker of the House o f Representatives announced an agreement between the Commonwealth Parliament and the University establishing the Parliamentary Internship Program. It will enable selected smdents to undertake research projects with a Member o f Parliament, Parliamentary Committee or officer.

The planning for the new Master of Business Administration course progressed under the interim Directorship o f Professor F J Marceau and the appointment o f Professor B W Stening as Director for two years.

In March Council agreed to name the new large lecture theatre complex The Manning Clark Centre.

Fhe inaugural meeting o f the Consultative Council of IAS was held at the University in May. The Council comprises leading international and Australian academics.

O n the industrial front, A N U introduced renewable fixed term appointments into the flexible staffing structures o f the Institute. A NU’s general staff were moved onto the new national award structure, albeit with only partial supplementation from the Government for the transition.

A proposal for the establishment of a Research Park is being developed and is under discussion within the University.

In 1996 ANU celebrates the 50th anniversary of the assent to the A N U Act. Council has established a working patty, chaired by the Pro-Chancellor, Miss Pauline Griffin, to prepare a program of activities to mark this major milestone in the development of the University.

7

The Year In Review

Government policies and pressures

f ■ th e Government initiated several important | reviews this year, including a review on -M- funding for research inffastmcture and an inquiry into research and developm ent. The Senate also conducted an inquiry into the organisation and funding o f research in the

Higher Education Sector. Despite their overlapping nature, the University has made, or is preparing submissions, to each.

ANU participated in the Government’s quality assurance audit and hosted an external panel. A wide cross section o f the University community, including senior officers, academic and general staff, students and members o f convocation, was

involved in discussions with the panel and the University believes that the panel was favourably impressed with the many aspects of the excellence o f its activities in all areas o f its stated missions. A NU does, however, feel that there should be

clearer definitions o f the criteria applied in the quality assurance audit.

During the annual discussions with the Department o f Employment Education and Training on the University’s educational profile, the Government’s desire to regain the 1990 levels

o f school leaver entrants in 1994 was discussed. It is anticipated this will cause no difficulty for the A NU and for 1994 it will offer 1,425 places to school leavers— 100 places more than the base

allocated by the Department.

Finance

f ■ ^hc 1993 recurrent grant received from the i D epartm ent o f Employment, Education X and Training (DEET) was $197,116,000. This grant included $15,107,000 in charges to be

met by students under the Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS). The Faculties were granted an additional amount o f $550,000

for growth in student enrolments o f 120 EFTSU. As well the University received $17,093,000 for the John C urtin School o f Medical Research from the D epartm ent o f Health, H ousing Local

Government and Community Services. Ehis am ount had been taken off the D E ET allocation

to the University as a result o f a Government decision to alter the funding arrangements for the School. T he seventh report of the Higher

Education Council to Minister Beazley noted that A N U continues to protest the transfer o f funding responsibility for JCSMR from D EET to the

Department o f Health. The H EC notes that “the current arrangement may be a constraint that results in some loss of flexibility”. T he University views this as an understatement and continues to

believe that the funding responsibility for the School should be returned to DEET. The University received a grant o f $4,750,000 for the Institute o f the Arts from the ACT Government consequent upon the merger o f the Instimte with the University.

While in money terms the grant was some $ 14m greater than in the previous year (after allowing for the adjustments for the John Curtin School and the Institute of the Arts), in real terms the grant was marginally smaller. In money terms, the

total of the grants was $689,000 less than in 1992; however in real terms the reduction in the grant was somewhat larger. Over the year, the operating cost index rose by 1.4 p>er cent, and actual enrolments grew by 2.7 pier cent (249 students).

The resultant reduction in funding pier EFTSU, together with the additional enrolments, placed severe pressures on resources within The Faculties. W ith the introduction o f the Relative

Funding Model for The Faculties, the University effectively receives a two-line budget from DEET, one for the Institute and one for T he Faculties.

Other University income received for opierating purposes (mainly interest on the investment of University recurrent funds and a contribution to University overheads from the Syndicated

Research Projects managed by ANUTECH Pty Ud), amounted to $6,933,000. This was $744,00 less than the 1992 receipts mainly because of the reduction in interest income received.

Funds were allocated to operational areas as follows: Institute of Advanced Studies 47 pier cent; The Faculties 21 pier cent; Central Administration 17 pier cent; and the Library, Computer Services Centre and Instimte o f the Arts 15 pier cent. These allocations differed only

marginally from those in 1992. Included in the above allocations were $17,361,000 for new equipment purchases across the University and

$2,453,000 for new research activities in the

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The Australian National University

Institute of Advanced Studies under the Strategic Plan, which is funded from a one per cent levy on the Instimte’s budget.

T he University established a building fund o f modest size in 1985 to enable urgent building extensions and refurbishment projects to be undertaken. T he money for the fund is mainly drawn from interest on long-term University investments, surplus income generated by the Housing Operation, capital contributions received from full fee paying programs for overseas students, and interest on Special Purpose Funds held by the Schools and Faculties. Over the years, the University has become increasingly short o f office accommodation for staff, teaching and laboratory space, and residential accommodation for smdents. As well, there is a need for extensive maintenance and

refurbishment resulting from an ageing stock o f buildings. Total capital works financed from the building fund in 1993 amounted to $10,256,584. The major projects undertaken in 1993 were the Accelerator Hall Stage II (cost $4.6m) and an extension to the Research School of Chemistry (cost $2. lm).

T he University received no capital works funds from the Department o f Employment, Education and Training in 1993, and this accentuated the accommodation problems on campus. However, D E ET changed its policy on capital works funding in 1993. From 1994, capital works funding for all universities is being rolled into the recurrent grants. T he University is to receive $2,875,000 in 1994, and over $6,000,000 each year thereafter. Fhis is a most welcome change in funding arrangements.

Recurrent funds reached their peak in real terms in 1977. Since then, their purchasing power has declined by approximately four per cent. However, because o f the need to increase expenditures on items such as building and site

maintenance, higher energy costs, salary increases (which were not fully funded from supplement­ ation) and incremental salary creep arising from staff becoming more senior over time, total staff numbers funded from recurrent grants have declined by 20 per cent from their peak in 1977.

The following table compares equivalent full-time staff, other than part-time teaching staff, casual staff, and academic visitors, financed from recurrent grants for the years 1977 and 1991—

1993.

In addition to the above funds available for spending on general University activities, the University attracts special purpose funds for research and consulting activities, and endowments. In 1993, the cash grants received by the University amounted to $38,460,000. This comprised research grants o f $23,650,000 received from Commonwealth Government agencies (principally the Australian Research Council); grants of $ 14,810,000 from other sources (State Government, industry and international agencies such as the Rockefeller Foundation and Ford Foundation); and income from consulting activities, sales of publications, donations and interest on special purpose funds of $3,640,000. This income is specific to Individual research stafFprojects/endowments or other designated activities, and is not normally available for general University purposes. Further details of major grants and donations are shown later in this chapter.

Such special purpose funds are becoming an increasingly important source o f income to the University, and they now represent 19.4 per cent o f the total funds available. T he number of full-time staff equivalents employed from these funds has increased substantially over recent years,

from 50 in 1977 to 505 in 1993.

The University introduced a Full Fee Program (FFP) for overseas students in 1988, in accordance with Government policy. The

program has been progressively expanded and it now covers all the University’s educational areas. In 1993, 612 FFP smdents were enrolled in The Faculties, and 366 smdents were enrolled in the Institute (principally in the National Centre for Development Studies). T he income received by the University from FFP smdents amounted to $10,400,000. The income is allocated to the

academic areas providing the programs after deduction o f Central Areas charges for administration and a capital contribution.

Full-time equivalent staff financed from recurrent funds 1977, 1991-1993

Excluding part-tim e teachers, casual staff, academic visitors and staff o f the Institute o f T he Arts

Staff category 1977 1991 1992 1993

Academic activities Research only Academic 518 494 490 485

Non-academic 1225 930 901 898

Sub-total 1743 1424 1391 1383

Teaching and research Academic 402 390 392 392

Non-academic 355 214 219 216

Sub-total 757 604 611 608

Sub-total Academic activities 2500 2028 2002 1991

Academic services Library 153 147 132 136

Com puting 41 43 48 50

O ther (a) 24 27 53 55

Sub-total Academic services 218 217 233 241

O ther services Student services 21 22 21 22

Administration 411 328 341 (b)360

Buildings & grounds(c) 216 140 116 120

Public services (CCE) 24 17 18 12

Sub-total o th er services 672 507 496 514

TOTA L UNIVERSITY 3390 2752 2731 2746

(a) Comprises Instructional Resources Unit (IRU) (30), Centre for Educational Development and Academic Methods (CEDAM) (7), and Animal Services (19). The latter was transferred from JC S M R in 1992.

(b) For 1993 includes National Office for Overseas Student Recognition staff (7).

(c) Parking and Traffic staff (8), were transferred to outside funds in 1992.

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The Australian National University

Institute of Advanced Studies

inaugural meeting o f the Institute of d Advanced Studies Consultative Council, -M- which was established in response to a recommendation o f the Review o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies chaired by Sir Ninian Stephen, was held in May 1993. T he members of the Consultative Council, which includes world leaders in research from outside Australia and the heads o f various research bodies and councils in Australia, had the opportunity to familiarise

themselves with the Institute’s structure, funding, staffing and aims and aspirations. Members also met with the then Minister o f Employment,

Education and Training who spoke favourably about the Institute and the assistance its staff provides to Government.

O n this occasion members o f the Consultative Council limited their advice to the University to an indication o f the general direction of their thinking on a number o f issues which confront the Institute in common with other major research institutions throughout the world— such as strategic planning, resource management and research balance. T he next meeting of the Consultative Council, in 1994, will look more closely at the charter for the Institute for the next decade. Schools and centres in the Instimte were advised to begin planning their ten-year mission statements within the context o f the 1995 review o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies by the University and the Australian Research Council.

During the later part o f the year, the University and the Australian Research Council commenced planning activity to prepare for their joint review o f the Instimte and its schools and centres. The joint preparations were marked by a spirit o f

cooperation and by year’s end good progress had been made towards framing the terms of reference for the reviews and the arrangements for their conduct.

Resource management in the Instimte of Advanced Studies has been characterised by competitive allocation of major equipment and com puting infrastructure in the University and by

Institute-wide competitive allocation of funds for strategic research developments. W ithin schools

and centres assessment o f research needs is the major determinant in allocating resources to research areas. Planning for the 1994 budget recognised the need for allocations between

schools to be influenced rather more by needs and merit than in the past. W ith the support o f the heads of research schools, the 1994 budget was allocated on the basis o f increasing the fund for the Institute-wide competitive allocations for strategic research developments and on the basis o f assessment o f each school’s performance in the areas of postgraduate training, collaboration with other Australian universities and in securing external funding for their research activities.

Arising from a recommendation of the Stephen Committee, the Instimte o f Advanced Studies has in place a program to expand its already

significant level o f interaction and collaborative research activity with Australian universities. The goal is for this activity to represent 12 perccn t o f the Institute’s budget by 1998. The University has made its first report to the Australian Research Council on its progress and was able to report that the IAS has met the first two milestones.

Following the adoption by the ANU Council o f a statement of objectives for The Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies developed and had accepted by Council a statement of objectives for the Instimte of Advanced Studies. The statement reads:

The fundamental objective ofthe Australian National University is to be one o f the world’ s great research institutions, distinguished also by outstanding teaching guiding students to the frontiers o f knowledge and the best standards o f

scholarship.

The Instimte o f Advanced Studies aims to maintain and enhance the University’s world class standing and excellence by:

■ engaging in research and scholarship at the highest international standards;

■ strengthening Australia’s capacity to undertake fundamental research both generally and in relation to subjects of national importance;

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■ providing outstanding postdoctoral and graduate training in all areas o f the Institute’s research activity;

■ cooperating with the University’s Faculties in both research and teaching;

■ encouraging collaborations which allow other Australian universities to benefit from the concentration o f research resources available at the Institute;

■ sustaining international exchanges and collaborations which enable Australia to contribute to and benefit from research in other countries; and

■ encouraging links which makes the scholarship and research resources o f the Institute accessible to the Australian community, industry and government."

Research School of Biological Sciences

t ■ ^he Research School o f Biological Sciences , (RSBS) is a leading national and Λ - international centre for fundamental biological research and post graduate training. Its general objectives are:

T o undertake research in biology, to the highest standards, with particular emphasis on integrative research in three areas—

■ plant biology, especially photosynthesis, cell biology, microbial interactions and ecological systems;

about major biological problems and continues to generate a large national and international following. Over the last decade about 15% of all published Australian research in biology has been

done in RSBS, and 31% o f all Australian high impact research publications in biology, as measured by citation frequency, bear the address o f the School.

In 1993 the Research School of Biological Sciences completed the consolidation o f its research programs which began with the restructuring from departments to research groups in 1986. Since then, two cycles o f external review have been completed, leading to significant internal redistribution o f resources. Four cycles of competitions, across campus, for strategic

planning initiatives have rewarded new ideas and significandy aided the structuring processes in the School. All o f this activity has taken its toll of resources and creative research foregone. At a

retreat in early July, group leaders and professors pondered the School’s future beyond conventional molecular biology and beyond the 1995 Review by ANU and ARC.

Significant achievements and enterprises in 1993 include:

Election o f Professor AJ Gibbs to the Fellowship of the Australian Academy o f Science. Professor Gibbs is a world authority on plant viruses and

has made major contributions to knowledge of the evolution and ecology o f viruses in plants, vertebrates and insects. H e has also played a leading role in establishing procedures for the

woddwide identification and classification of viruses, which have led to the establishment of one o f the world’s best biological databases in the Bioinformatics Facility in RSBS.

■ neurobiology, especially visual sciences and developmental neurobiology;

■ molecular and genetic studies, especially mechanisms relating to development, populations, systematics and evolution; and

T o serve as a research resource in these areas of biology for other Australian universities.

T he research topics addressed are chosen by individual investigators and groups to provide insight into fundamental biological problems. T he research itself is curiosity driven and enriched

by serendipity. It has changed the way we think

Emeritus Professor RO Slatyer, distinguished scholar in residence in RSBS, was made Companion o f the Order o f Australia (AC) in the

Queen’s Birthday Honours in June. H e was awarded the Gold Medal of the Ecological Society o f Australia in September.

Dr Jacek Plazinski took up a deferred ARC Senior Fellowship and one ARC postdoctoral fellowship was awarded and will be taken up in Dr. Hardham’s laboratory. Under ARC current

policy, Dr. Plazinski will be the last individual to so benefit form the outstanding opportunities for research in RSBS and the ANU.

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The Australian National University

Professor A drian Gibbs

Building on contacts established in the parliamentary Secretariats, the School took an active role in the genesis of, and submissions to, a Senate Inquiry into the Organisation and

Professor R/tIpb Slatyer

Funding of Research in the Higher Education Sector. A plea was made for continued autonomy o f the IAS, and for an adequately supported ARC, as complementary but not competitive elements o f a diverse research ecosystem in the Higher Education Sector. Professor Rolfe and others in the School also made submissions to the Industry Commission Enquiry into Research and Development in Australia.

Ehe School co-sponsored a conference on "Communicating Research" with University Public Affairs and ANUTech, featuring Cornelia Dean, the former deputy-editor, science and medicine of the New York Times. The School’s outreach has been greatly expanded by revision of the popular publication "Biologic" to address a target audience o f senior higher school students and potential undergraduates in biology. Soon, all Australian high schools will have received a complimentary copy, with an invitation to join our growing mailing list.

Research School of Chemistry

t ■ th e Research School o f Chemistry (RSC) 1 has established itself as one of the world’s leading centres for chemical research. The School is organised in terms o f 20 research groups covering the broad activities of synthetic, structural, mechanistic and theoretical chemistry, with special emphases on studies of condensed matter and biological chemistry. The School also plays a major role in Centre for Molecular Structure and Function. T he RSC has a major commitment to providing the best possible environment for the education o f young scientists at the postgraduate and postdoctoral levels. A recent survey o f the School’s alumni established that 140 past members presently hold positions in other Australian Universities. A notable feature o f the School’s organisation and planning has been the regular introduction o f new research activities. O ne third of the School’s current research has been established over the last eight years, some o f it made possible by retirements, but also by a tax on the groups which have continued on through this period. Reflecting the general demography of academic appointments throughout the country, there is likely to be a significant number o f retirements from the RSC over the next decade,

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and so the School Is making further tenured appointments in advance of these departures so as to maintain a desirable age profile. As a consequence, three new research groups were established in 1993.

Research highlights in 1993 from the RSC include:

■ T he discovery by D r John Thompson, in a collaboration undertaken with the University o f Queensland, o f a method for modifying the mineral kaolinite and radically altering its

properties to advantage. T he m ethod has led to the development of a family o f kaolinite amorphous derivatives ("KAD") with substantially modified and potentially valuable

properties. T he process for manufacturing KAD from kaolinite is very simple, low in energy requirements and is transportable. It has considerable potential as a low-cost scavenger for environmentally problematical

metals such as lead, silver, cadmium, zinc, copper and uranium in contaminated groundwaters, mine seepage, and industrial effluent. U nder certain conditions the scavenged metal can be retrieved and the KAD

recycled. KAD also has a significant potential as a water softener. A major goal o f this research has been to modify the properties of kaolinite to create new markets for Australian

kaolinite reserves and to add value to kaolinite before export.

Further collaborative research, this time with the National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology in Brisbane, has led to the identification of the chemical structures o f two naturally occurring plant components which possess interesting biological activities.

T he first, from the leaves o f the avocado species, Persea americana, shows a specific necrotic effect on mammary cell tissue of lactating animals and is active against a

number o f tum our cell lines. A provisional patent is being taken out on the potential therapeutic use of this compound. T he second compound, extracted from Crofton weed,

causes specific damage to the small intra-hepatic bile ducts in mice and could be a contributor to the "milk sickness" syndrome. This disorder was a principal cause o f death in

the central west of the USA during early settlement and resulted from humans drinking

milk from cows that had grazed on a closely related plant.

■ The derivation by the Bio-organic Chemistry Group o f the absolute three-dimensional structure o f JHB3, the juvenile hormone characteristic o f flies has received coverage in

New Scientist and on the BBC World Service Science Report. The Group has now carried out the first asymmetric synthesis o f JH B3, which provides the natural hormone efficiently and

in extremely high stereochemical purity. The juvenile hormone system o f insects mediates the neurohormonal control o f development and reproduction in the insect. Although flies are the vectors o f some o f the most severe diseases o f man and livestock, their juvenile hormone system has been poorly understood

relative to that of other insea groups. Knowledge o f the precise structure o f JHB3 and the availability o f pure hormone will allow scientists to identify its sites o f action in the fly, and to design synthetic insecticides on a rational, insect-sp>ecific basis.

■ The Protein Crystallography group has elucidated the structure o f the PI 1 protein. This is a key component in the complex regulatory system that is used by bacteria to

regulate the metabolic uptake o f nitrogen. PI 1 interaas with a number o f other proteins and from our structure we have identified which part is responsible for one of these interactions.

The low resolution struaure o f a baaerial quinone oxido-reductase has also been determined. In addition to its enzymatic activity, this protein is of great interest since it shows sequence similarity to alcohol

dehydrogenase and zeta crystallin which is found in the eye lens o f guinea pigs. The structure determination o f this dehydrogenase is expeaed to cast light on the way enzymes

evolve from one another.

The most notable event in the School in 1993, however, was the election of Professor John White to the Royal Society, the fourth member of RSC to be so honoured over the last decade. John W hite’s research has been addressed at an

understanding of the reasons why molecules self assemble to form crystals or quite complex biological structures such as virus. In order to achieve this understanding, it has been necessary first of all to determine by diffraction the structures themselves, i.e. the patterns formed in

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The Australian National University

The approach taken at the Research School to the study o f the Earth is to reach a quantitative understanding o f the planet through a combination o f laboratory studies, field experiments and numerical modelling o f the physical and chemical processes involved. The strands o f research include:

■ the study o f the behaviour o f terrestrial materials under the conditions that are representative o f the Earth’s interior, emphasising regions o f melting and o f changes in physical properties revealed by seismological investigation.

Professor John W hite

the self assembly process. For this, thermal neutrons, obtained from nuclear reactors or pulsed neutron sources, have been shown to be uniquely powerful by W hite and his colleagues. His methods use selective labelling of molecules by replacing some o f the hydrogen atoms in molecules by the heavier isotope deuterium. This process o f isotopic replacement in effect imparts a different “colour” to the labelled part and has been used successfully to determine molecular structure at surfaces, in solutions, and for complex

biological structures such as vimses. W hite and his group have not only developed much of the methodology but were also the first to apply the techniques to molecular solids, the elasticity of biopolymers, synthetic plastics and rubber, as well as the assembly o f molecules on the surface o f catalysts.

Research School of Earth vSciences

t ■ th e broad research objective of the Research > ' School o f Earth Sciences is the study o f the J L structure and evolution o f the Earth. This requires the study o f processes:

■ within the deeper parts o f the Earth in the mantle and core,

■ within the outer layers (the Earth’s crust, oceans and atmosphere), and

■ the interactions between mantle, crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere that have shaped the planet’s outer surface.

■ the examination o f the chemical and isotopic signatures o f rocks and minerals in order to determine the conditions under which they were formed and to establish the time scale o f geological events.

■ the geophysical probing o f the internal structure of the Earth, primarily using seismic methods.

■ the modelling o f the dynamics of the Earth’s interior, and o f consequent tectonic processes, and the modelling o f fluid processes in the earth’s emst and in oceanic circulation.

■ the investigation o f global change as recorded in earth materials, with emphasis on the last million years and on distinction between anthropogenic and other sources o f change.

Substantial effort has been directed this year to the development of techniques for the investigation o f past climate in the Australian region using high resolution isotopic records recovered from massive corals. Work in the Environmental Geochemistry group has made use o f oxygen isotope information to provide information on water temperature and on the intensity o f monsoons and El Nino events. Carbon isotope records taken from the same samples indicate a significant change in the isotopic balance at the time o f mass-spawning on the coral reefs, it is hoped that this will provide a close calibration o f the time scale for the isotopic and chemical records. Related work in the Geochronology and Isotope Geochemistry group has made use o f the ratio o f strontium to calcium in corals to provide a sensitive indicator o f the temperature o f the ocean water in which the coral has grown. The different isotopic system are complementary and collectively should provide

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significant information on past-climate by using coral samples from different localities.

The presence o f free and reactive fluids within the Earth have had a major effect on the style of tectonics and deformation o f our planet. Fluids have a strong influence on the deformation o f the earth both on short time scales, as in earthquakes, or on long time scales as in the formation o f fold belts. The majority o f ore deposits and their environments are intimately related to the influence o f fluids to first extract the critical ingredients from a larger mass of rock and then to deposit them in a concentrated zone. Significant

progress has been made during the year on the way in which fluids interact with deforming materials. Experimental observations have been

made o f the way in which the interaction between fluids and the gouge in a fault zone affect the time dependence o f the strength o f a fault, and these

have been complemented by the use o f computational and electrical analogue techniques to model flow, mixing and ore deposition within deforming materials. Support from the University

Major Equipment Fund will allow the establishment o f a major facility for the analysis and characterisation of fluid inclusions to allow geochemical fingerprinting o f the nature o f the

fluids involved in the formation o f ore deposits.

In addition to its research activities, the School has continued to develop its teaching programs. The annual Summer School in Earth Sciences had

two separate programs in 1993: the first week on the Physics o f the Earth and the second week on the Chemistry o f the Earth. Both programs are aimed at introducing Australian and N ew Zealand undergraduate smdents with physics, chemistry and mathematics backgrounds to the Earth Sciences as well as expanding the horizons of smdents o f geology. The Research School also

provides undergraduate courses and Ffonours-year supervision in a number o f areas in T he Faculties (Geology, Physics and Engineering), as well as occasional lecture series in other universities.

1993 marked the twentieth anniversary o f the Research School o f Earth Sciences as a separate unit within the University. During this period it has been guided by a sequence o f strong leaders: Professor Hales the foundation Director from

1973-1977, Professor Ringwood from 1977-1983 and Professor Lambeck from 1984-1992. Following the expiry o f Professor Lambeck’s term, the School was heavily involved

Professor D a v id Green

in the process o f selecting a new head. Professor D.H. Green, Professor o f Geology at the University o f Tasmania, has been appointed as Director o f the School from January 1994.

Professor Green is a former member o f the School and has been an active Visiting Fellow over the last two years whilst he has been in Canberra as Chief science Advisor to the Department o f

Environment, Sport and Territories. H e will bring a research interest in Petrology to complement the current activities in the School.

A very major loss to the School during the year came with the death o f Professor Ringwood in November. Professor Ringwood had been ill for the last 15 months and had borne his painful

affliction very bravely. Professor Ringwood was certainly one o f the most notable and internationally recognised Australian scientists and had made a major contribution to ANU over

a career spanning 35 years. His work on fundamental questions relating to the interior of the earth has been a very major influence on the development o f the Eanh Sciences. H e also had a

keen interest in the application of his knowledge and put major effort into such products as the SYNROC technique for the immobilisation of nuclear waste and the development of very hard

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The Australian National University

John Curtin School of Medical Research

Professor Ted Ringwood

composite materials based on diamonds and boron nitride.

Professor Kevin Lafferty, formerly Research Director o f the Barbara Davis Centre for Childhood Diseases, Denver Colarado, was appointed Director o f the School. Professor Sue Serjeantson was acting Director until the arrival o f the new Director. Professor Lafferty met with the JCSMR Research Advisory Board in July. ITie

composition o f the Board changed this year and now comprises Professor P Kuchel, Head Department o f Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Professor T. J. M artin, Director the Austin Research Institute, Professor M. Rowe, School o f Physiology and Pharmacology, University o f New South Wales, Professor J. Shine, Director the Garvan Research Institute, and the Director o f the Instimte of Advanced Studies, ANU. The School is grateful for the time and advice given to the Director by members of the RAB which supplies an expert objective external source o f review and guidance in planning research directions and funding within the School.

In November, a five-year $US3.2 million deal was signed between the Group led by D r Chris Parish and the Australian Biotechnology company, Progen Industries Limited, for research and development in anti-cancer drugs. Some of this

t ■ Ih e research mission o f the John Curtin School o f Medical Research is to do long term basic research leading to understanding the living systems and processes which produce human health and disease. We preserve the flexibility to develop discoveries which promise clinical application, whenever they occur. T he four Divisions o f the School,

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cell Biology; Clinical Sciences, and Neuroscience encompass a very wide range o f research disciplines in the medical sciences, allowing the biological bases o f many diseases to be studied from a fundamental, strongly molecular, point of view and providing great scope for cooperative projects and synergistic interactions. Over 60 PhD students collaborate with research staff in this endeavour.

D r Chris Parish

?.?

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work will be carried out in new laboratories, created from a former seminar room and storage areas. These laboratories, named the Howard Florey Laboratories, were opened by the Chief

Minister o f the A CT, Rosemary Follett, MLA, in December.

The School won support for two new research ventures from the University’s Strategic Initiative Program; a Centre for the study o f Autoimm une Diseases and a project to smdy the molecular basis

of Memory. Both involve cooperation between several groups in different Divisions. W e were also successful in attracting support from the Boardman Com m ittee to acquire several large

items of equipment, a Beckman Optima-XLA analytical ultracentrifuge, a Silicon Graphics Indigo 2 Extreme desktop molecular modelling work station and an Elite XL Flow Cytometer.

Professor Graeme Cox was awarded the Lemberg Medal of the Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the sixth scientist from the School to receive this honour since its

inception.

A major breakthrough in academic staffing arrangements was achieved this year with the ratification by the University Council of regulations allowing for Renewable Fixed Term appointments. This followed a great deal o f work

by members o f the School, notably Professor Young and Professor Blanden. This allows appointments to be made at academic levels B

through D for five years initially, with further five year terms available following review. T he first advertisement calling for applications for these positions has already been placed and the first

appointments will be made in 1994. The availability o f these positions offering a career structure for non-tenured researchers is expected to have a positive effect on morale and a

significant impact on the pattern o f research in the future.

Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories (MSSSO) form one of the world’s premier optical astronomical instimtions, carrying out research in most areas of stellar and galactic astrophysics, and offering PhD

studies in an internationally renowned graduate program.

A major achievement during 1993 was the successful detection of a microlensing event in a challenging experiment designed to search for dark matter in the Halo o f our Galaxy. This project is seeking an answer to one of the most puzzling features o f the Universe— that 90 per cent o f its matter content is currently unseen. This ’missing mass’ makes its presence felt through its gravitational attraction on other matter, but without experiments to constrain the mass spectrum we can only theorise as to its namre. Competing hypotheses are that is might be composed o f some form o f weakly-interacting particles pervading parts o f the Universe, or that it might reside in objects o f astronomical dimensions, akin to asteroids, planets or extremely low-mass stars. The present experiment is designed to detect "massive astronomical compact halo objects" (MACHOs) surrounding our own Milky Way Galaxy. Einstein’s relativity tells us that such objects can ’warp space’, and so act like

lenses in amplifying the light of more distant objects in any accidental line-up. The M ACHO team (from MSSSO, the Lawrence Livermore

Laboratory, and the University o f California) are regularly monitoring the light of about 10 million stars in the Magellanic Clouds, in the expectation o f detecting a handful o f such lensing events over

a period o f several years. In September they were able to announce their first detection after a year’s observation. This result has caused an immense amount o f interest in the scientific world, and the

experiment holds promise o f filling in one o f the most significant gaps in our understanding of the Universe at large.

For several years, MSSSO astronomers have been heading Australian efforts to obtain access to one o f the new generation o f 10-m class optical telescopes. Foremost in the planning stage has

been the need to assess whether any astronomical sites on the Australian continent meet the exacting requirements o f such a sophisticated instrument. A satellite survey conducted in

collaboration with the Meteorological Bureau has revealed that the best location, in terms o f cloud cover, lies in the north Flinders Ranges in South Australia. During 1993, an expedition was

mounted to test the steadiness o f the atmosphere ("astronomical seeing") at Freeling Heights there. Two substantial periods o f seeing measurement were undertaken in Ju n e- July and November-

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The Australian National University

December, and the results o f these observations will guide future decision making and planning.

The year saw the successful commissioning o f a new Cryogenic Array Spectrograph-Imager (CASPIR) on the 2.3-m Telescope at Siding Spring. Construction o f this instmment has been the top MSSSO development priority over the last two years. It will undertake a wide variety of scientific investigations, including the physics o f star formation, the chemical composition o f the very coolest starts, the nature o f active galactic nuclei, and the smdy o f high-redshift quasars.

Research on active galactic nuclei seemed to reach a significant synthesis at a well-timed international meeting directed at the physics o f all the complex observational phenomenology associated with quasars, radiosources, and emission line galaxies. Unification of these phenomena in a common physical model emerged as a theme o f the meeting. Billed as the First Stromlo Symposium, this was an excellent prototype for biennial meetings which will assemble top international astrophysicists in Australia to focus on the most ripe and productive topics in astronomy.

Professor Jeremy Mould, formerly Professor o f Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, took up the Directorship of the observatories during December. His principle research interests are observational cosmology and observational aspects o f the evolution o f stars. He is Principal Investigator for the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic

Distance Scale. The goal o f that project is to measure the Hubble Constant, and thus the age and size of the Universe. At Caltech he served three years as Executive Officer for Astronomy and then joined the Science Steering Committee for the W.M. Keck Telescope, now the world’s largest optical telescope.

Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies

t ■ th e primary aims o f the Research School o f ‘j Pacific Studies are to conduct research and .M . graduate and postdoctoral training, at the highest level, on the societies, economies and physical environments o f Fast and Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, and their relationship to

Australia. In order to reflect more tmly the range o f the School’s research interests it was decided during the year to expand its name, from the beginning o f 1994, to the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies.

The School’s research is a blend of historical and contemporary studies, and is based on long term informed expertise, concerned primarily with the social sciences: namely anthropology, prehistory, economics, geography, history, linguistics, political and social change, international relations, pieace, defence and strategic studies, but also the environmental sciences o f biogeography and geomorphology, and quarternary research. Research is conducted through four divisions comprising eight disciplinary departments and seven interdisciplinary centres or units. The North Australia Research Unit, located in Darwin, operates outside the divisional structure. Several programs and projects are conducted across disciplinary and departmental boundaries. These include the Gender Relations Project, Regime Change and Regime Maintenance Project, the Northeast Asia Program, Transformation o f Communist Systems Project and the Modern Economic History of Southeast Asia Project.

In many instances the research incorporates the expertise o f others outside the School through cooperation with other Australian and overseas universities, governments and institutions. At the same time, the range o f expertise of our own specialist staff is called upon to provide advice to governments and other organisations, to participate as consultants, as members of committees, in joint projects and for long-term secondments. In this way the School contributes to issues of national importance in the region. Examples for 1993 of joint research, and cooperation with governments and other institutions are listed in the appendices attached to this Report.

Developments such as the successful conclusion o f the GATT negotiations and the growing involvement o f Australia in the Asia- Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) fomm are transforming patterns o f economic, strategic and cultural relations in the region. Correspxmdingly, the emphasis in the School’s research program is modified and expanded to incorporate the new developments. The work by the Economics Division on APEC heads o f state in Seattle in

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November. Similarly, recent developments in the Indian economy led the Economics Division to extend research to South Asia. This, in turn, has been enhanced by the insights derived from earlier work by the Economics Department on East Asia. The Strategic and Defence Studies Centre made a

major contribution towards the establishment o f the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP), directed towards confidence

building in the region.

Significant progress was made in the technical area during the year with the development o f the luminescence D ating Laboratory. Using luminescence dating techniques on a num ber o f Australian sites, members o f the Department o f

Prehistory obtained results to indicate an unexpected antiquity for the colonisation o f the continent— 50,000- 60,000 years in several cases. Similarly, exciting advances were made in the extraction o f organic residues from archaeological and other fossil sources. T he first

haemoglobin and DNA was isolated from remains o f extinct Australian marsupials which will open the way to identification and dating o f the residues.

A number o f new initiatives in the School’s research program were expanded upon in conferences or workshops, which attracted specialists from around the world. T he Northeast Asia Program sponsored the first international

conference on modern Taiwan with the National Chenchi University, Taipei on the theme Taiwan in the Asia— Pacific in the 1990s’. It also sponsored a workshop, along with the School’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, and Murdoch University, on China as a power in the Asia- Pacific region. The Department of

International Relations organised another meeting o f the A N U /Institute o f the W orld Economy Moscow roundtable and with the East— West Centre, Hawaii organised the ’Economic and

Security Cooperation in the Pacific’ conference. T he Peace Research Centre organised a major international seminar, in conjunction with the Department o f Foreign Affairs and Trade and the

International Peace Academy, on ’UN Peacekeeping at the Crossroads’. The Australia— Japan Research Centre hosted a conference, on Japanese and Australian labour market

organisation. T he Centre has also been developing a research project, with the University o f Adelaide and the Chinese Academy o f the Social Sciences, to analyse the impact of China’s entry into GATI

on both the Chinese and the regional economies. T he Division o f Pacific and Asian History hosted four major international conferences on the

historical construction o f Japanese identity; colonialism, post-colonialism and the Chinese world; the Pacific Islands since independence; and

the history o f the environment in China. It was also a joint sponsor of the conference on ’Transmissions in Islam’, and with the Departments o f Human Geography and Political

and Social Change, sponsored the 'Vietnam Update’ conference. ’Labour: Sharing the Benefits’ was the theme o f this year’s ’Indonesia Update’ conference, organised by the Economics Department’s Indonesia Project and the Department o f political and Social Change. The latter department also hosted another two conferences during the year on ’Ethnicity and

Politics in South East Asia and the South Pacific’ and on ’"Traditional" and "Modern" in Contemporary Pacific Politics’.

A number o f senior staff appointments were made during 1992 to take effect from 1993. Professor R. Gerard W ard, who had been Director o f the Research School since 1981, relinquished the position in May at the completion o f his term. In

December 1992 University Council approved the appointment o f Professor M C Ricklefs as Director for a period o f five years. Professor

Ricklefs, w ho had been Professor History at Monash University, took up the position in June. O ther appointments included Professor A Anderson, formerly o f the University o f Otago, who took up the Chair o f Prehistory in July.

Professor R Duncan was appointed Head of the National Centre for Development Studies following the retirement o f Professor H Hughes and will take up the position at the beginning of

1994. Professor Duncan was previously Chief o f the International Trade Division o f the World Bank. Senior staff promotions included that of D r H Nelson o f the Division of Pacific and Asian

History and D r R Jones o f the Department of Prehistory to Professor. D r J Cotton resigned from the Northeast Asia Program in October to take up the Chair of Political Science at the

University o f Tasmania.

Academic excellence for a number o f members o f the School was publicly recognised during the year. Professor M Elvin was elected a member o f the Australian Academy o f the Humanities and

was also the inaugural holder of Chaire Europeenne at the Ecole Normale Superieure in

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Paris. D r D Tryon o f the Department of Linguistics was awarded the Vanuatu Independence Medal for services to that nation. M r G de Brouwer, a Doctoral student in the Australia-Japan Research Centre was presented

with the J G Crawford Award for his essay on recent developments in the Japanese money market. D r B M artin, formerly a PhD scholar in the Division o f Pacific and Asian History, was awarded the Crawford Prize for the best Humanities and Social Science dissertation of

1992.

Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering

t ■ th e objectives o f the Research School of . Physical Sciences and Engineering X (RSPhysSE) are:

■ to undertake research at the highest international levels in selected areas o f physical sciences and engineering with emphasis on fundamental research both generally and in relation to subjects o f national importance;

■ within those selected areas, to provide postgraduate and postdoctoral training programs which are at the forefront o f those offered by any university;

■ to cooperate with other Australian universities in the School’s areas o f expertise through joint research programs, including those requiring access to major A N U facilities and through the provision o f visiting fellowships, specialist lecture courses and postgraduate Summer Schools;

■ to encourage links which make the research and expertise o f the School available to the Australian community, particularly by technology transfer to Australian industry and cooperation with other Australian research

institutions.

In response to a clear national imperative to enhance research and postgraduate education in information technology, the School successfully argued for die establishment o f a new School of

Information Sciences and Engineering (RSISE)

within the Institute o f Advanced Smdies. The core of this new School will be two o f the departments from RSPhysSE, namely, the

Computer Sciences Laboratory and the Department of Systems Engineering. The Automated Reasoning Project from the Centre o f Information Science Research will also form part o f the new School. W e also argued successfully in the latest ANU-wide round o f strategic developments for funding o f a new research group in telecommunications engineering. This now will also form part of the new Research School. Although some o f the School’s engineering

activities will be transferred to the new School, much of the engineering strength within the Institute will rem ab b RSPhysSE.

Among a number o f honours which flowed to members o f the School during 1993 were the award by the Australian Academy of Science of the Lyle Medal to Professor E Weigold and the Pawsey Medal to D r S Hyde. Professor Weigold’s work is concerned with electron momentum spectroscopy, a technique which allows one to observe directly the detailed motion o f electrons b matter, whereas D r Hyde’s work was concerned with the ramifications of hypergeometric geometry in condensed matter systems, ranging from the biology of living creatures to the development o f previously unimaginable new polymers. The high quality of

the engineering and electronics workshops was exemplified by the performances of Stephen Battisson, who won the A CT Apprenticeship of the Year Award and by Michael Blacksell who won the W ork Skills (Industrial Electronics)

Competition in Australia and represented Australia in the International Youth Skills Olympics. T he year was capped by V bcent Craig, a PhD student in the Department of Applied Mathematics, who received the Young Achiever o f the Year Award. M r Craig’s research concerns the formation and coalescence o f bubbles in water, in particular the effect o f electrolytes on the coalescence o f bubbles. His work enables one to predict the behaviour of a wide range of electrolytes, and has a direct bearing on decompression sickness as well as the evolution of lifeforms.

Most of the School’s research work has been concerned with long-term smdies in basic physics and advanced engineering. The study o f crystal structure and dynamics in the Laser Physics Centre has resulted in the measurement o f the

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narrowest optical spectral feature observed in a solid (and perhaps in any system). T he feature was an optical hole in a crystal doped with dilute rare earth ions. In order to measure such narrow, and

hence long-lived feamres, it was necessary to modify a commercial laser to obtain a thousand-fold improvement in the frequency resolution. This is achieved by keeping the laser cavity, which is about one metre long, constant to within a billionth o f a centimetre, that is to within

about a tenth o f the diameter o f the atoms that make up the mirrors that form the cavity. Research into a new type o f optical switch involving non-linear optics proceeded in the Laser Physics Centre. T he theoretical background for

this work, which promises major advances in photonics, was carried out in the School’s Optical Sciences Centre. A new novel miniature laser, using non-linear waveguide phenomena has been developed. It generates ultra short pulses at very

high repetition rates. Other work in the Laser Physics Centre led to the development o f a new optical element— the reflective array. These arrays, which have obvious advantages and

applications in the focussing o f X-rays, also appear useful for imaging all electromagnetic waves, surface waves, acoustic waves and even particles.

T he D epartm ent o f Electronic Materials Engineering (EME) continued to develop major facilities and explore new research opportunities in the areas o f optoelectronic materials and

processes and advanced materials processing. A comprehensive suite of facilities for growing, characterising and processing o f III-V optoelectronic (laser) structures is now available.

Some o f these facilities are unique to Australia, and research has shown how to make new generation devices suitable for application in communications systems. Electronic and optical

circuits have been successfully isolated using a new ion beam approach. EME, together with the D epartment o f Applied Mathematics, were able to make major developments in the production of

hard compounds (nitrides, carbides and borides) by cold ball milling and the reduction o f materials by similar technology.

T he major new apparatus, the H -l Heliac, designed and constructed by the Plasma Research Laboratories and the School’s workshop staff, was brought into operation. T he measured magnetic surfaces are o f very high quality and just as computed. A wide range o f interesting plasma conditions have been produced. It is by far the

largest and most versatile heliac in existence, although a similar machine is under construction by EURATOM in Madrid. It now provides Australia with a most interesting and flexible experimental fusion research facility. T he heliac is a form o f modern stellarator, and during the year, Australia joined Europe, Japan and the USA in a formal IEA Implementing Agreement on Stellarators, which coordinates the world research program on stellarators. T he work on low-temperamre low-pressure radio frequency excited plasmas has led to the development of increasingly sophisticated plasma etching and deposition techniques in the production o f electronic and optical devices.

The components of the Daresbury superconducting linear particle accelerator arrived and installation began in the ground floor Accelerator Hall in the new John Carver Building. The upgrading o f the A N U heavy ion accelerator

facilities is part of a joint agreement between the UK Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) and the ANU. T he agreement includes

formalised extended collaborations with UK physicists, and during the year the CHARISSA group brought its experimental equipment to the Nuclear Physics Department and began their first experiments using the A N U M U D accelerator in September. T he group, comprising 21 members

from four universities (Birmingham, Oxford, Surrey and York), is funded by the SERC. We and the SERC are considering further proposals for research at the ANU facility.

The Department of Theoretical Physics continued its role in postgraduate education by organising Physics Summer Schools held over a three week period each January at the ANU. The

Summer Schools have provided advanced course work not otherwise available to Australian postgraduate students and staff. T he Sixth Physics Summer School on Modem Perspectives in

Many-body Physics'was held in January 1993 and attracted about 100 registered participants including many postgraduate and Honours

students from other Australian universities. These Summer Schools have made an important contribution to physics education at an advanced level.

During 1993 the role o f postgraduate training was significandy enhanced, with over 100 PhD students participating in the School’s research programs as part of their training. The massive

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increase in postgraduate student numbers was made possible only by the success the School had in attracting outside support for its activities. During 1993, over one-third o f its funding was derived from external sources.

Research School of Social Sciences

f ■ Xhe Research School o f Social Sciences is a community o f about 70 scholars, all of whom have their own individual research agendas. Some o f those agendas include aspects that inter-connect importantly with the work o f other scholars in the School; most scholars have projects that they pursue entirely independently some scholars have several such. This means that

it is impossible in a few words to represent the aggregate of work done in the School over the year. However, it is possible to provide a few illustrative examples, recognising that the singling out o f any particular project is somewhat arbitrary.

T he first example involves the publication in 1993 o f the Blackwell Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Edited by Robert Goodin (Philosophy Program) and Philip Pettit (Director’s Section), this volume is one in a series o f "Companion volumes" planned by

Blackwells, each dealing with a different area o f philosophy, and purporting to provide a coherent synopsis o f the state o f play in that area. Each volume involves statements from recognised experts on different aspects o f the area under consideration. In this particular volume, there are 41 topics dealt with, each by a different author, representing a wide variety o f institutions, including the Universities o f Cambridge, Oxford, Princeton, Chicago, Stanford, Berkeley, Harvard and many others However, 10 of the contributions (including four o f the seven major disciplinary studies) came from scholars in the Research School o f Social Sciences, and a further two from scholars elsewhere in the ANU. In this sense, the Companion volume is very much a School enterprise and its composition reflects the very considerable strength in political theory that

is currently in the School.

T he second example also involves cooperative research across the School— this one incorporating most o f the scholars in the School in some measure. In 1992, the School embarked

on an ambitious 10 year project drawing together academics from the Research School o f Social Sciences and the Australian university system as a whole to study the key Australian institutions, with an eye to their fitness for the country’s second century. The domain o f this Re-shaping Australian Institutions project covers institutions

ranging from the political (the constitutional issues relating say to our federal structure or the rights o f indigenous people or to the role o f parties in Australian politics) to the economic (our labour market institutions, for example) to the social and cultural (the institutions o f gender, or population growth, say). The first major appointments to this project were made in 1993. All these appointments involved secondments to the School o f scholars from elsewhere in the Australian system working on relevant topics. The enthusiastic response to advertisements effectively ensured that all such secondments would be for relatively short periods (one year, typically). The initial phase o f secondments were mainly focussed in the areas o f "the institutions of the welfare- state" and "the institutions o f gender". W e have begun two series o f books to accommodate the anticipated output o f the project one series under the general editorship o f Bob Goodin for Cambridge University Press, the other under the editorship o f John Braithwaite and Geoff Brennan for Allen and Unwin. The first volume in the Cambridge Series appeared in 1993: it was Corporations, Crime and Accountability by Brent Fisse (University of Sydney) and John Braithwaite (Law Program, Research School of Social Sciences).

The third example attends to the involvement of Bob Gregory (Economics) and Bruce Chapman (Centre for Economic Policy Research) in the preparation o f the government’s green paper on unemployment. D r Chapman was involved as a consultant to the Department o f Employment,

Education and Training and prepared papers on long-term unemployment that became significant input in the Green Papier. Professor Gregory was one of the seven members o f the Committee on Employment Opportunities that produced the Green Papier. This example spieaks to one important aspect of the Research School o f Social Sciences— to be a resource for independent academically informed research on major issues o f government policy. The issue o f long-term

unemployment is one on which the Economics presence in the School has a long-standing interest and expertise, and where the policy research

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desired by government is highly complementary with the program’s academic research.

The School saw, at the end o f 1993, the retirement o f Eugene Kamenka and the coming to an end o f the History of Ideas program in the

School. Eugene had been struggling with cancer over the last few years and died in January 1994. His contribution to the School had been long-standing (33 years) and highly significant, and despite his illness he maintained an active

writing and research program to the very last days.

Portrait o f Professor Eugene K am enka by Sydney artist U lf Kaiser

Apart from his scholarly work, Eugene was a "public intellectual", with a strong sense of obligation to speak out on social questions whenever an appropriate occasion presented. His

premature death is a loss not only to the School but to Australian intellectual life.

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

"yC E P H ’s future as a national centre of I excellence in public health education and .A. ^ research was confirmed very late in 1993, when the Minister of Health agreed in-principle

to the recommendations o f a committee he had appointed to advise on the future o f the public health education and research program under which N CEPH began five years ago. T he review panel was impressed by the high quality training in research o f national importance that has been undertaken at NCEPH, and expressed the view that it is essential to the development o f public

health in Australia that such a national centre continue to be supported. The details o f our future relationships with ANU, the Australian

Institute o f Health & Welfare, Commonwealth and State Health Departments, ACT Health, the future Clinical School in the ACT, and the

National Health & Medical Research Council remain to be finalised during 1994 and a long-term funding contract will begin in early 1995.

During 1993 four more PhD theses were completed and submitted, and three PhDs were awarded. A number of other important PhD

projects are nearing completion. Two o f the successful theses earned outstanding commendation from their examiners and have been nominated for University prizes.

The first seven graduates from our Master degree in Applied Epidemiology were farewelied in February at a valedictory event when their contributions to the Australian communicable diseases network were reviewed.

Late in 1993 details of a pilot program for the Master degree in Applied Epidemiology, to apply the same model to a national general practice evaluation network were finalised, and a cohort o f

10 trainees are being reemited to commence training in February 1994.

The centre was particularly sorry to farewell D r J Butler who has been a major contributor to our health economics profile. His broad ranging contributions to the economics of screening, general practice, hospital care, heroin, AIDS, and

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The Australian National University

health services in the A C T will be sadly missed. Still on the health economics front, D r Deeble’s research on the valuation o f Australian hospital capital led to two States, Queensland and Victoria, adopting his methods and contracting him to value their hospital stock during 1993.

For the past three years we have been involved in an investigation which has national and international ramifications for policy on illicit drugs, with assistance from the Australian Institute of Criminology. D uring 1993 there was a detailed exploration o f logistic issues including trial design and evaluation, impact on ex-users and other community groups, service provision, and law enforcement. As well as extensive consultations with a wide ranging reference group o f illicit drug users, ex-users, service providers, police, policy makers, and researchers, the study receives input from a 19 member Advisory Com mittee of experts from around the nation.

D uring 1993 N CEPH prepared a discussion paper and sponsored a two day workshop on a national women’s health program and a new national longitudinal study o f women’s health which was attended by over 30 women’s health researchers. The discussions resulted in two dozen recommendations concerning the conduct o f a longitudinal study o f women’s health in Australia, including a commitment to basing the study on the priorities identified in the national women’s health policy, and to a high level of collaboration among researchers different institutions.

N C E P H ’s graduate diploma program continues to attract a strong smdent cohort each year from among the various national and ACT government institutions that are located in the ACT.

Much o f the research in the centre has a policy flavour. D r McCallum’s work on aging and services for the aged provides a nice example of the policy implications o f community based survey work, especially that which can link various data sources together and follow people over time. A pilot project in which a large group o f Canberrans gave permission for their Medicare data to be electronically linked to community survey and hospital utilisation data, provides an example o f this work and the resultant linked dataset is being analysed by a number of researchers at N CEPH in an effort better to understand factors which determine community utilisation o f health services.

D r John M cC allum

During the year, D r Kliewer completed a major review of hospitalisation o f migrant Australians for the Bureau of Immigration Research. The review, which will be published by the bureau shortly, is another important resource which will

be o f particular interest to policy makers.

This was the third year o f a contract in which the centre is contracted to provide Technical Advisory Group services to the National General Practice Evaluation Program. A team which includes a group of part-time general practitioner researchers, a sociologist, and a statistician worked closely with about 100 grant recipients around the country to help foster and strengthen

methodology in general practice evaluative research. A series o f workshops, newsletters, and conferences were sponsored by the group. In addition, developmental work was initiated for a national survey of general practitioners and patients in an attempt f etter to understand their expectations and experiences o f general practice. It is anticipated that this will form the basis of a regular national survey o f these matters.

In its long-term strategic planning, the centre has recognised the importance o f an initiative in

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environmental health. An important PhD project which has explored the impact o f indoor gas heating on childhood respiratory illness is nearing completion, and the centre has been turning its

attention to ways in which it could more effectively address other environmental health questions.

Aboriginal health is another area in which a number o f N C E P H academic staff have substantial interest and experience. W e recognise, however, that the national interest requires greater

leadership and involvement in these matters from Aboriginal people themselves. During 1993, N CEPH provided a supportive environment for a group o f Aboriginal people to undertake research

into health care needs in the ACT Aboriginal population, d ire partnership that emerged between N C E P H and the Aboriginal community was instructive and helpful for both sides. Two

important working papers have been published as a consequence.

Glenda H um e who led the Aboriginal team was later awarded "A CT Aboriginal o f the Year" giving N C E P H an ACT "double", as Dorothy Broom was awarded the title "ACT W om an of

the Year" in recognition of her contributions to women’s health.

Idle coming year promises to be the beginning of a new phase in N C E PH ’s development. Australian health care institutions are evolving rapidly. H ie new Director o f the Australian

Institute o f H ealth and Welfare, Dr B Armstrong, has been made an Adjunct Professor to N CEPH . W e are exploring again the possibility of co-location with the Australian Institute o f Health

& Welfare on the University campus.

Emeritus Professor Jock OtleJwell

ddiis year the Centre’s Associate Director, Professor J Caldwell retired. Professor Caldwell has been awarded emeritus status and the prestigious title of University Fellow for the next

two years and will continue to use NCEPH as the base for his Presidency o f the International Union for the Scientific Study o f Population. His health transition work continues unabated as does his

focus on HIV/AIDS in the developing world.

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The Australian National University

The Faculties

Buildings and renovations

h i arly 1993 saw the Commerce department and part o f the School o f Mathematical Mi ^Sciences successfully co-located in the Crisp extension. The remainder o f the School of Mathematical Sciences was relocated to the Dedman and Neumann buildings. During the year Economic History, Business Manager’s

G roup o f The Faculties and the Faculty o f Science Office were all relocated. Refurbishment o f the Geography building gave us a new agro-ecology research laboratory and a fine environmental management teaching laboratory. Several laboratories o f the Division of Botany and Zoology, School o f Life Sciences were refurbished. Animal holding facilities were enlarged at Spring Valley farm. In accordance with University policy, facilities for the disabled have continued to be upgraded.

In an effort to enhance building security a Cardax system was installed on all egress doors in the Haydon Allen/Copland/Crisp/Dedman precinct.

T he Faculties and CSIRO have collaborated on the design of a new building to house the Department o f Com puter Sciences and the Division o f Information and Technology, CSIRO and construction has now commenced.

Plans are in train for a Physics annexe which will accommodate Physics staff, Psychology laboratories and the joint Faculty offices for Engineering and Information Technology and Science. Construction is due to begin shortly.

Planning is also underway for relocation and refurbishment o f the Faculty o f Law Faculty office which will allow the office to function more effectively.

T he roll into the University budget of increased capital funding has provided the first opportunity for many years to plan much overdue major buildings. Planning is actively underway for the construction o f a new Asian Studies building which will also accommodate the Linguistics and Modern European Languages departments,

currently located in the Dedman building. However, until this and other plans can be carried through, there will continue to be severe accommodation shortages.

New initiatives

Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology (FEIT)

The Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology (FEIT) was formally established on 1 September 1993. The establishment o f a new faculty is an historic event in the life o f any University and particularly so for ANU in F E IT s case since its creation was accompanied by a strong sense o f filling a long standing gap in the

University’s undergraduate education programs. The engineering disciplines will now take their place alongside those in the arts, the sciences, law, economics, commerce and Asian studies by having representation at the faculty level in the University’s academic structures.

Two departments have been assigned to the new Faculty. They are the Department of Engineering and the Department o f Computer Science. The former had its origins in the Engineering Interdisciplinary Program established in 1989. The Department o f Computer Science was established in 1976 and has been a member o f the

Faculty of Science for most o f its life.

FEIT has responsibility for two undergraduate degrees, the four year Bachelor o f Engineering and the three year Bachelor o f Information Technology (Engineering). Both of these degrees were developed within the Faculty of Science and will continue to have foundations which are strongly based on science units. In addition, FEIT will continue to have a substantial involvement in

the Bachelor o f Science since that degree is a major vehicle for computer science education programs. Because o f this role o f the BSc in the teaching work o f the new Faculty, the Department o f Computer Science will remain a full academic member o f the Faculty of Science.

The Faculties

The BE program is a heavily prescribed course in which all students smdy a number o f engineering strands in mechanical, electronic materials, information and systems engineering. T he

outcome is an innovative engineering program aimed at current and emerging needs for the design, manufacturing and services sectors o f Australian industry. The BlnfTech(Engineering)

is also a heavily prescribed course aimed at meeting the demanding requirements o f a modern software engineering education within a three year degree. T he four year BE has received provisional

accreditation from the Institution o f Engineers (Aust.) and will undergo the final accreditation process in May 1994.

Teaching in the BE program began in 1990. The first cohort o f students to complete the engineering program will therefore graduate from the Faculty at the 1994 Graduation Ceremony as

will students from the first cohort o f BlnfTech(Engineering) students who were enrolled in 1991. In 1994 FEIT will have about 30 full rime academic teaching staff and an approximate undergraduate smdent load o f 300 eftsu’s.

T he creation o f FEIT in The Faculties has been paralleled by the creation o f the Research School o f Information Sciences and Engineering (RSISE) in the Institute o f Advanced Studies. RSISE was established on 1 January 1994, four months later

than FEIT. Although the two developments were the end points o f separate processes, they both reflect the strategic importance o f the information sciences and engineering to the University’s

future. As might be expected, there is a close collegiate relationship between the two organisations involving joint research activities and joint appointments in a number o f areas. In

addition both FEIT and RSISE are major participants in three Cooperative Research Centres supporting research activities in advanced systems, networking and high performance computing.

Review o f the Faculty o f Asian Studies

1993 saw a major review of the Faculty o f Asian Studies, the first since 1979. T he Review Com mittee recommended among other things that the Faculty maintain its present range of

languages but also restore its badly-depleted

offerings on Asian history and society to achieve a 50/50 balance between language and non-language teaching. An increased coverage o f

contemporary Asian society was seen as highly desirable. T o make this expansion possible, the Review Committee recommended extensive

re-staffing, including two Chairs and a substantial number o f other posts, and where possible joint appointments with other parts of the University with an Asian interest. To increase coordination o f the smdy o f Asia across the University, the Committee also recommended the setting-up o f a small high-level University Asia Committee, and the appointment of an executive/liaison officer. University-wide coordinating centres for different Asian countries were also recommended. T o build on the Faculty’s outstanding achievements in language teaching, joint initiatives with M odern

European Languages in the use of advanced technology were seen as mutually beneficial. Strong emphasis was given to the need to ensure that the internationally outstanding library collection be protected against erosion due to funding constraints. Finally, the Com mittee

recommended that the Faculty be housed in a new building.

In its response, the Faculty accepted the broad outlines o f the Review report, and suggested some further initiatives, such as expanding the Faculty’s

links with the University of Canberra, particularly in the areas o f education, journalism and tourism, and its links with ITA and the Australian National Gallery to build on Canberra’s existing strengths in Asian art.

The University moved swiftly to implement the Review Committee’s recommendations. T h e University Asia Committee was set up, the contract for a new building (housing Asian Studies, Modem European Languages and

Linguistics) was awarded after competition to the firm of Pegrum Ciolek, and increased funding has been made available to the Faculty. This will

enable the Chairs, the liaison officer, and other posts to be advertised early in 1994. In addition, a grant from the Boardman Committee has made possible a major purchase in the area o f

Indonesian history, which is one o f the ANLFs areas of particular strength.

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The Australian National University

Establishment o f the Centre for Middle Eastern and Central Asian Studies

T he Centre for Middle Eastern and Central Asian Studies (CMECAS) is the first o f its kind in Australia. It is the only Centre o f learning that focuses on these two critical regions as a major point o f attention in the post-Cold War world.

The primary objectives o f CMECAS are threefold:

■ to promote, at a national level, Middle Eastern and Central Asian studies in both undergraduate and postgraduate domains;

■ to coordinate research by Australian and international academics and specialists;

■ to serve as a pool o f expertise for the public and private sectors.

T he Centre aims to integrate the smdy o f Middle Eastern and Central Asian politics, history, culmre and economics. It seeks to place these within the broader framework o f the changing global order.

The Centre seeks to examine the important role o f religion, especially Islam, to foster the smdy o f the most relevant languages— Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Hebrew— and to look at gender

politics. It also focuses on issues pertinent to Australia’s interests in, and the development of the country’s commercial, scientific and industrial ties with this dynamic part o f the world.

CMEG'XS is a teaching and research Centre with organic links to the Faculties and professional association with the Institute o f Advanced Smdies. Its activities are guided by a 13 member Advisory Board representing academia, the Australian community and business groups, and prominent scholars in Middle Eastern and Central Asian smdies as international advisors.

The Australian National Internships Program

Under the Australian National Internships Program which commenced in 1993, smdents from Australian and overseas universities come to A N U to undertake, for academic credit, course

units and internships working on designated

research projects in public sector institutions in Canberra. The four main placement components are:

■ The Commonwealth Parliament

■ The Australian Public Service

■ Fhe ACT Legislative Assembly and the ACT Public Service

■ Non-Government Organisations with public policy concerns.

In the first semester o f the program there were 23 interns, o f whom 16 were placed in the Commonwealth Parliament. It is expected that 100 smdents will participate in the program in

1994. Between 70 and 80 o f these will be placed in the Commonwealth Parliament. These smdents will come from a total of 30 universities (25 of them Australian).

National Undergraduate Scholarship Scheme

The National Undergraduate Scholarship Scheme has been in existence for many years. It is a generous scheme which has attracted the best school leavers from around Australia to the ANU. However, two problems recently emerged. First, the relative value o f the scholarships had diminished as against some other scholarships making them more attractive, even though they were discipline specific as against the NUS which is available in any discipline. The second concern was that NUS scholars were not coming from as wide a geographic background as the University wished.

T o overcome these problems, the scheme was reviewed in 1993. The value o f the scholarship has been increased. More significandy, the scheme

will now designate a number o f scholarships to be available in each State rather than there being open competition for all scholarships across Australia. By this means it is hoped to increase the

number o f States from which scholars come. The scheme will also be renamed The Australian National University Undergraduate Scholarship Scheme to identify it more clearly with the ANU.

The Faculties

Cooperation with the University of Canberra

oth universities meet regularly to discuss cooperation and are satisfied with the J L ^ current level o f progress. Each institution is encouraged to bring forward for discussion possible new endeavours, eg the A N U ’s Master o f

Business Administration Program.

Education profiles— 1994 to 1996

Both universities discussed growth plans for this period. T he University o f Canberra intends to maintain its present mix through to 1996, while the A N U intends to increase the ratio of postgraduate to undergraduate students and to offer m any postgraduate courses on a full fee paying basis.

Cross-institutional enrolment

It was agreed that while some areas o f smdy which were subject to quotas sometimes posed difficulties for cross-institutional enrolments there was no gross imbalance. 7.Tie situation would be

examined on an annual basis.

Centre for Australian Cultural Studies

Formal agreement was reached between the ANU, the University o f Canberra and the Australian Defence Force Academy for the establishment o f a Centre for Australian Cultural Smdies.

ACT School o f Engineering

The Board o f the A C T School o f Engineering was reconstituted following a review of the School. It now comprises members from each institution and representation from the Institution o f

Engineers. T he Board Chairman is alternately the Vice-Chancellor o f the ANU and the Vice-Chancellor o f the University o f Canberra.

Teaching o f Spanish

The possibility o f cooperation between the ANU and the University o f Canberra in teaching

Spanish was discussed and is being explored further.

Faculty of Arts

993 has been another difficult year for the \ Faculty— perhaps its most difficult ever. Λ - W ith less resources allocated for this year than in 1992, it had to cope with increased student numbers. This occurred despite raising

the school-leaver entry level to the 75th percentile and rigidly controlling our new undergraduate numbers. But re-enrolling students came unexpectedly out o f the woodwork. Furthermore the attractiveness o f the Faculty for graduate smdents has increased astonishingly. T he student

load for this Faculty has now increased since 1990 by over 50 per cent, but academic staff by only four per cent. (There would have been a significant decrease in academic staff were it not for outside funds and fee-paying smdents).

Despite these huge increases, more than any other faculty experienced, when the Faculties’ Resources Committee came to apply our own adaptation of the relative funding model for the distribution of

resources for 1993 only one/third of the adjustments generated by the model away from the historic proportions were implemented. The

result was that the Faculty was allocated less resources for this year than in 1992.

This might have been tolerable had smdent numbers also declined. When the further increase in smdent enrolments became manifest earlier this year, not surprisingly there was considerable distress and outrage right across the Faculty.

Despite these extraordinary strains, the Faculty has been performing extradordinarily well in the circumstances. A brief summary o f some o f the positive indicators evident over the past two years

follows:

■ A DEET-sponsored survey of recent graduates opinions as to the quality o f their undergraduate degrees rated Arts at ANU second highest in the country.

■ Two o f the inaugural VC’s Awards for Excellence in Teaching;

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The Australian National University

■ Two Crawford Prizes for best graduate theses went in 1992 to students from this Faculty and another to a Master’s smdent in 1993;

■ T he number o f full-time equivalent undergraduate students has increased from 1990 to 1993 by 38 per cent;

■ T he number o f full-time equivalent postgraduate students has increased from 1990 to 1993 by 233 per cent. T he Faculty o f Arts now has many more graduate students than

any other faculty or research school, and is third (behind the Faculty o f Science and the Research School o f Pacific Studies) in the number o f PhD students;

■ As a result o f the latest announcements by the Australian Research Council, the Faculty will have in 1994 eight ARC fellows (including three ARC senior fellows) and roughly $1.5m.

in competitive grants. There are entire universities who have not done as well as this.

Also on the positive side, the Australian National Internships Program was launched in July following the signing with the two Presiding Officers of the Commonwealth Parliament o f an agreement to cover parliamentary internships in areas o f public policy. Under this program students with an academic background in political science, public administration, or law will come to the A N U to undertake internships in the Parliament and other public sector bodies. They will come from the state universities in Australia, and from selected universities overseas. Twenty three students from six universities undertook the pilot program, with some very pleasing results. Interest amongst Members o f Parliament has also quickened, so that over 90 students will be offered a placement for 1994.

In October, a new Centre for Middle Eastern and Central Asian Studies began operations, sponsored jointly by the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty o f Asian Studies. The need for a scholarly centre which could provide informed and well-researched interpretations o f political, economic and cultural developments in this

region became starkly evident at the time o f the G ulf War. Its geographical coverage, which takes account o f the break-up o f the former Soviet Union, will be unique in the world.

A new graduate certificate in Language Teaching was introduced in response to the needs o f the

ACT Department o f Education to upgrade the linguistic skills o f its language teachers. This innovative course, organised cooperatively by the Faculties o f Arts and Asian Studies, offers year-long units in Japanese and Indonesian, and

intensive weekend units on aspects of applied linguistics and second-language acquisition.

The BA course concentrating on Australian Studies was extensively reconstructed during the year, with a new lectureship devoted to the new core units. T he Faculty has also been involved in planning for a Centre for Australian Cultural Studies to be established jointly by the ANU, AD FA and the University o f Canberra— with which the cultural institutions in Canberra are

expected to affiliate.

Although a program major in Women’s Studies has been offered for many years, smdent interest at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels grew significandy. Another emerging area of critical scholarship in which there appears to be smdent interest is film studies. This is part o f a broader and growing study o f contemporary culture, which needs to be pursued in ways which at times cut across tratitional disciplinary boundaries.

Much effort went into providing information for the Government’s ’quality assurance’ exercise. Whilst this University would be the last to abandon its commitment to the pursuit o f excellence in teaching and research, there are grave doubts about the conceptual soundness and administrative efficiency o f this particular way of ensuring that the Government’s own policies do not condemn us all to mediocrity. As part of a rolling program, the Department of Sociology was reviewed in the latter part o f the year.

It might be thought that all these positive signs show that we can cope quite well with our reduction in resources per smdent. That would be a grave mistake; the excellence which the Faculty has striven so hard to build up can all too easily be dissipated. It has survived with as good a record as

it has only because of the commitment and character of its staff, both academic and support. The unfortunate fact is that the Faculty coped at cost to the health o f its staff.

Given these conditions, it is remarkable that members o f Faculty managed to maintain their rate o f scholarly publications, with departments

The Faculties

reporting the publication during the year o f nearly 40 books and monographs and 266 articles. A striking example o f how the concept o f publication is changing is The Palace o f Diocletian

at Split, 13 Megabytes of text and images mounted on the internet, on servers in the USA, Europe and Australia by Michael Greenhalgh.

Faculty o f Asian Studies

993 was an extraordinary year for the Faculty. O nce again, smdent numbers rose markedly, both in the undergraduate and postgraduate areas, and the Faculty’s small band of staff was further reduced by retirements and resignations. W ith replacements still uncertain, great dedication was required o f Faculty staff and some courses, unfortunately, could not be given. But a wide range o f new initiatives was nevertheless undertaken. A major focus for rethinking and planning for the future was provided by a review of the Faculty. Fhe Review committee recommended rebuilding the Faculty, with particular emphasis on an expanded coverage o f contemporary Asian societies and related subjects, and introducing new language-teaching technologies. At the end of the year, the ANU accepted the committee’s recommendations for a substantial num ber of new staff in language and

non-language areas, including two Professors. A high-level committee for the coordination o f the study o f Asia in all parts o f the university was also established as recommended by the Review.

T he new four-year degree program continued to expand, with an increased number o f outgoing smdents to China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, and Thailand. Incoming exchange smdents were mainly from Japan, and this group

performed extremely well in their A NU studies, with a substantial proportion o f honouts-level results. A num ber o f the Faculty’s new initiatives under this program were funded by D E FT under

the UMAP program.

T he quality o f the Faculty’s graduates continues to be tested and validated by external assessment. In 1993, smdents from the China Centre won first and second prizes in the National Chinese

Eisteddfod (Sydney, May 1993) and the level of Chinese language attainment has been highly rated by employers in business and Foreign Affairs and Trade. Smdents from the Japan Centre won

14 scholarships awarded by the Japanese Ministry o f Education and educational foundations. A graduate o f the Faculty, Lisa Macdonald, won third prize in an international Malay language speech contest held in Kuala Lumpur, competing against native speakers.

Mrs Thuan Macintyre was invited by the American Council for the Teaching o f Foreign Languages to be the academic member o f a committee to review Vietnamese language

teaching in recognition o f her exceptional achievements in this area.

T he Faculty has a long tradition o f developing language texts for use in Australia and overseas and is now involved in pioneering the development o f computer packages for language teaching. T he National Thai Studies Centre was awarded a grant from Apple Macintosh for this

purpose.

There were also new initiatives in the Faculty’s coverage o f Asian society, notably a course on Technology, Innovation and Society developed by D r A Vervoorn.

There has been a particularly active and constructive smdent body in 1993, making a major contribution, especially to the Faculty Review.

The Faculty also has a commitment to raise the level of language and other teaching related to Asia in the wider community. This year, Faculty staff developed communicative language modules

for Indonesian and Japanese teachers in the new Language In-Service for Teachers (LIFT) program for DEFT. In its first year, the program was assessed as a very successful response to teachers’

needs. The Dean of the Faculty is on the steering committee o f the ACT Magnet Schools program, designed to increase the amount and quality of

coverage o f Asia in Australian schools. The Faculty also provides language training for embassy staff, and has introduced a M Litt in

Applied Linguistics for Japanese teachers.

Mrs T Yang o f the China Centre has been engaged in simultaneous translation and interpreting at the ministerial level for the Departments o f Foreign Affairs and Trade and

Prime Minister and Cabinet and in legal and technical translation for government.

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The Australian National University

T he National Thai Studies Centre again had a very active program, including the production and distribution o f a regular newsletter, a publication program, running o f a large-scale annual briefing conference, the Thailand update

(Melbourne, October) and developing custom designed intensive language courses for Immigration, Local Administration and Ethnic Affairs, and for university staff elsewhere in Australia.

Despite diminished numbers, the Faculty has an active and productive research program, reflected in the following major publications:

A E Backhouse, The Japanese Language: an Introduction, Oxford University Press.

R K Barz and Y K Yadav, A n Introduction to H indi and Urdu, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.

V Hooker, ed, Culture and Society in New Order Indonesia, Oxford University Press.

S Supomo, Bharatayuddha: an OldJavanese poem a n d its Indian sources. lata Pifaka Series vol 373. (New Delhi: International Academy o f Indian Culture/'Aditya Prakashan).

Ehe Faculty’s research is recognised in ARC and other funding, notably a large ARC grant awarded to D r R Tyler for a new translation o f the major Japanese classic The Tale o f Genji.

In September the Faculty hosted an international conference, "Transmissions o f Islam", run by D r V Hooker in honour o f Professor A H Johns, who retired at the end o f the year.

Also retiring in 1993 is D r R Mason, another long-standing member of staff who has rendered distinguished service. W e thank them both for all they have done for the Faculty.

Professor W J F Jenner gave the Morrison lecture, entitled "A knife in my ribs for a mate".

Among our more adventurous staff members, D r S Dyer spent three months on fieldwork in ex-Soviet central Asia, and D r A Diller was the first Westerner to transcribe a historic Thai inscription in a wasp-infested mountain cave in south Thailand.

As part o f the ANLTs determination to further support its high-quality teaching and research on Asia, the university committed funds for a new

building for the Faculty. Construction will begin

in 1994 and will incorporate technical facilities for the latest developments in language and other teaching.

Faculty of Economics and Commerce

lot smdents completing Year 12 in 1992 the cut-off for entry into the Faculty in 1993 was a tertiary entrance rank of 74 50 for all single degree courses offered by the Faculty. There were 423 places provided to new students which, when combined with 1195 re-enrolling smdents,

resulted in a total of 1618 smdents in the Faculty. These figures do not include those accepted as fee-paying overseas smdents or non award smdents.

The highly successful Bachelor of Economics degree specializing in Actuarial Studies unfortunately had to suspend its intake o f new smdents in 1993. This was as a result of Macquarie University, the joint venmre partner, withdrawing from an agreement with the Faculty. Successful negotiations have taken place with the Actuarial Studies group at the University o f Melbourne and as a result the Faculty will be able to have a new intake o f students into the Actuarial Studies program in 1994. To implement this arrangement the University has had to commit significant resources to the development o f a video conferencing facility to enable lectures and mto rials in a number o f specialist units to be conducted without smdents or academic staff from either University having to leave their respective universities.

The demand for places from new full fee-paying overseas students weakened in 1993 with 68 new (81 in 1992) and 157 re-enrolling (146 in 1992) smdents. Among the former 47 enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce and combined degrees, 13 in the Bachelor o f Economics and combined degrees and eight in the Bachelor of Information Technology degree.

Twinning arrangements were also entered into with two Malaysian colleges in 1993; Kolej Damansara Utama (KDU) on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur and Kolej Antarabangsa in Penang. The latter campus is a new campus under the direct academic control o f the University of Sydney. Under the twinning arrangements

The Faculties

students will undertake the first year o f their degree course in one of these two Malaysian colleges before coming to A N U to complete the remaining years o f their course o f smdy. T he first

intake o f students through these arrangements are expected to commence their second year o f study at A N U in 1995.

New course developments included the introduction o f a Graduate Diploma in Finance and a Master o f Commerce degree by coursework and sub-thesis. In addition arrangements were

made for the Department o f Commerce to offer, jointly with the Department o f Computer Science, a Bachelor of Information Technology

(Honours) program. At the undergraduate level a joint Bachelor o f Commerce/Bachelor o f Economics degree was introduced. This joint degree will enable students to obtain a broader

training in the commerce and economics disciplines as well as satisfying the professional requirements o f the accounting profession.

T he Faculty has suffered significandy as a result of funding policies which have been adopted by the University since 1992 and which relate to the allocation o f recurrent expenditure. As a result the

Faculty is now heavily dependent on income derived from the training of overseas students. This is of concern as this source o f income is dependent on a large number o f factors beyond

the control o f the Faculty and the University.

T he Faculty visitor program continued to be active in 1993, with all departments benefiting from visits by academics both from within

Australia and overseas. The Faculty is also fortunate to receive significant help from other parts of the A N U in the teaching of its undergraduate and graduate programs. A number o f staff undertook short term transfers to the Institute o f Advanced Studies to enable them to concentrate on their research.

All departments had significant numbers of publications in high quality international journals and edited volumes, with many staff members presenting papers at conferences and workshops,

both nationally and internationally.

At the end o f 1993 the Faculty approved the establishment o f a Centre for Applied Economics. In addition to the establishment o f an active visitor program and the organization of

conferences and workshops, it is envisaged that

the Centre will publish a journal that deals with policy issues in a language accessible to non-academics.

1993 saw a relatively large influx o f junior academic staff into the Faculty; as a result the demographic profile of the Faculty has changed significantly during the past twelve months. The Faculty continues to have difficulty in attracting senior academic staff of the calibre expected of such positions in each o f the four departments. This has resulted in senior positions remaining

unfilled in all departments.

Members o f the Faculty continued to be active in outreach activities for both government agencies and private enterprise organizations. These included the Australian Bureau o f Agricultural and Resource Economics, The Commonwealth Department of Employment, Education and Training, the Commonwealth Department of Transport and Communications, the

Commonwealth Department of Arts, Sport, the Environment and Tourism, the New Zealand Treasury, the Commonwealth Department of Health, Housing and Community Services and

the ACT Government.

Major publications by members o f Faculty during 1993 included:

Forsyth, P. and J.A Batten (eds), International Finance in Australia: A Case Study Approach, Butterworths, 1993.

Hughes, David and Albon, Robert (eds), Capital Ideas: Suggestions for Economic Reform in the ACT, Federalism Research Centre, ANU, 1993.

Jubb, P.B. and Haswell, S., Company Accounting, Melbourne, Thomas Nelson Australia, 1993.

Faculty of Law

993 was probably the Law Faculty’s most 9 difficult year since its establishment. This - V flowed directly from shortage of resources. While the relative funding model o f resource

allocation was not applied unmodified, the Faculty nonetheless was reduced to a staff: student ratio of 1:26. This was the second poorest ratio of any Law School in Australia. Its effect was

felt in excessive teaching demands made upon staff, particularly with regard to marking. There was a reduction in the number o f forms of assessment available to students, particularly in

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The Australian National University

compulsory subjects. But the marking burden that a number o f members o f staff had to carry at the end of the year was intolerable.

Late in the year, the proposal was made that the relative funding model should become the sole basis for allocation o f funds to faculties. The effect o f this on the Law Faculty would have been devastating. It would have ensured that the Law School was the worst funded in Australia. The Dean felt obliged to raise this issue formally on behalf o f the Faculty in a letter to the Vice­ Chancellor. Further consideration of the method o f allocation o f funding then occurred and the Resources Committee agreed to make funds available immediately to ameliorate the Law School’s position. The required level o f funding will be reviewed further during 1994. T he Law

Faculty should be funded at a level that at least brings its staff smdent ratio to a point equivalent to the average Australian law schools. At present that is 1:19.6. These changes in funding enable the Faculty to approach 1994 with a greater sense o f optimism than has been possible in 1993. The staff will be reviewing the future directions o f the Faculty at a two day retreat in February 1994.

Despite the difficulties referred to above, the Faculty made some valuable advances in 1993. In the middle of the year appointments were made to a post in Japanese Law and another in the Law o f the Indigenous People. Both posts were funded from external sources. These appointments enable the Faculty to move into important new areas o f teaching and research. T he appointment o f Ms V Taylor from the Centre for Asian Law, University o f Melbourne, has brought significant Asian connections which the Faculty is moving to explore. Success has already been achieved in obtaining funding to establish an exchange program with Kobe University. Funding is also being sought to establish connections with Indonesian law schools.

Apart from these developments, the Faculty has managed to maintain a strong research output and has continued its customary contribution to the parliament and the government. A particular contribution in the latter category' was Professor Pearce’s three inquiries and reports to the Minister for Transport and Communications on matters arising from the sale o f pay-TV licences. T he Centre for International and Public Law has continued an active program o f research and public activities. W arranting special mention are

Professor Alston’s work on the United Nations conventions on the Rights o f the Child and Professor J R Disney’s Community Tax Project.

The Legal Workshop continues to provide a high quality practical legal training course that qualifies smdents for admission to practice as a legal practitioner. T he post-graduate nature o f the

legal Workshop course was recognised this year with its acceptance as a course leading to the award of a graduate diploma. From 1993, smdents who complete the course will be awarded the Graduate Diploma in Practical Legal Training. T he funding available to the Workshop in 1994 has been drastically reduced as a result o f the application o f the relative funding model. The future viability o f what has become a very good course will need to be considered carefully. The possibility o f charging smdents who undertake the course will need to be pursued.

Professor D Pearce resigned as Dean o f the Faculty on 31 December 1993. Professor T Campbell has been appointed Dean for five years from 1 January 1994.

Professor Philip Alston

The Faculties

Professor D ennis Pearce

the transfer from the Faculty of Science o f the Department o f Computer Science and the Interdisciplinary Engineering Program, the latter now renamed the Department of Engineering.

Other events of note in 1993 include:

■ introduction of a Graduate Program in Scientific Communication building on the successful Graduate Diploma in Scientific Communication;

■ introduction of a third year unit in Ichthyology following appointment o f a lecmrer (Dr ) Kalish) with support from the National Aquarium;

■ development of computer simulated laboratories in the Division of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology with support from CAUT;

■ the award of the 1993 NSW Channel Ten Young Achiever Award to M r V Craig, a 1992 Honours smdent in the Department of Chemistry for his work concerning the

behaviour o f salt solutions. This work received considerable interest because o f its intriguing and far-reaching implications including an understanding o f ’bends’ in divers;

Professor Ju lia n Disney

Major Publications:

M r SC Bottomley, and Professor R Tomasic Directing the Top 500: Corporate Governance and Accountability in Australian Companies, Allen & Unwin, 1993.

D r D Kiniey The European Convention on Human Rights: Compliance with Incorporation, Dartmouth, 1993.

M r JR Passant, M r N McLeod and M r O ’Keefe Essential Tax Legislation 1993, Law Book Co., 1993.

M r N C Sneddon Domestic Violence in Australia: The Legal Response (2 ed), Federation Press, 1993.

Faculty of Science

f ■ th e most significant event affecting the | Faculty o f Science in 1993 was the JL inauguration of the new Faculty of Engineering & Information Technology by the Minister for Science & Small Business, Senator Chris Schacht. This new faculty was formed by

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The Australian National University

D r Jo h n Kalish

■ the award o f 1993 ANZAAS Medal to Professor B Selinger (Department o f Chemistry); the award recognising Professor Selinger’s role in scientific communication and his role as Chair o f the Intractable Waste Inquiry;

■ the award o f the Distinguished Ecologist Lectureship at Colorado State University to Professor A Cockburn (Division of Botany & Zoology);

■ promotion o f D r D Wickramasinghe (Department o f Mathematics) to Professor.

Institute of the Arts

t ■ th e year 1993 was successful and productive for all areas o f the Institute o f the Arts. -M- The Institute strengthened its intrinsic links with the community and there was a further consolidation of the fruitful and cooperative relationships within the University.

In the first part o f the year new student administration structures and personnel procedures were established. Emeritus Professor P

Karmel was reappointed for a further 3 year term as Chair o f the Board o f the Instimte o f the Arts. Mr R Cornwell was appointed Secretary o f the Institute.

M r Ross Cornwell

This year saw an increase in the demand for science courses resulting in an increase o f 10 percentile points in the T E R cutoff for entry into the basic BSc degree to 80.4. Enrolments in Honours and postgraduate courses were also strong. Total undergraduate enrolment in 1993

(excluding Engineering and Computer Science) was 1427 eftsu including 57 eftsu in overseas FFPOS enrolments. The corresponding postgraduate load was 222 eftsu of which 65 were FFPOS. Enrolments in Forestry account for 43% o f the latter but there was an encouraging growth in overseas PhD enrolments in the biological sciences.

Amongst a steady stream o f journal articles, reports and reviews the following books were published: Birds o f Prey and Gamebirds o f Australia, P D Olsen, F Crome and J Olsen; Australian Raptor Studies, P D Olsen (ed.),

RAOU and Neuropsychology in Clinical Practice, S W T ouyz, D G Byrne and A Gilandas.

The Canberra School o f Art continued to expand its activities and develop its wide ranging international networks. In September, 14 students and two staff from the Kyoto Seika University in Japan visited the School for a three week

exchange. Also that month, 16 staff members from the Jakarta Institute o f Fine Arts spent four days at the School. T he work o f senior teaching staff and former smdents continued to feature prominently and three recent graduates, Paul Uhlmann, Carl Sutherland and Michelle Beevors won prestigious Samstag International Visual Arts Scholarships, each worth up to $50,000.

Staff at the Canberra School o f Music maintained an impressive schedule o f performances and recordings throughout 1993. All staff members took part in the year-long process of developing the School’s Strategic Plan. Applications for all courses at the School increased and most notable was the large number o f overseas applicants for

the newly introduced graduate music program. The School’s production o f Three Little Operas

The Faculties

and the joint ballet production with the National Capital Dancers provided invaluable experience for many students. Many past and current smdents won significant awards and orchestral

appointments.

ITA continued to manage the National Carillon on behalf o f the Commonwealth and distinguished D utch carilloneur, D r J Maassen was artist-in-residence.

The Australian Centre for the Arts and Technology had a productive first full year on campus. ACAT received a grant from the University’s CAUT to extend the work already

undertaken in association with the Department of Anthropology. Staff and smdents at the centre continued to present innovative performances and

national broadcasts. The Centre enroled its first smdents in the new Master of Arts (Electronic Arts) course.

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The Australian National University

Centres and Bridging Structures

Centre for Information Science Research

he Centre for Information Science Research (CISR) is a University Centre that spans both the Institute of Advanced Studies and The Faculties. CISR has as research groups departments and groups from both parts o f the University as well as the CSIRO Division o f Information Technology.

O ne o f its main objectives is to fund, sponsor and promote multidisciplinary research in the information sciences. A focus for this research since 1988 has been CISR’s extensive resources in high performance parallel computing systems that are made available through the Centre’s Parallel Com puting Research Facility (PCRF). CISR is also the University’s vehicle for establishing relationships and agreements in information science and technology with organisations and industry, both in Australia and overseas, that encourage joint research and development in these areas.

In 1987 and 1988 CISR funded a number o f successful multidisciplinary research projects in information science research in a diverse variety of areas such as artificial intelligence, artificial vision, computational molecular biology,

neurocomputing and parallel computing.

In 1993 a call for proposals for a further round o f research projects was made. A considerable number o f very high-quality proposals were received and ten proposals were finally chosen by the CISR Management Committee for funding in the following areas: complex systems in biological vision, solutions o f dense linear algebra problems on parallel computers, parallel file systems for continuous media, inference for

non-linear inverse problems geophysics, learning o f manipulation for robotic control, scalable hierarchical particle algorithms for galaxy formation and astrophysical hydrodynamics, parallel algorithms for NP-complete problems, symbolic reasoning systems, scene analysis and

segmentation by animals and computers and advanced technology for compiler parallelization.

The Cooperative Research Centre for Advanced Computational Systems (ACSys) for which CISR is the coordinating A N U organisation formally commenced operation on 1 October, 1993. The Executive Director o f CISR Professor M McRobbie was appointed as the Chief Executive Officer of ACSys at the inaugural ACSys Board Meeting held at the end o f 1993. All its projects are expected to commence during 1994.

In 1992 CISR coordinated a major national initiative in supercomputing with the formation o f the Australian Cooperative Supercomputer Facility (ACSF). This facility is to be based at A NU and has as partners the South Australian Centre for Parallel Com puting (representing Flinders University, the University of Adelaide and the University of South Australia), the Sydney Regional Centre for Parallel Computing (representing Macquarie University, the University o f New South Wales, the University of Sydney and the University o f Technology, Sydney), CSIRO and DSTO. In 1992 the ACSF was awarded an initial grant o f about $1 million and in 1993 it was awarded a further grant for around an additional $ 1 million from the ARC’s Mechanism C Infrastructure Program making a total of around $2 million for the ACSF’s central facility.

The PCRF’s Thinking Machines Corporation CM-2 massively parallel supercomputer was replaced by a CM-5 parallel supercomputer that became folly operational in early 1993 and reached nearly 100% utilisation towards the end o f the year. T he CM -2 was moved to another site in Canberra around m id-1993 but ANU scientists continue to be significant users o f it. In an important development it was decided in 1993 that 50% o f the time on the CM -5 would now be allocated by the Supercomputer Time Allocation Committee due to the rapidly growing use o f this machine as a production machine. This in m m highlights how parallel supercomputers have now moved into the mainstream as production machines.

Centres and Bridging Structures

Courses in parallel computing were offered by PCRF staff throughout the year to researchers from A N U and other organisations using the the

CM -5 and other PCRF resources. T he CM -5 was also used in the teaching o f undergraduate courses in computer science at ANU and Monash University.

ANU1 s relationship with the world’s second largest com puter company Fujitsu, which is one o f the University’s most important links with industry, continued to expand and deepen during

1993. In May a A N U delegation headed by the Chairman o f CISR and the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Terrell, travelled to Japan for one o f the regular ANU/Fujitsu

Management Meeting?. W hile there the delegation met with the Chairman o f Fujitsu, Mr Yamamoto, and the President, M r Sekizawa, and this was followed by a news conference with the Japanese media. During the year M r T Min ami of

Fujitsu Laboratories, Japan visited CISR for twelve m onths to carry out joint research in the Automated Reasoning Project.

CISR, ANUSF and the CSC were responsible for the development o f a proposal in 1992 for the acquisition o f a massive data storage device which was funded by the UCC. After an exhaustive

evaluation exercise contracts were signed in 1993 with the Storage Technology Corporation, the world’s largest supplier o f such devices, for the acquisition o f an STK ACS 4400 tape robot with

a total capacity o f about 160 terabytes o f data. T he ACS 4400 is front-ended by a new generation multiprocessor server from Sun Microsystems. T h e full system was delivered in

late 1993 and will be fully operational in 1994.

D r J Slaney and D r M Grundy were invited to visit I C O T , Japan in February by the Director of the I C O T Research Centre. T he purpose o f the visit was to further collaborate with IC O T

researchers in th e areas of semantically contrained reasoning, design, implementation and testing of automated reasoning software.

D r Slaney, together with Masayuki Fujita and Frank Bennett, were awarded the IJCAI-93 Publishers Prize for their paper on "Automatic Generation o f Some Results in Finite Algebra presented at the Thirteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in August, which is the world’s most prestigious artificial intelligence conference.

CISR hosted a number o f major visits by international researchers in 1993, principal among them being the visit by the Director of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory Rick Stevens and

his colleague D r I Foster. While at A N U they gave a series o f four seminars in high performance computing and communications.

The inaugural national Logic Summer School was organised for the first time by the Automated Reasoning Project in C IS R It was very successful and was attended by undergraduates and beginning postgraduates who were selected from those who applied after advertisement. The Logic Summer School consisted o f a series o f tutorials, workshops and seminars that were given by CISR

staff and by academics from elsewhere in Australia.

During 1993, Professor McRobbie travelled to Europe and Japan as part of a number o f Government sponsored activities or as a member o f various Government delegations including: the O E C D Higji Performance Com puting and Communications Expert Group in Paris (March); the Real W orld Computing Project in Tokyo (March); the Department o f Industry, Technology and Regional Development

Delegation to Japan (May); the A C T Chief Minister’s Business Delegation to Japan (October/November); and the Department of

Employment, Education and Training/Australian Research Council Delegation to Japan (October/November).

Centre for Molecular Structure and Function

f ■ ^hc Centre for Molecular Structure and Function (CMSF) is an interdisciplinary JL research centre that links the Research School o f Chemistry, the Research School of

Biological Sciences and John Curtin School of Medical Research. The common goal o f all the groups in the CMSF is to understand biological systems at the atomic level by using advanced chemical, biochemical and genetic techniques. The CM SF was established to promote

interactions between the three schools so that the combined resources of the schools could be focussed on important biological smdies that require techniques or resources that are not

available within a single school. For example, the

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The Australian National University

Protein Crystallography laboratory within the Research School of Chemistry is working toward the structures o f proteins o f interest to medical researchers within the John Curtin School.

T he groups within the CMSF have been particularly productive in the last year. O nly a few examples can be quoted here: The structure o f an important protein involved in nitrogen regulation has been solved within the Research School o f Chemistry. T he Gene Targeting Laboratory in the medical school has become fully operational within the last year. A number of imaginative experiments to probe the mechanism o f photosynthesis have been completed within the Research School of Biological Sciences.

Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies

t ■ th e Centre for Resource and Environmental : Studies (CRES) is unique within the Australian university system. It is transdisciplinary research and postgraduate training centre that seeks to integrate the physical,

biological and social components of complex resource and environmental issues. CRES research covers a very wide range o f resource sectors and environmental issues at spatial scales ranging from global to local and temporal scales ranging from milliseconds to millenia. Such a coverage is possible only through a highly developed network o f collaboration with systems scientists and disciplinary specialists elsewhere at ANU and in other Australian universities and overseas institutions. Frequently CRES staff play a key catalytic role in major national and international research projects. Just one example is the NSF funded collaboration between CRES staff and USA and N Z specialists on an international comparative analysis o f flood plain management.

Sustain ability o f humans, their institutions and the environment has been a central focus o f the CRES strategic plan since 1986. In 1993 major effort was directed to completion o f a series o f books on the sustain ability theme, to be published by Cambridge University Press. These represent the culmination o f the Fundamental Questions Project and the first book in the series will be published in 1994. An increasing number o f postgraduate students are choosing topics that relate to social and policy aspects o f sustain ability.

At the global scale CRES has strengthened capacity to research atmospheric trace gases and global carbon dioxide fluxes through successful installation o f the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM2) on the ANU Supercomputer Facility. Estimates of the level of fossil fuel based emissions needed to achieve atmospheric stabilisation have been generated for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). CRES continued to play a key role in the

Commonwealth Climate Impact Assessment and Management (COMCIAM) program. Intensive workshops were conducted in the Caribbean, African and Asia- Pacific regions and Visiting Fellows trained in environmental data-base development for their respective countries. By the end of 1993 this training had been provided for representatives from more than 40 countries. Also in 1993, CRES organised an AIDAB sponsored symposium on Climate Impact Assessment Methods for Asia and the Pacific.

At the national level CRES has maintained a high level o f involvement in Federal and State Government initiated reviews o f resource and environmental policy, planning and management. These include such issues as coastal zone management, national forest policy, national biodiversity strategy, urban environmental

indicators, population/environment interactions at regional level, aboriginal land use, drought policy and natural disaster reduction. An important initiative, in its second year o f a three year term was the National Local Government

Environmental Resource Network (NLGERN). By the end o f 1993 almost 40 pier cent (320 out o f 814) of Local Governments in Australia were participating in the network. The project was invited to represent its work as a national case study at the International Union of Local Authorities Conference in Toronto in June, 1993.

Postgraduate smdent numbers continue to rise with 33 PhD students and 4 MRES smdents in 1993. A high percentage o f these are mature age smdents who bring a wide range of skills and experience and add significandy to the intellectual resources of CRES. External grants and consultancies continued to provide more than 40 per cent of the total budget.

Centres and Bridging Structures

Centre for Visual Sciences

or the Centre for Visual Science the year began on a high note with the Robertson Symposium on Sensory Strategems, which was held to honour Professor A Horridge, who had been the inaugural Executive Director o f the CVS. Ifiis meeting was organised as a cooperative venture between the CVS and the Research School o f Biological Science and, while these two groups provided the bulk of the funding, valuable support was also provided by the John Curtin School o f Medical Research, the Centre for Information Science Research through its Fujitsu Fund and from the Commonwealth Government through the Department of Industry, Technology and Commerce.

The Robertson Symposium attracted world-wide attention and around 50 visitors came from overseas and as many from interstate. The meeting took place early in February just after the

announcement o f the Australia Prize and the three prize winners, P O Bishop, V Mountcastle and H B Barlow, after receiving their awards in Melbourne, came to contribute to the Robertson Symposium. W ith too many names to detail, an

indication o f the spread of interest can be obtained from a list o f home towns. Thus the visitors from the Unites States came from

laboratories in Bethesda, Bloomington (IN), Boston, College Park (MD), David (CA), Galveston, Los Angeles, New Haven, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Tucson; while those from the United Kingdom came from Aberdeen, Bath, Cambridge, Keele, Leeds, London, Newcastle on Tyne, Oxford, Sheffield and York; those from France came from Lyon and Marseilles; from Germany

they cam from Bochum, Frankfurt, Gottingen, Tubingen; from Hungary, from Szeged; from Japan, Sendai, Kawasaki; and representatives came from Israel (Jerusalem); Switzerland (Zurich); Italy

(Genova), Holland (Groningen); Canada (Montreal) and India (Bangalore).

T he keynote speakers included David Hubei, from Harvard University, who won the Nobel Prize in 1981; Robert Wurtz and Vernon Mountcastle, past presidents o f the US Neuroscience Society, the husband and wife

neuroanatomists, Ray and Jennifer Lund, who head departments at Cambridge and London Universities, respectively. Many other departmental heads from vision laboratories

around the world contributed to the program and compared notes with staff and students from universities around Australia. W ith the funds provided by D ITA C the organising committee was able to assist smdents coming from Western

Australia and Queensland.

A second important initiative in 1993 has been the implementation of the resolutions passed by the Committee that reviewed the Centre in 1992. Accordingly a professorial position has been

advertised in Visual Science for RSBS and this position will carry with it the Executive Directorship o f the CVS. T he successful candidate will therefore replace the present

Director, D r G H Henry, who retires in 1994. Fhe electoral committee interviewed a short list o f four in December and each o f the candidates presented a public seminar. T he new Director has now been selected and formal announcement will be made when the University Council meets early

in 1994.

In publications the same high level o f productivity has been maintained this year and in addition two new laboratories have come on line in the Centre. The first is one dedicated to studying single cell responses in mammalian visual pathways and the second is for the recording o f eye movements in human subjects. The equipment for the eye movement laboratory, purchased with funds provided by the Vice-Chancellor’s Fund for Large

Equipment, is amongst the most modern available around the world. Studies from this laboratory will add a new dimension to the contributions coming from the CVS.

Humanities Research Centre

f ■ “ th e Humanities Research Centre (HRC) devoted most of its activities in 1993 to a -M- nominated annual theme, Sexualities and Culture. Four major conferences were held: ‘Lips of Coral— Sex, Violence and Surrealism’ (March,

convened by D r T Gott and D r K Wach) held in conjunction with the National Gallery of Australia addressed the Surrealists’ subversive use of violent and sexually explicit subject matter

from a contemporary perspective; ‘Regimes of Sexuality’ (July, convened by D r J Ballard) focussed on the four related themes o f contrasts between Western and non-Western

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The Australian National University

understanding o f what might constitute a field of sexuality, historical shifts since the Enlightenment in Western concepts o f sexuality, the reconceptualisation o f sexuality in recent decades and the interaction o f an international discourse o f AIDS with national and local sexualities; ‘Breath o f Balsam— Reorienting Surrealism’ (July-August, convened by D r S-A Wallace), held jointly with the Museum o f Contemporary Art in

Sydney, brought together artists, performers, curators and writers to focus on issues o f sexuality and culture within a framework informed again by surrealism; and ‘Forces o f Desire’ (August, convened by D r J J Matthews) which looked at the range o f organisation and meanings o f desire, the theorisation o f desire as sexuality and the cultural and psychic investments in such understanding?. A named seminar in honour o f Professor J Gallop, Distinguished Professor o f English and Comparative Literature at the University o f Wisconsin (June, convened by D r J J Matthews) was devoted to aspects o f Professor

Gallop’s work and ranged across her research interests o f psychoanalytic and feminist criticism and literary theory.

‘Extra-Thematic’ conferences included ‘The Dawn of History’ (April, convened by D r J Thomas and Professor S Macintyre) which was about the making o f the academic discipline o f history in Australia; and ‘Music and Musicians in Australian Culture 1930— I960’ (September, convened by D r P Read, D r N Brown and L Sitsky), jointly sponsored by the HRC with the

Canberra School o f Music, National Library o f Australia and National Film & Sound Archive. This conference explored music and musicians in Australian culm re from the social and music

historians’ perspectives.

The first HRC Summer School was held in 1993 (February, convened by D r Nicholas Thomas and D r D Chakrabarty). T he theme was ‘Colonialism and post-colonialism: humanities in a post-imperial world’ and it was organised in

conjunction with the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory, University o f M elbourne The school explored the issues o f post-colonial criticism in literature, history, anthropology, cultural smdies and feminism, challenging prior understandings o f colonial histories and representations, exploring the politics o f identities and redefining traditions in contemporary culture and cultural theory.

Visiting Fellows in 1993 were Professor H Abelove, Wesleyan University; D r D Chisholm, University o f Alberta; Associate Professor}

D ’Emilio, University o f North Carolina; D r G Dowsett, Macquarie University; Associate Professor L Duggan, Brown University; Professor D M Halperin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Dr V Kirby, University o f California at San Diego; Professor B Massumi, McGill University; Associate Professor D Olkowski, University o f Colorado; Associate Professor C Patton, Temple University; Ms G Rubin, USA; Professor C S Vance, Columbia University; Professor M Vicinus, University o f Michigan and Professor PRC Weaver, University o f Tasmania

Visiting Scholars in 1993 were Associate Professor A Cousins, Macquarie University; D r D Deacon, University o f Texas at Austin; Dr P Eggert, Australian Defence Force Academy; D r H

Garlick, University o f Queensland; D r A-M Hilsdon, Queensland University o f Technology; Dr A RJagose, University ofMelboume; D r M A MacIntyre, La Trobe University; D r A MacLachlan, University o f Sydney; D r J Wilson, University o f Otago and M r C Zika, University of Melbourne

Professor G Clarke, Director of the Centre, undertook archaeological work on the site o f Jebel Khalid, o f which he is the co-leader, from 26 August to 2 November. H e gave the keynote address in Chicago at the annual conference o f the North American Patristics Society in May and presented a paper at the conference at Macquarie University in July on Ancient History in a Modern University. Professor Clarke continued to serve on a number o f University committees and on his forthcoming book on Dionysius the Great o f Alexandria as well as on a book and articles on his arclvEological work at Jebel Khalid on the Euphrates.

Professor D Schreuder, the Associate Director, resigned on 1 April 1993 to take up the position as Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Macquarie University and M r James Grieve was seconded from the Department o f Modem European Languages to the position o f Assistant to the Director, from 1st January 1993. He was appointed Acting Director from 26 August to 2 November while the Director was absent overseas.

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NHMRC Social Psychiatry Research Unit

r T P l h e U nit has now operated for 19 years. It 1 was established in 1975 by the National Λ . Health and Medical Research Council (N H & M RC), which provides an annual grant to The Australian National University as the host

institution. T he U nit’s work is reviewed by an external com mittee every four years. There was a successful review in 1992 and the next is scheduled for 1996.

The U nit conducts research on the epidemiology o f mental disorders. W ith the ageing o f the Australian population and the consequent national importance of the health of the elderly,

the U nit has for the past decade focussed its research on mental disorders most affecting older people, particularly dementia and depression. In recent years there has also been rising national concern about the quality o f mental health services and the U nit has carried out smdies o f service evaluation where these are relevant to its expertise in psychiatry epidemiology. Emphasis continues to be given to methods for

measurement in research on mental disorders.

A major research activity o f the U nit is the Canberra— Queanbeyan Longitudinal Study o f the Elderly which has been assisted by a grant from Rotary. T he aims o f this project cover three

areas: (1) dementia, cognitive decline and, as a contrast, successful cognitive ageing; (2) depressive disorder and, again as a contrast, well-being and (3) psychosocial factors in general

health. T he project began with a survey o f over 1,000 elderly people in 1991— 92 and the group will be followed up in 1994— 95 and 1998- 99.

T he U nit has a strong reputation for its work in psychiatric epidemiology and this is reflected in on-going international collaborative projects. D uring the past year, research work has been

carried out joindy with: the Division o f Mental Health, W orld Health Organization, the Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and the Faculty of

Medicine, University of Geneva.

School of Mathematical Sciences

F ■ th e School of Mathematical Sciences (SMS) I sponsored a special year in 1993 on the - 1 - theme ’Group Actions’. This involved significant support from the School both in terms

o f funding for visitors (including partial funding for numerous graduate students from other Australian universities) and also in the time given by members o f the algebra research program in

planning (especially by D r L G Kovacs).

Activities were planned by an Organising Committee which included members from Sydney, Melbourne and Perth, as well as from the

ANU. It was chaired by Professor C E Praeger (University o f Western Australia), with D r P J Cossey (ANU), Professor K J Horadam (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology), D r L G

Kovacs (ANU), and D r D E Taylor (University of Sydney) as members; D r M F Newman (ANU) was a very active de facto member.

T he main objective was to bring to the ANU leading international algebraists to lecture on their recent work broadly fitting the theme ’Group Actions’, and to collaborate with Australian

researchers in the area. Throughout the planning stage the organisers emphasised that this must be a national program. They encouraged the participation o f mathematicians from state

universities both in planning and in taking part in the various activities, and they decided to focus on providing an opportunity for Australian research students in algebra to interact with international

leaders in the field. This latter decision had a consequential effect on

(a) the timing o f activities: any period of workshops/lectures needed to fit in with tutoring commitments o f students from state universities;

(b) the funding of activities: students could expiect to have access only to partial funding for a stay of several weeks at the ANU;

(c) the namre o f activities planned to involve graduate students: lectures needed to be accessible to graduate students.

There were several periods during the year when numbers o f Australian algebraists came to the A NU to take advantage o f the opportunity for

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The Australian National University

mathematical contact with each other and with visiting algebraists from overseas. The most extended period was in June when a three week workshop was held which consisted o f several short lecture courses on a range of important and

new developments broadly involving Group Actions, given by both Australian and overseas mathematicians. The challenge was to make these lecture courses accessible to research students, and to encourage research students in the broad field o f algebra to attend the workshop. The lectures were accessible and this was appreciated not only

by the students but also by the others who attended.

Apart from activities at the ANU there are several other aspects o f the program worthy of special mention.

(a) The 1993 Algebra Conference o f Victoria was held (at the Royal Melbourne Institute o f Technology) as a joint activity with our program.

(b) The three week workshop in June was planned to dove-tail with the Annual Meeting of the Australian Mathematical Society at the University o f Wollongong in the following week. T he special year program provided two o f the

invited talks and ten o f the contributed talks (including four sm dent talks) at that conference.

(c) The August 1994 issue o f the Journal o f the Australian Mathematical Society (Series A) will be a special issue containing papers from the Group Actions special year.

N ot only was the special year program experimental for the School o f Mathematical Sciences, but it was also experimental for the rest o f Australia. It was an experiment to increase the national role o f the School. T he support provided by other Australian universities for their staff and students, and for funding overseas speakers, was

made with the hope that programs of this nature might be a continuing feature o f the activities o f the School o f Mathematical Sciences.

Funds came initially from the Mathematical Sciences Research Visitors’ Program o f the SMS, then more from various sources within the A N U Centre for Mathematics and its Applications. Eight other Australian universities (some using grants for this purpose from the Australian Research Council) joined in by partial support for the participation o f their own (staff and graduate smdent) members and by sharing the cost of

overseas visitors. T he University o f Auckland and the University o f the Philippines sent two members each (one staff, one smdent). The Royal Society o f London paid the fares o f two visitors.

Graduate School

r ■ th e Graduate School, which commenced enrolling smdents at the beginning of 1991, in now a well recognised component o f the University. Its development has been, and will continue to be, evolutionary. In 1993 the University established a high-level working parry, comprising both academic staff and graduate smdents, to recommend future directions of development. It is expected that the working party will report in m id-1994. One new Graduate Program, in Scientific Communication, was accredited in 1993. Two others, Evolution and Systematics, and Ecology, merged to form a single program: Ecology, Evolution and Systematics. Thus the total number o f Programs remains at 37.

The graduate smdent population at the ANU maintained its rapid growth: from 1412 in 1990, through 1639 in 1991 and 2022 in 1992, to 2254 in 1993, an increase o f 60 per cent in 3 years. The increase for PhD smdents has been 45 per cent. The Graduate School continued to press the University to formulate a clear policy on the desirable balance between graduate and undergraduate smdents.

The Graduate School awarded 34 scholarships for PhD smdy in 1993. T he increase from 20 in the previous year was largely due to financial support from ANUTECH. In addition, the A N U received 81 Australian Postgraduate Research Awards in

1993, and the Faculties and individual Research Schools awarded 117 A N U PhD scholarships.

Graduate employment

An annual survey o f the destinations o f graduates from all Australian Universities, conducted in association with the Graduate Careers Council o f Australia, found that 79.9 per cent o f ANU graduates (pass, honours and postgraduate) were working or smdying in Australia and 11.1 per cent were working or studying overseas at the time of the survey. It showed that 6.4 per cent were unemployed and seeking full-time work. Also, 4.4 per cent o f graduates were working

Centres and Bridging Structures

part-time and seeking full-time work. In addition, 1.7 per cent o f graduates were unemployed and stated that they were unavailable for employment.

The statistics for each cohort revealed that 1.5 per cent o f PhD graduates; 2.3 per cent o f Masters; 2.7 per cent o f Graduate Diplomas; 6.5 per cent of honours and 7.3 percent o f pass degrees were

unemployed and were seeking full-time work.

The survey clearly revealed the advantage o f higher degrees in today’s job market. It was, therefore, encouraging to note that in 1993, 40.6 per cent o f ANU. graduates were able to m m pete successfully for places in postgraduate courses.

This followed the trend o f previous years. In 1992 39.5 per cent o f students were engaged in further study at the tim e o f the survey.

The public sector still continued to recruit A N U graduates although there was an overall decline in the intake. It is noteworthy that increases occurred for PhD and Graduate Diplomas.

Employment in the public sector was 12.3 per cent o f pass graduates, 16.4 per cent o f honours graduates, 42.3 per cent o f Graduate Diplomas, 25.9 per cent ofMasters and 23.1 per cent o f

PhD graduates. This represented a decrease o f 3.0 per cent for pass graduates, 4.9 per cent o f honours graduates and 15.1 per cent ofMasters graduates an increase of 3.9 per cent for Graduate

Diplomas and 8.6 per cent for PhDs when compared with the 1992 results.

There was a decline in recmitment into the private sector. This year 11.5 per cent o f pass graduates, 16.4 per cent of honours, 42.5 per cent o f Graduate Diplomas, 25.9 per cent ofMasters

and 23.1 per cent o f PhD graduates. This represented a decrease of 2.0 per cent for pass graduates, 4.9 per cent for honours, 15.1 per cent for Masters and an increase o f 3.9 per cent for

Graduate Diplomas and 8.6 per cent for PhD graduates.

This year 4.9 per cent of all graduates found employment in the education sector with 21.5 per cent o f PhDs and 7.8 per cent ofMasters employed in that field.

In 1993, 39 per cent of Australian students doing PhD degrees at the ANU were women. The Graduate School continued various initiatives aimed at increasing the participation o f women in

research degrees. For example, three one-year re-entry scholarships were awarded for the first

time. These scholarships are for women who have been absent from academia for a significant period due, for example, to family responsibilities, and are intended to enable them to upgrade their skills

and qualifications with a view to pursuing a research degree. Each of the 1993 awardees studied for a Graduate Diploma, and at least one has now been successful in winning an ANU PhD scholarship.

Library

t ■ th e year 1993 saw a continuing acceleration tJ of access to information through

-M . international network connections (the INTERNET). The establishment o f ELISA, the Library’s Electronic Library Information Service, in June 1993 provided a framework for individual academics and students to access, free o f charge, a significant proportion o f the information available

on the networks. Materials available range from the US Presidential candidates’ speeches to the Library o f Congress Exhibition on the Vatican.

In April 1993 the Uncover service, which allows access to a large amount o f periodical literature, was made available on the campus network. The principle use, apart from document supply, of this system is for academics and students to browse

articles in over 13,000 current periodicals, some of which are not available at A NU and most of which are available before surface mail copies arrive.

A further enhancement to this network document access and supply mechanism was the launch by the then Minister, the Honourable Kim Beazley, in September 1993, of the Current Contents

Service. This was funded by the Department of Employment, Education and T raining and provides data access for a 15 month period to all

Australian academic libraries.

The Library also successfully introduced the delivery o f daily “electronic newspapers” to academics from the Reuters service. Material ranging from Eastern Europe to contemporary Asia is delivered to academics around the campus

to their terminals taking information from sources as diverse as the Xinhua News Bulletin to the BBC World Service to international newspapers. The capacity to enhance the service to other

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The Australian National University

universities in Australia was being explored late in 1993 as a commercial project with Reuters.

T he Library finds itself, as do many elsewhere in the Western world, at a significant watershed in history vis a vis the changing nature o f access to information while at the same time attempting to keep up with the output o f material in printed form. It cannot, however, be long before the transition to electronic refereed journals significantly changes the nature of information

provision, particularly in the sciences. In the meantime the rising cost o f periodicals in the sciences, particularly exacerbated by the profit-making o f the small number o f European multi-national firms which dominate science publishing, led to a significant serial cancellations project and in 1993 $280,000 of science serials were cancelled. The process o f consultation, however, was extremely lengthy and discussions to move from an historical to a resource allocation formula based on user groups were often difficult. Nonetheless in the longer term significant decisions will have to be taken in terms o f article supply and resource allocations around campus.

In physical moves on campus the QA (Mathematical Sciences) material was transferred from the Physical Sciences Library and from the Chifley Library and consolidated in the Hancock building to form a mathematics collection there. Moves were also undertaken to consolidate more social sciences and humanities material in the Chifley building.

Significant discussions took place with the National Library o f Australia on Asian resource sharing (70% o f all material in Australia on Asia is

held by the National Library and ANU). Preparatory discussions were held to establish a National Asian Information Centre which would bring together the two collections physically on the A N U campus and distribute as far as possible the contents electronically via AARNet (the Australian Academic and Research Network). T he

successful outcome o f these discussions will depend on major discussions with the government in 1994. Nonetheless the principle o f collaborative work with the National Library in this area will continue irrespective of the outcome o f the physical building program.

A strategic plan was developed for the period 1993— 5. This will be under continuous review in the light of diminishing resources on campus.

The replacement o f the Urica system by a new Integrated Library Management System was begun. By the end o f 1993 the Library decided to implement the internationally recognised Innopac

system after appropriate consultations with the University Com puting Committee.

The Library also participated as lead institution in the introduction o f planning for a National Chinese, Japanese, Korean library system to allow direct on-line access to the records o f Chinese, Japanese and Korean script material which has

previously not been possible.

University House

"yniversity House has three major V I functions: to serve as a social centre for members o f staff and their colleagues from other institutions; to provide accommodation and conference facilities for academic visitors and organisations; and to play a

role in the public relations and hospitality work of the University. It is also expected and required that the House shall not be a financial burden upon the University.

The House continued to trade well through 1993. Reflecting the continuing recession, sales were slightly lower in all areas, but careful control o f labour costs and wastage maintained the rate o f profit to that of the previous year. T he new operating surplus is over $100,000, and that is after allowance for additional maintenance and renovation, some $350,000 more than in previous

years.

The bulk o f House income comes from accommodation and general functions, but all areas were profitable, and the House appears attractive to members o f staff of the University and to its visitors. T he Cellar, noted for its informal restaurant and active bottleshop, has been most successful, with several well-attended wine-tastings. The refurbishment at the beginning of the year o f the main restaurant BOFFINS has seen that investment reflected in substantially better returns. Old Canberra House, for some years a source of difficulty, is now consistently successful, particularly with weddings and Christmas parties, while training courses for the Australian Taxation Office provided a steady source o f income.

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Centres and Bridging Structures

During 1993, several major maintenance projects were completed. Besides the refurbishment o f BOFFINS, the final stages o f the kitchen work were completed, an electrical up-grade was carried

out through the whole building, and fire-rated doors were installed. Furthermore, with advice from the retiring Maintenance Manager, M r P Forrest, the House embarked on a three year

program, giving particular attention to the accommodation area, and designed to bring the whole building up to present-day standard.

Despite the importance of profit from accommodation, some rooms are nin down, and several major items, such as electrical wiring and plumbing, require complete overhaul and

replacement. D uring 1993, the House put new bed-spreads and curtains in all rooms, and new carpets into more than a dozen suites. Ceiling? of the top floor rooms have been fire-proofed, and equipment and materials have been purchased for

more work in the coming year.

Club membership o f the House remains about 1600. Members’ functions are reserved for members only. Four "Members dining-in nights" were held in the Scarth Room, with wines

presented and discussed by representatives o f major vineyards. T he House has a growing number o f reciprocal clubs interstate and overseas and maintains a staff exchange agreement with

International House of Japan.

An important collegiate function o f the House is the regular Wednesday dinner in Hall, when residents, members and visitors gather and meet informally. Several o f these dinners have been accompanied by music, while the Master may also invite members o f the University and the wider community to H igh Table. A major function of the year was the dinner, attended by the artist, to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary o f the

placement o f the mural "Regeneration" by Leonard French.

T he program o f Music at Lunchtime, with smdents o f the Canberra School of Music, was increasingly successful. The House is contributing

to the Studentship program o f the School, providing training for Canberra school-children.

The House also welcomed the Convocation Literary Lunches, arranged by university Public Affairs with the support o f The Canberra Times. The traditional feast at M id-W inter was

celebrated with the Band o f the Royal Military College, Duntroon, while Commencement, two Graduation Dinners, St Andrew’s N ight and Christmas were all fully attended.

Graduate student residents continue to play an important part in the life o f the House, and the Student Ball in September was extremely successful. T he Post-Graduate and Research Smdents’ Association (PARSA) has its offices in free-of-charge accommodation in the former Master’s residence in Balmain Crescent, and the President o f PARSA nominates one member of the board o f Fellows. Through the good offices o f D r R Spear, Dean of the Graduate School, the House has been a frequent venue for lectures under the auspices of the Graduate Forum. We believe that senior smdents o f the University now look upon the House as a natural and agreeable meeting place

In the new venmre in 1993, the House advertised scholarships, with free accommodation, for doctoral smdents. The two successful candidates are M r D Rasmussen of the Research School of Chemistry and Ms R O norato of the Department o f Psychology in the Faculty o f Science.

During 1993, therefore, University House confirmed its popularity within the University and in the Canberra community. From the basis o f its successful trading, with reserves established

over recent years, the House is now in a position to offer increasing support to the University as a whole, while also embarking on a comprehensive program o f maintenance and replacement of

plant, equipment and furnishings.

Above all, however, University House is supposed to offer a pleasant and friendly atmosphere. With good management and a loyal staff, we believe it has continued to do so.

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The Australian National University

University Resources and Services

uring 1993 many o f the initiatives begun I ■ in the previous year to increase the effectiveness o f student, staffing and general administration were completed. A major smdy of information technology requirements across the campus resulted in a directions statement to assist the University in its use o f computing applications in a range o f areas.

Building work commenced or planned during the year will alleviate accommodation shortages for T he Faculties and provide a new car parking structure. A heritage and conservation plan, and a landscape plan for the campus were developed. Tw o new units— Public Affairs Division and the

Planning U nit— were established from within existing resources. A major enhancement o f the University’s payroll system was completed. Campus-wide consultations were held on reports o f working parties into performance review for general staff and participation in decision-making.

Buildings and Grounds Division

"TB W"ajor building activity continued | \ / | throughout the year with the

A . τ -M.completion o f projects begun last year and new work started during 1993.

These latter included a new building for the Computer Science Department of the new Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. The building is a joint venture with the CSIRO Division o f Information Technology. Planning began for a new building for the Asian Studies Faculty, the Departments of Modern European Languages and linguistics o f the Faculty o f Arts and the Language Laboratories. It is expected that the building will be ready for occupation in First Semester 1995. An extension to the Research School o f Chemistry, providing relief for the overcrowding o f the building, was in progress during the year. T he second stage o f the Accelerator Hall was begun and the project named the John Carver Building to honour the distinguished scientist and former Director o f the

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering. Construction of the first parking structure, providing 350 parking places adjacent to the Copland Lecture Theatre was begun. This project was funded from fees charged for parking on campus.

Infrastructure changes as a result o f the Development Policy Plan included the construction o f a link road between Sullivan’s Creek Road and Daley Road to the South of the RSBS enclosure. T he closure of Sullivan’s Creek Road at its junemre with University Avenue and Fellows Road near the Asian Studies Building plus the construction o f speed humps and associated bus lay-bys followed many consultations with staff and students on methods o f avoiding pedestrian/vehicle conflict on campus and discouraging through traffic. The closures will be on trial for six months into 1994.

The Division coordinated the preparation o f the first stage o f a Heritage and Conservation Plan and a Landscape Strategic Plan by consultants. Both studies followed the recommendations of the Development Policy Plan and were assisted by ad hoc sub-committees o f the Buildings & Grounds Committee whose membership comprised staff o f the University and experts from external organisations. Both reports were presented in December. T he Landscape Strategic Plan was prepared after a series of open meetings with staff and students.

Following representations from the Campus Advisory Committee supported by the Buildings and Grounds Committee, a submission to the Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Group resulted in a significant increase in funding for building maintenance. Planning o f this work and priority allocation was carried out with the assistance o f a group comprising a Head o f Research School, two

Business Managers and Officers of the Division.

The Head o f Division was a member o f the National Capital Planning Authority governmental working group on the Development o f West Basin and Acton Peninsula. The study continued throughout the year.

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Centre for Continuing Education

f ■ th e Centre for Continuing Education is one f o f the University’s major links with the .M . local and national communities. It provides short courses in its Professional

Development Program for over 1200 public servants and private sector workers; regular outreach courses for over 2500 Canberra’s citizens

in such areas as Languages, Literamre, Computing, Humanities, Liberal Arts, Science and Ecology, etc; conducts conferences which address significant emerging social, scientific, economic issues; organises summer schools in the Arts, Languages and Commerce; and conducts

academic research and consultancies in adult and higher education.

Towards the middle of 1993, the Centre’s budget was cut by one third, which limited the Centre’s capacity to explore new directions. Despite this handicap a num ber o f significant steps were taken

by the Centre in 1993.

During the summer, the Centre offered a course in Accounting for undergraduate students and those needing to satisfy the requirements o f the professional accounting associations. T he course, Financial Accounting Theory, was run in association with the Department o f Commerce and recognised by the Faculty o f Economics and Commerce for status towards a degree. It attracted

20 students from ANU, the University o f Canberra and the accounting profession. More courses o f this type are planned for 1994 and 1995.

T he Centre organised and administered an international conference, T he Transition from Elite to Mass Higher Education, attended by delegates from 16 countries in Sydney, on behalf o f D EET and the OECD. This major conference

has been a major influence in shaping the OECD agenda on Higher Education. O ne o f the first conferences on the High C ourt’s Mabo decision on native title was conducted by the Centre.

In 1993, the Centre gave greater attention and resources to the conduct o f Summer Schools, the University Preparation Scheme which offers bridging course allowing adults without the relevant qualifications to seek university entrance through C C E non-formal courses, the conduct of

regular seminars on higher education and the expansion o f courses in the Professional Development Program.

Centre for Educational Development and Academic Methods (CEDAM)

993 was an important year for the Centre in 1 its efforts to build a balanced professional - 1 . development program addressing the diverse needs o f academic staff with varying responsibilities and at different stages in their careers. At the same time the Centre continued its involvement in emerging areas of significance for effective teaching and learning such as the

integration o f information technology and quality management in teaching. Throughout the year, CEDAM staff provided advice, facilitated departmental activities, and conducted seminars,

courses, and workshops.

■ Teaching and Learning—Academic staff and departments from T he Faculties, ITA and the Institute o f Advanced Studies continued to seek advice and support through individual consultations, participation in CEDAM seminars, and the provision and interpretation of smdent feedback on units and teaching. Quality Management and Evaluation in

Teaching and Learning, a project funded through the National Priority (Reserve) Fund and commenced in 1992, extended in 1993 to include projects based in the Departments o f Commerce, Engineering, Modem European

Languages, the School of Art and the Faculty of Law. In addition, the Centre’s first Teaching Bazaar" showcased recent developments in teaching practice and the

integration o f information technology into teaching at the ANU. Two important CEDAM publications emerged from the 1992 Co-ordinators Project and will be valuable

resources for ANU teaching faculty: Guidelines for Co-ordinators and the M anual for Tutoring and Demonstrating.

■ Academic Leadership— The Centre expanded its academic leadership program during 1993 in offering a semester course on leadership

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The Australian National University

skills for academic staff. Based on an Australian Graduate School of Management’s open learning unit, the course was customised to attend to the unique leadership challenges o f the university environment. Academic staff from The Faculties, the Institute and ITA participated in this new course. A major seminar convened by CEDAM in 1993

brought together a broad representative range o f ANU senior academics, administrators, students, and guests from outside the University, was highly successful in stimulating discussion o f critical issues surrounding the meaning and future o f Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

at the ANU.

■ Career Development—A wide variety o f Centre activities focused on developing an academic career, a theme in the Centre’s annual orientation seminar for newly appointed staff. Funding to support the enhancement o f professional skills o f A N U academic staff was available from grants secured by CEDAM from the Commonwealth StaffDevelopment Fund. These programs included a continuation o f the highly successful 1992 Individual Initiatives Scheme, grants toward the upgrading o f qualifications of staff in ITA, and a scheme providing leave for research and writing for seven women members o f academic staff. Another new and important resource for career development was the Centre’s publication: Profiling Quality in Teaching: A

Guide to the Teaching Portfolio for Academic Staff.

■ Research Practice — In response to the need to maintain and improve the University’s level o f externally funded research, the Centre continueu to organise workshops on applying for grants. Included were separate hands-on workshop» for staff applying for large and

small Australian Research Council (ARC) grants and fellowships, and for National Teaching Development Grants. Subsequent workshop» provided opportunities for

applicants to solicit feedback and advice on draft applications. T he continuing need for these workshop» is evident in the high level of participation o f A N U staff.

CEDAM staff continued to be active in the various arenas o f scholarship and professional practice. In addition to attendance and

presentations at conferences, publications, and community service, staff were involved in a number o f externally funded projects. For example, Centre staff continued research on effective PhD supervisory practices (with the Graduate School) and were involved with the Department o f Commerce on a computer assisted instruction project.

Computer Services Centre

f ■ th e Computer Services Centre provides * computer services for research and teaching J L and network services to the campus. It also manages the facilities o f the Management Information Systems Division administrative computer system and provides some services for

the Centre for Information Science Research equipment.

The University completed a study on the Directions o f Information Technology and the implications IT would have on campus activities. The report, distributed widely within the

University and to other Universities in Australia, was well received. The University is now considering paolicies and IT implementation plans across the University in light o f the study. Most initial effort will be targeted on networking, on training and IT awareness for staff and smdents, and on exploring the potential for the use o f IT in teaching methods.

A N U Supercomputing Facility—ANUSF and Fujitsu renewed agreements whereby ANUSF are perting several widely used chemistry programs and mathematical program libraries to the VP range o f supercomputers and carrying out extensive research and development working the

mathematics area, managed by the Head, Academic Services, ANUSF. Fujitsu delivered a 1 Gbyte Systems Storage U nit as an up>grade to the VP-2200 Unix based supercomputer. A Storage Technology silo with an initial capacity o f 1 Terabyte was installed at year end. A submission to the Australian Research Council to upgrade the supercomputer installation, in collaboration with others, was successful.

CSC Facilities Management—The campus backbone network was expanded and all buildings requiring connection to the network have now been connected. Progress was made in linking

University Resources an d Services

parts o f the administrative computing network into the backbone. More powerful general purpose Unix capacity was installed within the

central services.

Faculties Computer Unit—The facilities o f the unit were stretched during the year with the high enrolments. All microcomputer capacity was

replaced for the start of the year and dum b terminal equipm ent as replaced by X-terminals and more powerful servers. T he environmental and ergonomic conditions in the general purpose laboratories were improved.

Finance and Accounting Division

T he Division started the year by successfully installing a microcomputer driven cash receipting system which is simultaneously interactive with administrative mainframe computing applications. T he project was driven by an urgent

need to streamline the payment o f smdent fees and to record the payment immediately on sm dent records and financial records o f the

University. T he system was later extended to all receipting undertaken within the Division and is ready for implementation in other areas o f the University on request.

Substantial work was undertaken on the design and development o f a new smdent fees management and accounting package. The package is a companion to the Registrar’s Smdent

Infonnation System, both o f which are due for installation in 1994. Work included the preparation o f a user specification, consultation

and advice on system design, preliminary testing o f the package and development of an acceptance test plan.

W ork on the cash receipting system and the smdent fees management and accounting package was performed in cooperation with staff o f the Management Information Services Division and

the Registrar’s Division.

A revision o f practices associated with the recording o f debt and subsequent recovery action was completed. This complements a new computerised processing regime installed in the

previous year and substantially finalises a project

which has modernised the University’s accounts receivable processing system.

Specifications were prepared to remove an anomaly o f non-departmentalised-reporting for sp>ecial purpose and research funds at the School, Faculty and Centre level in the University’s

financial system. Implementation o f the modification was deferred until 1994 because of a re-assignment o f priorities to other budgetary and financial systems. The set o f modifications, when installed, will give consistency to the structure o f stored financial data and allow managers to ascertain the total funds available at a ’departmental’ level.

Stamtoty reporting for the 1992 year was completed again on schedule. The reporting reflected those revisions required by the Department o f Finance (vide Guidelines for

Financial Statement of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities) to which the University must adhere. The review o f financial statements

by staff o f the University’s Audit Office and the Australian National Audit Office and the subsequent resolution o f issues, were completed in

time to permit the financial statements to be incorporated in the 1992 Annual Report o f the University.

T he University will report its financial activity for 1994 to the Department o f Employment, Education and Training, Department o f Finance and the Australian Government. T he reporting will be presented in a single format for the first

time for the 1994 year. Considerable planning by staff o f the Division was undertaken in 1993 to enable this innovation. T he planning culminated in adjustments to financial recording practices to

start from January 1994. The 1994 revised format has been adopted by Commonwealth and State Governments and incorporates the reporting requirements o f the Australian Bureau o f Statistics.

The Centre for Continuing Education was established as an Ancillary Activity during 1993 and the transfer of financial records was effected smoothly. The operations of the Centre are now

contained in a discrete segment o f the financial systems. This action will support management of the Centre and permit full accrual accounting techniques to be applied to its operations.

There were several revisions to the Finance and Accounting Manual resulting from changes to

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The Australian National University

administrative practice. This publication, which codifies financial practice, is a source document for senior managers o f the University.

A search conference for senior staff o f the Division and representatives of administrative staff reviewed the appropriateness and adequacy o f services provided to managers in the University. T he conference also reviewed the priorities and services offered by the Division. T he conference clarified many issues, assisted with

the refinement o f the objectives o f the Division and prepared the way for the Central Areas strategic planning exercise undertaken in late 1993.

Management Information Systems Division

t ■ th e Management Information Systems f Division provides and supports the J L University’s core administrative com puting applications (Financial, Stores & Purchasing, Students, Payroll/Personnel, Convocation, Central Records and Mailroom) to meet operational and information requirements and provide the means o f complying with statutory responsibilities and managerial obligations in a timely manner.

Fhe number o f users o f the administrative systems grew to 640 during the year and at peak times there were more than 140 concurrent users, compared with about 100 in 1992. The growth in use during the year was far greater than anticipated.

T he Smdent Systems Replacement project, based on the University o f New South Wales Smdent Information System, was a major activity during 1993. The technical work required in converting

the U N SW system was greater than estimated. Implementation o f Release 1 (Undergraduates) is scheduled for the second quarter o f 1994 with functionality for Institute o f the Arts and postgraduate smdents to follow later in the year.

fh e Payroll/Personnel Enhancement project which commenced in mid 1992 was completed on time and within budget. Further enhancements are being processed through

normal change control procedures.

On-line fees receipting was implemented for first semester enrolment. For Central Services Fee payments, smdents presented their MICR encoded form to the cashier who "swiped'' this

through the M ICR reader attached to a microcomputer. This initiated a request to the mainframe and smdents details were displayed. Payment was then made by cash, credit card or cheque using "point o f sale" hardware, and the details confirmed by the cashier. Databases were

updated and a receipt printed. O n average this process took 45 seconds.

The AVCC initiated Core Australian Standard for Management and Administrative Com puting (CASMAC) project resulted in two major groupings o f universities being formed in 1993 to develop and implement integrated core

administrative computing applications. The ANU, after careful consideration, opted not to join either o f these groups but instead joined with the University o f New South Wales and Macquarie University to form a third unit call the NATURAL group. ANU and U NSW have exchanged applications over several years. A Memorandum o f Understanding was signed in late 1993.

Members o f the Division were involved in the University’s IT Directions Study and will continue to be involved in implementation o f the Directions Statement.

Planning Unit

f g t h e Planning Unit was established within the portfolio of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor Λ . (Planning and Administration) in 1992 in response to the Council’s concern that the University provide a more concentrated focus on planning issues.

The U nit’s objectives are to enhance the capacity of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Planning and Administration) to advise the Vice-Chancellor on a wide range o f issues, to assist the Central Areas

Divisions in their support to the academic and smdent community through broad strategic and operational planning, and to provide detailed information for internal management and planning and for statutory reporting to Government.

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The U nit was established by drawing together various existing positions and activities in the Central Areas with a ’planning’ and ’project’ capacity. Its ability to provide planning support

and management information was strengthened by the integration o f the Statistical Office which was previously located in the Management Information Systems Division. T he core staff o f

the U nit is supplemented by personnel on secondment from other areas within or outside the University.

The functions o f the Unit cover a variety o f areas from strategic planning for administrative issues and support for academic planning, through to

assistance with a number of projects to improve the University administration’s efficiency and effectiveness. Major achievements in 1993 included:

■ provision o f resource materials, detailed information and briefing papers for the University’s Senior Officers on a range o f issues including the annual educational profile

negotiations with the Commonwealth and support o f the Enrolment Planning Committee;

■ support for a number o f major projects including the preparation o f the University’s IT (Information Technology) Directions Statement, the development o f a strategic plan for the Central Areas, and the Smdent Administrative Procedures Review; and

■ production o f a range o f statistical information for management and planning including the Statistical Handbook, two editions o f the Statistical Bulletin, a large number o f ad hoc

reports, and preparation o f statutory and external reports eg to DEET, ABS and AVCC.

fh e work o f the U nit relies on extensive consultation with other areas on campus to bring about a wide range o f improvements. In the case o f the Smdent Administrative Procedures Review,

for example, U nit staff facilitated the work o f academics, students and administrative staff in developing the new Smdent Information System which will replace three existing systems. O ther

changes which arose out o f this Review included a new smdent card to incorporate several previously disparate services, improvements to smdent fee processing, a revision of the University

Handbooks, a new University policy on privacy, and improved desktop com puting and staff

development arrangements within the Registrar’s Division.

During the year, staff members o f the Unit worked with their colleagues from the Planning Services, University of New South Wales, on a

number of issues including arrangements for exploiting information in administrative systems for management and planning purposes and for easier reporting to Government.

Ih e U nit staff participated in a range o f developmental and training activities to equip them to meet the existing and emerging needs of the University, especially in relation to the provision o f information for decision making, quality assurance procedures in the tertiary education sector, change management, computing and statistical analysis and presentation.

Public Affairs Division

t ■ th e Public Affairs Division was established 1 during 1993 by combining the former JL University Public Relations section with the Official Publications Unit, the Drill Hall Gallery, the A N U Art Collection and Graduate Affairs. The new Division includes the ANU Arts Centre and the re-established Creative Arts

Fellowships program. It is responsible for promoting the A NU campus as a major conference venue and is currendy developing plans, in conjunction with halls o f residence,

colleges and other areas o f the University involved in these conferences, to coordinate activities and to formalise funding and promotion arrangements. The Division began a program to bring consistency to A NU’s advertising approach, especially the visual presentation o f the

University, in conjunction with the Secretary's Division. T he Division has the primary organisational responsibility for Conferring of Degrees Ceremonies.

The Division was supported in its work by the Public Affairs Committee o f Council, created in 1993, the members of which include representatives o f Council, the academic and general staff and the ACT community.

During 1993 services provided by the Division included the preparation o f public relations plans for Research Schools, a special plan for the Institute o f Advanced Studies, promotion of the

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The Australian National University

openings o f Faculties, Centres and special events, participation in student recruitment, media releases for a range o f activities and coordination o f visits to the campus. A N U Reporter, the University’s fortnightly newspaper, was again successful in showing the outside world the vitality, scope and importance o f work at the University. T he media pursued many o f the stories which appeared in A N U Reporter.

Major Divisional achievements during the year were:

■ The inaugural Contemporary Art Fair at the Drill Hall Gallery, supported by local commercial galleries and by a grant from the A C T Cultural Council

■ The award o f Canberra Critics’ Circle 1993 Visual Arts Awards to the Manager o f the Gallery and to the Curator of the A N U Art Collection

■ The inaugural A N U Chess Festival— which became Australia’s second largest

■ Publication o f S ta ff News on a permanent basis

■ Cooperation with the Research School of Biological Sciences in conducting the seminar Communicating Science and the associated visit o f American science journalist, Cory Dean

■ An increase in media coverage of the University’s teaching and research activity

■ A successful re-launch o f The National Graduate

■ A major “cleansing” o f the ANU Convocation Roll and the location o f “lost” graduates

■ A dynamic program o f exhibitions for the Drill Hall Gallery

■ Fhe revived A NU Poets’ Lunch

■ A successful A N U TECH Prize short story competition in A N U Reporter

■ Ihe funding o f the Looby Portrait o f A D Hope

■ Fhe Tournament of Minds achieved 1,000 competitors for the first time

■ O ne extra Conferring of Degrees Ceremony was organised

Media Liaison

During 1993 the two Media Liaison staff undertook a number public relations projects in addition to their normal work of arranging media

interviews and responding to media requests for information. Projects included arranging and promoting openings o f various new parts o f the University, the preparation of a new staff booklet, and visits to the campus. Media liaison staff were assisted throughout the year by a student from the Public Relations course at the University o f Canberra on an unpaid internship basis.

A series o f performance indicators is being developed for media liaison work. T he series uses data collected from the A N U ’s daily media

summary and the number and subjects o f media releases issued by the Division. The 1993 results will be used as the benchmark. Further development in 1994 will provide data on proactive and reactive responses to media requests for information and comment. The 1993 baseline figures indicate that news and comment related to the University’s research programs and

commentaries/interviews with academics on their areas o f research and teaching expertise were the two main reasons for mentions o f the A N U in all media during 1993. In the second half o f the year media releases were targeted more directly to specialist writers and/or to regional/specialisr publications, including specific radio programs. This was reflected in a slight increase in media pick-up o f releases over the second half o f the year.

Publications Office

The Publications Office coordinates production o f more than 40 publications and works closely with the Graduate School, the Undergraduate Smdent Admissions Office, the Deputy Registrar (Smdent Policy and Planning), the International Education Office and Faculty Offices. Overall, there has been an increased demand for “official publications”. Prior to 1990 the Office produced a relatively small number o f publications— Faculty (now Undergraduate) Handbook, Rules Book, University Annual Report, Undergraduate Prospectus, Smdent Accommodation Booklet, Directory o f Smdent Services, Conferring o f

University Resources and Services

Degrees Booklets, Staff List, Wall planner, Visitors to Australian Universities, Commonwealth Universities Yearbook entry, University Legislation and a Graduate Studies

booklet. Recendy the number o f publications has more than tripled, and the demand for higher quality productions has increased. This has been achieved with a reduction of staff in 1989 from 4.5 to 3 (the present staffing level).

ANU Arts Centre

It has been an exciting and stimulating year for the ANU Arts Centre. Activities highlighted the theatre space as an excellent music and dance performance venue. T he Arts Centre has established itself as a venue for the annual St

Valentines Jazz Festival, Canberra Rep’s Music Hall and the Australian Playwrights ’ Conference, which has now moved to the September vacation. Drama productions through the year in which the

Centre cooperated with the D rama Program included The Cherry Orchard and Julius Caesar directed by Geoffrey Borny and Habeas Corpus directed by T ony Turner. The law smdents presented their annual Law Revue and a group o f smdents with a base in the Economics Faculty staged a University Revue. The Centre staged two small musical gems. A free-lance conductor brought soloists from the Australian O pera to perform a program o f Bach Cantatas and then a program o f unpublished songs by Rossini. Both concerts attracted good audiences and were highly acclaimed by critics. Opera A C T produced Figaro on Tour, a bowdlerised version o f Mozart’s opera Marriage o f Figaro. Vis-a-vis Dance Canberra, staged a production during the Australian Drama

Festival which used the Centre’s stage to its full potential and audience response was excellent. Canberra Grammar School presented its final year

productions in the Arts Centre with the smdents doing all the stage set up, lighting (under supervision), directing and performing. T he year ended with Canberra City Opera’s production of

The Gondoliers. This was an amazing community project which did well at the box-office.

Drill Hall Gallery

The Drill H all Gallery’s charter is to provide the Canberra com m unity with a selective program of high quality exhibitions that display the latest trends in Australian and international art. Its objectives are to support the arts in the Canberra

region, to strengthen the existing relationship between the A N U and the wider Canberra community, and to support the academic interests o f the university. A wide variety of exhibitions was held in the main Gallery and in the A NU Exhibition Room, bringing a total o f 16,704 visitors.

Those which originated at the Gallery were the most successful. These included Ten Years o f Acquisitions. A Selection o f the A N U Collection. To celebrate the International Year of the W orld’s

Indigenous People, the Gallery organised two exhibitions by contemporary Aboriginal artists of international reputation: Mamunukuwi Jilamarra— Tiwi Women’s Art and Gordon

Bennett. Painting History. The Tiwi women are at the forefront o f aboriginal printmaking. The catalogue o f this exhibition, published by the Drill Hall Gallery, was referred to as "a work of

art" by The Canberra Times and the Gallery continues to receive requests for copies from libraries, collectors and galleries throughout Australia and from as far afield as Japan, Hong

Kong, Germany and France.

The highlight o f the year was the first .

Contemporary Art Fair, which brought more than 3000 people to the Drill Hall Gallery during 10 days. Participants were AGOG, Ben Grady Gallery, Chapman and Solander Galleries as well as the National Gallery Shop, the ANU Co-op and A rt Monthly. The Fair provided a fomm for the commercial galleries to present their best works and to work together for the first time. It

attracted new local audiences to the visual arts in Canberra. T he participants would like to make the Contemporary Art Fair a biennial event. The Fair received financial assistance from the ACT

Government, and was highly profitable for the participants. In November, the Manager o f the Drill Hall Gallery, Nancy Sever, and the Curator of the ANU Art Collection, Johanna Owens, were each presented with 1993 Visual Arts Awards by

the Canberra Critics’ Circle for organising the Fair.

Graduate Affairs Office

1993 was an important year for Graduate Affairs and saw significant progress in a number of areas. T he appointment of a full-time Graduate Affairs Officer at the beginning o f the year enabled the

University to re-invigorate the program which aims at developing the graduate body as a

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The Australian National University

M s N ancy Sever (pictured left) a n d M s Joanna Owens

dynamic, informed and interested association with a continuing interest in the University. Modest goals set for the yeat included the “recovery” and updating o f addresses o f graduates and the initiation o f more regular contact with

members o f the Convocation. The first goal was substantially achieved when the Office took responsibility for maintenance of the Convocation Roll. This led to the development of special techniques to locate some o f the 6000 members with unknown addresses. T he task was carried out with the assistance of a person on the JobStart

program. The second goal was met through the production o f four editions o f the Convocation magazine, The National Graduate, which was re-designed, and through the participation o f the Graduate Affairs Office in a range o f activities including direct contact at Conferring o f Degrees Ceremonies.

An additional responsibility taken up by the Graduate Affairs Office was the selection and marketing o f a range o f memorabilia for graduates

o f the University. A proposal for the formation of an A N U Alumni Association was developed and the Graduate Affairs Office assisted a number o f other areas o f the University in their activities involving graduates.

Registrar’s Division

f'T F ^hroughout 1993, concerted activity was directed to the review of procedures for the Λ . administration o f students which was initiated in June 1992 and mentioned in last year’s annual report. Following an intensive evaluation o f available options, a decision was

made to introduce a new Student Information System, based on the University of New South Wales Student System, adapted to meet AN U’s requirements. Rapid progress was achieved, with the result that the new system, as it relates to undergraduates, it expected to be implemented in the second quarter o f 1994. The aim is to enhance the system further during 1994 to incorporate administrative requirements relating to postgraduates and smdents of the Institute o f the Arts.

Working parties established to examine various related aspects of student administrative procedures also made substantial progress, of which the benefits will begin to be apparent from

1994. There was wide consultation and discussion within the Division to develop corporate aims and objectives. The need for a program o f staff training designed to meet the needs o f staff of the

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University Resources an d Services

Division who will be faced with procedural and technological changes was agreed upon and will be implemented during the coming year.

In an atmosphere o f increasing computerisation of administrative tasks, the need emerged to establish a user-support group within the Division to

provide assistance with networking and operating services.

The sustained high demand for the University’s undergraduate and postgraduate course offerings continued to produce a high work-load on staff of the Division. O ther factors, too, have tested the resilience o f staff: the need for the University to expand and diversify its sources o f funding, which calls for greater entrepeneutship and individualised accountability; the more intense

and frequent requirements for justification, review and monitoring o f activity o f both individuals and groups; the changed and more diversified array of academic staffing arrangements; together with the continuous striving for greater efficiency and effectiveness in meeting the expectations o f the University itself, the Division’s clients— the staff

and students— and of the Government.

Ihc University continued to incorporate its equity program into its normal activities during 1993, with the University assuming funding responsibility for a pan-time disability officer to assist the increasing number o f its students with disabilities. A Welfare Officer position was created during the year to assist students in their contacts with AUSTUDY and other government agencies.

Ihc University’s access program Countrywide succeeded in attracting increasing numbers o f educationally disadvantaged smdents, many of whom also benefited from the accommodation

bursaty scheme put in place to assist smdents in financial need. T he University was commended by DEBT for its high retention rate o f Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smdents, and for the

number o f those smdents who progressed from undergraduate to postgraduate studies. The University also prut in place in 1993 an additional equity program to support women in

non-traditional areas, such as engineering and postgraduate research degree courses.

T he Grants Office was again notable for the necessary expansion of its operations. As well as taking an increasingly pro-active role in identifying external research grant opportunities, the Office administered the biennial Strategic

Developments competition in the Institute of Advanced Studies which is a key instmment in facilitating change in research direction within the Institute as a whole. The Office continued to

provide a much-valued advisory service to staff on seeking external grants, partly in association with CEDAM.

During 1993, steps were taken to make a continuing appointment o f a University Legal Officer. M r S Herrick, a former Commonwealth public servant, Solicitor and practising Barrister, was appointed following wide advertisement and

took up duty in October. Though the University retains a firm o f solicitors, the demand for in-house legal services, particular in the areas of contract negotiation, general commercial law and administrative law, as well as in relation to the interpretation o f University and other relevant legislation, is most conveniendy met by means of this kind o f appointment.

M r Stephen H errick

A new Head o f the International Education Office, M r I Harris, formerly o f the University o f New England, also took up duty during October.

fh e educational services centres located in the Division play a vital role in the life o f the University.

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The Australian National University

Study Skills Centre

Both undergraduate and postgraduate students continued to visit the Centre in increasing numbers on matters relating to their academic progress. This year 1480 students sought advice from staff in the Centre, an increase o f 17% over

1992, and many other smdents were assisted through lectures and seminars given by Study Skills staff at the invitation of different departments.

Overseas, second language and equity smdents made good use o f the special assistance available to them.

Staff continued to be invited to mn workshops and seminars at other universities on teaching international smdents, to give papers and be keynote speakers at national conferences, and to lead discussions with professional colleagues in other centres. T he Centre was selected as the example o f ’best practice’ in the provision o f academic support services for a national project Rinded by the AVCC and DEBT and managed by the Queensland University of Technology. The work of the graduate adviser in the A N U ’s

innovative Graduate School is being recognized as unique and valuable, resulting in many requests for papers and information about issues relating to graduate smdents.

University Counselling Centre

T he Counselling Centre Review Committee, which issued its report in April, strongly endorsed the quality and the range o f the Centre’s services

to smdents and staff, and produced some helpful ideas about ways o f Rirther increasing the Centre’s effectiveness. Unfortunately, senior officers decided that resource constraints required a restriction in the Centre’s personal counselling services to University staff. From the beginning of

1994, staff with marriage and family issues will normally be referred to an agency in the community.

Towards the end o f the year, the Adviser to Staff was included within the Centre, with a special line o f responsibility to the Secretary, and with particular responsibilities for assisting staff with work-related issues. This arrangement will facilitate mote professional support for the Adviser and better coordination of the services

provided to staff by the Adviser and the counsellors.

In 1993, the Centre aimed to Rirther increase its availability to smdents (affer a 46% increase between 1990— 92 in the number o f smdents counselled)— by improved arrangements for ensuring that smdents with urgent needs are seen immediately, and by increasing the overall number o f counselling hours available. Demand for counselling continued to stretch the resources of the Centre, and an increasing number o f smdents presented issues o f great severity or

urgency.

During the year, the University decided that the post ofSm dent Welfare Officer should continue on a permanent, full-time basis. The Officer would provide information and advice to smdents about sources o f financial and other material support, and would work under the professional supervision o f the Head o f the Counselling Centre. The need for this service has grown with the increased difficulties experienced by many smdents in making ends meet.

Besides individual counselling, the Centre was also asked to contribute to dealing with difficult issues and simations on campus and to provide immediate assistance in a number o f crises or emergencies. There was also an increase in the number o f requests from academic areas to assist in the resolution o f disputes.

Health Service

The Health Service continued to offer a confidential general practice medical service to all ANU smdents, spouses o f overseas smdents, ANU staff and short-term ANU visitors.

Medical consultations were charged for mostly by direct billing Medicare or charging through the Medibank Private Overseas Smdent Scheme.

Nurses provided clinical support for the general practice service, free treatment for minor accidents on campus, and counselling on specific health matters. Health education covered nutrition sessions in the self-catered halls of residence, first-aid and general advice for the Inward Bound teams and static displays in the Health Service covering skin care, overseas travel health advice,

"colds and flu", STD ’s and exercise.

University Resources an d Services

Physiotherapy has continued to be provided at no charge to students. The main problems for students have been postural backs, due to long

hours spent bending over desks or keyboards, and sporting injuries. Private physiotherapy has also been provided by the Sports Medicine Centre on two days per week and this service has been available to staff for a fee.

The Health Service had a small increase in the number o f medical consultations and patients seen during the year. However, it is unable to provide for all the students who request consultations during term and examination

periods due to lack o f space. Some smdents have had to be advised o f the location o f nearby practices during very busy periods.

For 1994 there will be a few staff changes. Dr Furnass, the former director and more recently a Licensee, has retired. Mrs Levick, the physiotherapist for many years, has resigned, and Ms Khamsone, a medical receptionist, has taken leave without pay to spend a year in Laos.

The Service expects that 1994 will continue on similar lines to 1993.

1992/93 to S2.34M (1.6% o f the University’s salaries bill) due in part to difficulties o f rehabilitation in some cases, even though the total number o f claims had decreased. Following

intensive investigations, review o f cases and implementation o f various procedures and practices, the cumulative effort resulted in a reduction in the premium for 1993/94 to $ 1.26M (0.8% o f the estimated salaries bill).

At the end o f the year the Assistant Secretary (Administration), John Harper, whose responsibilities included the management of the Personnel Office, retired after 37 years o f service.

Secretary’s Division

T he Division includes a number of groups providing staffing services; the Personnel Office, the Industrial Office, the Appointments and Academic Staffing Section, staffTraining and

Development U nit and the Equal Employment O pportunity Unit.

P erson n el O ffice

1993 saw the completion o f a major enhancement _

o f the Personnel and Payroll System. Although a Industrial O ffice full post implementation review will be conducted in 1994, the new upgraded system is a A significant initiative early in the year was the considerable improvement on the old system. completion of negotiations and certification of the

O ne important task following the completion of Memorandum of Agreement for General Staff the enhancement is the training o f users to utilise under the Australian Industrial Relations fully the capacity of the new system. Commission’s (A] RC) Structural Efficiency Principle (SEP). The agreement introduced a

T he University’s workers’ compensation 10-grade classification and salary structure insurance is arranged through COMCARE. covering all general staff positions and established There was an unexpected rise in the premium in equitable internal relativities across the various

M r John Harper

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classification groups. Since then, there has been a great deal o f work associated with drafting and negotiating classification descriptions for each

new grade. The Unions’ acceptance o f the revised classification procedures which had been developed by the Industrial Office also formed part of the agreement and the new procedures came into operation mid-year. Other matters contained in the agreement included revised procedures for Fixed Term and Casual appointments, the rationalisation o f a number of award provisions, policies, procedures (with an emphasis on increased flexibility) and the

introduction o f market related loadings for general staff.

At the national level there were negotiations about enterprise bargaining agreements for both academic and general staff A National Framework Agreement emerged for general staff

to form the basis o f enterprise bargaining within the University in 1994. As a result o f this agreement, general staff received a salary increase o f 1.4% from late 1993 with a further 1.5% to be paid in 12 months. Further increases depend upon the outcome o f the enterprise bargaining process. A similar agreement for academic staff has still be negotiated.

T he Industrial Office continued to monitor and, where necessary propose amendments to, personnel policies and procedures; to monitor the

EEO Policy as it relates to recmitment issues; and to advise and assist areas resolve grievances and disputes. There was a significant increase in the number o f performance related matters referred to the Industrial Office for resolution. The number o f formal disputes (i.e. those notified to the AIRC for conciliation or arbitration) was small. The disputes, however, were complex and required many hours both in preparation time and in formal submissions to the Commission. Each dispute was resolved to the University’s satisfaction. T he University was also affected in October by a national strike relating to academic staffing issues.

T he reports o f two working parties— one chaired by Professor L Mander on a Work and Performance Review Scheme for General Staff and the other a management/union group on participation in decision-making, chaired by D r D Rawson— were distributed widely for discussion and negotiation.

Union amalgamations continued through 1993. The old Association o f Draughting, Supervisory and Technical Employees (ADSTE) after amalgamation became part of the Automotive, Metals and Engineering Union (AMEU). The most significant for the higher education industry was an extension o f the coverage o f the ANU Administrative and Allied Officers Assocation

(AAOA) to some universities in Victoria and South Australia and then the amalgamation o f AAOA with the two academic unions— the

Federated Australian University Staff Association (FAUSA) and the U nion of Australian College Academics (UACA). As a result the National Tertiary Education Industry Union (NTEU), which covers both academic and general staff, was created. T he N T EU is now one o f the largest unions in Australia and, together with AMEU, the Health Services Union of Australia (HSUA) and the Australia Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Workers Union (LHMU) forms the ANU General Staff Single Bargaining Unit.

A ppointm ents and Academ ic S taffing S ection

Following the Report on the Review o f the University’s Administration, devolution of particular staffing activities has been trialled in the Institute o f Advanced Studies after receiving support from heads o f Research Schools early in

1993. The Research School of Social Sciences assumed responsibility for all staffing matters to the level o f professor. Fhis trial has proved extremely successful with exchange of information across the University computer network. Later in

1993, the Research School of Chemistry was added to the network and to the devolution trial. Two schools, not yet networked, have assumed responsibility for visiting fellow matters.

Devolution o f academic staff selection to The Faculties has had limited success. T he feasibility of further devolution will be considered by Deans and Heads o f Research Schools early in 1994.

The Section, on assuming responsibility for both general and academic appointment matters, has responsibility also for servicing selection committees for senior administrative positions— seven such new appointments were made in 1993.

Procedures for promotion to all academic levels (B to E (1)) were folly implemented in 1993 in both The Faculties and the Institute o f Advanced Studies. Procedures have been set in place in the

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Institute for promotion to level E(2) in 1994. In 1993, a two stage process for considering promotions in T he Faculties was initiated, with Faculties Promotions Committees making the initial recommendations for prom otion to level B and C to the Board o f The Faculties Promotions Committee. Faculties Promotions Committees

assumed responsibility for promotion to level B. The two-step process follows that which has been in place in the Institute for a num ber o f years.

Policy and procedures for making renewable fixed term appointments were approved in 1993 and a major revision o f the procedures for release from teaching and release exclusively for research was made to include leave granted for teaching relief. A number o f other policy papers were also updated or revised. Conditions o f appointment for academic staff were extensively revised.

The Section, together with the Industrial Office, participated in meetings of the Joint Academic Award Restructure Committee. This has provided a useful fomm for discussions and negotiations with the Academic Staff Association.

Staff T raining an d D ev elo p m en t

The Staff Training and Development U nit’s (STDU) major activity was running the Supervisory Skills Program (SSP93) from March until September. It included 10 Modules with an individual work project. Parallel with this a program was conducted for nominating supervisors.

Programs were devised specifically for entire service groups in the Housing Office and Buildings and Grounds Division and the Administration o f the Research School o f

Biological Sciec.es. In two of these areas Total Quality Service will be a feamre of their management style and continuing programs are planned. O ther programs were designed and run for a number o f areas including the Registrar’s Division, D epartm ent of Nuclear Physics in the Research School o f Physical Science and Engineering and Records. These programs varied from team building and managing change to the role o f the supervisor.

University wide programs included Managing Change, Keyboard Skills, Effective W riting, Role of the Supervisor, Setting Goals and Performance Measurement, Staff Selection Briefing^, Conflict

Resolution, Giving and Receiving Feedback, Quality Service, Tim e Management, Job Finding and Interview Skills, and Welcome Programs for

the new staff held in April and October. Work continued on job re-design and providing advice on the W ork Performance Review Scheme.

T he U nit also conducted programs in conjunction with other groups which included EEO, AIDS Awareness and Disability Awareness. Four Speech craft courses were run by University Toastmasters Groups in conjunction with STDU.

E qual E m p lo y m en t O p p ortu n ity U n it

Following the passage of the Disability Discrimination A ct 1992and its implementation on 1 March 1993 the Policy for People with Disabilities, referred to in both the 1991 and 1992

reports, was finalised by the EEO Committee in February and forwarded to Council for endorsement at its May meeting. As foreshadowed

in the last report, a Disability Advisory Group has been formed as a sub-committee of the EEO Committee to oversee the carriage o f the policy.

Matters concerning both staff and students with a disability are contained in the policy and Council has asked that amendments to the Smdent Discipline Rules be prepared which would

proscribe harassment of persons with a disability, their relatives and close associates by students of the University.

Following an agreement with the Department of Employment, Education and Training on the employment o f a consultant to develop an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recruitment and Career Development Strategy for the University, M r E Law developed a strategy which is now awaiting University consideration.

T he Council Committee Against Sexual Harassment met on eight occasions during 1993. New pamphlets and a booklet providing comprehensive details of each step in the process

o f resolving a complaint will be distributed at the start o f the 1994 academic year. Self protection workshops for women were conducted again in

February and August and continue to be rated as highly effective by participants.

T he HIV/AIDS Education Inter-Campus working Group met on six occasions in 1993. T he report on the Commonwealth AIDS Prevention and Education (CAPE) program was

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completed and submitted. Funding has been provided to extend the Campus AIDS Worker position for a further three years.

A support group was formed to assess the needs o f staff from non-English speaking backgrounds and consider ways o f meeting these needs. It is anticipated that program delivery will become a staff training responsibility.

T he EEO U nit provided administrative support to the Disability Advisory Group, the Committee Against Sexual Harassment and the HIV/AIDS W orking Group. In addition, two trainees were

placed in the U nit during the year with both being successful in subsequently obtaining jobs.

Business Office, Central Areas

T he Business Office provided financial and administrative services to the Divisions that comprise the Central Areas, Graduate School and the Centre for Information Science Research. Services were expanded later in the year to include the MBA Program.

University-wide activities included links with the Commonwealth Department o f Administrative Services (DAS) on a variety o f service-oriented initiatives, eg. removals, leasing of vehicles, records management and storage, printing and duplicating and fuel supply. A successful trial was completed on the use o f DAS Removals for the recruitment o f academic staff.

In 1993 the five year travel agency contract with Thomas Cook Pty Ltd concluded. Following wide consultation on possible alternatives, the business was put out to tender. In September, Traveland Pty Ltd took up a three year contract essentially on the same basis as previous arrangements.

Insurance matters, University-wide, became a major issue later in the year due to a large increase in the cost o f property insurance.

Instructional Resources Unit

T he Instructional Resources U nit (IRU) continued to respond to many multi-faceted media service requests during 1993. The Technical Services Section, in conjunction with T he Faculties, completed a significant upgrade o f the audio visual facilities in the lecture theatres

and teaching areas o f the University. A guide giving straightforward instructions to users o f the lecture theatres was produced, with the aim of

reducing the number o f help calls and general dissatisfaction with using lecture theatres.

Information technology played an increasingly significant role. A dedicated tele-conferencing facility is currently being installed in The Faculties and multi-media projects were completed on the digital AVID editing system by

IRU Productions. A new animation graphics service was successfully introduced early in 1993 offering, 2D, 3D modelling and rendering and has become an important component o f the overall IRU media service.

The Language Centre provided increased technical support for tutors preparing their own teaching materials. The Language Laboratory Users’ Committee provided a valuable forum for

inter-departmental liaison and planning for the new Asian Studies Building.

Occupational Heath and Safety

In 1993, the University’s cumulative efforts in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) policy and administrative action maintained the high standard o f O H S performance established over

the last few years, with the University’s lost-time injury incidence rate being maintained at 2.0 per 100 equivalent full-time employees per year. T he University’s O H S committee network is now well established and many committees are now assisting with the administration o f routine preventative activities— like staff induction, O H S audits, hazard rectification and accident investigation.

New OHS policy, code o f practice and guideline development occurred in three fields during the year (Electrical Safety, Field Work Safety, Laser Safety). Five major administrative procedures and training programs were implemented or significantly improved during the year (laboratory signage, occupational strains, dangerous goods packaging and consigning, bicycle safety, radiation

operations audit).

The Unit’s series o f O H S training programs were routinely run including the offering o f programs to non-University participants via ANUTECH. New courses developed during the year were OHS for Managers and Supervisors, OHS for Manual

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Handlers, Occupational Strains, Compressed Gases and Cryogenics, Emergency Procedures and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. T he Wellness Program continued to be well supported during

1993 with a new course being developed in Defensive Driving.

th e U nit’s audit program undertakes the systematic and complete audit o f a particular hazard or occupational group with res p e a to established University OHS policy. D uring 1993, an audit was completed for benzene use and

exposure, and the results will be reviewed by the OHS Policy Committee. Appropriate changes in work procedures are being implemented.

During 1993, continuing development occurred in the contribution made by consultants to the activities o f the O H S Unit. D r N Marsh, Occupational Physician, is now providing consultant medical services to the U nit’s prevention program and D r C Ludford continues to provide input to our Biological Safety programs.

Adviser to Staff

T he adviser provides a welfare and social work service for all staff and is an important link in the University’s industrial and worker’s compensation procedures.

Ms A Dargan retired from the position at the end of 1993 and has now been replaced by Ms K Foster.

As a result o f a review of the operations o f the position, it is now being transferred to the University Counselling Service but the occupant

will still work closely with the Secretary and the other staff within the Division.

Animal Services

Established in August 1991, the Animal Services Division was formed by the amalgamation of Animal Services, John Curtin School o f Medical Research and the Faculties Animal Care Facility.

T he merger, as well as having merit in terms of economic rationalisation, resulted in standardisation o f animal management practice, more comprehensive animal health monitoring and, as a combined unit, one more able to answer animal welfare questions. T he larger operation has resulted in clearer definition o f animal technical staff career pathways.

At its commencement, the Division instimted a cost recovery process. This has resulted in a greater degree o f user accountability and less

waste, with concomitant increase in cost effectiveness.

T he Animal Services Division’s real strength is in rodent production and maintenance. For example, there are currently 30 mouse strains produced in the Specific Pathogen Free Unit and a number o f these are unique within Australia. It has been increasingly important to study the function o f genes and their derangements involved in human diseases. For this purpose the Division is now producing a number o f transgenic mice strains and it is predicted that the range will increase quite markedly in the near future. Six strains o f rats are produced in high security conventional facilities. T he reproductive performance of these rodent species together with regular pathogen monitoring, ensures that rodents produced by the Division meet an international standard essential for critical research studies. Murine viruses, for example, have the capacity to completely invalidate critical research, especially those pertaining to immunolgical programs and ongoing surveillance for these is an essential part of preventative medicine programs.

O f the other species, the pig operation has expanded during the year. This species is particularly valuable in that much of its metabolism is similar to man and it is a

particularly useful model for the study o f human health problems, such as diabetes, and some aspects o f Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

In addition to production and maintenance of animal species, the Division provides a variety o f advice to research and teaching personnel (for example on the use of anaesthetics, applied genetic aspects, OH&S considerations) is

involved in a large number o f routine interventions and provides surgical services to some studies. During 1993, the Division was also involved with Johnston and Johnston in a

program training ACT surgeons in laparoscopy techniques.

Housing Office

The University acknowledges that providing accommodation is an important factor in helping to attract high quality staff, postgraduate students and visitors. Accordingjy, the Housing Office

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offers rental housing to eligible members o f staff, academic visitors, full-time postgraduate students and their families.

Using the University’s own housing and, where appropriate, the private rental market, the Housing Office ensures that accommodation is available on arrival and organises all related services provided by the University. The provision o f assistance and guidance to tenants who have difficulty with matters connected with their accommodation goes well beyond the services offered by the private sector, an essential attribute where visitors and their families come from a different cultural or non-English speaking backgrounds. The Housing Office continues to be fully-self-financing from rental income and interest earnings, taking responsibility for staffing costs, maintenance and depreciation o f its assets.

O p eratin g E n viron m en t

The Strategic Plan (1992-1995) has recast the role of the Housing Office. A number o f policy changes (such as the reduction in the categories of staff eligible for University accommodation, and the sale o f dwellings) have already been implemented. Funds from the sales financed the refurbishment o f Fenner Hall and will finance redevelopment projects to replace older existing buildings. The shortage o f student accommodation was eased in 1993 with the opening o f Fenner Hall and the increasing vacancy rate for rental properties in Canberra; two events which allowed the sale of a number o f University dwellings allocated to smdent groups.

Fhe Liversidge Court Apartments continue to be used fully by visitors. An enhancement of the reservations system by the addition o f phone accoun ting software in 1993 has provided a higher standard of service to guests and improved profitability.

T he restoration and refurbishment o f the house at 16 Lennox Crossing, originally built circa 1913, is in its final stages with all external works complete. Originally known as Cottage 3, Canberra, this is the only remaining building o f its type in Canberra and will be proposed for classification under the National Estate Pregram. The Director’s residence at M ount Stromlo has also been renovated and restored to the standard required for a property with such historical significance.

Projects to redevelop property sites owned bv the University commenced in 1993 as part of the Strategic Plan to shift to a smaller holding o f medium density property through rationalisation of existing detached housing. These residential project redevelopments will be the first to adopt a

total asset management approach to the creation of new residential accommodation to increase the certainty o f long term financial performance.

Preliminary feasibility work on the redevelopment of the Garran accommodation complex will also commence in 1994.

In 1993, the Housing Office established a specific ’outreach’ service for residents o f its University dwellings with accommodation related difficulties. The Office has also implemented its staff service training program to ensure that staff are able to provide the levels of service required in an increasingly commercial operation.

Mid-year, residents and departing guests were surveyed independendy about a number of matters relating to housing including efficiency and service levels. 87% o f respondents indicated overall satisfaction with housing and 89% said they would recommend ANU housing to a colleague or fellow smdent. The main areas of concern related to rental levels (especially for postgraduate students) and to maintenance problems with older houses. The importance o f the availability o f university housing was mentioned by a significant majority of respondents.

O u tlo o k

The operation o f a Housing Referral and Advisory Service to assist staff, smdents and visitors with accommodation was approved in late 1993. T he establishment of the Service also formalises the increasing use o f private sector accommodation services. For the 1994 academic year, the Service will provide specific assistance to single undergraduate and postgraduate students through the establishment o f a rental tenancy guarantees system for private sector tenancies.

Expansion of the Liversidge Court Apartment complex will commence in 1994 with the renovation and refurbishment of adjacent houses.

An integrated Asset Management System for housing properties will be installed in early 1994. The pilot program has already streamlined the

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maintenance process and the full system software (based on the system used by the Buildings & Grounds Division) is being written for the Housing Office. T he system will eliminate the

need for duplication of data entry and a number o f maintenance registers and provide greater certainty in the financial management o f the University’s residential property portfolio.

Visiting Fellows

The University’s Visiting Fellow program benefits the A N U and strengthens links with other Australian universities.

T he num ber o f Visiting Fellows to the University in 1993 increased by over 30%, to 600. More than half o f the visitors were from overseas and two thirds o f all visitors received financial support. T he tim e spent at the A N U ranged from a few weeks to the full year.

A number o f distinguished retired members of staff continue to pursue their scholarly interests while holding Visiting Fellowships.

Outside Studies and Professional Development Program

T he University believes that overseas study is essential if its scholars are to stay at the forefront o f their disciplines and its outside studies program

which includes a discrete professional development program for non-continuing staff, provides opportunities for sustained research and scholarly activity free from teaching and routine

administrative duties. It also allows staff access to research facilities and material not available in Australia.

Recently available external funding to some staff in T he Faculties allows relief teaching to enable such staff to pursue active research programs more easily.

Outside studies or professional development must be approved and staff are required to report on their results. T h e proportion o f staff taking these programs in Australia is small.

Number participating

1992 267

1993 201

Length o f program: 13 weeks or less 195 136

13 to 26 weeks 56 52

26 to 39 weeks 13 6

39 to 52 weeks 3 7

T he total time in years approved for outside studies and professional development by members o f the academic staff during 1993 was 43.38 compared with 49.79 in 1992. This represented

5.23 per cent o f the total time o f all members of the academic staff of lecturer or above, compared with 5.99 pier cent in 1992.

O f the 201 staff taking outside studies or professional development in 1993, 139 received some measure o f financial support. The average amount o f assistance was $2,658, compared with $3,268 in 1992. There has been a downward trend in the level of assistance sought over the last three years.

Senior Appointments

Professor R D Terrell will take up appointment as Vice-Chancellor in January7 1994 following the vacation of the office by Emeritus Professor L W

Nichol at the end of 1993. Professor D Pearce, previously the Dean, Faculty of Law, became Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor in December. Professor] H Carver will continue as Acting

Director o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies and Deputy Vice-Chancellor until the end o f January 1994, when Professor S Serjeantson will take up permanent appointment.

A number o f new appointments were made to Directorships in the Institute of Advanced Studies. Professor K J Lafferty took up office as Director, John Curtin School o f Medical

Research in September. Professor Lafferty, a former Professorial Fellow of the A N U comes, more recently, from a position as Research Director of the Barbara Davis Center for

Childhood Diabetes, Denver, Colorado, USA Professor J R Mould took up appointment as Director, M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories in December. Professor D H Green, Professor of Geology at the University of Tasmania, and Chief Science Advisor,

Department of Arts, Sport, the Environment and Territories will take up appointment as Director,

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Research School o f Earth Sciences in January 1994.

Professor B D O Anderson was appointed Acting Director o f the new Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering from 1 January 1994.

Professor R B Stanton was appointed Dean o f the new Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology until a permanent appointment is made following an election within the Faculty. Professor J C Turner will replace Professor Μ N Barber as Dean, Faculty o f Science in Febmaty

1994 and Professor T Campbell will succeed Professor D C Pearce as Dean, Faculty o f Faw also early in 1994.

In May, Mr D R Cornwell was appointed Secretary o f the Institute o f the Arts. A number o f other senior level general staffing appointments were also made, including M r C Hogan as Head o f the Planning Unit, M r J S Mahoney as Head, Public Affairs Division, M r I Harris as Head, International Education Office, and Ms P Kcmp-Flliott, Director, Jabal Aboriginal and

Forres Strait Islander Centre. M rS Herrick was appointed as the University’s I,egal Officer.

M r J im M ahoney

University Fellowships, awarded by Council to honour exceptionally distinguished retired academic staff wishing to continue active research, were offered to Emerims Professors J Caldwell and L Zines, to be taken up in 1994.

Careers and Appointments Service

The number of students seeking counselling from the Service increased during 1993 because o f the very competitive graduate job market. Attendances at skill development workshops also increased, reflecting the concern students were expressing about their futures. The Service arranged a program o f workshops specifically for international students. Participation in campus visits programs by employers declined and the Service sought new avenues o f employment and information to assist students in their job searches. There was an increased demand from senior officers and academics within the University for information concerning the destinations o f the ANU graduates. Local and international students continued to seek pmt-time and casual employment to augment their finances.

M r Chris Hogan

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HIV/Aids Unit

The HIV/AIDS Inter-campus W orking Group, which is composed o f representatives o f the ANU, University o f Canberra, Canberra Institute o f Technology and AIDS community education workers, met six times in 1993. In consultation

with the W orking Group a review o f the Campuses AIDS Worker position recommended that to fulfil a need to educate students and staff relating to sexually transmitted diseases, a three year pan-tim e position should be created.

During the sm dent orientation period the Campuses AIDS Worker, Jane Keany, released educational materials funded by a grant from the Commonwealth AIDS Prevention Education

(CAPE) program. The posters, pamphlets, postcards and a tea towel, were targeted at specific smdent risk behaviours and were designed in close consultation with students. Since the launch of the materials in February 1993 by Professor P Baume, they have been progressively released during specific events such as special sex and

health weeks and seminars. Exposure o f the materials to interstate post-secondary institutions has resulted in many requests for access to them.

T he Campuses AIDS W orker regularly contributed articles to smdent newspapers and participated in Orientation Week activities, was

guest speaker for lecturers at each instimtion and assisted many students at both the personal level and with AIDS related assignments, and organised a series of workshops at several halls of residence aimed at improving students’

interpersonal and sexual communication. She will continue and expand on this innovative work in 1994.

A competition organised by the Campus AIDS W orker to create a condom dispenser for the ANU Students’ Association was a most successful venmre involving the Smdent Unions o f the

ANU and ITA and resulted in an exhibition of the works and an eye-catching dispenser for the ANU. This competition will become a regular event.

The winning entries in the annual competition to create a design to highlight AIDS awareness which is open to students in all the participating organisations, are being used as a bookmark, beer

coaster and pillow slip, and will be released in Orientation Week 1994.

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Student Services

A ■ The following four reports have been provided by the organisations represented in this section.

ANU Students’ Association

^ 993 saw the landslide re-election o f Green I Alliance with most candidates for office Λ . bearer positions and Student Representative Council members attaining around 70% o f the primary vote.

Building on the achievements of the previous administration, President Katherine Cummins, Treasurer M atthew Lobb and General Secretary Rebecca M ohr spearheaded the expansion o f the Association into a well resourced, active and accountable voice for students, in the university and in the wider community.

T he services o f the Students’ Association were expanded to include free legal advice, gay and lesbian contact officers, a better student loan service and free condoms in the interests o f safe sex. The finances o f the Association were reviewed with money being set aside for capital expenditure on new computers, printer, fax modem and

networking into the university’s computer system. T he Association also developed, in conjunction with the other smdent organisations, a capital component o f the General Services Fee to ensure the future o f student controlled capital works. Strong resourcing o f affiliated Clubs and Societies

remained a priority, and clubs from the newly amalgamated Schools o f Music and Art were encouraged.

O ther activities included lobbying for an uniform system of supplementary exams across all Faculties, m nning extensive campaigns to inform students about the the issues in the m n up to the Federal election and the increases to HECS in the Federal Budget, and successfully lobbying against the imposition o f anti-student unionism legislation proposed by the Liberal members o f the A.C.T. Legislative Assembly.

Another priority was the development of a strong, consistent student agenda within the university decision making bodies. This provided an active student voice on issues such as funding for student housing, safety on campus, parking, campus development, and the establishment o f a Research and 1 echnology Park. This also ensured that the costs of the new Smdent Information System would not be a burden on the smdent body.

The W om en’s Department initiated and developed a sexual harassment survey for the campus and held a successful Women’s Flealth Day. The International Students’ Service was given an office, and they published newsletters and held many activities including an International Smdent Awareness Week.

The Association also ran a strong campaign to affiliate to the National Union of Students, which was defeated by a narrow margin. The ANU thus

remains one of only three campuses left in Australia which have no national representation.

Postgraduate and Research Students Association

f ■ th e Postgraduate and Research Students’ Association (PARSA) continued to promote the welfare and further the interests of postgraduate students at the ANU.

At an individual level, PARSA provided advice and assistance to postgraduate students experiencing difficulties with supervision, finances, resource allocation and other academic and non-academic aspects of postgraduate life. PARSA continued to represent general

postgraduate interests on many of the University’s committees. The Association presented submissions, from a postgraduate view, to the Committee for Quality Assurance in Higher Education and the Senate Committee Inquiry into the Organisation and Funding o f Research in Higher Education.

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Student Services

Throughout the year, PARSA raised and pursued issues o f importance to postgraduates within the University, including the need for supplementary exams and supervision guidelines. PARSA provided a forum for a number o f special-interest groups including the University Housing Tenants’ Group, and lobbied the University on

their behalf. PARSA also hosted several International Smdent functions, as well as the annual PARSA Postgraduate Ball held at University H ouse in October.

The Association’s regular publication, Antitheses, provided a forum for a range o f postgraduate issues, including discussions on the appointment o f a research assistant, membership o f the

Students U nion and University tenancy. Four editions o f Antitheses and the 1993 Postgraduate O rientation H andbook were published and distributed to all postgraduates.

A research assistant was appointed in November to assist PARSA in obtaining and compiling information relevant to specific postgraduate interests, e.g. contacting students and program conveners to assess the role o f the Graduate School in preparation for a submission to the W orking Party into the Future Directions o f the

Graduate School. PARSA actively liaised with the Graduate School on its activities and participated in graduate forums and seminars organised by the Graduate School.

In December, PARSA sent six delegates to the annual council meeting o f the Council of Australian Postgraduate Associations (CAPA), and

two delegates to the associated Gender Conference. Independently, and through CAPA, PARSA continued to lobby the Federal Government on issues o f concern to all postgraduates.

ANU Union

993, both a difficult and rewarding year, marked a turning point for the Union, and changes to the management philosophy have the potential to effect the running o f the U nion for many years.

This significant change was driven by the Board o f Management. In 1993 the Board was extremely active in all areas of policy formation and

articulated it’s management philosophy, which centres around improving amenities and services to members, in a Strategic Plan, the first o f its kind produced by the Union. Late in the year the new amenities-centre philosophy found physical form with the opening o f a members’ lounge in the Bridge area o f the U nion Building. Work also began on a full-scale renovation o f the popular Asian Bistro.

1993 brought a significant improvement in the Union’s financial performance. After a large loss in 1992, the operations in 1993 rebounded to record a $100,000 turnaround. This excellent result was due to the hard work and dedication of all the U nion’s staff, who put in an effort far beyond what was expected.

This year also saw the retirement o f the Union’s long standing General Manager, M r T Senti. Tony had served the U nion as General Manager for 11 years, and his retirement marked the end o f an era o f great change and improvement for the Union. In the wake o f his departure the Union was able, at the close o f 1993, to consider the

possibility o f a new form for the U nion’s senior management.

Sports Union

he commencement o f 1993 was highlighted by the opening o f the building extensions which commenced early 1992. The project provided a new and enlarged Weights and Fitness complex, a Sports Shop and Administration offices.

The new facilities proved highly popular with members, exceeding all expectations in usage figures and more than justifying the Sports Union’s decision in proceeding with the project.

The Recreation and Intramural sports programs again proved highly successful and provided members with diverse and quality sports and recreational activities in which to participate.

University sports facilities played host to a number o f local and national sports championships with our grounds being used for National Junior Cricket competitions and the

Sports Hall for ACT and International Volleyball contests.

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Student Services

ANU Sports Clubs once again were active in ACT competitions and of particular note was the win by the Australian Rules Club in the Monaro League Division 1 competition.

Internationally, nine A N U students were selected in the Australian Teams for the W orld Student W inter & Summer Games, and all competed with distinction.

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ANUTECH Pty Ltd

993 was a year targeted to consolidate I previous years in developing and extending J L our international marketing in the technology, forestry and social sciences areas, establishing a track record o f on-sales in the syndicated R & D area with emphasis on the first two syndicates relating to life sciences, and generally expanding in terms of scientific

instruments and other University products into the marketplace. All o f these moves were designed to position A N U T E C H to take strategic advantage o f a more confident marketplace as the recession ebbs.

T he year saw a num ber o f changes to A N U T E C H ’s Board, which is appointed by the Council of the University, and comprises five external and four University members, and the Managing Director M r John Morphett. The Chairman o f the Board, M r Bruce Topfer,

together with two other Board Members, M r Ian Shedden and M r Fulton Muir, had their terms extended in 1993 to 1995, and that o f Mr Norman Tieck was extended to 1994. Other changes saw Professor John Carver rejoin the Board, and M r John Thorne appointed a Director to replace D r Lex Beardsell.

Operating revenue for 1993 approached $44 million, with a profit before gifts and donations to the A NU o f $998,000. T he shareholder’s equity is $7.1 million. Benefits accming to the University for teaching and research projects amounted to $17.1 million, made up o f $ 11.4 million to the Institute o f Advanced Studies and $5.7 million to A N U Faculties and Centres. In addition, significant benefits arose through the world-wide distribution o f University publications through Bibliotech.

T he number o f completed projects reflects a steady state, with 126 projects finalised in 1993 ft>r a total value o f $8.96 million. At the end o f December there were 202 projects in hand, with a total value o f $65.71 million.

The donations to the University from 1993 funds were allocated as follows:

Engineering Undergraduate Scholarships $18,000 Women in Engineering Scholarships $4,400 I G Ross Scholarship $1,500

Departmental Publications Distribution and Promotion $25,000

Public Lecture Scries $16,000

YTce-Chancellor’s Initiatives $255,000

TOTA L $319,900

International marketing of projects and instruments increased significantly, with visits to Japan, the United States and Europe, and there were notable successes. Among the highlights were the first overseas sale by ANUTECH’s instruments Division, Australian Scientific Instmments (ASI), o f a commercial SHRIMP II (Sensitive High Resolution Ion MicroProbe) to the Canadian Geological Survey. The $2.6 million sale was made against strong competition with multinational instrument manufacturers. As such, it represents an important stage in the developing recognition for the University’s scientific instmments and in the growth of ASI. Other sales by ASI included a prototype MASIF (Measurement Apparatus for Surface Interactions and Forces), and laboratory ball mills for the manufacture of new materials.

SHRIMP’s quality o f engineering was recognised in the 1993 A CT Institution of Engineers Excellence Awards. SHRIMP received the highest award in the Engineering Products Category, and became eligible to compete against a broad field in the 1994 National Excellence Awards.

Syndicated R & D success was reflected in the sale or initial agreement for two out of seven biological sciences projects. Anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals originating in the John Curtin School o f Medical Research (JCSMR) were licensed to the Australian biotechnology company Progen Industries Ltd for $4.8 million plus royalties. An initial agreement was signed with an international company for the development, marketing and distribution o f a

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fungal dieback diagnostic kit from the Research School o f Biological Sciences (RSBS).

Because o f the high market potential o f the remaining five biological sciences syndicated projects, A N U T E C H has funded further research with a view to attracting a manufacturing partner to move the projects fully to commercialisation. T he other five syndicated projects, in the physical sciences, continued to progress well, affirming the value o f this form of funding into the University.

A num ber o f other agreements were signed during the year. Life Sciences Division negotiated a collaborative agreement with a German pharmaceuticals company, Boehringer-Ingelheim, to provide $80,000 per year for two years’ research on potential asthma treatments, also in JCSMR. Negotiations with Otsuka

Pharmaceutical Co Ltd resulted in an extension o f funding o f $ 128,000 for promising anti-cancer research originating in RSBS.

most comprehensive environmental investigations yet undertaken of a large forested area in Australia, at Eden on the N SW South Coast.

A N U TECH broke new ground in 1993 with the establishment o f the National Quality o f Life Foundation, which was designed to test the effectiveness o f a different mechanism for funding and integrating research. T he Foundation’s approach is multidisciplinary, and its initial research focuses on improving the nation’s health and well-being.

In other developments, the Rural Health Education Centre transferred its base to the ANU and operates through A N U TECH Pty Ltd. The Centre coordinates a satellite broadcast network o f country hospitals across three states, linking country general practitioners and isolated health professionals for interactive professional health education programs.

Early in the year, A N UTECH signed a Generic Technology G rant Agreement with the Industry Research and Development Board and a commercial collaborator, Javac Pty Ltd which will

provide $400,000 to support a proof-of-concept study for new manufacturing technology for processing microchips.

Determined marketing efforts also bore fruit in consultancies. A major consultancy for the D epartm ent o f Health, Housing, Local Government and Community Services was carried out in association with the ANU

D epartm ent o f Chemistry. This examined the control o f materials used in the manufacture of illicit drugs, particularly amphetamines. Consultants from the D epartm ent o f Economics,

Research School of Pacific Studies, worked through A N U TECH for the D epartment of Foreign Affairs and Trade as contributors to a study o f international aspects o f India’s economy.

T he Forestry and Environment Division expanded strongly into consultancies in 1993. O ne example was an Environmental Impact Study o f the W aning Management Area to assess

proposed uses o f the forest, completed for State Forests o f N ew South Wales by consultants from the A N U National Centre for Development Studies and the ANU Forestry Department. Also,

in association with the A N U Forestry Department, A N UTECH conducted one o f the

Apart from marketing, A N U TECH was involved in a variety o f research-related activities throughout the year. T he Company assisted the Industries Commission in its Inquiry into Research and Development in September, and welcomed many visitors, mostly from overseas,

interested in ANU know-how and technology. They included D r Z hu Xun, the Minister of Geology and Mineral Resources in the Government of the People’s Republic o f China, a follow-up delegation led by his Vice-Minister, and a delegation from the Korean Academy of Technology (KAITECH), led by the

Director-General D r Sang Moon Kang.

Turning to training, vigorous marketing produced positive results: short courses in Forestry and Environment Division in association with various University Centres and Departments

registered excellent attendances, and Social Sciences Division also made gains. The English Language Centre is now more widely known

internationally. Person training and conference attendance days for 1993 totalled 2287 days.

An issue which featured strongly in 1993 was trade practices and the obligations o f inventors and consultants to ensure their products are described accurately, since over-embellished claims (oral or written) can furnish a basis for later

litigation, particularly if the project gets into difficulties even if unrelated to the science itself.

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A N UTECH as the University’s commercial company must seek out and critically examine different alternatives with the view to advancing

the University’s projects and expertise. The benefits, both in terms o f new products into the marketplace and the University’s enhanced national and international reputation, are well worth the effort expended in terms o f staff and

financial support. O ur continuing development and preparation for the future appears to be succeeding, and the public perception o f the University’s excellence has been actively reinforced by activities ranging widely from development assistance to syndicated research programs.

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Research a t th e Australian National University

Research at the Australian National University

"W" n the last five decades, A NU researchers, ■ recognised among the world’s leading .M . academics, have made some o f the major breakthroughs in fundamental and applied physical, biological and earth sciences research and contributed to greater understanding o f the

social sciences and the humanities.

T he seven Schools of A N U ’s Institute o f Advanced Studies have a primary research and graduate education focus. Staff in the six Faculties, while responsible for undergraduate and graduate teaching, also have a research role.

Fhis section, while far from comprehensive, provides an insight into the wide range o f research activities pursued at the University during 1993.

Bubbles

'■ lo a m forms on the surface o f soapy water destined for the washing up. It also forms ■Λ. on the surface of the sea water at the beach. T he bubbles in the soapy solution are stubilised

by surface elasticity.

Although it has been know since the 1920’s that the bubbles in salt water retain their integrity because o f the salt, the reasons for this effect are not understood. W ith assistance from Professor

Barry N inham o f the Department o f Applied Mathematics in the Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering and Professor Ric Pashley from the Department o f Chemistry, Mr Vince Craig a PhD student studying in both these departments has been investigating the factors which affect whether bubbles retain their integrity

or coalesce.

M r Craig has created a device to measure the coalescence o f bubbles in a solution. The equipment consists of a glass column containing ground glass frit or a section o f ground glass

melted flat w ith tiny holes at its base. Gas is forced through the ground glass into a solution contained in the glass column above. Bubbles forming in the solution rise in the glass column

and coalesce until they become stable.

M r Vince Craig w ith the apparatus used fo r the bubbles experiment

A light is then shone through the frothy solution to measure its coalescence. A high signal indicates a high level o f coalescence while a low reading shows little coalescence.

By adding calibrated amounts o f salt to the water in the glass column M r Craig has been able to obtain results for a range of concentrations of each solution in less than half an hour. This is

days ahead of previous available techniques.

Using his results and based on characteristics of the elements in any solution, M r Craig is now able to predict the coalescing behaviour of that solution. There is however no overall theory that

explains this phenomenon or why the force that attracts bubbles to one another tends to act at the relatively long range o f 500 Angstroms. mm

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Lava flows from this volcanic activity would have been up to a hundred times greater than from any volcano seen today. They would have m n for hundreds o f kilometres at depths o f tens o f

metres. T he lava itself having risen through beds rich in sulphur would have blasted large amounts o f sulphur and dust into the atmosphere. This would have dimmed the sun and caused climatic cooling. Sulphur aerosols are particularly effective at absorbing sunlight. Such global cooling may also have caused an ice age with its associated

drops in sea levels.

T he sulphur w ould also have caused acid rain. T he most recent ice age, only 12,000 years ago did not result in a large extinction event and Dr Campbell and his colleagues suggest that the acid

rain may therefore have been a more important factor in the event than the ice age.

Corroborating evidence has come from Professor John Veevers o f Macquarie University who has found evidence o f an ice age at the end o f the Permian Period at exactly the level predicted by

the A N U team.

Active Galaxies

A ctive galaxies include quasars, Seyfert / l galaxies, BL-Lac objects and Radio ^ iA J T a la x ie s . About one percent o f all galaxies are active; even our own galaxy is active although

at a very low level. Astronomers have been trying to unify these different types o f galaxy by examining the ways in which the observed properties o f an active galaxy can change when viewed from different angles.

Active galaxies are massive powerhouses o f energy, but the physical processes occurring in these galaxies are not well understood. A team from the M t Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatories is

currently studying Centaurus A, the closest active galaxy that is best smdied from the southern hemisphere.

As part o f a program o f studying the physical processes in Active Galaxies,

D r G eoff Biclcnell, D r Mike Dopita, M r Anton Koekemoer and D r Ralph Sutherland have been studying the interaction between dense gas clouds and the jets o f fast moving and highly energetic

plasma that are spewed from active galaxies into the cosmos.

In the course o f this work they have shown that the glowing clouds o f gas observed outside the nuclei o f active galaxies may be excited by shock waves. Shock waves are produced when two

clouds o f gas collide. These wave propagate back through the gas, producing a region o f hot, high density gas. In active galaxies they can be caused by the interaction of dense clouds o f gas with outflowing jets of ionised plasma or through

collisions o f clouds when an active galaxy undergoes a merger with another gas rich galaxy.

Very high temperamres in the range 1 -1 0 million degrees Celsius are produced if velocities in the colliding clouds exceed 200 kilometres per second. T he resultant X-ray and ultraviolet

radiation ionises any gas that has not yet been shocked producing what is referred to as "high excitation" line emission.

This theoretical work has now received substantial confirmation through spectroscopic observations o f gas clouds outside the nucleus o f Centaurus A Dr. Bicknell and Dr. Dopita have found evidence

for turbulent internal motions in these clouds and strong signs o f entrainment of gas into the surrounding jet.

In another part of this program, PhD student Anton Koekemoer has been using the Anglo Australian Telescope at Siding Spring to study gas motions in more distant radio galaxies. In these

galaxies M r Koekemoer has found evidence for velocities in the order o f 200 to 500 kilometres per second proving that the essential condition for strong shock waves is present. H e has also applied

theoretical relations for the amount of emission from the shocks and has found very good agreement with his observations.

Other theoretical work at Mt. Stromlo relates to other aspects of Unified Schemes. A number o f years ago, astronomers at Cambridge had identified two types o f radio galaxies: Class I

galaxies emit bright obvious jets while the higher powered Class II galaxies emit jets that generally only become obvious where they impact on the intergalactic medium. The methods by which

these two classes of jets propagate through the intergalactic medium are quite different. The jets from Class II galaxies are supersonic, while those from Class I galaxies are transonic and also

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Radio—Optical image o f the closest active galaxy, Centaurus A

turbulent. Using the technique of very long baseline interferometry, astronomers have found that the jets from the Class II galaxies travel at very close to the speed o f light. This means that most o f the radiation is beamed forward so that it appears in a very narrow cone. A Class II galaxy viewed at decreasingly small angles to its jets becomes a quasar, while a Class I galaxy becomes a BL-Lac object. A Quasar can therefore only be seen from a particular angle. This means that they are relatively rare compared to radio galaxies.

Theoretical work by Geoff Bicknell involving the physics of relativistic entraining flow now strongly supports the idea that jets from the less powerful Class I galaxies also travel initially near the speed o f light. However due to interaction with the interstellar medium, these decelerate so that the flow makes a transition to about sixty percent of the speed of light. This work confirms the view that BL-Lac objects are Class I radio galaxies viewed almost pole on.

Atom Optics

"W" nterferometers based on particles o f light, ■ electrons or neutrons have been in existence J L fo r some time. However a joint team from the Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering (RSPhysSE) and the Department o f Physics in the Faculties are working on a project to develop one o f the world’s first practical atomic interferometer. The team includes D r Ken Baldwin with postdoctoral student Bruce Stenlake from the Laser Physics Centre at RSPhysSE, D r Hans Bachor, D r Craig Savage and D r David McClelland plus students Qiming Li and Nigel Snoad from the Department of Physics in the

Faculties as well as ARC postdoctoral fellow D r Ian Littler.

Their project is focusing primarily on the development o f the beamsplitter for the atom interferometer.

In an interferometer a beam o f light, electron, neutrons or, in this case, atoms is split and then rejoined. The process relies on a key quanmm mechanics concept; that matter is simultaneously both a wave and a particle. Thus although atoms

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D r Ken B aldw in o f the Laser Physics Centre w ith the atom trap apparatus

are fundamental particles o f matter they also behave like waves when an obstacle is placed in their way. W hen the waves o f the split beam are rejoined their patterns interfere with one another

and create distinctive signals. If something has affected one o f the beams while it is split, then a different signal will be produced and detected when the beams are rejoined.

T he project will investigate new ways o f making atomic interferometers for use in a variety o f applications. A more versatile and effective device will allow the beam to be split at a much wider

angle than is currently possible. This will enable sensitive measurement o f gravitational fields which would assist detection o f underground ore bodies. It would also provide a more sensitive

measure o f acceleration, possibly leading to the development o f more effective gyroscopes in aircraft navigation.

fired at the atom it absorbs and re-emits many photons. W ith each absorption the atom is slowed due to momentum transferred from the photon. I ens o f thousands of photons are required to completely stop an atom which is then caught and held on place by the three laser beams and a

magnetic field.

This work has applications for the understanding o f atmospheric chemistry in areas o f environmental interest. It can also be aimed at developing new types o f high technology devices

by using atoms to deposit structures onto silicon or other materials or direct-write atomic lithography and could lead to high precision clocks.

Cancer Treatment

f ancers are deadly diseases. Existing ■ therapies include chemo and radio therapy JtU st attack the cancerous cell themselves. In these types o f therapies the treatment must attack every cancer cell so that the tum our does

not regrow. In many cases the tum our is inaccessible and thus treatment is not possible. Some cancer cells are also developing resistance to therapies.

However D r Chris Parish and his colleagues in the Cell-Cell Interaction Group at the John Curtin School o f Medical Research have been developing some new approaches to anti cancer

therapy.

Another team is working on technology which will enable the manipulation o f individual atoms. This team includes Dr Baldwin, D r Bachor and D r Savage as well as Dr Stephen Buckman and

Professor Erich Weigold from RSPhysSE and PhD student Marcus Jacka. This group will use laser beams to control the behaviour o f single atoms in the same way that conventional optical elements are used to control light.

All cells living in the human body, whether they are cancerous or not, need a blood supply. Most angiogenesis or blood vessel growth occurs in humans before birth. It is only after major surgery

or injury that angiogenesis occurs in adults. However a solid tumour formed by cancer is unable to grow larger than about half a millimetre in diameter without inducing growth o f new

blood vessels.

Initially the team will focus on studying so-called metastable helium by using lasers to trap and control the atoms. They have built an atom trap which uses lasers to cool the atom to within millionths o f a degree of absolute zero. Eh is means that the atoms which normally travel at around l,000m /s at room temperature are slowed down to near zero velocity. W hen the laser light is

Dr Parish’s group are attempting to prevent angiogenesis and hence stop the growth and spread o f cancers. To do this they are growing antibodies that will prevent the growth o f the

endothelial cells that line blood vessels. These cells are unique to blood vessels. The group have raised a number o f monoclonal antibodies that are specific for growing endothelial cells.

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This type of treatment has many advantages over existing therapies. Since the antibody is targeting antigens on the blood vessel walls they’re are eminendy accessible. Resistance to the treatment is also less likely to occur since the treatment has nothing to do with the cancer.

T he only class o f cancer likely to be unaffected by this treatment is leukaemia where the cancer is growing in and circulated by the blood itself.

However some other diseases are likely to be advantaged by the therapy, retinopathy, or growth o f blood vessels across the eyes in diabetes sufferers, could be treated by angiogenic drugs. T he inflammatory reaction that is aggravated by

new blood vessels growing into the joints o f chronic rheumatoid sufferers may also be alleviated or prevented.

Another problem for cancer sufferers is tumour metastasis or the spread o f the cancer throughout the body. An enzyme called heparanase is essential for the passage of m m our cells through blood vessel walls and into body tissues. The group is working on an heparanase inhibitor to prevent

metastasis. They have found that sulphated sugars provide sign post molecules to tell cells where to go. These sugars will also inhibit metastasis by

preventing the cancer cells penetrating through the walls of the blood vessels.

Any drug developed with these properties may also be important as anti inflammatory drugs since white blood cells also use the same enzyme to pass through blood vessel walls and enter sites o f inflammation.

O ther aspects o f this work include the possible development o f diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic agents.

Coconut Oil

■ p e o p le in the Pacific Island nations pay a ■ ^ h i g h price for the fossil fuels they import to .M . m n power generators and marine and truck diesel engines. However they have the best potential diesel substitute growing right on their

doorsteps in the coconut palms that are superbly adapted to the harsh environment of tropical atolls.

Coconuts are a grossly under-utilised resource. The plants are long-lived and prolific. They produce coconuts every month. Currently in the islands coconuts are used mainly for domestic purposes: coconut cream for cooking and as pig feed. In addition, dried coconut flesh or copra is a

major cash crop for coastal people. The copra is exported to Europe and Japan where coconut oil is exnacted in large vegetable oil mills.

D r Dan Etberington is looking fo r a cost effective way o f producing coconut o il as a substitute fo r diesel

But the world price for copra has declined markedly over the years and the villagers still need to import fossil fuels.

D r Dan Etherington from the Department o f Economics in the Research School of Pacific Studies is looking to a cost effective way of producing coconut oil at a village level. The largest potential domestic market for such oil is as a diesel fuel replacement.

O f all the vegetable oils, coconut oil is the best potential direct substitute for diesel and can be used in existing diesel engines and power

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Research a t the Australian National University

generators with little modification. However the oil must be preheated, since it freezes at a relatively high 24°C, or mixed with diesel in a ratio o f one third diesel, two thirds coconut oil. D r Etherington and his team are collaborating with the D epartm ent of Mechanical Engineering

at the University o f Wollongong to optimise the use o f coconut oil in diesel engines.

An added advantage o f using coconut oil as a fuel is that it does not produce a net increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide and there is no pollution associated with the harvest and

production o f coconut oil. However difficulties in extracting the oil at a local level have, to date, been a major barrier to its wholesale use

throughout island nations.

D r Etherington has found that low pressure expelling o f coconut oil is possible from freshly grated and dried coconut provided the grating (shredding) is fine and the moisture content and

temperamre are correct. Drying and heating is done in the sun. Measuring and optimising the moisture content has been done in collaboration with the C SIR O ’s Centre for Environmental

Mechanics. W ith these three parameters at correct levels, D r Etherington has been able to extract up to 80 per cent o f the available oil using a simple, light weight press not dissimilar to a large

caulking gun.

T en of these presses have been manufactured by a Queanbeyan company and were trialled in pilot studies in V anuatu and the Solomon Islands.

years work. U p until now identification and subsequent patenting of new varieties whether they were roses, grasses, fruit trees or potato plants has been based on the morphology o f the plant in question. Leaf shape, size and colour; bud, flower and seed characteristics; stems and roots separate

the different varieties and species from each other.

But plants grown under different conditions may also appear physically different. Hydrangea flowers range from pink through to blue depending on the acidity o f the soil. Eucalyptus

moorei, a smnted mallee shm b o f a gum tree when growing in its natural state, appears as an elegant tree in a fertile, moist garden.

Plant breeding in the nineties can be big business. Hence the technique used to distinguish different varieties needs to be precise enough to be able to stand up in court should legal action be taken. O ne way to ensure this precision is to use DMA profiling o f plants.

Similar to the use of D N A fingerprinting in forensic work, DNA profiling can identify varieties down to the last gene.

Using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR) large amounts of D N A are made from a small sample. The genome o f the plant D NA can then be scanned. Each genome will

display a characteristic banding pattern which can be compared to known varieties to determine its uniqueness.

DNA Profiling

It would be very unlikely that any two varieties would display the same bands.

A rose is a rose is a rose you might say. But if the rose is blue or black or pink with X JBqxirplc stripes it might just be a different plant from the plain red or yellow or pink flower

in the next door neighbour’s garden.

It is these differences between plant varieties that the Co-operative Research Centre in Plant Sciences from the Research School o f Biological

Sciences and the Division o f Plant Industry at CSIRO is targeting in its work on D N A profiling for plants.

Plant breeders both large and small all over the world have the legal right to retain possession of their intellectual property and end results o f many

O ne role o f the CRC in Plant Science has been to lobby for the acceptance o f D NA profiling by international bodies and to assist in developing protocols to be used in the protection o f specific crops. Australia along with sixteen other nations

have negotiated an agreement to use D N A technology to help prevent theft o f such intellectual property. In addition Australia has been given the task to develop protocols for the

protection o f citrus varieties.

In line with these guidelines more than 700 varieties have been registered with the Australian Plant Variety Rights office in the Department o f Primary Industry and Energy by corporate and

private breeders.

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M s l.ynette Preston (pictured right) with P hD student, Katrina Moore, observing photographs taken from bands o fD N A gels. The technique they are using is k now n as "scoring".

Another role is in carrying out DNA profiling for clients although this task may eventually be taken over by a separate body.

C R C researchers involved in the project are D r Rudi Appels, D r M atthew Morell, Ms Lynette Preston, Ms Judy Toman, and Mr Maurice van der Heijden.

Reshaping Australian Institutions

eshaping Australian Institutions project got into ft ill swing in 1993 with 25 -M-^L-ippointmcnts being made, mainly from Australian state universities, 13 as short-term salaried secondments, and 12 as Research Affiliates or Sabbatical Fellows. The work o f those who have already arrived is listed in program

reports.

ILe project aims to contribute to rethinking Australia’s foundational institutions for the centenary of federation, and generally, to

stimulate the theory o f institutional design. A new strand on Institutions o f the Media, coordinated by Professor Clem Lloyd of the University o f Wollongong, was added in 1993.

Over forty seminars or workshops were held in the School during the year. Fhe project has become a central and distinctive part o f our intellectual community, building bridges between disciplinary programs and reaching out to state universities, parliament, the bureaucracy, courts and the business community. Ms Mary Denton, of the Law Program, is empolyed half-term as Administrator o f RAI.

Early appointments were concentrated in the Institutions of Aboriginal Australia, and Theory strands, though some appointments were made to to other strands. Lively intellectual communities are flourishing in these areas.

Lhe Mabo series o f seminars was particularly successful. Some key players in this policy domain left seminars with important new insights. Father Frank Brennan, who joined the project full-time in 1993 after shorter visits to the Law Program

Research at the Australian National University

and Federalism Research Centre in previous years, was selected as an outstanding achiever in the National Australia D ay Council awards for his work on indigenous rights.

T he most important event was the Australian Historical Association 1993 Conference in Canberra on the theme “The Shaping o f Institutions: Historical Perspectives”. This broadened the historical foundations o f the project, and nicely complemented the historical work on Australian institutions undertaken by appointees such as D r James W arden (Federalism

Research Centre) and Associate Professor Alison M ackinnon (History).

Green political theory will afford one o f many theoretical coherences to the project. A well attended workshop was organised on this topic, which, among other thing?, discussed Professor

Bob Goodin’s book, Green Political Theory. In addition, conferences on “Federalism and the Environment”, “Consensual Policy Making and M ultiparty Politics”, and “Environmental Interventions” gave considerable impetus to the Institutions o f the Environment strand and brought a steady stream of Green parliamentarians and activists into the School.

T he sister project on Institutional Design held a stimulating workshop on “Democratic Theory” that informed the theoretical focus o f the project

on citizenship. T he feminist theory theme was enriched by the contributions o f Professors Iris Young and Carole Pateman as visitors to the School for this event.

Cambridge University Press and Allen and Unwin have launched new publishing programs in association with the project. Professors John Braithwaite and Geoffrey Brennan will be editors o f a Cambridge series on Reshaping Australian

Institutions. Published in this program will be the work o f scholars from the A NU and elsewhere who are researching and writing on the

institutions o f the nation.

Professor G oodin is the editor o f another series on Theories o f Institutional Design. Like the other series, this is multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary, but focus is on the theory of institutions rather than on specific Australian instimtions. T he objective o f this series is to enrich normative discourse surrounding

important issues on reshaping the social, political,

and economic institutions o f contemporary societies.

Among the important institutionalist books produced in the School during 1993 were: Janeen Baxter’s Work at Home: The Domestic Division o f Labour, Tim Bonyhady’s Places Worth

Keeping: Conservationists, Politics, and Law, Geoffrey Brennan and Lauren Lomasky’s Democracy and Decision: The Pure Theory o f Electoral Preference, Noel Butlin’s Economics and

the Dreamtime: A Hypothetical History, Paul Finn’s Abuse o f Official trust, Brent Fisse and John Braithwaite’s, Corperations, Crime and Accountability, Fred Gtuen and Michelle Grattan’s Managing Government: Labor’ s Achievements and Failures, Philip Pettit’s, The

Common Mind, Peter Self s Government by the Market1 The Politics o f Public Choice, and Graeme Snooks’s Economics Whithout Time: A Science Blind to the Forces o f Historical Change.

KAD

uring routine research on • ■ kaolinite/alkali-halide nano composites last year, D r John Thom pson o f the Research School o f Chemistry and D r Ian Mackinnon o f the University o f Queensland discovered that they had totally destroyed the crystal structure o f the material they were examining.

But the new material they had created is shaping up as a valuable commodity for Australia. Known as Kaolinite Amorphous Derivative (KAD), the

material is simple to produce and has numerous potential uses.

Kaolinite is a common mineral found in many parts o f Australia and is mined at Weipa in Queensland. Kaolinite clays are currently used in making cups and saucers in the ceramics industry,

to provide a high quality surface for glossy papier in the papier industry and as an inert filler in piolymers.

But KAD has totally different structure and chemical properties to the original kaolinite clay.

Ordinary kaolinite has a surface area o f around four or five square metres pier gram. KAD has a surface area in excess of 150 square metres pier gram. It may even be as high as 300 square metres

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per gram. KAD also has an increased ability to exchange cations. This is some 30 to 50 times higher than the original clay. These two properties allow for several practical uses of the KAD.

O ne is in the removal o f kations from solution. So-called ’clever chemicals’ are currendy used to seek out and immobilise either desirable or undesirable species in solution. They are used to clean up-waste water which may be contaminated with heavy metals and in the extraction industries

to separate desired elements from the rubbish.

But while clever chemicals are usually extremely expensive to produce, the new KAD is not. In addition the process o f modifying kaolinite is able to be used with the relatively impure kaolin ires as well as the pure kaolinites.

KAD has proved particularly effective in removing lead, copper and cadmium from solution. It has the potential to scavenge many more problem species.

KAD is also well able to remove calcium and magnesium from water giving it significant potential as a water softener. The principal market for such solid water softeners at present is in the laundry detergent industry. KAD could replace synthetic zeolites which are currently used as an alternative to phosphorus. Zeolites are expensive to produce and have some environmental drawbacks. KAD’s fine particle size and the simplicity o f Its manufaemre makes it a promising alternative to the synthetic zeolites.

A further use for KAD could be as an industrial catalyst. Its huge capacity to exchange cations could be o f value in facilitating specific chemical processes for creating chemical compounds.

Machos

t ■ the observable mass o f the universe falls far jj short o f explaining several astronomical J L phenomena. T he high rotational velocities o f stars and gases at great distances from the galactic centre o f disc galaxies, for example, can only be explained by the existence of many times more matter than is actually able to be observed. This matter, known as dark matter since it cannot directly be detected by instruments currently available, could take the form of stillborn or dead stars, planetary lumps o f rock or whole planets the

size o f Jupiter. Such objects may be too small to emit any detectable radiation.

There are two main hypotheses to explain the discrepancy between the actual observable mass of the universe and the mass that is hypothesised. One hypothesis suggests that the extra mass is made up of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles; the other that it consists o f Massive Astronomical Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs).

In a joint venture with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University o f California in the United States of America, scientists at the M ount Stromlo and Siding

Springs Observatories (MSSSO) are now searching for the universe’s missing mass.

The team consisting o f Professor Alex Rodgers, Dr Peter Quinn, Professor Ken Freeman, D r Bruce Peterson and M r Simon Chan are using the

rejuvenated 50inch Great Melbourne Telescope that was built in 1868 to search for MACHOs. Completely refitted, this telescopes performance is now equivalent to any similar sized modern telescope. It also has the world’s most powerful detector system for imaging stars.

To detect the M ACHOs the scientists are observing the many millions of stars in the nearby galaxy o f the Large Magellanic Cloud (L M Q through the ’halo’ surrounding our own galaxy. This halo contains old stars and clusters formed during the birth o f the galaxy as well as the postulated dark matter.

The LMC can only be observed from the Southern Hemisphere and MSSSO astronomers have had considerable experience in studying the variable stars in this galaxy.

The astronomers are looking for variations in the strength o f light we receive from stars. This variation can be caused by the bending o f their emitted light due to gravitational lensing as a large object passed between the star and the Earth. When this occurs the star will brighten for a time, depending on the mass o f the object. Fhe mass of any dark unseen objects can then be deduced from the length o f time that the object is brighter.

The probability o f dark matter crossing in front of a star while it is under observation and causing gravitational lensing to occur is one in a million. The project is designed to make one thousand million observations in the course o f its four year

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life and is on track to complete that target. However to date very little of the data collected has been analysed. T he equipment collects 64 megabytes every 300 seconds during periods o f observation. Analysis to date has shown at least one possible M A C H O event occurring during a one month tim e span in March 1993.

Ancient DNA

Tfc J f e .gafauna such as the Australian | % / | diprotodons and the giant kangaroo A . ▼ ^ .b e c a m e extinct long ago. Fossil records of these ancient animals have given us an insight into their physiological structure, their distribution and in some cases even their social behaviour. But w hat o f their relationship to human beings? H ow did our arrival thousands of years ago affect their survival? H ow did their existence affect our welfare?

M r Tom Loy exam ining a fossilised bone fr o m a D iprotodont w hich is approxim ately 100,000years old. M r Loy has extracted both haemoglobin a nd other proteins, as w ell as

intact D N A fr o m these bones.

M r T om Loy from the Research School o f Pacific Studies has been investigating these animals with a view to discovering some o f these

interrelationships. M r Loy is a pioneer in analysis o f ancient D N A and has worked on ancient blood since 1981 when he found that blood residues of

proteins and haemoglobin were present on stone tool surfaces.

But the am ount o f blood remaining on these surfaces is infinitesimal. So M r Loy needed a way o f either increasing the amount of material available for analysis or of being able to analyse such tiny quantities of the existing material.

H e began by using forensic wildlife techniques of crystallisation o f haemoglobin. However considering the tiny quantities of blood that were available for him to work with, it was not until

the advent o f polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the late 1980’s that he was able to increase to a usable quantity the amount o f D NA in the blood samples. W orking in association with D r Klaus Matthaei from the John Curtin School o f Medical Research M r Loy is now able to routinely amplify a single fragment of a single gene from a single cell.

Another problem has been to separate valuable material from the ’junk’ such as degraded proteins, haemoglobin, various bacteria and manganese and other minerals which may inhibit the PCR process. However the discovery o f the particular part o f the genome that always varies from species to species has alleviated this and

other problems allowing scientists to identify species w ithout needing to analyse the entire genetic code o f the sample. This o f course does not prevent scientists from taking the analysis that

one step further and determining sex o f the animal or doing taxonomic relationship or genetic evolutionary work.

Mr Loy and his team are now able to extract D NA from samples of Australian marsupials in the range o f 80,000 to 100,000 years old. His oldest specimen to date has been a Jurassic sea-dwelling animal found in Queensland called a

plesiosaur. It died some 160 million years ago and the analysis o f its DNA represents an opening to analyse the D NA of creatures of great antiquity.

In his current work Mr Loy is looking to developing a series of DNA profiles of ancient Australian marsupial species so that they can be

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compared with blood residues on the tools o f the Australian Aboriginals. This would help determine the relationship between the arrival of the Aboriginals and the disappearance o f these

large creatures. It would also assist in further understanding the subsistence and economy o f prehistoric Aboriginal communities.

Sunlight and Trees

"■ "p ictu re a parent tree growing in by itself on I ^ c le a re d , agricultural land. Beneath its Λ . protective branches young seedlings reach out for the sun and light that they need to continue growing. But rather than the expected random distribution o f young trees the seedlings are all growing in the shade of the parent plant; in the cold, slighdy dark and damp conditions o f the its southern side.

Researchers under the direction o f D r Marilyn Ball of the Research School of Biological Sciences are investigating the causes of this asymmetric growth o f Eucalyptus paucifhra also known as a white sally or snow gum. Its forests brave the snow of the highest and coldest parts of the

P h D students a t the Research School o f Biological Sciences, M s Jenny Butterworth (pictured right) a nd M s Rochelle Christian, measure fluorescent emission fr o m leaves.

Southern Tablelands o f NSW and in particular the Orrotal Valley where cleared grazing land is now part o f a National Park.

They have found that the seedlings need the shelter provided by the parent plant; shelter in fac from the sunlight itself.

Australian plants are well known for their tolerance to heat and light. They have evolved in ; climate that has a high incidence o f sunlight. However they have not evolved to experience high irradience constantly during all the daylight hours

and the seedlings in the Orroral Valley are in fact experiencing a process called photoinhibition.

Photoinhibition occurs when plants are under stress. Instead o f helping the plant’s growth the necessary sunlight hinders the process of photosynthesis. Such stress may be induced by salinity, by drought, by nutrient deficiencies, by elevated levels o f carbon dioxide or, as in the Orroral valley, by the extreme cold.

All the seedlings at the base of the parent trees are exposed to the cold during the winter months. But it is only when the cold is combined with exposure to extra sunlight that the trees’ growth is retarded. So the seedlings and juveniles that are exposed to higher light conditions on the northern sides o f the parent trees grow poorly if at

all.

Members o f the team are studying photoinhibition and regeneration o f plants after fire, the effects o f salinity on mangroves and the effects o f light and elevated carbon dioxide levels on rainforests and Eucalypt forests. They are also studying the general conditions under which photoinhibition occurs.

The team is using infrared thermal imaging to study the micro climate o f eucalyptus seedlings where they are subject to injury from low

temperatures. In particular they have been looking at why seedlings growing on bare ground fare better than those surrounded by grass and have found that the grassed surface experienced much colder temperatures than the bare ground.

They are also using an instrument known as the PAM 2000 to measure fluorescent emission from leaves. The instrument allows them to determine how light is being used in the plant and whether it has a high efficiency light use or whether it is photo inhibited. The team is conducting

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experiments in both the field and under controlled conditions. Photoinhibition is known to affect plants other than just snow gums. Mangroves, some rainforest species and the New Zealand beech trees all display symptoms. It could be a significant problem when trying to regenerate trees on grassland and denuded areas. Farmers and other people reforesting the Australian landscape may need to provide protection from light as well as from competition from rabbits, stock and weeds and from windy and dry conditions.

Protein Crystallography

■" p r o te in s are the building blocks o f life. They ■ ^ re g u la te most biological processes. Research J L by D r David Ollis o f the protein crystallography group from the Centre for

Molecular Structure at the Research School o f Chemistry and his team of D r Eong Cheah, Dr Paul Carr and M r Peter Suffolk aims to increase fundamental understanding o f these essential compounds and assist in developing possible

applications.

As a part ofcthis work and in conjunction with scientists from the John Curtin School o f Medical Research and the Research School o f Biological Sciences A he team has mapped the crystal structure o f a bacterial protein called PII. Although the team’s PII was extracted from the bacteria Escherichia coli, similar proteins are found

in almost all bacteria.

Initially D r Nick Dixon o f the Research School of Chemistry isolated the sequence of D N A that encodes for the protein. H e then purified the

protein and produced the crystals.

Further refinement in D r Ollis’ laboratory produced crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography and to produce the diffraction patterns that provide a picture o f the arrangement

o f atoms in a crystal.

PII is a signal protein that controls the balance of nitrogen in the bacterial cells by altering the behaviour o f other proteins which shift nitrogen around. In the long term D r Ollis would like to be able to produce mutant forms o f bacteria in which the PII has been altered so that he can observe its effect on nitrogen regulation in the

bacteria.

A schematic diagram which represents the structure o f the P II molecule

T he team’s next step is to crystallise different forms of the protein, to isolate other proteins that interact with PII and even to crystallise the complex that is formed by these interacting proteins.

In addition to the PII protein the crystallography group has recently solved the structure o f a quinone oxo-reductace protein.

The group along with M r John Andrews as the Research School of Biological Sciences is also examining the protein that activates the unique plant enzyme rubisco. Rubisco is the world’s most

abundant protein. It is used by plants to convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into organic carbon. However another protein activates the rubisco and it is this activator that D r Ollis and his group

are attempting to elucidate. Although crystals of this activator have already been grown by the group they are not yet large enough for analysis.

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Great Barrier Reef and El Nino

A lthough in ancient times huge coral reefs / l existed in several areas including what is JL « n o w Europe and Canada, the Australian Great Barrier Reef at 2,000 kilometres long is

currently the largest reef in the world.

Previously thought to be anything from three to ten million years old, recent research by D r Allan Chivas leader o f the Environmental Geochemistry Group at the Research School of Earth Sciences, postgraduate smdent M r Frank Peerdeman, and Professor Peter Davies, University o f Sydney, has indicated that the reef may be only four hundred thousand years old.

Their research work began aboard the international research vessel JOIDES Resolution with the collection o f core samples o f the sea-floor sediments adjacent to the reef platform east o f Cairns. T he samples contained skeletons o f tiny marine creamres called Foraminifera. As Forrnaninifera grow they incorporate oxygen from ocean water in their skeletons of calcium carbonate.

The oxygen is a mixture o f the isotopes oxygen 16 or oxygen 18. The ratio o f these two isotopes has been shown to be a good temperature indicator and can be measured accurately using a stable-isotope mass spectrometer.

For the core taken near Cairns, the oxygen-isotope record o f Foraminifera indicates a progressive increase o f up to 3° Celsius over the period 400,000 to 275,000 years ago. This rise in temperature, together with seismic evidence for the commencement o f reef growth also at about 400,000 years, points to a change in water temperamre as the trigger for the development of the Great Barrier Reef.

The ratio o f the isotopes will also indicate changes in the physical environment, such as the formation or melting o f the polar ice cap». This information is being linked to other data collected by the JO ID ES Resolution to create a clearer picture o f the effect o f sea level and temperamre

change on formation and growth o f the reef. The team is trying to determine how the coral platforms started to grow', whether they died and whether they were reinitiated. They are also

Divers collecting a core fr o m a coral 'bommie' on the Great Barrier R e e f

studying how the formation of the reef itself may have affected the shape o f the continental shelf.

This type of research offers a high resolution tool and is able to indicate fluctuations o f oxygen isotopes in much finer detail than any previous measure. These types o f study may help provide a greater understanding o f what to expect in the future with the prospect o f higher sea levels due to global warming. If as is expected sea levels rise by as much as one metre over the next one hundred years, then the reef will probably slowly match

this rise.

Dr Allan Chivas and D r Michael Gagan from the Environmental Geochemistry Group at the Research School of Earth Sciences with D r Peter Isdale at the Australian Institute o f Marine Science in Townsville r1 ink that some o f the

information needed to unravel the mysteries o f the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) may also be locked in coral.

An ENSO occurs when warm sea surface temperamres form in the central and eastern

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Pacific. Such events occur at irregular intervals every three to five yean and profoundly affect weather over half o f the planet. They cause dramatic rainfall off the Peruvian coast and often severe droughts in Australia.

However it is only since 1980 that climate modellers have had access to the satellite data that confirm the presence o f the warm pool o f water which forms in the western Pacific Ocean and expands across the eastern Pacific to the South American coast. W hy and how each EN SO begins and what the precurson to that pool o f warm water are, have yet to be determined. W ork on coral may provide some o f the answen.

The oxygen-isotope record o f sea surface temperatures that is locked in the coral gives us an accurate record of these temperatures for maybe as far back as six hundred years since this is around how long an individual coral lives. This linked

svith accurate rainfall records for the last 90 veats should be able to help present a picture o f why and how an ENSO occurs.

However this work is not oniv important in attemnting to predict when an ENSO mav occur, :t could also be significant in understanding the yeennouse effect. This is because a vital clue to

global wanning mav be heralded bv the sea surface temperature. And this is one area where scientists can produce accurate records since samples from coral reefs are available for the past thousands of vears.

Technegas

"T X ulm onarv embolism is a potentially fatal ■ -^condition caused by blood clots that -*■ generally move from the groin up to the lungs. It has been a problem disease because its symptoms o f breathlessness and acute chest pain

are very similar to those of a heart attack or even broken ribs. And their treatments are diametrically opposed. Patients suffering from a pulmonary embolism need to be treated with anticoagulants to dissolve the clot and make the

blood thinner. O n the other hand many o f the patients who display these symptoms have been involved in a major road accident or have undergone surgery or childbirth and the last thing

doctors wish to do is to prevent their wounds from healing.

This is where D r Bill Burch o f the John Curtin School o f Medical Research was coming from when he created Technegas in 1984. At the time he was trying to formulate an ultra fine gas that could penetrate deep into patients’ lungs. This lung aerosol would carry radioactive particles to allow accurate gamma ray images o f the structure o f the airways to be seen. D r Burch made the

Technegas by placing some liquid technetium (a radioactive element) into a cmcible o f pure graphite and raising it to 250°C in a chamber filled with argon.

T he exact structure of Technegas is as yet unknown, but it does contain the newlv identified molecule called buckminsterfullerene or buckv balls’. Buckminsterfullerene is the third known

natural state o f carbon; armorphorous powder and diamonds are the other two. It is a verv stable three dimensional carbon molecule and consists o f closed cages o f 60 or more carbon atoms.

T he buckminsterfullerene molecule in Technegas seems to enclose a single tinv particle o f a radionudide called technetium m its cage. At this stage D r Burch is not sure whether the technetium is implanted in the buckv bail or bonded in some other way. H e is working with elect rochemist D r Graham Heath in the A N il's Research School o f Chemistry on me chemistry or technetium and with surface chemists from U N SW to trv to find out how other atoms are implanted into the buckv ball cluster.

In the meantime Technegas is already in use both ror diagnosis and research around the world. The firm Tetlev Manufacturing Ltd now buiid a machine that can produce Technegas in just 15 seconds and allows patients to inhale the gas. Technegas from these machines produce an almost one huneired percent accurate diagnosis quickly and easily. With some minor modifications the machine can also be used on comatose and infant patients.

But Technegas may have other applications apart from diagnosis o f pulmonary embolism. Observations to date indicate that it is a biologically harmonious molecule with the technetium sending out its gamma ray locked inside. T he particles are extremely small; about ten nanometres. It may be possible to use them to label monoclonal antibodies and thus trace process o f disease through the body. It is a potential flag for anything moving within the

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body. Aside from being used to scan lu n ^ it may have applications in scanning bone marrow and also the gastrointestinal system.

Leading The Bioinformatics Revolution

ioinformatics is the branch o f information I ^ s c ie n c e involved in the management and J L ^ analysis o f biological information. It originated in the science o f statistics, which was developed by scientists, such as Francis Gallon and Ronald Fisher, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, to analyse variable biological data, such as human body and mental characteristics, crop yields and their genetic basis. However it has

blossomed, over the past quarter century, as fast computers with large memories have become available and, even more recently, as high speed international computer networks have linked most biologists into a single ’global village’. Driven by Professor Adrian Gibbs, in 1993, the Research School o f Biological Sciences established o f a ’Bioinformatics Facility’ to act as a cross-campus focus for bioinformatics at ANU. and to share skills and equipment.

Staff o f the Facility, particularly those associated with the A N U ’s campus-wide Centre for Molecular Structure and Function, assist and train molecular biologists in the analysis o f nucleotide and amino acid sequence data. Use is made o f programs developed in RSBS, and those available from the Australian National Genomic

Information Service; an internationally unique facility centred at the University o f Sydney providing all Australian molecular biologists with on-line access, through AARNET, to the major

international genomic databases and the latest computer tools for analysing those data.

Novel computer programs for studying the relationships and evolution o f genes are being developed by D r Georg Weiller, Professor Adrian Gibbs and colleagues. Their ’Phylogenetic W orkbench’ is a suite o f interactive programs for

identifying trends in the evolution o f genes, and is being used, for example, in a collaborative project with the University o f Amsterdam on the epidemiology ofhum an immuno-deficiency virus, the cause o f AIDS.

Another important facet o f the work o f the Bioinformatics Facility is its work on biodiversity. The DELTA (Description Language for Taxonomy) taxonomic database system is the world’s most advanced suite of programs for handling taxonomic information. This system has been developed in a 20 year collaborative project between D r Mike Dallwitz of the CSIRO Division o f Entomology and D r Les Watson of RSBS. Dr. Watson (see photo) has "retired" to

Western Australia and will collaborate with colleagues in RSBS to continue this work. The DELTA system has started a worldwide revolution in taxonomy. This dry,

name-generating backwater of biology is fast becoming a modern branch of information science able to provide a huge range o f information in a wide range of formats, and to generate novel ideas and questions. Data in DELTA format databases are being used to produce camera-ready books directly, even translated into different languages. However the databases are used most powerfully with the interactive program INTKEY, either for interactive identification, or as a source of comparative data with high resolution colour pictures. Major products include

■ ’The Families o f Angiosperms, 530 characters o f the species o f 560 families o f flowering plants, which, with 670 illustrations, is available on C D -R O M or through InterNet;

■ ’Grass Genera o f the World’, 495 characters o f 785 genera o f grasses;

■ ’Grasses o f Australia’, 170 Australian grasses o f the subfamily Pooideae, and part o f the Australian Biological Resources Survey’s plan to automate the ’Flora of Australia’.

DELTA has also been used to compile the VIDE database o f plant viruses (569 characters of 890 species and 55 genera o f plant vinises) by Professor Adrian Gibbs and many Australian and overseas colleagues. D r Cornelia Birchen-Osmond and the Data Subcommittee of the International Committee on Taxonomy o f Viruses are now using this as a basis for the ICTVdB, an international database o f all viruses, for medical, veterinary and agricultural reference..

The Facility is also monitoring, and participating in, the current explosion in data networking. Dr David Green has developed a Bio Gopher

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information service which, in 1993 grew from 40 enquiries each day, to more than 1000 per day (10% from Australia, 50% from N orth America). Dr Green has also developed Australia’s first

networked information server using W orld W eb Web and Mosaic facilities, which allow multi-media documents (e.g. text, images, graphs, video and sounds) to be supplied to, or examined

and obtained from, all InterNet sites around the world. M any examples of the School’s work are now available through these facilities, including the DELTA databases mentioned above and, in

November 1993 for example, they received more than 1500 enquiries daily from around the world. W ork is also continuing on other uses, for example, facilities for disseminating

’Environmental Geographic Information’ for the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service, and for the International Organization for Plant Information (IOPI), which is documenting the distribution of

plants around the world. T he facilities have also been used by D r Green to establish Australia’s first hypermedia journal Complexity International, which is a normal scientific journal

in all but its mode of distribution.

Bioinformatics is not only providing biologists with new and stimulating ways to handle primary data, but is also producing specialist bioinformaticians, scientists whose primary tools

are computers and databases, which they mine for the knowledge embedded in them.

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Staff

Senior academic staff resignations and retirements

Institute o f Advanced Studies

D r James Robert Gerald Butler, Fellow, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health.

D r Ronald Neil Byron, Fellow, National Centre for Development Studies, Research School o f Pacific Studies to appointment as Director o f the Economics and Policy Research Program in the Centre for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia.

Professor John Charles Caldwell, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health.

D r Russell Ian Close, Senior Fellow, Division of Neuroscience, John Curtin School o f Medical Research.

Professor Ian Roy Cowan, Department o f Environmental Biology, Research School o f Biological Sciences.

D r Lincoln Hubert Day, Senior Fellow, Demography Program, Research School o f Social Sciences.

D r Martyn Drury, Australian Research Council Queen Elizabeth 11 Fellow, Research School o f Earth Sciences.

D r J J Eddy, Senior Fellow, Historical Studies Division, Research School o f Social Sciences.

D r Walter Niel Gunson, Senior Fellow, Pacific and Asian History, Research School o f Pacific Studies.

D r Halcro Johnston Hay, Fellow, D epartment o f Nuclear Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering.

Professor Richard A Higgott, Department o f International Relations, Research School o f

Pacific Studies to appointment at University o f Manchester, U K

Dr John Howard, Australian Research Council Fellow, Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering.

Professor Helen Hughes, National for Development Studies, Research School o f Pacific Studies.

Mr James Thomas Geoffrey Jukes, Senior Fellow, Department o f International Relations, Research School o f Pacific Studies.

Mr Peter Sherman Jull, Fellow, North Australia Research Unit, Research School o f Pacific Smdies.

Professor Eugene Kamenka, History o f Ideas Program, Research School of Social Sciences. University o f Manchester, U K

Mr Richard Lawrence Leaver, Fellow, Department o f International Relations, Research School o f Pacific Smdies to appointment at

Flinders University.

Dr Robert Famham Miller, Senior Fellow, Political Science Program, Research School o f Social Sciences.

Professor Alfred Edward Ringwood, Geochemistry, Research School o f Earth Sciences.

Dr James Norman Shelton, Senior Fellow, Division o f Clinical Sciences, John Curtin School o f Medical Research.

D r Patricia Joy Solomon, Fellow, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health to an appointment as Lecturer at University o f Adelaide.

D r Peter Van Ness, Fellow, International Relations, Research School of Pacific Smdies.

Dr Philip Malzard Walker, Fellow, Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering.

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Staff

Dr Leslie W atson, Senior Fellow, Molecular Evolution and Systematics Group, Research School o f Biological Sciences.

Dr Y Yoshii, Fellow, M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories to appointment at National Astronomy Observatory, Japan.

The Faculties

Dr John A Broomhead, Reader, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science.

Ms R Burnett, Senior Lecturer, Faculty o f Law.

M r Edward Charles Chapman, Reader, Department o f Geography, Faculty o f Science.

D r Graham A rthur Chilvers, Senior Lecturer, Faculty o f Science.

Dr Robert Gale Cushing, Reader, Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts.

D r Peter John Forsyth, Senior Lecturer, Department o f Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce.

Professor Christopher Andrew Gerstle, Dean of the Faculty o f Asian Studies to appointment to the Chair o f Japanese Studies in the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of

London.

Professor R A Higgott, Graduate Program in Public Policy, Faculty of Arts to an appointment at University o f Manchester, UK.

Professor Stanley Hinds, Department o f Physics and Theoretical Physics, Faculty o f Science.

D r Michael John Howell, Reader, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science.

D r Ian Morris Hughes, H uman Ecology, Faculty o f Science.

Professor A nthony Hearle Johns, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty o f Asian Studies.

Professor Ngo Van Long, Reader, Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics to appointment at McGill University Montreal, Canada.

D r Charles Campbell Macknight, Reader, Department o f FListory, Faculty o f Arts to appointment as Professor o f Humanities, University o f Tasmania.

D r Richard Henry Pin Mason, Senior Lecturer, Asian History Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies.

Dr Michael Stirling McCrae, Senior Lecturer, Department o f Commerce, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce to appointment at University of Wollongong.

D r Douglas James Miles, Senior Lecnirer, Depanment o f Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty o f Arts.

Dr Michael Kevin Murray, Fellow, Centre for Mathematics and its Applications, Faculty of Science.

Dr Stephen Parker, Reader, Faculty o f Law to appointment o f Chair at Griffith University.

D r T Rajapatirana, Senior Lecturer, South and West Asia Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies.

Professor Ronald John Sandeman, Department of Physics and Theoretical Physics, Faculty o f Science.

M r Francis Wilfred Shawcross, Senior Lecturer, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty o f Arts.

M r E R Skrzypxsak, Senior Lecturer, Japan Centre, Faculty of Asian Smdies.

Dr P R Stewart, Reader, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biolog)', School o f Life Sciences, Faculty o f Science.

Dr Barend Jan Terwiel, Reader, Asian History Centre, Faculty of Asian Smdies to appointment as Head of Department and Chair o f South East Asian Smdies at the University o f Hamburg.

D r M J Wiedemann, Reader, Division o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Faculty o f Science.

M r Paul Winer, Senior Lecturer, Department o f Statistics, Faculty of Economics and Commerce.

D r Geoffrey Burke W ood, Reader, Department o f Forestry, Faculty of Science.

99

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Senior academic staff appointments and promotions

Institute of Advanced Studies

D r A Acharya, Fellow, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Research School o f Pacific Studies, formerly York University, Canada.

Professor A J Anderson, Professor and Head, Department o f Prehistory, Research School o f Pacific Studies, formerly, University o f Otago.

D r G Bammer, Fellow, T he National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, formerly Research Fellow.

D r G R Barme, Division o f Pacific and Asian History, Research School o f Pacific Studies, promoted to Fellow.

D r C S Bean, Sociology Program, Research School of Social Sciences, promoted to Fellow.

D r G V Bicknell, M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, promoted to Senior Fellow.

D r A Braithwaite, Fellow and Head, Cell Transformation Group, Division of Cell Biology, John Curtin School o f Medical Research, formerly Fellow.

D r S J Buckman, Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted to Senior Fellow.

D r C J Burden, Fellow, Department o f Theoretical Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering, formerly Research Fellow.

D r S von Cacmmerer, ARC QEII Fellow, Plant Environmental Biology Group, Research School o f Biological Sciences, promoted to Academic

Level C.

D r Y Chen, ARC Fellow, Optical Sciences Centre, Research School o f Physical Sciences, formerly Research Fellow.

H Christensen, Social Psychiatry Research Unit, promoted to Fellow.

Dr G B Cox, Division o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, promoted to Professor.

Dr M J Dodgson, Professor, Master o f Business Administration Program, Research School of Pacific Studies, formerly Unversity o f Sussex.

Dr S J Dowrick, Economics Program, Research School o f Social Sciences, promoted to Senior Fellow.

Dr J R Evans, Plant Environmental Biology, Research School o f Biological Sciences promoted to Fellow.

Professor B J Galligan, Professor and Director o f the Federalism Research Centre, Research School of Social Sciences, formerly Acting Director.

Dr G A Heath, Research School o f Chemistry, promoted to Senior Fellow.

Dr M Hegland, Fellow, jointly with the School of Mathematical Sciences and the Centre for Information Science Research, formerly Research Fellow, CISR

Dr M Hess, Senior Lecturer, National Centre for Development Studies, Research School of Pacific Studies formerly University of New South Wales.

Dr D J Hinde, Fellow, Department o f Nuclear Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering, formerly Fellow (non-continuing), Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering.

Dr S K Jain, Fellow, The National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, o transfer from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Dr C Jagadish, Fellow, Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, formerly Research Fellow.

Professor R M Jones, Department o f Prehistory, Research School o f Pacific Studies, promoted to Professor.

Dr M A Keniry, Fellow 50%, Research School of Chemistry, formerly full-time Facility Coordinator, N M R Facility.

T Kibedi, Department o f Nuclear Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted to Fellow.

100

Staff

D r E V Krishnamurthy, Senior Fellow, Computer Science Laboratory, Research School o f Physical Sciences, formerly Fellow.

D r S Kuyucak, Department o f Theoretical Physics, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted to Fellow.

Professor, K J Lafferty, Director, T he John Curtin School o f Medical Research, formerly o f University o f Colorado Health Sciences Center.

D r R L Leaver, Department o f International Relations, Research School o f Pacific Studies, promoted to Fellow.

Mr T H Loy, Department o f Prehistory, Division o f Society and Environment, Research School of Pacific Studies, promoted to Fellow.

D r W J McKibbin, Professor, Department o f Economics, Research School o f Pacific Studies, formerly T he Brookings Institution of

Washington, D C.

D r Μ K Macphail, Fellow, Department of Biogeography and Geomorphology, Research School o f Pacific Studies, formerly private consultant.

Professor I D McCalman, Associate Director and Professor, Humanities Research Centre, Research School o f Social Sciences, formerly Senior Fellow, History Program, Research School o f Social Sciences.

Professor C A McGilchrist, Professor, The National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, formerly University o f New South Wales.

D r D J Mitchell, Department o f Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted to Professor.

Professor J R Mould, Director, M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, formerly California Institute of Technology.

D r Η N Nelson, Division o f Pacific and Asian History, Research School o f Pacific Studies, promoted Professor.

D r J L Parker, Department o f Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted to Fellow.

D r M S Patel, Fellow, The National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, formerly Communicable Diseases Centre, Northern Territory.

D r J Plazinski, ARC Senior Research Fellow, Division o f Plant Cell Biology, Research School o f Biological Sciences, formerly Fellow.

D r G D Price, ARC QE1I Research Fellow, Molecular Evoloution and Systematics Group, Research School o f Biological Sciences, promoted to Academic Level C

D r J C Quigglin, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School o f Social Sciences, promoted to Senior Fellow.

Professor A D Rae, Professor, Research School o f Chemistry, formerly University o f New South Wales.

Professor M C Ricklefs, Director, Research School o f Pacific Smdies, formerly Monash University.

D r H W Schranz, Research School o f Chemistry, promoted to Research Fellow.

D r B Sibthorpe, Fellow, Fhe National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, on transfer from the Department o f H um an Services and Health.

D r M L Skotnicki, ARC Research Fellow, Molecular Evolution and Systematics Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, promoted to Academic Level C.

Professor B W Stening, Director, Master of Business Administration Program, Research School o f Pacific Smdies, formerly Griffith University.

D r K M Wells, Fellow 50%, Research School o f Pacific Smdies, formerly Indiana University.

The Faculties

D r A P Byrne, jointly D epartment o f Physics and Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Science and Department o f Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, promoted

to Senior Lecturer.

101

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Professor R J Campbell, Department o f Philosophy, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Professor.

M r J Cattapan, Foundation Studies, School o f Art, Institute o f the Arts, promoted to Lecmrer.

D r P Chen, Senior Lecmrer, Department of Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce, formerly Michigan State University.

D r D B S Craig, Department of Flistory, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

D r A Cuevas, Senior Lecmrer, Interdisciplinary Engineering Program, Faculty of Science, formerly Ciudad University, Spain.

D r L M Elliott, Department of Political Science, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Lecmrer.

D r D J Ellis, D epartm ent o f Geology, Faculty of Science, promoted to Reader.

D r E O Fisher, Senior Lecmrer, Department of Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce, formerly Cornell University.

Ms D Fogwell, Graphic Investigation Workshop, School o f Art, the Institute o f the Arts, promoted to Lecmrer.

D r G Garvey, Senior Lecmrer, Department o f Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce, formerly University o f New South Wales.

D r J Hart, Department o f Political Science, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Reader.

M r V Hill, School o f Music, Institute o f the Arts, promoted to Reader.

D r V G Hooker, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty o f Asian Studies, promoted to Reader.

D r R N James, Senior Lecmrer, Department o f Forestry, Faculty o f Science, formerly New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

Mrs Y Johns, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

D r C M Jones, Department of Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Mr P Juntanamalaga, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies, promoted to Lecmrer.

Dr Η M Kennett, Physics and Theoretical Physics, Faculty o f Science, promoted to Lecmrer.

D rD Kinley, Faculty o f Law, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Dr J W Knott, Department of History, Faculty of Arts, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Mrs T MacIntyre, Southeast Asian Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies, promoted to Lecturer.

Dr S Mahendrarajah, Senior Lecmrer, Department of Forestry, Faculty o f Science, formerly Research Fellow, Department o f Economics, Research School o f Pacific Smdies.

Dr R L Martin, Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty o f Science, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Dr M McKinley, Department of Political Science, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Dr S K Mugford, Department o f Sociology, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Reader.

Dr P J Oakes, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Dr E A Ormerod, Department o f Mathematics, Faculty o f Science, promoted to Lecmrer.

Mr B-O Palmqvisr, School of Music, Institute o f the Arts, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

D rD H Parker, Department of English, Faculty of Arts, promoted to Reader

Professor J M Power, Director, Australian National Internships Program, Faculty o f Arts, formerly University ofMelbourne.

Dr P J Rose, Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Arts, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Dr A Rosenfeld, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Reader.

Mr L Sitsky, School o f Music, Instimte o f the Arts, promoted to Reader.

102

Staff

Dr Z H Stachurski, Reader, Interdisciplinary Engineering Program, Faculty o f Science, formerly Monash University.

Ms W Teakel, Foundation Smdies, School o f Art, Institute o f fh e Arts, promoted to Lecturer.

Dr J H Tillotson, Department o f History, Faculty of Arts, promoted to Reader.

Dr A C F Trevitt, Department o f Forestry, Faculty of Science, promoted to Senior Lecturer.

Dr R Tyers, Reader, Department o f Economics, Faculty o f Economics and Commerce, formerly Senior Lecturer.

Professor] L W arhurst, Professor and Head, Department o f Political Science, Faculty o f Arts, formerly University o f New England.

Dr K M Wells, Senior Lecturer 50%, Department of Asian History, Faculty of Asian Smdies, formerly Indiana University.

Dr A H Welsh, Department o f Statistics, Faculty of Economics and Commerce, promoted to Reader.

Professor D T Wickramasinghe, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, promoted to Professor.

Dr K Windle, Modern European Languages, Faculty o f Arts, promoted to Senior Lecturer.

Dr S Yoshida, Japan Centre, Faculty o f Asian Smdies, promoted to Senior Lecmrer.

Senior general staff appointments

G M Burke, Warden Brace Hall

D R Cornwell, Secretary, Institute o f the Arts

V J Counter, Systems Controller, Registrar’s Division

P Daroesman, Executive Officer, N CEPH

K A Foster, Personal Adviser to Staff

I G Harris, Head, International Education Office

S K Herrick, Legal Officer

C Hogan, Head, Planning Unit

P Kemp-Elliott, Head, Jabal Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Centre

J S Mahoney, Head, Public Affairs Division

N P Rodgers, Warden, Burton and Garran Halls

G Watt, Warden, Fenner Hall

Senior general staff resignations and retirments

M L Barnett, University Public Relations

A F Dargan, Personal Adviser to Staff

J S Harper, Assistant Secretary, Administration

R M Hickman, School Secretary, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

L C Parke, Observatories Secretary, M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

S Pell, Executive Officer, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

A B Salter, Senior Assistant, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Finance and Fabric)

103

T h e A u stralian N a tio n a l University

104

A ppendices

A ppendices

105

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l University

University Statistics excluding the Institute of the Arts

Full-time equivalent staff as at 31 March 1993

D esignation_____________ males females total

Academic activities

Research on ly staff Level E Professor 101 3 104

Level D Senior Fellow 116 4 120

Level C Fellow 87 13 100

Level B Research Fellow 123 23 146

Level A Post-doctoral Fellow 78 53 131

ARC Level E 1 0 1

ARC level D 0 0 0

ARC level C 11 2 13

ARC Level B 21 11 32

ARC level A 28 12 40

Visitor 61 16 77

total 627 137 764

Research on ly support staff Research Officer 21 17 38

Research Assistant 53 129 182

Technical Officer 186 41 227

Technical Assistant 148 117 265

Administrative positions 30 14 44

other 110 266 376

total 548 584 1132

Teaching and research staff Level E Professor 32 4 36

Level D Reader 59 2 61

Level C Senior Lecturer 120 17 137

Level B Lecturer 84 43 127

Level A Assistant Lecturer 25 32 57

Visitor 10 2 5

total 330 100 430

Teaching and research support staff Research Officer 1 1 2

Research Assistant 3 4 7

Technical Officer 41 4 45

Technical Assistant 33 14 47

Administrative support 6 4 10

other 19 108 127

total 103 135 238

D esignation males females total

Academic services

Library staff professional/administrative 13 66 79

other 16 67 83

total 29 133 162

C om puting staff professional/ administrative 22 5 27

other 17 11 28

total 39 16 55

General U niversity services

Administration chief administrative officer 9 0 9

senior administrative officer 30 19 49

administrative officer 21 36 57

administrative assistant 26 33 59

clerical/keyboard staff 39 154 193

other 19 13 32

total 144 255 399

Buildings and grounds professional 4 0 4

trades 45 1 46

other 41 14 55

cleaning and security 18 1 19

total 108 16 124

Other services* 45 53 98

Independent operations 68 97 165

Total staff 2041 1526 3567

* includes Audio-visual, Health, Counselling, Student Employment, Communication skills, Centre for Continuing Education, CEDAM and veterinary services

Small discrepancies may be apparent in totals, due to rounding.

106

U niversity S tatistics

post-

Research only stall pro f sen fell res doc ARC ARC ARC ARC ARC visitor TOTAL

fell fell fell

LEVEL E D c B A E D C B A

Institute o f Advanced Studies Research Schools o f — Biological Sciences 8 15 6 19 26 1 6 6 13 100

John C u rtin School 9 15 8 29 21 1 1 3 37

o f M edical Research Physical Sciences & 13 23 19 25 8 3 3 6 10 110

Engineering Social Sciences 24 11 11 10 6 1 1 9 73

Pacific Studies 18 24 25 15 7 1 2 10 102

C hem istry 7 6 5 4 34 4 8 68

Earth Sciences 7 8 2 13 6 3 6 4 2 51

School o f M athem atical 7 4 4 6 2 1 2 26

Sciences C entre for Resource and 2 4 4 2 1 4 17

E nvironm ental Studies H um anities Research 1 1 2 4

C entre C entre for Inform ation 1 1 4 1 I 8

Science Research M t Strom lo and Siding 3 8 3 1 1 16

S pring Observatories N ational C entre for 2 9 1 3 5 20

Epidem iology and P opulation H ealth N H & M R C Social 1 1 4 6

Psychiatry Research U nit A ustralia-Japan 1 1 2

Research U n it

T otal IAS and Centres 104 119 98 134 115 8 20 24 68 688

T he Faculties Arts 1 1 6 2 1 1 4 2 1 19

Asian Studies 1 2 3

Econom ics & 1 1

C om m erce Law 2 2

Science 1 6 14 3 6 13 7 50

T otal T he Faculties 1 2 12 17 1 4 12 16 10 75

T otal Research only Staff 104 120 100 146 132 1 12 32 40 78 763

Small discrepancies may be apparent in totals, due to rounding.

107

Teaching and research staff"

prof reader senior

lecturer

lecturer assist. lecturer visitor T O T A

LEVEL E D C B A

Institute o f Advanced Studies Research School of-—

Pacific Studies 5 5 8 18

Total IAS 5 5 8 18

The Faculties

Arts 6 18 47 41 14 2 128

Asian Studies Economics &

3 3 11 8 5 2 32

Commerce 4 7 23 22 19 4 79

Law 9 5 10 18 1 1 44

Science 14 26 43 33 10 3 129

Total The Faculties 36 59 134 122 49 12 412

Total Teaching and Research staff 36 59 139 127 57 12 429

Small discrepancies may be apparent in totals, due to rounding.

U niversity S ta tistics

Institute o f the Arts at 31 March, 1993

(Excluding part-time and casual staff)

Academic Staff Above Sen.

Lecturer

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer Below

Lecturer

TOTAL

Teaching and Research Music 0.00 0.84 0.00 0.00 0.84

Ausn. Centre for Arts and Technology 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00

Sub-total T eaching and Research 0.00 1.84 0.00 0.00 1.84

Teaching Only An 1.00 10.00 15.50 11.00 37.50

Music 3.00 11.00 23.00 7.00 44.00

Ausn. Centre for Arts and Technology 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 2.00

Sub-total T each in g Only 4.00 21.00 39.50 19.00 83.50

Total Academic Staff males 4.00 19.84 23.00 8.00 54.84

females 0.00 3.00 16.50 11.00 30.50

Total 4.00 22.84 39.50 19.00 8 5 .3 4

General Staff Professional Technical Trades Other TOTAL

Services Academic 0.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 7.00

Library 3.60 0.00 0.00 5.63 9.23

Student Services 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.50

Other Services 0.00 3.00 0.00 6.00 9.00

Sub-total Services 4.10 4.00 1.00 17.63 26.73

Buildings and Grounds 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00

Administration 3.00 0.00 0.00 28.20 31.20

Sub-total B & G and Admin 3.00 0.00 0.00 29.20 3 2 .2 0

Total General Staff males

females Total

3.00 4.10 7.10

4.00 0.00 4.00

1.00 0.00 1.00

9.00 37.83 46.83

17.00 4 1 .9 3 5 8 .9 3

Academic General TOTAL

Total IT A

males females Total

54.84 30.50 85.34

17.00 41.93 58.93

7 1 .8 4 7 2 .4 3 144.27

109

T he A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Home Region o f Students 1993

(Excluding Full Fee Paying Students) (Including ITA)

Postgraduates Undergraduates Total

Overseas The The

IAS Centres Faculties ΓΓΑ Total Faculties ΓΓΑ Tota A N U

Asia

Malaysia 1 0 1 0 2 17 1 18 20

China 5 0 3 1 9 4 0 4 13

H ong Kong 2 0 3 0 5 5 0 5 10

O ther Asia 1 0 3 1 5 14 2 16 21

Sub-Total 9 0 10 2 21 40 3 43 64

Europe

UK 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 3 4

O ther Europe 1 0 1 1 3 2 0 2 5

Sub-Total 2 0 1 1 4 5 0 5 9

Pacific

New Zealand 23 0 14 1 38 3 0 3 41

PNG 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 3

O ther Pacific 1 0 0 0 1 7 0 7 8

Sub-Total 24 0 14 1 39 13 0 13 52

America

USA 1 0 4 1 6 8 0 8 14

Canada 4 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 5

Sub-Total 5 1 4 1 11 8 0 8 19

O ther Overseas 2 1 4 0 7 0 1 1 8

Australia 322 71 1197 41 1631 7023 624 7647 9278

Gross Total 364 73 1230 46 1713 7089 628 7 7 1 7 9 4 3 0

110

U niversity S tatistics

Enrolments 1993 (excluding full fee paying students)

frill­ tim e

part­ tim e Total

PhD Courses Institute o f Advanced Studies 304 42 346

The Faculties 190 56 246

University Centres 29 4 33

Total 523 102 625

Master’s D egree Courses Institute ot Advanced Studies 21 17 38

The Faculties 87 181 268

University Centres 20 20

ITA 11 2 13

Total 119 220 339

Graduate D ip lo m a Courses Institute o f Advanced Studies 16 21 37

The Faculties* 171 429 600

University Centres 5 15 20

ITA 22 11 33

Total 214 476 690

LittB Courses ITie Faculties 2 1 3

Bachelor D egree Courses Arts 1127 741 1868

Arts (Aus) 8 20 28

Arts (A H Q 41 14 55

Arts (DS) 23 6 29

Arts (ES) 26 11 37

Arts (PS) 34 34 68

Arts/Comm 72 3 75

Arts/Econ 100 15 115

Arts/Law 406 29 435

Arts/Sc 249 47 296

Asian Studies 322 85 407

Asian Studies (Arabic) 6 0 6

Asian Studies (Hindi) 3 0 3

Asian Studies (Korean) 3 0 3

Asian Studies (Thai) 5 4 9

Asian Studies/Commerce 41 2 43

Asian Studies/Economics 98 5 103

Asian Studies/Law 60 4 64

Asian Studies/Science 20 1 21

Chinese Studies 12 0 12

Indonesian Studies 9 1 10

Japanese Studies 22 0 22

Commerce 318 68 386

Commerce/ Law 115 6 121

Economics 186 62 248

Bachelor D egree Courses frill- part- Total (C ont’d) time tim e

Economics (Actuarial Studies) 20 0 20

Economics/Law 117 9 126

Information Tech (Comm) 26 9 35

Information Tech (Econ) 10 5 15

Information Tech (Eng) 48 13 61

Information Tech (Info Syst) 36 11 47

Information Tech (Science) 13 3 16

Law 57 13 70

Law (Graduate) 83 78 161

Science 605 296 901

Science (Forestry) 120 13 133

Science (Kes&EnvMan) 146 45 191

Science/ Commerce 78 4 82

Science/Economics 121 12 133

Science/Law 143 2 145

Science (Forestry)/Econ 25 2 27

Commerce/Engineering 18 1 19

Engineering 56 9 65

Engineering/ Economics 22 1 23

Science/Engineering 111 4 115

Assoc Dip (Policy Smdies) 0 57 57

Institute o f the Arts 529 59 588

Total Bachelor Courses 5690 1804 7494

Other Courses frill­

time

part­ tim e Total

master’s qualifying 4 4

graduate certificate 7 7

non-degree graduate 36 36

non-degree undergraduate 1 75 76

cross institutional p-g 8 111 119

cross institutional u-g 9 9

cross institutional 11A 28 28

Total O ther Courses 9 270 279

Gross enrolments 6557 2873 9430

N et Enrolments** 6555 2866 9421

Full Fee Paying Students

frill­ time

part­ time Total

postgraduate 445 94 539

undergraduate 374 58 432

ITA 7 0 7

N et Total** 825 150 975

111

T he A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

D egree & D ip lom a males females

Courses com pleted (year ended 31 March, 1993)

Total

Doctor o f Philosophy 97 46 143

Master 94 59 153

Graduate Diploma 126 87 213

Bachelor o f Letters 4 2 6

Bachelor with Honours 100 73 173

Bachelor Pass 472 428 900

Associate Diploma 10 7 17

Diploma 8 3 11

Total 911 705 1616

* including Legal Workshop ** adjusted for concurrent enrolments

112

C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o th e r p u b lic institutions

Cooperation with government and other public institutions

f ■ t h e A u stra lia n N atio n al U n iv e rsity I en c o u ra g e s m em b ers o f th e a c a d e m ic -M- staff to g iv e sp ecialist a d v ic e a n d assistance to F e d e ra l an d S tate G o v e rn m e n t d ep artm en ts a n d to o th e r p u b lic institutions, b o th w ith in A u stra lia a n d internationally. T h is help ta k e s m a n y

forms—c o n su lta n c ie s, m e m b e rsh ip of com m ittees, in v o lv e m e n t in p a rtic u la r projects, se c o n d m e n ts, etc. T he fo llo w in g list records s u c h c o o p e ra tio n fo r 1993. T his is not n ecessarily co m p reh en siv e.

Central Administration

Professor A D Barton, member, A C T Divisional Council, Australian Society o f Certified Practicing Accountants; director, UniSuper LTD and member of the Audit Committee; member, ACT Third Patty Insurance Premiums Advisory

Committee; member, Panel in General Academic Qualifications, National Office o f Overseas Skills Recognition.

Dr R Erskine, member, Asia Pacific Co-ordinating Committee for International Research Networking; member, Advisory Board,

Pacific Neighbourhood Consortium; member, NSW/ACT University Com puter Centres Directors; member, Australian University Computer Centres Directors; member, ACT

Education Information Network; member, Internet Society Advisory Council.

Ms J McCallum-Johnston, at the request o f the National Association of Prospective Students, ACT Branch, consulted with the Australian Catholic University, ANU Student Admissions

Office, AD FA, University o f Canberra, Canberra Institute o f Technology and A C T Career Education Association on a project to provide comprehensive A C T tertiary course information to all ACT Year 10 students.

M r J Mahoney, Head, Public Affairs Division, edited the journal University Public Relations established during 1993.

Emeritus Professor L W Nichol, Vice-President, Australian Higher Education Industrial Association; member, National Gallery Foundation, Canberra Group; International

Committee for the Study o f Educational Exchange; member, Business/Higher Education Round Table.

M r G Pickford, President, A CT Branch, AITEA; member, National Capital Anractions Association; Executive Member, A CT Cultural Council and Chair, Community Arts and Festive

Events Committee.

M r P A Selth, member, A CT Heritage Council; member, Advisory Board, T he Centre for Australian Public Sector Management, Griffith University.

C R Steele, member, Executive Committee of ALUS (Australian Library and Information International Service); member, Executive Committee o f the Council o f Australian

University Librarians; convener, ANU Convocation/Canberra Times Literary Lunches; secretary, Magellan Society; editorial boards, Australian Academic and Research libraries,

Australian and New Zealand Journal o f Serials Librarianship, The Electronic Library, Information Management Report, Interlending and Document Supply, Journal o f Librarianship & Information

Science and Librarianship and Information Work Worldwide.

Professor R D Terrell, member, N ZI General Accident Bicentennial Scholarship Committee; Chair, International Development Program Audit

Committee; elected member, Inaugural Board of Directors, Australian Education Office, Washington, DC.

113

T h e A u str a lia n N a t io n a l University

Research School of Biological Sciences

Developmental Neurobiology

P Harrison, awarded an Achievement Certificate (Research) by the Commonwealth Health Department for research efforts over the past two years.

A D Blest, Associate Editor, Cell and Tissue Research; reviewed grant applications to the National Science Foundation, USA and to the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, New Zealand; visited the University o f Canterbury, New Zealand, to plan the field work he will conduct in New Zealand during his tenure o f an Erskine Fellowship awarded for six

months in 1994.

L Reece attended the Australian Neuroscience Society conference, Melbourne and the Society for Neuroscience, Washington.

R Mark visited the Oxford University Laboratory o f Physiology/McDonnell-Pew Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and gave a seminar on Two stages in the formation of a mammalian retinocollicular projection: anatomical and physiological evidence; visited London University Instimte o f Ophthalmology and delivered the same seminar.

Visual Sciences Group

T Maddess, invited presenter, Symposium on Sensory Processing at the Annual Meeting o f the Japanese Zoological Society in Okinawa, Japan; gave a one-day exhibition during the Canberra Science Fair.

1 Morgan lectured to Biomedical Science students at the University o f Canberra; represented RSBS on BIOLAC; member, Education and Training Fomm of the Department o f Education and Training and o f the Board o f Management o f the

Local Industry Education Network Committee.

M Nagle, Visiting Fellow, Indian Instimte of Science, Bangalore where he collaborated with Madhu Vairy on the application o f dynamically scalable wavelet based filters to the detection of

motion in image sequences.

Zhang Shao-Wu, Visiting Fellow, Indian Instimte of Science, Bangalore, in September, where he conducted and completed a collaborative research project on honeybee learning gave three invited seminars on pattern recognition by honeybees.

P Sobey, co-organiser o f a workshop on ’From Living Eyes to Seeing Machines’ and o f the Centre for Visual Sciences Seminar Series.

Mandyam Srinivasan, co-organiser of the Robertson Symposium on Sensory Stratagems, and o f a workshop on ’From Living Eyes to Seeing Machines’; member, Editorial Boards,

Vision Research and Australian Journal o f Intelligent Information Processing Systems.

G Stange, invited presenter, Symposium on Sensory Processing at the Annual Meeting o f the Japanese Zoological Society in Okinawa and at the European Society o f Insect Taste and

Olfaction in Caglian, Sardinia; Visiting Fellow, Max-Planck Institute for Behavioural Physiology in Seewiesen and gave seminars at Kyusku University, Fukuoka, and at the University o f Tucson in Arizona.

J Wellard worked with D r N Osborne, Nuffield Institute of Ophthalmology, Oxford University, on nitric oxide in the retina; visited the laboratories o f Professor C Blakemore, Department of Physiology Oxford and D r P Feltz, Department o f P h y s io lo g y , Louis Pasteur University, Strasbourg received support from the International Society for Neurochemistry and an

Australian Young Scientist Award from DEET.

Molecular and Population Genetics Group

J Gibson attended the 34th Annual Drosophila Research Conference in San Diego and International Congress o f Genetics in Birmingham.

D Reed was awarded a scholarship by the organisers to attend the International Genetics Congress in Birmingham, UK in August.

Molecular Evolution and Systematics Group

D G Green gave an invited plenary address at the Computational Techniques and Applications

114

C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o t h e r p u b lic institutions

Conference (CTAC), Canberra; his work on hypermedia information led to service for several external bodies, including membership of: Steering Com mittee on Information Technology, Australian Biological Resources Survey (ABRS);

Information Systems Committee o f the International Organization for Plant Information (IOPI); and Technical Working Group, International Biodiversity Network (BIN21); consultant: Committee for the Advancement of University Training (CAUT); National Resource

Information Centre (NR1C); and Tasmanian Parks and W ildlife Service; Co-editor, Complexity International.

E Ball organised the RSBS contribution to the National Science Summer School, organised and chaired a session on the Evolution o f

Developmental Regulatory Genes for a Robertson Symposium, helped organise and attended a Boden Conference on ’Molecular Systematics of

Gene Families’ at Thredbo, gave a lecture and radio interview on ’Colonisation o f a newly created tropical island by plants and animals’ as part o f the Canberra Science Festival, spent two weeks o f August on Outside Studies in the

laboratory o f D r Nipam Patel, Carnegie Instimtion, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and a week o f fieldwork in the laboratory o f D r D Miller, James Cook University during the coral spawning season.

C Buchen-Osmond, invited speaker, Triennial Meeting o f the Executive o f the International Com mittee o f Taxonomy o f Viruses in Glasgow, Scotland, where she also attended the DCth

International Congress of Virology; while in the USA she participated at several meetings concerning development and integration o f large databases at the American Type Culmre Collection at Rockville and the National Center

for Biotechnology Information, National Library o f Medicine, the National Institute o f Health, Bethesda Maryland, and continued to work on the ICTVdB® project at Duke University,

Durham, N orth Carolina, funded by the national Science Foundation.

A J Gibbs, invited speaker at three overseas meetings; attended meeting on ‘T he Production and Uses o f Genetically Transformed Plants’ at the Royal Society and on ‘Molecular Mechanisms o f Resistance to Plant Pathogens’ at the Ciba

Foundation in UK; participated in a meeting on Phylogeny Reconstruction at the British Natural

History Museum, and a meeting o f the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses in Glasgow; attended a meeting o f the Australian Systematic Botany Society; and gave seminars in Brisbane, Oxford, Palmerston North and Perth; member, Executive Committee of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses and chair of its Data Subcommittee; member, Board o f the Australian National Genomic Information Service; editorial boards of 3 journals.

A J Gibbs and D G Green convened two major meetings on molecular evolution: the first 1993 Robertson Symposium on Frontiers o f Molecular Evolution, ANU, Canberra, and the Australian Academy of Science’s Boden Conference on

Molecular Systematics o f Gene Families, Thredbo.

J M Hancock visited UK and France including M RC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London; European Bioinformatics Institute, Hinxton Hall, Cambridge; AFRC Centre for Genome Research, Edinburgh;

Department o f Molecular and Cell Biology, University o f Aberdeen; attended International Congress for Genetics and 4th European Society

for Evolutionary Biology Congress, Montpellier, France; attended seminars at University o f Aberdeen, UK; Edinburgh, U K

D Haywar and M Jones both won poster prizes at the Australia New Zealand Society for Cell Biolog', Monash University.

D Shaw, member, editorial board, Chromosome Research.

M Skotnicki attended seminars at University of Massachusetts, Amherst; attended Australasian Biotechnology Conference, Perth; Symposium on Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Interactions, New Brunswick; International Congress o f Virology, Glasgow.

C Weiller, convener, Canberra Chapter o f the Australian Systematic Botany Society; worked for three days at the National Herbarium o f New South Wales; contributed to a five day DELTA

workshop; attended the Southern Temperate Ecosystems Conference in Hobart, combined with herbarium and field work; attended the International Monocots Symposium at Kew

London, doing herbarium work at Kew and the Natural History Museum; and attended the Descriptive Databases workshop in Perth

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presenting a poster entitled Automated Taxonomic Descriptions o f the Australian Pooideae (Poaceae).

G Weiller gave seminars at Sydney University; University o f Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Utrecht University, T he Netherlands and Vienna Biocenter, Austria.

Plant Cell Biology Group

D r A L Cleary with Professor Gunning and Drs Williamson and Harper ran practical classes and a tutorial for 3rd year students from Sydney University; visited USA; invited speaker, The Gordon Conference on the Plant and Fungal cytoskeleton in Andover, New Hampshire, and invited sp>eaker and co-chair o f ’Plant Cell Structure: Recent Advances’ at the 51st Annual

meeting o f the Microscopy Society o f America, Cincinnati, Ohio; visited laboratories at the University o f Southwestern Louisiana and University o f Massachusetts; presented an invited papier at the XV International Botanical Congress in Yokohama, Japan and an invited lecture at Mie University, Tsu-city, Japan.

Professor B B S Gunning, Co-Director, Cooperative Research Centre for Plant Science throughout 1993; Honorary Vice-President, representing Australia, at the XV International Botanical Congress held in Japan and attended by about 4500 delegates; gave invited lectures at the International Botanical Congress in Yokohama, the annual meeting o f the New Zealand Electron Microscopy Society for Cell Biology held in Palmerston N orth, the Australian & New Zealand Society for Cell Biology held in Melbourne and the third Gordon Conference on the Plant and Fungal Cytoskeleton held in New Hampshire, USA; editor, Protoplasma; member, editorial boards, Planta and The Plant Journal

D r A R Hardham, member, editorial board, Mycological Research, ran practical classes for the National Science Summer School and a week-long workshop on Applications o f Antibody Techniques to Plant Biology for the CRC for Plant Science; gave a seminar at the University o f Sydney and invited lectures at the annual meeting o f the Australian Biochemical Society held in Adelaide, the Australian and New Zealand Society for Cell Biology held in Melbourne and the International Congress on Plant Pathology held in Montreal.

D r P C L John, invited spieaker, 10th EMBO, Europ>ean Cell Cycle Conference held in La Rochelle, France.

D r G O Wasteneys held an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, working jointly with the University o f Heidelberg and the Max Planck Instimte for Cell Biology in Ladenburg, Germany; resumed his Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship with PCB; invited spxaker, ’Light Microscopy o f Living Cells’ program and chair, ’Cell and Organelle Motility’ session at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Canterbury, UK; attended a meeting of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Bonn

and gave a research seminar at the Botanical Instimte, University o f Bonn, as a guest o f Professor A Sievers.

D r R E Williamson, invited speaker at the Gordon Conference on the Plant and Fungal Cytoskeleton and in the sympwsium ’Ultrastructure and Formation o f Cell Walls’ at the XV International Botanical Congress in Yokohama; co-organiser and speaker in the symp>osium ’Dynamics of the Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility’; while in Japan he visited the Himeji Instimte o f Technology as part o f an international scientific collaboration program with Professor Tem o Shimmen and attended the Symposium on Giant Cells of the Characeae held at O tsu in honour o f the 80th birthday of Professor Noburo Kamiya; attended the International Conference on Arabidopsis Research at Columbus Ohio and held discussions with collaborators at the University o f Missouri at Columbia; gave seminars at the Department of Genetics and the School of Botany, University o f Melbourne; member, editorial boards, European Journal o f Cell Biology and Cell Biology

International; member, advisory board, Plant Journal and as co-leader of the Development Program in the Plant Science Centre.

Director’s Research Group

S Grace gave a research seminar at the University of Colorado, Boulder, en-route from the Harden Conference.

B Osmond, chair, Section 6, Australian Academy of Sciences and coordinator o f the Australia/UK/NZ trilateral exchange programs in biology and biotechnology sponsored by DITARD; spent time at Duke University (thesis

C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o t h e r p u b lic institutions

defense o f Suchandra Balachandran) and in September (thesis defense o f Evan M cDonald and research at D uke University Marine Laboratory); organised a G ordon Conference in Irsee, Germany, and gave plenary lectures at conferences

in Panama, Japan and Europe, and at D uke University and the University o f Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; in the course o f travel, research discussions were also held in W iirzburg

and Palo Alto, CA, and he participated in a Department o f Energy workshop on the Molecular Ecology o f Photosynthesis, Belmont,

MD.

S Robinson worked at Duke University and gave research seminars at the University o f Essex and at the D eparm ent o f Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, en route to and from the

Harden Conference; visited the D epartment o f Botany, University o f Queensland to set up HPLC equipment for pigment separation and gave two reseach seminars there.

J Rohozinski worked for five weeks in the University o f Nebraska, Lincoln en route from the International Virology Congress and organised the collection o f filamentous brown algae for an international search for virus infection

in these organisms.

T Wydrzynski and W Hillier held research discussions in the Max-Volmer-Institue, Berlin, the University o f Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Washington University, St. Louis, M O , and the

National Renewable Energy laboratory, Golden, C O , in the course o f private trips to Europe and the United States.

Plant Environmental Biology

Professor G D Farquhar, member, Sectional Com mittee 6, Australian Academy o f Science and chair, and the Gottschalk Award Committee, Australian Academy o f Science; member,

Scientific Steering Committee, International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC/IGBP) and The Australian Com mittee for International Geosphere— Biosphere Programme;

member, Editorial Board, Functional Ecology (British Ecological Society); Review board o f Plant, Cell and Environment; chair, Advisory Com m ittee for the Australian Journal o f Plant

Physiology; Editorial Review Board, Tree Physiology and Consulting Editor, Plant and Soil.

D r Μ K Morell presented a three lecture coutse on the genetic manipulation o f plants to fourth year and PhD students in the Faculty o f Agriculture at the University o f Sydney;

represented the Plant Variety Rights Office of Australia as an Australian delegate to the meeting o f the W orking Group on Biochemical and

Molecular Techniques and D N A Profiling in Particular’ o f the International Union for the Protection o f New Varieties o f Plants in Geneva; gave seminars on Rubisco at the University of Lausanne, Michigan State University and the University o f Sydney, and on starch biosynthesis

in plants at the Bread Research Institute, Sydney, and presented a workshop on D N A Profiling of Plants to members of Plant Variety Rights Office,

Department o f Primary Industries and Energy.

D r S von Caemmerer contributed to a 2 day course on photosynthesis for students from University o f NSW; invited speaker at a Gordon Conference, Irsee, Germany and travelled for

research and gave seminars at University of Munster, University of Diisseldoif, University of Kaiserslautern, the Institut Fiir Pflanzengenetik

und Kulturpflanzenforschung and the Carnegie Institute (Stanford).

D r J Evans, member, Review Board of Plant, Cell and Environment.

D r M R Badger gave a seminar at the Murray Darling Freshwater Research Institute, Albury, NSW.

Drs T J Andrews and M R Badger contributed to a two-day course on photosynthesis for students visiting from the University o f Sydney.

PhD scholar, C Mate attended and presented a poster at the Gordon Conference on ‘Photosynthesis and C 0 2 metabolism in plants held in Irsee, Germany, visited and presented

seminars at the University o f Utrecht, T he Netherlands and the University o f Lausanne, Switzerland; presented a seminar at the University o f Nevada, Reno.

Ecosystem Dynamics Group

Dr Noble attended the Executive Meeting of the International Union of Biological Sciences General Assembly in Paris; member, Australian

National Committee for MAB, and on the Editorial Board of Ecological Applications,

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Ecological Modelling Biodiversity Letters and the UNESCO/MAB Book Series; as member o f the Internationa] Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Scientific Steering Committee on the ’Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems’ Core Project, attended planning meetings in Tokyo, California, Virginia and Canberra; appointed a

lead writer on the Guidelines for assessing Impacts o f Global Change and organised a meeting on landscape issues held in Toledo, Spain for the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and attended a meeting in Toronto; President, Ecological Society o f Australia.

Professor Slatyer, Companion o f the Order of Australia (AC), awarded the Gold Medal o f the Ecological Society o f Australia; chair, Australian Foundation for Science and member, CRA Science Advisory Board, the UNESCO International Advisory Committee for Biosphere Programs, the Science and Industry Forum, and the National Committee on the Environment of the Australian Academy of Science; member, Senior Advisory Board of the SCOPE Sustainable

Biosphere Project, the University o f Melbourne’s Research Policy Advisory Committee and the Australian Minerals and Energy Environment Foundation.

Dr Lavorel participated in discussions for the EIS of the Snowy Mountains hydro-electric authority cloud seeding proposal; worked at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Montpellier, France on developing an approach to species diversity in Mediterranean landscapes; invited speaker, International Botanical Congress in Japan and at the GCTE Workshop in Spain on Global Change and Landscape Dynamics in Mediterranean Ecosystems.

Dr Ball, member, Editorial Committee, Australian Journal o f Botany lecturer at the International Science School for high school students held at the School o f Physics, University of Sydney.

Dr Chesson, editor, Theoretical Population Biology, associate editor, The American Naturalist, organiser, Graduate Discussion Seminar for the newly constituted Graduate Program in Ecology, Evolution and Systematics; gave seminars at the University o f Adelaide.

Dr Gitay, chair, session on functional types for global vegetation mapping at the GCTE

Workshop on Functional Types held in Virginia USA; gave seminars at Queen’s University, University o f Toronto, and the Canadian Wildli

Service, Ontario, Canada; gave a seminar at the USDA Forest Service in Missoula, Montana; participated in the North Australian Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Forum held in Darwin.

Dr Williams, lecturer on namral and disturbed ecosystems at the University o f New England, NSW; Regional Councillor, Ecological Society o Australia and member of the Organising Committee for the 1993 Symposium o f the

Ecological Society o f Australia, held at RSBS; ga\ seminars on her fire research at Idaho State University, and Pepperdine University, Los Angeles, USA, University of New England, NSV

and to the A CT Parks and Conservation Service, Canberra; visited the United States and Canada t attend conferences on Forestry for the 21st Century, Oregon and on The Ecological Implications of Fire in Greater Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park; continued collaborative work with Professor J Anderson, Idaho State University and visited colleagues at several other sites.

Molecular Structure and Function Group

G L G Miklos, Visiting Fellow, Neurosciences Institute, La Jolla, California researching and writing a book on ’Brain Evolution and the Origins of Organizational Complexity’; presente seminars and had research consultations in the Neurobiology Department, the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, USA; attended TT Cytoskeleton and Cell Function’ meeting in Col Spring Harbor, New York, USA; invited chair, moderator and speaker at the Dahlem Konfcrenzen ’Flexibility and Constraint in Behavioural Systems’, Berlin, Germany; invited speaker in the Center for the Study o f Evolution and the Origin o f Life, UCLA, Los Angeles, US invited speaker at the Lome Genome Meeting, Lome; invited speaker at the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists Meeting in

Canberra.

H D Campbell, member, ANU Recombinant DNA M onitoring Committee and of the C l Laboratory Inspection Team which inspected C certified facilities.

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Plant Microbe Interaction Group

Dr Greaser, member, CHEMLAC Library Committee.

Dr M Djordjevic presented two talks and 4 posters at the Northern American Rhizobium Conference in Minneapolis and attended the Australian Nitrogen Fixation Conference in

Brisbane; conducted a course on the Genetic Engineering o f Rhizobium in Bogor Indonesia.

Dr J W einm an presented a talk and two posters at the N orth American Rhizobium conference in Minneapolis and attended the Australian Nitrogen Fixation conference in Brisbane

John Curtin School of Medical Research

division o f Cell Biology

Professor G L Ada, member, International Science and Technology Advisory Committee ilSTAC), D epartment o f Industry, Technology mu Regional Development; chair, Vaccine W orking G roup, National Centre in H IV

• pidemiology and Clinical Research; member, International Committee to advise the Swedish Government on Vaccine and Drug Research for ,\ID S and Related Tropical Research; member, International Jurv, Sandoz Prize for Immunology; adviser, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, New York; member, Vaccine Selection G roup and W orking G roup on HIV Vaccine Development

and Assessment, Division o f AIDS, National Instimtes o f Health.

Professor R V Blanden, co-editor, Experimental and Clinical Immunogenetics, member, Editorial Board, Immunology and Cell Biology, member, Advisory Board, Journal oflmmunogenetics,

member, Research Advisory Board o f the National M ultiple Sclerosis Society o f Australia; member, Virology-Immunology Study Group, Commonwealth Aids Research Scheme.

D r D Cohen, member. Editorial Board, Oncogene.

D r P Cooper, Public Officer for Australian Cancer Society, Clinical Oncological Society of Australia and A CT Hospice Society; consultant,

ANUTECH.

Dr P D Hodgkin, ACT Councillor for Australasian Society for Immunology.

D r A Mullbacher, Founding member and member o f the Steering Committee o f the Australian Science Festival.

D r C Parish, Editor-in-Chief, Immunology and Cell Biology.

D r A J Ramsay, editor, Australian Society for Immunology (ASI) Newsletter.

D r I A Rams haw, member, W orking Party Group on Immune-Based Therapies for HIV; member, W H O Comminee on Research Priorities for

future Vaccine Adjuvants.

D r P Waring, founding member and member o f the Steering Committee, First Australian Science Festival; examined theses from University of

Queensland and Queensland University of Technology.

Division o f Clinical Sciences

D r N G Ardlie, member and councillor, Australian Postgraduate Federation o f Medicine; member, Advisory Comminee, Medical

Laboratory Science Degree Course, University of Canberra; member, Medical Advisory Comminee, National Heart Foundation (ACT Division); serves on the Merck Sharp and Dohme

Lipid Teaching Faculty; reviewer o f Atherosclerosis, Pathology and Thrombosis Research; assessor for grant bodies including the

National Health and Medical Research Council and the National Heart Foundation o f Australia.

D r R Baker, member, Organising Comminee, 15th Annual Conference on the Organisation and Expression o f the Genome, Lome, Victoria, Australia; reviewer, Genetics and Biochimica et

Biophysica Acta.

Dr P Board, reviewer for the N H & M RC , the ARC the Victorian Anti Cancer Council, the New Zealand MRC and the Wool Research and

Development Corporation; reviewer, American Journal o f Human Genetics, Human Biology, member, editorial advisory panel, Biochemical Journal, member, organising committees for the

15th Annual Conference on the Organization and

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Expression o f the Genome and the 17th Annual Scientific M eeting o f the Human Genetics Society o f Australasia.

D r G Buffinton, member, Board o f Directors, Australian Society for Medical Research.

Professor W F Doe, member, Australian Drug Evaluation Council; serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee, Australian Cancer Foundation; member, Advisory Committee,

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health; the N H & M RC Social Psychiatry Research Unit; served on the N H & M R C Regional Grants Interviewing Committee; director o f Gastroenterology U nit at Woden Valley Hospital; member, Gastroenterological Society of Australia; member, T he Asian Pacific Committee, Royal Australasian

College o f Physicians; Councillor and a member, Social Issues Committee; member, International Scientific Advisory Committee for the W orld Congresses o f Gastroenterology 1994; member, International Scientific Advisory Committee, Combined European Societies of Gastroenterology 1992; editor, Journal o f

Gastroenterology and Hepatology, reviewer for Cytokines, Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Gastroenterology and Gut; Patron, Canberra Cancerians Committee and member, Australian Academy o f Forensic Science.

D r S Easteal, associate editor, Journal o f Molecular Evolution, Molecular Biology and Evolution, convener, 15th Annual Conference on the Organization and Expression of the Genome; member, Board o f Directors, Genome Conference Inc; Council member, Australasian and South East Asian Tissue Typing Association; member, National Institute of Forensic Science Working Party on establishment o f national standards for D NA profiling; Foundation President, Australasian Chapter of The Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution; provided expert advice in relation to DNA evidence used in seven court cases in New South Wales and The Northern Territory.

D r Hapel, reviewer for project and program grants for the N H & M R C and CARG.

D r M Kohonen-Corish, convener, Annual Scientific Meeting, H um an Genetics Scoiety of Australasia, Canberra.

Dr S McColl, reviewer for the Arthritis Foundation o f Australia; the Cancer Society o f Canada; the Medical Research Council of Canada; Le Fonds de la Recherche en Sante du Quebec.

Dr P M cCullagh, chair, South East New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory Hydatid Control Campaign; Deputy President, National Brain Injury Foundation; medical adviser to Legacy, Vietnam Veterans’ Association of Australia and Returned and Services League of Australia.

Dr H O ’Neill, member, editorial Board, Immunology and Cell Biology, assessor o f grants for the Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria, and the National Health and Medical Research Council.

Professor S Serjeantson, member, editorial boards, Human Biology, Human Immunology and Immunology and Cell Biology, reviewer, American Journal o f Human Genetics, Diabetologia, the European Journal o f Immunogenetics and Tissue Antigens, A C T president for the H um an Genetics Society o f Australasia (HGSA); member, Committee for Scholarships to Harvard University; member, Advisory Committee, N H & M R C Social Psychiatry Research Unit.

Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

Dr M Bessell, vice-president, IAU Commission 29; member, Working Group on Spectroscopic Data Archives; member, Organising Committee IAU Symposium 167; member, Organising Committee ESO Workshop on T he Bottom o f the Main Sequence and Beyond.

Dr M Colless, member, Australian Time Assignment Committee for the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

Dr J. Dawe, member, Steering Committee, Orana Regional Environmental Plan, No 1.

Dr M Dopita, chair, Australian Time Assignment Committee for the Anglo-Australian Telescope; chair, Interstellar M edium Panel o f Cycle 4

Hubble Space Telescope Allocation Committee; member, Organising Committee IAU Commission 34, Interstellar Matter; member,

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C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o th e r p u b lic institutions

Board o f Editors, Proceedings o f the Astronomical Society o f the Pacific; member, Board o f Editors, Astrophysics and Space Science; member, Council o f the Astronomical Society o f Australia; member, Antarctic Astronomy Working Group; made a

submission to the DITAC review o f the operations o f the Australian Space Office.

D r D Faulkner, immediate past president, Astronomical Society of Australia; chair, Organizing Com m ittee 1994 Harley W ood School o f Astronomy.

M r R Fenwick, member, Warm mbungles Landcare G roup Inc.

Professor K C Freeman, member, Australia Telescope Steering Committee; member, Australian Large Telescope Working Party; member, Australia Telescope Users Group;

member, Organising Committee, International Astronomical U nion Commissions 28, 30 and 33; member, Europ>ean Southern Observatory Visiting Committee; chair, E & F W hite

Conference Committee, Australian Academy o f Science.

D r A Kalnajs, member, Organising Committee, IAU Commission 33, The Structure and Dynamics o f the Galactic System

D r R Lavery, member, Australian Time Assignment Com mittee for the Anglo-Australian Observatory.

Professor D Mathewson, vice-president, Executive Committe, International Astronomical Union; member, International Bilateral Programs Committee, Department of Industry, Technology

and Regional Development; member, IAU W orking G roup on Antarctic Astronomy; member, French/Australian W orking G roup on Antarctic Astronomy, member, Australian Time

Assignment Com mittee for the Anglo-Austral ian Telescope; member, Time Assignment Com mittee for the Australia Telescope.

D r J Norris, member, Council o f the Astronomical Society o f Australia; member, Time Assignment Com mittee for the Anglo-Austral ian Telescope; member, Time Allocation Committee

for the UK Schmidt Telescope.

D r B Peterson, member, Advisory Committee on Instrumentation for the Anglo-Australian

Telescopic; member, Schmidt Telescopic Advisory Panel.

D r P Quinn, member, Australian Time Assignment Committee for the Anglo-Australian Observatory.

Professor A W Rodgers, member, National Committee for Astronomy, Australian Academy o f Sciences; collaborated with D r J Le Marshall,

Bureau o f Meteorology and M r N Coopis, RM IT on Cloud Climate Analysis o f Australian C ontinent for siting large Australian Optical Telescope.

D r N Visvanathan, chair, Local and Scientific Organising Committees, 28th AGM, Astronomical Society of Australia.

D r P W ood, member, Magellanic Cloud Working Group, IAU Commission 28; member, Working Group on Planetary Nebulae, IAU Commission 34; member, Scientific Organizing

Committee, Astrophysical Applications o f Stellar Pulsation, Cape Town.

Research School of Social Sciences

Australian Dictionary o f Biography

D r C Cunneen, member, Editorial Advisory Committee to the National Library o f Australia, guide to collections of manuscripts relating to Australia; member, committee o f management, Arts Centre, ANU.

Ms S Edgar, member, Advisory Board, Writers’ Centre, University o f Canberra.

Professor J D Ritchie, lecturer, Joint Services Staff College; member, Advisory Committee, Australian National Dictionary Centre·, member, Australian Universities Advisory Committee to

the Encyclopaedia Britannictc, committee member, Friends o f the National Library o f Australia.

Centre for Economic Policy Research

D r B J Chapman, consultant, Department of Employment, Education & Training on long term unemployment: causes, consequences and policy responses; informal consultant, Committee

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on Employment Opportunities; Rapporteur, education issues for the Future o f Australia; associate editor, Education Economics·., research associate, Western Australia Labour Market Research Centre, and National Institute o f Labour Studies; president, ACT Branch, Australian Economics Society; numerous radio

interviews on long-term unemployment and labour market programs.

D r J Quiggin, advice and comments provided to numerous organisations including ACOSS, ACTU, Australian Consumers Association, Centre lor International Economics, Disabled

People International, Public Sector Union, United Nations Association, Uniya; editorial boards, Journal o f Economic Behaviour and Organisation, Australian Journal o f Agricultural Economics, Journal o f Risk and Uncertainty.

Centre for Immigration and Multicultural Studies

D r J Jupp, executive director, Academy o f the Social Sciences in Australia; vice-president, Asian Association of Social Science Research Councils; member, A C T Multicultural Advisory Council; chair, A CT Reference Group, Bureau of Immigration and Population Research; member, editorial board, Australian Journal o f Political Science, board member, Research Committee on Politics and Ethnicity, International Political Science Association; international member, Refugee Studies Centre, York University, Canada; member, Advisory Committee, School o f Languages and Com munity Services, A CT Institute of TAPE; member, Canberra Regional Committee on Migration Planning and Settlement, Department of Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic Affairs; member, Core Advisory Committee, Bureau o f Immigration

Research National Education Materials Project; member, management committee, Queanbeyan Multilingual Centre; member, multicultural interests’ working party, ACT Cultural Council; member, merit award selection committee, ACT Government.

D r B York, oral history interviewer, National Library o f Australia; consultant, The Malta Yearbook.

Demography

D r G Carmichael, assistance to Australian and New Zealand Governments over proposal to replace arrival and departure cards with departure cards only on trans-Tasman passenger routes; coordination and preparation, Demography Program submission to Australian Bureau o f Statistics on 1996 Census; preparation of Demography Program’s submission to Inter-departmental Committee Review o f Census of Population and Housing; member, Council o f the Australian Population Association (APA); organiser, APA national W D Borrie Essay Competition; member, organising committee, APA 1994 Conference.

Dr L Corner, member, Commonwealth Secretariat H um an Resources Development Working Group; member, AIDAB-IDP Joint Selection Team for Smdent Training Program in

Indonesia; assistance to U N DP Jakarta on design of women and development project, Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of Indonesia; assistance to U N IFEM Regional Program for Asia and the Pacific to develop a work program for

1994-9; assistance to the State Ministry for the Role o f Women, Government o f Indonesia to prepare Country Report on implementation of Nairobi Forward-looking Strategies;

Dr L Day, member, Working Party, symposium on O ptim um Population of Australia, Australian Academy o f Science; Director, Roger Bartell Memorial Education Fund; talk on The future of low-birthrate populations’, ABC radio; author, submission to ’Canberra in the year 2000’ inquiry.

Dr A Gray, assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission on study of Aboriginal mortality; conducted workshops on data analysis for population health, Pakistan and

Bangladesh, with D r P K Streatfield, Associate, The Population Council, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Dr T Hull, assistance to United Nations Population Fund on design of project to promote higher quality care in Chinese fam ily Planning Program; assistance to AIDAB in review o f International Training Program o f BKKBN (Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board).

Professor G Jones, member, Australian National Committee for the United Nations Conference

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on Population and Development, Cairo; chair, organising committee, Ministerial Seminar on Population and Development in the Asia-Pacific Region, Academy o f Science and the Academy of

the Social Sciences in Australia, Canberra; head, Program Review and Strategy Development Mission for the Philippines appointed by the United Nations Population Fund.

D r D Lucas, co-author, background paper. ’The family and social and economic change in the Pacific’, ESCAP regional preparatory meeting on

International Year o f the Family; co-author, paper on ’Language, videos and reproductive health in the South Pacific’, for Pacific 2010 project, NCOS.

participant, discussions with Australian Bureau of Statistics on 1996 Census.

Director’s Section

Professor G Brennan, associate editor, International Review of Law and Economics, Constitutional Political Economy; member, editorial boards, Public Finance Quarterly, Journal o f Economic Behaviour and

Organisation; member, Executive Committee, International Seminar in Public Economics, member, American Economic Association,

Southern Economic Association, Public Choice Society, Economic Society o f Australia; chair, Panel B, Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

Ms C McMurray, collaboration with National Statistical Office o f Papua New Guinea, design of user-friendly software for demographic and social data; corresponding member, Com m unity Aid Abroad/Freedom from Hunger Southern African Regional Committee.

Professor G McNicoll, DLitt examiner, Flinders University o f South Australia; invited lecturer, Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy o f Sciences; member, editorial board, Population and

Development Review.

D r P Meyer, assistance to Australian Academy of Science, program for Ministerial Seminar on Population and Development in the Asia-Pacific

Region; treasurer, Canberra Chapter, Society for International Development; member, organising committee, Indonesia Study Group; member, organising committee, APA 1994 Conference.

D r H Tesfaghiorghis, coordinated and conducted Census Data Users Workshop, Government o f Tuvalu, funded by UNFPA Suva and coordinated

by Demography Program, South Pacific Commission. Consultant, Government of Tuvalu, examining 1991 Population and Housing Census.

D r C Young, consultant, Centre for C ontinuing Education, on ’Report on the Impact o f the Discipline Review o f Engineering’, funded by Department o f Employment, Education and Training; consultant, Australian Bureau o f

Statistics, preparation of Social Atlas for Canberra— Queanbeyan; member, A C T Electoral Commission; member, ACT Reference Group, Bureau o f Immigration and Population Research;

D r K Haakonssen, member, Academy o f Social Sciences in Australia; International Faculty, Danish Research Academy; editorial board, Edinburgh Studies in Intellectual History,

Edinburgh University Press; consulting editor, Journal o f the History ofIdeas·, advisory editor, British Journalfor the History o f Philosophy, committee member (conference secretary),

Australasian Society for the History of Philosophy; member, Planning Committee, Encyclopedic History of Political and Social Concepts Used in English-Speaking Societies; assessor, ARC grants; reader, various academic journals and publishing houses; examiner, La Trobe University.

D r A Martin, chair, Committee for the Advancement o f University Teaching (CAUT); chair, Research Committee, Australian College o f Education; member, organising team,

international conference on higher education, D EET/OECD.

Professor P Pettit, member, appointment committee, Philosophy Chair, Flinders University o f South Australia; elected president, Australasian Association o f Philosophy, chair, Australian

Committee for Philosophy Summer School in China; China, Britain, Australia; associate editor, Journal o f Political Philosophy, member, editorial boards, Journal o f Applied Philosophy, Philosophical

Papers, Australasian Journal o f Philosophy, Ratio, International Journal o f Philosophical Studies, European Journal o f Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, co-editor, Basil Blackwell series on Economics and Philosophy with Dr Alan Hamlin, University o f Southampton.

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Economic History

Professor G D Snooks, joint editor, Australian Economic History Review, joint general editor, the Macmillan Economic History o f Southeast Asia·, executive member, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand; consulting editor,

Cambridge Economic History o f Australia·, consultant to the Australian Academy o f Science, Environmental Science Project for Schools; member, board o f advisers, History o f Global Change Project (USA).

Economics

Professor P F Apps, Report for D ept of Health, Housing, Local Govt and Community Services on home ownership.

D r S Dowrick, associate editor, Journal o f Industrial Economics, consultant, Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet, Prices Surveillance Authority, and Office o f Economic Planning Advisory Council; treasurer, ACT Branch,

Economic Society o f Australia; referee, American Economic Review, Journal o f Economic Literature, Journal o f Industrial Economics, Canadian Journal o f Economics, International Journal o f Industrial

Organisation, Australian Economic Papers, Oxford Economic Papers, Australian Economic Review, Economica, Policy, Prometheus, Economic Record Review o f Economics and Statistics, European Economic Review.

D r S Grant, referee, Economic Record Information Economics and Policy, Journal o f Economic Behaviour and Organisation, Australian Economic Papers, Australian Journal o f Marketing and Agricultural Economics.

Professor R G Gregory, board member, Reserve Bank of Australia, Australian Institute of Family Studies; principal consultant, Aged Care Review and Nursing H om e Funding Review, Department o f Health, Housing & Community Services; member, Task force on Employment Opportunities, Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet; research associate, National Instimte o f Labour Studies; joint organiser, PhD Conference in Economics and Business with the University o f Western Australia; associate editor, Labour

Economics, member, Editorial Board, Economic and Labour Relations Review.

Professor F H Gmen, chair, Advisory Committee, Bureau ofTourism Research, Economic Priorities Advisory Committee o f the ACT, External Panel of Review, Australian Instimte ofFamily Studies, Remuneration Tribunal; Consultant, O E C D on Australia’s anti-dumping policies.

Mr T Karmel, referee, Economic Record consultant with D r F Vella, Department o f Employment, Education & Training (Credentialism).

Professor A R Pagan, member, Retirement Incomes Modelling Task Force, Commonwealth Treasury; consultant, Commonwealth Treasury (TRYM Model), Economic Planning Advisory Council (Unemployment Models), New Zealand Reserve Bank (Inflation forecasting); co-editor, Journal o f Applied Econometrics, editorial board,

Economic Record Handbook o f Applied Econometrics, Kluwer Series in Computational Economics and Cambridge University Press Series on Modern Themes in Econometrics; Fellows Nominating Committee, the Econometric Society.

Professor J Pitchford, lectures on ’Developments in Macroeconomics’, Economic and Fiscal Analysis Branch, Department of Finance; associate editor, Journal o f Population Economics.

Federalism Research Centre

Dr P Forsyth, member, National Grid Management Council, Consultative Working Group.

Professor B Galligan, council member, Constitutional Centenary Foundation; director, International Association of Centres for Federal Studies; member, Economics and Management Faculty Advisory Committee, Queensland University o f Technology; editorial board, Griffith Law Review and Deakin Monograph Series in Public Policy and Administration; consultant, Coastal Zone Inquiry, Resource Assessment Commission.

History

Professor P Bourke, president, Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia; president, Australian Historical Association; chair, committee o f review of the Department o f History, Monash University; chair, committee of review o f the Discipline o f Politics, Flinders University;

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member, Steering Committee, Australian Research Council Project on Research Funding Bases; member, Steering Committee, Australian Research Council Project on Publication Indicators; member, Management Committee, ARC Project on Indicators for the Review o f the

Institute o f Advanced Snidies.

Professor K S Inglis, member, Conseil Scientifique, Centre de Recherche de l’HistoriaJ de la G rande Guerre, Peronne; chair, editorial

advisory board to official history o f Australia’s involvement in southeast Asian conflicts 1948-1975; member, directing group, T om b of Unknown Soldier project, Australian W ar Memorial.

D r F B Smith, associate, Official History Unit, Australia in the Vietnam War, Australian W ar Memorial; Executive Committee o f the Australian Society o f the History of Medicine.

History o f Ideas

Professor E Kamenka, chair, Ethics Committee, IVF Program, John James Memorial Hospital; president, Australian Society o f Legal Philosophy; executive member, International Association for Philosophy o f Law and Social Philosophy (IVR); member, Editorial Advisory Board, International Marx Engels Foundation (IMES); vice-president, International Society for Universalism (Warsaw).

Professor J Passmore, general editor, continuing publication o f the collected works o f Bertrand Russell; member, International Institute o f Philosophy.

D r N Rupke, editorial adviser, Isis (Oxford).

Humanities Research Centre

Professor G W Clarke, member, Council o f the Australian Institute of Archeology in Athens; treasurer, Australian Academy o f the Humanities; member, sub-committees on publications,

finance, languages and library, Australian Academy o f the Humanities; member, National Com mittee o f the Arthur Boyd Australian Centre in Italy; member, advisory boards, Mediterranean Archeology, New Documents Illustrating Early

Christianity, member, higher degrees committee, Canberra Instim te of the Arts; member, selection committee for Harold W hite Fellowships, National Library o f Australia.

Law

Professor J B Braithwaite, council member, Australian Consumers’ Association; part-time commissioner, Trade Practices Commission; consultant, Commonwealth Department of

Health, Housing and Community Services; consultant, Australian Law Reform Commission; consultant, National Road Transport Commission; consultant, OECD; member, NSW

Police Education Advisory Council; chair, NSW Police Research Advisory Council; member, Advisory Committee, Institute o f Criminology, University o f Sydney; member, editorial board,

Criminology Australia; member, editorial board, Contemporary Sociology, member, editorial advisory board, Law and Policy, member, International Advisory Board, British Journal o f

Criminology, series editor, Reshaping Australian Institutions, Cambridge University Press; series editor, Sydney Instimte o f Criminology Monograph series; member, editorial board, Journal o f Regulatory Law and Practice, Law and

Society Review, member editorial committee, Australian Studies in Law, Crime andJustice, member, editorial board, Crime and Society series, Westview Press; board member, Research Committee on Crime and Social Control,

International Sociological Association; vice-president, Australian and New Zealand Society o f Criminology; member, editorial board,

InternationalJournal ofthe Sociology o f Law, Australian and New Zealand Journal o f Criminology, member, editorial advisory board, Law and Social Incjuiry.

Professor P D Finn, member, Advisory Board, Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies, University o f Melbourne; consultant, Chair Selection Committees, Law Faculty, University o f

Melbourne; external examiner, Law School, University o f Hong Kong; editor, Essay Series, Law Book Company; public officer, Constitutional Centenary Foundation; consultant, N SW Department of Premier and Cabinet, W A Inc Royal Commission, Queensland Electoral and Administrative Review Commission, Unidroit, Australian National Audit Office; invited submissions to some number of Commonwealth and State Parliamentary Committees.

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Philosophy

Professor R E Goodin, co-editor, journal o f Political Philosophy, editor, book series on ’Theories o f Institutional Design’, Cambridge University Press; consulting editor, Australasian Journal o f Philosophy, member, editorial boards,

British Journal o f Political Science, Ethics, Journal o f Public Policy, Political Studies, Human Rights Quarterly, The Responsive Community; member (Australian representative), executive committee, Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics; member, Founding Board, Committee on the Political Economy o f the Good Society (PEGS); member, advisory board, Centre for Philosophy & the Environment, University o f Manchester, UK; program chair & ex officio member Executive Committee, International Political Science Association.

Professor F C Jackson, consulting editor, Australasian Journal o f Philosophy, international adviser, Mind, chair, council of Australasian Association o f Philosophy, subject editor, Routledge

Encyclopedia o f Philosophy.

D r M Smith, member, editorial boards, Journal o f Political Philosophy, Australasian Journal o f Philosophy.

Politics

Professor B Hindess, associate editor, Journal of Political Philosophy; member, editorial board, Australian and New ZealandJournal o f Sociology, Politics, member, editorial advisory board, Culture

and Policy, Sociological Inquiry, and Thesis Eleven, panel member, Australian-Asian Perceptions Project, Academy o f the Social Sciences in Australia

Professor T H Rigby, international editorial consultant to Journal Europe-Asia Studies, member, editorial board o f Australian Slavonic and East European Studies, member, International Affairs Commission, General Synod o f Anglican

Church in Australia.

Sociology

D r M D R Evans, elected board member, Research Committee on Social Stratification and Mobility, International Sociological Association; principal organiser, international conference,

Research Committee on Social Stratification, Australia.

Professor F L Jones, chair, Australian Consortium of Social and Political Research (Inc) (ACSPRI); member, advisory committee o f the National Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health; member, editorial Board, International Journal o f Sociology and Social Research.

Dr J Kelley, member, editorial board, InternationalJournal o f Public Opinion Research.

Dr T Makkai, consultant, Commonwealth Department o f Health, Housing and Local Government.

Dr G Marks, consultant, Higher Education Research Grants Analysis, Research Policy Section, Higher Education Divison, Department of Employment, Education and Training.

Social Sciences Data Archives

Dr R G Jones, treasurer, Australian Consortium for Social and Political Research Incorporated (ACSPRI); regional secretary, International Association for Social Science Information Service

and Technology (IASSIST); council member, International Federation of Data Organisations (IFDO); member, Australian Council o f Archives Electronic Records Committee; consultant, Department of Defence, study o f ethnicity in the Australian Defence Force; consultant, Graduate

Careers Council o f Australia on factors affecting graduate employment outcomes; consultant, Department of Employment, Education and Training, Year 12 completions; consultant, Australian Construction Services on Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander housing needs assessment project, Stage 2; consultant, Office o f Multicultural Affairs on a sample survey of selected potential non-English speaking

background legal aid client groups; consultant, Department of Health, Housing, Local Government and Community Services for analyses o f the NCADA 1993 National Household Survey; Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA) advisory group; Alcohol Misuse and Violence Symposium

consultancies steering committees; assistance to the ATSIC Funding Formula Steering Committee in assessing tenders.

C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o t h e r p u b lic institutions

M r E V Merrill, secretary, Australian Consortium for Social and Political Research Incorporated; member, executive committee o f the Australian Association for Social Research.

Urban Research and Compliance Programs

D r V Braithwaite, chair, Australian Institute o f Criminology Ethics Committee, member, Aged Care Advisory Council o f ACT.

Professor M Neutze, member, Australian Statistics Advisory Council; member, Advisory Group, Australian U rban and Regional Development

Review; member, editorial board, Government and Policy; reviewed Assessment o f Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Housing Needs, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Commission; advised A CT Electricity and Water on W ater Pricing in ACT.

D r D Lamberton, conference chair, Tenth Biennia] International Conference o f International Telecommunications Society, Sydney; coorganiscr 1993 STEP (Science, Technology and Economic Progress)

Collaborative Inter-University PhD Program, University o f Wollongong, and APROS (Asian-Pacific Researchers in Organisational Smdies) Fifth Colloquium, East-West Centre, Honolulu, 1993; co-editor, Information Economics and Policy, and general editor, Prometheus, member, editorial boards, Telecommunications

Policy, Economics o f Innovation and New Technology, Intelligent Environments, Futures Research Quarterly.

D r P Grabosky, member, editorial board, Australian a nd New Zealand Journal o f Criminology, chair, Scientific Com mittee for the 8th International Symposium on Victimology;

member, advisory committee, Sydney University Institute o f Criminology; consultant, Australian Law Reform Commission for its reference on Compliance w ith the Trade Practices Act, National Road Transport Commission on compliance w ith road transport laws; assisted School o f Justice Administration, Griffith

University.

Ms A-M Jordens, member, Com munity Education Sub-Committee, Torture Rehabilitation and Network Service Act inc.

(TRANSACT).

Professor P Troy, member, International Advisory Board, Policy and Politics, member, ACOSS Advisory Committee on Urban and Regional Development.

Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering

Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories

Professor] H Carver, chair, United Nations Scientific and Technical Sub-Committee, Peaceful Uses o f Outer Space; member, National Committee, Solar-Terrestrial Space Physics; director, AUSPACE; director, ANUTECH Pty

ltd .

Professor R W Crompton, executive member, Board, Australian Journals o f Scientific Research; president, Australian Institute o f Physics; vice-president, Australian Fulbright Association.

D r B R Lewis, associate editor, Journal o f Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, member, International Advisory Board, International Conferences on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics.

Professor E Weigoid, secretary, (Physical Sciences), Australian Academy o f Science; chair, Editorial Board, Australian Journal o f Physics, associate director. Electronic Structure of

Materials Centre, Flinders University o f South Australia; member, National Committee for Spectroscopy.

Dr L A Woolf, member, ACT Radiation Council.

Computer Sciences Laboratory

D rT R J Bossomaier, A CT representative and convener, ACT Section o f Australian Occam and Transputer User Group.

Professor R P Brent, international coordinator, ACM Special Interest Group on Numerical Mathematics; member, Advisory Board of

Software Verification Research Centre at University o f Queensland; editor, Advances in

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Computer Science, regional editor, Parallel Processing Letters·, editorial board, International Journal on High Speed Computing.

D r I D G Macleod, editorial board, Communication Outlook.

D r J B Millar, editorial boards, Speech Communication and Journal o f British Voice Association, central coordinating committee, Speech Databases and Assessment; convener, CO COS DA International Working Group on Speech Corpora and Labelling, secretary, Australian Speech Science and Technology Association; chair, ASSTA National Spoken

Language Database Committee.

Department o f Electronic Materials Engineering

Professor N H Fletcher, chair, Antarctic Science Advisory Committee; visitor, Cooperative Research Centre for Molecular Engineering and Cooperative Research Centre for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology; Editor-in-Chief, Acoustics Australia) chair, Project Committee, Australian Academy o f Science primary-school science project ‘Primary Investigations’; member, Advisory Committee, Acoustics and Vibration

Centre, Australian Defence Force Academy; member, Program Advisory Committee, Applications o f Nuclear Physics, ANSTO; member, Editorial Advisory Committees, international journals Acustica and Applied Acoustics, member, Research Committee,

University o f Canberra.

D r C Jagadish, vice-chair, IEEE ACT section; chair, IEEE Australian Joint Chapter of Electron Devices Society and Lasers & Electro-Optics Society.

D r C Jagadish and Professor J S Williams, member, Scientific Advisory Committee, Australian Com pound Optoelectronics Materials

and Devices Conference.

D r M C Ridgway, member, Investigative Committee formulating a proposal for the creation o f a Materials Science Centre at the Australian National University.

Professor J S Williams, member, Boardman Major Equipment Committee; member, Board o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies; member,

Program Advisory Committee, Applications o f Nuclear Physics, ANSTO; member, editorial board, Radiation Effects and Defects in Solids and Vacuum TA1P, member, International Advisory Committee, Ion Beam Analysis and Ion Implantation Equipment and Techniques conference series; member, International Materials Research Society Committee; president, Australian Materials Research Society.

Energy Research Centre

Dr K V Garzoli, vice-chair for Australasia, Horticultural Engineering Commission, International Society for Horticultural Science; chair, Greenhouse Construction Commission, Horticultural Engineering Commission, International Society for Horticultural Science; member, Rural Research council (Dried Fruits).

Professor S Kaneff, director, International Solar Energy Society; joint editor, Current Practices in Energy Resources and Technology.

Mr T Lee, editor, Solar Progress (incorporating South Wind)·, director, Australian and New Zealand Solar Energy Society.

Dr R A Marshall, adviser, IAP Research (USA) o f electromagnetic launch technology.

Laser Physics Centre

Professor L T Chadderton, editor, International Journal Radiation Effects and Dejects in Solids (formerly Radiation Effects)·, member, editorial advisory board o f the following international journals: Journal o f the Physics and Chemistry o f

Solids, Nuclear Tracks and Radiation Measurement, International Materials Science Forum, Thin Films, member, steering committee, Bilateral Science & Technology Agreement, Mexico and the Federal Government of Australia; member, committee for Solar Photovoltaic Cell Development, DITAC.

Dr K Baldwin, president, Australian Optical Society, member, Science Policy Committee, Australian Institute o f Physics; member, Australasian Council on Quantum Electronics; member, the National Committee for Physics, Australian Academy o f Science; representative of

the Australian Institute o f Physics, Board, Federation o f Australian Scientific and Technological Society; vice-president, FASTS; member, Organising Committee, International

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Q uantum Electronics Conference ’96; member, Australian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy Liaison Committee.

D r N Manson, chair, organising committee, International Conference for Dynamical Processes in Excited States o f Solids.

Professor B Luther-Davies, member, Organising Committee, International Q uantum Electronics Conference ’96; member, Australian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy Liaison Committee.

Department o f Nuclear Physics

Professor G D Dracoulis, member, Program Advisory Committee, International Conference, T he Future o f Nuclear Spectroscopy 1993; member, International Advisory Committee

Conference, Physics with Large Gamma-Ray Detector Arrays, 1994; co-organiser Nuclear Physics/Particle Physics section, AIP Congress 1994; chair, NUPP; member, joint UK/ANU panel advising U K Nuclear Physics Committee on use of A N U facilities.

D r D F Hebbard, chair, ACT Radiation Council.

D r L K Fifield, co-chair, 6th International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, 1993; guest editor, Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

Professor J O Newton, member, Academy of Science Forum on Science and Industry.

Professor T R O phel, member, Council of Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering.

D r A E Stuchbery, member, Committee ACT branch, Australian Institute o f Physics.

Optical Sciences Centre

D r T J H ine, consultant, Department of Information Technology, CSIRO.

D r J D Love, fellow, Australian Photonics Cooperative Research Centre; member, Organising Committee, 18th Australian

Conference on Optical Communications, Wollongong; director, Siemens Years 9-10 Science School, ANU; conference vice-chair, 10th

International Conference on Integrated Optics & Optical Fibre Communications, H ong Kong, June 1995.

Professor A W Snyder, associate director, Australian Photonics Cooperative Research Centre; member, editorial board, Pure and Applied Optics·, invited editor, Prentice Hall

International series in Optical Electronics.

Plasma Research Laboratory

D r R W Boswell, member, Consultative Committee, Seventh Gaseous Electronics Meeting, Sorrento; joint chair, International Workshop on Plasma Processing, Melbourne;

member, Editorial Board, UK Institute o f Physics journal Plasma Sources Science and Technology; member, Organizing Committee, 2nd

International Conference on Reactive Plasmas and 11th Symposium on Plasma Processing, Japan 1993; member, Program Committee, Symposium o f the American Vacuum Society,

USA 1993; Vice-President, Australian-French Association o f Professional and Technical Specialists.

Professors S M Hamberger and R L Dewar, members, Executive Committee, Stellarator Concept, International Energy Agency.

Professor S M Hamberger, member, International Advisory Committee, Plasma Physics Conferences.

Department of Systems Engineering

Professor B D O Anderson, director, Nucleus Ltd; president, International Federation o f Automatic Control (IFAC); member, Theory Committee o f IFAC; member, CRA Scientific

Australian Advisory Committee; member, Prime Minister’s Science and Engineering Council; member, Cooperative Research Centres Committee; member, editorial board, Journal o f

Multidimensional Systems and Signal Processing, Optimal Control Applications and Methods, International Journal o f Adaptive Signal Processing, International Journal ofRobust and Nonlinear

Control, book series of Systems and Control Foundations and Applications.

D r R R Bitmead, Director, Cooperative Research Centre for Robust and Adaptive Systems; chair, Mathematics o f Control Committee o f IFAC;

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chair, IF AC Subcommittee, National Committee for Automatic Control and Instrumentation, Institutions o f Engineers, Australia; member, I FAC Technical Board; editor, International Journal o f Adaptive Control and Signal Processing,

associate editor, Automatica.

D r M Green, associate editor, System and Control Letters, member, editorial board, International Journal o f Robust a nd Nonlinear Control

D r R A Kennedy, associate editor, Adaptive Control and Signal Processing.

D r I Μ Y Mareels, associate editor, Systems and Control Letters, Automation, Adaptive Control and Adaptive Estimation, reviewer, Mathematical Reviews, International Program Committee of SYSID 1994 10th IFAC Symposium on System Identification.

Professor J B Moore, chair, International Federation o f Automatic Control Young Author Papier Award Committee; member, IFAC Technical Committee ofTheoty; associate editor,

Springer Verlag Industrial Control Series, Systems and Control Letters.

D r R C Williamson, member, ACT schools accreditation panel.

Department o f Theoretical Physics

Professor R J Baxter, member, Editorial Board, Journal o f Physics A: Mathematical and General, Journal o f Geometric and Functional Analysis, member, International Advisory Committee, 19th

International Conference on Statistical Mechanics, Xiamen, China 1995; convener, South East Australian Statistical Mechanics Meeting, Canberra 1993.

D r V V Bazhanov, convener, South East Australian Statistical Mechanics Meeting, Canberra 1993.

Professor W A Coppiel, member, Advisory Board, Dynamics Reported.

D r Μ P Das, convener, Gordon-Godfrey Condensed M atter Workshop, Computational Methods for Novel Condensed Matter Systems, Sydney 1993; member, Editorial Board,

Condensed Matter and Materials Communications.

Dr A J Davies, casual science correspondent, JJJ national ABC radio network.

Professor R L Dewar, president, AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in Magnetically Confined Plasmas, Canberra 1993; member, ACT Branch Committee, Australian Institute o f Physics.

Dr H J Gardner, secretary, AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in Magnetically Confined Plasmas, Canberra 15)93; secretary, Computational Techniques and Applications Conference, Canberra 1993.

Dr K Kumar, member, Editorial Board, Transport Theory and Statistical Mechanics.

Dr B A Robson, member, International Advisory Committee, 5th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions, Taormina, Italy 1994; member, A CT Branch Committee, Australian Institute o f Physics.

Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies

Dr G Bloschl, member, International Association of Hydrological Sciences; member, American Geophysical Union; member, European Geophysical Society; convener, AIH Workshop on non inverse groundwater model calibration techniques; convener, Workshop on scaling in hydrology.

Dr V A Brown, Public Health Committee, National Health and Medical Research Council; member, Advisory Committees of the Institute o f Environmental Studies, University o f New South Wales; Master o f Science in Health Policy, School of Health Systems Sciences, Latrobe University; member, Expert Advisory Group on Environment and Development for Fourth World Conference on Women, Beijing; consumer representative on local Government Environment Round Table; consultant, Resources Assessment Commission Coastal Zone Inquiry, Melbourne City Council, Department o f Environment Sport and Territories, and Office o f Local Government.

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C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o th e r p u b lic institutions

Dr A W Claridge, member, Federal Long-footed Potoroo Recovery Team and N ew South Wales Long-footed Potoroo Steering Committee; scientific adviser, Victorian Long-footed Potoroo

Recovery Team; consultant and adviser, New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service; consultant, Australian Nature Conservation Agency; adviser, Victorian D epartm ent o f

Conservation and Natural Resources; adviser, State Forests o f N ew South Wales; co-convener, in a session, Ecological Society o f Australia’s Annual Meeting.

M r M S Com m on, Reader, D epartm ent o f Environmental Economics and Environmental Management, University o f York; member, International Society for Ecological Economics; member, W orking Group III Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

D r FI C Coombs, member, Board o f the Howard Florey Institute o f Experimental Physiology and Medicine; member, Board o f the Aboriginal Law Research Unit, University o f New South Wales; visiting fellow, N orth Australia Research U nit and

Macquarie University; member, Conference on Constitutional Review, convened by Universities o f Sydney and Melbourne, and consultant to

Commonwealth Law Reform Commission on constitutional reform.

D r J B Dargavel, chair, Tropical Forest History W orking G roup o f International U nion o f Forest Research Organisations.

M r S Dovers, member, Commonwealth Environment Protection Authority Advisory Com mittee o f State of the Environment Reporting member, Environment Institute of

Australia Journal working group, editorial board, Australian Journal o f Environmental Management.

D r F Ghassemi, member, International Association o f Hydrogeologists; member, International W ater Resources Association; member, Environment Institute o f Australia;

member, Simulation Society o f Australia; member, Canberra Hydrological Society; collaborator, Australian Geological Survey Organisation (formerly Bureau o f Mineral

Resources), W estern Australian Department of Agriculm re and the Western Australian Geological Survey.

M r P M Hancock, Fellow, Australasian Institute o f M ining and Metallurgy; member, Mineral

Industry Consultants Association; member, International Association o f Engineering Geologists; adviser to the Australian Academy of Science on environmental science textbook for secondary schools; consultant, Downer Mining

Ltd (New Zealand) on the valuation o f mineral resources.

D r J W Handmer, member Australian Committee for the United Nations International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR), representing the interests o f the

research community; member, Research Grant Committee for the IDNDR; member, Australian Delegation to the ID N D R W orld Conference; Senior Associate of the Flood Hazard Research

Centre, Middlesex University, London; Visitor, Natural Hazards Centre, University o f Colorado, Boulder; member, National Flood Warning W orking Party, Australian Emergency Management Institute; member, Canberra

Hydrological Society; Consultant to National Capital Planning Authority, NSW Public Works Department, Bureau of Meteorology, Emergency

Management Australia; International Council of Scientific Unions/International Geographical Union; European Union (via Middlesex University) on flood warnings; Australian

representative, International Geographical Union (IGU) W orking Group on mega-cities and disasters; member, Advisory Panel for the Disaster Management Centre, University o f New England; member, Institute of Australian Geographers;

member, Australian Institute of International Affairs; member, International Research Committee on Disasters; member, A CT Flood

Planning Committee.

Dr M F Hutchinson, consultant for Potsdam Instimte for Climate Impact Research; International Laboratory for Research into Animal Diseases (ILRAD), Nairobi; International

Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan; United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), Nairobi; EROS Data Centre, United States

Geological Survey, Sioux Falls; Texas A&M University; Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI); member, Working Group Focus 4, Weather Generator, o f BAHC/IGBP; CSIRO

Division ofW ater Resources, Canberra; CSIRO Division o f Atmospheric Physics; Bureau of Rural Resources, Canberra, Queensland Department of Primaiy Industries.

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D r A J Jakeman, Fellow, Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, associate editor, Journal o f Forecasting, member, editorial board, Ecological Modelling, Environmetrics, and Environmental Software, president, Modelling and Simulation Society o f Australia; member o f the Board o f Directors, International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (I MACS); I MACS Technical Committee on Modelling and Simulation of Environmental Systems; member, executive, Clean Air Society of Australia and New Zealand (ACT Branch); member, American Geophysical Union; convener, International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, 1993; convener, AIDAB W orkshop on Climate Impact Assessment Methods for Asia and the Pacific, 1993; member, Scientific Committee, International Conference on Environmetrics, 1994; member, International Program Committee, IEEE Conference on Systems, M an and Cybernetics, 1993; research collaborator with CSIRO Divisions o f W ater Resources and Atmospheric Research; Centre for W ater Research and Department o f Economics, University o f Western Australia; Institute o f Hydrology (UK) and Department o f Environmental Sciences, University o f Virginia.

D r D B Lindenmayer, member, Australian Ecological Society; member, Australian Mammal Society; member, Australian Institute ofBiology, member, Australasian Wildlife Management Society; member, IUCN /SSC Australasian Marsupials and Monotremes Sptecialist Group; principal member, Leadbeater’s Possum Forest Management Committee; consultant, Melbourne W ater Corporation and Victorian Department of

Conservation and Natural Resources; consultant, Melbourne W ater Corporation, Australian Nature Conservation Agency, State Forests o f NSW, NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service.

Professor I D Moore, adjunct Professor o f Geography, D epartment o f Earth Sciences, Montana State University, USA; Director, W ater Research Foundation o f Australia Ltd; member, editorial board, Hydrological Processes·, consultant for Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research; Department o f the Arts,

Spjort, the Environment, Tourism and Territories; collaborator with CSIRO Division o f Water Resources, Canberra; CSIRO Division o f Soils, Canberra; D epartment o f Civil and Agricultural Engineering, The University o f Melbourne; the University o f South Australia, Charles Sturt

University, Canberra University; Queensland Department o f Primary Industries, Toowoomba; Forestry Commission o f NSW, Sydney; USDA-Agriculrural Research Service, Tucson; Environment and Risks Department, Bureau o f Geological and Mineral Research (BRGM), France; Forestry Canada; member, American Geophysical Union; member, Soil and Water Conservation Society; member, American Society of Civil Engineers; member, American Society of Agricultural Engineers; member, American Institute Hydrology; member, Hydrological Society o f Canberra.

Professor H A Nix, Fellow, Australian Institute o f Agricultural Science; member, National Committee for the Environment, Australian Academy o f Science; member, management

committee, Edith and Joy London Foundation, ANU; member, National Committee for Quaternary Research, Australian Academy o f Science; member, Australian National Committee for Man and the Biosphere Program, UNESCO; member, Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union; member, International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP) Coordinating Panel on the Effects o f Climate Change on Terrestrial Ecosystems; Director, Water Research Foundation o f Australia Ltd; member, Australian Society o f Soil Science; member, Ecological Society o f Australia; member, ANU Advisory Committee on Forestry Education; chair, Program Advisory Committee, Commonwealth Climate Impact Assessment and Management Program (COMCLAM); adviser, National Population Council’s Inquiry into Population Issues and Australia’s Future; member, Organizing Committee, Joint Academies Symptosium on Land Use/Land Use Cover;

member, National Tidal Facility Project co-ordinating Committee for the South Pacific Sea Level and Climate Monitoring Project; chair, Advisory Committee, Australian Botanic Gardens Australian Network for Plant Conservation;

member, Planning Group, Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS); member, Content Review Committee, National Museum o f Australia; member, Scientific Advisory Board,

International Congress on Modelling and Simulation; member, Advisory Committee, CSIRO Science Education Project ‘Conservation of the Richmond Birdwing butterfly’.

Dr T W Norton, secretary and executive councillor, Ecological Society of Australia (ESA);

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advice and cooperative work with Australian Museum, N SW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Museum o f Victoria, D epartm ent o f Conservation and Natural Resources, Victoria,

Department o f Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia, Departm ent of Parks, Wildlife and Heritage, Tasmania, Forestry Commission o f Tasmania; Australian Conservation Foundation; Commonwealth Department o f the Environment, Sport and Territories.

D r H Ross, member, Awards Committee, International Association for Impact Assessment. Consultancy for Tangentyere Aboriginal Council; Associate Director, National Thai Studies Centre.

M r D I Smith, editorial panel, Applied Geography; advise and cooperative work with A C T Electricity & Water, Public Works Department and Department ofW ater Resources,

N SW (including Working Party on Flood Insurance) and Australian Counter Disaster College; all in the area of flood damage assessment, and with Department o f Primary

Industry and Resources and D epartm ent o f Agriculture N SW in studies o f Commonwealth and State drought relief policy. Australian

representative International Geographical Union, Study G roup on Environmental Change in Karst Areas.

D r J A Taylor, secretary, Modelling and Simulation Society o f Australia; president, Clean Air Society o f Australia and N ew Zealand (ACT Branch); member, Australian Scientific

Com mittee for the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program; member, United Nations Scientific Advisory Com mittee for

Terrestrial Ecosystem M onitoring and Assessment; member, United States University Corporation for Atmospheric Research International Affiliates Program; invited expert,

N A TO Advanced Study Institute on the Global Carbon Cycle; visiting scientist, United States National Centre for Atmospheric Research; member, American Geophysical Union Advisory

Com mittee for Australia and New Zealand; member, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, W orking Groups I and II review panels; adviser, T he National Science and Technology Centre.

Humanities Research Centre

Professor G W Clarke, member, Council o f the Australian Institute of Archaeology in Athens; treasurer, Australian Academy of the Humanities;

member, sub-committees on publications, finance, travel grants, languages and library, Australian Academy of the Humanities; member,

Consultative Committee o f the Four Academies; member, Libraries’ Committee o f the Consultative Committee o f the Four Academies; member, National Committee o f the Arthur Boyd Australian Centre in Italy; member, advisory

boards o f Mediterranean Archaeology, and of New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity; member, higher degrees committee, Canberra Institute o f the Arts; member, selection committee for Harold W hite Fellowships for the National Library of Australia; member, Selection Committee for Fulbright awards; member,

Management Board of Scholarly Editions Centre, AD FA.

Faculty of Arts

M r D Adams, member, Politics Accreditation Panel o f the ACT Education Department.

D r C Allen, Co-editor, Australian Journal o f Linguistics.

D r A Andrews, member, Editorial Board, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory.

D r R Attenborough, member, Advisory Board for Journal o f Human Ecology.

D r J A Ballard, member, Commonwealth AIDS Research Grants Committee and ACT HIV/AIDS-Related Legislation Review

Committee; consultant, PNG Government on HIV/AIDS policy.

Mr R W Barnes, member, Religious Smdies accrediting panel, ACT Board o f Senior School Smdies; member, School of Religion and Philosophy, (ACT Division) Advisory

Committee, Australian Catholic University.

Dr P Bellwood, editor, Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association Bulletin.

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D r D Blaazer, member, History panel o f A C T Board of Senior Secondary Studies; editor, Australian Historical Association Bulletin; member, AHA executive.

D r P Boddington, member, Departmental Ethics Committee o f Department o f Health, Housing, Local Government and Community Services.

D r G J Borny, member, Drama Accreditation Panel, ACT Department of Education.

D r G Bowen, treasurer, Australian and New Zealand American Studies Association.

D r N Brown, member, A CT Schools Authority, Australian Studies Curriculum Development Panel; Assistant Editor, Australian Historical Association Bulletin, member, AHA executive.

D r P T Brown, member, ΝΑΑ'Π French Panel; co-opted member, School Board, Telopea Park School (Lycee Franco-Australien); member, National Panel for French Government postgraduate scholarships awards.

D r O Dent, member, Medical Workforce Advisorv Committee o f the Royal Australasian College o f Physicians; member, Commonwealth AIDS Research Grants Committee (CARG); chair, CARG Social Science Research Grants Assessors Group; member, National Health and Medical Research Council Panel o f Independent Assessors; Research Grants Assessor, Health and Community Services Research and Development Grants Program; Research Grants Assessor, National D m g Crime Prevention Fund; chair,

then Member, A C T Cancer Society Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee; research affiliate, Department o f Surgery, T he University of Sydney; member, Committee of the Australian Gastroenterology Institute; member, Steering Committee for N H & M RC consultance on social, economic and environmental impact assessment o f revised guidelines for lead in blood and lead in air; member, Ethics Committee o f the Department o f Health, Housing, Local Government and Community Services; member, A C T Cancer Regulations Advisory Committee, A C T Health.

D r G Gray, member, A CT Women’s Consultative Council; member, Board o f Family PlanningACT; member, A CT W om en’s Health Advisory Committee; member, Steering

Committee o f Australian Women’s Health Network.

Mr I Green, consultant, Aboriginal community groups including Marranunggu W hite Eagle Association.

Dr C Gregory, member, editorial board, Man.

Professor M Greenhalgh, consultant, DEET.

Dr A D Grishin, member, Australian National Committee of the Comite International d’Histoire de l’Art; member, Australian National Committee o f the Australian Association for Byzantine Studies.

Dr C Groves, consultant on Orangs for Western Plains Zoo and provided occasional identifications for ACS; member, Editorial Board, International Journal o f Primatology, Cyptozoology, Zoological Research, and Oryx.

Mr G J Halligan, member, French Panel, ACT Board o f Senior Secondary Studies.

Dr J Hcffernan, consultant, Canberra Archaeological Society; member o f the Heritage Council o f the A CT and its Standing Committees for Aboriginal Heritage, the Heritage Registers, Heritage Objects and Heritage Grants.

Dr K Holmes, member, editorial board, Australian Feminist Studies.

Dr A Hyslop, member, Transitional Executive o f NTEU (ACT); Treasurer, Australian Historical Association, Representative on Editorial Board, Australian Historical Studies.

Mr P R Ireland; chair, ΝΑΑΠ Russian Panel; deputy chair, NAAIT, A CT Regional Advisory Committee.

Dr I Keen, gave evidence at the Jawoyn (Gimbat Area) Land Claim.

Dr D H Kelly, member, History accrediting panel, A CT Board o f Senior School Smdies.

Mr T Kirkpatrick, member, Committee Adult Literacy and Basic Education Program, ACT.

D rJ Knott, member, Editorial Board, The Push: A Journal o f Early Australian Social History.

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Dr R Kuhn, convener, International Political Science Association Study Group.

Dr B V Lai, interim chair, Pacific Manuscripts Bureau; member, Editorial Board, University of Hawaii Press’ Pacific Island Monograph Series; Corresponding editor, The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal o f Island Affairs.

D r DLee, consultant, Deakin University for production o f book on Australian Defence Policy.

D r A Liddicoat, editor, Australian Revieu> o f Applied Linguistics; representative for A C T node o f NLLIA’s Child Literacy and ESI. Research Network.

D r M Lyon, member, Editorial Board, Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness.

Professor I McBryde, member, Editorial Board for Aboriginal History, member o f the Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Committee (NSW); member, Technical and Scientific Advisory C om m ittee for the W illandra Lakes World Heritage Area; consulted as a Key Informant for the Evaluation o f the Heritage Protection Policy of ATSIC; in collaboration with Robert Paton and Vlad Potezny conducted field work at the M t William greenstone quarry in Victoria for the Department o f Aboriginal Affairs.

D r M McKinley, lectures and presentations, Joint Services Staff College, the Royal Australian Naval Staff College, the N SW Premier’s Department Senior Executive Residential Program.

D r C Macknight, member, Board o f Aboriginal History.

D r C M Mayrhofer, member, Latin accrediting panel, ACT Board of Senior School Studies.

Mrs J Mayrhofer, Co-opted member, School Board of Telop>ea Park School (Lycee Franco-Australien); member, Council o f the Modern Language Teachers’ Association o f the ACT.

D r A Milner, member, Australia’s Asian Context Committee o f the Australian Research Council; member, Research Committee, Australian

Institute o f International Affairs.

D r G Moliterno, member, Italian Embassy Com mittee for award of Italian Government scholarships.

D r M A Moffatt, treasurer, Australian Association for Byzantine Studies and member of its Publications Committee; treasurer of A CT branch o f Museums Association; member, managerial committee o f Mediterranean Archaeology; member o f Advisory Panel of CAUT.

D r U Mosel, linguist adviser, Australian South Pacific Culture Fund.

Ms M-J M ountain, Assistant Editor, Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association; the Com mittee o f the Canberra Archaeological

Society and the Public Officer of the Australian Archaeological Association.

D r S Mugford, associate editor, International Journal on Drug Policy, internation co-chair, Drug Policy Foundation Conference, Washington DC (November meeting).

D r N Peterson, president, Australian Anthropological Society; consultant for the Northern Land Council; co-organised the ACFOA/ANU Seminar Series on Dilemmas of

Development.

D r J Pettman, member, Governing Council of the international Studies Association; member, Smdent Assistance Review Tribunal, Department of Education, Employment and Training.

Professor B M Rawson, member, Australian Research Council; chair, ARC Research Training and Careers Committee; member, W om en’s Employment, Education and Training Advisory Group; member, NSW Board o f Studies Syllabus Committee, History, Years 7-12.

D r P Read, chair, Aboriginal History, Curatorial Adviser, Australian Archives touring exhibition.

D r K Rensch, member, Editorial Board, Pacific Studies.

D r P Rose, consultant in matters o f Forensic Speaker identification.

D r D Rowland, secretary, ACT Division, Australian Association o f Gerentology; editor, Journal o f the Australian Population

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Association,xxsundl member, Australian Population Association.

D r L J Saha, vice-president, Research Committee on Sociology o f Education, International Sociological Association.

D r A Saikal, member (and occasional chair), National Advisory Committee on Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies; member, National Research Com mittee o f T he Australian Institute o f International Affairs; member, reference Committee o f the Department of Education and Training for the establishment of National Advisory Com mittee for Arabic and Middle

Eastern Studies; member, editorial boards o f Journal o f Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies and the Australian Journal o f International Affairs, president-elect o f the Australian Middle

Eastern Studies Association.

D r T Shop>en, reviews editor, Australian Review o f Applied Linguistics Member, ACT Schools Accrediting Agency.

D r M Simms, president, Australasian Political Studies Association.

D r M J Stoijar, vice-president, Australian Academy o f the Humanities.

D r N Thomas, co-editor o f History and Anthropology.

D r K Win die, member, N SW H SC Russian Examiners’ Committee; member, NAAIT Russian Panel.

M r 1 F H Wilson, member, Editorial Board, Australian Journal o f Chinese Affairs.

Faculty of Economics and Commerce

Department o f Commerce

M r S Brehaut, received research funds from the W ool Research and Development Corporation which enabled him to be involved, with several State and Commonwealth Goverment E)epartments, in a project associated with the sale o f raw wool by producers.

Mr R Clarke, consultant on a range o f issues including Electronic Data Interchange and data security to many agencies including Department of Health, Department o f the Arts and Administrative Services, Australian National Audit Office, Department ofTransport and Communications and the ACT Government.

Department o f Economic History

Dr Η M Boot, director o f several courses m n by ANUTECH for public servants.

Mr S Dodds, economic adviser to the Green Party.

Department o f Economics

Dr R Albon, comments on Qantas’s Submission to the National Competition Policy Review for Aviation, Repxm 5, 21, 26 April 1993; submission, National Competition Policy Review'.

Dr P Forsyth, appointed Grid Management Council, Consultative Working Group; consultant, Commonwealth Department of Tourism on Economics o f Tourism.

Dr M Harrison, commissioned paper industry Taskforce on Leadership and Management Skills chaired by David Karpin.

Dr C Jones, member, World Bank mission to Republic o f Kyrgyzstan to review external trade regime.

Mr B Smith, expert witness in mineral royalty hearing in the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory.

Dr R Tyers, consultant, LDC Trade Reform and Developed Country Labour Markets with R McDougal, CO P, Monash and R Falvey, ANU.

Department o f Statistics

D rT S Breusch, consultant, Bureau o f Transport and Communications Economics, Canberra, on Bulk Ship Loss Project.

D r T S Breusch & Dr J C Robertson, Econometric training course, Bureau o f Transport and Communications Economics, Canberra.

Dr R L Chambers, consultant, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, projects

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on farm financial performance and farm risk analysis; collaborative research with members of the same organisation.

M r R B Cunningham, statistical consultant, Australian Institute of Sport, high altitude training study; consultant psephologist, Australian

Broadcasting Corporation; consultant, Department o f Conservation and Natural Resources, Victoria.

Ms C F Donnelly, data analyst, D epartment o f Conservation and Natural Resources, Victoria; data analyst, A D EPT Software.

D r D F Nicholls, participant in evaluation o f the National Industry Extension Scheme for the Department o f Industry, Technology and Commerce; consultant in development o f a

model for the determination o f international student review, Department o f Employment, Education and Training; expert witness in two

cases in Federal Court of Australia.

D r T J O ’Neill, consultant, Federal Office o f Road Safety.

Faculty o f Engineering and Information Technology

Department o f Computer Science

D r C W Johnson, chair, Standards Australia subcommittee IT/9/22 (Programming Languages and their Environments); member, ACT

Information Technology Industry Training Council; member, Computing Discipline Advisory G roup Canberra Instimte o f Technology

D r B P Molinari, member, A C T Information Technology Industry Training Council.

D r A V Peterson, member, Com puting Studies Panel, A CT Board of Senior Secondary Studies.

Professor R B Stanton, Industry Research and Development Board; member, Information Technology Committee; member, Board o f ACT School o f Engineering.

Department of Engineering

D r A Blakers, President, A CT Branch and member, national committee, Australian and New Zealand Solar Energy Society; reviewer ofDPIE document Renewable Electricity for Australia by D r M Stevens for Solar Progress; co-presenter, series o f community workshops on retrofitting energy saving measures in houses; submission with P Lyons J obs in the Sun, to the House of Representatives Inquiry into Environmental Policies which Stimulate Employment Growth.

Associate Professor S Hall, Fellow, Institute of Engineers, Australia (IEAust); board member, Mechanical College, IEAust; representative (Canberra Division), Public Affairs, IEAust; convener and chair, Women in Engineering Group, Canberra Division IEAust; member, Canberra Division IEAust Committee; member, Course Assessment Panel, Engineering Education Australia, IEAust; member, Mechanical Discipline

Committee IEAust; member, Australian Federation o f University Women; member, Australian Instimte of Energy; member, American Society ofMechanical Engineers; member, Acoustical Society of America; member The

Combustion Institute; external academic on course advisory committee, Q U T School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, U C Q Mechanical Engineering Department.

D r J Kieffer and Dr I Μ Y Mareels, consultancy, the Australian Government Solicitor, Attorney-General’s Department, Review o f Analysis o f a Vehicle Accident Report Morris

Lonnie— v— The Commonwealth.

Faculty of Law

Professor P Alston, chair, United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; chair, Meeting o f the chairs of International Human Rights Courts,

Commissions and Committees, Vienna; Discrimination Commissioner for the ACT (on leave); Senior Legal Adviser to UNICEF, New York; member, National Advisory Committee on

Discrimination in Employment and Occupation; member, Advisory Group on Children’s Rights, International Child Development Centre, Florence; member, Advisory Group on Women’s

Rights, International H uman Rights Law Group,

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Washington DC; member, Editorial Advisory Board, Third World Quarterly, Australian Year Book o f International Law; InternationalJournal o f Children s Rights; International Journal ofHealth and Human Rights, University of Pennsylvania Human Rights Series.

M r P Bailey, submission to, and appearance before, the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Trade, H um an Rights Sub-committee, on implementing human rights

obligations; conduct o f a session for the Refugee Review Tribunal on human rights concerns; submission to A C T Attorney-General on proposals for age discrimination; forum leader in University o f Canberra seminar on the Fumre of Canberra.

M r P J Bayne, consultant, Electoral and Administrative Review Commission o f Queensland on the reform o f Queensland law concerning appeals against administrative decisions; adviser, Law and Government group of the Parliamentary Research Group; barrister, Administrative Appeals Tribunal o f the

Commonwealth and o f the ACT in public interest test cases concerning the Freedom o f Information Act 1982 (Cth) and Freedom o f Information Act 1989 (ACT); member, Academic Advisory Board, Ombudsman Committee, American Bar Association; member, Editorial Committee; editor, Freedom oflnformation section, Australian Journal o f Administrative Law, editor, Federal Law Review.

M r S C Bottomley, Director, Welfare Rights and Legal Centre, ACT; member, Editorial Advisory Committee, Australian Journal o f Corporate Law.

M r S H Bronitt, submissions to the Law Commission o f England & Wales, responding to its proposals concerning the Draft Criminal Code

(Report N o 122) and W ork Cover Authority (NSW) on liability for transmitting HIV/AIDS; presented paper to an A C T teachers’ workshop outlining the law and procedure in cases o f child sexual assault organised by ACT Family Planning; appointed State Editor, Criminal Law JoumaL

Professor T D Campbell, Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Smdy o f Criminology and the Social and Philosophical Study o f Law, University o f Edinburgh; consultant, Royal College of Psychiatrists regarding draft Mental Welfare Bill (ACT).

Ms R Creyke, academic member o f ad hoc National Working Party on Elder Abuse report due February 1994; he Working Party was convened by the Office for the Aged, Department of Health, Housing, Local Government and Community Services; part-time member, Social Security Appeals Tribunal; part-time member , Standards Review Panel for Nursing Homes; submission, Attorney-General’s Department on proposed amendments to the Acts Interpretation Act 1901 (Cth).

Professor J L R Davis, legal adviser, Senate Standing Committee for the Scrutiny o f Bills; member, Legal Studies Panel of the A CT Schools Accreditation and Certification Agency; member,

editorial board, Torts Law Journal consultant to the law firm Blake Dawson Waldron, Sydney, in providing (with M r N C Seddon) a series of in-house seminars on recent developments in the law o f contract.

Mr P Drahos, member, Australian Society o f Legal Philosophy; member, International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy; member, Copyright Society of Australia.

Mr S Fridman, submission to the Australian Stock Exchange in response to that organisation’s discussion paper on Differential Voting Rights; instructor in the O pen Learning Program operated by the Australian Graduate School o f Management; lectured on contract and negligence to officers of the Retirement Benefits Office, Commonwealth Government; addressed members o f the Commonwealth Association o f Anaesthetists.

Mr R S Geddes, part-time Acting President, Australian Capital Territory Guardianship and Management o f Property Tribunal; member, University’s Committee Against Sexual

Harassment and Sexual Harassment Panel; member, Faculty’s Enrolments Committee; attended the ACT Guardianship and Management o f Property Tribunal Seminar, Canberra; two lectures on Legal Matters in Dementia Care in a series entitled Dementia—A Family Affair; lecture on Legal Issues for Respite Carers for FaBRiC; lecture on Guardianship and Management o f Property Tribunal for Sexuality and Disability Workshop; lecture on wills and guardianship for A C T Carers Association.

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Professor D W G reig consultant to the Australian Government on the East Tim or case which is due to be heard by the International C ourt o f Justice; lecturer in charge o f the Introduction to

International Law course for Graduate Diploma in Foreign Affairs and Trade for the Department.

Professor N Cunningham, and the Centre for Environmental Law conducted the Environmental Outlook conference with Department o f Environment, Sport and Territories and the Crime and Environment Conference with the Australian Institute o f Criminology.

D r D Kinley, visiting fellow, Department o f Public Law, University of Edinburgh; researched European Com m unity law (including visits to the European Parliament in Brussels and the European C ourt o f Justice in Luxembourg); the constitutional ramifications for the United

Kingdom’s ratification of the ’Maastricht Treaty’ and comparative analysis o f the notion of responsible government in Australia and the United Kingdom (upon which subject he delivered a paper to the Edinburgh Law Faculty); visited the newly inaugurated European Law

Centre at Cambridge University; submission in July to the H um an Rights Sub-Committee o f the Commonwealth Parliament’s Joint Standing Com mittee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and

Trade on the options for enhanced parliamentary scrutiny o f legislation affecting human rights in Australia; with M r P Bailey gave oral evidence to the Sub-Committee in November.

Professor D Hambly, chair, Parole Board o f the ACT; Visiting Professor, Institute o f Comparative Law in Japan, C huo University, Japan; member, editorial board, Torts Law Journal, member, selection com mittee for Rhodes Scholarships for Australia— at-large; Director, London House

Association o f Australia; member, Australian Academy o f Forensic Sciences; member. Medical I.egal Ethics and Research Panel, National Brain Inquiry Foundation Inc.

M r G J Lindell, delivered paper T h e Parliaments o f the States and Territories in an Australian Republic’, at the 15 th Annual Conference o f the Australasian Smdy o f Parliament Group held in

Melbourne; legal adviser, Clerk Assistant (Procedure) o f the Senate regarding constitutional validity o f the Industrial Relations Legislation Amendment Bill (No 2) 1992; adviser, Australian

Acting Solicitor-General regarding the legal impediments to the establishment o f the Australian Republic; gave evidence to the Senate Standing Committee on Constitutional and Legal

Affairs regarding the constitutional validity of the Taxation Deficit Reduction Bill 1993; member, Australasian Study of Parliament Group; Australian Society of Legal Philosophy; Australian

Institute o f Administrative Law, Selden Society— Australian Secretary; editorial consultant, Public Law Review·, coordinator, Menzies Lecture.

M r J D McMillan, Vice President, Australian Institute o f Administrative Law Inc; convener. Government Law Interest Group o f the Australian Law Teachers’ .Association; written and oral submission to the Australian Senate Select Committee on Public Interest Whistleblowing, presented paper, Administrative la w and Public Administrative Law Conflicting Values’ to the

1993 AIAI. and IPAA National Conference; presented paper, ’The Whistleblower versus the Organisation: Who Should be Protected?’ to a workshop on Freedom o f Communication in Australia’; presented paper, ’Should

Whistleblowing be Recognised by Organisational Ethics, Codes o f Conduct and legislation?’ to an HR Conference on Ethics and Codes of Conduct’; addressed public seminar staged by the

Republican Advisory Committee; address seminar on constitutional change staged by the Australian Republican Movement; addressed a Seminar on Future Directions in Australian Constitutional

Law’; conducted courses or gave I centres on Administrative Law to the Centre for Continuing Education, the Department o f Employment Education and Training the Department of

Primary Industries and Energy, the Government Retirement Benefits Office, and the Insurance and Guarantee Commission.

Dr A Mugasha, provided written comments to the Attorney-General’s Department concerning the Draft Convention on Independent Guarantees and Stand-by letters o f Credit, which

is under consideration by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law.

Mr J Passant, adviser, Australian Taxation Office on the administration o f the French tax system; adviser, Parliamentary Library Service on the collection o f tax before legislation is passed; acknowledged in the Service’s publication Beating

the Budget.

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Professor D C Pearce, member, Attorney-General’s Copyright Law Review Committee; member, Executive of Australian Institute o f Administrative Law, member,

Editorial Boards, Public Law Review, Legislative Studies, Administrative Review, member, ACT Law Society’s Administrative Law Committee; consultant, Administrative Review Council reference on review o f decisions under Patents legislation; submission to Senate Employment, Education and Training Committee enquiry into the organisation and funding of research into higher education; submission to Senate Select Committee enquiry into whistleblowing; inquiry into Pay-TV Licences for Minister for Transport and Communication; inquiry into MDS Licence Tendering Process for Minister for Transport and Communication; review o f Legal Services, Department of Transport and Communication; briefing seminar for Minister for Justice on Access to Justice; adjudicator, G C O ’Donnell Copyright Essay Prize; examiner, PhD thesis, Law Faculty, Melbourne University.

Ms B M Sangjia, conducted courses in working with cases and legislation for government departments (Retirement Benefits Office, ACT Attorney-General’s Office, Department o f Social

Security and the Health Insurance Commission) organised by the Centre for Continuing Education; contract law for the University o f Sydney Law Faculty.

M r C J Rowland, lectured to various government departments, retirement planning courses (including the ANU) and community groups on consumer protection as well as the need to make a will, estate planning and the administration o f deceased estates; member, Probate Committee o f the Law Society o f the ACT; member, Law Reform Committee o f the Law Society o f the ACT; corresponded with the Victorian and

Queensland Law Reform bodies in a move towards a joint project on further reform o f the law o f succession in the Australian Capital Territory and in Victoria and Queensland.

M r N Seddon, report on the ACT Government’s draft bill on mental welfare law; gave evidence to an ACT Legislative Assembly Committee examining the public responses to the draft bill; provided an opinion to the Department of Employment Education and Training on the effectiveness o f contracts which implement refund policy for overseas full fee paying smdents;

prepared, at the invitation of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department, a written response to proposed U N ID RO IT Principles for International Commercial Contracts, followed by round table meetings on the draft principles; member, ACT Community Law Reform Committee; member o f two sub-committees working on reform o f domestic violence law and on mandatory reporting of child abuse, respectively; responsibility for substantial redrafting of the final report on mandatory reporting o f child abuse; member, Board of the Welfare Rights and Legal Cenne Ltd; member,

Board o f CARE Credit and Debt Counselling Service Inc; member, A CT Law Society’s Law Reform and Law Review Committee; prepared report responding to proposals for the regulation of the security industry.

Dr J Seymour, member, Society for the Reform o f the Criminal Law, member, ACT Chapter o f the Australian Academy o f Forensic Sciences; member, Australian and New Zealand Society o f

Criminology, Australasian Law Teachers Association, National Centre for Socio-Legal Studies (LaTrobe University, Melbourne); member Socio-Legal Studies Society (Oxford); m em ber, Criminal Law Consultative Committee of the ACT; member, Research Ethics Committee of the Australian Institute o f Criminology; Board member, Open Family Foundation Inc. (ACT); member, ACT Children’s Court Juvenile Justice Consultative Group; participant in seminar, ‘Family Conferencing in Juvenile Justice: Debating the Issues’, University o f Melbourne; participant in a national seminar on ‘Current Issues in Social Security Law’, ANU Centre for International and Public Law.

Ms P Weeks, A CT convener, Smdent Assistance Review Tribunal; chair, national Conveners Conference; member, Family Planning ACT Ethics Committee; member, Editorial Committee, Australian Journal o f Labour Laur, executive member, Industrial Relations Society of the ACT; conducted seminars and workshops for the Family Planning Association on ‘Law and Family Planning and Fertility Control’, and on Legal Issues in Delivery of Health Services to Health Education course at the University of Canberra.

Professor D J Whaian, legal adviser, Senate Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances and ad hoc advice to the Department

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o f the Senate; legal adviser, A C T Legislative Assembly Com m ittee on the Scrutiny o f Bills and Subordinate Legislation; member, Editorial Board, Journal o f Law and Information Sciences and A N U academic Board o f T he Laws o f Australia; Council member, British Institution o f

Environmental Sciences; member, Australian Federal Police Assessment and Career Development Centre’s Assessor Panel; consultant, N orthern Territory Government on land law reform; 13 Senate seminars to Commonwealth officers from almost all Commonwealth departments, the Insurance and Superannuation Commission, the Australian Taxation Office, a number of private enterprise bodies and the Parliamentary Press Gallery and smdents in the A N U Graduate Program in Development Administration; a special seminar to the

Commonwealth Department o f Health, Housing and C om m unity services and officers o f the Australian Law Reform Commission; paper to an A CT Legislative Assembly seminar on the Role and Operation o f the Standing Com mittee on Scmtiny o f Bills and Subordinate Legislation.

Ms F Wheeler, consultant, Native Title Bill; participant, ’Future Directions in Australian Constitutional Law’ conference; presented paper ’Com mon Law Native Title in Australia: An Analysis o f M abo v Queensland [No

2]— delivered to Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Solicitors and Attorneys, Canberra Office, addressed the National Capital Seminar, Canberra Grammar School, ’T he Constitution’; addressed

the Australian National University Graduate School Fomm, ’M abo v Queensland [No 2]— A Legal Perspective’; lecture delivered as part of the U pdate 93 series, ’T he High Court and Implied

Freedoms and Limitations U nder the C onstitution’.

Legal Workshop

M r A P S Thew, member, Committee of Management, Legal Workshop; member, C ontinuing Legal Education Committee, Law Society o f the A C T ; member, the Legal Education

Com mittee A CT, Law Society o f the ACT; chair, Australasian Professional Legal Education Council; member, Editorial Committee, Journal o f Professional Legal Education and the APLEC

Bulletin·, consultant to High C ourt o f Australia, external professional for evaluation o f registry legal staff.

M r G G Dellar, member, Civil Litigation Committee, Law Society o f the A CT and of the Consumer Law Committee, Law Council of Australia; Consumer Trustee on Travel Compensation Fund; consultant, Trade Practices Commission; chair, ACT Consumer Affairs Advisory Committee; member, A C T Government W orking Party on Commercial Leases; observer,

Legal W orkshop Committee o f Management; External Professional for evaluation of performance o f staff of ACT Attorney-General’s Department.

M r A C Finlay, member, Legal Workshop Committee o f Management; member, Continuing Legal Education Committee, Law Society of the ACT; member, Professional Conduct Committee, Law Society o f the ACT; conducted seminars on N SW and ACT Conveyancing for para-legals on behalf o f ACTAID, Canberra Institute o f Technology.

M r D Hass all, member, Professional Conduct Committee, Law Society o f the ACT; member, Insolvency Committee, Law Society of the ACT; member, A C T Bar Association.

M r H Selby, member, Australian Advocacy Institute Teaching Committee; member, ACT Legal Aid Review Committee; convener, Disciplinary Appeal Committee (Australian Public Service); conducted ‘expert witness’ workshops for psychologists, accountants and engineers.

M r G Tamsitt, consultant, University o f Western Sydney Committee for Establishing a Law School.

Ms L M Zamprogno, convener, Community Liaison Committee and observer, Commercial and Business Law Committee, Law Society o f the ACT; observer, Legal W orkshop Committee of

Management; attended Legal Advice Bureau on a regular basis; member, Core Group, Young Lawyers Association of the ACT; member,

Selection Committee of Sir John Crawford Scholarship, Australian-American Association; Councillor, Australian-American Association, Canberra.

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National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

D r G Bammer, adviser, women and addiction, Alcohol and D m g Service, ACT Health; grants assessor, Commonwealth AIDS Research Grants, South Australian H ealth Commission Research

Grants and Public Health Research and Development Research Fellowships; invited author, article on musculoskeletal disorders for a chapter on visual display units for the fourth edition o f the International Labour Office Encyclopaedia o f Occupational Health and Safety.

D r D Broom, Public Officer, The Australian Sociological Association; member, ACT Government’s Canberra in the Year 2020 Reference Panel; member, ACT Chief Minister’s W om en’s Consultative Council and W om en’s

Health W orking Party; member, Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council Subcommittee on W om en and Health; member, Australian National Committee for the United Nations International Conference on Population and Development; member, Community Consultative Committee o f the Key Centre for W om en’s Health in Society; member, Australian Institute o f Health and Welfare Ethics Committee; consultant, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Advisory G roup on Breast Implants: Complaints and Protocol Project; consultant, National Association for Loss and Grief (ACT) Review o f Coronial System; consultant, ACT Alcohol and D m g Service; grant assessor for Australian Research Council, General Practice Evaluation Program, A C T Health Grants, and Department o f Health, Housing and Com munity Services; reviewer for Social Science Quarterly, Australian Feminist Studies, and Australian dr New ZealandJournal o f Sociology.

D r J Butler, Secretary, Australian Health Economics Society; consultant, Merck Sharp & D ohm e (Australia); consultant, AIDAB.

Ms P Dance, adviser, A C T Assisting Drug Dependants Incorporated for their research on Steroid Use; consultation with the Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health about guidelines for paying honoraria to respondents and for funding for chief investigators; chair o f a workshop Gay and

Lesbian Injecting Drug Use projects (GLIDUP) (This project is funded by the AIDS Council of NSW).

Dr D Legge, guest lecturer (on public health) to the staff o f the Health Advancement Branch o f the Department o f Health, Housing, Community Services and Local Government in May; consultant (on quality assurance) to the Midland Regional Health Authority, New Zealand; resource person for a professional development workshop (for health promotion workers) presented by the Centre for Development and Innovation in Health in Brisbane in December.

Dr J McCallum, consultant, Export o f Aged Care Services to Asia Project o f the Commonwealth Department of H um an Services and Health; Vice President, A C T Branch Australian Association of Gerontology; member, Working Party for Protection o f Older People of the Commonwealth Department of H um an Services and Health; consultant, Evaluation o f the Successful Ageing Project, ACT Health Advancement Service; consultant, Mental Health Status o f NESB Elderly, Victorian Transcultural Psychiatry Unit; adviser, National Health Survey general health stams measurement, Australian

Bureau o f Statistics; member, ACT Health Goals and Targets Planning Group.

Ms C McMurray, Demographic Data Specialist, National Statistical Office, Papua New Guinea, to design an interactive software system for the Pilot Provincial Data System, Papua New Guinea Population and Family Planning Project; Asian Development Bank Staff Consultant, (Demographic and Health Data Specialist) to Loan Fact-Finding Mission, Marshall Islands Health Project.

Dr C Peterson, assessor, Worksafe (National Occupational Health and Safety Commission).

Dr A Plant, consultant on Health Indicators, Northern Territory Department o f Health and Community Services; consultant on tuberculosis in Vietnamese applicants for immigration, International Organisation for Immigration, H o Chi M inh City, Vietnam; external examiner, New Zealand College o f Community Medicine.

Dr L Smith, consultant, World Health Organization; adviser, Fred Hollows Foundation.

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C o o p e r a t i o n w ith g o v e r n m e n t a n d o t h e r p u b lic institutions

Institute o f the Arts

Emeritus Professor P Karmel, AC CBE, president, Australian Council for Educational Research; member, Australian Statistics Advisory Council; member, Council o f The Chinese University of

H ong Kong.

Professor D Williams, chair, A C T Cultural Council; vice-president, National Council for Heads of Art and Design Schools; member, International Com minee o f the Visual Arts and Craft Board o f the Australia Council; member, National Advisory Comminee for the Asia/Pacific Triennial; executive member, Board o f

Management, A n Monthly Australia; chair, ACT Assembly Artworks Comminee.

J Beaumont, musical director, Canberra Children’s Choir; council member, Australian Society for Music Education, A CT Chapter.

D Crisp, member, Music Accreditation Panel, A C T D epartm ent o f Education.

J Ewington, member, Asia Link— Arts to Asia Com minee, University of Melbourne, Myer Foundation.

R Holmes, member, organising comminee, W orld Conference of the International Council for Traditional Music; conducted the review of

the Queensland School Music Curriculum for the Queensland Department of Education; president, Musicological Society o f Australia, A C T Chapter;

member, Choralie Rockwell Foundation for the Development o f Asian Music.

V Kirk, member, Board o f Senior Secondary Studies, Textiles Accreditation Panel, ACT Department o f Education.

N Lendon, member, Board o f Senior Secondary Studies Art Accreditation Panel, ACT Department o f Education.

M Martin, chair, Art Bank Board.

M McBride, conductor, Canberra Youth Orchestra; member, Programming Committee of the Canberra Symphony Orchestra; member, Brandenburg Orchestra o f Australia; member, the Australia Ensemble; guest conductor, Queensland

Symphony Orchestra; guest conductor, Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

R McIntyre, OAM, member, Performing Arts Committee, A C T Cultural Council; conductor, Canberra School o f Music community choir.

Bengt-Olov Palmquist, conductor, Oriana Chorale.

S Procter, member, Visual Arts and Craft Board o f the Australia Council.

L Sitsky, composer The Golem performed by the Australian Opera.

V Taylor, member, Board o f the Canberra Symphony Orchestra; vice-president A C T Flute Society.

D Worrall, board member, Australian Music Centre; A C T representative, Australian Network for Art and Technology.

143

The A u str a lia n N a tio n a l University

Joint research projects undertaken with universities, CSIRO and other institutions

Research School of Biological Sciences

Developmental Neurobiology

O ther A u stralian Universities

Time course o f development of pathways from periphery to cortex subserving the mystacial vibrissae in the wallaby by L R Marotte, R F Mark and M L Porter with P Μ E Waite and C Leamey, School o f Anatomy, University o f New South Wales.

Development o f the anterior commissure in the wallaby by L R M arotte and R F Mark with K Ashwell, School o f Anatomy, University of New South Wales.

T he brainstem raphe nuclei in the wallaby (Macropus eugenii) by L R Marotte with P M E Waite, C D Mardman and D Vu, School of Anatomy, University o f New South Wales.

Serotinergic innervation o f the cortex o f the wallaby (Macropus eugenii) by L R Marotte with D Vu and P Μ E Waite, School of Anatomy, University o f New South Wales.

A cystatin and a novel Ca2+-binding protein in arthropod photoreceptors by J A Clausen and A D Blest with L Kelly and M Brown, Department

o f Genetics, Melbourne University.

O ther Institutions

Multiple region PERG is being examined in clinical trials for the examination of glaucomatous scotoma and pre-scotoma retinal defects associated with glaucoma by T Maddess and A C James with S W ine and I Goldberg, University o f

NSW , Prince o f Wales and North Shore Ffospitals, Sydney and Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane.

An ongoing study involving 350 subjects was concluded this year in the surgery o fD r Goldberg in Sydney. New trials concluding in January 1994

have begun. The studies examine our new techniques for assessing glaucomatous damage in contrast to conventional methods. So far some 18600 patient visits have been processed by T Maddess with S Wine, J Dobinson and I

Goldberg, University o f NSW, Prince o f Wales and North Shore Hospitals, Sydney and Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane.

Visual Sciences Group

Other Australian Universities

A multiple region PERG for the examination o f retinal defects associated with glaucoma by T Maddess and A C James with D r S W ine, North

Shore Hospital, Sydney and Dr I Goldberg, Prince ofWales Hospital, Sydney.

New psychophysical techniques for assessing glaucomatous damage by T Maddess with D r S Wine, University o f NSW , Dr J Dobinson, Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane and I Goldberg, Prince o f Wales Hospital, Sydney.

Functions of peptidergic amacrine cells by I Morgan with D r M Boelen, Latrobe University College o f Northern Victoria.

Nitric oxide in mammalian retinas by I Morgan with D r D Ehrlich, University of Melbourne.

Transmitter systems in human retina by I Morgan with D r D Ehrlich, University of Melbourne.

Effects o f excitotoxins on ganglion cells by I Morgan with D r P Jeffrey, University o f Sydney and D r S Robinson, University of Queensland.

Other Institutions

Pattern vision in honeybees by M V Srinivasan and S W Zhang with D r M Lehrer, University o f Zurich, Switzerland.

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c ts u n d e r t a k e n w ith universities, CSIRO a n d o t h e r institutions

Visual control o f insect flight by Μ V Srinivasan and S W Zhang with Dr T Collett, University of Sussex, UK.

Learning processes in insects by Μ V Srinivasan and S W Zhang with Professor R Gadagkar, Indian Institute o f Science, Bangalore.

Visual analysis o f insect egomotion by M.V. Srinivasan and S W Zhang with R Voss, University o f Tubingen, Germany.

Biologically inspired machine vision by Μ V Srinivasan, M Nagle and P Sobey with Professor Y V Venkatesh, Indian Institute o f Science, Bangalore.

Role o f peptidergic amacrine cells in control of eye growth by I Morgan with Professor W Stell, University o f Calgary, Canada.

Role o f amacrine cells in the generation o f non-linearities in ganglion cell responses by I Morgan with Professor Naka, New York University, U SA

Localisation o f enkephalin receptors in chicken retina by I M organ with D r I C Maderspach, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary.

Molecular and Population Genetics Group

O ther A u stralian U niversities

Molecular characterization and m apping o f plant myosin-related genes using YAC technogy and yeast mutants by J Plazinski with R Maleszka.

O ther In stitu tion s

Genetic variation in Gpdh in Drosophila melanogaster by T Wilanowski and J Gibson with D r P T Barnes, Connecticut College USA

Molecular analysis of singed alleles from natural populations o f Drosophila melanogaster by J Gibson with D r M Golubovsky, Russian Academy o f Science, St Petersburg.

Molecular Evolution and Systematics

O ther Australian U niversities

Cloning and characterization of grasshopper cell cycle genes by M Jones and E E Ball with D r Η E Richardson and Professor R B Saint, University o f Adelaide.

Cloning and characterization o f coral homeobox genes in relation to development by E E Ball with D r D J Miller, A Miles, and Dr H Berghammer, James Cook University and Dr P Harrison,

Southern Cross University.

Complex systems by D G Green with D r T J Bossomaier.

Evolutionary biology o f the Australian avifauna by D C Shaw with L Christidis, National Museum o f Victoria.

Chromatin conformation and the speciation process by D C Shaw with D Colgan, Australian Museum, Sydney.

Hybrid Zones in Queensland sittellas by D C Shaw with I Scott and M Westerman, University o f La Trobe.

Automated taxonomic revision and keys for Pooideae (Poaceae) for Flora o f Australia by C M Weiller and L Watson with Dr M J Henwood, School o f Biological Sciences, University of Sydney.

Taxonomic studies of the Epacridaceae by C M Weiller with D r R K Crowden, Department of Plant Science, University of Tasmania.

Molecular systematics of potyviruses by A J Gibbs with Asociate Professor J L Dale, Queensland University o f Technology and K Thomson, University o f Queensland.

Molecular phylogenetics o f the immune system by A J Gibbs with Dr E J Steele, Wollongong University.

O ther Institutions

Cloning and characterization of grasshopper transcription factors by E Ball and colleagues with D r N H Patel, Carnegie Institution, Baltimore, Maryland, USA and E J Rehm and Professor C S

145

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Goodman, University o f California, Berkeley, USA

Construction o f code o f standardised descriptors for virus characteristics for the International Committee o f Taxonomy o f Viruses database ICTVdB®, a database for all viruses by C Biichen-Osmond and A J Gibbs with L Blaine, Bio informatics, American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, Maryland, USA

A microcomputer model for predicting the spread and control o f foot and mouth disease in feral pigs by D G Green with D r R Pech and D r J C

Mcllroy, CSIRO Wildlife and Ecology.

FireNet— an international network for landscape fire information by D G Green and A C Trevitt with D r A M Gill, CSIRO Plant Industry.

Virus-tolerant Arabidopsis mutants, and carmovirus sequencing by M Skotnicki with D r A Simon, University o f Massachussetts, Amherst, USA

T -D N A tagged virus-tolerant Arabidopsis mutants by M Skotnicki with D r Csaba Koncz and D r J Dangl, Max-Planck Institute, Cologne, Germany.

Taxonomic studies o f the Epacridaceae by C M Weiller with D r J M Powell, National Herbarium o f New South Wales.

V ID E (plant virus) database by A J Gibbs with Professor A Bnint, Horticulture Research International, UK.

Molecular systematics o f luteoviruses by A J Gibbs with M J Gibbs and D r I Cooper, Institute o f Virology, Oxford, U K

Molecular systematics o f protoctist parasites o f insects by J A Ninham, P Keese, G Weiller and A J Gibbs with L Malone, Horticulture Research, Auckland, NZ.

Evolutionary ecology o f viruses of Nicotiana glauca by A J Gibbs with D r F Garcia-Arenal, Agronomos Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid, Spain.

Plant Cell Biology Group

Other Australian Universities

Molecular characterisation o f symbiotic genes in Anabaena azollae by J Plazinski with D r W Shaw, Northern Territory University, Darwin.

Immunodetection o f Phytophthora cinnamomi in infected chestnut roots by A R Hardham with S Chambers and D r E Scott, University of Adelaide.

Isolation of plasmodesmatal proteins by A R Hardham and B E S Gunning with L Blackman and Dr R L Overall, University of Sydney.

Immunological characterisation of a novel vacuolar transport system in fungi by A R Hardham with Professors A E Ashford and W G Allaway, University o f Sydney and University o f

NSW.

Con focal microscopy o f the plant cell cytoskeleton by B E S Gunning with D r J Hush, School o f Biological Science, University of Sydney.

The cytoskeleton and cell division by B E S Gunning with Professor J D Pickett-Heaps, School o f Botany, University ofMelboume.

Antibodies to g-tubulin by B E S Gunning with Dr J Marc, School o f Biological Science, University o f Sydney.

cdc genes in root meristems by P C L John and B E S Gunning with P Webb and Professor J Hamill, Monash University.

Function o f the CKS cell cycle group o f proteins by P C L John with D r E Williams, Perth University Medical School.

Nuclear DNA amounts and evolutionary ecology o f seed size by P C L John with Dr M Leishman and Professor M Westoby, Macquarie University.

Other Institutions

Control o f patterns o f xylogenesis by P Warren Wilson with Professor L Roberts, University of Idaho, USA

Effects o f maize profilin on cytoplasmic streaming in characean algae by G Wasteneys with D r F Grolig, Justus-Liebig-Universitar, Giessen, Germany.

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s u n d e r t a k e n w ith u n iversities. C SIR O a n d o t h e r institutions

Microtubule polarity determination in plant cells by tubulin protofilament decoration by G Wasteneys with Professor D r E Schnepf, University o f Heidelberg, Germany.

Microtubule dynamics and exocytosis in Nitella by G Wasteneys with D r I Foissner, University o f Salzburg, Austria.

Regulation o f chloroplast motility in Vallisneria by G Wasteneys with S Liebe, University o f Heidelberg, Germany.

T he structure and motile properties o f the endoplasmic reticulum in characean algae and the involvement o f the cytoskeleton in characean cell differentiation by G Wasteneys with D r D Menzel, Max-Planck-Institute for Cell Biology, Ladenburg, Germany.

Cvtoskeletal localization in Tradescantia stamen hairs by G Wasteneys with D r J Willingale-Theune, D r D Menzel and Professor P Traub, Max Planck Institute for Cell Biology,

Ladenburg, Germany.

Immunocytochemical comparisons between Phytophthora and Saproleqnia:. implications for Oomycete phylogeny by A R H ardham with D r G W Beakes, University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK.

Confocal microscopy and microinjection of cytoskeletal probes by B E S G unning with Professor P K Hepler, Departm ent o f Botany, University o f Massachusetts.

W riting a textbook on microstructure and the biology o f plant cells by B E S G unning with Professor M W Steer, Department o f Botany, University College, Dublin.

Cell cycle control proteins in lateral root development by P C L John with Professor F W ightman, Carleton University, Ottowa, Canada.

Conserved cell cycle control proteins by P C L John with D r J Hayles and Professor P Nurse, Imperial Cancer Research Fund Labs, London, UK-

Anal ys is o f putative cellulose synthesising complexes in the plasma membrane o f mutant Arabidopsis plants by R E X dliam son with Professor W em er B erth, Universitat Heidelberg,

Germany. ____________

Smdies o f the cytoskeleton and cell wall in rsw mutants o f Arabidopsis by R E Williamson with Dr I I Baskin, University o f Missouri, Columbia, USA

Director’s Research Group

O ther A ustralian U niversities

Photoprotection in rainforest understorey plants during sunflecks by S A Robinson and C B Osmond with J W ading and D r I E Woodrow,

Department of Botany, James Cook University.

Photoinhibition and photoprotection in Arabidopsis by S A Robinson, L A Franklin, G G R Seaton and C B O sm ond with A W Russell and D r C Critchley, Department o f Botany,

University o f Queensland.

Ammonium and glutamate metabolism in a GDH1 null mutant o f maize by S A Robinson with Professor G R Stewart, Department of Botany, University o f Queensland.

Time-resolved absorption changes in P680 in the presence of increasing ethylene glycol concentrations by W J Hillier and T J

Wydrzynski, with D r P Lukins, Department of Applied Physics, University o f Sydney.

Photoinhibition of marine macrophytes by L A Franklin and C E Lovelock, with Professor A W D Larkum, School of Biological Sciences,

University o f Sydney.

Taxonomy of algal containing, free living ciliates b y j Rohozinski with Professor D J Patterson, School o f Biological Sciences, University of Sydney.

Development of a flash spectrophotometer by T J Wydrzynski with Professor A B Hope, Department of Biological Sciences, Flinders University.

Photoinhibition of macroalgae and seagrasses on coral reefs by L A Franklin and G G R Seaton, with Professor A W D Larkum, School of Biological Sciences, University o f Sydney.

O ther Institutions

Photoinhibition and photoprotection in Arabidopsis by S A Robinson, L A Franklin, G G

147

T he A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

R Seaton and C B O sm ond with A W Russell and D r C Critchley, Department of Botany, University o f Queensland, and with Drs J M Anderson and W S Chow, CSIRO Division of

Plant Industry.

Measurement o f peroxidic intermediates o f water catalysis using luminescence by W J Hillier and T J Wydrzynski with Professor G Renger, Max-Volmer Institute, Technical University of

Berlin.

Temperature effects on chlorophyll fluorescence in Antarctic mosses by C E Lovelock with D r R Seppelt Australian Antarctic Division.

Desiccation tolerance o f Ulva rotundata by C B Osmond with C Casper and D r J Ramus, Duke University Marine Laboratory.

Studies o f the stability o f the D 1 protein during photoinhibition o f genetically engineered Chlamydomonas by C B Osmond with P B

Heifetz and Drs J E Boynton and N W Gillham, Botany and Zoology Departments, Duke University.

Measurement o f changes in alternative respiratory pathway flux during greening of soybean cotyledons, using oxygen isotope discrimination by S A Robinson with D r J A Berry, Department o f Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, and with M Ribas-Carbo, L Giles and D r J N Siedow, D epartment o f Botany, Duke University.

Algal vimses by J Rohozinski, with D r J L van Etten, Department o f Plant Pathology, University o f Nebraska.

Susceptibility o f a chlorophyll b-less mutant o f rice to photoinhibition by S A Robinson with D r W S Chow, CSIRO Plant Industry and D r I Terashima, Department o f Botany, University of Tokyo.

Plant Environmental Biology

O th er Australian Universities

Pressure-volume relations o f guard cells by P Franks, I R Cowan, G D Farquhar, with D r S Tyerman, Flinders University, South Australia.

The mechanism of Rubisco investigated by means o f the chemiluminescence associated with the oxygenase reaction in the presence o f M n * ions

by T J Andrews and H J Kane with Associate Professor R Me C Lilley and M r S Cox, Department o f Biological Sciences, University o f Wollongong. Study o f the structure o f Rubisco by means o f X-ray crystallography by T J Andrews with D r P M G Curmi, Department o f Physics, University o f NSW.

Rubisco from dinoflagellates by T J Andrews with Dr D Yellowlees and M r S Whitney, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, James Cook University.

Short term effects o f variation in ambient C O 2 pressure on leaf elongation by J Masle and G Farquhar with M r J Eckman, Dr T Conroy and Professor Snow Barlow, of the University of Western Sydney.

Characterisation o f enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism from soybean root nodules and leaves and molecular cloning o f genes by Μ K Morell with D r L Copeland, University o f Sydney.

Other Institutions

Carbon isotope discrimination and yield of peanuts and the legumes by G D Farquhar with Dr G Wright, Queensland Dept o f Primary Industry.

Carbon isotope discrimination in relation to growth and environment o f origin o f eucalpyt species by P Kriedemann and G D Farquhar with Professor J Anderson, University o f Idaho, D r M Austin (CSIRO Wildlife and Ecology) and D r J Williams (RSBS Ecosystem Dynamics).

Carbon balance o f Amazonian rain forest and savannah vegetation in Brazil by J Lloyd with D r R Francey, CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Professor J Grace, University o f Edinburgh, D r A C Miranda and D r H Miranda, Universidade de Brasilia and Dr J Gash, Institute of Hydrology, U K

The regulation of Rubisco’s activity by T J Andrews and H J Kane with Professor A R Portis Jr, US Department of Agriculture/University o f Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.

Electron micrographic analysis of conformational changes o f the enzyme Rubisco in the presence of Rubisco activase under various conditions by means o f computational enhancement by C Biichen-Osmond and T J Andrews with Professor

148

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s u n d e r t a k e n w ith universities, CSIRO a n d o t h e r institutions

A R Port is Jr, US Department o f Agriculture/University o f Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.

X-ray crystallographic investigations o f the structure o f m utant Rubiscos by T J Andrews and Μ K Morell with D r I Andersson, Swedish Agricultural University, Uppsala.

Genetic relationship between plant transpiration efficiency and mineral content by J Masle and G Farquhar with D r A Yeo, University o f Sussex, U K

Molecular determinants o f starch quality in wheat by Μ K Morell with Dr R Appels, D r S Rahman, D r I Batey, D r E Lagudah (Plant Science Centre and CSIRO Division of Plant Industry) and D r P Sharp, D r N Darvey, D r F Stoddard, Plant Breeding Institute, University o f Sydney.

D N A profiling o f mandarin by Μ K Morell and L R Preston (Plant Science Centre) with D r R Appels (Plant Science Centre and CSIRO Division o f Plant Industry), D r R Peakall, the

Faculty o f Science, ANU and L S Lee, Bundaberg Research Station, Queensland D epartm ent of Primary Industry.

Molecular analysis o f the COz-concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by M R Badger, J-W Yu and G D Price with Drs M

Spalding and L Marek, Botany Dept, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA

Analysis o f inorganic carbon exchange in green microalgae and lichens by M R Badger with D r K Palmqvist, D ept of Plant Physiology, University o f Umea, Sweden.

Isolation and analysis o f plasma membranes from cyanobacteria by M R Badger, J-W Yu and G D Price with D r B Norling, D ept o f Biochemistry,

University o f Stockholm, Sweden.

Molecular analysis of the CC>2-concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria by M R Badger, J-W Yu and G D Price with D r D Siiltemeyer, University o f Kaiserslautern, Germany.

Antisense RNA against the Reiske FeS protein of the cytochrome b

Anderson and F Chow, CSIRO Division o f Plant Industry.

Ecosystem Dynamics Group

O ther Australian Institutions

Theory of marine benthic communities by P Chesson with D r A Buder, University of Adelaide.

Maintenance o f species diversity in the Australian arid zone by P Chesson with D r J Facelli, University o f Adelaide.

Models o f population viability analysis by I Davies and I R Noble with D r H Possingham, University o f Adelaide and D r T N orton and D r D Lindenmeyer, CRES.

Influence o f habitat and disturbance regime on patterns o f diversity o f herbaceous communities by S Lavorel with D r S McIntyre, University of New England.

Fire and environmental heterogeneity in temperate ecosystems by J E Williams with Professor R J Whelan, University o f Wollongong.

O ther Institutions

Canopy architecture in relation to photoinhibition along climatic gradients by M C Ball and J Egerton with D r M S McGlone, Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd, Christchurch.

Cold-induced photoinhibition and the regeneration niche in mountain beech, Nothofagus solandri by M C Ball and J Egerton with D r M S McGlone, Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd, Christchurch.

Regeneration o f eucalypt species under natural and altered microclimates by M C Ball, M Cochrane, J Egerton and P D unne with D r R Leuning, CSIRO Centre for Environmental Mechanics.

Density-dependent habitat selection and the storage effect as interacting mechanisms of coexistence in ecological communities by P Chesson with D r M Rosenzweig, University of Arizona, USA

Theoretical and empirical studies o f communities in stochastic environments by P Chesson with D r N Huntly, Idaho State University, USA

149

T he A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Theory o f communities in spatially variable environments by P Chesson with D r A Ives, University o f Wisconsin, USA

Functional types o f rainforest plants by H Gitay, I R Noble and P D unne with Professor} H Connell, University o f California, Santa Barbara, USA

Community structure in grassland by H Gitay with Associate Professor] B Wilson, University of Otago, New Zealand.

The effect o f fire on tussock grasslands by H Gitay with D r W G Lee, Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd, Christchurch.

Species interactions in Nothofagus communities by H Gitay with M r B Smith and Associate Professor J B Wilson, University o f Otago, New Zealand.

Land unit and land system mapping in the Northern Territory by H Gitay with M r P Wilson, Conservation Commission o f the Northern Territory, Darwin.

Landscape models o f community dynamics by S Lavorel with D r R H Gardner and D r R V O ’Neill, O ak Ridge National Laboratory, USA

Mechanisms o f species diversity in Mediterranean landscapes by S Lavorel with D r M Debussche, D r J Escarre and D r J Lepart, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Montpellier, France.

RESTORELAND: a decision support system for land management in western N SW by I R Noble with staff at the CSIRO Division o f Wildlife and Ecology.

Long-term population dynamics o f rainforests by I R Noble and I Davies with Professor J H Connell, University o f California, Santa Barbara, USA and D r M Lowman, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Models o f savanna dynamics by I R Noble with M r J Gignoux, D r J-G Menaut, Ecole Normale Superiore CNRS, Paris and Dr C Prado, Catholic University, Santiago, Chile.

Dynamic models o f eucalypt forests by I R Noble with D r Μ P Austin, CSIRO Division o f Wildlife and Ecology.

Potential operational use ofhyperspectral remote sensing to map and monitor physiological activity o f Australian vegetation by J Roden and M C Ball with D r A Held and Dr D Jupp, CSIRO Division o f W ater Resources.

Effects o f elevated C O 2 on Australian temperate rainforest species o f different successional stages by D Wiggins and M C Ball with Professor G D Farquhar (Plant Environmental Biology Group) and D r R Gifford, CSIRO Division o f Plant Industry.

Fire and environmental heterogeneity in temperate ecosystems by J E Williams with D r A M Gill, CSIRO Plant Industry.

Water-use efficiency in eucalypts by J E Williams with Professor G D Farquhar (Plant Environmental Biology Group), Professor J E Anderson, University of Idaho, D r P E

Kreidemann, CSIRO Forestry and D r Μ P Austin, CSIRO, Wildlife and Ecology.

Patterns and processes underlying epicormic shoot production in eucalypts by J E Williams with Dr A M Gill, CSIRO, Plant industry.

Molecular Structure and Function Group

O ther Institutions

Molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of the human S6 kinase gene by G L G Miklos with Professor R Erikson Dr S Ottilie the Biological Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Professor T Vik, Indiana University Medical Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA and chromosomal mapping of the human S6 kinase gene with D r G C Webb, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, SA

Cloning and characterisation of genes at the base of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, G L G Miklos with Professor H G de Couet, Zoology Department, University o f Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA and D r M Yamamoto, Miyazaki Medical College, Miyazaki, Japan.

Molecular biological analyses ofcephalopod nervous systems by G L G Miklos, with Professor H G de Couet University of Hawaii at Manoa,

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s u n d e r t a k e n w ith u niversities, CSIRO a n d o t h e r institutions

Honolulu, Hawaii USA and Professor J Arnold, University o f Hawaii at Manoa, H onolulu and Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA.

Chromosomal mapping o f the hum an and mouse flightless genes by H D Campbell and I G Young with D r J Hoheisel, ICRF Laboratories, London and German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg

and D r P Lichter, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.

Analysis o f the possible role o f the hum an flightless gene in the Smith-Magenis syndrome by H D Campbell and I G Young with D r K-S Chen and D r J Lupski, Baylor College o f Medicine,

Houston.

Expression o f the human and mouse flightless proteins by H D Campbell and I G Young with D r D Kwiatkowski, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

Plant Microbe Interaction Group

O th er In stitutions

Analysis o f in situ expression patterns o f the developmental regulated CHS1 gene in subterranean clover by M A Djordjevic, E Gartner, S Thomson, J J W einman with L Heath,

R F I Kahn, T J Higgins, CSIRO Plant Industry.

Investigation o f anthocannin regulatory genes in legumes by J D e Majnik, J Weinman, M Djordjevic, B Rolfe, with D rs G Tanner and P

Larkin, C SIR O Plant Industry, Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory.

Research School of Chemistry

Molecular weight studies o f the beta subunit of IL-5 receptor by D r P D Jeffrey and Professor I G Young with D r G Ralston, Biochemistry Department, University o f Sydney.

Gene targeting o f interleukin genes by D r K I Matthaei with M r M Kopf and Professor G Kohler, Max Planck Institute fur Immunbiologie, Freiburg, Germany.

Gene targeting of G-protein genes by D r K I Matthaei with Professor Μ I Simon and A J Watson, Division of Biology, California Institute

o f Technology, Calfomia, USA

Structure/function o f milk proteins by D r D C Shaw with D r M Messer, Department of Biochemistry, University o f Sydney, Sydney, N SW and K R Nicholas, CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Ecology, Gungahlin, ACT.

Trypsin inhibitors by D r D C Shaw with Dr J H Bradbury, Division of Botany and Zoology, ANU and D r J Carver, Department o f Chemistry, University o f Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW.

Structure o f human immunoglobulin by D r D C Shaw with Professor A B Edmundson, Harrington Cancer Centre, Amarillo, Texas, USA

Control o f viral DNA transcription by polyoma virus large T antigen by D r N A Sunstrom with D r N Acheson, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The mechanism by which a transcription complex forms on the mouse dihydrofolate reductase promoter when the promoter is assembled into chromatin by D r D Tremethick with D r P Farnham, McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University o f Wisconsin, USA

The biology o f the histone H 2A variant H2AZ by Dr D Tremethick with D r J Wells, University o f Adelaide.

The expression of Interleukin-3, Interleukin-5 and their receptors in the mouse brain by Dr S Ymer with D r B D Shivers, Parke-Davis, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Research School of Earth Sciences

The fluid dynamics laboratory o f RSES is accommodating experimental work o f D r J R Taylor, Physics Department, University College, Australian Defence Force Academy. D r Taylor is

collaborating with Professor G Veronis (a visitor to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics group) on a .study o f salt-finger convection.

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Studies o f diatoms in Antarctic lakes by D r Μ I Bird with D r A M cM inn, University o f Tasmania.

Studies o f the sea-level history and processes o f dolomitisation at Resolution Guyot, Mid-Pacific Mountains, using ODP-recovered cores by D r A R Chivas with Associate Professor P G Flood, University o f New England.

A smdy o f the Pleistocene and Pliocene sea-level and climatic history o f the Queensland continental margin using results and recovered

cores from O D P Leg 133 by Dr A R Chivas and M r F Peerdeman with Professor P J Davies, University o f Sydney. This and other projects utilised the School’s Finnigan M AT-251 mass spectrometer, micro-carbonate device and inductively-coupled plasma spectrometer.

An investigation o f the generation o f highly nonlinear solitary wave disturbances by mid-latitude cold frontal systems by D r D R Christie with Drs M J Reeder and N J Tapper, Monash University and Professor R K Smith,

University o f Munich.

Smdy o f the properties o f interacting solitary waves using high resolution satellite imagery by D r D R Christie with D r M J Reeder, Monash University.

Research on the tectonic and magmatic development o f the Vanuatu island arc and North Fiji Basin by D r S Eggins with D r A Crawford, University o f Tasmania and marine geoscientists from O RSTO M (France).

Studies on the Balleny hotspot by Drs S Eggins and McCulloch with R Lanyon, a PhD student and Drs Crawford and Varne, University o f Tasmania.

Pilot smdy o f the sediment hosted gold mineralisation in the Witwatersrand gold fields by D r Eldridge with Drs G N Phillips and R E Meyers, Economic Geology Research Unit, Geology Department, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld.

A sulfur isotope study on metamorphosed ores from New South Wales by D r Eldridge with D r P K Seccombe, Geology Department, Newcastle University.

O n the late Quaternary sedimentary evolution o f the coast and inner continental shelf bordering

the central Great Barrier Reef by D r Μ K Gagan with D r D P Johnson, James Cook University o f North Queensland and D r G M Crowley, Monash University.

Dr J H etgt gave research seminars at the Geology Departments o f both Monash and La Trobe Universities, and participated in the ‘Chemistry of the Earth’ summer school; also completed two pieces o f collaborative research with Professor A Ewart, University o f Queensland relating to the evolution o f the Lau back-arc basin/Tonga Arc/fore-arc system.

Noble gas studies o f submarine basalt glasses from the Lau Basin by D r M Honda and Professor I McDougall with D r T J Falloon, University o f Tasmania.

Professor B L N Kennett gave a number o f seminars at other Australian Universities during the year with short visits to Melbourne, Adelaide (Flinders) and Brisbane.

Mapping sea-level change in northern Queensland during Holocene time for the purpose o f establishing constraints on mantle viscosity as well as on the global ice budget o f the continental ice sheets by Professor Limbeck with the Sir George Fisher Centre of James Cook University o f North Queensland; and with the School o f Surveying University o f New South Wales for precise positioning using GPS and comparisons with earlier Doppler positioning to measure tectonic displacements in Papua New Guinea.

Characterising the physical properties o f mande minerals by D r L Liu with Professor D Creagh, Department o f Physics, University College, Australian Defence Force Academy, using the Australian National Beamline Facility in Tsukuba, Japan.

Dr McCulloch gave a seminar on ‘T he use o f Sr/Ca ratios in corals as a recorder of sea surface temperature’ at the Department o f Geology, James Cook University o f Northern Queensland.

Continuing collaboration on the applications of trace element geochemistry as a paleo-environmental indicator by D r McCulloch and D r H Veeh, Flinders University.

Work on the dating o f ocean cores using U-Th mass spectrometry by D r McCulloch, Dr

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Mortimer, and Ms Lund, a PhD sm dent from Sydney University and Professor P Davies, Sydney University.

O n the chemiea! and isotopic composition of basalts from the Baikal region, Russia by D r W F M cDonough with D r D Ionov, School o f Earth

Sciences, Macquarie University.

A small dating project on the W ollumdilly Basin, N SW by Professor I McDougall with D r P F Carr and J A Jones, Department o f Geology, University o f Wollongong.

Examining the evolution o f the northern edge of the Yilgam block by Dr A P N utm an with Ms J W indh, University of Western Australia.

Dating glacial deposits o f the Lambert Glacier, Antarctica by D r J Stone with D r M M abin of James C ook University.

O n records o f palaeoclimate in Tasm anian cave deposits by D r J Stone with D r A Goede, University o f Tasmania.

O n karst erosion and river valley incision in the Buchan district, Victoria by D r Stone with D r B Finlayson and D r M Eliaway, University o f Melbourne and D r J W ebb, La T robe University; this work is funded by an ARC grant.

A SHRIM P study o f the zircon age of, and inheritance in, the zoned Stanthorpe granite and one o f its enclaves by Ms A Hughes, Macquarie University, as part of her Honours project with

D r I Williams.

O n the chronology of metamorphism in central Australia by D r I Williams with D r W J Collins, Newcastle University.

D r I Williams spent two days in southwestern Victoria in O ctober with the Melbourne University field geology class.

Study o f the provenance o f enlaves in selected Palaeozoic granites from Victoria by D r I Williams with D r R C Price and M r J Anderson, La Trobe University.

continue to provide joint supervision and support for a graduate smdent, M r P A Hutchinson, who

algae awa; wind waves is a focus o f the work. GEM is also providing joint supervision of another PhD smdent, M r S Billings, who this year commenced a study o f the behaviour o f buoyant particles in turbulence using numerical techniques.

Measurement o f radionuclide abundances in central Great Barrier Reef shelf sediment cores by Drs Μ I Bird and Μ K Gagan with M r P Wallbrink, CSIRO Division o f Water Resources, Canberra.

Image processing of airborne spectrographic imager data by M r S G Blake with M r G Byrne and Mr D Jupp, Division of W ater Resources.

Editing a multiauthored book on solid-state processes in the geosciences by D r J Fitz Gerald with D r J N Boland, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining.

W ork on a project to identify the main sources o f sediment that are rapidly filling Lake Argyle in the O rd River Catchment by D r McCulloch and D r

Wasson, CSIRO.

T he elasticity o f high T c ceramic superconductors at high pressure by D r S Rigden with D r G White, CSIRO Division of Applied Physics.

Smdies o f sediment production and dispersal in the Murrumbidgee and O rd River catchments by D r J Stone with Drs R Wasson and A Murray and M r P Wallbrink, Division of Water Resources.

Trace element x-ray microanalysis by M r N G Ware at the CSIRO Division o f Exploration and Mining (Perth).

Members o f the Organic Petrology Group collaborated closely in a number o f projects with CSIRO, especially the Division o f Coal and Energy Technology and the Division of

Petroleum Resources.

is carrying which mix out research into the physical processes algae through a water body. Stirring o f

from the water surface bv effects of

C om m onw ealth Scientific a n d In d u stria l Research O rganisation (CSIRO )

T he Geophysical Fluid Dynamics G roup and CSIRO ’s Centre for Environmental Mechanics

In tern ation al Collaboration

Geochemical smdies on plume related picrites by D r V Bennett with Drs M Norman and H West, University o f Hawaii.

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Geochemistry o f komatiites from the Barberton region, South Africa by D r V Bennett with Professor C Anheusser, University o f Witswatersrand, South Africa.

Intracrystalline fractionation of oxygen isotopes in kaolinite, and on an experimental smdy o f oxygen-isotope fractionation in gibbsite by D r M I Bird with D r F Longstaffe and D r W S Fyfe, University o f Western Ontario.

A project to model the dynamics o f obliquely convergent orogens by D r J Braun with Professor C Beaumont, Dalhousie University, Canada.

D r I H Campbell, chair, Commission for Igneous and Metamorphic Petrogenesis and subcommission o f the International U nion o f Geological Sciences.

Palaeocli mates o f weathering clays by D r A R Chivas with Professor Hermelin, EAFIT University, Medellin, Colombia and D r A Hall, University o f Edinburgh, Scotland.

A smdy o f the coral reefs o f the Xisha Islands, South China Sea by D r A R Chivas, Professor J Chappell and Ms X W ang with members o f the Institute o f Marine Geology, Qingdao, China.

Studies o f atmospheric Hadley cells and planetary dynamics by D r S A Condie with Professor P B Rhines, University ofWashington.

Use of neutron diffraction techniques to investigate deformation mechanisms and the development o f lattice preferred orientation in experimentally deformed pyrite ores by D r S F Cox with Professor H Siemes, RWTH-Aachen.

Galerkin methods for the calculation o f theoretical seismograms for three-dimensionally varying media by D r P R Cummins with Professor R Geller, University of Tokyo.

Smdies o f the moat sediments at the Creede Colorado mining district by Dr S Eldridge with D r M A McKibben, University o f California at

Riverside, D r P M Bethke, US Geological Survey, Reston and D r R O Rye, US Geological Survey, Denver where rhe most extreme sulfur isotopic variation reported to date was found using the SHRIM P ion microprobe.

The M t Pinatubo eruption products to show that the eruption seems to have incorporated

geothermal material as well as magmatic and that the magma itself was not necessarily as sulfur-rich as intially supposed by D r S Eldridge with D r M A McKibben, University of California at

Riverside.

A recent project to get boron isotopes working on a microanalytical facility has also begun between Dr Eldridge and D r W P Leeman, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Rice University in Houston, Texas.

Using SHRIMP to smdy the ages o f greenstone sequences in Zimbabwe by Mr C M Fanning with Professor R W Nesbitt, University of Southampton, UK, and Professor J F Wilson, University o f Zimbabwe, Harare.

The role o f microstructures in influencing Ar diffusion in feldspars by Dr J D Fitz Gerald with Professor T M Harrison, Department Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA

Tertiary fluviomarine palaeoenvironments in Namibia by D r Μ K Gagan with D r R McMiller, Geological Survey o f Namibia and D r Μ K Seely, Namibian Desert Ecological Research Unit.

Studying the dynamics o f submarine lava flows and o f lava domes by D r R W Griffiths with Professor J H Fink, Arizona State University.

A continuing smdy o f ocean circulation dynamics and the behaviour o f western boundary currents by D r R W Griffiths with Professor P Comillon, Graduate School o f Oceanography, University o f Rhode Island.

Arc and back-arc systems by Dr J Hergt with Professor C J Hawkesworth, Open University, Dr K Nilsson Farley, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and D r S H Bloomer, Boston University.

A new smdy o f the Curacao Island picrites by D r J Hergt with D r M Storey.

Noble gas studies o f submarine lavas dredged from the East Pacific Rise and the Woodlark Basin, near Papua New Guinea by D r M Honda and Professor I McDougall with Professor M R

Perfit, University o f Florida.

Professor B L N Kennett, Vice-President, International Association for Seismology and the

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Physics o f the Earth’s Interior (IASPEI) and chair, IASPEI Commission on Wave Propagation.

T he effects o f interfacial disequilibrium and compositional convection on the growth o f mushy layers by D r R C Kerr with D r M G

Worster, University of Cambridge.

Fluid dynamics and thermodynamics o f the ascent o f granitic magmas in dykes by D r R C Kerr with D r J R Lister, University o f Cambridge and Dr N Petford.

Professor Lambeck, member o f NASA’s Investigator Team for the Magellan mission to Venus.

A study o f U and Pb transport in zircons by D r J K W Lee with Professor A K Sinha, Virginia Polytechnical Institute and State University.

D r L Liu continued collaboration with D r E H uang at the Academia Sinica, Taipei.

D r A P Nutm an undertook international collaboration projects as follows: crustal evolution o f the northeast and northwest

Greenland with the Geological Survey of Greenland; dating of ultra-high pressure rocks from southern China with D r S Maruyama, Tokyo Institute ofTechnology, Japan; dating of the W yom ing province and the basement of Florida and Georgia USA with D r P Mueller,

University o f Florida and D r J W ooden, United States Geological Survey; Evolution of Godthabs fjord, west Greenland with D r C R L Friend, Oxford Brookes University, UK; dating o f Archaean volcanic rocks from southern India with

D r B Chadwick, University of Exeter, UK; dating o f early Archaean rocks from northeastern China with Professor D Y Liu and M r B Song, Chinese Academy o f Geological Sciences, China.

Synthesis and characterisation o f specimens of high-pressure minerals by Dts Rigden and Jackson with Professor R C Liebermann, SUNY (Stony Brook).

Geochemical and isotopic studies o f Lau Basin lavas by D r W F McDonough with Drs G Loock and S L Goldstein, Max-Planck-Institut fur Chemie in Mainz.

T he compositions of ultramafic rocks from Japan by D r W F McDonough with Professor F A Frey and D r A Brandon, Massachusetts Institute o f Technology.

Oxidation states o f mantle samples by D ts W F M cDonough and R Rudnick with Drs H St C O ’Neill and D Canil, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth

The geochemistry of mande peridotites by Drs W F M cDonough and R Rudnick with D r H -G Stosch.

Development and testing o f experimental methods for laboratory measurement o f elastic wave speeds and attenuation by D r Jackson with Professor H Spetzler, M r I Getting and their colleagues at University o f Colorado (Boulder).

The age and composition o f peridotite xenoliths from Montana, USA by D r R L Rudnick with D r A J Irving, University o f Washington, Seanle.

The geochemistry of Siberian diamondiferous eclogites by D r R L Rudnick with D r Z Spetsius, Institute ofD iam ond Industry, Russia.

The geochemical and isotopic evolution of Quaternary silicic magmas in the Jemez volcanic field in northern New Mexico by D r T Spell with Dr P RKyle, New Mexico Instimte o f Mining

and Technology.

Studies in East Africa by Professor I McDougall with Professor F H Brown, University o f Utah.

Provision o f a numerical time framework for the evolution o f vertebrates in East Africa, by Professor I McDougall with the National

Museums o f Kenya, through D r Meave Leakey.

Transformational plasticity and its geophysical applications by Professor A C McLaren wath Dr A Meike, LawTence Livermore National Laboratory, California.

A thermochronological smdy o f the metamorphic core complex in the Paparoa Range in the South Island by D r T Spell with D t A Tulloch, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, New Zealand.

Dating lava flows from the western United States by D r J Stone with Professor H Friedrichsen, Dr K Hammerschmidt and D r D H ilton, Freie

Universitat Berlin.

Microstructural changes during the drying of brown coal; and the demineralisation o f coal by

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members o f the Organic Petrology G roup funded by N E D O (Japanese New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization).

Preparation o f a book on organic petrology by Professor G H Taylor with Professor A Davis, Pennsylvania State University, USA and D r M Teichmiiller, Geologisches Landesamt, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.

The dynamics o f particle suspensions by Professor J S Turner with Professor Η E Huppert, Institute o f Theoretical Geophysics, University o f Cambridge.

D r I Williams spent a week in September with D r R Parrish, Geological Survey of Canada, demonstrating SH R IM P II and assisting with the analysis o f a number o f test samples to aid Parrish

in assessing SHRIM P II’s performance.

Isotope geochemistry o f the Kermadec arc/back-arc system by D r J Woodhead with D r J Gamble, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand.

Aspects o f the geochemistry of the Polynesian hotspot region by D r J Woodhead with D r C W Devey, University o f Kiel, Germany.

T he petrology o f carbonated eclogites from the Bohemian Massif by D r G Yaxley with H Klapova, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

Techniques for the determination of three-dimensional shear wave structure from the waveforms o f seismic surface waves by D r A Zielhuis with Professor G Nolet, Princeton University.

John Curtin School of Medical Research

Division o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

X-ray structure o f human dihydropteridine reductase by D r W L F Armarego with Drs D L Ollis and P Carr, Research School o f Chemistry, A NU and Professor H Taguchi, Department of

Natural Sciences, Kyoto W om en’s University, Kyoto, Japan.

Expression of human dihydropteridine reductase in deficient human cells by Dr W L F Armarego and D r N Yang with D r R G H Cotton, The Murdoch Research Institute, Royal Children’s

Hospital, Melbourne.

Expression o f mutant human dihydropteridine reductase in Ecoli by D r W L F Armarego and D r N Yang with Drs R G H Cotton and P Smooker, The Murdoch Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne.

Structure o f FoFi-ATPase subunits by X-ray crystallography by Professor G B Cox with D r M Guss, University o f Sydney.

ATP-binding cassette membrane transporters by Professor G B Cox with D r A J Howells, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, The Faculties, ANU and Professor R K Poole, Department o f Microbiology, Kings College, London, U K

ATP-synthase mechanism by Professor G B Cox with Professor A E Senior, School o f Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, New York.

Proton-eneigised membrane transporters by Professor G B Cox with Professor A J Pittard, University of Melbourne.

Application o f novel affinity chromatography to the isolation o f proteins involved in inositol polyphosphate metabolism and cell signalling by Dr P Foster and Professor M A Denborough with

Professor S Ozaki, Department o f Resources Chemistry, Faculty o f Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan.

Application o f novel affinity chromatography to the purification o f particulate D-myo-inositol polyphosphate 5-pbosphatase by D r P Foster and Professor M A Denborough with Professor B V L Potter, Department o f Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, England.

Kinetic analysis o f potent and selective inhibitors of D-myo-inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase by D r P Foster and Professor M A Denborough with Professor B V L Poner, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University o f Bath, England.

Role o f nuclear localisation of the p l3 suc* subunit of the cdc2-kinase complex in controlling cell

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proliferation by D r D Jans with D r E Williams, Lions Cancer Institute, Royal Perth Hospital.

Nuclear localisation of the interferon induced IF16 protein by D r D Jans with D r J Trapani, Austin Research Institute, Melbourne.

Nuclear localisation of the cbl oncogene by D r D Jans with D r W Langdon, D epartm ent o f Biocemistry, University o f Western Australia.

Receptor-mediated delivery o f D N A and phototoxin molecules to the nucleus of specific cell types with application in gene therapy and cancer phototherapy by D r D Jans with Professor A Sobolev, Research Centre for Molecular

Diagnostics and Therapy, Moscow.

Molecular basis o f phosphorylation-mediated regulation o f nuclear protein transport by D r D Jans with D r S Hubner, Max-Planck-Instimt fur Biophysik, Franfurt am Main, Germany.

Nuclear localisation of the mUBF transcription factor by D r D Jans with Professor M Muramatsu, Saitama Medical School, Saitama, Japan.

Molecular weight studies o f proteins by D r P D Jeffrey with Drs D L Ollis and N E Dixon.

Division o f Cell Biology

Association o f molecules involving f and c chains on N K cells by D r J G Altin and Ms E B Pagler with D r H S Warren, Woden Valley Hospital, Canberra, ACT.

Studies on the structure o f CD 4 on human T lymphocytes by Drs J G Altin and C R Parish with Drs G Lynch and A Cunningham, Virology Unit, W estmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW.

Evolutionary origin of germline V genes in the immune system by Professor R V Blanden with Dr E J Steele and M r H Rothenfluh, University of W ollongong, N SW and Professor A J Gibbs,

Research School of Biological Sciences, ANU.

Definition o f p53 promoter elements activated by adenovirus E l a by D r A W Braithwaite with Dr M Oren, D epartment o f Chemical Immunology, Weizmann Instimte, Rehovot, Israel.

Role o f p53 and retinoblastoma genes in SV40-induced immortalisation of hum an cells by

D r A W Braithwaite with D r R Reddel, Children’s Medical Research Instimte, Westmead, Sydney, NSW.

Studies o f functional domains within mouse p53 by Drs A W Braithwaite and P Jackson with Dr M Reed, State University o f New York, Stonybrook, USA

Identification o f p53-responsive elements within the PCNA promoter by Drs A.W. Braithwaite and P. Jackson with D r Gil Morris, Department o f Pathology, Tulane Medical Center, New Orleans, USA

Identification o f a novel p53-response element in the M C K promoter by Drs A W Braithwaite and P Jackson with Drs J Buskin and S Hauschka, Department o f Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA

Mapping o f E3 proteins responsible for the down-regulation of adenovirus E la by Drs A W Braithwaite and A Mullbacher with D r W S M Wold, St Louis Medical Center, School of

Medicine, St Louis, USA

Involvement o f cytokines and nitric oxide in the side-effects o f diethylcarbamazine in filariasis patients by Drs IA Clark and K A Rockett with

D r P Turner, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland.

Role ofTNF-induced nitric oxide in CNS function by Drs IA Clark and K A Rockett with Professor M Friedlander, Neurobiology Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingjiam,

USA

Induction o f cytokines and nitric oxide by molecular components o f malaria parasites by Drs I A Clark and K A Rockett with Drs D Kwiatkowski and C Bate, Institute o f Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.

Interaction ofTN F, nitric oxide, and the chemo-attractant cytokine, CP10 by Drs IA Clark and K A Rockett with D r C Geczy, Heart

Research Institute, Sydney, NSW.

Possible role o f nitric oxide in Dengue and Typhoid by Drs IA Clark and K A Rockett with Dr S McGladdery, US Naval Medical Research Unit, Jakarta, Indonesia.

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Interactions o f ethanol with nitric oxide in the central nervous system by Drs I A Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with D r F Widmer,

Peptide Technology, Sydney, NSW.

The influence o f cytokines on nitric oxide production by human endothelial cells by Drs I A Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with D r L Belov, Peptide Technology, Sydney, NSW.

Cytokines and nitric oxide in filariasis patients treated with diethylcarbamazine by Drs I A Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with D r P Turner, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland.

Roles o f lymphotoxin in malarial pathology by Drs I A Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with D r B B Aggarwal, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA, and D r A Ferrante, University o f Adelaide, South Australia.

Involvement o f nitric oxide in the pathogenesis o f cerebral malaria by Drs IA Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with Professor M Friedlander, Neurobiology Research Centre, University o f Alabama at Birmingham, USA; D r D

Kwiatkowski, Instimte of Molecular Medicine, John RadclifFe Hospital, Oxford, UK.

Induction o f cytokines and nitric oxide by molecular components o f malaria parasites by Drs I A Clark, W B Cowden and K A Rockett with D r C Bate, T he Middlesex Hospital Medical School, University o f London, UK; D r P Jakobsen, University Hospital, Copenhagen,

Denmark.

Regulation o f fos-related antigens by the testis-determining factor SRY by D r D Cohen with D r A Sinclair, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria.

Role o f Fra-1 in insulin-dependent cell growth by D r D Cohen with Professor E Englesberg Department o f Biological Sciences, University of California at Santa Barbara, USA

Regulation o ffra- 1 expression following insulin stimulation by D r D Cohen with D r M Alexander-Bridges, H H M I, Harvard Medical School, Boston, U SA

Structure o f the mouse fra-2 gene by D r D Cohen with D r H ideo Iba, Institute of Medical Science, University o f Tokyo, Japan.

Adjuvant activity o f gamma inulin by D r P Cooper with D r E Steele, Department o f Biology, University o f Wollongong, NSW; D r G

Tannock, Professor R Clancy and D r G Pang, Faculty o f Medicine, University o f Newcastle, NSW; D r G Jones, University o f New England, Armidale, NSW; Professor R Raisin, Sydney

University o f Technology, NSW; D r J Cox, Commonwealth Serum Laboratories, Parkville, Victoria; Professor P Carnegie and D r H Deol, Murdoch University, Western Australia; D r P Ey, University o f Adelaide, SA D r P Goldwater, Adelaide Children’s Hospital, South Australia;

Drs I Frazer and R Tindle, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland; D r R Chevis, Chevis Agricultural Services, Oakdale, NSW; Professor S Faine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria; D r R H all, University o f Western Australia; D r D Jackson, School o f Microbiology,

University o f Melbourne, Victoria; D r R Gupta, Massachusetts Public Health Biological Laboratories, Boston, USA Professor A B Dalgleish, St Georges Hospital, London, UK; Professor A Erdei, Department o f Immunology, Lorand Eotvos University, God, Hungary; D r F Vogel, AIDS Vaccine Research Branch, N IH ,

Bethesda, U SA D r G Cerini, Lederle-Praxis Biologicals, Pearl River, New York, USA; D r T Spithill, Victorian Institute of Animal Science, Attwood, Victoria; D r G Layton, British Bio-Technology Ltd, Oxford, UK.

Novel approaches to vaccine technology by D r W B Cowden with D r B Moss, Peptide Technology Ltd, Sydney, NSW.

Design and synthesis o f novel immunological adjuvants by D r W B Cowden with Drs B Moss, F Widmer, P Schober, Peptide Technology Ltd, Sydney, NSW.

An approach to inhibition of atherogenic monocyte migration across the endothelium by Dr W B Cowden with Professor R T Dean and Dr J Dawes, H eart Research Institute, Sydney, NSW.

Small peptide inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor by Drs W B Cowden, K A Rockett and I A Clark with Drs D Rathjen and R A ton, Peptide Technology Ltd, Sydney, NSW.

The sensitivity o f ‘anetgic’ B cells to T cell stimulation by D r P D Hodgkin with Professor A Basten and D r J Eris, Centenary Institute o f

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Chancer Medicine and Cell Biology, University of Sydney, NSW.

Hie use o f T cell membranes to separate events in T cell-B cell collaboration by D r P D Hodgkin with D r M R Kehry, Department o f Molecular Biology, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Connecticut, U SA

Idle ability o f T cell membranes to induce somatic hypermutation in vitro by D r P D Hodgkin with D r E J Steele and M r H Rothenfluh, Department o f Biology, University

o f Wollongong, NSW.

Design, construction and immunobiological testing o f recombinant fowl pox vectors encoding cytokine genes by Mr K H Leong, Drs A J Ramsay and I A Rams haw with D r D Boyle, CSIRO, AAHL, Geelong, Victoria.

CL2D M P liposome elimination o f Marginal Zone Macrophages by D r A B Lyons with D r N van Rooijen, Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Investigation o f the behaviour o f transferred transgenic B lymphocytes using fluorescent probes by Dr A B Lyons and Dr C R Parish with D r D Fulcher, Ms S Korn and Professor A Basten, The Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell

Biology, University of Sydney, NSW.

Construction o f an adenovirus vector coding for the outer-surface protein o f Borrelia burgdorferi by D r A Miillbacher with D r M Simon, Max Planck Institute fur Immunobiology, Freiburg, Germany; D r R Wallich, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany.

Construction o f Adenovirus vaccine vectors by Dr A Miillbacher with Dr G Both, Division of Biomolecular Engineering, CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW.

Analysis o f genetic control o f response to viruses by D r A Miillbacher and Professor R V Blanden with D r A Hill, John RadclifFe Hospital, Oxford, U K

Polymorphism o f Syrian hamster class I M H C peptide transporters by Drs A Miillbacher and M Lobigs with D r M Simon, Max Planck Institute fur Immunobiologie, Freiburg, Germany.

The immune response to scabby mouth pox vims by Drs A Miillbacher and M Lobigs with Dr James Chin, Elizabeth MacArthur AG Institute, NSW Department of Agriculture, Camden, NSW.

The role o f T cell serine proteases in apoptosis and viral clearance by Drs A Miillbacher and P Waring with D r M Simon, Max Planck Institute fur I mmunobiologie, Freiburg, Germany.

Polyanion binding sites on C D 2 and C D 4 molecules by D r C R Parish with D r E Reinherz, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA; Dr M Recny, Precept Inc. Boston, USA

Searching for CD2 ligands by D r C R Parish with D r M Sandrin, Austin Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria; D r L Harrison, Walter & Eliza Hall Instimte, Melbourne, Victoria.

Role o f CD 45 in cell adhesion by D r C R Parish with D r D Coombe, Westerm Australian Research Institute for Child Health, Penh, Western Australia.

Polyanions as anti-HIV agents by D r C R Parish with D r A Cunningham, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW; Dr D Coombe, West Australian

Research Institute for Child Health, Perth; Dr C Rider, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, London, U K

Degradation o f basement membranesby leukocytes and tumour cells by D r C R Parish with D r P A Underwood, Division o f Molecular Biology, CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW; D r C Geczy, Heart Research Institute, Sydney, NSW.

Prolongation o f allograft survival by castanospermine by D r C R Parish with Drs A Hibberd and K Bowen, Departments of Surgery and Endocrinology, Royal Newcastle Hospital, NSW.

Modulation o fT cell immunity by D r C R Parish with D r B Fazekas de St Groth, Centenary Instimte o f Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology,

University o f Sydney, NSW.

Analysis o f cell adhesion molecules on human T lymphocytes Drs C R Parish and J Altin with D r H Warren, Woden Valley Hospital, Canberra,

ACT.

Immunobiology of recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding cytokine genes by D r A J

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Ramsay with Professor J Gauldie and D r F Graham, McMaster University, O ntario, Canada.

Immunobiology o f recombinant Salmonella vectors encoding cytokine genes by D r A J Ramsay with D r R Strugnell, University o f Melbourne, Victoria.

Antiviral immunity in cytokine gene knockout mice by D r A J Ramsay with D r M Kopf and Professor G Kohler, Max-Planck-Institut fur

Immunbiologie, Freiburg, Germany; Professor A Husband, University o f Sydney, NSW.

T cell immunity to immunogenic sequences o f HIV by Drs A J Ramsay, W B Cowden and Professor R V Blanden with Professor D Cooper,

St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW.

Design o f viruses for the biological control of vertebrate populations by D r I A Ramshaw with Drs P Jackson, P Kerr, M Bradley, C H Tyndale-Biscoe, Division ofWildlife and

Ecology, CSIRO, Canberra, ACT.

The use o f vaccinia virus expressing IL-2 in the treatment o f melanoma by Dr I A Ramshaw with Professor P Hersey, Oncology and Immunology Unit, Royal Newcastle Hospital, NSW.

Construction and testing of recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing genes o f M leprae by D r I A Ramshaw with Professor A Basten and D r W

Britton, Centenary Institute o f Cancer, Medicine and Cell Biology, University of Sydney, NSW.

Effect on virus-encoded cytokines on the imjmune response in the skin by D r J Ruby with D r G Halliday, Department o f Dermatology, University o f Sydney, NSW.

Division O f Clinical Sciences

Structural analysis o f ubiquitin-specific proteases by Dr R Baker with D r C Hill, Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah School o f Medicine Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Role o f ubiquitin-specific proteases in cancer by D r R Baker with Associate Professor D A Gray, Department o f Medicine, University o f Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Ubiquitin-specific proteases in Drosophila eye development by D r R Baker with D r J Vize,

Department o f Zoology, University o f Texas, Austin, Texas USA

Ubiquitin-specific proteases o f Saccharomyces cerevisiae by D r R Baker, with D r C Vazquez, Laboratory o f Molecular Genetics, National Institute o f Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

Molecular genetics and structure o f the glutathione S-transferase, by D r P Board with Professor B Mannervik, Biochemistry

Department Uppsala University, Sweden.

A vaccine for Fasciola hepatica by D r P Board with D t M Howell, Division o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The Faculties, ANU.

Structural analysis o f glutathione S-transferase by D r P Board with D r M Parker, St Vincents Medical Research Instimte Melbourne.

The glutathione transferases o f the sheep blowfly by D r P Board, with D r R Russel, Divison of Entomology, CSIRO Canberra.

The Budesonidc trial, by Dr G Buffinton, Professor W F Doe, M r S McKenzie, and D r P Pavli, with D r I Abdool, Woden Valley Hospital and Ms B Underwood, Astra Australia, Sydney.

Epithelial cell chemokine release by Professor W F Doe with Dr R Ulevitch Scripps Research Foundation La Jolla, California USA

Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer by Professor W F Doe and Dr M Kohonen-Corish with D r D J B St John and D r F A Macrae, Royal Melbourne Hospital.

Molecular evolution in mammals by D r S Easteal with D r C Collet, CSIRO Division ofW ildlife and Ecology.

Molecular evolution by retroposon-mediated gene, by D r S Easteal with Dr H Fitzgerald, University of California, San Francisco.

Duplication o f PDH and PGK genes by D r S Easteal with D r Η H Dahl, Murdoch Institute, Melbourne.

The population distribution of HLA-DP antigens, by D r S Easteal with D r G Thomson & H Salomon, University o f California at Berkeley.

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Ih e origin o f modern humans, by D r S Easteal with D r C P Groves, ANU.

Polymorphism in putative M H C class processing genes, by D r A Gautam, with Professor J Monaco, Department o f Molecular Genetics, Microbiology, University o f Cincinnati, Cincinnati, U SA

Transfection o f murine class II molecules in processing mutants by D r A Gautam, with D r E Mel 1 ins, T he Children’s Hospital o f Philadelphia, USA

Differential assembly of various M H C class II molecules in antigen processing mutants, by D r A Gautam, with Professor J McCluskey, Blood 7 ransfusion Service Adelaide, South Australia.

Linkage analysis o f neuromuscular diseases by Dr A Gautam, with D r N Laing, T he Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, Q E II Medical Centre, Nedlands, W A

Molecular genetic analysis o f chromosomes 18 deletions by D r A Gauatam, with D r V Jammee, Cytogenetics laboratory W oden Valley Hospital, Canberra.

Myb transformed cell lines as models for in vitro haematopoiesis by Dr A Hapel with D r T Gonda, I MVS, Adelaide.

Purification o f gp 120 (HIV) by D r A Hapel, with D r B Kemp, St Vincent’s Institute o f Medical Research, Melbourne.

Purification ofIL -3 plus M-CSF responsive stem cells from bone marrow by D r A Hapel with D r I Bertoncello, Peter MacCallum Institute, Melbourne.

T cell receptor genes in differentiating myeloid progenitor cells by D r A Hapel, with D r W Cook, Department o f Surgery, University o f Melbourne.

Analysis o f T cell receptor gene rearrangement in early lymphoid cells by D r H O ’Neill and D r C Jolly with D r W Li and D r K Shortman, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Melbourne.

Development o f the brain in the thyroidectomized foetal lamb by P McCullagh, with D r S Rees, Department o f Anatomy, University o f Melbourne.

Appearance o f Langerhans cells in foetal lamb sldn by D r P McCullagh, with D r S McClure CSIRO M cMaster Laboratory.

TLie use o f Laser Fourier Transform Raman spectoscopy in the investigation o f the oxidative modification o f low density lipoprotein by Drs M L Selley and N G Ardlie with D r P Fredericks,

Department of Chemistry Queensland University o f Technology.

The effect o f oxidized low density lipoprotein on isolated rat heart by Drs M L Selley and N G A dlie, with D r R Willis Division o f Science and Technology, Griffith University.

Studies on the role of trace metals in the pathogenesis o f atherosclerosis by Drs M L Selley and N G A dlie, with D r F W att, Department o f Physics University of Oxford.

Factors responsible for human cytomegalovirus induced proliferation o f infected endothelial cells, by Drs M L Selley and N G A dlie, with D r S B Woodroffe Department o f Biological Sciences,

University o f Wollongong.

Detection o f pre-diabetics by Professor S W Serjeantson with Professor I Mackay, D r M Rowley and Professor P Zimmet, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Monash University, . Melbourne.

Tire genetics o f diabetes G Western Pacific by Professor S W Serjeantson with Professor P Zimmet, and D r G Dowse, Lions International Diabetes Institute, Caufield.

The molecular basis of complement component C4 by Professor S W Serjeantson and Ms J Banyer with D r B Currie, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin.

T C R usage bias in autoimmunity by Professor S W Serjeantson and Dr C Olive, with Professor P Gatenby, Clinical Immunology, Royal Prince A ired Hospital Sydney.

The molecular basis of transplantation antigens by Professor S W Serjeantson and D r X Gao, with D r P Bennett, National Institute o f Diabetes and Kidney Disorders Phoenix, USA

Genomic organisation o f the urokinase receptor gene by D r Yao Wang and Professor W F Doe,

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with D r L K Johnson, Salix Pharmaceuticals, Inc Palo Alto CA, USA.

Alloreactive Natural Killer cells by D r H Warren with D r F Christiansen and D r C Witt, Department of Clinical Immunology, Royal Penh

Hospital.

Zeta-associated Molecules in NK cells by D r H. Warren with Dr J Altin, Cell Biology.

A new ligand for CD 2 by D r H Warren with Dr C Parish, Cell Biology.

Neuroscience

.Activity o f novel baclofen agonists by Professor D R Curtis, Dr G Lacey with Drs D I B Kerr and J Ong, Department o f Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University o f Adelaide.

Structure activity relationships of phosphinic derivatives of baclofen by Professor D R Curtis, Dr G Lacey with Drs W Froestl and S Mickel, Ciba-Geigy Ltd, Basle.

Synthesis and testing o f new novel antimalarial drugs by D r B G Barlin with Professor K Ricckmann and Mrs B Kotecka, Army Malaria Research Unit, Ingleburn.

Synthesis and testing o f nitrogen heterocycles for interaction with central and peripheral diazepam binding sites and as antagonists o f adenosine receptors bv Dr G B Barlin, Dr L P Davies, D r B D Glenn, Vision Research Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, ANU with D r P Matyus, Head, Department Institute for D rug Research, Budapest and D r N W Jacobsen, Chemistrv Department, University o f Queensland and Dr M Wong, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne.

Immunogold localisation o f the ryanodine receptor in skeletal muscle by D r A F Dulhunty, Dr P RJunankar with M r T M Lewis, Department Physiology, University o f Adelaide.

Characterisation of a brain polypeptide which cross reacts with a mondonal antibody to the skeletal ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel by D r A F Dulhunty, D r P RJunankar with Dr P Sah, Faculty o f Medicine, Discipline o f

Human Physiology, University of Newcastle.

Virus proteins as proton channels by Professor P Gage with Associate Professor D Cook, Department o f Physiology, University of Sydney.

Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance protein by Professor P Gage with D r A F Cowman, Walter & Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne.

Molecular mechanisms of excitation contraction coupling studied in skinned skeletal muscle fibres bv D r P R Junankar with Professor D G Stephenson and D r G D Lamb, Department o f Zoology La Trobe University.

Structural homology between Ca2+-activated K t channels (maxi-K) in rabbit T-tubules and in Chara by D r D R Laver with Professor N A Walker and Ms C Cherry, School of Biological Sciences, University o f Sydney-

Sympathetic neuretransmission to the dilator muscle o f the rat iris by Dr C E Hill with Drs G D S Hirst, F R Edwards and M Klemm,

Department o f Zoology, University o f Melbourne.

Involvement o f pertussis toxin sensitive and insensitive mechanisms in a-adrenoceptor modulation o f noradrenaline release from rat sympathetic neurones in tissue culture by D r C E

Hill, D r I A Hendry with D r D A Powis, School of Medicine, University ofNewcastle.

Age-related changes in tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase in a genetically hypertensive rat strain by D r I A Hendry with Dr C Bell, D epartment o f Physiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne.

Regulation o f ncurotrophin receptor by growth factors at various stages o f development by D r IA Hendry with D r P Bartlett, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne.

Immunolabelling for taurine in taurine-deprived retinae by D r A Leon with Dr D V Pow, Vision, Touch and Hearing Research Centre, University of Queensland.

Demyelination and conduction in the optic pathway by Professor W R Levick with D r W M Carroll, D epartment o f Neurology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA.

Mechanism o f direction-selectivity o f rabbit retinal ganglion cells by Professor W R Levick

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with D r D I Vaney, Vision Touch & Hearing Research Centre, University o f Qld.

SpatiotemporaJ white noise analysis o f mammalian visual neurones by Professor W R Levick with D r M C Citron, Division o f Neurology, Childrens Hospital o f Los Angeles, California.

Compression o f the optic nerve by Professor W R Levick with Professor W Burke, D epartm ent o f Physiology, University of Sydney.

Spread o f action potential in preterminal axons and synaptic boutons of primary afferents in spinal cord by Professor S J Redman with D r B Walmsley & D r M Nicol, Medical Biochemistry, Faculty o f Medicine, University o f Newcastle, and Dr B Graham, Centre for Cognitive Science, University o f Edinburgh.

Intracellular recording from the visual cortex by Dr T R Vidyasagar with D r P Xing, Department of Neurobiology, Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen, Germany and Dr M Volgushev Max-Planck Institute for Brain Research Frankfurt, Germany.

Perceptual learning in seeing form from motion by D r T R Vidyasagar with D r G W Stuart, Neurophysiology and Neurovision Lab Mental Health Research, Institute o f Victoria.

Processing o f colour and spatial vision in the primate by D r T R Vidyasagar, G H Henry with D r P R M artin, D epartment o f Physiology, University o f Sydney, Sydney.

Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

Infrared imaging o f polar ring galaxies by D r M Arnaboldi and Professor K C Freeman with D r P Sackett and D r L S Sparke, Institute o f Advanced Study, Princeton.

T he kinematics o fN G C 1399 by Professor K C Freeman and D r M Arnaboldi with D r X H ui, Caltech, and D r M Capaccioli, Osservatorio di Capo dimonte.

B and V photom etry o f the 30 Doradus cluster (N G C 2070) by M s S Beaulieu with D r G

Meylan, European Southern Observatory, Dr S Djorgovski and D r N Weir, Caltech, and D r D Crabtree, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.

Deep photometry and the kinematics ofSDIG and of the SIC by Ms S Beaulieu and Ms S Cote with D r C Carignan, Universite de Montreal.

T he H I distribution and kinematics o f dwarf spheroidals by Ms S Beaulieu and Ms S Cote with D r S Demers and D r C Carignan, Universite dc Montreal.

T he H I distribution and kinematics o f four dwarf irregular galaxies by Ms S Beaulieu with D r G Meurer, Space Telescope Science Institute and Dr

C Carignan, Universite de Montreal.

T he dark matter and the extended ΕΠ disk of N G C 2915 by Ms S Beaulieu with D r G Meurer, Space Telescope Science Institute and D r C Carignan, Universite de Montreal.

HI detection in SGC0938.1-7623 by Ms S Beaulieu with D r G Meurer, Space Telescope Science Institute and Dr C Carignan, Universite de Montreal.

A survey o f the whole southern sky for millisecond pulsars by M r J F Bell with D r R N Manchester, D r S Johnston, D r M Bailes and M r J Glowacki, Australia Telescope National Facility,

Professor A G Lyne, Dr P A Harrison, M r D R Lorimer and M r C Robertson, Manchester University, D r N D ’Amico, Istituto di Fisica dell’Universita, M r L Nicastro, Istimto di Radioastronomia del CNR, Ms V M Kaspi, Princeton University and M r T M Tauris, Aarhus University.

High precision timing of southern millisecond pulsars by M r J F Bell with D r R N Manchester and D r M Bailes, Australia Telescope National Facility , Professor A G Lyne, Manchester University, and Professor S R Kulkarni, M r J Navarro and M r J Sandhu, Caltech.

Identifying optical companions to binary millisecond pulsars by M r J F Bell and D r M S Bessell with D r M Bailes, Australia Telescope National Facility, Professor S R Kulkarni, M r E M Leitch, Caltech and Professor A G Lyne, Manchester University.

Optical studies o f the SM C pulsar J0045-7319 binary system by M r J F Bell and D r M S Bessell

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with D r V M Kaspi, Princeton and D r M Bailes, Australia Telescope National Facility.

Searches for southern pulsar wind nebulae by M r J Bell with M r A Melatos and Professor D Melrose, Sydney University, and D r M Bailes, Australia Telescope National Facility.

A spectroscopic study o f faint objects in the Edinburgh-Cape U V survey by D r M Bessell with Dr D O ’Donaghue, University o f Cape Town, D r R Stobie and D r D Kilkenny, South African Astronomical Observatory.

A study o f K giant model atmospheres by D r M Bessell with D r B Plez, Niels Bohr Institute Copenhagen.

A study o f galactic centre K giants by D r M Bessell with D r E Sadler, University o f Sydney.

A Southern Parallax Program by D r M Besssell with D r P Ianna, University of Virginia.

A smdy o f mira model atmospheres by D r M Bessell and D r P R W ood with D r M Scholz, University o f Heidelberg.

A search for brown dwarfs by D r M Bessell with D r G Stringfellow, Pennsylvania State University.

Extended emission line regions in active galaxies by M r A Koekemoer, D r G V Bicknell and D r M A Dopita with Professor R D Ekers, Australia T elescope National Facility, CSIRO.

Elliptical galaxies as tracers of non-uniformities in the H ubble flow by D r Μ M Colless with Professor R L Davies and M r G Baggley, Oxford, Professor D Burstein, Arizona State, Professor E Bertschinger, Massachusetts Iinstitute o f Technology, Professor G Wegner, Dartmouth,

D r R Saglia, Pisa/Heidelberg and D r R McMahan, UNC.

Redshift surveys and galaxy evolution by D r Μ M Colless and D r B A Peterson with Professor R S Ellis, D r K Glazebrook and Dr D Schade, Cambridge, D r T Broadhurst, Johns Hopkins, D r K Taylor, Anglo-Australian Observatory and D r S Cole, Durham.

The peculiar velocities o f cD galaxies by D r Μ M Colless with M r A M Dunn, Cambridge.

Substructure in the Coma cluster by D r Μ M Colless with Professor A Oemler, Yale and Professor S D M W hite and M r A M Dunn, Cambridge.

A 21-cm line smdy o f the Fourcade-Figueroa galaxy by Ms S Cote and Professor K Freeman with D r A Bosma, Observatoire de Marseille.

HI redshift survey o f low surface brightness objects by Ms S Cote with D r T Broadhurst, Johns Hopkins University, and D r J Loveday, Fermilab.

Dynamical smdy o f cold versus warm IRAS sources by Ms S Cote with Dr T Broadhurst, Johns Hopkins University.

HI in local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies by Ms S Cote with D r C Carignan and D r S Demers, Universite de Montreal.

Post-asymptotic giant branch evolution in the Magellanic Clouds by Dr M A Dopita, D r S Meatheringham and D r P W ood with D r H C Ford, Johns Hopkins, STScI, D r E Vassiliadis and Dr Ralph Bohlin, STScI, Dr P Harrington, U Maryland, and D r T Stecher and D r S Maran, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Optical identification of EUVE survey objects by Dr M A Dopita and D r M S Bessell with Professor S Bowyer and D C Christian, Center for EUV Astrophysics, U California, Berkeley.

The Antarctic astronomy initiative by D r M A Dopita with D r M Burton, U New South Wales.

A survey for ring nebulae associated with WR stars in the Magellanic Clouds by D r M A Dopita and M r J Bell with Professor T Lozinskaya,

Sternberg State University, and D r You-Hua Chu, Illinois State University.

Optically violent variables by D r M A Dopita with Drs M Shara and L Drissen, Space Telescope Science Instimte and Professor D Wickramasinghe, Department o f Mathematics, ANU.

Photoionisation modelling of Nova LMC 1990#1 by D r M A Dopita and D r S J Meatheringjiam with Professor S Stanfield, Arizona State University, D r R E Williams, Space Telescope Science Institute; D r S D Ryder, U o f Alabama,

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and Drs G Sonnenbom and S Shore, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

Determination o f the emission mechanism in LINERS by D r M A Dopita and D r G V Bicknell with D r A P Koratkar and D r I N Evans, Space Telescope Science Institute, D r E M Sadler,

Department o f Physics and Astronomy, U Sydney, and D r R S Sutherland, JILA, U o f Colorado.

H ST observations of the O -rich supernova remnant N 132D by Dr M A D opita with D r W P Blair, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Dr P F Winkler, Middelcbury College, D r R Kirshner and D r J C Raymond, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard, D r K Lond and D r J

Morsey, Space Telescope Science Institute, and D r R S Sutherland, JILA, U Colorado.

A search for 21 -cm emission in globular clusters bv D r D J Faulkner and D r P R W ood with D r A E Wright, Australia Telescope National Facility,

CSIRO.

Dynamics o f planetary nebulae in the Sombrero galaxy by Professor K C Freeman with D r H Ford, Space Telescope Science Institute, and D r X Hui, MIT.

Dynamics o f N G C 1399 by Professor K C Freeman and D r M Arnaboldi, with D r H Ford, Space Telescope Science Institute, D r X H ui, M IT, and Professor M Capaccioli, Osservatorio di Capodimonte.

T he disks o f edge-on spirals by Professor K C Freeman, with D r R A Vaile, University o f Western Sydney, and D r A Bosma, Observatoire de Marseille.

T he dynamics o f the polar ring galaxy N G C 465OA by Professor K C Freeman with D r P Sackett and D r H -W Rix, Institute o f Advanced Study, Princeton.

Radio studies o f the late type galaxies N G C 24 and N G C 45 by Professor K C Freeman with D r C Carignan, University o f Montreal.

Search for cool white dwarfs in the galactic halo by Professor K C Freeman, D r M Bessell and Mr C Lidman, with D r J Silk, University of California, Berkeley.

Dynamics and chemical properties o f the globular cluster omega Centaurr by Professor K C Freeman with Professor T de Zeeuw, D r R Reijns and D r R L e Poole, Leiden Observatory, and Dr

P Seitzer, University o f Michigan.

Space Telescope studies o f interacting galaxies by Professor K C Freeman and Ms J English, with D r S Zepf, University o f California, Berkeley, and D r K Ashman, University o f Kansas.

Space Telescope studies o f the post-starburst galaxy N G C 5102 by Professor K C Freeman and D r P Quinn, with Professor C Norman, Johns

Hopkins University and D r N Scoville, Caltech.

Luminosity functions and structure o f young and intermediate age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud by Professor K C Freeman and D r R A W

Elson, University of Cambridge.

The radial distribution o f C N and Ca abundances in omega Centauri by Professor K C Freeman and D r J Norris, with Dr M Mayor, Geneva Observatory.

Dynamics o f the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy by Professor K C Freeman with D r R D Cannon, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

H I studies o f the Fourcade-Figueroa galaxy by Professor K C Freeman and Ms S Cote, with Dr A Bosma and D r E Athanassoula, Observatoire de Marseille.

The opacity o f spiral galaxies by Professor K C Freeman, with D r Y-I Byun, University of Hawaii and D r N Kylafis, University o f Crete.

Simulations o f merging elliptical galaxies by Mr D Fuilagar and D r P Quinn with D r J Salmon, Caltech, and M r M Warren, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Physics o f emission-line regions in radio galaxies by M r A Koekemoer and D r G Bicknell with Professor R Ekers, Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO.

Cluster dark matter mapping via gravitational tensing o f background galaxies by Ms H Liang with D r T Broadhurst and D r A Sazlay, Johns Hopkins University, and D r W Couch,

University o f New South Wales.

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A multi-wavelength study of cluster mass distribution by Ms H Liang and Professor R Ekers with D r M Pierrs, CEN Saclay.

The ages and luminosity functions o f some open clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud by D r G Lynga with Professor B Westerlund, Uppsala, and Dr P Linde, Lund.

Heavy element abundances in the most metal deficient stars by D r J E Norris with D r T C Beers, Michigan State University, and D r S G Ryan, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

Lithium abundances in the most metal deficient stars by D r J E Norris with D r S G Ryan, Anglo-Australian Observatory, and D r G S Stringfellow, Pennsylvania State University.

Rotational velocities o f blue horizontal branch stars in globular clusters by Dr J E Norris with Dr G S Da Costa, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

The abundance patterns in w Centauri, M 22 and N G C 6752, by D r J E Norris with D r G S Da Costa, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

CN O abundances in the globular cluster N G C 6397 bv D r J E Norris with Dr R D Cannon, Dr B F Crokc and D r G S Da Costa, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

ILc velocity dispersion of objects at 60 kpc from the galactic center by D r J E Norris with D r M R S Hawkins, Royal Observatory Edinburgh.

Field blue horizontal branch stars as tracers of the stellar populations o f the galaxy by D r J E Norris with D r H L Morrison, Kitt Peak National Observatory.

Red giant branch stars as tracers o f the extended galactic disk by D r J E Norris with D r E M Green, University o f Arizona and D r H L Morrison, Kitt Peak National Observatory.

Color magnitude diagrams of metal rich globular clusters by D r J E Norris with D r A Sarajedini, Kitt Peak National Observatory.

Imaging observations o f radio QSOs to search for the effects o f gravitational lensing by intervening galaxies by D r B Peterson with D r R Webster, Melbourne University, and Dr M Drinkwarer, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

Identification of galaxy cluster x-ray sources found near the south ecliptic pole by Rosat by D r B Peterson and D r M Colless with D r M Pierre, Saclay, D r J Loveday, Fermilab, and colleagues at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterresrrische Physik, Munchen.

Observational studies of the surface density, colours and redshifts o f distant galaxies by D r B Peterson with D r Y Yoshii, National Astronomical Observatory Japan, Professor J Silk,

University o f California, Berkeley, and colleagues at the European Southern Observatory

Models of the luminosity evolution o f galaxies by Dr B Peterson with D r Y Yoshii, National Astronomical Observatory Japan.

Searches for optical pulsars by D r B Peterson and Dr A J Kalnajs with D r R N Manchester, Australia Telescope National Facility.

Smdies of large scale stmeture using a sparsely sampled redshift survey from the APM galaxy catalogue by D r B Peterson with D r J Loveday, Fermilab, D r G Efstathiou and D r S Maddox, Oxford University.

Smdies o f the intergalactic medium using Q SO absorption lines by D r B Peterson with D r R Bond, Center for Theoretical Astrophysics, and Dr S D ’odorico, European Southern Observatory.

High dispersion spectroscopic smdies of comets bv Dr B Peterson with Dr S Wyckoff and D r P Wehinger, Arizona State University.

Smdies o f large scale stmeture using a redshift survey obtained with the UK Schmidt Telescope and fiber spectrograph by Dr B Peterson and D r M Colless with D r S Raychaudhury, Center for Astrophysics, and D r J Loveday, Fermilab.

N-body dynamical and hydrodynamical techniques on parallel supercomputers by D r P J Quinn with D r J Salmon, Caltech Concurrent Supercomputing Facility.

Research on galaxy formation— Los Alamos Advanced Com puter Facility by D r P J Quinn with D r W Zurek and Dr M Warren, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

N-body experiments on globular cluster evolution, globular cluster formation in mergers and galaxy-satellite interactions by D r P J Q uinn

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with D r L H cm quist and D C Grillmair, U C Santa Cruz.

HN I and ground based spectroscopy o f chromospheric activity in globular cluster giants by Professor A Rodgers with D r A Dupree, D r L H artm ann and D r D B Zucker, Harvard, and Dr G H Smith, Lick.

HS Γ and ground based observations of interstellar absorption lines in g“ Velorum to determine local interstellar gas composition and depiction by Professor A Rodgers with Professor L Spitzer and D r E Fitzpatrick, Princeton University Observatory.

Search for massive astrophysical compact halo objects by Professor A Rodgers, Professor K Freeman, D r B Peterson, and D r P Q uinn with staff o f the University o f California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

VLB! observations of low redshift radio galaxy cores and MKII correlation by M r S Tin gay with Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; University o f Tasmania;

University o f Western Australia; University o f Adelaide; Sydney University; University of Western Sydney; and Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory.

Pre-launch survey for space VLB1 missions by Mr S J Tingay with D r R A Preston, Jet Propulsion laboratory, M r G Mollenbrock, Brandies University and M r F Kenta, ISAS.

Determining accurate distances to Virgo and Fornax clusters by D r N Visvanathan with Ms A Schroder and Professor G Tam mann, University o f Basel.

Visual-infrared color gradients o f cD galaxies in Abell Ccusters by D r N Visvanathan with Dr Pleiter, ESO, Certer, RGO, D r G Mackie,

University o f Wisconsin, and D r A Pickles, IfA, University o f Hawaii.

Internal velocity dispersion and line strength of elliptical galaxies in compact groups by D r N Visvanathan with D r P Hickson and Ms C Mendes de Olivcria, University o f British Columbia.

IRAS galaxies behind the southern Milk)' Way by D r N Visvanathan with D r T V amada, Kyoto University.

The apparent non-correlation of the integrated H-alpha and radio continuum emission in normal starforming galaxies by D r N Visvanathan with D r S Ryder, University o f Alabama, Tuscalloosa.

A study o f long period variables in the SMC by D r P W ood and Dr M S Bessell with D r C Moore, University of Wollongong.

Deep vearches for planetary' nebulae in the northern LMC by Dr P W ood with D r S M G Hughes, Caltech.

The tilt of the LMC as a function o f the age of the stellar population by D r P W ood with Dr S M G Hughes, Caltech.

Search for dust-enshrouded AGB stars in the bar o f the LMC by D r P W ood with D r S M G Hughes, Caltech.

Study o f variable stars in local group galaxies by Dr P W ood with Dr T D Kin man, Kin Peak National Observatory.

A smdy o f Cepheid variables and stellar evolution in intermediate mass stars by D r P W ood with D r P Chiosi, Padua.

The smdy o f O H /IR star variability at the galactic centre by D r P Wood and D r P J McGregor with Professor H Habing, Leiden.

A smdy o f dome seeing at the Anglo-Australian Telescope by D r P Wood with D r S Ryan, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

Research School of Pacific Studies

Agriculture's decline as a share of G D P and total employment in the market economies of East Asia by Professor P W an and D r W M anin with the

World Bank.

Research on the Chinese tea industry, by Dr D F.therington and D r K Forster, University of New Engjand.

Development o f a computer software package MUI.BUD for tree growth management by Dr D Etherington with International Council for Research in Agroforestry and D r T Lawrence, University o f Canberra.

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Research on coconut oil as fuel by D r D Etherington with Centre for Environmental Mechanics, CSIRO, D r D Hagen, Energy Stewards Pty Ltd, D r O Kennedy, University of Wollongong and Professor K Rhee, Texas A & M University System.

Regional development theory and its appreciation between Professor B Higgins and D r D Sovie, Director, Canadian Instimte for Research on Regional Development.

Economics o f institutional change in poor rural areas o f Sumatra by D r C Barlow and Harvard Institute for International Development, Centre for Policy and Implementation Studies, Jakarta, and Research Institute for Estate Crops (Medan).

The world rubber industry by D r C Barlow with Dr S K WJayasuriya o f La Trobe University.

Cooperation between Professor R Gam aut and Murdoch University's Asia Centre Advisory Council.

A budgetary and economic analysis o f the North American Free T rade Agreement by Professor W McKibbin with Dr J Manchester, US Congressional Budget Office.

Economic development and arms trade by Professor W McKibbin with Professor L Klein, L'niversity o f Pennsylvania.

Research on the global costs of policies ro reduce Greenhouse Gas emissions by Professor W McKibbin with D r P Wilcoxen, The Brookings Institute for US Environmental Protection Agency.

Research on macroeconomic adjustments to external shocks in Thailand by Professor P Warr with D r Bhanupong Nidhiprabha, Thammasat University.

Research on economic reforms in India by Drs K Kalirajan and R Shand with Dr A Gulati, National Council o f Applied Economic Research, New Delhi.

Research on production efficiency in Bangladesh rice production by Drs K Kalirajan and R Shand with D r M Alauddin, University o f Queensland.

Research on measuring disguised unemployment by D r K Kalirajan with Dr G Shantakumar, National University of Singapore.

Research on temporal variation in technical efficiency in the Chinese iron and steel industry in the 1980s by Dr K Kalirajan with D r Cao Yong, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Research on new export arrangements for Australia by Professor P Drysdale, Professor R Gamaut and D r A Elek with D r Hadi Soesastro and D r Mari Pangetsu, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Jakarta; Professor Tai-Ying Liu, Professor Rong-I W u and D r Ching-Mai W u, Taiwan Institute o f Economic Research; Dr Bo H o Koo and D r Soo-Gil Young, Korea Development Institute; Dr Ryutaro Komiya, Ministry o f International Trade and Industry Research Institute, Japan; Professor Motoshige Itoh, University ofTokyo; Professor Liu Guoguang, Professor Zhou Shulian and Professor Pei Shuping, Chinese Academy o f Social Sciences; Mr R Fynmore, BHP; D r I Gould, CRA; M r B Frilay, BP Australia; M r S Burdon, A-OTC; Mr Gaishi Hiraiwa and M r Kazuo Nukazawa, Japan Federation o f Economic Organisations; M r Osamu Uno, Mr Haruyasu Ohsumi and Mr Nobuo Takahashi, Kansai Federation o f

Economic Organisations; D r Key-Oh Song and Mr Sung-Woo Kim, Korean Iron and Steel Association; D r Mohammed Sadli, Indonesian Chamber of Commerce; and D r Chen-Fu Koo, Taiwan Committee, PBEC

Japanese investment in Australia by Professor P Dtysdale with Professor S Nicholas, University of Melbourne, and D r J Morison, University o f New England.

The East Asian steel industry by Professor P Drydale and D r C Findlay with D r R Bishry, Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPP) o f Indonesia.

Japan and Australian labour market reform by Professor P Dtysdale with Ms H Campbell, Mr I Cook and M r P Tobin, Department o f Industrial Relations.

New developments in the East Asian textile industry by D r C Findlay with Professor Motoshige Itoh, University of Tokyo.

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Research on Japanese investment abroad by Professor P Drysdale with D r R Myers, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

Impact o f C hina’s entry into G A TT by Professor P Drysdale, Professor R Garnaut and D r L Song with Associate Professor C Findlay, D r A Watson and D r R Pomfret, University o f Adelaide, and

Professor Liu Jiangyong, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Assistance to the Thai Ministry of Health by D r F Perkins to develop a framework to measure the cost savings in employing a combined hepatitis B and D T P vaccine for childhood diseases, with D r B Biggs, W alter and Eliza Institute, Melbourne.

Research on population growth and employment projections to 2010 in the Islands/Australia research program at the National Centre for Development Studies with Professor K Gannicott, Wollongong University; on women in education

in the South Pacific with Professor K Gannicott, Wollongong University and Ms B Avaloss, University o f Papua New Guinea; on natural resources and environment in the Pacific with Dr D Davis, University of New England; and on urban services in island capital cities by M r R Cole with D r J Connell and D r J Lea, University of Sydney.

Com pendium o f Korea Project by D r Y H Choe-Wall with scholars from many universities.

Cooperative research project on the link between religious and commercial institutions in French territories bv D r D Shineberg and J-M Kohler, ORSTOM," Paris.

Modern Pacific history by D r B J Lai with D r K Howe, Massey University and D r R C Kiste, Center for Pacific Studies, University o f Hawaii.

Recent mral history in north Vietnam by Professor B Kerkvliet with M r Nguyen Quang Ngoc, Centre for Cooperative Vietnamese Smdies, University of Hanoi.

Political Authority and Legitimacy in Southeast Asia by D r W Case, Dr H Crouch and Professor B Kerkvliet with D r Muthiah Alagappa,

East-West Center, Honolulu.

Elections in Southeast Asia by Professor B Kerkvliet and D r H Crouch with Professor R

Taylor, School of Oriental and African Smdies, University o f London, and other participants.

Regime Change and Regime Maintenance in Asia and the Pacific by Dr R J May and D r H Crouch, with Associate Professor C Thayer, on secondment from the Australian Defence Force Academy, and 19 project associates from other Australian and overseas universities.

Comparative study on economy, society, and development by Dr R J May with Professor L Diamond, Hoover Institution, and associates.

Research into managing diversity; governments and ethnicity in Southeast Asia and the Pacific by Drs R J May and H Crouch, with Drs S

Henningjiam and B Lai (Pacific and Asian History), and with Drs D Brown and Chua Beng H uat (National University o f Singapore), Dr F Loh Kok W ah (Universiti Sains Malaysia), Dr A Renard (Payap University, Thailand).

Research into Papua New Guinea electoral politics by D r R May and D r B Standish with Professor Yaw SafFu, University o f Papua New Guinea.

Research into political violence in Papua New Guinea by D r W Standish with D r Wari Iamo, then o f PNG National Research Institute, Port Moresby.

United Nations Peacekeeping Operations in Cambodia by Associate Professor C Thayer with Professor R C Thakur, University o f Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Research on Indian economic, political and strategic outlook by Dr A Gordon with Monash University.

Research on groundwater nitrate in Java by Professor J J Fox with D r G Smith, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Faculties and the Division of Public Health, School of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta

Eastern Indonesian Fishing Communities by Professor J J Fox and D r Y Raharjo, Indonesian Institute o f Sciences, Jakarta.

Politics o f Tradition in the Pacific Project by Dr M Jolly with Macquarie University and

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Department o f Archaeology and Anthropology, The Faculties, ANU.

Collaborative research between D r K Ram and Rim M enon o f Kali on Indian state policies regarding maternity for Women Press, New Delhi.

Research on maternity and sexuality in Asia and the Pacific by Drs M Jolly and K Ram with staff in Tropical Health Program, University of Queensland Medical School and Gender Studies Unit. University o f Melbourne, Departments o f Sociology, University o f Newcastle and Flinders University.

Research on ‘high resolution analysis o f past sea level, hydrology' and climate in the Australian region, as a baseline for assessing future changes, and for testing predictive climatic models’ by Professor J Chappell with Dr R Wasson, CSIRO Division ofW ater Resources and D r E Wolanski, Institute o f Marine Science.

Research on Q uaternary sea level changes recorded on the H uon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, by Professor J Chappell and D r C Campbell in collaboration with the University of Papua New Guinea, Cornell, Cambridge, Tongji, Nagoya, Tokyo, Yokohama and Wellington Universities, the California Institute of Technology, and the Instimte o f Geography,

Moscow.

Smdy o f vegetation dynamics and history in New Caledonia, by D r G Hope with D r J Read, Monash University and Centre Technicale Forestiere Fropicale, Noumea.

Southern Forest Archaeological Project by M r J Magee with Professor] Allen, LaTrobe University.

Research on ecology o f Finnish boreal forest by D r P Minchin with Tiind Tontcri, Finnish Forest Research Institute.

Research on prediction o f climate from pollen assemblages by D r P Minchin with Professor] Dodson, University o f New South Wales and Dr ] Oksanen, University o f Kuopio, Finland.

Work on CSIRO Student Research Scheme by- Ms G Atkin.

Geomorphology o f tropical esmaries by Professor J Chappell with D r C Woodroffe, University o f Wollongong.

Late Quaternary sealevels and coral diagenesis by Professor] Chappell with Dr Z Zhu, Curtin University.

Origin o f large shell mounds at Weipa by Professor J Chappell with D r G Bailev, University o f Cambridge and D r R Cribb, James Cook University.

Palaeoclimate modelling by Professor J Chappell with D r ] Syktus, CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research.

Palaeomonsoons o f China and Australia by Professor] Chappell with D r An Zhisheng, Xian Institute o f Loess and Quaternary' Geology.

Palaeoseismicity, landslides and sea level changes at H uon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea by Professor J Chappell with Professor Yoko Ota, Yokohama National University.

Research on high resolution analysis of past sea level, hydrology and climate in the Australian region, as a baseline for assessing future changes, and for testing predictive climatic models’ by Professor] Chappell with Dr R Wasson, CSIRO and D r E Wolanksi, Institute o f Marine Science.

Research on Quaternary sea level changes recorded on the H uon Peninsula, PNG by Professor] Chappell and Dr C Campbell in collaboration with the University o f Papua New Guinea, Cornell, Cambridge, Tongji, Nagoya, Tokyo, Yokohama and Wellington Universities, the California Institute of Technology, and the Institute o f Geography, Moscow.

Variations in the intensity of the southwest Monsoon: Palaeoclimatic reconstructions from Australia and India over the last 125ka by D r] Croke with Associate Professor G Nanson and D Price, University o f Wollongong and Dr A K Singhvi, Earth Science Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India.

Late Quaternary environments in Tasmania by Dr G S Hope, D r M Macphail with Professor E A Colhoim, University of Newcastle and D r P Augustinium, University of Tasmania.

Regeneration strategies of plants on ultrabasic substrates by D r G Hope, Mr S McCoy, D r J Ash and M r Tanguy Jaffrc, ORSTOM, Noumea.

J o i n t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s u n d e r t a k e n w ith u n iv e rs itie s . C SIRO a n d o t h e r in stitu tio n s

Vegetation and climate in Maluku by D r G Hope and M r Pusat Studi Lingkungen, Universitas Pattimura, Ambon, Indonesia.

Groundwater Recharge investigation project by M r P Lane and D r N Nanda Kumar, D r R Vertessy and D r E O ’Loughlin, CSIRO Division o f W ater Resources.

Ccnozoic Palynostratigraphy o f the eastern margin o f Australia by D r M Macphail with Dr C Jenkins, Ocean Sciences Institute, University of Sydney, D r R Hclby, consultant, Sydney, M r A D

Partridge, La ’Probe University and D r P Quiltv, Antarctic Division, Hobart.

Ccnozoic palynostratigraphy o f the northern margin o f Australia by D r M Macphail with D r C Jenkins, Ocean Sciences Institute, University of Sydney, D r R Helby, consultant, Sydney, M r A D

Partridge, l a Probe University, D r E M Truswell, Australian Geological Survey Organisation and Professor R S Hill, University o f Tasmania.

Ccnozoic palynostratigraphy o f the Murray Basin by Dr M Macphail with M r J Kellctt and D r E M 1 ruswcll, Australian Geological Survey Organisation.

Neogene floras and vegetation o f southern Australia by D r M Macphail with Professor R S Hill and D r G Jordan, University o f Tasmania

and M r A D Hope, La Trobe University.

Paleogene floras and vegetation of southern Australia bv D r M Macphail with Professor R S Hill and D r M Pole, University of Tasmania, D r

E M Truswell, Australian Geological Survey Organisation and Dr J Pickett, N SW Mines.

D rought in the Australian outback: Milankovich and anthropogenic forcing o f the Australian monsoon (N SW funded project) by M r J Magee with Professor G H Miller, University o f

Colorado.

Southern forests Archaeological Project by Mr J Magee with Professor J Allen and D r N Stern, La Trobe University.

Research on agricultural systems in Papua New Guinea by Dts B J Allen, R I. Hide, G S Humphreys and R M Bourkc with M r E Sitipai and B Wavi, P N G Department of Agriculture and Livestock, Drs M Levett and G Sem,

Geography Department, UPNG, and D r W Iamo and M r T Nen, PNG National Research Institute.

Research into new model o f soil formation by Dr G S Humphreys with Professor T R Pator. and Dr P B Mitchell, Macquarie University.

Geomorphology and late Quaternary histoiv of the eastern Star Mountains by D r G S Humphreys with Professor R Blong, Macquarie University.

Project on land tenure in the Pacific Islands by Professor R G Ward with Profcsor M Rodman, York University, Canada, Drs A Hooper and K James, East-West Center, Honolulu, and D r J T O ’Meara, Melbourne University.

Research on environmental criticality in Southeast Asia by Emeritus Professor H C Brookfield and Ms Y Byron with Dr L M Potter, University o f Adelaide.

Development o f China’s future spatial economy by Professor G J R Linge with Professor D K Forbes, University of South Australia, Professor Li Wen-yan, Institute of Geography, Beijing and

Professor W ang Huivong, State Development Council, Beijing.

Work on future directions for research in industrial geography by Professor G J R Linge with Professor G A van der Knapp, Economic Geography Institute, Erasmus University,

Rotterdam.

Research on finance, institutions and industrial change by Professor G J R Linge with Professor E Schamp, Johann Wolfgang Gocthe-Universitat, Frankfurt am Main.

Research on urban transport problems by D r P J Rimmcr with Professor J A Black, Department o f Transport Engineering, School o f Civil Engineering, University o f New South Wales.

Project on internationalisation o f Japan and its spatial integration by D r P J Rimmcr with Professor Cheung Chi-wai, Tokuyama University, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Research on cities, transport and economic integration and a systems approach to the economic history of Southeast Asia by Dr P J Rimmcr with D r H W Dick, University of Newcastle.

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Research on trade facilitation between Australia and Indonesia by D r P J Rimmer with D r H Dick, University o f Newcastle, M r J Parapak, Indonesian Department of Posts, Tourism and Telecommunications and M r M Siregar, Indonesian Department of Transport.

Research on Australian intergration in a dynamic Asia-Pacific economy by D r P J Rimmer with Dr H Dick, University o f Newcastle.

Research on cross-border developments and the spread o f HIV/AIDS by D r D J Porter with Associate Professor Mya Than, Institute o f Economics, Yangon, Myanmar.

Research on social and economic marginalization in rural areas by D r D J Porter with D r Pham Van Bien, Institute o f Agricultural Sciences of South Vietnam, H o Chi Minh City.

Research on planning and fiscal relations between provincial and local levels of government in the context o f economic liberaalization by D r D J Porter with M r Nguyen Dinh Khoi, Centre for Rural Planning and Development, Da N an g Vietnam.

Research on the impact of a large bilaterally funded rural development project by D r D J Porter with Kaisahan, Cagayan d’Oro, Philippines.

Atlas o f Languages o f Intercultural Communication in the Greater Pacific Area by D r D Tryon with Professor S Wurm, Australian Academy for the Humanities and D r P Miihlhaiisler, University of South Australia.

Research on knowledge and use of wild plants among the Kalam o f Madang Province, PN G and the people o f Waya Island, Fiji by Professor A Pawley and D r R Gardner, Auckland Museum.

Research into the Genetics of Early Humans by Dr A Thorne and M r T Loy with Drs J Peacock and E Dennis, Division of Plant Industry, CSIRO.

Collaborative project on palaeoanthropology and prehistory o f eastern Indonesia and northern Australia by members o f Department o f Prehistory with Professor Teuku Jacob, Gadja Madah University, Indonesia.

Research into the application o f obsidian hydration dating and site thermometry by M r W

R Ambrose, with D r R Torrence, The Australian Museum, Sydney; D r Douglas Sutton and D r P Sheppard, The University o f Auckland; and D r C Stevenson, Archaeological Research Consultants, Columbus, Ohio.

Research into the feasibility o f freeze-drying large waterlogged wooden structures at bases in the Australian Antarctic Territory by M r W R Ambrose, with D r I Godfrey, the West Australian

Maritime Museum, Fremantle.

Analysis o f soils excavated from sites in Greece bv D r B L Fankhauser, with G Rapp, Archaeometry Laboratory at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, USA

Analysis o f archaeological artefacts for kava and other foods by D r B L Fankhauser, with R Rechtman o f the University o f California at Los Angeles, USA

Analysis o f stains on teeth from burials excavated in the Mariana Islands by D r B L Fankhauser, with J Craib, Craib and Associates, Queensland.

Analysis of certain types of pottery from Tonga for kava by D r B L Fankhauser, with Professor R Green, University o f Auckland, New Zealand.

Optical dating o f quartz by D r R G Roberts, with D r N A Spooner and D G Questiaux, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History o f A t, Oxford University, UK.

Spectral analysis o f quartz by D r R G Roberts, with D r Η M Rendell, Geography Laboratory, University o f Sussex, U K

Luminescence behaviour of quartz by D r R G Roberts, with D r S W S McKeever and M F Morris, Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, USA

Laboratory beta source calibrations by D r R G Roberts, with D Stoneham, Research Laboratory for Achaeology and the History o f Art, Oxford University, U K

Radionuclide analysis o f sediments by D r R G Roberts, with D r A S Murray, J M Olley and P J Wallbrink, Division o f Water Resources, CSIRO.

Optical and U-series dating comparison by D r R G Roberts, with Professor P W Williams,

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D epartment o f Geography, University o f Auckland, N ew Zealand.

Palaeohydrology o f the Nullarbor Plain by D r R G Roberts, with D r D Gillieson, D epartment of Geography and Oceanography, Australian Defence Force Academy.

Early hum an occupation o f the Kimberleys by Dr R G Roberts and Professor R Jones, with D r S O ’C onnor, Centre for Archaeology, University of Western Australia.

Early hum an occupation o f Cape York by D r R G Roberts and Professor R Jones, with B David, D epartment o f Anthropology and Sociology, University o f Queensland and D r M J Morwood, Department o f Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology, University of N ew England.

Archaeological research in the Simpson Desert by D r M A Smith, with Mr P M Clark, Western Lands Commission, Buronga.

Dating ratite eggshell from Pleistocene sediments by D r M A Smith and D r G F van Tets and Dr M McCulloch, Research School o f Earth Sciences, with Professor G Miller, University of Colorado.

Archaeological investigations on the Adelaide River floodplains by Dr M A Smith, with Ms C J Brockwell, Northern Territory University.

Taiwan area studies by Drs J Unger, P Rimmer, G Klintworth, J Cotton, G M a and Professors M Elvin, W Jenner (The Faculties) and S Harris

with Professor W Kaspar, D r S Markowski, D r R I McEwin and D r Ο K Tam, Australian Defence Forces Academy, and Professor Η H Hsiao,

National Taiwan University, and Instimte of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, I aipei.

Correlation o f several dating techniques using coral collected from raised beaches, H uon Peninsula, PN G by D r R Grim, M r J Head, Dr J Chappell (Biogeography and Geo morphology)

with D r M McCulloch (Research School o f Earth Sciences) and D r C Tuniz, ANSTO.

M ultidating o f archaeological and palaeo anthropological sites in South Africa by Dr R Grim and M rs L Taylor with D r J Bink, National Museum, Bloemfontein and D r P Beaumont, McGregor Museum, Kimberley.

TL dating of palaeo-lake sequences in Western New South Wales by D r R Grim and Mr N Hill and D r J Ferguson, AGSO; and o f sand dunes near Lake Victoria by D r Grim and M r N Hill with Professor G Miller, University o f Colorado.

ESR dating o f cave bear evolution of the Iberian Peninsula by D r R Grim and Mrs L Taylor with Professor T de Torres, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.

AMS Dating o f samples with anomalous ESR results by D r R Grim, M r M Abeyratne and M r J Head with D r C Tuniz, ANSTO.

TL and l4C dating intercomparison at the Puritjarra Rockshelter, N T by M r M J Head and D r M Smith (Prehistory) with Professor J R Prescott, University of Adelaide.

Joint CSIRO/ANU collaboration on dating of organic material from soils by M r M J Head with Dr G Bowman, CSIRO Division o f Soils, Canberra.

Correlation o f 1 4C ages o f chemical components of selected soil samples by M r J Head with D r J Skjemstad, CSIRO Division of Soils, Adelaide.

Evaluation o f the chemical components o f stickrat middens from central Australia by M r M J Head with D r J Quade, University of Arizona.

Evaluation o f the feasibility o f dating tufa deposits from the streams within and close by the Lawn Hill National Park, north western Queensland by M r M J Head with D r D Gillieson and M r R

Drysdale, ADFA

]4C chronology of loess/palaeosol sequences from the Loess Plateau in northern China by M r M J Head with Profesor An Zhisheng and Assistant Professor Zhou Weijian, Academia Sinica, Shaanxi Province, China.

14C dating o f organic lake sediments in New Zealand by M r M J Head with D r M Mabin, James Cook University, Townsville.

Pretreatment of samples and preparation of graphite targets for ' x . Accelerator Mass Spectrometry by Mr M J Head with D r C Tuniz, ANSTO, Lucas Heights.

Dating o f Late Pleistocene charcoal under Australian humid tropical forests by M r M J

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Head with D r M Hopkins and D r A Graham, Tropical Forest Research Centre, Division o f Wildlife and Ecology, CSIRO and D r J Ash, Department o f Botany, Faculty o f Science.

AMS dating o f physical and chemical fractions o f lake sediments from Lake Barrine by D r J Head and Professor D Walker with D r C Tuniz,

ANSTO.

Dating o f palaeosols by M r J Head with D r W Zhou, D r M Zhou and Professor Z An, Xian Laboratory o f Loess and Quaternary Geology, Academia Sinica, China.

I4C activity measurements on rainforest trees by Mr J Head, Professor D Walker and D r J Ash (Botany, The Faculties) with D r W Zhou, Xian Laboratory o f Loess and Quaternary Geology, Academia Sinica, China.

Evaluation o f Q uartz counting vials for liquid scintillation 14C spectrometry by M r S A Robertson with D r A Hogg, University o f Waikato, New Zealand.

Investigation o f middens, cheniers and mound accumulations by D r M Sullivan with D r S O ’Connor, University o f Western Australia.

W ork on the history o f Geomorphology o f Papua New Guinea by D r M Sullivan with D r P J Hughes o f N orthern Territory University and Professor E Loftier o f the University of Saarbandes.

Reconstruction o f past environments o f the Lower Mary River Plains by D r M Mulrennan with D r C Woodroffe o f the University o f Wollongong.

Research into the historical role o f Chinese entrepreneurship for the development o f Southeast Asia’s economy by Professor J A C Mackie with D r M Godley, Department of

History, Monash University.

Smdv o f the transformation of communist systems by Drs D Marr, J Unger, R Miller, B McCormick, X Zhang, A Chan (China Centre,

I AS), J Frentzcl-Zagorska (RSSS) and Protcssor H Rigby (RSSS) with D r O K Tam , Australian Defence Foices Academy, University o f New South Wales.

Research School of Social Sciences

Centre for Economic Policy Research

Dr B J Chapman on income contingent loans: theory, policy and data from Australia’s unique experience, with D r T T Chia, University o f Singapore.

Dr B J Chapman on on-the-job training and experience estimates, with D r H ong Tan, W orld Bank.

Dr Μ P Kidd on occupational segregation and the importance of aggregation in Canada, with Professor M Shannon, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Dr Μ P Kidd on the determinants o f demand for health insurance, with S Hopkins, Curtin University.

Dr Μ P Kidd on occupational access and wage discrimination, with Professor P Dolton, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Dr J C Quiggin has produced a new edition of Agricultural Decision Analysis, with Drs J Anderson, J Dillon and B Hardaker, University o f New England.

Dr J C Quiggin on the economics of crop insurance, with Professor R Just, University of Maryland.

Dr J C Quiggin on international agreement on global warming, with Professor J Horowitz, University o f Maryland, College Park.

Dr J C Quiggin on finance theory with generalised expected utility, with Professor M Ormiston, University o f Arizona.

Demography

Environmental health survey by D r A Gray, with Dr G Henderson, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and staff of Tharawal Aboriginal Health Service.

Estimates o f Aboriginal mortality for Western Australia, South Australia, and the Northern Territory for 1986-1991 period by D r A Gray,

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with D r N Luther, East-West Population Centre, University o f Hawaii and D r K Gaminiratne, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research,

ANU.

Consultancy to Government o f Indonesia on a maternal and child health project in Central Java by D r A Gray, with Dr J Achmad, National Institute for H ealth Research and Development,

Indonesia.

T he m om entum of fertility decline, a smdy using Demographic and Health Survey data from a number o f countries, by D r A Gray, with D r J Cabigon, Population Institute, University o f the

Philippines.

Completion o f editing a book on Urbanization in Large Developing Countries, by Professor G Jones, with Professor P Visaria, Gujarat Instimte o f Development Research, Ahmedabad, India.

Director’s Section

Professor G Brennan on the rationalist reconstruction o f the liberal constitution, with Dr A Hamlin, University o f Southampton.

Professor G Brennan on the economic theory of federation with Professor J J Pincus, University of Adelaide.

Professor G Brennan on trust in economic relations, with D r H Kliemt University o f Duisburg.

D r A M artin on the knowledge base o f school principals with Professor B J Biddle, University of Missouri-Columbia, and D r L Saha, Department o f Sociolog)-, T he Faculties, ANU.

Professor P Pettit on freedom and responsibility, with D r M Smith, Monash University.

Economic History

Professor G D Snooks worked jointly with Professor J J Pincus, University o f Adelaide, on the Australian Economic History Review, with Dr R V Jackson, University o f Queensland, on the

Cambridge Economic History o f Australia; and with contributors from the universities o f Harvard, Stanford, Rochester, Oxford, LSE, Essex, W ellington, N ew South Wales, Melbourne, La

Frobe, and Queensland on two books that he is editing for international publishers.

Professor D Pope was involved in collaborative research on labour market effects o f International Migration with Professor G Withers, Director, Economic Planning Council o f Australia (EPAC);

endogenous tariffs with Professor W Kaempfer, University o f Colorado, USA; and on balance of payments under the Gold Standard Policies: Canada and Australia Compared, with Professor J Floyd, University of Toronto.

Economics

D r S Dowrick on fertility and economic growth, with Professor J A Brander, University o f British Columbia.

D r S Dowrick on monopsony and union bargaining power in interdependent labour markets, with D r R Naylor, University of Warwick.

D r S Dowrick on the determinants of union attitudes to technological change, an empirical smdy using the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey, with Dr S Machin, London School of

Economics.

Professor R G Gregory on Aboriginal well-being as measured by height and weight, with Professor S Nicholas, University o f Melbourne.

Professor R G Gregory on new and old industries in Australia, with Dr P J Sheehan, Victoria University o f Technology.

Professor A R Pagan on evaluating real business cycle models, with Professor F Canova, European University Instimte, Florence.

Professor A R Pagan on stylized facts for financial data, with Professor P Kearns, University of Rochester.

Professor A R Pagan on seasonal integration and the evolving seasonals model, with Professor S Hylleberg, University o f Aarhus, Denmark.

Federalism Research C e n tre

Professor B Galligan on attitudes to Rights in Australia, with Professor J Fletcher, University of Toronto, Professor I McAllister, Australian

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Defence Forces Academy, and D r R Jones, Social Science Data Archives, RSSS.

Professor B Galligan on constitutional theory and practice for Australia’s Second Century with Professor C Sampford, Griffith University.

Professor B Galligan on consensual policy making and multi-party politics, with Associate Professor I Marsh, UNSW .

H istory

Ms P Crichton, Ms P Hardy, Dr M Stell, preparation o f a bibliography for the Federation Project (coordinated by Macquarie University).

Professor P Bourke, completed longstanding collaboration with Associate Professor D DeBats of Flinders University in producing book Washington County, to be published by Johns Hopkins University Press; joint project with B Martin o f the Science Policy Research Unit at the University o f Sussex, on study o f research production in Australia and the UK.

H istory o f Ideas

Professor E Kamenka on comparative constimrionalism in relation to former and present communist countries, with Professor A

E-S 1 ay, and Ms C S C Leung.

Professor E Kamenka on legal culture and ideology in the countries of Indo-China, with Professor A F.-S Tay, and MLss C S C Leung.

Law

'Integrity in Government’ by Professor P Finn with Professor G Carney, Bond University, and Dr J Uhr, Australian National University.

‘The Role o f Parliament in Australia’ by Professor P Finn, with Professor C Saunders, University of Melbourne, and M r D Solomon, Electoral and Administrative Review Commission, Queensland.

‘Corporations, Crime and Accountability’ by Professor J Braithwaite, with Professor B Fisse, University o f Sydney.

‘Nursing Home Regulation in Action’ by Professor J Braithwaite, with D r D Gibson, University o f Queensland, Professor D Ermann,

University o f Delaware, and D r T Makkai, D r V Braithwaite and Ms A Jenkins, ANU.

P h ilo so p h y

Professor R Goodin on rights, young and old, with D r D M Gibson, University o f Queensland & Australian National University.

P o litics

D r M Simms, project on women in the political elite, with Professor S Carroll, The Eagleton Institute o f Politics, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA

S o ciology

Professor F L Jones on patterns o f ethnic intermarriage in Australia, with Professor R Luijkx, Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

D r J Baxter on women’s class location, with Professor J Western, University o f Queensland.

D r C Bean on the electoral system, electoral bases, and future outlook for minor parties and independents in Australia, with Professor E Papadakis, University of New England.

D r J Kelley and D r M Evans on class and images o f inequality, with Professor T Kolosi, Eotvos University, Hungary.

D r J Kelley and D r M Evans on social stratification in Brazil, with Professor A O Haller, University o f Wisconsin, Madison.

D r T Makkai on welfare values and the informal economy in Eastern Europe, with Professor R Rose, University o f Strathclyde.

D r T Makkai on immigrants in the Australian labour market, with Professor I McAllister, University College, University o f New South Wales, Canberra.

D r G N Marks on the effects o f socialism on social stratification in Poland, with D r K Zagorski, Institute o f Applied Economic and Social Research, University o f Melbourne, and Dr

H Ganzeboom, University of Nijmegen.

Dr M Western on inter-generarional mobility in terms o f the relative permeability o f boundaries,

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with Professor E Olin W right, University o f Wisconsin, Madison.

Urban Research Program

D r S C Bourassa on econometric modeling o f house prices in Australian capital cities, with Professor P H Hendershott, O hio State University.

Faculty of Economics and Commerce

Department of Statistics

D r R L Chambers, consultant, CSIRO project on oil industry product temperature and volume.

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology

Department of Computer Science

High performance parallel computing, joint research between Department and D IT CSIRO involving a number of academics and scientists from both institutions.

Ramsey T heory by D r B McKay with R Faudree, Memphis State University, S Radziszowski, Rochester Institute of technology, U SA

Random Graphs by Dr B McKay with N W ormald, Melbourne University and A Frieze, Camegie-Mellon University, USA

Asymptotic Enumeration by D r B McKay with W ang Xiaoji, University of N SW and R Canfield, University o f Georgia, USA and E Bender, University o f California at San Diego, U SA

Cycles in Graphs by D r B McKay with D H olton, University of Otago, N Z and R Aldred, University o f Otago, N Z.

Cayley Graphs by D r B McKay with C Praeger, University o f Western Australia.

Constructive Enumeration of Combinatorial Objects by D r B McKay with G Royle, University o f Western Australia.

Analysis o f a Parallel Quicksort by D r J M Robson with P Zimmermann (INRIA Nancy).

Quadratic Residues by D r J M Robson with B Litow, James Cook University.

Generation o f Random Binary Search Trees by D r J M Robson with L Devroye McGill University.

O n the Refinement Calculus by D r T N Vickers and D r C C Morgan, Oxford University (joint editors).

The development of a generic program refinement tool by Dr T N Vickers and Dr D A Carrington, D r I J Hayes, and Professor] Walsh, University o f Queensland, and Ken Robinson, University o f New South Wales.

Tiling Figures o f the Plane with two Bars, a Horizontal and a Vertical one by D r J M Robson with D Beauquier, LITP IBP and Paris XII, M Nivat and E Remila, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon.

Parallel search in sorted multisets and applications to NP-Complete problems, by D r J M Robson with Paolo and Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon.

The development of high level language facilities for the Fujitsu A PI000 distributed memory multiprocessor computer by D r C W Johnson with D r M R Osborne, School o f Mathematical Sciences, ANU, Dr S Roberts, SMS, and

Professor R B Schnabel, University o f Colorado at Boulder, Colorado, USA

Compiler Technology for Parallel Supercomputing ARC Project by D r P Tang with Professor Richard P Brent at Computer Science Laboratory in Research School o f Physical

Sciences and Engineering ANU.

Specification and Design o f a Kernel for an Extensible DBMS by D r J Yu with D r K Yamaguchi, University of Tokyo and D r K Furuse, Richo Co, Japan.

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Department o f Engineering

D r A Blakers was academic host to Armin Aberle, a Feodor Lynen Fellow from Germany at University o f N ew South Wales (sponsored by the Alexander von H um boldt Foundation).

The assembly o f flexible materials by D r B J McCarragher with D r G Dodds, Electrical Engineering Department, Queens University of Belfast.

Intelligent control by D r B J McCarragher with Dr Sheng Liu, Department o f Mechanical Engineering, MIT.

Cooperative Research on Robust and Adaptive Systems project de-interleaving pulse trains by D r I Μ Y Mareels with V Clarkson, D r J Perkins and Professor D Gray, DSTO.

Nonlinear control by D r I Μ Y Mareels with Professor G Bastin and Dr G Campion, Department of Systems Engineering (Unite Auto), University o f Louvain La neuve, Belgium.

Adaptive control by D r I Μ Y Mareels with Professor J W Polderman, Department o f Applied Mathematics, Univesity Twente, Fhe Netherlands.

Cooperative Research on Robust and Adaptive Systems project beamforming and array shape estimation by D r I Μ Y Mareels with M Goris and D r D McClean, CSIRO.

Faculty of Law

Mr Bottomley continued preparation o f textbook on Australian corporate law with Professor R Tomasic, University o f Canberra.

Professor Campbell conducted research jointly with D r Wojciech Sadurski, Faculty o f Law, University o f Sydney on Freedom of Communication in Australia: A Study in Applied Legal Philosophy, funded by the Australian Research Council; joint organisation of

Workshop, 6 -8 August.

Mr Drahos, joint project with D r R Fowler o f the Australian Centre for Environmental Law, University o f Adelaide, on technology transfer and environmental law.

Professor Cunningham continued a successful joint venmre with Sydney and Adelaide Universities in supporting the Australian Centre for Environmental Law (ACEL); formed in 1992, ACEL brings together an unprecendented body of

expertise in environmental law to facilitate high quality, collaborative research and teaching in this vital area of law and policy.

Professor Hambly commenced work with Professor H Luntz, University o f Melbourne on the 4th edition of the book. Torts: Cases and Commentary.

Dr B Moles, M r Seddon and Ms Sanga continued research with staff from the University o f Melbourne on the Contract Law— Hypertext Project.

Faculty of Science

Division o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Strain and developmental variation in Echinococcus granulosus by D r C A Behm with .Associate Professor R C A Thompson, Institute for Molecular Genetics and Animal Diseases,

School o f Veterinary Studies, Murdoch University, WA, and D r A J Lymbery, WA Department o f Agriculture.

Chemotherapy of Giardia infections by D r C A Behm with D r J A Reynoldson and Associate Professor R C A Thompson, Institute for Molecular Genetics and Animal Diseases, School o f Veterinary Studies, Murdoch University, W A

Metabolism in trichomonads by Dr C A Behm with D r M R Edwards, School o f Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University o f New South Wales.

In vivo N M R studies of helminth metabolism by Dr C A Behm with Professors E G Planter and S N Thompson, University California, Riverside.

The entomopathogenic nematode Steinemema carpocapsae by D r C A Behm with D r J Curran, CSIRO Division Entomology.

Genetic and environmental regulation of development in Echinococcus by D r E M

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Bennet-Jenkins with Associate Professor R C A Thompson, School Veterinary Studies, Murdoch University, WA, Drs A J Lymbery, WA D epartment Agriculture, C A Behm and D J Jenkins, SE N SW & ACT Hydatid Control

Campaign and Professor C Bryant.

An investigation into the molecular mechanisms o f cholestasis by Dr F L Bygrave with D r Y Hamada, National-Nishi Sapporo Hospital, Sapporo, Japan and Tokyo Tanabe Pharmaceutical Company, Tokyo, Japan.

Smdies on the biological control o f the tip-moth (Hypsipyla robusta) a pest o f the Australian Red Cedar, Toona australis by D r F L Bygrave with D r Μ T Tanton, School o f Forestry and Drs C W hittle and T Bellas, CSIRO Division o f

Entomology.

Smdies on the mechanism o f action o f hepatotoxins by D r F L Bygrave with D r P Waring, Cell Biology, JCSMR.

Involvement o f cytokines and nitric oxide in the side-effects o f dierhylcarbamazine in filariasis patients by D r I A Clark with D r P Turner, James Cook University, Townsville.

Role o f TN F-induced nitric oxide in CNS function by D r I A Clark with Professor M Friedlander, Neurobiology Research Center, University o f Alabama, Birmingham USA

Induction o f cytokines and nitric oxide by molecular components o f malaria parasites by Dr IA Clark with D rs D Kwiatkowski and C Bate, Institute o f Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.

Interaction o f T N F , nitric oxide, and the chemo-attractant cytokine, CP 10 by D r I A Clark with D r C Gcczy, Heart Research Institute, Sydney.

Possible role o f nitric oxide in Dengue and Typhoid by D r I A Clark with Dr S McGladdety, NAMRU, Jakarta.

Interactions o f ethanol with nitric oxide in the central nervous system by D r I A Clark with D r F W idmer, Peptide Technology Sydney.

The influence o f cytokines on nitric oxide production by human endothelial cells by D r I A

Clark with D r L Belov, Peptide Technology, Sydney.

Cyclic electron transport by D r R E Cleland with Dr D S Bendall, Biochemistry Department, Cambridge, UK.

Use o f the Q electrode in photosynthetic systems by D r R E Cleland with D r J Wiskich, Botany Department, University o f Adelaide.

Genetic variants of Ross River virus by D r L Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with Dr R Kuhn, Purdue University, USA and D r J Straus, California Institute of Technology, USA

Molecular genetics of Murray Valley encephalitis virus by D r L Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with D r C M Rice, Washington University School o f Medicine, USA

Epitopes o f Murray Valley encephalitis vims by Dr I, Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with Dr J Roehrig, Centre for Vector-borne Viral Diseases, USA

Growth o f Ross River vims in vector mosquitoes by Dr L Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with D r R Russell, Westmead Hospital/Sydney University.

Sequencing the Barman Forest vims genome by Dr 1. Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with D r G P Card, Department of Primary Industries and Energy.

Isolation o f antigenic variants o f Barman Forest viruses by D r L Dalgarno and D r R C Weir with D r G Burgess, James Cook University.

Regulation of alternative oxidase in plant mitochondria by D r D A Day and D r J Whelan with D r J Wiskich, University o f Adelaide and J Siedow, Duke University.

Cloning o f alternative oxidase from soybean by Dr D A Day and Dr J Whelan with D r L Macintosh, Michigan State University, USA

Induction o f alternative oxidase synthesis in cultured sycamore cells by D r D A Day and D r J Whelan with Professor R Douce and D r R Bligny, Grenoble, France.

Respiratory mutants of tobacco plants by Dr D A Dav and D r J Whelan with Drs M Badger and D Price, RSBS, ANU.

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Import o f proteins into isolated plant mitochondria by D r D A Day and D r J Whelan with D r E Glaser, University o f Stockholm.

Day Localisation o f malic enzyme in soybean nodules by D r D A Day with D r S Craig, CSIRO, Division Plant Industry, Canberra.

N A DH dehydrogenases in spinach leaf chloroplasts by D r D A Day with D rs R Douce, J Joyard, A-J D om e and M Block, CENG, Grenoble, France.

Transport across the peribacteroid membrane o f legume nodules by D r D A Day with D r A Puppo, University Nice, France.

Characterization and application o f Hobo-like transposable elements in the blowfly Lucilia cuprina by D r A J Howells with D r P Atkinson, CSIRO Division Entomology, Canberra.

Molecular characterization of genes involved with sex determination in the blowfly Lucilia cuprina by D r A J Howells with Dr P Atkinson, CSIRO Division Entomology, Canberra.

Biological Control o f Vertebrate Pest Populations by D r P A Janssens, CSIRO Division Wildlife and Ecology, Agricultural Protection Board Western Australia, Department Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia, and John Curtin School o f Medical Research, ANU.

Cloning a serotonin receptor gene in Lucilia cuprina by D r P A Janssens with D r P East, CSIRO Division o f Entomology.

Immune responses to Eimeria spp by D r K S Ovington with D r N C Smith, University Zurich, Switzerland.

Drug resistance in Fasciola hepatica by D r K S Ovington with D r J C Boray, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, Camden NSW.

Nitrate in Indonesian groundwaters by D r G D Smith and R Wetselaar with Professor J Fox, Research School o f Pacific Smdies, and with members o f the Faculty' of Medicine at the University o f Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Transposable genetic sequences associated with the mec region in staphylococci by D r P R Stewart with D r D D ubin, Department o f Microbiology

and Molecular Biology, University o f Medicine and Dentistry o f New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA

Comparison o f chromosomal resistance gene clusters in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Europe, North America, and Australia by D r P R Stewart with D r S Poston, Guy’s Hospital Medical School, London.

Molecular epidemiology of multiresistant staphylococci by D r P R Stewart with Ms W El-Adhami with Ms C Franklin, T he Alfred Hospital, Melbourne.

Molecular studies o f the epidemiology and virulence o f Haemophilus influenzae by D r P R Stewart with Ms P Moor, D r P Collignon, Woden Valley Hospital, Canberra and Professor L Gilbert, Westmead Hospital, Sydney on Salmonella vector system by D r N Verma with Professor B Stocker and Associate Professor G Schoolnik, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California.

Salmoneila-HIV project by D r N Verma with Professor J Berzofsky, NIH, Bethesda.

Development o f vaccine against shigellosis by Dr N Verma with Professor A Lindberg and D r A Kamell, Karolinska Instimte, Sweden.

Effects o f exercise on various aspects of neutrophil and erythrocyte function in trained and untrained human subjects by D r M J Weidemann and D r R D Telford, Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Instimte o f Sport,

Bruce.

Division o f Botany & Zoology

D r J A h , ’Rainforest dynamics’. Tropical Rainforest CRC. Principally with D r M S Hopkins, CSIRO Rainforest Research Centre, Atherton. ’Biological control o f Echium, Hypericum and Onopordium. Student projects at PhD, Hons and Grad Dipl Sci levels, supervised with D r R Groves CSIRO Plant Industry, D r D Briese, D r J Cullen and Dr A Shepherd, CSIRO Entomology, Canberra: ’Fungal infestation of grasses’. PhD project supervised with Dr J Burdon, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra. ’DNA RAPDs in Acacia and rainforest plants’. D r R

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Appels, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra. ’Succession on ultramafics’ PhD pr.

Body size and foraging in honey bees by D r P Cooper with D r S L Buchmann, USDA-ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona, U SA

Investigation o f the occurrence o f opioid-like peptides in insects and their role in control o f feeding and digestion by D r P Cooper with D r P East, CSIRO Entomology.

Malpighian tubule function in black field crickets, Teleogtyllus oceanicus by D r P Cooper with D r A T Marshall, La Trobe University.

Maternal investment strategics, energetics and feeding ecology o f Antarctic and Subantarctic fur seals at Macquarie Island by D r P Cooper with D r P Shaughnessy, D r S Goldsworthy, CSIRO

Wildlife, D r H Crowley, Madagascar.

Haematology o f crabeater seals by D r P Cooper with D r P Shaughnessy

Systematics and biogeography o f Waratahs (Telopea and Alloxylon: Proteaceae) by D r M Crisp with D r P Weston, Royal Botanic Gardens,

Sydney.

Molecular systematics o f Australian genera of legumes (Fabaceae) by D r M Crisp with D r R Appels, Division of Plant Industry, CSIRO.

Systematics & taxonomic revisions in Fabacaeae, Pittosporaceae and Myrtaceae by D r M Crisp with Australian National Botanic Gardens.

Systematics and Phylogeny o f legumes (Fabaceae) by D r M Crisp with D r J A Chappill, University o f W estern Australia; D r J J Doyle, Cornell University, USA; and D r P H Weston, Royal

Botanic Gardens, Sydney.

Biogeography o f the Southern hemisphere by Dr M Crisp with D r Η P Linder, University of Cape Town, South Africa.

Tem peramre adaptation in E. coli. by D r D G ordon with Professor R Lenski, Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University.

Role o f rhizopines in Rhizobium Ecology by Dr D G ordon with D r P Murphy, D epartment of

Crop Protection, Waite Campus, University o f Adelaide.

Entomology textbook: The Insects: A n Overline o f Entomology by Dr P Gullan to be published in May 1994 by Chapman & Hull, London; co-author with Dr P S Cranston, CSIRO Division o f Entomology.

A Taxonomic Revision o f the Australasian Iceryine Margarodidae (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) by D r P Gullan with D r D J Williams, Natural History Museum, London.

Ant-Coccid Interactions in Myrmecophytic Macaranga in South-East A ia by D r P Gullan with M r P Heckroth, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt, Germany and Dr

B Fiala, Theodor-Boveri-Institut, Wurzburg, Germany.

Ecology o f alpine mammals by D r D A Happold with N SW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Ecology o f mammals o f Malairi by D r D A Happold with Malairi Department o f National Parks.

Ecology o f African mammals by D r D A Happold with the University o f Antwep, Belgium, Senkenberg Museum, Frankfurt, Germany,

British Museum (Natural History), London and the Alexander Koenig Museum, Bonn, Germany.

‘Validation o f orange roughy age by radiocarbon dating’ by D r J Kalish with G S Burr, US National Science Foundation-University of A izona AMS Facility and the New Zealand Fishing Industry Board.

‘Estimation o f age, growth, mortality, and recmitment variability o f orange roughy’ by D r J Kalish with C Francis, D Tracey, and P Horn, New Zealand Ministry o f Agriculture and Fisheries.

‘Age determination o f smooth and black oreos’ by Dr J Kalish with P McMillan, A Hart, and I Doonan, New Zealand Ministry o f Agriculture and Fisheries.

otolith chemistry’ by D r J Kalish with M Livingston and K Schofield, New Zealand Ministry o f Agriculture and Fisheries.

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Validation o f daily and annual increments in the otoliths o f Australian salmon’ by D r J Kalish with D Stevens, New Zealand Ministry o f Agriculture and Fisheries.

‘Age and growth o f Dissostichus eliginoides and Dissostichus mawsoni’ by Dr J Kalish with R Williams, Australian Antarctic Division.

‘Retrospective determination of ocean radiocarbon and application to studies o f carbon flux, ocean circulation, and fish ageing’ by D r J

Kalish with S Rintoul, CSIRO Division of Oceanography.

Biological control o f take-all: a fungal root rotting disease o f wheat by D r Murali Nayudu with D r P W ong, Biological and Chemical

Research Institute, Sydney, with M r J Whitley, Griffith and with M r D Pottie, Condobolin, N SW D epartment o f Agriculture.

Active role in global diversity project, International Association o f Meiobenthologists by D r W Nicholas coordinated by Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

Comparisons o f RAPI) and allozyme variation in natural populations o f Buffalograss by D r R Peakall, with D r D R H uff and Professor P E Smouse o f Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA

Determining the phylogenetic affinities position o f the phylum onychophora among the major interebrate phyla by D r D Rowell, with D r J Oakeshott, CSIRO Division of Entomology.

Primary sex ratio in a social spider by D r D Rowell, with D r B Main, Zoology Department, University o f Western Australia.

Evolution o f the Australian Onychophora by D r D Rowell, with Drs Tait, Briscoe and Reid, Macquarie University.

Auxin regulation o f xyiogenesis patterns in pith explants by Professor J Warren Wilson, with Professor L W Roberts, University o f Idaho, USA

Effects o f light interception and carbon dioxide concentration on crop photosynthesis by Professor J Warren Wilson, with D r D W Hand, Horticulture Research International, Littlehampton, U K

Growth o f rice with and without natural levels o f solar UV radiation by D r M Whitecross, with D r L Lewin, N SW Department o f Agriculture. Effects o f UV-B radiation on photosynthesis of higher plants with D r J M Anderson and D r W S Chow, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry.

Characterisation o f oscillations of leaflets of Desmodium gyrans by D r M Whitecross, with Dr G P Findlay, Flinders University o f South Australia.

Control o f expression o f seed storage protein genes in transgenic plants by Dr M Whitecross, with D r T J Higgins, CSIRO Division of Plant

Industry.

Department of Chemistry

Bio-distribution of compounds tested as potential new drugs for use in Boron-Neutron Captive Therapy by D r J A Broomhead with D r B A lan (ANSTO).

Synthesis o f transition state analogues of dihydro-orolase as potential anti-malarial and anti-leukemic drugs by Professor J A Elix and D r K L Gaul, CSIRO, Division of Animal Health, Parkville, Victoria (funded by ARC).

Lichenological and chemotaxonomic projects by Professor J A Elix with a number o f international researchers including D r A W A cher, Herbarium, National Botanic Gardens of NSW, Sydney; D r G Kantvilas, Tasmanian Herbarium, University of Tasmania and D r I W Brodo, National Museum o f Science, Botany Section, Ottawa, Canada, D r K Kalb (Lichenologisches Institut, Neumarkt, Germany), D r S Huneck (Institut Air Biochemie der Pflanzen, Halle, Germany), D r H T Lumbsch & Professor G B Feige (Fachbercish 9/Botanik, Universitat Essen, Germany), D r H Mayrhofer (Institut fur Botanik, Karl Franzens Universitat, Graz, Austria), Dr L Ferraro (Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Corrientos, Agentina), Professor T H Nash (Department o f

Botany, A izona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA), D r Feeya David and Dr Kan Chantrapromma (Prince of Songkla University,

Hat Yai, Thailand), D r Kansri Boonpragob (Ramhamkhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand), Asociate Professor M ohd Wahid bin Samsudin, Asociate Professor Laily bin Din and M r Ab IJah

bin Hamat (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia) and D r Μ T Adler

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(Universistad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires, Argentina).

Single vibronic level flourescence spectra and electronic and vibrational relaxation o f benzene with W D Lawrance of School o f Physical Sciences, Flinders University, South Australia.

Structural and mechanistic studies on the cyt. b/f complex found in plant thylakoid membranes, using electron spin resonance and biochemical

modifications by Dr R J Pace with D r J Anderson, CSIRO, Plant Industry. T he design and development of a novel biosensing technology using synthetic ion channels contained in a specifically engineered, solid substrate supported bilayer membrane. An CRC

funded project (Centre for Molecular Sensing and Engineering) with D r R J Pace involving CSIRO Division o f Food Processing, Sydney University and several industrial partners. D r Pace is involved as an Independent Associate.

A fundamental smdy o f the forces involved in thin film formation by Professor R M Pashley with Rohm & Haas (Aus). A smdy o f the mechanisms involved in membrane fouling by Professor R M Pashley with Memtec Ltd.

Ab initio molecular orbital studies o f aspects of Hard-Soft Acid-Base theories in organic chemistry and variable geometry SN2 transition states in enolate alkylations by D r R Rasmussen with

Professor P V R Schleyer; Instim t fur Organische Chemie, Universitat Erlangen-Niirnberg.

Department o f Forestry

‘Fire history derived from Xanthemhea’, a project by D r Banks and Dr M Gill, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry Fire Ecology Unit.

Weathering and protection o f wood surfaces with benzotriazole U V absorbers and hindered amine light stabilisers by Dr Evans and D r K Schmalzl, CSIRO Division ofForest Products, Clayton,

Melbourne.

Vibrational spectroscope of chemically modified wood surfaces after weathering by D r Evans with Professor N Owen, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA

W ater repellency of pine after treatment with modified wood preservative formulations by Dr

Evans with D r R Wingate-Hill, A N UTECH and Mr P Carmthers, Koppers-Hicksons.

Comparative smdy of importance, centroid and control variate sampling for estimating the volume o f tree stems by D r G B W ood with Professor Η V Wiant Jr, West Virginia

University, USA, and D r Η T Schreuder, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, Fort Collins, USA

Comparison o f several formulae and methods for estimating the volume o f butt logs by Dr G B W ood with Professors Η V W iant Jr, D W Patterson and C C Hassler, West Virginia

University, USA, and Professor J C Rennie, Department o f Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN, U SA

D r Turner is involved in an ARC grant jointly submitted with Dr Skidmore, U N SW Centre for Remote Sensing and GIS entitled ‘Development of Neural Network and Hybrid Models for Predicting Forest Resources using Remotely Sensed and Ancillary Spatial Data’, and a jointly submitted grant with the Lachlan Catchment Management Committee funded under the National Landcare Program, entitled ‘Farm Forestry Project Feasibility Investigation’.

Individuals from many other organisations are involved in cosupervision o f postgraduate research preyam s— see Research Report for details.

Department o f G e o g r a p h y

Collaborative research on effects of grazing on chenopod shrublands by D r R Greene, with Department o f Agriculture, Western Australia.

Collaborative research on effects o f grazing on soil structural and hydrological properties by D r R Greene, with CSIRO Division o f Soils and Division o f Wildlife and Ecology.

Collaborative research by D r J Lindesay, with D r R Allan, CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, on ENSO variability on multi-decadal

timescales in the Indo-Pacific region; associate editor, Journal o f the Australian Meteorological and. Oceanographic Society.

Collaborative research by D r J N ott, with D Price, University of Wollongong on past climate

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Department o f G e o lo g y

Redox controls on determining ore element ratios in intmsion-related mineralisation by D r P L Blevin with Professor P A Candela, University of Maryland, USA

Textural and chemical evidence for the exsolution and transport o f volatiles in felsic magmas by Dr P L Blevin with Professor P A Candela, University o f Maryland, USA

Vertebrate Fossils from Gogo by Professor K S W Campbell, D r R E Barwick, D r P A Pridmore and Dr J Long, Western Australian Museum.

Rhipidistian Fishes from the Early Carboniferous of Queensland by Professor K S W Campbell, D r R E Barwick and Professor R Fox, University o f Alberta.

(Caledonian Granites by D r B W Chappell with D r W E Stephens, University o f St Andrews, Scotland.

Continental-Margin Volcanics by D r B W Chappell with D r A Ewart, University o f Queensland.

Donegal Granites by D r B W Chappell with Emeritus Professor W S Pitcher, University o f Liverpool, UK.

Granites in south eastern Australia by D r B W Chappell with Emeritus Professor A J R W hite, La Trobe University.

Relationships between mineralization and volcanic rocks by D r B W Chappell with Emeritus Professor R L Stanton, University o f New England.

X-ray spectrometry by D r B W Chappell with D r K Norrish, CSIRO Soils Adelaide.

Granites o f the American Cordillera by D r B W Chappell with Professor L T Silver, California Institute o f Technology, USA

Island-arc rocks by D r B W Chappell with D r R W Johnson, Bureau o f Mineral Resources.

Dolomite Lakes o f Western Victoria by D r P De Deckker with Professor W M Last, University o f Manitoba, Canada.

T he history o f Saline Lakes from New Mexico by D r P D e Deckker with Dr R M Forester, US Geological Survey7.

Quaternary deep-sea cores from the Tasman Sea by D r P D e Deckker with Professor C S Nelson, University o f Waikato, New Zealand.

Quaternary deep-sea cores from the southeast Indian Ocean, Tasman Sea and Southern Ocean by D r P D e Deckker with Drs L Labeyrie and M Labracherie, CNRS, France.

Quaternary history of the Nile and lakes in Egypt by D r P D e Deckker with Professor M A J Williams, Monash University.

Ostracoda from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary from Alaska by D r P D e Deckker with D r E M Brouwers, US Geological Survey.

Bauxite by D r R A Eggleton with Comalco Ltd.

Structures o f M n Fe-layer silicates by D r R A Eggleton with Professor S Guggenheim, University o f Illinois, Chicago.

Caldera moat sediments were studied to learn the range o f sulfur isotopic variability by D r C S Eldridge, P M Bethke, USGS, Reston VA, R O Rye, USGS Denver, and M A McKibben, University o f California, Riverside.

Witwatersrand sulfides were examined isotopically by D r C S Eldridge, G N Phillips and R E Meyers, both from the Economic Geology Research Unit, James Cook University, Townsville.

Metamorphosed sulfides from New South Wales were investigated isotopically by C S Eldridge and P K Seccombe, University of Newcastle.

Sediment-hosted coppier mineralisation in Western Australia was studied jointly by D r C S Eldridge and scientists from Western Mining Corporation.

GO2 fluid movement through the crust by D r D J Ellis with D r Y Hiroi, Chiba University, Japan.

Ion-probe studies o f Antarctic and Japanese metamorphic rocks by D r D J Ellis with D r K Shiraishi, National Institute of Polar Research, Jap>an, D r Y Hiroi, Chiba University, Japan and Dr M Fanning, RSES.

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Geochemistry o f Antarctic metasediments and igneous rocks by D r D J Ellis with D r J W Sheraton, Bureau of Mineral Resources.

Geochemical and isotopic study o f Antarctica syenitis and charnockites by Drs D J Ellis and J-X Zhao with D r K Shiraishi, National Institute of Polar Research, Japan, D r J W Sheraton, AGSO and Dr Μ T McCulloch, RSES.

Mineralogy o f the Soroako (Indonesia) Ni-ore by Dr M Le Gleuher with D r J P Ambrosi, Univesite d’Aix-Marseille III, France, and PT IN C O Indonesia.

The Evergreen Formation o f the Surat Basin by Mr T Liang with BMR Eastern Australian Basins Project.

Isotopic dating o f precious and base metal deposits and their host rocks in eastern Australia using ^A r/'^A r dating facilities at RSES, also collaboration with AGSO by D r C Perkins with

Dr J L Walshe, D r I McDougall.

Stmcmre and mineralization o f Cowara Gold Mine, NSW , by D r M J Rickard with D r K McQueen, University o f Canberra.

Palaeoenvironmental studies o f the Monaro by Professor W D L Ride with D r G Taylor, University o f Canberra.

Sulfur-isotope studies using the ion-microprobe by D r J L Walshe and D r C S Eldridge with Dr R Both, Adelaide University.

Genesis o f the gold-bismuth-copper deposits of Tennant Creek by Dr J L Walshe with B Williams, NBHPeko, Dr R Both, Adelaide University.

Study o f the M t Chalmers volcanic hosted massive sulfide deposit by D r J L Walshe with Dr R Both, Adelaide University.

Study o f Brown’s Creek G old Deposit, N SW by D r J L Walshe with Newcrest and CSIRO, North Ryde.

Geochemical and isotopic study o f Proterozoic dyke swarms in central-southern Australia by Dr J-X Zhao with D r Μ T McCulloch, RSES, and D r R J Korsch, AGSO.

SHRIM P zircon U-ph dating, and trace element and isotopic study of Proterozoic ophioliths in south China by D r J-X Zhao with D r Xian-hua Li, Institute o f Geochemistry, Academia Sinica,

and Professor W Compston, D r Μ T McCulloch, and M r C M Fanning, RSES.

Department of Mathematics

Bethe Ansatz solution o f an O(n) model on the honeycomb lattice by D r Μ T Batchelor with J Suzuki, Tokyo University.

Noise reduced Laplacian growth models by D r M T Batchelor with B I Henry, University o f NSW.

Generalisations of the Hughes subgroup by D r R A Bryce with V Fedri and L Serena, University o f Florence.

Structural properties o f finite groups related to the class size and character degree frequency functions by Dr J Cossey with C Casolo, University of Udine and T O Hawkes, Warwick University.

Structure o f products o f finite nilpotent groups by D r J Cossey with S E Stonehewer, Warwick University.

Existence o f normal complements in finite groups by D r J Cossey with X Guo, Shanxi University.

Vertex operators and infinite dimensional algebras in statistical physics by D r B Davies with O Foda, Melbourne University, M Jimbo and T Miwa, Kyoto University.

Q uantum loop modules and quantum spin chains by D r B Davies with D Altschuler, Lyon University.

Calculation o f correlation functions from the properties o f infinite dimensional quantum algebras by D r B Davies with M Jimbo, Kyoto University and M Okado, Osaka University.

Approximation to minimal surfaces by D r J Hutchinson with G Dziuk, Freiburg University.

Energy minimisation problems by D r J Hutchinson with N Fusco, Naples University.

Super strong wave collapse in plasmas and the convergence o f solutions toward known isotropic solutions by D r B LeMesurier with V Shvets, Auburn University, USA.

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Structure o f amenable Banach algebras by D r R J Loy with F Ghahramani, University o f Manitoba, G A Willis, Newcastle University and A G Kepert, University o f Copenhagen.

Problems o f uniqueness of norm for Banach algebras by D r R J Loy with H G Dales, Leeds University.

Holomorphic Dynamical Systems by D r G Martin with A Hinkkanen, Illinois University.

Kleinian groups and Geometric Function Theory by D r G Martin with F W Gehring, Michigan University.

Combinatorial group theory by D r M A Ward with T C Hurley, University College, Galway.

Feed-back mechanisms in mass transfer in close binaries by Professor D T Wickramasinghe with B Warner, Capetown University.

Evolution o f magnetic binary starts by Professor D T Wickramasinghe with K W Wu, Sydney University.

Emission properties o f close binaries by Professor D T Wickramasinghe with J Bailey, Anglo-Australian Observatory, Sydney.

Department o f Physics and Theoretical Physics

Scramjet Testing in Free Piston Shock Tunnels by Professor R J Sandeman and Dr A F P Houwing with Professor R J Stalker and D r R Morgan, University of Queensland.

Laser induced Fluorescence in Shock Tunnel Flows by D r A F P Houwing and Professor R J Sandeman with D r M Rubinsztein-Dunlop, University o f Queensland.

Laser-induced fluorescence studies of transient shock structures and steady shock layer flows by Dr A F P Houwing with Professor R K Hanson, High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, USA.

Wall Catalytic Effects in Hypersonic High Enthalpy Flow by Professor R J Sandeman with Dr S L Gai and D r N Mudford, Australian Defence Force Academy and D r G Roberts, University o f Southampton, UK.

Aero-assist Flight Experiments by Professor R J Sandeman and D r A F P Houwing with D r N Mudford and D r S L Gai, Australian Defence Force Academy and with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley,

USA

Weak Mach Reflection by Professor R J Sandeman with Professor K Takayama, Shock Wave Research Centre, Sendai, Japan.

Computational Fluid Dynamics Code Validation by D r A F P Houwing and Professor R J Sandeman with Professor Hirschell and D r C M undt, Messerschmidt Bolkow Blohm Deutsche Aerospace, Germany and Dr I Tuohey, British Aerospace, Australia.

Structure o f high-K isomeric states in hafnium isotopes by D r A P Byrne with D r P M Walker, University o f Surrey, UK and the EUROGAM

collaboration at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, UK.

Lifetime and g-factor measurements o f excited states in promethium nuclei by D r A P Byrne with D r P D Cottle, Florida State University, USA

Studies of near-spherical lead and mercury nuclei by D r A P Byrne with Professor A R Poletti, University o f Auckland, NZ.

Structure ofhigh-spin states in samarium-136 by D r A P Byrne with D r A M Bruce, University o f Brighton, U K

Nuclear spectroscopy o f very neutron-deficient lead nuclei by D r A M Baxter and D r A P Byrne with Professor G D Dracoulis, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, A NU and Dr R V F Janssens, D r Μ P Carpenter and others, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

Diode Laser pumped CWNd:YAG ring Laser by Dr H-A Bachor and C C Harb with Professor H Welling, Laser Zentm m Hannover, Germany.

Nonlinear effects in high sensitivity interferometry by D r H-A Bachor with Professor R Byer, Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, USA

Interferometer detection of gravitational waves by Professor R J Sandeman, Dr H-A Bachor and D r

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D E McClelland with groups at University of Western Australia, University o f Adelaide, CSIRO, Lindfield, AWA Defence Industries, VIP AC Engineers and DYNAVAC.

Australia/French collaboration on long baseline interferometry for gravitational wave detection by D r D E McClelland and Professor R J Sandeman

with Professor A Brillet, VIRGO Project, Otsay, France.

Australia/US collaboration on long baseline interferometry by Professor R J Sandeman with Professor R Vogt, LIGO Project, CALTECH, USA

Q uantum Noise reduction: Theory and Applications by D r H-A Bachor and D r D E McClelland with Dr G Milburn, University of

Queensland.

Generation o f squeezed light in frequency doublers by D r H-A Bachor with Professor J Mlynek, Universitat Konstanz, Germany.

Q uantum noise of self-frequency-doubling lasers by D r H-A Bachor with D r F Laeri, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany.

Magneto-optic trap for sodium by D r H-A Bachor with Professor W Sandle and D r R Ballagh, University o f Otago, N Z.

Division o f Psychology

Relationship between housework and pocket money: An investigation o f single child families in Beijing by D r M J Chen with Professor Li Q uing Shan, Division o f Social Psychology, Institute o f Sociology, Chinese Academy o f Social Sciences, China.

Development o f a theory o f mind by D r M J Chen with Professor Lin Zhong Xian, Head of Division o f Cognitive Psychology, Institute of

Psychology, Chinese Academy o f Sciences, China, and Professor Miao Xian Chun, Department of Psychology, East Chine Normal University, Shanghai, China.

Binocular distance perception by D r M L Cook with Professor B Gillam, University o f New South Wales.

Modularity and integration of spatial information: stereopsis, perspective and

occlusion by D r M L Cook with Professor B Gillam, University o f New South Wales.

Inspection time: Investigating the relationship between intelligence and speed of information processing by Dr D P Mahar with Associate Professor B D Mackenzie, University of Tasmania.

Rehabilitation of naming errors in dementing speech by D r B Weekes with Ms H Bennett, Mr B Casey and Professor A Browe, Aged and

Extended Care Department, Concord Hospital, Sydney.

Grouping mechanisms in space and perception by Dr B Weekes with D r N Donnelly, University of Kent and Professor G Humphreys, University of Birmingham.

Right hemisphere spelling by D r B Weekes with D rJ Ogden, University o f Auckland.

CentreforResourceandEnvironmentalSmdies

Noninverse groundwater model calibration techniques by G Bloschl with CSIRO Division o f Water Resources, Centre for Groundwater

Studies, Adelaide.

An experimental and numerical examination o f spatial organisation from a hydrological perspective by G Bloschl with the Department o f Civil and Environmental Engineering, University

of Melbourne.

Scale issues in hydrology by G Bloschl with the Centre for Water Research, University of Western Australia.

Distributed runoff model accuracy by G Bloschl with the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Station, Tucson, Arizona.

Development of a State-of-the-Environment monitoring process for the city of Melbourne by D r V A Brown with the Institute for Urban Affairs and ICE Consulting.

Development ofstate-of-the-environment reporting guidelines for Local Government by D r V A Brown and the National local Government State-of-the-Environment Reporting Fomm.

The potential for integrated social, economic and environmental indicators, by D r V A Brown with the Centre for Cultural Policy, Griffith University.

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Research project on information and research needs for coastal zone management by D r V A Brown with Resources Assessment Commission.

Research into the Environmental Information Needs o f Local Government by D r V A Brown for the Environmental Liaison Unit, Climate Change and Policy Branch, Department o f the Environment, Sport and Territories.

Conference Committee member and Editor, Conference papers by D r V A Brown for the Public Health Association of Australia.

Preparation o f a Manual on Environment Management for women of the Pacific by D r V A Brown as one o f an expert panel, for the Commonwealth Secretariat and the National Local Government Environmental Resource Network.

Local Agenda 21: Protocols for Australian Local Government Environmental Management by Dr V A Brown with the National Local Government

Resource Network and the Municipal Conservation Association.

Nutritional value o f hypogeal (underground fruiting) fungi for ground-dwelling marsupials by A W Claridge with S J Cork, CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Ecology, Canberra.

A review o f mycophagy among Australian mammals by A W Claridge with T W May, National Herbarium, Royal Botanic Gardens, Victoria.

Spatial distribution o f ground-dwelling mammals in the forests of south-eastern Australia by A W Claridge with R Cunningham, Department of Statistics and New South Wales National Parks

and Wildlife Service.

Interim management plan for the Long-footed Potoroo in the forests o f south-eastern Australia by A W Claridge with New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Survey for the smokey mouse in the forests of south-eastern New South Wales by A W Claridge with New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Economic analysis o f the choice o f instruments for pollution control in the Forth Estuary by M S

Common with N Hanley and I Moffatt, University o f Stirling.

A comparative study of CO 2 emissions in Australia, Germany and the UK by M S Common with J Proops, University o f Keele.

A call for lost independence by H C Coombs with National Graduate.

Aboriginal Autonomy: issues and strategics in Australia by H C Coombs with Cambridge University Press.

Developing Aboriginal policies and strategies for negotiation with agencies and white societies by H C Coombs collaborating with Aboriginal Land Councils and other organisations.

Rights and responsibilities in forest resource regimes by D r J B Dargavel and D r S Jennings, University o f Tasmania for Resource Assessment Commission.

Environmental history in Australia by S Dovers and others in CRES and ANU, along with various researchers in other Australian universities and CSIRO.

Sustainable energy systems by S Dovers and others in CRES with various researchers in private sector and other Australian universities.

Study o f sustainability of mineral industry by P M Hancock in liaison with members o f the Australian Geological Survey Office, directors and executives o f mining companies and representative officers of environmental organisations.

Three dimensional simulation o f sea water intmsion by F Ghassemi, A J Jakeman and T H Chen with the collaboration o f the Australian Geological Survey Organisation (formerly Bureau of Mineral Resources, BMR).

Hydrodynamics o f deep basinal fluids in the Canning Basin, W A by F Ghassemi with the collaboration o f the Australian Geological Survey Organisation (formerly BMR).

Global salinisation o f land and water resources, by F Ghassemi, A J Jakeman and H A Nix in collaboration with a large number o f research instimtions in Australia and other countries.

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Mathematical modelling o f groundwater flow and salinity o f the North Stirling Soil Conservation District, Western Australia by F Ghassemi, J Gomboso and A J Jakeman with the Western Australian Geological Survey and the Western Australian Department o f Agriculture.

Emergency planning and response by J W Handmer with the Flood Hazard Research Centre, Middlesex University, London.

Flood warning system development and emergency planning for dam failure by D r J W Handmer and Mr D I Smith with the Australian

Emergency Management Institute.

Cooperative smdies by Dr J W Handmer and M r D I Smith with the N SW Department ofW ater Resources; and the N SW Public Works D epartment concerning floodplain management.

Environmental emergencies by J W Handmer with the Flood Hazard Research Centre, Middlesex University.

Collaboration by J Handmer with J Lidstone, Queensland University of Technology to develop a project on hazard education.

A Conservation Strategy for the Australian Antarctic Territory by J H andm er with the Australian Antarctic Foundation and D McMichael and Associates.

Preparation by J Handmer o f national overviews o f flood warning practice in France and Portugal for the European Union (via Middlesex University).

Development of a climate and terrain information system for Africa by M F Hutchinson, J P M cM ahon and H A Nix in collaboration with International Laboratory for Research into Animal Diseases (ILRAD), Nairobi and

International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan.

Spatial Interpolation o f Real Time Monthly Rainfall for Queensland by M F Hutchinson with Queensland Department o f Primary Industries.

Catchm ent and water quality modelling by D r A J Jakeman with D r P G Whitehead and Dr I G Ijttlewood, Institute o f Hydrology, United Kingdom.

Identification of probability distributions for environmental management by D r A J Jakeman and M r Bai Jun with D r M McAleer, Department of Economics, University o f Western Australia.

Impacts o f climate change on Western Australian catchments by D r A J Jakeman and M r W Ye with D r B Bates, CSIRO Division of Water Resources.

Impacts of land use change on Western Australian catchments by D r A J Jakeman and Mr D Post with D r M Sivapalan, University ofWestern Australia.

Identifiable models o f catchment response by D r A J Jakeman with Professor G M Hornberger, University of Virginia.

Effects o f climate change on water supply for irrigation in theGoulburn basin by D r A J Jakeman and Mr S Schreider with D r A B Pittock, CSIRO Division o f Atmospheric

Research.

Maintenance of viable wildlife populations under various land management options by D B Lindenmayer with the Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Adelaide, Australian

National Parks & Wildlife Service and the Victorian Department o f Conservation & Natural Resources.

Predicting the conservation values o f water catchment forests by D B Lindenmayer with Melbourne Water Corporation.

Review o f models for Population Viability' Analysis by D B Lindenmayer with the School o f Forestry at the University of Melbourne and the

Department of Applied Mathematics at the University of Adelaide.

Identifying minimum critical numbers of animals for release in reintroduction programs by D B Lindenmayer with the School o f Forestry, University o f Melbourne.

Predicting wildlife corridor effectiveness using generic models for Population Viability Analysis by D B Lindenmayer in collaboration with the

Department of Conservation Biology, Chicago Zoological Society.

Assessment of tree nutrient factors as a determinant of faunal distribution by D B

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Lindenmayer in collaboration with the School of Forestry, University o f Melbourne.

Application o f GIS technology and habitat and population modelling to the control o f pest marsupials in New Zealand by D B Lindenmayer

with D epartm ent o f Information Research, University o f Otago, New Zealand.

Minimisation o f the impacts o f edge effects in retained forest systems by D B Lindenmayer with the Australian National Parks & Wildlife Service.

Coupling GIS technology and habitat models to predict wildlife distributions and plan land allocation by D B Lindenmayer with M urray Darling Basin Commission and the Victorian Department o f Conservation and Natural Resources.

Assessment o f the limitations o f linear programming methods for integrated wildlife management by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Forestry, University o f Melbourne and Victorian Department of Conservation & Natural Resources.

Assessing conservation values o f closed water catchment forests by D B Lindenmayer with the Melbourne W ater Corporation.

Assessment o f the interactive role o f disease and other ecological factors in compromising wildlife reintroduction and translocation programs by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ANU and CSIRO Division o f Wildlife & Ecology.

Investigating spatial landscape changes associated with logging operations, wildlife dispersal biology and population persistence by D B Lindenmayer with D epartment o f Biochemistry and Molecular

Biology, A N U and CSIRO Division o f Wildlife & Ecology.

Assessing applied forest management options and reserve design strategies using computer-based simulation modelling procedures by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Applied Mathematics, University o f Adelaide, the Australian Namre Conservation Agency and the Victorian Namre Conservation Agency.

Review o f models for population viability analysis by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Forestry, University o f Melbourne, University o f

Adelaide and Department of Conservation Biology, Brookfield Zoo, Chicago, USA

Assessing corridor effectiveness in wood production forests by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Statistics, ANU and Department

o f Conservation Biology, Brookfield Zoo, Chicago, U SA

Modelling extinction processes in small fragmented populations by D B Lindenmayer with D epartm ent o f Conservation Biology, Brookfield Zoo, Chicago, USA

Linking GIS-derived landscape data with population modelling to derive estimates o f metapopulation viability by D B Lindenmayer with D epartm ent o f Applied Mathematics,

University o f Adelaide and Department o f Conservation Biology, Brookfield Zoo, Chicago, USA

Spatial Interpolation of coupled habitat models and GIS data to predict the spatial distribution of forest fauna by D B Lindenmayer with N SW Department o f Conservation and Land Management, Department o f Statistics, ANU, and Victorian Department o f Conservation & Natural Resources.

Modelling the relationships between forest marsupial distribution and Acacia gum nutrient status by D B Lindenmayer with D epartment o f Forestry, University o f Melbourne.

Asessing the economic basis for some forest wildlife management strategies by D B Lindenmayer with Forestry Canada, Ontario, Canada.

Generating performance estimates o f habitat models for forest wildlife by D B Lindenmayer with Department o f Statistics, A N U and Victorian Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Scale effects in Land, Water and Vegetation Assessment, by Professor I D Moore and D r M F Hutchinson with P Gessler, CSIRO Division of Soils.

Topographic analysis for distributed hydrologic and erosional modelling of landscapes, by Professor I D M oore in collaboration with D r J Wilson, D epartment o f Earth Sciences and the

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Geographic Information and Analysis Centre, Montana State University, USA

Predicting soil water distribution and runoff from terrain attributes and weather, by Professor I D Moore in collaboration with D r J Kalma, CSIRO Division ofW ater Resources.

Initiation and development o f ephemeral gullies on arable land, by Professor I D Moore in collaboration with the Department o f Civil and Agricultural Engineering, T he University o f

Melbourne.

Modelling erosion in complex terrain, by Professor I D Moore in collaboration with the Natural Resource Management Unit, Queensland Department o f Primary Industries, Toowoomba.

New methods o f evaluating and mapping o f soil hydrological and other properties as a key to sustainable land use in the Murray-Darling basin, by Professor I D Moore and D r M F Hutchinson in collaboration with the Division o f Soils, CSIRO, Bureau of Mineral Resources, NSW Conservation and Land Management, N SW Land Information Centre.

Characterizing soil properties in forested catchments, by Professor I D Moore in collaboration with Dr P Ryan, Forestry Commission o f New South Wales.

Spatial analysis o f boreal forest ecosystems in Canada, by Professor I D Moore in collaboration with Forestry Canada, Ontario Region.

Global positioning system for enhanced field survey o f natural resources by Professor I D Moore, in collaboration with Professor J Gilliland, University o f South Australia and D r T Dare-Edwards, Charles Sturt University.

Developing an environmental geographic information system for Tasmania: an application to assessing the potential for hardwood plantation forestry by Professor H A Nix, J A Stein and J L Stein and the Bureau o f Rural Science,

Department o f Primary Industries and Energy.

Classification o f large environmental datasets using the Fujitsu Supercomputer by Professor H A Nix, J A Stein, J L Stein with D Singleton, CSC Supercomputer Unit, A NU and L Belbin, CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Ecology.

Commonwealth Climate Impact Assessment and M anagement Program (COM CIAM ) Data Base Development Workshop, Sri Lanka by Professor H A Nix, J McMahon and K O rd with AIDAB.

Commonwealth Climate Impact Assessment and Management Program (COM CIAM ) follow-up in-country clinics in data base development in

east and west Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Ghana and Sierra Leone by Professor H A Nix, J M cM ahon , K Ord and D r B Lees, Geography, A N U with AIDAB.

Distribution and habitat requirements of koalas in south east New South Wales by D r T W Norton and Η M Neave with D r S J Cork, CSIRO

Division ofWildlife and Ecology, Canberra and M r M Saxon, NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Integrating process modelling o f the distribution and abundance of arboreal mammals and birds in the cucalypt forests o f the east and south coasts o f Australia with geographic information systems,

with a view to land management prescriptions by D r T W Norton, Professor H A Nix, Professor I D Moore, D r Μ P H utchinson and J P M cM ahon with CSIRO Division ofW ildlife and Ecology, Canberra and N SW National Parks and Wildlife representatives.

Conservation status and habitat requirements o f Long-footed Potoroo by D r T W Norton with M r A Claridge, Forestry Department, ANU and M r M Saxon and National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Population viability analysis o f forest-dependent fauna by D r T W N orton and D r D B Lindenmayer with D r Η P Possingham, University o f Adelaide and M r I Davies, RSBS, ANU.

An ecological and social smdy o f environmental conditions and people’s well-being in Bangkok, Thailand by Dr H Ross and M s S Punpuing with the Institute for Population and Social Research,

Mahidol University and Department o f Urban and Regional Planning, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.

Review o f Aboriginal housing design in Central Australia D r H Ross with Ms P Morel, Department of Anthropology, Bloomington,

Indiana, for Tangentyere Council and Department of Lands and Housing.

191

Sustainable development planning for Aboriginal communities D r H Ross with D r E Young, University College, University o f New South Wales. '

Sustainability and the built environment, D r H Ross, M r S Dovers, D r S Boyden, with Professor A Rodger, Melbourne University, and others.

Dam failure damage assessment, Mr D I Smith and Sydney W ater Board.

Cooperative hazard policies, D I Smith and J Handmer with N Erikson, University o f Waikato, P May, University o f Washington and R Burby, University o f New Orleans.

Input on risks to life and property from tropical storm surge by D I Smith with Queensland Interdepartmental Committee on Storm I ide and Bureau o f Meteorology.

Formulation o f National Flood Policy by D I Smith with Department ofW ater Affairs and Forestry, Pretoria, South Africa.

Implications o f greenhouse climate rainfall change for urban flooding by D I Smith with CSIRO Division o f Atmospheric Research.

Mathematical modelling of trace gases in the atmosphere by D r J A Taylor with Professor R Cicerone, University o f California, Irvine, D r G

Brasseur, Director, Atmospheric Chemistry Division, U nited States National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and D r P Zimmerman, Senior Scientist, NCAR Ocean atmosphere trace gas exchange with D r D

Erickson, N CA R Hybrid modelling o f stream acidity with P Whitehead, Institute o f Hydrology, UK Developing constrained inversion techniques for application to determining the sources and sinks o f greenhouse gases with J Mulquiney D r A J Jakeman and Professor J Norton, University o f

Birmingham, U K Consultant on greenhouse gas emissions to the Department o f Primary Industry Modelling the biogeochemical cycles o f atmospheric N 2O, with L Bouwman, RIVM, The Netherlands Global tracer transport modelling, with Shoichi Taguchi, National Institute for

Resources and the Environment, M ITI, Japan.

Insecurity in the N SW logging industry by Ms J Tracey and D r J Dargavel for N SW Logging Association.

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

T he feasibility research into the controlled availability o f opioids by D r G Bammer with Professor D Chappell and M r D McDonald, Australian Institute of Criminology; D r J Butler, University o f Newcastle; Professor R Jarrett and D r P Solomon, University o f Adelaide; and Ms K Mundine, W innunga Nimmitvjah, the A CT Aboriginal H ealth Service.

An exploratory study on the cost-effectiveness o f alternative cancer control strategics by D r J Butler with D r D Doessel, Department o f Economics, University o f Queensland.

Addressing one aspect of acute respiratory infection— maternal care and coping behaviour by Professor J C Caldwell and Professor R M Douglas with D r J Lob-Levyt, Maternal and Child Epidemiology Unit, Iondon .School o f

Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Acute Respiratory Infection Programme, W orld Health Organization, Geneva.

A continuing major smdy o f the social context o f AIDS in Africa by Professor J C Caldwell and Ms P Caldwell with Professor Orubuloye, O ndo Srate University, Nigeria, D r J Anarfi, University o f Ghana, Professor D Agyeman and Dr K Awusabo-Asare, University o f Cape Coast,

Ghana, and Professor] Ntozi and D r J Mukiza-Gapere, Makerere University, Uganda.

A smdy o f health transition (the cultural, social and behavioural determinants o f health) throughout Nigeria by Professor] C Caldwell and Ms P Caldwell with Professor I O Ombuloye, O ndo State University, Nigeria, the Nigerian Institute for Social and Economic Research (NISER) and six other universities across Nigeria.

A smdy o f adolescents’ body image, weight concerns and weight-control practices by M r D Crawford with Ms M Nowak, Anton Breinl Centre, James C ook University.

Contribution and translation for an adaptation of the new Our Bodies Ourselves (1992 edition) into Thai, by Ms Wassana Im-Em with Chiang Mai and Payap University, Thailand.

192

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s u n d e r t a k e n w ith u n iversities, CSIRO a n d o t h e r institutions

A study o f stomach cancer among immigrants in Australia and Canada by D r E Kliewer with Ms A Brancker, Statistics Canada and D r G Giles, Anti-Cancer Council o f Victoria.

A study o f ischaemic heart disease among immigrants in Australia and Canada, by D r E Kliewer with Ms A Brancker, Statistics Canada.

A report o f cancer among Australian immigrants by D r E Kliewer with D r G Giles, Anti-Cancer Council o f Victoria and M r P Jells, Australian Institute o f Health and Welfare.

A methodological paper relating to proportionate mortality analyses by D r E Kliewer with D r K Smith, University of Utah.

A revision o f NCEPH working paper number 30— The health o f populations on North Queensland Aboriginal communities: change and continuity— for publication in Human Biology by Dr S J Kunirz and D r G Santow with D r R Streatficld, Queensland Health.

Research into paradigms of public health by D r D legge with Ms W Drewery, Educational Smdies Department, Waikato University, New Zealand and Professor D Neubauer, Political Studies Department, University o f Hawaii.

rhe implications of economic rationalism for health policy making by D r D Legge with D r R Irvine, Health Studies Department, University of Newcastle and Professor D Neubauer, Political Smdies Department, University o f Hawaii.

The relations between structural change in the international economy, the changing environment within which health development policy for developing countries is made, and the health

outcomes in such countries by D r D Legge with D r J Cliff, Faculty o f Medicine, University of Eduardo Mondlane, Maputo, Mozambique and Professor D Sanders, Department of Public

Health, University o f the Western Capie, South Africa.

A text for health sociology by D r D Legge with D r A Petersen, Sociology Program, Murdoch University.

The D ubbo Smdy o f the Health o f the Elderly by Dr J McCallum with Associate Professor L Simons and Ms J Simons, Lipid Department, St Vincent’s Hospital, University o f NSW , and D r Y

Friedlander, Department of Social Medicine, Hadassah Medical Organization, Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

Planning the Mental Health Status o f NESB Elderly Survey by D r J McCallum with Professor H Minas, Victorian Transcultural Psychiatry Unit.

Research on disability, and planning the Australian meeting o f the REVES group by D r J McCallum with D r C Mathers, Australian

Institute o f Health and Welfare.

Evaluation o f the Successful Ageing ACT Project by D r J McCallum with D r S Campbell, Director, Aboriginal Liasion Office.

A paper examining record linkage in epidemiological research in Australia by Dr B Sibthorpje and D r E Kliewer with D r J Bass, Australian Institute o f Health and Welfare.

Aboriginal population change in Western Australia by Dr L Smith with M r G Briscoe, History Program, Research School o f Social

Sciences.

The impact on women and their families of having and caring for premature and sick infants by D r J Thompson with D r J Keaney, Woden Valley Hospital.

NHMRC Social Psychiatry Research Unit

French and German versions of the Canberra Interview for the Elderly (CIE) by Professor A S Henderson and D r A Mackinnon with Dr R Mulligan, Hopital Cantonale, Geneva, Switzerland.

Occupational exposures and Alzheimer’s disease by Professor A S Henderson, D r A F Jorm and Mrs A E Korten with D r R G un, Department o f Community Medicine, The University of Adelaide and with D r H Creasey and Professor G A Broe, Department o f Geriatric Medicine,

Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW.

Neuropsychological and psychiatric functioning in former prisoners o f war by D r A F Jorm with Professor G A Broe, D r C Tennant, Mrs R Sulway and Dr O Dent, Department of Geriatric

193

T he A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Medicine, Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW.

Socio-emotional sequelae of parental care and control by D r B Rodgers with M RC National Survey o f Health and Development, UK.

Anxiety and depression in offspring o f divorced parents by D r B Rodgers with M RC National Survey o f Health and Development, U K

Psychological problems in general health care by Mrs A E Korten with Division o f Mental Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

The epidemiology o f mental disorders in later life, by Professor A S Henderson with Professor J-P Michel, Department o f Geriatric Medicine, University o f Geneva, Switzerland.

The epidemiology o f depression in old age by Dr A F Jorm with D r Y Forsell, Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.

Methods o f screening for dementia by D r A F Jorm and D r A J Mackinnon with D r R Mulligan, Hopital Cantonale, Geneva, Switzerland.

Dementia-free life expectancy in Australia by Dr A F Jorm with D r C Mathers, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Dr K Ritchie, INSFRM, Montpellier, France.

Forgetting rates in Alzheimer’s disease by D r H Christensen with D r M Kopelman and D r N Stanhope, Academic Psychiatry, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, U K

Implications o f dementia for families, services and for social policy; and effectiveness o f early intervention or additional assistance for delaying or preventing admission to care, by D r P A Pollirt and Professor D W O ’Connor, Department o f Psychological Medicine, Monash University.

Child development risk factors for adult schizophrenia by D r B Rodgers with D r P B Jones and Professor R M Murray, Department o f Psychological Medicine, Instimte o f Psychiatry, London, U K

Research School of Biological Sciences

Visual Sciences Group

A multiple region PERG for the examination of retinal defects associated with glaucoma by D r T Maddess and D r A C James with D r S Wine, North Shore Hospital, Sydney and D r I Goldberg, Prince o f Wales Hospital, Sydney.

New psychophysical techniques for assessing glaucomatous damage by D r T Maddess with Dr S Wine, University o f NSW, D r J Dobinson, Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane and I Goldberg, Prince o f Wales Hospital, Sydney.

Functions o f peptidergic amacrine cells, by D r I Morgan with D r M Boelen, Latrobe University College o f Northern Victoria.

Nitric oxide in mammalian retinas by D r I Morgan with D r D Ehrlich, University of Melbourne.

Transmitter systems in human retina by D r I Morgan with D r D Ehrlich, University of Melbourne.

Effects o f excitotoxins on ganglion cells by D r I Morgan with D r P Jeffrey, University o f Sydney and D r S Robinson, University o f Queensland.

Role o f peptidergic amacrine cells in control of eye growth by D r I Morgan with Professsor W Stell, University o f Calgary, Canada.

Role o f amacrine cells in the generation o f non-linearities in ganglion cell responses D r I Morgan with Professor Naka, New York University, USA

Localisation o f enkephalin receptors in chicken retina by D r I Morgan with D r I C Maderspach, Hungarian Academy o f Sciences, Hungary.

Pattern vision in honeybees by Professor Μ V Srinivasan and D r S W Zhang with D r M Lehrer, University o f Zurich, Switzerland.

Visual control o f insect flight by Professor Μ V Srinivasan and D r S W Zhang with D r T Collett, University o f Sussex, U K

194

J o in t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c ts u n d e r t a k e n w ith u n iv ersities, CSIRO a n d o t h e r institutions

Learning processes in insects by Professor Μ V Srinivasan and D r S W Zhang with Professor R Gadagkar, Indian Institute o f Science, Bangalore.

Visual analysis of insect egomotion by Professor Μ V Srinivasan and D r S W Zhang with R Voss, University o f Tubingen, Germany.

Biologically inspired machine vision by Professor Μ V Srinivasan, M Nagle and D r P Sobey with Professor Y V Venkatesh, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

195

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Degrees and Diplomas Conferred

Bachelor o f Arts

Jacinta Maria Adams Elizabeth Anne Ahern Luke Paul Aiken Antonella Anna Amodio

Robert Denis Appel Guillermo Alejandro Arredondo Jo Lara Astley Angela Jane Baker

Geoffrey Dennis Bardwell inis Grace Bateman Katherine Jane Bates Tonya Jane Beeton

Eugenia Berjitsky Elizabeth Helen Berryman Joanna Bertzeletos Daniel Phillip Bigna

Meridan Jane Biziak Melanie Jane McGavin Black Michaele Anne Bond Stephen Anthony Bond Andrew Robert Boote Justin Piers Booth

Louise M aty Booth Derek Jeames Bopping Fiona Louise Borman Victoria Jodi Bowen Prances M aty Bowron Jocelyn Leigh Boyd Angus David Boyle

Megan Frances Breen Sarah Louise Breusch Uwe Brockmeyer Lyn Margaret Brown Adrian Norman Browne

Helen Rhonda Buck Fiona Jane Buie Caroline Frances Bush Vanessa Jane Bushell

Eileen Butcher Louise Patricia Bygrave Anthony Francis Campbell Mary Elizabeth Campbell

Emma Louise Carlsen Devrin Lawrence Carlson-Smith Andrew James Carson Jane Ingram Castles

Claudia Ingeborg Caton

Philippa Jane Chapman Peter Bian Lin Cheah, BComm Melb, I.LB Christina Cheng Peter Francis Chesworth Po W an Cheung Jill Josephine Clapin

Lindsay Roger Clark Tania Deanne Clarke Elizabeth Anne Clement Aoife Julia Clifford M atthew Vincent Clissold, BEc

Kathryn Shirley Cochrane Amanda Louise Codd Fiona Ruth Conolly Stephen John Conroy

Michael Oliver Corscadden Georgina Sylvia Cowdroy Annalisa Therese Cranby Jillian Crockart John Michael Cross

Vaughan M atthew Croxford Tanja Cvijanovic Peggy Indrawati Daroesman Margaret Davidson Alison Kate Dayman

Damian Charles de Montemas Maty Elizabeth Deane Ian David Denham William Ian D e Vere

Benjamin Joseph Digan Hayley Anne Dingwall Grace Ethel D itton, BEd DarwinIT Stephen John Dixon Barbara May Doran Jenny Doukas Maya Drobnjak Jane Dwyer Leah Suzanne Dyer Karen Ann Eamens Angela Louise Edmends-Besant Adrian John Edwards Leanne Wendy Ellis Abigail Clare Enright Alison Joyce Everall Thea Melvie Exley, BA Tas. Jean A nn Fallance Adriana Farcut Joanne Lee Felton Laura Fennell

196

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Wallace Edmund Fernandes Raelie Marie Fineran Raelene Fitzgerald Marita Foley Ian Andrew Fowler Martin Peter Franc Cassandra Lee Freeman

Harry Friend, MBBS Liverpool Stephen Paul Frost Susan Meredith Galbraith Beverly-Ann Galloway Matthew Rodney Gardiner Jacqueline Graham Garland

Neil Robert Goodwin Sarah Margaret Gordon Angela Gordon-Smith Timothy Andrew Miles Gore Victoria Annette Murray Gosper Richard Hamilton Goss Jacqueline Grau Trisha Ruth Gray Sarah Jane Grealy Sasha Karl Grebe Susan Bronwen Griffiths Debra Grogan Gareth David Hall Annette Yve Halloran Jena Hamilton

Patricia Lea Hannan Ann-Maree Hanratty Shirley Hardjadinata

Elizabeth Inten Hardjono Richard Jon Harris Nicole Susan Hartigan Merryn Jane Harty Therese Josephine Hatfield Jennifer Ann Hazlewood

David Roblin Hearder Gina Heathcote Sarah Jane Heathcote Fiona Elizabeth Henderson

Kirsten Jane Higgins Justin Piers William Hill Therese Mary Hill Alexander Ross Hilson

Tracey Anne Hind M atthew G uy Hinder Amanda Susan Hirschfeld Jason John Hitchick

Vanessa Joan Horton Melissa Anne Horten Maree Ann Howard Q uinton H ugh

Brett James Hughes Adele Hughes

Belinda Jane Hunt Melinda Rachel H unt Joanne Claire Hurst

Anna-Marie Phyllis Innes Dinah Elizabeth Jackson Janina Christine Jankowski Edwina Ruth Jans

Ingrid Anita Jaugietis Carmel Bernadette Jean Anthony Victor Allan Jenkins Juliet Peta Johannes

Andrew Kenneth Johnson Craig William Johnson David Andrew Johnson Heather Lynne Jones Melissa Ann Jones Leila Meera Jordan Jim Karelas

Marie-Celine Keane Elizabeth Jane Keith Samantha Kendall Jacquelyn Lesley Keys

Emily Edwina King Mavis Rose Kingham Adrian John Kirk Jacqueline Anne Kirkpatrick Anne Patricia Kirwan Justine Anne Knowles Simon Timothy Langford Alopi Sione Latukefu Ljubica Draga Lauc Murray Robert Iawler

Megan Elizabeth Layton Sean N orm an Scott Leaver, BSc Amanda-Jane Lee Renee Elmina Leon

Emma Leslie Gabrielle Josephine Lewis Adreinne Lim Suet Chin Kylie Antoinette Littlcr

Nicole Lisa Livermore Mathew Garry Long Philip David Lord Rowena Sue Love Amanda Jane Lovell Caroline Anne McCarthy Catherine Helen M cCarthy Michael Anthony McFadden Simon Alexander MacKenzie Andrew Darren McKernan Justine Elizabeth McLean

Gail Dianne McNamara Tara Catherine McNeilly James Keith MacNevin Felicity Jane Maher

197

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Pauline Mak, BComm Andrea Malone Heidi Patricia Maloney Susan Elisabeth Manley Wallace Julia Marthenas

Radiel Simone Martin Dimitrios James Matzarakis Helen Elizabeth McCaffrey, BEc Stephanie Jane McDonald Anthony John Mclnerney

Steven Mark McIntyre Paul Anthony McKay Kelly-Anne McLaughlin Kirsty Elaine McLean Paul Christopher McLellan Catherine Jane McMaster Inigo Amadeus Merriman Rebecca Anne Millhouse Catherine Mary Mills Jeremy Dean Milsom

Rachel Louise Milthorpe Erika Molnar Jason David Neilen James Maurice Newman Gregory Jude Newton David James Nockels Julienne Ingrid Nurse Carol Ann O ’Carroll Elizabeth Ann O ’Donnell Damien Patrick O ’Donovan Maurice Terence O ’Riordan Maria Josephine O ’Sullivan Craig Brendan Ogilvie Carolyn Lee Paris Johanna Phyllis Mary Parker Kelly Anne Parkes Christopher T imothy Paul Dallas Clayton Pearce Peter John Pearson Andrew Paul Pemberton Suzanne Mary Pennell Rich cl Peters Christine Helen Petersen Monica Marie Pflaum Penelope Jane Philp Marian Desley Pihan Katherine Alice Pockley Anthony John Polinelli Joy Frances Prendergast Elizabeth Jane Pugh Victoria Ramshaw Rajsri Rao Sabina Faiz Rashid Kelly Anne Raymond Camille Helen Raynes-Greenow

Bryan David Read M atthew Robert Reeves Natasha Michelle Regterschot Hilary Elisabeth Dix Richards Dugald McRae Richards Nancy Louise Richardson Marcel Ritschel Celia Roberts

Lana Therese Roberts Deborah Ann Robertson Ian Michael Rodgers Suddhiborn Rochanabuddhi Ian Francis Rohr Eugene G uy Romaniuk Sarma-Lee Rumbachs Anthony Richard Ryan

Megan Helen Ryan Hugh Vincent Sainty Robert Francis Lawrence Sartor Robin Gerard Saville Susan Louise Schuller Kent Graeme Edward Scott-McLean Andrew Charles Scully

Branka Seselja Sean Patrick Sexton William Adam Sharpe Ronald Jeffrey Shaw Kirsten Leigh Shorn Michael John Sims Helen Lucy Skeat Andrew James Skidmore

Suzette Skobier Angela ITierese Smith Peter Andrew Smith Fiona Jane Smither Angela Joy Snedden Anna Charlone Somerville

Kresimir Dennis Spelic Shennia Maree Spillane Christine Ann Stack Nerolie Jane Stafford Katherine Ann Staunton Jacqueline Ann Stenhouse

Marcus Nikola Strkalj Catherine Anne Strong Alexander Williams Stuart Steven Sweeney Marja Katriina Tahka Leonard James Tally Joan Mary Tanton

Samuel David Thawley Melissa Yvonne Thompson Simon John Thwaites

Helen Anne Tilley Biserka Tkalcevic

198

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Beatrice Caitlin Tormey Peter Alexie James Tm da Charmaine Mary Tunn Deborah Josephine Tunnicliff Nigel James Scott Underwood Jonas Jacob Walter van Praag, BSc

Catherine Louise Vincent Ngaire Q uain Wallace Samantha Jane Walker Abigail Francis Walsh Justin Bruce Walsh Wendy Marec Ward Jeremy Campbell Waterford Emily Meredith Watson James Allan Watson Joanna D orothy Watt Nigel John Waugh Gail Christine Weaving John M artin Webb Tamara Webber

Michael Carrington Westaway Tina Louise Weston Adrienne Lesley White

Elyssa Gay White Lisa Maree Whitehorn Brant Robert Whitsed Annabelle M aty Whitty Trudi Sheree Williams Yvonne Julie Wilson Jennifer Susan Wimmer

Kathryn Margaret Winley Andrew Harris Witchard Nicole Anne Woclz

Douglas James Ross Wonders Patricia D ianne Worthy Alison W right Melanie Jane Mounsteven Wright Claire Diana Young Elizabeth Joy Youm Angelina Zubac Susannah Zweep

Bachelor of Arts degree w ith honours

Ryan Adey Michaela Katherine Carey Andreyev Neuza Aparecida Bertolani Elisabeth Llewellyn Bowdler

Cameron Alexander Bray Samantha Jane Bricknell Stephen John Broadbent Damien Andrew Browne

Shakira Josephine Bmford

Jacinta Maree Carroll Ruth Vallery Chisholm Damian John Cobum Sheridan Yvonna Coombes

David Gordon Cooper Michael James Cooper Rebecca Beatrice Copland, BA UNE Mark Richard Cossey Fiona-Marie Crowe Natalie Carmen Cujes Simon Jeremy Cullen Timothy Jowan Curnow Tanya Reureu Davies

Richard Davis Jane Alys Patricia Dickins Cathryn Jane Donohue Helen Mary Donovan

Catherine Jane Dyer Adrian Wentworth Evans Benjamin Gwynfor Evans

Matthew Paul Farrer Michael Firestone Heather Anne Fitt Christopher John Gosling Stephen Geoffrey Graham

Rochelle Marilyn Gray Alistair Martin Grinbergs I iggy Sian Nicole Hall Colin James Harrison

Rosanna Russell Hindmarsh, BA Syd. Philip Gary Hunt Daniel John Huppatz Nelia Nacima Hyndman-Rizik Gloria Olivia Joy Jackson Tamarisk Tree Jakobson

Pamela Lynne Joyce Lisa Michele Wardlaw-Kelly Rodgar Roy Patrick Keogh Donna Maree Kleiss, BA Griffith Ian Michael Krebs Belinda Ann Lee John Alexander Litchfield

Simone Marie Livingston Gersha Lourandos Zdcnek John Bernard Lund, BA D ip Ed UNE Kaori Matsuda, BA Meiji Matthew William Moir Anthony Kevin Monaghan

Jennifer Elizabeth Newell Heather Mary Nicholson Michael Anthony Palic

Johanna Pask Victoria Jane Pitt, LLB Zaklina Plavotic Katherine Jean Rainbird

199

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

David M anning Rennie Christopher James Roach David Leighton Ryan Nicole Louise Sadler Anthony Nicholas Seebach

Scott Lawrence Simon Inga Caroline Simpson Catherine Agnes Slavica Amanda Eva Smith Shelley Louise Smith Martin Douglas Steer Wendy Michelle Stone Marjorie Leng H ong Tan Christopher William Taylor Jacqueline Taylor Sonia Jasmine Thomas Charles Samuel W ann Kirsten Margareta Wehner Karen Louise Welberry Katherine Rachel W hite Michael Eric Harvey Wilson Andrew Simeon Chang Witheford, LLB Marilyn Sue W right

Bachelor o f Arts (Art History and Curatorship)

Keitha Jane Boyle Amelia Luisa Mullin Raelene Woods

Bachelor o f Arts (Asian Studies)

Natasha Vera Bolonkin Leanne Marie Bradshaw Sean James Brennan, BEc David Andrew Broughton Dianne Elizabeth Bruce Shakira Josephine Bruford Karen Anne Bush Wayne Robert Camilleri John Joseph Castley

Tanya Elizabeth May Channel!, BEc Vivien Jean H ui Chen Vivian W ai W a Chu

Douglas Stephen Clark Dale M ary Cox Candice Marie Culnane, BComm Nicole Maree Dailey William Steven Daw

Louise Maree D e Britt Angela Meg Dixon David Bruce Duke Susanne Soonit Eiden

Joanne Leigh Evans Michelle Nicole Eeros Gordon D ixon Fisher Lyndall Denise Franks William Fraser

Eng H ong Gan Melanie Jane Gander W endy Christine Gardiner Alisoun Jane Garrard

Gregory William Ginnivan Andrew John Gow Rochelle Marilyn Gray Anne-Maree Harrison John Eugene Hart, BA Melb.

Pamela Florence H an Kate Mary Hayes Christopher Michael Heidemanns Katharine Alice Hole Julia Horsley James William Hyndes

Midori Iijima Ewan Fraser Isbister Adam Marc Jones Emma Felicia Katauskas

Robert Gilchrist Kinloch Norman Kevan Knowles, BEc WAust. Christiane Stephanie Kovacevic Robert John Kyle Isabelle Micheline Georgette Lange Kerri Sylvia Leech Louise Maree Lindsay Justine Mai Nguyen Xuan Long Rachel Wai Leng Low Dianne Joy Makepeace Christine Elizabeth McKenna Louise Victoria McNeil Jacqueline Louise Mitchell

Deborah Jane Moss Kelly Mulligan Fhi Minh Trang Nguyen Katherine Sarah Jane Old Melissa Jane Pack Victor Charles Petersen, BEc Melissa Jane Randall Stephen John Rowdiffe Yan Yan Martina Shiu Karina Joy Shorter Jennifer Kay Smith Kiraly Amanda Southern Lisa Meredith Starkey M atthew James Keir Stephens Somchith Sukhaseume Nicholas David Alexander Thomas Michael Gerard Tierney Ross McDougall Warren

200

T he A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Bachelor o f Economics degree w ith honours

Adam Wesley Allanson Anthony John Bice Robert Martin Campbell

Kok Chung Cheang Rochelle Mary Edge Christine Lorraine Groeger Richard Charles Hancock Chad Augustine Hogan Lynette Yue Ling Huang Caralee Kendig Christopher James Liew Matthew Randell Lobb Christopher Alan Savage John Albert Simon, BSc

David M atthew Tonuri, BSc Roslyn Clare Van Vliet, BA(Asian Smdies) Andrew John Wilson Xiao Dong W u

Bachelor o f Information Technology

Mark Andrew Goleby W an Chung Ho Uri Amos Teitler David Bruce Thomson

lTiuytien Farida Truong

Bachelor o f Japanese Studies

Nicole Maree Chegwyn Kirsty Jane Cheyne-Macpherson Donella Catherine Johnston

Bachelor o f Laws

Simon Karl Anderson, BSc Brendan Colin Augustin Simon Banks, BA Gary Peter Bauer, BComm Meredith Kinga Anne Boroky, BA Adel. Sarah Rose Bower

Gregory Thomas Brackenreg, BAppSc Canberra David John Braggett, BEc Khai Tuong Bui, BSc WAust. Patricia Ann Bunton, BA(Asian Studies) Stephen William Burke Nicholas John Butler, BA Stephen Peter Byrne Gavin Mark Carney, BSc(Med) MBBS Syd. Bradley James Chenoweth

David Lindsay Cleland Kathryn Shirley Cochrane Natalie Carmen Cujes Rebecca Clare Curran, BA Deborah Claire Curtis Jason Andrew Denisenko, BComm

Danny Dichiera, BA Adel Richard Robert Macfie Doyle, BComm Simon Edgar Duke, BA Jacqueline Elizabeth Easter

Richard Gregory Farrell, BComm Laura Fennell Glyn Cameron Fiveash

Catherine Mary Gainer, BSc Paul Ross Gray Kathryn Alice Haigh, BA Susan Jane Hayman, BSc Fiona Elizabeth Henderson Bronwyn Margaret Horn, BComm Kirstin Fiona Isaacs Robert Janssens Glenn Andrew Jones Andrew Ronald Jungwirth, BEc

Fong Mei Kam Marianne Kelly, BA Grant Brendan Kennealy, BA William David Kerlev Judith Ann Keys Li Lu Khoo, BComm

Hea-Lyon Kim, BA SangMyung Women sUniv(Korea), MA Syd. Kerry Jane Kn owlet, BSc Constantine Joseph Kouper, BA Wai Chin Raymond Lam Julia Dawn Lansley

Nicholas James Lemmon Deborah Lopert, BSc Jennifer Louise Low, BA Fiona Robin MacDonald Cameron Iain MacLean Stephanie Ruth Mancell, BA Justine Mary Matthews

Barbara McCarthy, BA Qld Mary Anne McCarthy, BComm James Paul McQuillan, BA Anthony Paul Merrilees, BA

George Michalis, BEc Susan Jane Milne, BA SAIT Michael Eric Mobbs, BComm Timothy John Luke Morphy, BA Melb. Natasha Nadj, BA Vijay Chand Naidu, MA Syd. Julian Damon O ’Connell Julian David Olley, BSc James Frances Peterswald, BSc Syd.

204

Adriano Ernesto Giuseppe Piccoli, BEc Carolyn Anne Pope, BA Louise Kristine Rafferty John Robert Reynolds, BA

Dugald McRae Richards Sarma-Lee Rumbachs Brendan Adrian Scott, BSc Vinod Senthilvasan, BComm Andrew Lindsay Smith, BSc Simon Christopher Starr, BEc Susan Anne Taylor, BA Simon Marian Peter Tchaikovsky Angela Gai Tierney

Helen Jane Vickers, BA Anura Rajasiri Weereratne Tina Louise Weston Nancye Louise W hybrow

Donald Richard Wilkinson, BA GradDipPublicLaw John Paul Wilson, BSc John Wilson Smith, BEd(PhysEd) Flinders

Melanie Jane Mounsteven W right

Bachelor o f Laws degree w ith honours

Kumaralingam Amirthalingam Angela Jane Baker Elissa Dai Baxter, BEc Michael John Bessell, BEc

Graeme John Blank Peter Ross Brown, BComm Geoffrey Charlton Budd, BA(Asian Studies) Antonio D e Paulo Buti, BPhysEd DipEd

M Industrial Relations WAust. Stephen James Byron, BComm Denise Michelle Chick, BA Jacqueline Elizabeth Chin

Douglas Stephen Clark Damien Patrick Coleman, BEc Christopher Trent Davis Surendra David Dayal

Derek Thomas Fittler, BA N S W Andrew John Greinke, BComm Nefley Clare Hetherington, BA Graeme Anthony Hill, BA Andrew Scott Howe, BA Justin Denis Hyland, BEc

Elizabeth Jane Keith James Sinnet King, BA WAust. Geoffrey Keith Lamb, BE(Mech) N S W IT Renee Elmina Leon

Gabrielle Josephine Lewis Andrea Malone

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Amanda Milin, BComm Ariane Hartland Mitchell, BA Annette Lilian Musolino, BA Damien Patrick O ’Donovan

Liesl Mary O ’Meara, BComm Timothy Charles Oldham, BSc James Murdoch Paterson, BComm Sally Caroline Petherbridge, BA Janine Clare Pritchard, BA

Eugene Guy Romaniuk Della Candacie Stanley, BA Hugji Malcolm Stodart, BSc Sarah Elizabeth Todd, BSc Melb. Martijn Brian Daniel Wilder Richard John Wilson, BA Jonathan Neil Woodger, BA

Bachelor of Science

Stella Acheampong Elisha Mary Ahern James Francis Allen Antonella Anna Amodio

Mirofia Evgenievna Anchugov Iain James Haig Anderson Timothy Luke Armstrong Christine Margaret Atyeo Matthew Leslie Austin Elizabeth Badawy David Shaevitch Bamfbrd Joanna Bertzeletos

Mark Cornells Bleyerveld Lawrence Augustine Boyer Colin Robert Brading Joseph Vlatko Bresic Samantha Jane Bricknell Louise Broadbent Smart Ian John Brown Ian Lester Burrows Calum Buder Mandy Lee Callaghan Matthew John Patrick Calthrop Jennifer Campbell Fabiola Maria Campora Luisa Geraldina Capezio Giles Fergus Raymond Carroll Cheih Shiong Chai Carolyn Mei Wun Chan Man H on Chan Mimi Chan Caroline Mary Chavez Lam Seng Cheah Bujal Chemat Wai Kwong Cheng

205

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Moira Anne C hin Louise Christensen Chi Keung C hung Peter Mark Joseph Clark Kate Elizabeth Clark-Walker, BA Wendy Diane Close, BEc Catherine Maree Condon Marie Catherine Cook, BA Stephanie Ruth Cook Susan Bridget Cooper, BA John Leslie Corcoran Annalisa Therese Cranby Janelle Patricia Cretney

Raymond John Crook Allan Keith Cunliffe Timothy Jowan Curnow Fiona Lillian Zeenie Daniell Theresa Kathleen Daniell Surendra David Dayal Ann-Marie D i Michiel

Glenn Norm an Dickins Catherine Leura Dixon Meredith Doutre Alan Graham D unn Adrian John Edwards Timothy James Henry Edwards Gregory John Eggins Sonja Eibl Craig John Elphick Susan Margaret Emmett Bronwyn Margaret Evans Curt W erner Hayden Fahndrich, BA Glenda Lilian Ferguson David Stewart Field King Fai Alex Fung Gillian Rhonda Gardner Robert Colin Gardner, BEc(Hons) Anthony Giannasca

Bronwyn Joy Goody Sulari Dharshini Goonetilleke Rachelle Maree Graham Michael John Joseph Harmer Craig Laurence Harris Matthew John Harris Emily Ann Jardine Herbert Jimmy H in Fai H o

Alun Gordon Hoggett Richard Leslie Holgate Maree Ann Howard Sonya Maree H uleatt T hu Hoanh Huynh

Cherie Tm die Ingram Gavin David Jeffries Anthony Victor Allan Jenkins Suzanne Mary Jenner

David Neil Johnston Tim othy David Jones Leila Meera Jordan Deane Katsoolis Robert Keirven Danielle Kellahan Andrew Peter Kelman

Lars Moritz Kiewitt Sandra Kim Peter Kindermann Abigail Katherine Megaera King Anne Patricia Kirwan Thomas Leslie Klekner George Chris Kokkinis Paul Adrian Koschei Josip Kristo

Paul Albert Kuske Anthony Francis Labb Lee Yuen Ming John Peter Lawrance

Yuen M ing Lee Yew H ong Leong Chee Shan Leung Chi Kwong Alfred Li Tania Pauline Lioulios C hun C hing Lui Igor Sebastian Lukaszyk Sarina Nadia Lusso Charlene Jo Ly Thomas McCoy

Peter Rodney Maddocks Julia Lucie Mansour Jeremy William Ransford Marples Peter Kevin McCarthy, BA Susanne Louise Meeny Gavin John Mercer Jacqueline Anne Meyers

Gregory James Miles Fiona I nrraine M ilne Andrew Christian Mitchell Joanne Nicole Mitchell

Louise Catherine Mitchell Timothy William Muirhead David Peter Dell Munns Paola Andrea M unro Sian Catherine M unro Trevor Alexander Murdock

Ngok Ling Patty Ng Loc-Hoa Nguyen Quoc Hien Nguyen Thanh Doanh Nguyen Peter Nilsson Megan Louise Noble Denis Kieran O ’Dea Douglas James Osborn

206

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n f e r r e d

Matthew Pang Katrina Maree Patch Deborah Ann Peereboom Dominique Dieu H a Pham Kylic Patricia Pickett

Robert James Priest Kenneth Norm an Pritchard Jenny Rebecca Pummeroy Glenn Rogers

Ginny Marisa Sargent Carmel Maree Saunders Anthony Michael Scherl Kent Graeme Edward Scott-McLean

Duncan Stewart Searle Patrick Leslie George Sefton Cecilia Barbara Shlegel Ling Linda Siau Shuk M ing Siew Robert John Small Graeme Michael Smith Justin James Smith

Paul Dennis Smith Rodney Craig Spence David Ian Spencer

Nathan Allan Spinaze Kylie Elizabeth Steele Sean James Sullivan John Davidson Sutherland David John Svenson Ludzia Anna Szychowska Samuel Roger Taylor Brace G rant Telfer Christopher Michael James Thomas .Alan W ing W ah To Kylie Ann Trengove Luka Ujdur Isabella Alice Urbanek Nicoletta Valeri James Santiago Villegas Michelle Anne Walker Scan Joseph Walsh, BEc Jeremy M ark Waterman

Tamara Webber, BA Douglas Colin Whaite Patrick Lloyd Whish-Wilson, BEc Kwai Chau W ong Kwok Kay W ong Maria Prances Woodgate

Damian John Woods Nicholas Ian Wyrdeman

Bachelor of Science degree w ith honours

David Anthony Antelmi Simon Arthur David Terence Atkins Holger Averdunk Felicity Heather Benn Susan Jane Bennett, BSc Griffith Stephen David Billings

Patricia Margaret Brown, BComm N S W Anthony Ronald Budd Mary Carmel Carse, BA Charles Claudianos

Catherine Lucy Coddington Leon Norm an Court Keron Coyle, BEc

Susan Sheryl Coyne Vincent Smart Craig Camille Elizabeth Crowley Susan A nne Daly

Leanne Kay Dansie, BSc Flinders Paul James Darwen Marlene Lesley Davey Jacqueline Anne de Chazal

Greg Mark de Plater Patrick Joseph John Dessi Alberto Dias John Andrew Domagala Raymond Charles Duell Suzanne Marie Edgecombe Davin James Fifield Melanie Frances Fitzpatrick Jennifer Ruth Ford Carolyn Rae Fry Wilfred Kelsham Fullagar Amber Elizabeth Geelan James Andrew Gifford Catherine Anne Gilchrist Timothy Richard Gill Stuart William Girvan Ursula Anne Grott, BSc Ruth Patricia Hagan Gavin Angus Hall Rodney Andrew Hardwick Justin Bren Harsdorf Antoinene Louise Harmer Paul David Hanis Peter John Heness

Michael Easdy Hiron Simon Patrick Hogan Alastair James Hunt

Marcus Jacka Nicholas Paul John

207

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Frances Mary Johnston Elisabeth Alexandra Kerr Penelope Lineton King Nigel Rory Kirk Eleanor Kirkpatrick Berin Francis Lautenbach Peter John Lawrence Wendy Lee Kwong Joo Leek Jeremy Shen-Yi Liew Andrew John Longhorn Ronald Anthony Lough Land, BAppSc UNE Smart Boyd Love Mary-Therese Lovell, LLB Kaylene Anne Lutze, BSc UNE Duncan McLaughlin Justine Mason Christopher Jon Maunder Anne Louise Mayfield Jason Campbell Mein

Susan Michele Metz Jeremy Dean Milsom Scott Barnes M ilton, BSc Alexandra Grace Mitchell

Rory Benedict Molinari Laurence Henry Nelmes Darren M ark O ’Shaughnessy Rina Sara Onorato, BSc Meredith Lee O rr, BA Rebecca Jane Osborne Karen Joy Herkes O tt Jonathan Charles Price Sarah Eliza Rodgers Megan Helen Ryan Leena Kaarina Savolainen, BSc Flinders Mark Eric Scarborough Sharon Schulz Antony Leon Shepherd Derek John Smith Kirsty Anne Smith Anna Charlotte Somerville Matthew Justin Stocks Christopher Desmond Strusz Michael Frederick Smckings Donald Robert Syme Colin Tanfield Taylor Elizabeth Shelley Thomas David William Thurbon Judith Monica Toman Matthew Philip Tonge Kin Hay Wai Beverley Joy Warner Ralph Rasjid Wdcox Samanda Michelle Williams David Anthony Wilson

Andrew Bernard Wynberg Rowena Anne Witham Richard Alexander Zentelis John Nigel Zigman

Bachelor o f Science (Forestry)

Andrew Robert Winton Boleyn Rodney James Bristow Bronwyn Helen Clarke Sailosi D rum a Degei Wolfgang Drexler Anthony John Evans Ram Vuki George Bronwyn Joy Goody Aled James Hoggett

Gavin David Jeffries Robyn King Philip Lacy Rohan Anthony Nelson, BEc Thomas Alexander Newby Michael William Ryan Anthony Michael Scherl

Ian McEwan Shakespeare Ian Edward Smith Aaron James Soanes Stephen John Towle Susana Lomani Waqainabete Michael Alexander Radford Wilson Byron John Yeo

Bachelor o f Science (Forestry) degree w ith honours

Martin Antony Crevatin Nelson Nhamoinesu Gororo Patrick Charles Groenhout

Philip Richard Mason Ross Leonard McLoughlin Stephen Jonathan Mylius James David Roy Pirie

Bachelor o f Science (Resource and Environmental Management)

Ruth Cameron Aveyard Trent Patrick Barry Nicholas Martin Clancy Kirrily Jane Costello Rodney Allan Edmundson Ian Alexander Gaze Michael Robin Gilbert Sally Elizabeth Hamilton

208

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Craig John Harre David Jongeneel Smart William Johnston Robert Le Febvre Pui Lin Jennifer Li Michael William Paix Nina Stahl

Carl Phillip Vincent Peter Stewart Wallace Karen Melissa Weinman

Bachelor o f Science (Resource and Environmental Science) degree w ith honours

Jamie Lea Allnutt

Bachelor of Letters

Peter Michael Brown, BComm N S W Richard Paul Fordham-Edwards, BA AdelCollArts&Ed William Gordon Williams, BA CanberraCAE

Graduate Certificate in Development Administration

H ong Zheng, Cert Nanjing, BA FujianNormal Univ

Graduate Certificate in Economics of Development

Son T uong Nguyen, DipEcMath NatEconColl

Graduate Certificate in Public Policy

John Francis Collis, BA Macq. Geraldine Patricia Daly, BAppSc Canberra Aleata Helen Johnston, BEd WolL Craig Hamish Lindsay, BA

Penelope A nn Elizabeth Main, BSc N S W Carol Ann Miller, BSc(Econ) Lend., GradDip(LibStud) Westemlnst David Thomas Quinlan, BA(Mus) CITA

Gregory John Ryan, BSocWork S A IT Giancarlo Savaris, BA Canberra Christopher Shelling

Graduate Diploma in Accounting

Joselito Gaetos Diga, BSc San Beda Coll Felix Tei Nartey, BSc(Hons) Ghana Huey Chi Erica Tham, BComm Mark David Wilson, BEc

Graduate Diploma in Arts

Gavina Esther Bailey, CertHumanities PontifiicaUnivCatolPeru Cathie Margaret Clelland. BA(Hons) DipEd NSW , BA(Hons) N ’ cle Sebastianus Fernandez, Sarjana Nusa, Magister

InstTch Tmg&EdSci Marisa Jeannelle Gomes, BA(Admin) Canberra Masror Hausen, BA Punjab, BEcSocStud(Hons) Wales Glen Forrest James, BAppSc Canberra Jacqualine Maree Korsman, BA(Asian Studies)

Andrew Hugh McCabe, BA Triarko Nurlambang, Sarjana Indonesia Yoshiaki Onomi, BA Kyushu Patricia Pilfey, Dip SenecaCollApplArts,

DipDesign OntarioCollArt Laurellejune Russell, BA Minako Sakai, BA M IntStud Sophia W w in Triwinarti, SarjanaSastra Indonesia Angela W u, BA(Asian Smdies)

Graduate Diploma in Demography

Lina Bade, BA PNG Galefele Beleme, DipStat BA(Stat) Botswana Anne Maree Blume, BEd Syd, BA Nazneen Chowdhury, BSc(Stat) MSc(Stat) Dhaka

Zemicael Desta, BA(Econ) Asmara George Ebong, BSc Med Makerere Wassana Im-Em, BSc(Nursing) RoyalThaiArmyNursingHosp, MSc Boston

Ketty Kadarwati, BSc Doctorandus GadjahMada Asaad Malik, BAdmin AcadBusAdmin, MPA GradSchlPubAdmin Xianhu Shi, BSc BeijingNormalUniv, MSc

HuazhongNormalUniv Sheriff Seikh Talibuya Sonko, DipDem IntStatProgCntr A’isha Alison Louise Speight, BA (Asian Smdies)

Tina Tauasosi, BSocSc Waikato Andrew Tearapiri Teaurima, CertPopStud IntinstPopStud

209

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Graduate Diploma in Development Administration

Yupapom Boontid, BBusAdmin Bangkok Anuro Lumabas Jr Cebuma, BSc(MechEng) UnivCityManila Yuanhua Chen, Diploma Anhui

Kittipol Chotipimai, BPolSc Chulalongkom Rowena D ato Cuanico, BSc EastemPhilippines Setariki Cula, BEc Monash, DipEd SPacific Lorna Kaggwa, BA Dar-Es-Salaam Henry Pisimi Koiaie, DipEdStud BEd PNG Medelina Kusharwanti, Doctorandus Diponegoro Semi Rogoyawa Lewanirabe, BA SouthPacific Dharam Lingam, DipHealthMgmt SouthPacific Anne Emmanuel Mazalla, AdvDipEcPIanning

InstDevMgmt, PostgradDiploma 1nstRuralDevPlanning Muhammad Muhadjir, MSocPolSc Indonesia Rupcni Naului Nacewa Xiaobo Pan, BEng Zhejiang Khamphanh Phimsipasom, BEd

Dongcok Tch PmgCo/J Wilarno Setiawan, SarjanaAdminNegara Sarjana M uda DiponegoroSentarang Bijaindar Pratap, DipCommDev SouthPacific Aree Redfern, BA(Acctng) SouthPacific

Eliudi Betri Sanga, BA Dar-F.s-Salaam Joses Wawari Sanga Mali Siaroon, BA Silpakom Daniel Rihon Sijam, DipSecTchg GorokaTchColl Tauaasa Taafaki, DipDevAdmin

SouthDevonTechColl, CertProjPlan&Mgmt lntTraininglnst Daw Tenzin, BA Punjab Viliami Teli Tiseli, BA SouthPacific Moeaki Maliepo Toma, BA Auckland Emmanuel Concepcion Torrente, BS(CommDev) Philippines, Diliman Qiyuan Wang, Diploma Shanghai]iaotong Zhidong Yu, CertGrad BeijingRadioBroadcasting&TVUniv Wahdi Salasi April Yudhi, Doctorandus GadjahMada

Graduate Diploma in East Asian Studies

Terence Patrick Beven, DipEd NSW, BSc PhD Pas. Natasha Lynley Davis, BEc Adel Lisa Marie Gay, BA(Asian Studies) Benjamin Peter Hanisch, BA Adel

Graduate Diploma in Econometrics

Zita Villa Juan Albacea, BSc MSc Philippines(Los Banos) Brett Steven Ryder, BEc MEc

Graduate Diploma in Economic History

Paul Benedict McGuire, BCom Melb. Smart John Smith, BEc WAust.

Graduate Diploma in Economics

Yi-Lin Chen, BA Anhui, MA(Econ) Nankai Godfrey Joseph Cini, BAgSc I n Probe Ovidio Iglesias, BEc Jim Dimitrios Kapsalis, BCom Mellb.

Hazel Honey Fabricante Lim, BA AteneodeManila Stephen James McMillan, BEng(Mech)(Hons) Adel Yew May Martin, BA(Mod Lang) Canberra Patrick Daniel Power, BSc(Agr) Syd. Phaisan Ruphanitkit, BA(PolSci)(Hons)

ChiangMai Jian H ua Wan, Bachelor Xianmen, MEc PostgradSchlPeople 'sBankChina Hong Wai W o n g BCivEng SingaporePolytech,

BEc

Jodie Leanne Wyett, BEc Flinders

Graduate Diploma in Economics o f Development

Lilli Ann Samson Carino Abello, BS MA Philippines H im t Berhe, BA AddisAbaba Siew Kion C hang BSc Tuong N hu Che, BSc HanoiPolytechUniv Anh Tuan Dao, BEc Hanoi

Haji Ismail Duraman, BA(Econ) CityBirmPolytech, MSc Salford Christopher Richard Elstoft, BCom Melb. Qingbo Guan, Bachelor Peking Lisette Suarez Jamora, BA Northwestern Maria Louella Aniceto Leh, BA Philippines Binzhang Liu, BSc Nankai, MEc

ChineseAcadSocSci Thomas Benjamin Babasa Marcelo, BSc Philippines Arphaxad Gomborojo Agomas Masambu,

BA(Econ)(Hons) DarEsSalam

210

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Abu Taher Mollik, BComm(Hons) M Comm Dhaka Rolando C hing Navarro, BBusEcon Philippines Huy D ue Ngo, BEc RostovStateUniv Tuan D ung Nguyen, DipEngEc

LeningradEngEcInst Thi H oa Pham, BSc RostovStateUniv Prado no, BSc Doctorandus GadjahMada Syed Mizanur Rahman, BComm(Hons)

MComm Dhaka Nigel Rajaratnam, BAgEc Syd Libin Tang, BEc People’ sUnivChina, DipBusEnglish UnwIntBus&Ec Thi N hung Tran, BA ForeignLangTch TmgColl Shek Yiu Tsang, BSocSc HongKong

I ri Thanh Vo, Diploma Hanoi, HigherDegree MoscowStateUniv Paceli Vuniwaqa, BSc Cant.

Graduate Diploma in Environmental Management and Development

Sumithra Kumari Arambepola, BA(Hons) Peradeniya Nyit C hong Choo, BSc(For) UnwAgric,Malaysia Serghei Gabriel de Bray, AssoDipAppSc BAppSc

CanherraCAE Chusak Deemeesri, BA RanikamhalngUniv Panfilo Guerrero De Guzman, BSAgricEcon Philippines, Los Banos Anthony Robert Gill, BEc Flinders

Ross Eric H ugh an, BSc Melh. Pauline Geek Song Kho, BA(Hons) DipPlanPubTransport OxfordPolytech G. Hari Kumar, BSc Kerala, Diploma

IndianForestColl Andrew Peter McAuley, BComm Qld John Stephen Murray, BEc DipEd la T . Erik Karl Olbrei, BA JamesCook

Bharat Bilas Pant, DipEd DegreeEd Tribhuvan Edward Wesley Peck, BAppSc CanherraCAE Heri Poernomo, Sarjana SarjanaMuda PembangunanNasionaL

DipGeothermalEnergyTech GeothemiallnstAuck. Miranda Jane Rawlinson, BA Noel Gordon Ryan, BEc Macq. Trio Santoso, BSc(For) BogorAgricUniv

Pakpoom Teranantana, BA Ranikamhaeng

Graduate Diploma in Foreign Affairs and Trade

Phillip David Allars Roman Anorov Adrian Francesco Arena, BA LLB Syd. Margaret Bowen, BA(AsianSmdies) Anthony Ivan Bubalo, BA N S W Phong H ung Bui, BEng JamesCook Penelope-Ann Bum, BEc(Hons) Syd. Marc John Campbell Helen Jane Campbell, BEc Monash Radek Antonin Divis, BA Tas. Alan Steven Elliott Andrew Cyril Engel Martin Fitzpatrick

Donald Foley Michele Anne Forster, BA Monash Malcolm Geoffrey Greening, BAppSc GradDipAppEc CanherraCAE Jane Marie Hardy, BA SACAE, BA Flinders

Martin Anthony Huber, BAppSc(AppGeog) CanherraCAE Julienne Patricia Iftene, BA Melh. Kathy Kay Klugman, BA Syd

Peter Francis Knight, BA (Asian Studies)(Hons) Sonya Koppe, BA(Hons) WAust. Graham Keith Letcher, BSc BCommEng LaT. Alison Jane Lloyd, BA Melh. Richard Charles Mathews, BA D ipEd Melh.

Ian Michael McConville, BA LLB Monash Esther Antionette Merrillees, BA Syd. Jeanette Lucy O ’Connor, BA Syd. Kylie Deanna Oakes, BA

Susan Clare Oliver, BA BJuris LLB WAust. Anthony Pearce, BSc LLB Syd David Christopher Pearl, BEc Syd Anna Siobhan Pun, BA Melb.

Gordon William Selleck Caitlin Sarah Sharp in, BA(Hons) Syd Bernadette Louise Sielv, BA N S W Derek Guyton Tucker Jane Urquhart, BA

Trudy Elizabeth Witbreuk, BA LLB Tas. Kathryn Joyleen Wong, BComm N S W

Graduate Diploma in International Law

Fiona Rosemary Manning, BA Melh., LLB Michael Grant Manning, BA(Hons) Macq., LLB Natasha Verona Victoria Wake, DipChinois InstNatLanguesEt Civilisations Orientales, Cert

InstSciPolitiques

211

T he A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Graduate Diploma in International Relations

Ardi Hermawan, Sarjana Airlangga Riichiro Takayama, BA Keio

Graduate Diploma in Population Health

Jonathan Abrahams, BSc Melb. Evon Hazel Bowler, BSc N S W Helen Audrey Cameron, DipEd LaT., BSc MSc Melb., PhD Brian Robert Haddy, BEc Adel.

Graduate Diploma in Public Economic Policy

Lachlan MacQuarrie Clark, BEc Ivon Rohan Shaw Hardham, BEc Kwong Yin Koo, BA(SocSci) Canberra Dinah Patao, BS Philippines Lindsay G ordon Rowan, BEc Craig Andrew Thorburn, BComm Vivienne Kay Waller, BA BSc Melb.

Graduate Diploma in Public Law

Yusuf Abdul-Karim, BA(SocSci) UnivSci&TechKumasi, MA NewBrunswick Tracey Narelle Brandmp, BA Monash Wade Ewart Cox, MLitt UNE, BA Vesna Cvjeticanin, Dipl NoviSad

Geoffrey Charles Dawson, BA DipEd MSc(Arch) Syd. Kym Francis Duggan, LLB Adel., GradDipl .cgalPractice SA IT Neil John Dwyer, BA Qld LLB Karen Margaret Fryar, BA(Asian Studies) LLB Virgina Jane Greville, BA Qld Carolyn Joy Jenkins, BA QJd M Litt N ’ cle Stephen Donald McCutcheon, BEc Syd. Mira Mihajlovic, BSc Darrel Andrew Nolan Mark Robert Ross, BSc JamesCook Cedric Jean Schaffer, BSc Flinders Terese Ellen Smith, BA(Hons) las. Eric Robert Thorne, BEc(Hons) Christopher Charles Vevers, AssocDipLabourStud

SACAE, BA Adel. Bronwen Anne Worthington, DipEd WolllEd, BEd Deakin, GradDipEd CharlesSturt

Graduate Diploma in Public Policy

Lindsay Joseph Croft, BAppSc Canberra Ralph William Curnow, BA Canberra Samuel Bruce Guster, BA Meg Ellen Henderson, BSocWork Q ld MA

Bradford John Collins Macdonald Robert Keith McFadden, BA CanberraCAE Shamsa Khan Niazi, BA Punjab Margaret Ruth O ’Brien, DipSocStud Adel,

GracLDipErg LincolnlnstHealth Yogaranee Irene Raphael, BSc Ceylon, MSc Qld John Raymond Shaw, BA Tas.

Graduate Diploma in Resource and Environmental Management

Pedro Felipe Camaigo Mejia, TituloAbogado Javeriana Julia Lesley Clarke, BA LittB Kate Leura Dixon, BSc

Cristeta Foronda, BScfAgric) Philippines Maria Joao Martins Goncalves, BSc (Agr) Syd. Natasha Maree Langham, BA Ross Anthony O ’Connell, BBus-Acctng

CharlesSturt Jason Poxon, BEc WAust. Michael Jonathan Vardon, BEd Melb. Helen Louise W ood, BLandscapeArch N S W

Zhimin W u, BA Zhengzhou

Graduate Diploma in Science

Malcolm Charles Arney, BA UNE Jennifer Burnett, BAppScfChem) CanberraCAE Angela Marie Lynne Colagross, BS(Zool) Calif. Annalisa Co petti, BA DipEd MA Syd. Andrew Thomas Deane, BSc(For) David Timothy Ferris, BEc Scott Kennedy Fry, BA Qld Agah Drajat Garnadi, BSc BandunglnstTech

Philip Gibbons, BAppSc VictoriaColl Martin Golman, BSc(For) PNGUnivTech, GradDipNatRes RoseworthyAgricColl Cheng Yen Hsieh, BSc NatTaiwan Albert Mugambi Kiruki, BSc Nairobi Guilhermina Gaspar Kumaghwelo, DipForEng

EduardoMondlane Elizabeth Kunihira, BSc(For) Makerere Jason Jinjun Li, BSc NortheastUnivTech Martin Richard McLaughlin, BSc(For)

Gerald Mutisya, BSc Nairobi Bartholomew Mark Pang, BSc

212

Iva Annette Quarisa, BSc Randall Kenneth Scott, BAppSc CapricomialAE Matthew Jude Smyth, BSc Golden Hill Tam, BSc ChineseUnivHongKong John William Wellard, BAppSc BendigoCAE

Margaret Yonga, BSc Nairobi

Graduate Diploma in Scientific Communication

Rebecca Louise Anderson, BSc AdeL Michael Edward Harvey, BSc Syd. Lisa Julienne Jones, BSc AdeL Kate Alison Langford, BSc Michelle Lorraine Marsh, BAppSc SAust. Andrew Kent Purvis, BSc Adam Leon Selinger, BSc

Bronwvn Nicole Terrill, BSc Qld Kym-Marie Turnbull, BSc Leah Joanna W itton, BSc Syd

Graduate Diploma in Statistics

Brett Andrew Davis, BMath(Hons) M M ath N ’ cle Neng Arniati Hartanto, BStats AcadStat, GradL)ipDevPlanTech InstSocialStudiesNetherlands Ann Leverton, BSc(Hons)

LoughboroughUnivTech, MSc Southampton Yvonne Kist Morrow, BSc Deakin Kulya Nitirungjarus, BSc (Math) PrinceofSongkla Borek Dalibor Puza, BSc Richard Alexander Webb, BEc BSc

Graduate Diploma in Strategic Studies

Shao-Peng Gong, BA BeijingNormalUniv, MA ForAffColl Mui Ngah Lee, BA BSocSci National UnivSingapore Kusma Wiriadisastra, BA Indonesia, MA

NatlU nivJakarta

Master o f Applied Epidemiology

David Franci Cheah, MBBS Qld BBus(HealthEd) Q U T Robert James Condon, MBBS AdeL, D T M & H Wit. Angela Merianos, MBBS NSW , M PubHealth Syd.

Michael Crawford Pearce, BVSc Syd., MSc JamesCook

Anthony Paul Stewart, MBBS Monash Anthony John Watson, MBBS WAust. Philip Weinstein, AssocDipParkMgmt Riverina-MurrayIHE, BSc MBBS AdeL

Master of Arts

M ohd Kamarulnizam Abdullah Bukhari, AssocGenSmd Indiana, BSc Utah Bayodele Omotade Adetunji, BSc(Hons) MSc Ibahan Trent Patrick Barry, BSc(Res&EnvMan) Naomi Rorona Bolenga, BSocSci Waikato Anthony Paul Burns, BA Qld

David Frank Butler, BA VicUnivWell Roger Paul Camilleri, BCom Melb. David Nigel Christie, BA(Hons) DipEd Melb., MEdAdmin UNE, PhD D under Benedict Thomas Coleman, BA(Hons) WAust.

Darryl Leon Collins, DipTchg S A IT Margrit Davies, BA(Hons) Paul Mio Dugdale, MBBS Flinders Christopher Hereward Clare Emsden, BA Reed Alan Banzon Feranil, BSc(PubHealth)

MA(Demog) Philippines Sean Jeffrey Field, BA(Hons) AdeL Andrew John Finnic, BSc(Hons) Otago Caroline Sylvia Funaki, BA

Lisa Marie Gates, DipEd Q U T, BA Qld Haslani Haris, BStat AcadStat]akarta, CertPopStud IntlnstPopStud Laurance Kendall Hazlewood, BA DipEd MA Syd. Susan Heistein, BA(Hons) Monash Angela Margaret Hemming, BA Vic. John David Hennessy, BA(Hons) DipSocSci UNE

Michael Paul Hettinger, BA HolyCross, MPubAdmin Colorado Mark Terrence Hewson, BAfHons) WAust. Didin Achmad Holidin, Sarjana Muda

AcadStat]akarta, Sarjana Padjadjaran Madhur Gigi Jaatinen, BA BEc Jolly Kamwanga, BA Zambia Eliza Kaczynska, BEc(Hons) LaTrobe,

GradDipIntRe! Tin Fook Koh, BBA Singapore David Koh Wee Hock, BA BSocSci (Hons) NatSingapore Patricia Margaret Lay, DipEd WollIEd BEd

SAust CAE Darrell John Lewis, BA Xin H ua Li, BA BeijinglnstForeignStud Rattanatay Luanglatbandith, BA Patna John H enty McCaffrie, BA Qld

213

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Yashoda Malla, BA Tnbhuvan, MA BanarasHinduUniv, GradDipPubM gmt SriLankalnstDevAdmin, PostgradTrng(Manpower Planning) Mane. Craig William Mark, BA(Hons) Syd.

Helen Ruth Marshall, BA Elisa Moses Mjema, BSc Dar-Es-Salaam Adrian Hugh Morrison, BEc(Hons) Qld Reupena Muagumtia, DipPopStud IntlnstPopStud

Edib Muslim, Sarjana Indonesia Thi Van Anh Nguyen, DipPsych RostowStateUniv Michael Niblett, BA Rodney John Nockles, BA(Hons) LaTrobe Tanya Karen Parkin, BA(Hons) WAust. Ram Sharan Pathak, GradDipPopSmd MA

Tribhuvan Victor Llewellyn Pawley, BA A tick. Roger Graham Penhale, BSc BE(Elec&E’nic)(Hons) Adel. Kandage W asantha Sriyadari Priyadarshini

Atukorala, BA Kelaniya Michaela Richards, BA(Hons) Svend Saerkjaer Wayne Christopher Smith, BA(Hons) WAust. Thomas Leonard Spahr, BA Vermont Patricia Joan Stadtmiller, D ipEd CanberraCAE,

BALittB Scott Louis Strachan Robinson, BA(Hons) LINE, BA Nima Sulina Singarimbun, GradinGeog

GadjabMada Soewartoyo, BA(PubAdmin) GadjabMada Tita Loizano Tabije, BS(Stats) Philippines Bee Lock Tee, BSc NtttionalUnivSingapore Richard James Thomson, BA(Hons) Warwick Rosemary Gray Trott, BA (Asian Studies)(Hons) Miriam Sally Wales, BA(Hons) Otago Ephygenia J Woisso, BSc Dar-Es-Salaam Chris Kin Hing Yeung, Dip(Hons)

HongKongBaptistColl

Master of Arts (Asian Studies)

Hyung-A Kim Van Leest, BA Chung-Ang, D ipEd Melb., MA

Master o f Clinical Psychology

Cindy Joan Devine, BSc(Hons) Marian Bernadette Scarrabelotti, BA Melb., GradDipSc Tracey Diane Wade, BSc Adel., BSc(Hons)

Flinders

Master o f Development Administration

Apolonio P. Basilic, BS(MiningEng) MapualnstTechPhilippines, GradDipDevAdmin Nongkran Chanvanichporn, BA Thammasat,

GradDipDevAdmin Sompong Chirabundamsook, BA MA Chulalongkom, GradDipDevAdmin Trevor Alphonso Clement, BSc(PubAdmin)

UnivWestlndies, GradDipDevAdmin Lorna B. Escueta, BA LagunaColl GradDipDevAdmin Muhammad Aslam Khan, BA MA Sind,

GradDipDevEc Strathclyde, MA Vanderbilt, GradDipDevAdmin Rosario Natividad Pangahas Labaro, BSc(Forestry) MForestry Philippines,

GradDipDevAdmin Florida Manuel Lacanlalay, BSc PhilippinesColLComm, MPA Philippines, GradDipDevAdmin Walailak Padungcharoen, BA Thammasat David William George Paxton, BVSc Q ld

GradDipDevAdmin Caroline Amakobe Sande, BA USIntUniv, GradDipDevAdmin Joses Wawari Sanga, GradDipDevAdmin

Chyi-Fen Tsuei, BBusAdmin NatTaiwan CollMarineSc&Tech, GradDipDevAdmin Miria Ume, BA PNG, GradDipDevAdmin Ati W ugtungam Wobiro, BEc PNG, MA

ViclInivManc., GradDipEcDev

Master o f Economics

Gerard Januaries Antioch, BEc GradDipEc James Gary Beard, BSc(Hons) Cant. John Alan Chisholm, BEc (Hons) LaTrobe Peter Edward Dalrymple Crone, BEc WAust.

Georgina Jane Dempster, BA Otago Andrew Dickson, BCom Melb. Peter Edward Greagg, BA(Admin) CanberraCAE, GradDipEc Aidan Tendai Padraic Gregan, BEc GradDipEd

Paul Franz Heidhues, BA GeorgAugust Kanwaljit Kaur, BEc(Hons) Macq. David Leslie King, BComm N S W Theodore Levantis, BEc GradDipEc George Lin, BComm N SW Adrian Pawsey, BEc(Hons) Tas.

214

D e g r e e s a n d D ip lo m a s C o n fe r r e d

Peter James Tulip, BA Syd., GradDipEc Louise Maree Will, BEc(Hons)

Master o f Economics of Development

Angelo Salvador Moscoso Benedictos, BA(Fxon) Philippines, GradDipEcDev Satish Chand, DipEd BA SouthPacific, GradDipEcDev Saipin Cintakulchai, BS MS Kasetsart, AssocDip Steven Sandy Gibson, BA SPacific,

GradDipEcDev Ichiro Oishi, BEc Tokyo, GradDipEcDev Narong Pomlaktong, BEng ChiangMai, MEng AsianlnstTech, MPolSc Saitama Mohammad Mafizur Rahman, BSc(Hons) MSc

Jabangimagar, GradDipEcDev Quoc H uy Vu, Diploma RostovStateUniv, GradDipEcDev Long-Xi Wang, BEc ShanghaiUnivF'm&Econ,

GradDipEcDev Xiao Lu Wang, GradDipEcDev Geoffrey Alan Wye Wright, BComm LLB Otago, GradDipEcDev

Master o f Forestry

M ohammad Ali, BSc Chittagong, GradDipSc Foster Tinkholawo Chawawa Banda, BSocSci Malawi

Master o f International Law

Bui Kim Chi, BA InstForLang, LLB Hanoi Yan Long, LLB SouthCentrelnstPol&Law Tracy Fay Reid, BA LLB Qld

Master o f Laws (Public Law)

Graham Leslie Hyde, LLB Warwick, L.LB(G)

Master o f Legal Studies (Public Law)

Nicholas Ruthven Lambert Grant, GradDipLegStud CanberraCAE', BA Klaus Ulrich Popp, BA

Eric Elvin Gordon, BA Curtin Carolyn Marie Groves, BA GradDipTchg CanberraCAE Ronald Barrie Hadlow, BSc

Lena Elizabeth Hurley, BA Matthew Jonathon Hyndes Gerald Andrew Keaney, BA Yong-Xia Liu, BA LiaoningNormalUniv Widjajanti Mulyono, Sarjana Indonesia Joan Margaret Munro, BA

Mark Tapani Pallas, BA N S W Catherine Thoms, BA Dilber Kahraman Thwaites, LLB NatChengchi Univ

Master of Public Law

Mary-Ellen Margaret Barry, BA LLB N SW Timothy Gerard Beale, BEc LLB Qld Geoffrey Ross Kennett, BA(Hons) LLB(Hons)

Master of Public Policy

Joan Lorna Corbett, GradDipEd CanberraCAE', BA Christopher John Eichbaum, BA M A Cant. Pamela Cheryl Francis, BA UNF,

DipTechPhvsiotherapy S A IT Grant Gregory Johnson, BEc(Hons) Syd. Jane Elspeth Lambert, BA Flinders Vincent Michael McMullen, BA

GradDipUrban&RegionalPlanning Curtin Gary Frederick Manison, BBus Curtin Michael Dominic Martindale, BEc(Hons) WAust. Jonas Liudvikas Mockunas, BSc AdeL James Gerard O’Callaghan. D ipEd CanberraCAE,

BA

Rhonda Anne Piggott, BA(Hons) Qld Richard Michael Sisson, BA CurtindrWAust. Victoria Simone Walker, BA M A Syd. Garry Donald Winter, BA Griffith,

GradDipT(Sec) BrisbaneCAE

Master of Resource and Environmental Studies

John Christian Gallant, BEng R M IT

Master o f Letters

Karina Cameron Aveyard, BA Jose Carlos Barrero, BA Adrian Edward Cunningham, BA Kuring-gaiCAE Gabrielle Maree Edmonds, BA

Master of Science

Rita Anggraini, SarjanaKimiaSl SarjanaKimiaS2 Institut TeknologiBandung Charles Charbel Harb, BSc

215

T h e A u stralian N a tio n a l U niversity

Bernadette Hince, BA BSc Xiaoyuan Hong, BSc MEc Beijing Krishna Hari, Gautam, BSc BA Tribhuvan, DipFor IndianForestColl Crispen Takuranei Marunda, BSc(Agric)(Hons)

Zimbabwe Ben Takavadiyi Mutandadzi, BSc(For) GradDipSci Samidi, Sarjana BogorAgricUniv, GradDipSci Timothy Nicholas Stone, BA Valerie Alberta Sturesteps, BA GradDipSc Aung Than, BSc(For) Arts&SciUniv, GradDipSc Garry Anthony Webb, BSc Macq. Qin Yang, BSc MSc HuazhongUnivSci&Tech

Doctor of Philosophy

Fatif Abul-Husn, BA MA AmericanUnwBeirut Benjamin Hardwick Andrews, BSc(Hons) Fony Arioli, BSc Mvma Austria, BA StLouis, GradDipEcDcv,

' MFcDev Damian Joseph Barrett, BSc (Hons) Adel. Ni Luh Sutjiati Beratha, MA Monash Esther Pauline Bryant, BA Francis David Bui beck, BA MA Markus Buchhom, BSc Melb. Yong-Ik Byun, BSc Yonsei

Bmcc Kenneth Caldwell, BA MA Yong Cao, BA Sichuan, MA PostgradSchl Cass, China, GradDipEcDev MFcDev David Bmce Carter, BSc JamesCook, BSc Adel. Juleen Ann Cavanaugh, MS NCarolinaState, BSc

Song-Xi Chen, BSc MSc BeijingNormalUniv, MSc Vic., Wellington Andrew Walker Claridge, BSc(Hons) Richard Charles Comes, BSc MSc Southampton Thierry Cortege, BEarthSci CertOceanography

MOceanography Bordeaux Arthur Ralph E)avis, BSc(Agr) MSc Guelph John David William Deamaley, BSc(Hons) Monash Jane Elizabeth Drakard, BA(Hons) Kent, MA

Monash

Roger Andrew DuBois, BSc Adel. William Andrew Ducker, BSc(Hons) Thomas Enters, Diplom-Forstwirt Freiburg, MEnvironDesign Calgary Dane Laurence Flannery, BSc Xiaojiar.g Gao, BMed BeijingSecondMedColl

MMedSc BeijingLungTumourdrTBInst Carl Johann Grillmair, BSc Calgary, M Sc Vic. Lisbeth Mary Haakonssen, BA M A NewBrunsivick

Abdul Hakim, BA Peshawar, MA Punjab, GradDipDemog Md. Rezaul Haque, BSc(Hons) MSc Rajshahi Sally Anne Henderson, BAgSci Melb.

Paul Phillip Hesse, BSc(Hons) Macq. Deborah Louise Hill, BA(SecStud) CanberraCAE, BAMA Peter Collin Hill, BSc(Hons) Melb. Mats Harald Holmqvist, BSc Lund Deborah Maree Hope, BSc(Hons) Donald Phillip Horan, BSc Paul Arthur Howies, BSc Adel., BSc Laurence Steven Irlicht, BSc Melb. Enoch Iwamoto, BEd TokyoGaKugei, MA

IntChristian Univ Joanne Faith Jamie, BSc Qld Peter Norford Johnston, BA BSc(Hons) Cant, Andrew Gordon Kepert, BSc WAust.

Seppo Keronen, BSc Sionc Ngongo Kioa, BA SouthPacific, GradDipEcDev, MFcDev ITiomas Andrew Kirkpatrick, BA(Hons) Leeds,

PostgradDip Sudan. MA York Fcrdynand Jan Kos, MSc Jagielloman Francois Ladouceur, BSc MAppSci EcolePolytechnique Deog-An Lee, BA ChonnamNat Ί MA SeoulNat I

Fa Na Li, BA MA Peking, GradDipSEAsianSmdies Brett Andrew Lidbury, BSc(Hons) N ile Anna Elisabeth Liechti-Smcki

Qiao Lin, BSc Sichuan You Su Lin, Degree in Eng & Int’l Affairs BeijmglnstForlangs, MA Yan-Xia Lin, BSc FujianTchrs, MSc Jordan Judith Helen Littleton, BA Syd, MA

Peter Karl Loewenhardt, BSc Sask. Keith Malcolm Lovcgrove, BSc Patricia Anne Ludowyk, BSc GradDipSc Elizabeth St Clair McKenzie, Cert Ed

BathurstIchColl BA Syd., MEd CanberraCAE Anthony John Makin, BA BEc(Hons) Q ld MEc Yam Bahadur Malla, BSc Meerut, DipForestry Wales, MSc Reading David Fernandes Martin, BEng(Chem) (Hons)

Qld MSc(SocAnthrop) LSE Xin Meng, BEc BeijingEcon/nst, MEc ChineseAcadSocSci, GradDipEcDev MFcDev Joseph Gerald Mintoff, BMath(Hons)

GradDipPhil MA Wollongong Bernard Robert Eugene Moizo, BA MA PhD Paris Roger Leslie M orton, BScAgr(Hons) Syd. Daudi Rivelo Mukangara, BA MA

PostgradDipLaw Dar-es-Salaam Raoul Alexander Mulder, BSc(Hons)

216

Zolleen Olive, BSc(Hons) LiverpoolPolytech ndrew David Barclay Paice, BSc WAust. om M oorti Pant, BEc Tribhuvan, MA(Econ) Thammasat Dawn Elizabeth Partridge, BA WAust. Desmond Bruce Patterson, BSc(Hons)

Vic., Wellington 1 Tchad Francis Patterson, BAppSci Swinburne, GradDipSc Kalanethee Paul. BSc DipEd MSc

NatUnivSingapore Merlyne M . Paunlagui, BA JoseRizalColL, GradDipDemog Joanne Claire Pemberton, BA(Hons) N S W Jane Elizabeth Perkins, BSc WAust. Jeffrey Dean Petchev, BEc WAust., MEc Jane Elizabeth Perkins, BSc WAust. Julia Playford, BSc(Hons) WAust.

l ing Kui Q in, BSc GuizhouAgricColl, MSc Ewa Zofia Radlinska, MSc Warsaw M d Shafiqur Rahman, BSc MSc Dhaka, MAgricSci Reading Martin Eugene Rayner, BSc(I'or)(Hons) Jeffrey Robert Rich, BA(Hons) Melb.

Debra Janet Rickwood, BA Macq. David Roe, BA(Hons) UnivCollNWales Boudewijn Francois Roukema, BSc(Hons) David Ross Rowland, BSc Qld, GradDipTchg

Kelvin GroveCAE John Cornish Rudder, MA Claire Diana Runciman, GradDipEd CanberraCAE, BA

Philip Francis Xavier Ryan, BSc(Hons) Melb. Ilyas Saad, SarjanaEkonomi Hasanuddin, MA(DevEcon) WdliamsColl, MEcDev Moses Olufemi Salau, N atC enEd AdeyemiCollEd,

BSc(Hons) MSc Lagos Um m e Salma, BA(Econ)(Hons) MA(Econ) Dhaka, GradDipEcDev MEcDev Angela Elizabeth Samuel, BSc (Hons) Melb. U te Christiane Schuppler, Staatsexamen

Diplom-Biologin Karlsruhe Pamela Anne Hadleigh Scowen, BSc Alberta, BSc MSc Queen’ s

Badra Sriyani Senanayake, BSc MPhil Peradeniya Kesaia Lolou Seniloli, BA SouthPacific, MA Frederick Bruce Shadbolt, BSc GradDipSci Robyn Lindsay Sheen, BA(Hons) LINE Peter Alan Stanley, GradDipEd CanberraCAE,

BALittB David Russell Bancroft Stockwell, BSc Michael James Strasser, BSc Monash Ralph Slater Sutherland, BSc(Hons) Shaun Tennant, BSc WAust. Kenneth Thomas, BAppSci CanberraCAE Phillip Raymond Thompson, BSc WAust. Peter William Thygesen, BSc Hai-Tan I ran, BSc(Hons) Syd. Ida Ngai Ling Truong, BSc N S W Emanuel Vassiliadis, BSc Melb. Guy Vezina, BSc Laval, MSc Mass. James Michael Virgona, BSc(Agric) Syd., MSc

Macq.

Michael Peter Vischer, Lizentiatsexamen Basel Ursula Vollerthun, BA N S W Dennis Patrick Walker, BA MA Melb. Jian Wang, BSc HebeiTchrUniv

Xian-Qi W ang BSc Xiamen, MSc BeijinglnstChem Tech Yanjie Wang, BSc ShenyangUnivMech&ElecEng Michael George Wiedenbeck, BS(Hons) Mich.,

Dip ETHZurich Arthur Robert Witherall, BA Adel Zheng Zhou Xu, MMedSci FourthMditaryMedColl Gang Yang BSc M Sc Peking, GradDipEcDev

MEcDev Zhuquan Zang BSc MSc ShandongTchUni Shuqing Zhang, BSc MSc Changchun Xiao Guang Z hang BEc MEc

ChinesePeople’ sUniv, GradDipEcDev MEcDev Xichuan Zhang BSc BeijinglnstPost&Telecom Xuedong Zhang, BSc Nankai Jian-Xin Zhao, BSc Nanjing, MSc Adel.

Tong-Tao Zheng BA BeijingPhysicalTmgUniv, MA Xiamen

217

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Prizewinners

Undergraduate Awards

U n iv ersity M edal

Simon Arthur, BSc Mathematics Anthony John Bice, BEc Economics Stephen David Billings, BSc Theoretical Physics Patricia Margaret Brown, BSc Psychology Carolyn Gardner Bull, BA(Asian Studies) BEc

Asian Studies Kok C hung Cheang, BEc Economics Timothy Jowan Curnow, BA BSc Linguistics Carolyn Rae Fry, BSc Human Ecology James Andrew Gifford, BSc Mathematics

Rochelle Marilyn Gray, BA Linguistics Graeme Anthony Hill, BA LLB Kwong Joo Leek, BSc(Hons) Neuroscience Smart Boyd Love, BSc(Hons) Geology Timothy Charles Oldham, BSc LLB Megan Helen Ryan, BA BSc Botany/Zoology Donald Robert Syme, BSc Computer Science Catherine Elizabeth Travis, BAfAsian Studies)

Asian Studies Karen Louise Welberry, BA English Katherine Rachel White, BA English Xiao D ong W u, BEc Economics

A nderson C o n su ltin g Prize

Uri Amos Teitler Information Technology

A ustralian C apital Territory Bar A ssociation Prize

Della Candacie Stanley

Australian C om p u ter Society (Canberra Branch) Prize

Glenn Norm an Dickins

A ustralian F ederation o f U n iv ersity W o m en , A C T Prize

Carolyn Gardner Bull (shared) Catherine Elizabeth Travis (shared)

A ustralian Finance C onference Prize

Adam Wesley Allanson Monetary Economics

A ustralian M in in g and P etroleum Law A ssociation Prize

Douglas Stephen Clark

A ustralian P sychological S o ciety Prize

Patricia Margaret Brown

A ustralian S ociety o f A ccountants P rize

Sheih Yiin Yew

T h e B .C . M eagher Prize

Graeme Anthony H ill Commonwealth Constitutional Law

Blackburn M edal for Research in Law

Graeme Anthony Hill, BA LLB (shared) Timothy Charles Oldham (shared) Sarah Elizabeth Todd, BSc Melh., LLB (shared)

B utterw orths B ook Prize

Angela Jane Baker Practice and Procedure

B utterw orths B o o k Prize

Della Candacie Stanley Succession Law

C om p u ter Science Prize

Donald Robert Syme

D a n te A lighieri Society (Canberra B ranch) Prize

Robert Francis Lawrence Sartor Italian III

E co n o m ic S o ciety Prize

Kok C hung Cheang Economics I V H

218

Ernst & Y oung Prize

Van Po Chiu (shared) Wai Sing Ip (shared)

l Friends o f th e Library B lackburn M edal in Drama

Natasha Vera Bolonkin

G.S.L. T ucker Prize

Anthony Alois Vorhauser

G eorge K n ow les M em orial Prize

Della Candacie Stanley

H anna N eu m an n P rize for M athem atics

Simon A rthur (shared) James Andrew Gifford (shared)

Institute o f A dvanced S tu d ies P rize

Matthew Randell Lobb Economic History IV H

T he In stitu te o f W o o d S cien ce Prize

Aled James Hoggett

Irene C respin Prize

Ginny Marisa Sargent Palaeontology

J.B . W ere & Son Prize

Kok C hung Cheang

Janet E lspeth C raw ford Prize

Carolyn Rac Fry

L.F. C risp M em orial Prize

Victoria Jane Pitt Political Science I V

L eslie H old sw orth A llen M em orial Prize

Katherine Rachel W hite

M a cp h illa m y C u m m in s an d G ib son Prize

Anthony John Mclnerney— Commercial Law

M ick W illiam s Prize in H istory

Damien Andrew Browne

P eter M ay Prize

Benjamin Gwynfor Evans

Q u en tin G ibson Prize

David Leighton Ryan Philosophy

R ichard B .D avis Prize

Kirsten Margareta Wehner Anthropology

S ch lich M em orial T rust Prize

Aled James Hoggett (shared) Rohan Anthony Nelson (shared)

Statistical S ociety o f A ustralia (Canberra Branch) Prize

David Stewart Field

T h e Suprem e C ou rt J u d ges’ P rize

Timothy Charles Oldham, BSc LLB

T h e T illyard Prize

Fiona-Marie Crowe, BA (shared) Carolyn Rae Fry, BSc (shared) Timothy Charles Oldham, BSc LLB (shared)

T im b in d U tilization Prize

Aled James Hoggett

Y ou n g W o m en s’ C hristian A ssociation Prize

Della Candacie Stanley

Postgraduate Prizewinners

J.G . Crawford Prizes

The J.G. Crawford Prizes were established in 1973 to recognise Sir John Crawford’s outstanding contribution to the University successively as Director o f the Research

School of Pacific Studies for seven years and as Vice-Chancellor for five years. The late Sir John Crawford was Chancellor from 1976 to 1984.

219

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

P h D Prizes

Brian Gerard Martin, MA Glas., DipLib NSW , PhD Mary Christina Webb, BSc Melb., PhD

M aster Prize

Stephanie Catherine Anderson, BA MA

V ice-ch a n cello r’s Awards for E xcellen ce in T ea ch in g

Gregory Ernest Fry, BComm NSW , MA Rosemary Lois Martin, BSc Otago, MSc PhD Auck. Christopher Millar Jones, BEc PhD

220

University Public Lectures

University Public Lectures sponsored by ANUTECH

Single Public Lectures

Dr Kevin Lafferty

Politics, Personalities and the Development o f Science 28 January

Professor David Hubei

How the Brain Sees in Three Dimensions 10 February

Professor Michael Arbib

The Eye a nd the Hand: Distributed Computing in the Monkey Brain 11 February

Professor Roger Penrose

Computability and the M ind 24 March

Mr Julian Cribb

Are we the Sick Man o f Asia Because our Population is Scientifically Illiterate? 18 March

M r Trevor Robinson

Supercomputers Essential Tools or Expensive Toys? 6 July

Professor John Polkinghorne

Science a nd Creation 26 August

Professor Rainer Pommerin

Current Aspects o f German Defence Policy 9 September

Professor Rainer Pommerin

United Germany in a Still Divided Europe 9 September

Professor Erwin K Scheuch

Unification: The Economic and Social Consequences for Eastern Germany 5 O ctober

Professor Claus Leggewie

Is Germany a Multicultural Society? 7 October

Professor Claus Leggewie

Is there a European Identity? 7 October

Dr D J Faulkner

The Copemican Revolution: to commemorate the 450th Anniversary of'de Revolution! bus Orbium Coelestium ’ 7 October

Inauguration Lecture

Professor M C Ricldefs

Pure and Applied: the Research School o f Pacific Studies and Our Asian!Pacific Region 15 November

Named Lectures

AJ Birch Lecture

Professor A Pines

Some Magnetic Moments 24 June

T h e Florey Lectures

Not held in 1993

T he Basham Lecture

D r Jim Masselos

221

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

T h e D A B row n Lecture

D r Maurice W Bell

Walking on Water 3 November

T h e Jack B eale Lecture

T D Fenwick

Water Management— a New Age 4 November

T h e J o h n C u rtin M em orial L ecture

Professor Eugene Kamenka

Australia Made M e B ut Which Australia? 16 July

T h e M en zie s Lecture

Professor Robert O ’Neil

Freedom o f Expression and Public Affairs in Australia and the USA: . Does a Written B ill o f Rights Really Matter? 5 October

T h e 5 4 th M orrison Lecture

Professor W F J Jenner

A Knife in M y Ribs for A Mate: Reflections on Another Chinese Tradition 6 O ctober

T h e M u lv a n ey Lecture

Presented next in 1994

J

222

Principal Grants and Donations

t ■ th e University is indebted to those organisations and individuals who make grants and donations for . use in research and other activities. Such funds play an important role in the ongoing activities o f the University. The following list includes grants reported to Council and donations received during 1993

D onor Purpose A m ount

s

Grants

A boriginal an d Torres Strait

Islanders C om m ission

For consultancy— A T S IC H ou sin g Loans-Alternative F un d in g

Sources and Related Services

2 6 ,900

A C T A rts & Special Events For assistance w ith prom otion o f publicity for A C on tem p o rary A rt

Fair

7,500

A lzheim er’s Association A ustralia For Rehabilitation o f Speech Errors in Patients w ith D em entia,

Faculty o f Science

10,000

A ndrew W M ellon F oundation, T he For Postdoctoral Program for U S based Researchers, N ational

C entre for Epidem iology and Population H ealth and Research

School o f Social Sciences

3 59,712

Asia F o u n d atio n , The For Conference— Pacific D ynam ism and the International

E conom ic System, Research School o f Pacific &C A sian Studies 32,239

Asian C u ltu ra l Council For Participation o f Archaeologists from V ietnam in the 15th

Congress o f the IndoJulPacific Prehistory Association

6,475

Asian D evelopm ent Bank For Pacific Trade an d D evelopm ent Conferences, Research School

o f Pacific & Asian Studies

28,777

A ustralia C ouncil for the A rts For Exhibition T o u r— M argaret W est, 1981-1991, Institute o f the

Arts

15,714

A ustralia Indonesia Institute For Sponsored V isit o f M r K alam Scbayang to Research School o f

Pacific & Asian Studies

9,955

For publication o f Indonesia U pdate 1993, Research School o f

Pacific δ ί Asian Studies

7,000

A ustralian Academ y o f Science For Elizabeth and Frederick W h ite Research Conference, Research

School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

5,000

A ustralian a n d Overseas

Telecom m unications C orporation

Lim ited

For O T C T elecom m unications S tu d en t Award, Research School o f

Physical Sciences and Engineering

25,000

223

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

A ustralian A rm y, T h e

A ustralian C entre for International

A gricultural Research

A ustralian Geological Survey

O rganisation

A ustralian In stitute o f Aboriginal &C

T orres Strait Islander Studies

A ustralian In stitu te o f C rim inology

A ustralian In stitu te o f N uclear

Science an d Engineering

Australian International

D evelopm ent Assistance Bureau

Australian N uclear Science &

T echnology O rganisation— Access

to M ajor Research Facilities Program

F or a H isto ry o f A ustralian A rtillery, Research School o f Pacific &

A sian Studies

F or R esearch on the Em ergence and Integration o f Regional G rain

M arkets in C h in a (in C ollaboration w ith A delaide University),

R esearch School o f Pacific & A sian Studies

F or research o f Econom ic Policy C hoices for Rural D evelopm ent in

P apua N ew G uinea, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

For research o n Cyanide In Cassava, Faculty o f Science

For Analysis o f G row th and Stabilisation Policies in Indonesia,

Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

For stu d y o f Geology and G eochem istry o f Lake Cowal, Faculty of

For research o f Sacredness in Sick C o u n try , Faculty o f Arts

For a stu d y of A boriginal Rock M usic, Faculty of Arts

F or research in to H IV R isk For A boriginal H eroin Users in the

A C T , N ational C entre for E pidem iology and Population H ealth

S u p p o rt for W orkshop, N ational C entre for Epidemiology and

P opulation H ealth

For research into H eating and C on fin em en t o f Toroidal H eliacs,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

F or research in to Infrared D etector Array, Research School o f

Physical Sciences and Engineering

F or research into Laser Sensing o f Plasma D ensity and D ensity

Fluctuations, Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

S u p p o rt for Plasm a Science & T echnology Conference, Research

School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

For research in to H eating a n d C on fin em en t o f Toroidal Heliacs,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

For T rain in g W orkshop-C olom bo Sri Lanka, C entre for Resource

and E nvironm ental Studies

For Sem inar on D evelopm ent Im plications o f Population T rends

in Asia, Research School o f Social Sciences

S u p p o rt for research at the N T T , E uropean Southern Observatory,

La Silla, C hile, M o u n t Strom lo and Siding S pring Observatories

F or research access to SERC D aresbury Laboratory, United

K ingdom

For research in to the Single S trand B inding P rotein, Research

School o f C hem istry

14,500

191,844

34,471

64,658

15,000

5,000

21,832

22,240

16,548

5,153

17,256

10,000

5,900

14.000

10,900

63.000

15,500

6,600

10,283

9,209

224

For research access to ISIS R utherford-A ppleton Laboratory in U K ,

Research School o f C hem istry

9,9 8 0

F or research at the A rgonne N a tio n a l Laboratory U SA and

R utherford A ppleton Laboratory, U K , Research School o f

C hem istry

16,367

A ustralian Sports C om m ission S tudy into the C o n d u c t o f A ustralian Sports C lubs 6 2 ,500

A ustralian T ele- com m unications

and Electronics Research Board For research in A utom atic Speech Recognition, Research School o f Physical Sciences and E ngineering 11,000

For Postgraduate Scholarship in N on-L inear O ptical W ave guide

D evices, Research School o f Physical Sciences and E ngineering 11,000

F or research into A daptive H id d e n M arkov Signalling Processing,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering 11,000

For Postgraduate Scholarship for research into N ew T echniques in

Signal C oding, Research School o f Physical Sciences and

Engineering

11,500

For research into M etallisation o f Si G e /Si H eterostructures,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

4 ,0 0 0

F or research in to Sem iconductors, Research School o f Physical

Sciences and Engineering

3,000

For V isiting Fellow ship 1993/94, M o u n t Strom lo and Siding S pring Observatories 16,156

For research in to Processing o f W ool by Low T em perature Plasma,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering 89,315

A ustralian W ool C orporation For Postgraduate Scholarships on the Chinese Industry and

Sino-Australia W ool Trade, Research School o f Pacific &C Asian

Studies

18,925

F or Postgraduate Scholarships in W ool in C h in a and N o rth east

Asia, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

7131

C h ia n g C hin g ju lk u o F ou n d atio n for

In te rn a tio n a l Scholarly Exchange

F or a Study o f T ao ist B iography from the Second to the Eleventh

C entury, Faculty o f Asian Studies

S u p p o rt for 15th C ongress o f the IndoJulPacific Prehistory

Association, T h ailan d , 1994, Research School o f Pacific & A sian

Studies

115,108

16,547

C h ick en M eat D evelopm ent and

R esearch C ouncil

For Research Fellowship, Faculty o f Science 6 6 ,600

C live and V era R am aciotti

F o u n d a tio n

F or Analysis o f U nique L ym phoid Cell Types, John C u rtin School

o f M edical Research

3 2 ,047

225

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

C o m itc In ternational Perm anent des F or S tudy o f an E ndangered Language in Papua New G uinea, 7,194

Linguisres R esearch School o f Pacific &C Asian Studies

C om m o n w ealth E nvironm ent For study o f W aste M anagem ent, C en tre for Resource and 100,000

Protection A gency— Local E nvironm ental Studies

G o v e rn m e n t D evelopm ent Program

C S IR O F or C lim atic Analysis o f East Asia (C h in a an d M ainland SEAsia), 33,000

C e n tre for Resource and E nvironm ental Studies

F or stu d y o f Potential Im pact o f C lim ate C hange on R u n o ff and 76,000

W ater Availability for Irrigation, C en tre for Resource and

E nvironm ental Studies

F o r research in to the Biological C o n tro l o f Vertebrate Pest 44,000

Populations, Jo h n C u rtin School o f M edical Research

F or C lim atic Analysis o f East Asia (C hina and M ainland SEAsia), 45,000

C en tre for Resource a n d E nvironm ental Studies

D airy R esearch and D evelopm ent F or Postgraduate Scholarship in T h e S tructure and M anagem ent o f 78,700

C o rp o ratio n R ural Research, Faculty o f Arts

D e p artm e n t o f Em ploym ent, F or E nvironm entally Sustainable C hem istry Laboratory C ourse, 20,118

E ducation and T raining Faculty o f A rts

F or J o in t H E R D S A /A N U N ational T eaching W orkshop-H igher 46,200

E ducation B eyond 2000

F or consultancy to Develop an A boriginal and Torres Strait 23,000

Islander recruitm ent strategy. Equal E m ploym ent O p p ortunity

U nit

Australian Research Council

For study o f G lobal C lim ate C hange, Faculty o f Arts 50,000

For a C ase S tudy o f Technology T ransfer In to Australian 157,731

M anufacturing, Research School o f Social Sciences

For research in to Flow in Porous Solids, Research School o f 52,577

Physical Sciences and Engineering

C ollaborative Research G ra n t for research into M etallogenic 43,900

Epochs o f the Tasm an O rogen, Faculty o f Science

C ollaborative Research G ra n t for research in to M etallogenic 87,800

Epochs o f the Tasm an O rogen, Faculty o f Science

For Research Fellowship— M aking H istories, Faculty o f Arts 270,946

For S enior Research Fellowship)— M olecular Analysis of Plant 3 45,479

M yosin, Research School o f Biological Sciences

For Postdoctoral Fellowship for Isotope a n d Trace-Elem ents 98,438

Studies, Research School o f E arth Sciences

226

P rincipal G r a n ts a n d D o n a tio n s

For research into Energy T ransfer an d Reaction D ynam ics,

Research School o f C hem istry

M echanism B G ra n t for A ustralian C ultural Studies in M usic, In stitu te o f the Arts

M echanism C G ra n t for the developm ent of A ustralian N ationally

Shared Chinese, Japanese and K orean Languages A utom ated Library System

M echanism C G ra n t for the establishm ent o f O n -L in e Links

Between Australian U niversities a n d the N ikkei D atabase in Japan,

Research School o f Pacific & A sian Studies

M echanism C G ra n t for E nhanced Field Survey o f N atural

Resources, C entre for Resource an d Environm ental Studies

N atio n a l Priority (Reserve) F u n d

For Australian N ational Intern sh ip Program, Faculty o f A rts

For Evaluation o f 1992 A N U /Japanese U niversities Exchange

Program , Faculty o f Asian Studies

For D evelopm ent o f Interactive C om puter Sim ulated Experim ental

Projects for B iochem istry and Biology Students, Faculty o f Science

For D iscipline Review— E ngineering, C entre for C o n tin u in g

Education

S u p p o rt for A n A ustralian International Conference on the

T ransition from Elite to M ass Post-Secondary E ducation, C entre

for C o n tin u in g E ducation

F or Experim ental Design in Process Q uality C ontrol, Faculty o f

F or the D evelopm ent and Im plem entation o f a D epartm ental

A dm inistration Inform ation System, Faculty o f Science

For Aboriginal Awareness in Law Program, Faculty o f Law

Targeted Institutional Links Program

For Korean Scholarship, Research School o f Pacific & A sian Studies

For Korean A cadem ic Linkages Program, Research School o f

Pacific & Asian Studies

F or Taiw an Scholarship, Research School o f Pacific & A sian Studies

For Taiw an A rea Studies Program , Research School o f Pacific &

Asian Studies

For Post D octoral Fellowship, Research School o f Biological

Sciences

305,173

4 6 .000

60.000

50.000

172.000

200.000

10.000

4 3 ,225

6 8 ,500

3 0 0 .0 0 0

9 9 ,300

166,700

150.000

6 0 ,000

52.000

6 0 .000

52.000

9 0 .000

227

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

D e p artm e n t o f Foreign Affairs and

T rade

D e p artm e n t o f H ealth, H ousing and

C o m m u n ity Services

Evaluations a n d Investigations Program

F o r A dvisory Services in H igher E ducation— Im pact o f the 1990

Review, C entre for C o n tin u in g E ducation

S upport for Sum m er School for Secondary School Science

Teachers, C entre for C o n tin u in g E ducation

F or Exploring D em ographic C oncepts and D ata, Faculty o f Arts

For study o f C om m on N ational C ourses in Subjects o f Small

E nrolm ent, C entre for C o n tin u in g Education

For the developm ent o f C hinese/Japanese and Science Library

Service

S u p p o rt for 1993 Peacekeeping Sem inar, Research School o f

Pacific & A sian Studies

For the Encyclopedia o f Korea Project, Research School o f Pacific

& A sian Studies

For publishing the A ustralian Journal o f C hinese Affairs

For Pacific Islands Studies, Research School o f Pacific & Asian

Studies

F or Research Scholarship o n T h e Role o f Alcohol Intoxication on

Sexual Risk-taking Behaviour

For research into D evelopm ent o f Live R ecom binant Vaccines

A gainst H IV , John C u rtin School o f M edical Research

For P ro d u ctio n o f M onograph on the Law in Relation to

S ubstitute D ecision-M aking for Legally Incom petent Residents in

H ostels and N ursing H om es in Australia, Faculty o f Law

For G eneral Practice Evaluation Program , N ational C entre for

E pidem iology and Population H ealth

S u p p o rt for H arkness H ealth C onference, Research School o f

Social Sciences

F or stu d y o f the Effect o f Lead C o ntam ination and M ine Closure

in the B roken H ill C om m unity, C entre for Resource and

E nvironm ental Studies

For study o f Prem ature Infants, N ational C en tre for Epidemiology

and P opulation Health

For stu d y to assess the satisfaction w ith G eneral Practice, N ational

C en tre for Epidem iology and Population H ealth

F or G ra n t W ritin g W orkshop, N ational C entre for Epidemiology

a n d P opulation Health

39,125

70,469

50,205

35.000

46.000

125.000

10.000

20.000

5,000

63,600

171,743

12,000

9,156

10,000

38,520

10,000

21,200

17,000

228

P rincipal G r a n ts a n d D o n a tio n s

F or study o f Illicit D ru g Users, N ational C entre for Epidem iology

and P opulation H ealth

For the study o f D em en tia in A ustralia, Social Psychiatry Research

U n it

D e p artm e n t o f Im m igration, Local For N ational Local G overnm ent Environm ental Resource

G o v ern m en t and E thnic A ffairs Program , C entre for R esource and Environm ental Studies

For N ational Local G overnm ent Environm ental Resource N etw o rk

and A dm inistration S upport For Advisory G ro u p , C entre for

Resource and E nvironm ental Studies

D e p a rtm e n t o f Industrial Relations For research into Japanese Enterprise-Based Labour M arket

O rganisation and A ustralian Labour M arket Reform , Research

School o f Pacific 8 i Asian Studies

D e p a rtm e n t o f Industry, T echnology A dditional fu n d in g For T h e H u b b le Space Telescope, M o u n t

an d C o m m e rc e Strom lo and Siding S pring O bservatories

Bilateral Science a n d Technology Program

For Ion-Beam Processing o f O ptoelectronic M aterials, Research

School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

For research in Epitaxial G ro w th in G P IV S em iconductors,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

For research o f Baryonic D ark M atter, M ount Strom lo and Siding

S pring Observatories

A dditional fu n d in g for research o f Baryonic D a rk M atter, M o u n t

Strom lo and Siding Spring Observatories

For research in to the G eochem istry o f D iam ondiferous Eclogites

from Siberia, Research School o f Earth Sciences

For research in to H igh Energy Ion-Beam Processing o f E lectronic

and O ptoelectronic Devices, Research School o f Physical Sciences

an d Engineering

For research in to From Living Eyes to Seeing M achine, Research

School o f Biological Sciences

For research in to Silicide/G erm anide M etallization of

S em iconductor Structures, Research School o f Physical Sciences

and Engineering

For research in to Algal V irus Restriction / M odification Enzymes,

Research School o f Biological Sciences

For study o f Parallel S upercom puting in C om putational

Astrophysics, M o u n t Strom lo and Siding Spring O bservatories

For research in to T ran sp o rt Processes in C onfined Fluids, Research

School o f C hem istry

54,522

7.000

309.000

24 0 .0 0 0

25.000

46,811

5,202

12.000

23,000

10,600

5,250

6,400

6.000

5,600

13,400

8,000

7,004

229

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

D e p artm e n t o f Social Security

D e p artm e n t of the Arts. Sport, the

E n v iro n m e n t and Territories

D ep artm en t o f W ater Resources

Energy Research and D evelopm ent

C orporation

European C o m m u n ity Commission

Federation of U niversity

W om en— Q ueensland Fellowship

F und Inc

Fisheries Research and D evelopm ent

C orporation

Ford Foundation, T h e

F or research into V egetation and A tm osphere Interactions,

Research School o f Biological Sciences

S u p p o rt for W orkshop on D irection in N o n parametric C urve

E stim ation, Faculty o f Science

F or attendance at the 6 th R F Superconductivity W orkshop in

USA; Septem ber/O ctober 1993, Research School o f Physical

Sciences an d Engineering

For C o m p u te r Study o f Fluid Flow in Porous Media, Research

School o f Physical Sciences and E ngineering

For research, C entre for Inform ation Science Research

For research intoN onlinear Effects o f R adio-Frequency Waves,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering

For M odelling o f E nvironm ental Processes, Centre for Resource

and E nvironm ental Studies

For C onsultancy Services, Faculty o f Arts

For research o f the E volution o f the A ntarctic, Faculty o f Science

For research into O cean C irculation an d Fish Ageing, Faculty o f

Science

For C lim ate research. Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

For stu d y o f the Ecology and Im pacts o f Feral (Stray) C ats in the

A C T , Faculty o f Science

F or research into Road Traffic A ccident D ata, Faculty' of

Econom ics and C om m erce

For study o f Forests For Recharge C ontrol, Faculty o f Science

For research into T h in Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells, Faculty

o f Science

For Postgraduate Award— H igh T em perature Chemical Reactors,

Faculty o f Science

For E uropean C o m m unity C ourse, Faculty o f Arts

For A udrey H arrisson Fellowship, N ational C entre for

E pidem iology and Population H ealth

For research in to Radiocarbon D a tin g of Fish, Faculty o f Science

S u p p o rt for the International Secretariat o f the Pacific T rade and

D evelopm ent Conference, Research School o f Pacific & Asian

Studies

8,000

10,695

8,000

5.000

8.000

5,000

8,100

135,000

19.000

26.000

490.000

13.250

14.868

10.000

297.000

63.000

8,000

12.000

268,115

86,331

230

P rincipal G r a n ts a n d D o n a t io n s

S u p p o rt for the H ealth T ran sitio n Review Journal, N ational

C en tre for E pidem iology and Population H ealth

146,763

G E O P E K O For G old and C o p p er M etallogenesis o f Lake C ow al Prospect

(N S W ), Faculty o f Science

3 0 ,0 0 0

G lyzin Parm aceuticals Ltd For research into the Im m urosuppressivc Effects o f G lyzinc and

Cyclosporin A, Jo h n C u rtin School o f Medical Research 4 1 ,0 2 3

G rains Research & D evelopm ent

C o rp o ra tio n

For research in to M anaging N itrogen to M aximise the G rain Yield o f W heat, Research School o f Biological Sciences 2 6 ,508

For research in to G enetic Engineering, Faculty o f Science 72,381

For Study o f Asian G rain M arkets— Research School o f Pacific &C

Asian Studies

3 0 ,0 0 0

For Research Fellow ship into W heat M anagem ent, Faculty o f 2 3 ,0 0 0

G reat B arrier Reef M arine Park

A u th o rity

For research in to Fringing Reefs, Research School o f E arth Sciences 3 0 ,0 0 0

G riffith U niversity For a study o f P opulation R edistribution in Thailand, Faculty o f 3 4 ,4 0 0

In stitu te o f H ydrology For Rainfall R u n o ff M odel D evelopm ent, C entre for R esource and

Environm ental Studies

16,722

Japan Foundation, T h e For the Short T e rm Intensive Language Course at Kansai

University, Faculty o f Asian Studies

2 0 ,0 0 0

K orea D evelopm ent In stitu te, T h e S upport for the Pacific T rade and Developm ent Conference Secretariat (PA FTA D ) F un d in g C onsortium , Research School o f

Pacific & Asian Studies

4 3 ,1 6 5

K orea Research F oundation For the Korean Studies Program , Faculty o f Asian Studies 9 5 ,6 6 7

M acquarie University F or the developm ent o f an Australian National Speech D atabase,

Research School o f Physical Sciences and Engineering 163,180

M ea t Research C orporation F or research into Subterranean Clovers, Research School o f Biological Sciences 3 1 4 ,8 9 6

N a tio n a l G eographic Society For the Archaeological Survey and Excavation in the H alm ahera Islands,Faculty o f Science 17,007

N a tio n a l H ealth and M edical

R esearch Council

For research into the Ross R 'ver Virus, Faculty o f Science

For research by the Social Psychiatry Research U nit

130,980

3 ,3 4 9 ,6 7 0

For research in to T h e Regulation o f Bile Secretion, Faculty o f Science 2 2 0 ,4 4 6

For research in to M alarial Im m unosuppression, Faculty o f Science 6 2 2 ,1 1 5

231

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

F or M edical Postgraduate Research Scholarship on the M urray

Valley Encephalitis V irus, Faculty o f Science

23,028

For M edical Postgraduate Research Scholarshipon Inflam m atory

Bowel Disease, John C u rtin School o f M edical Research 23,028

F or research into O xygen D eprivation o f the Brain, Faculty o f 36,123

F or research into M urray Valley Encephalitis Virus, Faculty o f 175,216

N ational K orean Studies C entre For K orean Language T eaching M aterials D evelopm ent, Faculty o f

Asian Studies

5,000

N ational O ccu p atio n al H ealth and

Safety C om m ission

For research into W orkers’ C om pensation Incentive Schemes,

Faculty o f A rts

52,775

O ffice o f Energy, D epartm ent o f

M inerals an d Energy

For research into T h in Film Polycrystalline Silicone Solar Cells,

Faculty o f Science

255,070

Peptide T e c hnology Limited F or research into C hem ical Synthesis a n d Protein Synthesis, John C u rtin School o f M edical Research

63,338

Porgera J o in t V enture F or research into Structural D eform ational C ontrols on O re

Genesis, Research School o f E arth Sciences

33,000

For research into Fluid C hem istry o f M agnetic H ydrotherm al O re

D eposits, Research School o f Earth Sciences

72,000

R othm ans F ou n d atio n For research in to N onlinear D ynam ics, Research School o f Physical

Sciences and Engineering

47,000

Rural Industries Research and

D evelopm ent C orp o ratio n

For research in to Soils, Tillage, H erbicides and Soil Fauna in the

N S W W h ea t Belt, Faculty o f Science

176,411

F or research in to C om m u n ity G roups and G overnm ent Policy in

Resource M anagem ent, C entre for R esource and Environm ental

Studies

33,827

F or research in to Phytophthora, Research School o f Biological

Sciences

12,000

Sanwa Bank F o u ndation, The S u p p o rt for Scholarship, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies 8,633

Sekretariat N egara R epublik

Indonesia

F or S hort C ourse Study For Officials o f State Secretariat, Research

School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

13,995

Shepherd F oun d atio n F or research in to H ealth, W eight C o n tro l Practices and Beliefs in

A d ults,N ational C entre for E pidem iology and Population H ealth

19,078

Sm ith K line Bcecham

Pharm aceuticals

F o r research in to H epatitisSep A, N ational C entre for

Epidem iology and Population H ealth

36,100

Telecom For T h e Investigation o f H igh Energy Im p lan t Isolation o f

O p to e le ctro n ic Devices, Research School o f Physical Sciences and

Engineering

20,000

232

P rincipal G r a n ts a n d D o n a tio n s

U n ited N a tio n s University, T h e For research into G lobal E nvironm ental Change— S undaland Rain Forests, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies 5,036

U niversity o f N ew S outh W ales A dditional F u n d in g for A R C G ra n t— Im m igrant Labour M arket, Research School o f Social Sciences 9,000

U niversity o f Q ueensland For research into N eural N etw orks, Research School o f Physical

Sciences and Engineering

5,000

U niversity o f Sydney F or research into Visible Fibre Laser Sources, Research School o f

Physical Sciences and Engineering

184,000

U niversity o f Tasm ania F or Australia / France C ollaboration on A ntarctica and C lim ate

Research, Faculty o f Science

15,250

U niversity o f W ashington For study o f C ooperative H azards Policy, C entre for R esource and

E nvironm ental Studies

103,435

W ennerA ugG ren F ou n d atio n for

A nthropological Research

S upport to a tte n d IndoA ugPacific Prehistory Association

Conference, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

14,388

W est A ustralia Forest Industries L td For Phd Scholarship Thesis o n the Econom ic Im pact o f Im m igration, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

2 9 ,020

W o o l Research and D evelopm ent

C o rp o ra tio n

For research in to the C hanging Structure o f the N o rth Asian

Textile Industry, Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies

109,823

W o rld H e alth O rganisation For research in to C erebral M alaria, John C u rtin School o f M edical

Research,

221,271

Su b -total GRANTS $ 5 0 0 0 and above $ 1 5 ,1 9 7 ,9 8 6

233

T h e A u str a lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Donations

A nglo-A ustralian Telescope Board S u p p o rt for M o u n t Strom lo and Siding Spring O bservatories 5,000

A nonym ous S u p p o rt for School o f M usic 6,000

A nsett A ustralia S upport for A ustralia/Japan Research C entre 5,000

A ustralian law Teachers Association S upport for Legal Research N ew sletter 5,000

Bankers T ru st S u p p o rt for School O f M athem atical Sciences 14,000

Blackwell Publishers S upport for journal, Research School o f Social Sciences 9,476

B uchdahl, H A S u p p o rt for Scholarships 5,000

B uchen -O sm o n d , C S upport for Research School o f Biological Sciences 12,000

B utterw orths P ty Ltd S u p p o rt for Legal Research N ew sletter 5,000

C anberra C horal Society S u p p o rt for School o f M usic 10,000

C anberra In stitu te o f Technology S u p p o rt for A ID S Education O fficer 6,000

C oco C ola A m atil S u p p o rt for Fulbright Fellowships 5,000

C onsolidated Press H oldings Ltd S upport for C om m onw ealth Fellowships 195,000

C ro u g h ,G J S u p p o rt for Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies 8,000

C S IR O S u p p o rt for M o u n t Strom lo and Siding S pring Observatories 5,000

S u p p o rt for Conference, C entre for Resource and Environm ental 5,000

Studies

C u sa c k s G ift o f D isplay cases, Geology, Faculty o f Science 15,000

H am erslev Iron P ty Ltd S u p p o rt for M inerals a n d Energy F orum 5,000

H am m o n d , J S u p p o rt for Scholarships 5,000

H arvard C lub o f A ust. S u p p o rt for Scholarships 20,421

H ill, H S u p p o rt for Research School o f Pacific & Asian Studies 12,500

H olm es a C o u rt, R obert Foundation S u p p o rt for Fulbright Scholarships 18,300

H orridge C onsultants Pty Ltd S u p p o rt for Research School o f Biological Sciences 5,000

H ughes, P J and Sullivan, Μ E S u p p o rt for Research School o f Pacific & A sian Studies 5,000

Kirby, James N , F oundation S u p p o rt for Jo h n C urtin School o f M edical Research, 10,000

K opke, P S u p p o rt for C om m onw ealth Fellowships 10,000

Kornfeld, F S u p p o rt for Scholarships 20,000

234

P rin cip al G r a n ts a n d D o n a tio n s

Investm ents P ty Ltd S upport for C om m onw ealth Fellowships 10,000

M enzies F oundation S u p p o rt for Scholarships 10,000

N ational Parks and W ildlife Service S u p p o rt for C entre for R esource a n d Environm ental Studies 8,000

N ew Z ealand M inistry o f D efence S u p p o rt for graduate program , Strategic Defence Studies C entre 15,000

N oble, I. R. S u p p o rt for Research School o f Biological Sciences 2 0 ,162

Pacific E conom ic C onsultants S u p p o rt For D ep artm en t o f Econom ics 19,416

Reid, B ruce and Joy, F ou n d atio n S upport for Jo h n C u rtin School o f Medical Research, 2 0 ,000

Rockwell International Ltd S u p p o rt for Engineering Scholarships 9,000

Rockwell Systems Aust. S u p p o rt for graduate program , Strategic Defence Studies C entre 10,000

Salom on Brothers Inc. S u p p o rt for F ulbright Fellowships 17,000

Science &C Engineering Research

C ouncil, U K

G ift o f equipm ent— Linear A ccelerator, Research School o f

Physical Sciences and Engineering

6,10 0 ,0 0 0

T elecom S upport for M aths Sum m er School 3 0 ,000

LIniversity o f Sydney S upport for M o u n t Strom lo and Siding S pring O bservatories 5,000

W ierzbika, A. S u p p o rt for Faculty o f Arts 11,000

S u b-total D O N A T IO N S $ 5 0 0 0 and above $ 6 ,7 1 1 ,2 7 5

S u b-total GRANTS A N D D O N A T IO N S $50 0 0 and above $ 2 1 ,9 0 9 ,2 6 1

O th er Grants and D on a tio n s under $5 0 0 0 6 1 5 ,4 8 8

T O T A L Australian N ation al U niversity Grants and D on ation s

(excluding Grants through A nutech Pty Ltd)

$ 2 2 ,5 2 4 ,7 4 9

235

T h e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity

Freedom of Information Act 1982 Statement

t ■ t h i s sta te m e n t h a s b e e n p re p a re d in

y co m p lian ce w ith Section 8 of the

JL Freedom of Information A ct 1982 an d is co rre c t to 31 D ecem ber 1993. M ore detailed in fo rm a tio n is available in tw o p u b lic d o c u m e n ts en titled — University Legislation a n d Adm inistrative Guide.

1. Functions of the University’s decision­ making Council and Boards are as follows:

Council

In accordance with section 18 o f the Australian National University Act 1991 the Council is the governing authority of the University. Section 9 o f the Act provides that, subject to this Act and the Statutes, the Council has the entire control and management o f the University and is to act in all matters concerning the University in such manner as appears to be best calculated to promote the interests of the University.

The membership o f the Council is set out in section 10 o f the Act. It is chaired by the Chancellor and comprises 22 members which include elected officers of the University and other ex-officio members, representatives o f both Houses o f Parliament, persons appointed by the Governor-General, persons appointed by the Chief Minister o f the ACT, representatives of various groups o f the University’s academic staff, representatives o f the general staff, graduate and undergraduate students as well as convocation, and one other person at the discretion o f Council.

Committees o f the Council

Council is assisted by the following committees:

■ The Standing Committee considers any matter relating to the University referred to it by the Council or, if Council is not sitting, transacts

the business of the University except for matters solely within the competence o f the Council.

■ T he Finance Committee makes recommendations and decisions concerning financial and accounting matters o f the University.

■ O ther continuing committees o f Council are— Appeals Committee, Audit Committee, Buildings and Grounds Committee, Committee Against Sexual Harassment, Committee on Child Care, Committee on Conditions and Appointment o f the Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellors, Emergency Appointment

(Vice-Chancellor) Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Committee, General Services Fee Committee, Honorary Degrees Committee, University Fellowships Committee and Public Affairs Committee.

Board o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies

The function o f the Board is to advise the Council on any matter relating to education, learning, research and other academic work o f the University; it makes recommendations on the establishment o f additional research schools in the Institute; the abolition, combination or subdivision o f those research schools or departments o f the research schools; the promotion o f persons to academic offices in the Institute; the enrolment o f students for courses of study or research in the Institute; the requirements o f courses o f study in the Institute; the granting o f degrees, diplomas, certificates, honours and scholarships; and on academic matters pertaining to the Institute.

The Board o f the Institute o f Advanced Studies comprises a chairperson appointed by the Council from among the professors in the Institute, the Vice-Chancellor, the Deputy Vice-Chancellors, the head o f each research school, four heads o f departments in each research school chosen by the respective faculty board, one member chosen by

236

- .. Freedom of Information A ct 1982 Statem ent

the faculty o f each research school, the Chairperson and one other member o f the Board of The Faculties, two members elected by and from the graduate students o f the Instimte and such other persons as the Council appoints. The

Institute o f Advanced Studies comprises the John Curtin School of Medical Research and the Research Schools o f Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Pacific Studies,

Physical Sciences and Engineering, and Social Sciences. It incorporates the M ount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health and a

number o f mainly multidisciplinary academic centres.

The Board is assisted by the following committees:

■ Committee on General Policy

■ Promotions Committee

■ Strategic Developments Committee.

Board o f The Faculties

The function of the Board is to make recommendations to the Council on the academic development of the University; the establishment, abolition, combination and subdivision of faculties and of departments and other bodies within T he Faculties (other than the Institute of

the Arts); the promotion o f persons to academic positions in The Faculties; the assigning of any staff (academic and non-academic) to a department or faculty or to another body within T he Faculties; the admission o f students to the University and and to courses and parts of courses; examinations; scholarships for courses of study and research; the granting o f degrees, diplomas, certificates and honours; the discipline o f students; and other academic and related

matters.

T he Board of T he Faculties comprises a chairperson appointed by the Council from am ong the professors in T he Faculties, the Vice-Chancellor, the D eputy Vice-Chancellor,

the D ean of each faculty within T he Faculties, the Dean o f Students, the President o f The Australian National University Students’ Association, the Chairman and one other member o f the Board of

the Institute o f Advanced Studies, heads of departments and divisions, heads o f centres in the Faculty o f Asian Studies, three professors o f law,

other representatives o f academic staff and students and such other persons as the Council appoints from time to time. T he Faculties offer undergraduate and graduate courses in arts, Asian studies, economics and commerce, engineering

and information technology, law, and science.

T he Board is assisted by the following committees:

■ Steering Committee

■ Resources Committee

■ The Faculties Research Grants Committee

■ Academic Progress Appeals Committee

■ Admissions Committee

■ Committee on Consultation

■ Faculties Computing Committee

■ electoral committees for academic posts

■ Postgraduate Scholarships Committee

■ Promotions Committee

■ Standing Committee o f Tenure Committee

■ Prospective Smdents Liaison Committee

■ Undergraduate Awards Committee

Joint Committees of the Academic Boards

The two academic boards have the following three major joint committees:

■ Graduate Degrees Committee

■ Joint Committee on Postgraduate Awards

■ Board of Management, Centre for Continuing Education

237

T h e A u stralian N a tio n a l U niversity < ΛλΙ ; ·

2. The functions of the University’s statutory officers are as follows:

Chancellor

T he Chancellor presides at all meetings of Council and on all ceremonial occasions when available to do so. The Chancellor signs the Annual Report o f the University to the Governor-General.

Pro-Chancellor

The Pro-Chancellor chairs meetings o f the Standing Committee and, in the absence o f the Chancellor, presides at meetings o f the Council

and on ceremonial occasions.

Vice-Chancellor

The Vice-Chancellor is the C hief Executive Officer o f the University and has such powers and duties as the Stamtes prescribe or, subject to the Statutes as the Council determines. The Vice-Chancellor’s role is to control and manage the affairs and concerns o f the University including the control and management o f real and personal property vested in or acquired by the University. T he Vice-Chancellor has, and may exercise, such powers as are necessary or desirable to discharge those duties. T he Vice-Chancellor also represents and acts for the University in its relations with the Commonwealth Government and other bodies.

Deputy Vice-Chancellors

The two D eputy Vice-Chancellors generally assist in all aspects o f the Vice-Chancellor’s work, but particularly advise on the academic affairs o f the University and deputise for the Vice-Chancellor in that officer’s absence. O ne D eputy Vice-Chancellor is also Director o f the Institute of Advanced Studies.

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Finance and Fabric)

The Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Finance and Fabric) advises the Vice-Chancellor on all matters concerning management o f the University’s finances and fabric.

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Planning and Administration)

The Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Planning and Administration) advises the Vice-Chancellor on the effective administration o f the University, on matters o f concern to students and staff and on the University’s relationship with the community.

3. Powers of the University

The University’s powers are based on the Australian National University A ct 1991. Under this legislation the University has made statutes, rules and orders.

Statutes

Council has made 31 stamtes under section 27(1) which are valid at present—

Affiliation (Canberra Institute o f the Arts) Stamte Board o f T he Faculties Stamte Board o f the Instimte of Advanced Studies Stamte Chancellorship Stamte Com puting Services Stamte Convocation Stamte Courses and Degrees Stamte Default Certificate Stamte Deputy Vice-Chancellotship Stamte Discipline Stamte Faculties and Faculty Boards (Instimte of Advanced Studies) Stamte

Faculties (The Faculties) Stamte Fees Stamte Halls o f Residence Stamte Institute o f the Arts Stamte Interpretation Stamte Library Stamte Liquor (Affiliated Colleges) Stamte Liquor (Halls o f Residence and University Union) Stamte

238

Freedom of Information A ct 1982 Statem ent

Liquor (University Arts Centre) Statute Liquor (University House) Statute Membership of the Council Stamte Parking and Traffic Stamte Pro-Chancellorship Stamte Professorial Board Stamte Residential Colleges (Affiliation) Stamte Staff Superannuation Stamte Superannuation Funds (Investment and Management) Stamte University House Stamte University Seal Stamte Vice-Chancellorship Stamte

Institute o f the Arts Stamtes preserved under Section 57—

Academic Progress Stamte Admission Stamte Affiliation (ANU) Stamte Courses and Awards Stamte

Elected Members o f Council Stamte Fees Stamte G ranting of Advanced Standing Stamte Interpretation Stamte Library Stamte Scholarship Stamte Sm dent Conduct Stamte Traffic Stamte

Rules

Rules have been made under the above stamtes relating to admissions, examinations, fees, discipline, courses and degrees, courses of smdy, sm dent academic progress, University House, halls o f residence, affiliated colleges, membership o f Council, the Library, and faculties and faculty boards.

Orders

Orders have been made under the above stamtes relating to bachelor degrees, professional training in law, research schools, University House

discipline, the Library, liquor, and Fee paying overseas students.

4. Documents or publications produced by the University

Documents available for purchase by the public or otherwise accessible in terms o f the Freedom o f Information Act 1982are— Council statutes, rules and orders Annual Report o f the A N U to Parliament Annual reports o f schools, faculties, centres and

units to the Council Faculty Handbook Rules (a companion volume to the former) Graduate School Handbook

Institute o f the Arts Annual Report Institute o f the Arts Handbook Institute o f the Arts Prospectus Undergraduate Prospectus

Statistical Handbook Administrative Guide Purchasing Policy and Procedures University M ail Accounting Manual

Radiation Safety Handbook Ionizing Radiation Safety Occupational Health and Safety Unit Information Manual

Documents which are customarily made available to the public otherwise than under the Freedom o f Information Act, free o f charge, upon request are— A N U Reporter, National Graduate, S ta ff News,

periodic listing o f visitors by their university and area o f interest. Information pamphlets and booklets on courses and academic requirements in various disciplines, leaflets on academic appointments in the Institute o f Advanced Studies and in The Faculties, Library Guides,

Directory o f services for students, and Student accommodation booklet.

Internal working documents include internal user manuals, Financial Authorisations, Personnel and Payroll (General), Stores and Purchasing Systems Manuals and other policy and procedural documents.

Facilities for access

A reading room is available at University Public Affairs office. Limited facilities for the perusal o f

239

T he A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U niversity ·>, - -.-■ · · -

documents applicable to individual areas are also available at tbe Personnel Office and/or Student Administration.

FOI procedures and initial contact points

Applications for access to documents under the Freedom o f Information A ct 1982 should be lodged in writing with the Secretary or the Registrar of the University. Applications should include an application fee or a request for its remission, an address to which notices may be sent and, to facilitate contact with the applicant, a telephone number effective during normal business hours. Properly lodged applications for access to documents will be acknowledged and a decision

notified to the applicant as quickly as possible. In accordance with the provisions o f section 23 of the Freedom o f Information A ct 1982 the Vice-Chancellor, the Deputy Vice-Chancellors, the Pro-Vice-Chancellors; the Registrar, the Secretary, the Head, Buildings and Grounds

Division; and the Head, Finance and Accounting Division, are authorised to grant or refuse access to documents. Inquiries regarding freedom of information and access to documents may be made at—

Public Affairs Division 28 Balmain Crescent Tel: (06) 249 2229

The Personnel Office Chancelry Building East Road Tel: (06) 249 4735

Smdent Administration Chancelry Annex Ellery Circuit Tel: (06)249 3339

Telephone inquiries may also be directed to the FOI Officer Tel: (06)249 2511.

240

·. - A u d ito r -G e n e r a l's R ep o r t

Auditor-General’s Report

241

Auditor-General

26 M ay 1994

Sir G e o ffre y Y een d A C C B E C h a irm a n o f th e C ouncil o f th e U niversity A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U n iv ersity P. O . Box 4

C A N B E R R A A C T 2600

D e a r S ir G e o ffre y

A U S T R A L I A N N A T I O N A L U N I V E R S I T Y - F IN A N C IA L S T A T E M E N T S 1993

P le a se find en c lo se d th e sig n e d fin an cial s ta te m e n ts fo r th e U niversity fo r th e y e a r e n d e d 31 D e c e m b e r 1993, to g e th e r w ith th e au d it r e p o r t on th e financial s ta te m e n ts p u rsu a n t to su b se c tio n 49(2) o f th e A u s tra lia n N a tio n a l U n iv ersity A ct 1991.

A n a u d it r e p o r t on th e fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts h a s a lso b e e n fo rw ard ed to th e M in iste r for

E m p lo y m e n t, E d u c a tio n a n d T ra in in g , to g e th e r w ith a signed copy o f th e financial

s ta te m e n ts.

Y o u rs sin cerely

J. C. T a y lo r

A u d ito r-G e n e ra l

Australian National Audit Office, GPO BOX 707, Canberra ACT 2601 · Telephone (06) 203 7500 · Fax (06) 273 5355

242

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

Centenary House 19 National Crt Barton ACT 2600

our ref;

I N D E P E N D E N T A U D I T R E P O R T

T o th e M in ister fo r E m p lo y m e n t, E d u c a tio n a n d T rain in g

S cope

I h a v e a u d ite d th e fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts o f th e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U n iv e rsity fo r th e y e a r e n d e d 31 D e c e m b e r 1993. T h e financial s ta te m e n ts include th e c o n so lid a te d fin an cial s ta te m e n ts o f th e e c o n o m ic e n tity c o m p risin g th e U niversity a n d th e e n tity it c o n tro ls a t th e y e a r ’s en d o r fro m tim e to tim e d u rin g th e y e a r. T h e s ta te m e n ts c o m p rise:

. O p e ra tin g S ta te m e n t o f the U niversity a n d o f the e c o n o m ic e n tity

. S ta te m e n t o f F in a n c ia l P osition o f the U niversity an d o f th e e c o n o m ic e n tity

. S ta te m e n t o f C a sh F low s o f th e U n iv ersity an d of th e e c o n o m ic entity

. C e rtific a te o f th e V ic e -C h a n c ello r an d th e P ro V ic e -C h a n c e llo r (F in a n c e a n d

F ab ric), a n d

. N o tes to a n d fo rm in g p a rt o f th e fin an cial sta te m e n ts.

T h e C ouncil o f th e U n iv ersity is re sp o n sib le fo r th e p re p a ra tio n a n d p re s e n ta tio n o f th e fin an cial s ta te m e n ts a n d th e in fo rm a tio n they c o n ta in . I have c o n d u c te d a n in d e p e n d e n t a u d it o f the fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts in o r d e r to ex p re ss an o p in io n o n th e m to the

M in iste r for E m p lo y m e n t, E d u c a tio n a n d T ra in in g an d th e C h a irm a n o f the C ouncil o f th e U niversity.

T h e a u d it has b e e n c o n d u c te d in a c c o rd a n c e w ith th e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l A u d it O ffice A u d itin g S ta n d a rd s, w hich in c o rp o ra te th e A u stra lia n A u d itin g S ta n d a rd s, to p ro v id e re a s o n a b le a s s u ra n c e as to w h e th e r th e fin an cial s ta te m e n ts a re fre e o f m a te ria l

m issta te m e n t. A u d it p ro c e d u re s in clu d ed ex am in atio n , o n a te st basis, o f ev id e n c e

s u p p o rtin g th e a m o u n ts a n d o th e r d isclo su res in the fin an cial s ta te m e n ts, a n d th e

e v a lu a tio n o f a c c o u n tin g p o licies a n d significant a c co u n tin g e stim a te s. T h e se p ro c e d u re s h a v e b e e n u n d e rta k e n to fo rm an o p in io n w h e th e r, in all m a te ria l re sp e c ts, th e financial s ta te m e n ts a re p re s e n te d fairly in a c c o rd a n c e w ith A u stralian a c c o u n tin g c o n c e p ts an d s ta n d a rd s a n d s ta tu to ry re q u ire m e n ts so as to p re s e n t a view w hich is co n sisten t w ith m y

u n d e rsta n d in g o f th e U n iv e rsity an d th e e c o n o m ic entity’s fin an cial p o sitio n , th e resu lts o f th e ir o p e ra tio n s a n d th e ir cash flows.

GPO Box 707 Canberra Australian Capital Territory 2601 Telephone (06)203 7300 Facsimile (06)203 7777

243

I hav e n o t a c te d as th e a u d ito r o f the su b sid iary c o m p a n y A N U T E C H Pty L im ited. I

have, h o w ev er, received su fficien t in fo rm a tio n a n d e x p la n a tio n c o n c e rn in g th is subsidiary to e n a b le m e to form a n o p in io n on th e e c o n o m ic e n tity ’s financial sta te m e n ts .

T h e a u d it opinion e x p re sse d in this re p o rt h a s b e e n fo rm e d on th e a b o v e basis.

Q u a lific a tio n

A s s ta te d in N ote 1 u n d e r B asis o f A cco u n tin g , th e U niversity d e p a r te d fro m the

re q u ire m e n ts o f th e A u stra lia n A cco u n tin g S ta n d a rd s on P ro fit a n d L o ss o r o th e r

O p e ra tin g S ta te m e n ts (A A S 1) a n d A c c o u n tin g fo r R e v a lu a tio n o f N o n -c u rre n t A ssets (A A S 10), in re sp e c t o f th e fu n d s in v ested in th e C o m m o n w e a lth S u p e ra n n u a tio n

A c c o u n t (C S A ) to p ro v id e fo r th e e m p lo y e r fu n d e d p a rt o f p e n sio n s p a id by the

A u stra lia n G o v e rn m e n t fo r U n iv ersity e m p lo y ees.

T h e U n iv ersity acco u n ts as re v e n u e the c h a n g e s in m a rk e t value o f a sse ts o f th e CSA

b e tw e e n th e beginning a n d e n d o f each p e rio d , irre sp e c tiv e o f w h e th e r th e gains (or

losses) a re realised. T h is tr e a tm e n t is th e sa m e as p ro v id ed fo r u n d e r th e A u stra lia n

A c c o u n tin g S ta n d a rd o n F in a n c ia l R e p o rtin g by S u p e ra n n u a tio n P la n s (A A S 25).

H o w e v e r th e C SA is n o t a s u p e ra n n u a tio n p la n in te rm s o f th e d e fin itio n in A A S 25.

T h e U n iv e rsity believes th a t th e S ta n d a rd s A A S 1 a n d A A S 10 a re n o t a p p r o p r ia te for

th e s u p e ra n n u a tio n funds.

T h e a c c o u n tin g tre a tm e n t a d o p te d by the U niversity is co n trary to th e re q u ire m e n ts of A A S 10 fo r rev alu atio n o f n o n -c u rre n t assets in th a t th e in crem en t has n o t b e e n tak en

to a n in v e stm e n t re v a lu a tio n re se rv e for u n realised gains. T h e tre a tm e n t is a lso co n trary to A A S 1 in th a t the fin an cial re su lt has b e e n d e te rm in e d a fte r a c c o u n tin g fo r rev en u e

fro m u n re a lise d gains in th e O p e ra tin g S ta te m e n t.

T h e G u id e lin e s fo r F in a n c ia l S ta te m e n ts o f P ublic A u th o ritie s and C o m m e rc ia l A ctivities re q u ire th e U niversity to c o m p ly w ith the a c c o u n tin g sta n d a rd s. T h e G u id e lin e s also

p ro v id e th a t w h ere th e U n iv ersity believes th a t financial sta te m e n ts so p r e p a r e d d o not show fairly th e financial tra n s a c tio n s an d th e s ta te o f affairs o f th e U niversity, it should sup p ly a d d itio n a l in fo rm a tio n a n d e x p la n a tio n s so as to show fairly th o se m a tte rs . As

s ta te d by th e U niversity in N o te 1, th e effect o f th e d e p a rtu re s fro m th e s ta n d a rd s is to

in c re a se th e surplus fo r th e y e a r by $36,516,936.

Q u a lifie d A u d it O pinion

In a c c o rd a n c e w ith su b se c tio n 49 (2 ) o f the A u stra lia n N atio n al U niversity A c t 1991, I now r e p o r t th a t the s ta te m e n ts a re in a g re e m e n t w ith th e accounts a n d re c o rd s o f the

U niversity a n d th e e c o n o m ic e n tity , an d in my o p in io n , ex cep t fo r th e effects on the

financial s ta te m e n ts o f th e m a tte r re fe rre d to in the qu alificatio n p a ra g ra p h :

. th e sta te m e n ts a re b a s e d u p o n p ro p e r a c c o u n ts a n d records

244

th e s ta te m e n ts sh o w fairly in a c c o rd a n c e w ith S ta te m e n ts o f A c c o u n tin g C o n c e p ts a n d a p p lic a b le A c c o u n tin g S ta n d a rd s th e fin an cial tra n sa c tio n s a n d cash flows for th e year e n d e d 31 D e c e m b e r 1993 a n d th e s ta te of a ffa irs o f th e U niversity an d

th e e c o n o m ic e n tity a t th a t d a te

th e re c e ip t, e x p e n d itu re an d in v e stm e n t o f m oneys, a n d th e acq u isitio n a n d

d isp o sal o f asse ts, by th e U n iv ersity d u rin g th e y e a r h a v e b e e n in a c c o rd a n c e w ith th e A u stra lia n N a tio n a l U n iv ersity A ct 1991, an d

th e s ta te m e n ts a r e in a c c o rd a n c e w ith th e G u id e lin e s fo r F inancial

S ta te m e n ts o f P u b lic A u th o ritie s a n d C o m m e rc ia l A ctivities.

D . S. L e n n ie

E x ecu tiv e D ire c to r A u s tra lia n N a tio n a l A u d it O ffice C a n b e r r a

26 M a y 199*4

The Australian National University - · - '> . - - ■ - · ...

Financial Statements

246

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEM BER 1993

CERTIFICA TE

In our opinion the accounts for the University and the consolidated accounts for the Economic Entity are drawn up to show fairly the :

operating results for the financial year ended 31 December 1993;

financial position as at 31 December 1993; and

cash flows during the financial year ended 31 December 1993.

The statements have been made out in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities approved by the Minister for Finance except as indicated in Note 1.8.

R D T E R R E L L Vice-Chancellor

A D B A R T O N Pro Vice-Chancellor (Finance & Fabric)

Ί Α May 1994

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

OPERATING STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 1993

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

COST OF SERVICES

OPERATING EXPENSES

Fuel and power 6,201 6,129 6,123 6,045

Incomplete project expenditure 13,348 7,687

Library books and periodicals 5,991 5,507 6,005 5,511

Maintenance of equipment and facilities 11,695 12,667 11,650 12,716

Materials, supplies and minor equipment 9,506 14,704 17,264 17,518

Pension payments 16,668 10,934 16,668 10,934

Salaries, oncosts and leave 2 195,032 184,567 189,680 179,477

Scholarships 12,919 12,283 12,927 12,318

Sundry 3 32,064 34,786 25,076 26,599

Travel, conferences and fieldwork 10,177 8,512 9,093 8,175

Provisions 4 78,336 31,922 67,424 23,446

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 391,937 329,698 361,910 302,739

OPERATING REVENUES FROM INDEPENDENT SOURCES

Net investment revenue 5 75,634 26,829 66,375 20,101

Research grants 26,725 22,156 13,436 8,089

Other revenue 6 68,233 61,804 60,443 54,605

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES FROM INDEPENDENT SOURCES 170,592 110,789 140,254 82,795

NET COST OF SERVICES 221,345 218,909 221,656 219,944

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT

Parliamentary appropriations 7 182,575 183,970 182,575 183,970

Research grants 44,959 45,164 44,957 45,145

TOTAL REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT 227,534 229,134 227,532 229,115

OPERATING RESULT 8 6,189 10,225 5,876 9,171

OUTSIDE INTERESTS AND TRANSFERS

Operating result 6,189 10,225 5,876 9,171

Accumulated operating results at beginning of financial year 235,175 228,712 232,069 226,598

Aggregate of amounts transferred from reserves 9 3,641 1,061 3,456 973

TOTAL AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION 245,005 239,998 241,401 236,742

Aggregate of amounts transferred to reserves 9 2,915 4,823 2,423 4,673

ACCUMULATED OPERATING RESULTS AT END OF FINANCIAL YEAR $242,090 $235,175 $238,978 $232,069

>48

Ή Ε A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

iTATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 31 DECEMBER 1993

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

Notes S'000 $'000 S'000 $'000

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash 22 66,477 53,932 63,048 48,284

Receivables 10 17,765 16,546 15,369 15,6%

Investments 11 9,865 12,451 9,865 12,451

Inventories 251 617

iJ£ 172

Other 12 12.495 12,376 1,622

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 106,853 95,922 89,985 78,225

NON-CURRENT ASSETS

Receivables 13 1,633 2,571 1,633 2,571

Investments 14 375,482

260,138

296,965 377,466 298,949

Property, plant and equipment 15 225,854 254,849 221,122

Other 16 92,832 92,335

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS 730,085 617,725 633,948 522,642

TOTAL ASSETS 836,938 713,647 723,933 600,867

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Creditors 17 78,714 30,206 78,358 29,644

Provisions 18 25,363 18,580 25,072 18,318

Other 19 12,955 16,047

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES 117,032 64,833 103,430 47,%2

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Borrowings 4,001 4,003 4,001 4,003

Provisions 20 346,400

93,700

304,139 346,295 304,064

Other 21 91,916

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES 444,101 400,058 350,296 308,067

TOTAL LIABILITIES 561,133 464,891 453,726 356,029

NET ASSETS $275,805 $248,756 $270,207 $244,838

EQUITY

Parent Entity Interest

33,715 Reserves 9 13,581 31,229 12,769

Accumulated Results of Operations 242,090 235,175 238,978 232,069

TOTAL EQUITY $275,805 $248,756 $270,207 $244,838

249

T H E AU STRA LIA N NA TIO N A L U N IV E R SIT Y

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 1993

Economic Entity University

Notes

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Inflows

Research grants Interest and other investment earnings Dividends received Other receipts Sale of technology licence

Outflows

Payments to employees Direct investment expenses Payments to suppliers

NET CASH USED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES 22

1993 1992 1993 1992

$'000 S'000 $'000 $'000

6,179 6,422 14,932 12,544

25,217 23,708 24,757 23,822

6,533 6,053 6,533 6,053

92,596 105,108

33,787

64,233 78.836

(202,461) (200,283) (197,122) (195,007) (2,638) (2,762) (2,638) (2,762)

(110,079) (106,251) (92,553) (89,220)

(184,653) (134,218) (181,858) (165,734)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Inflows

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment Repayment of loan principle Proceeds from sale and maturity of investments Commonwealth bank loan Interest on technology licence funds

Outflows

Payment of loan principle to borrowers Acquisition of investments Acquisition of property, plant and equipment

NET CASH USED BY INVESTING ACTIVITIES

CASH FLOWS FROM GOVERNMENT

Inflows

Receipts from appropriation Recurrent Capital

Research grants

Outflows

Refund of unspent research grants

NET CASH PROVIDED BY GOVERNMENT

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD

Cash at beginning of reporting period 22

CASH AT END OF REPORTING PERIOD 22

3,968 2,286 3,947 2,170

1,543 628 1,543 628

78,923 41,804 78,923 41,290

4,000 4,000

9,234 8,136

(9) (81) (9) (81)

(125,209) (103,874) (116,421) (63,822)

(28,816) (51,520) (28,923) (51,536)

(60366) (98,621) (60,940) (67,351)

212,330 154,409

3,452

212,330 154,409 3,452

45327 34,862 45,327 34,857

(93) (144) (95) (144)

257,564 192,579 257,562 192,574

12,545 (40,260) 14,764 (40,511)

53,932 94,192 48,284 88,795

66.477 53,932 63,048 48,284

250

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES TO AND FO RM IN G PA RT OF THE ACCOUNTS 31 DECEM BER 1993

1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Basis of Accounting

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for some assets which are reported at valuation.

The financial statements accord with the requirements of the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Public Authorities and Commercial Activities (the Guidelines) approved by the Minister for Finance except as indicated in Note 1.8.

The financial statements are presented on an economic entity basis. The statements include consolidated reporting for the Australian National University and its wholly and beneficially owned subsidiary company ANUTECH Pty Ltd incorporated in Australia.

The accounts for ANUTECH Pty Ltd have been prepared for the same reporting period as the University using consistent accounting policies. Balances, transactions and unrealised profits arising from intra­ entity transactions have been eliminated.

The University has adopted a market value basis for the investments held on behalf of the Commonwealth Superannuation Account and has followed the disclosure requirements of the Australian Accounting Standard on Financial Reporting by Superannuation Plans (AAS 25) for investment revenue as if it were a superannuation plan. The University accounts as revenue the changes

in market values of assets of the Commonwealth Superannuation Account between the beginning and the end of each reporting period, irrespective of whether the gains (or losses) are realised. The effect of disclosing unrealised gains and losses in revenue rather than in an Unrealised Gains Reserve is to increase the surplus for the year by $36,516,936. This treatment of unrealised gains and losses

represents a departure from the requirements of Australian Accounting Standards on Profit and Loss Statements (AAS1) and Accounting for the Revaluation of Non-Current Assets (AAS 10).

These departures from the Australian Accounting Standards (AAS1 and AAS 10) have been made because, in the opinion of the University, the standards are not appropriate for the Commonwealth Superannuation Account. The University considers that its accounting policy accurately discloses the financial performance and position of the Commonwealth Superannuation Account.

The comparative figures in the Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows have been restated following a change in the definition of Cash as stated in Note 1.3. Comparatives in Note 25 Remuneration of Executives have been restated following a change in the method of calculating salary oncosts and benefits.

251

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES continued

1.2 Investments

Funds are invested using guidelines approved by the Council of the University in the following categories:

Bank accepted bills Certificates of deposit Convertible notes Corporate bonds Debentures

Government and semi-government stocks and bonds Overseas managed investment funds Managed investment funds Promissory notes Properties

Shares and share options Short term money market Units in unit trusts

1.3 Cash Flows

Cash for the purposes of the Statement of Cash Flows, includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with banks and money market investments readily convertible to cash. Transferable certificates of deposit which had been included in the definition of cash in 1992 have been reclassified as investments in 1993.

1.4 Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realisable value.

1.5 Property, P lant and Equipm ent

1.5.1 Depreciation and A m ortisation

Depreciation and amortisation are calculated on a straight line basis on all property, plant and equipment other than freehold land and works of art. Rates are calculated to allocate the cost or value of the assets against revenue over the useful life of the assets.

1.5.2 Valuation o f Assets

Assets are stated at accumulated historical cost except for properties donated to the University, investments, major assets held on behalf of the Housing Operation and non-electronic musical instruments. The valuation of non-electronic musical instruments at replacement cost was undertaken by Institute of the Arts officers, who are considered to be experts in this field, as at 8 February 1988.

Non electronic musical instruments acquired after that date are valued at cost.

All land and buildings gifted to the University are assessed by independent qualified valuers and revalued in the University's books of account. The last independent valuation was performed in 1993 by Egan, Wilkinson and Swinboume, registered valuers.

252

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES continued

1.5.2 Valuation o f A ssets (cont)

During 1993 land and dwellings held on behalf of the Housing Operation were valued independently at current market prices by Egan, Wilkinson and Swinboume, registered valuers. All valuations are estimates of the amounts for which the assets could be exchanged between a knowledgeable willing buyer and a knowledgeable willing seller in an arm's length transaction at the valuation date. These assets are revalued every three years.

Investment assets of the Commonwealth Superannuation Account are stated at market value. Market value in relation to investments has been determined as:

Land and buildings - all valuations are estimates of the amounts for which the assets could be exchanged between a knowledgeable willing buyer and a knowledgeable willing seller in an arm's length transaction at the valuation date. The most recent independent valuations of land and buildings were performed in 1993 by registered valuers Finch Freeman of Melbourne and Ray L Davis Pty Ltd of

Canberra;

Shares in public companies and convertible notes - the official market quotation price as listed by the Australian Stock Exchange at the close of business on 31 December 1993 ;

Government and semi-government stocks and bonds - independent valuation provided by the Short Term Group of Melbourne. Capital Indexed Government Bonds - independent valuation provided by SBC Dominguez Barry of Sydney;

Overseas managed investment funds - valuation supplied by the fund management groups; and

Unit trusts - directors' valuation.

1.6 Employee Entitlements

The University makes provision for employee recreation leave other than for members of academic staff. It provides for long service leave after seven years continuous service for all employees excepting those in the Ancillary Activities where the entitlement is calculated from the date of employment. The effect of this inconsistency on financial statements is not considered to be material.

1.7 Deferred Research and Development Costs

Research and development costs at ANUTECH are expensed as incurred except where future benefits are expected, beyond any reasonable doubt, to exceed those costs. Where research and development costs are deferred such costs are amortised over future periods on a basis related to expected future benefits. Unamortised costs are reviewed at each balance date to determine the amount that is no longer

recoverable and any amount so identified is written off.

1.8 Guidelines for Financial Statements of Commonwealth Entities

Pursuant to clause 6 of Schedule 2 to the Guidelines, the delegate of the Minister for Finance has varied the form of the Australian National University financial statements for the financial year ending 31 December 1993 so that the University sites at Acton campus and Mt Stromlo received free of charge by lease in perpetuity and on restricted use for the University activities, need not be brought to

account but a description of those sites shall be included in the notes to the financial statements.

253

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

S'000 S'000 $’000 $'000

2. SALARIES, ONCOSTS AND LEAVE

Salaries 155,680 147,308 150,896 143,227

Oncosts 31.037 29,291 30.607 28,566

Long service and recreation leave 8.315 7,968 8.177 7,684

$195,032 $184,567 $189,680 $179,477

3. SUNDRY EXPENSES

Academic visitors 1,406 1,327 1,406 1,328

Advertising 1,401 1,288 1,390 1,281

Bad debts 58 27 58 27

Consultancy 4,700 3,689 3,579 2,572

Cost of goods sold 6,558 6,286 1,69! 1,563

Interest expense 440 337 440 337

Loss on disposal of assets 515 3,092 515 3,092

Miscellaneous 8,545 10,759 7,664 8,533

Occupancy 4,579 4,424 4,579 4,424

Publishing 1,343 1,247 1,357 1,254

Telephones and telex 2.519 2,310 2,397 2,188

$32,064 $34,786 $25,076 $26,599

4. PROVISIONS

Depreciation on property, plant and equipment 19,200 16,814 19,003 16,574

Provision for deferred building maintenance (462) 685 (462) 685

Provision for doubtful debts (102) 91 (102) 91

Provision for employee superannuation entitlements 47,484 5,469 47,484 5,283

Provision for employee leave entitlements 1,546 896 1,50! 896

Provision for land tax (83) (83)

Provision for technology licences and royalties 10,670 8,050

$78,336 $31,922 $67,424 $23,446

254

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

5. NET INVESTMENT REVENUE

Dividends 5,808 5,131 5,808 5,131

Interest 24,972 24,121 15,713 17,393

Income from unit trusts 1,091 1,042 1.091 1,042

Rentals from investment properties 8,388 10,445 8,388 10,445

Changes in net m arket value

Investments held at balance date

Convertible notes 253 253

Corporate bonds 210 (390) 210 (390)

Government and semi-government securities 3,443 (289) 3.443 (289)

Shares and share options 39,657 (2,533) 39,657 (2,533)

Properties (2,875) (8,463) (2,875) (8,463)

Units in unit trusts (3,918) (470) (3,918) (470)

Investments realised during the period

Bank accepted bills 2 2

Convertible notes (9) (9)

Corporate bonds 306 (41) 306 (41)

Debentures 13 13

Government and semi-government securities 909 1,078 909 1,078

Shares and share options 761 (436) 761 (436)

78,752 29,454 69.493 22,726

Direct investment expense 0 .1 1 8 ) (2,625) (3,118) (2,625)

$75,634 $26,829 $66,375 $20,101

6. OTHER REVENUE

Donation of equipment 6,100 6,100

Foreign exchange gains 25 77 25 77

Higher Education Contribution Scheme 13,731 14,436 13,731 14,436

Rentals 5,221 5,302 5.138 5,254

Sundry 13,527 13,856 15,366 15,809

Tariffs, buttery and catering 10,313 10,292 10,313 10,292

Tuition fees 9,736 8,628 9,770 8,737

Profit on syndicated R&D projects 1,679 1,679

Project management fees and recoveries 2,948 2,231

Sales 4,953 5,303

$68,233 $61,804 $60,443 $54,605

255

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1 9 9 3 1992 1 9 9 3 1992

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

7. PARLIAMENTARY APPROPRIATIONS

Operating grant 182,575 179,377 182,575 179,377

Capital grant 4,593 4,593

$182,575 $183,970 $182,575 $183,970

8. ABNORMAL ITEMS

Abnormal items in the operating result are

Revenue

Accrued income on technology licences Long term project revenue Profit on syndicated R&D projects Sales tax rebate

Expense

Long term project expenditure Provision to purchase technology licences and royalties

6,371 8,597 1,679 105

$16,752

8,597

8,050

$16,647

256

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

9. RESERVES Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Asset replacement 1,808 1,677 1,808 1,677

Asset revaluation 22,985 2,126 21,616 2,124

Building 3,750 5,048 3,300 4,848

Capital development 199 199 199 199

Equipment 3,806 3,171 3,806 3,171

Project development

Research donations

339

.........

328

324

286

.....

S e lf insurance

Dwellings 500 500 500 500

Workers' compensation 250 250

$33,715 $13,581 $31,229 $12,769

Movements in reserves

Asset replacement

Balance at beginning of year 1,677 1,582 1,677 1,582

Transfer from retained surpluses 131 106 131 106

Transfer to retained surpluses ( i n (ID

Balance at end of year $1,808 $1,677 $1,808 $1,677

Asset revaluation

Balance at beginning of year Revaluation increments on revaluation of Land Buildings

2,126

8,647 12,212

2,126 2,124

8,647 10,845

2,124

Balance at end of year $22,985 $2,126 $21,616 $2,124

Building

Balance at beginning of year 5,048 1,827 4.848 1,627

Transfer from retained surpluses 1,758 3,256 1,508 3,256

Transfer to retained surpluses (3.056) (35) (33)56) (35)

Balance at end of year $3,750 $5,048 $3,300 $4,848

257

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Capital development

Balance at beginning of year 199 199 199 199

Balance at end of year $199 $199 $199 $199

Equipment

Balance at beginning of year 3.171 2,540 3,171 2,540

Transfer from retained surpluses 785 1,295 785 1,295

Transfer to retamed surpluses (150) (664) (150) (664)

Balance at end of year $3,806 $3,171 $3,806 $3,171

Project development

Balance at beginning of year 324 257

Transfer from retained surpluses 200 150

Transfer to retained surpluses (185) (83)

Balance at end of year $339 $324

Research donations

Balance at beginning of year 286 291

Transfer from retained surpluses Transfer to retained surpluses

42

(5)

Balance at end of year $328 $286

Self insurance dwellings

Balance at beginning of year 500 484 500 484

Transfer from retained surpluses 16 16

Balance at end of year $500 $500 $500 $500

Self insurance workers' compensation

Balance at beginning of year 250 513 250 513

Transfer to retained surpluses (250) (263) (250) (263)

Balance at end of year $250 $250

258

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

10. RECEIVABLES - CURRENT

S'000 S'000 S'000 S'000

Trade debtors 12.206 11,125 9,859 10,332

Provision for doubtful debts (232) (336) _____£ 3 2 1 (336)

11,974 10,789 9,627 9,996

Advance payments and prepaid expenditure 5,586 5,514 5,537 5,457

Loans 205 243 205 243

$17,765 $16,546 $15,369 $15,696

11. INVESTMENTS - CURRENT

Investments at valuation (see note 1.5.2)

Corporate bonds 4,856 4,856

Government and semi-government securities 964 964

$5,820 $5,820

Investments at cost

Corporate bonds 4,337 4,337

Debentures 3,570 120 3.570 120

Government and semi-govemment securities 165 3,892 165 3,892

Transferable certificate of deposits 1.793 2,619 1,793 2,619

9,865 6,631 9,865 6,631

$9,865 $12,451 $9,865 $12,451

Aggregate quoted market value at balance date of investments at cost

Corporate bonds 4,248 4,248

Debentures 3,702 122 3,702 122

Government and semi-govemment securities 174 3,997 174 3,997

Transferable certificate of deposits 1,816 2,619 1,816 2,619

$9,940 $6,738 $9,940 $6,738

12. OTHER CURRENT ASSETS

Incomplete project expenditure 5,130 1,779

Materials in store 1,536 1,622 1.536 1,622

Research and development funding 5,829 8,975

$12,495 $12,376 $1,536 $1,622

259

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

13. RECEIVABLES-NON-CURRENT $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Loans $1,633 $2,571 $1,633 $2,571

14. INVESTM ENTS-NON-CURRENT

Investments at valuation (see note 1.5.2)

Convertible notes 5,635 4,195 5,635 4,195

Corporate bonds 15,232 34,995 15,232 34,995

Government and semi-government securities 75,079 39,208 75.079 39208

Investment properties 66,295 68,575 66.295 68,575

Shares and share options 162,990 103,765 162,985 105,763

Units in unit trusts 18,062 21,899 18.062 21,899

343.293 272,637 343288 274,635

Investments at cost

Corporate bonds 5,504 5,504

Debentures 4,246 7,936 4246 7,936

Transferable certificate of deposits 14,094 5,122 14,094 5,122

Government and semi-government securities 7,868 8,807 7,868 8,807

Shares and share options 21 2,024 2,010 2,010

Other 456 439 456 439

31189 24,328 34.178 24,314

$375,482 $296,965 $377,466 $298,949

Aggregate quoted market value at balance date of investments at cost

Corporate bonds Debentures

5,835 4,612 8,308

5,835 4,612 8,308

Transferable certificate of deposits 14239 3,043 14239 3,043

Government and semi-govemment securities ...... 8,352 9,356 8252 9,356

Shares and share options 17 2.024 17

$33,162 $20,724 $35,162 $20,724

260

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

S'000 S'000 S'000 S'000

15. PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

Land and buildings at cost 170,889 166,957 170,889 162,240

Accumulated depreciation (48.965) (45,341) (48.965) (45,125)

Accumulated building maintenance provision (2,820) (3,308) (2,820) (3,308)

119,104 118,308 119,104 113,807

Land, dwellings and buildings at valuation 71.918 49,329 66.168 49,329

Accumulated depreciation (363) (1,173) (363) (U 7 3 )

Accumulated building maintenance provision (2,029) (2,004) (2,029) (2,004)

69,526 46,152 63,776 46,152

Plant and equipment at cost 146,079 128,291 146,193 127,784

Plant and equipment at valuation 991 991 991 991

Accumulated depreciation (81,463) (70,568) (81,116) (70,292)

65,607 58,714 66,068 58,483

Crown lease 3,400 3,400

Accumulated amortisation (272) (272)

3,128 3,128

Works of art and rare library materials at cost or valuation 2,773 2,680 2,773 2,680

$260,138 $225,854 $254,849 $221,122

16. OTHER NON-CURRENT ASSETS

Deferred research and development costs 617 240

Research and development funding 2,914 7,381

Technology licence fund accrued income 16,231 11,644

Technology licences fund cash investment 73,070 73,070

$92,832 $92,335

261

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

17. CREDITORS - CURRENT

$'000 $'000 S'000 S'000

Accrued expenses 13,304 3,669 13,304 3,674

Income in advance * 53,856 16,067 54.466 16,707

Other creditors 5,130 5,110 5,126 5,110

Trade creditors 6,424 5,360 5,462 4,153

$78,714 $30,206 $78,358 $29,644

* Income in advance includes an amount of $14,210,644 for special purpose grants (1992 $12,274,669).

18. PROVISIONS - CURRENT

Employee superannuation entitlements 16,992 11,077 16,992 11,077

Employee leave entitlements 8.371 7,503 8,080 7,241

$25,363 $18,580 $25,072 $18,318

19. OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES

Incomplete project revenue Research and development advance funding 6,804 ___6J5L

$12,955

4,457 11,590

$16,047

20. PROVISIONS - NON-CURRENT

Employee superannuation entitlements 321,129 279,560 321,129 279,560

Employee leave entitlements 25,271 24,579 25,166 24,504

$346,400 $304,139 $346,295 $304,064

21. OTHER NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Income in advance 3,051 2,893

Provision to purchase technology licences and royalties 87.667 81,642

Research and development advance funding 2.982 7,381

$93,700 $91,916

262

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity University

1993 1992 1993 1992

$’000 $'000 $'000 $'000

22. STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

22.1 Reconciliation of Cash

Cash balance comprises

Cash on hand 56 62 56 62

Bank 4,335 2,009 4,280 1,706

Deposits at call 62,086 51,861 58.712 46,516

66,477 53,932 63,048 48,284

22.2 Reconciliation of O perating Result to Net Cash Flows from Operations

Operating result Depreciation and amortisation of property 6,189 10,225 5.876 9,171

plant and equipment 19,200 16,814 19,003 16,574

Building maintenance (462) 685 (462) 685

Provision for doubtful debts (102) 91 (102) 91

Provision for land tax (83) (83)

Provision for employee entitlements 1,560 960 t m t 896

Provision for employee superannuation 47,484 5,283 47,484 5,283

Provision for purchase of technology licence 997 32,201

Revenue received from government (227,532) (192,579) (227.532) (192,574)

Net gam from the sale of investments (2,010) (514) (2,010)

(Increase)ZDecrease in operating assets Receivables 349 14,960 2,599 14,307

Inventories (2,636) (3,161) (2,997) (3,253)

Assets (Revaluation) (36,517) 11,892 (36,517) 11,892

Other (3,129) (1,486)

Increase/(Decrease) in operating liabilities Creditors 11,088 (30,107) 11599 (28,723)

Other 868 601

Net cash flows from operating activities (184,653) (134,218) (181,858) (165,734)

263

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

23. LAND

A ustralian Capital Territory

The major teaching and research facilities of the University are located on the Acton Campus site of 141 hectares and the Mt Stromlo site of 81 hectares These sites are provided free of charge and held on lease in perpetuity. The use of this land is restricted to University activities. The value has not been assessed nor been brought to account.

Negotiations have commenced since the amalgamation of the Canberra Institute of the Arts with the University on 1 January 1992 to transfer to the University on lease in perpetuity 4.443 hectares of land occupied by the Institute. The value has not been assessed nor brought to account.

The University occupies other sites of 224 hectares within the Australian Capital Territory on varying leasehold terms and conditions; likewise, these sites have not been brought to account.

New South Wales

The University owns 148.2 hectares of freehold land at Coonabarabran on which is located the Siding Spring Observatory and a further 3 hectares is held by the University at Coonabarabran under permissive occupancy. The value has not been assessed nor been brought to account.

The University owns 349.3 hectares of freehold land at Kioloa and 41.3 hectares of freehold land at Mongarlowe given to the University by individual donors for teaching and research purposes. The value of this land has been assessed and brought to account.

N orthern T erritory

The University occupies 26,500 hectares near Tennant Creek held on lease in perpetuity on which is located the Warramunga Seismic Station. The value has not been assessed nor been brought to account.

The University occupies 3.9 hectares at Darwin held on lease in perpetuity on which is located field research headquarters. The value has not been assessed nor brought to account.

Fiji

The University occupies 1 hectare at Suva held on a 75 year lease from November 1965 which is used for field research purposes. The value of this site has not been assessed nor brought to account.

Papua-New Guinea

The University occupies 5.5 hectares within Papua-New Guinea held on varying leasehold arrangements for field research purposes. The value has not been assessed nor brought to account.

264

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

Economic Entity 1993 1992

S'000 $'000

24. COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE NOT BROUGHT TO ACCOUNT

Material capital expenditure contracted for and payable:

(a) not later than one year, 8,442

(b) later than one year but not later than two years; 2,000

(c) later than two years but not later than five years after the end of the financial year _________

Total capital expenditure commitments $10,442

5,134

$5,134

Material lease and hire expenditure contracted for and payable:

(a) not later than one year, 70

(b) later than one year but not later than two years, 39

(c) later than two years but not later than five years 9

after the end of the financial year __________

Total lease and hire expenditure commitments $118

45

23

21

$89

University 1993 1992

$'000 $'000

8,442 5,134

2,000

$10,442 $5,134

25

13

21

$59

50

39

9

$98

25. REMUNERATION OF EXECUTIVES

Fees are not payable to members of Council. Employees of the University who are members of Council do not receive remuneration for Council service other than their salaries. Directors of ANUTECH Pty Ltd, other than the Managing Director and the

Manager, Technological Marketing Life Sciences Division, do not receive remuneration for their services.

The number of staff of the University whose remuneration falls within the following bands in excess of $ 100,000 are

$100,000-$109,999 36 38 36 38

$110,000-$119,999 18 12 18 12

$120,000-$129,999 9 4 9 4

$130,000- $139,999 2 2 2 2

$140,000-$ 149,999 2 1 1 1

$150,000-$159,999 $160,000-$169,999

1

$170,000- $179,999 $180,000-$189,999 1 1

$190,000- $199,999 I B p 1111

$200,000 - $209,999 1 1

68 59 67 58

Aggregate remuneration: 1993 $7,686,328 (1992 $6,392,535).

265

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

26. SUPERANNUATION COM M ITM ENTS

26.1 Commonwealth Superannuation Account

The University maintains an account, on conditions approved by the Treasurer of the

Commonwealth, to meet the employer's liability to the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme.

Transfers are made to the account each fortnight in accordance with a predetermined formula approved by Council and based on advice from the Commonwealth Actuary. The University's contribution rate in 1993 was 14 per cent of eligible employee superannuabie salaries. The University's 1993 contribution was $4,489,091. Pensions are met on an emerging cost basis and paid to the Retirement Benefits Office.

Pension payments amounted to $16,667,540 for 1993.

The actuarial assessment undertaken as at 30 June 1993 indicated that sufficient funds were available to meet all benefits that would have been payable under the plan in the event of termination of the plan and voluntary or compulsory termination of the employment of each employee who contributes to the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme.

The financial transactions and balances of the Commonwealth Superannuation Account have been included with the accounts of the University

26.2 Supplem entary Superannuation Scheme

The University administers a Supplementary Superannuation Scheme for academic and general staff. The Scheme is being maintained only for retired members on benefits. The actuary has advised that the Fund was in a sound financial state as at 30 June 1993. The total accumulated funds of the scheme at 31 December 1993 were $23,585,419 comprising $23,623,391 in investments and other assets and $37,972 liabilities. No contributions were made by the University to the scheme during 1993. Pension payments for 1993 amounted to $1,568,762.

26.3 Superannuation Scheme for A ustralian Universities

New continuing staff members employed by the University since 1 April 1983 have been required to join the Superannuation Scheme for Australian Universities, which is managed independently of the University. The University contributes to the Scheme at the rate of 14 per cent of members' salaries. During 1993, the University's contributions were $12,864,583.

26.4 Employee Non Contributory Productivity Superannuation Schemes

The University pays contributions for eligible employees, other than employees who are contributors to the Commonwealth Superannuation and Public Sector Superannuation Schemes, to the Tertiary Education Superannuation Scheme. The University's contributions for employees who are contributors to the Commonwealth Superannuation and Public Service Superannuation Schemes are paid to the Retirement Benefits Office.

The University's contributions to the Tertiary Education Superannuation Scheme in 1993 were $3,689,485 and the University's contributions to the Retirements Benefits Office during 1993 were $886,969.

26.5 Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

The University has a number of employees who are members of the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme to which the University contributes at the rate of 12.4 per cent of members salaries. During 1993, the University's contributions amounted to $182,183.

266

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

27. TRUST FUNDS

Endowments are received by the University to fund scholarships, prizes and lectures. The balance of the funds at 31 December 1993 was $39,104.

28. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

Guarantees of $115,034 have been given to the University Co-operative Credit Society for loans made to needy students.

The University is a defendant in four legal actions. The aggregate value of three of these claims is $252,000. The value of a fourth claim involving a protracted breach of contract dispute has yet to be determined.

ANUTECH has guaranteed $451,000 to an unrelated party in return for advance funding of projects based on conditions of the agreements. No liability is expected to arise.

ANUTECH has guaranteed $60,000 to an unrelated party as security for advance payments by overseas students for the English language courses. No liability is expected to arise.

ANUTECH is a respondent in two unrelated legal actions undertaken by commercial entities with whom ANUTECH has contracted with in its normal course of business. It is not possible to estimate liability, if any, with these actions. In respect of each action ANUTECH expects to be indemnified at least in part by its insurers.

29. AUDITORS' REMUNERATION

Fees for audit services provided to the University by the Australian National Audit Office are estimated to be $205,000. An amount of $50,000 is due and payable for audit services to 31 December 1993. Fees amounting to $26,900, for ANUTECH Pty Ltd and $15,200 for the University, were paid or are due and payable to Ernst and Young, Chartered Accountants, for audit and other services provided .

30. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRES

The University is receiving Commonwealth Funding under the Cooperative Research Centres Program for the establishment of the following Cooperative Research Centres:

Plant Sciences - a program for collaboration in research and development in the plant sciences with CSIRO and Biochem Pacific Pty Ltd to facilitate and undertake specific research and development and educational programs in plant biology. The University's contribution (representing 48 per cent of the total of the partners' contributions) in the form of staff and equipment resources will have a total approximate value of $10,800,000 over seven years from 1991. The Centre is administered by the University.

267

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

30. Cooperative Research Centres (cont)

Robust and Adaptive Systems - a joint venture with CSIRO and the Sciences and Technology Organisation of the Department of Defence. Management Services are provided by ANUTECH. The activities of the Centre are to conduct scientific and engineering research into Robust and Adaptive

Signal Processing and Control Systems, to conduct engineering research training at several levels to meet perceived national needs and to provide a basis for development, commercialisation and technology transfer of the research conducted at the Centre. The University's contribution (representing 48 per cent of the total of the partners' contributions) in the form of staff and equipment resources will total $5,202,000 over six years from 1991.

Australian Photonics - cooperative research with five research organisations, seven business partners and two government instrumentalities on the development of optical waveguide devices and photonic networks and systems for communications, information processing, sensing and industrial applications. The University's contribution (representing 8 per cent of the total of the partners' contributions) in the form of staff and equipment resources will total $3,066,000 over seven years from 1991. The Centre is administered by the University of Sydney.

Biological Control of Vertebrate Pest Populations - a cooperative research centre with the core participants being the CSIRO, the University, Agricultural Protection Board of Western Australia and the Department of Conservation and Land Management. The Centre is developing a new method of biological control that will reduce the birth rate of feral pests. The University's in kind contribution

(representing 11 per cent of the total of the partners' contributions) will be $3,512,000 over the next seven years. The centre is administered by the CSIRO.

Costs for all Cooperative Research Centres are expensed as incurred except where future benefits are expected beyond reasonable doubt to exceed these costs. In 1993 all costs were expensed.

It was announced in 1992 that the Australian National University will be party to two other Cooperative Research Centres: Advanced Computational Systems and Research Data Network Centres. It is expected that these Centres will commence operation in early 1994.

31. SYNDICATED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

31.1 Syndicates 1 and 2

In December 1990 ANUTECH Pty Ltd entered into agreements with two syndicated research and development partnerships worth a total of $50,000,000.

Under the terms of the agreements the partnerships agreed to:

provide funds for research for three years 1991-1993. The research funds for 1993 are disclosed in Notes 12,16,19 and 21;

acquire technology licences from ANUTECH Pty Ltd for $34,600,000.

The $34,600,000 received from the sale of the technology licences has been placed into a technology sinking fund (Note 16) along with accrued income earned (Note 16) and the profit component from the research and development for the duration of the agreements.

The agreements with each partnership contain a put option which gives each partnership the option of selling the technology licences back to ANUTECH Pty Ltd for a consideration equal to the accumulated balance of the technology sinking fund. A provision to purchase the technology licences has therefore been recorded (Note 21).

The partnerships are able to exercise their options during the period 31 January 1998 to 31 January 2003. ANUTECH Pty Ltd has entered into agreements with two indemnifiers who have agreed to meet any shortfall on the put option payment should either of the partnerships exercise their option.

268

T H E A U S T R A L IA N N A T IO N A L U N IV E R S IT Y

NOTES continued

31.2 Syndicate 3

In June 1992 ANUTECH Pty Ltd entered into agreements with a syndicated research and development partnership worth a total of $51,500,000.

Under the terms of the agreement the partnership agreed to:

provide funds for research for three years 1992-1995. The research funds for 1994 and 1995 are disclosed in Notes 12,16,19 and 21;

acquire technology licences from ANUTECH Pty Ltd for $33,800,000.

The $33,800,000 received from the sale of the technology licences has been placed into a technology sinking fund (Note 16) along with accrued income earned.

The agreement with the partnership contains a put option which gives the partnership the option of selling the technology licence back to ANUTECH Pty Ltd for a consideration equal to the accumulated balance of the technology sinking fund. A provision to purchase the technology licences has therefore been recorded (Note 21).

The partnership is able to exercise their option on 30 June 1997. ANUTECH Pty Ltd has entered into an agreement with an indemnifier who has agreed to meet any shortfall on the put option payment should the partnership exercise their option.

32. RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

The University enters into a number of transactions for the provision of goods and services under normal commercial terms and conditions with student organisations based on campus.

33. SEGMENT INFORM ATION

The Economic Entity operates predominantly in the Australian Capital Territory for the purpose of teaching and research.

34. DIRECTORS INTERESTS IN CONTRACTS

There were no members of the Council in 1993 with interests in contracts with the University.

35. SIGNIFICANT EVENTS AFTER THE BALANCE DATE

The University has secured an interest only loan of $8,000,000, to assist with funding the University's building program. Repayments are $3,000,000 three years after the draw7 down date and $5,000,000 five years after the draw down date.

269

The Australian National University

ANUTECH Pty Limited

A C .N . 008 548 650

(Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)

Audited Financial Statements for the year ended 31 December 1993

Contents

S tatu tory R eports and A ccou n ts

D irecto r’s R eport

In d ep en d en t A uditor’s report

D irecto rs’ statem ent

P rofit and Loss account

B alance sh eet

C ash F lo w Statem ent

N o te s to an d form ing part o f th e A ccounts

270

ANUTECH PTY LIMITED

D IRECTO RS’ R E PO R T

The directors present their report on the results of ANUTECH Pty Limited for the financial year ended 31 December 1993. and the state of affairs of the Company at that date.

DIRECTORS

The directors in office at the date of this report are:

Mr Ronald Bruce Topfer (Chairman) Professor Allan Douglas Barton Professor John Henry Carver

Mr John Wallace Morphett Mr Jam es Fulton Muir Professor Charles Barry Osmond Professor Ian Gordon Ross

Mr Ian William Shedden Mr Norman Robert Tieck Mr John William Thorne

PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES

The principal activities of the Company during the year were to undertake the marketing of the research and experimental work of The Australian National University, and there was no significant change in the nature of these activities during that period.

OPERATING RESULTS

The operating profit of ANUTECH Pty Limited for the year ended 31 December 1993 was $998,188 ($642,325 in 1992). Donations totalling $320,000 ($450,000 in 1992) were made to The Australian National University.

INCOME TAX

The Company is exempt from income tax under Section 23 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936.

DIVIDENDS

Under its Memorandum and Articles of Association the Company is precluded from paying a dividend to the members.

REVIEW OF OPERATIONS

ANUTECH's total revenue for the year was $43.6m, compared with $33.5m the previous year.

ANUTECH's profit, before gifts and donations to The Australian National University, w as $998,188 compared to $642,325 in 1992.

In the difficult economic environment of 1993, ANUTECH has been able to maintain growth and profitabi in its operating divisions highlighting ANUTECH's successful m ethods of operation in providi economical and efficient services to our customers.

In summary 1993 has been another successful year for ANUTECH in achieving its goals and objectives particularly in benefiting The Australian National University.

Noteable outstanding su ccesses for the year were the Kandrian Gloucester Aid project in Papua N Guinea, the on-sale of a syndicate project to Progen Pty Ltd, and a SHRIMP II sale to the Geological Surve of Canada.

271

ANUTECH PTY LIMITED

DIRECTORS' REPORT (continued)

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN THE STATE OF AFFAIRS

There were no significant changes in the state of affairs of the Company.

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS AFTER BALANCE DATE

There are no matters or circum stances that have arisen since the end of the financial year that have significantly affected or which may significantly affect the Company.

LIKELY DEVELOPMENTS AND EXPECTED RESULTS

ANUTECH foresees 1994 as another difficult year with som e signs of improvement and anticipates similar net results to those of 1993.

PARTICULARS OF DIRECTORS

Name of Director Qualifications, Experience Interest in Interest in

and Special Responsibilities Shares Contracts

Allan Douglas BARTON

John Henry CARVER

John Wallace MORPHETT

Jam es Fulton MUIR A.O.

Charles Barry OSMOND

B.Com, PhD, FCPA Nil Nil

Professor of Accounting and Treasurer ANU 1984 - 92 Pro Vice-Chancellor (Finance and Fabric) of the ANU 1992 - present Director since 1984

AM, MSc(Syd), PhD ScD (Camb), FAIP, Nil Nil

FAA.FTS Emeritus Professor Past Director Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering (ANU) Director Institute of Advanced Studies (ANU), 1993 Foundation Director 1979, resigned December 1991, re-appointed April 1993

BE, CPEng, FIE, FAIM, FAICD Nil Nil

Company Secretary 1979-85 Chief Executive 1982-87 Managing Director since March 1987

Director, St George Building Society Nil Nil

Past Chairman Canberra Development Board Past Member ANU Council Past Chief Manager for ACT Westpac Banking Corporation Director since October 1988

BSc., MSc (UNE), PhD (Adel.) Nil Nil

Director of Research School of Biological Sciences (ANU) Director since 1992

272

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

DIRECTORS* REPORT (continued) -\ ' ΙΙβ ΙΙ

PARTICULARS OF DIRECTORS (continued)

Name of Director Qualifications, Experience

and Special Responsibilities

Interest in Shares

Interest in Contracts

Ian Gordon ROSS A.O. MSc. PhD. FRACI, FAA

Emeritus Professor Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the ANU 1977-1989 Pro Vice-Chancellor of the ANU

1989-1990 Past Chairman Australian Research Grants Committee

Foundation Director since 1979

Nil Nil

Ian William SHEDDEN BE, FTS. HonFlEAust. FIChemE.

37 years commercial experience in engineering contracting and technology development Director since March 1987

Nil Nil

Norman Robert TIECK Investor, experienced in retailing,

property and finance Past Member Canberra Development Board and National Capital Planning

Committee Director since March 1987

Nil Nil

John William THORNE BSc (ANU)

Manager Technology Marketing, Physical Science Division Director since July 1993

Nil Nil

Ronald Bruce TOPPER Barrister and Solicitor ACT, NSW and Victoria Senior Partner, Mallesons Stephen Jaques 1981-89 Past Chairman Valuation Review Board Past member ACT Law Reform Commission Grazier

Director since September 1990 Chairman of Board since August 1991

Nil Nil

SHARE OPTIONS

No options for shares in the Company have been issued during the financial year and no options remain unexercised.

273

A N U T E C H P T Y L IM IT E D

DIRECTORS’ REPORT (continued)

DIRECTOR'S BENEFITS

Since the end ot the previous financial year no director of the Company has received or become entitled to receive any benefit, other than a benefit included in the aggregate amount of emoluments received or due and receivable by the directors shown in the consolidated accounts, by reason of a contract entered into by the Company or an entity that the Company controlled or a body corporate that was related to the Company when the contract was made or when the director received, or become entitled to receive the benefit, with:

The amounts contained in this report have been rounded off under the option available to the Company under S 311 and regulation 3.6.05 of the Corporations Law and Regulations.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

a director: or a firm of which a director is a member; or an entity in which a director has a substantial financial interest

ROUNDING

Canberra, March 1994

274

ill Ernst & Young m Ernst & Young House m Phone: 06 247 388854 Marcus Clarke Street Fax: 06 257 2648Canberra, ACT 2601 06 257 5425AustraliaMail Address GPO Box 281 Canberra, ACT 2601Independent Auditor's ReportTo the Members of Anutech Pty LimitedScopeW e have audited the financial statements o f A nutech Pty Lim ited for the financial year ended 31 D ecem ber 1993 as set out o n pages 7 to 20, including the Statem ent by D irectors. T he com pany's D irectors are responsible for the preparation and presentation o f the financial statements and the inform ation they contain. W e have conducted an independent audit o f these financial statem ents in o rd e r to express an opinion on them to the m em bers o f the com pany.O u r audit has been conducted in accordance w ith Australian A uditing Standards to provide reasonable assurance as to w hether the financial statements are free o f m aterial m is-statem ent Our procedures included exam ination, on a test basis, o f evidence supporting the am ounts and other disclosures in the financial statem ents, and the evaluation o f accounting policies and significant accounting estim ates. T hese procedures have been undertaken to form an opinion as to w hether, in all material respects, the financial statem ents are presented fairly in accordance with A ustralian accounting standards an d statutory requirem ents, so as to present a view w hich is consistent with o u r understanding o f the com pany's financial position, the results o f its operations and its cash flo w s.T h e audit opinion expressed in this report has been form ed on the above basis.Audit OpinionIn o u r opinion, the financial statem ents o f A nutech Pty Lim ited are properly drawn up:(a) so as to give a true and fair v iew of:(i) the com pany's state o f affairs as at 31 D ecem ber 1993, and its profit and cash flow s for the financial year ended on that date; and(ii) the o th er m atters required by D ivisions 4 , 4A and 4B o f P a rt 3.6 o f the C orporations Law to be dealt with in the financial statements;(b) in accordance w ith the provisions o f the Corporations Law ; and(c) in accordance w ith applicable A ccounting Standards.E R N S T & Y O U N GG . F. W elsh P artnerC anberraD ate Opinion Form ed: 16 M arch 1994 UpAu

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

STATEMENT BY DIRECTORS

In accordance with a resolution of directors of ANUTECH Pty Limited, we state that -

(1) In the opinion of the directors:

(a) the profit and loss account is drawn up so a s to give a true and fair view of the profit of the Company for the financial year ended 31 December 1993; and

(b) the balance sheet is drawn up so as to give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Company as at 31 December 1993;

(c) at the date of this statement there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

On behalf of the board

A. D.Barton Director ,

Canberra, March 1994

276

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 1993

Notes

1993 $'000

1992 $'000

Operating revenue 2 43,567 33,514

Operating profit before abnormal items 2 868 537

Abnormal items 3 130 105

Operating profit 998 642

Retained profits at the beginning of the year 2,251 2,121

Aggregate of amounts transferred from reserves

17 185 88

Total available for appropriation 3,434 2,851

Donation provided for or paid to The Australian National University

1 (■) 320 450

Aggregate of amounts transferred to reserves

17 492 150

812 600

Retained profits at the end of the year 2,622 2,251

The profit and loss account should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

277

A N U T E C H P T Y LIM ITED

B A L A N C E SHEET

A T 31 DECEM BER 1993

C U R R EN T ASSETS

Cash

Receivables Inventories: Finished goods - at cost

Other T O T A L CU R R EN T ASSETS

N O N -C U R R EN T ASSETS

Investm ents Properly, plant and equipment

O ther T O T A L NO N-CURRENT ASSETS

T O T A L ASS E TS

C U R R EN T LIABILITIES

C reditors and borrowings

Provisions

Other T O T A L C U R R EN T LIA B ILITIE S

N O N -C U R R EN T LIABILITIES

Provisions

Other TO TA L N O N-CURRENT LIA B ILIT IE S

TO TA L LIA B ILIT IE S

NET ASSETS

S H A R E H O LD E R S ’ EQUITY

Share capital

Reserves Retained profits TO TA L SH AR EH O LD ER S' EQUITY

1993 19!

Notes $'000 S'Ot

5 3,402 5,6ί

6 2,583 1,32

1(f) 84 44

7 10,705 10.52

16,774 17,92

8 16 1

9 6,251 4,99

10 92,832 92.33

99.099 97,34

115,873 115.27:

11 1,352 1,461

12 611 712

13 12.997 16.041

14,960 18.215

14 105 7E

15 93,700 91.916

93,805 91,991

108,765 110.210

7,108 5,063

16 2,000 2.000

17 2,486 812

2,622 2.251

7,108 5.063

The balance sheet should be read in conjunction with the accom panying notes

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE ACCOUNTS

31 DECEMBER 1993

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

(a) Basis of accounting

The financial statements have been prepared under the convention of historical cost accounting except for certain assets which are stated at valuation. Cost in relation to asse ts represents the cash amount paid or the fair value of the asset given in exchange.

The accounts have been m ade out in accordance with the requirements of the Corporations Law, which include disclosures by Schedule 5 and applicable accounting standards.

The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous year unless otherwise specified.

Where appropriate 1992 figures have been reclassified to facilitate comparison.

A N U T E C H P T Y L IM I T E D

(b) Property, plant and equipment

Cost and valuation Property, plant and equipment are carried at cost or at independent valuation. Any surplus on revaluation is credited directly to the asset revaluation reserve and excluded from the profit and loss account.

Any gain or loss on the disposal of revalued assets is determined as the difference between the carrying value of the asset at the time of disposal and the proceeds from disposal, and is included in the result of the Company in the year of disposal.

D epreciation Depreciation is charged on the Company's non-current assets under the prime cost method so as to write off the cost of the assets over their estimated useful lives. Major depreciation periods are: - Building 40 years - Plant and equipment 3 to 10 years

(c) Cash

For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash includes cash on hand and in the bank, cash management trusts, commercial bills and term deposits.

(d) Investm ents

All investments are valued at Directors’ valuation based on estimated market value at balance date.

The Company's interest in associated companies which are not controlled entities have been valued at Directors' valuation and dividend income is only taken into profit as it is received.

Associated com panies are com panies in which the Company exercises significant influence by holding shares and participating in financial and operating policies. Generally, the shareholding in associated companies represents 20% to 50% of the voting power.

280

ANUTECH PTY LIMITED

NOTES CONTINUED

31 DECEMBER 1993

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

(e ) Projects - project revenue and expenditure

Long term projects Projects which are expected to run for more than one year have been classified as long term projects..

The balance of funds available to meet expenditure in future years is carried forward as incomplete project revenues. Deficits are carried forward as incomplete project expenditure. Provision is made in the current year for any anticipated future losses on the projects.

(f) In v e n to rie s

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realisable value. Costs are assigned at purchase cost on a first in first out basis.

(g) Employee entitlem ents

Provision is made for long service leave, annual leave and other contractual entitlements, estim ated to be payable to em ployees on the basis of statutory and contractual entitlements.

(h) Income tax

No provision for income tax has been made as the Company is exempt under Section 23 of the Income Tax A ssessm ent Act 1936.

(I) Donations and Gifts to The Australian National University

Under the Company's Memorandum and Articles of Association the Company is precluded from the paym ent of dividends to its owner The Australian National University. The articles provide for donations and gifts and these are considered an appropriation of profits rather than an expense of the Company.

(j) Deferred income - Rental received in advance

Under the conditions of the lease agreement with the CSIRO dated 13 July 1990, rent will not be charged for the first two years of the twenty year term. As a result the rental income received in advance will be brought to account as income from 1 January 1993 on an annual straight line basis for the remaining 18 years.

(k) Deferred research and development costs

R esearch and development costs are expensed as incurred except where future benefits are expected, beyond any reasonable doubt, to exceed those costs. Where research and development costs are deferred such costs are amortised over future periods on a basis related to expected future benefits. Unamortised costs are reviewed at each balance date to determine the amount that is no longer recoverable and any amount so identified is written off.

( l) Research donations

Funds donated to ANUTECH have been recognised as income in determining the profit for the year.

281

A N U T E C H P T Y LIM ITE D

NO TES CO NTINUED

31 D ECEM BER 1993

NOTE 2: REVENUE A N D EXPEN SES

1993 1992

Notes $'000 $'000

O perating profit fo r the year has been arrived at after including

(i) O perating revenue before abnorm al item s

R evenue from com pleted projects 8,356 9,993

R e ve n u e fro m long te rm p ro je c ts 13,507 4,990

A c c ru e d incom e on te c h n o lo g y lic e n c e s in v e s tm e n t 8,991 6,371

P ro fit on syn d ica te d re s e a rc h an d d e v e lo p m e n t p ro je c ts 1,679 1,679

Sales 7,505 7,573

Project m anagem ent fees and recoveries 2,948 2.231

O ther operating revenue:

42,986 32,837

Interest from unrelated corporations 268 357

Proceeds on sale of property, plant and equipm ent 21 116

Rental revenue 162 99

451 572

Abnorm al items 3 130 105

Total operating revenue 43,567 33.514

(ii) The follow ing items of expenses:

Provision fo r em ployee entitlem ents 179 186

D epreciation on building 118 108

D epreciation on property, plant and equipm ent 79 132

Rental - operating lease 41 40

P ro visio n to pu rch a se te c h n o lo g y lice n ce s and ro ya ltie s 10,670 8,050

(iii) P rofit/floss) on sale of property, plant and equipm ent (D

-

NO TE 3: A b n o rm a l ite m s

Included in the operating profit are the following item s :

Sales tax rebate 130

105

282

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

N O T E S CO NTIN U ED

31 D ECEM BER 1993

N O TE 4: S Y N D IC A T E D R E SE A R C H AND D E VE LO P M E N T

(a ) S y n d ic a te s 1&2

In Decem ber 1990 A N U T E C H Pty Limited entered into agreem ents w ith tw o syndicated research and developm ent partnerships w orth a total of $50m .

U nder the term s of the agreem ents the partnerships agreed to:

(a) Provide fun ds fo r research fo r three years 1991-1993.

(b) Acquire te ch n o lo g y licences from AN U T E C H for $34.6m .

T h e $34.6m re ceived fro m the sale of the technology licences has been placed into a technology sinking fund (N ote 10) along w ith accrued incom e earned (Note 10) and the profit com ponent from the research and d e velopm ent fo r the duration of the agreem ents.

T h e agreem ents with ea ch partnership contain a "put option" which gives each partnership the option of selling the te ch n o lo g y licence s back to A N UTECH fo r a consideration equal to the accum ulated balance of the "technology sinking fund". A provision to purchase the technology licences has therefore been recorded (N o te l 5).

T h e partnerships are able to exercise their options during the period 31 January 1998 to 31 January 2003.

A N UTECH has e n tere d into agreem ents with two indem nifiers who have agreed to m eet any shortfall on the pu t option pa ym ent sh o u ld either of the partnerships exercise their option.

(b ) S y n d ic a te 3

In June 1992 A N U T E C H Pty Lim ited entered into agreem ents with a syndicated research and developm ent partnership w orth a total of $ 5 1 .5m.

U nder the term s of the ag reem ent the partnership agreed to:

(a) Provide fun ds fo r research fo r three years 1992-1995. The research funds fo r 1995 are disclose d in N otes 7, 10. 13, and 15.

(b) Acquire tech nolog y licence s from AN U T E C H for $ 3 3 .8m.

T h e $33.8m re ceived from the sale of the technology licences has been placed into a technology sinking fund

(N ote 10) along w ith accrued incom e earned (Note 10).

T h e agreem ent w ith the partnership contains a "put option" which gives the partnership the option of selling the tech nolog y licence back to AN UTECH fo r a consideration equal to the accum ulated balance of the

"technology sinking fund". A provision to purchase the technology licences has therefore been

recorded (N o te l 5).

T h e partnership is able to exercise their option from 30 Jun e 1997.

A N UTECH has en tere d into an agreem ent with an indem nifier who has agreed to m eet any shortfall on the

put option pa ym ent sho uld the partnership exercise the ir option.

283

A N U T E C H P T Y LIM ITED

NOTES CONTINUED

31 DECEMBER 1993

1993 1992

Notes $'000 $'000

NOTE 13: OTHER LIABILITIES (CURRENT) Incom plete project revenue 1(e) 6,846 4,457

Research and Developm ent Syndicate:

R esearch and D evelopm ent advance funding 1994 4

12,997 16,047

NOTE 14: PROVISIONS (NON-CURRENT) P rovision fo r em ployee entitlem ents 1(9) 105 75

NOTE 15: OTHER LIABILITIES (NON-CURRENT) D eferred incom e - rental received in advance 1 0 1,417 1,500

D eferred incom e - prepaid interest 1,634 1,393

R esearch and Developm ent Syndicate:

R esearch and D evelopm ent advance funding 1995 4(a)&(b) 2,982 7,381

P rovision to purchase technology licences and royalties 4(a)&(b) 87,667 81,642

93,700 91,916

NOTE 16: SHARE CAPITAL A uthorized capital

5,000,000 ordinary shares of $1.00 each 5,000 5,000

Issued 2,0 00,0 00 ordinary shares of $1.00 each 2,000 2.000

NOTE 17: RESERVES (a) Building fun d reserve

Balance 1 January 1993 200 200

T ransfe r (to) / from retained profits 250 -

Balance 31 Decem ber 1993 450 200

(b) Project developm ent fund reserve

B alance 1 January 1993 324 257

T ransfe r (to) retained profits (185) (83)

T ransfe r from retained profits 200 150

Balance 31 Decem ber 1993 339 324

(c) Asset revaluation reserve

Balance 1 January 1993 2 2

SurplusZ(loss) on revaluation of 1,367

non-current assets - *

B alance 31 Decem ber 1993 1,369 2 .

(d) R esearch donations reserve

B alance 1 January 1993 286 291

Transfer (to) / from retained profits 42 (5)

Balance 31 Decem ber 1993 328 286

Total R eserves 2,486 812

286

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

NOTES CONTINUED

31 DECEMBER 1993

NOTE 18: STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

a) R econciliation of cash Cash balance com prises:

cash at bank and on hand

cash m anagem ent trusts

com m ercia l bills and term deposits

b) R econciliation of the operating profit to the net cash flo w s from operations

O perating profit

D epreciation

Provision fo r em ployee entitlem ents

Changes in assets and liabilities Trade debtors Prepaym ents

A ccrued interest Inventory

Incom plete project expenditure D eferred expenditure Trade creditors ANU paym ents

Incom plete project revenue R&D com pensa tion revenue Deferred incom e

R&D advance funding Provision fo r purchase of technology licence

Net cash flow from operating activities

Notes

1993 1992

$'000 $'000

28 278

1,044 1,784

2,330 3.561

3,402 5,623

998 642

197 240

59 64

(1,461) 165

8 (27)

191 44

361 92

(3,313) (1,156)

(188) (97)

(173) 50

65 (335)

2,389 1,997

(738) (1,025)

158 1,393

(1,679) (1,679)

10,231 40,336

7,105 40,704

287

A N U T E C H P T Y LI M IT E D

NOTES CONTINUED

31 DECEMBER 1993

NOTE 19: SEGMENT INFORMATION The C om pany operates predom inantly in the technical

and research industry in A ustralia

NOTE 20: REMUNERATION OF DIRECTORS Am ounts received, or d ue and receivable by directors

(being full tim e em ployees of com pany)

Num ber of directors whose rem uneration was within the follow ing bands:

1993

$70,000-$79,999 1

$100,0 00-$109,999 1

NOTE 21: RETIREMENT AND SUPERANNUATION S uperannuation contributions and am ounts paid in

connection w ith the eventual retirem ent from the office of dire ctor

NOTE 22: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

Am ounts re ceived or due and receivable by the

auditors for:

- auditing the accounts

- other services

1993 1992

Notes $'000 $'000

166 165

1992

1 1

47 46

25 _ 2 27

22

41

NOTE 23: EXPENDITURE COMMITMENTS Lease expenditure contracted fo r bu t not otherwise provided fo r in these accounts.

Payable not later than one year 62 60

Later than one yea r and not late r than tw o years 42 50

Later than tw o years and not late r tha n five years 125 40

Later than five years 709 800

938 950

The lease expenditure com m itm ents are predom inantly owed to The Australian N ational U niversity fo r the building site.

The annual lease paym ents are sub je ct to CPI

increases with a contract review in 1996.

288

A N U T E C H P T Y L I M I T E D

NOTES CONTINUED

31 DECEMBER 1993

NOTE 24: CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

B usiness undertaking

A N UTECH has guaranteed $451,000 to an unrelated party in return for advance funding of projects based on the conditions of the agreem ents. No liability is expected to arise.

A N U T E C H ha s g u a ra n te e d $ 6 0 ,0 0 0 to an u n re la te d p a rty as se cu rity fo r a d v a n c e p a ym ents by o ve rseas

s tu d e n ts fo r th e E n g lish L a n g u a g e c o u rse s. N o lia b ility is expected to arise.

L e g a l A ctions

A N U T E C H is a re s p o n d e n t in tw o un re la te d lega l a c tio n s undertaken by c o m m e rc ia l e n titie s w ith w h o m

A N U T E C H ha s c o n tra c te d w ith in its n o rm a l co u rse o f business.

O n e of these a c tio n s is in fa c t a co u n te rc la im w ith re s p e c t to A N U T E C H 's c la im fo r o u tsta n d in g fee s. O ut

o f c o u rt n e g o tia tio n s are p ro c e e d in g w ith re sp e ct to o n e o f the se actio n s. A lth o u g h A N U T E C H

b e lie v e s it is n o t in a n y b re a c h of c o n tra c t, it is n o t p o s s ib le to e s tim a te lia b ility , if any, w ith the se

a c tio n s but D ire c to rs are c o n fid e n t tha t th e p o te n tia l lia b ility is m a n a g e a b le in v ie w o f A N U T E C H 's

fin a n c ia l po sitio n. In re s p e c t o f ea ch a ctio n A N U T E C H exp e cts to be in d e m n ifie d at least in p a rt by

its insurers.

NOTE 25: CONTROLLING ENTITY

T h e Australian National U niversity is the beneficial shareholder of ANUTECH Riy Lim ited.

NOTE 26: RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

The nam es of the Directors of the C om pany during the financial year were:

Mr Ronald Bruce To pfer (Chairm an)

Professor Allan D ouglas Barton

Dr Penelope Louise Beardsell (resigned May 1993) Mr Joh n W allace M orphett

Mr Jam es Fulton M uir Professor Ian G ordon Ross

Mr Ian W illiam Shedden

Mr Norm an R obert Tieck Professor C harles Barry Osmond

P ro fe s s o r J o h n C a rv e r (a p p o in te d A pril 1993)

M r J o h n T h o rn e (a p p o in te d J u ly 1993)

M r J.W . Morphett is a Director of the associated com panies Virax Pty Limited and Paterson Instruments Pty Limited.

No dire ctors other than M r J.W . M orphett, Dr P.L. Beardsell and M r J. Thorne, w ho are full tim e em ployees of the

C om pany, received rem uneration for their services.

A N U T E C H provides a range of services to its controlling entity The Australian National U niversity. These transactions

take place on normal com m ercial term s and conditions.

M iscellaneous item s of com pute r hardware and software were sold to directors during th e year. These

transactions take place on norm al term s and conditions.

A N U T E C H provides project m anagem ent services fo r Paterson Instruments Pty Limited. A N UTECH received $16,480 for m anagem ent sen/ices and $3,750 fo r director fees. These transactions were based on norm al com m ercial conditions.

A N U T E C H received $19.911 as rental incom e and cost recovery from Trippett Shedden Pty Limited of w hich Mr I.W.

S hedden is a director. These transactions take place on norm al term s and conditions.

289

THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Board of the

Institute of Advanced Studies

Research School of Social Sciences

Research School of Pacific Studies

Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering

John Curtin School of Medical Research

Research School of Biological Sciences

Research School of Chemistry

Research School of Earth Sciences

Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

GRADUATE SCHOOL

School of Mathematical Sciences

Board of The Faculties

Institute of the Arts

Faculty of Arts

Faculty of Science

Faculty of Law

Faculty of Asian Studies

Faculty of Economics and commerce

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology

Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies

UNIVERSITY AND OTHER CENTRES Humanties Research Centre, Centre for Visual Sciences Centre for Information Science and Research NH&MRC Social Psychiatry Research Unit

Centre for Molecular Structure and Function

Kelly Thompson, Tuckers’ Peace (detail) Cotton, Linen,

Woven,

Dyed and Painted Double Cloth Pick-up 0.62 x 8.5 m MA(VsualArts)

1994

Canberra School o f Art, Institute o f the Arts

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

PARLIAMENTARY PAPER No. 211 of 1994 ORDERED TO BE PRINTED

ISSN 0727-418