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Department of Transport - Report - 1993-94


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AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING SERVICE CANBERRA 1994

Commonwealth of Australia 1994

ISSN 1032-1896

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without

prior written permission from the Australian Government Publishing Service. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights

should be addressed to the manager. Commonwealth Information Services, Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84,

Canberra ACT 2601.

Cover design and internal layout design by the Public Affairs Section, Department of Transport.

Produced by the Australian Government Publishing Service

Secretary Graham Evans

R e f No: T94/131

T he H on Laurie Brereton, MP M inister for Transport Parliam ent H ouse C A N B ER R A A CT 2600

D ear M inister

I have pleasure in forw arding to you a report on the operation o f the D epartm ent o f T ransport during the year ended 30 June 1994 in accordance with sub-section 25(b) o f the Public Sen’ice Act 1922.

D uring the past year there have been substantial changes in this portfolio. Following m achinery o f governm ent changes on 23 December 1993, the Departm ent o f T ransport and Com m unications w as abolished and the Departm ent o f Transport and the D epartm ent o f Com m unications were created. On 28 January 1994 the D epartm ent o f Com m unications w as renamed the Departm ent o f Comm unications and the Arts.

The primary functions o f the Departm ent o f Transport are to develop policy options for reform o f the transport system consistent with the Governm ent's policy priorities, to implement its decisions including, as appropriate, revised regulatory and institutional arrangem ents, and to oversight the Commonwealth's continuing functional responsibilities in transport, notably in respect o f the portfolio's Governm ent Business Enterprises. The D epartm ent's particular focus has been on m easures designed to achieve a m ore efficient transport sector within a m ore integrated national fram ew ork. The D epartm ent's objectives are to ensure: improved efficiencies within all m odes with the benefits realised in one part o f the chain being passed through to users; that the Federal Governm ent funding available for transport infrastructure is used in the m ost cost-effective m anner, that advantage is taken o f gains in efficiency with which services are provided by the transport sector domestically, by looking to expand the overall m arkets through the export o f these services; and that there is a strong focus on safety and security in all aspects o f the transport system.

A program structure for the Departm ent o f Transport was established after 23 D ecem ber 1993 w ith minimum adjustm ents to the workings o f the sub program s responsible for policy and safety regulatory functions

GPO Box 594 Canberra ACT 2601 Telephone: (06) 274 7573 Telex: 62018 Facsimile: (06) 247 4736

DE PARTMENT OF TRANS P ORT Hi

In co rp o rate m anagem ent, separate corporate support resources and associated system s w ere established for the D epartm ent o f Transport and D epartm ent o f Com m unications and the Arts, This included budget m atters, structures, staffing, accom m odation and adm inistration.

Prelim inary steps w ere taken tow ards developing a w orkplace bargaining agreem ent. A new hum an resource strategy, with a focus on staff m anagem ent priorities in the departm ent over the next three years, was published and distributed to all staff.

Significant accountability initiatives included a program o f training courses in legal aw areness, a strengthening o f arrangem ents for providing legal advice to the departm ent and the adoption o f new procedures for records management.

All o f these achievem ents and changes within the portfolio could not have been effectively im plem ented and m anaged but for the dedication and professionalism o f all departm ental sta ff and I com m end their efforts.

I am confident that the D epartm ent is now well placed in term s o f corporate focus, personnel and m anagem ent system s to respond effectively and w ith enthusiasm to future challenges in the portfolio.

Y ours sincerely

G R A H A M EVANS 1 Septem ber 1994

iv DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Contents Secretary’s letter of transmission.................................................................................................... iii

Introduction.........................................................................................................................................1

Portfolio overview...............................................................................................................................2

Corporate overview............................................................................................................................ 4

Section 1: Departmental programs Program 1: A v ia tio n ........................................................................................ 11

1.1 Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure..................................................................... 13

1.2 Investigating for Safety (Bureau of Air Safety Investigation)......................................... 21

1.5 International Air Services Commission..............................................................................25

Program 2: L and T r a n s p o r t........................................................................ 27

2.1 Road and Rail Policy Development.................................................................................. 29

2.2 Road Safety (Federal Office of Road Safety)....................................................................37

Program 3: M a r itim e .......................................................................................45

3.1 Maritime Policy..................................................................................................................... 46

Program 4: C o r p o r a te D ir e c tio n a n d S u p p o r t..................................53

4.1 Executive...............................................................................................................................55

4.2 Management Support and A dvice......................................................................................58

4.3 Research (Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics)................................63

4.4 National Transport Planning Taskforce.............................................................................68

Section 2: Financial statements and appendixes Contents..............................................................................................................................................69

Financial statements 1993-94........................................................................................................... 70

Appendixes.......................................................................................................................................127

Indexes

Government reporting requirements.................................................................................156

Glossary of terms and acronyms....................................................................................... 157

Index.....................................................................................................................................160

D E P A R T M E N T OF T R A N S P O R T V

Introduction This report provides an account of the Department of Transport’s performance during 1993-94. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of

Public Accounts on 17 March 1994.

The 1993-94 annual report requirements differ in some important respects from the requirements for previous departmental annual reports. The changes result from measures introduced to streamline and

rationalise Budget and Budget-related documents, including annual reports, following the Government’s decision to

introduce budgets prior to 30 June each year. The focus of the report is on information necessary to enable ministers and the Parliament to make informed judgments about the Department’s performance.

To ensure that there is no reduction in the amount of information available to Members, Senators and the public, material not included in this report, but which the guidelines require to be provided on request, has been compiled into a collection of

supplementary material and is available from the Department. An outline of this information is included as part of the annual

report guideline compliance index at page 156. Information about the activities of the

Department is also available through a range of departmental publications. Guidance on the types of information held by the Department is contained in the Department’s Freedom of Information Statement at Appendix 1. The Director, Public Affairs, (06) 274 7522, is able to assist with any requests for information about the activities of the Department.

The report is in two sections. Section 1 contains an overview of portfolio and corporate activities, and program and sub­ program performance reports. Program reporting is focused on significant achievements during the year. Sub-program

reports also include, where appropriate, information on:

• Activities directed towards achieving the Government’s social justice activities.

• Significant legislation and judicial decisions.

• Client feedback mechanisms used to monitor and assess the impact of sub­ program activities.

• Contributions to the work of parliamentary committees and preparation of responses to reports of parliamentary committees.

Section 2 contains the Department’s financial statements, appendixes and indexes.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT 1

Portfolio overview The role of the Transport Portfolio is to support the Government’s objective of developing Australia’s transport sector, consistent with the Government’s broader economic and social policy objectives. The portfolio is also involved in implementing the Government's policies across the full range of activities from administration and regulation to providing infrastructure and delivering services, (the latter to both operators and end users). Major activities include:

• Providing appropriate aviation infrastructure and operation of airways and airport services (Civil Aviation Authority and Federal Airports Corporation).

• Developing, implementing and enforcing aviation safety and security standards, and investigating aviation accidents and incidents (CAA, Aviation Policy Division and the Bureau of Air Safety Investigation).

• Providing airline services (Qantas).

• Setting national road safety standards (Federal Office of Road Safety).

• Operating the national railways systems (Australian National Railways Commission and the National Rail Corporation).

• Operating the national shipping line (Australian National Line).

• Providing national marine navigation aids; maritime safety and protection of the maritime environment (Australian Maritime Safety Authority).

• Developing and accommodating the Government’s shipping industry reforms (Shipping Industry Reform Authority).

• Developing national transport planning measures (National Transport Planning Taskforce).

• Administering financial assistance grants (Department of Transport).

The portfolio structure is shown at Figure 1.

2 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

The Department’s progress in implementing recommendations of Australian National Audit Office reports is included in reports provided quarterly to the JCPA by the Minister for Finance. Further detail on ANAO reports affecting the Department is contained in the supplementary annual report material available from the Department on request.

The Department contributed submissions to and/or appeared before parliamentary committees conducting the following inquiries:

• Aspects of Heavy Vehicle Road Charges

• Ships of Shame: Inquiry into Ship Safety

• Inquiry into the Efficiency of Road Construction and Maintenance

• Matters Arising from Pay Television Tendering Processes.

During 1993-94, the Minister or Department was involved in three significant legal actions. These concerned:

• The crash of Advance Airlines commuter aircraft at Sydney Airport on 21 February 1980.

• The crash of a light aircraft at Gloucester on 11 November 1992.

• Litigation against the auditors of the National Safety Council of Australia, Victoria Division.

Further detail on these actions is contained in the supplementary annual report material available from the Department on request.

During the year, the Commonwealth Ombudsman made no reports to the Minister under the provisions of the Ombudsman Act 1976.

6 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Ι κ.i m 2: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT as at ,‘$0 Jlni: 1 9 9 4

O th er Portfolio Bodies

Federal Airports Corporation

(iivil Aviation Authority

International Air Services Commission

Australian National Railways Commission Australian National Line Australian Maritime Safety

Authority

Shipping Industry Reform Authority

Seafarers Safety Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority

Secretary

(Graham livans)

Aviation

Buttsworlli Λ/g FAS)

1ASC Secretariat (Ian Itisehbieth Exrcutive Officer)

Road Safely (Peter Makeham FAS)

BAS1

(Rob Lee Director)

Land Transport Policy (Ghris Thorpe FAS)

Parliamentary Secretary (The lio n . Neil O'Keefe, MP)

Minister for Trans[x>rt (The lio n . Laurie Brerelon, MP)

Deputy Secretary (Transport Operations) (Vanessa Fanning A/S)

Summary table of resources Note: Running costs figures appearing in the financial and staffing summaries in Section 1 of this report contain an apportionment of property operating expenses relating to property usage of individual sub­ programs. This is different from the approach adopted in preparing the financial statements in Section 2

of the report, where property operating expenses for the Department are shown against the Management Support and Advice sub-program.

Reconciliation of programs and appropriation elements for 1 9 9 3 - 9 4

Program Approp. Bills Mo 1 & 3 Approp.Bills

+ Mo 2 & 4 + Special

Annotated + approps(a) Program = approps

Adjustments + (b)

Program = outlays

$(‘000) Scooo) $0000) $(O00) $(O00) $(O00) SCOOO)

Aviation 34,507 21,012 - 263 55,782 (1,046) 54,736

Land 24,186 494,250 924,575 249 1,443,260 (6,971) 1,436,289

Maritime 46.620 250 30,442 2 77,314 (2) 77,312

Corporate 40,784 - - 538 41,322 (1,709) 39,613

total 146,097 515,512 955,017 1,052 1,617,678 (9,728) 1,607,950

(a) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriation to allow a departm ent access to the money it earns.

(b) Adjustments to derive outlays, includes receipts items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances etc.

Outlays summary table 1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget(a) Actual

$(‘000) $(‘000) SCOOO)

C om p on en ts o f ap p rop riation s

Program costs 2,225,054 1,534,237 1,333.601

(excluding running costs) (b)

Running costs (c) 92,680 83.441 75,935

Total appropriations 2,317,734 1,617,678 1,409.536

Less adjustments (d) (11,926) (9,728) (8.910)

Total outlays 2 ,3 0 5 ,8 0 8 1 ,6 0 7 ,9 5 0 1 ,4 0 0 ,6 2 6

(a) 1993-94 estimate figures include additional estimates and other revisions, consistent with estimates of the 1993-94 financial

outcome published in Budget Paper No 1 “Budget Statements 1994-95”.

(b) Includes special appropriations contributing to program costs (excluding running costs).

(c) Includes expenditure funded from Section 35 receipts.

(d) Adjustments to derive outlays include receipt items classified as outlays, (ie three categories of receipts [money paid into

the Public Account] are offset against appropriations in the calculation of outlays: user charges, repayments of advances

[loans or equity] and proceeds from sale of capital assets), and net movements in trust account balances.

D E P A R T M E N T OF T R A N S P O R T

SECTION 1

Departmental programs

Program 1: A viation

1.1 Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure.......... ........................................................... 13

1.2 Investigating for Safety (Bureau of Air Safety Investigation)..........................................21

1.5 International Air Services Commission............................................................................. 25

Program 2: L and T ra n sp o rt

2.1 Road and Rail Policy Development.................. 29

2.2 Road Safety (Federal Office of Road Safety).....................................................................37

P rogram 3: M aritim e

3.1 Maritime Policy...................................................................................................................... 46

Program 4: C o r p o r a te D ir e c tio n a n d S u p p o r t

4.1 Executive..................................................... 55

4.2 Management Support and A dvice...................................................................................... 58

4.3 Research (Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics)................................63

4.4 National Transport Planning Taskforce............................................................................. 68

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION

O b jectiv e

Safe, secure and efficient air transport services and appropriate infrastructure, operating within acceptable environmental standards and responsive to user requirements.

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY

S u b -p ro g ra m

OUTLAYS Actual Budget (a) (1992-93) (1993-94) $(‘000) $(l000)

STAFFING Actual Actual (1993-94) (1993-94) $(‘000) (Staff years)

1.1 Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure 55,256 46,156 36,134 143.9

1.2 Investigating for Safety 8,051 7,492 6,777 74.6

1.5 International Air Services Commission 922 1,088 843 8.2

TOTAL 64,229 54,736 43,754 226.7

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

P R O G R A M 1: AVI AT I ON 11

Aviation program structure As at 3 0 June 1 9 9 4

- I

Manager Corporate Services Jenny Hill A/g

First Assistant Secretary Aviation Anne Buttsworth A/g

Director BASI Rob Lee

John Pike

Deputy Director Policy David Adams

Principal Adviser John Kerr A/g

.Assistant Secretary Aviation Security Ray Turner

Assistant Secretary Infrastructure & Industry Policy Tony Wheelens A/g

Assistant Secretary International Relations Ross Cough A/g

1.1 Aviation Policy , Security and Infrastructure

1.2 Investigating for Safety

1.3 Federal Airports 1.4 Gvil Aviation

1.5 International

Corporation Authority

Commission

Secretariat Executive Officer Ian Rischbieth

12 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 1.1: Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure Contact officer: Anne Buttsworth (06) 274 6000

Operations

Policy and Standards

FAC Coordination

Infrastructure Planning

Environment

Americas & Pacific

International Policy Coordination

Special Projects

CAA Coordination

Industry Policy & Analysis

Canberra-based

Qld and WA)

Statistics

Divisional Management Unit

Europe, Middle East & Africa

Multilateral Relations

Ray Turner

Principal Adviser John Kerr A/g

First Assistant Secretary Anne Buttsworth A/g

Assistant Secretary International Relations Ross Gough .A/g Tony Wheelens A/g

Assistant Secret

1.1 Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure

D escription: Aviation D ivision

The Aviation Division’s infrastructure and industry policy branch deals with issues relating to airport infrastructure and environment, domestic and international industry trends, consumer issues, the Civil Aviation Authority, the federal Airports Corporation and Qantas. Its international relations branch advises on a broad range of international aviation issues,

negotiates and administers Australia’s air service arrangements with other countries and provides policy advice relating to Australia’s membership of the International Civil Aviation Organization. The aviation security branch develops policy standards and legislation to regulate aviation security, monitors implementation, identifies the requirement for and disseminates aviation security intelligence, and develops and tests arrangements for coordinating the aviation response to incidents of unlawful interference with aviation.

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget (a) Actual $(•000) $(•000) $(•000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 20,605 16,521 15,808

Program costs

Air services - subsidy 1,146 1,177 1,177

ALOP - maintenance grant 18,531 4,096 2,226

ALOP - benefit subsidies 5,298 3,084 3,083

ICAO - contribution 1,043 1,199 1,199

Contribution towards airport infrastructure improvements - 12,700 12,700

Second Sydney Airport land acquisition and works 9,828 7,899 733

Contribution towards the development of

Badgerys Creek Airport - 370 -

Newcastle economic development initiative

upgrading Newcastle Airport 2,750 - -

Perth Airport - land acquisition 500 - -

OECD Air Transport Study contribution - 43 41

Total appropriations 59,701 47,089 36,966

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (4,445) (933) (832)

Total outlays 55,256 46,156 36,134

Revenue and/or items not affecting outlays (92,223) (110,004) (110,953)

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 199.8 141.4 143.9

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(h) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a departm ent access to the money it earns.

(c) Adjustments to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

D E P A R T M E N T OF T R A N S P O R T

Objective

A policy and operational framework for achievement of the program objective; such framework also enabling:

• Portfolio Government Business Enterprises to meet their commercial, service and other obligations to shareholders, consistent with Government policies and objectives for these enterprises and their industry sector.

• The negotiation and administration of air services arrangements to maximise the overall benefits to Australia arising from international air services, including Australian carrier participation in the international sector.

• Appropriate response to developments in multilateral forums.

• An effective aviation security regulatory regime.

• The transfer of Commonwealth aerodromes to alternative ownership.

P erformance indicators

• Extent to which international air-services arrangements provide expanded opportunities for Australian and foreign airlines to participate in the carriage of passengers and freight traffic to and from Australia.

• Extent to which aviation has contributed to developing tourism to Australia and to which additional opportunities have been created for Australian carriers to participate in markets between other nations.

• Extent to which changes in the policy framework fostered a competitive environment for domestic and international aviation in accordance with national interest objectives.

• Degree to which aviation infrastructure has developed to meet national, social, economic and community needs in an environmentally sensitive manner.

• Extent to which a secure environment has been achieved for civil aviation operations.

In te r n a tio n a l r e la tio n s

Bilateral outcomes negotiated during the

year (about 1.2 million additional seats), as

well as opportunities available from previously agreed arrangements, meant an

increase in entitlements to 26.2 million seats. Airlines took advantage of these rights

to benefit from the recovery in the

international market, particularly in the

Asian region. As a result, there was strong growth in Australia’s international scheduled

revenue passenger movements to 10.2

million during 1993, an increase of 9.4 per

cent over the previous year.

With an eye to the rapid growth forecast for markets in the Asia-Pacific region, negotiations were focused on that region, and

an important outcome was a doubling of capacity entitlements with Taiwan. Capacity entitlements agreed previously with Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Indonesia became available during the year. New arrangements were agreed with the United States on the North Pacific route. Dual designation was agreed with the Philippines. Discussions with Thailand are continuing.

Other achievements were a new air-services agreement with Mauritius, and new agreements (replacing non-treaty

*

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION 15

arrangements ) and extra capacity with Bahrain and South Africa. New capacity was negotiated with Brunei, Jordan, Tonga and Western Samoa.

Ansett became Australia’s second international passenger carrier, beginning operations to Indonesia on 11 September 1993. Ansett was also designated to operate to Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong and Japan and will begin services to Japan and

Hong Kong in September 1994. Reflecting open capacity arrangements with New Zealand, Ansett Air Freight and National Airlines began scheduled freight services to New Zealand. Australia Air was designated to operate to the People's Republic of China but as at 30 June 1994 had not begun operations.

Competition was enhanced by the entry of six new foreign carriers, and by the Department approving passenger and freight-charter programs between Australia and Japan, Britain, Europe, Vietnam and New Zealand.

The International Air Services Commission’s legislative base was reviewed with a view to introducing proposed legislative amendments into the Parliament.

Work continued to hasten immigration processing of passengers travelling between Australia and New Zealand. Progress was made also on negotiating safety regulatory arrangements to apply from November 1994.

D o m e stic m a rk et rem a in s c o m p e titiv e

The Department monitored deregulation of the domestic aviation industry, which continued to deliver benefits to consumers.

Air fares remained well below pre­ deregulation levels in 1993, with nominal average fares in the December 1993 quarter

18.9 per cent below (23.8 per cent in real terms) those recorded for the September 1990 quarter (Prices Surveillance Authority). In the 12 months to 30 June 1994, Australian-registered airlines carried 19.8 million passengers over Australian flight stages.

The definition of domestic airline activity was changed from 1 July 1993 to accommodate the mix of domestic and international traffic carried by Australian- registered airlines over flight stages within Australia. Although definitions used for statistical reporting of “domestic passengers” before 1 July 1993 are not directly comparable, it is estimated that passenger numbers between 1992 and 1993 increased by about 5 per cent.

A irp ort refo rm

A review of the FAC’s performance, pricing and capital structure was undertaken during the year. One of the issues addressed in this review was the possible sale of the FAC.

The Government considered the review of the FAC’s performance in the context of the 1994-95 Budget and the development of the “Working Nation” statement. It decided that, subject to the outcomes of the Australian Labor Party conference in September and of a scoping study, all federal airports and the Sydney West Airport at Badgerys Creek would be sold over the period 1995-96 to

1997-98. The Government indicated a preference to sell the airports individually, subject to the outcome of the scoping study. It was agreed also that an ownership neutral regulatory regime for federal airports would be developed.

After the Government’s decisions, the Federal Airports Scoping Study Taskforce was established with officials from this Department and the Department of Finance.

16 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

The task force is to complete the scoping study by the end of 1994.

Following the Government’s announcement to

accelerate development of the new Sydney

West Airport by the construction of a runway capable of handling major aircraft, the

Sydney West Airport Taskforce was

established to implement this decision.

It is proposed that a new 2900m runway will

be commissioned in 1998-99. This will

provide the opportunity for the subsequent

development of terminal capacity by the year

2000, with the private sector participating to the greatest extent possible.

As well as oversighting the necessary planning, design and environmental impact

studies for the airport development, the task force will be coordinating the planning for

road and rail access to the airport. The task

force is expected to complete an initial report

by the end of 1994.

In February 1994, the Minister for Transport

said Sydney (Kingsford-Smith) Airport’s new

parallel runway was expected to be

operational by September 1994, nine months

earlier than planned. Draft noise and air

quality management plans for Sydney Airport

were developed in conjunction with the

community, industry, aviation authorities and

the three levels of government.

The Commonwealth gave the FAC a $12.7

million equity injection to bring forward

construction of a satellite arrival and departure centre at Melbourne (Tullamarine)

Airport, but decided to defer indefinitely

plans to provide funds to the FAC for stand­

alone common user domestic terminal

facilities.

L ocal a e r o d r o m e s tr a n sfe r r e d to lo c a l o w n e r s

The Government’s program of withdraw ing from direct involvement in local aerodromes was completed, with 12 of the remaining 14 aerodromes in Commonwealth or joint user ownership being transferred to full local ownership. A total of $7.5 million in non- recoverable grants was provided for the transfers. The civil facilities at Schofields aerodrome in NSW were transferred to the Department of Defence, and Wittenoom aerodrome in Western Australia was closed.

S a fety sta n d a rd s a n d r e g u la tio n s

The Government announced in August 1992 that the cost of aviation safety standard setting and surveillance would be met jointly

by the Government and the aviation industry. Cost recovery of the industry’s portion of the costs of aviation safety standard setting and surveillance began in 1993-94 and is being phased in over two years. The costs of implementing safety standards, including regulatory services, will be fully recovered from the industry from 1 July 1994. The

Government will continue to fund aviation search and rescue.

The Department facilitated the implementation of interim cost recovery arrangements in 1993-94, pending the CAA

finalising a long-term funding strategy for aviation safety regulation. These arrangements involved recovering an additional $4.5 million from industry through

duty on aviation fuels and a special charge on Australia’s international operators.

In April 1994, the CAA began consulting industry about a recommended funding strategy, with a view to implementing a final strategy on 1 July 1995. On the basis of that

17 PROGRAM 1: AVIATION

timing, the Department arranged for an

extension of the interim funding to apply

from 1 July 1994. This was announced in the

1994-95 Budget and means a further

increase in duty on aviation fuels.

Cost recovery arrangements introduced for

1993-94 required amendment to the Aviation

Fuel Revenues (Special Appropriation) Act

1988 to enable the payment to the CAA of

duty collected on aviation turbine fuel. The

Civil Aviation Regulations were amended to

enable the CAA to institute safety audit

programs relating to the operation of certain

international air services, and to charge for

carrying out those programs.

The Department led a task force charged

with ensuring that the CAA had effective

control of its buildings and other fixed assets

on non-CAA land. The task force began

putting in place the arrangements necessary

to ensure the CAA has such control.

C o n su m e r p r o te c tio n

The Department participated in a Federal Bureau of Consumer Affairs working group that produced a draft strategy to increase aviation consumer awareness of risks associated with air travel. The strategy is expected to be finalised by September 1994 for Ministers to consider.

D e p a r tu r e tax

Departure tax increased from $20 to $25 on

1 January 1994, and from 1 July 1994 will be

administered by the Australian Customs

Service. The Government announced in its

1993-94 Budget that departure tax would be

replaced on 1 January 1995 by a $27

passenger movement charge.

E x p o r tin g serv ices

The Department is working with the Australian aviation industry and Commonwealth and state agencies on arrangements for exporting Australia’s aviation services.

The Department contributed to the formation of Airport Industries Australia and Aviation Training Australia, networks aimed at increasing Australia’s exports of airports- related and aviation training services.

In te r n a tio n a l foru m s

Since the International Civil Aviation Organization’s 1992 resolution (co-sponsored by Australia) urging states to prohibit smoking on all international flights by 1 July

1996, Australia participated in efforts to ban smoking on aircraft. The Department held negotiations with New Zealand, Canada and the US with a view to reaching agreement to ban smoking as soon as possible on non-stop flights between these nations.

Australia participated in developing internationally agreed standards and practices for safe and efficient aircraft operations. The Uruguay Round negotiations liberalised services for repairing and maintaining aircraft, computer reservation systems, and selling and marketing air transport.

The Department was represented at a meeting of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation’s Transportation Working Group, which agreed to undertake a study to identify and find possible solutions to congestion points in APEC economies.

Australia is a member of the steering committee for this study, which will examine cargo and passenger movements on aviation and maritime services between APEC

18 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

economies, as well as areas of domestic transport systems that immediately interact with international services.

The Department provided the Australian representative to the working session of the ICAO Asia-Pacific Traffic Forecasting Group held in Vancouver in May 1994. The group undertakes detailed forecasts of aviation activity in the Asia-Pacific and trans-Pacific regions. These became the official ICAO projections and are made available to ICAO member states to assist planning in such areas as infrastructure and navigation. The group is made up of representatives from Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, the US and

ICAO.

N ation al fo r u m s

A Standing Committee on Transport (SCOT) aviation working group, chaired by the Commonwealth with representation from all states and territories, was established and it met three times during the year to consider issues such as airport development and passenger carriers’ liability arrangements. The working group is to report to SCOT on

agreed outcomes in late 1994.

A viation se c u r ity

Amendments to the Air Navigation Regulations, aimed at improving the effectiveness of Australia’s aviation security provisions, came into effect in December

1993.

New proposals for cargo and mail were developed by the Department in consultation with the air freight industry.

The National Aviation Security Program explains the policy and legal framework for aviation security and outlines the responsibilities of various parties for implementing aviation security

arrangements. The program was revised and reissued in May 1994 to reflect changes in the regulatory framework and industry operations.

The Department worked with industry to develop minimum aviation security training requirements. Those for air crew and airport operator security operatives were determined and will be implemented by airlines and airports.

The Department regularly audits the aviation security operations of airports and airlines to make sure they comply with regulatory requirements. A review of this audit function commented favourably on the professional

approach being developed and found it to be an effective means of achieving compliance, thereby, enhancing aviation security.

A review of the National Aviation Security Exercise Program was undertaken by the Department. The review, which contained input from industry, confirmed the program’s value in enhancing security awareness and developing an appreciation by industry of crisis management arrangements. It also identified a need for greater awareness at airport level of preparatory and preventive security measures, and for airport-based organisations to be more involved in exercises. These requirements have been incorporated in a revised exercise program.

Eight security exercises were conducted by the Department to test arrangements for responding to acts of unlawful interference with civil aviation. The Department and Qantas were involved in a Commonwealth/ state national exercise to test counter­ terrorism arrangements in response to simulated incidents at Sydney (Kingsford- Smith) Airport.

This exercise, and others to be organised by the Department and by the Standing Advisory Committee for Commonwealth/State

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION 19

Cooperation for Protection Against Violence, are an important preparation for the 2000 Olympic Games.

S o c ia l ju s tic e

The Remote Air Serv ices Subsidy Scheme provides subsidies for air services where there are no suitable alternative forms of transport to remote areas.

The Government provided more than $1.1 million in direct subsidies to five operators

in Queensland, the Northern Territory, South

Australia and Western Australia to cover the

shortfall of revenue against costs of operating

the services in 1993-94. As part of the

Government’s consideration of the

departmental review of the scheme, the

Prime Minister announced, on 31 March

1994, that the Prime Minister’s Rural and

Regional Task Force would prepare a report

on the scheme.

20 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 1.2: Investigating for Safety Contact officer: David Adams (06) 274 6404

FAC Coordination Computer Services

Administrative Services Investigations Branch

Investigation Support

Flight Recorder Services

Field Offices Qld, NSW. Vic.SA.WA

Safety Deficiency

Safety Research

Safety Analysis Branch

Confidential Aviation Incident Reporting (CAIR)

Engineering Services

Safety Information

Director Rob Lee

Deputy Director Policy David Adams

John Pike Jenny Hill A/g

1.2 Investigating for Safety BASI

D escription: B ureau oe Air S afety Investigation The Bureau is the Government's air safety investigation agency. BASI’s activities are focused on promoting safe aviation by investigating selected occurrences and safety deficiencies most likely to yield new and high-value safety information. The Bureau gives particular emphasis to fare-paying passenger operations and to systemic and organisational factors affecting safety. Considerable resources are dedicated to pro-active work to identify aviation system deficiencies that could compromise air safety.

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION 21

ΜΗΝ

RESOURCE TARLE

I:;S I Ik,uth> n

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(‘000) $(‘000) $(‘000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 7,801 7,225 6,615

Program costs

Search and rescue 353 380 270

Total appropriations 8,154 7,605 6,885

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (103) (113) (109)

Total outlays 8,051 7,492 6,777

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 74.1 80.4 74.6

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a departm ent access to the money it earns.

(c) Adjustments to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

Objective

Safe aviation promoted by disseminating information and safety recommendations.

P erformance indicators

• The number of investigations and research projects undertaken, and the degree of acceptance of recommendations made.

• The quantity and quality of safety information produced and distributed.

• Contribution and participation in key specialist aviation safety forums.

22 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

In v e stig a tin g a c c id e n ts a n d in c id e n ts

During the year, BASI took a leading role in applying fully the method of analysing systems safety developed by Professor James

Reason, of Manchester University. His model focuses on identifying safety deficiencies within a total system, such as air transport.

BASI applied this model to its investigation into last year’s crash of a Monarch Airlines Piper Chieftain, in which seven people were killed. Recognising the need to address management and organisational factors in accident investigations, the International Civil Aviation Organization has issued guidelines on the application of the Reason model.

BASI conducted 400 investigations during the year. Of these, 60 were field investigations — six of which were undertaken after major aircraft accidents - and 340 office investigations. Details from 3085 reported occurrences were incorporated in the Bureau’s database for statistical purposes.

The safety analysis branch completed and published reports on seven safety research projects and special studies. In addition, five research projects were commenced in 1993­ 94, to be completed over the next 12 months.

In 1993-94 the Bureau conducted 46 investigations of air safety occurrences and four special studies which resulted in 84 recommendations and 20 safety advisory notices being directed to the Civil Aviation Authority and other relevant aviation organisations. During this period, 45 responses to recommendations were received, of which 35 were accepted by BASI.

A c c id e n t r e p o r ts g o p u b lic

BASI produced and distributed 11 occurrence reports. These included an inflight engine fire on a Boeing 727, a post­ landing reverse-thrust engine failure on a

Boeing 737, an inflight power loss on all four engines of a BAe 146, and two instances of breakdown of separation (when aircraft get closer together than the prescribed standard) involving high-capacity regular public transport aircraft.

The Bureau’s Confidential Aviation Incident Reporting program issued 251 notifications of potential threats to air safety, bringing them to the attention of the aviation community and industry.

Two editions of the Bureau’s safety journal, Asia-Pacific Air Safety, were published and about 60,000 copies of each were distributed throughout the aviation community. A high

level of content, quality and topicality has been maintained, which has been reflected in consistent positive feedback from local and international readership. The journal won a departmental Australia Day awrard for its effectiveness in promoting aviation safety. The Bureau also conducted 810 information

searches in response to requests for information concerning air safety occurrences from government authorities, industry and the public.

P a r tic ip a tio n in a v ia tio n safety fo r u m s The Bureau both gains from and contributes to the aviation community through its

involvement with various professional organisations and specialist international safety forums. Its participation in such forums has two primary goals - to collect safety information and to disseminate safety

information.

23 PROGRAM 1: AVIATION

During the year, officers from BASI participated in such forums as the ICAO Flight Recorder Working Group, the International Aircraft Cabin Safety Symposium, the Western European Association for Aviation Psychology conference, the International Air Transport Association’s 22nd Technical Conference on

Human Factors, together with the annual seminars of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators and the Flight Safety Foundation. The Bureau continued to participate in the six-monthly meetings of IATA’s Safety Advisory Committee.

In the domestic domain, BASI took part in a broad range of industry meetings and conferences that focused on aviation safety. The Bureau hosted an airline accident investigation seminar aimed at providing domestic and international carriers with information on the Bureau’s role and operations. BASI continued also to support the CAA’s safety education program.

S o c ia l ju s tic e

BASI is committed to improving aviation safety and concentrates on air safety issues of greatest potential benefit to the Australian community.

The Bureau ensures that information derived from its investigations and research is disseminated throughout the aviation community and is made readily available to the public.

During the year, BASI has regularly consulted the aviation community and, through its safety magazine, Asia-Pacific Air Safety, and other publications, has provided aviation safety information to the aviation community and general public in an objective way.

Information from the Bureau’s computerised database is available to the public, subject only to constraints placed on issuing particular categories of information in accordance with international agreements.

24 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 1.5: International Air Services Com m ission Contact officer: Ian Rischbieth (06) 267 1100

D escription: International Air S ervices Commission The IASC is an independent statutory authority which makes determinations on allocating scheduled international air route capacity to Australian carriers on public benefit grounds. The Commission works with wide-ranging public benefit criteria set by the Minister for Transport. As an independent statutory authority, it reports separately to Parliament on its operations.

The Commission is supported by a small secretariat. The Chairman and members of the Commission are appointed by the Governor-General under section 40 of the International Air Services Commission Act 1992.

O bjective

International aviation rights, allocated among Australian carriers so as to foster:

• Greater economic efficiency in the airline industry, and increased competition between Australian carriers.

• Increased responsiveness by airlines to the needs of consumers, including an increased range of choices and benefits.

• Australian tourism and trade.

• The maintenance of Australian carriers capable of competing effectively with airlines of foreign countries.

PROGRAM I: AVIATION 25

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(•000) $(•000) $(•000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 924 1,088 845

Total appropriations 924 1,088 845

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (2) - (2)

Total outlays 922 1,088 843

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 6.1 8.9 8.2

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estim ates. (b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the m oney it earns. (c) Adjustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt item s classified as outlays, net m ovem ents in trust account balances, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT

O b jective

A safe, efficient and innovative land transport sector, com plying with governm ent policies on

the environm ent and responsive to u ser requirem ents.

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY OUTLAYS STAFFING Actual Budget (a) Actual Actual (1992-93) (1993-94) (1993-94) (1993-94)

$(‘000) $(‘000) $(‘000) (Staff years)

Sub-program

2.1 Road and Rail Policy Development 1,963,239 1,422,619 1,242,588 80.9

2.2 Road Safety 171,833 13,669 12,332 87.6

TOTAL 2,135,072 1,436,288 1,254,920 168.5

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

P R O G R A M 2: LAND T R A N S P O R T 27

Land Transport program structure As at 30 June 1994

Assistant Secretary Road Transport Anthony Ockwell

Principal Adviser Rob Elder A/g

First Assistant Secretary Land Transport Policy Chris Thorpe

Assistant Secretary

Tony Slatyer

Assistant Secretary Rail Neville Potter

2.1 Road & Rail Policy Development

Assistant Secretary Road User Keith Wheatley

Assistant Secretary Motor Transport Dennis McLennan

First Assistant Secretary Federal Office of Road Safety Peter Makeham

2.2 Road Safety

2.2 Australian National Railways Commission

28 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 2.1: Road and Rail Policy D evelopm ent C ontact officer: C hris T horpe (06) 2 74 7651

Resource Management Unit

Infrastructure & Pricing

National Rail & Infrastructure

Assistant Secretary Roads Tony Slatyer

Assistant Secretary Rail Neville Potter

Assistant secretary Road Transport Anthony Ockwell

Research & Liaison

Road Transport Regulation

ARIAC Section

Roads Program Management Section C

Technical Services Section

Section

Program Evaluation

Information

Roads Program Coordination

First Assistant Secretary Chris Thorpe

2.1 Road & Rail Policy Development

Roads Program Management Section A

Roads Program Management Section B

munspofi

D escription: Land T ransport P olicy D ivision The Land Transport Policy Division has three branches that deal with the Commonwealth s responsibilities for road transport, rail and roads. In developing its policy advice to government, the division works cooperatively with the states, territories and industry. It administers road and rail infrastructure programs and funds research supporting the land transport program objectives.

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT 29

RESOURCE TARLE

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b)

1992-93 Actual $(‘000)

5,174

1993-94 Budget (a) $(‘000)

6,256

1993-94 Actual $(‘000)

5,583

Program costs Free or concessional fares 2,548 3,100 3,100

Establishment and payment to National Road Transport Commission 962 1,100 1,096

Provincial cities and rural highways program (including for payment to the Australian Land Transport Development Trust Fund) 100,000

Urban public transport program (including for payment to the Australian Land Transport Development Trust Fund) 30,000

Contribution to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development - Road Transport Research Program 55 55 40

Bicycle Federation of Australia 7 7 7

Funding for transport infrastructure (including for payment to the Australian Land Transport Development Trust Account) 523,312 404,350 228,347

National Rail Corporation - equity contribution 162,672 58,700 58,700

Funding for transport infrastructure 21,750 29,650 23,944

Payment of amounts equal to penalties resulting from prosecutions under regulations made for the purposes of paragraph 56(2)(d) of the Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 305 550 524

Survey work - Alice Springs - Darwin rail link - 1,000 181

Special appropriations Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988 1,105,949 908,075 908,075

Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 16,679 16,500 19,735

Total appropriations 1,969,413 1,429,343 1,249,332

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 1992-93 Actual $(‘000)

1993-94 Budget (a) $(‘000)

1993-94 Actual $(•000)

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (6,174) (6,724) (6,745)

Total outlays 1,963,239 1,422,619 1,242,588

Revenue a n d /or item s not affecting outlays (25,519) (24,368) (27,257)

STAFFING

1992-93 Actual

1993-94 Budget

1993-94 Actual

Staff years 83.2 85.5 80.9

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the money it earns. (c) Adjustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

O bjective

The Land Transport Policy Division seeks to create a safe, efficient and innovative land transport sector complying with government policies on the environment and responsive to user requirements.

P erformance indicators

Successful reform of the land transport sector, will be measured by the extent to which the Department:

• Develops a more competitive transport environment through national policies, practices and technical regulations that support industry restructuring, and to improve the efficiency of road and rail transport infrastructure, operations and services.

• Aligns prices more closely with the costs of providing services, to ensure greater efficiency in resource use and enhanced demand management.

• Administers federal land transport programs in a manner that maximises effectiveness and cost efficiency of the resource allocated.

• Recognises broader government policy objectives, including access and equity, social justice and environmental obligations.

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT 31

I

\ND UNSPORT

P olicy fra m ew o rk

Land transport - road, rail and road transport services - is primarily the constitutional responsibility of the states and territories.

The Commonwealth has a clear interest in maximising the efficient and effective operation of the national transport system and, as such, actively promotes the structural

reforms needed to achieve this. The Commonwealth does so by adopting a strategic focus, and working with the states and territories through intergovernmental agreements and other mechanisms.

The Department has played a leading role in several policy initiatives that promote the structural reform of road and rail transport.

In recent years, there has been a focus on integrating national transport systems through a framework established at the 1991 Special Premiers' Conference.

This involves putting in place a national regulatory and charging regime for road transport, a national, commercially focused rail freight system and new federal road funding arrangements. In 1993-94, the Department’s focus was on ensuring these initiatives were implemented effectively.

This activity has been guided by four policy principles: to promote greater industry competition and efficiency in a framework in

which benefits can be passed to users; to recognise the Government’s public interest, social justice and safety objectives; to reform Government Business Enterprises; and to recognise the internationalisation of transport services.

The Department’s achievements in the land transport sector during the past year are reported against these principles.

P r o m o tin g g rea ter in d u stry c o m p e titio n

Reforms of road and rail transport have been guided by:

• Greater industry competition to improve efficiency and to ensure benefits are passed on to users.

• Regulatory arrangements supporting competitive structures.

• Pricing regimes that are aligned better to the costs of providing services.

• Measures that help industry restructure to improve productivity, and the efficiency of labour, management and capital.

R oad tra n sp o rt

The Department worked closely with the National Road Transport Commission and state and territory agencies to speed up

development of the national heavy-vehicle charging regime and develop a single set of heavy-vehicle regulations.

The NRTC’s recommendations for national charges have been endorsed by the Ministerial Council for Road Transport. Federal Parliament passed the legislation in May 1993, and in December 1993 passed the regulations necessary for these charges to be put into place on 1 July 1995. States and territories now need to pass complementary legislation so national heavy-vehicle charges can be applied within their jurisdictions from that date.

Developing uniform heavy-vehicle regulations has moved slowly, reflecting the extent of the task of consolidating nine heavy-vehicle regulatory regimes into a single, plain-English, national code. The federal legislation needed to implement this code, the Road Transport Reform (Vehicles

32 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

and Traffic) Act, was passed by the Federal Parliament in December 1993.

Regulations relating to heavy-vehicle standards and mass and loading limits were approved by the Ministerial Council for Road Transport in November and December 1993. Further regulations - relating to road worthiness, driving hours for buses, and oversize and overmass vehicles - have been prepared and Ministers are expected to make a decision on them in the first half of 1994­ 95.

Implementing these national regulations depends on the states and territories passing complementary legislation. Some states will consider such legislation only when they have seen the full regulatory package, which is not expected to be available before the end of 1994. Progressive implementation of the regulations is expected from 1 July 1995.

The Department has promoted mutual recognition of current regulatory arrangements (and of national regulations as they are progressively developed) to allow operators to realise the benefits of the reform process as soon as possible.

Pending implementation of the national scheme, the Federal Interstate Registration Scheme continues to provide interstate operators with a viable alternative to state registration. The number of B-double heavy- transport vehicles registered under FIRS more than doubled during 1993-94. FIRS regulations will be amended progressively to allow more efficient vehicle operations to be pursued under the national framework.

To aid an informed debate on road cost recovery, the Department is chairing a Commonwealth-state-territory working party on taxes and charges imposed on the road transport industry. The purpose of this study is to develop a database of all road transport

industry taxes and charges levied by the three tiers of government. One important aspect is to identify what constitutes a tax and what constitutes a charge, to estimate the impact of taxes on operating costs.

Rail

Attaining reform in the rail area has been pursued by:

• Establishing National Rail to improve the performance of the interstate freight system and to act as a catalyst for further structural improvements to other rail services.

• Providing funds for strategic investment in the national rail network, including through the One Nation program.

Since February 1993, NR has progressively assumed interstate rail freight functions from the state rail agencies and the Commonwealth-owned railway, Australian National. NR is now responsible for marketing, terminals (except in Western Australia), deploying and maintaining wagons, and crewing trains in the Melbourne-Adelaide corridor and partially in the Sydney-Melbourne corridor.

The Department has been actively involved in assisting the smooth and efficient take-up by NR of functions where shareholder issues have been involved. These issues include management of Islington and Alice Springs freight terminals and equipment, interstate business involving the movement of ore concentrates from Broken Hill, and AN’s

RoadRailers (freight transport units that can be towed on rail by a locomotive and on road by a prime mover).

Problems associated with new terminal operating systems, unreliable locomotives and terminal lifting equipment, and

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT

I

>N D t * N S P O B T

insufficient and poorly maintained wagons caused a decline in NR’s performance. NR, supported by shareholders, has begun to address these problems. Standards of service, as measured by service reliability and on- time performance, improved during the latter part of 1993-94.

NR has acted to promote reform of the rail industry as a whole. Its enterprise agreement has set an industry standard. The agreement reduced the number of rail unions covering the NR workforce from 30 to two, and introduced new work practices involving multi-skilling and team working. NR has let a commercial contract for wagon maintenance and terminal handling equipment. In May 1994, NR sought expressions of interest for provision of locomotive power and maintenance services on the same basis.

To put the pricing of rail services on a more efficient basis, NR is negotiating with its customers the range of services provided previously by state-based railway systems. This will ensure rates charged for providing services fully meet the cost of providing those services, and that the supply of services more closely matches demand by its customers. These negotiations have led to some services, such as shunting to private sidings, being eliminated and an increase in rates for services that previously did not meet their full costs.

During the year, considerable effort was put into administering the One Nation rail program. The rate of expenditure under this program, which is focused on improving the quality of service and transit times on the interstate rail freight network, has accelerated. After initial planning and design delays, the $430 million program is fully committed and work is under way across the

whole program. The major project - conversion to standard gauge of the Melbourne-Adelaide railway line - is scheduled to be completed by June 1995.

An aim of the One Nation program is improved intermodal coordination. A significant milestone was achieved with the completion, in March 1994, of a new road linking the South Dynon rail freight terminal with the Port of Melbourne. This targeted investment has been very cost effective, allowing better integration of services and reducing the cost of moving shipping containers through the port.

R oad in fr a str u c tu r e

The Commonwealth does not own, or control directly what happens on, Australia’s roads. Roads policy objectives are promoted by exerting influence on how the states and territories undertake their road management functions.

Since the July 1991 Heads of Government agreement on the delineation of road funding responsibilities, from 1 January 1994 the Federal Government has been responsible for funding an 18,500km expanded National Highway System, which includes also urban links in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and the ACT.

Following a departmental assessment of state and territory administrative arrangements for the NH program, the Government decided to strengthen the process for setting forward strategies and to provide incentives to the states and territories to obtain the best value from Commonwealth road funding. The Department has implemented, or is implementing, several measures aimed at achieving this purpose. These include:

• Multi-year programming of NH road works, with projects put in order of priority

34 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

against established criteria on a national basis.

• Widened competitive tendering

requirements.

• Best-value incentives, such as

opportunities to redirect efficiency savings

to other high-priority NH projects.

• Improved accountability (through

performance agreements) of state and

territory authorities for their management of NH road funds.

• Greater controls on administration grants.

• Improved quality systems.

Consultants were engaged to review the

condition of the NH and report in 1994 on

the strategic development of the NH over the

next 20 years. The review findings will be a

key input into the long-term strategy for managing the NH.

The Department is strengthening quality

systems for the administration of the NH

program. A new management information

system, to be commissioned in 1994, will

allow the expenditure performance of the

states and territories, and of the physical

progress of road projects, to be more closely

tracked.

The Department effectively managed the

disbursement of $1014.5 million in road

program funds to the states and territories for

projects approved by the Minister, in line with the cash-flow requirements of these

projects. Details of these payments and progress on these projects will be reported

separately in the 1993-94 Review o f

Operations, published under the Australian

Land Transport Development Act 1988.

P u b lic in te r e st, s o c ia l ju s tic e a n d sa fety o b je c tiv e s

The environment Throughout the year, the Department advised the Minister, the Department of the

Environment, Sport and Territories, and the Department of Housing and Regional Development on a range of environmental issues relating to land transport. These included the Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development, the National Greenhouse Response Strategy and the Better Cities Program. The Department has worked closely with the Department of Housing and Regional Development on transport aspects of its Australian Urban and

Regional Development Review. In both the Better Cities Program and the Australian Urban and Regional Development Review,

the Government’s transport policy objectives were reflected in the strategies adopted. Implementation of the National Bicycle Strategy was finalised.

Social justice Funding for community service obligations or subsidies were made in 1993-94 for a number of AN rail services, including passenger services, Tasrail and free/concessional travel, mainly to

pensioners. The NH provides improved transport access for many Australians. This factor is taken into account when determining funding priorities, particularly

in relation to projects in rural and remote areas.

The Department continued to provide secretariat services to the National Accessible Transport Committee. Since February 1992, the Committee has developed strategies for improving transport accessibility for people with disabilities,

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT

I

iliJVSPOKT

including the less-mobile elderly. It has formulated a national common voucher scheme for interstate use of concession taxi fare entitlements, user requirements design

of taxis and personalised vehicles, and a more integrated approach to funding community transport services, including brokerage schemes. The committee worked with the Disability Discrimination Commissioner on assisting transport providers to comply with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. This liaison will ensure that the NATC’s work reflects, and is part of, the Australian Disability Strategy.

Safety The Department continued to promote a safer operating environment for the road transport industry by providing research grants to the Road Transport Forum for its self regulation project, aimed at improving industry compliance with regulations and considering the health and fitness of transport operators. Commonwealth funding over several financial years for this purpose totals $625,000.

Development of uniform national safety and technical regulations has been a major safety focus for the year. As a result of growing inter-system rail operations and the emergence of franchised private rail operators, the Department has played an important role in focusing on this issue by chairing a working group of officials to consider options. The Australian Transport Council adopted the working group’s report in February 1994 and agreed that a rail safety intergovernmental agreement be developed. The Department is chairing the task force set up to formulate a draft by November 1994 and is liaising closely with an industry rail system task force established

to address technical issues associated with a national rail safety regime.

R e fo rm o f GBEs

The Government decided in July 1993 that AN would continue as a single enterprise consisting of four businesses: South Australian intra-state freight, Tasrail (freight- only services in Tasmania), interstate passengers, and contracting workshop and maintenance activities. AN will be reviewed again in mid-1995 by which time uncertainties surrounding NR’s role will have been substantially resolved to allow transfer of interstate freight functions to be completed.

The Department continued to monitor AN’s performance during the year. Important improvements in AN’s efficiency resulted from its assuming full control of the Indian Pacific transcontinental passenger service (a development promoted by the Department); opening the new workshops at Launceston and upgrading the Islington and Port Augusta workshops - all funded under the One Nation initiative. The Commonwealth also funded redundancies that have proved necessary through ongoing restructuring and transfer of functions to NR.

I n te r n a tio n a l ser v ic es

The Department tabled a paper on “intelligent vehicle and highway systems” technology at the Auckland meeting of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation’s Transportation Working Group.

Through participating at such meetings, the Department has sought to promote Australia’s expertise in technology and infrastructure development within the Asia-Pacific region, and to assist trade by reducing transport

costs for industries competing on international markets.

36 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 2.2: Road Safety C ontact officer: P eter M akeham (06) 2 74 7447

Certificate Approvals

Policy Development Section National Road Trauma Advisory Council Secretariat

Dennis McLennan

Administration & Coordination

Research

Audit & Safety Investigations

Vehicle Standards Statistics & Analysis

Public Education

Regulation Policy & Projects

Assistant Secretary Road User Keith Wheatley

First Assistant Secretary Federal Office of Road Safety Peter Makeham

22 Road Safety

I

D escription: Federal O ffice of Road S afety The F ederal Office of Road Safety guides the developm ent of m easu res to reduce the incidence and severity of crashes. The road user branch conducts research into the causes of road crashes, develops standards and policies to improve safety of road users, develops road safety public education programs and provides policy advice for, and adm inistrative support to, the National Road Trauma Advisory Council.

The motor transport branch adm inisters the M o to r V ehicles S ta n d a r d s A c t 1 9 8 9 which sets uniform national vehicle safety, em issions and noise standards, known as the A ustralian Design Rules, for all vehicles entering the A ustralian m arket for the first time. The branch approves new model types and ensures production and test facilities of vehicle manufacturers conform to A ustralian requirem ents. The b ranch’s responsibilities also encom pass vehicle safety-related defects, fuel efficiency and the transport of dangerous goods.

PROGRAM 2: LAND T RANSPORT 37

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(‘000) $(‘000) $(‘000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 5,930 7,906 6,976

Program costs

Road Safety Improvement Package (including

for payment to the Australian Land

Transport Development Trust Fund) 163,400 6,000 5,580

Australian Motorcycle Council - grant 10 10 10

Special appropriations

Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988 2,700 - -

Total appropriations 172,040 13,916 12,566

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (207) (247) (234)

Total outlays 171,833 13,669 12,332

Revenue an d /or item s not affecting outlays (4,114) (4,657) (4,495)

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 91.9 93.1 87.6

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estim ates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the m oney it earns.

(c) Adjustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt item s classified as outlays, net m ovem ents in trust account balances, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Objective

A safer environment for road users through developing and implementing effective road safety policies that will help minimise deaths, injuries and crashes, and meet the Government’s environmental policy objectives.

P erformance indicators

• The extent to which practical road-safety measures are implemented at the federal, state and territory level.

• The degree to which improvements to vehicle safety standards have been achieved.

• The extent to which vehicle safety investigations and monitoring vehicle recall campaigns contribute to vehicle safety.

• The extent to which statistical analysis and road safety research initiatives have assisted in formulating policy and in providing direction for road-safety public education campaigns.

• The degree to which the community responds positively to public education campaigns.

• The extent to which the Motor Vehicle Certification System and related imports approval system operates efficiently and meets the changing requirements of the Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989.

• Effectiveness in addressing environmental issues as they relate to road safety and the community.

I m p le m e n tin g r o a d safety m e a su r e s

After almost a 33 per cent decline in the road toll since 1988, an upward trend emerged in road deaths from mid-1993 - deaths on

Australian roads were 6.5 per cent higher in 1993-94 than in 1992-93.

Striving to lower its road fatality rates to equal the best in the world, Australia played host in October 1993 to an international conference, “Safely on the Road to the 21st Century”, at which best practices were exchanged within Australia and with

overseas countries.

Australia’s first National Road Safety Action Plan, which sets down a range of actions to be implemented by governments and the community to achieve the objectives of the

National Road Safety Strategy, was endorsed

by the Australian Transport Council on 8 June 1994. This plan contains a nationally cohesive, integrated approach to road trauma and involves commitment by governments,

industry and the community.

In June 1994, the Government obtained state and territory agreement to introduce 11 short-term priority measures, based largely on the action plan, as a means of dealing with the recent rise in road deaths.

The University of Queensland completed a major research project for the Department. A program from the project, aimed at reducing the incidence of recidivist drink driving, has been adopted throughout Queensland and is expected to be extended to other states and

territories.

A national “Safe Travel to School” program was adopted by the Ministerial Council in

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT 39

February 1994 in an effort to reduce crashes involving school children. A code of practice for the voluntary retrofitting of safety features in buses was commissioned after the Department and the National Road Transport Commission submitted a joint report to the Council.

The Department and the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority developed a road-safety education package, containing videotapes and teaching notes, for senior high-school students. The Department intends to promote and distribute this package throughout Australia.

Im p r o v e m e n ts to v e h ic le safety sta n d a rd s

Air bag protection for drivers is now being offered in vehicles manufactured in Australia and mass-produced imports. Safety options in vehicles are becoming a high priority for Australian consumers and the Department s research and promotion, as well as ADR policies, have played a large role in these developments.

By introducing the requirement that from 1 July 1994 lap-sash seat belts be fitted into passenger coaches, Australia leads the world. In light of this requirement, the Department

is funding further research to help manufacturers of bus seats meet their obligations. Ministers at the ATC have noted that the recently approved design rules provided the highest standard of safety in the world for new buses and coaches.

Safety of car and bus passengers has been further enhanced since ADRs were introduced requiring seats to be strengthened and a new universal requirement for laminated windscreens.

The Department, in conjunction with the NRTC and the Australian Bus and Coach Association, is developing an action plan to provide guidelines on improving the safety of existing buses, ranging from seat belts to energy-absorbing padding on exposed metal surfaces.

As a means of further improving the safety of Australian motorists and passengers in offset crashes (off-centre frontal crashes), the Department carried out a series of car-to-car tests which were the first of their kind in the world. The results of these tests will contribute to developing an international standard for offset barrier-crash testing of passenger cars. The international test procedure will form the basis of a new ADR for offset frontal-crash protection.

Noting the changing pattern of vehicle ownership, the Department is reassessing the safety of passengers of light commercial and four-wheel-drive vehicles in a crash test program and by a project to collect data on the performance of these vehicles in on-road crashes.

The Department initiated and is leading an Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation project to identify areas where differing vehicle standards in member countries constitute trade barriers so these barriers may be removed. The survey design for the project, which will provide an opportunity to foster international harmonisation of vehicle standards, has been completed.

The Department is negotiating the endorsement of a mutual recognition agreement whereby Australian certification, testing and conformity of production procedures will be accepted by the European Union. The agreement includes both motor vehicles and components. It is anticipated the agreement will be completed in 1995 and

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

will provide significant benefits for Australian industry.

V eh icle sa fety in v e stig a tio n s an d r e c a ll c a m p a ig n s

During the year, the Department conducted 56 formal safety investigations and these resulted in eight safety recalls of vehicles or components. Vehicle manufacturers notified the public of 47 recalls. Serious safety faults identified included seat-belt stalk failures, missing child-restraint anchorages and hydraulic hose leaks in power-steering systems.

The Departments recall-monitoring program led several manufacturers to finalise outstanding recall actions, ensuring the maximum number of affected vehicles were

recalled within a reasonable period. At 30 June 1994, 182 recall campaigns were active; 30 were made inactive or were closed

in 1993-94.

With the cooperation of suppliers, unsafe products such as add-on interior mirrors and seat-belt relocating devices were successfully withdrawn from mass marketing.

S ta tistic a l an alysis a n d r e se a r c h

The Department’s statistical and research data has been instrumental in establishing new policy benchmarks, including an offset

frontal-crash performance standard, alcohol limits for heavy-vehicle drivers, and the cost effectiveness of anti-lock braking systems for heavy vehicles. Nine research reports were

issued in 1993-94.

Problems highlighted by a departmental report on the safety of centre-back seat passengers contributed to lap-sash seat belts

being put in centre-back seats of three big­ selling Australian built sedans.

A recognised gap between road safety policy and practice by local governments was bridged with the publication of two important resource manuals for local government practitioners. They are Sharing The Main Street and Towards Traffic Calming.

The enormous economic cost of road crashes is to be re-evaluated with a new publication on injury data providing a refined basis for calculating crash costs.

The Department’s research and analytic work on young drivers has contributed directly to the development and extension of its young driver public-education campaign by

allowing more skilful targeting of the intended audience.

C o m m u n ity r e s p o n s e to p u b lic e d u c a tio n c a m p a ig n s

Education focused on identified high-risk groups of drink drivers, rural road users, and young drivers. Major campaigns conducted during the year included: Drive Safe Under .05 This Christmas; Light Right; and Life for

Young Drivers.

Surveys have confirmed high awareness and retention by the community (between 80 and 90 per cent) of the Department’s public- education campaigns. Subsequent research

indicates that a change in attitudes has been achieved as a result.

A refined methodology was adopted for a community attitude survey conducted in 1993-94 to ensure the community’s views were accurately recorded and could be acted on.

More than 4000 requests for public education materials were met during the year and 175 orders a month for school-based

y

TRANSIT

41 PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT

road-safety education kits were satisfied. The Department provides road safety information to more than 500,000 school children across Australia.

M otor v e h ic le c e r tific a tio n

During 1993-94, 133 assessments of vehicle testing and manufacturing plants, both local and overseas, were conducted. Japan, Italy, France, Germany, Sweden, Korea, The Netherlands, Britain and the United States were visited during the program. The extensive assessment provides positive assurance that vehicles supplied to the Australian market meet the national standards specified in the ADRs.

More than 4500 approvals were issued for the importation of about 8000 vehicles.

E n v ir o n m e n ta l issu es

The Department has begun preparing a sixth edition of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code reflecting the latest United Nations standards. This is expected to be published in late 1995.

A draft code of practice for a fuel economy scheme to help reduce fuel consumption by new vehicles was prepared in consultation with vehicle manufacturers. It is to be considered by the Federal Government as part of the national greenhouse response strategy.

A new ADR limiting noxious emissions from new diesel-engined vehicles was published in September 1993 and the new standard, aligning Australia with a range of overseas standards, will be phased in during 1995-96.

A review of the emission limits in the ADR for petrol-engined vehicles was completed and a revised rule is expected to be gazetted in 1994.

Full-scale testing began in a major program to assess the emissions performance of vehicles already on the road. The study is gathering crucial data on the deterioration and failure of emission control systems, and the impact that good maintenance practice could have on reducing emissions. This data is fundamental in developing strategies to reduce vehicle pollution in cities and has attracted world-wide interest. Using vehicles lent by their owners, this pioneering work will take about two years.

S o c ia l ju s tic e

The Department made constant efforts throughout the year to ensure that important road safety information was available to all sectors of the Australian community and in particular, to identified high-risk sectors.

Recognising the diverse needs of the Australian community, the Department provided, mainly to parents, a range of print materials in 16 languages to help improve road safety for children. These materials are distributed through health and community centres, social clubs and schools. The Out and About road safety guides for children aged from six to seven has been produced with subtitles for the hearing impaired.

A research project was commissioned to help prepare appropriate public-education material for elderly drivers, aimed at making them more aware of changes that may affect their risk levels and what they can do to manage and reduce those risks. In conjunction with the Northern Territory Government, the Department is developing a project aimed at reducing the level of road trauma among Aborigines.

All research was aimed at reducing road trauma and its economic and social costs which go far beyond those directly arising

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

I from road crashes. During the year, the I Department analysed the main differences I between fatal crashes involving male drivers I and those involving female drivers. The I proportion of female drivers has continued to

increase over recent decades and preliminary analysis suggests fatal crashes involving female drivers result from very different circumstances than those involving male

drivers.

Major national media campaigns covering

key safety issues were targeted at sectors of

the community considered at risk: Rethink

Your Drink, which targets men and women

separately; Life for Young Drivers, which

concentrates on risk taking and inexperience

of the young; and two campaigns with a focus

on rural road users, Crash in Bed, Instead

and Light Right.

PROGRAM 2: LAND TRANSPORT

PROGRAM 3: MARITIME

O b jectiv e

E fficient, com petitive and safe shipping and shore-b ased services to support A ustralia’s i nternational and dom estic trade.

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY

OUTLAYS STAFFING Actual Budget (a) Actual Actual (1992-93) (1993-94) (1993-94) (1993-94) $(‘000) $(‘000) $(‘000) (Staff years)

Sub-program

3.1 Maritime Policy 57,504 77,312 65,123 60.9

TOTAL 57,504 77,312 65,123 60.9

I a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

Maritime program structure As at 30 June 1994

Assistant Secretary National Shipping &

David Anderson

First Assistant Secretary Paul Merner

3.1 Maritime Policy

Assistant Secretary International & Commercial Shipping Policy Danny Scorpecci

3.2 Australian National

3.3 Australian Maritime Safety Authority

3.4 Shipping Industry Reform Authority

P R O G R A M 3: MA R I T I ME

Sub-program 3.1: Maritime Policy Contact officer: Danny Scorpecci (06) 274 7611

3.1 Maritime Policy

First Assistant Secretary Paul Merner

Assistant Secretary International & Commercia Shipping Policy Danny Scorpecci

Assistant Secretary National Shipping & Infrastructure David Anderson

1

International Shipping Relations Shipping Industry Efficiency

1

Legislation & Commercial Shipping Shipping Infrastructure

1

Cargo Facilitation

Bass Strait Shipping Assistance

1

AMSA Maritime Personnel

Liaison Policy

ANL Liaison

Marine Incident Investigation Unit

Resources Management Unit

D escription: Maritime Policy D ivision The Maritime Policy Division develops policy advice on international and domestic shipping, shore-based shipping services, ANL and AMSA operations, seafarers rehabilitation and co m p en sa tio n arra n g e m e n ts an d m a ritim e in d u stry o ccupational h e a lth and safety arrangements. It also adm inisters regulatory arrangements governing international liner and coastal shipping, and financial assistance programs for Australian shipowners. The marine incident investigation unit investigates marine casualties associated with ship operations.

46 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

RESOURCE TABLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(‘000) $(*000) $(‘000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 3,621 4,822 4,405

Program costs

Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme 33,000 40,500 37,681

Search and rescue 895 1,300 942

Funding for transport infrastructure 20,000 - -

Tasmania - compensation payment in respect of the

Bass Strait passenger service - 250 -

Special appropriations

Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987 58 30,442 22,555

Total appropriations 57,574 77,314 65,583

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (70) (2) (460)

Total outlays 57,504 77,312 65,123

Revenue a n d /o r item s not affecting outlays (154) (140) (351)

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 56.4 62.5 60.9

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the m oney it earns.

(c) Adjustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

PROGRAM 3: MARITIME

Objective

A policy framework to enable:

• More efficient and competitive services to users of the Australian flag shipping, towage and shore-based cargo-handling industries.

• Access to competitive, reliable international shipping services by Australian exporters.

• Australian National Line and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, as Government Business Enterprises, to meet their commercial, service and other obligations to shareholders, consistent with government policies and objectives for these enterprises and their industry sector.

P erformance indicators

• The extent to which Australian shippers have access to more efficient and competitive domestic shipping services.

• Improvements in price and efficiency of shore-based shipping services.

• Extent to which Australian exporter access to competitive liner shipping services is enhanced through policy and regulatory means.

• Efficiency of arrangements to provide advice on the operations of ANL and the AMSA.

• The extent to which Australia has promoted a competitive international shipping environment in international forums.

• Efficient and effective administration of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme.

• Effectiveness of investigations of marine casualties

• The coverage of Australian seafarers by efficient, effective and equitable occupational health and safety, and rehabilitation and compensation regimes.

M ak in g d o m e s tic sh ip p in g e ffic ie n t a n d c o m p e titiv e

The Department, in conjunction with the Shipping Industry Reform Authority, continued to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of domestic shipping services.

During 1993-94 the multi-skilling retraining program for existing ratings was completed, the average crew size on Australian ships being reduced from 20.5 to 18.

Under the auspices of SIRA, discussions began on issues associated with employment arrangements in the shipping industry. SIRA

is to report to the Government by the end of July 1994 on progress on these issues.

In 1993-94 grants of $22,554,905.63 were made under the Ships Capital Grants Act 1987. These grants were for purchasing two new ships (both introduced in 1992-93), seven modifications to existing ships and supplementary payments to four previous grants.

Continuing the trend of recent years, the number of single voyage permits used for carriage of cargo increased from 307 in 1992-93 to 470 in 1993-94. These permits, issued under the Navigation Act 1912, allow

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

unlicensed ships to cany interstate cargo when no suitable licensed vessel is available. No continuing voyage permits were issued.

For the period ending 30 June 1994, a total of 82 coasting-trade licences were issued, compared with 80 for the year ending 30 June 1993.

Im p r o v e m en ts in p r ic e a n d e ffic ie n c y o f s h o r e -b a s e d s h ip p in g ser v ic es

The Department developed a Port Interface Cost Bulletin, in response to the recommendations of the Warehouse to Wharf report of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure. The bulletin is designed to enable the progress of

waterfront reform to be properly monitored. It contains information on the performance of stevedoring companies and port authorities, together with changes in waterfront costs, and is to be disseminated to waterfront users each six months. The first issue of the bulletin will be distributed in July 1994.

The structural changes introduced in the stevedoring industry under the Government’s waterfront reform program continued to bring about productivity improvements. Average container handling rates of 20.4 TEUs (a standardised measure equivalent to a 20-foot freight container) a crane an hour were achieved in 1993-94, compared with 12.8 in

1989. Stevedoring charges were reported to be about $190 a container on average. This is 25 per cent less than in 1990.

The improved efficiency of the waterfront continued to provide savings to shippers in terms of reduced inventory, demurrage and interest costs. Some port authorities and customs brokers reduced their charges also, and there is evidence of reductions in

stevedoring charges being passed on to shippers.

Representatives from the Department attended meetings of a working group established by the Council of Australian Governments to examine the scope for further government action on micro­ economic reform in the maritime area. The

Department provided a number of background papers for the working group, which is to report to COAG by mid-July

1994, on a program of measures for continuing reform in the port authority sector, together with a timetable for implementing the program. The working group is to report also on any measures that could assist in continuing to reform the stevedoring and Australian flag shipping industries.

Departmental representatives worked with private sector and government agencies on the National Consultative Group on Transport Electronic Data Interchange to coordinate the introduction of EDI into the transport and related trading sector. A report of the Group’s activities for the preceding 12 months was

tabled in Parliament on 14 December 1993. In conjunction with Tradegate Australia Ltd and the EDI Council of Australia, the Department is funding a project to accelerate the development of guidelines for implementing EDI messages for commercial

processes associated with maritime trade.

A d visin g o n ANL a n d AMSA

The Department advised the Minister on financial matters relating to ANL, consistent with accountability guidelines for GBEs, and on preparations for a possible sale of a large proportion of ANL (a process in which the

Department is working with the Department of Finance Task Force on Asset Sales). On 4 March 1994, the Minister for Transport and

PROGRAM 3: MARITIME

p n m

the Minister for Finance announced that a due diligence study for ANL would begin.

The Department advised the Minister on implementing the Government’s GBE reform package in respect of AMSA. It helped also to develop arrangements for the disposal of AMSA’s surplus lighthouse properties.

The Department consulted regional users of the Omega global radio-navigation system to help the Government decide whether to continue operation of the Australian station. In May 1994, the Government announced its decision to continue operating the station.

The Department initiated and is taking a leading role in coordinating a major study, to be completed in October 1994, into the environmental aspects of shipping operations in the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait area.

P a r tic ip a tin g in in te r n a tio n a l fo ru m s

Although the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade was finalised on 15 December 1993, no agreement to liberalise maritime services was reached and negotiations have been extended until June

1996. The Department will participate in the post-round talks to further liberalise multi­ lateral shipping arrangements.

The Department attended both meetings of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation’s Transport Working Group held in 1993-94. The Group has agreed to an Australian initiated project to encourage the adoption of compatible EDI procedures by the region’s international transport operators.

To assist in preparing a draft Convention on the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances by Sea, the Department participated in sessions of the International

Maritime Organization’s legal committee. The convention will provide compensation for incidents occurring from the carriage of hazardous and noxious substances. The

Department worked closely with Canada and Norway to prepare a strategy to ensure the Convention provided an equitable liability and compensatory regime. This tripartite proposal was endorsed by the IMO’s Legal Committee in March 1994, and will provide the framework for the Convention.

The Department provided advice in the lead- up to the Government’s December 1993 decision to adopt the provisions of the International Convention on Salvage 1989. The Convention includes new environmental protection provisions and better reflects modern developments in international shipping. Legislative proposals to give effect to the Convention are expected to be introduced into Parliament in 1994-95.

At a workshop on practical shipping issues of common concern, the Department continued to promote discussions between the Dynamic Asian Economies and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Maritime Transport Committee, with the view to promoting liberalised shipping policies and regional cooperation.

T he T asm anian F reigh t E q u a lisa tio n S c h e m e

Under the TEES, the Commonwealth provides financial assistance to alleviate the comparative freight-cost disadvantage of shipping certain non-bulk goods between Tasmania and the mainland.

Industry reported positive feedback on the Department’s administration of the scheme, and there were no referrals of the Department’s decisions to the TEES Review Authority.

50 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Payments to claimants totalled $37.6 million in 1993-94, of which $32 million was under the northbound component of the scheme and $5.6 million under the southbound component.

The Department processed 4383 claims in an average time of seven days, compared with 4341 claims processed in 1992-93 in an average time of 11 days.

In v e stig a tin g m a r in e c a su a ltie s

During 1993-94, the Department’s marine incident investigation unit initiated 14 investigations into marine casualties, pursuant to the Navigation (Marine Casualty) Regulations. The Department published 14 investigation reports, seven of which were investigations initiated before 1 July 1993.

Arising from the findings of investigations, the Department made a number of proposals to AMSA on regulatory and operational matters.

In response to the recommendations of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure in the Ships o f Shame report of December 1992, the Department

improved the quality of its investigations and reports, and increased the circulation of reports by 70 per cent to about 500 copies.

In May 1994, the Department submitted proposals on international standards for marine accident investigations to the 63rd Session of the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee. These proposals, which have received support from the Marine Accident Investigators International Forum, have been included in the MSC’s program for further consideration at the 64th session to be held in 1994-95.

S e a c a re

The Seafarers Safety, Rehabilitation and

Compensation Authority is an independant

body established in December 1992 to

oversee compensation, rehabilitation and

occupational health and safety arrangements

for Australian seafarers. The Authority,

which reports separately to Parliament, has a part-time chairman and is supported

administratively by officers of the Maritime

Policy Division.

O c c u p a tio n a l h e a lth a n d safety fo r sea fa re rs

After extensive industry consultation, the

Department developed legislative proposals

for modern occupational health and safety

arrangements for the maritime industry. The

resulting Occupational Health and Safety

(Maritime Industry) Act 1993 received Royal

Assent on 18 January 1994.

S o c ia l ju stic e

The new occupational health and safety

arrangements for seafarers are comparable with the arrangements applicable under other

state and federal occupational health and

safety legislation. These arrangements are

aimed at ensuring seafarers are not

disadvantaged in their working environment

when compared with people employed in

other industries.

Through the TFES, the Commonwealth

alleviates the comparative freight

disadvantage of shipping certain non-bulk

goods between Tasmania and the mainland.

PROGRAM 3: MARITIME 51

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT

O bjective Strategic leadership and direction, together with appropriate management organisation, structure, practices, support and research, so as to enable efficient and effective program formulation and delivery, while preserving proper accountability.

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES SUMMARY

OUTLAYS STAFFING Actual Budget (a) Actual Actual (1992-93) (1993-94) (1993-94) (1993-94) $(‘000) $(‘000) $(‘000) (Staff years)

Sub-program

4.1 Executive 5,094 3,741 3,201 46.7

4.2 Management Support and Advice 38,747 27,411 26,408 232.1

4.3 Research 5,163 7,610 6,836 92.6

4.4 National Transport Planning Taskforce — 852 386 1.1

TOTAL 49,004 39,614 36,831 372.5

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT

Corporate D irection and Support program structure As at 3 0 June 1 9 9 4

P O R A T E

54 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 4.1: Executive Contact officer: Joanne Blackburn (06) 274 7982

Secretary Graham Evans

Vanessa Fanning A/g Mike Waller

1.1 Executive

D escr iptio n: E xecutive

The Executive is responsible for managing the Department and ensuring policy development, implementing and evaluating government policies and priorities, and fulfilling corporate objectives. The Executive comprises the Secretary, Deputy Secretary (Transport Operations) and Deputy Secretary (Transport Policy).

ItESOEItCE TABLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual S(-000) $(000) $(•000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 5,094 3,741 3.201

T otal appropriations 5,094 3,741 3,201

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) - (1) -

Total outlays 5,094 3,741 3,201

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years (d) 54.7 40.6 46.7

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates. (b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the m oney it earns. (c) Adjustm ents to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

(d) Staffing figures include all senior executive service staff and executive support staff.

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT

Objective

Strategic leadership, direction and management organisation for the Department.

P erformance indicator

The extent to which the Department meets government priorities and policy objectives, and is managed effectively.

pfofcwe

O verview

As at 30 June 1994, the Executive of the Department comprised the Secretary, Graham Evans, Deputy Secretary (Transport Policy) Mike Waller, and Acting Deputy Secretary (Transport Operations) Vanessa Fanning.

Since the last annual reporting period, a number of changes occurred in the executive management of the Department. On 6 September 1993, the Associate Secretary of the former Department of Transport and Communications, Roger Beale, was appointed as Associate Secretary to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. On 6 September 1993, Rod Sims, formerly a Deputy Secretary' of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, was appointed Deputy Secretary (Transport).

Following machinery of government changes on 23 December 1993, the transport programs of the previous Department of Transport and Communications formed the

new Department of Transport. The communications programs became part of the new Department of Communications. As a result of these changes, Mike Hutchinson transferred to the Deputy Secretary position in the Department of Communications. On 28 January 1994 the Department of Communications and the Arts was formed.

On 31 January 1994, Mr Sims resigned from the Australian Public Service. Mike Waller was appointed Deputy Secretary (Transport Policy) and began duty at the Department on

18 April 1994.

The Executive is extensively involved in policy development and implementation of government policy in the transport sector, both on a day-to-day basis and through oversight of policies and implementation. Over this reporting period, the Executive was extensively involved in ongoing policy and structural reform in transport and communications (until 23 December 1993). Particular attention was given to supporting the work of the National Transport Planning Taskforce, undertaking regulatory and scoping study work relating to the sale of the Federal Airports Corporation, and strengthening the Department’s trade

coordination group.

M in isteria l c h a n g e s

Senator the Hon. Bob Collins was Minister for Transport and Communications until 23 December 1993. After changes to ministerial and administrative arrangements, the Hon. Laurie Brereton was appointed Minister for Transport and the Hon. Neil O’Keefe was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport.

56 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

V lanagem ent

After the creation of the Department of Transport, a program structure for the Department was established with minimum adjustments to the workings of the sub­ programs responsible for policy and safety- regulatory functions. Establishing corporate support functions was, however, more complex because corporate support resources were shared with the Department of Communications and the Arts until separation of these resources between the two departments on 30 June 1994.

In view of the necessary priority given to the separation of parts of the former Department of Transport and Communications, some aspects of strategic planning, such as reviewing the corporate plan, will be undertaken during 1994-95.

Steps were taken towards developing a workplace bargaining agreement. A new human resource strategy, focusing on staff

management priorities in the Department over the next three years, was published and distributed to all staff.

All sub-program managers are represented on either the Planning, Evaluation and Audit Committee or the Human Resources Committee. These committees advise the Secretary’s Management Group, involving the Executive, the head of Corporate

Management and two sub-program managers, which meets regularly to address management-related issues in more detail.

Consultation with staff associations continued through the Departmental Consultative Council which provides a national forum for consultation and negotiations on significant issues of concern to management and staff. The Council facilitates the mutual exchange of

information to develop understanding about the direction of changes within the Department and the likely impact on staff.

In overseeing the implementation of transport policies and programs, the Executive ensures that broader government priorities and objectives, including social justice and access and equity considerations, are fulfilled.

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DI RECTION AND SUPPORT

Sub-program 4.2: M anagement Support and Advice Contact officer: Bill Ellis (06) 274 7657

Aviation Legal Section

Personnel Services & Advisory Section

Assistant Secretary Legal & General Joanne Blackburn

Human Resources Planning Section Transport & Corporate Legal Section

Assistant Secretary Human Resources Carol Boughton

Contracts, Assets & Supply Section Workplace Bargaining

Staff Dev elopment

Communications Legal Section

Parliamentary Liaison Internal Audit Resource Management

Policy Coordination

Public Affairs

GBE Policy & Avisorv Councils

Financial Management Information Systems

Strategic Planning

Richard Thwaites

Accounting Policy & Procedures

Information Systems

John Elliott

Assistant Secreifc Trade Coordima

Neil Primrofs-

Librarv Property and Services

D escription: Management S upport and Advice The Corporate Management Division provides a range of support and advisory services to enhance the Department’s ability to advise on policy and ensure accountability requirements are upheld. Its key strategies include developing skills, resources and organisational structures appropriate to changing support requirements, and to provide timely, efficient and effective services to engender a culture of service responsive to user needs through improved levels of awareness, motivation and accountability.

After administrative changes announced by the Prime Minister on 23 December 1993 and 28 January 1994, the sub-program provided corporate advice and support to both the Department of Transport and the Department of Communications and the Arts until 30 June 1994.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(•000) $(‘000) $(•000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) 38,317 27,370 25,146

Program costs

Compensation and legal expenses 1,303 1,700 1,655

Total appropriations 39,620 29,070 26,802

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (873) (1,659) (394)

Total outlays 38,747 27,411 26,408

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 351.3 242.7 232.1

GORPOfi

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a departm ent access to the money it earns.

(c) Adjustments to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

Objective

High quality and timely support services and advice, delivered efficiently and effectively to meet the program objective and the needs of the Minister and departmental program management.

P erformance indicators

• Degree to which the Division’s structure, skills and resource base match the changing support needs of the Department.

• Degree to which corporate services activities are relevant, timely, efficient and uphold accountability requirements.

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT 59

T he D e p a r tm e n t’s c h a n g in g su p p o r t n e e d s

A major challenge during the year was the need to establish a corporate support resource and associated systems for the newly formed Department of Communications and the Arts. This included budget, structures, staffing, accommodation and administration.

The core of this resource was drawn from the former Department of Transport and Communications, with some additional resources obtained through negotiations with the Departments of Finance and Administrative Services. The process aimed to ensure that staff were treated fairly and that resources were divided equitably between the two departments.

Although operational considerations were given priority, staff preferences were met, where possible, in deciding the distribution of staff between the departments. During the transition phase, the sub-program delivered corporate support services to both departments.

In the context of workplace bargaining, the sub-program identified departmental initiatives to be included in an agency agreement. Study groups, made up of departmental officers and union representatives, assessed productivity implications of proposed initiatives and, where appropriate, developed implementation strategies.

The mid-year change in administrative arrangements delayed the process of negotiating a workplace agreement until key staffing and budgetary issues were resolved. Negotiations recommenced in May 1994, with the Department and unions aiming to reach an early agreement.

Preparations were made for the separation of the Spectrum Management Agency from the Department’s office automation network with effect from 1 July 1994. The Australian Cultural Development Office was connected to the network and planning began to establish a separate information technology structure for the Department of Communications and the Arts. Access to network printers, when using host-based systems, was improved.

The reform measures that have been undertaken during the past six years to bring about change in the transport sector in Australia have resulted in substantial gains in our relative international competitiveness, as well as a recognition of a need to grow the aggregate market for the sector through an enhanced performance in the export of these services.

The Department has been actively engaged for some time, both in bilateral talks and through a variety of multilateral agencies, in seeking to liberalise offshore regulatory regimes so as to reduce barriers to the export of competitive Australian transport services.

To enhance our efforts in this area, a trade coordination group was established in November 1993 to provide coordination and a clear strategy for promoting trade in transport services. Bilateral relations in transport coordination are being strengthened, in the first instance with Indonesia, and regional relationships are being strengthened through the Association of South-East Asian Nations Australia Forum and through the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation's Transport Working Group.

The sub-program contributed to developing corporate coherence and direction by managing and participating in the Secretary’s Management Group; the Planning,

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Evaluation and Audit Committee; and the Human Resources Committee. Enhanced policy coordination and monitoring mechanisms covering cross-divisional responsibilities were set in place to cover such issues as access and equity, trade coordination and Government Business Enterprise performance.

The sub-program monitored and promoted best practice in managing the Department’s Equal Employment Opportunity, Industrial Democracy, and Occupational Health and

Safety functions, and in handling structural changes by servicing and participating in consultative arrangements with unions through the Departmental Consultative Council, the APS Joint Consultative Council, the OH&S Committee and regular informal discussions with workplace delegates.

Accrual reports for the 1992-93 financial year were prepared and subjected to a pilot audit by Price Waterhouse. The difficulties

identified will be used as a basis for improving reporting capacity for 1994-95, and in modifying computerised financial systems.

M eetin g a c c o u n ta b ility r e q u ir e m e n ts

Staff-development activities took a high priority and the Department met its training guarantee levy obligation. Net eligible training expenditure was $2,695 million, total number of training days was 6378, and 983 staff participated in formal training. The

average participation rate was 6.81 days training for each officer.

The major staff development program conducted during the year was a one-day legal awareness training course on statutory obligations and administrative responsibilities. This was followed by a

series of workshops that focused on specific sub-program legal issues. An evaluation found the training program was successful in raising the level of staff awareness in relation to their statutory obligations and administrative responsibilities. It has been a significant factor also in moving towards achieving improved quality in decision making in the workplace. Because the training has been worthwhile and the legal awareness of participants improved across the board, provision will be made to continue it in 1994-95.

Since the Department’s legal resources were reviewed, measures have been introduced to strengthen legal resources available to departmental managers and to ensure they are used to best effect. These included:

• Outposting a senior officer of the Attorney- General’s Department as General Counsel.

• Written guidance to staff about when legal advice should be obtained and how best to go about it.

• Moving to the legal officer structure for employment of officers engaged in legal work.

These arrangements have enhanced the Department’s capacity to respond to the range of increasingly complex legal issues arising in commercial, legislative and other aspects of its functions. An evaluation of the

Department’s legal services is to be conducted in 1994-95.

New records management procedures were put into practice during the year. An evaluation of the improved procedures has found that overall awareness of proper records management practices has increased

noticeably. Continued awareness and reinforcement of best practice is achieved

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT

n ,ifiPORATE

through continual training and audit programs.

Implementation of the Department’s fraud control plan emphasised a need to raise the level of awareness of fraud and security- related issues. A memorandum of understanding was agreed with the Australian Federal Police, and departmental fraud-control guidelines were finalised.

Internal audit reviews focused on compliance and accountability issues. As a result, work practices have improved and staff are making more effective use of departmental computer systems. The overall level of compliance was considered satisfactory. A review of purchasing highlighted the need to review decentralised processing arrangements. This will be done in 1994-95.

The sub-program continued to implement government decisions made in May 1993 which reinforced GBE reforms begun in 1988. This included a submission to the Joint Committee of Public Accounts Inquiry

into the Commercialisation of Public Sector Operations, developing financial target methodologies and assisting in a review of

the capital structure of the Federal Airports Corporation. During 1993-94, transport GBEs provided $26.57 million in dividends and $89.53 million in income tax to consolidated revenue.

S tatu s o f w om en

The Department’s women’s desk unit coordinates portfolio input to the 1993-94 Women’s Budget Statement and alerts sub­ programs, when relevant, to issues that may impact on women.

S o c ia l ju stic e

Numerous social justice issues were coordinated, including inputs to the Women’s Budget Statement, the International Year of the Family, the International Year of the World’s Indigenous People, a paper on social justice for indigenous Australians, the

Government’s response to the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, and the Government’s policies on age discrimination, productive diversity and the Australian Disability Strategy.

62 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Sub-program 4.3: Research Contact officer: Maurice Haddad (06) 274 6801

Research Manager \ir& Sea Transport Sue Elderton

Sea Transport

Resource Management

Computer Services Broadcasting

Information Services

Transport Safety

Telecommunications

Mike Cronin

Land Transport

Research Manag Communications Fi Chris Cheah

Transport & the Environment

Research Manage Research Manager ■ansport Externalitit Leo Dobes

Bureau of Transport & Communications Economics Director Maurice Haddad

4.2 Research

D escription: B ureau oe T ransport and Communications Economics This sub-program is the responsibility of the BTCE. It carries out research relevant to policy issues in the portfolios of Transport, and Communications and the Arts. The Bureau

comprises four research groups and a corporate services unit which provides support services to the research groups.

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DI RECTION AND SUPPORT 63

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual

FINANCIAL

$(‘000) $(•000) $(•000)

Running costs (b) 5,215 7,659 6,970

Total appropriations 5,215 7,659 6,970

Adjustments affecting outlays (c) (52) (49) (134)

Total outlays 5,163 7,610 6,836

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Actual

Staff years 86.9 92.3 92.6

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a department access to the money it earns.

(c) Adjustments to derive outlays, including receipt items classified as outlays, net movements in trust account balances, etc.

Objective

A better information and analysis base for policy formulation, in transport and communications, through research; and more informed public debate, through information dissemination.

P erformance indicators

• Improvement in the efficiency and effectiveness of transport and communications services.

• Use of Bureau research results and expertise in policy making.

• Citation of Bureau research results in journal articles, books and specialist government reports.

• Media coverage of Bureau work.

• Number of Bureau publications sold through the Australian Government Publishing Service.

• Level of participation in government inquiries, committees, commissions, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

A c h ie v em en ts

Bureau research over the past year contributed indirectly to improvements in the efficiency of transport and communications services. Its evaluation studies of shipping and waterfront services, road safety programs, airline services, and aggregation policy for regional television services provided an objective assessment of the effectiveness of micro-economic reform programs in those areas.

Other studies completed during the year on international aviation, alternative transport fuels, major rail projects, the international telecommunications market, broadcasting economics, and dry bulk shipping provided useful new data and analytical input to developing policy options on these issues.

The Bureau also began two major studies on current policy issues to be completed by December 1994.

• A study of the adequacy of transport infrastructure on 12 major corridors on the national network for the National Transport Planning Taskforce. The study will estimate demand for all transport modes for the next 20 years, and assess the adequacy of transport infrastructure capacity on these corridors to meet the projected demand.

• The Communications Futures project is exploring the technological developments in communications, the potential market response to these developments, and the

implications for social and economic policy. The research results to date have been published in two “work-in-progress” papers and discussed at a well-attended industry seminar in March 1994.

A third area of research in progress is the Bureau’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Project which attempts to estimate the cost of

reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector by a range of policy initiatives. The Bureau has commissioned a major study of urban passenger transport as a means of collecting data and modelling behavioural responses required for the costing analysis.

The Bureau completed a number of major studies during the year which resulted in the following publications:

R e p o r ts

81 The progress of aviation reform (1993)

82 International telecommunications: an Australian perspective (1993)

83 Elements o f broadcasting economics

(1993)

84 Port interface cost index (1993)

85 Structural failure o f large bulk ships (1994)

86 International aviation: trends and issues

(1994)

O c c a sio n a l p a p e r s

106 Roads policy and Australian federalism

(1993)

107 Modelling land use: transport environment interaction (1993)

108 Greenhouse gas emissions and the demand for urban passenger

transport: design of the overall approach

(1993)

In fo r m a tio n p a p e r s

38 The road freight transport industry

(1993)

39 Alternative fuels in Australian transport

(1994)

CORPOft Dieecr

PROGRAM 4: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT 65

j S p o r a t e

I BCTON

W ork in g p a p e r s

9 Cost effectiveness of “black spot” treatments; a pilot study (1993)

10 Costs of reducing greenhouse gases in Australian transport (1993)

W ork in p r o g r e ss p a p e r s

1 Emerging communications services: an analytical framework (1994)

2 Delivery technologies in the new communications world (1994)

T ran sp ort a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n s in d ic a to r s b u lle tin 40 September quarter (1993)

41 December quarter (1993)

42 March quarter (1994)

43 June quarter (1994)

B u lle tin 2 Research in communications economics in Australia (1993)

O th er title s • Communications Research Forum 1993 papers (1994)

• A review of the Alice Springs to Darwin railway project (November 1993)

• An economic evaluation of the Sydney- Brisbane transport corridor (1994)

The Bureau retains AGPS as the main distributor of its publications. In 1993-94, more than 6500 copies of Bureau publications were distributed or sold.

R esea rch fe llo w sh ip s

Three Bureau fellowships were taken up during 1993-94.

Professor of Economics and Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Brunei

University, Martin Cave, who visited in August-September 1993, made major contributions to the Communications Research Forum and conducted three workshops in communications which were w idely attended.

John Zerby, of the Department of Econometrics, University of NSW, is contributing to Bureau research on the Asian market for telecommunications services and

equipment.

Professor Mike Tretheway, of the University of British Columbia, who visited in May 1994, made a keynote presentation at the

Bureau’s conference on international aviation.

C o n fe r e n c e s an d sem in a rs

The Bureau initiated the first Communications Research Forum in August 1993. This forum brought together more than 100 academics, government officials and representatives of the telecommunications and broadcasting industries to discuss research and policy priorities, and to identify

emerging issues. Dr Maurice Haddad, Colin Cronin, Kym Starr, Chris Cheah and Franco Papandrea, all officers of the Bureau,

presented papers on the role of research in policy development, international telecommunications, evaluating telecommunications reform, communications futures and the broadcasting industry.

In May, about 100 participants from the private and government sectors, attended the Bureau’s International Aviation seminar in Canberra. Meg Crooks presented the Bureau’s research in aviation.

Bureau officers presented papers at several other conferences, seminars and workshops throughout the year and disseminated information about Bureau research:

66 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Bulk ship losses: a statistical analysis (Australasian Transport Research Forum 1993) - Neil Gentle and Stephen Wheatstone.

Monitoring the Australian waterfront: port performance and reliability (Australasian Transport Research Forum 1993) - Anthony Carlson.

Loss o f large dry bulk carriers (Maritime Technology Conference 1993) — Neil Gentle and Stephen Wheatstone.

The port interface cost index (AIC Conference 1994) - Neil Gentle.

Overview o f BTCE project strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector (Australian Road Research Board workshop on models for travel demand management 1993) - Patricia Green.

Draft methodology fo r the calculation o f greenhouse gas emissions from Australian transport (BTCE workshop on transport externalities 1993) - David

Cosgrove and Anita Scott-Murphy.

Entry and exit conditions for Australian aviation (Australian Transport Research Forum 1994) - John Street, Pip Spence and David Smith.

An aggregate empirical model o f international airline traffic for selected Asia Pacific countries (Australian Transport Research Forum 1993) —

David Mitchell.

Alternative fuels in Australian transport (BTCE workshop on transport externalities 1993) - Beryl Cuthbertson.

• Costing and costs o f transport externalities: a review (BTCE workshop on transport externalities 1993) - Dr Franzi Poldy.

Bureau research covering community service obligations, transport safety and infrastructure, rail/road freight, energy efficiency, communications technologies, broadcast economics and transport

externalities was extensively covered in the media.

P a r tic ip a tio n in g o v e r n m e n t in q u ir ie s , c o m m itte e s , c o m m is s io n s , e tc

The Bureau was represented on or prepared submissions for the following:

• Steering Committee on National Performance Monitoring of Government Trading Enterprises

• National Passenger Processing Committee

• Australian Rail Industry Advisory Council

• Trade Practices Act Part X Review Panel

• National Transport Planning Taskforce

• The Darwin Committee

• Technical Committee of the Tourism Forecasting Council

• Steering Committee on the Impact of Marine Oil Spills on the Great Barrier Reef

• House of Representatives Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure

conpoe DIRECT

P R O G R A M 4 : C O R P O R A T E D I R E C T I O N A N D S U P P O R T 67

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I

Sub-program 4.4: National Transport Planning Taskforce Contact officer: Martin Cotton (06) 274 6487

Secretariat Executive Officer Martin Cotton

4.4 National Transport Planning Taskforce

D escription

The taskforce consists of three part-time members supported by a secretariat of eight full­ time staff.

It is expected to complete its inquiry and report to the Government on its findings in October 1994.

O bjective

To improve the integration of the national transport system.

RESOURCE TARLE

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget (a) Actual $(‘000) S(-000) $(‘000)

FINANCIAL

Running costs (b) - 852 386

Total appropriations - 852 386

Total outlays - 852 386

STAFFING

1992-93 1993-94 1993-94 Actual Budget Xetual

Staff years - 7 1.1

(a) Budget figure amended to include additional estimates.

(b) Annotated appropriations are a form of special appropriations to allow a departm ent access to the money it earns.

68 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

SECTION 2

F inancial statements and appendixes

F in a n c ia l sta te m e n ts 1 9 9 3 - 9 4

Table 1: Aggregate statement of transactions by fu n d .............................................77

Table 2: Detailed statement of transactions by fund................................................ 78

Table 3: Program summary.......................................................................................... 89

Table 4: Program statement........................................................ 91

Table 5: Statement of supplementary financial information.................................. 108

A p p e n d ix e s

Appendix 1: Freedom of Information Act: Section 8 statement...................................127

Appendix 2: Departmental and portfolio addresses...................................................... 139

Appendix 3: Equal Employment Opportunity................................................................ 142

Appendix 4: Equal Opportunity in board and executive appointments...................... 144

Appendix 5: Staffing overview and performance appraisal.......................................... 145

Appendix 6: Industrial Democracy.................................................... .....150

Appendix 7: Occupational Health and Safety................................................................ 152

Appendix 8: Use of consultants........................................................................................153

Appendix 9: Advertising and market research...............................................................154

?

vCIAL EMENTS

Financial Statem ents, 1 9 9 3 -9 4 - Supplem entary Statem ent This supplementary statement has not been audited but is provided for the general information of readers.

Total expenditure for the Department in 1993-94 was $2491.5 million, a decrease of $1838.6 million from the previous year. The Department also collected receipts totalling $1512.1 million in 1993-94 compared with $2104.8 million in 1992-93.

Expenditure reductions • Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988 special appropriation expenditure decreased by $200.6 million due primarily

to the untying from 1 January 1994 of National Arterial funding.

• Departmental running costs expenditure decreased by $43 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Payments to the Public Broadcasting Foundation in support of Ethnic Radio News Service decreased by $1,799 million: the three year ERCAS program has been completed. The $140,000 expenditure in

1993-94 represents the final payment of the program.

• Remote Commercial Television Services subsidy decreased by $3,307 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. A decrease of $1.2 million in 1993-94 is due to Optus offering half transponder pricing to RCTS licensees following the introduction of the

B-series satellites. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and

the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Road Safety Improvement Package expenditure decreased by $157.8 million: One Nation funds that were provided for the Blackspots road safety projects were completed in 1992-93.

• Provincial Cities and Rural Highways program a decrease of $100 million: the program was completed on 30 June 1993.

• Urban Public Transport program a decrease of $30 million: the program was completed on 30 June 1993.

• Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan — Maintenance grant: reduction in expenditure of $16.3 million reflects completion of a program of withdrawals of ALOP aerodromes from the plan and transfers of Commonwealth aerodromes to local owners.

• Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan — benefits subsidies: reduction in expenditure of $2.2 million reflects completion of a program of withdrawals of ALOP aerodromes from the plan and transfers of Commonwealth aerodromes to local owners.

• Grants in support of public broadcasting decreased by $1.3 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Australian National Railways Commission expenditure reduction of $20.8 million reflects projected improvements in AN’s financial performance.

70 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

• Australian Broadcasting Corporation Domestic Services expenditure decreased by $149.4 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and

the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Australian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Australia expenditure decreased by $5.1 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993.

Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Special Broadcasting Sendee Operating Expenses expenditure decreased by $20.6 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Payments for broadcasting and technical services decreased by $38.9 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Australian Maritime Safety Authority expenditure decreased by $3.5 million as a result of a review of the Community Service Obligation and a reduction in the maritime radio communications contract.

• Australian Broadcasting Authority expenditure decreased by $2.2 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Payments to the Civil Aviation Authority under the Civil Aviation Act 1988 decreased by $8.5 million reflecting the implementation of the Government’s decision to recover part of the costs of safety regulation from the aviation industry and administrative efficiencies achieved by the CAA.

• Australian Telecommunications Authority expenditure decreased by $5.4 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• Australian Broadcasting Tribunal reduction in expenditure of $2.7 million: the Tribunal ceased operating on 5 October 1992 when the new Broadcasting Services Act 1992 came into effect.

• Waterfront Industry7 Reform Authority reduction in expenditure of $22.9 million reflects the completion of the program on 31 October 1992.

• Second Sydney Airport land acquisition and works expenditure reduced by $9.1 million reflecting progress towards finalisation of claims relating to compulsory

acquisitions of properties on the Second Sydney Airport site at Badgerys Creek and acquisition of potentially noise-affected properties adjacent to the airport site.

• Funding for Transport Infrastructure decreased by $294.9 million reflects 1992­ 93 being the peak year for One Nation road works.

• Newcastle economic development initiative — reduction in expenditure of $2.75 million: a grant of $2.75 million was paid to local government in 1992-93 for upgrading Newcastle Airport as part of a

FIN A.ML STATEMEyj

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 71

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I

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package of special assistance to the Newcastle region.

• National Rail Corporation equity contribution reduction of $103.9 million reflects the payment schedule established in the NR Shareholders Agreement.

• Australian and Overseas Telecommunications Corporation equity contribution reduction of $750 million: in 1991 the Government agreed to the conversion of $2 billion of Commonwealth Debt to Equity held by Telecom — $1 billion on 1 July 1992 and $250 million on each of 1 July for the following four years.

• Australian Broadcasting Corporation capital expenditure decreased by $2.9 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• National Broadcasting capital expenditure decreased by $37.1 million as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order of 23 December 1993. Post-AAO expenditure for the Department of Communications and the Arts is shown in that department’s financial statements.

• National Radio Network expenditure decreased by $1.1 million: funding was provided for the establishment of a national multilingual radio network. The $1.45 million expenditure in 1993-94 represents the balance of funds required.

• State funding for transport infrastructure reduction in expenditure of $17.8 million reflects the completion of the maritime One Nation initiative.

• Reimbursement to Optus Pty Limited for AUSSAT Pty Ltd for redundancy payments: reduction of $1.4 million reflects the

completion of payments under the AUSSAT Share Sale contract.

• Australian Television Service to South-East Asia reduction in expenditure of $5.4 million reflects the finalisation of the set-up costs.

In c r e a s e d e x p e n d itu r e • Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 special appropriation additional funding of $3.1 million predominantly due to the increase

in registration of B-Double configuration vehicles under the Federal Interstate Registration Scheme.

• Increase of $3.7 million in payments to the CAA under the Aviation Fuel Revenues (Special Appropriation) Act 1988 reflects the implementation of the Government’s decision to recover part of the costs of safety regulation from the aviation industry. Duty on aviation fuels was used to recover part of the industry’s contribution under arrangements introduced in 1993-94.

• Payment of levies to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority additional funding of $3.7 million due to increased shipping activity.

• Ships Capital Grants Act 1987 additional funding of $22.5 million: payments under the Act are determined by the timing of new ship purchases by shipowners and the subsequent claim for a grant. The increased level of expenditure in 1993-94 was significantly affected by a $19.1 million grant for the LNG tanker Northwest Sandpiper.

• Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme increase of $4.7 million due to a backlog of claims at the commencement of the financial year, a 5 per cent increase in the

rates of assistance and an increase in the tonnages shipped.

72 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

» Shipping Industry Reform Authority increase of $9.6 million reflects the first full year implementation of the shipping industry reform program announced in

April 1993 and the associated expenditure including the Government contribution to Voluntary Early Retirement and training/retraining components of programs.

• Contribution towards airport infrastructure improvements one-off equity injection of $12.7 million was paid to the Federal Airports Corporation in 1993-94 to fund the acceleration of a new arrivals/departures satellite at Melbourne International Airport.

• Australian National Railways Corporation equity contribution $160.4 million reflects a Government decision to address AN’s debt:equity ratio following the decision to transfer AN’s interstate freight business to

National Rail.

• Australian Broadcasting Corporation subscription television — $2.9 million was provided in 1993-94 for the establishment of subscription television broadcasting services.

R e c e ip ts c o lle c t e d Below is a broad summary of receipts by program:

Aviation: $110.9 million collected for departure tax and $0.6 million from various fees and charges levied for use of airports and facilities.

Broadcasting: $0.6 million recovered from fees and licences under regulation of broadcasting functions and $2.5 million for recoveries associated with national broadcasting services.

C om m unications: $269 million was received from AOTC in repayment of advances and interest bearing advances, $125.7 million from sale of Satellite TV

Service and $0.9 million for recoveries of ITU

contributions.

T elecom m u n ication s regulatory

activities: $1 million in charges were

receipted under the Telecommunications

(Applications Fees) Act 1991.

Rail: $179.4 million was collected in relation

to repayments and interest payments of loans

from state governments and Australian

National.

Road: $24.4 million was collected in fees

and charges relating to the Interstate Road

Transport Act 1985 and the sale of motor

vehicle compliance plates.

Maritime: $48.1 million was recovered in fees and charges relating to navigation

facilities, oil pollution levies, coastal trading

permits and the administration of the Trade

Practices (International Liner Cargo

Shipping) Amendment Act 1989.

Civil Aviation Authority: $5 million relating to interest and loan repayment.

Federal Airports C orporation: $300 million relating to interest and capital

repayment.

G overnm ent B u siness Enterprises:

(Federal Airports Corporation, Civil Aviation

Authority, Australian Postal Commission,

Australian and Overseas Telecommunications

Authority and Australian Maritime Safety

Authority made dividend and interest

payments of $398.6 million and $44.4 million

respectively.

Corporate: $1.8 million was collected from

corporate activities and miscellaneous

sources.

FINANCI AL STATEMENTS

.•ANCiAL p T E M E N T S

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

Centenary House 19 National Crt Barton ACT 2600

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

Scope

I have audited the financial statem ent o f the D epartm ent o f T ransport for the year ended 30 June 1994.

T he statem ent com prises:

. C ertificate by the Secretary and First A ssistant Secretary C orporate M anagem ent

Division

. A ggregate S tatem ent o f T ransactions by Fund

. Detailed Statem ent o f T ransactions by Fund

. P rogram Sum m ary

. P rogram Statem ent

. Statem ent o f S upplem entary Financial Inform ation, and

. N otes to and form ing part o f the Financial Statem ent.

T he S ecretary and First A ssistant Secretary C orporate M anagem ent D ivision are responsible for the preparation and presentation o f the financial statem ent and the inform ation contained therein. 1 have conducted an independent audit o f the financial statem ent in o rder to express an opinion on it.

T he D epartm ent em ploys the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial

statem ent.

T he audit has been conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office A uditing Standards, w hich incorporate the A ustralian A uditing Standards, to provide reasonable assurance as to w hether the financial statem ent is free o f material m isstatem ent.

Audit procedures included exam ination, on a test basis, o f evidence supporting the am ounts and o th er disclosures in the financial statem ent, and the evaluation o f accounting policies and significant accounting estim ates. T hese procedures have been undertaken to form an opinion w hether, in all m aterial respects, the financial statem ent is presented fairly in accordance with A ustralian accounting concepts and standards applicable to public sector reporting entities em ploying a cash basis o f accounting, and statutory requirem ents, so as to present a view w hich is consistent with my understanding o f the D epartm ent’s operations and certain assets and liabilities.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been form ed on the above basis.

G P O Box 707 C a n b e rra A ustralian C apital Territory 2601 T e lep h o n e (06) 203 7300 F acsim ile (06) 203 7777

74 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

A u d it O p in io n

In accordance with sub-section 51(1) o f the Audit Act 1901, I now report that the financial statem ent, in my opinion:

. is in agreem ent with the accounts and records kept in accordance w ith section 40 o f

the Act

. is in accordance with the financial statem ent guidelines made by the M inister for

Finance, and

. presents fairly, in accordance with S tatem ents o f A ccounting C oncepts and applicable A ccounting Standards and with the G uidelines, the transactions o f the D epartm ent for the year ended 30 June 1994 and certain assets and liabilities as at that date.

C .M . M cPherson Executive D irector A ustralian N ational A udit Office

C anberra

20 S eptem ber 1994

f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s

STATEMENT BY THE DEPARTMENTAL SECRETARY

AND

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER

CERTIFICATION

W e certify that the financial statem ents for the year ended 30 June 1994 are

in agreem ent with departm ental accounts and records, and

in our opinion, have been prepared in accordance with the disclosure requirem ents o f the Financial Statem ents Guidelines for Departmental Secretaries (Modified Cash Reporting)

JA A N CU L jplTTESlEN TS

Dated

Signed Signed

D ated

Departmental Secretary First Assistant Secretary

C orporate M anagement Division

76 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Financial statements, 1993-94

Table 1: Aggregate statement of transactions by fund, for the year ended 30 June 1993

This Statem ent show s aggregate cash transactions, for w hich the Departm ent o f Transport is

responsible, for each o f the three Funds m aking up the Com m onwealth Public Account.

1992-93 Actual $

1993-94 Budget $

1993-94 Actual $

CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND (CRF)

2,104,833,769 Receipts 2,881,098,000 1,512,076,856

1,193,236,137

3,136,847.551

Expenditure from Special Appropriations

E xpenditure from Annual Appropriations

1.022.023.000

2.026.663.000

1,025,407,757

1,466,123,626

4,330,083,688 Expenditure 3,048.686,000 2,491,531,383

LOAN FUND

0 Receipts 0 0

0 Expenditure 0 0

TRUST FUND

2,718,743

2,031,702,814

(2,033,536,983)

N otional Balance at 1 July 1993

Receipts

Expenditure

884,574

1,091,595,000

(1,091,595,000)

884,574

1,081,285.495

(1,081.379,188)

884,574 Notional Balance at 30 June 1994 884,574 790,882

884,574

Represented by:

Cash 884,574 790.882

884,574 884,574 790,882

finaM STATEME

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 77

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Table 2: Detailed statement of transactions by fund, for the year ended 30 June 1994

This statem ent shows details o f cash transactions, for which the Departm ent is responsible, for the

Consolidated R evenue Fund and the Trust Fund (The Departm ent w as not responsible for any

transactions o f the Loan Fund).

Consolidated Revenue Fund: receipts

The CRF is the main working fund o f the Com m onwealth and consists o f all current m oneys received by the

Com m onwealth (excluding loan raisings and m oneys received by the Trust Fund). The Departm ent is

responsible for the follow ing receipt items.

1992-93 Sub -

Actual Program

$ (c)

1993-94 Budget $

1993-94 Actual $

2,485,697 A irport navigation charges (a) 1.1 250,000 557,621

18,801 A irport business concessions (a) 1.1 5,000 4,257

175,036 Airport rentals (a) 1.1 20,000 22,443

3,740 Charges for air transport regulatory services (b) 1.1 4,000 2,606

Federal Airports C orporation (FA C) -5,100,000 D ividend (b) 1.3 (d) 7,700,000

49,344,500 Interest (b) 1.3 43,937,000 40,563.200

Capital Repaym ent (a) 1.3 300,000.000 300,000.000

Australian National Line (ANL) Lim ited -0 Dividend (b) 5.2 (d) 0

Civil Aviation A uthority (CAA) -1,979,750 Interest (b) 1.4 1,651,000 1,651,000

5,000,000 Repaym ents (a) 1.4 5,000,000 5,000,000

2,000.000 Dividend (b) 1.4 (d) 15,800,000

143,340 Recoveries for works and services (a) 1.1 10.000 9,732

4,114,315 Sale o f forms for m otor vehicle com pliance plates (b) 4.2 4.657,000 4,494,903

Australian National Railways Com m ission (ANRC) -2,603,302 Interest (b) 4.3 2,404,000 2,403,559

450,000 Repayments (a) 4.3 2,540,000 2,540,000

0 Debt to equity conversion (a) 4.3 160,400,000 160,400,000

40,726,331 M arine navigation levy (b) 5.3 41,466.000 44,505,480

Australian M aritim e Safety Authority -2,279,156 Interest on capital base (b) 5.3 2,270,000 2,228,784

4,500,000 Dividend (b) 5.3 (d) 3,065,000

78 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual ____ $

Sub -

Program ____ (c )

1993-94 Budget ____ $

1993-94 Actual ____ $

9,945 Administration o f Part X o f the Trade Practices 5.1 20,000 12,320

Act 1974 (b)

N ational Railway N etw ork Agreem ent -7,475,825 Interest (b) 4.1 6.613,000 6,613,462

5,499,077 Repaym ents (a) 4.1 6,130,000 6,129,933

144,202 Navigation Act 1912 (b) 5.1 120.000 222,742

1,868,174 Oil pollution levy (b) 5.3 2,896,000 3,374,378

554,367

Railway A greem ent (W estern Australia) -

Interest (b) 4.1 529,000 529,267

440,645 Repaym ent (a) 4.1 400,000 400,288

185,306

Railway Standardisation (New South W ales and

Victoria) A greem ent -

Interest (b) 4.1 176,000 175,510

191,674 Repaym ents (a) 4.1 192,000 191,674

16,999,318

Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 - Registration charges (b) 4.1 16,500.000 19,414,101

304,794 Fines (b) 4.1 550,000 524,232

70,000,000

A ustralian Postal Corporation -

Dividend (b) 3.4 (d) 27,000,000

0 Capital R epaym ent (a) 3.4 200,000,000 0

263,000,000

TELSTRA Corporation Lim ited

Dividend (A O TC ) (b) 3.3 (d) 345,000,000

168,627,615 Interest (b) 3.3 118,479,000 0

75,600.000 R epaym ent o f Interest-B earing A dvances (a) 3.3 75,600,000 18,900,000

1.000,000,000 Repaym ent o f advances - D ebt equity sw ap (a) 3.3 250,000.000 250,000.000

5,478,329

N ational Broadcasting Service - R ecoveries -

Technical facilities and services provided to 2.5 4,814.000 2,548,275

1,321,879

broadcasters and other parties sharing at national

transm itting stations (a)

Other (a) 2.5 0 2,776

10,385

81,963,792

27,915

256,431

132,239

Radio Frequency M anagem ent -

Radio and television interference fees (a)

Radiocom m unications licence fees and charges (b)

Fines, costs and exam ination fees (b)

Radiocom m unications equipm ent type-testing fees (b)

Recoveries o f International T elecom m unication Union 3.1

0

0

0

0

144,000

0

0

0

0

96,000

contribution (a)

F I N A N C I A L S T AT E ME NT S

0 0 1 0

0

?

.^aV C IA L P 'liM K N T S

1992-93 Sub -

Actual Program

$ (0

1993-94 Budget $

1993-94 Actual $

Regulation o f Broadcasting -1,610,613 Fees - conversion o f AM Licences to FM (b) 2.1 0 0

7,031,818 Licence fees - radio stations (b) 2.1 8,900,000 413,558

87,547,033 Licence fees - television stations (b) 2.1 124,400,000 0

0 Fees - radio licence establishm ent 2.1 250.000 189,000

103,725 Fees - limited licences (b) 2.12 0 0

4,546,100 Fees - National M etropolitan Radio Plan (b) 2.1 9.423,000 0

Provision for dividend paym ents from governm ent

(d) business enterprises (d) (e) 1.366,200,000 (d)

1,673,480 Telecommunications (Application fees) Act 1991 (b) 3.5 1.673,000 961,759

9,999,091 Telecommunications (Carrier Licence Fees) 3.5 10,000.000 0

Act 1991 (b)

75,000,000 Sale o f Third M obile Licence (b) 3.6 (d) 0

0 Sale o f Satellite subscription television licences (b) (d) 125,701,100

2,674,760 M iscellaneous (a) (e) 1,000,000 872.596

1.406,130 Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 - to be credited to (e) 1,475,000 896.206

Running Costs - Sub Division 6 5 0 -0 1(a) (See N ote 21)

6,000 ATS/CST Subsidies (a) (See N ote 21) 6.2 0 8,800

92,219,138 Departure Tax (b) 1.1 110,000,000 110,950,295

2,104,833,769 Total Receipts C onsolidated Revenue Fund 2,881,098,000 1.512,076,856

(a) Receipts offset w ithin outlays.

(b) Receipts not offset within outlays (i.e receipts classified as revenue or as financing transactions).

(c) R efer to Program Statem ents.

(d) Dividend paym ents for Governm ent Business Enterprises w ithin the Portfolio were estim ated as a

global dividend o f $1,366.2 m illion for 1993-94 - actual outcom es are show n against individual GBEs.

(e) A llocated to various sub-programs.

80 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Consolidated Revenue Fund: expenditure

The Constitution requires that an appropriation o f moneys by the Parliam ent is required

before any expenditure can be m ade from the CRF. Appropriations follow two forms:

• special (or standing) appropriations; and

. annual appropriations.

The D epartm ent is responsible for the follow ing expenditure items:

1992-93 Actual $

Sub­

Program (a)

1993-94 Budget $

1993-94 Actual $

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS

16,678,596 Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 4.1 16,500,000 19,734,822

1,108,649,000 Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988 4.1 908,075,000 908,075,000

23,613,278 Aviation Fuel Revenues (Special Appropriation)

Act 1988

1.4 25,400,000 27,341,546

57,893 Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987 5.1 30,442,000 22,554,906

44,237,369 Paym ent o f Levies to the Australian M aritim e Safety 5.3 Authority 41,606,000 47,701,483

1,193,236,137 Total Expenditure from Special Appropriations 1,022,023,000 1,025,407,757

1992-93 Actual $

Sub­

Program (a)

1993-94

Appropriation $

1993-94 Actual (b) $

ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS

(A ppropriation Act N o 1

(A ppropriation Act N o 1 Section 35

1,325,189.109 {Appropriation Act N o 3

1,001,687,000

905,006

8,615,000 705,164.381

(A ppropriation Act No 2

1,811,658.442 (A ppropriation Act No 4

(A dvance to the M inister o f Finance

1,024,976,000

250,000

40,872

760,959,245

3,136,847,551 Total expenditure from Annual A ppropriations (c) 2,036,473,878 1,466.123,626

4,330,083,688 Total expenditure from Consolidated R evenue Fund 3,058,496.878 2,491,531,383

(a) Refer to Program Statem ents.

(b) Expenditure figures for this part of the table are shown in aggregate.

(c) The 1993-94 Appropriation includes an am ount o f $905,006, w hich is deem ed

to be appropriated to D ivision 650-1 Running Costs. (See N ote 21)

H N A N cf STATE»® ;

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 81

Details o f expenditure from Annual Appropriations

^Ancial ' "SitMEYiS

1992-93 Actual $

Sub - 1993-94 Program Appropriation (a)_______ $

1993-94 Actual $

APPROPRIATION ACTS Nos 1 AND 3 D ivision 650. - A DM INISTRATIVE

132,384,375 1 Running Costs (See Note 21)

2 Other Services

(b) 117,147,006 89.370,942

2,548,434 01 Free or concessional fares 4.1 3,100,000 3,100,000

32,999,802 02 Tasm anian Freight Equalisation Schem e 5.1 40,500,000 37,681,343

1,248,024 03 Search and rescue 1.2/5.1 1,680,000 1,211,933 1

1,145,721 04 Air services - subsidy 1.1 1,177,000 1,177,000

1,302,855 05 Com pensation and legal expenses 6.2 2,085,000 1,927,921

100,000 06 Australian Council for Radio for the Print

Handicapped - Transm ission subsidy

2.5 100,000 50,000

1,938,500 07 Payments to the Public Broadcasting Foundation

in support o f Ethnic Radio News Service

2.1 140,000 140,000

962,367 08 Establishm ent o f and paym ent to the National

Road Transport Com m ission

4.1 1,100.000 1,095,923

3,307,055 09 Remote Com m ercial Television Services Subsidy 2.1 2,063,000 0

163,400,000 10 Road safety im provem ent package (including for

paym ent to the Australian Land Transport

Developm ent Trust Fund)

4.2 6,000,000 5,580,000

100,000,000 Provincial Cities and Rural Highways Program

(including for paym ent to the Australian Land

Transport D evelopm ent Trust Fund)

4.1 0 0

30,000,000 Urban public transport program (including for

paym ent to the Australian Land Transport

Developm ent Trust Fund)

4.1 0 0

35,000 Paym ents under subsection 34A(1) Audit Act

1901

3 Grants and Contributions

3.1 0 0

10,000 01 Australian M otorcycle Council - Grant 4.2 10,000 10,000

18,531,049 02 Aerodrom e Local Ownership Plan

- M aintenance grant

1.1 4,096,000 2,225,870

5,297,796 03 Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan - Benefits

subsidies

1.1 3,084,000 3,083,045

4,800,124 04 International Telecom m unication Union

- Contribution

3.1 4,860.000 4,859,937

266,200 05 Asia-Pacific Telecom m unity - Contribution 3.1 289,000 262,908

2,259,000 06 Grants in support o f public broadcasting 2.1 3.045,000 950,000

54,918 07 Contribution to the Organisation for Econom ic Co-operation and D evelopm ent - Road Transport

4.1 55.000 39,752

1

Research Program

82 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual $

Sub - 1993-94 1993-94 Program Appropriation Actual (a)_______ $__________ $

7,000 08 Bicycle Federation o f Australia - Grant in Aid 4.1

1.043,029 09 International Civil Aviation Organisation 1.1

- Contribution

7,000

1,199,000

503,641,249 191,737,006

D ivision 651.- AU STRA LIA N NATIO N A L RAILW AYS CO M M ISSIO N

59,000,000 For expenditure under the Australian N ational Railway: 4.3 45,000,000

C om m ission Act 1983

59,000,000 45,000,000

D ivision 652 - BR OADCA STING AND T EL EV ISIO N SERVICES

1 Australian Broadcasting Corporation - O perating expenses

479,781,000 01 General activities - Dom estic services

13,696,000 02 G eneral activities - Radio Australia

under Part VII o f the Australian B roadcasting

Corporation Act 1983 or in respect o f associated services

11.182,000 14,809,000

7,000

1.198.502

153,972,077

38,200,000

38,200,000

2.2 497,442,000 330,372,000

2.2 14,095,000 8,587,000

2.3 70,501,000 43,915,800

2.5 87,516,000 37,937,331

634,791,535 669,554,000 420,812,131

D ivision 653.- A U ST R A L IA N M A R ITIM E SA FETY A UTHORITY

17,979,000 1 For expenditure under the Australian M aritim e Safet; 5.3 14,480,000 14,479,617

_____________ A uthority A ct 1990 _________________________________

17.979.000 14,480,000 14,479,617

Division 654.- A U STRA LIA N B R O A D CA STIN G A UTHORITY

11.182.000 1 For expenditure under the Broadcasting Services 2.4 14,809.000 8,962,000

Act 1992

8,962,000

Division 655.- C IV IL AVIA TIO N AUTH O RITY

59.260.000 1 For expenditure under the Civil A viation A ct 1988 1.4 50,800,000______ 50,800,000

59.260.000 50,800,000 50,800,000

D ivision 656. - A U STRA LIA N TEL EC O M M U N IC A TIO N S A UTHORITY

12.226.000 1 For expenditure under the T elecom m unications Act 3.5 12,030,000 6,815,000

___________ 1991 - O perating expenses ________________________________

12.226.000 12,030,000 6,815,000

F I N A N C I A L S T AT E ME NT S

❖ jC IA l

'MnMBNTS

1992-93 Actual $

Sub­

Program (a)

1993-94 Appropriation $

1993-94 Actual $

Division 657. - SH IPPIN G INDUSTRY REFO RM AUTHORITY

220,051 1 Running Costs 5.4 500,000 260,286

1,223,841 2 Shipping Industry Reform Program 5.4 12,297,000 10,863,271

1,443,892

REG U LA TIO N O F BR OADCA STING A N D TELEV ISIO N

12,797,000 11,123,557

2,753,000 Australian Broadcasting Tribunal - O perating expenses 0 0

2,753,000

W A TER FRO N T IN D U STR Y REFORM A UTHORITY

0 0

519,981 Running Costs 0 0

22,392,453 W aterfront Industry Reform Program 0 0

22,912,434 0 0

1,325.189,109 TOTAL A PPRO PR IA TIO N ACTS Nos 1 AND 3

APPROPRIATION ACTS Nos 2 AND 4

D ivision 970. - C A PITA L W ORKS AND SERVICES

1 Acquisitions, Buildings, W orks, Plant and Equipm ent

1,011,207,006 705,164,381

0 02 Contribution tow ards airport infrastructure 1.1

im provem ents

12,700,000 12,700,000

9,828.215 03 Second Sydney Airport land acquisition and work 1.1 7.899,000 733,289

0 04 Contribution tow ards the developm ent o f 1.1

Badgerys C reek Airport

370.000 0

523,312,000 05 Funding for transport infrastructure (including 4.1

paym ent to the Australian Land Transport

D evelopm ent Trust A ccount)

404,350,000 228,347,316

2,750,000 New castle econom ic developm ent initiative - 1.1

U pgrading o f N ew castle airport

0 0

500,000 Perth A irport - L and Acquisition 1.1 0 0

215,034 Departm ental plant and equipm ent 3.1/3.2

3 Equity, Advances and Loans

0 0

162,672,000 01 N ational Rail C orporation - equity contribution 4.1 58,700,000 58,700,000

1,000,000,000 02 TELSTRA Corporation Lim ited - Equity 3.3

contribution

250,000,000 250,000,000

0 03 Australian National Railways Com m ission - 4.3

Equity contribution

160,400,000 160,400,000

1,699,277,249 894,419,000 710,880,605

84 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual $

Sub­

Program (a)

1993-94 Budget $

1993-94 Actual $

D ivision 971 .-CA PITA L W ORKS A ND SERVICES -

B R O A D CA STIN G AND TELEVISION

1 For paym ent to the A ustralian Broadcasting Corporation

9,216.000 01 G eneral activities - Dom estic services 2.2 7,500,000 6,324,000

51,764,807 2 Provision and installation o f radio and television 2.5 transm itters and ancillary buildings, works

and technical equipm ent for national broadcasting

3 For expenditure under the Special Broadcasting

Service Act 1991

77,157,000 14.623,645

2,517.000 01 N ational Radio N etw ork 2.3 1,450,000 1,450,000

0 02 Capital W orks and Services 2.3 750,000 0

63,497,807 86,857,000

Division 972.-PA Y M EN T TO OR FOR T H E STA TES, THE

N O R TH ERN TERRITORY A N D THE A U STRALIAN

CA PITA L TERR ITO RY

22,397,645

41750000 01 Funding for Transport Infrastructure 4.1 29,650,000 23,944,392

304,794 02 Paym ent o f am ounts equal to penalties resulting 4.1

from prosecutions under regulations m ade for the

purposes o f paragraph S56(2)(d) o f the Interstate

Road Transport Act 1985

550,000 524,232

0 03 Tasm ania - C om pensation in respect o f Bass Strait 5.1 passenger service

250,000 0

42,054,794

D ivision 973.-O T H E R SERVICES

30,450,000 24,468,623

0 01 Survey w ork - Alice Springs - Darwin rail link 4.1 1.000,000 180,500

1,428,591 Reim bursem ent to O ptus Pty Lim ited for A U SSA T 3.1

Pty Ltd redundancy paym ents

0 0

0 02 Contribution to the Organisation for Econom ic 1.1

Co-operation and D evelopm ent - A ir Transport Study

40,872 40,872

1,428,591

Division 974. - BR OADCA STING A N D T EL EV ISIO N

1 Other Services

1,040,872 221,372

0 01 Paym ent to the Australian Broadcasting 2.2

C orporation for the for the establishm ent of

subscription television broadcasting services

12,500,000 2,991,000

5,400,000 Australian Television Service to South-E ast A sia 2.2 0 0

5,400,000 12,500,000 2,991.000

1,811,658,442 TOTAL A PPRO PR IA TIO N ACTS N os 2 A ND 4 1,025,266,872 760,959,245

FIN A M ''

(a) Refer to Program Statem ents

(b) A llocated to various sub-program s

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E ME N T S 85

‘".‘uttNCIAL »' [.TrtMENTS

1992-93 Actual $'000

1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

RECEIPTS

Revenue

(150,647) 1. Aviation (155.592) (176,667)

(100,839) 2. Broadcasting (142,973) (603)

(670,548) 3. Com m unications (330,152) (498,663)

(32,237) 4. Land Transport (31,429) (34,155)

(49,528) 5. M aritim e (46,772) (53,409)

0 6. Corporate D irection and Support 0 0

0 GBE G lobal D ividends (a) (1,366,200) 0

(1,003,800) Total Revenue (2,073,118) (763,496)

(1,101,034) Plus Receipts Offset W ithin Outlays (807,980) (748,581)

(2.104,834) Total Receipts to Consolidated Revenue Fund (2,881,098) (1,512,077)

(a) D ividend paym ents for G overnm ent Business within the Portfolio w ere estim ated as a global Dividend

o f $1,366.2 m illion for 1993-94.

90 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Table 4: Program Statement, for the year ended 30 June 1994

This Statem ent shows details o f expenditure from annual and special appropriations for each program and sub­

program adm inistered by the Departm ent. Each 'annual' appropriation item contributing to a sub-program is

identified by its description follow ed by its appropriation code in brackets. 'Special' appropriations are identified

by reference to the legislation containing the special appropriation. Partial allocations o f appropriations to

sub-program s are identified by (p) follow ing the item. W ith respect to those sub-program s for

which 'expenditure from appropriations' and 'outlays' differ, the Statem ent discloses inform ation reconciling

the am ounts concerned. The Statem ent also show s details o f revenue for each program (w here applicable).

A detailed explanation of each program and sub-program is provided in the text pages o f this Annual Report.

1992-93 Actual $'000

Notes 1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

PROGRAM 1: AVIATION

1.1 Aviation Policy, Security and Infastructure

Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

10.420 Salary and allowances (22) 6,400 7,535

8.534 Adm inistrative expenses (22) 6,607 6,420

74 Property O perating Expenses - Capital 0 0

Other Services - Division 650-2

1,146 Air services - Subsidy (650-2-04) 1,177 1,177

Grants and Contributions - D ivision 650-3

18,531 Aerodrom e Local O w nership Plan - M aintenance grant (23) 4,096 2,226

(650-3-02)

5,298 Aerodrom e Local O w nership Plan - Benefits subsidies (24) 1.986 3,083

(650-3-03)

1,043 International Civil Aviation O rganisation - Contribution 1,189 1,199

(650-3-09)

Capital W orks and Services - D ivision 970-1

0 Contribution towards airport infrastructure 12,700 12,700

im provem ents (970-1-02)

9,828 Second Sydney Airport land acquisition and works (25) 7,899 733

(970-1-03)

Contribution towards the developm ent o f Badgerys

0 Creek A irport (970-1-04) (26) 370 0

Other Services - Division 973

OECD A ir Transport Study contribution (973-02) (27) 0 41

2,750 Newcastle econom ic developm ent initiative (28) 0 0

- U pgrading o f Newcastle Airport

500 Perth A irport - Land A cquisition (29) 0 0

58,124 Expenditure from A ppropriations 42,424 35,113

F I N A N C I A L S T AT E ME NT S

1992-93 Actual $'000

Notes 1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

Less receipts offset within outlays

(19) Airport business concessions (5) (4)

(2,486) A ir navigation charges (30) (250) (558)

(175) A irport rentals (20) (22)

(143) Recoveries for works and services (10) (10)

(1,375) M iscellaneous (p) (31) (498) (111)

(247) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) (150) (127)

53,679 Outlays 41,491 34,281

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(92,219) Departure Tax (110,000) (110,950)

(4) Charges for air transport regulatory services (4) (3)

(92,223) (110,004) (110,953)

1.2 Investigating for Safety

,/^VNCIAL

H^rae-NTS Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

3,530 Salary and allowances 3,775 3,712

3,333 A dm inistrative expenses 2,170 1,885

O ther Services - D ivision 650-2

____________353 Search and rescue - Division 650-2-03 (p) ___________ 380____________ 270

7,216 Expenditure from Appropriations 6,325 5,867

Less receipts offset within outlays

(4) M iscellaneous (p) 0 (28)

____________ (99) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) ___________(113)____________(80)

7,112 O utlays 6,212 5,758

1.3 Federal Airports Corporation

Receipts offset within outlays

0 Federal Airports Corporation - Loan repaym ent _______(300,000)_______ (300,000)

(54,445) Outlays (300,000) (300,000)

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(5,100) Federal Airports Corporation - Dividend

(49,345) - Interest

(32) 0

(43,937)

(7,700)

(40,563)

(54,445) (43,937) (48,263)

92 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Notes

Actual $'000

1993-94 Budget $’000

1993-94 Actual $'000

1.4 Civil Aviation Authority

Special Appropriations

23,613 Aviation Fuel Revenues (Special A ppropriation) Act 1988 25,400 27,342

Civil A viation Authority - D ivision 655

59,260 For expenditure under the Civil A viation Act 1988 (655-1) 50,800 50,800

82,873 Expenditure from Appropriations 76,200 78,142

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

(5,000) Civil A viation Authority (CAA) - Repaym ents (5,000) (5,000)

77,873 Outlays 71,200 73,142

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(2,000) Civil Aviation A uthority (C A A ) - D ividend (32) 0 (15,800)

(1,980) -In terest (1,651) (1,651)

(3,980) (1,651) (17,451)

1.5 International Air Services Commission

Running Costs - D ivision 6 5 0 -l(p)

359 Salary and allowances 455 383

385 A dm inistrative expenses 508 349

744 Expenditure from Appropriations 963 731

Less receipts offset within outlays

0 M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(2) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) 0 (2)

742 Outlays 963 729

1.6 Qantas

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

0 Qantas Dividend 0 0

0 0 0

FINAIW STATBMEi

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 93

1992-93

A ctu al

$'000

N otes 1993-94

B udget

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

TOTAL: AVIATION PROGRAM

148,957 Expenditure From Appropriations 125.912 119,852

139,406 O utlays (180,134) (186,090)

?

(150,647) Revenue

PROGRAM 2: BROADCASTING

2.1 Broadcasting Policy

Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

(155,592) (176,667)

2,052 Salary and allowances 2,010 1,049

495 A dm inistrative expenses 728 134

14 Property Operating expenses - Current

Other Services - D ivision 650-2

0 0

1,939 Paym ents to the Public Broadcasting Foundation in

support o f Ethnic Radio News Service (650-2-07)

140 140

3,307 Remote Com m ercial Television Services Subsidy (650-2-09) 2.063 0

0 Interest on deposits under section 89 DAO o f the

Broadcasting Act 1942

G rants and Contributions - Division 650-3

0 0

2,259 Grants in support o f public broadcasting (650-3-06) 3,045 950

10.066 Expenditure from Appropriations 7,986 2,274

Less receipts offset within outlays

(19) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(3) Section 35 o f the Audit A ct 1901 (p) (2) (0)

10,044 Outlays 7,984 2,274

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

Regulation o f Broadcasting

(7,032) Licence fees - radio stations (8,900) (414)

(1.611) Fees - conversion o f AM licences to FM 0 0

Fees - radio licences establishm ent (250) (189)

(87,547) Licence fees - television stations (124,400) 0

(4,546) Fees - National M etropolitan Radio Plan (9,423) 0

(100,736) (142,973) (603)

94 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual $■000

Notes 1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

2.1.2 Station Planning (34)

Running Costs - D ivision 650-1 (p)

754 Salary and allow ances 0 0

210 A dm inistrative expenses 0 0

964 Expenditure from Appropriations 0 0

Less receipts offset within outlays

(0) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(1) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) 0 0

963 Outlays 0 0

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(104) Fees - lim ited licences 0 0

(104) 0 0

2.2 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Broadcasting and Television Services - D ivision 652

479,781 General activities - D om estic services (652-1-01) 497,442 330,372

13,696 General activities - R adio A ustralia (652-1-02) 14,095 8,587

Capital W orks and Services - Broadcasting and

Television - D ivision 971

9,216 General activities - D om estic services (971-1-01) 7,500 6,324

Broadcasting and Television - D ivision 974

0 Paym ent to the A ustralian Broadcasting Corporation 12,500 2,991

for the establishm ent o f subscription television

broadcasting services (974-2-01)

5,400 Australian Television Service to South-East Asia 0 0

508,093 Expenditure from A ppropriations 531,537 348,274

508,093 Outlays 531,537 348,274

2.3 Special Broadcasting Service

Broadcasting and T elevision Services - Division 652

64,525 Special B roadcasting Service - O perating expenses (652-2) 70,501 43,916

Capital W orks and Services - Broadcasting and

Television - Division 971

2,517 N ational R adio N etw ork (971-3-01) 1,450 1,450

0 Capital W orks and Services (971-3-02) 750 0

67,042 Expenditure from A ppropriations 72,701 45,366

67,042 Outlays 72,701 45,366

F I N A N C I A L S T AT E ME NT S

1992-93

A ctu al

$'000

Notes 1993-94

B udget

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

.«CNtlAL »' -i-fliW k v rs

2.4 Australian Broadcasting Authority

A ustralian Broadcasting Authority - D ivision 655

11,182 For expenditure under the Broadcasting Services Act

1992 (655-1)

14,809 8,962

11182 Expenditure from Appropriations 14,809 8,962

11182 Outlays

2.5 National Transmission Agency

Running Costs - D ivision 6 5 0 -l(p)

14,809 8.962

3,121 Salary and allowances 4,330 1.988

2,123 A dm inistrative expenses

O ther Services - Division 650-2

2,240 763

100 A ustralian C ouncil for Radio for the Print Handicapped

(650-2-06)

Broadcasting and Television Services - D ivision 652

100 50

76,790 For paym ents in respect o f technical services provided

under Part VII o f the Australian Broadcasting

Corporation Act 1983 or in respect of associated

services - (652-3)

Capital W orks and Services - Broadcasting and

Television - Division 971

87,516 37,937

51,765 Provision and installation o f radio and television

transm itters and ancillary buildings, works and technical

equipm ent for national broadcasting (971-2)

77,157 14,624

133,899 Expenditure from Appropriations

Less receipts offset within outlays

171,343 55,362

(9) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(6) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) (4) (12)

(5,478) National Broadcasting Service - Recoveries -

Technical facilities and services provided to

broadcasters and other parties sharing at national

transmitting stations

(4,814) (2,548)

(1,322) National Broadcasting Service - Recoveries - Other 0 (3)

127,084 Outlays 166,525 52,799

96 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93

A ctu al

$ ’000

N otes 1993-94

B udget

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

Australian Broadcasting Tribunal

Regulation o f Broadcasting and Television

2,753 A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal - O perating expense; (35) 0 0

2,753 Expenditure from Appropriations 0 0

2,753 Outlays

TOTAL: BROADCASTING PROGRAM

0 0

733,999 Expenditure From Appropriations 798,376 460,238

727,161 Outlays 793,556 457,675

(100,839) Revenue

Program 3: COMMUNICATIONS

3.1 Telecommunications Policy

Running Costs - D ivision 6 5 0 -l(p)

(142,973) (603)

2,651 Salary and allowances 4,156 1,891

911 Adm inistrative expenses

Other Services - Division 650-2

3,052 730

35 Paym ents under subsection 34A(1) Audit A ct 1901

Grants and C ontributions - D ivision 650-3

0 0

4.800 International Telecom m unication Union - Contribution

(650-3-04)

4,853 4,860

266 Asia-Pacific T elecom m unity - Contribution (650-3-05)

Other Services - Division 973

289 263

1,429 Reim bursem ent to O ptus Pty Lim ited for A U SSA T Pty

Ltd Redundancy Paym ents

0 0

10,092 Expenditure from Appropriations

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

12,350 7,743

(7) M iscellaneous (p) 0 (160)

(7) Section 35 o f the A udit A ct 1901 (p) (15) (12)

(132) Recoveries International T elecom m unication Union

Contribution

(144) (96)

9,946 O utlays 12191 7 ·475

f is a w 1 STATCMEl

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 97

1992-93

A ctu al

$ ’000

N otes 1993-94

B udget

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

A tV V C IA L ► ‘ f '- i E M E N T S

3.3 TELSTRA Corporation Limited

Capital W orks and Services - Division 970

3 Equity, A dvances and Loans

1,000,000 TELSTRA C orporation Lim ited - Equity contributions

(970-3-02)

250,000 250,000

1,000,000 Expenditure from Appropriations 250,000 250,000

Less receipts offset within outlays

(1,000,000) Repaym ent o f advances - Debt equity swap

(75,600) Repaym ent o f Interest-Bearing Advances

(250,000)

(75,600)

(250,000)

(18,900)

(75,600) Outlays (75.600) (18,900)

Less receipts offset within outlays

TELSTRA Corporation Lim ited

(168,628) - Interest

(263,000) - Dividend (32)

(118,479)

0

0

(345.000)

(431,628) (118.479) (345,000)

3.4 Australian Postal Corporation

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

Australian Postal Com m ission

(70,000) - Dividend (32)

- Capital Repaym ent

0

(200,000)

(27,000)

0

(70,000) (200,000) (27,000)

3.5 Australian Telecommunications Authority (AUSTEL)

Australian T elecom m unications Authority - Division 656

12,226 For expenditure under the T elecom m unications Act 1991

- Operating expenses (656-1)

12,030 6,815

12,226 Expenditure from Appropriations 12,030 6,815

12,226 Outlays 12,030 6,815

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(1,673) Telecommunications (Application fees) Act 1991

(9,999) Telcommunications (Carrier Licence Fees) Act 1991

(1,673)

(10,000)

(962)

0

(11,673) (11,673) (962)

98 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93

A ctu al

$'000

N otes 1993-94

B u d g et

$'000

1993-94

A ctu al

$'000

3.6 Communications Selection Team Running Costs - D ivision 6 5 0 -l(p)

152 Salary and allow ances 99 83

523 A dm inistrative expenses 145 42

675 Expenditure from Appropriations 244 124

675 Outlays 244 124

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(75,000) Sale o f Third M obile Licence (36) 0 0

Sale o f Satellite subscription television licences 0 (125,701)

(75,000)

Radiocommunications Policy and Operations (37)

0 (125,701)

Running Costs - D ivision 6 5 0 -l(p)

14,240 Salary and allow ances 0 0

5,133 A dm inistrative expenses 0 0

Property Operating E xpenses

210 -C u rren t 0 0

250 - Capital 0 0

Capital w orks and Services - Division 970

215 D epartm ental plant and equipm ent (970-1-01) 0 0

20,047 Expenditure from A ppropriations 0 0

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

(11) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(356) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) 0 0

(10) Recoveries for works and services - other interference fees 0 0

19,669 Outlays 0 0

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset w ithin outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(81,964) Radiocom m unications licence fees 0 0

(28) Fines and costs and exam ination fees 0 0

(256) R adiocom m unications equipm ent type-testing fees 0 0

(82,248) 0 0

FINAN STATOHt

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 99

1992-93

A ctu al

$'000

N otes 1993-94

B udget

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

TOTAL: COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM

1,043,040 Expenditure From Appropriations 274,624 264,683

(33,084) O utlays (51,135) (4,485)

(670,548) Revenue (330,152) (498,663)

Program 4: LAND TRANSPORT

4.1 Road and Rail Policy and Development

Special Appropriations

1,105,949 Australian Land Transport Development Act 908,075 908,075

1988 (p)

16,679 Interstate Road Transport Charge Act 1985 16.500 19,735

Running Costs - D ivision 650-1 (p)

3,447 Salary and allowances 3,920 3,591

750 Adm inistrative expenses 1,079 882

O ther Services - D ivision 650-2

2,548 Free or concessional fares (650-2-01) 2,800 3,100

962 Establishm ent and paym ent to the National Road 1,100 1,096

Transport Com m ission (650-2-08)

100,000 Provincial Cities and Rural H ighways Program (39) 0 0

(including for paym ent to the Australian Land Transport

D evelopm ent T rust Fund)

30,000 Urban public transport program (including for paym en (40) 0 0

A ustralian L and Transport D evelopm ent T rust Fund)

Grants and Contributions - Division 650-3

55 Contribution to the Organisation for Econom ic 55 40

Cooperation and Developm ent - Road T ransport

Research Program (650-3-07)

7 Bicycle Federation o f Australia - Grant in Aid (650-3-08) 7 7

Capital W orks and Services - Division 970

Funding for transport infrastructure (including for

523,312 paym ent to the Australian L and Transport D evelopm en (41) 404,350 228,347

Trust Account (970-1-05)

3 Equity, A dvances and Loans

162,672 National Rail C orporation - equity contribution 58,700 58,700

(970-3-01)

100 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual $'000

Notes 1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

Paym ent to or for the States, the Northern Territory

and the A ustralian Capital Territory - Division 972

21.750 Funding for Transport Infrastructure (972-01) 29,650 23,944

305 Paym ent o f am ounts equal to penalties resulting from 550 524

prosecutions under regulations made for the purposes

o f paragraph S56(2)(d) o f the Interstate Road

Transport A ct 1985 (972-02)

Other Services - D ivision 973

0 Survey w ork - A lice Springs - Darwin rail link (42) 1,000 181

(973-01)

1.968,436 Expenditure from Appropriations

TRUST FUNDS TRANSACTIONS AFFECTING OUTLAYS

1,427,786 1,248,222

Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988

(1.105.949) -Levy (908,075) (908,075)

(100.000) -Provincial Cities and Rural Highways (39) 0 0

(30,000) -Urban public transport (40) 0 0

(515,312) -Funding for Transport Infrastructure (from Division (110,000) (110,000)

970-1-05)

(1,751,261) Total Receipts (1,018,075) (1,018,075)

1,751.261 -Expenditure 1,018,075 1,018,075

0 - Net E ffect on O utlays 0 0

Interstate Road Transport Act 1985 (16,679) -Charge (16,500) (19,735)

(16,679) Total Receipts (16.500) (19,735)

16,679 -Expenditure 16,500 19,735

0 -Net E ffect on O utlays 0 0

0 Total T rust Funds transactions affecting outlays 0 0

HN AX: ST ATE ME

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 101

1992-93 Notes 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget Actual

$'000 $'000 $'000

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

(18) M iscellaneous (p) 0 (0)

(189) Section 35 o f the Audit A ct 1901 (p) (247) (233)

171,009 Outlays 11,860 11,133

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(4,114) Sale o f form s for m otor vehicle com pliance plates (4,657) (4,495)

(4,114) (4,657) (4,495)

4.3 Australian National Railways Commission

Australian National Railw ays Com m ission - Division 651

59,000 For expenditure under the Australian National Railwa; (43) 45.000 38,200

Com m ision Act 1983

Equity A dvances and Loans - Division 970-3

0 A ustralian N ational R ailw ays Com m ission - Equity 160,400 160,400

contribution (970-3-03)

59,000 Expenditure from Appropriations 205,400 198,600

Less receipts offset within outlays

(450) Australian National R ailw ays C om m ission - (2,540) (2,540)

Repaym ents

0 AN D ebt to Equity conversion (160,400) (160,400)

58,550 Outlays 42,460 35,660

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset w ithin outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(2,603) Australian N ational R ailw ays Com m ission - Interest (2,404) (2,404)

(2,603) (2,404) (2,404)

TOTAL: LAND TRANSPORT PROGRAM

2,198,651 Expenditure From A ppropriations 1,645,293 1,458,189

2,191,821 Outlays 1,475,382 1,288,271

(32,237) Revenue (31,429) (34,155)

FINANC STATEME

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 103

1992-93

A ctu al

$'000

N otes 1993-94

B u d g et

$'000

1993-94

A ctual

$'000

Program 5: MARITIME

5.1 Maritime Policy

Special Appropriations

58 Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987 (44) 30,442 22,555

Running Costs - D ivision 650-1 (p)

2,237 Salary and allowances 2,729 2,649

562 A dm inistrative expenses 948 921

O ther Services - D ivision 650-2

33,000 T asm anian F reight Equalisation Schem e (650-2-02) 34,000 37,681

895 Search and Rescue (650-2-03) (p) 1,300 942

Paym ent to or for the states, the Northern T erritory and

the A ustralian Capital Territory - D ivision 972

0 Tasm ania - Com pensation in respect o f the Bass Strait 0 0

passenger service (972-03)

20,000 Funding for Transport Infrastructure (46) 0 0

56,751 Expenditure from Appropriations 69,419 64,748

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

(68) M iscellaneous (p) (47) 0 (306)

(2) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) (2) (0)

56,681 O utlays 69,417 64,442

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(10) A dm inistration o f Part X o f the Trade Practices Act 1974 (20) (12)

Oil pollution levy (p) 0 (115)

(144) Navigation Act 1912 (120) (223)

(154) (140) (350)

5.2 Australian National Line

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

0 A N L Lim ited - D ividend 0 0

0 0 0

104 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Actual $'000

Notes 1993-94 Budget $'000

1993-94 Actual $'000

5.3 Australian Maritime Safety Authority-Special Appropriations

44,237 Paym ent o f Levies to the A ustralian M aritim e Safety (48) 41,606 47,701

Authority

Australian M aritim e Safety Authority - D ivision 653

17,979 For expenditure under the A ustralian M aritim e Safety 14,480 14,480

A uthority Act 1990 (653-1)

62,216 Expenditure from Appropriations 56,086 62,181

62,216 Outlays 56,086 62,181

Revenue (i.e receipts not offset within outlays

or classified as financing transactions)

(40,726) M arine navigation levy (p) (41,466) (44,505)

(2,279) Australian M aritim e Safety A uthority - Interest on (2,270) (2,229)

capital base

(1,868) Oil pollution levy (p) (49) (2,896) (3,259)

(4,500) -D ividend (32) 0 (3,065)

(49,374) (46,632) (53,058)

5.4 Shipping Industry Reform Authority

Shipping Industry Reform A uthority - D ivision 657

138 Salary and allowances 250 157

82 A dm inistrative expenses 250 104

1,224 Shipping Industry Reform Program (50) 12,297 10,863

1,444 Expenditure from A ppropriations 12,797 11,124

Less receipts offset w ithin outlays

(696) M iscellaneous (p) (51) 0 (154)

748 Outlays

Waterfront Industry Reform Authority (52)

12,797 10,970

W aterfront Industry Reform Authority

246 Salary and allow ances 0 0

274 A dm inistrative expenses 0 0

22,392 W aterfront Industry R eform Program 0 0

22,912 Expenditure from A ppropriations 0 0

22,912 Outlays 0 0

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

t

I

1992-93 Notes 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget Actual

$'000 $'000 $'000

TOTAL: MARITIME PROGRAM

143,324 Expenditure From Appropriations 138,302 138,053

142,557 O utlays 138,300 137,592

(49,528) Revenue

Program 6: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT

(46,772) (53,409)

6.1 Executive

Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

4,555 Salary and allow ances 4.902 3,783

333 A dm inistrative expenses 424 158

4.889 Expenditure from Appropriations 5,326 3,942

Less receipts offset within outlays

(0) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

0 Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) (1) 0

4,889 O utlays 5,325 3,942

6.2 Management Support and Advice Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

17,390 Salary and allowances 17,355 12,099

14,365 Adm inistrative expenses 17,278 12,073

930 Legal Services (53) 1,278 1,615

Property O perating Expenses

17,731 - Current 14,634 11,857

1.119 - Capital 2,788 1,015

O ther Services - Division 650-2

1,303 Com pensation and legal expenses (650-2-05) (54) 1,385 1,928

52,838 Expenditure from Appropriations 54,718 40,588

Less receipts offset within outlays

(6) ATS/C ST Subsidies 0 (9)

(423) M iscellaneous (p) (502) (90)

(444) Section 35 o f the Audit Act 1901 (p) (890) (295)

51,965 Outlays 53,326 40,195

106 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

1992-93 Notes 1993-94 1993-94

Actual Budget Actual

$'000 $'000 $'000

6.3 Research

Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

3,624 Salary and allow ances 4,131 4,242

762 A dm inistrative expenses 1,223 1,406

4,386 E xpenditure from Appropriations 5,354 5,648

Less receipts offset within outlays

(2) M iscellaneous (p) 0 0

(50) Section 35 o f the Audit A ct 1901 (p) (55) (49) (134)

4,334 O utlays 5,305 5.513

6.4 National Transport Planning Task Force

Running Costs - Division 650-1 (p)

0 Salary and allowances (56) 331 104

0 A dm inistrative expenses (56) 450 235

0 Expenditure from Appropriations 781 339

0 O utlays 781 339

TOTAL: CORPORATE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT PROGRAM

62,113 Expenditure From Appropriations _________ 66,179__________50,517

61.188 O utlays _________ 64,737__________49,989

FINAN STATE!®

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 107

Table 5: Statement of Supplementary Financial Information as at 30 June 1994

1992-93 1993-94

(

$'000 Notes $'000

i

2,191

Current Assets Cash 16 455

2,115 Receivables 11 1,635

- Accrued Revenues Kf), KD 11,127

891 Prepayments Kg) 896

69,684 Loans/Advances 15 14,692

25 Inventories Ke) 1,129

J Non-Current Assets

57,108 Property, Plant and Equipment KD,17 83,451

1 - Intangibles 1(1), 18 31

1,825,688 Loans/Advances 15 196,715

300,000 Promissory Notes -

NCUL

* v

Prepayments 1(g) 26

HP

2,061

Current Liabilities Creditors 13 986

859 Accrued Expenses 14 680

- Employee Entitlements KD, 19 5,524

- Unearned Income l(i),l(D 46

- Other KD,20 550,411

Non-Current Liabilities

Employee Entitlements KD, 19 9,250

- Other 1(1),20 72,350

108 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Notes to the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 1994

Note 1: Statement of Significant Accounting Policies

(a) The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Financial Statements Guidelines fo r Departmental Secretaries (Modified Cash Reporting), issued by the Minister for Finance in January 1994.

(b) (i) The financial statements have been prepared on a cash basis with the exception of the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information which includes certain accrual - type information

(ii) The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the historical cost convention and do not take account of changing money values or, except where stated, current values of non-current assets.

(c) Amounts shown in the Aggregate Statement of Transactions by Fund and the Detailed Statement of Transactions by Fund have been rounded to the nearest dollar, other amounts have been rounded to the nearest $1,000. FINAM

STA TE»

(d) All classes of non-current assets controlled or administered by the Department are disclosed in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information. Assets costing less than $2,000 have not been brought to account with the exception of computer equipment. Assets are valued at acquisition cost less depreciation, or where appropriate by independent valuation. Assets are depreciated using the straight line method over the life of the asset with a 5% residual value.

(e) Inventories brought to account in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information comprise of:

. publications produced by the Department for sale; and

. equipment, spares and stores that typically are not readily available from suppliers and have a long procurement lead time. They are held in reserve for immediate use when required.

(f) The accrued revenues amount shown in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information is an aggregate of amounts payable to the Department. Of this amount, $10,531,140 relates to departure tax collections made by Australia Post for the month of June 1994, which had not been remitted to the Commonwealth. The balance of accrued revenues related to interest on outstanding balances of loans/advances and fees and charges.

(g) The prepayment amount shown in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information is an aggregate of amounts paid by the Department in respect of goods and services that have not been received at 30 June 1994.

FINANCI AL STATEMENTS 109

(h) The Department does not have any non-current assets which are subject to finance leases.

(i) The unearned income amount shown in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information is an aggregate of subscription fees received by the Department in advance of the service being provided.

(j) All vesting employee entitlements (including annual leave and long sendee leave) are recognised as liabilities.

Long service leave is calculated having regard to the probability that long service leave will, in the future, be either taken or have to be paid. Provision for long service leave as at 30 June 1994 is determined on a pro-rata entitlement for each employee whose service equals to or exceeds the benchmark of five years.

(k) Overseas transactions occurring during the year have been converted at the rate of exchange prevailing at the date of each transaction. Loan guarantees arranged in overseas currencies have been converted at the rate of exchange prevailing at 30 June 1994.

(l) This is the first year in which the Department has brought these items to account. It was not practical to provide comparative figures for the year ended 30 June 1993.

(m) Where a variation between Budget and Actuals for 1993-94 is considered significant, a brief explanation of the reasons for the variation has been included in the following notes.

A significant variation has been taken to be a variation of more than 20 per cent from Budget or where the dollar amount of the variation also exceeds $250,000.

(n) All non-current classes of assets administered or controlled by the Department has been disclosed in the Statement of Supplementary Financial Information.

(o) In Tables 1 to 4 the column headed "1993-94 Budget" refers to the original budget estimates appearing in the budget documents issued in August 1993. The term "Budget" is distinguishable from the term "Appropriations" - the former refers to the amounts of expenditure estimated in the Budget documents, whereas the latter refers to the total amounts appropriated by Parliament during the financial year, including the use of the Advance to the Minister for Finance facility.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

The Department of Transport and Communications was renamed the Department of Transport on 23 December 1993 following the transfer of the Communications functions to the newly established Department of Communications.

The financial statements presented above reflect receipts and expenditures that occurred while those Communication functions were part of the Department, ie, from 1 July 1993 to 22 December 1993. For details of receipts and expenditures post 22 December 1994 in respect of the transferred functions, it is necessary to refer to the financial statements

of the Department of Communications and the Arts.

The Budget columns in Tables 1 to 4 reflects the total budget allocation for the Department of Transport and Communications as provided for in the August 1993 budget documents. The 'Actual' amounts reflect the aggregate of cash transactions for those functions which were under the control of the Department during the time the

transactions took place. Accordingly, the loss of the Communication functions during the year results in the 'Actual' amounts being significantly less than the 'Budget' amounts in respect of the Broadcasting and Communication Programs and the Management Support and Advice Sub-program.

FINANI STATEME

Note 3: Contractual Expenditure

Note 2: Restructuring of the Department

The Department as at 30 June 1994, had entered into the following contractual arrangements.

Item Not later

than 1 year

1-2

years

2-5

years

5 years and later

Total

($’000) ($’000) ($'000) ($’000) ($’000)

Provision of remote air services 1,215 - - 1,215

Consultancies, studies and tests 3,270 - - - 3,270

Property leases 7,936 6,739 19,607 8,499 42,781

Other leases 211 85 - - 295

Total 12,632 6,824 19,607 8,499

47,562

f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s 111

Note 4: Commitments

t

N C IA L ΈΜΒ-Vrs

The Department as at 30 June 1994, had entered into the following commitments.

Basis of Not later 1-2 2-5 5 years Total

Commitment than years years and

1 year ($'000) ($’000) ($'000)

later ($’000) ($'000)

Payments under ALTD programs 544,100 767,700 863,200 - 2,175,000

CSO obligations - 43,340 91,387 - 134,727

Second Sydney Airport site 4,653 - - - 4,653

Computer acquisition 127 " - - 127

Total 548,880 811,040 954,587 - 2,314,507

Note 5: Act of Grace Payments

No payments were made in 1993-94 pursuant to subsection 34A(1) of the Audit Act 1901.

Note 6: Waiver of Rights to Payment of Moneys

No payments were waived in 1993-94 under section 70C(2) of the Audit Act 1901.

112 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 7: Amounts Written Off

The following details are furnished in relation to amounts written off during the financial year 1993-94 under sub-section 70C(1) of the Audit Act 1901.

Up to $1,000 Over $1,000

No. Amount $ No. Amount$

Losses or deficiencies of public moneys - - - -

Irrecoverable amounts of revenue - - 3 40,673

Irrecoverable debts and overpayments - - - -

Amounts of revenue or debts and overpayments the recovery of which would, in the opinion of the Minister, be uneconomical 2 221 1 4,435 \

Lost, deficient, condemned, unservicable or obsolete stores 24 12,136 18 164,698

fin an; STATEM1

Note 8: Losses and Deficiencies in Public Moneys

No action was taken in 1993-94 regarding losses and deficiencies in public moneys and property under Part XIIA of the Audit Act 1901.

Note 9: Resources Received Free of Charge

During 1993-94, the following Commonwealth departments provided services to the Department without charge. Expenditures for the services were met from those department's appropriations.

Attorney-General's Department

Whilst the Attorney-General's Department now charges for most of its legal services, some services were provided free of charge. No valuation is available.

Department of Finance

Provision of payroll system and the administration of an accounting ledger for the Department. These services were valued at $57,467.

f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s 113

Note 10: Contingent Liabilities

Although legal actions brought against the Commonwealth are defended in appropriate cases and matters are often settled before court hearings for less than the figure originally sought, it is possible that the liability of the Commonwealth could total $68,414,586 in respect of 51 current claims for damages and compensation. Most of these claims relate to matters in which the Department has been advised are likely to be successfully defended. The total amount reflects estimates of maximum possible liability for each case and not the likely liability.

Note 11: Receivables

Amounts owing to the Department as at 30 June 1994 totalled $2,246,688. Of this amount an estimated total of $611,225 was not expected to be recovered. Details are as follows:

1992-93 Class Current Less 30-60 More Total

than days than

J 30 days 60 days

►ftfl NCIAL $ $ $ $ $ $

«Îœ Ε Ν Τ 8

1,292,653 Trade 155,418 48,036 38,889 319,812 562,155

205,323 Less doubtful debts - - - 194,370 194,370

1,087,330 Net 155,418 48,036 38,889 125,442 367,785

870,494 Other 11,671 17,777 3,746 495,146 528,340

960 Less doubtful debts - - - 416,854 416,854

869,534 Net 11,671 17,777 3,746 78,292 111,486

9,502 Commonwealth Departments 32,926 - - 2,280 35,206

- Less doubtful debts - - - -

9,502 Net 32,926 - - 2,280 35,206

148,294 Commonwealth owned entities 1,120,299 30 61 597 1,120,987

- Less doubtful debts - - - -

148,294 Net 1,120,299 30 61 597 1,120,987

2,114,660 Total 1,320,314 65,843 42,696 206,611 1,635,464

114 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 12: Borrowings Supported by Commonwealth Guarantee

Borrower Authorising Legislation No. of Loans

Total

principal amount covered by guarantee

Total balance

outstanding at 30 June 1994

($’000) ($'000)

Australian National Railways Commission

Australian National Railways Commission Act 1983 Section 36(1) and (2) 25 565,909 627,721

Civil Aviation Authority

Civil Aviation Authority Act 1988 Section 58(1) 2 115,000 113,125

Note 13: Creditors

Invoices rendered by creditors that were unpaid by the Department as at 30 June 1994 totalled $986,193, of which a total of $101,360 was overdue.

1992-93 Period Trade Other

$ $ $

1,884,399 Current Less than 353,578 412,790

166,940 30 days 25,366 182

4,465 30-60 days More than 13,144 5,006 60 days 4,230 -

2,060,810 396,318 412,972

Common­ wealth Depart­ ments

Common­ wealth owned entities

Total

$ $ $

111,255 7,210 884,833

2,150 - 27,698

56,289 " 69,433

- - 4,230

169,694 7,210 986,193

FINANC STATEMElt

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 115

Note 14: Accrued Expenses

Accrued expenses incurred by the Department as at 30 June 1994 totalled $680,087 as follows:

1992-93 $

1993-94 $

737,297 121,759

Trade Other

610,370 69,717

859,056 680,087

“ fYM EOTS

Note 15: Outstanding Balances of Loans/Advances

Borrower Purpose of Amount to be

advance/loan repaid

within one year

($’000)

Amount to be repaid later than one year

($’000)

Total

outstanding at

30 June 1994

($’000)

Federal Airports Corporation Establishment loans to FAC - 100,000 100,000

Civil Aviation Authority Establishment loans to CAA 5,000 20,000 25,000

Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Establishment loans to AMSA - 19,374 19,374

NSW, Vic Rail Standardisation

agreement 192 3,050 3,242

WA Railway agreement 388 8,402 8,790

NSW, Vic, Qld, WA National Rail Network agreement 6,862 31,656 38,518

Australian National Railways Commission

Finance ANRC's capital program 2,250 14,232 16,482

Total 14,692 196,715 211,406

116 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 16: Cash balances as at 30 June 1994

Cash balances as at 30 June 1994 consisted of $113,560 on hand and $341,611 at bank.

Note 17 Property, Plant and Equipment

(i) Land and Buildings

Land

Buildings and Structures Less accumulated depreciation

Total Land and Buildings

$'000

65,256

5,457 1,425

4,032

69,288

(ii) Computers, Plant and Equipment

Office Equipment Less accumulated depreciation

Computer Equipment and Software Less accumulated depreciation

Plant and Equipment Less accumulated depreciation

Registered Vehicles, Plant and Equipment Less accumulated depreciation

Total Computers, Plant and Equipment

* 1

FINANC STATEME!

2,132 616

1,516

22,632 12,668

9,964

683 254

429

120 90

29

11,939

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 117

(ili) Leasehold Improvements

Leasehold Improvements Less accumulated depreciation

9,947 7,723

2,224

Note 18: Intangibles

The intangibles amount shown is the capitalised cost less accumulated amortisation of developing a training video and notes for the Department's Industrial Democracy training package. The video and training notes are available for purchase by other organisations.

$'000

RESENTS

Intangibles - at cost Less accumulated amortisation

54 23

31

Note 19: Employee Entitlements

As at 30 June 1994, employee related liabilities totalled $14,773,061.

Liability Current

$

Non-current $

Total $

Accrued salaries 139,766 - 139,766

Long service leave 188,766 9,249,551 9,438,317

Recreation leave 4,566,275 - 4,566,275

Accrued Performance Pay 628,703 - 628,703

Total 5,523,510 9,249,551 14,773,061

118 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 20: Other Liabilities

The Department as at 30 June 1994, the following other liabilities:

Item Current Non-current Total

($'000) ($'000) ($’000)

Grants under the ALTD program 275,900 72,000 347,900

Rail infrastructure 218,200 - 218,200

CSO obligations 49,339 - 49,339

Payment under the Tasmanian Equalisation Freight Scheme 550 350 900

Ships Capital Grants scheme 5,750 - 5,750

Other 672 - 672

Total 550,411 72,350 622,761

Note 21: Running Costs

This appropriation was annotated pursuant to s.35 of the Audit Act 1901 to allow the crediting of receipts to be retained by the Department.

The categories of receipts which may be credited to the s.35 account include:

. user charges

. contributions from officers towards the provision of telephones

. contributions from officers towards the provision of motor vehicles

. contributions from officers towards the cost of staff housing

. contributions from participants towards the cost of conducting conferences and seminars

. sale of staff housing

FINANC STATtMB

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 119

sale of surplus or under performing personal (ie. non real estate) assets.

The annotated appropriation operated as follows:

Annotated appropriation Receipts Appropriation Expenditure

$117,147,006 $89,370,942

$116,242,000 $905,006

Note 22: Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure

Transfers of Commonwealth aerodromes to local ownership and closures of Aviation regional headquarters during 1992-93 resulted in a increased requirement for salaries, redundancy payments and administrative expenses for 1993-94.

Note 23: Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan - Maintenance Grant

Reduced requirement for 1993-94 reflects completion of a program of withdrawals of ALOP aerodromes from the Plan and transfers of Commonwealth aerodromes to local ownership. Variation between 1993-94 Budget Estimate and actual expenditure reflects outcome of negotiations with local owners.

Note 24: Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan - Benefits subsidies

Reduced requirement for 1993-94 reflects completion of a program of withdrawals of ALOP aerodromes from the Plan and transfers of Commonwealth aerodromes to local ownership. Variation between 1993-94 Budget Estimate and actual expenditure reflects outcome of negotiations with local owners. Additional requirement for social benefit subsidies was fully offset by savings in the maintenance grants item.

Note 25: Second Sydney Airport land acquisition and works

Reduced expenditure reflects progress towards finalisation of claims relating to compulsory acquisitions of properties on the Second Sydney Airport site at Badgerys Creek and acquisition of potentially noise-affected properties adjacent to the Airport site. A number of anticipated settlements did not take place during 1993-94, resulting in under-expenditure against the 1993-94 Budget Estimate.

Note 26: Contribution towards the development of Badgerys Creek

Funding was provided towards the cost of relocating a power line on the periphery of the Badgerys Creek site. The project did not commence in 1993-94.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 27: Advance to the Minister for Finance

Additional funds of $40,872 were required from the Advance to the Minister for Finance for the contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development towards a major OECD air transport study.

Note 28: Newcastle Economic Development Initiative

A grant of $2.75 million was paid to local government in 1992-93 for upgrading Newcastle Airport as part of a package of special assistance to the Newcastle region.

Note 29: Perth Airport - Land Acquisition

Expenditure during 1992-93 related to finalisation of a land acquisition at Newburn, WA, adjacent to Perth Airport, to allow for future development of the Airport.

Note 30: Air navigation charges

FINANCE STATEMEN"

Reduced receipts for 1993-94 reflects the completion of the transfer of Commonwealth aerodromes to local owners. Actual receipts against the Budget Estimate reflects some slippage against anticipated timings for aerodrome transfers in 1993-94.

Note 31: Miscellaneous - Aviation

Reduced Budget Estimate for 1993-94 reflects reducing number of surplus assets for disposal, commensurate with progress in the program of aerodrome transfers and Regional Office closures. Anticipated disposals of a number of surplus staff residences were not finalised during 1993-94.

Note 32: Dividends payable by Government Business Enterprises

Dividend payments for Government Business Enterprises within the Portfolio were •estimated as a global dividend of $1,366.2 million for 1993-94. Actual outcomes are shown against individual GBEs.

Note 33: Federal Airports Corporation - Interest

The FAC's $300 million loan repayment was made earlier than was anticipated at the time the 1993-94 Budget Estimates were prepared, resulting in a reduction in the interest payable for 1993-94.

FINANCI AL STATEMENTS 121

These functions transferred to the Australian Broadcasting Authority on 5 October 1992.

Note 35: Australian Broadcasting Tribunal

The Australian Broadcasting Tribunal ceased operating on 5 October 1992 when the new Broadcasting Services Act 1992 came into effect.

Note 36: Sale of Third Mobile Licence

The sale of the third mobile licence will generate $140 million. $75 million was receipted in 1992-93 with balance due in 1995-96.

Note 37: Radiocommunications Policy and Operations

The functions of the former Radiocommunications Division in the 1992-93 program structure, are now the responsibility of the Spectrum Management Agency.

Note 38: Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988

Funding for Road Safety from the ALTD Act ceased in 1992-93 and was provided under separate appropriation in 1993-94.

Note 39: Provincial Cities and Rural Highways Program

The Provincial Cities and Rural Highways program was completed on 30 June 93.

Note 40: Urban Public Transport Program

The Urban Public Transport program was completed on 30 June 93.

Note 41: Funding for Transport Infrastructure

Delays in the letting of contracts has resulted in reduced expenditure.

Note 34: Station Planning

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Delays in finalising negotiations for tender arrangements has resulted in reduced expenditure.

Note 42: Survey Work - Alice Springs - Darwin link

Note 43: Australian National Railways Commission

The expenditure reduction reflects projected improvements in AN's financial performance.

Note 44: Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987

Payments under the Act are driven by the timing of investments by shipowners in eligible ships and subsequent claims for grants. The increased level of expenditure was due to a $19.1 million grant for the LNG tanker Northwest Sandpiper.

Note 45: Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme (TEES)

FINAV 5TATEME

Additional funds were provided during the year to cover an increase in payments due to a backlog of claims at the commencement of the financial year, a 5% increase in the rates of assistance and an increase in the tonnages shipped.

Note 46: Funding for Transport Infrastructure - Maritime

Funds were provided in 1992-93 only as a one-off contribution under the One Nation Program for infrastructure development at the Port of Townsville.

Note 47: Miscellaneous - Maritime

The receipts are due to recoveries of TFES overpayments and an oil pollution incident.

Note 48: Payment of Levies to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Additional funds were provided during the year for increased shipping activity.

Note 49: Oil pollution levy

The increased receipts reflect an increase in shipping activity.

FINANCI AL STATEMENTS 123

* ANCIAL 1 "E M E N T S

The increase reflects the first full year implementation of the shipping industry reform program announced in April 1993 and the associated expenditure including the Government contribution to Voluntary Early Retirement and training/retraining components of programs.

Note 51: Miscellaneous - Shipping Industry Reform Authority

The receipt relates to a refund of the Commonwealth share of funds remaining in Trust Accounts established for the disbursement of Commonwealth and Employer funds for Voluntary Early Retirement packages plus the Commonwealth share of interest earned on those funds during the initial Shipping Industry and Towage Industry Reform Programs.

Note 50: Shipping Industry Reform Program

Note 52: Waterfront Industry Reform Authority

Waterfront Industry Reform Authority reduction in expenditure of $22.9 million reflects the completion of the program on 31 October 1992.

Note 53: Attorney General's Legal Expenses

Additional funds were transferred from the administrative expenses item at Additional Estimates to cover increased legal fees.

Note 54: Compensation and Legal Expenses

Additional funding was provided during the year for legal costs associated with various common law claims.

Note 55: Research - Section 35 Receipts

Additional revenue received for consultancy work carried out by the Bureau in providing estimates of Greenhouse Gases including long term forecasts in the transport sector.

Note 56: National Transport Planning Task Force

The lower level of expenditure results from the delayed commencement of the Taskforce and development of the work program resulting in the need to carryover funds to 1994-95 to meet associated consultancy costs.

124 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Note 57: ANL Guarantee

The Minister for Transport announced the Government's intention to guarantee ANL's existing debt, and any further net drawdowns on ANL's $100 million promissory note facility (which under ANL's Articles of Association require Government approval). The due diligence report conducted by consultants, Price Waterhouse and Salomon

Brothers, indicated that as at August 1994 ANL's net debt totalled $180 million. To the extent that the majority of existing liabilities are secured against assets of the company, the potential financial impact of any calls on guarantees which may be given under the provisions of the Bill in the future is significantly reduced. The successful restructuring

of ANL will further reduce exposure.

FINAV st a ttw

F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S 125

S f -

Freedom o f Inform ation Act: Section 8 Statem ent The Freedom o f Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act) requires Commonwealth

Government agencies to make available information about their organisation,

functions and operations, and about rules and practices which are used in making

decisions which affect members of the

public.

Section 8 of the FOI Act requires each agency to publish detailed information about

the way it is organised, its powers, the kinds

of decisions made, arrangements for public involvement in work of the agency,

documents held by the agency and how members of the public can obtain access to

these documents.

The body of this Annual Report explains the

major functions of the Department, the major issues affecting members of the public and

the role of the other agencies in the portfolio.

This statement supplements that general information to meet the requirements of s.8

of the FOI Act and is correct as at 30 June

1994.

In this statement, particulars of the

organisation and functions of the Department

are detailed under each program. The

programs are Aviation, Land Transport,

Maritime, and Corporate Direction and

Support.

Appendix 1

Anyone is entitled, under the Act, to apply for access to documents. In many cases, however, you may not need to use FOI. First,

try asking the nearest office of the Department — the information you want may be readily available. An alternative is to approach the Director of Public Affairs on (06) 274 7522, who may be able to help you. If you do decide to make a formal request under the Act, the Department’s FOI Coordinator, on (06)274 7157, can assist you.

There are several agencies which, although part of the Transport portfolio, are not part of the Department. These include the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, Civil

Aviation Authority, Federal Airports Corporation and International Air Services Commission.

A full list of portfolio bodies is at Appendix 2. If you wish to obtain information or documents about these bodies, you should approach them direct.

For the purposes of the FOI Act, records of the Bureau of Air Safety Investigation, Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics, and Shipping Industry Reform Authority are records of the Department. Requests for access to documents of these bodies should be directed to the Department’s FOI Coordinator.

FOI c o r r e s p o n d e n c e

Correspondence on FOI matters should be addressed to:

The Secretary Department of Transport GPO Box 594 CANBERRA ACT 2601 Attention: Freedom of Information

Coordinator

How to get inform ation

APPENDIXES 127

FOI p r o c e d u r e s

The general power to grant or refuse access to any document held by the Department is held by the Secretary. The Secretary has authorised sub-program executive officers to grant and refuse access to documents held by their respective sub-programs under the Act. Generally, access is provided in the form of copies of documents, however, the Department can provide a reading area for the inspection of documents made available under the FOI Act.

C a te g o ries o f d o c u m e n ts

The Department maintains records in various forms.

• Files on a wide range of topics related to the Department’s functions are maintained by the Department’s Records Management Unit.

• Card indexes are used generally for minor record-keeping purposes such as for indexing reference material.

• Computer databases are maintained for keeping bulk records.

C lasses o f r e c o r d s

Records are maintained in at least one form on the following.

Aviation Air safety investigation; international agreements relating to aviation; international and domestic aviation service issues; aviation environmental issues; aviation infrastructure issues; the FAC, the CAA, aviation security; Public Register of International Airline Tariff filings; liaison with industry and state government bodies;

departure tax administration; international aviation issues; statistical information on

passenger, freight, mail and aircraft movements; monitoring and economic analysis of the aviation industry; deregulation issues; aviation competition and

consumer issues; intermodal issues; and register of available capacity pursuant to Section 49 of the International Air Services Commision Act 1992.

Land Transport Industrial relations in the transport industry; rail matters; research and development; road funding; road legislation and statistics; road programs; road transport industry; urban public transport; records of project approvals, financial commitment and expenditure under the various roads and land transport programs; and receipts and payments under the Federal Interstate Registration System.

Road Safety All road fatalities in Australia for selected years since 1980; crashes resulting in serious injury 1988-89; applications for compliance plate approvals; vehicle standards; vehicle safety recalls monitored by the Federal Office of Road Safety; vehicle safety investigations conducted by FORS; road safety research database (contains comprehensive records of road safety research being carried out in Australia); and subscriptions to Australian Design Rules, Conformity o f Production Manual, Test Facility Inspection Manual, and Single

Uniform Test Inspection Manual.

Maritime International maritime conferences and conventions; register of conference agreements; register of ocean carrier agreements; register of designated shipper

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

bodies; register of non-conference ocean carriers with substantial market power; register of obligations concerning unfair pricing practices; marine cargo liability;

international shipping services; Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987; ANL; AMSA; coasting trade provisions of the Navigation Act 1912; the waterfront, including

stevedoring and port authorities; shipping and waterfront industry reform; seafarers rehabilitation, compensation and occupational health and safety in the maritime industry; Tasmanian Freight

Equalisation Scheme; and marine casualty investigations.

M an agem en t

Financial management; personnel matters; and contracts and information management.

Some of this material may be exempt from disclosure under the FOI Act.

Manuals In accordance with s.9 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982, a list has been compiled of unpublished manuals and other

documents used by departmental officers as a guide to procedures and practices to be followed when dealing with the public. The list is correct as at 30 June 1994 and is available on request from the FOI Coordinator or any office of the Australian Archives.

Functions and powers by program and sub­ program Program 1: Aviation

1.1 Aviation Division The Aviation Division is involved in international and domestic aviation issues. It

is made up of three branches - Infrastructure and Industry Policy, International Relations, and Aviation Security - and a divisional management unit and aviation statistics unit. The Division also had administrative responsibility for the Federal Airports Scoping Study Taskforce, and a regulatory team.

F u n c tio n s

• Negotiate and administer international air services arrangements between Australia and other countries.

• Formulate and administer policy concerning international air freight and non-scheduled international services.

• Examine the economic aspects of international airline operations.

• Advise on consumer protection issues in the aviation industry.

• Provide policy advice and administrative action in relation to Qantas, including issues of ownership and financial performance.

• Liaise with the IASC on policy matters affecting international air services.

• Formulate policy and attitudes on Australian participation in international aviation organisations.

• Monitors agreements and developments in international aviation, tourism and trade.

• Administer departure tax.

• Coordinate Commonwealth involvement in the FAC and the CAA.

• Advise on issues related to the Government’s proposed sale of federal airports and Sydney West Airport.

• Monitor deregulation in the airline

industry.

APPENDI XES 129

• Collect, analyse and publish international, domestic and general aviation statistics.

• Assess and provide advice on national airport infrastructure planning and development issues.

• Develop and implement strategies to minimise the adverse impact on the environment of aviation-related activities.

• Develop and audit compliance with aviation security policies and standards.

• Implement and oversight the closure of the Department’s regional aviation offices.

Powers

The Division exercises delegated decision making powers, and advises the Minister on the exercise of powers, under:

Air Accidents (Commonwealth Government

Liability) Act 1963

Airports (Business Concessions) Act 1959

Airports (Surface Traffic) Act 1960

Air Navigation Act 1920

Air Navigation (Charges) Act 1952

Aviation Fuel Revenues (Special Appropriation) Act 1988

Civil Aviation Act 1988

Civil Aviation (Carriers Liability) Act 1959

Civil Aviation (Damage by Aircraft) Act 1958

Departure Tax Collection Act 1978

Federal Airports Corporation Act 1986

International Air Services Commission Act 1992

Air Navigation Regulations

Air Navigation (Aerodrome Curfew)

Regulations

Air Navigation (Aircraft Noise) Regulations

Air Navigation (Charges) Regulations.

1 .2 B u rea u o f Air Safety

In v estig a tio n

Functions BASI records and investigates details of accidents and incidents involving civil aircraft in Australian airspace. It gathers safety information for analysis, undertakes research and prepares recommendations and reports for dissemination to appropriate parties within the industry. The Bureau undertakes also systemic investigations entailing detailed examination of particular aspects of the aviation system and focuses its attention towards the pro-active use of safety information obtained during investigations.

Powers Officers of the Bureau exercise statutory decision-making powers delegated by the Secretary to investigate air accidents and incidents.

1 .5 In te r n a tio n a l Air

S e r v ice s C o m m issio n

The IASC, made up of three members appointed by the Government, is an independent statutory body established on 1 July 1992.

Functions The Commission makes determinations, on public benefit grounds, allocating available capacity to Australian carriers to operate

international scheduled air services to countries in accordance with Australia’s bilateral air services arrangements with those countries. The broad aim is to promote:

• Greater economic efficiency in the airline industry, and increased competition between Australian carriers.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

• Increased responsiveness by airlines to the needs of consumers including an increased range of choices and benefits.

• Australian tourism and trade.

• The maintenance of Australian carriers capable of competing effectively with airlines of foreign countries.

Powers

The Commission exercises decision-making powers under the International Air Services Commission Act 1992.

Program 2: Road and Rail Policy 2.1 L and T ran sp ort P o licy D iv isio n

The Land Transport Policy Division is made up of three branches - Road Transport Branch, Rail Branch and Roads Branch.

Functions To advise the Minister on:

• Strategies for reforming the Australian rail system, in particular, the development of National Rail, and encouraging the states to operate their systems efficiently.

• Developing roads and providing financial assistance to the states and territories for roads purposes under the Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988.

• Urban public transport issues.

• Road transport industry matters, including the structure, operations and regulation of the industry, and the administration of the Federal Interstate Registration Scheme.

• Commonwealth involvement in land transport planning and research, including

financial assistance for Austroads and the

Australian Road Research Board.

• The recovery of road costs and road user pricing systems, and energy consumption

in operating land transport systems.

• The relationship of land transport to other

areas of public policy such as social justice

and the environment.

Powers

The Division advises the Minister on the

exercise of powers under:

Australian Land Transport Development Act

1988

Australian National Railways Commission

Act 1983

Railways Agreement (SA) Act 1975

Railways Agreement (Tasmania) Act 1975

National Rail Corporation Agreement Act

1992.

The Division exercises delegated decision­

making powers under the above legislation in

regard to payments from the Trust Funds to

the states, the Northern Territory and the

ACT; approval of project proposal reports;

and approval of compliance with National

Highway design standards. Officers of the

Division also exercise delegated decision­

making powers under the Interstate Road

Transport Act 1985.

2 .2 F e d era l O ffice o f R oad

S afety

The Federal Office of Road Safety is made up of two branches - Motor Transport Branch

and Road User Branch.

APPENDIXES 131

Functions Program 3: Maritime

• To coordinate and promote road safety strategies nationally in conjunction with the National Road Transport Commission

and the National Road Trauma Advisory Council.

• To formulate national policies and

proposals for vehicle safety, vehicle emissions and noise, vehicle fuel efficiency in relation to ecologically sustainable

development and greenhouse issues, road user and traffic standards and procedures,

and transport of dangerous goods and explosives by road and rail.

• To carry out research and development leading to safety, emission and noise

Australian Design rules for all new vehicles, and administers these nationally under the Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989.

• To administer the allocation of funds for the Federal Black Spot program to redesign and promote treatments with high benefits in relation to their costs to modify sites

with a known serious accident history.

• To conduct and sponsor road safety research programs, and plans, coordinates

and carries out national road safety education and publicity programs.

Powers Divisional officers exercise delegated

powers, and advise the Minister on the exercise of his powers, under the Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989, the Explosives Act 1961, and the relevant aspects of the Australian Land Transport Development Act

1988.

3.1 M aritim e P olicy D ivision

The Maritime Policy Division is made up of two branches - National Shipping and Infrastructure Branch; International and Commercial Shipping Policy Branch - and the Marine Incident Investigation Unit.

Functions • Develop policy advice in relation to international and domestic shipping, shore-based shipping services, the

operations of ANL and the AMSA, and seafarers rehabilitation, compensation and occupational health and safety arrangements.

• Provide administrative support to the Seafarers Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority.

• Administer regulatory arrangements governing international liner shipping and coastal shipping.

• Administer programs of financial assistance for Australian ship owners (Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987) and shippers of goods to and from Tasmania (TFES).

• Investigate marine casualties associated with the operation of ships.

Powers A range of powers are vested in the Minister but delegated to divisional officers. These include powers under the Navigation Act 1912 and Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974.

The Minister appoints an officer of the Division as the Registrar of Liner Shipping under Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

The Division advises the Minister on the exercise of his power under the Navigation Act 1912 to grant continuing voyage permits. Single voyage permits are approved by

divisional officers under ministerial delegation.

Powers under the Ships (Capital Grants) Act 1987 are vested in the Secretary of the Department and the majority are delegated to a divisional officer.

3 .4 S h ip p in g In d u stry R eform A u th ority

The objectives of SIRA are to promote, facilitate and monitor the restructuring and revitalisation of the Australian shipping industry to improve its efficiency and

international competitiveness through effective implementation of the shipping reform strategy.

Functions • To establish detailed targets and timetables for the shipping reform strategy in line with the strategic objectives set by the

Government.

• To oversee the implementation of the strategy, including the crewing, training and early retirement components.

• To monitor progress towards strategy objectives.

• To manage the government-sponsored elements of the strategy including the progressive release of government funds once specified targets have been met.

Powers SIRA does not exercise statutory decision­ making powers.

Program 4: Corporate Direction and Support

4 .1 E x ecu tiv e

The Executive is made up of the Secretary, the Deputy Secretary (Transport Operations) and the Deputy Secretary (Transport Policy).

Function The Executive has overall responsibility for the Department’s strategic management and

operations.

4 .2 C orp orate M anagem ent

The Corporate Management Division is made up of four branches — Planning and Budgeting Branch, Human Resources Branch, Legal and General Branch, Policy Coordination Branch - and the Information Systems Section and the Internal Audit Section.

Functions • To provide financial policy and management advice, including the monitoring of financial performance across

the Department.

• To develop and implement policies, procedures and systems relating to effective personnel management in the Department.

• To provide advice and assistance in relation to legislative development and other legal issues.

• To provide advice to the Minister, Secretary and senior officers of the Department on matters needing inter-divisional coordination.

a p p e n d i x e s 133

• To provide support services in the areas of supply, accommodation and office services, property planning and management and information services and systems.

Powers Divisional officers exercise delegated powers under the Public Service Act 1922 and associated legislation, the Audit Act 1901 and the Archives Act 1983.

4 .3 B u r e a u o f T ran sp ort a n d

C o m m u n ic a tio n s E c o n o m ic s

Functions The BTCE is a centre for applied economic research within the Department. It investigates the efficiency and growth of the transport and communications industries, and the development of effective transport and communications policies.

Powers No statutory decision-making powers are exercised by the Bureau.

4 .4 N a tio n a l T ran sp ort P la n n in g T a sk fo rce

The NTPT was established in October 1993 to examine the adequacy of both transport infrastructure and operational systems to meet Australia’s future transport needs, focusing primarily on the interstate movement of freight.

Functions Under its terms of reference the Taskforce is required to:

• Assess future transport demand and associated infrastructure needs.

• Examine impediments to the efficient operation of the transport chain.

• Consider questions relating to the degree of coordination, integration and competition within and between individual modes of transport.

• Suggest criteria for evaluating national transport infrastructure investment.

The Taskforce, which is supported by a small secretariat based in the Department, has been asked to present its final report to the Government in October 1994.

Powers The Taskforce does not exercise statutory decision-making powers.

Arrangements for outside participation and public involvement Departmental officers participate in a wide range of organisations reflecting the broad range of the Department’s functions. The Department has a continuing involvement in the following organisations.

Program 1: Aviation Although no formal arrangements exist for outside participation or public involvement, departmental officers participate in or contribute to the following committees and forums.

ICAO Asia P a c ific A rea T raffic F o r e c a stin g G rou p

Australia is an official member of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Asia-Pacific Area Traffic Forecasting Group, which is made up of representatives from

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Singapore and the United States. The Group undertakes a range of forecasts of aviation activity in the

Asia-Pacific region and drafts an official report. These forecasts become official ICAO projections and copies of the Group’s detailed report are made available to member states to assist planning work in a range of relevant areas such as infrastructure provision and navigation facilitation.

A u stralian A viation A dvisory C o m m itte e

The Division participates, with observer status, on the Australian Aviation Advisory Committee. The Committee is organised and managed by the CAA and advises the CAA on meeting its responsibilities for safety

regulation and on the operational aspects of the services it provides. The Committee, with its expert and industry membership, was established in 1988 to advise on all regulatory proposals in order to improve the quality of advice provided to the CAA and to streamline consultation. Matters discussed are generally of a technical and or regulatory nature.

S ta n d in g C o m m itte e o n T ran sp ort A viation W ork in g G roup

The 20th SCOT meeting on 3 August 1993 noted the agreement by Ministers at the June 1993 Australian Transport Advisory Council meeting that SCOT should take a higher profile in discussing aviation issues. The meeting agreed that a working group of

representatives from the Commonwealth and all states and territories, should be established to consider aviation issues of mutual interest, including interstate aviation issues, international aviation issues,

intrastate aviation issues, infrastructure issues, and aviation safety and standards. The Department chairs working group meetings.

C o m m itte e s c o n c e r n in g e n v ir o n m e n ta l m a tter s at S yd n ey A irport

The Department participates on various committees concerning environmental matters at Sydney Airport. These include the Sydney Noise/Air Management Plan Steering Committee and working groups developing the Noise Management Plan and Air Quality Management Plan. Involvement by the Department is coming to an end, and will cease after the NMP and AQMP are issued September 1994.

C o m m itte e s c o n c e r n in g e n v ir o n m e n t m a tters at o th e r a ir p o r ts

Departmental officers participate on the following committees on an ad hoc basis.

• Adelaide Airport Consultative Committee

• Alice Springs Airport Consultative Committee

• Archerfield Airport Consultative Committee

• Avalon Airport Noise Abatement Committee

• Brisbane Airport Consultative Committee

• Canberra Airport Consultative Committee

• Coolangatta Airport Consultative Committee

• Darwin Airport Consultative Committee

• Essendon Airport Consultative Committee

• Jandakot Airport Consultative Committee

APPENDI XES 135

F

• Melbourne Airport Consultative Committee

• Perth Airport Consultative Committee

• Sydney Airport Consultative Committee

• Sydney Airport Environment Sub­ committee.

For some committees a departmental representative attends all meetings, but for others, departmental representation is restricted to rare occasions when matters directly relating to the Department’s responsibilities are on the agenda. These committees provide a useful forum to meet industry and community groups to discuss the impact of the Governments aviation environment policies on the operations at the respective airports.

Program 2: Land Transport A u stra lia n R ail In d u stry A dvisory C o u n cil

The ARIAC was established to provide advice on developing an efficient and competitive rail system in Australia. It is a primary source of external advice on the rail industry for the Federal Minister. The Council is made up of senior people from rail management, unions and government, who are closely involved in the industry’s day-to­ day activities and who are users of rail services. The Department is represented on the council and provides the secretariat support.

A u stralian R oad R e se a r c h R oard a n d A u stroad s

The Department is a member of the Australian Road Research Board, and a senior departmental officer is a director of the Board. The Department is also represented on the Advisory Committee. The

Department is also a member of Austroads and is represented on the Council. A senior departmental officer is the Program Manager for the Road and Road Transport Policy Program.

A u stra lia n R oad T ran sp ort A dvisory C o m m itte e

The ARTAC provides the Federal Minister with direct industry-based advice on all aspects of the road transport industry. The Committee is made up of representatives from the road transport industry and government bodies, and is supported by a secretariat provided by the Department.

A u stralian T ran sp ort C o u n cil

The ATC was established in June 1993, subsuming the functions of the Australian Transport Advisory Council and the Ministerial Council for Road Transport. The ATC is a Ministerial forum for Commonwealth, state and territory consultations and advice to governments on coordinating and integrating all transport and road policy issues at a national level. The Council is made up of Commonwealth, state and territory Ministers responsible for transport, roads, and marine and ports matters. The New Zealand and Papua-New Guinea Ministers for Transport, along with the Australian Local Government Association, have formal “observer” status on the Council. The Council is supported by the SCOT and its advisory groups and committees, and the NRTC and its technical advisory groups and committees.

N a tio n a l R oad T raum a A dvisory C o u n cil

The NRTAC was established in August 1990 by the Prime Minister, and was appointed to

136 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

advise the Government on effective and achievable ways to further reduce the number of people killed and injured on Australian roads.

P e r m a n e n t I n te r n a tio n a l A sso cia tio n o f R oad C o n g r e sses

The Department is represented on the executive of the Australian National PIARC committee, which represents and promotes PIARC in Australia. The Department is a national government member of PIARC.

R oad E n g in e e r in g A sso c ia tio n o f Asia a n d A ustralasia

This association, which has its headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, promotes the advancement of road engineering practices. The Department has been an institutional member since 1978.

N ation al A c c e ssib le T ran sp ort C o m m itte e

In keeping with the Government’s obligation to provide access and equity for all Australians, the Commonwealth Government

established the NATC in 1992 to examine and advise the Minister on ways of improving accessibility to, and availability of, transport for people with disabilities, including the

less mobile elderly. The Committee consists of representatives of the Commonwealth, state and territory governments, disability groups, and industry. The Department provides secretariat support for the committee.

Program 3: Maritime A u stralian T ran sp ort C o u n c il

Divisional officers participate in the work of the Committees and sub-groups of the ATC, including the SCOT and the Marine and

Ports Group. These examine and provide advice to federal and state Ministers for Transport, and the Northern Territory Minister for Transport, on a range of issues in

the marine and ports sector.

N a tio n a l C o n su lta tiv e G rou p o n T ran sp ort E le c tr o n ic Data In te r c h a n g e

The National Consultative Group on

Transport EDI was established by the Federal Government in November 1992 to coordinate and accelerate the implementation of EDI in the transport and trading sectors. The need for a national EDI working party was identified in the House of

Representatives Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure Wharehouse to Wharf report. The Group is chaired by the Department,

with membership drawn from EDI peak

bodies and relevant government agencies.

Program 4: Corporate Direction and Support D e p a r tm e n ta l C o n su lta tiv e C o u n c il

The Departmental Consultative Council, established within the Industrial Democracy

framework, provides a national forum for consultation and negotiation on significant issues of concern to management and staff,

and facilitates the mutual exchange of information. Membership is made up of management and major unions which share the coverage of staff working in the

Department. ID and Equal Employment Opportunity are standing agenda items for

Council meetings.

APPENDI XES 137

N a tio n a l T ran sp ort P la n n in g T a sk fo r ce

Under its terms of reference, the NTPT is required to consult widely in undertaking its work. A discussion paper seeking views was issued in December 1993 and an intensive consultation program undertaken with transport users, operators, government agencies and other interested parties.

F r e e d o m o f In fo r m a tio n in q u ir ie s , 1 9 9 3 -9 4

During 1993-94, the Department received, under the Freedom o f Information Act 1982, 31 requests for access to documents. Most of these were requests for documents relating to aircraft accident investigations. An appeal on an access decision was taken to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. As at the end of this reporting period no decision has been handed down.

In response to four applications, access was provided to all documents requested. Partial access was granted to a further 14 requests. No access was given to three requests, because documents were considered to be either exempt or because no documents could be found within the description provided. Six requests remained current at 30 June 1994.

F r e e d o m o f In fo r m a tio n s ta tistic s, 1 9 9 3 -9 4

Requests received No

On hand at 1 July 1993 5

Received 31

Action on requests Access in full 4

Access in part 14

Access refused/no documents located 3 Transferred in whole 3

Withdrawn Current as at 30 June 1994

Response time

6 6

0-30 days 11

31-60 days 8

61-90 days 2

91 plus days 0

Internal review On hand at 1 July 1993 1

Applications received 2

Decision affirmed 1

Greater access given 1

Withdrawn 1

Current as at 30 June 1994 0

Review by Administrative Appeals Tribunal Applications 1

Fees and charges Total application fees collected $ 680.00 Total charges notified $1,196.52

Total charges collected $3,132.40

C o m p la in ts to th e O m b u d sm an

During 1993-94, the Ombudsman received 27 complaints (16 oral and 11 written) about departmental actions. Of these, nine were resolved in favour, or partly in favour, of the complainant, and three in favour of the

Department. Others were not formally resolved by the Ombudsman, for example, where the Ombudsman exercised her statutory discretion not to investigate a complaint.

There were no formal recommendations made to the Department or formal reports to the Minister under the provisions of the Ombudsman Act 1976. No recommendations for act of grace payments were made.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Appendix 2

Departm ental, Portfolio addresses Central office, Canberra Myuna Complex GPO Box 594 Tel: (06) 274 7111

(Todd, Trace, Drakeford Canberra ACT 2601 Telex: 62018

and Cox Buildings) Fax: (06) 257 2505

corner Northbourne Avenue and Cooyong Streets Canberra ACT 2600

Bureau of Air Safety Investigation Central office: 24 Mort Street PO Box 967 Tel: (06) 274 7111

Braddon ACT 2601 Civic Square ACT 2608 Fax: (06) 247 3117

Interstate offices P rogram 1: A viation

Aviation Security Regional Offices Brisbane: 12th Floor PO Box 10243 Tel: (07) 838 9999

363 Adelaide Street Brisbane Queensland 4000

Sydney:

Brisbane Adelaide Street Queensland 4000 Fax: (07) 238 9991

Level 7 PO Box E382 Tel: (02) 283 1665

1 Market Street Sydney NSW 2000

Melbourne:

St James NSW 2000 Fax: (02) 283 1702

3rd Floor PO Box 6444 Tel: (03) 685 3260

6 Riverside Quay South Melbourne Victoria 3205 St Kilda Road Victoria 3004 Fax: (03) 685 3586

Adelaide: 8th Floor PO Box 538 Tel: (08) 237 7723

10 Putney Street Adelaide SA 5000

Adelaide SA 5001 Fax: (08) 237 7796

Perth: Control Tower Complex PO Box 385 Tel: (09) 477 1234

Perth International Airport New burn WA 6104 Cloverdale WA 6105 Fax: (09) 477 1069

A P P E N D I X E S

P rogram 3: M aritim e

Sydney: Level 7 PO Box Q78 Tel: (02) 283 1650

1 Market Street Queen Victoria Building Fax: (02) 283 1679

Sydney NSW 2000 Sydney NSW 2000

Hobart: 5th Floor GPO Box 1269 Tel: (002) 205 307

3 Brooke Street Hobart Tasmania 7001 Fax: (002) 241 386

Hobart Tasmania 7000

Government Business Enterprises, statutory authorities and other bodies Civil Aviation Authority 25 Constitution Avenue GPO Box 367 Tel: (06) 268 4111

Canberra City ACT 2601 Canberra ACT 2601 Telex: 62221

Fax: (06) 268 5686

Federal Airports Corporation 2 Lord Street Locked Bag 28 Tel: (02) 207 7777

Botany NSW 2019 Botany NSW 2019 Fax: (02) 316 5606

International Air Services Commission Scala House GPO Box 630 Tel: (06) 267 1100

11 Torrens Street Canberra ACT 2601 Fax: (06) 267 1111

Braddon ACT 2601

Qantas Airways Ltd Qantas Centre Tel: (02) 691 3636

203 Coward Street Telex: 20113

Mascot NSW 2020 Fax: (02) 691 3277

ANL Ltd 432 St Kilda Road GPO Box 2238T Tel: (03) 869 5555

Melbourne Victoria 3004 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Telex: AA 130584

Fax: (03) 869 5319

Australian Maritime Safety Authority Benjamin Offices PO Box 1108 Tel: (06) 279 5000

Belconnen ACT 2617 Belconnen ACT 2616 Fax: (06) 279 5858

Shipping Industry Reform Authority 4th Floor, Drakeford Building GPO Box 1719 Tel: (06) 274 7665

72 Northbourne Avenue Canberra ACT 2601 Fax: (06) 274 7690

Canberra ACT 2600

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Seafarers Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority Level 4, Drakeford Building GPO Box 594 Tel: (06) 274 7704

72 Northbourne Avenue Canberra ACT 2600

Canberra ACT 2601 Fax: (06) 274 6699

Australian National Railways Commission 1 Richmond Road GPO Box 1743 Tel: (08) 217 4111

Keswick SA 5035 Adelaide SA 5001 Fax: (08) 231 9936

National Rail Level 5 Perth House PO Box 1419 Tel: (02) 685 2555

85 George Street Parramatta NSW 2150

Parramatta NSW 2124 Fax: (02) 687 1804

National Road Transport Commission Level 5 PO Box 13105 Tel: (03) 321 8444

326 William Street Law Courts Fax: (03) 326 8964

Melbourne Victoria 3000 Melbourne Victoria 3000

APPENDI XES 141

Equal Employment Opportunity An important aspect of the Department’s corporate goal is to involve and treat staff fairly and equitably. In support of this commitment, the Department’s 1992-1995 EEO Program outlines a variety of EEO initiatives at the corporate, sub-program and individual staff member level. These initiatives are designed to assist with identifying and eliminating discriminatory practices so that staff, particularly those within the EEO designated groups, can continue to pursue the careers of their choice.

EEO reports were presented regularly to the Departmental Consultative Council, where issues discussed included progress of the EEO program, vacation child care, the EEO budget, and general EEO activities. EEO statistical data were also reported in The State o f the Department document.

The Department continued its representation on the Australian Public Service Joint Council Sub-committee, Women in the Service and EEO Minority Groups, wdiich concentrates on EEO and in particular women’s issues related to APS employment matters.

As part of the continuing development of policies to assist workers with “carer” responsibilities, a proposal to provide an employer-sponsored vacation child-care program was developed, with the program expected to be operational midway through

1994-95.

Appendix 3 Under the principle of reasonable adjustment

to accommodate people with disabilities, a number of modifications to the work environment were undertaken during the year.

Sub-program strategies in the EEO program provided a significant focus for promoting EEO principles and practices. This reflects the devolved management environment in the Department, where line managers are expected to take prime responsibility for human resource issues, including EEO.

The EEO program emphasises the need for all staff to make themselves aware of their personal rights and responsibilities in

achieving the EEO goals. A network of EEO contact officers throughout the Department assisted the EEO Coordinator in raising awareness and distributing EEO information.

EEO and sexual harassment contact officer networks were maintained as a first point of contact for any aggrieved staff member.

During the year an evaluation committee was established to assess progress of the Department’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recruitment and Career Development Plan. The plan aims to highlight and improve career options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and potential recruits through training and career development initiatives.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff were encouraged to maintain contact and to become involved in future activities relating to Aboriginal issues, and in the evaluation of the Recruitment and Career Development Plan.

The Department has two Aboriginal cadets pursuing tertiary study under the Aboriginal Cadetship Program. One cadet has undertaken already a work placement with

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

the Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics, and the other, appointed during the year, is expected to begin work in the Aviation sub-program during the university summer break (1994-95).

Positions with primary carriage of EEO coordination were one SOG C with oversight responsibility and one ASO 6. Other staff in the Human Resources Branch were involved

in EEO projects as required. The First Assistant Secretary, Corporate Management Division, was the designated Senior Executive Responsible for EEO.

At the end of June 1994, the Department held EEO data on 96 per cent of staff.

Tables 7 and 8 at Appendix 5 show gender and designated group breakdown for actual permanent staff (including inoperatives) by salary groupings (Table 7) and occupational groupings (Table 8) respectively.

Total numbers for the Department and the APS (in brackets) are: women 39.5 per cent (46.6 per cent); non-English speaking background 17.7 per cent (12.2 per cent);

Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders 0.8 per cent (1.2 per cent); and people with disabilities 4 per cent (4 per cent).

There were slight increases in the percentages of all the designated groups represented in the Department, with the exception of people with a disability.

The establishment of the Spectrum Management Agency in July 1993, with a staff of almost 400 and a large number of

technically oriented, traditionally male- dominated positions, contributed to this change in profile.

The current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff is seven officers (0.8 per cent). Although this is still low compared with the APS figure of 1.2 per cent, there has been an increase from last year. The

implementation of the Department’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recruitment and Career Development Plan is expected to address this further over time.

Priorities for the next financial year include having operational a vacation child-care program, completion of the revision of the EEO program to reflect the revised organisation and functional structure resulting from the machinery of government changes, and on providing a range of cross- cultural awareness activities.

a p p e n d i x e s 143

Equal Opportunity in board and

executive appointm ents Equal Opportunity data relating to board and executive appointments in the portfolio as at 30 June 1994 are as follows:

Total number of positions occupied - 135

Positions filled by EEO target groups:

Appendix 4

Male Aboriginal 0

Female Aboriginal 0 Male NESB 0

Female NESB 0

Male disabled 0

Female disabled 0

Total males 123

Total females 12

Of the 35 appointments made during the year, five were female.

Provision of this information is voluntary.

144 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Appendix 5

Staffing overview and perform ance appraisal

Table 6: Senior Executive Staff num bers (nom inally at 30 June 1994)

Nominal Classification

M F Total

Gains M F

Losses M F

SESB1 19 3 22 1(a) 1 1

SES B2 7 2 9 1

SES B3 1 1 2 1

Associate Secretary 1

Secretary 1 1

Total 28 5 33 3 1 3 1

(a) Secondment until January 1995

I n te r -a g e n c y m o b ility

One Associate Secretary from the former Department of Transport and Communications transferred to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet; one SES B3 transferred to the Department and then resigned during the year; one SES

B2 officer retired; and one SES B1 officer transferred to PM&C. In addition, one SES B3, who transferred temporarily in 1992-93, returned to PM&C during the period.

One SES B3 (Deputy Secretary) was

promoted from the Department of Defence

and two SES Bis (one to Corporate

Management Division from the Department

of Primary Industries and Energy and one

secondment to the Bureau of Transport and

Communications Economics from the

Australian Bureau of Agricultural and

Resource Economics) commenced during

1993-94.

A P P E N D I X E S

Table 7: EEO groups within salary ranges, permanent actual positions including inoperatives, 30 June 1994 Staff who have volunteered EEO data Salary Range Men Women Total(l) XESB1 NESB2 ATSI PWD Total(2) < = $23748 13 18 31 5 3 2 1 28

42% 58% 18% 11% 7% 4% 90%

$23749 - 26967 36 59 95 10 7 3 7 91

38% 62% 11% 8% 3% 8% 96%

$26968 - 29894 28 61 89 8 16 0 2 84

31% 69% 10% 19% 0% 2% 94%

$29895 - 33519 27 55 82 6 2 0 1 79

33% 67% 8% 3% 0% 1% 96%

$33520-36511 47 45 92 6 7 0 4 90

51% 49% 7% 8% 0% 4% 98%

$36512 -42719 87 55 142 13 19 0 6 135

61% 39% 10% 14% 0% 4% 95%

$42720 - 47814 134 44 178 14 15 0 8 173

75% 25% 8% 9% 0% 5% 97%

$47815 - 56063 139 22 161 8 12 0 5 153

86% 14% 5% 8% 0% 3% 95%

$56064 - 59183 16 1 17 1 1 0 0 17

94% 6% 6% 6% 0% 0% 100%

> =$62064 34 6 40 1 3 0 2 37

85% 15% 3% 8% 0% 5% 93%

Total 561 366 927 72 85 7 36 887

61% 39% 8% 10% 1% 4% 96%

Key:

NESB1 - Non-English speaking background, first generation.

NESB2 - Non-English speaking background, second generation.

ATSI - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

PWD - People with a disability.

(1) Total number of permanent actual staff in the Department including inoperatives. Percentages of men and

relate to this total.

(2) Total number of staff w ho have volunteered EEO information. Percentages of EEO groups relate to this total.

Note: Staff of the Corporate Management Division of the Department of Transport also serviced the Department of

Communications and the Arts from its formation until 30 June 1994.

women

146 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Table 8: EEO groups within occupational groups, permanent actual positions including inoperatives, 30 June 1994 Staff who have volunteered EEO data

Group Men WomenTotal(l)NESB1 NESB2 ATSI PWD Total(2)

SES 34 6 40 1 3 0 2 37

85% 15% 3% 8% 0% 5% 93%

Administrative 425 342 767 61 73 3 31 736

55% 45% 8% 10% 0% 4% 96%

Professional 78 5 83 8 7 2 2 80

94% 6% 10% 9% 3% 3% 96%

Technical 9 2 11 0 0 0 0 9

82% 18% 0% 0% 0% 0% 82%

Trade 4 8 12 2 0 0 1 11

33% 67% 18% 0% 0% 9% 92%

Miscellaneous(S) 11 3 14 0 2 0 0 14

79% 21% 0% 14% 0% 0% 100%

Total 561 366 927 72 85 5 36 887

61% 39% 8% 10% 1% 4% 96%

Key:

NESB1 - Non-English speaking background, first generation.

NESB2 - Non-English speaking background, second generation.

ATSI - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

PWD - People with a disability.

(1) Total number of perm anent actual staff in the Department including inoperatives. Percentages of men and women

relate to this total.

(2) Total number of staff who have volunteered EEO information. Percentages of EEO groups relate to this total.

(3) Includes Public Affairs officers.

Note: Staff of the Corporate Management Division of the Department of Transport also serviced the Department of

Communications and the Arts from its formation until 30 June 1994.

A P P E N D I X E S 147

Table 9: Actual staff (1) by classification group and location at 30 June 1994

State SES s o ASO

5-6

ASO 1-4

PAO 1-2

ITO 1-2

PO TO ASI GSO Misc Total

ACT 40 305 182 266 3 21 4 10 23 16 18 888

QLD 1 2 2 6 11

NSW 1 2 1 3 7

VIC 2 3 4 9

TAS 1 3 8 12

WA 2 2 4

SA/NT 2 2 1 5

Total 40 310 193 282 3 21 4 10 39 16 18 936

Key:

SES - Senior Executive Service

SO - Senior Officers and equivalent

ASO - Administrative Service Officer

PAO - Public Affairs Officer

ITO - Information Technology Officer

P 0 - Professional Officer

TO - Technical Officer

ASI - Air Safety Investigator

G SO - General Service officer Misc - includes Graduate Administrative Assistants and Office Trainees

(1) Includes perm anent and temporary, full-time and part-tim e staff but excludes inoperatives. Some levels include

a num ber of officers on Higher Duties Allowance.

Note: Staff of the Corporate Management Division of the Department of Transport also serviced the Department of

Communications and the Arts from its formation until 30 June 1994.

Table 10: Actual permanent and temporary full-time and part-time staff at 30 June 1994 Permanent Temporary Total

Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

M F M F M F M F

536 316 9 32 16 19 2 6 936

Staff of the Corporate Management Division of the Department of Transport also serviced the Department of Communications I

and the Arts from its formation until 30 June 1994.

148 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

P e r fo r m a n c e a p p ra isa l

This financial year was the first in which Senior Executive Service officers were eligible for receipt of performance payments. Payments were based on a full 12-month performance appraisal cycle. In contrast, the performance payments for Senior Officers were based on a link cycle of six months and the performance payments received represented 50 per cent of

the amount payable for a 12-month cycle.

The number of officers in each of the SO and SES classifications, and the aggregate amount paid to each group are: SO* SES

Grade C Grade B Grade A Band 1 Bands 2 and 3

Number 165 116 12 22 9

Amount ($) 127,338 231,350 25,350 107,600 65,875

* Includes equivalents in each grade.

The maximum amounts payable for each classification and performance appraisal rating are: 1 2 3 4 5

Band 3 Nil Nil 7500 11250 15000

Band 2 Nil Nil 6250 9375 12500

Band 1 Nil Nil 5000 7500 10000

Grade A Nil Nil 2000 2670 4000

Grade B Nil Nil 2000 2670 4000

Grade C Nil Nil 806 1075 1500

The number of officers receiving each appraisal rating for each classification are as follows. Because of number limitations, information on geographic region is unable to be reported and gender information can only be reported for SOs grades B and C.

1 2 3 4 5 Total

SES Band 2 + Band 3 0 0 4 5 0 9

Band 1 0 1 16 5 0 22

SOs Grade A 0 1 6 5 0 12

Grade B 0 4 82 30 0 116

Male 0 2 72 27 0 101

Female 0 2 9 4 0 15

Grade C 0 11 118 35 1 165

Male 0 10 94 26 1 131

Female 0 1 24 9 0 34

APPENDI XE S 149

MX 6

150

Industrial Dem ocracy Included in the Department’s corporate goal is the aim to ensure that we “involve and treat our staff fairly and equitably”.

A major objective of the Department’s Industrial Democracy Plan is to ensure “the significant involvement of staff and their unions in decision making”. The plan is linked with the Department’s corporate objectives and extends a commitment to ID through actions designed to implement and enhance more participative work practices, contribute to a more efficient and productive workplace, and promote the efficient and effective use of the Department’s most valuable resource - its people.

The third Industrial Democracy Plan for the former Department of Transport and Communications, produced in accordance with s.22C of the Public Service Act 1922, was distributed to all staff in August 1993. Implementation of the plan has continued since the creation of the Department of Transport.

The Departmental Consultative Council continued to function as the national forum for information exchange and discussion between management and staff on issues of mutual concern. The DCC is an integral component of the Department’s ID plan.

Membership comprises management representatives for both central and state- based staff, and national officers of the six unions having significant coverage of staff. The DCC is co-chaired by management and the unions, and meets three times each year.

Appendix 6

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Key issues addressed by DCC in 1993-94 included: consideration of an evaluation of performance appraisal and pay arrangements, conducted by a joint working party; work-based child care; the revision of the Procedures for the Introduction o f Technological Change; the Department’s collocation in Civic; endorsement of the Department’s third Industrial Democracy Plan, and the outcomes of a snapshot

examining the operation of industrial democracy in three sub-programs. The latter showed that although arrangements were generally satisfactory in some areas, further top-down consultation was considered desirable.

An additional consultative mechanism operates through meetings of workplace delegates and management. These meetings are held at two-monthly intervals and are a useful forum for disseminating information, and resolving specific problems raised by delegates on behalf of members.

The Senior Executive Responsible for ID in the Department is the First Assistant Secretary, Corporate Management Division, who is also a member of the Joint Council of the Australian Public Service. Staffing resources specifically allocated to ID include an SOB (0.1 ASL) and an SOC (0.3 AST), together with secretariat support for the DCC and the workplace delegates meetings of SOB (0.1 ASL), SOC (0.3 ASL) and ASO 5 (0.5 ASL).

Considerable structural reorganisation has occurred in the Corporate Management Division as a result of machinery of government changes announced by the Prime

Minister on 23 December 1993, and 28 January 1994. Efforts were made during the latter half of the financial year to ensure that both organisations, the Department of

Communications and the Arts and the Department of Transport, continued to meet their obligations under the Public Service Act 1922

ID awareness and implementation training has been provided at induction and middle management courses run throughout the year

by the staff development section. Work is

continuing on ways to incorporate ID as part of a combined human resource management package in all appropriate courses run by the Department.

Priorities for 1994-95 will be the evaluation of the transport aspects of the current ID plan and production of a Department of Transport plan.

APTO

A P P E N D I X E S 151

O ccupational Health and Safety In accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991 and after consultation with unions, the Department endorsed an occupational health and safety agreement on 6 August 1993. The agreement will be reviewed in August 1994. As part of the agreement, Health and Safety Committee meetings have continued at three- monthly intervals. The main issues discussed and resolved at these meetings include provision of a safe and healthy work environment particularly in relation to Departmental accommodation, fire evacuation and safety procedures, occupational health and safety policies, and accident and incident reports.

On completion of the initial two-year term of appointment of the health and safety representatives for the Department’s designated work groups, a review of the work groups was held and the Public Sector Union carried out an election on behalf of the Department in December 1993 to enable the appointment of health and safety representatives for the next two-year term. These health and safety representatives were provided with appropriate training to help them carry out their functions.

With the completion of the examination of the warehouse facilities in June 1994, the audit of the physical working environment of departmental premises in Canberra, begun in 1991-92, was finalised. A wide range of factors relating to health and safety were examined and, as a result of the audit, a number of improvements and changes

Appendix 7 occurred to enhance the working conditions

of staff.

With relocation of significant numbers of staff during the year, assessment of 108 work stations of departmental staff was a major activity, together with the provision of ergonomic furniture and equipment to staff with particular needs. Staff are encouraged to have regular eye tests, generally associated with the use of screen based equipment, and during the year, about 95 tests were undertaken.

As part of its commitment to a safe and healthy work force, the Department ran its fifth annual Health Awareness Week in which 136 staff undertook health and fitness assessments.

R e h a b ilita tio n a n d c o m p e n s a tio n

The aim of the Department’s occupational rehabilitation program is for a swift and safe return to duty of employees who have been ill or injured, with early intervention being a key element of successful rehabilitation. The outcomes of this year’s rehabilitation program are: of a total of 19 staff on rehabilitation programs, 16 injured employees returned to pre-injury duties (84 per cent of all cases), one staff member was redeployed within the Department and two were off work at 30 June

1994 (11 per cent).

There were 40 workers’ compensation claims lodged during the year. There were 57 accidents and incidents reported of which seven were reportable to Comcare under s.68 of the Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991. The most common work-related injuries are stress, back injuries, occupational overuse, strains and sprains, and cuts and bruises.

About 25 per cent of these occurred outside

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

work premises-at lunchtime, or on journeys to and from work.

The 1993-94 Comcare premium was significantly reduced in comparison with the previous year’s premium and reflects the Department’s success in managing its claims.

Use o f consultants In 1993-94, the total number of consultants under engagement, was 177. The total amount paid to consultants during the year was $4,818,348. Details of these consultancies are available on request.

Appendix 8

APPE NDI XES

Appendix 9

Advertising and m arket research Program 2: Land Transport

A d v e r tisin g a g e n c ie s

Paid to R eason

$34,305.89 Ogilvy & Mather R e th in k y o u r d rin k television advertisements

and roll-over fees

$88,500.38 Ogilvy & Mather Drink driving “smart card” promotion

$5,560 Ogilvy & Mather Y o u n g drivers advertisement radio pilot

$3,158 Ogilvy & Mather Northern Territory drink drive “rethink”

television advertisement

$43,536 Cook, Green & Moore Drink drive L ig h t R ig h t television advertisements

$193,666.71 Ogilvy & Mather Developed concepts, organised promotional material and launched the D rivesafe campaign

$ 3 6 8 ,726.98 Sub-total

M ark et r e s e a r c h o r g a n isa tio n s

Paid to R eason

$28,200 Worthington Di Marzio Evaluate Young D rivers radio campaign

$52,300 Elliott & Shanahan Market research for a “drink drive”

campaign

$36,000 Elliott & Shanahan Evaluate “rural drink drive” campaign

$21,735 Klein & Associates Concepts for the “rural drink drive”

campaign

$62,000 Maxine Krige Strategic

Research

Motorcyclists

$32,500 Brand Development Evaluate Young Drivers television campaign re-run

$5,620 Kindergarten Union Gave expert advice on early childhood education

$24,150 Brand Development Evaluate Young Drivers television campaign

$21,000 Ramis Corporation Pty Ltd A survey of community attitudes to a range of road safety-related issues.

$ 2 8 3 ,5 0 5 Sub-total

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

D ir e c t m ail o r g a n isa tio n s

Paid to Reason

$3,987.69 3T-ACT Mailing Distribute the Out & About newsletter $5,583.87 3T-ACT Mailing Distribute the Roundabout magazine $9,571.56 Sub-total

M edia a d v e r tisin g o r g a n isa tio n s

Paid to Reason

$799,752 Mojo Re-run television Young Drivers advertisements

$8,348 Mojo Young Drivers radio advertisements

$882,757 Mojo “Drink driving” television advertisements

$36,229 AIS “Drink driving” magazine advertisements

$751,883 Mojo “Rural drink driving" television advertisements

$747,720 Mojo Young Driver television advertisements

$3,226,688 Sub-total

ΛΙΤΗΝ

A P P E N D I X E S 155

Compliance index

I n d e x to G o v ern m en t r e p o r tin g r e q u ir e m e n ts

Secretary's statement Aids to access

Corporate and portfolio overview Objectives Social justice overview Corporate structure Portfolio legislation and statutory authorities Non-statutory bodies Government companies EEO in appointments Major documents Program reporting Activities Social justice (including access and equity) Human resources Staffing overv iew Performance pay Training Interchange system Equal Employment Opportunity Industrial Democracy Occupational Health and Safety Post-separation employment Other resources Financial statements Fraud control Claims and losses Purchasing and use of consultants Payment of accounts Capital works management Property usage Market surveys External scrutiny Reports by the Auditor-General Inquiries by parliamentary committees Comments by the Ombudsman Decisions of courts and administrative tribunals Freedom of Information (FOI) Privacy Client comments Impact monitoring Business regulations Status of women Environmental matters

Guideline Rage

1-4 iii-iv

5 v

6 69, 156-168

7 1

8 1.4

9 5

10-11 4,7

12-17 available on request

18-21 available on request

22-24 available on request

25 4,4

26 1.128-129

27-28 9-68

29-30 5,20,24,35-36,42-43,51.62

31-33 145-148

34-35 149

36-39 61

40 available on request

41 143

42 150-151

43-44 51,152-153

45 n/a

46 70-125

47-49 62, available on request

50-51 available on request

52, 53, 55-60 153, available on request 54 available on request

61 n/a

62 available on request

63 154-155

64-67 5-6, available on request

68-70 6

71-73 6

74-76 6

77 127-138

78-83 available on request

84-85 n/a

86-87 available on request

88 62

89-94 35,42, available on request

156 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Glossary of acronyms used

A

ADR AGP ALOP ALTD AMSA

ANAO AN ANL ANRC APEC APS AQMP ARTAC ASI ASO ATC ATSI

B

BASI BTCE

c CAA COAG

D

DCC

E

EDI EEO EO

F

FAC FIRS FOI FORS

Australian Design Rule Australian Government Publishing Service Aerodrome Local Ownership Plan Australian Land Transport Development Australian Maritime Safety Authority Australian National Audit Office Australian National Australian National Line Australian National Railways Commission (see AN) Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Australian Public Service Air Quality Management Plan Australian Road Transport Advisory Committee Air Safety Investigator Administrative Service Officer Australian Transport Council Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Bureau of Air Safety Investigation Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics

Civil Aviation Authority Council of Australian Governments

Departmental Consultative Council

Electronic Data Interchange Equal Employment Opportunity Equal Opportunity

Federal Airports Corporation Federal Interstate Registration Scheme Freedom of Information Federal Office of Road Safety

G GBE Government Business Enterprise

GSO General Service Officer

I

IASC IATA ICAO ID IMO ITO

J JCPA

M MSC

IN NATO NESB

NH NMP NR NRG NRTAC NRTC NTPT

o OECD OH&S

P PAO PIARC PM&C PO PSA PWD

International Air Services Commission International Air Transport Association International Civil Aviation Organization Industrial Democracy International Maritime Organization Information Technology Officer

Joint Committee for Public Accounts

Maritime Safety Committee

National Accessible Transport Committee Non-English Speaking Background National Highway Noise Management Plan National Rail National Rail Corporation (see NR) National Road Trauma Advisory Council National Road Transport Commission National Transport Planning Taskforce

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Occupational Health and Safety

Public Affairs Officer Permanent International Association of Road Congresses Prime Minister and Cabinet Professional Officer Prices Surveillance Authority People with a Disability

158 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

s SCOT Standing Committee on Transport

SES Senior Executive Service

SIRA Shipping Industry Reform Authority

SO Senior Officer

τ TFES TO

Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme Technical Officer

Index

A

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recruitment and Career Plan, 142-3 Aboriginal Cadetship Program, 142 accident investigations and reporting,

aviation, 23 accountability requirements, Department of Transport, 61-2 accrual accounting, 61 acronyms, glossary, 157-9 address for correspondence, Freedom of

Information, 127 addresses, Departmental and Portfolio, 139­ 41 Advance Airlines, crash, 6 Advertising and Market Research

(Appendix), 154-5 Aggregate statement of transactions by fund, Financial Statements, 77 Air Navigation Regulations, amendments, 19 air services, international, 15-16 aircraft crashes, 6 Airport Industries Australia, 18 airport reform, 16-17 airports

Badgerys Creek airport, 17 environmental matters, committees concerning, 135-6 Sydney West Airport, 16-17 Ansett, international operations, 16 Appendixes

addresses. Departmental and Portfolio, 139-41 Advertising and Market Research, 154-5 Equal Employment Opportunity in board

and executive appointments, 144 Equal Employment Opportunity, 142-3 Freedom of Information section 8 statement, 127-38 Industrial Democracy, 150-1 Occupational Health and Safety, 152-3

Staffing Overview and Performance Appraisal, 145-9 Use of Consultants, 153 Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation, 18, 36,

40, 50, 60 Asia-Pacific Air Safety, 23-4 Asia-Pacific air services, 15 Aspects of Heavy Vehicle Road Charges,

Parliamentary inquiry, 6 asset sales, 49 Auditor-General’s reports, 5-6 Australian Aviation Advisory Committee,

135

Australian Bus and Coach Association, 40 Australian Cultural Development Office, 60 Australian Customs Service, 18 Australian Dangerous Goods Code, 43 Australian Disability Strategy, 62 Australian Federal Police, 62 Australian Land, Transport Development Act

1988, 35 Australian Maritime Safety Authority, advice concerning, 49-50 Australian National Audit Office, 5-6

Report, Financial Statements, 74-5 Australian National Line, 49-50 Australian National Rail. 36 Australian Public Service Joint Consultative

Council, 61 Australian Rail Industry Advisory Council. 136 Australian Road Research Board, 136 Australian Road Transport Advisory

Committee, 136 Australian Transport Advisory Council, 136 Australian Transport Council, 36, 39, 136, 137 Australian Urban and Regional Development

Review, 35 Austroads, 136 Aviation Division functions and powers, Freedom of

Information statement, 129-30 legislation determining powers, 130 Aviation Fuel Revenues (Special

160 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Appropriation) Act 1988, 18 aviation fuels duty, 17-18 Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure subprogram, 13-20

airport reform, 16-17 aviation security, 19 consumer protection, 18 departure tax, 18 domestic market competitiveness, 16 exporting services, 18 forums, 18-19

international relations, 15-16 local aerodromes, transfer to local owners, 17 objective, 15 performance indicators, 15 program structure, chart, 13 reform, airport, 16-17 resources, table, 14 safety standards and regulations, 17-18 security, aviation, 19 social justice, 20 Aviation program, 11-26

Aviation Policy, Security and Infrastructure subprogram, 13-19 Bureau of Air Safety Investigation subprogram, 21-4 International Air Sendees Commission

subprogram, 25-6 Investigating for Safety subprogram, 21-4 program structure, 12 aviation records, Freedom of Information

access, 128 aviation safety, promotions, 23 aviation security, 19 Aviation Training Australia, 18

B B-double heavy transport vehicles, 33 Badgerys Creek airport, 17 Better Cities Program, 35 bicycles, National Bicycle Strategy, 35

Bureau of Air Safety Investigation (subprogram), 21-4 functions and powers. Freedom of

Information statement, 130 Bureau of Transport and Communications Economics, 63-7 Freedom of Information statement, 134 buses, seat belts, 40

c casualties, marine, investigation, 51 certification, motor vehicle, 40, 42 child-care, 142-3 Civil Aviation Authority, 23 claims, compensation, 152 coaches, seat belts, 40 Comcare, 152-3 Communications Futures project, 65 compensation and rehabilitation. 152-3 competition

domestic aviation market, 16 industry, road and rail transport, 32 compliance index (Index to Government reporting requirements), 156 Confidential Aviation Incident Reporting

program, 23 Consultants, Use of (Appendix), 153 Consultative Council, Departmental, 57, 61, 137, 142, 150 consumer protection, aviation, 18 contact officer, Director, Public Affairs, 1 Convention on the Carriage of Hazardous and

Noxious Substances by Sea, 50 Corporate Direction and Support program, 53-67 Bureau of Transport and Communications

Economics, 63-7 Executive subprogram, 55-7 Management Support and Advice subprogram, 58-62 National Transport Planning Taskforce,

68

program structure, 54 Research subprogram, 63-7 resources, table, 53 Corporate Management Division functions and powers, Freedom of

Information statement, 133-4

INDEX 161

legislation determining powers, 133-4 Corporate overview, Department of Transport, 4-6 cost recovery

air safety, 17 road transport, 33 Council of Australian Governments, 49 Crash in Bed Instead (campaign), 5, 43 crashes, aircraft, 6 crash testing, vehicle, 40 dangerous goods, 43

D Department of Administrative Services, 60 Department of Communications and the Arts, creation, 60

Department of Environment, Sport and Territories, 35 Department of Finance, 49, 60 Department of Housing and Regional

Development, 35 Department of Transport Aviation program, 11-26 Corporate Direction and Support program,

53-67 Corporate overview, 4-6 creation, 4, 57 Financial Statements, 69-125 Land Transport program, 27-43 Maritime program, 45-51 Portfolio overview, 2-3, 7 public and outside participation, 134-8 resources, summary table, 8 Departmental Certification, 76 Departmental Consultative Council, 57, 61,

137, 142, 150 departure tax, 18 designated groups, Equal Employment Opportunity, 143 Detailed statement of transactions by fund,

Financial Statements, 78-88 Disability Discrimination Act 1992, 36 Disability Discrimination Commissioner, 36 domestic market competitiveness, aviation,

16

Drive Safe Under .05 This Christmas, 41 duty, aviation fuels, 17-18

E education, road safety, 41 Efficiency of Road Construction and Maintenance, Parliamentary inquiry, 6 electronic data exchange, 49, 137 emissions, engine, 43 environmental matters

airports, committees concerning, 135-6 road and rail transport, 35, 43 road safety, 42 Sydney Airport, committees concerning,

135

Equal Employment Opportunity, 61 Appendix, 142-3 board and executive appointments (Appendix), 144 groups within occupational groups, table,

147 groups within salary ranges, table, 146 Executive subprogram, 55-7 management, 57

Ministerial changes, 56 overview, 56-7 program structure, 55 resources, table, 56 exercises, security, 19 exporting services, aviation, 18

F Federal Airports Corporation, 16, 56, 62 Federal Airports Scoping Study Taskforce, 16 Federal Interstate Registration Scheme, 33 Federal Office of Road Safety, 37-43

functions and powers, Freedom of Information statement, 131-2 legislation determining powers, 131-2 fellowships, research, 66

Financial Statements, 69-125 Aggregate statement of transactions by fund, 77 Australian National Audit Office Report,

74-5

162 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Detailed statement of transactions by fund, 78-88 Notes, 109-25 Program statement, 91-107 Program summary, 89-90 Statement by Departmental Secretary and

Principal Accounting Officer, 76 Statement of Supplementary Financial Information, 108 Supplementary Statement, 70-3 forums, aviation

international, 18 national, 18-19 safety, 24 forums, marine policy, participation, 50 fraud control, 62 Freedom o f Information Act 1982, 127, 138 Freedom of Information section 8 statement, 127-38 address for correspondence, 127 functions and powers, by program and

subprogram, 129-34 ombudsman, complaints to, 138 public and outside participation, 134-8 records, classes of, 128-9 statistics, 138 fuels, aviation, duty, 17-18 functions and powers, by program and

subprogram, 129-34

G General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 18, 50 glossary of acronyms, 157-9 Gloucester, aircraft crash at, 6 Government Business Enterprises, 62

addresses, 140 reform, 32, 36 Great Barrier Reef shipping, 50 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Project, 65

H hazardous and noxious substances, carriage by sea, 50 heavy vehicles, road charges, 6

ICAO Asia Pacific Area Traffic Forecasting Group, 134-5 immigration processing, 16 incidents, aviation safety, 23 index, compliance, (Index to Government

reporting requirements), 156 Indian-Pacific rail service, 36 Industrial Democracy, 61 Appendix, 150-1 Industrial Democracy Plan, 150

infrastructure, road, 34 Inquiry into the Commercialisation of Public Sector Operations, 62

international air services, 15-16 International Air Services Commission, 16, 25-6 functions and powers, Freedom of

Information statement, 130-1 legislation determining powers, 128, 130 International Air Services Commission Act 1992, 128 International Civil Aviation Organisation, 18­

19, 23-4 International Convention on Salvage, 50 International Maritime Organisation, 50-1 international relations, aviation, 15-16 international services, road and rail

transport, 36 International Society of Air Safety Investigators, 24 International Year of the Family, 62 International Year of the World’s Indigenous

People, 62 Investigating for Safety subprogram, 21-4 accident investigations and reporting, 23 program structure, chart, 21

resources, table, 22 safety forums, 23-4 social justice, 24

J Joint Committee of Public Accounts, 6, 62 Inquiry in the Commercialisation of Public Sector Operations, 62

I

INDEX 163

i

Joint Consultative Council, Australian Public Service, 61

L Land Transport Policy Division functions and powers, Freedom of Information statement, 131

legislation determining powers, 131 Land Transport program, 27-43 Federal Office of Road Safety, 37-43 program structure, 28

resources, table, 27 Road and Rail Policy Development subprogram, 29-36 Road Safety subprogram (Federal Office

of Road Safety), 37-43 land transport records, Freedom of Information access, 128 Life for Young Drivers, (campaign), 5, 41, 43 Light Right (campaign), 5, 41 local aerodromes, transfer to local owners, 17

M management, Executive subprogram, 57 management records, Freedom of Information access, 129 Management Support and Advice

subprogram, 58-62 accountability requirements, 61-2 program structure, chart, 58 resources, table, 59 social justice, 62 status of women, 62 support needs, changes, 60-1 management support, changes, 60-1 manuals, unpublished, Freedom of

Information access, 129 Marine Accident Investigators International Forum, 51 marine casualties, investigation, 51 Maritime Policy Division

functions and powers, Freedom of Information statement, 132-3 legislation determining powers, 132-3 Maritime Policy subprogram, 46-51

AMSA, advice concerning, 49-50 ANL, advice concerning, 49-50 casualties, marine, investigation, 51 forums, international, participation, 50 marine casualties, investigation. 51 occupational health and safety, seafarers,

51

program structure, 46 resources, table, 47 Seacare, 51 shipping services, shore-based, price and

efficiency improvements, 49 shipping, domestic, competition and efficiency, 48-9 social justice, 51 Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme,

50-1

Maritime program. 45-51 program structure, 45 resources, table, 45 maritime records, Freedom of Information

access, 128-9 market competitiveness, domestic aviation, 16 Matters Arising from Pay Television

Tendering Processes, Parliamentary inquiry, 6 Melbourne Airport, 17 Minister for Finance, 6 Ministerial changes, Department of Transport, 57 Ministerial Council for Road Transport, 33,

136

mobility, staff, 145 Monarch Airlines crash, 23 Motor Vehicles Standards Act 1989, 37

IX National Accessible Transport Committee, 5, 35, 137 National Aviation Security Program. 19 National Consultative Group on Transport

Electronic Data Exchange, 49, 137 National Greenhouse Response Strategy, 35 National Highway Program, 5

164 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

National Highway System, 34-5 National Rail, 33-4 National Road Safety Strategy, 39 National Road Transport Commission, 32, 40 National Road Trauma Advisory Council,

136-7 National Safety Council of Australia Victorian Division, 6 National Transport Planning Taskforce, 56,

65, 68. 138 Freedom of Information statement, 133-4 Navigation Act 1912, 48 Navigation (Marine Casualty) Regulations,

51

1993-94 Review o f Operations, 35 Notes, Financial Statements, 109-25 NSW Roads and Traffic Authority, 40

0 occasional papers, research, 65 occupational health and safety, 61 Appendix, 152-3

seamens’, 51 Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991, 152 Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime

Industry) Act 1993, 51 offset crashes, 40 Olympic Games, 20 Ombudsman, complaints to, 6, 138 Ombudsman Act 1976, 6 Omega radio-navigation system, 50 One Nation rail program, 33-4, 36 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and

Development (OECD), 50 Out and About (road safety guides), 43

P papers, research, 65-6 Parliamentary committees, submissions, 6 Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for

Transport, 56 pay television, 6 performance appraisal, table, 149

Permanent International Association of Road Congresses, 137 Portfolio, Department of Transport changes to structure, 56

overview, 2 structure, 3, 7 Prices Surveillance Authority, 16 Procedures for the Introduction of

Technological Change, 150 Program statement, Financial Statements, 91-107 program structure, Department of Transport

Portfolio, 3 Program summary, Financial Statements, 89­ 90 public and outside participation in

Department of Transport, 134-8 public road safety education, 41-3 Public Sector Union, 152 Public Service Act 1922, 150-1 publications, research, 65-7

R rail transport, 33-4 recall programs, vehicle safety, 41 records, Freedom of Information access, 128­

9 aviation, 128 land transport, 128 management, 129

maritime, 128-9 road safety, 128 reform airport, 16-17

transport sector, 68 waterfront, 49 rehabilitation and compensation, 152-3 Remote Air Services Subsidy Scheme, 5, 20

reports, research, 65 research Australian Road Research Board, 136 fellowships, 66-6

market research, 154-5 papers, 65-6 publications, research, 65-7

INDEX 165

Research subprogram, 63-7 road safety, 39, 41 systems safety analysis, 23 Research subprogram, 63-7

bulletins, 66 conferences and seminars, 66-7 fellowships, research. 66 overview, 65 participation in inquiries, 66-7 program structure, chart, 63 reports, 65 resources, table, 64 resources, Department of Transport, summary

table, 8 Rethink Your Drink (campaign), 5, 43 roads Australian Road Transport Advisory

Committee, 136 Austroads, 136 charges, heavy vehicle, 6 construction and maintenance, 6 Efficiency of Road Construction and

Maintenance, Parliamentary inquiry, 6 Federal Office of Road Safety, 37-43 infrastructure, road, 34 international services, 36 Ministerial Council for Road Transport,

33, 136 National Road Safety Strategy, 39 National Road Transport Commission, 32, 40 National Road Trauma Advisory Council,

136-7 NSW Roads and Traffic Authority, 40 Permanent International Association of Road Congresses, 137 Road and Rail Policy Development

subprogram, 29-36 Road Engineering Association of Asia and Australasia, 137 Road Safety subprogram (Federal Office

of Road Safety), 37-43 Road Transport Forum, 36 road and rail transport, 32, 35, 43 RoadRailers, 33

Roads and Traffic Authority, NSW, 40 Safely on the Road to the 21st Century (conference), 39 safety, 37-43 Road and Rail Policy Development

subprogram, 29-36 competition, industry, 32 environmental considerations, 35 Government Business Enterprises,

reform, 36 international services, 36 policy framework, 32 program structure, 29 rail transport, 33-4 resources, table, 30-1 road infrastructure, 34-5 road transport, 32-3 safety, 36 social justice, 35-6 road construction and maintenance, 6 road deaths, trends, 39 Road Engineering Association of Asia and

Australasia, 137 road infrastructure, 34-5 road safety education, 41-3

measures, implementation, 39-40 records, Freedom of Information access, 128 research, 39, 41 Road Safety subprogram, 37-43

certification, motor vehicle, 42 education, road safety, 41 environmental issues, 42 program resources, table, 38 program structure, 37 recall programs, vehicle safety, 41 research, 41 road safety measures, implementation,

39-40 safety standards, improvement, 40 social justice, 42 vehicle safety investigations and recall

programs, 41 road transport, 32-3

166 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

cost recovery, 33 Road Transport Forum, 36 Road Transport Reform (Vehicles and Traffic) Act 1993, 32-3 RoadRailers, 33 Roads and Traffic Authority, NSW, 40 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in

Custody, 62 Rural and Regional Task Force, 20

s Safe Travel to School program, 39-40 Safely on the Road to the 21st Century (conference), 39 safety

air safety, 17, 21-4 Asia-Pacific Air Safety, 23-4 audits, aviation, 18 Australian Maritime Safety Authority 49­

50

Bureau of Air Safety Investigation subprogram, 21-4 education, road safety, 41 Federal Office of Road Safety, 37-43 forums, 23-4 forums, aviation, 23-4 incidents, aviation , 23 International Society of Air Safety

Investigators, 24 Investigating for Safety subprogram, 21-4 National Road Safety Strategy, 39 National Safety Council of Australia

Victorian Division, 6 Occupational Health and Safety, 61, 152­ 3 promotions, 23 recall programs, vehicle safety, 41 Road Safety subprogram (Federal Office

of Road Safety), 37-43 road safety measures, implementation, 39-40 road safety, 39, 41-3, 128 seafarers, 51 ship, 6, 51 Ships o f Shame: Inquiry into Ship Safety,

Parliamentary inquiry, 6, 51 standards and regulations, aviation, 17­ 18 standards, improvement, 40 salvage, maritime, 50 Schofields aerodrome, 17 Seacare, 51 seat belts, coaches, 40 security, aviation, 19 security exercises, 19

Senior Executive Service, 145 Sharing the Main Street (resource manual), 41 shipping

domestic, competition and efficiency, 48­ 9 Great Barrier Reef, 50 safety, 6 Shipping Industry Reform Authority, 48

Freedom of Information statement, 132-3 shipping services, shore-based, price and efficiency improvements, 49 Ships Capital Grants Act 1987, 48 Ships o f Shame: Inquiry into Ship Safety,

Parliamentary inquiry, 6, 51 social justice, 51 air safety, 24 aviation, 20

Department of Transport, 20 Management Support and Advice, 62 road and rail transport, 35-6 road safety, 42-3 Spectrum Management Agency, 60, 143 staff

classification by group and location, table, 148 development and training, 61 mobility, 145 permanent and temporary, table, 148 Senior Executive Service, table, 145 Staffing Overview and Performance

Appraisal, 145-9 training and staff development, 61 Staffing Overview and Performance Appraisal (Appendix), 145-9

INDEX 167

Standing Advisory Committee for Commonwealth/State Cooperation for Protection Against Violence, 19-20 Standing Committee on Transport Aviation

Working Group, 135 Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure, 51 Standing Committee on Transport (SCOT), 19 Statement by Departmental Secretary and

Principal Accounting Officer, Financial Statements, 76 Statement of Supplementary Financial Information, Financial Statements, 108 statistics, Freedom of Information, 138 status of women, 62 strategic planning, 57 Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable

Development, 35 Supplementary Statement, Financial Statements, 70-3 Sydney Airport, 17, 19

environmental matters, committees concerning, 135 Sydney West Airport, 16-17 systems safety analysis, 23

T Task Force on Asset Sales, 49 Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme, 50-1

Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme Review Authority, 50-1 television, pay, 6 The National Highway “Lifeline o f the

Nation”, 5 Towards Traffic Calming (resource manual), 41 trade, promotion, 60 Tradegate Australia Limited, 49

training and staff development, 61 Transport and communications indicators bulletin, 65 transport sector reform, 68

u Uruguay Round negotiations, 18, 50

V vehicle safety investigations and recall programs, 41 vehicle safety standards, improvement, 40

w Warehouse to Wharf (report), 49, 137 waterfront reform, 49 Wittenoom aerodrome, 17 women, status of, 62 Women’s Budget Statement, 62

workplace bargaining, 60

168 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT