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Commonwealth Parliamentary Association - Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference - Report of Delegation from Commonwealth of Australia Branch - 32nd, London, September-October 1986


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

32nd Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference, London, September-October 1986

Presented and ordered to be printed 27 November 1986

Parliamentary Paper No. 390/1986

'

Parliamentary Paper No. 390/1986

The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

Thirty-second Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference

London

September-October 1986

Report of the Commonwealth of Australia Branch Delegation

The Commonwealth Government Printer Canberra 1987

© Commonwealth of Australia 1987

ISBN 0 644 05753 X

Printed by Authority by the Commonwealth Government Printer

C O N T E N T S

Page

Report of the Commonwealth of Australia Branch Delegation

The Delegation

Attendance at the Conference

The Conference The Opening Ceremony Conference Deliberations

The General Assembly

Formation of Branches Finance Reports

CPA's 75th Anniversary Future Conference Venues Election of Officers Regional Representatives Other Business

Acknowledgements

1 - 1 5

1

2

10 10 10 11

13

Appendices

1. Speech by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II at the opening of the Conference

2. Speech by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, FRS, MP, at the opening of the Conference

3. Address to the Conference by the Commonwealth Secretary-General, Shridath S . Ramphal

4. Address to the Conference by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Sir Jeffrey Howe

5. Digest of numbers attending

6. Branches represented

7. Agenda for the Meeting of the General Assembly

iii

to co -j ΟΙ in ojtN jro

8. Minutes of the Eighth General Assembly, Saskatchewan

9. CPA Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

10. Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

11. Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987

12. Projection for 1988

13. Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

14. Working Capital Fund - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

15. Working Capital Fund - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987

16. CPA and Associated Purposes Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

17. CPA and Associated Purposes Trust - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

18. Amendments to the Constitution

19. Report of the Sixth Parliamentary Conference of Members from Small Countries, Jersey, 22 - 23 September, 1986

20. CPA Anniversary Poster

iv

THIRTY-SECOND COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE

LONDON, SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER 1986

Report of the

Commonwealth of Australia Branch Delegation

The members nominated to represent the Commonwealth of Australia Branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA) at the 32nd Commonwealth Conference are pleased to submit, for the information of the Branch and the

Parliament, the delegation's report on the visit to London for the Annual Commonwealth Conference.

r pHE DELEGATION

The Commonwealth of Australia Branch was invited by the United Kingdom Branch (the host Branch) to send a delegation of six members and a secretary to the Conference.

The delegation consisted of:

Senator John Coates (Leader)

Senator A.W.R. Lewis (Deputy Leader)

Mr I.M.D. Cameron, MP

Mr P.R. Cleeland, MP

Senator B. Cooney

Mr D.P.M. Hawker, MP

Mr K.G. Schneemann (Secretary)

2.

ATTENDANCE AT THE CONFERENCE

The United Kingdom Branch of the CPA hosted the Conference under the presidency of the Rt Hon. Bernard Weatherill, MP, Speaker of the House of Commons. Attendance at the Conference exceeded past record levels with 425 members, officials and others. The total number included 174 delegates and 156 secretaries, observers and officials. A

record number of spouses (95) accompanied delegates to the Conference.

Within the total attendance of 425 there were 23 members of the Executive Committee, 43 Presiding Officers, 7 Deputy Presiding Officers, 24 Ministers/Deputy Ministers and 67 Clerks-at-the-table.

A total of 94 Branches were represented at the Conference, 48 of which were National/Federal Branches (for further information of attendance refer Appendices 5 and 6).

The Conference Secretariat was headed by the incoming Secretary-General, Dr. the Hon. David Tonkin, supported by 11 members of the Headguarters staff (plus Mr R.B. Quayle, Clerk of the Tynwald Isle of Man, as a

special assistant to the Secretary-General).

The Host Branch Secretariat was headed by Mr Peter Cobb, Secretary, United Kingdom Branch and supported by 3 permanent officers, 4 secretarial officers and 1 temporary assistant. The Secretariat was supplemented by a number of additional staff made up of a Conference Co-ordinator, a Press and Information Officer and 25 additional staff including Medical Officers and Liaison Officers. These staff were recruited from the Parliament and a consultancy firm hired to assist in planning and organising the Conference.

In accordance with previous practice, the CPA, administered through the Headquarters Secretariat, met the cost of return economy class airfares to London and the United Kingdom Branch hosted the Conference, meeting the cost of accommodation, meals, official transport, functions, entertainment and the optional Conference tours.

THE CONFERENCE

The Opening Ceremony

Her Majesty the Queen, accompanied by His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, opened the Conference in Westminster Hall in a most impressive ceremony, complimented by the Band of the Welsh Guards, State Trumpeters, the

3.

Queen's bodyguard of the Yeoman of the Guard and Her Majesty's bodyguard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms.

The Queen addressed the delegates and 500 invited guests, including members of the British Parliament, the Diplomatic Corps, industry representatives and a contingent of school children from selected schools in London. The Prime Minister, the Rt Hon. Margaret Thatcher, MP, spoke after the Queen (their speeches can be found at Appendices 1 and 2) .

At the conclusion of the opening ceremony, delegates proceeded to the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre where they were given an opportunity to meet the Queen and mingle with senior members of the British

Parliament, including the Prime Minister and other Party Leaders.

Tours

Conference tours were held on Sunday, 28 September and were optional. Delegates were given a choice of 3 tours, all of which proved particularly interesting and successful. The choices were Blenheim Palace and Oxford; Chartwell (the

country home of Sir Winston Churchill) and Knole (one of the largest late mediaeval houses in England); and a river trip down the Thames to the Thames Barrier and the Royal Naval College at Greenwich.

Receptions and Functions

Delegates and accompanying officers enjoyed the warm and generous hospitality of their British hosts. The most notable of these functions were the welcoming reception at the Intercontinental Hotel; the reception in Lancaster

House, given by the Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, the Rt Hon. Baroness Young; dinner in Guildhall as guests of the Corporation of the City of London, hosted by the Rt Hon. the Lord Mayor, Sir William

Allan David; the Elizabethan Banguet at the Beefeater, St Katherine's Dock; and dinner in the Great Room of the Grosvenor House Hotel as guests of Her Majesty's Government, hosted by the Rt Hon. Margaret Thatcher, MP.

Conference Deliberations

The principal Conference activity commenced on Friday 26 September. Details of the panel and plenary

Finance

The CPA Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (see Appendix 9) were presented and adopted by the General Assembly.

Following the adoption of the Accounts, the Leader of the Commonwealth of Australia Branch delegation proposed to the Assembly that in future a list of current debtors (ie: Branches who have not paid their annual fee) for the

1986 calendar year be attached to the Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986. The Secretary-General, in responding to the Leader's motion suggested to the Assembly

that to attach such a list would prove misleading as the Secretariat currently exercised a certain level of leniency towards Branches who had not paid their fees in the current year by the time the General Assembly met. This related

particularly to those Branches who worked on a different financial year basis or were experiencing currency/foreign exchange problems.

It was pointed out to the Assembly that as a result of a previous iniative, a list of debtors did appear in the notes to the financial statements for previous years. Particular reference was made to the financial year ended 31 December 1985 and the accompanying notes to the statement which can be found at Appendix 9.

The Assembly noted the CPA estimated income and expenditure accounts for 1986, 1987 and projections for 1988. The Assembly noted with satisfaction that there was no plan to increase fees in 1988 and that in 1987 fees would

increase by 5% (over 1986) as approved by the General Assembly in Saskatchewan. It also noted a proposal by the Finance Sub-Committee (of the Executive Committee) that the fees would not increase other than in exceptional

circumstances and that in future any fee increase should be set in line with UK inflation levels.

The Assembly adopted the Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (refer Appendix 13).

The Assembly noted the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986 (Appendix 14) and the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987 (Appendix 15); it adopted the CPA and Associated Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (Appendix 16) and noted the CPA

and Associated Purposes Trust Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986 (Appendix 17).

8.

Executive Committee Report 1985/86

The General Assembly adopted the report of the Executive Committee for 1985/86 which had been circulated in draft form to all Branches before delegates left for the Conference.

Proposed amendments to the Constitution

(Refer Appendix 18). Under this item there were 9 proposed amendments. A number of these related to the Office of Treasurer, which the Commonwealth of Australia delegation did not support.

The implication of this particular group of amendments was to do away with the recommendation of the Working Party (which had been applied only in the last year) and return the Office of Treasurer to the position where the

Treasurer would be elected by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Executive Committee, as opposed to the Working Party Recommendation which proposed that the Treasurer be elected by the Executive Committee from among its members.

Both the Leader and Deputy Leader of the Commonwealth of Australia delegation spoke against the proposed group of amendments. They pointed out that their Branch did not support the amendment on principle - that is: that the Rt Hon. Mark Carlisle, who was appointed Treasurer under the pre "Working Party Report" arrangements, did not complete his term of office until October 1985

(Saskatchewan) and that the arrangements proposed by the Working Party (and approved by the General Assembly) had not been given an opportunity to be properly tried and tested.

Approval of the amendment would also increase the Executive Committee by an additional member and involve the CPA in additional expenditure. Senator Jeune had been appointed to replace the Rt Hon. Mark Carlisle. However, his term as Regional Representative was due to expire at the end of the present General Assembly meeting and under the present Constitution (unamended) he would be obliged to step down from his Office as Treasurer.

Out of respect for Senator Jeune, who had given a great deal of service to the CPA and continued to play a very important role as Trustee of the Working Capital Fund, Commonwealth of Australia Branch delegates moved that he be permitted to hold his Office as Treasurer until the Assembly

9.

meeting in 1988, after which the rules in the present Constitution should apply. This motion was put by the Commonwealth of Australia Branch, subject to a number of anomalies in the current constitution relating to the Office of Treasurer being removed.

The Commonwealth of Australia Branch amendment to the original amendment proposed was put. The Assembly voted 71 no, 38 yes. The amendment was therefore defeated. The original motion was then put. The result of the vote was 74 yes, 16 no. The original motion was therefore carried.

The balance of the amendments proposed were put and accepted by the Assembly, no vote being required.

Report of the 6th Parliamentary Conference of Members from Small Countries, Jersey, 22 - 23 September 1986

Senator Jackson (Bermuda) presented the report (refer Appendix 19). The General Assembly adopted the report.

Regional Conferences

The Assembly received a report from Hon. Hugh A. Edighoffer, MP on the 26th Canadian Regional Conference, Toronto, 26 July to 2 August, 1986.

CPA's 75th Anniversary

A proposal was put to the Assembly by Senator Jeune (Treasurer) on behalf of the Executive Committee that a special appeal on this 75th Anniversary of the CPA should be lodged to increase the base fund of the Working Capital Fund. The General Assembly approved the proposal and was

informed that the appeal to all Branches would be launched by the Secretariat shortly.

The Secretary-General took this opportunity to mention the CPA Anniversary poster (for details refer Appendix 20). He encouraged all Branches to place orders for the poster which would help publicise the CPA around the world as well as assist in the cost of printing the 8,000

poster sets which have been issued free of charge to each and every member of the CPA.

10.

Future Conference Venues

Branch representatives confirmed and extended, as appropriate, offers to host Conferences in the following years: 1987 Malaysia, 1988 Australia (Commonwealth, States and the Northern Territory), 1989 Barbados, 1990 Zimbabwe.

Mid-year Meetings of the Executive Committee

Invitations were extended as follows: 1987 Gibraltar, 1988 Trinidad and Tobago (provisional).

Election of Officers

The Hon. Dato' Shahrir bin Abdul Samad, MP, Minister of Federal Territory, Malaysia, was elected President of the Association to succeed the Rt Hon. Bernard Weatherill, Speaker of the House of Commons, United Kingdom.

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland, President of the Senate, Commonwealth of Australia, was elected Vice-President.

Regional Representatives

Ten new Regional Representatives were elected.

(a) Africa - Senator George Shinengundu (Zimbabwe) to replace the Hon. L. Mulimba. Standby Branch Botswana. Hon. T.T. Williams, MP (Sierra Leone) to complete the term of Mr Smith. Standby Branch The Gambia.

(b) Asia - Hon. Natwarlal Chandulal Shah, MLA, Speaker of the Legislative Assemby, Gujarat (India) was proposed as the Regional Representative. However, as he had been acting for a 6 month period there was some confusion concerning his eligibility. The

Executive Committee was asked to consider the question and would provide a ruling in due course.

(c) Australasia and the Pacific the Hon. J.H. Warner, MLA, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, Queensland, to replace Mr J.M. Beattie, MHA. Standby Branch Western Australia. The Hon. D. Sitai (Solomon Islands) to replace the Hon. K. Adeang. Standby Branch Kiribati.

11.

(d) British Islands and the Mediterranean -Dr the Hon. R.G. Valarino (Gibraltar) to replace Senator Jeune. Standby Branch Guernsey.

(e) The Hon. H.J. Swan, MLA, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly (Saskatchewan) to replace the Hon A. Donahoe, QC, MLA. Standby Branch to be advised.

(f ) South East Asia the Hon. Dato' Abdul Aziz Rahman (Pahang) to replace the Hon Dato' Syed Zain. Standby Branch Selangor. The Hon. Dato' Abubakar Rautin (Federal-Malaysia) to complete the term of the Hon. Muhyiddin. Standby Branch to be advised.

(g) West Indies, the Americas and South Atlantic - a delegate from Bermuda to replace the Hon. L.A. Williams, MP (to be advised). Standby Branch Antigua and Bermuda.

Other Business

Verbatim Report of Plenary Conferences

The production of a verbatim report of CPA Conference debates was again discussed by the General Assembly - the fourth year in succession. The Leader of the Australian delegation reminded delegates of the decision made at the Annual Conference in Nairobi (1983) the reasons why the verbatim report had been discontinued (cost). The

Secretary-General proposed to the Assembly that the Executive Committee prepare a report on the subject.

Resolutions

Dr Heptulla, MP (India) moved that the General Assembly once again consider the issue of resolutions at the conclusion of Annual Conferences.

She made a further recommendation that discussions and recommendations made at Annual Conferences should be followed up.

The General Assembly agreed that the Executive Committee should consider these matters and report back.

12.

Freedom of Parliamentarians

Senator Lewis (Commonwealth of Australia) moved that the Association in compliance with its Constitution and its Aims should examine the liberties and freedoms of Parliamentarians, in particular Commonwealth Parliamentarians. He suggested that within the Commonwealth there were members whose lives and freedoms were at risk. He recommended that the Association take this up as a matter of urgent concern.

After some discussion on the subject by delegates it was agreed that the Executive Committee would examine the proposal, subject to Senator Lewis providing additional and more specific information.

Appointment of a Deputy Secretary-General

Mr J.M. Beattie, ML A, Chairman of the Staff and Accommodation Committee, informed the Assembly that the Committee had conducted interviews in the last week and had made a recommendation to the Executive Committee. He

confirmed that four applicants were interviewed, one from Ghana, one from India and two from Trinidad and Tobago. He regretted that he was unable to inform the Assembly of the successful applicant as that person had not yet accepted the offer of the position.

Sir Robin Vanderfelt (retired Secretary-General)

The Rt Hon. Bernard Weatherill, MP, Speaker of the House of Commons, United Kingdom, and President of the Association, made a presentation to Sir Robin and Lady Vanderfelt on behalf of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association.

13.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The delegation wishes to congratulate the United Kingdom Branch for a very successful and enjoyable Conference. Special mention should be made of Peter Cobb, James Batten, Robin Godwin-Austen and their staff at the

United Kingdom Branch Secretariat, who put such an enormous effort, extending over many months, into guaranteeing the success of the Conference.

Receptions and functions, the warmth of welcome, generous hospitality and the accommodation arrangements extended to delegates are a tribute to the professionalism, generosity and achievement of the Host Branch. Special tribute is also paid to Dr. the Hon. David Tonkin at his

first Annual Conference and the Rt Hon. Bernard Weatherill for the vital roles they played both during the Conference deliberations as well as outside the Conference rooms.

■ I was personally honoured to be given the opportunity to lead the Branch delegation. I wish to thank the Deputy-Leader, Senator Austin Lewis, for his support and co-operation and my fellow delegates, both Commonwealth and State for their support, friendship and assistance throughout our stay in London. I express special thanks to our Secretary, Kieran Schneemann, for his untiring work on our behalf which helped to ensure a successful Conference

for the delegation.

JOHN COATES Leader-Commonwealth of Australia Branch Delegation

, I .

15.

SUMMARY REPORT OF THE PLENARY AND PANEL SESSIONS

For a full summary of the main points of agreement, differences of opinion and the main facts and views expressed by delegates during the panel and plenary sessions of the 32nd Commonwealth Parliamentary Association

Conference, refer to the October 1986 Edition of "The Parliamentarian".

APPENDICES

1. Speech by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II at the opening of the Conference

2. Speech by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, FRS, MP, at the opening of the Conference

3. Address to the Conference by the Commonwealth Secretary-General, Shridath S . Ramphal

4. Address to the Conference by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Sir Jeffrey Howe

5. Digest of numbers attending

6. Branches represented

7. Agenda for the Meeting of the General Assembly

8. Minutes of the Eighth General Assembly, Saskatchewan

9. CPA Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

10. Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

11. Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987

12. Projection for 1988

13. Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

14. Working Capital Fund - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

15. Working Capital Fund - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987

16. CPA and Associated Purposes Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for year ended 31 December 1985

17. CPA and Associated Purposes Trust - Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

18. Amendments to the Constitution

19. Report of the Sixth Parliamentary Conference of Members from Small Countries, Jersey, 22 - 23 September, 1986

20. CPA Anniversary Poster

APPENDIX 1

SPEECH BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN AT THE OPENING OF THE COMMONWEALTH 32ND PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE

As Head of the Commonwealth, I have great pleasure in welcoming you all to the 32nd Commonwealth Conference. I hope those of you from abroad will enjoy your stay in this country and that you will make new friedships and renew old

ones during your program of visits and functions. I am sure your debates will be both interesting and useful.

This is the third time I have opened your Annual Conference, and thus renewed links which go back seventy-five years, to the foundation of your Association at the time of my grandfather's Coronation.

Those who took part in that historic assembly, members of the Parliament at Westminster and representatives of the Parliament of the Dominions, clearly realised the importance of coming together. They set up this Association

to ease the exchange of information, and to reach a closer understanding and more freguent contacts between members of those Parliaments. Your presence today is a tribute to their far sightedness, though the present shape and size of your Association might surprise the founders. The Empire has

become the Commonwealth, and the many former Dependent Territories which have joined in the ensuing years demonstrate the strength and attractions of our international family. Clearly each believes that the Commonwealth has a valuable role to play.

For its part, the Association has given an extra dimension to the Commonwealth itself. It enables representatives from the Parliaments to meet together regularly in different parts of the world to discuss common problems and concerns. A program of Conferences, meetings and visits has made the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association into a unique channel for encouraging

co-operation and understanding.

All too often the divisions between nations are given more significance than the things which unite them. Differences in wealth are often stark; political allegiances often pull in opposing directions. This makes it the more important to cherish the links which we do have. Our common

language, our shared history and our common Parliamentary tradition give the Commonwealth its unique quality as a friendly family of nations.

From friendship springs understanding between individuals and thence between Governments. From the family relationship comes the capacity to disagree without breaking up. The more the members get to know about each other, the more they can help to reduce the tensions which threaten all peoples. That is a worthy aim for the Association to set itself. To succeed in it is to sustain a Commonwealth in which young people make up more than half of the total population, and to offer them a better prospect of a peaceful and prosperous future.

A few members of the Commonwealth family are not represented here today because they have adopted a different form of Government from the Parliamentary democracy which most of us share. A few which do have Parliaments have

chosen to to become members of the Association. Even among the members there are, I suppose, differeent degrees of enthusiasm for the Parliamentary principle. But all the members of the Commonwealth would, I hope, aspire to expand human dignity and the welfare of their peoples. For us, those objectives are enshrined in Parliamentary democracy, which teaches that friendship need not exclude plain speaking, and that understanding can best be reached in an atmosphere of tolerance and respect for the opinions of others.

I recall with pleasure the many meetings all round the world where I have spotted your familiar Association tie, and have struck up a happy exchange with the wearer. I recall with pleasure those occasions in 1961 and 1973 when the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association assembled in this

famous hall at the beginning of the 7th and 19th Conferences. For a third time I wish you well in your debates, and I have much pleasure in declaring the 32nd Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference open.

APPENDIX 2

SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER THE RT HON MARGARET THATCHER, FRS, MP AT THE OPENING OF THE 32ND COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE

Your Majesty, Your Royal Highness, My Lord Chancellor, Mr Speaker, Your Excellencies, Distinguished Commonwealth Parliamentarians, Ladies and Gentlemen.

Introduction

As Chairman of the United Kingdom Branch of our Association, I thank Your Majesty for your gracious speech opening this 32nd Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference.

We are honoured and grateful that Your Majesty, as Head of the Commonwealth, is with us today. Throughout your reign, Your Majesty has taken a deep, personal interest in the Commonwealth. You have a matchless knowledge of the member countries and your dedication and interest inspires

admiration everywhere.

It also falls to me, as Chairman of the host Branch, to greet all of you who have travelled to London for this Conference. One hundred and three separate legislatures, both nationa and local, are represented. Many

of you will know London well: others are here for the first time. We welcome you all most warmly to this our capital city.

The Parliamentary tradition

There could be no better setting for this opening ceremony than the Great Hall of Westminster, built more than 900 years ago: before Magna Carta: before the first Parliament.

As the Lord Chancellor put it on another great occasion: Westminster Hall is one of the eternal monuments of the human spirit, a testimony to that longing for liberty and justice for which all men yearn.

Indeed, this Hall, so long the home of our great Courts of Justice, reminds us that, without the rule of law, there can be no democracy.

It represents, too, the continuity of our Parliamentary tradition. A tradition that, across the years, we have taken to the many countries which are now members of the Commonwealth. A tradition which upholds the force of

argument and rejects the argument of force. A tradition which is at the heat of this Association.

As Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, I have attended four Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings.

That is relatively few compared with the record of some Commonwealth leaders, but I look forward to a fifth in Canada in October next year.

What has struck me most about those meetings is not just the advantages of our common language - great as they are: it is that real discussion takes place between Heads of Government. Not just exchanges of platitudes (though of course we should be lost without them). Not just the noisy clash of verbal battle (a custom which you will have learned from the House of Commons). But real debate which reveals aspects and experiences previously unknown or little appreciated by colleagues. We learn how different our problems are, from small islands of a few thousand peple to the largest democracy in the world with 750 million people;

from societies with their roots deep in the past to newly emerging states for whom technical cooperation within the Commonwealth means so much. Indeed I know from the many Commonwealth leaders who come to Downing Street, how highly valued that practical cooperation is.

It is difficult to define the nature of the Commonwealth. It does not have a Charter like the United Nations. Nor a Treaty like the European Community. Nor is it a regional grouping like the Organisation of African Unity or Association of South East Asian Nations. Nor is it the role of any one country to hold the Commonwealth together.

It has long ceased to be called the British Commonwealth. The Commonwealth belongs equally to all its members.

As the heads of Government agreed in Singapore in 1971, we are "a voluntary association of independent sovereign states, each responsible for its own policies, consulting and co-operating in the common interests of their peoples and in the promotion of international understanding and world peace". And may I add that we subscribe to the same values. The basic values of democracy, freedom, justice and equality before the law.

But just subscribing to them is not enough. We cannot preach them to others unless we practise them ourselves.

We don't ask of each other that we all observe the same political philosophy, or that we should all run our economies or our societies on the same lines. Indeed, it would be absurd to do so: our histories, customs, our cultures are too diverse. And over the past years the Commonwealth has in practice tolerated and accepted a very wide range of governments and policies.

To cite an example: we all detest the system of apartheid in South Africa and want to see it demolished as soon as possible. We don't quite agree how best to do it.

There is nothing unusual in agreeing the end but disputing the means. It was never envisaged that the Commonwealth would be or become an instrument for joint

executive action.

As free and independent sovereign states, we have a legitimate right to our own views. And the right, too, to hold those views without our motives being guestioned. That is the essence of tolerance, so important to the

Commonwealth. As one of our great Parliamentarians said: "Tolerance is good for all, or it is good for none".

Conclusion

A gathering such as this of respected parliamentarians is one of the great Commonwealth occasions. During this Conference you will share your ideas and ideals and make many new friendships - as I made many friends when

I attended my first Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference in 1978 in Nassau. And you will return home to share some of the world-wide wisdom gathered here with your Parliamentary colleagues.

Edmund Burk, whom I quoted a moment ago, once said: "Individuals pass like shadows but the Commonwealth is fixed and stable".

Of course, he had a different Commonwealth in mind, but his words apply no less to our Commonwealth of diverse and widely-spread independent nations united in their basic values, and united through The Queen as head of the Commonwealth. If we hold fast to those values, the

Commonwealth itself and this Association will continue to play a uniquely influential role in world affairs.

May I wish you all a happy and successful conference.

.

I

APPENDIX 3

COMMONWEALTH INFORMATION

THE COMMONWEALTH SINCE SASKATOON

Address by the

Commonwealth Secretary-General,

Shridath S. Ramphal

to the

32nd Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference

at the

Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre

London,

29 September, 1986

Commonwealth Secretariat, Marlborough House, London SW1Y 5HX.

When last we met in Saskatoon I paid tribute on behalf of

the Commonwealth to your outgoing Secretary-General, Sir Robin

Vanderfelt, for his outstanding service to the modern Common­

wealth. It is fitting that, for your first meeting in 25 years

without him, you have come back to the place of his own beginnings

in the service of the CPA. David Tonkin has solid foundations on

which to build. I join you in welcoming him to his tasks, confident

that his experience and attributes provide the basis for another

era of sturdy growth.

That growth, that success, is part of the Commonwealth's

growth and success also. Without the Commonwealth there is no

CPA, that is self-evident. But without the CPA, let me acknow­

ledge, the Commonwealth itself will be diminished. Together they

grow, reinforcing each other. It has become traditional for me

to talk with you about the year in retrospect - about the challenges

the Commonwealth has faced since last you met, of how it has

responded to them and how it must continue to fulfil its vocation.

I hope you will share my conclusion that from its trials since

Saskatoon the Commonwealth has emerged with enhanced integrity

and standing in the international community, with confidence in

itself that is neither brash nor vain, mindful of its weaknesses

and imperfections, but certain of its strengths and of its ability

to use them wisely in fulfilment of its highest aims. And I will

ask you to imagine with me just what the Commonwealth can be in a

world that shows signs of losing its way in the twilight of this

fading century.

Saskatoon itself was to be the prelude to perhaps the

Commonwealth's busiest year ever. The events themselves have

passed into history, and judgements upon them into the more

leisured domain of scholars. But the lessons of those events

and their immediate legacies are for today's politicians. They

are the stuff of tomorrow's politics. You cannot but dwell on

them in the CPA.

I left Saskatoon for the Commonwealth Heads of Government

Meeting in Nassau. It marked the start of a year which ended

with the London Review Meeting of a few weeks ago, with the

Mission to South Africa of the Commonwealth's Group of Eminent

Persons in between. One dominant issue provided a common thread

- that of apartheid South Africa. That issue is of immense

significance in itself and needs recalling for that reason; but

each of these Commonwealth events also offers glimpses of

Commonwealth realities that go beyond the issue.

The Nassau Summit

The Commonwealth met in Nassau on the eve of the 40th

anniversary of the foundation of the United Nations and the start

of International Year of Peace. We had fixed the dates for the

Nassau meeting to make it easy for as many Commonwealth leaders

as possible to go on to New York to participate in the Commemor­

ative Session. But convenience was not the sole consideration.

Commonwealth leaders were able to take to New York, as had been

hoped, the reinforcement of a collective Commonwealth commitment to

international peace and security and to internationalism itself, with

the United Nations at its centre. It is worth recalling now

that their Declaration on World Order was the single consensus

statement of commitment on behalf of any sample of the inter­

national community to emerge that year. The message the Common­

wealth sent to the UN was on the basis of absolute unanimity;

and Commonwealth leaders in New York spoke to it with conviction

and commitment.

In doing so, the Commonwealth was showing itself to be

part keeper of the grail of internationalism - one of the world's

custodians of the ethic of international co-operation. And there

were ways in which Commonwealth leaders gave practical fulfilment

to that commitment to co-operation in their Nassau conclusions

on international economic issues; in their agreements on action

in relation to small states; in relation to the economic situation

in Africa; in relation to the management of technological change

and the problems of youth unemployment; in strengthening our

work on the role of women in development; and in reinforcing

their faith in the Commonwealth Fund for Technical Co-operation

through replenishment of its resources. In all these and other

ways, Commonwealth leaders worked at Nassau, unnoticed for the

greater part by journalists in search of controversy. But

Commonwealth leaders knew they had worked well. And it was a

time, of course, when Her Majesty the Queen, as Head of the

Commonwealth, was with us, as she was to be later at the Review

Meeting, and even more recently with you, providing by her very

presence reassurance, continuity, encouragement and, above all

inspiration.

But there was controversy enough for the media.

The horrible realities within South Africa had placed aparthe±u

high on the Nassau Agenda. Its presence was nothing new; but

Commonwealth concern had been heightened by the emergency in

South Africa and the outrages to human decency which the electronic

media had brought into even the most complacent of living rooms

around the world.

Nor was it a concern focused only on the internal situation

in South Africa. Two years earlier at New Delhi, Commonwealth

leaders had identified apartheid as the root cause of the major

problems throughout the Southern Africa region: problems in

South Africa itself, in Namibia and right through the SADCC

countries; problems in the political, social, economic and, alas,

in the military sphere as well. At the heart of them all is

apartheid. This is reason enough for Commonwealth concern; but

there are even deeper reasons why apartheid so affronts the

Commonwealth as to be a major preoccupation.

The Commonwealth represents the supremacy of community

over otherness. It is the negation of both dominion and racism.

Apartheid is the embodiment of both. Minority white domination

is sustained by doctrines of racial superiority and systems

designed to both reflect and entrench racial inequality.

Apartheid is the very antithesis of the fundamental values of

the Commonwealth and, as such, poses an inescapable challenge

to Governments and peoples throughout the Commonwealth. It is

a direct affront to all the Commonwealth's non-white peoples and,

rather specially, to neighbouring black Southern African states.

But it is no less of an affront to decent people throughout the

world regardless of colour; white people who resent what apartheid

seeks to do through a racist philosophy that wrongly implicates

them.

Throughout the countries of the Commonwealth, therefore,

whether their majority populations are black, brown or white, or

are themselves so multiracial as to defy classification by

colour, apartheid stirs deep passions. In the collectivity of

the Commonwealth those passions are multiplied as apartheid is

seen to challenge also the most basic tenets of the Commonwealth.

That is why in 1961 South Africa had to leave the Commonwealth.

Apartheid was not compatible with Commonwealth membership. It

cannot today be compatible with Commonwealth acquiescence. The

Commonwealth's response to apartheid is not merely a Commonwealth

position on a serious issue on the global agenda; it is a

statement about the Commonwealth as well. In part, at least,

what the Commonwealth has been saying and doing on apartheid since

Saskatoon has as much to do with the Commonwealth itself as with

South Africa.

It is essential, I believe, to remember this. Not being

sensitive to it is a grievous omission, and that omission has

been a factor over the last twelve months. It is not possible to

be true to the Commonwealth while being less than militant against

apartheid. In the evolution of policy since Saskatoon this basic

truth has come to be more widely recognised. And it was this

recognition in the end that helped the Commonwealth to come

through not only with credibility but with its vitality renewed.

Nassau presented a difficult choice for Commonwealth

leaders, 45 of whom were for the imposition of economic sanctions

against South Africa, with one against. But that one was the

United Kingdom, and United Kingdom sanctions were the ones most

needed. Over the years, very many Commonwealth countries had

made it an act of basic policy to terminate economic relations

with South Africa. Some in the region, with historically

structured dependency on South Africa, could not do so overnight;

but India, for example, who had the potential to develop an

enormous volume of trade and investment with South Africa, twenty

years earlier severed economic links with South Africa in its

own national protest against apartheid. Over a much longer time,

however, Britain's economic interests in South Africa were so

consistently enlarged as to have made this :ountry the single

largest supplier of capital to South Africa and one of its major

trading partners.

Britain abhors apartheid; but, in the eyes of many -

rather specially apartheid's victims in South Africa - these

economic links were, in effect, a subvention to apartheid. Some

will contest that it was; certainly, this was not intended;

what is incontestable is that, in the result, if economic sanctions

were to be applied against South Africa, Britain had more to do

than any other member country. For many in the Commonwealth

that 'more to do' was both qualitative and quantitative -

qualitative in the sense of a higher moral obligation to withhold

the support and comfort that the British economic connection

offered to South Africa; quantitative from the very magnitude

of the trade and investment flows.

That is why the choices at Nassau were so difficult.

The overwhelming instinct of the Commonwealth was to press forward

with a collective Commonwealth commitment to sanctions. Canada,

Australia and New Zealand were all ready to do so, and so were

Commonwealth countries in Southern Africa, despite their high

level of economic dependency on South Africa. They could have

broken ranks with Britain then; but they were keen to carry

Britain with them, mindful of the importance of Britain's

participation.

And it was here that another factor became relevant to the

choice before the Commonwealth. Australia, building on a proposal

first offered by the Commonwealth Trade Union Congress, saw

sanctions being complemented by a process designed to facilitate

a real political dialogue within South Africa. As advanced by

Prime Minister Bob Hawke, the idea was to supplement economic

sanctions by encouraging a dialogue of change: the link itself

demonstrating that sanctions were not an end in themselves - not

merely punitive, and the reality of sanctions, in turn, providing

incentives for change.

But British resistance to sanctions at Nassau was

unyielding; and, in the end, the choice was to proceed without

Britain on a programme of substantial economic sanctions or to

agree on a much smaller package of measures (in which Britain

would join) and adopt the Australian proposal. Facilitating

dialogue would then not be a supplement to substantial sanctions

but a last try for dialogue before such sanctions were adopted.

Not without reluctance or hesitation, the Commonwealth chose the

latter route. For my own part, I had no doubt whatever that,

given the options before them at Nassau, Commonwealth leaders chose

the right way forward. So long as there was even a slender chance

to act by consensus, and so long as there was the possibility of

persuading Pretoria to take the path of peaceful change, it was

inevitable that the Commonwealth should try to explore them.

The Eminent Persons Group And so to the EPG - the Commonwealth's Group of Eminent

Persons that would try to facilitate the process of change

through peaceful negotiation within South Africa. It was by far

the hardest task the Commonwealth collectively had ever under­

taken in relation to South Africa or anything else. But the

Commonwealth's strengths were real ones and, as so often before,

they included the quality of the people on whom the Commonwealth

could draw. The Group of Eminent Persons hated their title; but

it was an apt one, and I pay tribute to them for their courage in

accepting the invitation to undertake their mission and for the

integrity with which they carried it out. 'Mission to South

Africa', like the Nassau Accord which spawned it, is now a part

of history. It was a mission about which many were sceptical -

including, at first, both the ANC and the UDF. Only the Common­

wealth's record over the years, its consistency in commitment

and performance, its essential credibility, carried it past the

starting post. That scepticism was there as well on the side of

the South African Government. Let it be said that the British

Government did much to break down resistance in Pretoria and make

the EPG exercise possible.

The result was a historic encounter. The Group held 21

meetings of one kind or another with South African Government

Ministers. It met three times with Nelson Mandela in the

precincts of Pollsmoor Prison. It met all the principal political

actors within South Africa. It met the ANC in Lusaka, leaders of

most of the Front-Line States, and it canvassed opinion exten­

sively in Europe and in Washington. Its 'negotiating concept'

was designed to provide a basis for an end to violence on all

sides; the violence of apartheid itself and the violence that

was now the response of its victims to it. In that context,

its proposals envisaged, besides a commitment to the ending of

apartheid, the establishment of political freedom, with the

ending of the emergency, the release of Mandela and other political

prisoners and the unbanning of the ANC and other political parties.

In an environment of a truce, it offered a pathway to peaceful

negotiation for ending apartheid and establishing democratic

structures in a united and non-fragmented South Africa. For a

brief moment that negotiating concept was a lantern of hope

piercing the gloom in South Africa. The light was put out by

Pretoria - almost as if it felt too exposed by the prospect of

change and preferred the darkness of apartheid undisturbed.

The Report of the EPG is the most authentic and authori­

tative account of present-day South Africa. It will be to the

eternal credit of the Commonwealth that the Group both dared to

try to promote change in South Africa and to tell why it was

thwarted. The clearest conclusion of the Group was that "at

present there is no genuine intention on the part of the South

African Government to dismantle apartheid" and "no present

prospect of a process of dialogue leading to the establishment of

a non-racial and representative Government".

To this extent, of course, the EPG did not fail; it

succeeded in blowing away the smoke-screen which Pretoria had

put up and behind which its apologists sheltered with talk of

'reform1.

But there was another aspect to the EPG's conclusions

which, given the political realities at Nassau, they could not

have failed to address. It was, of course, the matter of sanctions.

Some who are opposed to sanctions tend to underline that they

are opposed to 'punitive sanctions". But the truth is that

sanctions are not intended to be punitive; they are never an

end in themselves; they are essentially corrective. In the case

of South Africa, they are intended to induce Pretoria to come

to its senses and to negotiate the dismantling of apartheid and

the establishment of democracy. The EPG saw them in this light

as the path to negotiation, not the alternative to it, and

their sobering conclusion was that the absence of sanctions

actually now stood in the way of progress along that path. It

was a specific conclusion that they reached. "It is already the

case" , they emphasised in the penultimate paragraph of their

Report, "that their absence and Pretoria's belief that they need

not be feared, defers change."

They were talking of sanctions, of sufficient effective

pressure through measures other than those of diplomatic

persuasion. They had earlier made the point that: "it is not

sanctions which will destroy the country but the persistance of

apartheid and the Government's failure to engage in fundamental

political reform." And yet, the South African lobby in Britain

was bold enough to assert that the EPG had net come out in

support of sanctions. The Co-Chairmen of the Group were to lay

that particular fabrication to rest when they met in August with

Commonwealth leaders. "Is the Commonwealth to stand by and allow

a cycle of violence to spiral or will it take concerted action

of an effective kind?" was the critical question which the EPG

both posed and answered. They looked to the Commonwealth for

that "concerted action of an effective kind": action which they

said "may offer the last opportunity to avoid what could be the

worst bloodbath since the Second World War." And yet there are

still some who say that sanctions are wrong because they will

hurt the black people of South Africa and, in particular, will

increase unemployment among them. It will not surprise any of

you that, despite strident abuse from the South African lobby in

Britain, I stand by the assertion I made in the Foreword to the

EPG Report that "Sanctions and peace for South Africa have now

become one and the same.... The human spirit in South Africa

is crying out for the world's help, for the world' s solidarity.

It is proclaiming for all who allow themselves to hear that it

is not freedom that white South Africa should fear but freedom's

denial."

"Mission to South Africa' was released in mid-June within

the time-frame of six months from the 1st January which had been

allowed for their mission. Within days, thousands of copies were

distributed around the world - a tribute to the publishing

skills of Penguin Books. But much more than the range of distri­

bution was the warmth of the welcome it received from virtually

all corners of the international community save, of course, the

South African Government and its apologists abroad. One day,

when apartheid is ended and a free South Africa is welcomed back

to the Commonwealth - which, in a sense (as Oliver Tambo said

at the Royal Commonwealth Society recently) "black South Africa

never really left" - the Mission of the EPG will be recalled as

one of those critical turning points that put us on the right

side of history; and we will be proud it was a Commonwealth

mission.

The EPG Report was, of course, the principal document

before the meeting of Commonwealth leaders in London six

weeks ago - 'the mini-summit' I fear it is destined to be called -

a meeting between the President of Zambia and the Prime Ministers

of Australia, the Bahamas, Britain, Canada, India and Zimbabwe.

These seven had been invited by their colleagues at Nassau to

make a judgement whether, after six months of trying to advance

the process of dialogue for change, there had been adequate

progress in South Africa and, if not, to consider what further

measures should be adopted, what further sanctions should be

applied.

July 1986

The Commonwealth is not given to recrimination. Indeed,

the very opposite is its way. And so it should be in this matter

as well. I do not dwell, therefore, on events between the publi­

cation of the Report and the London meeting. Let it suffice that

a major question of credibility arose for the Commonwealth when,

despite events since Nassau, despite the EPG's mission, despite

specific acts of South African aggression against Botswana,

Zambia and Zimbabwe and the re-imposition of an even more

draconian emergency, Britain seemed to be moving back to a 'no

sanctions' policy and impugning the 'morality' of the path to

which the Commonwealth had been committed ever since Nassau.

It was a serious question of credibility, and it generated

feelings of rare intensity. They were not eased by the decision

of the European Community to invite the British Foreign Secretary

to travel again the route the EPG had taken. They led to a call

for a Commonwealth-wide summit if the Review Meeting ended in

debacle. They led to threats of countries leaving the Common­

wealth. They led eventually to a massive boycott of the

Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh.

For many, the latter two were matters of great anguish;

as you may know, I bent every effort against them both, mindful

of the passions which had been stirred, but anxious to guard the

Commonwealth fabric against unwarranted damage. In the end,

although I remain convinced that it need not have reached that

point, and deplore the fact that opportunities to prevent it

were not grasped, the Commonwealth Games were impaired. It is

one of the ironies of this sad situation that the people of

Scotland, and even more directly the people of Edinburgh, who

were in the front line of this damage to the Games, themselves

stood firmly with the Commonwealth in its stand for sanctions

against apartheid. This is one of the lessons I speak of that

Commonwealth politicians cannot ignore. It is the very essence

of politics to be sensitive to realities - and that means to be

sensitive to each other's sensitivities. We all have a

responsibility in the context of those realities - a responsi­

bility to the athletes and the organisers, to the city and to

the country that is host to the Games, but above all to the

Commonwealth itself, to work to ensure that they are not victims

of Commonwealth discord.

When I recall the care that was taken to preserve the

Commonwealth Games at Edmonton in 1978 and at Brisbane in 1982,

when each faced more direct problems than Edinburgh did; when I

remember the immense efforts of the Governments of Canada and

Australia respectively to secure the Games against impairment,

I know that such a sad result is not inevitable. The Common­

wealth Games Federation has invited me to explore means of

securing the Commonwealth Games against such future impairment.

I will do so; but I will need the help of all the Commonwealth's

politicians, of Governments and of parliaments, if I am to

succeed.

The London Review Meeting

Although, as I have said, the London Review Meeting,

barely six weeks old, has also passed into history, it is perhaps

too recently passed for us to be dogmatic about its out-turn.

But some things are beyond dispute. That the Commonwealth was

on trial no one will deny. Its credibility was on trial; its

integrity was on trial; its capacity to act above the level

of the lowest common factor of response was on trial. It was

on trial in the eyes of people within its member countries and

beyond its member states. It was on trial in the eyes of the

victims of apartheid, the oppressed people of South Africa. It

was on trial by every cynic who has abandoned belief that

collective action is possible across the lines of colour and

creed.

In London, the Commonwealth did not merely survive that

trial, it emerged from it with at least some new strengths. It

has been strengthened, I believe, in the long run in every one

of its member countries. It is important to underline that

despite the trauma of disagreement with the British Government,

other Commonwealth Governments have not seen this as a row

with Britain. Commonwealth leaders who participated in the

London meeting from beyond these shores were greatly sustained

by the understanding they believe they found within the British

public: from political parties; from the Anti-Apartheid

Movement; indeed, from each of the four estates. To some

degree, this contributed to a mitigation of the differences at

governmental level. And that mitigation derived also from the

manner in which the Review Meeting was conducted, with frankness

but without anger, with a genuine search for consensus but no

indulgence to self-deception.

And the differences were mitigated also because they did

not divide the Commonwealth on lines of colour. Though we leave

the judgements to history, we can surely assert even now that it

will be forever to the credit of Australia and Canada, of Bob

Hawke and Brian Mulroney, that when the Commonwealth was at the

cross-roads on apartheid, they stood shoulder to shoulder with

their non-white colleagues. Brian Mulroney's comment during

the meeting, which he was to repeat outside it, that Canadians

well understand the anguish of 25 million blacks oppressed by

the inhumanities of apartheid in South Africa because 25 million

was all the people of Canada, will long be remembered in Common­

wealth countries. So, too, will the strength of Bob Hawke's

resolve that the immorality of apartheid required the Commonwealth

to put into place itself, and help the world to do likewise,

those sanctions which he had first proposed in Nassau and which

South Africa's continued intransigence now made a political

imperative.

And the differences were rather specially mitigated

because of the meeting's conclusions. The fact that Sir Geoffrey

Howe's account of his findings largely confirmed those of the

EPG in the briefing Malcolm Fraser and General Obasanjo gave to

the meeting was, in some measure, a coming together. So, too,

was the unanimous conclusion of the seven leaders that there

had not been adequate progress since Nassau. So, too, was the

fact that there was no argument between them whether

further economic measures should be applied against South Africa.

London saw the end of a 'no sanctions' policy within the Common­

wealth.

There was difference only on what sanctions should be

applied. I do not pretend that it was a small difference and I

do not deny that the nature of the out-turn subsequent to the

meeting can widen the gap further. It has been widened by the

conclusions to date of the European Community: the thoroughly

deplorable conclusion excluding coal from the EEC list. But

for the Community, too, we are at the end of a 'no sanctions'

policy; and the Commonwealth has helped to make it so. And

while we reflect on outstanding differences between Britain and

the rest of the Commonwealth, let us not ignore that on 15 of

the 17 paragraphs of the London Communique there was agreement

between Britain and the others. Those paragraphs are important.

They underlined, for example, the agreed Commonwealth resolve -

agreed among all seven leaders - to pursue "a common path towards

fulfilment of our common purpose, namely, the dismantling of

apartheid and the establishment of a non-racial and represent­

ative government in South Africa as a matter of compelling

urgency." And all seven leaders went further; they reaffirmed

the seriousness of their resolve that should the action taken to

date fail to produce the desired effect within a reasonable

period, further effective measures will have to be considered.

And, beyond all this, all seven leaders went out of their

way to renew their "firm commitment to the future of the Common­

wealth and to the objectives which have guided it over the years."

I believe that renewal of commitment is a real one. I saw

Commonwealth leaders go to the brink and pull back from it. And

it was not only that they feared what they saw beyond the brink.

It was that they cared enough for what they would have left

behind. And so I have no hesitation in saying to you that the

Commonwealth has emerged from this trial not just with renewed

strength but with enlarged strength, and I invite you not just

in your consultations here but in your work as parliamentarians

in your capitals to reflect that strength and, by reflecting, to

reinforce it.

Beyond Review

But the Commonwealth's work did not end in London.

The Review Meeting, in a sense, was a beginning. To a very

special degree, it has helped the world to respond to the pleas

of the oppressed in South Africa for economic sanctions against

the apartheid regime. Those sanctions are now being put into

place with increasing conviction world-wide - from Scandinavia,

through Japan to the United States. Already, 65 American Cities

and 21 States have taken disinvestment action; some $30 billion

worth of pension funds investment are up for imminent -./ithdrawal.

Before your Conference ends here in London, (perhaps before this

day's end in Washington), the people of the United States,

through their Congress, will, I hope, have joined in an even more

significant way in the concerted programme for which the Common­

wealth has called. That Congressional Bill, which closely

mirrors the London list of eleven measures, will give our Common­

wealth list a world-wide reach.

We must now· look to the further help we can give those

most affected in Southern Africa, some of whom will themselves

share directly in the burden of sanctions and all of whom are

threatened with further acts of economic aggression and destab­

ilisation. We must not forget that, over the years, the South

African Government has waged an unrelenting campaign of economic

dislocation against Front-Line States. In addition to outright

military aggression, it has disrupted alternative transport

networks in order to force regional trade through its own, more

expensive, routes; it has destroyed power lines and oil install­

ations, houses, schools and factories. The cost of this

disruption to the nine members of the Southern African Development

Co-ordination Conference (SADCC) was estimated at over $10 billion

in the period 1980-84. That is about one-third of these

countries' total export earnings during that period. Today, some

estimates put the cost of South African destabilisation at $4 to

$5 billion a year. It is reckoned that some $5.3 billion in

assistance is needed to rehabilitate transport, communications

and industry in the region, of which only $1.8 billion has so

far been pledged by the international community.

The Commonwealth summit in London - all seven leaders -

warned that what South Africa calls 'retaliation' would invoke

the Commonwealth's collective resolve to take additional action

by way of further sanctions against South Africa. This, I am

sure, will also be the position of countries beyond the Common­

wealth; for if Pretoria continues to resort to aggression and

inhumanities beyond its borders, the obligation on the inter­

national community to defend the extended family of apartheid's

victims will be undeniable. A humanitarian international brigade

could well be the response of people world-wide, whatever

Governments do.

But we in the Commonwealth must be in the fore­

front of assistance. I have appealed specifically to Commonwealth

Governments to be ready to stand by their partners in Southern

Africa in this final phase of struggle against apartheid. Last

Thursday, Commonwealth Finance Ministers, in the context of South

Africa's aggressive measures against SADCC countries "expressed

solidarity with these states and stressed the importance of

international assistance to them in their current plight". In

Commonwealth terms, there is much to be done at bilateral levels

and collectively through the Secretariat, and each will require

resources. We must not be found wanting in this hour. The

Commonwealth, it is true, cannot meet all the needs for support

that will arise in Southern Africa; but can help to ensure that

those needs are met by all the world.

The Commonwealth's Promise

All this since Saskatoon. But there was, of course, much

more besides. Within recent weeks, indeed since London itself,

Commonwealth Law Ministers, Commonwealth lawyers generally,

Commonwealth Finance Ministers have met. Commonwealth Health

Ministers will be together in another few weeks. The Common­

wealth is at work on many fronts, and on many it is at work

without discord or disputation. In Harare in August, Law Ministers

agreed on innovative co-operative action between Commonwealth

countries to follow across jurisdictions the proceeds of drug

trafficking - a scheme which could be a model for international

action. In St. Lucia last week, Finance Ministers held what they

felt was one of their best meetings - and not just in terms of

threatened with further acts of economic aggression and destab­

ilisation. We must not forget that, over the years, the South

African Government has waged an unrelenting campaign of economic

dislocation against Front-Line States. In addition to outright

military aggression, it has disrupted alternative transport

networks in order to force regional trade through its own, more

expensive, routes; it has destroyed power lines and oil install­

ations, houses, schools and factories. The cost of this

disruption to the nine members of the Southern African Development

Co-ordination Conference (SADCC) was estimated at over $10 billion

in the period 1980-84. That is about one-third of these

countries' total export earnings during that period. Today, some

estimates put the cost of South African destabilisation at $4 to

$5 billion a year. It is reckoned that some $5.3 billion in

assistance is needed to rehabilitate transport, communications

and industry in the region, of which only $1.8 billion has so

far been pledged by the international community.

The Commonwealth summit in London - all seven leaders -

warned that what South Africa calls 'retaliation' would invoke

the Commonwealth's collective resolve to take additional action

by way of further sanctions against South Africa. This, I am

sure, will also be the position of countries beyond the Common­

wealth; for if Pretoria continues to resort to aggression and

inhumanities beyond its borders, the obligation on the inter­

national community to defend the extended family of apartheid's

victims will be undeniable. A humanitarian international brigade

could well be the response of people world-wide, whatever

Governments do.

But we in the Commonwealth must be in the fore­

front of assistance. I have appealed specifically to Commonwealth

Governments to be ready to stand by their partners in Southern

Africa in this final.phase of struggle against apartheid. Last

Thursday, Commonwealth Finance Ministers, in the context of South

Africa's aggressive measures against SADCC countries "expressed

solidarity with these states and stressed the importance of

international assistance to them in their current plight". In

Commonwealth terms, there is much to be done at bilateral levels

and collectively through the Secretariat, and each will require

resources. We must not be found wanting in this hour. The

Commonwealth, it is true, cannot meet all the needs for support

that will arise in Southern Africa; but can help to ensure that

those needs are met by all the world.

The Commonwealth's Promise

All this since Saskatoon. But there was, of course, much

more besides. Within recent weeks, indeed since London itself,

Commonwealth Law Ministers, Commonwealth lawyers generally,

Commonwealth Finance Ministers have met. Commonwealth Health

Ministers will be together in another few weeks. The Common­

wealth is at work on many fronts, and on many it is at work

without discord or disputation. In Harare in August, Law Ministers

agreed on innovative co-operative action between Commonwealth

countries to follow across jurisdictions the proceeds of drug

trafficking - a scheme which could be a model for international

action. In St. Lucia last week, Finance Ministers held what they

felt was one of their best meetings - and not just in terms of

ambience but of agreement over a broad range of analysis and

action regarding major international economic issues.

Let us not be faint-hearted in the face of some discords.

The Commonwealth is alive and well; vital and vigorous; and

never more acknowledged and respected in the wider world beyond

its membership. It is not going to please all of its constituents

all of the time; it did not please President Amin when it spoke

out against his horrors, or some Caribbean countries in its stand

on Grenada; but a worse fate would befall it were it not to face

up from time to time to the need to disagree; even - though I

hope rarely - with a country whose own genius for political

innovation made the Commonwealth itself possible.

Let me then conclude with the question I raised at the

beginning. Does not the unfolding of events since Saskatoon

encourage a vision of what the Commonwealth can be, of the role

it can play in our uncertain world? The Commonwealth cannot

take decisions for the world any more than it can negotiate for

it. But it really can help the world to negotiate, to decide

and to act. Its strength is its variety, which means that

difference is within it. But because it brings both a sense

of community and a facility for communication to those areas

of difference, it is a facility for harmonising them. But that

is not all, or not enough. It is the quality of the harmoni­

sation that matters, and that is determined by the nature of the

Commonwealth itself. It is the Commonwealth's intrinsic

character - so obvious here in the CPA - which, in turn, sets

the standards, the aims, the principles, the goals of the

Commonwealth.

It needs repeating that we are not a bloc actuated by

bloc interests, but a coming together of elements from many

blocs moved by objectives which transcend any one of them.

Whether we are looking to a world of greater equity in economic

relations, or of greater tolerance in politics, with a better

chance for peace and security, with political co-operation in

innumerable fields, the Commonwealth can show a way forward.

When we are trying to reflect in our international lives the

understanding we can no longer escape that all the world is a

neighbourhood and all its people are neighbours owing each other

a duty of care, is it not clear that the Commonwealth is a

facility which all the world rather badly needs? What can such

a Commonwealth not do if its member countries become truly alive

to its potential, care enough about giving it its farthest reach

for good, use it as an instrument for enlarging both ambition

for human betterment and its fulfilment?

The path since Saskatoon has not been an easy one, and

there are hazards ahead. But to have journeyed together thus

far has renewed our will and strengthened our capacity to travel

to a farther goal. I invite you to share with me a vision of

that journey and the promise it makes to a wider world. The

world is beginning to count on that promise. Don't let us in

the Commonwealth be the last to recognise the worth of what we

have - lest, in error, we diminish it.

APPENDIX 4

THE COMMONWEALTH: WHO CARES?

SPEECH BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH AFFAIRS TO THE COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE ON 30 SEPTEMBER 1986

My own personal Commonwealth experiences go back a long way, much further than I care to remember.

At Sunday School in 1935 I was presented with a card bearing a

message from King George V on the occasion of his Silver Jubilee. It was addressed "To the children of the British Empire", and read "As you grow up you will be the citizens of a great Empire... be

ready and proud to give to your country the services of your w o r k ,

your mind and your heart." The Empire has passed away, the

Commonwealth stands in its place. The message remains true today.

Some years later, I was fortunate to serve with the King's Africa

Rifles in Kenya and Uganda. Alas my Swahili has rusted almost

beyond repair, but I cherish the time spent t h e r e .

More recently as Chancellor of Exchequer, I greatly appreciated Commonwealth Finance Ministers' Meetings. Twice I had the privilege of being Chairman, once in Bermuda and once in L o n d o n . On the

latter occasion I was able to entertain my colleagues in the Tower of L o n d o n , and was much criticised for ever having let them out.

These contacts proved particularly useful when I was subsequently Chairman of the IMF Interim Committee.

And I have had count less contacts in my present job, at Heads of

Government Meetings and elsewhere. I am proud that my job is

described as that of Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary: the only one of 49 to be identified in this w a y .

Hence I have many personal insights and bonds of affection. We certainly need both if we are to tackle the problems facing the

world today.

Many cry out to be tackled multilaterally: global problems need global answ e r s . The UK fully recognises this. We of all countries

are not in the business of a "retreat from multilateralism". Quite the reverse. Almost 30 per cent of expenditure for which I am

responsible as Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary, including aid, is directly related to multilateral organisations. And that does not include Britain's contribution to the European Community. S o

So naturally we want - we all want - international institutions to be as effective as possible, in order to respond to real needs in a

balanced way. If they do no t , they will lose credibility, even the

support of their own memb e r s . The Commonwealth has succeeded in avoiding this p i t f a l l : long may that continue.

Or course, many Commonwealth countries work hard in their own regional organisations - for some it may be ASEAN, for others

CARICOM, or the South Pacific Forum. Britain's regional commitment is to the European Community.

Active regional diplomacy need not, and does not, mean that we care

less about the Commonwealth. Britain's commitment to the Community - as well as to the Commonwealth - strengthens both organisations, particularly at present when Britain has the Community Presidency.

Thus my recent mission in that role to Southern Africa has been

generally seen as a useful reinforcement of our own Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group - not least by members of that Group. The few

Commonwealth speakers who still take a different view must, I think, be seen as carrying brand loyalty to the Commonwealth beyond the call of duty.

Certainly in the Commonwealth and in our regional organisations, there are some issues which we cannot escape, problems that literally straddle the world.

Let me say a word about three such world-straddling issues - each

very different from the others.

I have something first to say about food. Yes, food. For the way

in which the world is producing its food today is to say the least

paradoxical! Full of paradoxes - from which I select just two.

Paradox number one: more plus more can equal less. Overall the

world's food problem today is not one of shortages but of surpluses. And these surpluses - too much food in some parts of the world -

aggravate shortages elsewhere. Protectionism for high cost surplus producers damages export prospects for low-cost growers - sometimes even destroys their domestic markets. So local production becomes uneconomic and goes into decline.

So you come to the second, even more distressing, paradox: huge surpluses co-exist with terrible food shortages, particularly in parts of Africa.

Commonwealth countries are deeply involved in every aspect of this process. Some of those countries most seriously affected by shortages are Commonwealth members. But so too are a number of the

surplus producers - and not just in temperate climates. For

developing Commonwealth members are steadily improving their ability to feed themselves and produce surpluses. There have been outstanding successes: India's green revolution, for example, and Zimbabwe's maize production.

The most urgent human problem, of course, is to feed the hungry.

Commonwealth institutions play a key role here: transferring agricultural expertise, securing more reliable transport systems and so on: and, most important of all perhaps, by helping to sustain and

enhance the stability of government, without which nothing is p o s s i b l e .

/ . . .

But far the largest political problem is to curb the g r o w t h , to cut

the size, of the protected food surpluses - to "demountainize food", as I said at the Tokyo S u m m i t . Our greatest political skills will

be needed to achieve this at the same time as maintaining the

economic and social health of our rural c o m munities.

Britain plays a leading part in each of these p r o c e s s e s . The

British Government last year delivered almost £100 million worth of food a i d . Band Aid and Live Aid raispd £60 Million m o r e . Our total

aid to Africa in 1985 was worth £550 Million. And in Europe Britain

is championing the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy. A caring Commonwealth can not only bring food to the hungry but can also help preach the gospel of uncomfortable political change to surplus producers and agricultural protectionists around the world.

Let me turn now to a second problem, which similarly affects us all.

How are we to cope with the far-reaching consequences of the transport explosion, which has so dramatically shrunk the size of the world?

Today's global mobility would astonish our forefathers. When this Association first met in 1911, many must have needed weeks to get

here by train and s h i p . Yet now we can fly half-way round the world

in 24 h o u r s .

This ability to travel has had various c o n sequences. Many countries now contain immigrant communities, often from other parts of the Commonwealth. Loyal to their new h o m e s , these communities retain links with their old o n e s . They bring new skills and ideas, but

their presence can lead to friction. Between hosts and new

arrivals: between country of origin and country of settlement.

Global tourism is a positive aspect of this mobility - international terrorism a very negative o n e . The one teaches nation about nation and brings countries closer t ogether. The other is a wretched scourge of our times, which takes advantage of the speed of

international communications to spread violence and m a y h e m . It is one with which we deal firmly in the UK, and on which we are

promoting better co-operation with our partners and allies. We are particularly determined to bear down on manifestations in this country of terrorist threats to any of our Commonwealth p a r t n e r s .

The third set of issues to which I turn can be summed up in one

w o r d : A f r i c a . Over a quarter of Commonwealth members are A f r i c a n . The Commonwealth interest in South Africa is natural.

The British position is clear. We share with everyone the view that

apartheid is evil and must go. This change will come. The

South African people themselves will bring it a b o u t . But the rest of the world must certainly do all in its power to bring about

political reform in that tragic c o u n t r y . We should leave no doubt about our loathing of apartheid and all its works.

/ . · ·

We have done so, often with our European partners, through a variety of measures. By not selling arms, not having military co-operation, not selling oil or collaborating on nuclear development, not importing gold coins, banning new investment, by following the Gleneagles policy on sporting contacts, and banning imports of South African iron and steel.

We should however be clear on two points: we oppose violence by

either side, and we do not believe one can defeat apartheid by

wrecking the economies of Southern Africa. It is perfectly possible - indeed I should say right - to be militant against

apartheid at the same time as being rational about one's policies. A bankrupt South Africa is no legacy for the majority who will one

day control it.

Rhetoric is bound to be tempered by realism in the operational decisions of governments from Harare to The Hague. But that is no

reason for any of us to question the sincerity of each other's

determination to end apartheid.

Of course South Africa is of vital concern to the Commonwealth. But we need to keep it in perspective. There is more to Africa than

just the problems in its southernmost nation. That is why I was

glad to participate in the UN Special Session on Africa earlier this year. I was impressed too by people's readiness to admit mistakes, to acknowledge the need to change economic structures, and open up markets. Decisions in this area will be difficult and painful. But the African states can make them.

The rest of us can help and the Commonwealth is well suited to this

practical, sensible work. The Commonwealth Fund for Technical Co-operation has a long list of successes: fish farmers trained at Orissa, an agriculture management course at Mananga, a workshop on rural credit at Harare. The British Government contributes

30 per cent of its budget: money well spent.

Conclusion

I started by saying that multilateral organisations must be judged by their relevance and effectiveness. The Commonwealth passes this test. Its agencies have an excellent record for effective help. Its Ministerial meetings generally concentrate on practica1

exchanges of views, and realistic joint commitments. As the Secretary-General reminded you yesterday the Commonwealth is at work on many fronts without discord or disputation.

We must all work to keep this so. Commonwealth meetings must not be

devalued. This forum is far too precious to waste.

In short, the Commonwealth is a force for good in the world. And if

we all care about it, we must make sure that it remains so.

APPENDIX 5

DIGEST OF NUMBERS ATTENDING 32ND COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE LONDON

1. Delegates 174

2. Secretaries 34

3. Official Observers 3

4. Unofficial Observers 34

5. Members of the Executive Committee (Including 3 Officials, the immediate past President, and 4 former Members of the Executive Committee) 30

6. Branches represented (not including States) 48

7. Observers

(a) Association Internationale des Parlementaires de Langue Francaise 1

(b) European Parliament 1

(c) Inter-Parliamentary Union 1

(d) Parliamentarians for Global Action 1

(e) Council of Europe

8. Representative of the Commonwealth Foundation 1

9. Representative of Commonwealth Secretariat 1

10. Accompanying spouses 95

11. Others - Society of Clerks-at-the-Table 37

12. Commonwealth Parliamentary Assocaition Headguarters Secretariat 11 1 3

13. Host Branch Secretariat 7

APPENDIX 6

BRANCHES REPRESENTED AT THE CONFERENCE

Antigua and Barbuda Gibraltar

Australia (Commonwealth Grenada

Australia (States) New South Wales Northern Territory South Australia Victoria Western Australia

Guernsey Hong Kong

India (Union)

India (States) Andra Pradesh

The Bahamas Assam

Bihar

Barbados Gujarat

Bermuda

Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu and Kashmir

Botswana Karnataka

Canada (Federal)

Madhya Pradesh Marashtra

Canada (Provinces) Alberta Manitoba New Brunswick

Manipur Meghalaya Nagaland Orissa

Punjab

Newfoundland and Labrador Rajasthan Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Ontairo Prince Edward Island Quebec Yukon

Sikkim Tamil Nandu Uttar Pradesh West Bengal

Isle of Man

Cayman Islands Jamaica

Cook Islands Jersey

Cyprus Kenya

Dominica Kiribati

Falkland Islands Malawi

Fiji Malaysia (Federal)

The Gambia Malaysia (States)

Johore

Sri Lanka

Malaysia (States) continued Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilian

Pahang Penang Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu

Sri Lanka

St Christopher-Nevis

St Helena

Swaziland

Tanzania

Mauritius Tonga

New Zealand Trinidad and Tobago

Papua New Guinea Turks & Caicos Islands

Saint Lucia Tuvalu

Sierra Leone United Kingdom

Singapore Western Samoa

Solomon Islands Zambia

Zimbabwe

APPENDIX 7

COMMONWEATTH PART .TAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

MEETING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

LONDON, 1986

A G E N D A

Document No,

APOLOGIES

MINUTES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY HELD IN SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN, ON THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER, 1985 3

MATTERS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES

APPLICATION FOR THE FORMATION OF BRANCHES : SUSPENSION OF RIGHTS OF CERTAIN BRANCHES, ETC

(1) Yukon - application for representation at annual conference

(2) Guernsey - application for increased representation at annual conference

(3) India Union Territories - application to form Branches :

(i) Mizoram (ii) Goa, Daman & Diu

FINANCE

(1) To adopt the CPA Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (printed at the back of the Report of the Executive Committee 1985-86)

Printed Booklet

(2) To note the CPA Estimated Income & Expenditure Account for 1986 4

(3) To note the CPA Estimated Income & Expenditure Account for 1987 5

(4) Projections for 1988 6

2

Document No.

(5) To adopt the Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (printed at the back of the Report of the Printed Executive Committee 1985-86) Booklet

(6) To note the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income & Expenditure Account for 1986 7

(7) To note the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income & Expenditure Account for 1987 8

* * * * * *

(8) To adopt the CPA and Associated Purposes Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1985 (printed at the back of the Printed Report of the Executive Committee 1985-86) Booklet

(9) To note the CPA and Associated Purposes Trust Estimated Income & Expenditure Account for 1986 9

6. TO CONSIDER AND, IF APPROVED, ADOPT THE REPORT OF THE Printed EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR 1985-86 Booklet

7. TO CONSIDER RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON THE FOLLOWING MATTERS :

(i) Amendments to the Constitution (see Appendix A) 10

8. REPORT OF SIXTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE OF MEMBERS FROM SMALL COUNTRIES, JERSEY, 22 AND 23 SEPTEMBER, 1936 9 * 1 1 *

9 REGIONAL CONFERENCES 11

Report on Regional Conference held since 30 June 1986 :

(1) Twenty-sixth Canadian Regional Conference, Toronto, 26 July - 2 August, 1986

10. CPA's 75TH ANNIVERSARY 11a

11 FUTURE VENUES 12

(1) Plenary Conferences

(a) 1987 - Malaysia

(b) 1988 - Australia, Commonwealth and States

3

Document No.

(c) 1989 - Barbados

(d) 1990 - Zimbabwe

(2) Mid-year Meetings of the Executive Cammittee

(a) 1987 - Gibraltar

(b) 1988 - Trinidad & Tobago (provisional)

(c) Thereafter

12. ELECTIONS 13

(1) President of the Association 1986-87

(2) Vice-President of the Association 1986-87

(3) Regional Representatives for :

(a) Africa :

(i) to replace Mr Mulimba (3 year term) (ii) to complete the term of Mr Smith (2 year term)

(b) Asia - to replace Mr Shah (3 year term) „

(c) Australasia & the Pacific - to replace :

(i) Mr Beattie (2 year term) (ii) Mr Adeang (2 year term)

(d) British Islands & the Mediterranean - to replace Senator Jeune (3 year term)

(e) Canada - to replace Mr Donahoe (3 year term)

(f) South-East Asia :

(i) to replace Mr Syed Zain (3 year term) (ii) to complete the term of Mr Muhyiddin (2 year term)

(g) West Indies, The Americas & South Atlantic -to replace Mr Williams (3 year term) 1 3

13. PRESENTATION OF PLAQUES TO RETIRING MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE OCMMITTEE

14. PRESENTATIONS

15. ANY OTHER BUSINESS

16. VOTE OF THANKS

24 SEPTEMBER 1986

APPENDIX 8

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

MINUTES OF THE EIGHTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY, SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN, HELD ON THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER, 1 9 8 5 ___________ _____________________

The Eighth General Assembly met in the Ramada Renaissance Hotel in Saskatoon on Thursday 10 October.

The President of the Association, Hon. Herb Swan, MLA, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, Saskatchewan, was in the chair.

The names of the delegates appointed to attend the General Assembly are listed at the end of the Report of Proceedings of the General Assembly in the Annual Report of the Association. A complete list is included in the

minute book of meetings of the General Assembly. The Secretary-General and secretaries to delegations were in attendance.

1. APOLOGIES

The Secretary-General reported that apologies had been received from : Mr Keith Penner, M P , Canadian Regional Representative; Hon. Richard Guay, MNA, Canadian Regional Representative; Hon. Brij Bhushan Mehra, MLA, Asian Regional Representative; Hon. Tan Sri Datuk Haji Mohd. Sunoh Marso, PMN,

SPDK, JSM, MLA, South-East Asian Regional Representative; Hon. W. St Clair- Daniel, CBE, CStJ, JP, MP, West Indies, the Americas 4 South Atlantic Regional Representative; Hon. Olin J.B. Dennie, M P , West Indies, the Americas 4 South Atlantic Regional Representative; Hon. Matthew Ramcharan, M P , West Indies, the Americas 4 South Atlantic Regional Representative; and

from the following Branches : Antigua 4 Barbuda, The Bahamas, Queensland, Dominica, Punjab, Lesotho, Montserrat and Tanzania.

2. MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY HELD IN DOUGLAS, ISLE OF MAN, ON WEDNESDAY 3 OCTOBER AND THURSDAY 4 OCTOBER, 1984

The General Assembly adopted the minutes of the meeting held in Douglas, Isle of Man, on 3 and 4 October, 1984.

3. MATTERS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES

There were no matters arising from the Minutes.

. . ./2

APPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION OF BRANCHES : SUSPENSION OF RIGHTS OF CERTAIN BRANCHES, ETC

Nevis Island Assembly - application to form Branch

On the proposal of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, seconded by Mr Tony Durant, MP , British Islands & Mediterranean Regional Representative, the General Assembly approved the formation of a Branch in Nevis Island.

Guyana

On the proposal of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, seconded by Hon. J.M. Shikuku, EBS, M P , African Regional Representative, the General Assembly agreed that, as the Guyana Branch had not paid its 1984 or subsequent membership fees, the Branch should be suspended under Clause 8 of the Constitution.

Uganda

Following the coup which had taken place in Uganda on 27 July 1985 and the suspension of parliamentary government, it was agreed, following the recommendation of the Executive Committee, that the Uganda Branch should be placed in abeyance in accordance with Clause 9 of the Constitution.

FINANCE

CP Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 3 1 31 December 1989

On the proposal by the Hon. Treasurer, and seconded by Hon. Arthur Donahoe, Q C , MLA, Canadian Regional Representative, the General Assembly adopted the CPA Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1984.

CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985

The General Assembly noted the CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985.

CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

The General Assembly noted the CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986.

3

(4) CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987

Having noted the CPA Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1987, the General Assembly approved a 5% increase in membership fees for 1987.

(5) Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1984

On the proposal by the Hon, Treasurer, and seconded by Hon. Arthur Donahoe, the General Assembly adopted the Working Capital Fund Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1984.

(6) Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985

The General Assembly noted the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985.

(7) Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986

The General Assembly noted the Working Capital Fund Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1986.

(8) CPA & Associated Purposes Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1984

On the proposal of the Hon. Treasurer, seconded by Dr the Hon, Na.ima Heptulla, MP, Asian Regional Representative, the General Assembly adopted the CPA & Associated Purposes Trust Accounts and Balance Sheet for the year ended 31 December 1984.

(9) CPA & Associated Purposes Trust Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985

The General Assembly noted the CPA & Associated Purposes Trust Estimated Income and Expenditure Account for 1985.

6. REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION FOR THE YEAR 1984-85

The Report of the Executive Committee for the year 1984-85 was adopted unanimously on the motion of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, seconded by Hon. L. Mulimba, M P , African Regional Representative.

7. RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

(1) Newsletters - distribution

The Chairman of the Executive Committee informed the General Assembly that the Officers of the Association, with the subsequent approval of the Executive Committee, had authorised the continuation of the

practice of distributing Newsletters every two months by air mail.

Following the decision of the General Assembly in Nairobi in October 1983 to discontinue publishing a verbatim report of Conference proceedings, the matter was referred back to the Executive Committee

for further consideration.

The matter was, however, reopened at the meeting of the General Assembly in the Isle of Man, where the matter was referred back to the Executive Committee for further consideration.

The Chairman of the Executive Committee informed the General Assembly that a verbatim report could be produced at a cost of one per cent of the CPA's annual expenditure, with virtually no charge to the Host

Branch. The General Assembly confirmed the decision taken in Nairobi by a vote of 74 to 34·

The Chairman of the Executive Committee outlined the selection and appointment procedure for the post of Secretary-General. The Executive Committee nominated Dr the Hon. David Tonkin to succeed Sir Robin Vanderfelt in July 1986.

On the proposal of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, seconded by Mr Tony Durant, Chairman of the Staff & Accommodation Subcommittee, the General Assembly endorsed unanimously the appointment of Dr the Hon. David Tonkin as Secretary-General.

Dr Tonkin thanked the President, the Chairman of the Executive Committee and the General Assembly and pledged his commitment to the ideals and principles of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association.

9 . REPORT OF THE STUDY GROUP ON "ELECTORAL LAW AND PRACTICE

On the proposal of Dr Lau Teik Soon, MP , South-East Asian Regional Representative, seconded by Hon. Arthur Donahoe, the General Assembly accepted the Report of the Study Group on "Electoral Law and Practice" which had met in Nova Scotia prior to the plenary conference.

(2 ) Verbatim Report

8 . APPOINTMENT OF SECRETARY-GENERAL

5

10. FIFTH COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE FOR MEMBERS FROM SMALL COUNTRIES, REGINA, 1-2 COTOBER, 1985

A Report on the Fifth Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference for Members from Small Countries held in Regina on 1 and 2 October, 1985 was tabled by Mr Jack Odle, M P , Barbados, and adopted by the General Assembly.

11. REGIONAL CONFERENCE

A Report was made on the Twenty-fifth Canadian Regional Conference.

12. OTHER SEMINARS AND REGIONAL CONFERENCES

Reports were made on Branch Seminars held in Grenada, Swaziland and Fiji and on the Caribbean Regional Parliamentary Seminar held in St Christopher- Nevis.

13. FUTURE VENUES

(1) Plenary Conferences

1986 - United Kingdom

Rt Hon, Ernest Armstrong, M P , United Kingdom, repeated the invitation of the United Kingdom Branch to host the 1986 plenary conference.

1987 - Malaysia

Hon. Muhyiddin bin Haji Mohd. Yassin, SMJ, PIS, MP, South-East Asian Regional Representative, invited the Association to hold the 1987 Conference in Kuala Lumpur.

1988 - Australia, Commonwealth and States

Mr E.J. Lindsay, FRD, MP , Australia, confirmed an earlier offer of the Commonwealth and State Branches in Australia to be host in 1988, Australia's bicentennial year.

1989 - Barbados

Mr R.E. Braithwaite, MP , Barbados, confirmed an earlier offer of Barbados to hold the 1989 Conference, when Barbados would be celebrating the 350th Anniversary of its Parliament.

1990 - New Zealand

Mr Ken Shirley, MP, New Zealand, reported that a parliamentary commission was considering an invitation to hold the Conference in New Zealand in 1990.

. . ./6

6

(2) Mid-year Meetings of the Executive Committee

1986 - Newfoundland

The President reaffirmed the Newfoundland Branch's invitation for the Executive Committee to hold its 1986 Mid-year Meeting in Newfoundland.

1987 - Gibraltar

Hon. J.E. Pilcher, MHA, Gibraltar, confirmed the Gibraltar Branch's invitation to hold the 1987 Mid-year Meeting of the Executive Committee in Gibraltar.

14. ELECTIONS

(1) President of the Association 1985-86

The President nominated the Rt Hon. Bernard Weatherill, MP, Speaker of the House of Commons, United Kingdom, as President of the Association for 1985-86.

The nomination was carried by acclamation.

(2) Vice-President of the Association 1985-86

On the proposal of Mr Muhyiddin, the General Assembly unanimously elected Hon. Datuk Shahrir bin Abdul Samad, M P , Minister of Federal Territory, Malaysia, as Vice-President of the Association for 1985-86. 3

(3) Regional Representatives

(a) Africa

On the proposal of Hon, S.C. Goodoory, MLA, Mauritius, the General Assembly elected Hon. Tom Smith, M P , Minister of Parliamentary Affairs & Leader of Government Business,

Sierra Leone, as Regional Representative for the African Region for a three-year term, and agreed that Mauritius would be the stand-by Branch.

(b ) Asia

On the proposal of Shri G.N. Azad, MP , Minister of State in the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, the General Assembly elected Dr the Hon. Najma Heptulla, MP , Deputy Chairman of the Rajya Sabha, India, as Regional Representa­

tive for the Asian Region for a three-year term.

. . ,/7

7

The General Assembly elected Hon. Sheikh Chandmohammad, MLA, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, Assam, as a Regional Representative for the Asian Region to complete the remaining one year of the three-year term of Shri

Lakshmanan.

(c ) Australasia & the Pacific

On the proposal of Mr E.J. Lindsay, FRD, M R , Australia, the General Assembly elected Mr B.C. Humphreys, MR, Government Whip, Australia, as a Regional Representative for the Australasian & the Pacific Region for a two-year term, and agreed that New Zealand would be the Stand-by Branch.

(d) British Islands & the Mediterranean

On the proposal of Mr Durant, the General Assembly elected Mr Ted Garrett, MR, United Kingdom, as a Regional Repre­ sentative for the British Islands & the Mediterranean Region for a three-year term and agreed that Gibraltar would be the Stand-by Branch.

(e ) Canada

On the proposal of Mr Donahoe, the General Assembly elected Hon. Lloyd P,. Crouse, PC, MR, Canada, as a Regional Repre­ sentative for the Canadian Region for a three-year term.

(f ) South-East Asia

On the proposal of Dr Lau Teik Soon, MR, Singapore, the General Assembly elected Hon. Muhyiddin bin Haji Mohd. Yassin, MR, Deputy Minister of Trade & Industry, Malaysia, as a Regional Representative for the South-East Asian

Region for a three-year term, and agreed that Hong Kong would be the Stand-by Branch.

(g ) West Indies, the Americas & South Atlantic

On the proposal of Hon. Alva Ross, MR , Speaker of the House of Representatives, Jamaica, the General Assembly elected Hon. Ivan C. Buchanan, MNA, Speaker of the National Assembly, St Christopher-Nevis, as a Regional Representative

for a three-year term, and agreed that the Falkland Islands would be the Stand-by Branch.

__-8

8

15. PRESENTATION OF PLAQUES TO RETIRING MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

The Chairman of the Executive Committee paid tribute to the retiring Members of the Executive Committee and called on Mr Muhyiddin, the Leader of the Malaysian delegation, to present plaques to the following retiring Members :

Hon. Herb Swan , MLA President of the Association

Rt Hon. Mark Carlisle, Q C , MP Hon. Treasurer of the Association

Alhaji the Hon. M.C. Cham, CRG, MP Regional Representative for Africa

Hon. Brij Bhushan Mehra, MLA Regional Representative for Asia

Hon. Jack Genia, MP Regional Representative for Australasia & the Pacific

Mr Tony Durant, MP Regional Representative for British Islands & the Mediterranean

Mr Keith Penner, MP Regional Representative for Canada

Hon. Dato' Shahrir bin Abdul Samad, MP Regional Representative for South-East Asia

Hon. W. St Clair-Daniel, CBE, CStJ, JP, MP Regional Representative for West Indies, the Americas t South Atlantic

The Chairman of the Executive Committee thanked the Malaysian Branch for * 1 6 their generosity in continuing the tradition of supplying the plaques to retiring Members of the Executive Committee.

Presentations were made to the Secretary-General as a mark of appreciation for his many years of devoted service to the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association.

16. VOTE OF THANKS

Mr Lindsay proposed a vote of thanks to the retiring President, which was carried by acclamation.

The General Assembly adjourned sine die.

11 AUGUST 1986

APPENDIX 9

CO M M O NW EA LTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION BALANCE SHEET AT 31ST DECEMBER 1985

Nofc 1985 1984

£

HXID ASSt-TS 3 12.962 —

CURRFNT ASSFTS Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . · . . . . . .

Debtors—Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and Associ-2,092 417

ated Purposes Trust . . . . . . . . . .

—Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Working Capi-1.733 1.128

tal Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.353 18.8 SO

— Branch fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 25,112 14,306

— Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,828 4,107

Cash at bank and in hand . ....................................................... 277.253 264,481

328.371 303,289

CL'RRFNl IIABI1 ITIF.S Creditors— Branch fee s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125.695 121,727

—Other ......................................... ............................. 64,289 61.367

189.984 189.094

ΝΠ VURRF.NT ASSITS ................................................................................ 138.387 114.195

NIT ASSI IS ............................................................................................. £151.349 i 114.195

FINANCF!) BY: Contingviicv Reserve Account. . . . . . . . . . . . 105,000 75,000

Income and Expenditure Account . . . . . . . . . . 46,349 39.195

£151.349 L114,195

SFNATt >R R R. JEUNE. QBE. H onewy Treasurer SIR ROBIN' VANDERFELT, KBF. Sormry·General 2t':'n A / .a / v.sV·

REPORT OF THE AUDITORS

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

We have audited the financial statements on pages 59 to 63 in accordance with approved Auditing Standards In our opinion the financial statements give a true and fair view of the stare of affairs of the Association at 31st December 1985 and of its excess of income over expenditure and source and application of funds for the year then ended.

DELOITTE HASKINS & SELLS CnjricreJ A ::.'ununi<

19th M a y 1 98b

C O M M O N W E A L T H P A R L IA M E N T A R Y A S S O C IA T IO N INCOME AND EXPENDITURE A C CO UN T FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31m DECEMBER 1985

N .’fc 1985 1984

L

INCOMI

Fees receivable from Branches . . . . , . . , 694,497 637,014

Ex-gratia fees received . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 5,517 3,610

Bank interest receivable. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.539 25,336

Sales of conference report . . . . , . . . . . . . 77 . —

Sales of other publications . . . . . . . . , . . . 7,129 4,592

Profit on sale of ties, badges and scarves . . , . . . . 703 HS6

Advertising revenue . . , . . . . , . . , . . . 605 3X5

Foreign exchange gain . . . . . . . . . . , . . .

1 XHl NOI1 URI

738.067

2,0X0

673.903

Annual Conference in Saskatchewan (1984 Isle of Man) . . 5 312,232 22X.27X

Publications (including salaries) . . , . . . . . . . 6 83,558 X0.5X4

Overseas visits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fares, accommodation and incidental expenses in respect of Executive 7 19,267 23,8X4

Committee meeting in Cyprus (1984 Malawi) . . . 28,474 34,865

Parlumentarx seminar:

Contribution to United Kingdom Branch . . . . . . . . 8 22,727 19,420

Appointment ot Secretary-General . . . . . . . . .

Other salaries. National Insurance, superannuation contributions and 9 18,833

expatriate stall allowances (including ex-gratia payment 1984) . 160,959 214,102

Printing, stationery and otfice equipment . . . . . 11.721 8.361

Hospitality . . . . . . . . . . , 5,107 3,708

Postage, cables and telephone expenses. . . . . . 12,977 8,406

Auditors' remuneration . . . . 2.965 2.600

Ottice cleaning . . . . . . . . . 1.230 1,201

Sundry expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.598 5,449

Books, newspapers and periodicals . . 2,494 1,651

Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.485

207.536 245,478

Foreign Exchange Loss . . . . . . . . . . 7,613

Stall Allowances--Moving . . 673 1,500

Home Leave . . . . . . . . .

673

1,678

3.178

Carried forward. . 1700.913 1635.687

Brought forward.

Working Partv Meeting—com . . . . . . . . ·

Less: Donation from Working Capital Fund . . ■

Excess of income over expenditure Transfer to contingency reserve Balance brought forward . .

Balance carried forward .

1985 1984

1 ■j '

700,913 635,687

— 9,126

— (6,000)

- 3,126

700,913 638.813

37,154 35,090

(30,000) (30,000)

39.195 34,105

146.349 0 9 .1 9 5

COM M ONW EALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION STATEMENT OF SOURCE AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31m DECEMBER 1985

1985 1984

£ £

SOURCE Oh l UNDS

Excess of income over expenditure tor the year. . . . . . . .

Adjustments for items not including the movement of funds:

37,154 55,090

Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,485 —

Transfer of fixed assets from Working Capital Fund . . . . . . (16,584) -

APPl ICATION OE FUNDS Purchase of fixed assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1.863)

£24,192 0 5 ,0 9 0

INCREASE IN WORKING CAPITAI

Increase (Decrease) in stock . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,675 026)

Increase (Decrease) in debtors . . . . . . . . . . . 10,635 (56,069)

Increase in creditors . . . . . . . . . . . . . (890) (51,554)

11,420 (68,549)

Movement in liquid funds: Increase in cash at bank and in hand . . . . . . . 12.772 105,459

£24.192 155.090

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st DECEMBER 1985

1 O bju Tivts The Commonwealth Parliamentary Association is a registered charity whose purpose is to promote knowledge and education about the constitutional, legislative, economic, social and cultural systems within a parliamentary democratic framework with particular reference to the countries of the Com­ monwealth of Nations and to countries having close historical and parliamentary associations with it

2 A. i HUNT INC, Poiicii s The financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis of accounting. Fixed assets are depreciated at 20 per cent per annum on a straight line basis Stock is valued at the lower of cost and net realizable value

Balances denominated m foreign currencies are translated into sterling at the rate ol exchange ruling at the balance sheet date Income and expenditure are translated at the rate of exchange prevailing on the date the transaction is recorded.

3 Fixh> Assets

1985

Printing equipment, photocopier and typewriters i

Asat 1st January 1985 .

Additions . . . 1.865

Fransler from Working Capital Fund . 25,5(*l

l27,424

h i hk! vi A NMN At 1st January 1985 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transfer from Working Capital Fund . . . . . . . . 8.977

Charge for war . . . . . . - __5,485

At 31st December 1985 £14,462

Net Book Value at 31st December 1985 . . . . . · £12,962

Net Book Value at 31st December 1984 . . . . . . ■ · 1 N't/

4. D i-.btohs— Branch Fees

Antigua and Barbuda Falkland Islands .

Johore(1983) . . . .

Meghalaya . . . .

Tanzania . . . .

Vanuatu . . . .

Western Samoa . .

5. Annuai C unh.ri.n u · in Saskatchi wan

Administration and other expenses Subvention to host branch, Saskatchewan

6. PlIBl it.a i ions Tin· Purluntirnlurun. . . . . . . · · ·

Annual Repoit 1984 . . . . . · . . . · · ■ ·

Conference Report 1983 . . . . . . . . ·

Newsletters . . . . . . . . . . . . · . · · ·

Miscellaneous publications . . . . . . . . ·

Publication staff salaries. National Insurance and superannuation con­ tributions . . . . . . . . . . - ■ · · · · · ·

7. O verseas Visits Executive Committee Chairman . . Regional Representatives and Officers Secretary-General .

Staff .......................................

President's travel . . . .

Finance Subcommittee—Jersey

1985 1984

£ £

662 291 291

2.705 2,705

1,660 —

12,442 —

6,220 —

1,131 —

1 11,512

£25,112 i 14,506

225,483 224,954 6,686 5,524

80,063 __

£312,232 £228,278

37,240 54,652

3,128 4,500

— 2,655

4,420 5,257

878 817

37,892 54,725

£83.558 £80,584

— 4.555

7,237 6,457

2,633 2,550

2,078 6,459

3,706 4,085

3,613 -

£19,267 £25,884

8. Pari.iameniary Seminar—Conirihuhon to LInheu Kingdom Branch A contribution of j.22,727 was made to the United Kingdom Branch tocover half the costs in holding the 34th Parliamentary Seminar at Westminster in 1985 (£.19,420 in 1984)

9. Arpointmeni oi Si i ritary-Geni rai

Selection Board meetings, fares and accommodation of members and selected applicants...London — Regional . . . . .

1985 1984

£ i

11,170 7,663

£18,833 £ -

APPENDIX 10

NOTES: REVISED ESTIMATED CPA INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT TO 31 DECEMBER 1986

These estimates must be considered provisional as there are certain items of expenditure where possible economies could be put forward during future meetings.

Since the draft account for 1985 has been presented to the Association, there has been a need to revise the 1986 Estimates in the light of sane significant improvement in total incane and savings on expenditure on the 1985 Account.

INCOME

Income is projected to rise by 7Jj% because of a corresponding increase in Branch fees:

Branch fee increase by 7%% over 1985

1985 1986 Increase

£694,497 £746,500 £52,003

Together with Bank Interest, sales of publications, etc, the total incane would be - £784,700.

EXPENDITURE

Our total expenditure shows a net figure of £736,320.

Conference Fares have now been estimated at £230,000.

Publications

No allocation has been made for publication of Conference Verbatim Report following the decision not to have one for this year.

Executive Committee Meeting in Newfoundland

At the last Executive Committee Meeting in Newfoundland, we had a saving of £10,000 due to the absence of five members. It has now been put at £30,000.

The Cost of Overseas Travel

As agreed by Executive Committee Members at the meeting in Saskatchewan, the Association should maintain this cost of £25,000 yearly for the next two years.

-2-

Westminster Seminar

The actual costs incurred by the United Kingdom Branch came to £47,000. The Association contribution at 50% of the total cost incurred is £23,500.

H Q Administration

Salaries include the four months overlapping of duties provided by the Secretary-General Designate and pensions for the members of staff.

Appointment of Deputy Secretary-General

We have allocated £10,000 towards the cost of appointing a new Deputy Secretary-General on the understanding that finalists will report to Headquarters for the Selection board interview in September.

Stationery and Office Equipment

There was a marked increase in stationery and rental of office equipment. Seme stock is being carried forward to the current year. Estimate is put at £12,000.

Installation of Computer System and Printing Machine

At this initial stage we have allocated £17,700 for automation of office equipment and £9,000 to replace the printing machine which is urgently required for in-house printing so as to reduce costs of printing our publication.

CPA Posters

This is now estimated to cost £9,300 (Please see Document No 19).

With regard to the remaining items of expenditure, a nominal increase of 5% is expected in view of inflation.

SUMMARY

With an expected income of £784,700 and expenditure of £736,320, there should be an estimated excess of income of £48,380. This, together with the credit balance of £46,349 brought forward from 1985, should give an estimated credit balance of £94,729 at the year-ending 1986. Proposed to transfer £20,000 to Contingency Reserve leaving £74,729 to be carried forward to 1987.

21 September 1986

Commonwealth Parliam entary Association

Headquarters Secretariat

Palace o f Westminster 7 Old Palace Yard London swip jjy Telephone 01-219 4666 Telex 911569 CPAHQ G Cables ‘Comjwlas London swi’

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSSOCIATION

CPA ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT TOR 1986 (REVISED)

INCOME

E £

Estimated Audited

Branch fees for the year

1986 1985

(73$% increase over 1985) 746,500 694,497

Bank Interest 29,000 29,539

Sales of Publications 7,200 7,129

Advertising Revenue

Profit of Ties/Badges/Scarves/

1,000 703

Pullovers 1,000 605

Items incurred in 1985 - 5,594

TOTAL INCOME 784,700 738,067

EXPENDITURE

Conference - Fares (United Kingdom) - Expenses

Executive Committee Meeting (Newfoundland)

Publications

The Parliamentarian

Annual Report/General Assembly Report

Newsletters

Publications Staff Salaries

Miscellaneous Printing

CPA Posters

"The Parliamentarian" Cumulative Index (1981/85)

230,000 4.500

30,000

38,500

4.500

5.000

43,200

1.000

9,300

3,000

264,500

104,500

225,483 6,686

28,474

37,240

3,128

4,420

37,892

878

Carried forward 369,000 344,201

-2-

£ £ £

Brought forward 369,000 344,201

Overseas Visits

President Executive Committee Chairman) Regional Representatives, ) 25,000 19,267

Secretary-General, Officers ) and staff )

Westminster Seminar 23,500 22,727

Headquarters Administration

Salaries, NHI, Pension 217,000 160,959

Allowance for Secretary-General Appointee: Installation Grant 2,590 -

Fares ) 7,000 _ Removal Expenses) Overseas Allowance 5,800 -

Appointment of Deputy Secretary-General 10,000 -

Stationery and Office Equipment 12,000 11,721

Installation of Micro-Computer System and printing machine 26,700 -

Hospitality 7,500 5,107

Postage and telecorrmunication charges 13,000 12,977

Audit and Accountancy Fee 3,000 2,965

Office Cleaning 1,230 1,230

Book, newspapers and periodicals 2,650 2,494

Sundry expenses 4,850 4,598

Depreciation 5,500 5,485

Items incurred in 1985 - 318,820 107,182

TOTAL EXPENDITURE · 736,320 700,913

Excess of Income 48,380 37,154

Credit balance brought forward from 1985 46,349 39,195

Transfer to Contingency Reserve (20,000) (30,000)

CREDIT BALANCE AT THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1986 74,729 46,349

21 September 1986

APPENDIX 11

NOTES: REVISED ESTIMATED CPA INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT,

1987

Again, these estimates must be considered provisional in anticipation of revisions at future meetings.

INCOME

As agreed by delegates at the last General Assembly for a 5% increase in Branch Fees for 1987, total Branch Fees will be increased by £37,300.

Together with estimated income from Bank Interest and saleable CPA items, the total estimated incane would be £822,400.

EXPENDITURE

Our estimated total expenditure shows a figure of £760,475.

Conference Fares

No doubt, it is one of the largest single items of expenditure. The cost fluctuates from year to year depending on the venue of the Conference and number of delegates attending.

It has been estimated at £250,000 for the Conference to be held in Malaysia. However, the actual cost will not be known until after the conclusion of the Conference.

Executive Ccnmittee Meeting - Gibraltar

£42,000 allocated for the Executive Canmttee Meeting to be held in Gibraltar - a mere 5% increase of 1986 estimate - this assuming all members are in attendance.

Publications

Expenditure on publications assuming a general 5% increase over 1986 figure. Again, no estimate for Verbatim Report.

Overseas Visits

Estimate of £25,000 remains unchanged.

Westminster Seminar

Estimate for this expense is being increased by 5% over estimate for 1986.

-2-

Headguarters Administration

All the items are subject to a 5% increase over 1986 estimates.

Depreciation - this expense remains unchanged, being written off over a five year period.

SUMMARY

With stringent control of expenditure over income, we should accrue an excess of income over expenditure of £61,925. Together with the balance brought forward from 1986, it is estimated that there should be a credit balance of £136,654. 2 1

21 September 1986

Commonwealth Parliam entary Association

Headquarters Secretariat

Palace o f Westminster 7 Old Palace Yard London sw ip sjy Telephone 01-219 4666 Telex 911569 CPAHQ G Cables ‘Coniparlas London swi’

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

CPA ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1987 (REVISED)

INCOME E £

Branch Fees for the year (5% increase over 1986) 783,800

Bank Interest 29,000

Sales of Publications 7,200

Advertising Revenue 1,200

Profit of Ties/Badges/Scarves/Pullovers 1,200

TOTAL ESTIMATED INCOME 822,400

EXPENDITURE

Conference - Fare s (Malaysia) - Expenses

Executive Committee Meeting - Gibraltar

Publications

The Parliamentarian

Annual Report/General Assembly Report

Newsletters

Publications Staff Salaries

Miscellaneous Printing

250,000 6,000

42,000 298,000

40.500

4,750

5,250

45.500

1,050 97,050

395,050 Carried Forward

-2-

£ £

Brought forward 395,050

Overseas Visits

President, )

Executive Conmittee Chairman) Regional Representatives, ) 25,000

Secretary-General, Officers ) and Staff )

Westminster Seminar ' 23,800

Headquarters Administration

Salaries, NHI, Pension and Overseas Allowance 252,050

Stationery and Office Equipment 12,000

2nd Phase - Micro-Computer System 15,000

Hospitality 6,300

Postage, Teleccrrmunication Charges 13,650

Audit and Accountancy Fee 3,300

Books, Newspapers and Periodicals 2,800

Office Cleaning 1,300

Sundry Expenses 4,725

Depreciation 5,500 316,625

TOTAL ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE 760,475

Estimated Excess of Income 61,925

Estimated Credit Balance brought forward from 1986 74,729

ESTIMATED CREDIT BALANCE AT THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1987

136,654

21 September 1986

NOTES: PROJECTION FOR 1988

APPENDIX 12

The estimate for 1988 must be considered very provisional as items of income and expenditure can change depending upon decisions reached at future meetings.

INCOME

Total income remains unchanged as for 1987 assuming no increase in Branch Membership Fees.

This is the present intention: an increase may be necessary in exceptional circumstances. Thereafter, the Subcommittee considers fees should be set annually in line with United Kingdom inflation levels.

EXPENDITURE

All items of expenditure assuming a nominal 5% increase.

SUMMARY

Excess of income over expenditure estimated at £21,150. brought forward from 1987 of £136,654, estimated credit forward to 1989 should be £157,804.

With balance balance carried

21 September 1986

ConilTLOn.wea.lth Headquarters Secretariat Parliamentary Association

Palace of Westminster 7 Old Palace Yard London swip 3JY Telephone 01-219 4666 Telex 911569 CPAHQ G Cables ‘Comparlas London swi’

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

PROJECTION OF CPA INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1988 (REVISED)

INCOME

Branch Fees for the year

Bank Interest

Sales of Publications

Advertising Revenue

Profit of Ties/Badges/Scarves/Pullovers

TOTAL PROJECTED INCOME

EXPENDITURE

Conference - Fares (Australia) - Expenses

Executive Committee Meeting

Publications

The Parliamentarian

Annual Report/General Assembly Report

Newsletters

Publications Staff Salaries

Miscellaneous Printing

Overseas Visits

President )

Executives, Committee Chairman, ) Regional Representatives, Secretary-General,) Officers and Staff )

7 8 3 ,8 0 0

2 9 ,0 0 0

7 ,2 0 0

1 .5 0 0

1 .5 0 0

8 2 3 ,0 0 0

2 6 2 ,5 0 0 6 ,5 0 0

4 6 ,0 0 0 3 1 5 ,0 0 0

4 2 ,5 0 0

5 ,0 0 0

5 ,5 0 0

4 7 ,8 0 0

1 ,1 0 0 1 0 1 ,9 0 0

2 6 ,2 5 0

4 4 3 ,1 5 0 Carried forward

-2-

£

Brought forward

Westminster Seminar

Headquarters Administration

Salaries, NHI, Pension and Overseas Allowance 271,800

Stationery and Office Equipment 12,600

3rd Phase - Micro-Computer System 10,000

Hospitality 6,500

Postage, Telecomrunication Charges 14,400

Audit and Accountancy Fee 3,500

Books, Newspapers and Periodicals 3,000

Office Cleaning 1,400

Sundry Expenses 5,000

Depreciation 5,500

TOTAL PROJECTED EXPENDITURE

Projected Excess of Income * 3 1

Estimated Credit Balance brought forward from 1987

PROJECTED CREDIT BALANCE AT THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1988

£

443,150

25,000

333,700

801,850

21,150

136,654

157,804

21 September 1986

APPENDIX 13

C O M M O N W EA LTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION W O R K IN G CAPITAL FUND

R E PO R T AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FO R THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER 1985

W ORKING CAPITAL FUND ACCOUNTS AND BALANCE SHEET FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER 1985

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT

During the year a further £15,195 was donated by three Branches to bring the Fund’s Capital Account to a total of £507,030. There was a significant increase in total income of approximately 14 per cent, from £53,782 to £61,223. This resulted from a general strengthening of the Sterling Money Market and increased dividends from our investment port­ folio.

A Study Group was held in 1985 on “ Electoral Law and Practice’’. It met in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prior to the Plenary Conference in Saskatchewan. Ex­ penditure of £4,919 was incurred for hotel accommodation for the seven Members.

Although requests for subventions for regional activities have increased con­ siderably in comparison with previous years, these have largely been matched by the improvement in income. At the end of the year, the excess of expenditure over income w-as £7,171 compared with £18,000 in 1984. W ith a credit balance brought forward at the beginning of the year of £63,378, the net credit balance carried forward to 1986 is £56,207.

BALANCE SHEET

All fixed assets, comprising a printing machine, phototypesetter and photocopier, were transferred to CPA Account. Listed investments consist of an investment portfolio managed by Hill Samuel. At the end of the year, the market value of the Association’s invest­ ment holdings had increased by 18 per cent, reaching £725,000. as against £614,000 in 1984.

The book value increased by 13 per cent from £489,000 to £555,000. The present trustees are:

Senator R. R. Jeune, OBE, Hon. Treasurer, Jersey Mr Ted Garrett, MP, United Kingdom Sir Robin Vanderfelt. KBE, Secretary-General

C O M M O N W E A L T H P A R L I A M E N T A R Y A S S O C I A T I O N

W O R K I N G CA PITAL F U N D

REPORT OF THE AUDITORS

TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE COM M ONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION WORKING CAPITAL FUND

We have audited the financial statements on pages 66 to 69 in accordance with approved Auditing Standards. In our opinion the financial statements give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Fund at 31st December 1985 and ot its excess of expenditure over income and source and application of funds for the year then ended.

DELOITTE HASKINS & SELLS ( ‘InnUral Auoiwiiims

19th May 19X6

BALANCE SHEET A Γ 31m DECEMBER 1985

Nows 1985 19X4

1. L

Fixi u Asst is 2 I6.M4

Lisii u Ins isi mi n is i 554.774 4X9J6.S

554.774 M .\949

Ct'HKt N 1 Assl IS Debtor and prepayments . . . . . . 26.408 J /,/6 7

Bank balances . . 88.812 121.191

115.220 142.160

CutHt.N I LlAHIl.II IIS Amount due to Commonwealth Parliamentary Association 15.353 IX.X50

Other creditors and accruals . . . 23.384 12.500

38.737 11.150

Nt 1 CuRRt ΝΊ Assns 76.483 111,010

1631.257 L616.959

Financld Bn Capital Account . 4 507.030 491.X .15

( jpital Reserve Account . 5 68.020 61.746

Income and Expenditure Account 56.207 6J.J7S

1631.257 vw

SENATOR R R |EUNF.

MR TED GARRETT Trustees SIR ROBIN VANDERFELT 29th Λ Ijy 19X6

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE AC CO UNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31m DECEMBER 1985

Note

Incomi·.

Interest receivable . . . . . . . . . ■ · ·

Income receivable on Capital Reserve Bank Account . . . . . .

Dividends received . . . . . · - · · · - · ·

Profit on sale of “ Office of Speaker*" . . . . . . · -

Exi’l-.NDITUkl·

Subventions to Conferences and seminars . . . . . . . . 6

Studv tours to Australia by Members of Pacific Islands Branches . .

Study Group on “ Electoral Law and Practice" .............................

Studv Group on "Securit y of Small States" . · . · · · ■ -

Fares and expenses of Clerk Designate (Grenada) at the House of Commons . . . . . . . . . · ■ · - · ·

Fare and accommodation of Secretary Designate to Africa . . .

Essay Competition . . . . . . ■ . ■ · ■ · ·

Staff travel expenses (seminar in Harare) . . . . . . . .

Management and professional fees . . . · · · · · ·

Parliamentary Newsletters . . . . · . . . ■ · . ·

Postage, telephone, stationery and sundry . . . . . . . .

Auditors' Remuneration . . . · · . · · ·

Publications— “ Office of Speakei” . . . . . . ■ . ·

— “ History of the CPA" . . . . .

Working Party Meeting (New Delhi. India) . . . - . . .

Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . ■ · · ·

Excess of expenditure over income . . . . . . . . .

Balance brought forward at beginning of year . . . . . . . .

Balance carried forward at end of year . . . . . . ■ ■ ·

1985 19X4

1 i

42,605 .15.X 15

1,459 2.575

17.001 15.594

158 ...

61.223 55.7X2

45.132 40,055

8,518 —

4.919 -

“ 6,457

I.55X 1.511

— 19 7

— 1.492

3.092 2.596

3.882 .1,274

635 211

1,250 610

- 1,690

966 1.941

• — 6.000

- 5.112

68,394 72.262

(7.171, (IX.4X0)

63.378 X1.X5X

L56.207 L6.1.57X

CO M M O NW EA LTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION WORKING CAPITAL FUND STATEMENT OF SOURCE A N D APPLICATION OF FUNDS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31>t DECEMBER 1985

Source oe Funds

Donations received from branches during the year Profit on disposal ot investments . . . .

A m u .a lion up Funds

Deficit of income over expenditure for the year . . . . .

Adjustment for items not involving the movement of funds: Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transfer of fixed assets to Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Purchase of fixed assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inv.rv.am· in W orking C apital (including investments) Increase in debtors and repayments . . . . . . . . . .

Decrease (1984 increase) in amount due to Commonwealth Parliamen­ tary Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Increase in other creditors and accruals . . . . . . . . . .

Increase m investments . . . . . . . . . . . . -

Decrease (1984 increase) in bank balances

1985 1984

15,195 14.019

6,274 17.618

21.469 51,657

(7.171) (18.480)

— 5.112

16,584 —

- (557)

£30,882 i Π .7 5 2

5,241 .?

3.497 (11.555)

(10,884) (2.464)

05H09 J f U J 7

63.263 (2.699)

(32.381) 20.4.?/ 130.882 i l 7.7.12

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31%t DECEMBER 1985

1. A c c o u n t in g Po i ivies

The financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis of accounting. Fixed Assets are depreciated at 20 per cent per annum on a straight line basis. Profits and losses on disposal of investments arc dealt with through the Capital Reserve Account. Dividends are credited to the Income and Expenditure Account on the dates received.

2 Fixed Assets

Printing equipment and photocopier

At beginning ot sear Addition . .

Transfer to Commonwealth Parliamentary Association

At end of s ear .

1985 1984

£ £

25.561

(23.561)

25.024 557

25.5t>l

D l PRkVIATION

At beginning of year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Charge for year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transfer to Commonwealth Parliamentary Association . . . . . .

At end of year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Net Book Value at end of year . . . . . . . . . . . .

3. Listed Investments Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Market value at 31st December . . . . . . . . . . . .

4. C apital Account

Balance at 1st January. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Donations received from Branches during the year . . . . . . . .

Balance at 31st December . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5. C apital R eserve Account Balance at 1st January. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Profit on disposal of investments . . . . . . . . . . . .

Balance at 31st December . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6. Subventions to Conferences and Seminars Subvention to Conference of Representatives from Branches in small countries. Saskatchewan (1984 Isle of Man) . . . . . . . .

16th African Regional Conference, Mauritius . . . . . . . .

18th Austialasian and Pacific Regional Conference, Vanuatu . . . . 16th Regional Conference uf Presiding Officers and Clerks, Kiribati . . Establishment of African Regional Secretariat . . . . . . . .

Regional Seminar in Swaziland on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure . . Regional Seminar in St Christopher-Nevis on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Regional Seminar in Grenada on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure . . Regional Seminar in Fiji on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure . . . . Seminar in Harare, Zimbabwe, for clerks and officials of Parliament in Central and Southern Africa . . . . . . . . . . . .

15th African Regional Conference, Harare, Zimbabwe . . . . . . Seminar in New Delhi, India, on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure for Members from Branches in Asian, South-East Asian and African Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Regional Seminar in Canberra and Tonga on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Seminar held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for Members from Branches in South-East Asian and Australasian and Pacific Regions . . ................

8.977

(8,977)

5.8b5 5.112

8.977

£ Nil 116.584

1554,774 Ϊ489.565

£724,847 L614.099

491,835 477.81b

15.195 14.019

£507,030 1491,855

61,746 44,128

6,274 17.618

£68,020 ib 1,74b

10,278 9,475

10,049 —

5.012 —

5,000 2,104 —

1,250 "

5,312 4,122 —

2,005 —

6,000 2,500

- 10,000

- 2,0b0

- 10,000

£45.132 C40.055

APPENDIX 14

NOTES: REVISED ESTIMATE OF WORKING CAPITAL FUND

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1986

The Estimate for 1986 includes items of expenditure which have already been incurred together with those which will be expended during the course of the year.

INCOME

Although the interest rate is likely to drop further in the final quarter of the year, we are still in course to maintain the total income estimated at £61,000 - by retaining more fund placement into the Sterling Money

Market (SMMO) . So far we have maintained a record level of funds in SMMO of £105,000.

EXPENDITURE

As a result of the success of the first Study Tours by Members of The Pacific Islands Branches, namely -Tuvalu, Kiribati, Niue, Cook Islands

the second year programme is to proceed accordingly from 20 to 28 May. The contribution from the Working Capital Fund is likely to be £8,000.

The Biennial Seminar for the Australasia and The Pacific Region is scheduled to be held on 25 October - 6 November, in Norfolk Island/Perth. The Trustees agreed to a subvention of £3,000.

Assistance granted to Kiribati Branch to enable their delegates to attend the 8th Australasia and The Pacific Regional Seminar to be held in Norfolk Island/Perth.

In the African Region there will be three Parliamentary events held, namely -Regional Seminar on parliamentary Practice and Procedure which took place in Botswana, 10 - 14 February. The agreed subvention of £5,000 is settled.

Malawi Branch requested £2,400 as subvention to enable them to hold the 3rd Regional Seminar for Clerks and other Parliamentary officials which is to be held 21 - 25 April.

Also, Malawi Branch applied for subvention toward the hosting of the 17th African Regional Conference from 20 - 27 June. The Trustees agreed to a subvention of £7,500.

Due to the kind generosity of Jersey Branch to host the 4th Conference of Members from Small Countries; the costs estimated at £10,000. The costs would be much higher if the Conference were to be held in London.

-2-

The balance of the items of expenditure are expected to be affected by a nominal cost increase.

Excluding possible future requests for Working Capital Fund subvention, it is estimated that we should have an excess of income of £12,815. With credit balance brought forward from 1985, the estimated balance at the end of the year should be £69,022.

21 September 1986

Commonwealth Parliamentary Association

Headquarters Secretariat

Palace of Westminster 7 Old Palace Yard London swip 3JY Telephone 01-219 4666 Telegrams ‘Comparlas Pari London* Cables ‘Comparlas London swi’

W O R K I N G C A P IT A L F U N D

ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1986

£

Estimated 1986

(REVISED)

£

Audited 1985

INCOME

Bank Interest ) Investment Income)

TOTAL INCOME

61,000 61,223

61,000 61,223

EXPENDITURE

Australasia & The Pacific Region

Study Tours to Australia by Members of the Pacific Islands Branches (2nd year) subvention 8,000 8,518

8th Australasia and The Pacific Regional Seminar, Norfolk Island/Perth 3,000 -

Air fare for Hon Speaker and Clerk from Tuvalu Branch to attend a Regional Conference of Presiding Officers and Clerks of the Pacific Region, Melbourne 815 -

Assistance granted for Kiribati delegates to attend the 8th Australasia & The Pacific Regional Seminar 1,000 -

African Region

Subvention to Seminar on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure, Botswana

17th African Regional Conference, Malawi

3rd Regional Seminar for Clerks and other Parliamentary Officials, Malawi

5,000

7,500

Carried forward 27,715 8,518

-2-

£ £

Brought forward 27,715 8,518

Air fares for two Regional Representatives to attend Regional Executive Committee Meeting in Harare 550 -

Conference of Members from Small Countries (Jersey) - Fares, printing and distribution of Reports 10,000 10,278

Parliamentary Newsletters 4,500 3,882

Administrative expenses (Postage, cables, telexes, stationery, etc) 670 635

Management fee 3,250 3,092

Audit fee 1,500 1,250

Items incurred in 1985 - 40,739

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 48,185 68,394

Excess of Income over Expenditure (Deficit) 12,815 (7,171)

Balance brought forward from 1985 56,207 63,378

ESTIMATED CREDIT BALANCE CARRIED FORWARD c,

jb ^ /

TO 1987

21 September 1986

APPENDIX 15

WORKING CAPITAL FUND

NOTES: ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1987

Estimated inccme from Bank interest and Investment income ..... £61,000

Estimated total expenditure stands at ..... £60,820

Estimated excess of incane over expenditure ..... £ 180

Apart from the subvention to the Study Tours to Australia by members of the Pacific Islands Branches (Final year), all other contributions from the fund are allocated and approved by the Finance Subcommittee in a meeting held in Jersey.

Contingency reserve of £6,850 is in anticipation of further requests for funds from Branches to organise Regional Seminars or Conferences, etc.

To date, estimates are incomplete as certain items of expenditure are pending.

21 September 1986

Commonwealth Parliamentary L ||||8 J Headquarters Secretariat Association Palace of Westminster 7 Old Palace Yard London s w i p gjY Telephone 01-219 4666

Telegrams ‘ Comparlas Pari London’ Cables ‘Comparlas London swi’

W O R K I N G C A P IT A L F U N D

ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1987

INCOME £

Bank Interest ) 61,000

Investment Income)

EXPENDITURE

Study Tours to Australia by members of the Pacific Islands Branches (Final year) subvention 6,000

Regional Conference for Presiding Officers & Clerks, Cook Islands 3,000

18th African Conference, Swaziland 7,000

Subvention to Seminar on Parliamentary Practice & Procedure, Africa 5,000

Fourth Regional Seminar on Parliamentary Practice & Procedure for Branches in Asia, South East Asia, and Africa Regions, New Delhi . 12,500

Conference of Members from Small Countries (Malaysia) - Fares, printing and distribution of Reports 10,000

Contingency Reserve (Assistance for Seminars etc, not yet received) 6,850

Parliamentary Newsletter 4,750

Administrative Expenses 720

Carried forward 55,820

-2-

£

Brought forward 55,820

Management Expense 3,500

Audit fee 1,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 60,820

Estimated Excess of Income over Expenditure 180

Estimated Balance brought forward 70,022

ESTIMATED CREDIT BALANCE CARRIED FORWARD TO 1988 70,202

21 September 1986

APPENDIX 16

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST

REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER 1985

CPA AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST ACCOUNTS AND BALANCE SHEET FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st DECEMBER 1985

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT

Total income improved by 20 per cent over 1984, i.e., from £1 ,700 to £2,100. The main items of expenditure during the year included the provision of air fares for certain Branches to be represented at Regional Seminars and Con­ ferences for Clerks and Officials of Parliament (an activity that received a subvention from the Working Capital Fund) and the usual contribution

towards the annual membership fees of some Branches to ensure their atten­ dance at a Plenary Conference of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Associa­ tion every fourth year. W ith the increasing demands on the Working Capital Fund over the past

year or so, the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and Associated Pur­ poses Trust continues to provide a valuable additional source of funds. In the current year, however, there are likely to be more demands made upon the Trust for assistance with projects that the Working Capital Fund is also sup­ porting.

BALANCE SHEET

Unlisted investment comprises of States of Jersey Housing Loan at 6 V2 per cent. Market value is £11,643

Maturity at end of 1986. Balance: Kleinwort Benson £1,157

National Savings Bank £10,500 The present trustees are:

Senator R. R. Jeune, QBE, President of the Finance and Economics Commit­ tee, Jersey Mr E. J. M. Potter. Greffier of the States, Jersey Sir Robin Vanderfelt. KBE, Secretarv-General.

C O M M O N W E A L T H PARLIA MENTARY ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES T R U ST

REPORT OF THF AUDITORS

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST

Wc have audited the financial statements on pages 72 to 74 in accordance with approved Auditing Standards. In our opinion the financial statements give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Trust at 31st December 1985 and of its excess of income over expenditure for the year then ended.

DF.LOITTE HASKINS & SELLS C .lu iric rc J / It': o u illililty

I V//i Mj) 1986

BALANCE SHEET AT 31st DECEMBER 1985

C m m i d Invi-simi-.ni

( "l,kkl M A ss ll S

Bank balances . . . . . . . .

C i kkt-Νΐ l l A i m m t s

Amount due to Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Sundrv creditor . . . . . . . . . . .

Fin a m t o ηί

Capital Account. . . . . ,

lruonie and Expenditure Account

Xt'fcs 1985

2 ιο.οηυ

3 _!_U 24

11,724

1,733 ___ 95

1,828

9.896

i 19,896

16,000 3,896

L19,896

1984 i w.ooo

10.728

10.728

1,128 S 5 _

1,21.1

9.515

T? 9,515

16,000 .1,515

i 19.515

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCt >UNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st DECEMBER 1985

1985

Investment income received . . . . . . . . · . ■ . 799

Bank interest receivable. . . . . . . . . . - - 1,324

2,123

EXH-KUII Ukl-Assistance to Branches to enable them to be represented every tourth year at a Plenary C.onterence of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316

Air lares provided lot delegates to attend Regional Seminar on Parlia­ mentary Practice and Procedure, St Christopher-Nevis . . 1,183

Assistance to Clerk ot Cook Islands Parliament on attachment to the House til Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Air tare provided loi the Speaker ol the Niue Parliament to attend the 15th Regional Conference ot Presiding Ottivei s and Clerks. Queens-

Air tare provided for the Clerk ol the Niue Parliament to attend the 7th C.onterence ot Commonwealth Speakers and Presiding Officers, New Zealand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

Air tare provided for a delegate from the Kiribati Branch to attend the 7th Australasian and Pacific Regional Conference. Canberra and

.Trustees" and miscellaneous expenses . . . . . . . J25

Auditor’xrvmuneiaiuui . . . . . 95

1.742

Excess o il ncome over Expenditure for the year (1984: Deficit) . 381

Balance at beginning ol year . . . . . . . . 3,515

Balance at end ot year . . . . . . 1.3,896

1984 j L

799 986

1,767

514

500

500

657 100 85

2,156

1569,

5,884

a 515

SENATOR R R.JELJNE ) MR E. J M POTTER > Trustees MR ROBIN VANDERFELT ) 29tli Λ/,η 1986

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st DECEMBER 1985

1. Accounting Policy The financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis ot accounting.

1 9 8 5 1984

2 . U n l i s t e d I n v e s t m e n t

S t a t e s o f J e r s e y 6 ' 2 p e r c e n t H o u s i n g L o a n 1 9 8 1 8 6

£

£

C o s t .................................................................................................................................................... . . L 1 0 . 0 0 0 /10,000

M a r k e t V a l u e a t 3 1 s t D e c e m b e r . . .................................................................. . . i l l . 6 4 3 £11,244

3 . B a n k B a l a n c e s

C a p i t a ! d e p o s i t a c c o u n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . 1 5 7 1.052

N a t i o n a l S a v i n g s B a n k i n v e s t m e n t a c c o u n t ............................................................. . . . 1 0 . 5 6 7 9 . 6 7 6

£ 1 1 . 7 2 4 £10,728

NOTES: CPA AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1986

APPENDIX 17

Anticipated income for the year is £2,149 and expenditure is £1,095, as follows:

£350 has been allocated for Dominica and Montserrat to enable them to be represented at the Plenary Conference.

Subvention of £500 has been agreed to enable delegate from Tuvalu Branch to attend 35th Parliamentary Seminar in UK. This has been settled.

Trustees1 and Miscellaneous Expenses comprise of stationery, telephone and other sundry expenses.

Auditor fee - £95.

Excess of Income over Expenditure estimated at £1,054 with a credit balance of £3,896 brought forward from 1985. The estimated credit balance at year end should be £4,950.

21 September 1986

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED PURPOSES TRUST

PLEASE ADDRESS YOUR REPLY TO:

STATES GREFFE, ST.HELIER, JERSEY, CHANNEL ISLANDS. TELEPHONE: CENTRAL 3 3 2 0 1.

(S.T.D. CODE 0 5 3 4 )

ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR 1986 (REVISED)

INCOME

Investment income

Bank interest receivable

TOTAL INCOME

EXPENDITURE

Assistance to Branches to enable them to be represented every fourth year at a Plenary Conference of the Conmonwealth Parliamentary Association

Air fare for a delegate from the Tuvalu Branch to attend the 35th Parliamentary Seminar in UK

Other items incurred in 1985

Trustees' and Miscellaneous Expenses

Auditor's Remuneration

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Excess of income over expenditure for the year

Balance as at 1 January 1986

Balance as at 31 December 1986

£ £

ESTIMATED AUDITED 1986 1985

799 799

1,350 1,324

2,149 2,123

350 316

500 -

- 1,206

150 125

95 95

1,095 1,742

1,054 381

3,896 3,515

4,950 3,896

21 September 1986

APPENDIX 18

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

MEETING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

LONDON 1986

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION

CLAUSE 21 - CHAIRMAN

Substitute - ·

"21. The President of the Association or, in his absence, the Vice-President, or, in their absence, the Chairman of the Executive Committee, or, in his absence, the Vice-Chairman, or, in the absence of all of them, a member chosen by the meeting, shall preside at a meeting of the General Assembly.

CLAUSE 23 - OFFICERS

Substitute -

"23. The Officers of the Association shall be the President, the Vice-President, the Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the Executive Committee and the Treasurer."

CLAUSE 24 - PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT

For paragraph (5) substitute -

"(5) Whenever the office of President is not filled or has become vacant the Vice-President or, if there is no Vice-President, the Chairman of the Executive Committee, shall act as President."

CLAUSE 26 - HONORARY TREASURER

Delete, renumbering Clause 27 (Vice-Chairman) as Clause 26 and insert -

"TREASURER

27. The General Assembly, on the nomination of the Executive Committee, shall elect a Treasurer for a term of three years. If the Treasurer is at the time of his election a Regional Representative, his office as such shall become vacant."

2

CLAUSE 28 - ASSUMPTION OF OFFICE BY CHAIRMAN, ETC

Omit "Honorary"

CLAUSE 29 - INTERIM VACANCIES

For paragraph (1) (c ) substitute -

"(c) in the case of the Treasurer, the Chairman of the Executive Committee shall appoint a member of a Branch of the Association as acting Treasurer until the next meeting of the General Assembly, which shall elect a successor for a

three-year term;"

CLAUSE 33 - POWERS OF COMMITTEE

For paragraph (2)(e ) substitute -

"(e) to determine the size and composition, both permanent and temporary, of the establishment of the Secretariat from time to time;

(f ) to appoint or terminate the services of the Deputy Secretary- General ; "

and renumbering paragraph (2)(f ) , (g) and (h).

CLAUSE 34 - DUTIES OF COMMITTEE

In paragraph (d ), for the words from "It shall" onwards, substitute -

"It shall consist of the Treasurer and not less than two members of Branches of the Association who have appropriate financial experience;"

At the end insert -

"(f) In exercising its powers under Clause 33(2), take into account the need, wherever practicable, to maintain regional balance among the Officers, Subcommittees and staff of the Association."

CLAUSE 40 - SECRETARIAT

For paragraph (1)(c ) and (d ) substitute -

"(c) such other staff as may be appointed by the Secretary-General subject to the general directions of the Executive Committee, the establishment of the Secretariat and the availability of funds for the purpose within the approved budget."

3

At the end insert -

"(4) The services of staff of the Association may be terminated as follows -

(a) in the case of the Secretary-General, by the General Assembly;

(b) in the case of the Deputy Secretary-General, by the Executive Committee;

(c ) in any other case, by the Secretary-General."

11 AUGUST 1986

REPORT TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

APPENDIX 19

Monday p.m. Sept. 29

I am pleased to report, in my capacity as Chairman of the final

session, that the SIXTH COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE

of members from SMALL COUNTRIES met most successfully in the

Channel Island of Jersey while most delegates to the plenary

conference were on their way to the plenary conference in

London. This was the first occasion when the two conferences

have met in different Branches.

Branches of the CPA in 30 jurisdictions with populations of

250,000 or less sent a total of 52 delegates and secretaries

and seven observers to the conference which was officially

opened by the Lieutenant Governor of Jersey, His Excellency

Admiral Sir William Pillar, GBE, KCB, on 22 September.

The conference opening ceremony was presided over by the Bailiff

of Jersey, Mr Peter Crill, CBE, who also serves as the Speaker

of the States of Jersey and interest in parliamentary

democracy was demonstrated by his attendance at several of

our sessions.

We were especially pleased to be able to hold our meetings in

the beautiful and historic States Chamber.

The Association's Executive Committee was meeting at the same

time, also as guests of the Jersey Branch, and Small Countries

Conference delegates appreciated the chance to meet informally

with Committee Members at the opening ceremony and on social

occasions.

Delegates had an opportunity to see something of the Island,

its people and its history on the weekend before the conference

began. We were taken to the marvellous Fort Regent leisure

centre development, to an interdenominational church service

and to the Howard Davis Farm where we were most impressed by

Jersey's agricultural achievements, especially the "talking"

Jersey cows.

. . .2/

The conference was most grateful to the States of Jersey, its

CPA Branch and to the people of the Island for their hospitality

during the conference.

The agenda for the conference has already been well circulated.

Suffice it to say that delegates focused attention on five very

important matters related to the physical environment, drug

trafficking, financial security, public spending and the future

of parliamentary democracy. There was a high degree of unanimity

on some of the solutions to the problems we discussed, particularly

on the need to press our governments to take concerted action to

curb illegal drug trafficking. As Senator Billie Miller of Barbados

said at the conclusion of the conference, "We talk so that we don't

fight."

Delegates were strongly in agreement that the Small Countries

Conference presents a microcosm of the issues which face larger

countries. The conference is seen as an essential prelude to the

plenary conference and it is our hope that it should continue in

the future.

We are most grateful to the trustees of the CPA Working Capital

Fund for subsidizing our travel to Jersey and we hope it continues

to support this important tie which binds us all.

APPENDIX 20

TO DELEGATION SECRETARIES [for distribution at briefing]

CPA ANNIVERSARY POSTERS

At its meetings in Saskatchewan and later in Newfoundland, Executive Committee approved the preparation of a set of wall posters for distribution to every Member of the CPA as part of the 75th Anniversary commemoration.

The two posters have been produced in full colour; the first depicts a map of the world showing the location of CPA Branch countries, states and provinces, with more detailed maps of each Region; the second, with a smaller map, has tables

showing details of Legislature and Government in each area.

The cost of producing and distributing free posters to each member (nearly 8,000 sets, or 16,000 posters) is considerable, but the Executive Committee is anxious to publicise the CPA as widely as possible in this Anniversary year, and to involve

individual members in this activity.

The Executive Committee would be most grateful for your

assistance with this important project.

1. In order to save the additional costs involved in distri­ bution, Secretaries attending the Conference are being asked if they would please collect the posters for their areas (one set per member), organise their carriage home and

arrange for them to be distributed to Branch Members on

their return.

Secretaries to unaccompanied delegations are asked to liase with the delegates directly involved to organise carriage of each Branch's quota.

Please contact CPA Headquarters Office (Room 313) to arrange to collect the posters

2. On your return home, would you please use your best

endeavours to persuade Members through their Branches to order additional copies of the posters for distribution to schools etc in their constituencies.

The posters may be ordered singly or in sets of two at a

cost of two pounds (sterling) per poster , plus postage.

There will be bulk discounts for Branch orders of more than fifty posters; Branches may perhaps approach education authorities to order posters for schools.

Pales of an average of two posters per member, (16,000) would recover the total costs. Order forms, to be supplied to

Branches- directly, should he returned by 20.12.86, please.

Many thanks for your help!