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Honey Industry Act - Australian Honey Board - Report and financial statements, together with Auditor-General's Report - Year - 1983-84 (21st)


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

Twenty-first Annual Report

1983-84

Presented 25 February 1985 Ordered to be printed 28 March 1985

Parliamentary Paper No. 113/1985

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AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

TWENTY FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 1983-84

1983 - 1984

T W E N T Y F IR S T A N N U A L R E P O R T of the A U S T R A L IA N H O N E Y B O A R D

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30TH JUNE, 1984

Printed by Mutual Aids, St. Peters, N.S.W., Ph. (02) 516-4211

TWENTY FIRST ANNUAL REPORT

CHAIRMAN S LETTER TO THE MINISTER

AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD, 647 GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY, N.S.W. 2000. (02: 211-2411)

(Telex: 23846)

The Hon. John Kerin M.P., Minister for Primary Industry, Parliament House, CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600.

Dear Minister, In accordance with Section 30 of the Honey Industry Act 1962, I have pleasure in submitting the annual report of the Australian Honey Board for the year ending 30th June 1984.

General Review After two years of record exports, sales for the year under review fell to 10,603 tonnes reflecting lower stock volumes surplus to dom estic requirements.

Domestic sales increased slightly to 12,616 tonnes.

Export prices fell steadily during the year as a result of poor demand by major importers.

The prices being obtained for exports at the close of the year were disap­ pointing when taking into consideration the more favourable Australian dollar exchange rate existing at that time.

Stocks of honey are light and we should expect an upturn in prices for the year 1984/85.

An operating surplus of $16,749 after increasing domestic and export promotional expenditure by $26,726 was a satisfactory result. Domestic prices at last show a pleasing upward trend and we anticipate further improved returns without causing any consumer buying resistance.

I.A.C. Inquiry The industry received the draft report issued by the Commission with disappointment and made strong representation to the Commission at the final hearing in Sydney during March 1984 towards gaining some additional

benefits for the industry to those recommended by the Commission in the draft report. The industry awaits the release of the final report with interest.

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Overseas Visit As a result of earlier communication between the Board and some overseas exporters, the Deputy Chairman and the Manager attended a meeting held in Mexico in May 1984.

As a result of this meeting an International Honey Exporters’ Organisation has been established and efforts are being directed to extending the representa­ tion of this organisation.

It is hoped that by an exchange of information between major exporters of production and stock levels a more realistic appraisal of world market oppor­ tunities can be gained.

Domestic Promotion During the year we negotiated for the appointment of Peter Russell-Clarke of Market Australia Pty. Ltd. to handle the Board’s domestic advertising promotional activity as from July 1st 1984.

We are confident that this well known identity in food promotion will materially improve the demand for honey in the domestic market.

Retirements Messrs Alan Fewster, Producer Representative and Bev Clifton, Packer Member representing Western Australia retired with effect from 30th June 1984.

Both served the Board for a long period and were forceful and constructive in their efforts to improve the state of the industry.

Mrs. Enid Walsh, a staff member for 19 years also retired during the year.

Management J he management continued to act efficiently at a reduced staff level and I commend their enthusiasm and dedication to the industry.

Government Assistance We have continued to receive most valuable assistance from officers of your Department and other Departments and are appreciative of the oppor­ tunities given to discuss industry matters with you personally.

Yours sincerely,

E.J. Davy, Chairman, Australian Honey Board.

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LEGISLATION The Honey Industry Act 1962 provides authority for the establishment, control and administration of the Board.

The major part of the Board's income is derived from a levy imposed by the Honey Levy Acts (Nos. 1 and 2) 1962 on honey produced and sold in Australia or used in the manufacture of other goods, and from a charge imposed by the Honey Export Charge Act 1973 on honey exported from Australia.

1 he Honey Levy Collection Act 1962 and the Honey Export Charge Collection Act 1973 provide the machinery for collection by the Department of Primary Industry of the levy and export charge.

FUNCTIONS The Board’s functions as defined in Section 16 of the Honey Industry Act 1962 are:— a) to make recommendations to the Minister with respect to the rate of levy

and export charge to be prescribed from time to time for the purposes of the Board under the Honey Levy Acts (Nos. 1 and 2) 1962 and the Honey Export Charge Act 1973; b) to make recommendations to the Minister with respect to the making of

regulations under the Honey Industry Act 1962 or any other Act, for the purpose of controlling the export of honey from Australia; c) to make reports and suggestions to, and to formulate plans for the consideration of, the Minister with respect to any matter affecting the Honey

Industry, including any matter relating to the export of honey from Australia; d) to promote the consumption and sale of honey, both in Australia and overseas; e) to assist and encourage the improvement of the methods of production,

storage and transport of honey; and f) such functions in relation to the export, and the sale and distribution after export, of honey as are conferred by or under the Act.

Under paragraph f) above, the Board operates Pools, sets minimum grade values for bulk honey exports and maintains high export standards.

COMPOSITION OF THE BOARD The Honey Industry Act provides under Section 7(1) that the Board shall consist of:— a) a member to represent the Australian Government, who shall be Chair­

man of the Board; b) five members to represent honey producers; and c) four members to represent honey packers.

At the end of the year under review, the composition of the Board was as follows:— Chairman: Mr. E.J. Davy Deputy Chairman: Mr. A.J. Fewster

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Representatives of Producers:

Queensland Member: Mr. J.C. Smith, MBE Deputy: Mr. K.C. Kelly

South Australia Member: Mr. J.C. Fuss Deputy: Mr. M.J. Koerner New South Wales

Member: Mr. K.J. Eastburn Deputy: Mr. E.N. Peadon

Western Australia Member: Mr. A.J. Fewster Deputy: Mr. R.O. Pollard Victoria

Member: Mr. R.H. McDonald Deputy: Mr. D.P. Nicel

Representatives of Packers: New South Wales Member: Mr. R.A. Cook Deputy: Mr. R.J. Bates

Victoria Member: Mr. N.R. Gorman Deputy: Mr. C.L. Swift

Western Australia Member: Mr. B.D. Clifton Deputy: Mr. S.R. Luce

South Australia Member: Mr. R.K. Barker Deputy: Mr. M.W. Hanrahan

All Board members were appointed for three years to 30th June 1984.

Executive Committee: Section 12-( 1) of the Honey Industry Act provides that there shall be an Executive Committee of the Board consisting of:— a) the Chairman of the Board; and b) three other members of the Board elected by the members of the Board, of whom at least one shall be a member representing honey producers and at least one shall be a member representing honey packers.

Three other members as defined in b) were as follows during the year under review:— Mr. B.D. Clifton — representing honey packers;

Mr. J.C. Smith, MBE — representing honey producers;

Mr. R.K. Barker — representing honey packers.

Honey Research Committee: Board representative during the year under review:— Mr. R.H. McDonald.

Executive Officers of the Board: Manager —Mr. J.B. Wells

Assistant Manager/ Secretary —Mr. R.B. Wilcher

Board Staff:

J otal number of employees at the end of the year under review was four.

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Board Meetings:

The following General Board Meetings were held during the year;— 69th Meeting — 27th September 1983 70th Meeting — 21st February 1984 71st Meeting — 28th/29th May 1984

No formal meetings of the Executive Committee took place however this Committee continued its role of administering the export minimum price structure on behalf of the Board.

LEVY The domestic levy rate was increased from 1.8 to 2.2 cents per kg. effective from 1st October 1983. The export charge of 0.5 cents per kg remained unaltered in 1983/84.

PRODUCTION Production for 12 months ended 30th June 1983 was 22,722 tonnes. In 1983/84 a late summer/autumn crop in Northern NSW and Queensland boosted production. Above average winter crops were evident in many areas of the Eastern States.

DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION Domestic consumption based on levies for the period was 12,616 tonnes or .803 kg. per capita. Past comparisons are:—

Total Consumption Per Capita

_____Tonnes_____ Kg,

30th June 1981 12,273 .822

1982 11,782 .776

1983 12,324 .802

1984 12,616 .803

EXPORTS Exports for the year were 10,603 tonnes valued at $10,764,043. The United Kingdom remained the most important market for Australian bulk honey followed by USA, Spain and the Federal Republic of Germany. Singapore

and Malaysia remain the main markets for pre-packed honey. Prices for bulk honey weakened during the period due mainly to the gradual revaluation of the Australian dollar following its devaluation in March 1983. High interest rates were a factor in keeping stocks at reasonably low levels. Whilst high

interest rates remain there is little incentive for packers to finance the holding of large stocks for lengthy periods. Exports of pre-packed honey continued to decline and this reflects increased competition in the main markets of the Middle East and South East Asia.

In May 1984 the Deputy Chairman and Manager attended an inaugural meeting of the International Honey Exporters Organisation in Mexico. Mex­ ico, Cuba and Australia were represented. The object of the organisation is to introduce some orderliness into the world marketing of honey by means of

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infor mation exchange. The Manager also visited the Board’s agents in USA, United Kingdom and the Federal Republic of Germany. Revised agency agreements with the U.K. Agents were finalised to be effective from 1st July 1984. Agency agreements with other agents were modified to provide unifor­ mity with the U.K. agency agreements.

Export Authorities The Board continued to exercise its control over exports through a system of licensing of exporters in accordance with the Honey Export Control (Licen­ ces) Regulations operating under the Honey Industry Act. A total of 31

licences was recommended and issued for the year ending 30th June 1984.

Two officers are appointed as authorised persons in each State Office of the Department of Primary Industry, which Department acts as an agent for the Board in respect of the issue of a Certificate of Permission of Authority to Export Honey for each shipment by a licensed exporter. This agency arrange­ ment does not apply in NSW where the Board’s office is located and autho­ rised persons are appointed from the Board’s staff.

United Kingdom/Europe Kimpton Bros. Ltd. and Overseas Farmers’ Co-operative Federations Ltd. continued as the Board’s appointed agents for the United Kingdom and Europe. From 1st July 1983 the European area of the agency exclusive of West Germany was extended to the Board’s German agents. In 1983 the United

Kingdom imported 20,742 tonnes of honey of which 6,295 tonnes or 30.3% was of Australian origin. Portugal remained a significant buyer of Australian honey. The U.K. Agents continue to provide valuable advice on market conditions and have assisted as members of the Honey Publicity Committee.

During the year Messrs. D.B. Thomas and D. Paines representing Kimpton Bros. Ltd. and J. W. Kendall representing O.F.C.F. Ltd. visited Australia and attended a Board meeting.

West Germany/Austria In 1983 West Germany imported 66,385 tonnes of honey of which 1,674 tonnes was of Australian origin. Exchange rates during the year were not conducive to making large export sales. From 1st July 1983 a new agent was

appointed by the Board viz: Adolf Determann of Hamburg. E.A. Springer and Co. GmbH continues as a Board agent. From 1st July 1983 the agency area was extended to cover Europe exclusive of the United Kingdom and Eire to be shared with the U.K. agents. The two agents provided helpful market reports at regular intervals during the year.

North America I η 1983 the USA imported 49,865 tonnes of honey of which 1,375 tonnes was of Australian origin. The domestic price support scheme in USA encour­ ages imports and reflects the overall increase in the volume of imports in recent years. However the stockpile of domestic crop is a serious concern. From 1st July 1983 a new agent was appointed by the Board viz. C.M. Goettsche and

Co. Inc. Sunland Inc. continues as a Board agent. Both agents have provided regular market advice during the year.

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MOVEMENT OF MINIMUM GRADE EXPORT PRICES FOR BULK HONEY (Previous year’s prices at same date in brackets)

Effective $A per tonne FOB

Date W ELA LA PA MA A DA

1/ 7/83 1,095 1,000 990 980 920 875 855

(885) (830) (805) (780) (685) (645) (625)

20/ 7/83 1,015 955 945 930 920 875 855

9/11/83

(885) (830) (805) (780) (685) (645) (625)

UK/Europe 960 890 880 870 860 850 840

U.S.A. 985 925 915 900 890 850 840

(970) (915) (890) (865) (785) (745) (725)

4/ 4/84 900 850 850 870 860 850 840

(1,065) (1,000) (980) (950) (890) (845) (825)

23/ 5/84 900 870 870 870 860 850 840

(1,095) (1,000) (990) (980) (920) (875) (855)

I.A.C. Inquiry Following industry submissions to the Minister for Primary Industry an Inquiry into the honey industry by the Industries Assistance Commission was announced in May 1983. The Commission called for submissions from the industry and sittings were held in Melbourne, Perth, Sydney and Brisbane during September 1983. The recommendations on the draft report released in

February 1984 were as follows:—

“The Industries Assistance Commission proposes to recommend that there be no change in the assistance provided to the honey industry. The Commission draws attention to its suggestion that the

Government consider increasing the level of research and extension funding available to the industry with the objective of improving the supply of publicity available information on pollination services.”

A final hearing of the Commission was held in March and the Commission presented its final report to Government in May 1984. The final report had not been made public at the end of the period.

Australian Shippers’ Council and Freight Rates The Board continues its membership of ASC which negotiates general freight rates and monitors closely all proposed variations in bunker surcharges and currency adjustment factors.

Independent negotiations were conducted with Conference Lines either by the Board or the Board’s overseas agents. Reductions in the freight for honey were achieved to:—

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Singapore/ Malaysia Thailand North America (East Coast)

Europe (bulk tanks and pre-packed honey)

Export Containers The average cost of 205 litre (300 kg) export drums increased during the year under review from $28.60 to $29.42. The average cost of 20 litre (30 kg) export drums increased from $3.12 to $3.36.

DOMESTIC PROMOTION The advertising firm Barry Banks Blakeney Advertising Pty. Etd. con­ tinued to handle the Board’s domestic advertising. The campaign centred around advertising in “Woman’s Day” magazine with a total of eight full colour pages and six junior colour pages. Advertisements invited readers to

write in for recipe booklets and other promotional material. Joint promotions with Vogel’s bread were conducted in “Women’s Weekly”, “Reader’s Digest” and “Family Circle”. A joint promotion with the Rice Marketing Board of NSW was also conducted. This involved joint advertising in national maga­ zines and cooking demonstrations in shopping centres.

In November 1983 the Board conducted a national consumer market survey. The results of the survey showed that honey was highly regarded in relation to other spreads and that it was considered to be relatively inexpen­ sive. This reflected the view that the domestic market is unduly influenced by the export market. The survey also showed the need to educate consumers on the qualities and different types of honey.

During the period a new honey cookbook was produced and launched with public relations/media campaigns. Initial sales of the cookbook have been encouraging. Sales of other promotional material continued to increase.

Each year there is a small allocation of funds to each State to conduct local promotional activities. The Board has a comprehensive library of educational films and video cassettes which are available for lending or for sale.

OVERSEAS PROMOTION United Kingdom The greater part of the promotion in U.K. took part during January to May 1984. The two principal supermarket chains, Sainsbury and Tesco, continue to offer well identified Australian honeys but these are in competition with house brands. Promotions have therefore been directed to smaller food chains. During the period promotions were conducted with the following companies:—

W.H. Cullen Ltd. Holland & Barratt Ltd. Culpepper Ltd. Petty Wood & Co. Ltd.

Montgomery Bell Ltd. (N. Ireland)

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Life Force Foods Ltd. (Dublin) Waitrose Ltd. Natures Way Ltd. (Health Foods) Kelkin Ltd. (Dublin)

Happy Nut House Ltd. (Health Foods) Hardy Ltd. Southern Health Foods Ltd. Regent Health Foods Ltd.

Boots Ltd. Hillards Ltd.

Promotion with the leading Health Food chain, Holland & Barratt, con­ tinued throughout the year with a re-issue of a coupon leaflet in their 160 stores. This resulted in some 3,000 enquiries to Australia House for the Recipe Book and “The Wonderful Story of Australian Honey”. There has also been a

big increase of inquiries and requests from the education authorities for recipe books and general information for the use of their various cookery classes. Petty Wood and Co. Ltd. increased their range of Australian honeys and assistance was provided with new labelling and new product promotions with

theii major customers. The company took a stand at the bi-annual Helfex Exhibition and Australian honey featured prominently.

The Department of Trade continues its programme of small displays of Australian products in the principal cities, usually under the aegis of the local Chamber of Commerce. Honey samples, together with recipe books and posters were supplied to each of these displays.

Board films are retained at the Film Unit at West Australia House and there was a steady demand throughout the period. There is also regular mail received at Australia House requesting information about Australian honey.

Singapore Pior to conducting the promotion campaign-in Singapore an omnibus consumer market survey was conducted. A number of interesting factors emerged and it was concluded that promotion should be directed at the

Chinese section of the community with children. The emphasis should be on the use of honey in drinks for health and energy qualities.

The promotion centred around the Australian food festival in May 1984. In store promotions were conducted in selected outlets of the following stores:—

Cold Storage Jason’s Supermarket Daimaru Healthy Life

N.T.U.C.

Promotion centred around free tastings of honey based drinks and small toy koala bears were given away with every jar of Australian honey purchased. Media advertising of Australian honey was also conducted in the following newspaper and magazines:—

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Straits Time Lian He Zao Bao Sisters Pictorial Her World

Malaysia The consumer market survey conducted in Singapore was considered to have relevance in Malaysia although the Chinese population is not as predom­ inant. An intense media campaign was conducted during May and June 1984 in the following newspapers/magazines:—

The Star Utusan/Malaysia Nanyang Siang Pau

Sin Chew Jit Poh Sin Ping Jih Pau New Life Post

The campaign concentrated on the health giving and medicinal properties of honey and the advantages of its use in drinks. The slogan used was “The Goodness of Australian Honey” and a competition was run for ideas on other slogans.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT The Board is subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act. During the period:—

(a) No requests for information have been made. (b) No rejections of requests have occurred. (c) No costs have been incurred. (d) The Board’s Manager is the F.O.I. Officer and is responsible for all FOI

procedures. (e) All staff have been trained to respond to FOI requests.

BOARD’S HONEY POOLS I he Board’s authority to conduct honey pooling operations is outlined in Section 18 of the Honey Industry Act. Pooling operations are now con­ ducted with various honey owners under the new lending procedures that

became operative from the commencement of Pool 22.

Finance to operate pooling is provided by the Reserve Bank of Australia after approval of the Board’s application by the Department of Primary Industry and the Treasury. This finance is guaranteed by the Commonwealth Government and is made available to the Board upon the conditions outlined by the Reserve Bank.

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Interest rates imposed during the year varied from 12.25% to 14.50% and are as follows:—

l July 1983 - 14.50%

24 August - 14.00%

21 September — 13.50%

12 October - 13.25%

23 November - 13.00%

14 December - 12.75%

5 January 1984 - 12.25%

16 March - 13.25%

13 April — - 14.25%

Honey Pool Operations During the year Pool No. 21 closed and Pool No. 22 was opened.

Pool No. 21 was closed on 31 December 1983 after all advances were repaid to the Reserve Bank.

Advances against Pool No. 22 were made to various owners of honey on the basis of the new security arrangements set by the Board.

Pool No. 22 was opened in October 1983 and will remain open for lending until the end of September 1984. All outstanding advances are scheduled to be repaid by 31 December 1984. The following statements show the movements in pooling operations for the period:—

HONEY POOL NO. 21:1 JULY TO 31 DECEMBER 1983

Grades

Outstanding at 30/6/83

Advanced to 30/9/83

Repaid· to 31/12/83

Tonnes Value

$

Tonnes Value

$

Tonnes Value

$

White 211 107,855 211 107,855

Extra Light Amber 803 377,375 31 15,190 834 392,565

Light Amber 177 79,480 71 34,272 248 113,752

Pale Amber 230 98,685 — — 230 98,685

Medium Amber — — — — — —

Amber — — — — — -

Dark Amber — — — — — —

Total 1,421 663,395 102 49,462 1,523 712,857

HONEY POOL NO. 22: 1 OCTOBER 1983 TO 30 JUNE 1984

Grades

Advanced to 30/6/84

Repaid to 30/6/84

Outstanding at 30/6/84

Tonnes Value

$

Tonnes Value

$

Tonnes Value

$

White 38 19,760 38 19,760

Extra Light Amber 89 42,720 — — 89 42,720

Light Amber 253 119,051 213 100,251 80 18,800

Pale Amber — — — — — —

Medium Amber — — — — — —

Amber — — — — — —

Dark Amber — — — — — —

Total 380 181,531 213 100,251 167 81,280

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Advances rates approved for pooling during the year were as follows:

Grade Range MM Advance Rate

1/7/1983 1/10/1983

to to

30/9/1983 30/6/1984

White 00- 34 56 52

Extra Light Amber 35- 48 49 48

Light Amber 49- 65 48 47

Pale Amber 66- 83 48 46

Medium Amber 84-100 43 45

Amber 101-114 40 42

Dark Amber 115 + 38 40

The financial movements of pooling operations are detailed in the Honey Pools Statement under the Financial Accounting Section of the Report.

HONEY LEVY The following tables show the amounts collected by the Department of Primary Industry for domestic honey levy and export charge and then remitted to the Board.

Domestic Levy

State of Collection

1977 $

1978 $

1979 $

1980 $

1981 $

1982 $

1983 $

1984 $

N.S.W. 42,023 30,259 62,611 70,995 78,303 76,502 76,317 91,123

Vic. 18,000 16,494 62,137 49,974 66,093 64,561 70,967 76,358

Q'ld. 73,687 86,096 34,326 34,797 42,780 39,118 41,944 47,229

S.A. 9,851 10,279 11,943 24,085 14,634 12,394 11,894 14,390

W.A. 11,294 12,311 10,970 15,014 16,070 15,539 17,255 19,855

Tas. 3,249 2,648 4,205 4,063 3,007 3,952 3,363 4,579

A C T . 205 107 89 117 29 4 88 46

Totals: 158,309 158,194 186,281 199,045 220,916 212,070 221,828 253.580

Levy/kg. Domestic Sales of

1.3 1.3/1.5 1.5/1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8/2.2

Honey in Tonnes

12,178 11,297 11,393 11,058 12,273 11,782 12,324 12,616

based on Collections

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Export Charge

State of 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984

Collection $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

N.S.W. 2,207 2,177 5,896 9,246 10,049 8,846 17,996 14,273

Vic. 5,676 939 6,519 14,433 9,604 19,610 15,660 7,120

Q'ld 2,404 3,104 4,395 17,900 11,865 16,511 19,376 21,959

S.A. 2,753 882 3,451 6,368 4,549 5,767 5,728 569

W.A. 7,706 4,840 2,233 6,463 5,053 9,229 15,905 7.046

Tas. 920 726 1,465 1,616 1,505 1,945 1,944 1,824

Totals: 21,666 12,668 23,959 56,026 42,625 61,908 76,609 52,791

Charae/ka. 0.3 0.3 0.3/0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

Export Sales of Honey in Tonnes based 7,222 4,223 5,690 11,205 8,525 12,382 15,322 10,558

on Collec­ tions

ANNUAL ACCOUNTS The Board’s Annual Accounts are presented in the form approved by the Department of Finance and are prepared as required under Section 30(1) of the Honey Industry Act 1962.

For the year, Board Revenues exceeded Expenditures by $16,749. The Surplus is an increase of $13,439 over the Surplus of the prior year.

The Board’s Revenues were substantially higher than the previous year. The major increase was due to a higher claim under the Export Market Development Grants Act 1974.

Revenue from the Domestic Levy increased due to a greater volume of domestic sales and an increase in the levy rate from October 1983. This was partly offset by a reduction in export charge earnings on exports for the period.

Demand for promotion material was, once again, higher and this is reflected in the increased sales of material of $6,638 for the year. Total Expenditure increased with major increases being recorded in Pro­ motion Expenditure ($26,726) and Audit Fee ($4,580). The Board again expresses disappointment at the high level of audit charge.

During the period, a substantial investment was recorded in the purchase of new promotional material.

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AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 30 JUNE 1984

ACCUMULATED FUNDS

Balance at 1 July 1983 Surplus (Deficiency) transferred from Income and Expenditure Statement

Balance at 30 June 1984

1984 1983

NOTES $ $

115,550 112,240

16,749 3,310

132,299 115,550

Represented by:

ASSETS

FIXED ASSETS Office Machines, Furniture and fittings — at cost less depreciation 14 5,952 3,918

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash at Bank and in Hand 27,270 112,645

Prepayments 1,011 1,474

Sundry Debtors 15 100,174 59,376

Pool Debtors 16 4,674 31,882

Advances 1.4 81,280 663,395

Stock of Promotion Material — at cost 75,131 25,940

TOTAL ASSETS 295,492 898,630

Less: LIABILITIES

CURRENT LIABILITIES Bank Overdraft 17 85,954 695,395

Sundry Creditors and Accrued Liabilities 18 24,556 31,217

Current Provisions 19 9,266 10,774

NON CURRENT LIABILITIES Non Current Provisions 20 43,417 45,694

TOTAL LIABILITIES 163,193 783,080

NET ASSETS 132,299 115,550

In our opinion, the accompanying — Income and Expenditure Statement, — Floney Pools Statement, — Balance Sheet,

— Statement of Sources and Applications of Funds, have been drawn up so as to show fairly the financial transactions for the year ended 30 June 1984 and the state of the affairs of the Australian Honey Board as al that Date.

E.J. DAVY J.B. WELLS

Chairman Manager

The attached notes form part of these financial statements.

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AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1984

INCOME

Proceeds from Levy C ollections Sale of Material Export Market Development Grant Overprice Gains

Interest Other Income

EXPENDITURE Board Members Salaries and related expenses Administration Audit fees

Depreciation Promotion — Australia Promotion — Overseas Transfers to Provisions

Surplus (Deficiency) Income over Expenditure Transferred to Accumulated Funds

1984 1983

Notes $ $

2 306,371 298,437

26,241 19,603

3 68,500 34,764

4 10,712 11,246

5 11,642 19,573

6 553 8,488

424,019 392,111

7 52,770 56,327

8 102,312 113,541

9 27,859 25,610

10 15,000 10,420

1,780 1,530

11 123,346 115,448

12 67,733 48,905

13 16,470 17,020

407,270 388,801

16,749 3,310

The attached notes form part of these financial statements.

AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

HONEY POOLS STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDED 39 JUNE 1984

ADVANCES ON STOCK POOLED

Advances at 1 July 1983 Advances for Year

Less Repayments

Advances outstanding at 30 June 1984

EXPENSES

Recoverable Expenses at 1 July 1983 Interest Insurance Administration

Less Expenses Recouped

Balance outstanding at 30 June 1984 to be recovered

1984 1983

NOTES

1.4

$ $

663,395 1,890,236

237,368 940,900

900,763 2,831,136

819,483 2,167,741

81,280 663,395

31,882 140,250

26,147 94,374

491 3,351

1,055 3,823

59,575 241,798

54,901 209,916

16 4,674 31,882

The attached notes form part of these financial statements.

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AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

STATEMENT OF SOURCES AND APPLICATIONS OF FUNDS FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1984

SOURCES OF FUNDS Funds from Operations Operating Surplus (Deficiency)

Add (Subtract) Non-Fund Items: Depreciation Provision for Long Service Leave Provision for Promotion

Expenditu re-Tasmania Provision for Recreation Leave Profit on Sale of Non-Current A ssets

Reduction in A ssets Current A ssets Cash at Bank and in Hand Prepayments

Pool Debtors Advances

Proceeds from Sale of Non-Current Assets

1984 1983

$ $ $ $

16,749 3,310

1,780 3,564

1,530 5,119

4,579 8,327 (140) 18,110

3,363 8,538

18,550

34,859 21,860

85,375 463 27,208 582,115

29,462 4,373 108,368 1,226,841

695,161 1,369,044

140 ________-

730,160 1,390,904

APPLICATIONS OF FUNDS Increase in A ssets Current A ssets Sundry Debtors

Stock Non Current A ssets Office machines, furniture & fittings Reduction in Liabilities Current Liabilities

Bank Overdraft Sundry Creditors & Accrued Liabilities

Long Service Leave Paid Recreation Leave Paid Promotion Expenditure-Tasmania

40,798 49,191 89,989

9,070 7,273 16,343

3,814 2,146

609,441 1,335,091

6,661 616,102 9,949 1,345,040

8,142 6,247 5,866

11,271 9,538 6,566

730,160 1,390,904

18

N otes to and forming part of the Financial Statements. NOTE 1. STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES 1. The Board's accounts are based on historical cost principles and have not been adjusted to incorporate changes in general purchasing power or changes in specific

prices.

2. Fixed A ssets and Depreciation. Fixed A ssets valued at less than $150 are not capitalised but are written off in the year of purchase. 3. Prepayments and Accruals.

Prepayments and accruals less than $75 are considered as being immaterial. 4. Pooling Arrangements. The Honey Pools Statement as presented reflects the financing operations during the year in respect of the pooling arrangements conducted by the Board in regard to

advances made to owners of honey in accordance with section 18(1 )(c) of the Honey Industry Act 1962.

NOTE 2. PROCEEDS OF LEVY COLLECTIONS

1984 1983

$ $

Domestic Levy 253,580 221,828

Export Charge 52,791 76,609

306,371 298,437

NOTE 3. EXPORT MARKET DEVELOPMENT GRANT Represents the expected reimbursement from the Export Development Grants Board based on eligible overseas expenditure incurred during the period. NOTE 4. OVERPRICE GAINS

Represents the earnings derived from the Board’s United Kingdom agents on various F.O.B. shipments of honey. NOTE 5. INTEREST Represents the difference between interest charged at the ruling bank rate on advances to

pool participants and interest charged to the Board on its net overdraft. NOTE 6. OTHER INCOME 1984 1983

$ $

Insurance incom e resulting from pooling — 2,881

Profit on sale of fixed assets 140 —

Prior year EMDG incom e adjustment Recovery of administration expenses

(629) 671

resulting from pooling 1,042 3,822

Miscellaneous — 1,114

553 8,488

NOTE 7. BOARD MEMBERS

1984 1983

$ $

Remuneration and sitting fees 30,287 29,640

Travelling and other expenses 8,204 9,540

Fares 14,279 17,147

52,770 56,327

NOTE 8. SALARIES AND RELATED EXPENSES 1984 1983

$ $

Salaries 87,538 97,491

Travelling and other expenses 2,386 3,572

Superannuation-Board liability 12,388 12,478

102,312 113,541

19

NOTE 9. ADMINISTRATION

Cartage, freight and packing

1984 $

1,198

1983 $

1,047

Insurance 1,478 1,396

Payroll tax — 1,022

Postage and telex 4,420 4,152

Printing and stationery 2,447 2,930

Rent, light and power 8,620 6,974

Repairs and maintenance 768 1,087

Subscriptions and publications 2,022 1,274

Telephone 3,864 3,426

Other expenses 3,042 2,302

27,859 25,610

NOTE 10. AUDIT FEE ,

The fee charged in the accounts represents the fee payable to the Auditor-General’s Office for their services as auditors for the year ended 30 June 1984.

NOTE 11. PROMOTION — AUSTRALIA

1984 1983

$ $

Promotion 118,016 110,986

Public Relations 5,330 4,462

123,346 115,448

NOTE 12. PROMOTION — OVERSEAS

1984 1983

$ $

United Kingdom 18,672 19,519

Other Areas 33,632 20,926

Overseas Travel 15,429 8,460

67,733 48,905

Promotional activities undertaken by the Board in selected markets received considerable financial support from the Commonwealth Government. For each $1.00 of approved Board expenditure the Overseas Trade Publicity Committee (OTPC) contributed 65 cents.

In addition, under the Export Market Development Grants (EMDG) Schem e a 70% grant on eligible Board expenditure was accrued for the year.

The financial effect of these grants is summarised as follows:

1984 1983

$ $

Joint Government and Board Expenditure (a) 137,935 80,413

Less OTPC Grant 35,709 31,508

102,226 48,905

Less EMDG Grant (b) 68,500 34,764

Net cost to the Board 33,726 14,141

(a) Includes cost of promotion literature for overseas promotion. (b) Estimated grant to be received in 1984/85.

NOTE 13. TRANSFERS TO PROVISIONS

1984 1983

$ $

Provision for Recreation Leave 8,327 8,538

Provision for Long Service Leave Provision for Accrued Promotion (a) 3,564 5,119

Expenditure — Tasmania 4,579 3,363

16,470 17,020

(a) Includes all em ployees regardless of length of service.

20

NOTE 14. OFFICE MACHINES, FURNITURE AND AT C OST LESS DEPRECIATION FITTINGS — 1984 1983

Office machines, furniture and fittings

$ $

— at cost Less Depreciation on office machines, 13,400 10,065

furniture and fittings 7,448 6,147

NOTE 15. SUNDRY DEBTORS

5,952 3,918

1984 1983

$ $

Accrued Domestic Levy 22,265 14,008

Accrued Export Charge 5,365 4,242

Accrued Overprice Gains 2,195 2,761

Accrued EMDG Grant 68,500 34,764

Sundry Trade 1,849 3,601

100,174 59,376

No debts were considered doubtful at 30 June, 1984.

NOTE 16. POOL DEBTORS Represents interest owing at 30 June 1984 on advances made to pool participants. No debts were considered doubtful at year end.

NOTE 17. BANK OVERDRAFT This represents the net borrowings for pool operations with the Reserve Bank of Australia. The overdraft arrangement is guaranteed by the Minister for Primary Industry in concur­ rence with the Minister for Finance.

NOTE 18. SUNDRY CREDITORS AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES 1984 1983

$ $

Accrued Bank Interest 133 2,027

Audit Fee 15,000 10,420

Domestic Promotion 4,703 16,050

Sundry 4,720 2,720

24,556 31,217

NOTE 19. CURRENT PROVISIONS

1984 1983

$ $

Provision for Recreation Leave Provision for promotion payment to the 6,529 7,374

Tasmanian Beekeepers’ Association 2,737 3,400

9,266 10,774

NOTE 20. NON CURRENT PROVISIONS

1984 1983

$ $

Provision for Recreation Leave 5,731 2,806

Provision for Long Service leave 8,550 13,128

Provision for Superannuation (a)

Provision for promotion payment to the 29,136 29,136

Tasmanian B eekeepers’ Association — 624

43,417 45,694

(a) The extent to the Board's liability for employer contributions has still to be determined. In terms of written advice from the Department of Finance no increase is required to be made to the provision at 30 June 1984. As at 30 June 1984 the Board has provided funds total ling $31,486 to meet this possible

liability. Against this amount the Board has offset an estimated refund amounting to $2,350 arising from the 10th Quinquenial investigation.

21

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIAN AUDIT OFFICE

The Honourable the Minister

22 November, 1984

for Primary Industry, Parliament House, CANBERRA, A.C.T., 2600

Cnr. Moore & Rudd Sts., Canberra City, A.C.T., 2601 Address correspondence to: Auditor-General Box 707, G.P.O. Canberra, 2601 Telegrams “Comaudit”

Telex 61653 Comaud Telephone: 484711

Dear Sir,

AUSTRALIAN HONEY BOARD

1 n compliance with sub-section 30(2) of the Honey Industry Act 1962, the Australian Honey Board has submitted for my report its financial state­ ments for the year ended 30 June 1984. These comprise a Balance Sheet, Income and Expenditure Statement, Honey Pools Statement, Statement of Sources and Applications of Funds and accompanying ‘Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements .

The financial statements, which have been prepared having regard to the policies outlined in Note 1, are in the form approved by the Minister for Finance under sub-section 30(1) of the Act and have been prepared in accordance with the ‘Guidelines for the Form and Standard of Financial Statements of Commonwealth Undertakings’ approved by the Minister for Finance. A copy of the financial statements and accompanying notes is attached for your information.

In accordance with sub-section 30(2) of the Act, I now report that the statements are in agreement with the accounts and records of the Board

and, in my opinion:—

• the statements are based on proper accounts and records

e the statements show fairly the financial operations for the year ended 30 June 1984 and the state of affairs of the Board as at

that date, and

• the receipt, expenditure and investment of monies, and the' acquisition and disposal of assets, by the Board during the year have been in accordance with the Act.

Yours faithfully, (Signed) C.T. MONAGHAN

C.T. Monaghan, First Assistant Auditor-General.

22

STATISTICS

BEEKEEPING: AUSTRALIA Table 1

Year

Number of apiarists

Beehives Honey Produced Beeswax

Produced

Pro­ ductive U npro­ ductive

Total Q uantity Gross

Value

Average production per productive hive

Q uantity Gross

value

(a) Ό00 Ό00 Ό00 Tonnes $'000 kg- Tonnes $'000

1972-73 2,372 370 105 475 17,580 7,904 47.5 261 294

1973-74 2,415 385 108 493 20,705 11,499 53.8 322 525

1974-75 2,266 381 110 491 20,636 9,292 54.2 326 515

1975-76 2,285 377 120 497 21,413 10,324 57.2 368 635

1976-77 2,274 348 145 493 14,929 8,405 42.9 352 777

1977-78 2,151 363 115 479 18,583 13,480 51.2 329 1,096

1978-79 2,201 369 132 501 18,258 14,111 49.5 349 1,213

1979-80 2,141 402 109 511 24,954 19,050 62.0 464 1,719

1980-81 2,224 379 151 530 19,548 15,815 51.6 366 1,366

1981-82 2,263 402 142 544 24,794 18,200 61.8 481 2,000

1982-83 N.S.W. 850 155 70 225 8,789 6,200 56.8 175 600

Victoria 406 66 24 90 2,704 2,100 41.0 48 200

Q'land 396 61 25 86 3,725 2,600 61.1 73 200

S. A. 322 60 22 82 3,224 2,200 53.4 61 200

W.A. 138 34 8 41 3,141 2,200 93.3 54 '400

Tas. 60 11 2 13 793 1,100 78.2 13 100

A.C.T. 10 1 — 1 36 — 42.6 — —

Australia 2,182 387 150 537 22,412 16,600 57.9 423 1,600

(a) Figures are based on the operations of beekeepers with 40 or " o re hives. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics.

HONEY PRODUCTION BY STATES (Tonnes) Table 2.

State 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80 1980-81 1981-82 1982-83

New South Wales 7,073 7,444 9,935 5,701 8,828 8,789

Victoria 3,106 2,715 4,065 5,160 5,388 2,704

Queensland 1,834 2,477 2,605 2,375 3,343 3,725

South Australia 4,316 3,048 5,098 3,604 3,955 3,224

Western Australia 1,468 1,841 2,624 2,023 2,556 3,141

Tasmania 759 684 573 669 690 793

A.C.T. 27 50 55 16 34 36

Australia 18,583 18,258 24,954 19,548 24,794 22,412

NOTE: Figures are based on the operations of beekeepers with forty or more hives.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

23

AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTION OF HONEY 1981-82 BY NUMBER OF BEEHIVES KEPT (a) Table 3

Western Australia

Production % of

Tonnes Total

Tasmania

Production % of

Tonnes Total

3,141 100.00

68 52 19 65

15 18

557

8.6 6.6 24.0 8.2

1.2 2.3 70.2

793 100.0

Australia

Production % of

Tonnes Total

961

1,743 1,897 2,256 12,740 2,070 3,082 7,562

4.3 7.8 8.5 10.5 12.2

9.2 13.8 33.7

22.412(b) 100.0

(a) Figures are based on the operations of beekeepers with forty or more hives. (b) Includes 36 tonnes in the A.C.T.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics.

LONDON PRICES FOR AUSTRALIAN LIGHT AMBER HONEY (QUOTATIONS) - AVERAGE MONTHLY PRICES Table 4

EXPORTS OF HONEY FROM AUSTRALIA IN 1983/84 BY GRADES (TONNES) Table 5

New South Wales Victoria Queensland South Australia Western Australia Tasmania

Total:

White

Extra Light Amber Light Amber

Pale Amber

Medium Amber Amber

51.0 1,104.3 1,326.6 288.5 29.7

129.6 942.7 161.6 92.3 30.1 5.4

3.0 1,471.5 1,998.9 372.0 133.2 —

— 17.4 — — — —

4.4 3.0 161.5 401.7 440.4 38.9

26.3 375.4 18.0 — .4 —

214.3 3,914.3 3,666.6 1,154.5 633.8 44 3

Dark Total Pre­

Amber Bulk packs Total Exports

2,800.1 245.5 3,045.6

18.0 1,379.7 88.0 1,467.7

— 3,978.6 52.6 4,031.2

— 17.4 98.5 115.9

40.2 1,090.1 428.0 1,518.1

— 420.1 3.9 424.0

58.2 9,686.0 916.5 10,602.5

Compiled from statistics released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics

EXPORTS OF HONEY FROM AUSTRALIA IN TONNES Table 6

1980-81 1981- 82

Bulk

Tonnes Pre-pack Total

$000 F.O.B. Bulk

Tonnes Pre-pack Total

United Kingdom 3,626 2 3,628 3,115 5,787 4 5,791 U.S.A. 227 4 231 174 2,463 28 2,491 Spain — — — 278 278 F.R. Germany 646 — 646 578 1,726 1,726 Singapore 38 568 606 957 54 259 313 Portugal 638 — 638 558 615 615 Malaysia 42 326 368 650 76 232 308 Indonesia 51 2 53 52 117 1 118 Thailand — — — 82 4 86 Italy 162 — 162 143 134 3 137 Saudi Arabia — 33 33 58 France — Oman 56 120 176 240 59 206 265 Switzerland ___ Belgium/Lux. 52 — 52 49 97 97 Denmark 53 — 53 42 87 _ 87 Sweden Hong Kong — — — 3 24 27 Philippines — — — 61 1 62 Other countries 314 1,413 1,729 2,649 86 383 469States of Shipment (a) N.S.W. 853 1,132 1,985 2,527 1,770 304 2,074 Victoria 1,733 70 1,803 1,659 3,805 189 3,994 Queensland 2,096 51 2,147 1,861 3,278 4 3,282 South Australia 434 521 955 1,219 1,017 126 1 143 Western Australia 455 688 1,143 1,660 1,472 521 1 993 Tasmania 334 6 340 339 383 1 384Total: 5,905 2,468 8,375 9,265 11,725 1,145 12,870 $'000

F.O.B.

Bulk

4,189 7,027 1,710 2,055 209 261

1,319 2,613 505 52

511 457

552 93

106 114

79 126

111 245

— 7

— 52

335 18

84 102

44 104

52 43 41

797 236

1,797 3,098 2,401 956 2,020

374

2,969 3,067 3,632 1,016

2,564 355

10,646 13,603

1982-83

Tonnes Pre-pack Total

2 7,029

8 2,063

— 261

— 2,613

259 311

— 457

268 361

— 114

1 127

— 245

54 61

— 52

147 165

— 102

— 104

11 52

204 440

5,531 4,946 1,639 1,227 201 996

2,169 919

542 189

412 506

675 71

119 128

116 106

191 114

86 41

45 86

181 7

— 58

81 57

75 57

— 57

— 29

58 55

628 37

158 3,127

133 3,200

73 3,704

150 1,167

431 2,995

9 364

2,650 2,647 2,999 1,066

2,996 391

2,801 1,380 3,978 17

1,090 420

954 14,557 12,749 9,686

1983-84

Tonnes Pre-pack Total

$'000 F.O.B.

— 4,946 4,367

4 1,231 1,153

— 996 933

— 919 824

319 508 827

— 506 528

273 344 667

1 129 135

9 115 118

— 114 106

69 110 170

— 86 77

64 71 95

10 68 71

— 57 51

— 57 50

— 57 51

28 57 82

— 55 59

140 159 400

245 3,046 3,125

88 1,468 1,455

53 4,031 3,737

99 116 195

428 1,518 1,832

4 424 420

917(a) 10,603 10,764

(a) The FOB value of pre-pack exports in 1983-84 was $1,770,811 or $1.93 per kg. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

UNIT VALUE OF EXPORTS OF HONEY Table 7

Y e a r

Q u a n t i t y ( T o n n e s )

V a lu e

( F O B $A )

U n it V a lu e

( F O B Φ/ k g .)

1 9 6 4 - 6 5 6 ,2 1 8 .8 1 ,4 3 2 ,0 0 0 2 3 ,0

1 9 6 5 - 6 6 7 ,3 6 3 .7 1 ,6 4 6 ,0 0 0 2 2 .4

1 9 6 6 - 6 7 5 ,9 1 9 .4 1 ,5 1 8 ,0 0 0 2 5 .6

1 9 6 7 - 6 8 4 ,6 5 0 .3 1 ,1 9 6 ,5 4 5 2 5 .7

1 9 6 8 - 6 9 5 ,5 4 1 .3 1 ,4 7 7 ,7 1 7 2 6 .7

1 9 6 9 - 7 0 6 ,6 4 7 .4 1 ,7 6 7 ,0 3 4 2 6 .6

1 9 7 0 -7 1 1 0 ,0 6 8 .5 3 ,0 6 5 ,7 5 4 3 0 .4

1 9 7 1 - 7 2 8 ,8 3 5 .6 3 ,6 3 4 ,5 3 1 4 1 .4

1 9 7 2 - 7 3 7 ,9 4 3 .5 4 ,7 1 0 ,4 0 4 5 9 .3

1 9 7 3 - 7 4 4 ,7 7 8 .1 3 ,5 6 8 ,0 7 8 7 4 .7

1 9 7 4 - 7 5 9 ,7 3 1 .8 5 ,8 4 4 ,3 6 6 6 0 .1

1 9 7 5 - 7 6 1 1 ,5 3 3 .6 6 ,3 2 3 ,6 2 2 5 4 .8

1 9 7 6 - 7 7 6 ,5 0 9 .5 4 ,5 8 4 ,9 4 8 7 0 .4

1 9 7 7 - 7 8 4 ,3 7 0 .2 4 ,2 7 9 ,7 3 3 9 7 .9

1 9 7 8 - 7 9 5 ,4 8 7 .0 5 ,1 9 9 ,1 6 8 9 4 .8

1 9 7 9 - 8 0 1 1 ,5 3 0 .0 1 1 ,7 3 0 ,5 7 4 1 0 1 .7

1 9 8 0 -8 1 8 ,3 7 4 .0 9 ,2 6 4 ,8 7 1 1 1 0 .6

1 9 8 1 - 8 2 1 2 ,8 6 9 .8 1 0 ,6 4 6 ,2 1 0 8 2 .7

1 9 8 2 - 8 3 1 4 ,5 5 7 .0 1 2 ,7 4 8 ,5 1 2 8 7 .6

1 9 8 3 - 8 4 1 0 ,6 0 3 .0 1 0 ,7 6 4 ,0 4 3 9 1 .0 2

EXPORTS OF BEESWAX FROM AUSTRALIA (Australian Produce Only) Table 8

1979-80 1980-81 1981 -82 1982-83 1983-84

Country of Origin Tonnes $'000 Tonnes $'000 Tonnes $'000 Tonnes $'000 Tonnes $'000 FOB FOB FOB FOB FOB

U.K. 71.7 296 22.8 93 148.1 578 113.1 435 99.1 360

France 22.1 97 40.7 169 39.1 150 42.4 166 68.5 257

Germany (FDR) — — — — — — 124.1 482 32.9 120

Japan 13.5 51 3.0 12 — — 0.7 4 15.0 61

Netherlands 17.0 70 42.2 173 52.7 213 47.1 179 13.8 49

Belgium/Lux. 4.5 23 — — 7.1 28 5.5 20 11.5 42

U S.A . — — — — — — — — 8.9 33

Korea — — — — — — 6.0 28 5.0 25

Taiwan — — — — — — 1.0 5 1.0 7

New Zealand 0.5 3 1.0 5 .4 3 15.9 17 0.1 1

Singapore— — — — — — — — — 0.1 1

Other Countries 88.6 377 66.9 281 55.9 244 12.1 51 0.1 1

State o f Final Shipiv e n t New South Wales 44.5 198 42.0 170 49.0 207 120.7 427 63.1 —

Victoria 37.8 157 47.3 204 81.1 323 55.5 216 47.1 —

Queensland 84.5 358 61.6 264 78.4 311 89.9 353 84.6 —

Western Australia 23.8 92 4.6 14 50.4 204 52.9 197 23.6 —

South Australia 18.2 74 16.8 63 41.3 157 42.9 172 25.0 —

Tasmania 9.1 38 4.3 18 3.0 12 2.8 12 12.5 —

Total: 217.9 917 176.6 733 303.3 1,216 367.9 1,387 256.0 955

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

27

ESTIMATED WORLD PRODUCTION OF HONEY ( 000 TONNES) Table 9

C o u n t r y o f O r ig in 1 9 7 8 1 9 7 9 1 9 8 0

1981 1 9 8 2 '9 8 3

U .S .R .R . C h i n a

U .S .A . M e x ic o C a n a d a A r g e n t i n a T u r k e y

B ra z il A u s tr a l i a E th i o p i a

F r a n c e I n d ia H u n g a r y G e r m a n y F .R .

R u m a n i a A n g o l a M a d a g a s c a r

Y u g o s la v ia G r e e c e K e n y a P o l a n d

E g y p t T a n z a n i a N e w Z e a l a n d

B u l g a r i a J a p a n Ita ly

C h ile C z e c h o s l o v a k i a C e n t r a l A f r ic a n R e p u b li c

C u b a A u s tr i a Ira n E a s t G e r m a n y

G u a t e m a l a S p a i n U r u g u a y A f g h a n i s t a n

P o r t u g a l S w e d e n T a iw a n

M o r o c c o K o r e a R e p u b li c C o l o m b i a El S a l v a d o r S w i t z e r l a n d S o u t h A f ric a

I s r a e l D o m i n i c a n R e p u b li c

B o liv ia U n ite d K in g d o m

B e l g i u m / L u x e m b o u r g

N o r w a y H o n d u r a s

1 7 9 .0 7 5 .0 1 0 5 .0 5 4 .0

3 0 .6 3 5 .0 2 1 .7 1 6 .0

1 8 .3 2 0 .0 9 .5

1 8 .5 8 .7 1 5 .0 14.1 1 2 .0

1 2 .0 5 .0

1 0 .0 9 .0

1 2 .0 9 .8 8 .5 8 .3 7 .0 8 .5 6 .9

6 .0

6 .0 5 .5 5 .5

6 .0

6 .0 4.1 3 .8

1 1 .0 1 .8 3 .6 2 .9

2 .7 2 .3 2 .2 1 .9

2 .2 2 .3

2 .0

2 .0

2.1 1 .2 1 .3

0 .9

1 .2 1 .0 0 .8

1 8 9 .0 1 1 0 .0 1 0 8 .3 5 2 .0

3 2 .9 3 0 .0 2 3 .7 1 8 .0

2 5 .0 2 0 .0 1 4 .4 1 6 .0

1 2 .4 9 .9 1 4 .6 1 3 .0 1 2 .2

5 .0 1 0 .0 9 .5 1 3 .0

9 .0 9 .0 6 .5 6 .0 7 .5 6 .5 5 .0 5 .0

5 .6 5 .5 5 .5 5 .5 5.1 3 .3 1 2 .0

1.8 3 .6

2 .8 2 .8 2 .6 2 .3 2 .0 2 .2 2 .3

2 .0

2.1 2.1 1.3 1.4

2 .0

1.2 1.1 0 .8

1 8 3 .0 8 1 .0 9 0 .6 6 0 .0 2 9 .2 3 3 .0 2 3 .0 2 0 .0

1 9 .5 2 0 .5

10.1 1 8 .0 1 4 .0 1 3 .5 1 4 .4

1 3 .5 1 2 .5 7 .0 1 1 .0

1 0 .0 1 0 .0 1 0 .0 9 .5

7 .5 7 .0

6 .2 6 .7 6 .0

6 .0 5 .7 5 .5 5 .0 5 .0

5.1 4 .0

1 3 .0 2 .5 3 .0

2 .9 2 .8

2 .7 2 .3 2.1 2 .2

2 .2

2 .0

2 .2

2 .2 1 .3 1 .4 1 .2 1 .2

1.1 0 .9

1 8 4 .0 1 1 6 .0 8 4 .3 6 0 .0

3 2 .9 3 0 .0 2 4 .0 2 4 .0 2 4 .8 2 1 .0

1 1 .0 1 8 .0 1 4 .5 1 4 .0 1 4 .5 1 3 .5 1 2 .5

8.1 1 1 .0 1 0 .0 1 0 .0 1 0 .0

9 .5 6 .9 7 .0 6 .0

6 .7

6 .0

6 .0 5 .9 5 .5 5 .0 5 .0 5.1 4 .3

1 0 .0 3 .0 3 .0 3 .0 2 .8

2 .7 2 .4 2 .2

2 .2

2 .2 2 .0

2 .2

2 .2 1.3 1 .4 . 1.4

1.2 1.0 1.0

1 8 6 .0 1 2 0 .0 1 0 4 .3 4 5 .0

3 0 .5 3 3 .0 2 4 .0 2 5 .0

2 1 .0

2 1 .0

2 2 .0

1 8 .0 1 5 .0 1 8 .0 1 4 .7 1 4 .0 1 2 .8 1 1 .0 1 1 .0 1 0 .5 1 0 .0 1 0 .0

9 .5 7 .6 7 .0 7 .4 6 .4 6 .0

6 .0

6 .0 5 .5

5 .2 5.1 5.1 4 .2

8 .0 3 .5 3 .0 3 .0

2 .8 2 .7

2 .4 2 .2

2 .2 2.1 2 .0

2 .3

2 .0 1.3 1 .4 1.3

1.3 1.0 1 .0

1 9 0 .0 1 0 0 .0 9 3 .0 6 4 .0

3 4 .8 2 8 .0 2 4 .2

2 2 .0 2 1 .5

2 1 .0 1 8 .5 1 8 .2 1 5 .2 1 5 .0 1 4 .5 1 4 .0 1 2 .8 1 1 .5 1 1 .0 1 0 .5 1 0 .2 1 0 .0

9 .5 7 .6 7.1 6 .5 6 .5

6 .0

6 .0

6 .0

5 .4 5 .3 5 .3 5.1 4.1

4 .0 3 .4 3 .0 3 .0

2 .9 2 .7 2 .3

2 .2

2 .2 2 .0

2 .0

2 .0

2 .0 1 .3 1 .3 1 .2 1 .2 1 .0 1 .0

T o ta l 8 2 2 .8 8 7 7 .3

I

8 3 7 .4 8 7 9 .7 9 0 8 .8 8 8 6 .3

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture

28

IMPORTS OF HONEY INTO AUSTRALIA Table 10

Country of Origin

1979-80 1980-81 1981 82 1982-83 1983-84

Tonnes $'000 Tonnes $'000 Tonnes o

o

Tonnes

o p Tonnes $'000

New Zealand 27.2 37 33.7 61 32.6 68 56.8 125 27.8 73

Hungary 9.3 17 7.3 12 6.9 11 11.2 22 12.6 27

U.S.A. 7.8 26 3.5 8 1.0 4 .2 2 12.1 23

United Kingdom 3.7 15 — — 2.6 7 3.3 12 5.3 16

France — — .5 — 1.7 9 5.2 32 4.0 22

China — — .6 4 2.9 17 .9 22.0 19

Germany FDR — — — — — .7 2

Canada — — — — — — — — .3 2

State of Import New South Wales 14.7 41 28.6 58 28.3 81 47.3 114 39.2 _

Victoria 48.1 83 28.6 62 28.8 69 37.9 124 26.4

Queensland 1.2 5 .6 2 2.0 4 4.4 11 1.4

South Australia — — — 1

Western Australia — — — — — — .1 1 .2 —

Total: 64.3 130 57.8 122 59.3 156 89.7 251 67.2 197

IMPORTS OF HONEY INTO WEST GERMANY (Tonnes) Table 11

Country of Origin 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

Mexico 19,925 20,363 19,054 23,236 22,017 18,092

China 7,006 13,133 14,884 17,138 18,303 16,773

Argentina 10,338 7,877 7,954 7,008 7,853 5,888

U.S.S.R. 1,667 2,061 2,760 4,723 7,023 3,722

Hungary 1,446 1,767 1,751 2,654 2,429 2,648

Bulgaria 849 395 266 659 198 1,911

El Salvador 1,367 1,315 1,672 1,964 1,468 1,887

Australia 125 492 1,786 795 2,193 1,675

Rumania 1,304 2,612 2,596 2,330 1,922 1,558

Cuba 1,718 812 1,344 1,866 1,893 1,556

Guatemala 2,455 2,104 2,224 2,369 1,730 1,368

Canada 1,079 1,362 1,571 1,586 1,581 1,351

Uruguay 481 541 559 1,509 1,030 1,231

Chile 936 1,007 609 881 290 1,219

T urkey — 65 115 16 401 1,095

Czechoslovakia 679 690 350 400 514 833

U.S.A. 2,459 2,492 2,170 827 732 534

France 545 547 586 116 615 508

G reece 403 326 1,209 1,953 923 407

Yugoslavia — — — 73 88 373

Other Countries 2,569 2,185 3,137 2,620 2,332 1,756

Total: 57,351 62,146 66,597 74,723 75,535 66,385

Source: West German Federal Statistical Office

29

Table 12

IMPORTS OF HONEY INTO JAPAN (Tonnes) Table 13

Country of Origin 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

China 8,410 8,403 13,366 14,805 18,018 21,028 22,785

Argentina 11,320 11,853 7,150 2,399 4,459 3,814 5,321

USSR 1,301 1,853 1,855 1,337 1,378 1,997 3,360

Hungary 636 616 412 553 647 612 717

U.S.A. 301 348 268 222 279 346 272

Rumania 428 320 221 82 112 108 139

Mexico 674 18 199 98 134 68 135

New Zealand 422 504 568 333 246 63 134

Canada 315 48 244 154 125 55 94

Taiwan — — — — — — 50

Guatemala — — — — — — 49

Australia 201 54 225 57 — 2 24

Spain — — — — — — 17

UK. · — — — 11 1 10 16

Other Countries 830 431 115 53 65 43 67

Total: 24,838 24,448 24,623 20,104 25,464 28,146 33,180

Dom estic Production: 6,241 8,517 7,469 6,211 6,800 7,358 7,000

Source: Japanese Official Trade Statistics

IMPORTS OF HONEY INTO U.S.A. (Tonnes) Table 14

Country of Origin 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

Mexico 9,222 3,822 11,308 12,528 20,020

China 8,182 7,919 8,636 7,949 8,795

Argentina 400 623 5,531 7,493 8,791

Canada 4,314 7,889 5,066 6,601 6,985

Australia 242 22 857 2,835 1,375

Guatemala 293 1 343 647 837

Hungary — 13 — 465 732

El Salvador 300 38 505 498 526

Dominican Republic 581 438 533 788 460

Honduras 242 59 315 660 450

Chile — — — — 397

Costa Rica — — — — 81

Other Countries 2,795 1,423 2,977 1,251 412

Total: 26,571 22,247 36,071 41,715 49,865

31

PRODUCTION AND EXPORTS OF HONEY: ARGENTINA (Tonnes) Table 15

PRODUCTION EXPORTS

Year Tonnes Year Tonnes

1971-72 21,000 1972 16,937

1972-73 22,000 1973 17,879

1973-74 30,000 1974 15,487

1974-75 18,000 1975 22,639

1975-76 24,000 1976 29,877

1976-77 18,000 1977 24,805

1977-78 35,000 1978 36,329

1978-79 36,000 1979 23,589

1979-80 37,600 1980 19,638

1980-81 32,000 1981 28,105

1981-82 35,000 1982 29,873

1982- 83

1983- 84

28,000 30,000 (a)

1983 29,237

(a) Estimated

SOURCE: Argentine Secretariat of Agriculture & Livestock and Argentine Bureau of Statistics and Census.

PRODUCTION AND EXPORT OF HONEY: MEXICO (Tonnes) Table 16

1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

Production 35,000 47,918 62,230 53,460 42,000 62,245 70,600 49,900 68,000

Exports 30,097 49,918 53,484 44,960 33,439 39,423 40,616 40,024 59,400

S O U R C E : M exican M in is try o f A g ric u ltu re and W ater Resources and M exican In stitu te o f Foreign Com m erce.

32

LIST OF AUSTRALIAN LICENSED EXPORTERS OF HONEY 1st July 1984 to 30 J u n e 1985

L ic e n c e N u m b e r N a m e a n d A d d re s s T elephone T elex

N E W S O U T H W A L E S

5 HONEY CORPORATION OF AUSTRALIA LTD., F orrester Road, S t. M a ry s , NSW, 2760

(P.O. Box 184)

(02)

623-5111

22957

21 LUVETE PTY. LTD. trading as:- HONEY DISTRIBUTORS and GLENROCK HONEY COMPANY 263 Victoria Road,

Gladesville, N.S.W., 2111

(02)

816-5300 74489

27 P.D.S. RURAL PRODUCTS LTD., 2 Rowe St., E a s tw o o d , N.S.W., 2122

(P.O. Box 292)

(02)

858-4444 26138

44 SANITARIUM HEALTH FOOD CO.

78-90 Old C anterbury Road, Lewisham, N.S.W., 2049 (P.O. Box 160 S um m er Hill, N.S.W., 2130)

(02)

560-7368 -

58 PETERSVILLE LTD, (EDGELL DIVISION), 10-12 Clarke Street, C r o w s N e s t, NSW, 2065

(P.O. Box 99)

(02)

436-8888

20423

59 THE MUDGEE HONEY CO. PTY. LTD. 28 R obertson S treet M u d g e e , NSW, 2850

(063)

72-2359

27113

Attn Goldvita

V IC T O R IA

5 HONEY CORPORATION OF AUSTRALIA LTD., Capilano Street, M a r y b o r o u g h , Vic., 3465

(P.O. Box 49)

(054)

61-2395

34412

6 UNIGATE AUSTRALIA PTY. LTD., Bridge Road D a n d e n o n g , Vic., 3175

(P.O. Box 13)

(03)

798-2222

31141

27 P.D.S. RURAL PRODUCTS LTD.,

85 Fairbank Rd, Clayton South, Vic. 3169

(03)

548-3011

36659

45 G.O. JACKEL & SONS, 99-103 Williams Road, W a n g a ra tta , Vic., 3677

(057)

21-2847

-

62 McMAHON DAIRY PRODUCTS PTY. LTD., 486 South Rd., M o o r a b b in , V ic ., 3 1 8 9

(03)

553-1411

36093

6 3 G E O R G E O G E IL & C O . P T Y . L T D .,

11 M e ld r u m S t.,

E a s t K e w , Vic 3102

(P.O. Box 142, North Balwyn, Vic., 3104)

(0 3 )

859-4530

3 4 1 8 8

64 RODERICK’S HONEY, 24 Murphy Street, B a irn s d a le , Vic., 3875

(051)

52-2180

~

65 ANDERSON HONEY PRODUCTS PTY. LTD., 8 Cam eron Pde., B r o a d fo r d , V ic ., 3 6 5 8

(057)

84-1815

-

Q U E E N S L A N D

4 A U S T R A L IA N E X P O R T E R S P TY. L T D ., (0 7 )

2 nd flo o r. N a ld h a m H ouse, 31-0221

193-207 M a ry S treet, (e xt. 45)

B risb a n e . Old 4000

5 HONEY CORPORATION OF AUSTRALIA LTD., (07)

391 Archerfield Road, 375-3777

Ina la , Old 4077

(P.O. Box 232)

27 P D S RURAL PRODUCTS LTD., (07)

25 M anton St., 395-6422

C o lm s lie . Q ld., 4170

(P.O. Box 221, M orningside, Qld, 4170)

S O U T H A U S T R A L IA

31 SOUTHERN FARMERS’ CO -OP. LTD. (08)

Cnr. Railway Tee. & London Rd., 352-5000

Mile End, S.A., 5031 (Box 1445 G.P.O. Adelaide, S.A., 5001)

W E S TE R N A U S T R A L IA

1 ANCHOR FOODS PTY. LTD., (09)

148 Carrington Street 337-3911

O 'C o n n o r. W A , 6163

(P O Box 143, Fremantle, 6160)

36 THE HONEY POOL OF W.A., (09)

99 B eechboro Road, 271-8133

B a ysw a te r. W A. 6053

(P O Box 105)

47 S BEKHOR & CO. PTY. LTD., (09)

843 Beaufort Street, 271-4920

In g le w o o d , W A 6052 (P O Box 15)

53 BAILE BROS (09)

Baile Road. 455-1313

C a n n in g Vale. W A 6155 455-1312

•54 SPRINGER (AUST.) PTY. LTD., (09)

1 Cliff Street, 335-4377

F re m a n tle, W A , 6160 (P O Box 666)

61 K T HEALY & CO., (09)

40 Willcock Street, 458-1330

Fe rn da le , W A . 6155

(P O Box 131, Cannington, 6107)

66 GOLDEN WEST HONEY PRODUCTS, (09)

34 Beaconsfield Road, 274-5608

Midvale, W.A., 6056

T A S M A N IA

7 R B CHAFfLES (004)

M a w b an n a. Tas 7321 58-8142

19 H.L. JON ES & SON PTY. LTD. (004)

111 Main Street, 91-1167

S h e ffie ld , Tas., 7306

33 I R STEPHENS. (003)

M o le Creek, Tas., 7304 63-1170

(P O Box 4)

43 DAYBREAK APIARIES PTY. LTD., (004)

4 W renswood Drive 24-5961

Kelcey's Tiers, Q uo ib a. Tas , 7310

60 L P VAN DER WOUDE, (004)

Iron Cliff Road, 37-2817

P en g uin , Tas . 7316 (P O Box 114)

40422

41501

42194

89194

92713

94894

92881

(Attn: 663 G OLDPAK)

94326

‘ Restricted to pre-packs.