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Aboriginal Hostels Limited - Report and financial statements, together with Auditor-General's Report - Year - 1983-84


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

ABORIGINAL HOSTELS LIMITED

Annual Report

1983-84

Presented 27 February 1985 Ordered to be printed 28 March 1985

Parliamentary Paper No. 98/1985

Aboriginal Hostels Limited Annual Report 1983-84

A detailed account of the functions, responsibilities and activities of the company from 26 June 1983 to 30 June 1984

Directors Miss L. O’Donoghue, C.B.E.,A.M..(Chairman) Mr N.T. Bonner, A.O. (until September 1983) Mr R.M. Eades, A.A.S.A.,F.C.I.S.,A.F.A.I.M. Mr R. Fordimail Mrs E. Foy Mrs M.R. Jackomos Mr C. Madden Mr G. Shaw Mrs M. Willmett General Manager Mr N.G. Perkins, O.A.M.,B.A.,F.A.I.M.,J.P. Company Secretary Mr R.C. Clarke, A.A.S.A.

CONTENTS Page

Aims and Achievements 2

Summary of Funds and Growth 3

Profile of Directors 4-5

Chairman’s Report 7-8

Directors’ Overview 9-22

— Introduction....................................................................................................9

— Funding in 1983-84...................................................................................... 10

— Company Operations................................................................................... 10

— Types of Hostels............................................................................................10

— Source and Application of Funds............................................................... 11

— Third Party Hostel Operations.....................................................................13

— New Hostel Developments 1983-84............................................................ 14

— Planned Hostels 1984-85 .............................................................................14

— Tariffs............................................................................................................ 14

— Occupancy.....................................................................................................15

— Staff................................................................................................................ 15

— Major operating Divisions............................................................................16

— Company Structure...................................................................................... 19

— Conclusion....................................................................................................22

Company News 23-28

Regional Reports 29-45

— Western..........................................................................................................30

—- Northern........................................................................................................32

—- North Queensland........................................................................................ 34

— South Queensland........................................................................................ 36

— New South Wales......................................................................................... 38

— South Eastern............................................................................................... 40

— Southern........................................................................................................42

— Central...........................................................................................................44

Location of Hostels 46-51

Financial and Statutory Information 52-53

Company Accounts 54-64

— Profit and Loss Account...............................................................................54

— Balance Sheet............................................................................................... 55

— Statement of Source of Funds..................................................................... 56

— Statement of Application of F u n d s............................................................ 57

— Notes to and forming part of the Accounts................................................ 58

— Auditor’s Report........................................................................................... 64

— Statement by Directors.................................................................................64

Appendix to the Director’s Overview 65-68

Addresses of Regional Offices 69

The Aboriginal flag shown on the cover of this report was first flown at the Aboriginal Te Embassy on the lawns of Parliament House, Canberra, in January 1972. The three colours of the flag represent the People, the Earth and the Sun. Black represents the Aboriginal people’s ancestors who have lived in Australia for te

of thousands of years. Yellow represents the sun, the giver of all life. Red represents the colour of the earth and land. The Aboriginal flag was designed by Mr Harold Thomas, a descendant of the Aranda

peoples of Central Australia. The Aboriginal flag, while as yet receiving no formal or official recognition, has great symbolic significance to Aboriginal Australians.

Registered Office and Head Office First Floor Woden House Cnr. Cailam and Neptune Streets Woden, A.C.T. 2606

Aboriginal Hostels Limited (Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)

The Hon. Clyde Holding, M.P. Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 1 December 1984

Dear Minister,

On behalf of the Board of Directors of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, I have much pleasure in submitting to you our 1983-84 Annual Report. This Report outlines the activities of our Company and includes the audited accounts from 26 June 1983 to 30 June 1984.

The detailed pages of the Report will show you the many practical ways our Company helps Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in this country to gain a better and more fulfilling life.

In this way we are playing our part in enabling Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in need to take their rightful place in the community with dignity and pride. This can only serve to help them become more responsible citizens, and in turn, this is beneficial to the social and cultural life generally throughout society.

We are grateful for the continued confidence and financial support of your Government for our important work in helping Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the nation.

I sincerely commend this Report to you and I hope you will find it both interesting and informative.

Lois O’Donoghue,C.B.E.,A.M. CHAIRMAN OF DIRECTORS

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

AIMS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

AIMS ACHIEVEMENTS

To provide temporary hostel accommodaton to meet the differing needs of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

To help local Aboriginal organisations provide hostel accommodation.

To keep the cost of all accommodation offered at a level residents can afford.

To employ Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders whenever possible.

To train Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

To assist in fostering Aboriginal culture.

To further promote harmony in community relations.

• Aboriginal Hostels provided a total of 135 hostels with 3,275 beds across Australia during the 1983/84 fiscal year.

• The Company will take over responsibility from the Department of Aboriginal Affairs for funding an additional 28 hostels from 1 July 1984 under its Third Party Hostel Grants Program.

• Hostel accommodtion is offered for the following categories of people: employment and training; education and training; aged persons; legal re­ habilitation; supporting mothers; transients; and fringe-dwellers. The Company also runs multi­

purpose hostels. • Under the Company's Third Party Hostel Grants Program. 55 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal or­ ganisations were financed over 1983-84 to provide

a total of 1,427 beds at 70 hostels. • The average cost to an Aborigine or Islander staying at one of our hostels is $5.53 a night for an adult Aborigine on unemployment benefit. This

cost covers accommodation and meals. • The cost of all our accommodation is based on the residents ability to pay. • The Company employed a total of 478 staff. Of

this total. 94 per cent are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. • Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders hold the many senior and responsible positions in the

Company. Eight of nine directors, the General Manager and all Regional Managers are Aborigi­ nes or Torres Strait Islanders. • During 1983-84 the Company spent $57,777 on

training staff to become skilled and competent to effectively work for the Company. • The Company strongly identifies with Aboriginal culture. Staff are encouraged to become involved

in Aboriginal sports and cultural activities. In addition, most Company hostels have Aboriginal language names or are named after prominent Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people. • The Company encourages all staff to participate in

local community activities. Moreover, open days are held at hostels for the general public to come in and see our work.

2

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

SUMMARY OF FUNDS AND GROWTH

MILLIONS $ Funds 1976-84

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984

3250

3000

2750

2500

2250

2000

1750

1500

1250

1000

750

500

250

Aboriginal Hostels Limited (Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)

PROFILES OF DIRECTORS

Lois O’Donoghue, C.B.E., A.M. — Chairman

Miss O’Donoghue, from South Australia, is in­ volved with the administration of many diverse Aboriginal organisations. As well as being the Chair­ man of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, she is a former Aboriginal Development Commissioner.

Appointed to the Board in July 1976, Miss O'Donoghue became Chairman of Directors in November 1981.

In June 1984, Miss O’Donoghue was appointed special consultant to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs to assist with the establishment of the Federal Government's proposed new Aboriginal Housing Authority.

Neville Bonner A.O. (until September 1983)

Mr Bonner has the distinction of being the first Aborigine to be elected to the Commonwealth Parlia­ ment as a Queensland Senator in 1970. He continues to be an active spokesman on Aboriginal issues.

He is currently a Commissioner of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. He was awarded an Order of Australia in January 1984 for services to politics and Aboriginal welfare.

Ron Eades, A.A.S.A.,F.C.I.S.,A.F.A.I.M.

Mr Eades, from Melbourne, is the only non­ Aborigine on the Board. He is a qualified accountant and brings extensive business knowledge and ex­ perience to the Board.

He is the Chairman of the Council of the William Angliss TAPE College in Melbourne, Secretary of the Victorian Branch of the Motor Inn and Motel Associ­ ation of Australia, and Honorary Secretary of the Melbourne Tourism Authority.

Elsta Foy

Mrs Foy, who lives in Broome, Western Austra­ lia. has experience in Aboriginal issues generally, but especially in health care. She speaks several Aboriginal dialects.

Mrs Foy was the co-ordinator of the Milliya Rumurra Alcoholic Rehabilitation group in Broome and now works for the State Department of Health.

She is a member of the State Aboriginal Housing Board Consultative Committee and was a foundation member of the State Aboriginal Medical Service.

4

Ray Fordimail

Mr Fordimail, a tribal leader of Katherine, is in­ volved in several Aboriginal organisations. He is a member of the Northern Land Council, Chairman of the Mimi Arts and Crafts Company, a board member of Baruwei Enterprises and a member of the Kalano Association. Of the Djawon tribe, Mr Fordimail speaks several Aboriginal dialects.

Mr Fordimail’s term as a Director expired on 30 June 1984.

Merle Jackomos

For many years Mrs Jackomos, from Victoria, has been involved in improving the living conditions of her people. Her interests include Aboriginal housing and education, as well as the general welfare and advancement of her people.

Mrs Jackomos was elected as a representative of the National Aboriginal Conference in November 1981. She also holds the following positions: a Director of the Aboriginal Advancement League in Victoria: and foundation and committee member of the Aboriginal Women’s Refuge, the Victorian Abor­ iginal Legal Service, the Victorian Aboriginal Medi­ cal Service, and the Federation of Aboriginal Women.

Her term as Director with the Company expired on 30 June 1984.

Charles Madden

From New South Wales, Mr Madden has been actively involved with Aboriginal health programs for many years and his work as a Director of the Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service has given him the opportunity to make a valuable contribution to the physical well-being of Aborigines.

Mrs Marjorie Willmett

In her work with the North Queensland Chjowai Aboriginal Co-operative at Jnnisfail, Mrs Willmett keeps active in the important area of assisting the Aboriginal and Islander people of the State in housing accommodation.

Mrs Willmett is also a member of the Nikju Aboriginal Legal Service, Wu Chopperum Aborigi­ nal Medical Service and the North Queensland Clump Mountain Co-operative.

Geoff Shaw

Mr Shaw has a strong interest and involvement in Aboriginal accommodation in central Australia. He is the Co-ordinator of the Tangentyerre Council at Alice Springs, which is the umbrella organisation for local Aboriginal Housing Associations.

He is the vice-Chairman of the Institute of Aboriginal Development, interim-Chairman of the Aboriginal Management Information Service in Alice Springs and an executive member of the Central Lands Council.

Mr Shaw has served as President of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress. He also served on the Council of the Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service.

5

6

THE CHAIRMAN’S REPORT Lois O’Donoghue, C.B.E., A.M.

Review of the Role of Aboriginal Hostels Limited

I am pleased to report that 1983-84 was, once again, a successful year for Aboriginal Hostels Limited. Within the limited resources available our Company continued to ensure that the best possible service was given to those Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders who were in need of temporary hostel accom­ modation.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited is directly funded by the Australian Government. A re­ cent draft White Paper set out the Australian Government's proposed policy on establishing

such Companies. The draft White Paper indi­ cated that unless there were unusual reasons for using a public company structure, the organisation should either be a statutory authority or operate under the direct control of a Government Department.

Undoubtedly, this pol­ icy was advocated be­ cause of the failure of some Government funded organisations to effect­

ively and properly ac­ count for the funds given for their work. Aboriginal Hostels Limited has never had

such problems. During its 11 years of operation, the Company has been re­ sponsible in handling its funds and carrying out its

work properly. These responsibilities and controls are clearly set out in our Company’s Charter and General

Agreement with the Aus­ tralian Government. The requirement of the Charter and General Agree­ ment have been meticulously followed. The

Auditor-General has never had to provide a ualified audit report or draw attention to eficiencies in our Company’s accounts in reporting to Parliament.

To determine the best type of organisation to meet the temporary accommodation needs of Aborigines and to ensure maximum efficiency and effectiveness of our service, the

Board of Directors agreed to a thorough review of our Company’s work during 1983-84, in­ cluding a ‘Think-Tank’ in April 1984 in which Directors and senior management participated.

The review of our Charter and General Agreement was not completed when the Min­ ister for Aboriginal Affairs announced the formation of a new Aboriginal Housing Auth­ ority to co-ordinate Aboriginal housing and to provide a focus for Aboriginal leadership.

The Board of Directors has expressed the strong belief that a company structure similar to Aboriginal Hostels Ltd is the best organisa­ tional form to offer quick, efficient ana effec­ tive solutions to the accommodation needs of

Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders gener­ ally across the nation.

New Aboriginal Housing Authority During the year, I was appointed as a consultant to the Australian Government on setting up the proposed new Aboriginal Hous­

ing Authority. My major task as consultant on the new Authority over the next year will be to consult with Aboriginal com­

munities and organisa­ tions throughout Austra­ lia. I will seek the advice of these communities and organisations on what they believe would be the most suitable structure for the new Authority.

My recommendations to the Minister for Abor­ iginal Affairs will be

based on the information I receive during these con­ sultations. I hope that my recommendations will streamline the provision of housing to Aborigines and Torres Strait

Islanders. Above all, the new Aboriginal Housing Authority must reduce the delays and frustrations in

providing decent accom­ modation to those most in need. While carrying out the

duties of advising the Australian Government I will maintain my position as part-time Chair­ man of Aboriginal Hostels Limited.

Greater Recognition of Aboriginal Hostels Limited Over the past few years there has been greater recognition within the community of the valuable work of Aboriginal Hostels Lim­

ited. In the past our Company has been fortu­ nate to gain support in its work from both Liberal and Labor Governments. This has been shown by statements in support of our work and increases in our funding in several pre­ vious years to expand our services to help

more people. In addition, Government Departments, namely the Departments of Aboriginal Affairs, Social Security, and Housing and Construe-

Presenting SirNinian Stephen with an Aboriginal sand painting on the 10th Anniversary of Aboriginal Hostels.

7

tion, have provided direct funding for our programs. We acknowledge and appreciate their valuable support for our important work. We are also now more recognised within the business community. Awards won by our Company over the past two years from the Australian Insitute of Management for dis­ tinguished achievement in annual report writ­ ing reflect the professionally high standards of management and staff. The Company has be­ come a body for other Aboriginal organisations to emulate.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited has a particu­ larly high reputation among Aboriginal com­ munities ana groups. We believe we are an Aboriginal company well-tuned to the needs of our people and responsive to those needs. Now, more and more non-Aborigines are learn­ ing of our work and finding that our people are competent at running a large, complex organis­ ation.

I would like to draw attention to two special Australians who deserve particular mention for recognising and supporting our Company’s work during the year under review. They are their Excellencies Sir Ninian Stephen, Governor-General of Australia, and his wife, Lady Stephen.

In November 1983 they opened the doors of their home in Canberra and hosted a reception for Company representatives to mark the 10 years of service and achievements by Aborigi­ nal Hostels Limited. Later, in March 1984, Sir Ninian officially opened a new multi-purpose hostel in Port Augusta, South Australia.

The opening of the new hostel was particu­ larly important to me. My fellow Directors decided that the new hostel in Port Augusta should be named ‘The Lois O’Donoghue Hos­ tel’. Having a hostel named after me, and Sir Ninian agreeing to open the hostel, were great personal honours.

Conclusion

The Directors and Management, supported by our staff across Australia, look forward to continuing to help Aborigines and Islanders in need of temporary accommodation.

The performance of our Company in terms of the beds provided and the large number of people assisted within a relatively small budget is impressive.

Our work helps overcome prejudice and disadvantage in Australian society. There can be no doubt that Aborigines are discriminated against in work, housing and general society. Added to this are the problems of high infant mortality, poor health, welfare dependency and few educational opportunities. Because of these disadvantages Aboriginal alcoholism, crime, and unemployment are too high.

Much remains to be done to help Aborigi­ nes and Islanders. Steps to overcome these problems must be tailored to suit the special needs of Aborigines and -Torres Strait Islanders. As a people, we must be given responsibility for our own progress through enlightened policies of self-development and self-determination.

As Australia’s foremost Aboriginal organis­ ation working in Aboriginal accommodation, we believe Aboriginal Hostels Limited is showing government, the bureaucracy, Abor­ iginal organisations and non-Aborigines the way for our people to develop efficiently and effectively.

When Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders can have pride in society as full citizens; when their immediate health and housing problems have been reduced; when all Australians recognise the importance of Abor­ igines and Torres Strait Islanders to this country — Australia will be a different and better nation.

M l would like to thank the directors of Aboriginal Hostels Limited for their assistance and co-operation in making the work of the Board positive and effective, jr j

8

THE DIRECTORS’ OVERVIEW

INTRODUCTION

The 1983-84 fiscal year saw continued growth of the Company with greater emphasis on the general consolidation of the Company’s administration and programs.

The year was significant because the Com­ pany had been operating for ten years. This was considered an important time to review our performance and look to the years ahead.

Specific attention was given to the Company’s past ten years of growth and the strategy, aims and direction of the Company into the future. As a result, revisions were made to our organ­ isational structure to take into account chang­ ing circumstances and needs of the people assisted by the Company.

This major change to the Aboriginal Affairs portfolio has been mooted to take effect as from 1 July 1985. From July 1984 to July 1985 the Chairman of Aboriginal Hostels, Lois O'Donoghue, will be appointed as consultant to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs on setting up the proposed new Aboriginal Housing Authority.

In June 1983 the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs established a Ministerial Portfolio Committee to discuss policy and major Abor­ iginal issues. Members of this Committee come

from the most senior levels of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, the Department of Aboriginal Affairs, the National Aboriginal Conference,

The Directors took specific measures to ensure the rationalisation of the Company’s services. A major examination of the Com­ pany’s Charter and General Agreement with the Australian Government was undertaken. This examination was later shelved when the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon. Clyde

Holding MP, announced the formation of an Aboriginal Housing Authority which is ex­ pected to include Aboriginal Hostels, the Housing Program Grants of the Aboriginal Development Commission, the Town Campers Assistance Program and parts of the Depart­ ment Aboriginal Affairs’ Community Manage­ ment and Services Program.

The Company’s submission to the Minister on the formation and structure of the proposed new Authority is attached in the appendix at the end of this Report.

the Aboriginal Development Commission, and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies. Aboriginal Hostels Limited is represented on this Committee by the Company Chairman, Lois O’Donoghue, and the General Manager, Neville Perkins.

The Company, the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and the other portfolio elements nave thus had the opportunity to discuss frankly Government policy on Aboriginal Affairs. The exchange of views has resulted in greater understanding of the problems faced in the Aboriginal Affairs portfolio and has meant that the Company has a direct influence on Govern­ ment decisions affecting Aborigines.

The iniative taken by the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs to establish the Portfolio Committee has been welcomed and supported by the Company.

9

Funding in 1983-84 The Company received $13,719 million from the Australian Government. The $13,719 million represented a rise of 32.2 per cent over the 1983-84 allocation of $10.38 million. Other sources of funds during the year were the Commonwealth Community Employment Pro­ gram ($776,455); Family Crisis Accommo­ dation Funding ($200,000) and Homeless Per­ sons' Assistance Program ($200,000).

These funds are used by the Company to produce tangible results for Aborigines and Islanders in need. This money represents a specific and worthwhile investment in the future of Aboriginal Australians.

Just as there is some difficulty in measuring the economic benefits of many government services, such as education and defence, it is sometimes difficult to measure the full benefits of the use of money in assisting Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders. To gauge the full benefits we need to ask: ‘What would the

rogress in helping Aborigines and Islanders ave been if the Company had not been providing hostel accommodation for the past 11 years?’

The answer simply is that many tens of thousands of Aborigines and Islanders would not have experienced improvements in health, education and employment services open to them. The overall benefits of the Company are therefore long-term and are of considerable value to all Australians.

The Australian Government's continued confidence in and support for the Company is fully justified when our contribution to Abor­ iginal advancement, self-development and self-management is considered. The Board of Directors hope that our important work is encouraged and supported by increased fund­ ing in future years, especially for new hostel acquisitions and operations.

Company Operations During the 1983-84 fiscal year, Aboriginal Hostels Limited operated or funded a total of 135 hostels around Australia providing 3,275 beds to meet the temporary accommodation needs of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders. This total included 70 hostels pro­ viding 1,427 beds operated by Aboriginal and

and non-Aboriginal organisations under the Company’s Third Party Hostel Grants Program. The remaining 65 hostels, with 1,848 beds were operated directly by the Company.

Details of the overall operations of the Company by category of hostel are set out in the table below.

From 1 July 1984, the Company will take over the responsibility of funding an extra 28 hostels from the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. These hostels are shown in the Direc­ tory of Hostels later in this Report.

For administrative purposes, several small hostels in an area may be operated as a single establishment.

Types of Hostels The Company has to provide different types of hostels to accommodate Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders with widely differing needs. It is impractical, for example, for the Company to house students and aged persons, or rehabilitation patients with transients in one hostel.

So Company hostels cater for differing needs of Aborigines and Islanders. Hostels provide temporary accommodation for Abor­ igines in education, employment, vocational training and for health reasons. The Company also serves the needs of transient, aged and supporting parent Aborigines.

The main types of hostels and their work are outlined below:

Employment and Training Hostels Accommodation is provided in the Com­ pany’s employment hostels to help Aborigines undertaking vocational training or seeking or starting work.

Regrettably, unemployment among Aborigi­ nal people continues to be the highest of any group of Australians. The help given to many Aborigines in having decent accommodtion when they move to a strange town to start work or take up an apprenticeship is important.

The help provided to many Aborigines who are resident in our employment hostels and the assurance of decent accommodation when they visit towns to look for or start work is a valuable and appreciated service.

COMPANY AND THIRD PARTY OPERATIONS 1983-84 Com pany No. of T hird Party No. of Total Total No.

Hostels Beds Hostels Beds Hostels Beds

Employment and Training 16 302 3 40 19 342

Education 13 373 22 528 35 901

Aged Persons 1 42 6 124 7 166

Rehabilitation . ------- — 20 329 20 329

Transient 16 460 7 118 23 578

Supporting Mothers & Child Care 6 47 6 101 12 148

Multi-purpose 13 624 5 87 18 711

Fringe-dwellers — — 1 100 1 100

Total 65 1848 70 1427 135 3275

10

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

SOURCE AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS

Source $18,269,491

Cash at Bank $236,567

Department of Aboriginal Affairs: Capital Grants $2,318,000 Third Party Hostels grants $2,130,000 Hostel Operations & Administration $9,271,000

Other Government Agencies: Department of Social Security $200,000 Department of Housing & Construction $200,000 Department of Industrial Relations $1,113,690 (including N.E.A.T. & N.E.S.A.)

Accommodation Charges & Sundry Income $2,704,109

Sale of Property $96,125

Application $18,269,491

;i/·* llll

r

Capital Purchases $2,684,641

Payments to Third Party Hostels $2,080,857

Food, Services & Sundry Expenditure $3,446,931

Repairs & Planned Maintenance $1,147,640

Increase in Trade Debtors and Reduction in Trade Auditors $645,841

Wages, Salaries & Superannuation $8,213,649

Fees: Directors $27,346 Auditors $22,586

11

Employment and training hostel accommo­ dation provides an essential base for Aborigi­ nes and Islanders seeking employment. With­ out such accommodation, many would have difficulty finding and securing work away from their homes. Employment hostels are often essential to the success of the attempt by Aborigines to improve their position in life. By providing accommodation for Aborigines on training courses, the Company helps these people while they are away from home.

Apprentices learn their various skills and equip themselves for a positive and valuable future in the community. Accommodation, in a family-home environment and with the sup­ port of Aboriginal Managers, ensures that these residents have a good opportunity to finish their various courses and rind employment.

Education Hostels These hostels help children and older students, often from small Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands communities, staying in

larger towns and cities to gain a good edu­ cation. As secondary schooling is unavailable in many remote communities, some Aborigi­ nes and Islanders have to live away from home to gain even a basic education. For tertiary students pursuing their educational goals this may mean moving to another State.

Ten years ago Aborigines in remote Austra­ lia had few chances to obtain good education. Now Aboriginal students can take full advan­ tage of the Company’s accommodation and the education programs offered by the State and Australian Governments.

The new Harry Nanya Student Hostel in Mildura.

Education hostels are necessary contribu­ tions to the development of many young Aborigines and Islanders, making them posi­ tive and productive citizens.

Contrary to some public opinion, Aborigi­ nes and Torres Strait Islanders are proud and ambitious. Although they wish to retain their culture and individual integrity, they also want to be good citizens, to take their rightful place in the community and contribute to Australian society. Educational hostels pro­ vided by the Company have helped many young Aborigines towards this desirable goal.

Aboriginal apprentices undergoing training.

Aged Persons Hostels The generally well-known problems of the aged are mirrored in Aboriginal society. The breakdown of tribal groups and families in recent years has heightened the problems associated with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander aged people.

The number of aged Aborigines assisted by the Company is growing. The Company has taken many positive steps to assist these people, although much remains to be done.

The most outstanding example of real as­ sistance to aged Aborigines is the Company’s Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged in Alice Springs, which is operated both as a hostel and a registered nursing home, requiring qualified nursing staff.

While extremely successful in meeting the needs of the aged," the Home cannot keep up with the demand from the Aboriginal com­ munity. However, the Company will continue to support initiatives to help the aged within our financial means and in the light of other priorities.

Rehabilitation Hostels Rehabilitation hostels, run by Third Party groups and funded by the Company, help Aborigines with alcohol problems. The under­ standing staff and pleasant hostel environment — away from the stresses of every-day life — are essential to the success of alcohol rehabili­ tation programs offered.

Rehabilitation centres for ex-offenders have been set up by Third Party organisations to meet the immediate needs of Aborigines leav­ ing prison. These hostels aim to provide sup­ port to help ex-offenders secure decent em­ ployment and avoid future problems.

While it is regrettable that such hostels are needed, the work of Third Party organisations that offer these services is important and justifies financial support from the Company.

Transient Hostels Transient hostels provide accommodation for Aborigines with differing problems and differing needs. Some transient Aborigines may be truly homeless. Without a hostel to stay at these Aborigines would probably have to live in slum conditions or sleep without shel­ ter.

12

Transient hostels provide an important sup­ port to many needy Aborigines. For those who are homeless, the accommodation gives a short respite in decent conditions while a more permanent solution to their problem is sought through the appropriate housing authorities.

For tribal and other Aborigines visiting a strange town, the ability to stay in secure and reasonable accommodation is both desirable and helpful, lessening the real fear of many Aborigines in adjusting to urban life.

Single Parent Family Hostels As in the community generally, some mar­ riages regrettably break down leaving some Aboriginal mothers to raise their children

without the help of the father. Support for such cases is given through our single parent family hostels. Single parent hostels provide the essential

requirements of a home environment within the financial means of the parent. Single mothers have the support of other mothers and the staff of the hostel in the difficult and demanding task of raising child­ ren on a low income.

Third Party Hostel Operations As well as operating its own hostels, the Company funds approved organisations to run their own hostels.

The Company, under its Third Party Hostel Grants Program, provides all, or part of, the finance required to subsidise the running costs of hostels in excess of tariffs collected from

residents and other funding of the organis­ ation. As well as being a cost-effective method of running hostels, it enables Aboriginal organ­ isations to provide accommodation quickly

where it is most needed. In addition, Aborigi­ nal groups bring the benefit of local knowledge of the problems and circumstances facing hostel residents in their care.

Third Party organisations are carefully ap­ praised for their experience, suitability and competence in providing hostel accommo­ dation. The Company places great emphasis on

the ability of the third party to provide high standards of services and appropriate pro­ grams to assist the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in their care.

If an organisation can meet the control criteria set down by the Company, and pro­ vided Company funds are available, groups will be eligible for deficit funding under the Third Party Hostel Grants Program.

It will be appreciated that the number of requests for financial assistance far outweigh the funds available, requiring thorough re­ search and evaluation of every request so that

available funds are fairly distributed according to need. In addition to financial support, the Com­ pany provides operating support and advice to

Third Party organisations. Encouragement and guidance, especially in the initial stages, are vital to the successful operation of the Third Party hostel.

A list of Third Party organisations working with the Company to provide accommodation for Aborigines and Islanders is set out below:

ABIS Community Co-op Society Limited Aboriginal & Islander Catholic Council Aboriginal & Islander Skill Development Scheme Aboriginal Boomerang Council Aboriginal Catholic Community Group Aboriginal Medical Service Aboriginal Rights League Aboriginal Sobriety Group Aborigines Advancement League of Victoria

Apatula Housing Association Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-op Bennelongs Haven Committee Bloodwood Tree Association Brisbane Tribal Council

Bunjalung Tribal Society Cathedral Hostel Committee Catholic Mission

Church of Christ Federal Aborigines Board Eastern Goldfields Aboriginal Advancement Council Franciscan Missionaries of Mary Institute Geelong and District Co-op Limited Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-op Ltd. Goolarabooloo Incorp. Greenhills Foundation Ltd.

Homeless & Aged Persons Care Agency Kiah Hostel Committee Kulila Association Incorporated Lower Murray Nungas Club MiIIiya Rumurra Incorporated Mitchell Aboriginal Housing Authority

Moongoong Darwung Aboriginal Association Moree Aboriginal Sobriety House Aboriginal Corp. Mullewa Rehabilitation Centre Murawina Limited Ngwala Willumbong Co-op Limited Nyoongah Community Inc.

Offenders Aid Rehabilitation Services One People of Australia League Orana Haven’s Committee Orange Aboriginal Corporation Pallotine Mission Point Pearce Community Council Prisoners Aid Association of N.S.W.

Save the Children Fund Sister Kates' Child & Family Service St Mary's Child Welfare Services St Vincent de Paul Society Tran by College for Aborigines

Umewarra Mission Inc. Uniting Church National Mission Frontier Service Valley Halfway House Committee Walgoo-Wydgee Association Aboriginal Corporation Weimijar Marli Yapitja Ltd Woma Society Woodleigh College Management Committee

Yudarma Aboriginal Corporation

Over the 1983-84 financial year, four organi­ sations were newly funded under the Third Party Hostel Grants Program to provide accom­ modation. The new groups funded were: Aboriginal Medical Service

Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-op Limited Geelong & District Aboriginal Co-op Limited Mirriwini Gardens Aboriginal Academy

In addition to the 70 hostels operated under the Company’s Third Party Hostel Grants Pro­ gram, from 1 July 1984 the Company will take over responsibility for funding 28 hostels,

previously funded by the Department of Abor­

t s

iginal Affairs. The new organisations, to be funded by the Company will be: Aboriginal and Islanders Alcohol Service Anglican Health & Welfare Service Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-op Boopa Werem Kindergarten Born Free Club Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Central Midlands Progress Association Christian Aboriginal Parent School Cunnamulla Aboriginal Co-op Djimununga Alcoholic Rehabilitation FORWAARD Geelong and District Aboriginal Co-op Hopevale Aboriginal Corporation Kalkadon Aboriginal Sobriety House Kulila Association Palm Island Rehabilitation Corporation Robinvale Homeless Persons Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Services Warringu Corporation Woompera Muralug Housing Corporation

Yamatji Ngura Yambah Houses Committee Yarrabah Community Council

Aboriginal Hostels Limited acknowledges and appreciates the valuable work and assist­ ance offered by all Third Party organisations in the promotion of the well-being of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

PLANNED HOSTELS 1984-85 The 1984-85 fiscal year will see the opening of six new Company hostels and the provision of funds to local Aboriginal groups to operate 34 new Third Party hostels. The proposals are subject to sufficient funds being made avail­ able by the Government in the 1984-85 fiscal year.

Proposed new Company hostels: Camooweal (Qld) Completion of the Homeless Persons Village Charleville (Qld) Multi-purpose Hostel Fitzroy (Vic) Night Shelter for Town

Campers

Joe McGinness Multi-purpose Hostel

Nhulunbuy (NT) Medical Transients Hostel Tennant Creek Town Campers Village (NT)

Proposed new Third Party hostels: Baroota Farm (SA) Born Free (QLD) Bunara Maya (WA) C.A.P.S. (WA) Chikka Dixon Centre (NSW) Congress Farm (NT) Cummeragunja (Vic) Djimununga (WA) FORWAARD (NT)

NEW HOSTEL DEVELOPMENT 1983-84 One highlight of the Company's work each year is the opening of new hostels to meet the needs of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

Company Hostels opened in 1983-84: Gladys Elphick 13-bed transient hostel in Adelaide (SA) Harry Nanya 18-bed student hostel in

Mildura (Vic)

Lois O'Donoghue 36-bed multi-purpose hostel in Port Augusta (SA)

New Third Party Hostels funded in 1983-84: Moongoong Darwung Boomerang Emergency Tribal Council

Ronald Cameron

Warren

A 40-bed student/transient hostel in Kununnurra (WA) A 15-bed emergency shelter in Perth(WA) A 12-bed emergency aged persons hostel in Brisbane(Qld) A 14-bed multi-purpose hostel in Ballarat (Vic) A 10-bed multi-purpose hostel in Geelong (Vic)

Third Party Hostels no longer funded in 1983-84: ‘ Eva Geia Bgwcoman

Bega House

Nyoongah

A 36-bed hostel in Townsville (Qld) A 10-bed hostel in Revesby (NSW)

A 10-bed hostel in Koondoola (WA)

Hopevale (QLD) Jabba-Gai-Yumha (QLD) (umbarra (Vic) K.A.S.H. (QLD) Ki Metta (QLD) Marge Tucker (Vic) Medical Centre (QLD) Moora (WA) Nguna Bayun (QLD) Nungar Shelter (WA) Nungas Farm (SA) PIADRAC (QLD) Paim-Metta (QLD) Robinvale (Vic) Ronald Cameron (Vic) Serdy’s Haven (QLD) Trinity Beach (QLD) Wandering Waardiny (WA) Warren (Vic) Warringu (QLD) Willong Shelter (WA) Yamatji Ngura (WA) Yeal-a-Mucckii (QLD) Yumba Houses (two hostels) (QLD)

TARIFFS The total revenue from hostel tariffs for 1983-84 was $2,522,714 — an increase of 21 per cent over the previous year.

There is a limit to the Company’s ability to charge tariffs to cover the cost of accommo­ dation offered. Because the people we help have little or no income, our tariffs are based on the ability of our residents to pay.

All Company tariffs are reviewed quarterly in line with adjustments in social security benefits and the male average adult award wage.

14

OCCUPANCY Hostel occupancy is an important yardstick by which the acceptance of the Company’s service can be judged. The Company is keenly aware for its hostels to be fully used whenever

possible. During 1983-84 hostel occupancy rates av­ eraged 76 per cent in Company hostels com­ pared with 74 per cent tne previous year. While the Company would like to achieve

higher rates, given the nature of the accommo­ dation offered and such factors as school holidays, the ending of employment and vo­ cational programs, these rates are considered satisfactory.

With a total of 135 hostels across Australia, with 3,275 beds, the Company provided about 1.182,000 bed/nights last year. Our average occupancy of 76 per cent over 1983-84 rep­ resents an excellent performance by the Com­ pany. The occupancy also reflects tne growing need for our service. If the total bed/nights for

1983-84 is averaged over the Company’s budget of $13,719 million the cost of eacn bed/ night available can be measured. The cost for each bed/night offered is about $11.60 — which represents effective and inexpensive accommodation for Aborigines and Torres

Strait Islanders. During the year the Company designed a new accommodation-guide pamphlet to be widely distributed to our hostel residents and Aboriginal communities. The Company hopes that distribution of this pamphlet, early in the coming financial year, will improve occupancy

levels. Occupancy is always under close and con­ tinuing review, and where there is insufficient demand for the service offered, the Company changes the category of residents assisted. Alternatively, the nostel may be sold and the financial resources transferred to provide ac­ commodation in areas of greater need.

STAFF The ultimate success of any organisation depends to a large extent on the ability of its

staff. In Aboriginal Hostels Limited great em­ phasis is placed on requiring all staff to thoroughly understand their responsibilities and to carry them out with skill and dedi­ cation. All our staff continue to respond in an enthusiastic way to their work.

The Company has a firm and positive Aboriginalisation policy. This policy means that the Board and management ensure that all positions in the Company are filled by an Aborigine or Torres Strait Islander whenever possible.

The General Manager, Neville Perkins, and all Regional Managers, who are Aborigines and Islanders, carry the major administrative re­ sponsibilities of the Company. They adminis­ ter the Company in a capable and responsible manner. They are commended by the Board of Directors for their work.

There are some positions within the Com­ pany which require specific qualifications or extensive work experience, which have not yet been possible to fill with Aboriginal em­

ployees. But more of these positions are being filled by Aborigines and Islanders. Aborigines and Islanders occupy the high­ est positions in the Company. Eight of the nine Board of Directors, the Company’s General Manager and all of the Regional Managers are Aborigines or Islanders. Almost all the indus­ trial and administrative staff are Aborigines and Islanders.

This makes Aboriginal Hostels Limited Australia’s largest single employer of Aborigi­ nes and Torres Strait Islanders.

The Company’s work and Aboriginalisation policy demonstrates beyond doubt that given the opportunity Aboriginal people can effectively operate a large-scale organisation as well as any other group in the community.

At the end of the 1983-84 year, there were 449 Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders employed by the Company. This represented 94 per cent of the Company’s 478 staff.

The following table gives details of the number and percentage of the Company’s Aboriginal staff in the various employment categories over recent years.

Aboriginal Staff: Total staff and proportion of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders employed as proportion of the total — June 1984 Employment type: June 1981 June 1982 June 1983 June 1984

Staff No. % A&TSI No. % A&TSI No. % A&TSI No. % A&TSI

Administrative 91 87.9 96 88.5 97 91.8 120 90.2

Hostel Managers 100 94.0 105 94.3 109 95.4 126 96.0

Industrial Employees* 177 94.9 196 96.9 186 99.5 212 100.0

Nursing 17 0.0 23 17.4 27 33.3 20 35.0

Total 385 88.0 420 90.0 419 92,4 478 94.0

Employment Area Central Office 40 75.0 44 77.3 48 83.3 60 98.3

Regional Offices 58 98.3 58 98.0 45 100.0 60 100.0

Hostels* 287 88.3 318 96.0 326 92.6 358 95.2

Total 385 88.8 420 90.0 419 92.4 478 94.0

A&TSI Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in c lu d e s part-tim e/casual Excludes people em ployed under the Com m unity Employment Program.

15

THE MAJOR OPERATING DIVISIONS

Administration The top administration of the Company continued in 1983-84 under the leadership and direction of the General Manager, Neville Perkins. He was assisted by the Company Secretary, Robert Clarke. While the Board of Directors has ultimate responsibility for the Company’s administration, the Board in turn

must rely heavily on the delegation of duties to the Chief Executive and the Company Sec­ retary. The success of Aboriginal Hostels Lim­ ited, to a significant degree, can be attributed to the leadership and work of Mr Perkins and his

deputy Mr Clarke. In January 1984 Neville Perkins was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for services to Aboriginal welfare and in July of this year he was bestowed with the profes­ sional grading of Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management.

The Board extends its thanks and appreci­ ation to these two senior administrators. They have acted at all times according to the require­ ments and policies set down by the Board.

The example set by Senior Management flows to other Managers working for the Com­ pany. Regional Managers as representatives of the Company throughout the nation have a most important role and responsibility. The contributions to this Annual Report from Re­ gional Managers reflects their attitude to their work. They deserve the Board’s thanks for their work for the Company and Aboriginal welfare generally.

All other staff working for the Company contributed to the past successful year. They too are congratulated by the Board for their efforts and achievements.

Review of Central Office In May 1984, following a proposal from the General Manager, the Board of Directors com­ missioned the leading management consult­ ancy firm Ferris Norton Associates to review the organisation and structure of Central Office. Ferris Norton Associates were chosen because they had conducted a study for the Company on its establishment in 1974.

The main objective of the latest review was to seek ways to improve administrative

efficiency in the light of changing workloads and increased responsibilities of Central Office staff. The 1984 review did not consider the Government’s proposal to set up a new Abor­

iginal Housing Authority, concentrating in­ stead on the internal administration of the Company. The review also covered the impact and use of computers on the work of the Company.

The review took six weeks. The Board received the final report in June 1984. After detailed consideration the main recommenda­ tions of the review were accepted. The re­ view’s recommendations will be carried out in 1984-85.

REGIONAL OFFICES The day-to-day administration of the Com­ pany depends heavily on the role of the eight Regional Offices around Australia.

Several Regional Offices administer the op­ erations of the Company in their respective States, and in one instance for two States. The Perth Office administers Western Australia; the Sydney Office, New South Wales; and the Adelaide Office South Australia. The Mel­ bourne Office administers the Company’s op­ erations in both Victoria and Tasmania, al­ though at present there are no Company or Third Party hostels in Tasmania.

Because of the size and scope of operations in the Northern Territory and Queensland, these areas are supported by four seperate Regional Offices.

In the Northern Territory, the Darwin Re­ gional Office administers the northern half of the Territory, while the Alice Springs Office administers the Company’s operations in Cen­ tral Australia.

In Queensland, the Cairns Regional Office administers all hostels north of Rockhampton including the Torres Straits, while the Bris­ bane Office administers south Queensland hostels.

While major policy decisions are made centrally, the Regional Offices and their staff are essential to carry out Company policies and provide assistance to Hostel Managers and their staff.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited prides itself on being able to offer its services to Aborigines

Regional Organisation of the Company Region Company No. of T hird Party No. of Total Total No.

Hostels Beds Hostels Beds Hostels ol Beds

Western Australia 7 182 18 474 25 656

North Northern Territory 4 213 1 24 5 237

North Queensland 5 201 4 176 9 377

South Queensland 13 474 9 200 22 674

New South Wales 16 361 15 241 31 602

Victoria & Tasmania 7 118 10 142 17 260

South Australia 7 138 11 142 18 280

South Northern Territory 6 161 2 28 8 189

Total 6 5 1 8 4 8 7 0 1 4 2 7 1 3 5 3 2 7 5

16

with a minimum of red tape. This can only be done through a developed and decentralised organisational structure. Regional Offices therefore have an important role in keeping in constant touch with the needs of the hostels, solving problems as they occur, and providing hostel staff with guidance and advice.

PERSONNEL SERVICES DIVISION

This Division directly administers all the Company’s personnel work, including indus­ trial relations and staff training. It has been a busy year for the Personnel Services Division

with greater emphasis on training and devel­ opment of staff and industrial relations. During 1983-84 the number of employees rose from 419 to 478 — a rise of 14 per cent. In

addition, 94 people were employed by the Company under the Australian Government's Community Employment Program. During the year, Mr David Kendall, a past-

employee of the Company, was appointed the Manager of the Personnel Services Division. Before taking up his post with the Company, Mr Kendall was Director of Industrial Re­

lations with the Confederation of Industry (ACT Branch).

Industrial Relations Industrial relations within Aboriginal Hos­ tels have never posed a problem. The year under review was no exception. Generally,

industrial relations were good and staff morale was high over 1983- 84. The Company took note of and carried out

the Government’s policy of encouraging em­ ployees to become members of the appropriate unions. In addition, the Company moved to establish proper Award coverage for all Com­ pany employees who are currently Award free.

All Industrial staff remained under the jurisdiction of the Federal Aboriginal Hostels Award (1983) with the Federated Liquor Trades and Allied Employees Union in all

States. In the Northern Territory the Aboriginal Hostels (Northern Territory) Award (1982) with the Federated Miscellaneous Workers Union covers industrial staff.

During the year the Company negotiated with the Secretaries and Managers Association of Australia to ensure that all managerial staff, including those who had previously been

covered by the Company’s own Hostel Man­ agers Agreement, were legally covered by an appropriate Award and represented by the appropriate union.

On 15 May 1984, Mr Justice Robinson of the Australian Conciliation and Abritration Com­ mission officially ratified the new Aboriginal Hostels Limited Managers Award (1984). This

new Award is working satisfactorily. The Company continues to negotiate with the Royal Australian Nurses Federation to establish proper Award coverage for Company nursing employees at the Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged. In addition, proper Award cover­

age has been sought for Company administrat­ ive and clerical employees.

Training The Company ensures that all staff are fully trained in their responsible role in caring for Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders living in hostels. The Company's Training Section, based in Central Office, conducted staff devel­ opment courses in Canberra and various State capitals over the year.

Over 1983-84 the Company gave greater emphasis to giving staff more basic training in Company procedures. There were training courses for Hostel Managers in all capital cities except Darwin and courses at Central Office for

Field and Liaison Officers, Payroll and Clerical Officers, and Assistant Regional Managers.

S ta ff training on the Com pany's new Com puter System

Many staff, particularly senior manage­ ment, attended executive courses on negotiat­ ing skills, high performance in management, and effective communication. Management bodies such as Rydges, the Australian Institute

of Management, as well as TAFE colleges were important in raising the professional qualifications and performance of our staff. Two additional initiatives were introduced

this year. The first was a series of catering seminars. The second was the training of Regional Managers through Central Office work experience.

Catering and cooking seminars were held in Brisbane, Cairns and Perth. These courses, run in conjunction with local TAFE colleges, re­ emphasised the importance of good, nutritious

food for hostel residents and portional control. Four of the Company's eight Regional Man­ agers at different times during the year spent a month at Central Office working in the various

divisions and sections. This training proved to be an excellent way of improving Company administration and understanding of the dif­ fering problems of Central Office and our

Regional Offices. The other four Regional Man­ agers will have similar training next year.

17

FINANCE AND INTERNAL AUDIT DIVISIONS

Highlights of the annual accounts in 1983-84 show:

Tariffs from hostel residents during 1983-84 exceeded $2,500,000 — a rise of 21 per cent The Company’s net fixed assets amounted to $13,812,263 — a rise of 20 per cent

The main sources of funds were: 1983-84

$

Direct Australian Government Contribution...................................................................... 13,719,000

Department of Employment and Industrial Relations........................................................ 776,455

Department of Housing and Construction.......................................................................... 200,000

Department of Social Security............................................................................................ 200.000

NEAT and NESA................................................................................................................... 337,235

Accommodation Charges.................................................................................................... 2,522.714

Sale of Property.................................................................................................................... 96,125

O ther............. 417,962

TOTAL................................................................................................................................. 18,269,491

The Finance Division is directly respon­ sible for the administration of all Company funds. Australian Government funds are re­ ceived primarily through the Department of Aboriginal Affairs (including $500,000 under the Town Campers Assistance Program).

The other main sources of the Company’s funds are from the Department of Housing and Construction’s Family Crisis Accommodation Program ($200,000), the Department of Social Security’s Homeless Persons Assistance Pro­ gram ($200,000) and the Department of Em­ ployment and Industrial Relations’ Com­ munity Employment Program ($776,455).

The Australian Government’s funds re­ ceived through the Department of Aboriginal Affairs, are based on total budget estimates of Company hostels, third party subsidies and Regional and Central Office administration costs in the coming financial year.

Each quarter the Company allocates these funds according to the following functions: 1983-84 $ • Administration (including salaries)...... 3.936,000 • Aquisition Program.................................. 1,115,000

• Development Program.............................. 1,203,000

• Hostel Operating Subsidies..................... 4,701,000

• Major M aintenance.................................. 634,000

• Third Party Grants.................................... 2,130,000

TO TAL................................................................ 13,719,000

All funds allocated, requests for expendi­ ture by Regional Offices and each hostel, as well as the collection of tariffs and payment of third party subsidies, are carefully checked and processed by the Finance Division.

A thorough audit is maintained of all funds to ensure proper budgetary control at all times. Continuous audits are made by the Company’s Internal Audit Division staff, ensuring proper and responsible accountability.

Computerisation The Finance Division tested computer pro­ grams which were designed to improve the Company's accounts reporting and data pro­ cessing. The Company is working to achieve a fully computerised accounting system operat­ ing at Central Office early in 1984-85, and subsequently train Regional Office staff to computerise their accounts.

PROJECTS & MAINTENANCE DIVISION The Projects and Maintenance Division carries out all detailed investigations on pro­ posed works that involve property acquisition, drafting design concepts, supervising the con­ struction of new hostels, the purchase of new hostel equipment, and hostel repairs and maintenance.

The Company’s buildings must be kept fully maintained and in proper order. The Division planned and began a comprehensive maintenance program. A special Hostel Main­ tenance Officer was appointed to co-ordinate with Regional Offices to ensure maintenance procedures at Company properties were fol­ lowed.

Expenditure on maintenance and upgrading for the year was $1,147,640 and was spent to ensure that the comfort and standard of accom­ modation for hostel residents was maintained.

At the end of the year, the value at cost of land and buildings owned bv the Company was $14,619,243. The work of the Division in supervising these assets is extensive.

To assist the Company in purchasing a hostel in a particular area, the Projects and Maintenance Division, in consultation with the Regional Office concerned, is responsible for selectipg sites and giving cost estimates and recommendations to the Board of Directors through the General Manager.

18

Aboriginal Hostels Limited (Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)

COMPANY STRUCTURE

Board of Directors

General Manager

-Western Region-

-Northern Region -

-North Queensland Region-

South Queensland Region—

-Eastern Region-

- South Eastern Region-

-Southern Region-

Central Region-

Company Hostels I________

-Audit Division

-Finance Division

Development & ■ Construction—

Company Secretary

Division

Administrative -Services---------

Division

Personnel -Services— Division

Planning & Design

Maintenance Co-Ordinator

-Projects Officers -Projects Administration

Research, Publicity & Marketing Third Party Grants Property

Services & Registry

-Personnel Administration

-Industrial Relations -Training

Third Party Hostels _________I

Hostel Residents

19

MAIN WORK OF THE PROJECTS AND MAINTENANCE DIVISION

HOSTEL TYPE OF WORKS COMMITTED FUNDS

$

W E S T E R N A U S T R A L I A Perth Regional Office Relocation 31,895

Pugang Village Maintenance and Development 143,904

Carnarvon Furniture, Equipment and Maintenance 27,901

Trilby Cooper Maintenance 37,960

Ninga Mia Village (1) Development 82,667

N O R T H E R N T E R R I T O R Y Galawu Hostel Maintenance and Development 30,323

Silas Roberts Hostel Maintenance and Development 31.895

Corroboree Hostel Maintenance and Development 248,348

Daisy Yarmirr Hostel Maintenance and Development 13.449

Ayiparinya Hostel Maintenance and Development 11.506

Sid Ross Hostel Maintenance and Development 11.260

Hetti Perkins Home (3) Maintenance and Development 26.520

Q U E E N S L A N D Kabalulumana Hostel (2) Development 164,091

Kuiyam Hostel Development 41,647

Kuiyam Hostel (3) Development 68,000

Jumula Dubbins Hostel Maintenance and Development 30,340

Cathedral Hostel Development 138,999

Cathedral Hostel (3) Development 103,120

Joe McGuinness Hostel Development 93,329

Joe McGuinness Hostel (3) Development 35,400

Iris Clay Hostel Maintenance and Development 26.059

Camooweal (1, 2, 3) Acquisition and Development 280,847

Jane Arnold Hostel Maintenance and Development 24.189

Elley Bennett Hostel Maintenance and Development 31.619

Jodaro Hostel Maintenance 20,633

Willie MacKenzie (3) Maintenance 162,261

Neville Bonner Hostel Maintenance 25,965

N E W S O U T H W A L E S Mark Ella Hostel Maintenance and Development 18,146

Mariyang Hostel Maintenance and Development 14,792

Bennelongs Haven Maintenance and Development 13,122

Val Bryant Hostel Maintenance and Development 39,889

Kirinari Hostel (4) Maintenance and Development 29,341

Kirinari Hostel (5) Maintenance and Development 18,727

43 Brunker Road Maintenance and Development 12,929

Chikka Dixon Hostel Maintenance and Development 11,774

V I C T O R IA Regional Office Relocation 16,737

William T. Onus Hostel Development 45,408

Lionel Rose Centre Maintenance and Development 11,083

Harry Nanya Hostel Acquisition and Development 195,813

Fitzroy Night Shelter (1) Acquisition and Development 176,997

S O U T H A U S T R A L I A Tanderra Hostel Maintenance 25,863

Cyril Lindsay Hostel Maintenance and Development 10,035

Broken Hill Hostel Maintenance and Development 18,968

Lois O’Donoghue Hostel Development 71,639

A U S T R A L I A N C A P I T A L T E R R IT O R Y Central Office 127,833

Notes: (1) All or part of funds provided under Town Campers Assistance Program. (2) All or part of funds provided by the Department of Social Security. (3) All or part of funds provided under Community Employment Program. (4) Kirinari Hostel — Newcastle (5) Kirinari Hostel — Sylvania Heights

2 0

Once the Board has approved a particular site and development program, the Projects and Maintenance Division seeks local Council approval, calls for tenders from building con­

tractors and supervises the work until the project is complete. In addition to this work, the Division is also responsible for maintaining and upgrading

hostels already owned by the Company. The Projects and Maintenance Division is therefore in close contact with each hostel, ensuring that running repairs are attended to, and major repairs or improvements are carried out as necessary.

The major work of the Division over 1983-84 is summarised in the table opposite. There were three hostels planned during 1983-84 that were delayed by Councils failing to give the required planning permission.

Hostels that were delayed were the Joe McGuiness Multi-purpose Hostel in Cairns, the Harry Nanya Hostel in Mildura and a proposed village at Dareton for town campers.

The Projects and Maintenance Division of the Company was able to assist in the training of Aborigines over 1983-84. The Division en­ sures that as much Aboriginal labour as poss­

ible is employed on all maintenance and building work. Many young Aborigines were employed for the first time on such work under the Australian Government’s N.E.A.T. pro­ gram.

In particular, ten young Aborigines were trained at the Willie MacKenzie Hostel in Brisbane with help from the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations under

the Federal Community Employment Program. The Division will continue to use as many Aboriginal tradesmen and trainees as possible

in future Company maintenance and develop­ ment work.

RESEARCH Research is important in enabling the Com­ pany to provide accommodation to people most in need. To assess the need for hostel accommodation among Aborigines and Torres

Strait Islanders in different locations and among different groups, the Company em­ ployed two full-time researchers. The re­ searchers receive assistance and information from Regional Managers.

In reviewing the need for hostel accommo­ dation, the Company’s Research Officers make detailed studies of local Aboriginal popu­ lations, and held discussions with local Abor­ igines, community groups, local authorities and government departments.

A 1980 major national survey carried out by the Company into the accommodation needs of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders showed 4,512 beds were required to meet their im­

mediate needs. The Company could only pro­ vide 3,275 beds in 1983-84 and the trend shows that demand for hostel accommodation

since 1980 has continued to increase. A further major study was carried out in May 1984 to update the information provided by the 1980 survey. In the new study, all major Aboriginal communities and organisations were canvassed on their hostel accommo­

dation needs. The information gathered showed that de­ spite the many more beds provided over the years by the Company, there is still a high

demand for new hostels nationally. Because the demand for accommodation today far exceeds the accommodation avail­ able, the Company must continue to research the needs of Aborigines to ensure that, subject to the Company’s financial constraints, hostels are provided to people in areas of greatest need.

21

PUBLIC RELATIONS The general improvement in the well-being of Aborigines will only occur when the Austra­ lian public has an enlightened and tolerant attitude towards Aborigines in Australia. The Company, through its public relations policy, aims to better inform the community of the extreme accommodation problems facing many Aborigines.

Having highlighted the disadvantaged pos­ ition of many Aborigines and Torres Strait islanders, the Company can then show the general community that an effective, self-help program can reduce their accommodation needs.

In July 1983 Aboriginal Hostels Limited celebrated its 10th Anniversary with an Anni­ versary Luncheon, an Aboriginal Ball, and sponsoring a group of traditional Aboriginal dancers from the Northern Territory to perform in Canberra.

The Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon. Clyde Holding, was our guest speaker at the Anniversary Lunch, held in Canberra, on 8 July 1983.

Throughout Australia many regional func­ tions were organised by Company staff. One of the most popular activities was several hostels having ‘open days' when the neighbours, com­ munity representatives and other organisa­ tions were invited to inspect the hostel and

share our hospitality at a barbecue. These open days were very successful and some Hostel Managers plan to hold other open days regu­ larly.

Over the past year, the Company continued to give strong prominence to public relations in order to positively inform the community of our record of achievement and give all staff pride in their Company.

In telling the public of our work, the Public Relations Section of the Company produces a quarterly magazine, ‘Hostel News’, which is distributed widely to government depart­ ments, Aboriginal organisations and staff.

‘Hostel News’ nas increased in circulation by 30 per cent over the past year. It is a popular publication, both within and outside the or­ ganisation.

The other main publication of the Company is the Annual Report — designed to inform the public of all our work and achievements to date. In May 1984, the Chairman of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, Lois O’Donoghue accepted a Bronze Award for the Company’s 1982-83 Annual Report from the Australian Institute of Management at a dinner at the Sydney Sheraton-Wentworth Hotel.

Company representatives at the A.I.M. Annual Report A wards— 1983.

Over 400 leading business figures attended the dinner. It was pleasing to see Aboriginal Hostels Limited — the only Aboriginal organ­ isation — winning another Award alongside other major Australian companies.

The latest award builds on- the success of Aboriginal Hostels Limited in 1982 when the Company won its first award from the Insti­ tute.

CONCLUSION Aboriginal Hostels Limited is a unique Company. We are the only government funded organisation specifically and primarily organ­ ised to provide a national hostel accommo­ dation service.

Without the Company’s direct and positive work many indigenous Australians would be further disadvantaged. Aboriginal Hostels Limited provides Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders with a real opportunity to improve their living conditions.

The temporary accommodation offered by the Company plays a major role in breaking the cycle of poverty and dependence that faces many Aborigines in Australia today. Only through an Aboriginal organisation like Abor­ iginal Hostels Limited can the necessary assist­ ance offered by Governments be truely effec­ tive.

There will be many changes in Aboriginal housing that will flow from the Government’s initiative of setting up a new Aboriginal Hous­ ing Authority at the end of the next financial year.

As Directors of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, backed by a professional and dedicated staff, we can confidently report that Aboriginal Hostels Limited will continue to provide an excellent service to the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Company’s care.

i t We can confidently report that Aboriginal Hostels Limited, backed by professional and dedicated staff, will continue to provide an excellent service to the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Company’s care.gg

22

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

Company News

Contributions to the 1983-84 Annual Report from the Staff of Aboriginal Hostels Limited 23

NEW ABORIGINAL HOUSING AUTHORITY Neville Perkins General Manager

The Minister for Aboriginal Affairs has announced the estab­ lishment of a new Ab­ original Housing Au­ thority to bring to­ gether and co-ordi­

nate all Aboriginal housing programs. Aboriginal Hostels Limited is to be a cen­ tral part of the new Aboriginal Housing

Authority which is expected to be established by 1 July 1985.

The Government has decided to establish a new Aboriginal Housing Authority to provide a focus under Aboriginal leadership for all Aboriginal housing programs. As well as in­ volving Aboriginal Hostels Limited, the new Authority will incorporate the existing Grant- in-Aid housing program of the Aboriginal Development Commission, the Town Campers Assistance Program, and elements of the Com­ munity Management and Services Program of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

The new Aboriginal Housing Authority will work towards solving the housing needs of various Aboriginal groups across Australia, whether they are on reserves and outstations, or those living in towns and cities.

The Authority will aim to promote the development of appropriate Aboriginal hous­ ing technology and employ and train Aborigi­ nes in building trades.

The Chairman of Aboriginal Hostels Lim­ ited, Lois O’Donoghue, will be a special ad­ viser to the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and the interim-Chairman of the new Authority.

Although the new Authority may change the structure of Aboriginal Hostels Limited from a separate incorporated Company, there will be little change to our work. Temporary hostel accommodation will still be provided for Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

The new Housing Authority is a challenge to our staff to keep up the excellent service provided by Aboriginal Hostels Limited today. With more work and responsibility, every employee of the new Authority will need to work towards the welfare of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders needing accommo­ dation.

GOVERNOR-GENERAL SUPPORTS HOSTELS Bob Clarke Company Secretary

Twice in 1983-84, the Governor-General of Australia, Sir Ninian Stephen showed his support for the work of Aboriginal Hostels Limited. Sir Ninian hosted a reception to mark the 10th anniversary of the Company and later in the year officially opened the Lois

O’Donoghue Hostel in Port Augusta. In his address at the opening of the Lois O’Donoghue Hostel, Sir Ninian said the hostel would provide Aborigines with, decent accom­ modation, among friends, where they could live with self-respect and in comfortable con­ ditions.

In opening the hostel, Sir Ninian Stephen paid special tribute to the Chairman of Abor­ iginal Hostels Limited, Lois O’Donoghue whom the hostel is named after, for her many years of dedicated work for Aborigines.

‘Lois O’Donoghue may not have personally invented the concept of Aboriginal Hostels, but she has long been a vital part of its

organisation,’ Sir Ninian said. ‘Indeed, she has been part of Aboriginal Hostels Limited for more than half its life, and she has been its Chairman for almost three

years, as well as pursuing a distinguished career of great activity in a host of Aboriginal organisations. ‘And at the same time as being a clever businesswoman, she is a warm and com­ passionate human being,’ Sir Ninian added.

Sir Ninian said he took it as a direct honour to the office of the Governor General that the Aboriginal community should ask him to per­ form the opening ceremony for so significant an Aboriginal amenity as the hostel. He said he believed the request was an act of faith in the future and would be taken as hope for that future, by people of goodwill all over Austra­

lia. ‘This hostel is one more accomplishment added to the achievements of Aboriginal Hos­ tels Limited in providing low cost temporary accommodation for Aborigines in need. ‘It provides more than just accommodation. It provides a homely, warm atmosphere which welcomes those who use it, assuring them they are welcome guests of an organisation which is their own.’

24

MILDURA RACISM Terry Garwood Regional Manager— Melbourne

Occasionally Ab­ original Hostels Lim­ ited has difficulty set­ ting up a new hostel in a town because of the attitudes of a few residents. Although the work of the Com­ pany is gaining

greater acceptance in the community, there are still isolated cases of racist attitudes.

In 1983, research by the Company showed there was a pressing need to provide student accommodation in Mildura. The Company found a suitable house in Eleventh Street, an affluent street in the town. But a syndicate of

local residents got together to ensure that Aboriginal Hostels Limited didn't buy the house. The Company believes the syndicate of Mildura residents that prevented Aboriginal Hostels Limited from buying the property in Eleventh Street at auction in December 1983 was racially motivated.

The most telling evidence of the racist views of some Mildura residents was in an anonomous letter sent to the Company by bigoted residents. The letter showed there is still much work to be done to change the attitudes of many people toward Aborigines. One effective way racist views can be changed

is by showing the attitude held is wrong. The letter is reprinted here to show the extent of the problems faced by Aborigines in trying to overcome prejudice in Australia, today.

The Human Rights Commission held a compulsory conciliation conference between Aboriginal Hostels Limited and some of the Mildura syndicate members in March 1984.

But the conference failed to resolve the dis­ pute. The Company sought legal advice of the Australian Government Solicitor whether there is a case for some Mildura residents to answer concerning possible breaches of Sec­ tion 12 of the Racial Discrimination Act, 1975. This matter is still under investigation.

After failing to buy the Eleventh Street property at auction there was still a desperate need for Aboriginal student accommodation in the town. Aboriginal students attending the school or college continued to live in over­ crowded or inadequate housing.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited subsequently bought a five bedroom, two storey, private house in Mildura for $167,000 which will be improved and converted into a student hostel.

We expect this hostel, like all our hostels around Australia, to be successful. Our staff and residents always aim to be good neigh­ bours. Once a new hostel is established and running, the Aboriginal staff and residents are usually quickly accepted by all but the most inward-tninking residents.

Dear Sir, So you have your hostel. A ren’t we lucky, we live nearby? We have been told to expect drunken parties, we have a friend th a t lives in H ector Street. They have had to pu t up w ith fights, drunken Abos on th eir lawn, but the last event was a stabbing w ith a broken bottle, th e ir favourite weapon.

The general opinion is th a t the hostel will be operating as a brothel in three m onths — as you have no control over your brethren. W hat a lovely house, we have been told to expect th a t it will be covered w ith flags and posters — naturally our house is on the m arket now as we

live too close to have to pu t up w ith braw ls, drinking parties a t our tim e of life. If you could behave like hum ans we wouldn’t mind. Everyone is on our side but have said they can’t do anything. My solicitor said he can’t do anything as you th rea ten court action if anyone does oppose you. If you w ant to be treated as equals you should act decently and not

th rea ten people who stick up for themselves. With other residents of the area and advice from a solicitor we intend to contact the H um an Rights Commission as we th in k we have rig h ts too and w an t to know w here we stand before it’s too late.

Yours truthfully Eight Little A ustralians

25

THE CURTIS MILLER STORY Curtis Miller Manager, Luprina Hostel

Staff Profile

Like many people my age I left school early. I was only 15 years old. I did not know it at the time, but it was to be the

start of my working life which was to lead me to many jobs all

over Australia. My first job was fruit picking in the Riverland area of

South Australia. Loxton was my home town, and my father worked on the local railways.

But things always change. In a short time I was working as a pipelayer for the State Department of Lands and my father transferred to the west coast of the State. I then had to make a decision: should I move with my family or stay in my home town? It was

difficult to know what was best. I decided to stay in my home town with my brother. My early ambition was simple — like most young people my age I wanted a car. I soon owned my first car and managed to get to see more of the State, but the car lead me into trouble.

I was very young and knew little of the law. I foolishly lent my car to three friends who used the car when they broke into a shop. I knew it was wrong to steal so I had decided I wouldn’t go along. But I was silly to let them use my car.

The police charged me with being an ‘ac­ cessory before the fact’. This meant that al­ though I didn’t steal anything, I knew the crime was going to happen and I had helped my friends by letting them use my car.

Although it was my first offence, and I had not been at the scene of the crime, I went to prison for almost a year. The time in prison gave me time to think about my future.

When I came out of prison I headed back for the only home I knew, the Riverland, and picked up odd jobs labouring or gathering fruit. But life in the Riverland had changed ana I felt the need for a fresh start.

I was soon walking the streets of Adelaide looking for work. I was lucky because I met another Aborigine, John Moriarty, who was involved with Aboriginal employment. He managed to find me a job and I was soon a teacher’s aide in the town of Menindee in the outback of South Australia.

As a teacher’s aide I gained two years valuable experience; learning to work with people — away from the drudgery and toil of manual labour. But the job didn’t last long. After two years the funding for my work as a teacher’s aide stopped.

Looking for some adventure I travelled across to Western Australia and found a job as a driller's offsider on an oil rig. It was a remote part of the State and I had my first contact with tribal Aborigines.

Like everyone working in the bush, I looked forward to the occasional visit to the city. On one visit to Perth I met my wife, Chessa. Getting married gave me many more responsi­ bilities. We soon moved to Kalgoorlie where we set up home.

To find work in Kalgoorlie I had to take any job that was offered. So I started working for a mining company. My past training did not count. I started doing menial work but was promised that if I worked hard I would get a better job soon. I was given the job of pouring sulphur and cyanide down drains — dirty and unhealthy work. The cyanide often left burns on my skin.

The work was soul-destroying and I was often miserable. All Aborigines joining the mining company were given these jobs to see if they were good workers. I decided to stay for at least six months — determined to prove myself a good worker and a family man. But some­ times something happens which you cannot control that destroys all your confidence.

While I was working for the mining com­ pany my wife had been carrying our first child. She carried the child for nine months — only to have the baby stillborn. I think this would badly affect anyone, and my wife and I were deeply depressed for many months.

We felt we had to leave Kalgoorlie — a town of so many bad memories for us. We headed for Ceduna in South Australia. Once again I was unemployed, but with my family responsi­ bilities I knew I had to find work.

I went along to the local council and badgered and annoyed people until I got a job. I was made a trainee plant operator — but most of my work was with a pick or a shovel.

I had to dig graves. Sometimes I thought I was the only person in the world digging graves. After people were buried it was my job to fill the graves in. Families and friends of the dead left the grave when the coffin was put into the ground. I would always be there to finish the job, covering the casket with red dirt.

There was little humour in this work, although my wife and I often joked that it was a ‘dead-end job’. One hot day, when I was breaking my back digging the hard ground, I stopped and threw down my shovel. I thought I must be able to do a better job than this, especially if I’m willing to learn.

About this time I first heard of the Aborigi­ nal Task Force. I thought to myself if other Aborigines can train, why can’t I? So with the support of my wife I applied to do the Task Force course.

26

There followed two years of intensive train­ ing when I studied; sociology, psychology, social work, communications and Aboriginal affairs. Not all the learning was in the class­ room. I met Aborigines from all over Australia who told me of their experiences and views. I soon learnt from my fellow people.

The Task Force was important for a special reason. More than the subjects taught, the course taught me to be confident. The teachers gave me the will to stand on my feet; to speak out; to communicate and persevere; to get others to understand me and what I wanted to do for my people and my family.

The Task Force gave me a will to survive and changed my whole outlook on life. Before I had often thought: ‘What’s the point?’ but now I knew that with hard work and good intention

1 could do a great deal. Times were still depressing, but I knew that I could improve my life if I kept trying and kept going.

When 1 went for job interviews after my Aboriginal Task Force training I was very confident. Soon I was employed as a social worker in Ceduna where I enjoyed my work for the first time since being a teacher’s aide a few years before. As a social worker in Ceduna I was helping those less fortunate than myself.

I was still looking to help by fellow Aborigi­ nes, when 1 got a job as training officer with Aboriginal Hostels Limited in Canberra.

I’m now back in Adelaide with my wife and family. After working as a training officer with Aboriginal Hostels Limited, I became a Hostel Manager. I now manage the Luprina Hostel in Adelaide. I’m very proud to be part of Aborigi­ nal Hostels Limited.

Looking back, I have come a long way since picking fruit in Loxton, pouring cyanide down drains in Kalgoorlie and burying people in Ceduna. But now I do the work 1 always wanted — I’m helping my people, and this

makes me be proud to be an Aborigine.

IMPORTANT WORK OF ABORIGINAL WOMEN

Edna Bandits Regional Manager — Darwin

The important

work of Aboriginal women, both within the Company and in educating all Austra­ lians to the concerns of Aborigines and Islanders, cannot be over-estimated.

Today, in Austra­ lia, there is a growing awareness of the need to overcome the

stereotyping and disadvantage suffered by women. Although not as extreme as the atti­ tudes of racists towards black people, there is a similarity in the discrimination. To be both a woman and an Aborigine in Australia is to truly experience discrimination.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited is a Company with a record of providing employment for both Aborigines and women. At the end of June 1984, 57 per cent of the Company’s

workforce were women. There were four Abor­ iginal women Directors and three Aboriginal women Regional Managers. I have become more active in promoting

Aboriginal women in the community, mainly through my appointment to an advisory body set up to advise the Northern Territory Govern­ ment on women’s affairs.

Other Aboriginal women are taking an ac­ tive role in their own lives on other bodies. The Australian Government recently spon­ sored a conference for the Aboriginal Women’s Task Force.

The conference gave Aboriginal women the opportunity to express their views on edu­ cation, employment, health, housing, land rights and other issues.

The Chairman of Aboriginal Hostels Lim­ ited, Lois O’Donoghue, spoke at the conference of the Aboriginal Women’s Task Force. In her keynote speech Lois O’Donoghue expressed the views and hopes of many Aboriginal women.

Lois O’Donoghue said that it is in the nature of Aboriginal women to bring people together to find solutions rather than conflict. She urged all Aboriginal women not to

dwell on limitations, but to see possibilities and the potential of the future. In the words of Lois O’Donoghue: O ur strength lies in our unity and ability to tap into each others’ talents and resources. Let us stop banging our heads against a brick wall, let us

climb over that wall. In the words of Martin Luther King — ‘Let us go to the Mountain.’ Let us go to the mountain because the view from the top is so much better.

27

NEW ZEALAND BASKETBALL TOUR Carmen Guivarra Audit Division Steno-secretary

Carmen Guivarra

before leaving on her tour of New Zealand.

Recently I went on a basketball tour of New Zealand as a member of the South Eastern Australian Aboriginal Women’s representative side — the Koorie Koalas.

On arrival in Auckland we were greeted by our Maori hosts and first experienced Maori culture. Maori’s — who number ten per cent of New Zealanders — believe in ‘Maoridom’, a concept similar to the national Aboriginal advancement movements in Australia. Maoridom aims to socially and culturally

develop Maori people through restructuring their own organisations and lifestyles to pro­ vide a better life for young Maoris. With their policy of ‘Tu Tangata’ (similar to Aboriginal self-determination and self-help) they concen­ trate on developing their communities and families for the benefit of Maori people.

Under Tu Tangata, Maoris advance with the New Zealand society, yet retain many of their traditional values — through the ‘Te Kohanga Reo’ or ‘The Language Nests’ which are child­ ren’s language centres and ‘K'okiri Centres’ to teach Maori crafts. Another interesting pro­ gram is ‘Maatua Whangai’ where young Maori’s needing welfare help are placed with their own tribal foster parents instead of in welfare institutions.

There is a great similarity between Maori and Aboriginal attitudes to land. Maori's be­ lieve their land should be kept undisturbed and used and administered by Maoris for the benefit of Maori people. While land is passed to blood-line descendants of the owners, Maori communities recognise that group ownership

is a desirable alternative if tne land is to be used to benefit the community.

We were taken to our first Maori house or ‘Marae’ which were to be our homes for our two week trip and which are similar to Abor­ iginal hostels. Marae's are set up with funds raised by the Maori community. As well as accommodating guests, the buildings are also used as a sacred meeting house for ceremonies and to teach young Maori's their language and culture.

In each town or city we played a Maori representative side and a local representative side. Unfortunately, the basketball tour was not a competitive success for our basketball team. We only won five out of 20 games. After each match all teams got together for refresh­ ments and gifts were exchanged. Sometimes a traditional Maori dance was performed for us. We responded by performing our traditional dances. When we left each Marae there were songs of farewell.

During the tour we visited the Maori Affairs Office in Hastings where we were given a brief idea of their aims and work. The Maori Affairs Office is similar to Australia’s Department of Aboriginal Affairs. In Auckland we visited the museum and got a better understanding of Maori culture and traditions.

I left New Zealand having made many friends. Maori people are overwhelming in their friendship — even when we managed to beat them at basketball. I returned to Australia with great basketball experience, better know­ ledge of our Maori brothers and sisters, and good memories which will last a lifetime.

Carmen Guivarra training

28

A b o r i g i n a l H o s t e l s L i m i t e d

REGIONAL REPORTS

WESTERN REGION

NORTHERN REGION

NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION

SOUTH QUEENSLAND REGION

NEW SOUTH WALES REGION

SOUTH EASTERN REGION

SOUTHERN REGION

CENTRAL AUSTRALIAN REGION

29

WESTERN REGION V>xy a

R e g io n a l M a n a g e r — B r ia n W y a tt

In Western Austra­ lia the 1983-84 year was one of consoli­ dation of the Com­

pany’s work. The main highlight was the opening of the

11-bea Beemidaar Hostel for transients in Carnarvon. This hostel assists Aborigi­ nal people who have to travel to Carnarvon

from Shark Bay, Onslow and Roebourne to get medical treatment. The hostel was formerly known as the Orana Hostel for students and managed by the Federal Aborigines Board of the Churches of Christ.

After a slow start, the hostel is performing well, justifying the decision of the Board of Directors to resume this property from the Third Party Program.

Close consultation has taken place with the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Ab­ original Development Commission under the Town Campers Assistance Program. We now have a good understanding of the accommo­ dation needs of fringe-dwelling Aborigines in Western Australia. There is a need to help Aboriginal fringe-dwellers at Laverton, Broome, Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Kununurra, Onslow, Wyndam and Halls Creek.

The 1983-84 year has been busy for our staff. The year has seen the relocation of the Regional Office premises, the investigations into proposed villages for town campers and the consolidation of the Company’s oper­ ations.

COMPANY OPERATIONS A l l a w a h G r o v e H o s t e l — P e r t h

This hostel can accommodate up to 20 Aborigines visiting the Guildford area of Perth. The staff of the Allawah Grove Hostel are to be congratulated on winning the inaugural Hardies-System Built Award for the ‘Best Kept and Maintained Hostel in 1983’. J a c k D a v i s H o s t e l — P e r th

This hostel caters for the needs of Aborigi­ nes coming to Perth for medical treatment. Assistance is given to these Aborigines through the Australian Government's Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Scheme. The hostel is an important part of the general

success of Aboriginal medical care in Western Australia.

B i b u lb u H o s t e l — N o r t h e r n This hostel caters for the needs of Aborigi­ nes from the central wheatbelt of Western Australia. Now in its second year of operation, this hostel continues to successfully help tran­ sient Aborigines around Northam. T r ilb y C o o p e r H o s t e l — K a lg o o r l ie

This transient hostel in Kalgoorlie provides accommodation for up to 25 Aborigines from the Eastern Goldfields. P u g a n g V i l l a g e — N o r s e m a n

This village complex can help up to 56 Aborigines. The multi-purpose hostel particu­ larly helps single mothers, familes, the unem­ ployed, students and the aged.

Over the past year occupancy, tariff collec­ tion and maintenance at the village has im­ proved. Money has been spent to improve the sewerage system, security and upkeep of the property. However, the mobile units used to accommodate residents will need replacing soon because they are getting old.

During the year a two week training course for hostel maintenance staff was held at the village. The Company received the help of the Technical and Further Education College in organising and running the course. N i n g a M ia V i l la g e — K a lg o o r l ie

This village provides basic shelter for Abor­ iginal fringe-dwellers. The 32-hectare site pro­ vides several shelters and dormitories, as well as central dining and washing facilities.

Ninga Mia, opened in 1982, is the first accommodation designed by the Company to specifically meet the needs of Aborigines who normally live in slum conditions on the edge of towns.

The Village gives Aborigines visiting Kalgoorlie from the bush, somewhere to stay that is suited to their needs for simple low cost accommodation.

B e e m i d a a r H o s t e l — C a n a r v o n The Region's newest Company hostel. The hostel can accommodate 11 medical transient Aborigines. The hostel was formerly operated by Federal Aborigines Board of the Church of Christ Group who ran the hostel (then named Orana) to provide Aboriginal student accom­ modation. The Company appreciates the past work of the Federal Aborigines Board.

THIRD PARTY OPERATIONS An effective way of providing low cost accommodation while at the same time en­ couraging local Aboriginal and community group self-management is through Third Party grants.

30

In Western Australia during 1983-84 the Company funded 15 organisations operating 18 hostels providing 474 beds each night for Aborigines. People helped included aged per­ sons, students, transients, fringe-dwellers and those on alcoholic rehabilitation programs. The groups involved in providing accommo­

dation with the help of Company Third Party grants are:

Aboriginal Boomerang Council — Geraldton Aboriginal Medical Service — Perth Aboriginal Rights League — Bayswater Bloodwood Tree Association — Port Hedland Churches of Christ Federal Aboriginal Board — Carnarvon

Goolarbooloo Inc. — Broome Homeless and Aged Persons Care Agency Inc. — East Perth Milliya Rumurra Inc. — Broome Moongoong Darwung — Kununurra Ninga Mina Aboriginal Village Inc. — Kalgoorlie Pallotine Catholic Group — Rossmoyne Sister Kates’ Child & Family Service — Perth St. Vincent de Paul — Perth Walgoo Wadgee Inc. — Mullewa

Because of more urgent needs for accommo­ dation elsewhere, funding for the Nyoongah Community which provided hostel accommo­ dation for six working Aborigines, was

stopped. Without the excellent service provided by these groups under the Company’s Third Party Hostel Grants Program, many Aborigines, par­ ticularly in the more remote parts of the State, would not have been given shelter.

FUTURE NEEDS

There is a need for more accommodation for Aborigines in Broome, Derby, Kununurra, Fitzroy Crossing, Marble Bar. Leonora and Laverton. All these towns have fringe-dwelling Aborigines living in deplorable conditions, usually sleeping rough in old cars or the open.

STAFFING Because of the remoteness of the Western Australian hostels from Central Office in Can­ berra, it is essential that a Company project and maintenance officer be based in the Re­ gion. The Company is expected to decentralise responsibility for this work in 1984-85 al­

lowing quick and immediate response to the maintenance and development problems as soon as they arise. The Western Australian Company staff

want to receive more training in the future. The staff are keen to learn all the skills needed to ensure the best service possible is offered to the Aborigines in the Company’s care.

MAY AMES TRUST FUND Five young Aborigines were given funds from the income of the estate of May Ames who bequeathed $50,000 to the Company in

1982. The Company is using the income from the estate of May Ames, according to her wish of encouraging the development and achieve­ ments of high-school Aborigines.

Josephine Lawford is Being partly spon­ sored as an exchange student to Alaska. Two promising Aborigines, Tony Walley and Daniel Penny, who have been picked for the

State Australian Rules Football side were granted money to cover their expenses. Juanita and Timothy Lyndon who came to Perth from Onslow to go to school were also given some of the money from the May Ames estate to cover their expenses.

CONCLUSION There are still many pressing accommo­ dation needs of Aborigines in Western Austra­ lia that have not been met. The Company’s work in this State will be needed for many years before a major impact on the accommo­

dation problems of Aborigines is made. The main problem is lack of money. With adequate funding the Company has the will­ ingness, staff and expertise to help many of our fellow people.

There are many Aborigines in Western Australia who have no adequate shelter. Many Aborigines in the Kimberlies, the Pilbara and the Goldfields urgently need assistance.

U The staff are keen to learn all the skills needed to ensure the best service possible is offered to the Aborigines in the Company’s care.jg

/ Ά \

NORTHERN REGION

y

R e g io n a l M a n a g e r — E d n a B a ro lits

The 1983-84 year was busy for staff be­ cause of major devel­ opment works to two hostels in Darwin and one in Katherine.

These much-needed renovations and im­ provements to our hostels in the Top

End of the Northern Territory sometimes disrupted the normal

accommodation service we usually offer Abor­ igines and Torres Strait Islanders. The renovations were to the Galawu and Silas Roberts Hostels in Darwin and the Cor- roboree Hostel in Katherine. Work on these renovations started early in 1983, and because of the difficulties of construction in northern Australia — particularly in the wet season — all renovations will not be completed until early in 1984-85.

The final cost of all the renovations is expected to be $310,000. For this cost there will be an extra 28 beds provided at the hostels.

At the end of June 1984 Aboriginal Hostels Limited operated four hostels in the Northern Region which had 213 beds. In addition, the Company funded a hostel offering 24 beds under the Third Party Hostel Grants Program.

As well as the increased role of the Com­ pany in the Region because of more beds being provided through our existing hostels, from 1 July 1984 the Company will take over respons­

ibility for one hostel previously run by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. Another change during the year was the greater emphasis placed by the Company on the need to assist Aborigines living on the edges of town. Interested government agencies came together in May 1984 for the inaugural meeting of the Town Campers Assistance Pro­ gram Regional Co-ordinating Committee.

Many of the problems of Aborigines and Islanders in the wider community — unem­ ployment, poor health and inadequate housing — are extreme in the Northern Territory. Town

Campers are particular!) disadvantaged. Many Aboriginal groups, particularly around Katherine, are in desperate need of help. Aboriginal Hostels Limited is planning to help these disadvantaged people in the coming years.

Despite all the change over the past year and the prospect of more demanding work in the coming year, the staff of the Northern Region have proved capable of doing their work, and have been loyal to the Company. Employees in his Region have a sense of

purpose in their work and a pride in the service they offer. In the Northern Territory there is always a need to educate others of the ability of Aborigi­ nes to manage their own affairs. Unfortunately, the stereotype of the lazy Aborigine remains in the minds of a few. Whenever possible I talk to people and organisations pointing out the value of the Company’s work and the strong commitment of our staff.

COMPANY HOSTELS

G a la w u H o s t e l — D a r w in

This 34-bed hostel is usually full with transient Aborigines visiting the town. Con­ tinued renovation work to the hostel through­ out 1984-85 caused the bed capacity to be reduced by seven. On most days five or six Aborigines have to be turned away because there is no room at the hostel. The develop­ ment of the Galawu Hostel will mean an extra

14 beds are provided, resulting in more Abor­ igines being helped in the future. A long serving employee of the Company and Manager of the Galawu Hostel during

1983-84, Francis Hayes, left the Company to become a Field Officer with the Northern Land Council. As a good employee, the Company will miss his efforts and expertise. However, I wish him well in his new work. S i l a s R o b e r t s H o s t e l — D a r w in

This popular 52-bed transient hostel had extensive renovations in 1982-83. During 1983-84 another $80,000 was spent on further improvements, including the addition of a new amenities block. There were several delays on the latest work, mainly the late start of build­ ing workers under the Community Employ­ ment Program and the problems caused by the wet season.

The main renovations were the demolition and rebuilding of the dining room and kitchen, complete repainting of the interior of the hostel and landscaping the grounds.

The hostel cannot keep up with the demand — again Aborigines are turned away daily because the hostel is full. D a i s y Y a r m ir r H o s t e l

This 44-bed hostel caters for students and transient Aborigines in need of medical treat­ ment. Occupancy fluctuates considerably over the year because of the students returning to their communities during the holidays and a few students dropping out of their courses.

Another reason why occupancy is not high is that some hostel beds have to be kept vacant for emergency medical referrals needing ac­ commodation quickly.

32

C o r r o b o r e e H o s t e l — K a t h e r in e

This 83-bed multi-purpose hostel is the largest in the Region. Aborigines accommo­ dated are usually those coming to Katherine to find employment, to go to school or to get medical treatment.

During the year extensions to the kitchen and dining room of the hostel were completed — and work on a proposed aged persons residential wing was started. Demand from

elderly Aborigines for accommodation is high and we expect all the 14 new beds to be occupied the day the new wing opens.

THIRD PARTY HOSTELS Over 1983-84 only one third party hostel was funded by the Company in the Northern Region. The Catholic Mission was funded to run the 24-bed Mintawyuga medical transient hostel.

From 1 July 1984 the Company will fund the FORWAARD Aboriginal group to run an 18-bed alcohol rehabilitation program for Aborigines in Darwin.

STAFF DEVELOPMENT The staff in the Northern Region have coped well with the disruption to the normal service offered to our residents, because of mainten­ ance and renovations at our hostels.

As well as gaining from this experience, there has been a significant emphasis on training staff. Hostel Managers attended a training course, and I became the third Re­ gional Manager to undergo a month of inten­

sive training at Central Office. With this training and the work experience of the past year staff of the Northern Region will be more able to cope with the increased residents we can help in 1984-85.

FUTURE NEEDS We look forward to an exciting year ahead. The Company has bought a property at Nhulunbuy which is being renovated and will be used as a transient hostel during 1984-85. There is a need to help more Aboriginal

students, aged persons and transients and so the Company will examine the need for ad­ ditional hostel accommodation in Darwin and

Katherine.

SSln the Northern Territory there is always a need to educate others of the ability of Aborigines to manage their own affairs,

33

NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION

o

R e g io n a l M a n a g e r — E v e ly n S c o tt

The demand for beds at our hostels in Northern Queensland has been exception­ ally high during

1983-84. While we did not open any new hostels during the year, this Region en­ sured that the best possible use was

made of all our hos­ tels.

There is still a need for hostels for tertiary students in Townsville and Cairns as more Aboriginal and Islander students have enrolled at the James Cook University and the Cairns Technical and Further Education College.

The Company also has to carry out further research to identify the need for more hostels to help young homeless Aborigines and the aged people. These needs are most pressing in Mackay, Mossman and Bowen.

One highlight of 1983-84 was the start of work on constructing the Camooweal Village for homeless Aborigines. Camooweal, north-west of Mt. Isa and just near the Northern Territory border, is a project funded primarily by the Department of Social

Security. The village is designed to alleviate the substandard living conditions of the home­ less Aborigines who visit Camooweal from the Lake Nash, Urandangie, Mt. Isa, Doomidgee, Tennant Creek and Brunette Downs districts.

The Camooweal Village was due to be completed in 1983-84, but there were delays in the administration and funding of the project. Eventually, these problems were sorted out and the project will be completed in November 1984.

Another important initiative in this Region was the Australian Government's Community Employment Program. Aboriginal unemploy­ ment is a severe problem in Queensland. Under the program 33 people have been em­ ployed working with the Company. Twenty- nine of those employed are Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, mostly working on the renovation of our hostels.

There were two social highlights in the Region in 1983-84. The first was the visit of the Sydney based Aboriginal and Islander Dance Theatre to Cairns. The second was a friendly sports competition between the students from Kuiyam Hostel and Woodleigh Residential College — an event now to be held annually.

COMPANY OPERATIONS The Company operates nine hostels in the Northern Queensland Region. These hostels provide 150 beds and new hostels and im­

provements will provide an extra 82 beds over the next financial year. J u m u la D u b b in s H o s t e l — T h u r s d a y I s la n d

This 36-bed transient hostel for Aborigines and Islanders visiting Thursday Island in the Torres Strait is managed by Shirley Hudson and Ayako Webb. The Managers and staff have

kept this hostel in such good condition that it has been nominated as the Region’s ‘Best Kept and Maintained Hostel — 1984'. Occupancy fell during the year. To remedy this problem management changes were made and a pamphlet was distributed to the com­ munities on the separate Islands in the Torres Strait. The pamphlet was also translated into the Western and Eastern languages of the Torres Strait Islands. With management changes, the distribution of the pamphlet and the hostel temporarily accommodating students during renovations to the nearby Cathedral Hostel, the Jumula Dubbins Hostel was full for the remainder of the year. K u iy a m H o s t e l — C a ir n s

This student hostel, with 52 beds, is the largest in the Region, accommodating second­ ary students from the Torres Strait and Abor­ iginal communities throughout the Northern Peninsula. The hostel has been used by tertiary and business college students in the past, but during 1983-84 the hostel only accommodated secondary high school students.

The hostel is now being renovated and extended to provide an extra fifteen beds, more dining room space, a new laundry and a staff room. Renovations are expected to be com­

pleted in the second half of 1984. I r is C l a y H o s t e l — T o w n s v i l l e

Transient Aborigines visiting Townsville and adult students attending the Townsville College of Advanced Education on N.E.S.A. training courses are the main users of the Iris Clay Hostel.

There were some problems at this 44-bed hostel during the year. Staff turnover was high, although the newly appointed Managers, Nita Levers and Michael Wright, have improved occupancy and staff morale. K a b a l u l u m a n a H o s t e l — M t. I s a

Demand from Aboriginal students who want to stay at this hostel is higher than the 20 people that can be accommodated. The hostel is always full because many Aboriginal famil­ ies in remote western Queensland prefer their children to attend school in Mt. Isa rather than at southern boarding schools.

To meet the high demand for student ac­ commodation at Mt. Isa, the Kabalulumana Hostel will be upgraded to provide an extra 12 beds. Requests for funding of third party

34

organisations to operate hostels in the town will be investigated by the Company’s research officers. Joe M c G i n n e s s H o s t e l — C a ir n s

This 25-bed hostel is under construction and will be finished by the end of November 1984. The hostel was named to honour Joe McGinness, from Cairns, who has been a

prominent activist in Aboriginal Affairs. When the hostel is opened in late November 1984 it will be the first multi-purpose hostel in the north Queensland region.

Community Employment Program Workers employed by the Company in Cairns.

THIRD PARTY HOSTELS In 1983-84 there were four student hostels funded in northern Queensland under the Company’s Third Party Hostel Grants Program — Cathedral College, Woodleigh Residential

College, Normanton Hostel and Marillac House. A fourth hostel, the Eva Geia Hostel for single mothers, closed midway through the

year. The Cathedral College, on Thursday Island, is run by the Anglican Church. The hostel accommodates 70 grade 8 to 10 students from the outer Islands who come to Thursday Island to attend school. The Diodes of Carpentaria

leases the hostel from the Company. Woodleigh Residential College accommo­ dates 70 students, most of whom are Aborigi­

nal or Islanders attending college in Atherton and Herberton. During the year the Department of Aboriginal Affairs provided $60,000 and the Company provided $4,000 as part of a $154,000 development. The official opening, on 12 May, was attended by the Company’s

Director, Marjorie Willmett and Assistant Re­ gional Manager, Jon Alderman. Normanton Hostel is in the Shire of Carpentaria, north-west of Mt. Isa. The hostel caters for up to 20 students and is run by the

Uniting Church Federal Mission. Marillac House in Mt. Isa is owned by the Catholic Church and administered by the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary. The 16-bed

hostel is run by Aboriginal staff and accommo­ dates female secondary school students from the remote north-west Aboriginal communi­ ties.

PROPOSED PLANS Staff in the north Queensland Region are confident in the Company’s ability to meet the changing needs of Aborigines and Islanders for accommodation. Demand for our services are

high and we will continue to try and meet the needs of our people within our limited budget. The north Queensland Region is fortunate

in having such good staff and nigh staff morale generally. All employees appreciate the need for the Company to promote its work and help by attending various social and business func­ tions and tell others, both Aboriginal and non­ Aboriginal, of our work. As Regional Manager,

I have tried to set an example, by attending several Aboriginal conferences as well as act­ ing as the Presiding Officer for a Human Rights Compulsory Conference during the year.

One problem facing the Region is the need to move to a larger Regional Office. Good accommodation space is scarce in Cairns, especially since the city's airport was opened to international airlines. We nope to move to new Regional Office premises in 1983-84.

CONCLUSION The past year has been busy and successful. Our emphasis has been on carrying out major maintenance and development of existing hos­ tels. Recent requests from other organisations

and communities for accommodation has been high. The Company will need to buy more properties to meet this growing demand. Finally, I would like to express my appreci­ ation to all of the Region’s staff. State and Australian Government Departments, Aborigi­ nal organisations, Third Party groups and many individuals who have made 1983-84 a successful year for the North Queensland Re­ gion.

f t Demand for our services is high and we will continue to try and meet the needs of our people within our limited budget, j g

3 5

SOUTH QUEENSLAND REGION V-^ o'

Regional Manager — Russel Bellear

The 1983-84 finan­ cial year saw a lim­ ited rise in beds pro­ vided by Aboriginal Hostels Limited in

South Queensland. We have, however, plans to open a multi­ purpose hostel at

Charleville and a sup­ porting mothers hos­ tel in Brisbane in the next year.

In addition, the Company is considering funding requests for assistance from Third Party groups in Maryborough, the Gold Coast, Cherbourg, Mt. Morgan and Rockhampton. There will also be accommodation offered through the Town Campers Assistance Pro­ gram.

At the end of 1983-84 the number of beds provided at Company-owned hostels totalled 474. Third Party hostels provided an extra total of 200 beds.

The most significant event for the 1983-84 year has been the employment of 23 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers to upgrade the Company’s Yumba Houses and the Willie MacKenzie Hostel. With these new staff, funded through the Community Employment Program, the South Queensland Region em­ ploys a work force of over 100 Aborigines and Islanders.

The program provides valuable training and experience for Aboriginal and Islander people. This successful training and work experience in the building trade will improve their pros­ pects of finding employment when they finish work at Yumba Houses and Willie MacKenzie Hostel.

COMPANY OPERATIONS Aboriginal Hostels Limited operates 13 Company-owned hostels in the South Queens­ land Region. These hostels provide 474 beds for Aborigines and Islanders in need. Four of these hostels are for supporting mothers, three are for students, one is employment and train­ ing and one is for transients. The four remain­ ing hostels are multi-purpose.

The main news concerning Company- owned hostels over 1983-84 focussed on the Yumba Hostel, Woongarra Hostel and the Jim Hagan Hostel. Y u m b a H o s t e l — B r is b a n e

Four houses in the Yumba Hostel complex are being converted into a 25-bed hostel for supporting mothers and their children. The existing 16-bed employment hostels for girls will remain.

Three of the four houses being converted will be made into the new 25-bed hostel. One house will be converted to a Hostel Manager's living quarters. Work is expected to finish on the Yumba Hostel complex in November 1984. W o o n g a r r a H o s t e l — R o c k h a m p t o n

This hostel caters for 16 students who attend training courses at the Rockhampton T.A.F.E. College. Major renovations at the Wonngarra Hostel have substantially im­ proved the student accommodation. These improvements help create an environment that is conducive to study and will improve the student’s morale and college performance. Jim H a g a n H o s t e l — T o o w o o m b a

This 35-bed multi-purpose hostel serves the accommodation needs of western Queensland Aborigines passing through Toowoomba for medical or legal services.

Local Aborigines have strongly supported the work of this hostel. Their support was certainly evident by their attendance and sup­ port of the successful hostel open day, held as part of the National Aborigines and Islander Week celebrations.

The Toowoomba Hostel is an important development in the Region. There have been two main benefits. First, the hostel supports local and transient Aborigines with much- needed emergency accommodation. Second, the Hostel has been of great value in making western Queensland Aboriginal communities aware of the benefits provided by Aboriginal Hostels Limited. As a result, we have had applications for Third Party funding from two other western areas — Cunnamulla and Mitchell.

THIRD PARTY HOSTELS The South Queensland Third Party Hostel Grants Program assists groups to run nine hostels with 200 beds. The organisations sup­ ported under the program are: • Aboriginal and Islander Catholic Council • Brisbane Tribal Council • Cunnamulla Aboriginal Co-operative • Kiah Hostel Committee • Mitchell Aboriginal Housing Authority • One People of Australia League • Yudarma Aboriginal Corporation • Yumbah House Committee

The Company will start funding the Cunnamulla Hostel with a Third Party grant in 1984-85. This 20-bed multi-purpose hostel has been made possible by the work of several organisations. The Western Queensland Hos­ pital Board donated a building and several Aboriginal organisations have funded the pro­

36

ject. Money has been given to the Cunnamulla Aboriginal Housing Association by the Abor­ iginal Development Commission, the Depart­

ment of Aboriginal Affairs as well as Aborigi­ nal Hostels Limited. Aboriginal Hostels is confident that the well-organised and good work of the

Cunnamulla Housing Company will enable this new Third Party hostel to provide Aborigi­ nal accommodation in a town where there is a

chronic housing problem.

FUTURE NEEDS Numerous organisations in south Queens­ land have asked for hostels and Third Party funds from the Company. The Company will assist these organisations to provide accommo­ dation when funds are available.

The need for hostels has been highlighted by Company surveys, investigations, and Field Officers working with the Department of Abor­ iginal Affairs and the Aboriginal Development

Commission. Unfortunately, all requests for help cannot be met immediately. As always we will try to meet the most important and pressing needs of our people first.

CONCLUSION During 1983-84 the Company has success­ fully met the most pressing accommodation needs of Aborigines and Islanders in Queens­

land that our limited resources would allow. There needs to be a major injection of funds in this Region to accommodate all our people satisfactorily.

Much of the success of Aboriginal Hostels Limited in South Queensland has been due to our staff and the good working relationships with other Aboriginal organisations, govern­

ment departments and the wider community. To all the people involved, I would express the appreciation of the Company for their help and

support over the past year. I hope we can foster these relationships in future years to the benefit of our people’s cause.

SS During 1983-84 the Company has successfully met the most pressing accommodation needs of Aborigines and Islanders in Queensland that our limited resources would allow,

37

NEW SOUTH WALES REGION

0

Regional Manager — Darryl Wright

The Company’s New South Wales Re­ gion continued its im­ portant role of pro­ viding accommoda­ tion to the Aboriginal community through­ out the State and the Australian Capital Territory.

Our main work in New South Wales is providing hostel beds

for Aboriginal job trainees, students and work­ ers. We also assist transients, supporting mothers and those needing alcohol rehabili­ tation.

The New South Wales Region is the largest of all the Company’s Regions. There are now 12 employment and training hostels, eight alcohol rehabilitation hostels, one legal re­ habilitation centre, and ten student hostels.

Although there were no new hostels bought or funded during 1983-84. the Region has been busy in the daily work of running our service and meeting the needs of the residents in our care. Resident welfare was a priority of the Region's staff. Problems that residents face are shared with staff, particularly with Hostel Managers. Friendly assistance and counselling is always available.

There was no major maintenance work or development of hostels in the Region during 1983-84. However, many hostels had old furni­ ture replaced and a new coat of paint applied. During 1984-85 the Wandendi, Shirley Smith and Tony Mundine Hostels will need mainten­ ance work.

A highlight of 1983-84 was inviting the public into our hostels to see our work. These open days were a great success. Community groups, organisations, government depart­ ments and neighbours all attended — meeting the staff and residents. These informal meet­ ings, often ending with a barbecue, were important in improving community relations.

Another important change in 1983-84 was the naming of our existing hostels after prominent Aborigines or Aboriginal words. New names given to hostels were: Mark Ella Hostel...................... 18 Hewlett St, Granville Chikka Dixon Hostel................90 Liverpool Rd, Enfield Done Scott Hostel..............37 Theodore St, Curtin, ACT Shirley Smith Hostel.....2 Kensington Rd. Summer Hill Val Bryant Hostel.................. 21 Grantham St, Burwood

lllawarra Hostel...................... 92 Curry St. Merewether Gerogery Hostel............................... 9 Bishop St, Dubbo

Warrina Hostel............................... 121 Cobra St, Dubbo

Brewongle Hostel....................... 17 Daniel St, Granville Lastly, the Region acted as host to a ‘Think Tank’ into the Company’s history, present achievements and future direction. This im- I

portant meeting was followed by a course for the Company’s Regional Managers on the use of computers.

COMPANY OPERATIONS As the largest single Region in the Com­ pany, space does not permit a detailed descrip­ tion of all our hostels in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. However, the main developments in the Region's work over the year concerned maintenance and develop­ ment to the Mark Ella Hostel, the Mariyang Hostel, the Val Bryant Hostel, and the Kirinari Hostels in Sydney and Newcastle.

The students at the Kirinari Hostel in Syl- vania Heights, Sydney, went on a trip they had been planning for two years. These enterpris­ ing students raised money to finance their two- week, eductational visit to the Aboriginal community on Elcho Island in the Northern Territory.

The students were given an Aboriginal Studies Grant by the Australian Government so they could learn about the traditional Abor­ iginal way of life. The Federal Minister for Education, Senator the Hon. Susan Ryan, pres­ ented the students with the grant when she visited the hostel and met the students in I

September 1983.

Senator Susan Ryan, Minister fo r Education, meets the students o f Kirinari Hostel-Sydney.

THIRD PARTY ORGANISATIONS The Region's Third Party Hostel Grants Program consists of 15 hostels providing 241 beds. The organisations supported under this program are: Aboriginal Skills Development Council, Benelongs Haven Committee, Bunjalung Tribal Society, Murawin Limited, Orange Aboriginal Corporation, Prisoners Aid Association, and Tranhy College for Aborigi­ nes.

38

The Company stopped funding the Kanangra Society Hostel in the Australian Capital Territory and the Yinganeh Women’s Refuge in Lismore during 1983-84.

The work of these organisations is vital to the success of the Company. I cannot praise too highly the responsible ana worthwile work of these people in helping others.

There have been many requests from the community to fund other hostels through the Third Party Hostel Grants Program. Because of the lack of funds we have not yet been able to meet these requests.

STAFF AND TRAINING At the end of the financial year there were 77 Company staff in the Region. Of these, 95 per cent were of Aboriginal descent.

A major change concerning staff during the year was the introduction of the new AHL Managers Award 1984, covering all managerial employees. This Award with the Secretaries ana Managers Association of Australia is im­

portant in setting out the conditions of em­ ployment for many of our staff. With this agreement in place, industrial relations should continue to be harmonious generally in the Region.

While there are the usual minor staff prob­ lems. these are sorted out by listening to each employee’s problem and offering help. Fort­ nightly staff meetings have become regular events with employees encouraged to express their views, concerns and problems and gener­ ally contribute to the improvement of the Company’s service. Staff morale is high, which

is important to the quality of service we offer to our Aboriginal brothers and sisters. Highlights of the training of staff in the

Region over 1983-84 included a cooking and food preparation course run by the Ryde Catering College. 1 also attended personal development and management courses run by the Australian Institute of Management and

Rydges Publications Pty Ltd. Staff training covers everyone from the Regional Manager down to new recruits. Sev­ eral young Aborigines were trained under the

NESA program. We were very pleased to be asked by tne Department of Employment and

Industrial Relations to take on extra NESA trainees because of our success in training others. Many of the young Aborigines that gain work experience with us as NESA trainees become permanent employees of the Com­ pany.

I am fortunate to be supported by excellent staff. The most important staff change in the Region was the appointment of a new Assist­ ant Regional Manager. After several months

looking for a suitable person with high qualifications and good experience, Toni Alderman was appointed. Toni joined the Company in May 1984 and has worked so hard she has become an inspiration to other staff.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited — working for the Aboriginal People.

THE FUTURE I am confident that the staff of the New South Wales Region will continue to work hard to help those residents in our care. Last year was a year of consolidation of our work. Without increased funding it is likely there will be little expansion of our service in

1984-85. There is a particular need to provide accom­ modation for tertiary students in Armidale, Lismore and Milperra. Without our help, and because of racial prejudice, many of these

students attending tertiary colleges find it almost impossible to get accommodation.

S t I am sure with the help of staff and whatever funds the Australian Government provides, we will all work to improve the service we offer to the benefit of the Aboriginal and wider communities,

39

SOUTH EASTERN REGION

a

Regional Manager — Terry Garwood

The 1983-84

financial year has been another de­

manding and exciting time for Aboriginal Hostels Limited in the South Eastern Re­ gion.

There has been a significant expansion in both Third Party and Company hostels provided. The Com­

pany approved funding for three new Third Party hostels, bought two properties as Com­ pany hostels and completely rebuilt another Company hostel.

The new Third Party hostels were the Warreen Hostel, Geelong;the Ronald Cameron Hostel, Ballarat, and the Marge Tucker Hostel, Richmond. The Harry Nanya Hostel, Mildura, and the Nightshelter, Fitzroy were the two properties bought by the Company. The W.T. Onus Hostel, Northcote, was rebuilt and re­ opened during the year.

This expansion of our service to the Abor­ iginal community needed more hostel staff and Regional Office space. New positions this year include, Third Party Liaison Officer, Clerical Officer, several Trainee Hostel Managers and more industrial staff. The Regional Office was moved to new, larger premises in Fitzroy.

I am extremely impressed with the enthusi­ asm and dedication of all our staff — including new appointees. Our staff ensure the Company provides a top quality service to the Aboriginal community.

I would like to mention the contribution to the work of the Company, especially in the South Eastern Region, of Merle Jackomos. Merle retired as the Victorian representative on the Company’s Board of Directors in June

1984. As Regional Manager I have always been given support and encouragement by Merle. During her years on the Board she has made an outstanding contribution to the work of the Company.

COMPANY OPERATIONS

W i l l i a m T . O n u s H o s t e l — N o r t h c o t e

This hostel was officially reopened on 21 October 1983 by the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon. Clyde Holding, M.P. This popular transient hostel had to be demolished the previous year after suffering severe struc­ tural damage from earth subsidence. The new building has 29 beds and is specially designed for hostel accommodation.

The hostel is now managed by Patricia Ockwell and the Assistant Manager. Andrew

Gardiner. Since the hostel reopened, it has always been full — often unable to cope with all the demand.

H a r o ld B la ir H o s t e l — G r e e n s b o r o u g h This 15-bed hostel provides accommo­ dation for students attending the Aboriginal Health Workers Training Program at the Koorie College.

The stable, secure family environment pro­ vided by Herb and Lorraine Patten, the Houseparents of the hostel, helps to ensure that all the students at the hostel can success­ fully complete their course and return to their communities to assist in improving the health of their people.

During 1983-84 the Company provided a bus at the hostel which is used to transport the students to and from College as well as for recreation trips.

L i o n e l R o s e C e n tr e — M o r w e l l

A new Hostel Manager, Kevin Walker, was appointed to this hostel after the transfer of Pat Ockwell to Melbourne. Kevin has successfully taken over the management of this hostel and also makes a significant contribution to Abor­ iginal welfare through his involvement in a variety of community activities.

Unfortunately, much needed major main­ tenance and development work at the Lionel Rose Centre could not be carried out because of a shortage of funds. I expect the Company will carry out these repairs in 1984-85.

This hostel also has had difficulties coping with demand for its 18 beds. Often, room has to be made to help accommodate more than 18 people who would otherwise have nowhere to go.

W i r r a m in n a H o s t e l — E s s e n d o n Houseparents, Terry and Georgina Hood, provide a warm, loving and secure environ­ ment for the five young Wards of the State. The children look on the hostel as their home.

In particular, Terry Hood has actively en­ couraged the sporting development of the boys. He takes them to all their games and coaches them.

Major maintenance and development has taken place at the hostel and this has greatly improved the facilities for the children.

G u n a i L o d g e — D a n d e n o n g This 11-bed hostel for transients was well managed by Gloria Gardiner. She worked en­ thusiastically to supervise major maintenance and development work at the hostel and improve the garden and yard of the hostel.

After a request from the local Aboriginal community, the Board of Directors approved I the change of name of Gunai Lodge to R. Roy

4 0

Harrison Hostel. The official name change ceremony will be held in late 1984. H a r r y N a n y a H o s t e l — M il d u r a

This hostel in Deakin Avenue, Mildura, was bought early in 1984. It opened as a hostel in April 1984 pending the approval of a council permit to carry out extensions and alterations.

Permanent appointment of Houseparents has not been made. Herb and Lorraine Patten, from the Harold Blair Hostel, acted as tempor­ ary Houseparents during the year.

Once the hostel is operating fully the Com­ pany expects it to make a significant contri­ bution to the educational achievement of local Aboriginal students.

THIRD PARTY HOSTELS The investigation of Third Party hostel funding applications has been quickly and thoroughly carried out by our new Third Party Hostel Liaison Officer. Tony Miller. His ap­ pointment has meant we have been able to encourage the opening of additional Third

Party hostels as well as monitor the work of existing ones. We want to promote and foster the work of Third Party Aboriginal community organisa­ tions so that our own community organisations can play a direct and active role in operating a

hostel. We have funded 10 Third Party hostels in 1983-84. These were:

Warren Hostel..............................................Geelong

Roy Cameron Hostel....................................Ballarat

Marge Tucker H ostel..............................Richmond

Worawa College....................................... Frankston

Meerindoo Hostel...................................Bairnsdale

Valley Half-Way H ouse........................Shepparton

Maloga Home.............................................. Nathalie

Gladys Nichols Hostel.............................Northcote

Winja Ulupna Halfway H ouse............. Brunswick Galiamble Halfway House....................... St. Kilda

The first three listed were Aboriginal hos­ tels funded by the Company for the first time. During the year we also completed investi­ gations of the need for hostels in Robinvale

and Cumerangunja. We hope to be able to fund these projects in 1984-85.

STAFF The 1983-84 year has seen many staff changes due to the continued expansion of the work in the Region.

The new staff that have been recruited represent a valuable human resource who will be trained and guided to make an even greater contribution to improving the service we offer

Aborigines.

The expansion of our work has caused more pressure and strain on all staff, but the Com­ pany is building a firm stable base for future growth of the Company.

Special mention needs to be made on the resignation of Winnie Quagliotti from the Company. Winnie was our Regional Employee of the Year for 1983 and was the longest

serving Company employee in Victoria. She left the Company because of illness but leaves with our best wishes after 10 years employ­ ment.

Another long serving employee, Anya Iaucone, who was Assistant Regional Manager, also resigned from the Company to move to Sydney.

I am saddened to make special mention of Gloria Gardiner, Manager of Gunai Lodge, who died in June 1984. She was a tireless and dedicated Hostel Manager whose passing was deeply felt by all the Region’s staff.

It must also be remembered that our indus­ trial staff such as cooks, domestics,

nightwatchmen, and gardeners make an essen­ tial contribution to our work. Although they are sometimes not noticed, they provide an essential service at our hostels. Without these staff, the job just could not be done.

FUTURE NEEDS While the Companys work in the South Eastern Region has expanded during 1983-84, there are still Aborigines who need our help in finding temporary accommodation. In 1984-85 the Company hopes to investigate a student hostel in Bendigo, a multi-purpose hostel in Shepparton and a town camp at Dareton — just outside the Region in New South Wales.

We also need to consolidate our expansion of 1983-84 to ensure our new hostels success­ fully meet the needs of the Aboriginal com­ munity.

CONCLUSION The 1983-84 year has been a most demand­ ing year for the South Eastern Region. The year has seen the recruitment of many additional or replacement staff, the relocation of the Re­ gional Office and the funding, purchase or opening of six additional hostels.

The year has seen a number of problems in the Sunraysia district with the Human Rights Commission investigating the actions of local residents opposing the sale of a property to the Company, and Council delays over our pro­ posal to build a town camp in Dareton.

I am fortunate in having understanding staff who support me and each other to overcome any problems.

U By working together we continue to successfully deliver a professional, temporary accommodation service to the Aboriginal community, j j

41

SOUT

σ

Regional Manager — Bob Ware

During 1983-84 we saw the expansion of the number of beds which were made available to the Abor­ iginal community in South Australia.

The highlight of the financial year was the opening of the Lois O’Donoghue Hostel at Port

Augusta, in March

1984, by the Governor-General of Australia, His Excellency, Sir Ninian Stephen. This hostel is named after our present Chairman, Miss Lois O’Donoghue, who has worked in the Port Augusta area and who is highly respected by both Aborigines and the non-Aboriginal community of South Australia.

The Lois O’Donoghue Hostel is a 26-bed multi-purpose hostel that will cater for Abor­ igines travelling to Port Augusta for either medical or business reasons, or are simply travelling through Port Augusta needing some­ where to stay overnight.

The Company acquired another property from the State Department for Community Welfare. The property, in Adelaide, was re­ named the Gladys Elphick Hostel and will provide 13 beds for Aborigines needing medi­ cal treatment.

Under the Companys Third Party Hostel Grants Program, the Company funded the Aboriginal Sobriety Group to operate another hostel in Adelaide for Alcoholic Rehabili­ tation. There are three hostels that are funded by the Company and operated by the Aborigi­ nal Sobriety Group.

During the financial year the Company in the Southern Region operated or funded 18 hostels — eight Company hostels and ten third party hostels.

COMPANY OPERATIONS K a li H o s t e l — W e s t b o u r n e P a r k , A d e l a i d e

This 11-bed hostel caters for female students taking tertiary studies at the Aborigi­ nal Task Force at the South Australian Insti­ tute of Technology, the Aboriginal Teacher Training Program at the Adelaide College of Arts and Education, Stones Business College and the Aboriginal Community College.

This hostel also takes in four Aboriginal students who come to Adelaide from the remote areas of the State for Secondary Edu­ cation at the Ingle Farm High School. L u p r i n a H o s t e l — D u d l e y P a r k , A d e l a i d e

This hostel is a 23-bed multi-purpose hostel which caters for Aborigines who come to

Adelaide for employment courses conducted by the T.A.F.E. College. We have found that there is a demand for student accommodation and have used this hostel to accommodate tertiary students.

This hostel also caters for large groups of Aborigines who come from the tribal areas of this State and who come from the Northern Territory to Adelaide for excursions.

N i n d e e H o s t e l — B e u l a h P a r k , A d e l a i d e

This hostel was one of the first operated in this State by the Company, and provides accommodation for 22 young Aborigines from the remote areas of this State and from the Northern Territory.

The hostel provides the opportunity for both primary and secondary students to gain a high level of education in Adelaide. The Houseparents at this hostel organise the school that each student will attend for the year and each student's Aboriginal Study Grants. These children whose ages range from

7 years to 16 years rely heavily upon the Houseparents for guidance. M u l g u n y a H o s t e l — S o u t h T e r r a c e , A d e l a i d e

This hostel is a student hostel, centrally located within the city of Adelaide. Mulgunya is a popular hostel because of it is close to the city’s educational institutions.

Mulgunya Hostel is a 13-bed hostel which caters for students attending the Aboriginal Task Force, the Aboriginal Music College, the Aboriginal Community College and the Abor­ iginal Teacher Training Program. These students come from all over Australia. Y a r i M il l e r H o s t e l — C e d u n a

This is a multi-purpose hostel which caters for Aborigines who come to Ceduna for legal, medical, health or welfare reasons and also for Aborigines who are travelling through Ceduna and wish to be accommodated overnight. This hostel is being used fully by the nearby Abor­ iginal communities. G la d y s E l p h ic k H o s t e l — K le m z ig , A d e l a i d e

This 13-bed medical hostel was acquired by the Company from the State Department for Community Welfare. This hostel is a 4-bedroom house, with a bedroom unit at the rear that can accommodate six residents.

This hostel caters for Aborigines who have to come to Adelaide for medical reasons. It mainly caters for Aborigines who come from the tribal areas of the State.

B r o k e n H il l H o s t e l — B r o k e n H il l

This hostel was originally operated as a Third Party operation, but because of manage­ ment difficulties the Company decided that it should be operated by Aboriginal Hostels Limited.

42

Accommodating up to 13 residents, this hostel caters for Aborigines who have alcohol problems. These people come to Broken Hill from Wilcannia, Dareton, Menindee, Bourke and Tibaburra.

L o is O 'D o n o g h u e H o s t e l — P o r t A u g u s t a

This hostel is a new acquisition and was opened in March 1984. The hostel is a 26-bed multi-purpose and transient hostel, which caters for Aborigines who visit Port Augusta for medical, health, welfare or legal aid reasons. It also caters for Aborigines who are

passing through Port Augusta and need some­ where to sleep for the night. We are delighted that the northern part of the State now has a hostel of this size and nature to cater for the needs of our people.

THIRD PARTY OPERATIONS The Company has expanded its Third Party Hostel Grants Program and it now funds eight Aboriginal organisations to operate eleven hos­ tels.

The Aboriginal Sobriety Group received funds from the Company to operate another alcohol rehabilitation hostel which will ac­ commodate eight people.

Alan Bell House — Adelaide.

The Company also funds the Catholic Church to operate a 10-bed young offenders hostel in Adelaide. This will cater for the many Aboriginal youths, some of whom are home­

less. The Southern Region has always encour­ aged Aboriginal organisations to seek funds to operate a nostel under the Third Party Pro­ gram. We are delighted to have increased our

funding to these organisations.

STAFF AND TRAINING I am pleased, once again, with the perform­ ance of the staff in this Region and commend them on the dedication in providing excellent accommodation standards to the Aboriginal community. Once again, we were fortunate in that there was very little staff turnover in the Region.

The Training Section from the Companys Central Office in Canberra has run courses in the Region to train Hostel Managers. There has been training in Central Office for the Clerical and Payroll Officer, the Assistant Regional Manager and the Regional Manager.

FUTURE NEEDS The Southern Region this year will be updating its research on aged persons accom­ modation needs. This area requires further review and assessment.

This Region will also be researching the needs of the many students who come to Adelaide for educational purposes. The Com­ pany has planned to upclate and expand the facilities at its Mulgunya Hostel by adding an additional storey to the building. This addition will cater for the accommodation needs of students who attend the Aboriginal Task Force, the Aboriginal Teacher Training Pro­ gram, the Aboriginal Music College and the

Aboriginal Community College.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS It is always pleasing to note that our re­ lations with the community have once again been generally good. We have tried to reach as many of the Aboriginal organisations and where possible, to show the wider community the excellent work of Aboriginal people in providing short- term temporary accommo­ dation.

CONCLUSION The 1983-84 year in the Southern Region has been productive and this will be main­ tained in the next financial year.

I would like to thank the Federal and State Government Departments, the many Aborigi­ nal organisations, individual Aborigines, pri­ vate Companies, the National Aboriginal Con­ ference and the staff of Aboriginal Hostels

Limited who have assisted us in making this a memorable year for the Company operations in South Australia.

S S I am pleased, once again, with the performance of the staff in this Region and commend them on the dedication in providing excellent accommodation standards to the Aboriginal community, jr j

43

/ γ ^ V

CENTRAL REGION

σ'

Regional Manager — Janet Edwards

Aboriginal Hostels Limited provides ac­ commodation in Cen­ tral Australia primar­ ily in Alice Springs. These hostels serve many Aborigines from the remote north of South Australia and the west of West­ ern Australia. Many Aborigines from the Darwin, Katherine

and Tennant Creek areas also visit the Central Region and use our hostels. There is greater demand for hostel beds than the Company can meet. At present, the Company provides eight hostels in the Region, seven Company hostels in Alice Springs and a Third Party hostel at Finke. These hostels cater for transients, aged persons, supporting mothers and children-in-care.

It is generally difficult to get accommo­ dation in Alice Springs. There are few houses rented on the private market and the cost of buying houses is high. As a result, many Aborigines visiting the town, and many Abor­ iginal townspeople, often have nowhere to stay. The closure of the Company’s 48-bed Sid Ross Hostel during the year for major repairs and renovations caused a temporary accommo­

dation shortage for Aborigines in the town. There is a particular problem in perma­ nently housing the homeless Aborigines of Alice Springs. Many still live in deplorable conditions in the Todd River. Under our Charter, Aboriginal Hostels Limited can only provide temporary accommodation. While we can offer some assistance, there needs to be more money spent to overcome the chronic problems of these people.

On a note of optimism for the future. Aborigines in Central Australia are proud that an Aborigine raised and educated in Alice Springs, Charles Perkins, was appointed Sec­ retary to the Australian Department of Aborigi­ nal Affairs.

Within the Company there were other im­ portant appointments. Mr Geoff Shaw from Alice Springs replaced Wenten Rabuntja as a Northern Territory representative on the Board of Directors. Mr Shaw is vice-chairman of the Institute of Aboriginal Development. Chair­ man of the Aboriginal Management Informa­ tion Service, and an executive member of the Central Lands Council and the Tangentyerre Council.

The next important appointment was Grace Smallwood as the new Matron of the Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged. Grace is the first Aboriginal Matron at the Home and has experi­

ence in the health problems of indigenous peoples. In 1976 Grace visited the United States and New Zealand to study the health problems in Indians and Maories. In 1981 she studied the Chinese healing methods and she has lectured in Australia and overseas on Aboriginal health and alcohol rehabilitation.

Highlights in the Region during the year were visits by the Board of Directors, the General Manager, and a conference held by Aboriginal groups into Land Rights and another held on Aboriginal Youth Recreation and Sport.

COMPANY OPERATIONS

A y i p a r i n y a H o s t e l — A l i c e S p r i n g s

This hostel of 15 cabins can accommodate 60 transient families visiting the town or waiting for permanent housing. Many people staying at the hostel come from the remote areas of Central Australia to start work or look for work in Alice Springs.

Our largest hostel in Alice Springs, Ayiparinya is always full, with long waiting lists of people wanting to stay. In 1983-84 the hostel cabins were painted by workers em­ ployed under the Community Employment Program. T o p s e y S m i t h H o s t e l — A l i c e S p r i n g s

Named after a well-known and respected Aranda woman, the Topsey Smith Hostel helps mothers from the bush who bring their children to Alice Springs for medical treat­ ment at the hospital. These people are assisted under the Isolated Patients Travel and Accom­ modation Scheme. R e n n e r S t r e e t — A l i c e S p r in g s

This house can accommodate four people. Usually the hostel is filled with Aboriginal men from remote areas working in Alice Springs. During 1983-84 help was also given to two elderly Aborigines, One of these Aborigi- : nes was transferred to the Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged for medical supervision. C h e w in g s S t r e e t — A l i c e S p r in g s

This hostel, consisting of a house and a separate flat, is usually kept to house staff coming from other regions who find it difficult to get accommodation in Alice Springs. The new Matron of the Hetti Perkins Home and her family are currently using this house and nursing sisters from the Hetti Perkins Home have been accommodated in the adjoining flat during the year. -

S id R o s s H o s t e l — A l i c e S p r in g s

The Sid Ross Hostel, named after an elder of the Aranda peoples, is a 48-bed transient hostel for the Pitjantjatjarra people. The hostel,

44

which is usually full, has a small kiosk where residents can buy their food to be cooked on barbecues and stoves in the hostel grounds. The hostel had to close temporarily in

February 1984 for major repairs and reno­ vations. Included in the new work will be the building of a new kitchen and dining room. The renovated hostel is expected to re-open in

September 1984. H etti P e r k i n s H o m e fo r t h e A g e d —

A l i c e S p r i n g s

The Hetti Perkins Home is unique in Aus­ tralia. being the only Aboriginal hospital cater­ ing for aged Aborigines who need medical attention. The Home is classified as a ‘C’ Class Hospital. Twenty qualified nurses and support staff give these Aborigines constant medical supervision in a relaxed nursing home.

As well as having appointed an Aboriginal Matron, the Company nas tried to raise the number of Aborigines employed at this cottage hospital. Two Aboriginal nursing sisters, Margaret O’Shane and Rose Foster, joined the staff of the Hetti Perkins Home.

The need for more beds at the 42-bed home is chronic. There are over one hundred elderly Aborigines in need of medical treatment on the waiting list. The hostel regularly receives re­ quests for accommodation from Aborigines in the Northern Territory and interstate which cannot be met. There is certainly a need for more Aboriginal staffed hospitals in other regions in Australia, particularly, Western Australia, Queensland and South Australia.

T H I R D P A R T Y H O S T E L S

The Company funds two Third Party hos­ tels in the Central Region. The St. Mary’s Child Welfare Service runs a 14-bed hostel for child­ ren, some of whom are handicapped. The second third party hostel is at Finke, the only hostel in the Region outside Alice Springs. This hostel is run by the Apatula Housing

Association and accommodates five elderly Aborigines. From 1 July 1984 the Region will start funding another hostel under the Third Party Hostel Grants Program: the Congress Rehabili­ tation Farm. This hostel was previously funded by the Department of Aboriginal Af­ fairs.

S T A F F A N D T R A I N I N G

The Company is an important employer of Aborigines in Central Australia, where unem­ ployment among Aborigines is high. Work with the Company, because of our strong Aboriginalisation policy, provides many Abor­

igines with an opportunity to gain useful employment and training. The Company has continued to place a strong emphasis on the training of the staff in the Central Region. Training courses have been held for Hostel Managers and clerical staff. For the training to be successful it needs to be backed by good work experience. This de­

ends on the efforts of senior staff sharing their nowledge and experience with new em­ ployees.

C O N C L U S I O N

There were no new hostels bought or funded in the Region during 1983-84, and major development was confined to the Sid Ross Hostel. Because of some senior staff changes it was difficult to offer a continuous high standard of service.

Aborigines work for the Company to help other Aborigines in need.

Many Aboriginal and community organisa­ tions have supported our work over 1983-84. Without their help we could not reduce the homelessness among Aborigines around Alice

Springs. The Company appreciates their assist­ ance and support.

SS The Company is an important employer of Aborigines in Central Australia, where unemployment among Aborigines is h ig h .jj

4 5

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

LOCATION OF HOSTELS

TYPES OF HOSTELS

Aboriginal Hostels Limited provides differ­ ing accommodation for Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders with differing needs. Hostels provide temporary accommodation for Abor­ igines in education, employment, vocational training and for health reasons. The Company also serves the needs of transient, aged and supporting parent Aborigines.

Company Hostels

Company Hostels are owned and operated by the Company. The full cost of running the hostel, including the hiring of staff, is met directly by the Company. Most of the Company Hostels are owned outright by Aboriginal Hos­ tels Limited.

Third Party Hostels

Under its Third Party Hostel Grants Pro­ gram, the Company provides all, or part of, the finance required to subsidise the running costs of hostels. This system allows local Aboriginal groups to help other Aborigines that are in

neea of assistance. Funding Third Party Hos­ tels is both an economical and responsive way of offering assistance.

KEY TO LOCATION OF HOSTELS ▲ Company Hostels

Δ Third Party Hostels

( Δ Δ Port Hedland

▲ Δ Δ ^Canarvon

Δ ^ M u lle w a

^Jeraldton

A A A Λ Μ„„Γ, A^ K a 'S ° ° r lie

A / a a m _

Δ Δ Δ A *Coolgardie

Δ Δ Δ *Northam

Δ Δ Δ φ PERTH φΑ · Norseman

Wandering

Thursday Is. ^

t ,

w

• Δ Kununurra

A A A DARWIN Δ Δ

Katherine

Hopevale^ δ

Normanton

▲ Δ Δ

Mt. Isa

▲▲ Δ Δ

Δ Δ Δ

Cairns e

Yarrabah

H e r b e r t o n * A

Palm Island L· Δ A Δ Δ Δ < Townsville

J -

A A A A A A Δ Δ * Alice Springs

A A Δ ·

Rockhampton

Δ Mitchell

A A A A A A A A A A Δ Δ Δ Δ Δ Δ

BRISBANE

Toowoomba *

Lismore *

No. OF BEDS

QUEENSLAND

Brisbane Born Free 27 Brook Street, Highgate Hills T

Elley Bennett 501 Brunswick Street, New Farm T

Jane Arnold 155 Moray Street, New Farm S

Jodaro 45 Enoggera Road, Newmarket MP

Joyce Wilding Pacific Highway, Mt. Gravatt MC

Kath Walker 41 Marine Parade, Redcliffe S

Kiah 156 Agnew Street, Norman Park MC

Opal House 19 Russell Street, South Brisbane MP

St. Martins 24 Sankey Street, West End MC

Tribal Council 32-36 Trinity Lane, Woolloongabba AP

Willie MacKenzie Ipswich Road, Wacol MP

Yumba Hostel 55 Grey Road, Hill End ET

Yumba Houses 47 Grey Road, Hill End MC

68 Ryan Street, Hill End MC

70 Ryan Street, Hill End MC

72 Ryan Street, Hill End MC

Cairns Joe McGinness 234 Spence Street MP

Jubba-Gai-Yumba# Harvey Road, Redlynch AP

Kuiyam 162 Grafton Street S

Nguna Bayun# 198 Grafton Street RA

Paim-Metta# 18 Fretwell Road, Whiterock MC

Trinity Beach# Cooks Highway, via Cairns MC

Warringu# 113 Tills Street, Manunda MC

Charleville Yudarma 39 Galatea Street RA

Cunnamulla Yumbah PO Box 126, Cunnamulla T

Herberton Woodleigh College Broadway, Herberton S

Hopevale Hopevale# Hopevale Mission, N. Queensland RA

Mitchell Mitchell Mary Street MP

Mt. Isa Kabalulumana 39 Pamela Street T

K.A.S.H.# Berkeley Highway RA

Marillac House 63 Enid Street S

Normanton Normanton Normanton, Shire of Carpentaria S

Palm Island Serdy’s Haven# Coconut Grove, Palm Island RA

Rockhampton Neville Bonner 5 Bridge Street, N. Rockhampton MP

Woongarra 11 Reaney Street, N. Rockhampton S

Yambah House# 306-310 Bolsover Street T

Thursday Is. Cathedral Cnr, Pearl & Tulley Streets S

Jumula Dubbins Victoria Parade T

Toowoomba Townsville

Jim Hagan Hostel Medical Centre# 110 Mary Street 35 Echlin Street, West End

MP RA

Iris Clay 261-269 Sturt Street T

Ki Metta# 14 Stanley Street T

PIADRAC# 9 Stagpole Street RA

Yarrabah Yeal-a-mucckii# Yarrabah Mission, N. Queensland RA

Born Free Club Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited

One People of Australia League Aboriginal Hostels Limited Kiah Hostel Committee One People of Australia League

Aboriginal & Islander Catholic Council Brisbane Tribal Council Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited

Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited Woompera Muralug Housing Corporation

Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal & Islanders Alcohol Service Boopa Werem Kindergarten Woompera Muralug Housing Corporation Warringu Corporation

Yudarma Aboriginal Corporation Cunnamulla Aboriginal Co-operative Woodleigh College Management Committee Hopevale Aboriginal Corporation

Mitchell Aboriginal Housing Authority Aboriginal Hostels Limited Kalkaaon Aboriginal Sobriety House Franciscan Missionaries of Mary Inst.

Uniting Church National Mission Palm Island Rehabilitation Corporation Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited

Yambah Houses Committee Cathedral Hostel Committee Aboriginal Hostels Limited Aboriginal Hostels Limited

Townsville A & I Health Services Aboriginal Hostels Limited Townsville A & I Health Services Palm Island Rehabilitation Corporation

Yarrabah Community Council

25 32 40 58 45

15 16 26 11

35 150 20 8

12 6 8

25 12 76 17

8

12 10 10 20 80

12 12 20 14

16 20 14 74

16 25 60 36

35 14 44 26

24 8

Dora Street Great Northern Highway 35 Hubble Street 52 O livia Terrace Ingada Village 85-89 Lindsay Street PO Box 406

97 Gregory Street 28 Innamincka Road 133 Great Eastern Highway 28 Porter Street

12-14 Hannan Street PO Box 983, Kalgoorlie St. Martins Way PO Box 67, Moora 29 M aley Street Lot 1762 Dennison Drive

2 York Road 113 Gt. Eastern Highway, Guildford 14-16 Lane Street 7 H allin Court, Ardross 340-344 Guildford Road, Bayswater 83 Trafalgar Square 317 Pier Street, East Perth

2-4 Norbert Street 191 Bennett Street 15 Palmeston Street 16 Thake Court, Koondoola 5th. Avenue, Rossm oyne 17 Harbourne Street 2 Edgar Street 2 Wedge Street c l- W andering Post Office

MP G oolarabooloo Inc.

RA M illiya Rumurra Committee S Churches of Christ Aborigines Board T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

S Churches of Christ Aborigines Board S Christian Aboriginal Parent School

RA Djimununga A lcoholic Rehabilitation ET Aboriginal Boomerang Council S Sister Kates’ Child & Family Service

T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

FV E. G oldfields Aboriginal Council T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

RA Yamatji Ngura

S M oongoong Darwung Aboriginal Assoc. AP Central M idlands Progress A ssociation RA M ullew a Rehabilitation Centre MP Aboriginal H ostels Limited T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

MC St V incent de Paul Society

S Sister Kates' Child & Family Service

AP Aboriginal Rights League T Aboriginal M edical Service

S Aboriginal M edical Service

T H om eless & Aged Persons Care Agency T Aboriginal H ostels Limited

RA A nglican Health & Welfare Service ET N yoongah Com m unity Inc. S P allotine M ission

MC A nglican Health & Welfare Service T B loodw ood Tree A ssociation

T B loodw ood Tree A ssociation

RA Kulila A ssociation

24 40 13

11 16 50 20

14 12 20 100 25

8

49 8

18 56 22 18 11 10 24

15 14 12 30 16 10 80 20 14 12 65

Key to Categories o f Hostels: AP = Aged Persons MC = Mother & Children

ET = Em ploym ent & Training MP = M ulti-purpose

FV = Fringe Village RA = Rehabilitation — A lcoholic

RL = Rehabilitation — Legal S = Students

T = Transients

# Refers to Hostels previously run by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs that become the responsibility and will be funded by Aboriginal Hostels Limited from 1 July 1984. * Operated only or in part of 1983-84

FINANCIAL AND STATUTORY INFORMATION

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

D i r e c t o r s ' R e p o r t f o r t h e P e r i o d 2 6 J u n e 1 9 8 3 to 3 0 J u n e 1 9 8 4

The Directors submit the Financial and Statutory Information Report for Aboriginal Hostels Limited for the period ending 30 June 1984, together with the Company's Statements of Accounts.

The Directors of Aboriginal Hostels Lim­ ited, at the 30 June 1984 were:

Miss L. O’Donoghue, C.B.E. A.M. Mr C. Madden Mr R.M. Eades Mrs M. Jackomos Mrs M. Willmett Mrs E. Foy Mr R, Fordimail Mr. G. Shaw

The net cost of Company operations can be allocated over various government Aboriginal programs as follows: $ Employment..................

Education.......................

Training.........................

Transient........................

Aged Persons.................

Supporting Mothers...... Medical Out-patients.... Alcoholic Rehabilitation Legal Rehabilitation...... Fringe-dwellers.............

3,252,816 2,500.197 477,447 540,927

1.239,872 3,363,081 759,725 813,981

18,725 140,580

Total 13,107,351

PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES The principal activity of the Company dur­ ing 1983-84 was the operation of properties as hostels for Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders. The basic aim of the Company is to provide temporary accommodation to meet the needs of Aboriginal people. The categories of persons for whom hostel accommodation is provided are:

• Students • The aged and infirm • Transients • Fringe-dwellers • Supporting parents and children • Workers and transients • Persons seeking rehabilitation

The provision of hostel accommodation means that many other urgent needs of Abor­ igines can be met. The Company’s work sup­ ports the participation by Aborigines in government programs of education and train­

ing, health, legal aid, rehabilitation and the provision of employment opportunities.

COST OF OPERATIONS The net cost of the Company’s operations in 1983-84 was $13,107,351 "($9,788,865 in 1982-83) including payments to third party organisations of $2,080,857 ($1,555,768 in

1982-83).

FIXED ASSETS During the year the Company increased its net investment in fixed assets by $2,811,923 ($1,240,866 in 1982-83) representing the up­ grading and additions to the Company proper­ ties.

PROVISION FOR DEPRECIATION An amount of $526,898 was provided for depreciation during 1983-84 ($465,921 in 1982- 83). On 30 June 1984, the Company had a credit balance in its provision for depreciation of $2,779,451 ($2,287,024 on 25 June 1983) which is considered adequate for the needs of the Company.

ASSETS VALUATION RESERVE Ownership of the Daisy Yarmirr hostel at 37 Glencoe Crescent, Tiwi, was transferred to the Company during the year by the Northern Territory Government at no cost. The Com­ pany’s fixed assets and the asset valuation reserve have been increased by $460,000 fol­ lowing an independent valuation arranged by the Department of Administrative Services.

PROVISION FOR MAJOR MAINTENANCE To conform to improved accounting stan­ dards the Company established during 1983- 84 a provision for major maintenance on its properties of $550,000.

LIABILITIES TO EMPLOYEES The provision for annual leave entitlements that have accrued was increased by $91,973 ($99,092 in 1982-831. An amount of $176,000 was charged for the period for employee entitlements for long service leave which have accrued to date (nil in 1982-83).

N.E.A.T. &N.E.S.A. During the year $337,235 ($129,279 in 1982-83) was received by the Company from the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations as a subsidy to train Company em­ ployees under the National Employment and Training and the National Employment Strat­ egy for Aborigines schemes.

OTHER Apart from items referred to in this report there were no other material transfers to or from Reserves and Provisions.

The cost of the operations to Aboriginal Hostels Limited may be examined in more detail by reference to the Statements of Ac­ counts and explanatory notes.

OTHER STATUTORY MATTERS In accordance with the requirements of the Companies Act 1981, your Directors further report that:

Before completing the Statements of Ac­ counts, the Directors took reasonable steps to ascertain that the current assets of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, other than debtors, were shown in the accounting records of the Com­

pany at a value equal to, or below, the value that would be expected to be realised in the ordinary course of business. At the date of this report the Directors are not aware of any circumstances which would render the values attributed to the current assets of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, mislead­

ing. Before completing the Statements of Ac­ counts of Aboriginal Hostels Limited, the Di­ rectors took reasonable steps to ascertain what action had been taken to write-off bad debts and provided for doubtful debts.

Since 30 June 1984 to the date of this report, no contingent liability has been undertaken by the Company. No contingent or other liability of Aboriginal Hostels Limited has become

enforceable, within the period which, in the opinion of the Directors, will or may substan­ tially affect the ability of the Company to meet its obligations as and when they fall due.

The results of the operations of Aboriginal Hostels Limited for 1983-84, in the opinion of the Directors, were not substantially affected by any item, transaction or event of material and unusual nature except as mentioned in this report.

Since 30 June 1984 to the date of this report, no item, transaction or event of a material and unusual nature, other than those occurring as a result of normal business, in the opinion of the

Directors, is likely to affect substantially the results of the operations of Aboriginal Hostels Limited for the period ending 30 June 1984. Since the end of the previous financial year,

no Director has received or become entitled to receive a benefit by reason of a contract made by Aboriginal Hostels Limited with the Direc­ tor or with a firm of which he or she is a

member or with a Company in which any Director has a substantial interest. In accordance with a resolution of Directors dated 23 October 1984 at Canberra in the

Australian Capital Territory.

J.Hagan DIRECTOR

L. O’Donoghue DIRECTOR

53

PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT 26 JUNE 1983 TO 30 JUNE 1984

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

INCOME Accommodation charges.........................................

Rent received............................................................

Interest received.......................................................

Sundry sales and income.........................................

N.E.A.T. and N.E.S.A. subsidies..............................

Grant from Aboriginal Development Commission .. Commonwealth Community Employment Program

Note 1984 1983

$ $

2,522,714 2.084,645 16,534 33,347

135,497 119,774 30,611 33,359

2 337,235 129,279

79,200

14 253,918 —

TOTAL INCOME 3,296,509 2,479,604

EXPENDITURE SUBJECT TO CASH SUBSIDY THIS FINANCIAL YEAR Food, material, services and sundry expenditure................... Wages and salaries...................................................................

Superannuation contribution by the Company...................... Directors’ fees...........................................................................

Audit fees.................................................................................

Bad debts..................................................................................

Payments to third party hostels...............................................

..... 3

..... 17

..... 4

..... 5

..... 8

4,594,571 7,735,871 477,778 27,346

22,586 1,247

2,080,857 91,973

3,276,479 6,294,878 427,783 22,383

19,800 45.903 1,555,768 99,082 Annual leave entitlements not taken.......................................

Expenditure subject to cash subsidy this financial year....... 15,032,229 11,742,076

EXPENDITURE NOT SUBJECT TO CASH SUBSIDY THIS FINANCIAL YEAR Depreciation of fixed assets........................................................

Major maintenance..................................................................... ... 7

526,898 550.000

465,921

Lone service leave......................................................................

Doubtful debts.............................................................................

Loss on disposal of assets...........................................................

.. 6

.. 12

176,000 89,451 29,282

14,631 45,841

Expenditure not subject to cash subsidy this financial year.... 1,371,631 526,393 TOTAL EXPENDITURE.............................................................. 16,403,860 12,268,469

OPERATING LOSS Total income less total expenditure........................................... 13,107,351 9,788,865

COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTION.......... .. 9 13,107,351 9,788,865 NET PROFIT OR LOSS............................................................... .. 1 Nil Nil

T h e a c c o m p a n y i n g n o t e s n u m b e r e d 1 t o 1 7 f o r m a n i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e s e a c c o u n t s .

54

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 30 JUNE 1984

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Note 1984 1983

CAPITAL $

Amount limited by Members' guarantee — $22 Funds for capital purchases provided by: The Commonwealth Government through: — Dept, of Aboriginal Affairs........................................................ 9 15,857,696 13,539,696

— Dept, of Social Security............................................................. 14 500,000 300,000

— Dept, of Housing and Construction........................................... 14 200,000

— Dept, of Employment & Industrial Relations............................ 14 522,537

Funds from other sources: — Aboriginal Development Commission...................................... 14 365,000 365,000

— Assets Valuation Reserve.......................................................... 1 1,273,087 813,087

TOTAL CAPITAL EMPLOYED..................................................... 18,718,320 15,017,783

Represented by: FIXED ASSETS At cost or valuation........................................................................ 16,591,714 13,779,791

Less provision for depreciation..................................................... 2,779,451 2,287,024

MET FIXED ASSETS...................................................................... 11 13,812,263 11,492,767

OTHER NON-CURRENT ASSETS Amount Owing by the Commonwealth Government................... 13 4,416,822 3,045,191

NET CURRENT ASSETS Total Current Assets Cash at bank and in hand............................................................... 10 592,463 829,030

Trade debtors — after doubtful debts; 1984 $111,597; (1983 $60,982)...................................................... 6 235,422 174,972

Other debtors — after doubtful debts; 1984 $4,706; (1983 $3,589) 6 575,905 141,950 Amount owing by the Commonwealth Government.................... 13 1,045,503 710,783

2,449,293 1,856,735

Less Total Current Liabilities Creditors — trade........................................................................... 238,855 116,186

— capital........................................................................ 48,521 221,361

— other........................................................................... 51,913 236,567

Provision for annual leave............................................................. 559,769 467,796

899,058 1,041,910

TOTAL NET CURRENT ASSETS.................................................. 1,550,235 814,825

LONG TERM LIABILITIES Provision for long service leave..................................................... 511,000 335,000

Provision for major maintenance.................................................. 550,000

TOTAL LONG TERM LIABILITIES.............................................. 1,061,000 335,000

TOTAL NET ASSETS SUMMARY Net fixed assets............................................................................... 13,812,263 11,492,767

Total non-current assets................................................................. 4,416,822 3,045,191

Total net current assets.................................................................. 1,550,235 814,825

Less total long term liabilities........................................................ 1,061,000 335,000

TOTAL NET ASSETS.................................................................... 18,718,320 15,017,783

T h e a c c o m p a n y i n g n o t e s n u m b e r e d 1 t o 1 7 f o r m a n i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e s e a c c o u n t s .

55

STATEMENT OF SOURCE OF FUNDS

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

2 6 J u n e 1 9 8 3 t o 3 0 J u n e 1 9 8 4 .

Note 1983-84 1982-83

SOURCE OF FUNDS

$ $

Funds from Operations Net Profit or Loss............................................................................ 1 Nil Nil

Add non-fund items — Annual leave entitlements not taken................................. 91,973 99,082

— Depreciation....................................................................... 526,898 465,921

— Major maintenance provision............................................ ...... 7 550,000 —

— Long service leave.............................................................. 176,000 —

— Doubtful debts.................................................................... ...... 6 89,451 14,631

— Loss on disposal of assets................................................... ...... 12 29,282 45,841

1,463,604 625,475

Reduction in Assets Current Assets — Cash at Bank....................................................................... 236,567

— Other Debtors...................................................................... — 29.617

— Amount owing by Commonwealth Government............... — 33,612

Proceeds from Sale of Non-Current Assets — Property Sales..................................................................... ...... 12 96,125 127,769

332,692 190,998

Increase in Liabilities Current Liabilities — Trade Creditors................................................................... 122,669 14,370

— Capital and Other Creditors................................................ — 195,127

122,669 209,497

Capital Grants — Department of Aboriginal Affairs........................................ ..... 9 2,318,000 1,003,916

— Department of Social Security............................................ ..... 14 200,000 200.000

— Department of Housing and Construction.......................... ..... 14 200.000 —

— Department of Employment and Industrial Relations........ ..... 14 522,537 —

— Northern Territory Government.......................................... ..... 1 460.000 —

(transfer of property at no cost) — Aboriginal Development Commission................................ — 365,000

3,700,537 1,568,916

TOTAL SOURCE OF FUNDS.................................................. 5,619,502 2,594,886

T h e a c c o m p a n y i n g n o t e s n u m b e r e d 1 t o 1 7 f o r m a n i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e s e a c c o u n t s .

5 6

STATEMENT OF APPLICATION OF FUNDS

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

2 6 J u n e 1 9 8 3 t o 3 0 J u n e 1 9 8 4 .

Note 1983-84 1982-83

APPLICATION OF FUNDS

$ $

Increase in Current Assets — Cash at Bank....................................................................

— Trade Debtors...................................................................

— Other Debtors...................................................................

— Amount owing by Commonwealth Government...................... 13

145,680 438,176 334,720

172,788 134,914

918,576 307,702

Increase in Non-Current Assets — Fixed Assets Net increase in assets at cost/valuation...............................

Add cost of assets sold and disposed.................................. ......... 12

2,811,923 159,878

1,240,866 222,425

2,971,801 1,463,291

— Amount owing by Commonwealth Government...................... 13 1,371,631 526,393

Reduction in Liabilities Current Liabilities — Capital and Other Creditors............................................

— Project Advance not expended.......................................

357,494

297,500

357,494 297,500

TOTAL APPLICATION OF FUNDS.................................... 5,619,502 2,594,886

T h e a c c o m p a n y i n g n o t e s n u m b e r e d 1 t o 1 7 f o r m a n i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e s e a c c o u n t s .

5 7

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE ACCOUNTS

as at 30 June 1984

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

1. STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES To assist the understanding of information presented in the accounts, the main accounting procedures adopted are summarised below ana are consistent with those used in previous years. The accounts have been prepared in accordance with the Seventh Schedule of the Companies Act, 1981 and are consistent with generally accepted accounting principles. Net Profit or Loss In the financial arrangements between the Commonwealth Government and the Company, the ‘Commonwealth Contribution’ is the amount sufficient to ensure that the Company’s annual operations achieve no profit or no loss for each financial year. For the purpose of income tax assessment the Company is accepted as a public benevolent institution. Historical Cost The accounts have been prepared on the basis of historical cost with the exception of assets

included in the Assets Valuation Reserve. Changes in the value of money or changes in the prices of specific assets are not reflected in the accounts. Assets Valuation Reserve From time to time, properties are transferred to the Company at no cost and are brought to account at market valuation determined by independent valuation, arranged through the Department of Administrative Services at the time of occupancy. The value is credited to Assets Valuation Reserve and is not brought to account in determining the operating result for the period during which the transfer was made. During 1983-84 ownership of the Daisy Yarmirr Hostel at 37 Glencoe Crescent, Tiwi was transferred to the Company by the Northern Territory Government at no cost. The Company’s fixed assets and the Asset Valuation Reserve ($1,273,087 in 1983-84, $813,087 in 1982-83) have been increased by $460,000 following independent valuation, reflecting this transfer. Depreciation of Fixed Assets Depreciation on buildings and land improvements, furniture and equipment is calculated on the straight line method over the useful life of the asset. Depreciation starts at the beginning of the six monthly period following date of acquisition, at the following rates:

• Motor vehicles at 15 per cent • Office machines, electrical equipment and library at 10 per cent • Furniture and fittings at 6 per cent • Building and land improvements at 4 per cent • Art and artefacts at 1 per cent

2. N.E.A.T. AND N.E.S.A. SUBSIDIES Funds are provided by the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations as a subsidy under the National Employment and Training and the National Employment Strategy for Aborigines schemes.

3. FOOD, MATERIAL, SERVICES AND SUNDRY EXPENDITURE

Repairs and planned maintenance. Food................................................

Fuel and power...............................

Travel..............................................

Telephone and telex.......................

Rent.................................................

Motor vehicle running....................

Cleaning..........................................

Rates................................................

Workers’ compensation..................

Minor equipment replacement....... Printing and stationery...................

Training costs.................................

Data processing costs......................

Staff advertising and removal costs Postage............................................

Public relations...............................

Management consultancy fees....... Other insurance costs.....................

Sundries..........................................

TOTAL

1983-84 1982-83

$ $

1,147,640 486,909 1,012,963 857,555 472,807 360,597 454,583 319,254

230,164 200,051 206,261 194,626 185,703 151,031 166,100 130,059

153,662 152,692 140,017 104,109 71,407 49,541

60,213 62,930

57,777 28,095

54,223 25,836

47,883 45,846

37,927 31,578

24,251 25,727

20,428 1,386

17,842 12,669

32,720 35,988

4,594,571 3,276,479

4. DIRECTORS’ FEES Directors' fees paid to part-time Directors were in accordance with the determination of the Remuneration Tribunals Act 1973. No other benefits were received by the Directors for their services to the Company.

5. AUDITORS’ REMUNERATION The amount of $22,586 ($19,800 in 1982-83) represents the audit fee. No other benefits were received by the Auditor for their services to the Company.

6. DOUBTFUL DEBT PROVISION Individual debts were examined and it is considered that $116,303 is a realistic provision to cover all doubtful debts as at 30 June 1984. The provision has accordingly been adjusted: $ $

1983-84 1982-83

Doubtful debt provision at 25 June......................................................... 64,571 111,438

Bad debts written off during the year against the provision.................. 37,719 61,498

Sub-total................................................................................................... 26,852 49,940

Increase in provision charged to this year’s Profit and Loss Account.... 89,451 14,631 Total Doubtful Debt Provision at 30 June 1984...................................... 116,303 64,571

59

7. PROVISION FOR MAJOR MAINTENANCE To conform to improved accounting standards the Company established during 1903-84 a provision ($550,000 in 1983-84, nil in 1982-83) for major maintenance on its properties.

8. PAYMENTS TO THIRD PARTY HOSTELS This amount represents supervised payments of a capital and operating nature to other organisations who operate hostels for Aboriginal people.

9. COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTION 1983-84 1982-83 $ $

Capital Contribution Net increases in capital contribution ($15,857,696 in 1983-84 less $13,539,696 in 1982-83) being cash subsidy received from the Commonwealth Government for capital purchases............................... 2,318,000 1,003,916 Total capital contribution...................................................................... 2,318,000 1,003,916

Operating Contribution Cash subsidy received from the Commonwealth Government, includ­ ing $2,130,000 in respect of third party hostels..................................... 11,401,000 9,296,084

Increase in amount owing by the Commonwealth Government for depreciation, major maintenance, long service leave and other non­ cash expenses. These items will not be subject to cash subsidies during the next twelve months ($4,416,822 in 1983-84 less $3,045,191 in 1982-83).............................................................................................. 1,371,631 526,393

Increase in the amount owing by the Commonwealth Government for items subject to cash subsidies during the next twelve months ($1,045,503 in 1983-84 less $710,783 in 1982- 83)................................ 334,720 (33,612)

Total operating contribution................................................................. 13,107,351 9,788,865

No reallocation of funds between capital and operating contributions were made during the year ended 30 June 1984.

10. CASH AT BANK AND IN HAND The total of $592,463 shown as cash at bank or in hand on 30 June 1984 was made up of:

Cash available to meet commitments at 30 June 1984 and invested in Commonwealth Trading Bank of Australia interest bearing deposits.... Cash in Central Office operating accounts deposited with the Commonwealth Savings Bank of Australia...........................................

Imprest accounts at savings banks throughout Australia and operated by nostels and regional offices for daily running requirements.............

Total

1983-84 1982-83 $ $

750,000 600,000

(365,517) 75,130

207,980 153,900

592,463 829,030

60

11. FIXED ASSETS i984 ig83

Land ® ®

At ro st....................................................................................................... 2,122,258 2,040,298

At independent valuation 1975 ............................................................. 48,000 48,000

At independent valuation 1976 ............................................................. 60,000 60^000

At independent valuation 1977 .............................................................. IOs’oOO lOsioOO

At independent valuation 1984 .............................................................. 24,000 ’

Total value ofland................................................................. ................. 2,362,258 2,256,298

Building and land improvement At cost...................................................................................................... 11,236,159 9,149,924

At independent valuation 1975 .............................................................. 205,000 205,000

At independent valuation 1976 .............................................................. 135,000 135,000

At independent valuation 1977 .............................................................. 241,000 241,000

At independent valuation 1978 .............................................................. 3,828 3,828

At independent valuation 1984 .............................................................. 436,000 —

Sub-total................................................................................................... 12,256,985 9,734,752

Less provision for depreciation............................................................... 2,161,175 1,780,289

Total value of building and land improvement..................................... 10,095,810 7,954,463

Furniture and Equipment At cost...................................................................................................... 1,587,640 1,505,052

At independent valuation 1976 .............................................................. 1,350 1,350

At independent valuation 1977 .............................................................. 10,449 10,449

S u b -total............................................................................................... 1,599,439 1,516,851

Less Provision for depreciation............................................................... 618,276 506,735

Total Value of furniture and equipment................................................ 981,163 1,010,116

Other Equipment At cost...................................................................................................... 372,574 271,432

At independent valuation....................................................................... 458 458

Total value of other equipment.............................................................. 373,032____ 271,890

Net Fixed Assets...................................................................................... 13,812,263 11,492,767

Type of assets brought to account at independent valuation are described in Note 1 — Assets Valuation Reserve. Included in Building and Land improvement are the cost of the Orana Haven Hostel, Brewarrina, N.S.W. ($122,154) and the Ninga Mia Fringe-Dweller Village, Parkeston, W.A. ($352,338) which

were constructed on Aboriginal land not owned by the Company. In addition, the Company has been appointed under the Crown Lands Consolidation Act 1913 of New South Wales, sole trustee of two Aboriginal Reserves on which are situated two hostels. Other equipment includes such items as bedding, linen, curtains, crockery, cutlery, kitchen utensils, etc. The value included is that of the initial purchase to operate the hostels and the replacements are charged directly against revenue.

12. LOSS ON DISPOSAL OF ASSETS 1983-84 1982-83

Hostel rebuilt and old buildings and fixtures written-off at the depreciated value o f............................................................................... ... 47,927

Furniture and equipment beyond economical repair at all hostels was written-off at the depreciated value of (cost $56,726]............................ 40,619 33,105

Sub-total.................................................................................................. 40,619 81,032

Less gain made on the sale of property at 7 Melrose Drive, Chifley, Australian Capital Territory (cost $25,640)......................................... 24,401 35,191

Add loss made on the sale of property at 7 Scott Street, Glebe, Tasmania (Cost $77,512).......................... 13,064 —

TOTAL LOSS.......................................................................................... 29,282 45,841

13. AMOUNT OWING BY THE COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT In accordance with the financial arrangements between the Commonwealth Government and the Company, this amount represents the difference between the cash subsidy received bv the Company and the Commonwealth Government Contribution.(Refer to Note 9.) The amount included in current assets represents those items subject to cash adjustments to be made during the next twelve month period. The amount included in non-current assets comprises non-cash expenses including de­

preciation, certain provisions and losses not to be subject to cash subsidies during the next twelve months.

14. FUNDS FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCIES Funds shown in these accounts as the Commonwealth Government contribution are received through the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. 1983-84 1982-83

Funds received from other government agencies were: $ $

Department of Social Security under the Homeless Persons Assistance Program. This was allocated for development of a fringe-dweller camp at Camooweal.......................................................................................... 200,000 200.000

Department of Housing and Construction under the Crisis Accommo­ dation for Families in Distress Program.................................................. 200,000

This was allocated for: Development of the Galawu Hostel, Finnis Street, Darwin ($100,000); Development of the Kabululumana Hostel, Pamela Street, Mt. Isa. ($100,000). Department of Employment and Industrial Relations under the Commonwealth Community Employment Program............................. 776,455

This was allocated for development ($522,537) and major mainten­ ance ($253,918) works on 12 hostels throughout Australia, includ­ ing the recruiting and wage costs of temporary employees to carry out the maintenance and development work. Funds were allocated to capital development where the works programs resulted in major upgrading or extensions to hostels, other works were allocated to maintenance in the Profit and Loss Account.

TOTAL 1,176,455 200,000

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15. HIGH SCHOOL TRUST ACCOUNT During 1981-82, $46,980 was received by the Company from the estate of the late May Ames to be used for the benefit of high school children. The funds have been invested by the Company in Commonwealth Trading Bank Interest Bearing Deposits as follows: Capital Account 1983-84 1982-83

$ $

Balance of account at 25 June.................................................................. 52,144 46,980

Receipts from interest on I.B.D’s ............................................................. 6,275 5A64

Sub-total................................................................................................... 58419 52J44

Transfer to Operating Account.............................. .................................. 7,419 _

Balance of Capital Account at 30 June 1984.......................................... 51,000 52,144

An Interest Bearing Deposit of $51,000, earning 11.0 per cent, per annum and maturing on 15 July 1984 was held at 30 June 1984. Operating Account Balance of Account at 25 June................................................................. — —

Receipts: transfer of interest from capital account................................. 7,419 —

interest on operating account.................................................. 5 3 —

Sub-total................................................................................................... 7,472 —

Payments: to Aboriginal high-school children....................................... 2,950 —

Balance of Operating Account at 30 June 1984..................................... 4,522

16. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (ESTIMATED) 1983-84 1982-83 $ $

Leasehold Commitments Outstanding unsecured commitment on unexpired term of leases for office space............................................................................................... 620,384 144,021

Capital Commitments Capital expenditure contracted for but not provided in the accounts.... 1,001,273 918,768 Capital Contingency

Of the $200,000 received from the Department of Housing and Construction (Note 14 refers) $100,000 was uncommitted at 30 June 1984 and may be repayable if not committed......................................... 100,000 20,953

17. EMPLOYER SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTION The Australian Government Actuary is currently undertaking actuarial investigations to determine the sufficiency of employer superannuation contributions paid by Commonwealth Authorities. When the results of these investigations are available an adjustment in respect of

past contributions may be necessary. The 1983-84 contribution of $477,778 represents payment at the currently prescribed rate.

6 3

Aboriginal Hostels Limited (Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)

AUDITOR’S REPORT AND STATEMENT BY DIRECTORS

Auditor’s Report to the Members of Aboriginal Hostels Limited

In accordance with Section 285 of the Companies Act 19811 report that, in my opinion: (a) the accompanying accounts being the profit and loss account, balance sheet, statement of source ana application of funds, notes to and forming part of the accounts and statement of Directors, which have been prepared on the basis of the historical cost convention stated in

Note 1, are properly drawn up in accordance with the provisions of the Companies Act 1981, and so as to give a true and fair view of: (i) the results of the Company for the period 26 June 1983 to 30 June 1984 and the state of affairs of the Company as at 30 June 1984, and

(ii) the other matters required by Section 269 of the Act to be dealt with in the accounts; (b) the accounting records and other records and the registers required by the Act to be kept by the Company have been properly kept in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Statement by Directors

In the opinion of the Directors of Aboriginal Hostels Limited: (a) the accompanying Profit and Loss Account of Aboriginal Hostels Limited is drawn up so as to give a true and! fair view of the results of operations for the period ended 30 June 1984.

(b) the accompanying Balance Sheet of Aboriginal Hostels Limited is drawn up so as to give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Company as at 30 June 1984. (c) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. In accordance with a resolution of the Directors dated 29 Octoberl984 in Melbourne in the State of Victoria.

Canberra, 7 December 1984 K.F. Brigden

AUDITOR GENERAL

L.O’Donoghue DIRECTOR DIRECTOR

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

APPENDIX TO THE DIRECTORS’ OVERVIEW

SUBMISSION TO THE MINISTER FOR ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS ON THE FUTURE ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ABORIGINAL HOSTELS LIMITED

65

APPENDIX TO THE DIRECTORS’ OVERVIEW

SUBMISSION TO THE MINISTER FOR ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS ON THE FUTURE ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ABORIGINAL HOSTELS LIMITED

The Hon. Clyde Holding MP Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Parliament House CANBERRA A.C.T. 2606

Dear Minister

Further to our recent discussions in Canberra, I would like to convey to you in more detail the views of Aboriginal Hostels Limited at this time regarding our future role, responsibilities and functions within the Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio. It is hoped that our views may assist you in your consideration of how and what changes to the Portfolio should be made.

We believe that within the near future it is desirable that a considerable reorganisation of the Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio should be considered and the appropriate decisions taken without delay. This is desirable in the view of the most recent decision by your Government to appoint Mr Charles Perkins as Secretary of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs, and in view of the continuing speculation in the media concerning changes in the leadership, roles and functions of the Aboriginal Development Commission, National Aboriginal Conference, Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies and Aboriginal Hostels Limited.

Furthermore, this is desirable because of ever-changing needs and attitudes, and above all because of the often expressed desire of your Government to allow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people more self-determination by which we can achieve many of our aspirations, which for so long have been denied us.

To allow us more self-determination is indeed healthy and to be encouraged, notwithstanding that there exists in the Australian community at large much racial discrimination and a distrust that our peoples have the capacity and will take their rightful place in the community, and to have the appropriate responsibilities in our own right, while maintaining our own culture and identity as Aboriginal Australians.

In our view, these changing attitudes are reflected, not only in purely monetary terms, but also in other positive directions. For instance, it is now recognised generally that given the right degree of responsibility and encouragement, Aboriginal and Islander people can manage their own affairs effectively and properly.

We believe Aboriginal Hostels Limited is a particular illustration in point. It is true to say that since its inception under the Whitlam Labor Government in June 1973 our Company has occasioned successive Governments no real concern, and on the contrary has achieved the confidence of Governments of all political persuasions. Our Company has, and continues to maintain, a high standard of efficiency and effectiveness, coupled with a most responsible attitude, not only in getting the job done without causing unnecessary waves, but also doing the job within the resources available and budgetary limits provided.

Indeed, you recognised and acknowledged the important work and achievements of Aboriginal Hostels Limited during our Tenth Anniversary Luncheon on National Aborigines Day, Friday 8 July 1983, when you described our Company as: ‘an outstandingly successful Aboriginal organisation . . . an important example of Aboriginal

business enterprise . . . a fine example of the confidence of the Government that created it because it believed in Aboriginal self-management’. You went on to say, and I quote:

‘Although Aboriginal Hostels is government funded, it's a model of business organisation within a free enterprise system; it manages funds efficiently; it monitors the effectiveness of its services and it responds to the changing needs of its clients right throughout Australia. Not many companies can claim those attributes.. . The work of Aboriginal Hostels is valued and recognised as of great importance by the Government. You have my assurance ... that we will continue to support you in your endeavours as a successfully managed Aboriginal organisation’. Indeed, we were grateful for your kind, considerate remarks, and we appreciated the recognition by your Government of our Company’s significant achievements to date.

It is against this background of achievement that my fellow Directors and I respectfully submit that it is time to expand the role, responsibilities, and functions of Aboriginal Hostels Limited as an accommodation authority meeting needs across the nation. In addition, we would suggest that it is time to rationalise the responsibility for all Aboriginal housing and accommodation within a single national Aboriginal authority. Our Company is willing and able to take on this important responsibility.

6 6

We propose that Aboriginal Hostels Limited should remain basically in its present form as a corporate structure, and that our Charter and General Agreement with the Commonwealth of Australia be amended to encompass the responsibility for not only additional categories of hostels and similar types of temporary accommodation with which we now deal, but also the full

responsibility in due course for administering and controlling the Grants-in-Aid Housing Program, together with all other associated functions related to housing and construction, such as the Community Management and Services function and the Town Campers Assistance Program. Should you approve this transfer of functions, we would envisage our Company assuming complete responsibility for advising on, assisting with, and where necessary conducting, the following fundamental functions. • Research of housing needs. • Planning and design of suitable housing. • Negotiations and oversight of associated housing services. • Maintenance of constructed and purchased property, including the formation of mobile skilled

Aboriginal building teams, using Aboriginal apprentices employed by Aboriginal Hostels Limited. • Training and supervision of tenants to encourage the proper use of properties purchased or rented. This would involve homemakers’ services and other support services.

• Control of funding and proper accountability. In discharging these functions, it is suggested that our Company would be the overall co­ ordinator, financial adviser and funding body to all existing Aboriginal and Islander Housing Associations presently conducting Grants-in-Aid programs.

In many respects the Grants-in-Aid Housing function is quite similar to our Company’s Third Party Hostels Grant Program and this it is not a function which is entirely new to us. We would expect, inter alia, a rationalisation of costs, improved efficiency, effectiveness and a reduction of current delays with housing programs generally with the early transfer of the Grants-in-Aid Housing

Program to our Company. We recognise that the handling and responsible administration of the large-scale funding that would be involved in the foregoing functions must be of great concern to your Government. Of major importance is the need, therefore, to ensure that the authority which handles this major task is capable of managing large scale operations properly and soundly.

Furthermore, the administration of these large scale operations, while being effectively controlled, should not bound up,neither by bureaucratic red tape on the one hand, nor lack of care or control on the other. Over the years Aboriginal Hostels has been able, within its Charter, to achieve accommodation programs effectively with a minimum of fuss, no bureaucratic red

tape,flexibility, and without waste or loss of resources. We believe it is imperative that if Aboriginal Hostels were to become responsible for the Grants- in-Aid Housing Program and the Community Management and Services function in the near future then we should retain a Company structure similar to our present corporate structure, under which there is a large degree of flexibility to utilise money, manpower and materials to effectively achieve the desired results of accommodating the needy properly.

We would have serious reservations, however, about any proposals to supersede our present corporate structure by creating a new Commission which may be subject to the same constraints as the Aboriginal Development Commission in terms of money, manpower, materials and public service regulations or conditions. Our Company fortunately does not suffer adversely from such

constraints as public service rules, obtaining Public Service Board approvals and staff ceilings. While our employees conditions of employment and service shall approximate those of the Australian Public Service, our employees, in the main, are not public servants as such, but Company employees whose conditions of employment and service can be determined by the Company’s Board of Directors, pursuant to the Company’s Articles and Memorandum of

Association. In our opinion, it should be feasible and appropriate for Aboriginal Hostels Limited to become Aboriginal Housing Limited or Aboriginal Accommodation Limited, to which the new functions could be transferred under a revised Charter and General Agreement between the Company and the Commonwealth of Australia. Indeed, it would appear that under the present Charter and General Agreement the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs could vest our Company with additional functions and responsibilities in respect to accommodation matters. Naturally, legal opinions should be obtained as a matter of urgency to assist with any determination on these matters.

You would be aware that during the past twelve months the present Charter and General Agreement has been under review with your Department. We have sought a number of significant changes which would have, if approved, enhanced the role and responsibilities of Aboriginal Hostels, including more self-determination for the Board of Directors, more independence for our

Company to deal directly with the Minister, increased financial delegations, and additional categories of hostel accommodation to be provided by our Company. This review now seems certain to be broadened and superseded by any decision on your part to transfer the Grants-in-Aid Housing Program and the Community Management and Services function to our Company.

Aboriginal Hostels Limited, having operated in the accommodation field for over ten years, has built up considerable expertise and experience, which we believe cannot be found elsewhere in

Australia. Company management and staff have proved their capabilities in most, if not all, of the areas mentioned above. While it would be essential to build on the existing administration and operational staff in the light of any added responsibilities, it is important to note that the organisational basis exists to effect a smooth transition, and to be effectively operational within a matter of months. We recognise, however, that this must entail careful and precise planning in advance of any transfer of functions.

It has been suggested in more recent times that a number of staff could be transferred to our Company from the Aboriginal Development Commission with the Grants-in-Aid Housing Program and that an agency arrangement could be worked out, whereby the Aboriginal Development Commission and Department of Aboriginal Affairs staff could act as agents for our Company at the Regional or Area Office levels. We believe that such matters of staffing would require caution and careful consideration, for we have certain reservations about the feasibility of any agency arrangement and we would want to be fully involved in the decision making process concerning any transfer of staff to our Company.

I have attached for your perusal a copy of our Company’s organisational structure as it exists at present and our 1982-83 Annual Report, which reflects something of our philosophy as well as our physical resources. 1 trust that these documents will give support to our various contentions and suggestions.

As discussed previously, we believe that whatever is decided about the future status and , structure of Aboriginal Hostels with any transfer of additional functions, there will be a need for a full-time Chairman of the Board, who would concentrate primarily on policy-making and public j relations with the aid of some staff. In addition, the size and composition of the Board of Directors should be reviewed, for it may be necessary to increase the membership of the present Board to include a suitable Torres Strait Islander and for a limited period a top non-Aboriginal industry chief with much expertise in housing development, while retaining majority Aboriginal representation from the States and Northern Territory.

It is important to stress that our various proposals are not based on any suggestion of building a ‘power base’ or ‘empire’. That is not our objective, for we are more concerned with improving the housing and living conditions of our people around Australia, together with improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the Grants-in-Aid Housing Program.

We consider that housing, be it temporary or permanent and be it Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal housing, is the basis of a sound community. The first requirement of course is food and nourishment, but shelter is not far behind. It is for these reasons that we desire to move into this field which we are confident of managing and co-ordinating effectively for the benefit of the whole community, but more especially for Aboriginal and Islander people. We not only have a great need for satisfactory shelter generally, but also require sympathetic training in how to effectively utilise that shelter for the maximum benefit. Proper and thoughtful training is needed to encourage those of our peoples not used to housing to use it effectively. Our Company’s track record and performance in meeting the accommodation needs of many of our peoples demonstrates that we are a little different in our approach and abilities as compared to other instrumentalities operating in this field.

On behalf of Aboriginal Hostels, I commend to you our various views and proposals in this submission. We would be pleased to discuss these matters further with you at your earliest convenience and we await your decision with great interest.

Yours sincerely

Lois O’Donoghue C.B.E. A.M. CHAIRMAN OF DIRECTORS

6 8

Registered Office and Head Office First Floor Woden House Cnr. Callam and Neptune Streets Woden, A.C.T. 2606

Telephone (062) 89 1222 Telex AA62991

Aboriginal Hostels Limited ( I n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e A u s t r a l i a n C a p i t a l T e r r i t o r y )

ADDRESSES AND TELEPHONE NUMBERS OF REGIONAL OFFICES

REGION MANAGER ADDRESS TELEPHONE

Western Mr B.J. Wyatt Suite 6

85 Stirling Street Perth, WA 6000 (PO Box 8139 Sterling Street Perth, WA 6000) (09) 328 8376

Northern Mrs E. Barolits 62 Smith Street

Darwin, NT 5790 (PO Box 3820 Darwin, NT 5790) (089) 81 4388

Northern Queensland Mrs E. R. Scott 2nd Floor Tropical Arcade Bldg Cnr Shields & Abbots Sts Cairns, Qld 4870 (070) 51 4174

South Queensland Mr R. Bellear 9th Floor Aviation House Cnr Wickham & Ballow Sts Fortitude Valley Brisbane, Qld 4006

(PO Box 261 Fortitude Valley, Qld 4006) (07) 52 5581

Eastern Mr D. Wright Suite 4, 2nd Floor

Coronet House 343-349 Riley Street Surrey Hills Sydney, NSW 2010

(PO Box 900 Darlinghurst, NSW 2010) (02) 212 3288

South Eastern Mr T. Garwood 55 Smith Street Fitzroy Melbourne, Vic 3067 (PO Box 204 Abbotsford, Vic 3067) (03)419 6577

Southern Mr R. Ware 9th Floor

Public Trustee Bldg 25 Franklin Street Adelaide, SA 5000 (08) 212 6633

Central Mrs J. Edwards 46 Hartley Street

Alice Springs, NT 5750 (PO Box 1945 Alice Springs, NT 5750) (089) 52 3829

AAboriginal Hostels Limited(Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory)