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Torres Strait Regional Authority—Report for 2014-15


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Torres Strait

Regional Authority

Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Torres Strait Regional Authority

Annual Report 2

014 - 2015

Torres Strait

Regional Authority

Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Torres Strait

Regional Authority

Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ii TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

The Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) recognises the Traditional Owners of the land on which we operate. We acknowledge the past and present elders of all Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area and respect the culture and lore of all Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

The TSRA will always make every effort to respect Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people’s cultural sensitivities when featuring the images or names of people who have recently died.

However, please be advised that this document may contain images of persons who have died after this Annual Report was prepared for tabling in Parliament in October 2015 and we offer our apologies for any distress caused if this occurs.

ISSN 1324-163X

The TSRA’s contact officer for the 2014 - 2015 Annual Report is Mr John Ramsay, Programme Manager Governance and Leadership. Telephone (07) 4069 0700 or email info@tsra.gov.au.

The TSRA Annual Report 2014 - 2015 is published on the TSRA website at www.tsra.gov.au in the following formats:

— Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML)

— Adobe® Portable Document Format (PDF) ISO 32000-1:2008

— ePub electronic publishing for eBook readers.

Vision iii

VISION

Empowering our people, in our decision, in our culture, for our future

Kala Lagau Ya

Ngalpun yangu kaaba woeydhay, a ngalpun muruygaw danalagan mabaygal kunakan palayk, bathayngaka

Meriam Mir

Buaigiz kelar obaiswerare, merbi mir apuge mena obakedi, muige merbi areribi tonarge, ko merbi keub kerkerem

Kala Kawau Ya

Ngalpan moebaygal thoepoeriwoeyamoeyn, ngalpan ya kuduthoeraynu, ngalpan igililmaypa, sepa setha wara goeygil sey boey wagel

The Indigenous people of the Torres Strait are of Aboriginal and Melanesian origin and speak two distinct traditional languages. In the Eastern Islands the traditional language is Meriam Mir, while the Western and Central Island groups speak either Kala Lagau Ya or Kala Kawau Ya, which are dialects of the same language. Torres Strait Creole and English are also spoken.

Our vision is expressed in the languages of our region, recognising the importance and diversity of our culture and traditional languages.

Our vision signifies that the heart of our region is our people, with culture an important part of our lives now and into the future. Empowering our people to contribute to and make decisions regarding their future ensures that our culture will remain strong and that the future will be guided by the people who live in the region and understand and promote its unique characteristics.

Section Title v iv TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

BOIGU ISLAND

SAIBAI ISLAND

MOA ISLAND

BADU ISLAND

MABUIAG ISLAND

IAMA ISLAND

WARRABER ISLAND

PORUMA ISLAND

MASIG ISLAND

ERUB ISLAND

UGAR ISLAND

MER ISLAND

WAIBEN ISLAND

NGARUPAI ISLAND

MURALAG ISLAND

KERIRI (HAMMOND) ISLAND

CAPE YORK PENINSULA

DAUAN ISLAND

ST PAULS

KUBIN

SEISIA

BAMAGA

UMAGICO

INJINOO

NEW MAPOON

TORRES STRAIT REGION

FIGURE P-1: MAP OF THE TORRES STRAIT REGION

Saibai wetlands.

HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Fisheries - Towards 100 Per Cent Ownership

It has long been the aspirations of the Traditional Owners of the sea and land in the Torres Strait to achieve 100 per cent ownership of all fisheries in the region. The fisheries include finfish, tropical rock lobster, hand collectables and prawn. The TSRA is pleased to report that the bêche-de-mer fishery, which forms a significant and high value component of the hand collectables fishery, is now 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people. This is the second fishery, after finfish, to be wholly owned. The TSRA’s Fisheries Programme will continue to work towards full ownership of the tropical rock lobster fishery (currently 56 per cent owned) and the prawn fishery, for which there is currently no ownership.

Addressing Gender Imbalance

The Torres Strait region lags significantly behind other Australian Indigenous regions in achieving balanced gender representation on elected bodies. A study by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies conducted in 2013 indicated a gender ratio of 80:20 (males to females) in the Torres Strait compared to a ratio of 50:50 in other regions. In 2014 - 2015 the TSRA partnered with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation to design a leadership programme for the women of the Torres Strait. This programme focuses on developing the skills women need to represent their communities in public office. Four women completed the pilot course this year and ten places are being offered on the 2015 - 2016 course.

From Grant Dependency to Self-Reliance

Since native title was determined on 3 June 1992 for the Meriam people on Murray (Mer) Island, the number of determinations has increased to 22, with the determination for the Kulkalgal people on 20 June 2014. There are 21 Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate, also known as Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs) in the Torres Strait. The TSRA has been working with PBCs since their inception to develop their capacity to control their own affairs to manage native title and engage effectively with native title holders. Until this year all PBCs were reliant on the TSRA for funding to support their operations. In 2014 - 2015 the TSRA entered into agreements with the Mura Badulgal and Mer Gedkem Le PBCs, located on Badu and Mer Islands, to move away from reliance on grant funding to a fee-for-service model. This achievement is documented further in the Governance and Leadership Programme case study on page 78.

Caring For Our Country

The TSRA ranger programme has expanded to 45 rangers and six vessels across 14 communities. The sixth vessel was inaugurated on Erub (Darnley Island) in January 2015. The TSRA is funded by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to continue the ranger programme through to July 2018. The TSRA has engaged a dedicated compliance officer to raise awareness of the community-based management of marine turtle and dugong in the region. Rangers are actively

Highlights and Achievements vii

viii TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

involved in a range of land and sea care activities, including turtle tagging, seagrass monitoring, removal of ghost nets, feral animal control, weed control and protection from invasive species.

Introduction of the PGPA Act 2013

The TSRA has completed the conversion of its policies and procedures from the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and PGPA Rule 2014. The TSRA engaged Effective Governance to provide PGPA training to the TSRA’s Board. The TSRA Board Charter has been rewritten to ensure that Board members have access to the latest governance policies. Training for TSRA staff is scheduled to be completed in July 2015.

Mid-Term Performance Review

The TSRA Board Charter required the Board to undertake a mid-term performance review. The TSRA engaged MLCS Corporate to review all Board papers between 2012 and 2015 and to attend as observers at Board Meeting 93 in March 2015. Board members and senior TSRA staff were interviewed and a performance survey instrument was developed. As of 30 June 2015, the review was being finalised.

Pathways to Employment

The TSRA Economic Development Programme, in partnership with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, Maritime Safety Queensland and the Australian Maritime College, is delivering the

Treaty awareness visit, Papua New Guinea.

Highlights and Achievements ix

Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project (TSMPP). The TSMPP has two key outcomes: providing accredited training in commercial fisheries and seafood handling (12 students); and providing accredited training for a Certificate II in Maritime Operations (55 students). In 2014 - 2015, 70 students attended TSMPP training-related activities, achieving a 100 per cent pass rate. Since commencing the TSMPP in 2013, 83 graduates have moved into full-time work in fisheries or maritime industries. The number of maritime safety incidents in Torres Strait waters has dropped from a high of 258 in 2007 to 118 in 2014. The TSMPP creates jobs and saves lives: it is a success story for the delivery agencies and the participants. This achievement is documented further in the Economic Development Programme case study on page 46.

A Focused Economic Development Strategy

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA reviewed the outcomes from its Community Economic Initiatives Scheme (CEIS). CEIS was predominantly an economic development grant programme to assist Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people to enter or improve commercial ventures. The review found the scheme had not contributed significantly to Indigenous employment and recommended a more strategic approach be taken to economic investment. The TSRA has designed a new regional economic development strategy, and the first two economic development forums towards implementing the strategy were conducted in 2014 - 2015. The third forum is to identify specific industry opportunities for targeted assistance, and is scheduled in the second half of 2015.

Engaging With Our Communities

The TSRA’s Governance and Leadership Programme and Native Title Programme have assisted 21 PBCs in the region to maintain their compliance with the requirements of the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations. This is the fourth consecutive year that full compliance has been achieved.

The TSRA is working with the Gur A Baradharaw Kod (GBK) Sea and Land Council, which has representation from all Torres Strait communities, to develop their capacity to manage native title and support the region’s PBCs. The GBK aspires to take over the Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) role when the TSRA’s appointment as the NTRB ends on 30 June 2016. This year the TSRA assisted the GBK to complete consultations with Torres Strait Islander communities throughout the region and in mainland regional centres in Cairns, Townsville and Mackay.

TSRA 20-year anniversary celebrations.

x TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

The TSRA Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer conducted eight community consultations, providing an opportunity for community members to hear presentations from each of the TSRA’s programmes on the services being delivered throughout the region. The two-day visits provide an opportunity for community deputations to discuss issues directly with the TSRA’s senior leadership team.

Employment

On 14 June 2015, the TSRA completed the migration of the remaining Community Development Employment Projects participants to Centrelink payments. Some 46 Remote Jobs and Communities Programme jobseekers were transitioned into permanent full-time employment positions and a further 196 commenced part-t ime employment.

Access to Healthy Food

The sustainable horticulture project, which is operated by the TSRA’s Environmental Management Programme, expanded from four communities in 2013 - 2014 to 13 communities in 2014 - 2015. The TSRA delivers a horticulture in schools programme in collaboration with the Tagai State College. This project has supported the employment of an environmental education coordinator based at Tagai College. Two campuses in the region received awards from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority for their level of community engagement and produce from the gardens.

Integrated Service Delivery

The TSRA, in partnership with Australian and Queensland government agencies, local government and non-government organisations in the region, is delivering against the service and infrastructure shortfalls identified in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula

Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029 Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) community booklets. Community consultations undertaken in 2008 and 2009 identified 1,613 service gaps. In 2014 - 2015, 773 service gaps (48 per cent) had been addressed, 382 (24 per cent) were in progress and 309 (19 per cent) had not yet commenced. The remaining 149 (9 per cent) of the items identified by communities had been assessed as not feasible or as a commercial or non-g overnment responsibility.

During community consultations in 2014 - 2015, five duplications were identified and the baseline was adjusted to 1,608 service gaps. As of 30 June 2015, the figures had improved to 1,034 (64 per cent) addressed, 209 (13 per cent) in

Prince of Wales, consultations.

progress and 87 (5 per cent) not yet commenced. The remaining 278 (17 per cent) of the items identified by communities had been assessed as not feasible or a commercial or non-government responsibility. Statistics for each of the Council of Australian Governments building blocks for Closing the Gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are included in Section 3 of this report.

Promoting and Advocating Critical Issues for the Region

The TSRA Chairperson, supported by the portfolio members and other Board members, participated in 35 meetings with Government Ministers and

senior departmental officials. These meetings help ensure that matters of relevance and importance to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region are being taken into account for new policies and service delivery. A number of these meetings are described in Section 1 of this report, in the Chairperson’s message.

The Torres Strait Regional Authority in its role as the Native Title Representative Body for the region has two native title determinations in progress. The Native Title Office has successfully negotiated social housing Indigenous Land Use Agreements with eight communities, enabling the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships to commence the social housing programme, on 76 lots.

Highlights and Achievements xi

Church on beach at Ugar.

Poruma, sandbags for erosion protection.

OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

Opportunities

To Explore Alternative Energy Sources to Facilitate Regional Growth

With the exception of a small (1,600 MWh) wind turbine installation on Thursday Island, all other power generation in the Torres Strait is from diesel generators. All fuel is transported by barge from Cairns. The cost of electricity for new industry would be prohibitive without further investment in alternative energy sources or subsidies. The Torres Strait is situated in the northeast / southwest monsoon belt and there are regular strong tidal flows. There are opportunities for research and investment into further wind power and tidal flow power generation.

To Secure Land Tenure for Social Housing and Home Ownership

Securing land tenure for infrastructure development

is both an opportunity and a challenge. As native title issues are resolved and tenure is secured through negotiated Indigenous Land Use Agreements, the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torre Strait Islander Partnerships is able to deliver social housing outcomes in communities. In areas where it is possible to establish freehold and leasehold land the TSRA is able to work with potential home owners by offering

subsidised home loans. The TSRA is ready to partner with the Torres Shire Council and the Torres

Strait Island Regional Council to identify ‘good renters’ who can be assisted into home ownership. While these opportunities are available, they can only be realised when land tenure is resolved.

To Improve the Outlook for Torres Strait Fisheries

In partnership with the Protected Zone Joint Authority, the TSRA is consulting with Torres Strait communities

on the draft roadmap towards 100 per cent ownership of fisheries within the Torres Strait. When

finalised, the roadmap will set out the priorities and

strategies to move Torres Strait fisheries towards the 100 per cent ownership aspiration.

The TSRA is progressing the Finfish Fishery Action Plan project. The project is designed to increase participation in this fishery and increase the benefits from the fishery to Torres Strait communities. Economic benefits can be achieved by assisting potential commercial fishers to actively participate in the industry. The action plan will also provide guidance to the TSRA on the investment of funds raised through the leasing of sunset fishing licences in this fishery.

To Improve Communication Within and Between Communities

The Torres Strait Islanders Media Association (TSIMA) and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council have drafted a contract to transition the management of the region’s 14 Remote Indigenous

Broadcasting Service stations to the TSIMA. The TSRA has assisted TSIMA to establish four stations

this financial year. It is estimated another two years will be required to bring the remaining ten stations on air. The TSRA is also actively engaged in using social

media, through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Opportunities and Challenges xiii

xiv TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

To Improve Telecommunication Services Throughout the Region

Telecommunications infrastructure in the Torres Strait area is poor, particularly for communities on outer islands. This impacts on service delivery and social inclusion. The TSRA has entered into a partnership with Telstra to develop a voice and data communications strategy for the Torres Strait area and to prepare an implementation plan. The TSRA funded Telstra to conduct a feasibility study to improve communications infrastructure throughout the Torres Strait area. Telstra has committed $15.0 million to this project and has commenced equipment and tower upgrades. The TSRA has allocated $1.8 million towards this project. The total cost of the communications upgrade will be $25.44 million. The TSRA is exploring options with the Australian Government to provide the $8.6 million in additional funding required to complete this project.

Challenges

Geography

The geography of the Torres Strait area influences our capacity to deliver services to the region. The cost of delivering services and infrastructure to the Torres Strait area is significantly higher than most other areas in Australia due to the air and sea travel and freight costs.

Land Tenure

The security of land tenure for investment remains the most significant challenge to growth in the region. The region has a combination of freehold, Torres Strait freehold, native title, Deed of Grant in Trust, and Katter leases. Businesses and some individuals hold leases which may be registered or unregistered, under a range of legislation. Few businesses or individuals are able to use

Boigu esplanade.

land as security for borrowing. The lack of tenure and its impact on access to loan funds impacts on economic growth. The simplification of land tenure regimes would increase opportunities for private investment.

Air Travel Costs

The cost of travel to the region remains an impediment to the growth of tourism as an industry. The Cairns - Horn Island air route was deregulated on 1 January 2015 thus opening the route to other operators. However, this has not led to increased competition on this route; the cost of travel to the region and within the region remains high.

Collecting Valid Fisheries Data

The majority of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers in the Torres Strait area

operate with Torres Strait Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) licences, issued under the Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984 (Cth). TIB fishers are not required to maintain catch logs or to report catch. Accurate catch data for the Torres Strait area is therefore not available and the TSRA relies on estimates provided by the Australian Fisheries Management Authority to report on the performance of initiatives undertaken by the TSRA Fisheries Programme.

Freight and Road Infrastructure

All freight into the Torres Strait arrives by sea or air from Cairns. The road north of Cooktown (to Bamaga-Seisia) cannot be used as a freight corridor. An all-weather road link between Cairns and Cape York would provide an alternative freight route and open the region for tourism and investment.

Adaptation to Rising Sea Levels and Temperature Change

While work has commenced on the construction of sea walls to mitigate tidal inundation damage for six of the low-lying Torres Strait islands, increasing sea levels remains a concern for the long-term viability of some communities. The TSRA is working with the Queensland Government and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council to establish a clear process to develop and implement appropriate adaptation measures regionally and at community level.

Regional Governance

The elected leaders in the region from the TSRA and the three local government bodies continue to advocate to achieve the region’s aspirations for a governance model that would provide greater autonomy. The TSRA Board members are participating in these ongoing discussions to develop a model of governance for the region that will both address the leaders’ aspirations and facilitate the effective delivery of government services.

Opportunities and Challenges xv

Coral reef.

xvi TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CONTENTS

Vision iii

Torres Strait Region v

Highlights and Achievements vii

Opportunities and Challenges xiii

Letter of Transmittal xxi

SECTION ONE Strategic Overview 1

Contributing to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy 3

Chairperson’s Message 4

Chief Executive Officer’s Message 9

SECTION TWO Programme Performance 15

How We Meet Our Outcomes 17

Outcomes and Planned Performance 17

Integrated Planning Framework 18

Portfolio Budget Statements Key Performance Indicators 20

Details About Our Programmes 29

Culture, Art and Heritage 30

Economic Development 40

Fisheries 48

Environmental Management 60

Governance and Leadership 70

Native Title 80

Healthy Communities 98

Safe Communities 108

Contents xvii

SECTION THREE Report of Operations 119

Where We Operate 120

Geography and Logistics 120

Culture 120

History 121

Native Title 121

Progress Towards Closing the Gap 121

COAG Building Blocks 122

Regional Statistics 126

How the TSRA Operates 132

Formation 132

Enabling Legislation 132

Functions 133

Powers 134

Responsible Minister 134

Ministerial Directions 134

Statement of Expectations and Statement of Intent 135

Ministerial Appointments 135

Briefings and Information 135

Judicial Decisions and Reviews 135

SECTION FOUR Corporate Governance and Accountability 137

Overview of Governance Structure 138

Governance Framework 139

TSRA Board 139

Executive Committee 154

Other Boards and Committees 157

Advisory Committees 158

Enabling Functions 161

Information Management and Technology 161

Environmental Sustainability 161

Risk Management 164

Accountability 166

Human Resources 167

Other Reportable Matters 170

xviii TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

SECTION FIVE Financial Reports 173

SECTION SIX Appendices 223

Appendix 1: Organisational Structure 224

Appendix 2: Advertising and Market Research 225

Appendix 3: Details of Grants 226

Appendix 4: Details of Consultants 230

Appendix 5: Compliance with Australian Government Statutes and Policies 234

Appendix 6: Explanation of Programme Budget Variance 235

SECTION SEVEN Compliance Index 239

Commonwealth Entity 240

SECTION EIGHT 247

Tables and Figures 248

Abbreviations 252

Index 256

Section Title xix

Canoe, Saibai.

Badu and Moa rangers learn how to set pitfall traplines.

Letter of Transmittal xxi

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Dancers perform at Torres Strait Masks exhibition.

SECTION ONE

Strategic Overview

TSRA Chairperson takes a look at an erosion site on Masig.

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chairperson’s Message 3

CONTRIBUTING TO THE INDIGENOUS ADVANCEMENT STRATEGY

The Australian Government is committed to achieving better results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in three priority areas - getting children to school, adults into work and building safe communities.

The Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) contributes to these priorities by:

GETTING CHILDREN TO SCHOOL

— Regional school attendance increased from 84 per cent in 2013 - 2014 to 88 percent in 2014 - 2015.

— While the Torres Strait is not one of the regions targeted by the Remote Attendance Strategy, the TSRA, through its Healthy Communities and Safe Communities programmes provides funding to non-government organisations in the region to promote school attendance. This includes after school care programmes, school holiday care programmes and the ‘Straight Start’ project which improves access to early education on outer islands.

— The TSRA’s Economic Development programme is developing a continuum from year 10 to work with the TAGAI High School and the Jobs Services Provider. This project will work with students throughout years 10, 11 and 12 to prepare them to enter the workforce.

— The TSRA’s Environmental Management programme in partnership with TAGAI College support a ‘Junior Ranger’ project to educate students in land and sea management. This popular activity is an incentive for school attendance.

GETTING PEOPLE TO WORK

— The TSRA is the agreement manager for the former Remote Jobs in Communities Programme (RJCP) and the current Community Development Programme (CDP) for the Torres Strait region.

— In 2014 - 2015, 45 participants have moved into full time employment. An additional 196 participants have found part-time employment.

— The TSRA’s Economic Development programme works with communities to identify infrastructure projects which will deliver both skills enhancement and employment opportunities. The TSRA provides funding to the CDP provider to deliver employment outcome focussed projects.

— The Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project (TSMPP) facilitates employment in commercial fishing, seafood handling and commercial vessel operations. Since it commenced in 2013, the TSMPP had enabled 83 persons to find full time employment in this industry sector.

BUILDING SAFER COMMUNITIES

— The TSRA’s Safe Communities programme works with communities and funds non-government organisations to deliver a range of social services and safety programmes within the region.

— The Port Kennedy Association and Mura Kosker Sorority are the key recipients of grant funding for these services which include child and family support services, financial counselling and adult literacy.

— The TSRA’s contribution towards the Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme has enhanced remote airport safety and jetties / landing areas safety.

— The Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme has provided over 1,400 life jackets to children in the region. The TSRA sponsors activities during domestic violence prevention month.

4 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE

I am pleased to present the Torres Strait Regional Authority’s 2014 - 2015 Annual Report, marking our performance at the end of our twenty-first year of operation.

Community Engagement

The Chief Executive Officer and I have continued our community engagement and communication programme throughout the reporting period, visiting Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area communities to inform our stakeholders on Australian Government Indigenous policies and the TSRA’s activities and initiatives. Community visits are invaluable as they provide an opportunity for the TSRA to listen to community concerns and for organisations and individuals to meet with the TSRA’s executive leadership team.

As part of our Integrated Service Delivery approach to community consultation in 2024 - 2015 we welcomed the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service to join with the TSRA on community visits. The support of Prescribed Bodies Corporate, elders groups and local government councillors has also been an important element of our visits and I thank them for their continued support.

This year’s schedule has been busy with visits being undertaken at Dauan, Ngurapai, Muralag, Iama, Mabuiag, Masig, TRAWQ, Boigu, Mer, and Poruma. I thank all community members for their hospitality and engagement during our visits.

TSRA Board Mid-Term Performance Review

The TSRA Board Charter requires that TSRA Board members undertake a formal review of their performance at the mid-point of their term in office.

The TSRA engaged the independent governance specialists MLCS Corporate to conduct the review.

MLCS Corporate evaluated the TSRA Board and TSRA Board committees, including the TSRA Executive Committee, TSRA Audit Committee and Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee. The performance report will be considered by the Board at its meeting in September 2015.

TSRA Board Strategic Workshop

The TSRA Board’s annual strategic planning workshop is an opportunity for Board members to reflect on the TSRA’s progress and successes as well as to look forward and consider priorities and potential challenges in forthcoming years. The TSRA Board’s Strategic Workshop was held over two days in early November 2014 and determined the Board’s priorities for delivering the outcomes from the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018. The projects and activities planned for 2015 - 2016 are based on those priorities. Those activities and the associated budgets were passed by the Board at our June 2015 meeting.

Another important focus of the strategic planning workshop was to inform the Board of changes to their responsibilities and accountability following the transition from the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (Cth) to the Public

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chairperson’s Message 5

Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) (PGPA Act). The TSRA engaged the governance specialist Effective Governance to deliver training to the Board on the implications of the PGPA Act.

’Think Collectively, Act Together’ - TSRA Economic Development Summits

The TSRA has planned a series of three economic development summits with an overarching theme of ‘Think collectively, act together’ to help guide the creation of commercially viable industries to contribute to wealth creation for Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait region. Summits one and two were held in November 2014 and April 2015 respectively. I recently announced that the third economic development summit will occur in the new financial year.

The first summit focused on regional leaders and explored opportunities for collaborative approaches. Presentations from Indigenous Business Australia, Ecotourism Australia, Regional Development Australia (Far North Queensland and Torres Strait), and the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, focused on employment aspects. The second summit started to develop a Regional Economic Investment Strategy, examining and prioritising economic development opportunities for the Torres Strait region that could be commercially viable.

Mediation for the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B

After the Federal Court recognised the Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC as the holder of the native title rights recognised in Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part A, the Federal Court’s focus turned to progressing the Part B portion of this claim. The Part B area is wholly overlapped by two claims - one filed on behalf of the Kaurareg People and the other filed on behalf of the Gudang Yadhaykenu People. The TSRA is aware a new claim may soon be lodged to replace the existing Part B claim.

During court-ordered mediation held in February 2015, agreement was reached between the Badulgal, Mualgal and Kaurareg Peoples that the western overlap is shared sea country. Negotiations have now started with the respondent parties (including the Commonwealth of Australia, the Queensland Government and fisher representatives) towards a consent determination for the western agreed area. We are hoping the court will convene a determination hearing in late 2015 or early 2016 to recognise native title rights over the western agreed area. Negotiations to resolve the eastern overlap area will be scheduled in early 2016 after the connection reports, to be completed in late 2015, are exchanged.

TSRA Chairperson at Kaziw Meta with new student transport bus. TSRA Chairperson and Senator Nova Peris.

6 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Our Commitment to Maintain Culture

‘Empowering our language, in our culture, for our future’ was the theme of the inaugural Torres Strait Language Symposium, held at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre from 11 to 13 March 2015. The event was presented in partnership with Tagai State College, a key stakeholder in language preservation, and brought together traditional language speakers and specialists from across the region to plan for the future revival and maintenance of Torres Strait language.

The TSRA has developed strategies for the preservation of music and dance, providing grant funding and direct support to local artists and cultural practitioners to produce and showcase art from the region. The TSRA-sponsored Indigenous Art Awards attracts artwork from throughout the region, and I acknowledge our important partnership with the National Museum of Australia in making the awards night a tremendous success.

One Hundred Per Cent Ownership of the Torres Strait Bêche-de-Mer Fishery

The single remaining non-Indigenous Transferable Vessel Holder (TVH) licence to fish in the Torres Strait bêche-de-mer fishery was purchased by the TSRA in January 2015 and is being held by the TSRA on behalf of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

The bêche-de-mer fishery is the second fishery to be 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the Torres Strait. In 2007, the Torres Strait finfish fishery became 100 per cent owned and is an important commercial asset to communities.

TSRA 20-year anniversary celebrations.

I thank all community members for their hospitality and engagement during our visits.

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chairperson’s Message 7

Torres Strait Treaty Cycle Meetings

The TSRA attended the Torres Strait Treaty Cycle meetings, hosted by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, in Cairns at the end of October 2014. These meetings include the Traditional Inhabitants Meeting and Joint Advisory Council meetings that discuss a number of cross-border issues related to the Torres Strait Treaty. These bilateral meetings with Papua New Guinea involve Traditional Owner representatives from Western Province villages, who are part of the Torres Strait Treaty.

An Environmental Management Committee meeting was held during the treaty cycle meeting period as the same stakeholders were involved. The forum was also used to facilitate a treaty coast development symposium to discuss sustainable economic development issues.

Official Visits

In November 2014, the TSRA welcomed the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to Thursday Island. The committee sought input from the TSRA on the timing, content and wording of referendum proposals. At the ninety-third meeting of the TSRA Board in March 2015, members met with Mr Warren Mundine, Chairperson of the Indigenous Advisory Council, and with committee member Mr Richard Ah Mat who provided an outline of the activities undertaken by the Indigenous Advisory Council.

The Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion, visited the region in January 2015. The Minister met with the TSRA Board and local government councils and toured the newly renovated sports stadium on Thursday Island. Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Agriculture and Chairperson of the Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority met with the

TSRA and both Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) and TVH fishers to discuss the Tropical Rock Lobster Management Plan and its opportunity for economic growth in the Torres Strait region.

Warraberalgal and Porumalgal Indigenous Protected Area

A dedication ceremony was held in July 2014 in recognition of the Warraberalgal and Porumalgal Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) as part of Australia’s reserve of protected areas. I congratulate the people of Warraber and Poruma Islands, the stewards of the Warraberalgal and Porumalgal IPA for having this significant area recognised. 

The IPA covers the nine islands of Atub, Bara, Bini, Babui, Guiya, Maza Guiya, Miggi Maituin, Ugain and Ulu as well as sandbanks and rocks that lie in the reserve area, which covers approximately 63 hectares.

Acknowledgements

In closing, I express my appreciation and thanks to the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, TSRA Board members, the TSRA’s Chief Executive Office, Mr Wayne See Kee, and the TSRA administration.

I also acknowledge the Elders, Traditional Owners, Prescribed Bodies Corporate and local government councillors for the support and hospitality provided to me when I visited your communities.

Joseph Elu Chairperson

Mer fishermen with their catch.

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chief Executive Officer’s Message 9

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S MESSAGE

Delivering Outcomes

Financial year 2014 - 2015 year has been another busy year as the TSRA Board members and programmes areas progressed and implemented policies and projects to achieve the outcomes identified in the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018.

In 2014, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion, announced the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS). One of the key activities undertaken by the TSRA Board was to map and align the outcomes

form the TSRA’s Torres Strait Development Plan to the five IAS programme streams. This enables us to demonstrate a strong alignment between the TSRA’s programme outcomes and government policy.

The TSRA maintained a strong focus on community engagement as we continued our community visit programme to inform Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region of the role of the TSRA and of changes to Australian Government Indigenous policies.

CEO and Muralag resident during Prince of Wales consultations.

10 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Effective communication with the appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region is a critical success factor for all agencies delivering outcomes in the region. This year the TSRA has extended its reach into communities by establishing Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts. The response, particularly from the young adult group, has been very positive.

Strong Programme Performance

Performance reporting. This year the TSRA changed its programme performance reporting from the narrative style used for many years, to a graphics-based ‘digital dashboard’ to highlight at-a-glance projects, activities and risks requiring the attention of the TSRA Board or the leadership group. The new style of reporting has reduced the volume of reporting per quarter from over 100 pages to under 30 pages, while still covering project budget, schedule, quality, risk and outcomes using key performance indicators. There has been a significant improvement in the level of reporting, with a stronger strategic focus. A similar approach has been adopted for Section 2, Programme Performance in this annual report. This streamlined and simplified reporting

format has been embraced by the TSRA’s Audit Committee and the Board members.

Grant funding. The TSRA operated two common funding rounds in November 2014 and March 2015. Through this process, 44 successful applications were supported. They contributed over $4.30 million towards community groups, Indigenous enterprises and individuals to carry out activities and projects that are aligned to the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 and that will benefit Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

Economic development. The TSRA commissioned an independent review of its economic development strategy during the reporting period. The review found that the practice of providing grant funding to support community-based economic development activities had not produced the intended employment or commercial viability outcomes. The Community Enterprises Initiative Scheme has been closed and will no longer be offered through the common funding round. A new economic development strategy is being trialled which targets specific initiatives identified through region-wide economic development forums. Two economic development forums were held during the reporting period; the final forum to identify the initiatives to be supported is scheduled for August

TSRA Board members with Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chief Executive Officer’s Message 11

2015. The programme is supporting 21 business clients with low interest loans. The loan portfolio is valued at $1.833 million.

Home ownership. The TSRA’s Economic Development Programme, with a portfolio value of $3.53 million, is supporting 25 families with subsidised home loans.

Caring for Country. The TSRA is delivering the Australian Government’s $42.0 million ‘Caring for Country’ commitment to the Torres Strait ranger programme through to 30 June 2018. The ranger programme employs 45 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal rangers based in 14 communities throughout the region. Ranger vessels operate in six Torres Strait Islander communities, and a seventh vessel is planned for the Mer community in 2016.

Ranger activities. Typical ranger activities include the removal of ghost nets and other marine debris, working with Torres Strait communities on dugong and turtle management, protection of culturally significant sites, removal of invasive plant species, recording of traditional ecological knowledge, monitoring of natural resources throughout the region and implementing of agreed actions from community-based plans. Rangers are also integral in the TSRA’s delivery of a range of natural and cultural resource management

initiatives on behalf of other agencies through external funding arrangements.

Leadership for tomorrow. The TSRA offers a range of leadership programmes in partnership with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation to assist Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region to grow their leadership skills. Opportunities include the Australian Rural Leadership Programme, Torres Strait Young Leaders Programme, Training Rural Australians in Leadership and the TSRA Women’s Leadership Programme (TSWLP). The TSWLP specifically targets women who are interested in public office and assists them to develop the confidence and skills to compete in the electoral process.

Senior leadership. The suite of courses offered through the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation targets tomorrow’s leaders, identifying people who are committed to extending their knowledge, understanding and capabilities in order to be more effective and influential. The premier course is the Australian Rural Leadership Programme which is delivered in six sessions over an 18-month period. The TSRA is pleased to congratulate Mr Kenny Bedford, the TSRA Member for Erub and Portfolio Member for Fishers, as our latest graduate from the twentieth Australian Rural Leadership Programme.

Iama community visit.

12 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Supporting Native Title Prescribed Bodies Corporate. The TSRA has developed a two-tier support model for Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate (RNTBCs) in the Torres Strait area which recognises the differing levels of capability and maturity of the 21 RNTBCs we support as part of our Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) function. The TSRA has two memoranda of agreement with higher performing (Tier 1) RNTBCs to operate on a fee-for-service basis. The remaining 19 RNTBCs are supported using a mix of capacity-building grants and direct support. In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA provided grants totalling $0.269 million to ten RNTBCs.

Native title. In 2014 - 2015, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs invited the TSRA to continue the NTRB role until 30 June 2016. While the NTRB is operating predominantly in a post-determination environment, there are still three native title claims to be resolved. The impacts of

the Torres Strait Sea Claim Part A determination on the commercial fishing rights of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people is still being worked through, with the newly formed Malu Lamar RNTBC representing the rights of Traditional Owners in the sea claim area.

Our Workforce

At a glance. The TSRA workforce grew from 141 to 147 this year, with 104 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people on staff. We are proud of our 71 per cent Indigenous employment level, one of the highest achieved by any government entity. The TSRA also maintains a good gender balance in its workforce, with 52 per cent male and 48 per cent female.

Diversity. In November 2014, the TSRA was nominated as a finalist in the Australian Public Service (APS) Diversity Awards for the TSRA Cultural Protocols Guide for TSRA Staff and the TSRA Indigenous Employment Strategy. The APS Diversity Awards considers Australian Government entities who have made a positive impact, are innovative, support collaboration and demonstrate their commitment to embracing diversity-related APS policy and initiatives.

Opportunities. There are opportunities for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal staff to be promoted to the highest levels in the TSRA, and skilling our workforce remains a high priority. This year the TSRA

provided an opportunity for seven experienced APS officers from other agencies to undertake a secondment into our programme line areas.

Our Partnerships

Many of our functions are performed in partnership with other agencies across three levels of government, with non-government organisations and with the private sector. The TSRA seeks to build on and extend these partnerships to make even greater efficiencies and deliver more effective outcomes for the region. Our partners in service delivery include:

Boigu Jetty (PNG coastline in background).

SECTION 1 Strategic Overview Chief Executive Officer’s Message 13

— Indigenous Business Australia

— the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation

— the Australian Fisheries Management Authority

— the Australian Maritime Safety Authority

— the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships

— the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

— the Torres Shire Council

— the Torres Strait Regional Council

— the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council

— the Torres Strait Islanders Media Association

— the Mura Kosker Sorority

— Port Kennedy Association.

Outlook

Financial. The TSRA’s budget for 2015 - 2016 will enable existing programmes and service levels in the region to be maintained, while again providing opportunities for innovative approaches to achieving the region’s and the TSRA’s vision and goals.

Board direction. Under the leadership of the Board, our focus on qualitative support for clients, stakeholders and communities will continue. The TSRA’s tiered support for native title RNTBCs and a re-invigorated economic development approach, which will be finalised in early 2015 - 2016, are positive examples of the Board’s commitment and ability to innovate to improve its performance and address regional challenges.

Communications. Consistent access to communication services is an issue within the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area. Improving access to these services is also critical for achieving more efficient, effective and cost-

beneficial service delivery to all communities for government and the non-government sectors. The TSRA will work to secure commitment for better services and infrastructure to support regional communication.

Target areas. The TSRA’s programme areas will continue to deliver against the 2014 - 2018 Torres Strait Development Plan, while targeting employment, education (including capacity building) and safe communities as priority areas for supporting sustainable regional growth into the future.

Acknowledgements

Although this year has been busy for both the administration and Board members, the TSRA is proud of its progress and achievements. The Report of Operations includes case studies from each of the TSRA programmes, highlighting more of our activities and achievements.

In closing, I express my appreciation and thanks to the TSRA Chairperson, Mr Joseph Elu, and the TSRA Board members who have guided the TSRA’s policies and set its strategic direction. Your ongoing efforts and support are truly appreciated. My appreciation is also extended to the TSRA staff and other agencies across all levels of government who have partnered with the TSRA to contribute to achieving the best outcomes for our communities.

I also acknowledge the Elders, Traditional Owners, Native Title Prescribed Bodies Corporate and local government councillors for their support and hospitality when the TSRA visited their communities.

Wayne See Kee Chief Executive Officer

Dauan community.

SECTION TWO

Programme Performance

TSRA Australian Rural Leadership Programme participant Regina Turner.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 17

HOW WE MEET OUR OUTCOMES

Outcomes and Planned Performance

This section provides details of performance against the key performance indicators (KPIs) contained in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014 - 15 for the Prime Minister and Cabinet Portfolio.

This is followed by additional reporting on other activities undertaken by the TSRA’s programme areas:

— Culture, Art and Heritage

— Economic Development

— Fisheries

— Environmental Management

— Governance and Leadership

— Native Title

— Healthy Communities

— Safe Communities.

Each programme report provides the following information:

— a statement of the regional goal

— a statement of the programme goal

— programme expenditure (the information provided in Table 2.12 is unaudited)

— a programme map, showing the linkages between programme projects, outputs, benefits, outcomes, regional goals and COAG Closing the Gap building blocks

— a statement of the programme’s performance

The Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 (Development Plan) was developed by the TSRA as required by section 142D of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth). The plan outlines eight TSRA programmes, listing the desired outcomes and benefits to be delivered. The Development Plan is published on the TSRA web site www.tsra.gov.au.

The Development Plan is derived directly from the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029 (Regional Plan). The Regional Plan was developed by the TSRA, the Torres Shire Council, the Torres Strait Island Regional Council and the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council, in consultation with Torres Strait communities. The Regional Plan captures community challenges, priorities and aspirations. A key element of the Regional Plan is its focus on integrated development planning and Integrated Service Delivery. This process aims to coordinate the effective delivery of a range of government services to local communities while ensuring that duplication and service gaps are minimised.

This process aims to coordinate the effective delivery of a range of government services to local communities while ensuring that

duplication and service gaps are minimised.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 19 18 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Integrated Planning Framework

FIGURE 2-1: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY INTEGRATED PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan

Strategic Direction - Australian Government and Queensland Government policies.

Regional Vision and Goals - Determined by elected representatives based on community consultations.

Integrated Service Delivery Framework - Joint arrangements to inform how the Regional Plan is to be delivered. Defines the roles and responsibilities of contributing agencies. Outlines the monitoring and reporting functions.

Council Corporate Plans

Outlines the individual vision and strategies for Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council, Torres Strait Island Regional Council and Torres Shire Council. Covers a period of 4 years and has a strategic and operational outlook.

Specific Purpose Service Delivery Plans/Projects

These will be specific plans and projects that are identified and developed on an as-required basis.

These plans will be managed by the appropriate agency that has the specific service delivery responsibility.

Torres Strait Development Plan

Outlining TSRA programs contributing to both the Regional Plan and COAG Building Blocks for Closing the Gap.

Integrated Service Delivery Action Plan

Agreement between communities, the TSRA and Government Service Delivery Agencies on action, priority and timing for the delivery of new services and infrastructure

TSRA Program Plans

Detailed program plans outlining management of programs.

Agency Plans

Individual plans developed by agencies for delivering services to the region.

Council Operational Plans

Detailed operational plans addressing infrastructure, transport and other areas.

Integrated plans that incorporate all levels of integrated service delivery for the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Prescribed Bodies Corporate

Community Consultations

Community Vision Documents

Inputs to the Regional Plan and other plans. There are a number of inputs which need to be fed into and be part of community and leader consultations. These inputs, when considered and discussed with community and leaders, produce vital information to incorporate into the Regional Plan and subsequent lower level plans by the various organisations involved in service delivery in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Australian Government and Queensland Government Policies

Regional Plan Community Booklets

Provides regular reporting to communities and other stakeholders on progress made towards delivering the Regional Plan

Communities

Delivery mechanism in the form of an agreement that will commit to Integrated Service Delivery and a framework outlining and establishing governance arrangements.

Inputs Integrated Plans Service Delivery Mechanism

20 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Portfolio Budget Statements Key Performance Indicators

Increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned commercially viable businesses

Five business loans with a total value of $928,213 were approved in 2014 - 2015. TSRA business loans are provided at concessional interest rates according to the level of assessed risks. One loan was provided to start a new business and four loans were in support of existing businesses. Figures on the total number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned business in the Torres Strait area are not yet available.

TABLE 2-1: NUMBER AND VALUE OF CONCESSIONAL BUSINESS LOANS, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Loans 4 3 3 5

Amount $454,242 $186,790 $114,909 $928,213

Increased availability of approved business training

The ‘Into Business Workshop’ project commenced in 2013 - 2014 and is delivered in partnership with Indigenous Business Australia. Workshops are conducted in three phases, and participants are required to complete all phases. Two workshops were conducted in 2014 - 2015, with 17 participants completing the training.

TABLE 2-2: INTO BUSINESS WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION, 2013 - 2014 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

No. of workshops 6 2

Participants 24 17

The TSRA also offers support to existing businesses through its Business Mentoring Support Project. In 2014 - 2015, two clients took advantage of this service.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 21

Increases in catches by Torres Strait and Aboriginal fishes relative to total allowable catch, strengthening claims for increased ownership

Progress against this indicator cannot be accurately quantified at present. The requirement to report catch is not mandatory for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers in the region, so comprehensive data to measure tangible outcomes does not yet exist. Discussions are continuing within the Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) to identify and implement a more robust system of data collection; however, this is likely to be a medium to long term outcome and remains a challenge for the TSRA and the PZJA.

The best available data can be obtained from the Status of Key Australian Fish Stocks Reports (AFSR) 2012 and 2014, produced by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation.

TABLE 2-3: TROPICAL ROCK LOBSTER CATCH STATISTICS, 2010 TO 2013

YEAR 2010 2011 2012 2013

Tropical rock lobster (tonnes) 191 201 188 586

Note:

Catch data for Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) fishers is reported for 2010, 2011 and 2012. The 2013 figure represents the total catch; the actual catch by Indigenous fishers in 2013 is unknown (Status of key Australian fish stock reports 2014, p. 217). Catch data for 2014 was not available at the time of printing.

TABLE 2-4: FINFISH FISHERIES CATCH STATISTICS FOR TRADITIONAL INHABITANT BOAT LICENSEES, 2011 - 2012 TO 2013 - 2014

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014

Coral trout 2.29 tonnes 1.08 tonnes Under 1.00 tonnes

Spanish mackerel 1.86 tonnes 1.64 tonnes Under 1.00 tonnes

Notes:

Finfish catch reporting is voluntary for the TIB sector. Data from processors is used to provide an estimate for TIB catch. These figures are not a true representation of the total catch.

The focus of the Fisheries Programme has been to increase the capacity of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers to participate in commercial fishing. To this end there has been a significant investment in accredited training through the Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project (TSMPP). Since its inception in 2013 the TSMPP has provided an opportunity for 120 persons to gain internationally recognised accredited training. Of these, 85 participants (71 per cent) have moved into maritime-related employment.

22 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Increase in the number of emerging and professionally active artists and cultural practitioners that have access to information and support to ensure copyright and intellectual property rights

With the further development of the Torres Strait art industry it has been increasingly important to focus activities with a view to enhancing the protection, copyright and intellectual property rights of both the individual artist and the cultural groups who share their knowledge. All artists and cultural practitioners who engage with the TSRA’s Culture, Art and Heritage Programme are informed of their rights in the promotion and publication of their work.

This is a standard practice achieved through various ways, including by providing information directly to artists and cultural practitioners when they become suppliers or exhibiters at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre; communicating regularly through quarterly newsletters; informing dance teams prior to dance events; and informing all participants in the Music and Dance Audit project before they make their recordings. Information

on copyright and intellectual property rights is also incorporated into sales and licensing agreements with the TSRA which covers the sale or reproduction of works.

In 2014 - 2015, there was an increase in specific information provided to artists and cultural practitioners through tailored workshops and individual meetings with the Arts Law Centre of Queensland, which focused on wills, resale royalties and the Indigenous Art Code. Table 2-5 reflects the increase in artists and cultural practitioners engaging with the TSRA.

TABLE 2-5: ACTIVE ARTISTS AND CULTURAL PRACTITIONERS, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Active artists 70 90 100 110

Cultural practitioners 20 40 77 80

With the further development of the Torres Strait art industry it has been increasingly important to focus activities with a view to enhancing the

protection, copyright and intellectual property rights of both the individual artist and the cultural groups who share their knowledge.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 23

Number of Native Title determinations claims successfully determined

The Native Title Representative Body in the Torres Strait is operating predominantly in a post-de termination environment with 29 native title claims successfully determined as at 30 June 2015. The claims currently being determined within the region are:

— QUD6040/2001 Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B

— QUD6005/2002 Warral and Ului

— QUD266/2008 Kaurareg People #1

— QUD267/2008 Kaurareg People #2

— QUD362/2010 Kaurareg People #3.

TABLE 2-6: KEY NATIVE TITLE REPRESENTATIVE BODY RESULTS, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Active native title claims under consideration

4 3 3 2(1)

Future Acts Received 105 60 64 85

(1) W hile there are five current native title claims in the region, the three Kaurareg claims are briefed out due to potential conflicts in representation. Two claims are classed as being active and under the management of the TSRA’s Native Title Representative Body.

Number of Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUA) that have compensation or other benefits as part of ILUA terms

The main ILUA activities undertaken throughout the Torres Strait in 2014 - 2015 were focused on social housing outcomes. Agreements were reached for 76 housing lots across the communities of Badu, Masig, Mabuiag, Mer, St Pauls, Poruma, Warraber and Ugar.

Other ILUAs were agreed for infrastructure projects on Masig, Poruma and Saibai, which had two.

TABLE 2-7: NUMBER OF ILUAS FINALISED, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Agreements 5 5 4 12(1)

(1) Includes eight social housing ILUAs.

24 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Number of endorsed community based management plans for the natural and cultural resources of the region being actively implemented

Each community in the outer islands is implementing a community-based management plan for dugong and turtle, with the support of the TSRA. The plans combine the traditional uses of these species with modern management arrangements and the sustainable use of dugong and turtle across the region. A dugong and turtle management plan for the Kaiwalagal region is under development by Traditional Owners and the TSRA.

Ranger Working on Country plans have been updated with community input across the region, and these continue to form the basis of ranger activities. Working on Country plans are developed with Traditional Owners who identify their priority natural and cultural resource management issues for a three-year period. The three Indigenous protected areas in the Torres Strait have management plans (either finalised or draft) that guide on-ground activities.

TABLE 2-8: COMMUNITY-BASED MANAGEMENT PLANS, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Plans 17 32 32 32

Increase the level of engagement of elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders in policy development and decision-making

The primary indicator of the level of engagement is the number of meetings between the elected members of the TSRA and Government Ministers. This includes engagements by the TSRA Chairperson and Board members during visits to Canberra, and also engagements with Ministers by the TSRA Board during visits by Ministers to the region. In 2014 - 2015, one of the significant commitments the TSRA sought from government was a commitment to the aspirations of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers to attain 100 per cent ownership of the Torres Strait fishery. The TSRA acknowledges the support of the Minister for Indigenous Affairs in this achievement. In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA purchased the last non-Indigenous licence in the bêche-d e-mer fishery, which increased ownership of the hand collectables fishery to 100 per cent. More detail on the bêche-de-mer fishery can be found in the case study attached to the Fisheries Programme section in this report.

TABLE 2-9: NUMBER OF HIGH LEVEL ENGAGEMENTS BY TSRA BOARD MEMBERS, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 -2014 2014 - 2015

Engagements 20 29 29 35

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 25

Number of PBCs that achieve Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC) compliance as at 31 December each year

All 21 Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate/PBC in the Torres Strait area achieved the required levels of compliance in 2014 - 2015.

TABLE 2-10: PBC COMPLIANCE RESULTS 2011-2012 TO 2014-2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015

Compliance 20 of 20 20 of 20 20 of 20 21 of 21

ORIC compliance is the minimal level of measurement of the capacity of a PBC to perform its functions under the Native Title Act 1993. To comply, PBCs must conduct an annual general meeting in accordance with their respective rule books and submit a general report by the due date. PBCs with incomes greater than $100,000 must also comply with additional financial reporting requirements.

The TSRA’s relationship with each PBC depends on the level of capacity the PBC has to manage its own affairs without assistance. This is measured using a PBC capacity maturity model which enables targeted assistance to be provided to PBCs for specific functions. The TSRA employs a PBC Support Officer to work with PBC directors and focus on capacity development. The TSRA also operates a PBC capacity-building grant facility which provides some operational funding to assist PBCs to establish and operate an office within their community.

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA was successful in moving two of the higher functioning PBCs from reliance on grant funding, to a fee-for-service model. This is covered further in the case study attached to the Governance and Leadership Programme section in this report.

Partnerships with other capacity building agencies have been important contributors to developing capability within the region. The TSRA has worked with ORIC, the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), the Aurora Foundation and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to coordinate and deliver training to the region.

A further measure of the capacity of PBCs is their effectiveness in engaging with Traditional Owners on native title matters. This is a qualitative assessment for which the only data available is the numbers of Future Acts and ILUAs which are successfully negotiated for each community. This data alone does not provide a measure of effectiveness as the quality and currency of the data varies between communities. The TSRA has not yet developed a meaningful measure of effectiveness and proposes a study with AIATSIS to develop those.

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA was successful in moving two of the higher functioning PBCs from reliance on grant funding, to a

fee-f or-s ervice model.

26 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Increased investment into new and existing regional environmental health infrastructure

Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 4B (MIP 4B) has been completed and Stage 5 (MIP 5) has started, with a target completion date of 31 December 2016.

The TSRA is currently working with the three local governments in the region to identify and prioritise projects for a proposed follow-on stage of MIP for the period 2016 - 2020.

The TSRA in the past has secured funding for infrastructure projects that address key environmental health concerns and safe transport and access issues. In 2014 -2015 a range of

projects were completed. Under the MIP 4B tidal gauge project four tidal gauges and one sea level gauge at Boigu, Kubin, Iama, Ugar and Thursday Island were installed. A tidal gauge and weather station was installed on the Thursday Island jetty. MIP 5 will deliver 13 environmental health infrastructure projects throughout the region.

The Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme (TIDS) successfully delivered four projects in the region, completing Hammond Island pavement and drainages works, ramp repairs for the St Pauls community and the Saibai Island jetty, airport drainage and pavement repairs on Northern Peninsula Area airstrips and jetty lighting and electrical reticulations for the Seisia community.

TABLE 2-11: MEASURES OF INVESTMENT (BY PROJECT NUMBERS) FOR REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURE, 2011 - 2012 TO 2014 - 2015

YEAR 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 20153

MIP projects1, 2 21 21 16 23

(1) M IP stages 4 and 4B ran from 2007 - 2008 to 2013 - 2014 and delivered health infrastructure projects totalling $113.0 million.

(2) T he TIDS delivered safety infrastructure related projects from 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015, totalling $3.8 million.

(3) T he total budget for MIP, seawalls and TIDS in 2014 - 2015 was $47.9 million.

Cargo delivery, Mer Island.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance How We Meet Our Outcomes 27

Appropriation programme expenditure 2014 - 2015 budget as compared to actual

A summary of the TSRA’s financial performance for each programme area for 2014 - 2015 is provided in Table 2.12.

Section 5, Financial Statements, provides further information about appropriation expenditure for each programme area at 30 June 2015.

TABLE 2-12: APPROPRIATION PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE 2014 - 2015, BUDGET COMPARED TO ACTUAL (UNAUDITED)

PROGRAMME

BUDGET $’000

ACTUAL $’000

VARIANCE $’000

Culture, Art and Heritage 4,630 4,499 131

Economic Development 13,407 13,358 49

Environmental Management 4,579 4,699 (120)

Fisheries 4,546 4,550 (4)

Governance and Leadership 5,412 5,336 76

Healthy Communities 14,716 14,629 87

Native Title Office 3,760 3,792 (32)

Safe Communities 4,487 4,375 112

Total 55,537 55,238 299 (1)

1. T he total variance represents 0.54 per cent of budget.

External funding programme expenditure 2014 - 2015 budget as compared to actual

Two programmes received external funding.

TABLE 2-13: EXTERNAL FUNDING PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE 2014 - 2015, BUDGET COMPARED TO ACTUAL (UNAUDITED)

PROGRAMME

BUDGET $’000

ACTUAL $’000

VARIANCE $’000

Culture, Art and Heritage 337 250 87

Environmental Management 9,747 9,655 92

Total 10,084 9,905 179

TSRA 20-year anniversary celebrations.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs 29

DETAILS ABOUT OUR PROGRAMMES

30 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE

Regional Goal

Protect, promote, revitalise and maintain Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal traditions and cultural heritage.

Programme Goal

The Culture, Art and Heritage programme goal is:

— to recognise that Culture, Art and Heritage are central pillars of regional development, and will protect, promote, revitalise and maintain Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal traditions and cultural heritage

Programme Objectives

The Culture, Art and Heritage Programme component will:

— protect culturally significant sites and artefacts to ensure longevity

— revitalise and maintain traditional cultural practices (art, dance, language, storytelling and songs) among communities

— ensure the protection of traditional knowledge, intellectual property and copyright

— underpin services and management practices with cultural values, and protocols.

Programme Deliverables

— An active and sustainable arts and craft industry in the region.

— Cultural values and protocols are integrated into service planning and management practice.

— The unique cultural heritage and histories of the region are preserved, maintained and promoted.

— Strong, supported and respected Ailan Kastom.

— The copyright, intellectual property and traditional knowledge of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region are protected.

The Culture, Art and Heritage programme goal is to recognise that Culture, Art and Heritage are central pillars of regional development,

and will protect, promote, revitalise and maintain Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal traditions and cultural heritage.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Culture, Art and Heritage 31

Programme Appropriation Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-14: CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE PROGRAMME APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

4,630 4,499 131

Programme External Funding Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-15: CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE PROGRAMME EXTERNAL FUNDING EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

337 250 87

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— An active and sustainable arts and craft industry.

— Cultural values and protocols are integrated into service planning and management practices.

— The unique cultural heritage and histories of the region are preserved, maintained and promoted.

— A strong, supported and respected Ailan Kastom.

— The copyright, intellectual property and traditional knowledge of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region are protected.

32 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Arts development programme l

Three art centres in the region are supported through this programme. Operational funding is provided as part of the TSRA’s partnership with the Australian Government Ministry for the Arts and Arts Queensland. Support in governance, leadership and arts administration is also provided to the art centres. Art skills development, artists’ forums and professional development workshops are also provided to support the development of a strong arts industry based on Torres Strait cultural product. In 2014 - 2015 art skills workshops covered painting and sculpture, project planning and grant writing. Artists’ forums covered copyright, professional arts network services and marketing.

Culture, art and heritage grants l

The grants programme supported 22 applications over two grant rounds in 2014 -2015. These grants support and encourage the development, promotion and maintenance of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal culture in the region.

Cultural maintenance programme l

The cultural maintenance programme covers the grants programme, the cultural maintenance exhibition programme in the Gab Titui Cultural Centre and the management of all relevant projects. In 2014 - 2015, the cultural maintenance exhibition ‘Evolution: Torres Strait Masks’ was held at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre. This exhibition has been recognised as being culturally significant by the National Museum of Australia and negotiations are in progress to tour the exhibition to Canberra and then nationally.

Cultural Policy implementation and Protocols lThe Culture, Art and Heritage (CAH) Programme delivers cultural orientation sessions for new staff to the TSRA and guides the

use of the TSRA Cultural Policy and the accompanying Cultural Protocols: a guide for TSRA staff. In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA worked with other government departments in the region with the aim of incorporating cultural protocols into service delivery arrangements. The TSRA Cultural Policy will be reviewed, updated and expanded in 2015 -2016.

Dance strategy

lThe Torres Strait dance strategy promotes and supports the performance of Torres Strait dance at high-profile national and international events. In 2014 - 2015, dance teams were selected through an application and assessment process to perform at the Darwin Festival in August 2014 and the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair in 2015.

The Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award l

This exhibition is an annual and major event in the Gab Titui calendar. The 2014 - 2015 event opened on 18 June with 50 entries from across the region. Over 400 people attended and prizes were awarded in a number of categories, including the ‘Overall Winner’; ‘Runner-up’; and ‘People’s Choice Award’.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Culture, Art and Heritage 33

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Gab Titui Cultural Centre touring exhibitions l

The exhibition ‘Bipotaim: Torres Strait Islander culture before settlement’ returned home to the Gab Titui Cultural Centre in 2014 after an extended tour that included the Queensland State Library and the National Museum of Australia.

The Torres Strait language strategy l

‘Empowering our language, in our culture, for our future’ was the theme of the inaugural Torres Strait Language Symposium, held at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre from 11 to 13 March 2015. The formation of the Torres Strait Language Reference Group, made up of representatives from each of the five island clusters of the Torres Strait, was one of the outcomes of the symposium. This group will act as a conduit for participation by communities in the development of a Torres Strait language charter and in the development of activities generated through the planned Torres Strait language centre, planned for 2015 - 2016.

Music strategy - Music and Dance Audit l The Music and Dance Audit has been progressively rolled out across the Torres Strait region since 2007. CD and DVD

productions of Torres Strait dance and music have been completed for 14 communities. The Mer Island community launched their CD/ DVD at the Mabo Day celebrations on 29 June 2015. Recordings for the communities of Masig and Kubin (Moa Island) are nearing completion. The Northern Peninsula Area communities’ project began in June 2015 and will be completed in 2015 - 2016.

Support to local artists lThe Gab Titui Cultural Centre supports between 70 and 120 local artists to promote and sell their work. In 2014 - 2015 Gab Titui returned a total of $142,000 in sales to local artists and suppliers. Additionally through the projects and strategies

already mentioned, the CAH Programme continued to develop the professional abilities of artists across all disciplines.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

34 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Increased income generated through retail sales via the Gab Titui Cultural Centre and established art centres in the region.

lOverall sales of product through the Gab Titui Cultural Centre (GTCC) did not achieve a 5% increase on the previous year’s sales as per development plan targets (See the financial statements in Section 5). This was primarily due to planned renovations of the GTCC Four Winds building. It is anticipated that sales will increase in 2015 - 2016 when renovations are complete. The three art centres have achieved an increase in sales this year.

Increased number of TSRA funded and supported activities that are based on Torres Strait Islander (Ailan Kastom) and Aboriginal cultural traditions in the Torres Strait region.

lIn 2014 - 2015, the Culture, Art and Heritage (CAH) Programme supported 22 grant funded projects; held the Inaugural Torres Strait Language Symposium; secured a $150,000 grant from the Ministry for the Arts to develop a Torres Strait language centre plan; and launched two cultural projects at the GTCC.

Attendees at Torres Strait Language Symposium.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Culture, Art and Heritage 35

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Increase in cultural heritage material and information specific to each community in the region that is documented, registered and accessible.

lIn 2014 - 2015 the CAH Programme continued with its key cultural maintenance initiative: the Music and Dance Audit project. This year Mer community launched their CD and DVD, the Masig community’s CD and DVD package was completed and the Kubin community’s music and dance recordings progressed, nearing completion.

The CAH Programme works closely with the Environmental Management Programme in the traditional ecological knowledge database project. Community-driven cultural heritage projects were supported through the CAH grants programme.

Increase in the number of emerging and professionally active artists and cultural practitioners that have access to information and support to ensure copyright and intellectual property rights.

lThe CAH Programme supported artists and cultural practitioners in the region through a range of activities. Support was provided through the coordination of Arts Law Centre workshops and individual meetings with artists; an artists’ forum; ongoing distribution of information on copyright and licensing laws to artists; and development of a two-day conference for artists and cultural practitioners covering intellectual property and copyrights, licensing agreements, wills, code of conduct within the arts industry and re-sale royalties.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Culture, Art and Heritage 37 36 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-2: CULTURE ART AND HERITAGE PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

PROTECT, PROMOTE, REVITALISE AND MAINTAIN TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL TRADITIONS AND

CULTURAL HERITAGE

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Increased income generated through retail sales via the Gab Titui Cultural Centre and established art centres in the region.

○ Increase in profile of emerging and established artists and cultural practitioners in the region and the production and sale of regionally produced arts and crafts.

○ Increased number of TSRA funded and supported activities that are based on Torres Strait Islander (Ailan Kastom) and Aboriginal cultural traditions in the Torres Strait region.

○ Increase in cultural heritage material and information specific to

each community in the region that is documented, registered and accessible.

○ Increase in the number of emerging and professionally active artists and cultural practitioners that have access to information

and support to ensure copyright and Intellectual property rights.

Gateway hub

for presenting,

preserving, promoting

and providing

Torres Strait Islander &

Aboriginal culture

and arts

Cultural Values and Protocols initiative

Arts industry development

Copyright and intellectual property rights initiative

Cultural

maintenance and observance

Cultural heritage management (links with Environmental Management

Program)

Increased marketing and online sales

Maintenance and protection plans

CAH-1: An active and sustainable arts and craft industry

Implemented business plan for GTCC

Cultural practices incorporated into TSRA

business

CAH-2: Cultural values and protocols are integrated into service planning and management practice

Increased national and international exhibitions

Strengthened copyright and IP measures

CAH-3: The unique cultural heritage and histories of the region are preserved, maintained and promoted

Expanded art and crafts facilities

CAH-4: Strong, supported and respected Ailan Kastom

CAH-5: The copyright, intellectual property and traditional knowledge of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region are protected

International recognition of the value of Torres Strait Islander & Aboriginal

arts and culture

Increased:

a) art and craft skills levels; b) Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal artists’ profiles; c) regional art and

craft production

Increased income from Torres Strait arts and crafts

Communities are able to undertake activities strengthening their Ailan Kastom, including the use of cultural protocols, language and

cultural maintenance

Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal artists and cultural practitioners’ individual and communal copyright and

intellectual property rights are protected

Traditional cultural heritage records artefacts and oral histories are identified, documented, preserved and

promoted

Increased knowledge, and application of copyright and intellectual property

rights to arts, crafts, culture and traditional knowledge

A sustainable art industry operates in the Torres Strait region

Increased incorporation of cultural values and protocols into service planning and management practices

Cultural heritage records including sites, artefacts, stories and histories

owned and securely accessible by Torres Strait Islanders

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

38 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Cultural Maintenance

The Gab Titui Cultural Centre is the Torres Strait’s first keeping place for historical artefacts and contemporary Indigenous art. The focus of the centre is to contribute to the maintenance, revitalisation and preservation of Torres Strait culture and the development and promotion of local Indigenous art.

The Ephraim Bani Gallery annually showcases a cultural maintenance exhibition with themes and issues of importance to the cultural identity of the Torres Strait and its people, with the aim of preserving local culture, history and heritage.

The 2015 Cultural Maintenance Exhibition is a significant project. The purpose is to highlight the continuing importance of Torres Strait masks, their evolution from the past and influence on present day contemporary art forms. Masks are representational of ancestral, supernatural and / or totemic beings that form an important component in the traditional beliefs of Torres Strait Islanders.

The exhibition takes the viewer on a journey from time immemorial when masks were used in ceremonial rituals involving art, theatre and dance by the ancestors. It tells of how these historic artefacts, that are now kept in national and international institutions, have inspired new and innovative works.

Masks are artistically impressive and culturally significant for Torres Strait Islanders and the art of making highly decorative masks has been practised for centuries. Irrespective of the impact of western culture on the Torres Strait, the art of creating masks and choreographing new dances are part of a continuing cultural tradition. The Gab Titui Cultural Centre has acknowledged the importance of showcasing and interpreting the storylines from the past to the present by commissioning contemporary works by identified local mask makers.

The exhibition was curated by the Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, with the invaluable support of award-winning Badu Island artist, Alick Tipoti.

Masks are artistically impressive and culturally significant for Torres Strait Islanders and the art of making highly decorative

masks has been practised for centuries.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Culture, Art and Heritage 39

Images left to right: Keris, Eddie Nona (Badu); Kuki Sagulaw Mawa, Vincent Babia (Saibai); Sor Kobir 1, Andrew Passi (Mer); Naga Mawa, Yessie Mosby (Masig). Photos: George Serras, National Museum of Australia

40 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Regional Goal

Enhance our region’s wealth by creating sustainable industries and increasing employment opportunities for our people equivalent to the wider Australian community.

Programme Goal

The Economic Development Programme goal is:

— to contribute to regional, community and individual economic improvement by taking the lead as whole of region economic development solution broker.

Programme Objectives

The Economic Development Programme component will:

— stimulate economic development across the region

— advance business skills and align training initiatives with regional employment opportunities

— advance Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal ownership and management of businesses in the region.

Programme Deliverables

— Increased capability of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal People in the region to manage commercially viable businesses.

— Improved access to capital and other opportunities to finance commercially viable businesses.

— Increased number of commercially viable businesses owned and or operated by Torres Strait and Aboriginal People in the region.

— Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal People in the region.

The Economic Development Programme goal is to contribute to regional, community and individual economic

improvement by taking the lead as whole of region economic development solution broker.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Economic Development 41

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-16: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

13,407 13,358 49

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— Increased capability of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region to manage commercially viable businesses.

— Improved access to capital and other opportunities to finance commercially viable businesses.

— Increased number of commercially viable businesses owned or operated by Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region.

— Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region.

TSRA Economic Development Summit.

42 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Business mentoring support l

Business Mentoring Support was provided to two clients in 2014 - 2015 to assist with organisational capacity building.

Business funding support lFive loan applications were approved.

Remote Jobs and Communities Agreement management lIn 2014 - 2015, 1,217 participants were successfully transitioned from the Remote Jobs and Communities Programme (RJCP) to the

new Community Development Programme (CDP).

176 Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) participants were successfully transitioned from CDEP wages to Income Support Payments as part of CDP.

Economic Development Investment Strategy l

A review of the Community Economic Initiatives Scheme (CEIS) was undertaken in 2014 - 2015. A key recommendation of the review was to close the CEIS and adopt a more strategic approach to economic development through the development of a regional economic investment strategy.

Development of a Torres Strait Regional Economic Investment Strategy is underway to identify sustainable industries and opportunities for commercially viable enterprise development. As part of the development of the strategy the TSRA has delivered two in a series of three economic development summits, which provide an opportunity for key stakeholders to contribute to the strategy.

The report is currently being prepared and is due for completion and presentation at the September 2015 Board meeting.

Into Business Workshops lTwo series of Into Business Workshops were delivered (comprising workshops A, B and C); 17 participants completed the workshop series.

Torres Strait Marine Pathways Project l

Certificate II in Maritime Operations (Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal) - 55 persons attained this certificate.

Certificate II in Maritime Operations (Marine Engine Driver Grade 3 Near Coastal) - 55 persons attained this certificate.

Prerequisite training programme, including Shipboard Safety Skill Set; First Aid and Marine Radio Operators (VHF) Certificate of Proficiency - 55 persons attained these prerequisite qualifications.

Certificate III in Fishing Operations course - 12 persons attained this certificate.

Wild harvest dive qualifications - 12 persons attained this certificate.

Certificate III in Maritime Operations (Integrated Rating) - 2 persons attained this certificate.

Certificate IV in Workplace Training and Assessment - 1 person attained this certificate.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Economic Development 43

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Home Ownership Programme l

No home loan applications were approved in 2014 - 2015. Complex land tenure arrangements in the Torres Strait continue to make it difficult for loan applicants to provide appropriate security for loans.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicator

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

An increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal People in employment

lIn 2014 - 2015, 45 RJCP participants moved from welfare into full-t ime employment and 196 moved into part-time employment.

Job placements were in the following industries:

— Government - 66

— Retail - 41

— Employment - 36

— Education - 21

— Other - 19

— Hospitality - 16

— Labour hire - 15

— Aged care - 12

— Construction - 6

— Rural - 5

— Child care - 3

— Fishing - 3

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Economic Development 45 44 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-3: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

ENHANCE OUR REGION’S WEALTH BY CREATING SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIES AND INCREASING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

FOR OUR PEOPLE EQUIVALENT TO THE WIDER AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITY

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Concessional Business Loans

Concessional Home Loans

Business Training

Business Support Services

Business loans granted at reduced rates

ED-1: Increased capability of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region to manage

commercially viable businesses

Home loans granted at reduced rates ED-2: Improved access

to capital and other opportunities to finance commercially viable businesses

Business training workshops conducted

ED-3: Increased number of commercially viable businesses owned and

or operated by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region

Business mentoring and support provided

ED-4: Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region

Commercially viable businesses owned and/or operated by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people

have increased

Commercially viable businesses and home ownership

Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people successfully completing business skills

development courses

Economically independent Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people

in the region

Improved individual wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned commercially viable businesses.

○ Increased availability of approved business training.

○ Increase in number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in employment.

46 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Converting Training to Employment

The primary aim of the Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project (TSMPP) is to further develop the skills and capability of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to operate commercial vessels and, in doing so, create pathways for careers in maritime-related industries.

A clear example of someone who has achieved this aim is Koeygab Pabai. Koeygab is a 27 year old Torres Strait Islander man who grew up on Thursday

Island and whose family hails from remote Boigu Island in the top western area of the Torres Strait.

After finishing high school on Thursday Island, Koeygab worked in various jobs before doing some part-time work as a deckhand with Torres Pilots. The seed to explore a career in the maritime industry was planted in Koeygab as a child. One of Koeygab’s grandfathers, Audi Gibuma, was a skipper of the pearling lugger Antonia and his other grandfather, Den Toby, worked on the famous MV Melbidir.

As Koeygab grew older, another role model who encouraged him to pursue a maritime career was his Uncle, Danny Ingui, who completed his maritime training at the Australian Maritime College in Tasmania and now works on commercial vessels in the mining sector in the Northern Territory. Koeygab, who has grown up around boats, was able to complete some maritime training whilst at high school but was not able to further his maritime training and career due to the unavailability of maritime training in the Torres Strait and the expense involved in completing this training outside the region.

In November 2013, Koeygab was selected to participate in the inaugural combined Coxswain/Marine Engine Driver course delivered in the Torres Strait through the TSMPP. Koeygab said the training delivered by the TSMPP was fantastic for a number of reasons: ‘The trainers from the Australian Maritime College broke down the information so that it could be understood and applied. Nothing was too much trouble. The training platform, MV Elizabeth II, was great in that being at sea there were no distractions and I was able to immerse myself in commercial vessel operations assisted by a supportive crew of professional mariners.’ He noted that the process to convert the training achievements into maritime qualifications had been simplified by the TSMPP-s ponsored course.

Koeygab said that many Torres Strait people have a fear of failure and that they need to get past this and

simply have a go: ‘If I can do it then anyone can!’

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Economic Development 47

Koeygab applied himself so well to the TSMPP training that he was nominated for trainee of the year at the transport industry Supply Chain and Logistics annual awards 2014. He was awarded a Highly Commended certificate.

Immediately following his training and having obtained nationally recognised maritime certificates of competency, Koeygab quickly obtained employment with Rebel Marine as the skipper of their inter-island ferry operating between Thursday Island and Horn Island. Following several months with Rebel Marine, Koeygab moved to McDonald Charter Boats and for eight months operated their inter-island ferry between Thursday and Horn islands.

With the assistance of McDonald Charter,

Koeygab completed his Master training, qualifying

him to operate a vessel up to 24 metres. He aspires

to one day be the skipper of one of the Sea Swift

vessels that service the Torres Strait. Koeygab said

it was his grandfathers and uncle who inspired

him to follow a maritime career. He achieved this

by being focused and extremely committed to

his training. Koeygab said that many Torres Strait

people have a fear of failure and that they need

to get past this and simply have a go: ‘If I can do it

then anyone can!’

Koeygab is now employed by the Torres

Strait Regional Authority. His marine pathway

training enabled him to win the position of

Fleet Mentor with the Torres Strait land and sea

rangers. He is responsible for the safe operation

of the seven ranger vessels operating across the

Torres Strait.

Torres Strait Marine Pathways graduate receives commendation for Trainee of the Year.

Koeygab applied himself so well to the TSMPP training that he was nominated for trainee of the year at the transport industry

Supply Chain and Logistics annual awards 2014.

48 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FISHERIES

Regional Goal

Enhance our region’s wealth, by managing and maintaining sustainable fishing industries and increasing employment and economic opportunities for our people.

Programme Goal

The Fisheries Programme goal is:

— to increase wealth in the region through commercially viable businesses and employment in the fishing industry, while ensuring the ecologically sustainable management of fishery resources.

Programme Objectives

The Fisheries Programme component will:

— provide greater access for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to the region’s commercial fisheries towards attaining a 100% share

— increase commercially viable businesses in the fishing industry that are Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned and/or operated

— deliver initiatives to increase capability and capacity of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to utilise the region’s commercial fisheries resources

— ensure that the region’s fisheries resources are sustainably managed

— ensure that Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people are engaged in the management of the region’s fisheries resources.

Programme Deliverables

— A commercially viable fishing industry which is 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

— Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people of the region.

— Sustainable management of fisheries resources.

The Fisheries Programme goal is to increase wealth in the region through commercially viable businesses and

employment in the fishing industry, while ensuring the ecologically sustainable management of fishery resources.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 49

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-17: FISHERIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

4,546 4,550 (4)

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— A commercially viable fishing industry which is 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

— Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people of the region.

— Sustainable management of fisheries resources.

50 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Fisheries communications lThis year the TSRA Fisheries Programme published a brochure depicting the history of commercial fishing in the Torres Strait from 1860 to the present. A fisheries newsletter was distributed in print and by email. These products facilitate communication

and engagement with Torres Strait communities on the culture of fishing in the region and fisheries capacity building and management.

Finfish capacity building lCapacity-building projects were delayed at the beginning of the financial year due to the need to clarify stakeholders’ roles and expectations. This status will be addressed in 2015 - 2016.

Finfish quota management lOn behalf of traditional inhabitants, each year since 2008 the TSRA has leased finfish fishery licences to non-traditional inhabitant fishers. The Fisheries Programme has provided administrative support to the TSRA Board and Finfish Quota Management

Committee to facilitate leasing processes. The aim of leasing licences is to maintain markets until the Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) licence sector can increase its catch. In 2015, for the first time the Fisheries Programme facilitated a meeting of the Finfish Quota Management Committee at Masig (an outer island in the Torres Strait). The open section of the meeting enabled a large range of community stakeholders to participate in discussions related to the management of the fishery.

The Fisheries Programme is running a project to develop an action plan for the Torres Strait finfish fishery. The plan will detail actions to increase the commercial participation and productivity of the TIB sector in the fishery and will help to guide the investment of funds.

Fisheries roadmap - towards 100 per cent ownership lThe TSRA has the lead on behalf of the Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) for the development of the Fisheries Roadmap

towards 100 per cent ownership of the commercial fisheries by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Traditional Owners. Extensive community engagement with a large number of stakeholders is needed for this vital project. Consultation is expected to be completed in 2015 - 2016.

Fisheries management framework l

The key output for 2014 - 2015 was a draft management framework. The completed framework is scheduled for release in 2015 - 2016.

The TSRA Fisheries Programme is leading a project that will inform community leaders and fisheries stakeholders on the New Zealand Maori model of fisheries ownership and management. The project will examine how aspects of the model could be effectively implemented in the Torres Strait.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 51

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Pathway into fishing lThe TSRA Fisheries Programme is developing a series of training workshops on effective representation and principles of fisheries management. These workshops will target new representatives at PZJA forums as well as other interested persons in the community.

This activity has two training components:

— Effective Representation - 13 fishers completed training in 2014 - 2015.

— Principles of Fisheries Management - this is a new course under development through the University of Wollongong for delivery in 2015 - 2016.

PZJA representation lBetween July 2009 and June 2015, the TSRA supported Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to contribute fisher and community perspectives to 53 PZJA forums, including working group and advisory committee meetings.

In March 2015, the TSRA Board agreed that Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people have demonstrated a well-developed capacity to represent their fishing sector at these forums and therefore attendance could be administered by the Australian Fisheries Management Authority in the same way as other fishing sectors’ attendance is managed.

The TSRA will continue to fund Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal representation and provide representatives with capacity-building training related to fisheries management and governance and member roles and responsibilities.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

52 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Increase in catches by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers relative to total allowable catch

lCatch reporting by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers in the Torres Strait is not mandatory, therefore measuring increased catch is not yet possible. However, the TSRA delivers a number of initiatives aimed at increasing participation in fisheries, including the development of an action plan for the finfish fishery to guide investment of funds raised through the leasing of licences in the fishery.

Number of opportunities for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to increase their understanding and use of Torres Strait fisheries resources

lThis indicator is being met through the pathway into fishing training activities outlined above. In 2014 - 2015, 13 fishers participated in the training.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 53

Bêche-de-mer fisher.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 55 54 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-4: FISHERIES PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

ENHANCE OUR REGION’S WEALTH BY MANAGING AND MAINTAINING SUSTAINABLE FISHING INDUSTRIES AND INCREASING EMPLOYMENT

AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR OUR PEOPLE

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Engaging in the PZJA and supporting engagement of Torres Strait Islander and

Aboriginal people in PZJA decision-making

Assisting communities to engage in program activities

Providing opportunities to develop the capability and capacity of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal

people to benefit from fisheries in the region

Managing access to fisheries resources held in trust for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal

people of the region

Effective engagement with community fishers

FI-1: A commercially viable fishing industry which is 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and

Aboriginal people

Opportunities for capacity and capability development

FI-2: Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people of the region

Shaping of fisheries management policy

FI-3: Sustainable management of fisheries resources

Administration of access to Torres Strait Fisheries

Advice on fisheries management

Opportunity for increased employment and wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people

from 100% of the region’s commercial fisheries resources

Opportunity for increased employment and wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people from

the region’s commercial fisheries resources

Increased revenue derived from fishing industry by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people

Sustainably managed fisheries provide opportunities for traditional,

recreational and commercial harvest by Torres Strait Islander and

Aboriginal people

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Number of opportunities for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to increase their understanding and use of Torres Strait fisheries resources.

○ Increase in catches by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers relative to total allowable catch.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 57 56 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

WAIBEN (THURSDAY) ISLAND

EAST CAY

MAIZUB KAUR (BRAMBLE CAY)

WARAL KAWA (DELIVERANCE ISLAND)

TURU CAY

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

CAPE YORK PENINSULA

MOA ISLAND

SAIBAI ISLAND

PRINCE OF WALES (MURALAG) ISLAND

BOIGU ISLAND

BADU ISLAND

NARUPAI (HORN) ISLAND

KERIRI (HAMMOND) ISLAND

MABUIAG ISLAND

ERUB ISLAND

MER ISLAND

DAUAN ISLAND

MASIG ISLAND

YAM (IAMA) ISLAND

WARRABER ISLAND

PORUMA ISLAND

UGAR ISLAND

BECHE-DE-MER FISHERY

Torres Strait

Produced on 19/08/2015 Produced by M.S. TRC: FI 2015 002

Coordinate System: GDA 1994 MGA Zone 54 Projection: Transverse Mercator Datum: GDA 1994

Disclaimer: The data/map is provided in good faith under the Creative Commons Attribute 3.0 licence. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information, the TSRA gives no warranties about its accuracy, reliability completeness or suitability for any particular purpose and disclaims all responsibility and all liability for any loss, damage or costs which may be incurred as a result of the information being inaccurate,

incomplete or misused in any

way and for any reason. The TSRA requests attribution as © Commonwealth of Australia (Torres Strait Regional Authority).

Fisheries Jurisdiction Line

Beche-De-Mer Fishery

Protected Zone

Ocean

Reefs and Shoals

Land Mass

0 40 20

Kilometres

FIGURE 2-5: TORRES STRAIT BÊCHE-DE-MER FISHERY

Refer to Beche De Mer Fishery case study on page 58.

58 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Bêche-de-Mer Fishery 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal People

The Torres Strait Regional Authority was pleased to announce in February 2015 that it had purchased the last non-Indigenous commercial fishing licence in the Torres Strait bêche-de-mer fishery. The purchase was part of the ongoing commitment by the TSRA to assist Torres Strait communities develop a commercially viable fishing industry that is 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

The bêche-de-mer fishery is the second fishery to be 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait and Aboriginal people. The first, the Torres Strait finfish fishery, which became 100 per cent owned in 2007, is now an important commercial asset to Torres Strait communities. The TSRA expects that over time the bêche-de-mer licence will generate significant benefits to the people of the Torres Strait.

The TSRA Chairperson Mr Joseph Elu worked closely with the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion, to secure the transfer of the licence. This important outcome will allow greater access to the fishery by Indigenous fishers in the region and provide economic benefits to Torres Strait communities.

The purchase of the licence took place shortly after the re-opening of the bêche-de-mer fishery to the take of black teatfish in November 2014. The 15 tonne total allowable catch of the black teatfish was taken in only two and a half weeks - a demonstration of the Torres Strait communities’ commitment to developing a productive commercial fishing industry in the region.

The TSRA will now work with its partners in the Protected Zone Joint Authority to develop a strategy for the future use of the licence for the benefit of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

The Torres Strait Regional Authority was pleased to announce in February 2015 that it had purchased the

last non-Indigenous commercial fishing licence in the Torres Strait bêche-de-mer fishery.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Fisheries 59

Bêche-de-mer fisher.

60 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Regional Goal

Our natural and cultural environment is an asset that is protected, preserved and enjoyed through sustainable management.

Programme Goal

The Environmental Management Programme goal is:

— to contribute to supporting the regional goal to protect and preserve the region’s natural and cultural environmental assets through sustainable management practices.

Programme Objectives

The Environmental Programme component will:

— promote the sustainable management of natural resources

— manage the effects of climate change, tidal inundation and erosion

— increase the utilisation of renewable energies

— reduce the environmental impacts of waste management

— improve land management for future generations.

Programme Deliverables

— Strengthened sustainable use, protection and management of natural and cultural resources.

— Improved community adaptation to climate change impacts, including sea level rise.

— Increased uptake of renewable energy for the Torres Strait.

— Support community sustainable horticulture.

The Environmental Management Programme goal is to contribute to supporting the regional goal to protect and preserve the region’s

natural and cultural environmental assets through sustainable management practices.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Environmental Management 61

Programme Appropriation Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-18: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

4,579 4,699 (120)

Programme External Funding Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-19: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

9,747 9,655 92

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— Strengthened sustainable use, protection and management of natural and cultural resources.

— Improved community adaptation to climate change impacts, including sea level rise.

— Increased uptake of renewable energy for Torres Strait.

— Support community sustainable horticulture.

Environmental Management team.

62 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Invasive species management l

The invasive species project has been delayed pending a commitment from the Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC) to jointly develop the regional pest management strategy. TSIRC have now committed to supporting the consultative arrangements and the project is scheduled to proceed in 2015 - 2016.

Ranger programme lA total of 45 rangers and three trainees, plus support staff, are employed by the TSRA across the outer island communities. Rangers are leaders in their communities, and are well respected in their roles.

Environmental education officer project l

The TSRA’s partnership with Tagai State College continues to deliver natural resource management engagement with regional school participants.

Adaptation planning and implementation l

A regional workshop was held on 10 June 2015. Workshops have been conducted on Boigu and St Pauls. Action plans are being reviewed by state agencies. The adaptation plan is in the final review phase and is scheduled for release in 2015 - 2016.

Alternate energy project lThe TSRA held discussions with Ergon Energy and other renewable energy providers in 2014 - 2015. The alternate energy project plan has been agreed and implementation will start in 2015 - 2016.

Biodiversity management and planning l

In 2014 - 2015, biodiversity surveys of Badu recorded 124 animal species, confirming the region’s healthy ecosystem.

Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs) l

In 2014 - 2015, three IPAs were managed in the Torres Strait. The Environmental Programme case study on page 68 provides further detail on those IPAs.

Land and sea management in the Torres Strait lThe land and sea management strategy for the Torres Strait will underpin regional natural and cultural resource management

priorities for the next five years. Community engagement on the strategy will continue into 2015 - 2016.

Seagrass and other research activities l

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA continued to work closely with researchers from universities and other organisations to support the Torres Strait natural management.

Sustainable horticulture project l

This project has focused on establishing community gardens and teaching people how to grow and prepare healthy foods. Community garden projects have been sustained for several years and the result will be reviewed in 2015 - 2016 to determine whether this is the most effective means of delivering the outcome. This activity also has outcomes for the TSRA’s Healthy Communities Programme.

Traditional ecological knowledge l

In 2014 -2015, the Traditional Ecological Knowledge project was in high demand across the region, with four systems in place. Additional systems will be established in 2015 - 2016.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Environmental Management 63

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Turtle and dugong management l

Each community in the outer islands has a community-based management plan for dugong and turtle that is being implemented with the support of the TSRA. The plans combine the traditional use of these species with modern management arrangements and support the sustainable use of dugong and turtle across the region. A dugong and turtle management plan for the Kaiwalagal region was being developed by Traditional Owners and the TSRA in 2014 -2015.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Kulkalgal Indigenous Protected Area sign-off.

64 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Number of actions in the Climate Change Strategy and associated action plans implemented.

lA draft regional adaptation and resilience action plan was developed (community workshops are scheduled in 2015 - 2016). An expert workshop to review the science and methodology of the adaptation and resilience planning was completed. The ownership of regional sea-level gauges was transferred to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Number of agreements in place with energy providers to reduce reliance on non-renewable diesel fuel usage for electricity production.

lErgon Energy has indicated strong interest in working with the TSRA to progress the uptake of renewable energy in the region. A project brief was approved and project plan developed. Discussion is in progress regarding the scope and responsibilities to develop and deliver a regional energy strategy.

Number of inhabited islands with active food producing community gardens in place.

lWhilst community interest in horticulture activities is high, participation has been low. An external review of this activity in 2014 - 2015 recommended that the TSRA refocus efforts on providing technical advice to communities and individuals rather than supporting and establishing community gardens.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

Environmental Management staff with Warraber Elder Mr Nelson Billy.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Environmental Management 65

Rangers doing beach clean up.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Environmental Management 67 66 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-6: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

OUR NATURAL AND CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT IS AN ASSET THAT IS PROTECTED, PRESERVED AND ENJOYED THROUGH

SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Land

Biodiversity planning and management; invasive species; sustainable

horticulture

Sea

Turtle and dugong planning and management; marine biodiversity; water quality; state

of the environment report card

People

Ranger project; Indigenous protected areas project; traditional ecological knowledge project;

Traditional Owner engagement

Coasts and Climate Climate change adaptation and resilience; renewable

energy

Control of pests and weeds; protection and maintenance of native species and habitats; Horticulture in Schools;

community gardens

Formation of partnerships for sustainable energy use and production

EM-4: Support community sustainable horticulture

Sustainable management of key marine habitats and species, including dugong and turtle, seagrasses, wetlands, coral

reefs; community-based monitoring; research; water quality assessment, hazard mapping and mitigation

EM-1: Strengthened sustainable use, protection and management of natural

and cultural resources

Employment of Indigenous Rangers; community-based natural and cultural plans developed and implemented; protection and management of traditional ecological knowledge

EM-2: Improved community adaptation to climate change impacts including sea level rise

Implementation of Climate Change Strategy; adaptation planning; community-based adaptation and resilience

framework developed and implemented; monitoring of climate change impacts; community education

EM-3: Increased uptake of renewable energy for Torres Strait

Local and regional food security improved

Communities have the skills to generate traditional food

Communities (in particular Traditional Owners) are empowered to manage their local natural

and cultural resources sustainably

Communities

understand climate change risks and what can be done to mitigate them in order to reduce their impacts on their culture

and wellbeing

Communities are less reliant on diesel to supply electricity

Torres Strait communities are well informed regarding the sustainable use, protection and management of natural and

cultural resources in the Torres Strait region

Regional self-sufficiency in energy production

Greater community self-sufficiency in food production

Torres Strait communities have minimised as much as possible the impacts of climate change on their

wellbeing, culture and environment

Reduced carbon footprint for the Torres Strait region

Torres Strait ecosystems are healthy, resilient and well-managed

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Number of endorsed community-based management plans for the natural and cultural resources of the region being actively implemented.

○ Number of actions in the Climate Change Strategy and associated action plans implemented.

○ Number of agreements in place with energy providers to reduce reliance on non-renewable diesel fuel usage for electricity production.

○ Number of inhabited islands with active food producing community gardens in place.

68 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Indigenous Protected Areas in the Torres Strait

The TSRA, with funding from the Australian Government, is supporting Traditional Owners of the region to consider, dedicate and manage Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs) on their lands to

promote natural and cultural resource conservation

as part of Australia’s National Reserve System.

IPAs make a significant contribution to Australian biodiversity conservation - making up over a third of Australia’s National Reserve System.

The Torres Strait IPA project covers three areas: Warul Kawa IPA, Pulu Islet IPA and the recently declared Warraberalgal Porumalgal IPA.

Aims

The project delivers the Australian Government’s IPA programme in the Torres Strait by supporting communities to identify, dedicate, and manage IPA’s in the Torres Strait region.

The goals of the IPA project are to:

— support Indigenous land owners to develop, declare and manage IPAs on their lands as part of Australia’s National Reserve System

— support Indigenous interests to develop cooperative management arrangements with government agencies managing protected areas

— support the integration of Indigenous ecological and cultural knowledge with contemporary protected area management practices.

Declaration of the Warraberalgal Porumalgal IPA

The Warraberalgal and Porumalgal IPA was initiated in 2010 after the TSRA’s Land and Sea Management Unit conducted workshops across the Torres Strait to inform Traditional Owners about the IPA programme and the opportunities for communities to establish IPAs in their region. The TSRA worked with Elders from Warraber and Poruma to produce a plan of management for the area.

A community meeting was held on 30 October 2012

to endorse the plan and it was decided that nine islands in the Warraber and Poruma people’s native

title determination would be declared as an IPA.

On the 19 June 2014, Traditional Owners from Warraber and Poruma wrote to the Australian Government to advise of the dedication of the Warraberalgal and Porumalgal IPA, and a formal dedication ceremony was held on 18 July 2014.

The Land and Sea Management Unit, under the direction of those Traditional Owners, organised the celebratory day to recognise the dedication of the IPA. At the Traditional Owners’ request, a feast and celebration was held during the day for all community members to recognise the hard work and dedication of those involved in the creation of the IPA.

The TSRA, including rangers from associated communities, continue to actively support the implementation of plans of management for all IPAs in the region.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Environmental Management 69

Warraber, street view.

70 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP

Regional Goal

Effective and transparent self-government with strong leadership.

Programme Goals

The Governance and Leadership Programme goal is:

— to support positive and meaningful outcomes for people in leadership, communication and governance. The programme will work towards achieving equality in leadership, as appropriate to Ailan Kastom, by delivering targeted activities for women and youth.

Programme Objectives

The Governance and Leadership Programme component will:

— involve Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders in legislative processes, policies and priorities

— undertake capacity building for current and future leaders across the region

— support effective regional communication

— coordinate the integration of the delivery of government services to the region

— develop the capacity of PBCs in the region

— improve the governance and leadership capacity of the Torres Strait Regional Authority

Programme Deliverables

— Implementation of the National Indigenous Reform Agreement service delivery principles.

— Appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal participation in decision-making.

— Improved communication, cultural competence and service delivery within a community development framework across governments.

— Strong Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal organisational leadership and governance.

— Strong PBC leadership and governance.

Governance and Leadership team.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Governance and Leadership 71

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-20: GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

5,412 5,336 76

Torres Strait Development Plan Programme Outcomes

— Implementation of the National Indigenous Reform Agreement service delivery principles.

— Appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal participation in decision-making.

— Improved communication, cultural competence and service delivery within a community developed framework across governments.

— Strong Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal organisational leadership and governance.

— Strong Prescribed Bodies Corporate leadership and governance.

Mer Tier 1 MOU signing.

72 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Community consultation and engagement l

At the request of community leaders, community consultation and engagement processes for two Northern Peninsula Area communities (Bamaga and Seisia) and two Torres Strait communities (Hammond and Saibai) were not completed in 2014 - 2015, and were rescheduled for 2015 - 2016.

ISD community booklets lCommunity booklets were completed for 15 communities (the results are shown in Section 3, Report of Operations). Community engagement activities need to be completed before the remaining booklets can be updated.

Media and communications support l This is a contracted activity through Zakazukha Marketing Communications. In 2014 - 2015, 85 media releases were

produced.

Internal and external audit support l

Both the external and internal audit programmes were completed. Audit recommendation tracking and status reports were provided at four Audit Committee meetings.

Assistance with Tertiary Education Scheme (ATES) l 12 tertiary scholarships were offered in 2014 - 2015. Ten students met the pass criteria in the first semester to qualify for the second

semester support payment.

Board and Chairperson support l

Four executive meetings, four Audit Committee meetings and four Board meetings were conducted in 2014 - 2015. Executive assistance was provided to the TSRA Chairperson.

Board Strategic Workshop lEleven Board members attended the Board Strategic Workshop held in November 2014. The workshop focused on the change from the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (Cth) to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act

2013 (Cth). The Board also examined the alignment of the TSRA’s programme outcomes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy programme streams.

Capacity building Gur A Baradharaw Kod Sea and Land Council (NTRB Transition)

lThe level of TSRA support to the Gur A Baradharaw Kod (GBK) Sea and Land Council is on schedule. GBK are still developing their procedures and employment contracts.

Indigenous leadership lIn 2014 - 2015, one person was supported to complete the Australian Rural Leadership Programme; seven people completed the Training Rural Australians in Leadership programme.

PBC support and capacity building l

All 21 PBCs met the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations compliance requirements as at 31 December 2014. Two PBCs reduced their dependency on grant funding by moving to fee-for-service activities.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Governance and Leadership 73

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Support to regional broadcasting l

The Torres Strait Islanders Media Association met their broadcasting hours and local content targets. A new recording studio was completed in 2014 - 2015, enabling the local production of music CDs, electronic recordings and live music broadcasts.

Women’s and youths’ leadership l

Participation in the youth leadership programme and the women’s leadership programme has increased. There has been an improvement in the number of youth completing the physically demanding ‘Outward Bound’ component of the youth programme.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Torres Strait Youth Leadership Scholarship participants at the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation.

74 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Achieve a minimum of 20 per cent increase in access to services over the life of the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 measured from the 2012 baseline Regional Plan Community Booklets.

lThe Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan (2009 - 2029) identified 1,608(1) service gaps.(2) In 2012 - 2013, 372 (23 per cent) had been fully addressed. This increased to 773 (48 per cent) in 2013 - 2014 and 1,034 (64 per cent) in 2014 - 2015. An analysis of the service gaps is shown in Section 3 of this report.

Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Women with the capacity to participate in leadership roles in the region measured from the 2012 baseline.

lThe 2012 baseline was six. Four women completed the Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Programme (TSWLP) in 2013 - 2014 and ten are enrolled in the 2014 - 2015 TSWLP. The TSWLP is delivered in partnership with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation. Three of the past six participants in the Australian Rural Leadership Programme were women.

Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal youth (18-25) with the capacity to participate in leadership development activities measured from the 2012 baseline.

lTraining Rural Australian in Leadership (TRAIL): — 2013 - 2014 two men / one woman

— 2014 - 2015 three men / four women

Torres Strait Young Leaders Programme (TSYLP):

— 2013 - 2014 one man / three women

— 2014 - 2015 one man / three women.

Both TRAIL and TSYLP are delivered in partnership with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

1. T he community consultations conducted in 2014 - 2015 identified that some community booklets contained duplicate entries of gaps in services. Five duplications were removed, reducing the baseline from 1,613 reported in 2013 - 2014 to 1,608 this year.

2. T he service gaps were identified in 2009 - 2010 as part of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan (2009 - 2029) development process.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Governance and Leadership 75

Helicopter is the only form of air transport into Ugar and Dauan islands.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Governance and Leadership 77 76 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-7: GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

EFFECTIVE AND TRANSPARENT SELF GOVERNMENT, WITH STRONG LEADERSHIP

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Governance and leadership capacity building

PBC capacity building

Support regional broadcasting

ISD

coordination

Women’s & youth leadership programs

Community engagement

Tertiary education assistance

Sponsor governance and leadership courses

Prescribed Bodies Corporate capacity building

Integration of the delivery of services to the region across whole of government

Effective Community Engagement

Support Regional Broadcasting

Sponsor and support women and youth leadership training

Sponsor and support undergraduate students

G&L-5: Strong PBC leadership and governance

G&L-1: Implementation of the National Indigenous Reform Agreement service delivery principles

G&L-2: Appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal participation in decision-making

G&L-3: Improved communication, cultural competence and service delivery within a community development

framework across governments

G&L-4: Strong Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal organisational leadership and governance

Elected and future leaders have the necessary skills and confidence to make

effective decisions

Integrated government services are accessible to communities

according to need

PBCs maintain capacity to meet legislative requirements

Elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders are involved in effective

decision making

An appropriate gender balance is achieved in regional governance

structures

Young people participate in regional leadership initiatives

PBCs are self-sustaining and operate autonomously

An appropriate gender balance is achieved in all governance bodies

Community government service needs are consistently met

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Increase the level of engagement of elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders in policy development and decision-making.

○ Achieve a minimum 20 per cent increase in access to services over the life of the Torres Strait Development Plan (2014 - 2018), measured from the 2012 Baseline Regional Plan Community Booklets.

○ Number of PBCs that achieve Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC) compliance as at 31 December each year.

○ Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal women with the capacity to participate in leadership roles in the region measured from the 2012 baseline.

○ Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal youth (18 - 25) with the capacity to participate in leadership development activities measured from the 2012 baseline.

78 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Supporting Prescribed Bodies Corporate

The TSRA provides capacity-building and basic operational funding support to Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate (RNTBCs) based in the Torres Strait area. The RNTBCs or Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs), as they are commonly referred to, play a crucial role in managing native title and representing the interests of Traditional Owners.

The level of funding for PBCs in the Torres Strait area is determined by the TSRA Board and an allocation is made from within the TSRA’s budget appropriation under the Governance and Leadership Programme. The TSRA does not receive external or additional funding to support PBCs.

One of the challenges in determining appropriate levels of support funding is the varying capacity and operational capability of the 21 PBCs in the Torres Strait area. As PBCs mature their governance models and develop the capacity to manage their own operations, it is expected that their reliance on grant funding to support their operations will decrease. The TSRA has developed a PBC capability maturity model to assist it to target PBCs with the greatest developmental needs. Conversely, PBCs demonstrating good levels of capacity should be expected to earn operational funding on a fee-for-service basis.

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA changed its PBC support model to a two-tier arrangement designed to align funding with governance capacity and operational needs.

Tier One applies to PBCs required by the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC) to produce audited financial statements. Generally these PBCs demonstrate good capacity to manage their own finance and administration and conduct transactions with a turnover greater than $100,000 per year. Tier One PBCs are able to effectively engage with their native title holders without external assistance. Tier One PBCs are offered an option to enter into a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the TSRA as their supporting Native Title Representative Body (NTRB). The MOA specifies the functions PBCs will undertake on behalf of the NTRB or provide to other entities. The PBC negotiates a fee for these services. Tier One PBCs are responsible for generating their own income and for managing their own business, although the NTRB continues to provide assistance with legal representation on native title determinations, Future Acts and Indigenous Land Use Agreements. Money earned by the PBCs under fee for service is received into their general accounts for use in accordance with each PBC’s rule book. There are no external reporting or acquittal requirements. Tier One PBCs are not eligible to apply for grant funding for operations or capacity building.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Governance and Leadership 79

Tier Two applies to PBCs who do not meet the Tier One criteria. These PBCs are required to maintain a basic level of legislative compliance specified by ORIC and to effectively engage with their native title holders, with assistance if required. Generally these PBCs are reliant on grant funding for more than 80 per cent of their operations and have infrequent transactions, with turnover less than $100,000 per year. Tier Two PBCs are fully supported by the TSRA and can apply for PBC support grant funding in line with the TSRA’s PBC grant guidelines. Fee-for-service activity is encouraged but generally provides only a small component of operational costs. Money required by the PBC under grant funding arrangements is received into their grant accounts for use in accordance with an approved budget. Grant

funding is externally reported and full acquittal is required. The Tier Two support model is similar to the funding arrangements the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has with the NTRBs that assist PBCs on the mainland.

Since the introduction of the two-tier model, the TSRA has entered into MOAs with the Mura Badulgal RNTBC (Badu Island) and the Mer Gedkem Le RNTBC (Mer Island). These PBCs now have full responsibility for managing land tenure in their respective communities following the transfer of the Deed of Grant in Trust on Badu Island to Mura Badulgal RNTBC in February 2014 and the reserve land on Mer Island to the Mer Gedkem Le RNTBC in December 2012.

TSRA Chairperson and Chairperson of Mer Gedkem Le signing the Tier 1 MOU.

80 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

NATIVE TITLE

Regional Goal

Protect, maintain and progress native title rights and recognition over the region’s land and sea country.

Programme Goal

The Native Title Programme goal is:

— To provide high-quality and culturally appropriate professional services to native title holders and claimants in the Torres Strait region, to facilitate the securing of legal recognition of native title to land and waters in the Torres Strait and thereby improve opportunities for improved economic, cultural and social participation for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the region.

Programme Objectives

The Native Title Programme component will:

— assist Traditional Owners obtain legal recognition of native title over land and sea in the Torres Strait region

— manage and legally protect native title rights

— build the capacity of Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs).

Programme Deliverables

— Provide legal, policy and advocacy support for PBCs.

— Support native title activities, including determination of claims and provision of legal advice and support.

— Negotiate and execute Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs) and other statutory agreements.

— Provide legal advice and support in relation to Future Acts.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 81

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-21: NATIVE TITLE PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

3,760 3,792 (32)

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— Changes to native title and Fisheries legislation which recognise the commercial rights as part of the native title rights of Traditional Owners under the Torres Strait Sea Claim Part A determination.

— Successfully negotiated Future Acts and Indigenous Land Use Agreements.

— Native title claims are successfully determined.

— Prescribed Bodies Corporate understand and meet their responsibilities under the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth).

82 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Native title compensation ¡ The Native Title Office briefed counsel to provide an opinion on the feasibility regarding a compensation claim for Mer under the Native Title Act.

This matter is currently in progress, with a view to lodging a compensation claim in the Federal court by December 2015.

Deeds of Grant in Trust (DOGIT) transfer ¡

The Queensland Government advised that there are currently no funded DOGIT transfers planned for the Torres Strait region.

Katter leases

¡ There are 351 Katter leases in the region. The TSRA does not have the legal resources to process Katter lease applications on behalf of Traditional Owners.

The Native Title Office provides information on the lease process to PBCs and Traditional Owners and assists them to refer enquiries directly to the Queensland Government.

Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use Agreement lThe Native Title Office is working on draft 22 of the Major Infrastructure ILUA with the Queensland Government and the

Torres Strait Island Regional Council.

Management of Future Acts l

The Native Title Office has received 85 Future Act notices this financial year. The Native Title Office has responded to 65 of these notices.

The Torres Strait Fisheries Working Group is a committee elected by the Malu Lamar (TSI) Corporation to assist with responses to Future Act notices relevant to the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part A area.

Native title claim Naghir Island l

One of the native title parties raised issues regarding the future conduct of the Naghir Island native title claim and concerns regarding anthropological research. This matter is currently under consideration regarding future funding.

Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B (QUD6040/2001 )

¡ The Part B area is wholly overlapped by two claims - one claim filed on behalf of the Kaurareg People and the other claim filed on behalf of the Gudang Yadheykenu People.

During Federal Court ordered mediation held earlier this year, agreement was reached between Badulgal, Mualgal and Kaurareg peoples that the western overlap is shared sea country. Negotiations have now commenced with the other respondent parties towards a consent determination in 2016 for the western agreed area.

Negotiations with the Gudang Yadheykenu People about resolving the eastern overlap area will be scheduled once the western overlap is determined.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 83

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

National Native Title Conference l

Torres Strait Prescribed Body Corporate delegates attended the National Native Title Conference, held from 14-18 June 2015. The Malu Lamar (TSI) Corporation Chairperson Maluwap Nona presented on the success of the Torres Strait sea claim. The TSRA Chairperson Mr Joseph Elu facilitated the Mabo lecture.

NTRB legal services lThe Native Title Office provided legal assistance to all Torres Strait PBCs and Traditional Owners upon request. Table 2.22 provides statistical information on levels of engagement.

PBC working group ¡ There was no requirement to schedule a separate PBC working group meeting this financial year. The Native Title Office fulfilled its engagement obligations with PBC chairs through meetings held at the National Native Title Conference and the regional sea forum.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation Chair Mr Milton Savage.

84 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Number of changes to native title and fisheries legislation that reflect the commercial rights of Traditional Owners.

¡ The Malu Lamar (TSI) RNTBC has a technical working group engaged to look at changes to fisheries and native title legislation.

Number of reported non-compliance matters involving Prescribed Bodies Corporate.

lThere are no reported non-compliance matters for the region.

Number of Deeds of Grant in Trust (DOGITs) transferred to Prescribed Bodies Corporate with appropriate support mechanisms.

¡ The Queensland Government has advised there are currently no further DOGIT transfers planned for the Torres Strait region.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 85

Dancers at Torres Strait Masks Exhibition.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 87 86 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-8: NATIVE TITLE PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

PROTECT, MAINTAIN AND PROGRESS NATIVE TITLE RIGHTS AND RECOGNITION OVER THE REGION’S LAND AND

SEA COUNTRY

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Progress and successfully negotiate ILUAs

Progress and successfully negotiate native title claims

Perform functions of Native Title Representative Body under the

Native Title Act

Develop proposals regarding legislation that impacts on native title

ILUAs and other statutory agreements negotiated and

executed

Successful determination of sea claim and outstanding land

claims

NT-2: Successfully negotiated Future Acts and Indigenous Land Use Agreements

NT-1: Changes to native title and Fisheries legislation which recognise the commercial rights as part

of the native title rights of Traditional Owners under the Torres Strait Sea Claim Part A

determination

Legal advice and support in relation to native title protection and management

Submissions, meetings, lobbying, consultation, participation in legislation development

NT-3: Native title claims are successfully determined

Submissions, meetings, lobbying, consultation, participation in legal representation

NT-4: PBCs understand and meet their responsibilities under the Native Title Act

PBCs have greater autonomy in managing native title and land in their communities.

PBCs understand and meet their compliance responsibilities

Native title claims are resolved

Money and other benefits flow into PBCs

Economic development opportunities flow to Traditional Owners from the

Regional Sea Claim Part A determination

Appropriate support mechanisms are provided to PBCs when DOGITs are transferred

All native title claims in the region are settled

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Number of changes to native title and Fisheries legislation that reflect the commercial rights of Traditional Owners.

○ Number of ILUAs that have compensation or other benefits as part of the ILUA terms.

○ Number of reported non-compliance matters involving PBCs.

○ Number of native title determination claims successfully determined.

○ Number of DOGITs transferred to PBCs with appropriate support mechanisms.

88 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Ugar Traditional Owners mapping out traditional land boundaries.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 89

Statistical Data

Table 2-22 provides a statistical summary of Native Title Programme activity in 2014 - 2015.

TABLE 2-22: NTRB PERFORMANCE STATISTICS

FACILITATION AND ASSISTANCE NUMBER

1. Claims experience

Claimant applications

Active claims represented at 30 June 2014 2

Plus claims filed this year by Native Title Representative Body 0

Less claims determined 2014 - 2015 0

Less claims dismissed 2014 - 2015 0

Less claims withdrawn 2014 - 2015 0

(+ or -) Other disposition (describe)

Active claims represented at 30 June 2015 2

Number of these registered by National Native Title Tribunal 2

Claims in Development 1

Non-claimant applications 0

Compensation claims 0

2. Agreements experience

Future Act notices received 85

Responses to Future Acts 63

Agreements concluded 0

Agreements in development 2

Indigenous Land Use Agreements concluded and registered 3

Indigenous Land Use Agreements in development 37

Complaints and disputes

Complaints

Received 0

Resolved 0

Pending 0

Disputes relating to native title applications 0

Disputes relating to Indigenous Land Use Agreements, rights of access and other matters 0

Requests for review of decisions not to assist

Requests received 0

Reviews completed 0

90 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Keeping Native Title Holders Informed - Sea Forum Summits

As the Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) for the Torres Strait region, the TSRA, through the Native Title Office (NTO), has the function of informing native title holders of any matter which may relate to or have an impact on native title in the area under section 203BJ of the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth).

In 2014 - 2015, there were many changes to state legislation that, potentially, could impact on the native title rights and interests of Traditional Owners in the region. An example of this is the amendment to the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (Land Holding) Act 1985 (Qld) regarding Katter leases and the amendment to the Torres Strait Islander Land Act 1991 (Qld) to allow freehold title. The changes will allow the grant of Katter lease applications and the introduction of freehold title on Torres Strait Islander land. The NTO not only has an obligation to make submissions to the relevant agency before the introduction of the legislation, but also to inform the region’s Traditional Owners through the Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs) of the possible impact of those changes on native title rights and interests.

PBCs hold native title in trust for all the Traditional Owners in the native title determination area and are incorporated under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (Cth) (CATSI Act). PBCs are appointed by the Federal Court following a determination of native title and have land dispute resolution functions when it comes to matters involving native title land. For example, should the government wish to make a grant of freehold title on native title land, an Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) will be required since the grant of freehold will extinguish native title. The PBC is required by law to engage with the Traditional Owners of the land and obtain their consent in writing before the PBC can sign off on an ILUA which would allow the grant of freehold to go ahead.

Keeping the PBCs informed is the best way of ensuring that important information of regional significance gets to the Traditional Owners so that a decision can be made with free, prior and informed consent.

A Sea Forum Summit is an important platform for informing all Traditional Owners through their PBCs of issues that can affect them, and provides direct and immediate feedback to governments on proposed changes to policies or legislation. A Sea Forum Summit is an

important platform for informing all Traditional Owners through their PBCs of issues that can affect them

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 91

The NTO arranged a Sea Forum Summit in Cairns from 18 to 20 February 2015. The summit was attended by the chairs of the 21 PBCs in the region and by Queensland Government representatives, including Ministers, who were able to provide an update on and explanation of important issues, such as the social housing programme and land tenure and cultural heritage matters. The Mayor of the Torres Strait Island Regional Council provided an update on local government matters and the NTO legal team gave an update on progress on the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B and on other native title matters of regional significance.

With all PBC chairs also being members of Malu Lamar, which is the PBC for the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part A, there was opportunity to hold a Malu Lamar meeting to discuss progress in the area of fisheries reform. To this end, a Malu Lamar fisheries working group was given authority to progress discussions with all fisheries stakeholders in the Torres Strait on their goal of 100 per cent ownership.

At the end of the Sea Forum Summit, a number of resolutions were recorded and voted on. Those resolutions included instructions to the TSRA in its capacity as the NTRB or instructions to the NTO to write to relevant Ministers outlining concerns regarding proposed changes to the law.

The chairs of Prescribed Bodies Corporate receiving an update on cultural heritage from Mr John Schiaro, principal cultural heritage adviser, Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships.

92 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Native Title Representative Body Reporting

The information reported in this section is specific to TSRA’s Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) functions under the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth).

Overview of the TSRA as a Native Title Representative Body

Native Title Representative Bodies (NTRBs) are primarily responsible for providing effective and equitable native title and related assistance to constituents in their prescribed regions. Constituents are those persons who hold or may hold native title in the region where the NTRB performs its functions. One of the guiding principles for the operation of NTRBs is that they should act in the best interests of their constituents.

The TSRA, through its Native Title Office (NTO), performs the NTRB functions for the Torres Strait region. In 1996, the TSRA was appointed as a recognised NTRB under the Native Title Act. The 1998 amendments to the Act required that NTRBs reapply for recognition. The TSRA was invited to reapply and was subsequently recognised as the Torres Strait NTRB for the period 2015 - 2016.

The NTO Operational Plan for 2014 - 2015 is aligned to the Torres Strait Development Plan2014 - 2018.

Prescribed Bodies Corporate

When a favourable determination of native title is made by the Federal Court, the Traditional Owners are required to establish a Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC). PBCs must be incorporated under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (Cth). The PBC model was adopted to enable native title communal property rights to interact meaningfully with Australian property law. It ensures that the body is represented by a legal entity vested with authority to make binding decisions on its behalf, thus ensuring legal certainty for any parties wishing to negotiate, conduct business or make agreements with the native title holding body. The TSRA recognises that PBCs have specific functions and obligations under both the Native Title Act and the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act.

The TSRA has established a PBC capacity-building grants facility. All PBCs in the region are invited to apply for financial assistance to offset the administrative costs associated with their native title role. The PBC grants are managed as part of the TSRA’s biannual common funding rounds. Capacity building for PBCs is managed by the TSRA’s Governance and Leadership programme. The NTO was instrumental in establishing the Queensland PBC working group as a lobby group to highlight the issues facing PBCs in Queensland and the rest of Australia. Native Title Representative

Bodies are primarily responsible for providing effective and equitable native title and related assistance to constituents in their

prescribed regions.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 93

Legislative Functions of the TSRA in its NTRB Capacity

In its NTRB role, the TSRA, through the NTO, performs specific functions under the Native Title Act. These include:

— facilitating the conduct of research, and the preparation and making of claims, by groups of Aboriginal peoples or Torres Strait Islanders, for determinations of native title and for compensation for acts affecting their native title

— assisting in the resolution of disputes within groups about the making of such claims

— assisting groups by representing them, if requested to do so, in negotiations and proceedings relating to the doing of acts affecting native title, the provision of compensation in relation to such acts and any other matter relevant to the operation of the Act

— facilitating support for and assistance to PBCs.

The legislative functions of NTRBs are set out in section 203B of the Native Title Act, which states:

1. A representative body has the following functions:

a. the facilitation and assistance functions referred to in section 203BB;

b. the certification functions referred to in section 203BE;

c. the dispute resolution functions referred to in section 203BF;

d. the notification functions referred to in section 203BG;

e. the agreement making function referred to in section 203BH;

f. the internal review functions referred to in section 203BI; and

g. the functions referred to in section 203BJ and such other functions as are conferred on representative bodies by this Act.

A NTRB may only perform its facilitation and assistance functions if requested to do so.

Organisational Structure and Corporate Governance Policies

NTO staff operate as a programme within the TSRA and are therefore included within the TSRA’s organisational structure (see Appendix 1). Similarly, NTO staff are bound by the same corporate governance policies that apply to the TSRA generally.

Report on Performance

In addition to the information below, the Native Title Programme Report on pages 80 to 91 provide statistical data on claims, agreements and complaints.

The TSRA operates in a predominantly post-determination environment. There are no significant trends in operating statistics which require intervention.

The TSRA is continuing to negotiate with the Queensland Government to resolve specific points of the Infrastructure and Social Housing Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA). This ILUA is in its twenty-second draft and the TSRA expects the issues to be resolved in 2015 - 2016.

There have been no significant changes in the nature of the principal functions and services provided through the NTO.

The general nature of complaints received have been that the PBCs have not consulted widely in communities (with all Traditional Owners) when communicating decisions relating to the ILUAs and future acts. The NTRB’s response is that the PBCs themselves should resolve disputes under their rules. The PBC support officer and visiting legal staff from the NTO reinforce this requirement with PBC members during community visits.

94 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Summary Resources Table

For the 2014 - 2015 financial year, the NTO received $3.760 million for operations.

The financial performance of the TSRA in its NTRB capacity is outlined in Table 2-23.

TABLE 2-23: NTRB FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

NTRB FUNCTIONS

ACTUAL 2013 - 2014 $’000

BUDGET 2014 - 2015 $’000

ACTUAL 2014 - 2015 $’000

VARIATION 2014 - 2015 $’000

Expenditure

Capital - - - -

Activities 2,293 3,200 3,194(1) 6

Corporate 605 560 598 (38)

Total 2,898 3,760 3,792 (32)

Income

Australian Government via Appropriation

2,959 3,760 3,760 0

Activity Generated Income - - - -

Interest - - - -

Reversal of previous Asset write downs

- - - -

Other - - - -

Total 2,959 3,760 3,760 0

(1) T his figure includes $0.115 million in credits from the Queensland Government for work relating to Indigenous Land Use Agreements performed by the NTRB on their behalf.

Performance against Budget

In performing its NTRB role, the TSRA has operated within the planned budget for 2014 - 2015.

There have been no significant changes in funding from 2013 - 2014 or changes to the 2014 - 2015 budget during the year.

There have been no significant occurrences during the period between the end of the reporting period and the tabling of the Annual Report of Operations.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 95

Management of Human Resources

The NTO has five employees, four of whom live in the region. They are:

— a Principal Legal Officer

— a Paralegal

— three Administration Support Officers.

Since 2005, the NTO has assisted 20 law students to undertake legal internships through the Aurora Project. One student has also undertaken Practical Legal Training.

Information about workforce planning, workplace health and safety, indemnities and insurance premiums for NTO staff are included within the TSRA’s procedures and policies.

All NTO staff are subject to the TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2011 - 2014. This Enterprise Agreement will remain in force until negotiations on the new Enterprise Agreement are complete. No NTO staff are on Australian Workplace Agreements.

NTO staff members participated in training and development with other TSRA staff as well as training and development to meet the requirements for legal practitioners in Queensland under the relevant legislation.

Table 2-24 shows the representation of Equal Employment Opportunity groups and classification levels in the NTO as at 30 June 2015.

TABLE 2-24: EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GROUPS, NATIVE TITLE OFFICE, 2014 - 2015

APS CLASSIFICATION FEMALE MALE

TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER OR ABORIGINAL PEOPLE WITH A

DISABILITY

Executive Level 2 0 1 0 0

Executive Level 1 0 0 0 0

APS Level 6 0 0 0 0

APS Level 5 1 0 1 0

APS Level 3 3 0 3 0

Total 4 1 4 0

96 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

NTO Consultancies for the 2014 - 2015 Reporting Period

The NTO uses external legal counsel and external consultants to meet its strategic objectives. Table 2-25 shows the consultants engaged during the reporting period.

TABLE 2-25: CONSULTANTS ENGAGED BY THE NTO, 2014 - 2015

EXPERTISE CONSULTANT SERVICE

Legal Robert Blowes SC Senior counsel for the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B

Tom Keely Junior counsel for the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B

Tina Jowett Counsel assisting with the negotiation of ILUAs and native title compensation

Michael Neal Independent legal representation for Naghir and Warral and Ului matters

Jim Brooks Independent legal representation for Naghir matter

Oliver Gilkerson Advice and assistance with the Deed of Grant in Trust (DOGIT) transfer

Development of an infrastructure and social housing ILUA

Advice and assistance with the Mer reserve transfer ILUA

Advice and assistance with the Saibai sea walls project

Legal representative for the Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B

Advice and assistance with Future Acts

Marrawah Law Kaurareg native title claims (brief out)

Greg McIntyre SC Independent legal representative for Naghir matter

Paul Sheiner Independent legal representative for Naghir matter

Prestons Law Representative for Bamaga in the Cape York native title claim

Dr Kevin Murphy Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B and Warral and Ului anthropological advice and reports

Anthropological Dr Brendan Corrigan Research and advice for the Naghir matter

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Native Title 97

Poruma PBC Chair Frank Fauid, TSRA Chair and TSRA Member for Poruma.

98 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

Regional Goal

To enhance both healthy communities and our living environment and achieve the provision of adequate, appropriate and affordable housing.

Programme Goal

The Healthy Communities Programme goals are:

— to monitor and provide strategic policy advice to the Torres Strait Health Partnership and Integrated Service delivery partners to ensure that advances are being made in primary and preventative health care

— to play a more direct role through the provision of funding and support to preventative health initiatives that will improve a healthy lifestyle and will link with the Environmental Management Programme to support local fresh food production

— to be directly involved in making housing more affordable for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

Programme Objectives

The Healthy Communities Programme component will:

— seek to influence policy for all health programs across all tiers of government

— monitor health services and health initiatives across the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area and provide strategic policy advice

— direct support targeting healthy lifestyles, including improving availability of fresh produce and healthy food options, and encouraging people to undertake healthy activities

— provide some direct support for home ownership.

Programme Deliverables

— Secure whole-of-government investment for infrastructure to support healthy homes and healthy living environments.

— Policies support community managed delivery of primary and public health care.

— Services and are based on regional needs and priorities.

— Improved access to affordable fresh and healthy foods.

— More active and healthy communities.

— Affordable home ownership available across the region.

Delivering the Strait Smile initiative in schools.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Healthy Communities 99

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-26: HEALTHY COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

14,716 14,629 87

Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

— Secure whole-of government investment for infrastructure to support healthy homes and healthy living environments.

— Policies support community managed delivery of primary and public health care services and are based on regional needs and priorities.

— Improved access to affordable fresh and healthy foods.

— More active and healthy communities.

— Affordable home ownership available across the region.

New gym on Thursday Island.

100 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Support community health projects l

Five grants funded a range of community-based healthy lifestyle promotion projects, including health prevention, increased school participation, dental health and community health leadership projects. Two programmes included:

— the Strait Smile programme, implemented in the Boigu, St Pauls, Mer, Warraber, Iama, Erub and Poruma communities

— the Shadow Fitness Programme, delivered on Mer

Seawalls and landfill renovation projects l

Seawalls protecting the Saibai Cemetery were constructed and works on Poruma emergency coastal stabilisation have also been undertaken.

Major works planned for Saibai were progressed, while works at Poruma and Boigu were delayed.

Works at Masig, Iama and Warraber are scheduled for completion by 2016 - 2017.

The Healthy Communities Programme continues to work with the Torres Strait Island Regional Council, other regional councils and the Queensland Government Department of Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning through the Major Infrastructure Programme management committee to address waste and landfill renovation issues in the region.

Sport and recreation activities (grants) l

The TSRA funded several local council infrastructure upgrades, including to the Thursday Island (TI) training facility at Ken Brown Oval and the TI stadium gym. Hammond Island received a shade sail for their outdoor basketball court.

The Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association continued to administer sports subsidy funding throughout the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Twelve major local sporting carnival events were supported.

Grants for 68 sport and recreation activities encouraged participation in a range of sporting and recreational events, including sports at state and national levels.

Sport and recreation participation rates in 2014 - 2015 were as follows:

— in the 0-12 age group: 179 children

— in the 13-25 age group: 834 young people

— in the 26-54 age group: 1,057 adults

— in the 55 years and over: 53 older persons

Total: 2,123 participants.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Healthy Communities 101

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Support community horticulture projects (grants) lThe Healthy Communities Programme, in conjunction with the Environmental Management Programme landcare supervisor,

provided technical support to four communities to maintain community gardens.

The TSRA also funded an environmental education officer role in Tagai State College.

The TSRA has embarked on the development of a three-year implementation strategy to improve people’s access to affordable, fresh and healthy food in the region. As part of the development of the strategy, the TSRA has engaged with key stakeholders, such as the local food supplier Islander Board of Industry and Services, to contribute to the strategy.

Waste feasibility support project l

A sustainable waste solutions awareness-raising project has been funded for a staged community awareness campaign to be delivered for Torres Strait inner islands (Kaiwalagal area).

A regional waste management implementation strategy, primarily driven at a regional level and involving three local government councils and the Queensland State Government, is being developed with support provided by the TSRA Healthy Communities Programme.

Horn Island Affordable Housing Project l

The Horn Island Affordable Housing Project is now at a stage where clearing of land and construction of serviced lots can commence; however, additional land tenure issues have emerged, which has led to delays in the construction of the subdivision of serviced lots.

The Torres Shire Council along with the Queensland Government is working with the TSRA Native Title Office to resolve these issues.

Major infrastructure projects l

Thirteen environmental health infrastructure projects will be delivered under the Major Infrastructure Programme - MIP5. These projects are underway and due for completion by December 2016.

Prince of Wales (POW) water service project (grant) lA total of 49 water tanks have been delivered to residents on POW and surrounding communities - Friday, Entrance, Port Lihou and

Packe islands.

A bore water drilling operation to locate emergency water to establish a well is underway on POW.

Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC) water and waste management programme

lThe TSRA continued its contribution to the TSIRC water and waste water management programme through 2014 - 2015 to ensure that services are adequately maintained for outer island communities.

102 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

TSIRC water testing project l

This project is being implemented in three Torres Strait communities. The TSIRC in-house water testing will be expanded to include all outer island clusters in 2015 - 2016, as part of ongoing improvements to water testing requirements for communities.

Ugar community access infrastructure project (grants) lSeveral feasibility studies to address the all-tide access issue at the Ugar community have been undertaken. All have found that

infrastructure solutions are cost prohibitive, and that reef dredging options may have significant adverse environmental outcomes. Due to budget constraints, non-infrastructure solutions will be investigated to resolve and improve community access outcomes.

Health promotion and community education projects lFour healthy communities workshops, delivered by the TSIRC were held at Warraber, Erub, Boigu and Mer communities. The

workshops built the capacity of 24 youths to change health outcomes for communities.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Rangers and community members sandbagging Dauar cemetery project.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Healthy Communities 103

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

Increased access to fresh and affordable foods in Torres Strait communities.

¡ The TSRA is adopting a multi-pronged approach to address this need and has engaged with local fresh food suppliers to improve the range and quality of foods, talked with retailers about how to improve the delivery of food supplies to outer island communities and contributed to discussions to improve community-based gardening initiatives. Measures for this criterion are still being developed.

Increase in participation in structured sport, recreation and healthy lifestyle activities.

lThe TSRA continued funding for sporting subsidies through its partnership with the Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association. Ten major local sporting events were delivered and 43 grants for a range of sporting and recreational activities were approved. A total of 2,123 participants were supported in 2014 - 2015.

Increase in serviced land and infrastructure to support housing for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

lThe TSRA has partnered with the Torres Shire Council to deliver the Horn Island Affordable Housing Project. The TSRA has contributed funding to establish the subdivision and in-ground services for 24 housing lots. Issues with land tenure have delayed progress and the council is working with the Queensland Government and the Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation to resolve boundary issues.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Healthy Communities 105 104 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-9: HEALTHY COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

ENHANCE BOTH HEALTHY COMMUNITIES AND OUR LIVING ENVIRONMENT

ACHIEVE THE PROVISION OF ADEQUATE, APPROPRIATE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Support community market garden and horticulture initiatives

Engage with food suppliers/retailers to increase supply and variety of healthy

food options

Fund Sport and Recreation activities and minor infrastructure

Support health education initiatives including physical education, nutrition,

obesity, diabetes programs, motivation, substance abuse

Contribute funding and provide policy advice for the delivery of essential services

and infrastructure to support Healthy living environments

Funding contribution towards community and market gardens

HC-3: Improved access to affordable fresh and healthy foods

Training initiatives in horticulture

Funding contributions towards sport & recreation minor infrastructure

HC-1: Secure whole of government investment for infrastructure to support healthy homes

and healthy living environments

Engage with food suppliers/retailers to explore improved healthy food options

Funding contributions towards health education initiatives

HC-2: Policies support community managed delivery of primary and public health care services

and are based on regional needs and priorities

Policies supporting Healthy Community development

Funding contribution made towards essential services and infrastructure to support healthy living

environments

HC-4: More active and healthy communities

HC-5: Affordable home ownership available across the region

Reduced prevalence of disease resulting from poor environmental health

infrastructure

Affordable fresh produce available for communities

Communities have essential services and infrastructure to support healthy living

environments

Increased government investment in housing and affordable home ownership options

Community and individual participation in healthy activities

Reduced overcrowding

Increased home ownership by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal

residents

Reduced chronic disease levels

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ Increased investment into new and existing regional environmental health infrastructure.

○ Increased access to fresh and affordable foods in Torres Strait communities.

○ Increase in participation in structured sport, recreation and healthy lifestyle activities.

○ Increase in serviced land and infrastructure to support housing for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

106 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

Improving health and social outcomes through sport and recreation

The Torres Strait Regional Authority has funded the non-government organisation Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association (TSYRSA) for the past 20 years. The TSYRSA manages low-value grants and distributes sports subsidies to sport and recreation bodies in the region. The TSYRSA has a strong foundation and established networks with sporting clubs and recreational bodies throughout the 16 inner and outer islands of the Torres Strait and in the communities on the Northern Peninsula Area.

The association has been responsible for, and proactive in, the promotion and implementation of a wide range of healthy lifestyle activities, sport and recreational activities and the allocation and administration of sporting funds throughout the Torres Strait region. The association works with regional sporting clubs, schools, sport interest groups and talented individuals with potential for state-level or higher representation.

Based on Thursday Island, the association has a range of resources (administration staff, office space, meeting space, access to computers and the internet) available to sporting and recreational bodies to assist them in planning and communicating events.

The TSRA conducted a performance review of all its major funded non-government organisations in 2014 - 2015. The review recommended that the TSRA should support additional governance and administrative training for the TSYRSA to assist them to build their organisational capacity to improve performance and prepare them for additional responsibilities.

In partnership with the TSRA, the TSYRSA is making a strong contribution towards closing the gap in health outcomes for the

people of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Healthy Communities 107

The TSYRSA has now embarked on a 12-month work plan which is strengthening the organisation’s existing services. The work plan includes the formal establishment of a sport and recreational reference group to improve collaboration between stakeholders and streamline programmes that benefit the whole of the Torres Strait.

The TSYRSA contributes to the improvement of the health and wellbeing of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region. The organisation facilitates access to elite sports pathways and the participation of youth at state and national levels.

The TSYRSA has recently secured additional programme funding from the Queensland Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing. They have established a partnership with the region’s Community Development Programme (CDP) service provider, My Pathway, to secure a major renovation upgrade of the Thursday Island Water Sports Club, which will be used as a training facility for CDP participants and a community sports and recreation facility.

In partnership with the TSRA, the TSYRSA is making a strong contribution towards closing the gap in health outcomes for the people of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Torres Strait representatives at School Boy Peninsula Rugby League.

The TSYRSA has a strong foundation and established networks with sporting clubs and recreational bodies throughout the

16 inner and outer islands of the Torres Strait and in the communities on the Northern Peninsula Area.

108 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

SAFE COMMUNITIES

Regional Goal

To have safe, healthy, respectful and progressive communities, based on Ailan Kastom and Aboriginal traditions (Communities) and strong families and safe and healthy communities that is guided by cultural and traditional Lore (Social Services).

Programme Goal

The Safe Communities goals are:

— to influence policy and monitor service delivery by other agencies

— to undertake a leading and supporting role through Integrated Service Delivery forums, contributing to the development and monitoring of standards for the provision of social services in the region. The programme will also contribute directly to some public and community safety and community accessibility outcomes through funding and support for targeted initiatives.

Programme Objectives

The Safe Communities Programme component will:

— contribute to the development of standards for the provision of all mainstream social services and facilities, including emergency response services, through engagement with responsible agencies

— undertake a policy advocacy, monitoring and supporting role with respect to mainstream services, advocating and acting as a solution broker on behalf of communities and the region, using Integrated Service Delivery forums

— provide direct funding and resource support for some social support services, and infrastructure, facilities and equipment, that contribute to improved safety and accessibility for communities and families (the TSRA will not provide mainstream social or community services).

Programme Deliverables

— Effective community and social services support.

— Families and individuals are safe in home and community.

— Public areas are safe and accessible for community members.

— Communities have access to appropriate transport infrastructure.

Badu Airstrip.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Safe Communities 109

Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015

TABLE 2-27: SAFE COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

BUDGET $’000 ACTUAL $’000 VARIANCE $’000

4,487 4,375 112

Torres Strait Development Plan Programme Outcomes

— Effective community and social service support.

— Families and individuals are safe in home and community.

— Public areas are safe and accessible for community members.

— Communities have access to appropriate transport infrastructure.

Erub Airport.

110 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Programme Performance

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

School attendance and learning initiatives (grants) l The TSRA provides grants for projects that improve the delivery of social services in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA supported the Ensuring a Strait Start project developed by the Torres Strait Islanders’ Regional Education Council (TSIREC) to improve access to early education support in Torres Strait communities.

Strait Start is currently being delivered on Thursday Island, Badu, and Poruma, Boigu, Iama, Erub, Kubin, Masig and Mer communities. TSIREC is working towards implementing the project in communities on Warraber, Mabuiag, Saibai, St Pauls and Horn Island.

Community safety partnerships l

The TSRA’s role in the Torres Strait is enhanced through partnerships with relevant local, state and Commonwealth agencies. The TSRA is a member of the Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme (TSMSP), which contributes to improved boating safety.

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA contributed to the TSMSP school-based marine safety, project enabling the purchase of correctly fitted life jackets for school-aged children in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area. (See the Safe Communities Programme case study on page 116).

The TSRA has key partnerships with the three local government councils in the region. In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA contributed funds towards the purchase and installation of high frequency (HF) radios to be used for improved communications capability for disaster management situations.

Community safety projects (grants) l

A lifeguard training project at the local pool in the Northern Peninsula Area is an example of a community safety grant project funded in 2014 - 2015.

Law enforcement partnerships l

The TSRA provides funding support for the delivery of legal services for residents in the region through a partnership with the Attorney General’s Department (AGD). The service is provided by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service.

The TSRA and AGD have agreed to continue their partnership arrangements for a further three years, ensuring that key legal services support will continue to be provided for the region.

In 2014 - 2015, 3,067 cases relating to duty lawyer, criminal, family and civil casework were supported; 8,931 cases were supported for advice and minor assistance. A new Community Legal Education Officer role was created to assist clients with understanding the legal process.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Safe Communities 111

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Social services delivered by NGOs - Port Kennedy Association and Mura Kosker Sorority

lCore operational and service support funding was provided to the Mura Kosker Sorority and Port Kennedy Association to continue to deliver important community social support services. With this support these two organisations deliver programmes such as child and family support services, after school and holiday care initiatives, financial counselling and literacy and women and men’s groups. Additional funding was also granted to support governance and administrative capacity building for these community-based non-government social services providers.

Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme (TIDS) lThe TSRA and the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads have extended their memorandum of

understanding to deliver the Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme (TIDS). In 2014 - 2015, TIDS delivered a schedule of works covering land, sea and air transport infrastructure on Torres Strait outer island communities and in the Northern Peninsula Area.

The Torres Strait works included:

— the final stage of the Hammond Island pavement and drainage works

— St Pauls and Saibai jetty and ramp repairs.

The Northern Peninsula Area (NPA) works included:

— airport drainage and pavement repairs on the NPA airstrip

— Seisia jetty lighting and electrical reticulations.

Coordination of infrastructure planning l The TSRA works in partnership with key Commonwealth and state agencies to secure and maintain funding relationships that

contribute to key regional infrastructure projects.

A co-funding initiative with the Torres Strait Island Regional Council commenced in 2013 - 2014 for infrastructure upgrades. In 2014 - 2015, this initiative delivered:

— installation of solar lights at Hammond Island wharf

— a welding shed fitout at Warraber

— construction of an airport waiting area on Mer

— refurbishment of community halls on Badu, Saibai and Ugar.

Community capacity building (grants) l

Nine grants were provided to individuals and community organisations to encourage community safety awareness and capacity building in our current social service providers, to improve the wellbeing of communities.

Social and economic engagement partnerships l In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA worked with key partners to improve social and economic community engagement. The Safe

Communities Programme contributed to Integrated Service Delivery forums, as well as interagency social service forums. While no new formal partnerships were finalised in this period, the programme’s existing partnerships to improve the safety of family, community and public spaces were strengthened.

112 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ACTIVITY FLAG STATUS

Social Services Delivered by NGOs (Grants) l

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA completed a review of the performance and financial management of non-government organisations (NGOs) in receipt of significant funding from the TSRA. These NGOs deliver vital social services to the region. As a result, additional funding and organisational support was provided to the Mura Kosker Sorority and Port Kennedy Association. This support will build governance and administrative capacity to improve the delivery of social support services in the Torres Strait region.

Activities funded in 2014 - 2015 included:

— Ailan Kreation, the ripple effect programme

— Port Kennedy Association - community after school care programme

— Port Kennedy Association - regional hub workshop stage 2

— Kaziw Meta College - new student transport bus.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started Completed /

On schedule

Behind schedule less than three months Behind schedule more than three months

Beachside BBQ affected by king tide, Sadie’s Beach.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Safe Communities 113

Additional Programme Specific Performance Indicators

INDICATOR FLAG STATUS

All Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people employed in the TSRA-supported social services sector in the region have appropriate accreditation.

lThe majority of indigenous staff employed by TSRA-funded organisations have appropriate accreditation to effectively perform their duties within the social services sector. These include certificates in aged care and disability services, children’s services, community services and business administration; an associate degree in Indigenous community management and development; and a diploma in financial counselling.

All TSRA-funded service delivery organisations in the region provide quality services and operate in accordance with relevant standards.

lSocial support services are effectively delivered in the region by the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy Association and are operated in accordance with relevant standards under the Associations Incorporation Act 1981 (Qld), and within the TSRA funding guidelines. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Queensland) also delivers legal services in the region in accordance with relevant standards and guidelines under the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department’s Indigenous Legal Assistance Programme.

Reduction in service referrals, response timeframes and waiting lists for social service providers.

lThe number of service referrals varies from time to time, depending on clients’ individual circumstances. The programmes delivered by the Mura Kosker Sorority and Port Kennedy Association include the disability / flexi-respite programme and the old people’s action programme. All responses to clients and waiting lists are managed efficiently and in a timely manner.

Increased participation in TSRA-supported community events by residents and TSRA-funded service organisations

lThe number of residents and TSRA-funded organisations who participate in various community events has increased to 300 compared to previous years, when there was an average of 200 participants. Some community events coordinated by the Mura Kosker Sorority and Port Kennedy Association are International Women’s Day celebrations, Domestic Violence Prevention Month, Mini Markets, White Ribbon Day, Biggest Morning Tea, Twilight Markets, National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) Week, National Aboriginal and Islander Children’s Day, and Child Protection Week.

Legend

¡ l l l

Not yet started KPI achieved KPI partially achieved KPI not achieved

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Safe Communities 115 114 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

FIGURE 2-10: SAFE COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME MAP

REGIONAL GOAL

SAFE, HEALTHY, RESPECTFUL AND PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITIES, BASED ON ISLAND CUSTOMS AND ABORIGINAL TRADITIONS

STRONG FAMILIES, SAFE AND HEALTHY COMMUNITIES THAT ARE GUIDED BY CULTURAL AND TRADITIONAL LORE

COAG TARGETS

CLOSE THE LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP WITHIN A GENERATION

HALVE THE GAP IN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WITHIN

A DECADE

Support Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal women, men and children’s social development and support programs; child and

family safety programs

Support safe and accessible community infrastructure; land and sea communications systems;

community capacity building

Participate in interagency and integrated service delivery meetings/forums to discuss issues of community and domestic safety and to contribute

to shaping planning and service delivery in the region

Funding contributions made to proactive and reactive social service providers

Contribute towards capacity building, training initiatives for social service and emergency

service providers

SC-1: Effective community and social services support

Funding contributions made to services and facilities that contribute to community accessibility

and safety standards

Monitoring and advocating for effective service delivery of community services

SC-2: Families and individuals are safe in home and community

Contribute to development of standards for provision of services and facilities for safe and healthy

communities through engagement with responsible agencies

SC-3: Public areas are safe and accessible for community members

SC-4: Communities have access to safe and accessible transport infrastructure

Increased use of proactive and social support services by 5%.

Increased effectiveness of social services support to communities

Improved capacity of social services providers to respond to community identified needs

Increased skills development and employment opportunity for community members delivering social

support services

Increased family and individual participation in community events

Improved access to safe transport and emergency services is reported through

the ISD evaluations

Increased participation in social and cultural activities by community by 5%.

Projects and

Initiatives Outputs Program Outcomes Benefits 2014 - 2018 Future Benefits Regional Goal and COAG Targets

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

○ All Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people employed in the TSRA supported social services sector in the region have appropriate accreditation

○ All TSRA funded service delivery organisations in the region provide quality services and operate in accordance with relevant standards

○ Reduction in service referrals, response timeframes and waiting lists for social service providers

○ Increased participation in TSRA supported community events by residents and TSRA funded service organisations

116 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

CASE STUDY

School-Based Maritime Safety Education

Boating is a key activity in the Torres Strait and boating safety is of the utmost concern for families in the region. In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA provided grant funding for the purchase of 1,400 children’s lifejackets as part of the Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme (TSMSP) school-based maritime safety education project.

The project, at the half way mark, complements the delivery of a contemporary school-based maritime safety education curriculum at each of the 24 campuses throughout the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area, with each child (pre-prep to Year 12) receiving a properly fitted lifejacket and each campus provided with an educational kit comprising boating safety equipment to legally and safely travel at sea.

The primary focus of the project is to improve the marine safety consciousness of young people through promoting boating safety in the Torres Strait region, which will in turn help reduce the potential future number of search and rescue operations in the area.

The success of this project is dependent on a range of partnering organisations. The TSMSP is a partnership between Maritime Safety Queensland, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, the TSRA, the Queensland Police Service and the National Maritime Safety Authority of Papua New Guinea.

Marlin Australia supplied the lifejackets at a significantly discounted price and Sea Swift transported the lifejackets free of charge to and throughout the Torres Strait region.

The TSMSP has contributed to a significant reduction in maritime safety incidents across the Torres Strait. The number of emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) activations has dropped from a high of 70 in 2008 - 2009 to a low of

29 as at 30 April 2015. During this period there has been an increase in the number of EPIRB carried by

Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal boat owners.

The number of maritime operational incidents has dropped from a high of 258 in 2006 - 2007 to a low of 118 as at 30 April 2015. While it is not possible to quantify the savings in maritime rescue operations, the significant reduction in incident numbers.

Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme visits Warraber school.

SECTION 2 Programme Performance Details About Our Programs Safe Communities 117

Seabird rookery, Bramble Cay.

Mer Ranger Aaron Bon inspecting a dog trap for turtle protection.

SECTION THREE

Report of Operations

120 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

WHERE WE OPERATE

Geography and Logistics

The Torres Strait is located in Australia and is part of Queensland. The area is approximately 150 kilometres wide at its narrowest point and is situated between the tip of Queensland’s Cape York Peninsula and Papua New Guinea. The region consists of over 270 islands and reefs.

The Torres Strait links the Coral Sea in the east to the Arafura Sea in the west; the two main navigation passages are the Prince of Wales Channel, north of Hammond Island, and the Endeavour Strait, between Cape York and Prince of Wales Island.

The Torres Strait islands have a variety of topographies, ecosystems and formations. Several islands, closest to the Papua New Guinea coastline, are low lying and are regularly inundated by sea water. Many of the western islands are hilly and steep. The central islands are predominantly coral cays and those to the east are volcanic.

The TSRA delivers services across the entire Torres Strait region, including 17 inhabited islands and the communities of Bamaga and Seisia in the Northern Peninsula Area of mainland Australia. Due to the region’s remoteness, the TSRA relies on air and sea links and limited phone, facsimile and internet communications between communities for the delivery of its services. Most travel within the region is restricted to small watercraft, helicopter and light aircraft. The main gateway to the Torres Strait is Ngarupai Airport located on Horn Island, a 20 minute ferry ride from the Australian Government, Queensland Government and two local government administration hubs located on Thursday Island.

The bulk of goods and materials required by the region are shipped by container vessel from Cairns and redistributed by barge from transhipment points on Thursday Island and Horn Island.

Culture

The picturesque Torres Strait region is predominantly inhabited by Torres Strait Islanders and Kaurareg Aboriginal people. Based on 2011 Australian Bureau of Statistics Census figures, the total population of the region is 8,738, of whom 6,997 (80.1 per cent) are Torres Strait Islander or Aboriginal people.

FIGURE 3-1: THE TORRES STRAIT

The Torres Strait’s unique Ailan Kastom is a central part of life in the region.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 121

The Torres Strait’s unique Ailan Kastom (island custom) is a central part of life in the region. Ailan Kastom is kept alive through the arts, rituals and performances, and the preservation of language and traditional knowledge, which are passed from one generation to the next. Cultural values are strongly intertwined with traditional, ancestral ties and respect for waterways, land, sea and the resources these provide.

History

The Torres Strait is named after Spanish explorer, Luis Vaez de Torres, who sailed through the area in 1606. Queensland Government administration of the Torres Strait was established on Thursday Island

in 1877, following the arrival of missionaries on Cape York Peninsula. Early settlers were involved in pearling, bêche-de-mer collection, and mining.

Native Title

Torres Strait Islander people first achieved recognition of their land rights in 1992 following the High Court’s landmark Mabo decision which granted the Meriam people native title rights over Mer (Murray) Island. This was the first time native title had been recognised under the common law of Australia. It set a precedent for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people throughout Australia to assert their native title rights through the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth).

Native title has been granted for 13 inhabited islands and most of the uninhabited islands in the Torres Strait region. In addition, the Kaurareg Aboriginal people have achieved recognition of their native title rights over seven inner islands: Ngarupai (Horn Island), Muralag (Prince of Wales Island), Zuna (Entrance Island), Yeta (Port Lihou Island), Mipa (Turtle Island), Tarilag (Packe Island) and Damaralag. There were no new determinations

in 2014 - 2015. Twenty two native title determinations have been made in the Torres Strait.

Native title claims are being pursued over the remaining two land claims and one sea claim.

Progress Towards Closing the Gap

Closing the Gap is a commitment by the Australian Government and state and territory governments to improve the lives of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Australians and, in particular, to provide a better future for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal children.

A national, integrated Closing the Gap strategy has been agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the peak intergovernmental forum in Australia. COAG brings together the Prime Minister, State Premiers, Territory Chief Ministers and the President of the Australian Local Government Association.

Closing the Gap is linked to a wider reform of Commonwealth-State financial relations. COAG’s national agreements and partnerships, in areas such as education, housing and health, are focused on overcoming Indigenous disadvantage.

In 2014 - 2015, the Australian Government introduced the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) which grouped over 150 Indigenous programmes into five programme streams. These are:

— Jobs, Land and Economy

— Children and Schooling

— Safety and Wellbeing

— Culture and Capability

— Remote Australia Strategies.

The TSRA has aligned its programme outcomes to these streams while continuing to deliver against the COAG targets:

— to close the life expectancy gap within a generation

— to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade

— to ensure access to early childhood education for all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities within five years

122 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

— to halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy

achievements for children within a decade

— to halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 (or equivalent) attainment rates by 2020

— to halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

— to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous school attendance within five years

COAG Building Blocks

The TSRA’s Programme structure is based on the seven COAG building blocks for Closing the Gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians. The building blocks are also used as the framework for the TSRA’s Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) project.

In 2008 - 2009, the TSRA completed community consultations as part of the development of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029. The first phase of the Regional Plan was delivered through the Torres Strait Development Plan 2009 - 2013 and the second phase was published as the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 on 1 July 2014.

The ISD project identified 1,613 gaps in service delivery across 20 communities. Detail of service gaps by community is contained in the Torres Strait Regional Plan ISD community booklets for 2012. Those booklets, prepared for each community and published through the TSRA’s Information Publishing Scheme, can be accessed on the TSRA website www.tsra.gov.au. Fifteen community booklets were updated in 2013 - 2014 and 2014 - 2015. The remaining four booklets will be

updated in 2015 - 2016. Progress is measured during

community consultation visits, generally covering each community once every second year. The status

as at 30 June 2015, measured against each of the building blocks, showing improvements measured in the communities visited in 2014 - 2015 is shown in

Table 3-1 and Figure 3-2. Table 3-1 shows the baseline

data for 2010 and progress in 2012, 2014 and 2015. Data sets were not prepared for 2011 or 2013.

Table 3-1 and Figure 3-2 show that the TSRA is making significant progress towards addressing the service gaps identified in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029. From the original 1,613 gaps in 2010, five duplicates have been removed, adjusting the ISD baseline to 1,608. As of 30 June 2015:

— 278 items had been identified as not being a function of government or advice had been received from the relevant government agency that the service could not be economically delivered in the region. These items include a number of small business opportunities for which financial and mentoring support was available, but where the community requesting the opportunity had not identified any person who wished to participate in that enterprise. These items are indicated in black in Figure 3-3.

— 87 items have not yet started. These are items for which funding has not yet been identified or for which there are other dependencies such as finalisation of native title issues. These items are indicated in pale yellow in Figure 3-3.

— 209 items are in progress. These are items for which funding has been identified or resources have been allocated. It is expected the majority of these in-progress items will be finalised over the next two financial years. These items are indicated in grey in Figure 3-3.

— 1,034 items have been completed. The service requested is either being provided in the community or is available to the community within a reasonable distance or timeframe, commensurate with services provided to the wider Australian rural community. In some cases an alternative service has been proposed; for example, home-based child care instead of a child care centre in smaller communities where a child care centre would not be economically feasible. These items are indicated in dark yellow in Figure 3-3.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 123

TABLE 3-1: SUMMARY OF COMMUNITY SERVICE ISSUES BY COAG BUILDING BLOCK

BUILDING BLOCK

BASELINE 2010

PROGRESS 2011 - 2012

PROGRESS 2013 - 2014

PROGRESS 2014 - 2015

NOT YET AVAILABLE

NOT YET AVAILABLE

IN

PROGRESS

AVAILABLE

EXCLUDED

NOT YET AVAILABLE

IN

PROGRESS

AVAILABLE

EXCLUDED

NOT YET AVAILABLE

IN

PROGRESS

AVAILABLE

Early Childhood

58

34 20

5

4 18 19 17 7 8 6

36

Schooling

132

32 63

38

4 15 29 84 15 3 14

100

Health

311

117 126

70

19 62 87 144 43 21 49

200

Economic participation

322

152 108

63

58 67 41 156 104 8 32

176

Healthy homes

248

74 147

27

16 39

(1)

82 109 33 7 42

165

Safe communities

440

185 167

89

41 101 107 192 67 35 64

271

Governance and leadership

102

22 40

40

7 7 17 71 9 5 2

86

Community total

1,613

616 671

332

149 309

382 773 278 87 209

1,034

(1) This figure was incorrectly reported as 69 in 2013 - 2014 the revised total for ‘items not yet available’ is 309.

124 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Progress in Service Delivery

FIGURE 3-2: PROGRESS OF SERVICE DELIVERY AGAINST THE TORRES STRAIT AND NORTHERN PENINSULA AREA REGIONAL PLAN 2009 - 2029

2000

1500

1000

500

0

2010 2012 2014 2015

Service Gaps

Legend

Excluded Not yet available In progress Available

Kaurareg masks on display at Gab Titui Cultural Centre.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 125

Progress by COAG Building Block

FIGURE 3-3: PROGRESS TOWARDS CLOSING THE GAP BY COAG BUILDING BLOCK, AT 30 JUNE 2015

Early Childhood

7 8

6

36

Schooling

15 14

3

100

Health

43

21

49

200

Economic Participation

104

8

32

176

Safe Communities

67

35

64

271

Healthy Homes

33

42

165

7

Governance and Leadership

9 5

2

86

Summary

278

1034

87

209

Legend

Not yet available In progress Excluded Completed

126 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Regional Statistics

The latest data available at the time of writing this report was from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). This data, based on the Census data collected in 2011, has been used to benchmark the progress of the TSRA’s programmes against Closing the Gap targets. The data used throughout this section is taken from the ABS website (Census QuickStats) and was current at 30 June 2015.

The figures used in the 2014 - 2015 report are for the Torres Strait and the two communities in the Northern Peninsula Area (Bamaga and Seisia) which are included in the TSRA’s area of responsibility.

Population

Population changes across the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area (Bamaga and Seisia) are shown in Tables 3-3 to 3-6.

TABLE 3-2: TOTAL POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA TOTAL (REGION)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

8,576 7,489 784 1,046 165 203 9,525 8,738

TABLE 3-3: TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA TOTAL (REGION)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

7,105 5,921 688 939 125 137 7,918 6,997

In 2011, the Torres Strait and Aboriginal population represented 80.1 per cent of the total population. This is a slight decrease from 83.1 per cent in 2006. The 2011 figure represents 4.5 per cent of the Torres Strait and Aboriginal population in Queensland and 1.3 per cent of the Torres Strait and Aboriginal population of Australia.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 127

TABLE 3-4: GENDER BALANCE OF THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA

REGION (AVERAGE)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

Male 49.7% 45.1% 47.8% 49.4% 50.9% 49.1% 49.5% 47.9%

Female 50.3% 54.9% 52.2% 50.6% 49.1% 50.9% 50.5% 52.1%

The gender balance in 2006 was slightly biased towards female. This increased by 1.6 per cent in 2011 to 4.2 per cent.

TABLE 3-5: AVERAGE AGE OF POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA REGION

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2016 2011

21 22 22 23 30 31 22 23

The population age remained more or less consistent between the 2006 Census and the 2011 Census. The age profile in Seisia is believed to be skewed by the number of older non-resident visitors in the community at the time of each census.

128 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Employment

Employment data for the Torres Strait columns in Table 3-7 relates only to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people. The figures for Bamaga and Seisia include non-Indigenous employees. The ‘not in the labour force’ figures were reported in the 2006 Census but not collected for the 2011 Census. These figures represent persons of working age who were not seeking employment.

TABLE 3-6: EMPLOYMENT IN THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

EMPLOYMENT TYPE

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA

TOTAL (REGION)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

Full Time

2,705

1,039 225 277 71 76

3,096

1,392

Part Time 837 82 84 13 17 938

Away from Work n/a 226 6 14 0 6 6 246

Unemployed 137 173 18 29 3 0 158 202

Total Labour 2,842 2,275 331 404 87 99 3,260 2,778

Not in Labour Force 1,352 n/a 134 n/a 27 n/a 1513 n/a

Across the region there is 8.8 per cent unemployment. This is 2.8 per cent higher than the Australian rate at 30 June 2015, which was 6.0 per cent. Seasonally adjusted labour force participation rates for the region are not available. The significant variation in the employment between 2006 and 2011 is due to differences in data collection between the two censuses. In 2006 only ‘employed’ was reported, with no distinction between full- and part-time positions. There has been a decrease of 603 persons in employment between censuses. This is reflective of the overall decrease in population, noted in Table 3-3.

Education

The number of people undertaking some form of education in 2014 - 2015 was 2,583. The education categories are shown in Table 3-8.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 129

TABLE 3-7: EDUCATION IN THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

EDUCATION LEVEL

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA

TOTAL (REGION)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

Pre-school n/a 136 n/a 15 n/a 0 n/a 151

Primary n/a 1,022 n/a 175 n/a 22 n/a 1,,219

Secondary n/a 404 n/a 88 n/a 8 n/a 500

Technical and further

n/a 113 n/a 23 n/a 3 n/a 139

University n/a 38 n/a 11 n/a 3 n/a 52

Other n/a 49 n/a 7 n/a 0 n/a 56

Not stated n/a 395 n/a 54 n/a 17 n/a 466

Total 0 2,157 0 373 0 53 0 2,583

The average school attendance in 2014 across years one through 12 was 88 per cent, an increase from 84 per cent achieved in 2013. In comparison, these figures are markedly better than the Northern Territory Indigenous school attendance figures for 2014 of 71.0 per cent. However, they are still below the

non-I ndigenous attendance rate of 91.5 per cent.

Income

The 2011 census data indicates that household incomes of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people were again significantly lower than the reported Queensland and Australian averages. This is reflected in Table 3-9.

TABLE 3-8: MEDIAN WEALTH IN THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA ($)

INCOME TYPE

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA

AVERAGE (REGION)

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

Personal n/a 360 n/a 577 n/a 506 n/a 411

Household n/a 952 n/a 1,117 n/a 785 n/a 971

The Queensland average for personal and household income was $587 and $1,253 per week, respectively. The Australian averages were $577 and $1,234. In the region, personal earnings are 70.0 per cent of Queensland average earnings and 71.2 per cent of Australian average earning. Household earnings are 78.6 per cent of both Queensland and Australian average earnings.

130 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Housing Tenure

The 2013 ABS QuickStats (June 2015) report that there were 1,722 private dwellings out of a total of 2,291 dwellings. Of these 1,718 had tenure arrangements, as show in Table 3-10.

TABLE 3-9: TENURE OF PRIVATE DWELLINGS IN THE TORRES STRAIT, INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA

TENURE TYPE

TORRES STRAIT BAMAGA SEISIA TOTAL REGION

2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011 2006 2011

Owned 116 90 6 0 5 5 127 95

Mortgaged 26 33 0 0 3 4 29 37

Rented 1,448 1,200 198 245 49 53 1,695 1498

Other 16 18 6 3 0 0 22 21

Not Stated 47 59 7 8 13 0 67 67

Total 1,653 1,400 217 256 70 62 1,940 1,718

The figures in Table 3-10 indicate a decrease in the number of houses owned in the region between 2006 and 2011. This may be representative of the decrease in population in the region, reported in Table 3-3. There has been a 21.6 per cent increase in the number of properties under mortgage between 2006 and 2011 with all but one being in the Torres Strait communities. The lack of freehold land and long tenure leasehold land in the region remains a barrier to an increase in home ownership.

Health

A synthesis of data from the ABS and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey shows that in 2014 - 2015:

— Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people were three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have diabetes/high sugar levels.

— Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people were twice as likely as non-Indigenous people to have asthma.

— Obesity rates for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal females and males were significantly higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in almost every age group.

— Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people rates for heart disease were significantly higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in all age groups from 15 to 54 years.

The mortality rate for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people remains significantly higher than for non-I ndigenous people.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations Where We Operate 131

Participants in the TSRA’s inaugural Women’s Leadership Programme at Parliament House, Canberra.

132 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

HOW THE TSRA OPERATES

Formation

The TSRA is a Corporate Commonwealth entity which was established on 1 July 1994 under the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Act 1989 (Cth), and now the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth). The TSRA is the leading Commonwealth representative body for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait, including two communities (Bamaga and Seisia) in the Northern Area Peninsula.

The TSRA comprises 20 elected representatives (the Board) and Australian Public Service administrative staff. The elected representatives are Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people who live and work in the Torres Strait region. The TSRA Board elects a Chairperson, a Deputy Chairperson and an Alternate Deputy Chairperson. A Chief Executive Officer is responsible for the TSRA’s administration and staffing.

The TSRA performs separate functions under the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) as the Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) for the Torres Strait region. In 2015, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs renewed the TSRA’s NTRB status until 30 June 2016.

Under section 142D of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) the TSRA is required to formulate and implement a plan to guide the progress of the Torres Strait region. This document, known as the Torres Strait Development Plan, is updated every four years, a period consistent with the term of the TSRA Board.

The Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 is the fifth development plan since the establishment of the TSRA. The plan outlines eight TSRA programme components: Culture, Art and Heritage; Economic Development; Fisheries; Environmental Management; Governance and Leadership; Healthy Communities; Native Title; and Safe Communities.

Enabling Legislation

The TSRA’s enabling legislation is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth). Part 3A, Division 1, section 142 of the Act states:

(1) A Torres Strait Regional Authority is established.

(2) The TSRA:

(a) is a body corporate, with perpetual succession; and

(b) is to have a common seal; and

(c) may acquire, hold and dispose of real and personal property; and

(d) may sue and be sued in its corporate name.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations How the TSRA Operates 133

Functions

The functions of the TSRA, as outlined in section 142A of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), are:

(a) to recognise and maintain the special and unique Ailan Kastom of Torres Strait Islanders living in the Torres Strait area;

(b) to formulate and implement programmes for Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(c) to monitor the effectiveness of programmes for Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area, including programmes conducted by other bodies;

(d) to develop policy proposals to meet national, State and regional needs and priorities of Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(e) to assist, advise and co-operate with Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal communities, organisations and individuals at national, State, Territory and regional levels;

(f) to advise the Minister on:

(i) matters relating to Torres Strait Islander affairs, and Aboriginal affairs, in the Torres Strait area, including the administration of legislation;

(ii) the co-ordination of the activities of other Commonwealth bodies that affect Torres Strait Islanders, or Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(g) when requested by the Minister, to provide information or advice to the Minister on any matter specified by the Minister;

(h) to take such reasonable action as it considers necessary to protect Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal cultural material and information relating to the Torres Strait area if the material or information is considered sacred or otherwise significant by Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons;

(i) at the request of, or with the agreement of, the Australian Bureau of Statistics but not otherwise, to collect and publish statistical information relating to Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(j) such other functions as are conferred on the TSRA by this Act or any other Act;

(k) such other functions as are expressly conferred on the TSRA by a law of a State or of an internal Territory and in respect of which there is in force written approval by the Minister under Section 142B;

(l) to undertake such research as is necessary to enable the TSRA to perform any of its other functions;

(m) to do anything else that is incidental or conducive to the performance of any of the preceding functions.

134 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Powers

The powers of the TSRA are outlined in section 142C of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), which states:

(1) The TSRA has power to do all things that are necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of its functions.

(2) The powers of the TSRA include, but are not limited to, the following powers:

(a) to accept gifts, grants, bequests and devises made to it;

(b) to act as trustee of money and other property vested in it on trust;

(c) to negotiate and co-operate with other Commonwealth bodies and with State, Territory and local government bodies;

(d) to enter into an agreement for making a grant or loan under Section 142GA to the State of Queensland or an authority of that State (including a local government body);

(e) to enter into an agreement (other than an agreement referred to in paragraph (d) with a State or a Territory.

(3) Despite anything in this Act, any money or other property held by the TSRA on trust must be dealt with in accordance with the powers and duties of the TSRA as trustee.

(4) The powers of the TSRA may be exercised in or out of Australia.

Responsible Minister

During 2014 - 2015, the TSRA was a Corporate Commonwealth entity within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio. The responsible Minister for the TSRA was the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion.

Ministerial Directions

Under section 142E of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the Minister has powers of direction in relation to the TSRA. Section 142E of the Act states:

(1) The TSRA must perform its functions and exercise its powers in accordance with any general written directions given to it by the Minister.

(2) The Minister must not give directions about the content of any advice, information or recommendation that may be given by the TSRA to a Minister, Department of State or authority of the Commonwealth.

(3) The Minister must not give directions about the content of any advice, information or recommendation that may be given by the TSRA to:

(a) a Minister of a State or Territory; or

(b) a Department of State of a State or Territory; or

(c) an authority of a State or Territory;

except for the purpose of protecting the confidentiality of information given to the TSRA by the Commonwealth or an authority of the Commonwealth.

(4) Subject to subsection (5), the Minister must cause a copy of a direction to be laid before each House of the Parliament within 15 sitting days of that House after that direction was given.

(5) The rule in subsection (4) does not apply if the laying of a copy of a direction before each House of the Parliament would result in the disclosure of a matter in a manner that would be inconsistent with the views or sensitivities of Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons.

The TSRA did not receive any formal Directions from the Minister during the reporting period.

SECTION 3 Report of Operations How the TSRA Operates 135

Statement of Expectations and Statement of Intent

In April 2014, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, provided a Statement of Expectations to the TSRA concerning the operation and performance of the TSRA. In response, the TSRA provided a Statement of Intent to the Minister.

Ministerial Appointments

There were two Acting Chief Executive Officer appointments from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015.

The Minister for Indigenous Affairs, under section 144L(a) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) appointed Mr John Ramsay and Mr Chris de Mamiel as Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Torres Strait Regional Authority for the periods outlined below:

Appointed: M r John Ramsay Duration: 1 3 to 31 January 2015

Appointed: Chris de Mamiel Duration: 1 t o 20 February 2015

Briefings and Information

Throughout the reporting period the TSRA provided updates of the TSRA's key outcomes and issues to the Minister for Indigenous Affairs.

Judicial Decisions and Reviews

There were no judicial decisions or reviews in 2014 - 2015.

Mabuiag Island.

SECTION FOUR

Corporate Governance and Accountability

138 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

OVERVIEW OF GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

FIGURE 4-1: TSRA GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Australian Government Parliamentary Committees State, Territory and Local Governments

Finance

Human Resources Information Technology Property Management

Prescribed Bodies Corporate Indigenous Representative Bodies Indigenous People in the Torres Strait Region Indigenous Corporations

Economic Development Fisheries Culture, Art and Heritage Native Title Environmental Management Governance and Leadership

Healthy Communities Safe Communities

Audit Committee

Chief Executive Officer

Stakeholders

Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) Board

Programme Delivery Corporate Support

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 139

GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

The TSRA’s governance framework provides a system of direction and controls, enabling regional outcomes to be achieved through organisational goals and objectives. The framework allows risks and issues to be escalated to the appropriate level. The resolution of risks and issues occurs through formal project management structures, programme structures, the Programme Steering Committee, the TSRA Audit Committee and the TSRA Board.

TSRA Board

The TSRA Board is an elected, representative body, which participates in scheduled quarterly meetings and issue-specific out-of-session meetings. The Board Chairperson is a full-time Principal Executive Officer, while other Board members are part-time officials who are remunerated in accordance with the determinations of the Remuneration Tribunal. The primary functions of the Board are to:

— set out the TSRA’s vision for the Torres Strait

— oversight the TSRA’s strategic objectives and direction

— approve programme mandates

— review the TSRA’s performance, its objectives and outcomes

— manage strategic risk and regional stakeholder relations.

The Chairperson and Executive Members of the TSRA are elected by the members at the first Board meeting following the TSRA General Elections. All TSRA Board members are also ‘officials’ under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. TSRA Board members are non-executive directors. The Board is the accountable authority for the TSRA.

2012 - 2016 Appointments

The TSRA Board consists of 20 members elected under Division 5 of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth). Following a review of the TSRA Board’s governance arrangements in 2010 - 2011, the method of appointing the TSRA Board was changed, removing the automatic appointment of councillors elected under the Queensland Government Local Government Act 2009. Twenty TSRA electoral wards were created and the first independent TSRA Board member elections were held in 2012. Twenty members for the communities of Badu, Bamaga, Boigu, Dauan, Erub, Hammond, Ngarupai / Muralag, Iama, Kubin, Mabuiag, Masig, Mer, Port Kennedy, Poruma, Seisia, Saibai, St Pauls, TRAWQ, Ugar and Warraber were declared elected by the Australian Electoral Commission. The current Board will serve until elections are held in 2016.

140 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Profiles of TSRA Board Members

Mr Joseph Elu, AO Chairperson and Member for Seisia

In October 2012, Mr Joseph Elu was elected for the fifth time to the TSRA Board. Mr Elu’s previous terms were 1994 - 1997, 1997 - 2000, 2000 - 2004 and 2004 - 2008.

At the inaugural meeting of the new TSRA Board in November 2012, Mr Elu was elected as the TSRA Chairperson and the Portfolio Member for Governance and Leadership.

During his career, Mr Elu has been an influential leader in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal affairs and Indigenous economic development. Mr Elu has been instrumental in assisting Indigenous people throughout Australia to develop sustainable economic enterprises. During his term, Mr Elu will continue to advocate for, and encourage, Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area communities to generate sustainable enterprises to create their own income.

Mr Elu became the Chairperson of Indigenous Business Australia (IBA) (formerly known as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) Commercial Development Corporation), in 1996 and remained there for 12 years. During his time as the Chairperson of IBA, Mr Elu influenced dynamic changes and grew the organisation, creating economic and employment opportunities for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people nationally.

In 2001, Mr Elu was awarded the Centenary Medal for his achievements and in 2002 was presented with an Honorary Doctorate from the Queensland University of Technology for his lifelong work in fostering the economic development of Indigenous people throughout Australia.

During 2008, Mr Elu was made an Officer of the Order of Australia and was also awarded the NAIDOC Lifetime Achievement Award.

Mr Elu has been the Chairperson of a number of organisations and committees nationally during his career. He has also held the positions of Mayor of the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council and Chairperson of the Cape York Natural Resource Management Board.

Mr Elu is the Chairperson of Seisia Enterprises Pty Ltd and Seisia Community Torres Strait Islander Corporation. He is also an elected Councillor on the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council.

Mr Aven S Noah Deputy Chairperson and Member for Mer

This is Mr Aven S Noah’s first term on the TSRA Board. He was elected in September 2012. At the inaugural meeting of the 2012 TSRA Board, Mr Noah was elected by the Board as Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Culture, Art and Heritage. Since becoming a member of the TSRA Board, Mr Noah has quickly grasped what his roles and responsibilities are to carry out his functions.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 141

Mr Noah believes that traditional land and sea rights are paramount to control resources, and the TSRA must work closely with Traditional Owners as these resources will form the foundation of the region’s economic independence as an autonomous state. Mr Noah’s passion is for greater autonomy for the people of the Torres Strait and he feels that by working with the regional leaders ‘home rule’ aspirations will progress.

Mr Noah has extensive experience in media and communications and is interested in the development of the media and telecommunications in the region and the implications for the region of the rollout of the National Broadband Network.

Mr Willie Lui Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Member for Warraber

In September 2012, Mr Willie Lui was elected for his second term to the TSRA Board. He was elected as the Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Environmental Management. Mr Lui previously served on the Board from 2008 to 2011.

Mr Lui served as the elected Torres Strait Island Regional Councillor for Warraber from 2008 to 2012 and was re-elected to the Council in 2014. Mr Lui holds a Certificate IV in Finance and is a qualified carpenter.

The key areas of concern for Mr Lui are the high cost of living, lack of employment opportunities and native title issues. He aims to work to see those concerns addressed through effective implementation of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029, and the TSRA’s Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018.

Mr Maluwap Nona Member for Badu

In September 2012, Mr Maluwap Nona was elected for a second time to the TSRA Board. Mr Nona is the Member for Badu and in 2012 he was elected by the Board as the Portfolio Member for Native Title.

As the Portfolio Member for Native Title, Mr Nona is a keen advocate on native title issues in the Torres Strait region. Mr Nona has been instrumental in the formation of the Gur A Baradharaw Kod Torres Strait Sea and Land Council. Mr Nona has been working towards the establishment of a regional sea and land use agreement between the TSRA, Malu Lamar, Gur A Baradharaw Kod, and Commonwealth and Queensland fisheries.

Mr Nona was involved in Leo Akiba on behalf of the Torres Strait Regional Seas Claim Group v. Commonwealth of Australia, where the High Court, on 7 August 2013, recognised that commercial rights for native title holders co-exist with native title rights over approximately 44,000square kilometres. Mr Nona is the Chair for the Sea Claim RNTBC, Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC and a member of the Malu Lamar Fisheries Working Group. These groups are progressing the interests of native title holders to achieve 100 per cent ownership of fisheries in the Torres Strait region and representation on the Protected Zone Joint Authority working groups.

Mr Nona is a member of the Expert Indigenous Working Group on the Council of Australian Governments’ investigation into Indigenous land administration and use. In his spare time Mr Nona is a professional fisherman working in the Traditional Inhabitant Boat sector.

142 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Mr Reginald Williams Member for Bamaga

In September 2012 Mr Reg Williams was elected for his fifth term on the TSRA Board. Mr Williams was the TSRA Member for Bamaga from 1994 to 1997, 1997 to 2000, 2000 to 2004 and 2008 to 2012.

Mr Williams was formerly the Chairperson of the Bamaga Island Council prior to its amalgamation into the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council (NPARC). He is a former Deputy Mayor of NPARC.

Mr Williams has specialist knowledge of his community, Bamaga, and possesses strong communication, negotiation and relationship management skills. Mr Williams also has unique communications skills that relate to Ailan Kastom.

In his previous terms, one of Mr Williams’s key concerns was housing in the Northern Peninsula Area. In this term he will continue to advocate for the development of more serviced housing blocks to cater for the needs of families in the region.

Mr Eric Peter Member for Boigu

Mr Eric Peter was elected to the TSRA Board as the Member for Boigu for the first time in September 2012.

Mr Peter is the chairperson of Mura Boigulgaw Aiy Kuyk Corporation and is on the Board of the Malu Ki’ai (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate and was an elected Councillor for Boigu between 1997 and 1999. Mr Peter is currently employed with My Pathway as the Cluster Mentor for Saibai, Dauan and Boigu Islands.

Mr Peter holds a Diploma in Community Administration / Management and a Certificate IV in Quarantine and Export Inspection. He is currently completing a Degree in Business at the Australian Catholic University. He has completed Australian Public Service (APS) Leadership and Indigenous Leadership programmes and has worked in the APS for more than 21 years.

Mr Peter’s key concerns relate to the low level of funding for community infrastructure, the weak regional economy, and the low number of private enterprises and businesses owned and operated by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

As a TSRA Board member, Mr Peter aims to empower the people of the region by supporting them to start-up businesses and enterprises.

Mr Sam Maka Member for Dauan

Mr Sam Maka was elected as the Member for Dauan in September 2012. This is Mr Maka’s first term on the TSRA Board. At the inaugural meeting of the new TSRA Board in November 2012, Mr Maka was elected as the Portfolio Member for Economic Development.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 143

Mr Maka plays an important role in the Dauan community, being an office holder for a number of organisations, including the Department of Agriculture (Biosecurity Officer); the Dauanalgaw (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC; Holy Cross Church Parish, Diocese of Torres Strait; and Outer Islands Rugby League.

Mr Maka gained his decision-making, strategic planning and leadership experience from his time in the military, community policing, public service and community volunteer groups.

Mr Maka has a wide range of concerns, such as building the capacity of the Dauan Prescribed Body Corporate, protecting sacred sites, further developing the Dauan Island town plan, establishing a recycling plant, and fostering awareness of natural

resources. He seeks to be proactive, consistent and persistent in seeking to address these issues.

During his term on the TSRA Board Mr Maka wishes to establish and strengthen working relationships with other TSRA Board members so that projects can be progressed and realised; encourage the TSRA and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council to work together to achieve concrete outcomes for his community and achieve continuity in government funding for the region.

Mr Kenny Bedford Member for Erub

Mr Kenny Bedford was elected to the TSRA Board as the Member for Erub for his second consecutive term in September 2012. Mr Bedford was elected as the TSRA Portfolio Member for Fisheries, a post he held during his first term (2008 - 2012). In his first term, Mr Bedford was also the TSRA Alternate Deputy Chairperson.

Mr Bedford is a Traditional Owner of Erub, is President of the Erub Fisheries Management Association, serves as a Director of Reconciliation Australia and is a strong advocate for the meaningful recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in our national Constitution.

Mr Bedford has a Bachelor of Applied Health Science and Diploma of Youth Welfare. He received the Vincent Fairfax Fellowship in 2000 and is a recent graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Programme.

As a commercial fisher and the Portfolio Member for Fisheries, Mr Bedford is acutely aware of the challenges the Indigenous people of the region face to gain full ownership and control of Torres Strait marine resources. Mr Bedford also plays an important role in negotiating and addressing marine resource management issues with relevant Papua New Guinea agencies and Treaty Village leaders.

The Member for Erub is committed to increasing economic development opportunities, especially through the greater and more efficient participation of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people across the various Torres Strait commercial fisheries. He acknowledges the importance of working with Traditional Owner representatives, local community fisher organisations and other stakeholders to help achieve these targets.

Mr Bedford’s other areas of attention and interest relate to the ranger programme and the maintenance of Torres Strait art, culture and heritage. He is acutely aware of the positive influence of art, culture and heritage on community health, cohesion and wellbeing.

In his second term Mr Bedford continues to diligently represent Erub and the region and, in particular, to play a constructive role in the economic and cultural development of Torres Strait fisheries for Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders.

144 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Mr Mario Sabatino Member for Hammond

Mr Mario Sabatino was elected to the TSRA Board as the Member for Hammond for the first time in September 2012. Mr Sabatino is the Councillor for Hammond Island on the Torres Strait Island Regional Council.

Mr Sabatino is well known in his community as a businessman - he currently owns and operates the M&M Mini Mart on Hammond Island and the Hammond Island Ferry, for which he is the Ship’s Officer. Mr Sabatino is a Director on the boards of a number of community organisations.

Mr Sabatino has a Master Class 3 Diploma of Transport and Distribution (Maritime - Deckwatch Keeping) and has 25 years commercial marine experience as Master and Officer.

Mr Sabatino’s key concerns are the need for regional and island economic development, improved training and employment outcomes in communities and achievement of real land tenure throughout the Torres Strait. He is also concerned that Hammond does not yet have a community-based organisation.

Mr Sabatino will advocate for enhanced networking with government agencies and the private sector to facilitate economic development; on-the-ground training that meshes with established organisations, businesses and partnerships in the region; and real land tenure to encourage outside investment in communities.

Mr Yen Loban Member for Ngarupai and Muralag

In September 2012, Mr Yen Loban was elected to the TSRA Board for the first time as the Member for Ngarupai and Muralag. He is a member of the TSRA Board Audit Committee.

Mr Loban is well known in his community. He is the Deputy Mayor of the Torres Shire Council as well as a businessman with 30 years experience in the light marine industry. He is the owner and operator of a sea cat marine charter, and a director of the Torres Strait Co-operative.

Mr Loban’s primary concerns are the lack of basic service infrastructure on Muralag, and the low level of support provided to the ongoing development for Ngarupai.

As a TSRA Board Member, Mr Loban will be working to ensure that the communities of Ngurapai and Muralag are healthy and safe; that they receive the same services as other communities across the Torres Strait; and that TSRA programmes focus on equity in service provision to the benefit of both those communities.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 145

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM Member for Iama

In September 2012, Mr Getano Lui Jr was elected for the fourth time to the TSRA Board. Mr Lui’s previous terms were from 1994 to 1997, 1997 to 2000, and 2000 to 2004. Mr Lui was the TSRA’s first Chairperson and during his term in 2000 - 2004 he shared responsibility for the regional governance and legislative reform portfolio.

Mr Lui is the Councillor for Iama on the Torres Strait Island Regional Council. He previously held the positions of Councillor and Chairperson of the Iama Community Council (1974 - 2004), Chairman of the Island Coordinating Council (1985 - 2000), and Chairman of the Islander Board of Industry and Service (1985 - 2000).

Mr Lui’s key areas of concern are health, housing and infrastructure, and the transfer of decision-making powers to local communities to enable them to control and manage their own affairs. He plans to advocate for community empowerment through self-determination and self-management.

Mr Saila Savage Member for Kubin

Mr Saila Savage was elected to the TSRA Board as the Member for Kubin on 8 December 2012. This is Mr Savage’s third time on the TSRA Board; he previously served from 2000 to 2004 and 2004 to 2008.

Mr Savage is a Board Member of the Mualgal (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC and the Kaurareg Land Trust and sits on the Cape York Land Council. He held the position of Chairman of Kubin Community for nine years, from 2000 to 2009.

Mr Savage has many years experience working on the railways, and for the past five years has worked in the technical division of the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads.

Mr Savage’s key concerns for the Kubin community include the lack of public and community transport; the impact of drugs and alcohol; the inadequate number of in-community traineeships offered for youth; the safety of children; the provision of social housing; the control of dogs and horses; the lack of a Queensland police presence; and insufficient numbers of land and sea rangers.

During his time on the Board, Mr Savage will be dedicated to serving his community and his people to the best of his ability to achieve positive and satisfying outcomes. He will be their voice at the table.

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Mr Keith Fell Member for Mabuiag

In September 2012, Mr Keith Fell was re-elected to the TSRA Board for a second consecutive term. He was subsequently elected by the Board as Portfolio Member for Healthy Communities, an office he held in his first term.

Mr Fell also holds the office of Deputy Mayor of the Torres Strait Island Regional Council and is the Chairperson of the Torres Strait Kaziw Meta College Board.

Mr Fell has a Diploma in Local Government Administration and a Certificate III in Sports and Recreation.

Mr Fell believes that education, training and communication are vital to achieving individual success and increasing the standard of living of people in the region. He is concerned with economic development and cultural and social issues.

Mr Fell is passionate about sports, recreation and good health practices for all people in the Torres Strait and the Northern Peninsula Area—more activities, more participation, a better lifestyle and a healthier future.

During his previous term on the TSRA Board, Mr Fell focused on achieving affordable housing for Torres Strait Islander people, and worked towards empowering his people through accessible employment and training opportunities. He aims to continue this work in his second term.

Ms Hilda Mosby Member for Masig

Ms Hilda Mosby was elected as the Member for Masig in September 2012. This is Ms Mosby’s first term on the TSRA Board.

Ms Mosby has more than 18 years experience in the Australian Public Service, working for the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (now part of the Department of Agriculture), and formerly for the Department of Immigration and Citizenship as a Movement Monitoring Officer.

Community involvement has been a paramount focus for Ms Mosby, who is an active member on committees dealing with education, health, justice, fisheries and native title in her community of Masig.

Of key concern to Ms Mosby is the impact of coastal erosion on low-lying Torres Strait communities, including her own community of Masig. Over her term she will advocate that coastal erosion issues continue to be addressed through an integrated approach by the relevant Australian Government and Queensland Government agencies.

The preservation of Torres Strait culture through language, music and art is another area that Ms Mosby is passionate about and she will continue to advocate for the best outcomes for the cultural wellbeing of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in this region.

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TSRA Chairperson and TSRA Member for Masig Hilda Mosby.

148 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Mrs Romina Fujii Member for Port Kennedy

In September 2012, Mrs Romina Fujii was elected to the TSRA Board for a second time. Mrs Fujii previously served on the TSRA Board from 1994 to 1997. Mrs Fujii is a member of the TSRA Audit Committee. She has also been nominated by TSRA to represent the Torres Strait on the National Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children Steering Committee.

Mrs Fujii is the Chairperson and an active member of the Port Kennedy Association, James Cook University Advisory Board, Queensland Women’s Health Network Committee, and Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak Ltd.

Mrs Fujii has experience in health, education, employment and training; governance training; and working with non-government organisations. She has a Certificate IV in Workplace Training and Assessment and has completed a degree in Social Work.

Mrs Fujii has worked as a volunteer in not-for-profit organisations such as Lena Passi Women’s Shelter, Mura Kosker Sorority and Torres Strait Home for the Aged. Mrs Fujii is also a member of the Thursday Island Rotary Club.

Mrs Fujii’s key concerns are the lack of skilled local people to draw on in the community and she therefore supports up-skilling in the workplace. Mrs Fujii believes in the TSRA’s aim to support enterprise and believes there is a great need to develop a well-planned strategy for economic development for the region.

During her time on the Board, Mrs Fujii will also advocate to ensure that all families are safe in the region and that the wellbeing of each family and youth is paramount. The aim is, through non-government organisations, for a regional services hub to improve the delivery of all social services in the region.

Mr Francis Pearson Member for Poruma

In September 2012, Mr Francis Pearson was elected for the second time to the TSRA Board as the Member for Poruma. He previously served on the Board from 2000 to 2004.

Mr Pearson is the Chairperson of the Poruma Zazethau Lag Torres Strait Islanders Corporation, director of the Porumalgal (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC and is the Torres Strait Island Regional Council Airport Coordinator at Poruma. He also holds the position of Divisional Engineering Officer. Mr Pearson has a Diploma in Teaching from James Cook University.

Mr Pearson’s key concerns are climate change and associated coastal erosion and the impact of high tides on low-lying Poruma, overcrowding, and community representation in Indigenous fisheries management.

Mr Pearson aims to advocate for more say from communities in decisions concerning fisheries in Torres Strait waters, and to push for a solution - that satisfies community expectations and concerns - to the erosion of low-lying islands.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 149

Mr Pearson comes from one of the communities that is affected by mobile phone signal black spots and is keen to work with current initiatives being investigated by the TSRA and Telstra to address this issue in his community. Mr Pearson would also like to see the business community contribute towards addressing this issue, as it will also benefit them and their businesses.

Ms Chelsea Aniba Member for Saibai

Ms Chelsea Aniba was elected as the Member for Saibai in September 2012. This is Ms Aniba’s first term on the TSRA Board.

Ms Aniba has qualifications in radio broadcasting, business administration, social housing, Indigenous justice studies and governance.

Ms Aniba has established a profile through her involvement in local radio, her eight years in radio broadcasting, and her membership of the Torres Strait Islanders Media Association committee of management. She is also a director on the board of the Saibai Community Development Corporation, which tries to enable the community through local enterprises.

Ms Aniba’s two primary concerns, which closely affect her home of Saibai Island, are coastal erosion and rising sea levels and the insufficient supply of social housing. Over her term, Ms Aniba will advocate for the ongoing construction of sea walls throughout the affected Torres Strait communities and the rollout of the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.

Ms Aniba’s other concerns relate to employment and economic development opportunities for local families; helping to keep, restore and revitalise our culture and strengthening Prescribed Bodies Corporate to enable them to progress native title issues. She also works closely with women’s organisations to prevent and break domestic and family violence in communities. Ms Aniba will advocate for the best outcomes in these areas.

Mr Kiwat Lui Member for St Pauls

In September 2012, Mr Kiwat Lui was elected to the TSRA Board for the first time. Mr Lui is also a member of the TSRA Audit Committee and a member of the Torres Strait Scientific Advisory Committee.

Mr Lui is a pastor at Kozan Outreach Church on St Pauls and a member of Sempolau Koey Kazil Inc (St Pauls Elders Group). He is also a former member of the Indigenous Fisheries Advisory Committee.

Mr Lui holds a Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Affairs Administration) and has over 20 years experience working with local and state government agencies in administration and financial services.

Mr Lui’s prime concerns are the lack of a long-term stable income stream for the people of the Torres Strait, continuing poor health outcomes and families struggling to make ends meet. He believes two means to address these concerns are to give Indigenous people of the region first preference for jobs, and to direct resources to health services that produce enormously tangible outcomes for the wellbeing of Indigenous people living within the region.

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In his term on the TSRA Board Mr Lui will be working to create wealth for the Torres Strait and its people, through assistance to small business from private consortiums, the Queensland Government and the Australian Government to enable them to become self-sufficient. Mr Lui also wants to ensure that all TSRA decisions are transparent and meet the region’s needs and aspirations.

Mr John Abednego Member for TRAWQ

In September 2012, Mr Abednego was re-elected for a fifth time to the TSRA Board as the Member for TRAWQ (communities of Tamwoy, Rosehill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine on Thursday Island). His previous terms on the TSRA Board were 1994 - 1997, 1997 - 2000, 2000 - 2004 and 2008 - 2012.

Mr Abednego held the office of TSRA Chairperson in his 1997 - 2000 term and was the Portfolio Member for Legal and Media in 2000 - 2004. Currently, Mr Abednego is the Portfolio Member for Safe Communities.

Mr Abednego is a councillor on the Torres Shire Council, member of the Parents and Citizens Committee of Tagai Secondary Campus and president of TRAWQ Indigenous Corporation. He also plays a role in the Anglican Church.

Mr Abednego has considerable experience in board management and administration, and policy development and strategic planning. Over his career he has been involved in mediation and counselling, court referrals and social justice interagency networking. He is currently completing a diploma in counselling.

Mr Abednego’s key concerns are land tenure, home ownership, social and alcohol-related issues and funding difficulties.

Mr Jerry Stephen Jr Member for Ugar

Mr Jerry Stephen Jr, an Ugaram Le from Ugar (Stephen Island), was born and educated on Thursday Island. Mr Stephen identifies as both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, as his grandfather was traditionally adopted to the Wuthathi Tribe.

In September 2012 Mr Jerry Stephen was elected to the TSRA Board for the first time. During his term, Mr Stephen has worked on and contributed to a number of regional issues, including fisheries, native title, environmental management and regional governance.

Mr Stephen has also worked in partnership with the Torres Strait Island Regional Council, Prescribed Bodies Corporate and the Ugar community elders to address local issues and progress the development of a proposed concept plan for the Ugar rock-groyne.

Mr Stephen has over 20 years experience working in the private and public sectors. His work has included the delivery of Australian Government programmes throughout the Torres Strait.

During Mr Stephen’s four-year term he will be working vigorously to support the TSRA Board to achieve positive outcomes for the Zenadth Kes (Torres Strait) region.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 151

Board Meetings

The TSRA Chairperson is required to convene at least four Board meetings each year under section 144E of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005. If it is considered necessary, the TSRA Chairperson may convene other meetings of the TSRA Board to enable to TSRA to carry out its functions.

During 2014 - 2015, the TSRA Board held four meetings, as shown in Table 4.1:

TABLE 4-1: BOARD MEETINGS AND APOLOGIES

MEETING NO. DATES APOLOGIES ABSENT

91 10 - 12 September 2014 Nil Nil

92 3 - 5 December 2014 Ms Chelsea Aniba

Mr Mario Sabatino

Mr Sam Maka (attended day one only)

Nil

93 4 - 6 March 2014 Mr Reg Williams

Ms Hilda Mosby

Mr Willie Lui (attended day one only)

Nil

94 11 - 12 June 2014 Mr Maluwap Nona (attended day two from

3.30 pm only)

Mr Mario Sabatino (attended day one only)

Nil

Mer Gedkem Le RNTBC members discuss economic development initiatives with the TSRA.

152 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Attendance at Board Meetings are outlined in Table 4.2

TABLE 4-2: BOARD MEETING ATTENDANCE

MEMBER NUMBER OF MEETINGS ATTENDED

Mr Joseph Elu 4 of 4

Mr Aven S Noah 4 of 4

Mr Willie Lui 4 of 4(1)

Mr John Abednego 4 of 4

Ms Chelsea Aniba 3 of 4

Mr Kenny Bedford 4 of 4

Mr Keith Fell 4 of 4

Mrs Romina Fujii 4 of 4

Mr Yen Loban 4 of 4

Mr Getano Lui (Jr) 4 of 4

Mr Kiwat Lui 4 of 4

Mr Sam Maka 4 of 4(1)

Ms Hilda Mosby 3 of 4

Mr Maluwap Nona 4 of 4(1)

Mr Francis Pearson 4 of 4

Mr Eric Peter 4 of 4(1)

Mr Mario Sabatino 3 of 4(1)

Mr Saila Savage 4 of 4

Mr Jerry Stephen 4 of 4

Mr Reg Williams 3 of 4

(1) Part attendance as recorded in Table 4-1.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 153

TSRA Board Charter and Ethics

The TSRA Board Charter was adopted in 2012 - 2013. The charter brings together all resources that Board members require to enable them to exercise their powers and responsibilities. Last year, the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (Cth) was replaced by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth). Accordingly, over this past year, the TSRA has reviewed the TSRA Board Charter to bring it in line with the new legislation, and the June 2014 ANAO Better Practice Guide 'Public Sector Governance, Strengthening Performance Through Good Governance'.

The TSRA Board Charter is based on ethical standards and good governance and contains key documents such as the Board Members Code of Conduct, and the TSRA’s Charter of Representation, Performance and Accountability, as well as the terms of reference relating to Board committees.

Board Member Induction

During 2014 - 2015, there were no changes to the composition of the TSRA Board. No Board induction training was conducted.

Board Code of Conduct

The TSRA Board’s Code of Conduct and ethics policies are published in the TSRA Board Charter.

Executive Coaching

The TSRA offers executive coaching and mentoring for TSRA Board members through an independent contracted service. In 2014 - 2015, there were no requests for coaching or mentoring.

Strategic Planning

The TSRA undertakes a strategic planning and training workshop for Board members in November each year. In 2014 -2015, the Strategic Planning and Training Workshop was held from 3 to 4 November. The Board received training on the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2014 (Cth) (PGPA) and the PGPA Rule 2014. Effective Governance was engaged to deliver this training. The Board also considered the alignment of the TSRA’s programme outcomes in the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 to the Australian Government Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) programme streams and determined there was a high level of alignment.

Mid-Term Performance Review

In March 2015, the TSRA Board underwent a mid-term performance review. The review was conducted by an external consultant, MLCS Corporate. The final report containing the recommendations of the review will be considered by the Board at a performance workshop in September 2015.

Training and Education

The TSRA provides opportunity for Board members to undertake accredited training in the areas of governance, leadership or business. The qualifications of individual Board members are detailed in the section ‘Profiles of TSRA Board Members’. In March 2015, TSRA Board members completed training in workplace health and safety, delivered by an independent external trainer.

154 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Executive Committee

The TSRA Board formed an Executive Committee in 2012 to assist the Chairperson to carry out his functions. The portfolio structure of the Executive Committee is aligned to the TSRA’s eight programmes. Executive meetings are held quarterly, immediately prior to each TSRA Board meeting. The TSRA Chairperson may call for additional Executive Committee meetings should they be required.

The TSRA Executive Committee’s objectives are:

— to ensure that policies and future directives are made in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the PGPA Act and other relevant legislation

— advocate for improved outcomes in the Torres Strait region

— represent the views of the TSRA on internal and external committees

— assist the TSRA Chairperson to communicate to Torres Strait communities government policies and TSRA decisions and achievements as they relate to the Executive Committee’s portfolio responsibilities.

TSRA Executive Committee Members

The 2014 - 2015 TSRA Executive Committee members and their portfolio responsibilities are shown in Table 4-3.

TABLE 4-3: MEMBERSHIP OF THE 2014 - 2015 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MEMBER ROLE

Mr Joseph Elu Chairperson

Portfolio Member for Governance and Leadership

Mr Aven S Noah Deputy Chairperson

Portfolio Member for Culture, Art and Heritage

Mr Willie Lui Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Environmental Management

Mr John Abednego Portfolio Member for Safe Communities

Mr Kenny Bedford Portfolio Member for Fisheries

Mr Keith Fell Portfolio Member for Healthy Communities

Mr Sam Maka Portfolio Member for Economic Development

Mr Maluwap Nona Portfolio Member for Native Title

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 155

Beach fishing, Mer Island.

156 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TSRA Executive Committee Meetings

In 2014 - 2015, the TSRA Executive Committee met four times, as shown in Table 4-4.

TABLE 4-4: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES

DATES APOLOGIES

8 September 2014 Nil

1 December 2014 Mr Maluwap Nona

2 March 2015 Mr Kenny Bedford (from 12.00 pm)

9 June 2015 Mr Kenny Bedford

Attendance at TSRA Executive Committee meetings is shown in Table 4-5.

TABLE 4-5: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING ATTENDANCE

MEMBER NUMBER OF MEETINGS ATTENDED

Mr Joseph Elu 4 of 4

Mr Aven S Noah 4 of 4

Mr Willie Lui 4 of 4

Mr John Abednego 4 of 4

Mr Kenny Bedford 3 of 4(1)

Mr Sam Maka 4 of 4

Mr Maluwap Nona 4 of 4

(1) Part attendance as recorded in Table 4-4.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 157

Other Boards and Committees

Programme Steering Committee

The TSRA has established a Programme Steering Committee (PSC) to monitor the performance of its programmes and operations. TSRA programmes manage projects and ongoing activities contributing to the outcomes outlined in the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 and the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029.

The PSC consists of the TSRA’s Chief Executive Officer, programme managers, project managers and the Chief Financial Officer. The PSC meets quarterly and also when required to consider specific project risks and issues. The PSC considers programme resources and ensures that strategies and operational activities align with the TSRA’s overall outcomes.

Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee

The role of the Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee (TSCMC) is to develop and support the implementation of a strategic coordinated approach to dealing with disaster mitigation, coastal erosion, inundation, climate change and associated long-term coastal planning issues in the Torres Strait through collaboration with all parties and to provide a pathway for local government councils to address climate change coastal issues on their islands.

The key deliverable by this committee was the Torres Strait Climate Change Strategy 2014 - 2018: Building Community Adaptive Capacity and Resilience, released in July 2014.

The TSRA’s membership of the TSCMC is shown in Table 4-6.

TABLE 4-6: MEMBERSHIP OF THE TORRES STRAIT COASTAL MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

MEMBER ROLE

Mr Joseph Elu Chairperson and Member for Seisia

Ms Chelsea Aniba Member for Saibai

Mr Eric Peter Member for Boigu

Mr Getano Lui (Jr) Member for Iama

Mr Willie Lui Member for Warraber

Mr Francis Pearson Member for Poruma

Ms Hilda Mosby Member for Masig

The TSCMC did not meet in 2014 - 2015. The Board mid-term review identified that this committee should be reviewed and if no longer required

should be closed. This recommendation will be considered by the Board during a performance workshop in September 2015.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Governance Framework 159 158 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Mr Kenny Bedford Member for Erub

Mr Kenny Bedford was elected to the TSRA Board as the Member for Erub for his second consecutive term in September 2012. Mr Bedford was elected as the TSRA Portfolio Member for Fisheries, a post he held during his first term (2008 - 2012). In his first term, Mr Bedford was also the TSRA Alternate Deputy Chairperson.

Mr Bedford is a Traditional Owner of Erub, is President of the Erub Fisheries Management Association, serves as a Director of Reconciliation Australia and is a strong advocate for the meaningful recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in our national Constitution.

Mr Bedford has a Bachelor of Applied Health Science and Diploma of Youth Welfare. He received the Vincent Fairfax Fellowship in 2000 and is a recent graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Programme.

As a commercial fisher and the Portfolio Member for Fisheries, Mr Bedford is acutely aware of the challenges the Indigenous people of the region face to gain full ownership and control of Torres Strait marine resources. Mr Bedford also plays an important role in negotiating and addressing marine resource management issues with relevant Papua New Guinea agencies and Treaty Village leaders.

The Member for Erub is committed to increasing economic development opportunities, especially through the greater and more efficient participation of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people across the various Torres Strait commercial fisheries. He acknowledges the importance of working with Traditional Owner representatives, local community fisher organisations and other stakeholders to help achieve these targets.

Mr Peter’s key concerns relate to the low level of funding for community infrastructure, the weak regional economy, and the low number of private enterprises and businesses owned and operated by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

As a TSRA Board member, Mr Peter aims to empower the people of the region by supporting them to start-up businesses and enterprises.

Mr Sam Maka Member for Dauan

Mr Sam Maka was elected as the Member for Dauan in September 2012. This is Mr Maka’s first term on the TSRA Board. At the inaugural meeting of the new TSRA Board in November 2012, Mr Maka was elected as the Portfolio Member for Economic Development.

Mr Maka plays an important role in the Dauan community, being an office holder for a number of organisations, including the Department of Agriculture (Biosecurity Officer); the Dauanalgaw (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC; Holy Cross Church Parish, Diocese of Torres Strait; and Outer Islands Rugby League.

Mr Maka gained his decision-making, strategic planning and leadership experience from his time in the military, community policing, public service and community volunteer groups.

Mr Maka has a wide range of concerns, such as building the capacity of the Dauan Prescribed Body Corporate, protecting sacred sites, further developing the Dauan Island town plan, establishing a recycling plant, and fostering awareness of natural

resources. He seeks to be proactive, consistent and persistent in seeking to address these issues.

During his term on the TSRA Board Mr Maka wishes to establish and strengthen working relationships with other TSRA Board members so that projects can be progressed and realised; encourage the TSRA and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council to work together to achieve concrete outcomes for his community and achieve continuity in government funding for the region.

Member for Poruma discussing resort project with TSRA Chair and staff.

Caption. Poruma temporary erosion protection.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 161

ENABLING FUNCTIONS

Information Management and Technology

In 2014 - 2015, improvements were made to various business-critical information and communications technology (ICT) services across the organisation. As part of the scheduled infrastructure maintenance plan, hardware was purchased to replace the server and storage infrastructure in both data centres located on Thursday Island. Basic implementation has been completed and extensive testing is currently underway prior to migrating production data and services across to the new hardware.

A planned replacement of multifunction printers was initiated, with 24 printers replaced across all TSRA offices. These machines had reached the end of their planned service life. This work was a precursor to a major upgrade in print management infrastructure software, scheduled for 2015 - 2016, to improve reporting and accounting of print consumables across the organisation.

Purchasing was completed for a comprehensive ranger VHF radio solution. This included negotiation of special licensing exemptions with the Australian Communications and Media Authority to allow ranger vessels to act as mobile coordination centres for combined land / sea ranger operations. Testing of the fully installed solution and training is scheduled to be completed in 2015 - 2016.

Hardware was purchased to replace one third of the TSRA’s desktop computers in 2015 - 2016, as the first tranche of a planned replacement of aging desktop hardware. The development of a Windows 8 Standard Operating Environment is complete and is in final testing prior to the rollout of the new hardware.

Work is progressing on the Telstra mobile network expansion project, with the TSRA committing funds to purchase critical hardware for the solution. This initiative will improve telephone and data communications across the region and will benefit all agencies in all levels of government as well as community members. Funding to complete this project is being sought. A number of departments and agencies have expressed interest in assuring the success of the project.

Environmental Sustainability

Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (EPBC Act) requires Australian Government organisations to detail their environmental performance and contribution to ecologically sustainable development (ESD). Table 4-10 provides an overview of the TSRA’s environmental activities and operations in relation to section 516A of the EPBC Act.

162 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE 4-10: COMPLIANCE WITH THE EPBC ACT, SECTION 516A (ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING)

ESD REPORTING REQUIREMENT TSRA RESPONSE

How the TSRA’s activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

The TSRA has reviewed and published an environmental policy outlining measures to improve its ecological sustainability.

During 2014 - 2015, the TSRA worked on implementing activities identified through its environmental management system, focused on ensuring that the TSRA is taking all reasonable steps to reduce its ecological footprint.

The TSRA’s environmental risks are managed at the project, programme and portfolio levels and are captured in the organisation’s risks and issues registers.

The TSRA maintains an environmental legal and other requirements register.

The TSRA has established a biennial audit process for its environmental management system.

Outcomes contributing to ecologically sustainable development.

The TSRA’s Environmental Management Programme contributes to ecologically sustainable development across all Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area communities. This includes:

— employment of 45 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as trainees, rangers and ranger supervisors

— partnering with Tagai State College in the horticulture in schools programme

— improving animal management and invasive species control, including management strategies for invasive fish, cane toads, and feral dogs impacting on green turtle nesting sites, and the development of a regional pest management strategy

— producing biodiversity profiles, fauna surveys and fire management plans for all inhabited Torres Strait Islands

— providing technical assistance to improve food production in the Torres Strait through a sustainable horticulture programme

— working with communities for sustainable management of turtle and dugong

— working with Ergon Energy and other partners to increase the use of renewable energy technologies

— building sustainability and resilience across the region through planning for climate change impacts

— monitoring environmental change across the region.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 163

TABLE 4-10: COMPLIANCE WITH THE EPBC ACT, SECTION 516A (ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING)

ESD REPORTING REQUIREMENT TSRA RESPONSE

Environmental impacts of operations The TSRA is committed to managing its operations and those of its contractors to minimise adverse environmental impacts and protect the

environment. There were no recorded adverse environmental impacts from TSRA activities in 2014 - 2015.

Measures taken to minimise environmental impacts During 2014 - 2015, the TSRA continued to apply a number of measures, including:

— the on-going operation of three solar photovoltaic systems on TSRA office sites, resulting in a projected annual energy saving of 140,000 kilowatt hours per annum or 96.5 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide

— the trial of office kitchen waste composting.

The TSRA requires its employees, contractors and suppliers to comply with the TSRA’s Environment Policy and environmental management systems by:

— implementing conservation measures in the TSRA’s offices

— minimising environmental impacts through better design and material selection for new staff housing

— requiring contractors to comply with relevant environmental regulatory requirements and minimum environmental performance requirements

— managing and reporting environmental incidents.

The TSRA monitors a range of environmental performance indicators, including energy use within TSRA offices, energy ratings of white goods purchased for TSRA staff housing, fuel consumption and vehicle performance.

The TSRA has adopted appropriate technologies to reduce travel and its dependency on paper-based filing systems. Those technologies include:

— telephone and video conferencing facilities

— iPads, to be used at all formal meetings, reducing paper consumption

— an electronic document and records management system.

The TSRA continues to modernise its computing operations through the adoption of new virtual technologies and desktop solutions. The new technology provides the TSRA with the opportunity to further reduce energy consumption and the impact of computers on the environment.

164 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Risk Management

The TSRA has standardised its processes for the identification, documentation and management of risks and issues. All TSRA projects and managed activities include risk assessments as part of the project planning and approval process. The TSRA’s management of risk is a continuous cycle (Figure 4-2) involving a systematic process to maintaining risk within an acceptable level.

Risk Identification

Risk identification involves identifying the issues that are likely to negatively impact on the achievement of the TSRA’s goals, as set out in Section 2. This includes identifying:

— political and strategic risks

— programme delivery risks

— operational support risks.

Risks are identified by:

— an annual risk management workshop attended by the TSRA’s Management Group (top down approach)

— completion of individual risk assessments at the programme / project level (bottom up approach)

— audits and assessments conducted by internal and external audit functions.

Risk assessment includes the process of

determining the:

— likelihood of a risk occurring

— consequence or impact of the risk occurring.

Risk Appetite

The TSRA is a custodian of the Australian

Government’s investment in the future prosperity

of the Torres Strait region. Therefore, the TSRA

seeks to balance its risk position between:

— investing in activities that may drive

substantial growth in the region

— the need to remain a stable organisation

with the capacity to continue to work for the

community into the future.

Therefore, the TSRA’s risk appetite is necessarily

around the middle of the risk-taking spectrum.

Depending on the results from year to year and on

community needs, the TSRA may choose to increase

or decrease its appetite for higher risk activities.

The TSRA:

— accepts a higher risk appetite when approving

a new system or process that offers greater

processing capacity and efficiencies

— accepts a moderate risk appetite for

programme outcomes that are aimed at

contributing to the regional goals

FIGURE 4-2: TSRA RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS

Risk identification

Risk Assessment

Risk Mitigation Risk Monitoring

Risk Reporting

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 165

— accepts a low risk appetite for significant breaches of security or unauthorised access to confidential records

— accepts a very low risk appetite for risks that would result in physical or mental harm to staff and the environment.

Risk Mitigation

Risk mitigation (or risk reduction) involves developing actions or plans to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. All mitigation steps are assigned an owner and timeframe.

Risk Monitoring

All TSRA employees are expected to identify and manage risks that are within their control.

The members of the TSRA’s management group are responsible for:

— incorporating suitable risk management activities into business planning (by completing risk assessments at the programme / project levels)

— ensuring that risk management processes are implemented

— ensuring that risk mitigation actions are followed.

The TSRA’s risk management system is:

— dynamic - by being responsive to change and assisting corporate learning and continuous improvement

— systematic - by being rigorous, transparent and explicit and taking into account stakeholder perspectives

— integrated and embedded - in so far as practicable, by reviewing established management planning, decision-making and reporting processes.

The risk management system is based on the better practice principles and processes outlined in AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Risk Management - Principles and Guidelines.

TSRA Deputy Chair with Gab Titui Indigenous Arts Award winner Ms Nancy Kiwat.

166 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Accountability

External Scrutiny

The TSRA is a Corporate Commonwealth entity and a portfolio body of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. The TSRA is accountable to the Parliament of Australia and the Minister for Indigenous Affairs.

The Auditor-General is the TSRA’s external auditor. The audit of the TSRA’s financial statements is conducted in accordance with an audit strategy agreed to by the Auditor-General and the TSRA. The 2014 - 2015 audit was conducted in August 2015. A copy of the Independent Auditor’s report, including the Auditor’s Opinion, is provided as part of the Financial Statements in Section 5 of this Annual Report.

Fraud Control

The TSRA has implemented a fraud control framework in accordance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework 2014. No incidences of fraud were detected in 2014 - 2015.

Internal Audit

The TSRA Audit Committee is assisted in the internal audit function by an external contractor, PDM Consultancy. PDM Consultancy is responsible for implementing the TSRA’s internal audit programme, which aims to provide assurance that the TSRA is managing key risks effectively and efficiently, and that it is complying with regulatory requirements and policies.

Compliance Report

In accordance with section 19 of the PGPA Act, the TSRA provided the Finance Minister and the Minister for Indigenous Affairs with a letter from the TSRA directors. The letter advised that the TSRA had:

— complied with the provisions and requirements of the PGPA Act

— complied with the PGPA Rules as amended from time to time.

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers

The TSRA indemnifies current and former directors and staff members against liability or costs incurred in connection with any claim brought against them as a result of, or in connection with, their appointment to any office or position in the TSRA. The TSRA holds directors’ and officers’ liability insurance cover through Comcover, the Australian Government’s self-managed fund. As part of its annual insurance renewal process, the TSRA reviewed its insurance coverage in 2014 - 2015 to ensure it remained appropriate for its operations.

In 2014 - 2015, no indemnity-related claims were made, and the TSRA knows of no circumstances likely to lead to such claims being made.

The cost of directors’ and officers’ indemnity insurance for 2014 - 2015 was $10,051.55.

Directors’ Interests Policy

In accordance with the PGPA Act and the PGPA Rule 2014, the TSRA Board has a policy and process to manage all direct and indirect conflicts of interest, including a register of all directors’ pecuniary interests and a requirement that directors make a formal declaration of their interests at each TSRA Board meeting. The declarations are recorded in the minutes of the meeting, available to all communities through their elected TSRA Board members. The pecuniary interest processes applies to all governance committees of the TSRA.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 167

Human Resources

The TSRA’s employees are located at TSRA facilities on Thursday Island, and throughout the island communities of the Torres Strait. A small TSRA office in Cairns continues to be used to increase TSRA’s capacity to attract people with skills and experience not available in the Torres Strait.

The TSRA’s Workforce Strategy complements the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018 and sets the strategic direction for supporting and developing our workforce.

Workplace Agreement

All TSRA staff continue to operate under the TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2011 - 2014. The terms and conditions of employment are set out in this agreement which, while designed to end on 30 June 2014, will remain in effect until replaced by a future agreement. As at 30 June 2015, the next TSRA Enterprise Agreement was still being negotiated. The salary ranges for staff covered under the Enterprise Agreement range from $42,334 for an APS level 1 staff member to $130,164 for an EL2 staff member These rates were effective from 16 October 2013.

Payroll and Leave Records

The human resources and payroll company Frontier Software Pty Ltd provides payroll software to the TSRA to facilitate in-house payroll.

Learning and Development

The TSRA’s employees attended internal and external learning and development courses throughout 2014 - 2015. This included programme and project management training, career development training, cultural awareness training, fraud awareness training, accredited relevant university studies and various other learning and development courses. In addition, mentoring and coaching was also provided to various staff.

As part of their induction, all new TSRA employees complete the Australian Public Service Commission’s on-line induction programme.

The TSRA Performance Development Programme informs the learning and development needed by staff and supports them in achieving the best outcomes possible for them as TSRA employees and as people.

Work, Health and Safety Management Arrangements

The TSRA fulfilled its responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth) in 2014 - 2015.

The TSRA has a Work Health Safety Management System. There were six notifications made to Comcare during the year arising from undertakings by the TSRA requiring giving notice under the Work Health and Safety Act.

There were no investigations conducted during the year relating to undertakings carried out by the TSRA and there were no notices given to the TSRA during the year under the Comcare legislation. Comcare has reviewed the workings of the Work Health Safety Management System during a site visit in 2014 - 2015.

The TSRA’s Work Health and Safety Committee comprises TSRA staff and managers who are responsible for developing and implementing strategies to protect employees from risks to their health and safety. The Work Health and Safety Committee works cooperatively to manage all the TSRA’s occupational health and safety policy and operational matters. Employees are informed of current issues and receive occupational health and safety publications from Comcare and other sources when available. The TSRA has trained employees who undertake duties as first-aid officers, fire wardens and occupational health and safety representatives.

168 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Workplace Health

The TSRA has an active early intervention and injury management strategy in place and continues to use occupational therapy services to provide ergonomic support, advice and case management services. On-site flu vaccinations and a healthy lifestyle reimbursement of up to $200 per year are also available to employees.

The TSRA has a Preventing Bullying and Harassment Policy and two trained harassment contact officers are available to provide employee support. The TSRA engages lngeus Australia Pty Ltd trading as Assure Programs to provide Employee Assistance Programme services to all employees where required.

Workplace Diversity

The TSRA is committed to supporting a culture of equity, inclusion and diversity, and to ensuring that its workforce is representative of the broader community. The TSRA upholds the Australian Public Service Values and strives to provide a workplace that is free from discrimination and that recognises the diversity of the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal communities that it serves. All TSRA staff receive up-to-date information on key developments in human resources, including developments in equal employment opportunity (EEO), harassment free workplaces and workplace diversity. Employees can also access publications from the Australian Public Service Commission and other related agencies.

A range of statistical information is collected during the recruitment of TSRA staff and is available to the Australian Public Service Commission on request.

Workplace Consultative Arrangements

The TSRA fosters and promotes workplace consultation through regular management, programme area and staff meetings. In addition, the TSRA conducts regular meetings with staff representatives on the Workplace Consultative Committee. As appropriate, management consults with employees on:

— major workplace changes

— the development of guidelines and policies applying to employment conditions

— the development and implementation of an Enterprise Agreement.

Privacy

The Australian Information Commissioner did not issue a report on the TSRA under section 30 of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) and no personal privacy complaints were made against the TSRA during the reporting period. The TSRA’s privacy policy has been reviewed to comply with the privacy law reform.

Staffing Profile

Tables 4-11 and 4-12 provide information on the TSRA’s employee numbers and classifications as at 30 June 2015.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 169

TABLE 4-11: STAFF PROFILE AT 30 JUNE 2015, BY APS LEVEL

CLASSIFICATION NUMBER OF STAFF

Principal Executive Officer 1

Executive Level 2 6

Executive Level 1 20

APS 6 25

APS 5 27

APS 4 5

APS 3 27

APS 2 13

APS 1 20

Trainee 3

Total 147

TABLE 4-12: TSRA STAFF PROFILE AT 30 JUNE 2015, BY EEO GROUP

CLASSIFICATION MALE FEMALE

TORRES STRAIT

ISLANDER OR ABORIGINAL PEOPLE WITH A DISABILITY

Principal Executive Officer 1 0 1 0

Executive Level 2 5 1 0 0

Executive Level 1 11 9 4 1

APS 6 13 12 12 1

APS 5 8 19 21 0

APS 4 1 4 5 0

APS 3 14 13 26 0

APS 2 3 10 12 0

APS 1 17 3 20 0

Trainee 3 0 3 0

Total 76 71 104 1

170 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Other Reportable Matters

Changes to Disability Reporting in Annual Reports

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007 - 2008, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010 - 2011, departments and agencies are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been replaced by the National Disability Strategy 2010 - 2020 which sets out a ten year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The National Disability Strategy Reports are published on the Department of Social Security web site: at www.dss.gov.au.

The Social Inclusion Measurement and Reporting Strategy agreed by the Australian Government in December 2009 will also include some reporting on disability matters in its regular How Australia is Faring report and, if appropriate, in strategic change indicators in agency annual reports.

Exemption from Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders

The Finance Minister has not granted any written exemption to the TSRA from any requirement of the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, thus the TSRA has not relied upon any exemption from the Finance Minister from any requirement of Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 in the preparation of this report.

Freedom of Information

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. An agency plan showing what information is published in accordance with the requirements is available at www.tsra.gov.au/media-and-publications/ information-publication-scheme/tsra-information-publication-scheme-agency-plan.

SECTION 4 Corporate Governance and Accountability Enabling Functions 171

Property Management

The TSRA has a property portfolio which includes office accommodation at three sites on Thursday Island; the Gab Titui Cultural Centre; and residential accommodation, consisting of 53 houses and apartments. The TSRA also owns and maintains the Green Hill Fort. The Green Hill Fort is a listed place on the Commonwealth Heritage list. In addition, the TSRA has a fleet of vehicles and vessels - most of which are located on outer island communities in the Torres Strait as part of the TSRA ranger programme.

Schedules for regular maintenance of property and assets are in place and these works are contracted out to appropriate tradespeople. Ongoing repairs and maintenance have been carried out in a way that considers our obligations to environmental sustainability, meets government procurement guidelines and supports Indigenous and local businesses.

Renovations to residential property were carried out, in line with the TSRA five year maintenance programme.

In 2014 - 2015, a medium works project, approved by the public works committee, was underway for an 18-dwelling residential development on Clark Street on Thursday Island. The construction of this housing is expected to reduce the TSRA’s reliance on rental accommodation and provide longer term financial benefits for the TSRA.

Purchasing Policy

The current version of the TSRA’s Procurement and Contracts Policy was issued on 19 December 2012. The TSRA’s procurement practices are based on the principles of:

— value for money

— open and effective competition

— ethical fair dealing

— managing risk and accountability.

Disclosure of Sacred Matters

In accordance with section 144ZB(4) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the TSRA Annual Report 2014 - 2015 does not disclose any matters known to the TSRA to be held sacred by Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal people.

Poruma Jetty.

SECTION FIVE

Financial Reports

174 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 175

176 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 177

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Independent Audit Report 1 74

Statement by the Accountable Authority, Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officer 1 76 Statement of Comprehensive Income 1 78

Statement of Financial Position 1 79

Statement of Changes in Equity 1 80

Cash Flow Statement 1 81

Schedule of Commitments 1 82

NOTE 1: S ummary of Significant Accounting Policies 1 84

NOTE 2: Ev ents After the Reporting Period 1 91

NOTE 3: Expenses 1 92

NOTE 4: Income 1 94

NOTE 5: F air Value Measurements 1 95

NOTE 6: F inancial Assets 1 97

NOTE 7: N on-Financial Assets 1 99

NOTE 8: Payables 2 01

NOTE 9: Provisions 20 2

NOTE 10: C ash Flow Reconciliation 2 03

NOTE 11: C ontingent Assets and Liabilities 2 04

NOTE 12: S enior Executive Personnel Remuneration 2 05

NOTE 13: R elated Party Disclosures 2 06

NOTE 14: R emuneration of Auditors 2 08

NOTE 15: F inancial Instruments 2 09

NOTE 16: F inancial Assets Reconciliation 2 13

NOTE 17: A ssets Held in Trust 2 14

NOTE 18: R eporting of Outcomes 2 15

NOTE 19: B udgetary Report and Explanations of Major Variances 2 16

178 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

2015 2014

Notes $’000 $’000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 3A 16,712 14,617

Suppliers 3B 18,357 16,507

Grants 3C 29,350 31,760

Depreciation 3D 1,325 1,250

Finance costs 3E 91 135

Write-down and impairment of assets 3F - 1

Loss on disposal of non-financial assets 3G 70 -

Total expenses 65,905 64,270

Own-Source Income Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 460 517

Interest 4B 1,742 2,130

Other revenue 4C 15,774 14,476

Total own-source revenue 17,976 17,123

Gains Gains from sale of assets 4D - 34

Reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 4E 248 65

Total gains 248 99

Total own-source income 18,224 17,222

Net cost of services 47,681 47,048

Revenue from Government 4F 48,159 49,645

Surplus attributable to the Australian Government 478 2,597

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Changes in asset revaluation surplus 978 184

Total other comprehensive income 978 184

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 1,456 2,781

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2015

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 179

2015 2014

Notes $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 6A 2,790 2,711

Trade and other receivables 6B 7,641 6,409

Other investments 6C 33,300 37,394

Total financial assets 43,731 46,514

Non-financial assets Land and buildings 7A,C 35,524 32,236

Plant and equipment 7B,C 1,789 1,582

Total non-financial assets 37,313 33,818

Total assets 81,044 80,332

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 8A 3,263 4,247

Grants 8B 386 288

Other payables 8C 436 391

Total payables 4,085 4,926

Provisions Employee provisions 9A 3,147 3,050

Total provisions 3,147 3,050

Total liabilities 7,232 7,976

Net assets 73,812 72,356

EQUITY Contributed equity 32 32

Reserves 14,840 13,862

Retained surplus 58,940 58,462

Total equity 73,812 72,356

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

180 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

58,462 55,865 13,862 13,678 32 32 72,356 69,575

Adjusted opening balance

58,462 55,865 13,862 13,678 32 32 72,356 69,575

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period

478 2,597 - - - - 478 2,597

Other comprehensive income

- - 978 184 - - 978 184

Total comprehensive income

478 2,597 978 184 - - 1,456 2,781

Less: minority interests*

- - - - - - - -

Closing Balance attributable to the Australian Government as at 30 June 2015

58,940 58,462 14,840 13,862 32 32 73,812 72,356

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Total equity

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT of CHANGES in EQUITY

for the period ended 30 June 2015

Contributed equity/capital

Retained earnings

Asset revaluation

surplus

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 181

2015 2014

Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from Government 48,159 49,645

Sales of goods and rendering of services 15,850 15,959

Interest 1,673 2,082

Net GST received 2,638 3,313

Total cash received 68,320 70,999

Cash used Employees 16,570 14,429

Suppliers 21,276 19,526

Loan payments 65 58

Grants 31,059 34,113

Total cash used 68,970 68,126

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 10 (650) 2,873

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Loan receipts 1,270 513

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment - 34

Investments 4,094 -

Total cash received 5,364 547

Cash used Loan payments 724 523

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 3,911 1,068

Investments - 594

Total cash used 4,635 2,185

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities 729 (1,638)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held 79 1,235

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 2,711 1,476

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 2,790 2,711

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

182 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

2015 2014

BY TYPE $’000 $’000

Commitments receivable Net GST recoverable on commitments 146 22

Total commitments receivable 146 22

Commitments payable Capital commitments Land and buildings 1,501 -

Total capital commitments 1,501 -

Other commitments Operating leases 1,922 693

Total other commitments 1,922 693

Total commitments payable 3,423 693

Net commitments by type 3,277 671

BY MATURITY

Commitments receivable Net GST commitments receivable Within 1 year 56 15

Between 1 to 5 years 90 7

Total GST commitments receivable 146 22

Total commitments receivable 146 22

Commitments payable

1,501 -

1,501 -

Capital Commitments Within 1 year Total capital commitments Operating lease commitments

Within 1 year 939 416

Between 1 to 5 years 983 277

Total operating lease commitments 1,922 693

Total commitments payable 3,423 693

Net commitments by maturity 3,277 671

Note: Commitments were GST inclusive where relevant.

Capital Commitments

Lease for office and residential accommodation

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Lease payments exist for 2 office accommodations. One lease is for a period of 1 year with 2 subsequent 1 year renewal options. The second lease is for a period of 2 years with 2 subsequent 2 year renewal options.

The TSRA currently lease houses for staff and contractor accommodation. Lease terms range from 1 month to 3 years with varying expiry dates.

During the year, the TSRA contracted a developer to complete civil works on the Clark Street Subdivision project. A contract commitment of $1,501,000 existed as at 30 June 2015.

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2015

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 183

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 1: S ummary of Significant Accounting Policies 1 84

NOTE 2: Ev ents After the Reporting Period 1 91

NOTE 3: Expenses 1 92

NOTE 4: Income 1 94

NOTE 5: F air Value Measurements 1 95

NOTE 6: F inancial Assets 1 97

NOTE 7: N on-Financial Assets 1 99

NOTE 8: Payables 2 01

NOTE 9: Provisions 20 2

NOTE 10: C ash Flow Reconciliation 2 03

NOTE 11: C ontingent Assets and Liabilities 2 04

NOTE 12: S enior Executive Personnel Remuneration 2 05

NOTE 13: R elated Party Disclosures 2 06

NOTE 14: R emuneration of Auditors 2 08

NOTE 15: F inancial Instruments 2 09

NOTE 16: F inancial Assets Reconciliation 2 13

NOTE 17: A ssets Held in Trust 2 14

NOTE 18: R eporting of Outcomes 2 15

NOTE 19: B udgetary Report and Explanations of Major Variances 2 16

184 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

The TSRA is structured to meet one outcome:

1.1 Objectives of the Torres Strait Regional Authority The Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of the TSRA is to achieve a better quality of life and develop an economic base for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal persons living in the Torres Strait.

The continued existence of the TSRA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the TSRA's administration and programs.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRR, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to TSRA or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the contingencies note.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

Progress towards closing the gap for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait Region through development planning, coordination, sustainable resource management, and preservation and promotion of Indigenous culture.

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the TSRA has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

· The fair value of land and buildings has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by an independent valuer. In some instances, the TSRA's buildings are purpose-built and may in fact realise more or less in the market.

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by clause 1(a) of Schedule 42 to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Financial Reporting Rule (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2014; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

· The initial fair value of concessional loans is taken to be the present value of all future cash receipts, discounted using the prevailing market rate of interest for instruments of a similar structure (currency, term, type of interest rate, credit risk). Subsequently the value of the loan is derived by applying the amortised cost using the effective interest method, with the initial market rate as the effective rate, and anticipated cash flows based on contracted repayment terms, resulting in the amortisation of the discount over the anticipated life of the loan.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 185

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

1.5 Revenue

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another non-corporate or corporate Commonwealth entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (this did not occur in 2014-15 or 2013-14).

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement .

c) the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and d) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction …….will flow to the TSRA.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Resources received free of charge are recoginised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when: a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably ........measured; and b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the TSRA.

b) the TSRA retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

Other new standards, revised standards, amended standards or interpretations that were issued prior to the signing of the statement by the accountable authority and chief financial officer and were applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the TSRA's financial statements and are not expected to have a future material effect on the TSRA's financial statements.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. The following new standards, revised standards, amended standards or interpretations were issued prior to the signing of the statement by the accountable authority and chief financial officer, were applicable to the current reporting period and had a material effect on the TSRA's financial statements.

i) AASB 1055 - Budgetary Reporting The Standard requires disclosure of budgeted financial statements and major variances with actual figures. The standard has resulted in a substantial new note to the financial statements that adds new information that previously has not been disclosed.

There are no new standards/revised standards/interpretations/amending standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the future reporting period that are expected to have a material financial impact on TSRA.

186 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Revenue from Government

1.6 Gains

Note 15G: Market Risk

Restructuring of Administrative Arrangements

Other Distributions to Owners

1.8 Employee Benefits

The FRR require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend.

Liabilities for 'short-term employee benefits' (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits ) and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (this did not occur in 2014-15 or 2013-14).

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Transactions with the Government as Owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to this entity) is recognised as Revenue from Government by the corporate Commonwealth entity unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

Net assets received from or relinquished to another Government entity under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are adjusted at their book value directly against contributed equity.

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 187

Separation and Redundancy

Superannuation

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. In 2014-15, the TSRA leased office accommodation, commercial and residential property for the operation of the organisation.

1.12 Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes: a) cash on hand; and b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily ........convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

1.9 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

The TSRA does not have any finance leases.

1.11 Fair Value Measurement

No transfer between levels of the fair value hierarchy has occurred at the end of the reporting period.

1.10 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance's administered schedules and notes.

The TSRA makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The TSRA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the TSRA's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2015. The estimate of the present value of the long service leave liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The TSRA recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

The TSRA's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. A provision for personal leave payable also exists for a select number of staff as personal leave is vesting for these staff due to a clause in their employment agreement.

188 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

1.13 Financial Assets

a) loans and receivables; and b) held-to-maturity investments.

Effective Interest Method

Held-to-Maturity Investments

Loans and Receivables

Impairment of Financial Assets

1.14 Financial Liabilities

Other Financial Liabilities

Financial assets carried at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held to maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities 'at fair value through profit and loss' or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the group has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as 'loans and receivables'. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

The TSRA classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition.

Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 189

1.16 Acquisition of Assets

1.17 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Revaluations

2015 2014

Buildings on freehold land 40 years 40 years

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Other Plant and Equipment 3 to 8 years 3 to 8 years

All heritage and cultural assets have indefinite useful lives and are not depreciated.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date was eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset was restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the TSRA using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor's accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

Following initial recognition at cost, material property, plant and equipment were carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. In accordance with the FRR, immaterial property, plant and equipment is measured at cost. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

1.15 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

190 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Impairment

Derecognition

Heritage and Cultural Assets

1.18 Taxation / Competitive Neutrality

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2015. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the TSRA were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

The TSRA has a limited collection of 21 (2014 : 21) distinct Cultural and Heritage assets with an aggregated fair value of $60,000 (2014: $60,000). Cultural assets are comprised of artworks, carvings, and traditional headdresseses. Heritage assets consist of models of 2 (2014 : 2) sailing vessels and a brass Pearl Diver’s helmet (2014 : 1) each of which has historical significance to the region. The assets are on display at the TSRA’s main office and the Gab Titui Cultural Centre. The conservation and preservation of TSRA’s heritage and cultural assets is achieved by a variety and combination of means including: the provision of education and awareness programs; asset management planning; professional training and development; research; and the provision of appropriate storage and display environments.

The TSRA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except: a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and b) for receivables and payables.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 191

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the TSRA.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

192 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 3A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 12,232 11,375

Superannuation Defined contribution plans 2,020 1,081

Defined benefit plans 469 424

Leave and other entitlements 1,991 1,737

Total employee benefits 16,712 14,617

Note 3B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Consultants and professional fees 6,314 5,998

Travel 3,158 3,106

Repairs and maintenance 831 1,161

Other staff costs 414 783

Office running costs 1,413 1,353

Property costs 473 487

Transport, freight and storage 647 706

Media, advertising and public relations 319 363

Other 3,529 1,450

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 17,098 15,407

Goods supplied in connection with External Parties 342 324

Total goods supplied 342 324

Services rendered in connection with External Parties 16,756 15,083

Total services rendered 16,756 15,083

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 17,098 15,407

Other supplier expenses Operating lease rentals in connection with External Parties Minimum lease payments 1,139 1,100

Workers compensation expenses 120 1

Total other suppliers 1,259 1,101

Total suppliers 18,357 16,507

Note 3: Expenses

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 193

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 3C: Grants Public sector:

Australian Government entities (related parties) 3,181 440

State and Territory Governments 516 -

Local Governments 13,214 16,675

Private sector:

Non-profit organisations 4,959 8,080

For-profit organisations 7,480 6,565

Total grants 29,350 31,760

Note 3D: Depreciation Depreciation:

Buildings 808 743

Plant and equipment 517 507

Total depreciation 1,325 1,250

Note 3E: Finance Costs Finance costs Write down of loans to net present value 91 135

Total finance costs 91 135

Note 3F: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets Asset writedowns and impairments from: Receivables goods and services - external parties provided for as impaired - 1

Total write-down and impairment of assets - 1

Note 3G: Loss on disposal of non-financial assets Carrying value of assets disposed 70 -

Total loss on disposal of non-financial assets 70 -

Finance costs are comprised of amortisation charges for new loan advances and amortisation charges as a result of revaluations to the total concessional loan portfolio using current market interest rates.

194 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 4A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services Sale of goods in connection with External parties 161 225

Total sale of goods 161 225

Rendering of services in connection with

External parties 299 292

Total rendering of services 299 292

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 460 517

Note 4B: Interest Loans 325 352

Deposits 1,417 1,778

Total interest 1,742 2,130

Note 4C: Other Revenue Rent 32 14

Other Government contributions 15,742 14,462

Total other revenue 15,774 14,476

Gains

Note 4D: Gains from Sale of Assets Plant and equipment Proceeds from sale - 34

Net gains from sale of assets - 34

Note 4E: Reversals of Previous Asset Write-Downs and Impairments Reversal of losses from remeasuring loans and receivables 244 60

Reversal of impairment losses 4 5

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 248 65

Note 4F: Revenue from Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs PGPA Act body payment item - 16,548

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet PGPA Act body payment item 48,159 33,097

Departmental special appropriations

- -

Total revenue from Government 48,159 49,645

Note 4: Income

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 195

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

For Levels 2 and 3 fair value measurements 2

2015 2014

Category (Level 1, 2 Valuation

$’000 $’000 or 3)

3

technique(s)1 Inputs used

Land 9,215 9,360 Level 2 Market

valuation

Buildings on freehold land

26,174 22,715 Level 3 Depreciated

Current Replacement Cost

Leasehold improvements

135 161 Level 3 Depreciated

Current Replacement Cost

Heritage and cultural

60 60 Level 3 Depreciated

Current Replacement Cost

Total non-financial assets

35,584 32,296

2. The entity has chosen to early adopt AASB 2015-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Fair Value Disclosures of Non-for-Profit Public Sector entities at 30 June 2015. The future economic benefits of the entity's non-financial assets are not primarily dependent on their ability to generate cash flows. The entity has not disclosed qualitative information about the significant unobservable inputs or a narrative description of the sensitivities of the fair value measurements to changes in the unobservable inputs.

3. Buildings on freehold land and leasehold improvements were re-categorised from level 2 to level 3.

Note 5A: Valuation Measurements, Valuation Technique and Inputs Used

1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Sales prices of comparable land adjusted for property size, location, topography, and other inherent attributes.

Construction costs of replacement assets having similar service potential including preliminaries and professional fees, adjusted for the consumed economic benefit and/or obsolescence of the asset.

Construction costs of replacement assets having similar service potential including preliminaries and professional fees, adjusted for the consumed economic benefit and/or obsolescence of the asset.

Sales prices of similar artwork adjusted for the Condition Rating and cost of achieving a sale.

Non-financial assets

196 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Fair value measurements - highest and best use differs from current use for non-financial assets The highest and best use of all non-financial assets are the same as their current use.

Buildings on freehold land

Buildings on freehold land

Leasehold improve-ments

Leasehold improve-ments

Other property, plant and equipment

Other property, plant and equipment

Heritage and cultural

Heritage and cultural

Total Total

2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July - - - - 1,522 1,580 60 60 1,582 1,640 Purchases - - - - 793 449 - - 793 449 Depreciation - - - - (516) (507) - - (516) (507) Disposals - - - - (70) - - - (70) - Transfers into Level 3 26,174 - 135 - - - - - 26,308 - Transfers out of Level 3

1

- - - - (1,729) - - - (1,729) -

Total as at 30 June 26,174 - 135 - - 1,522 60 60 26,368 1,582 1. Consistent with the FRR, other property, plant & equipment immaterial to the TSRA have been measured at cost. Accordingly other property, plant & equipment previously recorded as level 3 have been transferred out. Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Non-Financial Assets

Note 5B: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes The TSRA procured valuation services from Neil Teves - AAPI Registered Valuer No. 382, and relied on valuation models provided by Mr Teves. The entity tests the procedures of the valuation model every 12 months. Mr Teves provided written assurance to the entity that the model developed is in compliance with AASB 13.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 197

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 944 2,041

Cash on hand or on deposit - TSRA Housing Fund 1,846 670

Total cash and cash equivalents 2,790 2,711

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables in connection with External parties 588 204

Total goods and services receivables 588 204

Other receivables GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 2,057 955

Loans 5,102 5,362

Total other receivables 7,159 6,317

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 7,747 6,521

Less impairment allowance Loans (106) (112)

Total impairment allowance (106) (112)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 7,641 6,409

Trade and other receivables (net) expected to be recovered in No more than 12 months 3,408 1,878

More than 12 months 4,233 4,531

Total trade and other receivables (net) 7,641 6,409

Trade and other receivables (gross) aged as follows Not overdue 7,505 6,477

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days 125 12

31 to 60 days 17 7

61 to 90 days 14 6

More than 90 days 86 19

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 7,747 6,521

Impairment allowance aged as follows Overdue by:

More than 90 days (106) (112)

Total impairment allowance (106) (112)

Credit terms are net 30 days (2014: 30 days).

TSRA’s financial performance and balance sheet must be read in the context of its enabling legislation, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (ATSI Act) and the impact of accounting standards on the valuation of financial assets.

The ATSI Act requires that funds available under the TSRA Housing Fund, including interest earnings, are to be used exclusively for housing loans. Consequently, income earned on the TSRA Housing Fund is not available for operational expenses but is directed back into new loans.

Note 6: Financial Assets

198 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

TSRA holds a portfolio of concessional loans that are provided for business development and home ownership programs.

The values of these loans as at 2015 are as follows:

Concessional loans - nominal value 5,376 5,831

Less: unexpired discount (274) (469)

Concessional loans - carrying value 5,102 5,362

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance:

Movements in relation to 2015

Goods and services Loans Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance - (112) (112)

Amounts written off - 1 1

Amounts recovered and reversed - 5 5

Closing balance - (106) (106)

Movements in relation to 2014

Goods and services Loans Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance (65) (115) (180)

Amounts recovered and reversed 65 3 68

Closing balance - (112) (112)

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 6C: Other Investments Term deposits 26,054 30,321

Term deposits - TSRA Housing Fund 7,246 7,073

Total other investments 33,300 37,394

Other investments are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 33,300 37,394

Total other investments 33,300 37,394

Loans to individuals and businesses were made under the Business Funding Scheme for periods up to 10 years and Home Loans for periods up to 32 years. In relation to the housing loans, TSRA holds mortgages as sole mortgagor over the properties for which the loans are provided. TSRA receives market advice from a qualified valuer or market expert on the value of a property prior to the loan being approved. In relation to Business Funding Scheme loans, from 2007-08 TSRA has required that inexperienced business owner(s) successfully complete an approved business course and submit a business plan prior to the loan being approved. Security is not required for Business Funding Scheme loans. Principal is repaid in full at maturity. Interest rates for Business Funding Scheme loans were fixed in accordance with the loan contracts. Housing Loan interest rates were varied on 1 January 2015 in accordance with the loan contracts. Effective interest rates average 4.44% (2014: 4.21%) for Business Funding Scheme loans and 4.89% (2014: 5.06%) for Housing loans.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 199

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Land Fair value 9,215 9,360

Total land 9,215 9,360

Buildings on freehold land:

Work in progress 2,978 442

Fair value 23,196 22,273

Total buildings on freehold land 26,174 22,715

Leasehold Improvements: Fair value 135 161

Total leasehold improvements 135 161

Total land and buildings 35,524 32,236

Note 7B: Plant and Equipment

Heritage and cultural:

Artifacts and artworks Fair value 60 60

Total heritage and cultural 60 60

Other plant and equipment:

Cost 4,632 3,913

Accumulated depreciation (2,903) (2,391)

Total other plant and equipment 1,729 1,522

Total plant and equipment 1,789 1,582

Revaluations of non-financial assets

No plant or equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

There was a revaluation decrement recorded for land of $145,000 (2014: Nil). There were no revaluation increments or decrements recorded for plant and equipment (2014: Nil). Revaluation increments were recorded for buildings on freehold land of $1,122,483 (2014: $184,185) and have been credited to the asset revaluation surplus by asset class and included in the equity section of the balance sheet and the other comprehensive income section of the statement of comprehensive income.

No indicators of impairment were found for plant and equipment.

All revaluations are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. In 2014-15, an independent valuer, Neil Teves - AAPI Registered Valuer No. 382, conducted the revaluations as at 30 June 2015.

Note 7A: Land and Buildings

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings. No land or buildings were expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

200 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Land Buildings

Total land & buildings Heritage 1 & cultural

Other plant & equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

9,360 22,876 32,236 60 3,913 36,209

- - - - (2,391) (2,391)

9,360 22,876 32,236 60 1,522 33,818

- 3,120 3,120 - 793 3,913

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income (145) 1,122 977 - - 977

- (809) (809) - (516) (1,325)

- - - - (70) (70)

Total as at 30 June 2015 9,215 26,309 35,524 60 1,729 37,313

9,215 26,309 35,524 60 4,632 40,216

- - - - (2,903) (2,903)

9,215 26,309 35,524 60 1,729 37,313

Land Buildings

Total land & buildings Heritage 1 & cultural

Other plant & equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

9,360 22,816 32,176 60 3,517 35,753

- - - - (1,937) (1,937)

9,360 22,816 32,176 60 1,580 33,816

- 619 619 - 449 1,068

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - 184 184 - - 184

- (743) (743) - (507) (1,250)

Total as at 30 June 2014 9,360 22,876 32,236 60 1,522 33,818

9,360 22,876 32,236 60 3,913 36,209

- - - - (2,391) (2,391)

Total as at 30 June 2014 9,360 22,876 32,236 60 1,522 33,818

1

Land, buildings and other plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

Gross book value Accumulated depreciation and impairment

Depreciation

Total as at 30 June 2014 represented by

Additions:

By purchase

Note 7C (Cont'd): Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment for 2014

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value Accumulated depreciation and impairment Total as at 1 July 2013

Depreciation

Total as at 30 June 2015 Accumulated depreciation and impairment

Gross book value Total as at 30 June 2015 represented by

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment for 2015

Additions:

Disposals

By purchase

Total as at 1 July 2014 Accumulated depreciation and impairment

Gross book value As at 1 July 2014

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 201

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 8A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 3,263 4,247

Total suppliers 3,263 4,247

Suppliers expected to be settled No more than 12 months 3,263 4,247

Total suppliers 3,263 4,247

Suppliers in connection with External parties 3,263 4,247

Total suppliers 3,263 4,247

Note 8B: Grants Public sector: Local Governments - 196

Private sector: Non-profit organisations 376 92

For-profit organisations 10 -

Total grants 386 288

Grants expected to be settled No more than 12 months 386 288

Total grant 386 288

Note 8C: Other Payables Wages and salaries 381 343

Superannuation 55 48

Total other payables 436 391

Other payables expected to be settled No more than 12 months 436 391

Total other payables 436 391

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 8: Payables

202 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Note 9A: Employee provisions Long Service Leave 1,750 1,534

Annual Leave 1,304 1,427

Personal Leave 93 89

Total employee provisions 3,147 3,050

Employee provisions are expected to be settled No more than 12 months 1,197 1,235

More than 12 months 1,950 1,815

Total employee provisions 3,147 3,050

Note 9: Provisions

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 203

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per statement of financial position to cash flow statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per Cash flow statement 2,790 2,711

Statement of financial position 2,790 2,711

Discrepancy - -

Net cost of services (47,681) (47,048)

Revenue from Government 48,159 49,645

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation 1,325 1,250

Net writedown of financial assets 25 78

Interest on concessional loans (69) (48)

Reversal of previous loan writedowns and impairments (248) (65)

(Gain)/Loss on Sale of Assets 70 (34)

Movements in assets and liabilities Assets (Increase) / decrease in net receivables (1,485) 1,691

Liabilities Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions 96 175

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables (985) (1,244)

Increase / (decrease) in grants payable 98 (1,540)

Increase / (decrease) in other payables 45 13

Net cash from / (used by) operating activities (650) 2,873

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

204 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014 2015 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Contingent liabilities Balance from previous period

116 - 116 -

New contingent liabilities recognised

- 116 - 116

Total contingent liabilities

116 116 116 116

Quantifiable Contingencies Unquantifiable Contingencies Significant Remote Contingencies

There are no significant remote contingencies as at 30 June 2015 (2013-14: Nil). There are no unquantifiable contingencies as at 30 June 2015 (2013-14: Nil). Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Bank Guarantees

Total

The schedule of contingencies reports no contingent assets (2013-14 : Nil). There is a contingent liability as at 30 June 2015 in respect of a bank guarantee in favour of the Torres Shire Council. As a result the TSRA has recognised the contingent liability of $116,000 as at 30 June 2015 (2013-14 : $116,000).

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 205

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary 1,344,835 1,394,602

Other allowances 119,493 140,200

Total short-term employee benefits 1,464,328 1,534,802

Post-employment benefits:

Superannuation 209,084 200,495

Total post-employment benefits 209,084 200,495

Other long-term benefits:

Annual Leave 178,755 129,751

Long-service leave 86,633 23,811

Total other long-term benefits 265,388 153,562

Total 1,938,800 1,888,859

(2014: 27) The total number of senior management personnel that are included in the above table are 28

Note 12: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration

206 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

TSRA Director Name Council Relationships Mr Joseph Elu Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council

Mr Keith Fell Torres Strait Island Regional Council

Mr Getano Lui (Jnr) Torres Strait Island Regional Council Mr Mario Sabatino Torres Strait Island Regional Council Mr Willie Lui Torres Strait Island Regional Council

Mr John Abednego Torres Shire Council

Mr Yen Loban Torres Shire Council

Loans

2015 2014

$ $

62,125 22,740

87,435 40,000

7,554 16,375

411,195 2,219,529 333,032 268,684 119,515 396,028

17,790 114,192

Seisia Island Council - Joseph Elu - TSRA Chairperson Triple A Family Values Pty Ltd - Keith Fell - TSRA Board Member

Note 13A: Related Party Disclosures

Loans were made to the following directors and director-related entities. They were approved under normal terms and conditions applying to the TSRA's loan schemes. The directors involved took no part in the relevant decisions of the board.

The table below outlines the loan holder/s and the TSRA director with whom a related party connection exists.

Loban Marine - Yen Loban - TSRA Board Member

Bamaga Enterprise Pty Ltd - Reg Williams - TSRA Board Member

Loans to Directors and Director-Related Entities

Loans to director-related entities during the year

Loans to directors during the year

Seisia Community Torres Strait Islander Corporation - Joseph Elu - TSRA Chairperson

Loans to directors outstanding at year-end

Loan repayments by directors during the year Loans to director-related entities outstanding at year-end

Alice Loban - Yen Loban - TSRA Board Member

Loan repayments by director-related entities during the year Interest revenue included in net cost of services from loans to directors/director-related entities

The TSRA has adopted AASB 139 Financial Instruments - Recognition and Measurement , and treated loans outstanding at year end as Loans and Receivables valued at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 207

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Directors’ Name Council Grants Received Grants Received

2015 2014

$ $

* Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council 413,590 60,500

* Torres Shire Council 316,000 2,530,000

* Torres Strait Island Regional Council 1,911,848 3,267,350

J Elu, K Bedford Australian Fisheries Management Authority 906,832 -

K Bedford Australian Rural Leadership Foundation - 50,000

M Nona Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation - 80,000

M Nona Badu Island Foundation Ltd - 7,500

R Williams Bamaga Enterprises Limited - 8,000

F Pearson Buthu Lagau Saral (TSI) Corporation - 15,000

S Savage Community Enterprises Australia Ltd - 1,665,366

K Lui Denis Allan Newie - 6,500

K Fell Department of Transport and Main Roads - 500,000

S Savage DFK Kidsons

- Grant Controller for kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation - 117,100

K Bedford Erub Erwer Meta (TSI) Corporation - 92,000

K Bedford Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners Corporation (RNTBC) - 12,000

F Pearson Fred David - 8,350

K Bedford George Kapua Gutchen - 10,000

H Mosby Kailag Enterprises - 8,373

S Savage Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation - 28,800

K Lui Kaziw Asesered Le Association 4,800 30,000

F Pearson Kulkalgal Torres Strait Islander Corporation - 10,000

R Fujii Lena Passi Womens Cntre - 15,000

E Peter Malau Ki'ai (TSI) Corporation 12,000 8,400

H Mosby Masigalagal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC - 11,500

A Noah Mer Gedkem Le (TSI) Corporation 144,634 30,100

M Nona Mulalagal RNTBC 10,500 -

M Nona Mura Badulgal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC 15,200 -

R Fujii Mura Kosker Sorority Inc - 524,000

R Fujii Port Kennedy Association 1,221,500 606,000

F Pearson Porumalgal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC - 2,500

C Aniba Saibai Community Development (TSI) Corp - 10,000

C Aniba, A Noah & J Abednego Torres Strait Islanders Media Association - 798,780

H Mosby Torres Strait Islanders Regional Education Council Incorporated 169,365 -

K Fell Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc 74,100 -

K Fell Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other projects Trust 10,571,989 13,817,413

K Fell, S Maka Torres Strait Youth and Recreation Sporting Association Inc 1,275,000 325,000

J Stephen Ugar Ged Kem Le Zeuber Er Kep 10,700 -

K Lui Wug Danalaig Incorporated - 25,000

*Please refer to Note 13A for information regarding Director relationships with these entities.

Other Transactions with Directors or Director-Related Entities

Grants were made to the following Director-related entities. They were approved under normal terms and conditions applying to the TSRA's grant programs. The Directors involved took no part in the relevant decisions of the TSRA and may not be a representative of the governing body of the entity receiving the grant.

Note 13B: Related Party Disclosures

208 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$’000 $’000

Financial statement audit services were provided by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). Fair value of the services provided Financial statement audit services 46 46

Total fair value of services rendered 46 46

No other services were provided by the ANAO.

Note 14: Remuneration of Auditors

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 209

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$'000 $'000

Note 15A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Held-to-maturity Term deposits 33,300 37,394

Total held-to-maturity 33,300 37,394

Loans and receivables Cash and cash equivalents 2,790 2,711

Trade and other receivables 588 204

Loans receivable 4,996 5,250

Total loans and receivables 8,374 8,165

Total financial assets 41,674 45,559

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors 3,263 4,247

Grant liabilities 386 288

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 3,649 4,535

Total financial liabilities 3,649 4,535

The values of these loans as at 30 June 2015 are as follows: Concessional loans - nominal value 5,376 5,831

Less: unexpired discount (274) (469)

Less: impairment allowance (106) (112)

Concessional loans - carrying value 4,996 5,250

Note 15B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets Held-to-maturity Interest revenue 1,417 1,778

Net gains on held-to-maturity 1,417 1,778

Loans and receivables Interest revenue (see note 4B) 325 352

Reversal of impairment losses (see note 4E) 4 5

Reversal of losses from remeasuring loans and receivables (see note 4E) 244 60

Write down of loans to Net Present Value (see note 3E) (91) (135)

Receivables Goods and services - external parties provided for as impaired (see note 3F) - (1)

Net gain on loans and receivables 482 281

Net gain on financial assets 1,899 2,059

The net income from financial assets not at fair value from profit or loss is $1,899,000 (2014: $2,059,000)

Note 15C: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Liabilities

There are no gains or losses on financial liabilities for the year ending 30 June 2015 (2014: $Nil)

Note 15: Financial Instruments

TSRA holds a portfolio of concessional loans that are provided for business development and home ownership programs.

210 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Note 15D: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Note 15E: Credit risk

Not past due nor impaired

Not past due nor impaired Past due or impaired

Past due or impaired

2015 2014 2015 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Cash and cash equivalents 2,790 2,711 - -

Receivables for goods and services 414 197 174 7

Loans receivable 4,927 5,213 174 149

Term Deposits 33,300 37,394 - -

Total 41,431 45,515 348 156

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2015 0 to 30 31 to 60 61 to 90 90+

days days days days Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables for goods and services 110 3 - 61 174

Loans receivable 15 14 14 25 68

Total 125 17 14 86 242

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014 0 to 30 31 to 60 61 to 90 90+

days days days days Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables for goods and services 4 - 1 2 7

Loans receivable 8 7 5 17 37

Total 12 7 6 19 44

TSRA was exposed to minimal credit risk as the majority of loans and receivables and all held-to-maturity financial instruments are cash or high quality trade receivables. TSRA also holds a portfolio of concessional loans that are provided for business development and home ownership programs. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a trade debtor or a concessional loan holder. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade and loan receivables (2015: $5,583,000 and 2014: $5,454,000)

In relation to the housing loans, TSRA holds mortgages as sole mortgagor over the properties for which the loans are provided. TSRA receives market advice from a qualified valuer or market expert on the value of a property prior to the loan being approved. In relation to Business Funding Scheme loans, from 2007-08 TSRA has required that inexperienced business owner(s) successfully complete an approved business course and submit a business plan prior to the loan being approved. These policies mitigate against credit risk for the TSRA's loans portfolio.

TSRA has assessed the risk of the default on payment and has allocated $106,295 in 2015 (2014: $111,529) to an allowance for impairment. Security underpinning this impairment includes a 5 bedroom house, which was independently valued in June 2015 at an estimated total value of $550,000.

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired

The carrying amount of financial instruments matches their fair value in 2014-15 as in 2013-14.

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 211

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Note 15F: Liquidity Risk

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities in 2015 On within 1 between 1 between 2 more than

demand year to 2 years to 5 years 5 years Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors and accruals - 3,263 - - - 3,263

Grant liabilities - 386 - - - 386

Total - 3,649 - - - 3,649

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities in 2014 On within 1 between 1 between 2 more than

demand year to 2 years to 5 years 5 years Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors and accruals - 4,247 - - - 4,247

Grant liabilities - 288 - - - 288

Total - 4,535 - - - 4,535

TSRA receives funding from its Portfolio Department. TSRA manages its budgeted funds to ensure it has adequate funds to meet payments as they fall due. In addition, the TSRA has policies in place to ensure timely payments are made when due and has no past experience of default.

The entity had no derivative financial liabilities in either 2015 or 2014.

TSRA's financial liabilities were trade creditors and accruals and grant liabilities. The exposure to liquidity risk was based on the notion that TSRA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This was highly unlikely due to Government funding and mechanisms available to TSRA and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there were appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

212 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Note 15G: Market Risk

Sensitivity Analysis of the risk that the TSRA is exposed to for 2015-16 with respect to cash at bank and term deposits

Value $'000

1,035 -

1,179 144

891 (144)

Sensitivity Analysis of the risk that the TSRA is exposed to for 2015-16 with respect to concessional loans

Value $'000 5,102 -

4,978 (124)

5,231 129

Interest Rate Risk

TSRA holds basic financial instruments that did not expose TSRA to certain market risks such as 'currency risk' and 'other price risk'.

Decrease of 0.40% in market interest rate Increase of 0.40% in market interest rate

Assets past due and impaired are represented by loans individually assessed to be at high risk of default.

Net Present Value of Loans 30 June 2015

The value of concessional loans is derived by applying the amortised cost using the effective interest method. Because the loan portfolio is valued at net present value using market interest rates, movements in market interest rates will impact on the value of the loan portfolio and the income statement. The following table represents the effect to the income statement (and corresponding effect to the loan portfolio value in the balance sheet) when the current market interest rate is varied by 0.40%. 0.40% is anticipated to be a reasonable estimate of the maximum movement in market interest rates in financial year 2015-16.

Effect on Statement of Comprehensive Income Income (Expense) $'000

Effect on Statement of Comprehensive Income Income (Expense) $'000

Interest rate risk refers to the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. TSRA is exposed to interest rate risk primarily from cash deposits and concessional loans.

Interest earned on cash at bank and term deposits after they mature may be effected by changes in market interest rates. The following table represents the effect to the statement of comprehensive income (and corresponding effect to the cash value in the balance sheet) when the current market interest rate is varied by 0.40%. 0.40% is anticipated to be a reasonable estimate of the maximum movement in market interest rates in financial year 2015-16.

Decrease of 0.40% in market interest rate Increase of 0.40% in market interest rate

Anticipated interest earned for 2015-16 financial year at current market interest rate

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 213

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$'000 $'000

Financial assets Notes

Total financial assets as per statement of financial position 43,731 46,514

Less: non-financial instrument components Other receivables 6B 2,057 955

Total non-financial instrument components 2,057 955

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 41,674 45,559

Note 16: Financial Assets Reconciliation

214 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Monetary assets

2015 2014

$'000 $'000

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund - Monetary assets Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period (1 July) 40,384 41,278

Receipts 14,252 20,106

Payments (6,132) (21,000)

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period (30 June) 48,504 40,384

2015 2014

$'000 $'000

Finfish trust account - Monetary assets Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period (1 July) 886 449

Receipts 215 556

Payments (4) (119)

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period (30 June) 1,097 886

The values above are estimated fair values at the time when acquired.

Non-monetary assets The entity had no non-monetary assets held in trust in both the current and prior reporting period.

Torres Strait Islanders own 100 per cent of the Finfish fishery. Finfish quota that is not used by Traditional Inhabitant fishers is leased to Non-Traditional fishers. Leasing revenue is held in trust by the TSRA and disbursed to the beneficiaries for the benefit of the fishery. For example, capacity building activities to increase the number of Torres Strait Islanders fishing in an economical and environmentally sustainable way in the fishery.

On 17 October 1998, the Queensland State and the TSRA entered into a Major Infrastructure Program (MIP) Funding Agreement under which $15 million for major infrastructure projects was provided by the State over three years with matching funds from the Commonwealth. The co-funding arrangement between the State and TSRA has continued over the years as set out in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between TSRA and the State. On 14 April 2014, a variation to the MOU was signed to expand the trust fund to include not only MIP projects, but also the Seawalls project and Other Projects.

The recipients/ beneficiaries of infrastructure projects developed under the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund are the Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC), Torres Shire Council (TSC) and the Northern Peninsular Area Regional Council (NPARC).

TSRA’s role in the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund is set out in the Memorandum of Understanding between the State and TSRA. TSRA has a fiduciary duty in respect of the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund funds and in the development of Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund projects but not as the owner of any assets under construction or on completion. This is evidenced by the fact that no future economic benefit or returns will flow to TSRA as a result of its involvement with the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund. For financial statement preparation purposes, TSRA does not consolidate the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund funds into its financial statements as TSRA is of the opinion that it does not have control of the Fund.

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund

Finfish trust account

Note 17: Assets Held in Trust

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 215

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014 2015 2014

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Expenses 65,905 64,270 65,905 64,270

Own-source income 18,224 17,222 18,224 17,222

Net cost of outcome delivery 47,681 47,048 47,681 47,048

Outcome 1 is described in Note 1.1.

Total Outcome 1

Note 18: Reporting of Outcomes

216 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Actual

Original1 Variance 2

2015 2015 2015

$’000 $’000 $’000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 16,712 15,545 1,167

Supplier 18,357 21,524 (3,167)

Grants 29,350 24,989 4,361

Depreciation 1,325 900 425

Finance costs 91 150 (59)

Losses from Asset Sales 70 - 70

Total expenses 65,905 63,108 2,797

LESS: Own-Source Income Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services 460 240 220

Interest 1,742 1,462 280

Other revenue 15,774 13,247 2,527

Total own-source revenue 17,976 14,949 3,027

Gains Reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 248 - 248

Total gains 248 - 248

Total own-source income 18,224 14,949 3,275

Net cost of services 47,681 48,159 (478)

Revenue from Government 48,159 48,159 -

Surplus attributable to the Australian Government 478 - 478

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Changes in asset revaluation surplus 978 - 978

Total other comprehensive income 978 - 978

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 1,456 - 1,456

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. The entity's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respest of the reporting period (i.e from the entity's 2014 - 15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)).

2. Between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015. Explanations of major variances are provided futher at Note 19B.

Budget Estimate

for the period ended 30 June 2015

Note 19A: Departmental Budgetary Reports

Note 19: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 217

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Statement of Financial Position

Actual

Original1 Variance 2

2015 2015 2015

$’000 $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 2,790 4,611 (1,821)

Trade and other receivables 7,641 8,055 (414)

Other investments 33,300 22,200 11,100

Total financial assets 43,731 34,866 8,865

Non-financial assets Land and buildings 35,524 43,326 (7,802)

Plant and equipment 1,789 1,955 (166)

Total non-financial assets 37,313 45,281 (7,968)

Total assets 81,044 80,147 897

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 3,263 1,314 1,949

Grants 386 1,828 (1,442)

Other payables 436 4,177 (3,741)

Total payables 4,085 7,319 (3,234)

Provisions Employee provisions 3,147 3,253 (106)

Total provisions 3,147 3,253 (106)

Total liabilities 7,232 10,572 (3,340)

Net assets 73,812 69,575 4,237

EQUITY Contributed equity 32 32 -

Reserves 14,840 13,678 1,162

Retained surplus 58,940 55,865 3,075

Total equity 73,812 69,575 4,237

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. The entity's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period (i.e from the entity's 2014 - 15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)).

2. Between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015. Explanations of major variances are provided futher at Note 19B.

Budget Estimate

as at 30 June 2015

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2015

218 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Statement of Changes in Equity as at 30 June 2015

Actual Actual Actual Actual

Original

1

Variance

2

Original

1

Variance

2

Original

1

Variance

2

Original

1

Variance

2

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

58,462 55,865 2,597 13,862 13,678 184 32 32 - 72,356 69,575 2,781

Adjusted opening balance

58,462 55,865 2,597 13,862 13,678 184 32 32 - 72,356 69,575 2,781

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period

478 - 478 - - - - - - 478 - 478

Other comprehensive income

- - - 978 - 978 - - - 978 - 978

Total comprehensive income

478 - 478 978 - 978 - - - 1,456 - 1,456

Closing Balance attributable to the Australian Government

58,940 55,865 3,075 14,840 13,678 1,162 32 32 - 73,812 69,575 4,237

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 1. The entity's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period (i.e from the entity's 2014 - 15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)).

2. Between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015. Explanations of major variances are provided futher at Note 19B.

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT of CHANGES in EQUITY

Asset revaluation

Contributed

surplus

equity/capital

for the period ended 30 June 2015

Budget Estimate

Retained earnings

Budget Estimate

Budget Estimate

Budget Estimate

Total equity

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 219

Cash Flow Statement

Actual

Original1 Variance 2

2015 2015 2015

$’000 $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from Government 48,159 48,159 -

Sales of goods and rendering of services 15,850 13,487 2,363

Interest 1,673 1,312 361

Net GST received 2,638 - 2,638

Total cash received 68,320 62,958 5,362

Cash used Employees 16,570 15,545 1,025

Suppliers 21,276 21,524 (248)

Loan payments 65 - 65

Grants 31,059 25,139 5,920

Total cash used 68,970 62,208 6,762

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities (650) 750 (1,400)

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Loan receipts 1,270 600 670

Investments 4,094 7,600 (3,506)

Total cash received 5,364 8,200 (2,836)

Cash used Loan payments 724 450 274

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 3,911 10,600 (6,689)

Total cash used 4,635 11,050 (6,415)

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities 729 (2,850) 3,579

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held 79 (2,100) 2,179

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 2,711 6,711 (4,000)

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2,790 4,611 (1,821)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. The entity's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period (i.e from the entity's 2014 - 15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)).

2. Between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015. Explanations of major variances are provided futher at Note 19B.

Budget Estimate

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2015

as at 30 June 2015

220 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015

Explanation of Major Variances An unbudgeted shortfall in superannuation obligations was identified as part of a review of the payroll system.

During the year, the TSRA was funded $1.3M through an Indigenous Advancement Strategy grant from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet in order to purchase the only non-indigenous commercial Beche-de-Mer fishing license existing in the Torres Strait region. The TSRA contributed an additional $200,000 to this initiative. Beche-de-Mer is one of many commercial fisheries in the Torres Strait region. The purchase of the Beche-de-mer license by the TSRA for the benefit of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people of the Torres Strait is part of an ongoing process of securing 100% ownership of all Torres Strait commercial fisheries for the sole benefit of the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people of the region. This funding was not included in the original budget position.

The remaining variance from budget of $4.6M was transferred to grants and paid to various organisations to deliver indigenous employment and training programs in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula communities.

The budget reflects the depreciation funding received as part of the annual budget and is substantially less than actual depreciation expense.

The budget only includes funding agreements that had been signed at the time the budget was prepared. Additional funding was raised after the budget was prepared. Because the TSRA is the leading Commonwealth representative body for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait, they are often approached by other government agencies to deliver programs in the Torres Strait on an adhoc basis throughout the year. In recent years it has become common practice for the TSRA to enter into additional funding agreements with other agencies after the date that the budget is formally finalised.

The TSRA has undertaken a major development for the provision of staff accomodation on Thursday Island. Delays in the preliminary phases of construction, specifically in obtaining various administrative approvals, has reduced the capital outlays expected for FY 2014/15. This explains a larger balance of cash comprised of Cash at bank and Other investments, corresponding to a smaller balance of land and buildings.

The variance in payables arises from timing differences due to normal business activities.

The variance in retained surplus arises as a cumulative result of actual surpluses realised, whilst budgeting for breakeven results in prior years' budgets.

Retained Surplus (Statement of Financial Position)

Payables (Statement of Financial Position)

Depreciation (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

Affected line itmes (and Statement)

Note 19B: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances

Suppliers and Grants (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

Employee benefits (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

Cash and cash equivalents, Other investments and Land and buildings (Statement of Financial Position)

Other revenue (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

SECTION 5 Financial Reports 221

Corporate Team.

Poruma sewage pumping station inspection.

SECTION SIX

Appendices

224 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

APPENDIX 1: ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

FIGURE 6-1: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY STRUCTURE

Program Manager Economic Development and Fisheries

Program Manager Native Title

Program Manager Governance and Leadership

Program Manager Environmental Management

Minister

Torres Strait Regional Authority

Chairperson

Chief Executive Officer

Manager Corporate Services Chief Financial

Officer

Program Manager Healthy and Safe Communities Culture, Art and

Heritage

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 2: Advertising and Market Research 225

APPENDIX 2: ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH

The TSRA advertises all ongoing vacancies and non-ongoing vacancies which exceed 12 months duration using the Online Australian Public Service Jobs and SEEK websites, as well as other selected national advertising. The TSRA uses the Australian Government’s preferred supplier AdCorp Australia Ltd National to advertise tenders and recruitment notices.

The TSRA also uses Far North Queensland region-based print media for advertising job vacancies, publishing media releases and tenders and for distributing the TSRA community newsletters, in line with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

The TSRA did not conduct any advertising campaigns or make payments to market research, polling, direct mail or media advertising organisations in 2014 - 2015.

226 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

APPENDIX 3: DETAILS OF GRANTS

TABLE 6-1: DETAILS OF GRANTS

GRANT RECIPIENT PURPOSE

AMOUNT $

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Torres Strait Scientific Advisory Committee projects

216,302

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Managing traditional inhabitant representation at Protected Zone Joint

Authority forums

690,530

Australian Maritime Safety Authority School-based maritime safety education project 55,720

Australian Maritime Safety Authority Torres Strait Marine Pathways Project 1,450,000

Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh TSI Corporation Operational funding 50,000

Badu Island Foundation Ltd Aibai Sagulau Buai dance team - preservation of cultural practices and values 10,000

Deep Sea Dancers Support for dance performance 5,000

Denis Allan Newie Purchase of material and equipment for the

Arpaka dance team

8,500

Department of Transport and Main Roads (Queensland Government) Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme

500,000

Enterprise Management Group Pty Ltd Community Development Employment Project wages 2,870,308

Enterprise Management Group Pty Ltd Economic and community development projects 4,600,000

Erub Erwer Meta (TSI) Corporation Alcaston Gallery visit by exhibiting artist and support staff 10,500

Erub Erwer Meta (TSI) Corporation Promote arts centre 20,000

Erub Ewer Meta (TSI) Corporation Participation in exhibitions and art fairs 25,000

Erub Ewer Meta (TSI) Corporation Saam Karem Ira Kodo Mer Dance Team attendance at Cairns Indigenous arts fair 50,000

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 3: Details of Grants 227

TABLE 6-1: DETAILS OF GRANTS

GRANT RECIPIENT PURPOSE

AMOUNT $

Erub Ewer Meta (TSI) Corporation Operational funding 50,000

Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (TSI) Corporation RNTBC Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 6,000

Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (TSI) Corporation RNTBC Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 5,000

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Develop finfish action plan 68,500

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Torres Strait fisheries development projects 700,000

Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 100,000

Kaziw Asesered Le Association Inc St Pauls community raft race 4,800

Leo Morris Sam Dance equipment and materials 2,000

Malau Ki’ai (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Cultural celebrations on Boigu 12,000

Mer Gedkem Le (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Purchase jewellery-making materials 8,234

Mer Gedkem Le (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 67,000

Mer Gedkem Le (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 69,400

MM Loban and KM martin Capture and produce images of island life 9,330

Mualgal (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate

Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 10,500

Mura Badulgal (TSI) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 7,500

Mura Badulgal (TSI) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 7,700

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Patrick Mau create and showcase music and dance performance 13,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Dayne Noah - ilan life documentaries 15,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Ettie Mosby - Produce a CD 16,520

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Ailan Creation - ripple effect programme 17,000

228 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE 6-1: DETAILS OF GRANTS

GRANT RECIPIENT PURPOSE

AMOUNT $

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Sally Lawrence - Place Blo Mepla Project 22,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Patrick Mau CD promotional tour 25,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc NGO support funding 150,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc Operational support 437,000

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Operational support Moa Arts Centre 50,000

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Operational funding 50,000

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council Lifeguard training 21,590

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council Participation in 21st Laura dance festival 25,000

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council Deliver music and song writing training and mentoring

25,000

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council Multi-purpose circuit master plan development

42,000

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council Events coordinator 300,000

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart School Cultural tour to Brisbane 16,000

Port Kennedy Association Recording of contemporary secular songs 25,000

Port Kennedy Association Regional hub workshop 65,000

Port Kennedy Association Community after school care programme 95,000

Port Kennedy Association Community after school care programme 135,000

Port Kennedy Association Non-Government Organisation support funding 150,000

Port Kennedy Association Operational support 171,500

Port Kennedy Association Operational support 450,000

Saibai Mura Buway (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 8,750

Saltwater Blue Consultancy Services Repatriate Mabuiag myths and legends 10,000

Torres Shire Council Purchase High Frequency (HF) radios 16,000

Torres Shire Council Waste Solutions Project 130,000

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 3: Details of Grants 229

TABLE 6-1: DETAILS OF GRANTS

GRANT RECIPIENT PURPOSE

AMOUNT $

Torres Shire Council Events coordinator 300,000

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Strait smile (Dental health programme) 6,848

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Water-related infrastructure management support 1,700,000

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Expansion of in-house water testing on Badu and Iama Islands 100,000

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Purchase High Frequency (HF) radios 105,000

Torres Strait Islanders Media Association Inc

Media festival 5,000

Torres Strait Islanders Media Association Inc

Repairs to Gaffney House roof 70,000

Torres Strait Islanders Media Association Inc

Operational support funding 780,000

Torres Strait Islanders Regional Education Council Incorporated ‘Ensuring a straight start’ project 169,365

Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc Board strategic planning workshop 22,900

Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc New student transfer bus 51,200

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Seawalls 3,500,000

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Major Infrastructure Programme 7,071,989

Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association Inc Non-Government Organisation review work plan implementation

300,000

Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association Inc Operational recurrent and sporting subsidies

975,000

Ugar Ged Kem Le Zeuber Er Kep Le (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate

Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 10,700

Warraberalgal (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation Registered Native Title Body Corporate

Prescribed Body Corporates support funding 10,500

Total 29,349,686

(Total from audited Financial Statements - detail unaudited)

230 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

APPENDIX 4: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS

TABLE 6-2: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS

NAME

AMOUNT $ PURPOSE

SELECTION PROCESS JUSTIFICATION CODE

Andrew Mitchell 19,000 Image management

system

Direct sourcing B

Arenelle Pty Ltd 48,117 Programme and

planning support and mentoring

Direct sourcing C

Brendan Corrigan 17,611 Anthropological

services

Direct sourcing B

Contact First Business Solutions Pty Ltd

17,733 Business support services Open tender B

Curiousmindsco 10,080 Facilitation and

planning workshop Direct sourcing B

David Fell Environmental Pty Ltd

75,500 Biodiversity surveys Direct sourcing B

Davidson Workplace Solutions Pty Ltd

8,554 Enterprise agreement support Direct sourcing B

Deltapoint Consulting

40,988 Human resources support Direct sourcing B

Diana Abiad 24,284 Arts skills workshops Direct sourcing B

Dianne Chambers 20,944 Technical research and policy drafting Direct sourcing B

Effective Governance

20,787 Governance Professional Development Programme PGPA Act 2014

Direct sourcing B

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 4: Details of Consultants 231

TABLE 6-2: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS

NAME

AMOUNT $ PURPOSE

SELECTION PROCESS JUSTIFICATION CODE

Effective Governance

47,510 Facilitate effective traditional representation at fisheries forums workshops

Direct sourcing B

Emamulda Consulting Services 147,138 Anthropological services

Direct sourcing B

Environmental Systems Solutions

156,600 Traditional Ecological Knowledge System Open tender B

Fieldworx 29,335 Facilitation of

Language Centre Development Plan workshop

Direct sourcing B

Indigenous Business Australia

34,700 Into Business Workshops

Direct sourcing B

James Cook University

34,037 Survey of aquatic habitats Direct sourcing B

James Cook University

80,000 Torres Strait seagrass research and monitoring

Direct sourcing B

James Cook University

7,576 Invasive species Direct sourcing B

Kapish Services Pty Ltd

7,438 Software upgrade Open tender B

Kleinhardt Pty Ltd 9,435 Business loan support

and mentoring

Open tender B

KPMG Australia 24,947 Non-government

organisations work plans

Open tender B

Leading Practice Multi-Disciplinary Service

43,608 Framework for the delegation of environmental compliance powers to TSRA staff

Select tender C

Lewis Troutman 29,721 Structural review Select tender C

Miromaa Aboriginal Language and Technology Centre

41,818 Facilitate Torres Strait Language symposium Direct sourcing B

232 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE 6-2: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS

NAME

AMOUNT $ PURPOSE

SELECTION PROCESS JUSTIFICATION CODE

MLSC Corporate Pty Ltd

44,506 Board mid-term performance review Open tender C

NRM Locums Pty Ltd

18,000 Development of Torres Strait regional biosecurity strategy

Direct sourcing C

O’Neil Pollock and Associates

15,136 Economic Development summit facilitation

Select tender B

Pegasus Studios 40,000 Music and Dance Audit Direct sourcing B

Qld Regional NRM Groups Collective

9,500 Developing the monitoring and evaluation criteria for the Torres Strait Adaptation and Resilience Plan

Direct sourcing C

Reef and Rainforest Research Centre 150,698 Communication support

Direct sourcing B

Rohan Hamden and Associates 48,227 Adaptability and resilience workshops

Direct sourcing B

Sam Taylor 171,096 ITC support Direct sourcing B

Savvy Events - Melissa Robertson

26,814 Arts Centre mentoring Direct sourcing B

SC Lennon and Associates Pty Ltd

179,809 Community Economic Initiatives Support review

Open tender C

Tagai State College 100,000 Horticulture in schools project Direct sourcing B

Tagai State College 47,273 Indigenous Language Centre Direct sourcing B

TerraForm Design Pty Ltd

30,000 Land and Sea Management strategy Select tender C

Tracker Development

108,611 Develop Gab Titui Cultural Centre marketing plan

Select tender C

Tuna Blue Pty Ltd 6,400 Dugong and turtle

review

Select tender C

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 4: Details of Consultants 233

TABLE 6-2: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS

NAME

AMOUNT $ PURPOSE

SELECTION PROCESS JUSTIFICATION CODE

University of Queensland

8,000 Turtle dispatching device Direct sourcing B

University of Wollongong

11,818 Fisheries management framework Select tender C

Zakazukha Marketing Communications

86,382 Media support services Open tender B

Total Consultants 2,099,731

Justification Code:

A: Skills currently unavailable within TSRA

B: Need for specialised or professional skills

C: Need for independent research or assessment

Note:

All consultants engaged under section 144T of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) were engaged using the standard terms and conditions for the engagement of consultants by the TSRA as set out in the instrument referred to in subsection 144T(3). There were no significant differences between the terms and conditions on which that consultant was engaged.

(Total from audited Financial Statements - detail unaudited)

Masig school garden.

234 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

APPENDIX 5: COMPLIANCE WITH AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT STATUTES AND POLICIES

Under the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Schedule 1, Clause 12, the TSRA is required to provide particulars of:

— directions issued by the responsible Minister, or other Minister, under the enabling legislation of the TSRA or other legislation

— general policies of the Australian Government that were notified to the TSRA before 1 July 2008 under section 28 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Company Act 1997 and which continue to apply to the TSRA

— government policy orders that apply to the TSRA

under section 22 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

TABLE 6-3: COMPLIANCE WITH AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT STATUTES AND POLICY

DIRECTION AND GOVERNMENT POLICY COMPLIANCE

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), including the Indigenous Affairs legislation Amendments Bills numbers 1 and 2 of 2011 Compliant

Advertising and market research Compliant

Australian Competitive Grants Register (ACGR) Not applicable

Competitive neutrality (CN) Compliant

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 Compliant

Disability reporting mechanisms Compliant

Energy Efficiency in Government Operations Compliant

Fraud Policy Compliant

Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) Compliant

Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) Compliant

Protective Security Policy Framework Compliant

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth), including Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (Cth) Compliant

Senate Continuing Order no.6, as varied by the Senate on 3 December 1998 Compliant

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 6: Explanation of Programme Budget Variance 235

APPENDIX 6: EXPLANATION OF PROGRAMME BUDGET VARIANCE

This appendix references the appropriation programme expenditure 2014 - 2015 Table 2-12 on page 27 and provides additional information on the reason for the variances for each programme area’s expenditure as compared to budget allocations.

During 2014 - 2015, the TSRA operated under a programme structure which was focused on the delivery of outcomes and realisation of measurable benefits against the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029 and the Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018.

The 2014 - 2015 actual programme spend from appropriation totalled $55.238 million compared to a budget allocation of $55.537 million, resulting in a variance of $0.299 million or 0.54 per cent.

In the main, the variances can be attributed to changes in project phasing between financial years or under-expenditure in the grants projects due to the number of applications which are approved following the assessment process. The notes to Table 6-4 provide reasons for variances greater than two per cent between budget and actual.

The following programmes recorded variances between budget and actual.

TABLE 6-4: PROGRAMME BUDGET VARIANCE, 2014 - 2015 (UNAUDITED)

APPROPRIATION PROGRAMME VARIANCE BETWEEN BUDGET AND ACTUAL, 2014 - 2015

PROGRAMME VARIANCE $,000 VARIANCE (%)

Culture, Art and Heritage(1) 131 2.83

Economic Development 49 0.37

Environmental Management(2) (120) (2.62)

Fisheries (4) (0.09)

Governance and Leadership 76 1.40

Healthy Communities 87 0.59

Native Title (32) (0.85)

Safe Communities(3) 112 2.50

(1) M inor variation (2.83 per cent) due to number and value of grant funding applications approved.

(2) M inor variation (2.62 per cent) due to phasing of activities from 2014 - 2015 to 2015 - 2016.

(3) M inor variation (2.50 per cent) due to number and value of grant funding applications approved.

SECTION 6 Appendices Appendix 6: Explanation of Programme Budget Variance 237 236 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015 Economic Development Summit participants.

Masig Beach.

SECTION SEVEN

Compliance Index

240 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

COMMONWEALTH ENTITY

This Annual Report is prepared in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) (PGPA Act).

As a Commonwealth entity, the TSRA is also required to prepare an Annual Report in accordance with:

— requirements as set out in the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, with variations as set out in section 7AB of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Rule 2014

— requirements of other legislation, namely the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Cth), the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth), the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) and the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth).

Table 7-1 details the reporting requirements and provides the location of the relevant information within this Annual Report.

Any enquiries relating to this compliance Index can be directed to the TSRA by phone on (07) 4069 0700 or (toll free) 1800 079 093, or by email to info@tsra.gov.au.

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) - Section 144ZB

(2) C ertain matters must be included in the annual report. The TSRA must include in each annual report details of:

— Any directions given by the Minister under section 142E Page 134

— Any consultants engaged under section 144T Page 230 - 233

(3) R eport must include details of grants. If a grant was made by the TSRA during a period to an individual or body, the annual report for that period must set out:

— The name of the individual or body Page 226 - 229

— The amount and purpose of the grant Page 226 - 229

(4) R eport must not disclose sacred matters.

— The TSRA must not disclose in any annual report any matters known by the TSRA to be held sacred by Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons Page 171

SECTION 7 Compliance Index Commonwealth Entity 241

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

(5) R eport must include certain details about consultants.

— If an annual report gives details of a consultant engaged under section 144T, the report must set out any significant differences between the terms and conditions on which that consultant was engaged and the standard terms and conditions for the engagement of consultants by the TSRA as set out in the instrument referred to in subsection 144T(3)

Page 233

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011

(6) A pproval by directors

— The Annual Report of Operations must be approved by a resolution of directors of a Commonwealth authority. If the Commonwealth authority has only one director, the report of operations must be approved by that director.

Page xxi

— The Annual Report of Operations must be signed by a director and include details of how and when approval was given. The Annual Report of Operations must also state that directors are responsible for the preparation and contents of the Annual Report of Operations (in accordance with section 46 of the PGPA Act and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015).

Page xxi

(7) Exemptions

— The Finance Minister may grant a written exemption to the directors of a Commonwealth authority, or a class of Commonwealth authorities, from any requirement of these orders. An exemption must be in writing and may be subject to conditions.

Page 170

— Details of an exemption relied upon by the Commonwealth authority must be provided in the Annual Report of Operations. Page 170

(8) P arliamentary standards of presentation

— The annual report of a Commonwealth authority is tabled in Parliament by the responsible Minister under section 46 of the PGPA Act. Once tabled in Parliament, the annual report becomes part of the Parliamentary Papers series and as such, the report must comply with the presentation and printing standards for documents presented to the Parliament.

Compliant

242 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

(9) P lain English and clear design

— The Annual Report of Operations must be constructed having regard to the interests of the Parliament and other users. Information included in the report must be relevant, reliable, concise, understandable and balanced. For example, to the extent practicable:

a. u se clear design, including through headings and adequate spacing; Compliant

b. de fine acronyms and technical terms (such as through a glossary); Page 252 - 253

c. u se tables, graphs, diagrams and charts; and Section 8,

Tables and Figures, Page 248 - 251

d. i nclude any additional matters that may be appropriate. Section 2

(10) E nabling legislation

— The Annual Report of Operations must also specify the Commonwealth authority’s enabling legislation, including a summary of its objectives and functions, as specified in its legislation.

Page 132

(11) R esponsible Minister

— The Annual Report of Operations must specify the name of the current responsible Minister and the names of any other responsible Ministers during the relevant financial year being reported on.

Page 134

(12) M inisterial directions and other statutory requirements

— The Annual Report of Operations must provide details of:

a. d irections issued by the responsible Minister, or other Minister, under the enabling legislation of the Commonwealth authority or other legislation; and

Page 134

b. g eneral policies of the Australian Government that were notified to the Commonwealth authority before 1 July 2008 under section 28 of the CAC Act (as in force before 1 July 2008) and which continue to apply to the Commonwealth authority; and

Page 234

c. G overnment Policy Orders that apply to the Commonwealth authority under section 22 of the PGPA Act. Nil

— Where a direction or applicable policy has not been fully complied with, the report must include an explanation of the non-compliance. Nil

SECTION 7 Compliance Index Commonwealth Entity 243

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

(13) I nformation about directors

— The Annual Report of Operations must include information on the directors of the Commonwealth authority. This information includes directors’ names, qualifications, experience, attendance of board meetings and whether the director is an executive or non-e xecutive director.

Page 139 - 159

(14) O utline of organisational structure and statement on governance

— The Annual Report of Operations must provide an outline of:

a. t he organisational structure of the Commonwealth authority (including subsidiaries); and Page 224

b. t he location, in Australia or elsewhere, of major activities and facilities. Page 120

— The Annual Report of Operations can assist a Commonwealth authority to demonstrate that its governance is sound. Consequently, the Annual Report of Operations must include information on the main corporate governance practices that the Commonwealth authority used during the financial year. For example, details should be provided on:

a. b oard committees of the authority and their main responsibilities; and Page 154 - 159

b. e ducation and performance review processes for directors; and Page 153

c. e thics and risk management policies. Page 153 and 164

(15) R elated Entity Transactions

— The Annual Report of Operations must disclose the decision-making process undertaken by the board of the authority when:

a. i t approves for the authority to pay for a good or service from another entity, or provide a grant to another entity; and Page 207 The approval of

payments for goods and services and provision of grants is delegated to the Chief Executive Officer

b. a d irector of the authority is also a director of the other entity that provides the good or service or receives the grant; and

c. t he value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate value of those transactions, exceeds $10,000 (GST inclusive).

— If decision-making processes relate to multiple transactions to a single entity, with an aggregate value of more than $10,000 (GST inclusive), then a single report can be provided that explains the number of transactions and the aggregate of expenditure. The aim is to improve transparency around potential conflicts of interests in the operations of Commonwealth authorities.

244 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

(16) K ey activities and changes affecting the authority

— Highlighting key activities and changes that have affected the Commonwealth authority can assist the reader to understand the authority’s performance over the past financial year. Consequently, the annual report must detail any key activities and changes that affected the operations or structure of the authority during the financial year. This may include:

a. s ignificant decisions or issues as referred to in paragraphs 19(1)(c), (d) or (e) of the PGPA Act; and Nil

b. ope rational and financial results of the authority; and Section 5

c. k ey changes to the authority’s state of affairs or principal activities; and Page vii - xv

d. a mendments to the authority’s enabling legislation and to any other legislation directly relevant to its operation. Nil

(17) J udicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies

— As entities of the Australian Government, Commonwealth authorities are expected to have levels of accountability suitable for the public sector. Part of demonstrating these qualities involves reporting on judicial decisions and reports by third parties. As such, the Annual Report of Operations must include particulars of:

a. j udicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals that have had, or may have, a significant effect on the operations of the Commonwealth authority; and

Nil

b. r eports about the authority made by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

Nil

(18) O btaining information from subsidiaries

— Where directors of a Commonwealth authority are unable to obtain information from a subsidiary that is required to be included in the Annual Report of Operations before the annual report is submitted under section 46 of the PGPA Act, the directors must include an explanation on the missing information and how this affects the annual report.

No Subsidiaries

(19) I ndemnities and insurance premiums for officers

— The Annual Report of Operations must include details of any indemnity given to an officer against a liability, including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the officer’s liability for legal costs.

Page 166

(20) Di sclosure requirements for Government Business Enterprises Not Applicable

SECTION 7 Compliance Index Commonwealth Entity 245

TABLE 7-1: TSRA COMPLIANCE INDEX

GUIDING LEGISLATION REQUIREMENT

PAGE REFERENCE

(21) I ndex of annual report requirements

— To assist readers to locate the information required by the PGPA Act or other applicable legislation, the Annual Report of Operations must provide an index of annual report requirements, identifying where relevant information can be found in the annual report.

Page 240 - 245

Other Legislation

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Cth)

— Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Cth) requires certain annual reporting in relation to amounts paid by or on behalf of a Commonwealth authority during the financial year to advertising agencies; market research organisations; polling organisations; direct mail organisations and media advertising organisations.

Nil

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth)

— Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) requires Commonwealth authorities to include a report on environmental matters in their annual reports. Details of what is required can be found at http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/about/reports.html#annualcwth

Page 161

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth)

— The annual reports of Commonwealth authorities must include information set out in sub-item 4(2) of Schedule 2 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth)

Page 167

Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth)

— Section 93 requires agencies, including the TSRA, to provide information and statistics to the Australian Information Commissioner. Further details about these requirements can be obtained from the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner’s website at www.oaic.gov.au

Page 170

Saibai cemetery erosion protection works.

SECTION EIGHT

Tables and Figures Abbreviations Subject Index

248 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLES AND FIGURES

Tables

TABLE TABLE TITLE PAGE

Table 2-1 Number and Value of Concessional Business Loans, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 20

Table 2-2 Into Business Workshop Participation, 2013 - 2014 to 2014 - 2015 20

Table 2-3 Tropical Rock Lobster Catch Statistics, 2010 to 2013 21

Table 2-4 Finfish Fisheries Catch Statistics for Traditional Inhabitant Boat Licensees, 2011 - 2012 to 2013 - 2014 21

Table 2-5 Active artists and cultural practitioners, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 22

Table  2-6 Key Native Title Representative Body Results, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 23

Table 2-7 Number of Indigenous Land Use Agreements Finalised, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 23

Table 2-8 Community-Based Management Plans, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 24

Table 2-9 Number of High Level Engagements by TSRA Board Members, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 24

Table 2-10 Prescribed Bodies Corporate Compliance Results, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 25

Table 2-11 Measures of Investment (by Project Numbers) for Regional Environmental Health Infrastructure, 2011 - 2012 to 2014 - 2015 26

Table 2-12 Appropriation Programme Expenditure 2014 - 2015: Budget Compared to Actual (unaudited) 27

Table 2-13 External Funding Programme Expenditure 2014 -2015, Budget Compared to Actual (unaudited) 27

Table 2-14 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme Appropriation Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 31

Table 2-15 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme External Funding Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 31

Table 2-16 Economic Development Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 41

Table 2-17 Fisheries Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 49

SECTION 8 Tables and Figures 249

TABLE TABLE TITLE PAGE

Table 2-18 Environmental Management Programme Appropriation Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 61

Table 2-19 Environmental Management Programme External Funding Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 61

Table 2-20 Governance and Leadership Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 71

Table 2-21 Native Title Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 81

Table 2-22 Native Title Representative Body Performance Statistics 89

Table 2-23 Native Title Representative Body Financial Performance, 2014 - 2015 94

Table 2-24 Equal Employment Opportunity Groups, Native Title Office, 2014 - 2015 95

Table 2-25 Consultants Engaged by the Native Title Office, 2014 - 2015 96

Table 2-26 Healthy Communities Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 99

Participants in the TSRA’s inaugural Women’s Leadership Programme present to the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion.

250 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

TABLE TABLE TITLE PAGE

Table 2-27 Safe Communities Programme Expenditure, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 109

Table 3-1 Summary of Community Service Issues by COAG Building Block 123

Table 3-2 Total Population of the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 126

Table 3-3 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Population of the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 126

Table 3-4 Gender Balance of the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 127

Table 3-5 Average age of Population of the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 127

Table 3-6 Employment in the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 128

Table 3-7 Education in the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 129

Table 3-8 Median wealth in the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 129

Table 3-9 Tenure of private dwellings in the Torres Strait, including Bamaga and Seisia 130

Table 4-1 Board Meetings and Apologies 151

Table 4-2 Board Meeting Attendance 152

Table 4-3 Membership of the 2014 - 2015 Executive Committee 154

Table 4-4 Executive Committee Meeting Dates and Apologies 156

Table 4-5 Executive Committee Meeting Attendance 156

Table 4-6 Membership of the Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee 157

Table 4-7 Audit Committee Members 158

Table 4-8 Audit Committee Meeting Dates and Apologies 159

Table 4-9 Attendance at Audit Committee Meetings 159

Table 4-10 Compliance with the EPBC Act, section 516A (Environmental Reporting) 162

Table 4-11 Staff Profile at 30 June 2015, by APS Level 169

Table 4-12 Staff Profile at 30 June 2015, by EEO Group 169

Table 6-1 Details of Grants 226

Table 6-2 Details of Consultants 230

Table 6-3 Compliance with Australian Government Statutes and Policies 234

Table 6-4 Programme Budget Variance, 2014 - 2015 (unaudited) 235

Table 7-1 TSRA Compliance Index 240

SECTION 8 Tables and Figures 251

Figures

FIGURE FIGURE TITLE PAGE

Figure P-1 Map of the Torres Strait Region v

Figure 2-1 Torres Strait Regional Authority Integrated Planning Framework 18

Figure 2-2 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme Map 36

Figure 2-3 Economic Development Programme Map 44

Figure 2-4 Fisheries Programme Map 54

Figure 2-5 Torres Strait Bêche-de-Mer Fishery 57

Figure 2-6 Environmental Management Programme Map 66

Figure 2-7 Governance and Leadership Programme Map 76

Figure 2-8 Native Title Programme Map 86

Figure 2-9 Healthy Communities Programme Map 104

Figure 2-10 Safe Communities Programme Map 114

Figure 3-1 The Torres Strait 120

Figure 3-2 Progress of Service Delivery against the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsular Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029 124

Figure 3-3 Progress Towards Closing the Gap by COAG Building Block, at 30 June 2015 125

Figure 4-1 TSRA Governance Framework 138

Figure 4-2 TSRA Risk Management Process 164

Figure  6-1 TSRA Structure 224

252 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

ABBREVIATIONS

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

AGD Attorney General’s Department

AIATSIS Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

APS Australian Public Service

ATSI Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

CAC Act Commonwealth Authorities and Corporations Act 1997

CAH Culture, Art and Heritage

CDEP Community Development Employment Projects

CDP Community Development Programme

CEIS Community Economic Initiatives Scheme

COAG Council of Australian Governments

Cth Commonwealth

DOGIT Deed(s) of Grant In Trust

EEO equal employment opportunity

EPBC Act Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

EPIRB emergency position-indicating radio beacon

ESD ecologically sustainable development

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

GBK Gur A Baradharaw Kod Sea and Land Council

GTCC Gab Titui Cultural Centre

HF high frequency

IAS Indigenous Advancement Strategy

IBA Indigenous Business Australia

ICT information and communications technology

ILUA Indigenous Land Use Agreement

IPA Indigenous Protected Area

IPS Information Publication Scheme

ISD Integrated Service Delivery

SECTION 8 Abbreviations 253

KPI Key Performance Indicator

MIP Major Infrastructure Programme

MOA memorandum of agreement

NAIDOC National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee

NGO non-government organisation

NPARC Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council

NTO Native Title Office

NTRB Native Title Representative Body

ORIC Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations

PBC Prescribed Body Corporate

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PSC Programme Steering Committee

PZJA Protected Zone Joint Authority

RJCP Remote Jobs and Communities Programme

RNTBC Registered Native Title Body Corporate

TI Thursday Island

TIB Traditional Inhabitant Boat

TIDS Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme

TRAIL Training Rural Australians in Leadership

TRAWQ Tamwoy, Rosehill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine

TSC Torres Shire Council

TSCMC Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee

TSIMA Torres Strait Islanders Media Association

TSIRC Torres Strait Island Regional Council

TSIREC Torres Strait Islanders’ Regional Education Council

TSMPP Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project

TSMSP Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme

TSI Torres Strait Islander

TSRA Torres Strait Regional Authority

TSWLP Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Programme

TSYLP Torres Strait Young Leaders Programme

TSYRSA Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association

TVH Transferable Vessel Holder

SECTION 8 Index 255 254 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Finfish action plan consultations, Iama.

256 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

INDEX

A

Abednego, John, 150 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 and disclose of sacred matters, 171 and Torres Strait Development Plan, 17, 132

and TSRA, 132, 133, 134 advisory committees, 158 Board, 139, 151 ministerial appointments, 135 ministerial directions, 134 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission

Act 1989, 132 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Queensland), 110, 113 Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (Land

Holding) Act 1985 (Qld), 90 accountability, 166 adaptation planning and implementation, 62 AdCorp Australia Ltd National, 225 advertising and market research, 225 Ah Mat, Richard, 7 Ailan Kastom, 34, 70, 108, 120-21 Ailan Kreation, 112 air travel costs, xv Alternate Deputy Chairperson, 132 alternative energy project, xiii, 62 Aniba, Chelsea, 149 appropriation programme expenditure see

programme expenditure artists 6, 22, 32, 33, 35 arts development programme, 32 Arts Law Centre of Queensland, 22, 35 Assistance with Tertiary Education Scheme, 72 Associations Incorporation Act 1981 (Qld), 113 Assure Programs see Ingeus Australia Pty Ltd

(trading as Assure Programs) Attorney-General’s Department, 110 Indigenous Legal Assistance Programme, 113 Audit Committee, 158-59

and audit recommendation tracking and status reports, 72 and internal audit, 166 meetings, 72, 159

members, 158 review by MLCS Corporate, 4 Auditor-General and external audit, 166 Aurora Foundation

and TSRA, 25 Aurora Project and legal internships, 95 Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Health Survey, 130 Australian Bureau of Statistics and regional statistics, 126 Australian Communications and Media

Authority, 161 Australian Customs and Border Protection Service, 4 Australian Electoral Commission, 139 Australian Fisheries Management Authority

and fisheries data, xv and representation at PZJA forums, 51 Australian Government Indigenous Advancement Strategy, 153 Australian Government statutes and policies

compliance with, 234 Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) study of gender imbalance on elected

bodies, vii and TSRA, 25 Australian Maritime College, 46 and Torres Strait Maritime Pathways

Project, viii-ix

Australian Maritime Safety Authority and Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme, 113 and Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project, viii-ix Australian Public Service Commission

on-line induction programme, 167 State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin, 170 Australian Public Service Diversity Awards, 12 Australian Public Service Values, 168

SECTION 8 Index 257

Australian Rural Leadership Foundation, 11, 74 and Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Programme, vii, 74

Australian Rural Leadership Programme, 11, 72, 74 Australian Workplace Agreements, 95

B

Badu community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 Badu Island biodiversity surveys of, 62

Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 infrastructure upgrades, 111 Badulgal People and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B, 5 Bamaga

community consultation and engagement, 72 bêche-de-mer fishery map, 56-57

ownership, 6, 24 case study, 58

Bedford, Kenny, 11, 143 biodiversity conservation Indigenous Protected Areas and, 68 biodiversity management and planning, 62 ‘Bipotaim: Torres Strait Islander culture before

settlement’ exhibition, 33 Board, 132 appointments, 139 ethics, 153

functions, 139 and Indigenous Advisory Council, 7 meetings, 72, 151-52 review by MLCS Corporate, 4 support, 72 Board Charter, viii, 4, 153 Board members, 139

executive coaching, 153 high-level engagement, 24 induction, 153 profiles, 140-50 training and education, 153 Board Members Code of Conduct, 153 Board Strategic Workshop, 4-5, 72, 153 boating safety, 113 Boigu community

and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 and healthy communities workshops, 102 and Strait Smile programme, 100

Boigu Island, 4 and adaptation planning and implementation, 62 seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100 tidal gauge, 26 Building Community Adaptive Capacity and

Resilience, 157 bullying and harassment, 168 Bureau of Meteorology, 64 business funding support (loans), 42 business loans, 20 Business Mentoring Support, 20, 42 business training, 20

C

Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, 32 Caring for Country programme, vii, 11 Centrelink, x Chairperson, 132, 139, 151

executive assistance for, 72 Chairperson’s message, 4-7 Charter of Representation, Performance and Accountability, 153 Chief Executive Officer, 132 Chief Executive Officer’s message, 9-13 Climate Change Strategy, 64 Closing the Gap in Indigenous Disadvantage, 121

COAG Building Blocks, xi, 122-23, 125 COAG targets, 121-22, 126 Colbeck, Senator the Hon Richard, 7 Comcare, 167 Comcover, 166 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, vii, 4, 72, 153, 234 Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders, 234 exemption from, 170 Commonwealth Disability Strategy, 170 Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework, 166 Commonwealth Procurement Rules, 225 communication services, 13 community capacity building grants, 111 community consultations, x, 4, 72 Community Development Employment Projects participants and Centrelink, x and Income Support Payments, 42 Community Development Programme, 3 and My Pathway, 107 and Remote Jobs and Communities

Programme, 42

258 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Community Economic Initiatives Scheme, ix review of, 42 community engagement, ix-x, 4, 72 Community Enterprises Initiative Scheme, 10 community events

TSRA-funded, 113 community gardens, 64, 101 community health projects, 100 community horticulture projects grants, 101 Community Legal Education Officer, 110 community safety partnerships, 110 community safety projects grants, 110 community-driven cultural heritage projects, 35 compliance officer, vii compliance report, 166 compliance with Australian Government statutes

and policies, 234 conflicts of interests, 166 consultancies Native Title Office, 96 consultants, 230-33 copyright, 22, 35 corporate governance and accountability, 137-71 Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander)

Act 2006, 90, 92 Council of Australian Governments (COAG) and Closing the Gap in Indigenous Disadvantage, xi, 121-23, 125, 126 cultural maintenance, 6

case study, 38 Cultural Maintenance Exhibition, 38 cultural maintenance programme, 32 cultural orientation sessions, 32 Cultural Policy, 32 cultural practitioners, 22, 35 Cultural Protocols Guide, 12, 32 culture, art and heritage grants, 32 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 30-38

additional programme specific performance indicators, 34-35 and copyright and intellectual property rights, 22 external funding expenditure, 31 programme deliverables, 30 programme expenditure, 27, 31

programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 30 programme map, 36-37 programme objectives, 30 programme performance, 32-33 regional goal, 30 Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes, 31

D

dance strategy, 32 Darwin Festival, 32 Dauan Island, 4 de Mamiel, Chris, 135 decision-making

engagement of elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders in, 24 Deeds of Grant in Trust (DOGIT), xiv transfer, 82, 84 Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 4, 7 Department of Immigration and Border

Protection, 4 Department of Social Security, 170 Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 25 Deputy Chairperson, 132 Development Plan see Torres Strait Development

Plan 2014 - 2018 Directors indemnities and insurance premiums for, 166 Directors’ Interests Policy, 166 disability reporting in Annual Reports

changes to, 170 disaster management, 110 disclosure of sacred matters, 171 dugong management, vii, 24, 63

E

early intervention and injury management strategy, 168 ecologically sustainable development, 161-63 economic development forums, 10-11 Economic Development Investment Strategy, 42 Economic Development Programme, 40-47

additional programme specific performance indicator, 43 and employment opportunities, 3 programme deliverables, 40 programme expenditure, 27, 41

programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 40 programme map, 44-45 programme objectives, 40 programme performance, 42-43 regional goal, 40 and subsidised home loans, 11 Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes, 41 economic development strategy, 10

SECTION 8 Index 259

economic development summits, 5 Ecotourism Australia, 5 education statistics, 128-29

Effective Governance, viii, 5 elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders engagement in policy development and

decision-making, 24 Elu, Joseph, 140 and bêche-de-mer fishery licence, 58 and Mabo lecture, 83

see also Chairperson emergency position-indicating radio beacons, 113 Employee Assistance Programme, 167 employment, viii-ix, x, 3, 43

opportunities, 12 statistics, 128 from training to, 46-47 enabling functions, 161-71 Endeavour Strait, 120 Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 enterprise agreement see TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2011 - 2014 Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 161 environmental education officer project, 62 environmental health infrastructure, 26 environmental impacts of operations, 163 Environmental Management Committee, 7 Environmental Management Programme, 60-68 additional programme specific performance

indicators, 64 and ecologically sustainable development, 162 and ‘Junior Ranger’ project, 3 programme deliverables, 60 programme expenditure, 27, 61

programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 60 programme map, 66-67 programme objectives, 60 programme performance, 62-63 regional goal, 60 and sustainable horticulture project, x Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes, 61 environmental reporting, 161-63 Ephraim Bani Gallery, 38 Equal Employment Opportunity groups, 95 Ergon Energy

and alternative energy project, 62 and renewable energy, 64, 162

Erub community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 and healthy communities workshops, 102 and Strait Smile programme, 100

‘Evolution: Torres Strait Masks’ exhibition, 32, 38 Executive Committee, 154-56 meetings, 72, 156 members, 154

objectives, 154 review by MLCS Corporate, 4 external audit, 72, 166 external scrutiny, 166

F

Federal Court of Australia and Mer native title compensation, 82 and PBCs, 90, 92 and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Parts A

and B, 5, 82

Fell, Keith, 146 financial outlook, 13 financial reports, 173-220 financial statements, 177-220 finfish fishery

capacity building, 50 development of action plan for, 50 and leasing of sunset fishing licences, xiii ownership, vii participation in, xiii quota management, 50 Finfish Fishery Action Plan, xiii fisheries

catches, 21, 52 ownership, vii, xiii, 6, 21, 24, 49, 50, 91 fisheries communications, 50 fisheries data, xv, 21, 52 fisheries legislation changes to, 84 fisheries management framework, 50 fisheries management workshops, 51 Fisheries Programme, 48-58 additional programme specific performance

indicators, 52 and fisheries data, xv and ownership, vii, 21 and participation in commercial fishing, 21 programme deliverables, 48 programme expenditure, 27, 49

programme budget variance, 235

260 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

programme goal, 48 programme map, 54-55 programme objectives, 48 programme performance, 50-51 regional goal, 48 Torres Strait Development Plan

Outcomes, 49

fisheries reform Malu Lamar meeting and, 91 Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, 21 fisheries roadmap, xiii, 50 fraud control, 166 freedom of information, 170 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 170 freehold (land tenure), xiv, 90 Frontier Software Pty Ltd, 167 Fujii, Romina, 148 Future Acts, 25, 78, 80, 81

management of, 82

G

Gab Titui Cultural Centre, 22 and cultural maintenance programme, 32, 38 retail sales, 34 and support for local artists, 33 and Torres Strait Language Symposium, 6, 33

Gab Titui Cultural Centre touring exhibitions, 33 Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award, 32 gender imbalance on elected bodies, vii geography, xiv, 120 Governance and Leadership Programme, 70-79

additional programme specific performance indicators, 74 and PBCs capacity-building grants, 92 and PBCs compliance, ix programme deliverables, 70 programme expenditure, 27, 71

programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 70 programme map, 76-77 programme objectives, 70 programme performance, 72-73 regional goal, 70 Torres Strait Development Plan

Outcomes, 71

governance framework, 139-59 governance structure, 138 government engagement, xi

grant funding, 10 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 34 move of PBCs from to fee-for-service, vii, 25, 72, 78, 79

grants community capacity building, 111 community horticulture projects, 101 community safety projects, 110 culture, art and heritage, 32 details of, 226-29 learning initiatives, 110 PBCs capacity-building, 92 Prince of Wales Island water service project, 101 school attendance, 110 sport and recreation activities, 100, 103 Ugar community access infrastructure

project, 102

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and horticulture in schools, x Gudang Yadhaykenu People and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B,

5, 82

Gur A Baradharaw Kod Sea and Land Council, ix, 72

H

Hammond Island community consultation and engagement, 72 infrastructure upgrades, 111 outdoor basketball court, 100 pavement and drainage works, 26, 111

hand collectables fishery, vii health statistics, 130 health promotion and community education

projects, 102 Healthy Communities Programme, 3, 98-107 additional programme specific performance indicators, 103

programme deliverables, 98 programme expenditure, 27, 99 programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 98 programme map, 104-5 programme objectives, 98 programme performance, 100-102 regional goal, 98 and sustainable horticulture project, 62 Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes, 99 healthy communities workshops, 102

SECTION 8 Index 261

healthy food access to, x 62, 103 High Court of Australia, 121 high frequency radios, 110 home loans, 11 home ownership, xiii, 11 Home Ownership Programme, 43 Horn Island, 120

see also Ngurapai Island Horn Island Affordable Housing Project, 101, 103 Horn Island community

and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 horticulture, x, 62, 101, 162 horticulture in schools programme, x, 162 housing tenure

statistics, 130 human resources management, 167-69 Native Title Office, 95

I

Iama community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 and Strait Smile programme, 100

Iama Island, 4 seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100 tidal gauge, 26

income statistics, 129 indemnities and insurance premiums for officers, 166 Independent Auditor’s Report, 174-75 Indigenous Advancement Strategy, 3, 9, 72, 121 Indigenous Advisory Council, 7 Indigenous Art Awards, 6 Indigenous Art Code, 22 Indigenous Business Australia, 5 Indigenous Employment Strategy, 12 Indigenous Land Use Agreements, xiii, 23, 25, 78,

80, 81, 90, 93 see also Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use Agreement Indigenous Legal Assistance Programme

(Attorney-General’s Department), 113 Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs), 62 case study see Torres Strait IPA project information and communications technology (ICT)

services, 161 Information Publication Scheme, 170 Information Publishing Scheme (TSRA), 122 infrastructure planning and upgrades, 111

Ingeus Australia Pty Ltd (trading as Assure Programs), 167 Integrated Planning Framework, 18-19 Integrated Service Delivery, x-xi, 17, 122

and community consultation, 4 community booklets, 72, 122 forums, 111 intellectual property rights, 22, 35 internal audit, 72, 166 ‘Into Business Workshop’ project, 20, 42 invasive species management, 62 Islanders Board of Industry and Services, 101

J

Joint Advisory Council, 7 Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, 7

judicial decisions and reviews, 135 ‘Junior Ranger’ project, 3

K

Kaiwalagal region dugong and turtle management plan, 63 Katter leases, xiv, 82, 90 Kaurareg Aboriginal people, 120

and native title, 121 and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B, 5, 82 Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation and Horn Island Affordable Housing

Project, 103

Kaziw Meta College, 112 key performance indicators, 17, 20-27 Kubin tidal gauge, 26

Kubin community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 music and dance CD/DVD, 33, 35

L

land and sea management strategy, 62 Land and Sea Management Unit and Indigenous Protected Areas, 68 land tenure, xiv-xv

262 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

landfill renovation projects, 100 language preservation, 6, 33, 34 law enforcement partnerships, 110 leadership programmes, vii, 11, 73, 74 learning and development, 167 learning initiatives grants, 110 legal internships, 95 legal services, 110 legislative functions of the TSRA in its NTRB

capacity, 93 letter of transmittal, xxi lifeguard training project, 110 loans to business clients, 11, 42 Loban, Yen, 144 Local Government Act 2009 (Qld), 139 Lui, Getano, Jr, AM, 145 Lui, Kiwat, 149-50 Lui, Willie, 141

M

Mabo Day, 33 Mabo decision, 121 Mabo lecture, 83 Mabulag community

and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 Mabulag Island, 4 Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 McDonald Charter Boats, 47 Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use

Agreement, 82 Major Infrastructure Programme management committee, 100 Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 4B

(MIP 4B), 26 Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 5 (MIP 5), 26, 101 Maka, Sam, 142-43 Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation

and changes to native title and fisheries legislation, 84 and Torres Strait Fisheries Working Group, 82, 91 and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part A,

5, 12

maritime operational incidents, 113 maritime safety education school-based case study, 116

maritime safety incidents, 113

Maritime Safety Queensland and Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme, 113 and Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project, viii-ix market research, 225 Marlin Australia, 113 Masig community

and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 music and dance CD/DVD, 33, 35 Masig Island, 4 Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23

seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100 masks, 32, 38 media and communications support, 72 Mer community

and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 and healthy communities workshops, 102 music and dance CD/DVD, 33, 35 and ranger vessel, 11 and Strait Smile programme, 100 Mer Gedkem Le Prescribed Body Corporate,

vii, 79 Mer Island, 4 Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 infrastructure upgrades, 111

native title, 121 and native title compensation, 82 Shadow Fitness Programme on, 100 Meriam people native title, vii, 121 mid-term performance review, viii, 4, 153 ministerial appointments, 135 ministerial directions, 134 MLCS Corporate, viii, 4, 153 mortality rate, 130 Mosby, Hilda, 146 Mualgal People and Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Part B, 5 Mundine, Warren, 7 Mura Badulgal Prescribed Body Corporate, vii, 79 Mura Kosker Sorority, 3, 111, 112, 113 Muralag Island, 4 see also Prince of Wales Island Murray Island see Mer Island Music and Dance Audit, 33, 35 Music and Dance Audit project, 22 music and dance CD/DVD, 33, 35 music and dance preservation, 6 music strategy, 33 MV Elizabeth II, 46 My Pathway, 107

SECTION 8 Index 263

N

Naghir Island native title claim, 82 National Disability Strategy, 170 National Indigenous Reform Agreement service

delivery principles, 70, 71 National Maritime Safety Authority of Papua New Guinea, 113 National Museum of Australia, 6, 32, 33 National Native Title Conference, 83 National Reserve System, 68 native title, xiv

history, 121 PBCs and, 25, 90 Native Title Act 1993, 121 functions of Native Title Representative

Bodies under, 93, 132 and keeping native title holders informed, 90 and PBCs, 25, 81 TSRA NTRB function under, 92 native title claims and determinations, vii, 23

Naghir Island, 82 see also Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim native title compensation, 82 native title legislation changes to, 84, 90 Native Title Office consultancies, 96 and Future Acts, 82 human resources management, 95 and Indigenous Land Use Agreements, xi and legal assistance for NTRBs, 83 and Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land

Use Agreement, 82 and native title compensation, 82 and provision of information on lease process

to PBCs, 82 and Queensland PBC working group, 92 and Sea Forum Summit, 91 and TSRA’s Native Title Representative Body

functions, 93

Native Title Office Operational Plan, 92 Native Title Programme, 80-96 additional programme specific performance indicators, 84

and PBCs compliance, ix programme deliverables, 80 programme expenditure, 27, 81 programme budget variance, 235

programme goal, 80 programme map, 86-87 programme objectives, 80 programme performance, 82-83 regional goal, 80 statistical data, 89 Torres Strait Development Plan

Outcomes, 81

Native Title Representative Body in the Torres Strait community engagement, ix complaints, 93

consultancies, 96 functions, 92, 93, 132 Future Acts received, 23 housing agreements, xi legal services, 83 legislative functions, 93 management of human resources, 94 native title claims under determination, xi, 23 organisational structures and corporate

governance policies, 93 and PBCs, 92-93 performance against Budget, 94 performance, 89, 93-94 and RNTBCs, 12 summary resources table, 94 transition to Gur A Baradharaw Kod Sea and

Land Council, ix, 72 TSRA role as, 92, 132 Ngarupai Airport (Horn Island), 120 Ngurapai Island, 4

see also Horn Island Noah, Aven S, 140-41 Nona, Maluwap, 83, 141 non-government organisations

social services delivered by, 112 non-renewable diesel fuel usage for electricity production reduction of reliance on, 64 Northern Peninsula Area airstrips

repairs, 26, 111 Northern Peninsula Area communities community consultation and engagement, 72

music and dance CD/DVD, 33 Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council and Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan, 17

264 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

O

Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations and PBCs compliance, ix, 25, 72, 79 audited financial statements, 78 and TSRA, 25

officers indemnities and insurance premiums for, 166 official visits, 7 Online Australian Public Service Jobs, 225 operations

environmental impacts of, 163 geography and logistics, 120 report of, 119-35 organisational structure, 224 Outcomes and Planned Performance, 17-27

P

Pabai, Koeygab, 46-47 partnerships, 12-13 pathway into fishing (training), 51, 52 payroll and leave records, 167 PBC Support Officer, 25, 93 PDM Consultancy, 166 Pearson, Francis, 148-49 performance reporting

changes in, 10 Native Title Representative Body, 89, 93-94 programmes, 15-117 Peter, Eric, 142 policy development engagement of elected Torres Strait Islander

and Aboriginal leaders in, 24 population statistics, 126-27 Port Kennedy Association, 3, 111, 112, 113 Portfolio Budget Statements

key performance indicators, 17, 20-27 Poruma community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110

and Strait Smile programme, 100 Poruma Island, 4 emergency coastal stabilisation, 100

Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100 power generation, xiii prawn fishery, vii

Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs) capacity-building grants, 92 complaints, 93 and compliance with requirements of

Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations, ix, 25, 79, 84 DOGIT transfer to, 84 establishment of, 92 Federal Court and, 90, 92 and governance and leadership capacity, 70, 71, 72, 80

case study, 78-79 and information on lease process, 82 and information relating to native title, 90 legal, policy and advocacy support for, 80 move from grant-funding to fee-for-service,

vii, 25, 72, 78, 79 and National Native Title Conference, 83 and native title, 25, 90 and Native Title Act 1993, 81 support model, 78-79 PBCs working group, 83 Preventing Bullying and Harassment Policy, 168 Prince of Wales Channel, 120 Prince of Wales Island

water service project grant, 101 see also Muralag Island privacy, 168 Privacy Act 1988, 168 Procurement and Contracts Policy, 171 Program Steering Committee, 157 programme budget variance explanation of, 235 programme deliverables Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 30 Economic Development Programme, 40 Environmental Management Programme, 60 Fisheries Programme, 48 Governance and Leadership Programme, 70 Healthy Communities Programme, 98 Native Title Programme, 80 Safe Communities Programme, 108 programme expenditure, 27 budget variance, 235 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 31 Economic Development Programme, 41 Environmental Management Programme, 61 Fisheries Programme, 49 Governance and Leadership Programme, 71 Healthy Communities Programme, 99 Native Title Programme, 81 Safe Communities Programme, 109

SECTION 8 Index 265

programme goals Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 30 Economic Development Programme, 40 Environmental Management Programme, 60 Fisheries Programme, 48 Governance and Leadership Programme, 70 Healthy Communities Programme, 98 Native Title Programme, 80 Safe Communities Programme, 108

programme maps Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 36-37 Economic Development Programme, 44-45 Environmental Management Programme, 66-67 Fisheries Programme, 54-55 Governance and Leadership Programme, 76-77 Healthy Communities Programme, 104-5 Native Title Programme, 86-87 Safe Communities Programme, 114-15

programme objectives Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 30 Economic Development Programme, 40 Environmental Management Programme, 60 Fisheries Programme, 48 Governance and Leadership Programme, 70 Healthy Communities Programme, 98 Native Title Programme, 80 Safe Communities Programme, 108

programme performance, 15-117 Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 32-33 Economic Development Programme, 42-43 Environmental Management Programme, 62-63 Fisheries Programme, 50-51 Governance and Leadership Programme, 72-73 Healthy Communities Programme, 100-102 Native Title Programme, 82-83 Safe Communities Programme, 110-12

property management, 171 Protected Zone Joint Authority and bêche-de-mer fishery licence, 58 and fisheries data, 21

and fisheries ownership, xiii and Fisheries Roadmap, 50 forums, 51 representation, 51 Public Governance, Performance and

Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), viii, 4-5, 72, 153, 234 and Audit Committee, 158 and compliance report, 166

and conflicts of interests, 166 training on, viii, 5, 153

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 and conflicts of interests, 166 training on, viii, 5, 153 Pulu Islet Indigenous Protected Area, 68 purchasing policy, 171

Q

Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships and community consultations, 4 and economic development summits, 5

and social housing programme, xi, xiii Queensland Department of Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning, 100 Queensland Department of National Parks, Sport

and Racing, 107 Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, 111 Queensland Government

and DOGIT transfer, 82, 84 and Horn Island Affordable Housing Project, 103 and Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use

Agreements, 93 and Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 82 and rising sea levels, xv Queensland PBC working group, 92 Queensland Police Service, 113 Queensland State Library, 33

R

Ramsay, John, 135 ranger programme, vii-viii, 11, 62 ranger vessels, 11, 161 Rebel Marine, 47 regional adaptation and resilience action plan,

draft, 64 regional broadcasting, 73 Regional Development Australia (Far North

Queensland and Torres Strait), 5 Regional Economic Investment Strategy, 5 regional energy strategy, 64 regional environmental health

infrastructure, 26

266 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

regional goals Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 30 Economic Development Programme, 40 Environmental Management Programme, 60 Fisheries Programme, 48 Governance and Leadership Programme, 70 Healthy Communities Programme, 98 Native Title Programme, 80 Safe Communities Programme, 108

regional governance, xv regional pest management strategy, 62 Regional Plan see Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009 - 2029

Regional Plan Community Booklets, 74 Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate (RNTBCs), vii support for, 12, 13, 78

see also Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs) Remote Attendance Strategy, 3 Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service stations, xiii Remote Jobs and Communities Programme, x, 3

and Community Development Programme, 42 Remuneration Tribunal, 139 research activities, 62 responsible minister, 134 risk management, 164-65

S

Sabatino, Mario, 144 sacred matters disclosure of, 171 Safe Communities Programme, 3, 108-16

additional programme specific performance indicators, 113 programme deliverables, 108 programme expenditure, 27, 109

programme budget variance, 235 programme goal, 108 programme map, 114-15 programme objectives, 108 programme performance, 110-12 regional goal, 108 Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes,

109

Saibai Cemetery, 100 Saibai community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110

Saibai Island community consultation and engagement, 72 Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 infrastructure upgrades, 111 jetty repairs, 26, 111 seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100

Savage, Saila, 145 school attendance, 3, 129 grants, 110 school-based maritime safety education

case study, 116 Scullion, Senator the Hon Nigel, 7, 9, 58, 134 sea claim see Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim Sea Forum Summits, 90-91 sea levels, xv, 64 sea walls, xv, 100 seagrass and other research activities, 62 See Kee, Wayne see Chief Executive Officer SEEK website, 225 Seisia community

community consultation and engagement, 72 jetty lighting and electrical reticulations, 26, 111 senior leadership, 11 service delivery

geography and, xiv service gaps, 74 serviced land and infrastructure, 103 Shadow Fitness Programme, 100 social and economic engagement partnerships, 111 social housing programme, xi, xiii Social Inclusion Measurement and Reporting

Strategy, 170 social media, xiii, 10 social services, 111, 112 accreditation, 113

service referrals, response timeframes and waiting lists, 113 social support services, 113 sport and recreation activities

case study, 106-7 grants, 100, 103 St Pauls community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110

and Strait Smile programme, 100 St Pauls Island and adaptation planning and implementation, 62

Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 ramp repairs, 26, 111 staff induction, 167 staff learning and development, 167

SECTION 8 Index 267

staffing profile, 168-69 Statement of Expectations, 135 Statement of Intent, 135 Status of Key Australian Fish Stocks Reports, 21 Stephen, Jerry, Jr, 150 Strait Smile programme, 100 strategic overview, 1-13 strategic planning workshop see Board Strategic

Workshop sustainable horticulture project, x, 62

T

Tagai High School, 3 Tagai State College and environmental education officer, 101 and horticulture in schools programme, x, 162

and ‘Junior Ranger’ project, 3 and natural resource management engagement, 62 and Torres Strait Language Symposium, 6 telecommunications infrastructure, xiv Telstra

mobile network expansion project, 161 voice and data communications strategy for the Torres Strait area, xiv Thursday Island, 120 and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 Ken Brown Oval and TI stadium gym, 100 tidal gauge, 26 Thursday Island Water Sports Club, 107 tidal flow power generation, xiii tidal gauge project, 26 Tipoti, Alick, 38 tidal inundation, xv Torres, Luis Vaez de, 121 Torres Shire Council and Horn Island Affordable Housing

Project, 103 and Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan, 17 Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional

Plan 2009 - 2029, x-xi, 17, 74, 122, 157 service delivery, 124 Torres Strait Climate Change Strategy 2014 - 2018, 157 Torres Strait Coastal Management Committee

members, 157 review by MLCS Corporate, 4 Torres Strait Development Plan 2009 - 2013, 122 and Regional Plan, 122

Torres Strait Development Plan 2014 - 2018, 10, 74, 132 and programme outcomes, 4, 9, 13, 17, 153, 157 and Regional Plan, 122 and Workforce Strategy, 167 Torres Strait Development Plan Outcomes

Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 31 Economic Development Programme, 41 Environmental Management Programme, 61 Fisheries Programme, 49 Governance and Leadership Programme, 71 Healthy Communities Programme, 99 Native Title Programme, 81 Safe Communities Programme, 109 Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984, xv Torres Strait Fisheries Working Group, 82 Torres Strait freehold, xiv Torres Strait Health Partnership, 98 Torres Strait IPA project, 68 Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC)

and healthy communities workshops, 102 and infrastructure upgrades, 111 and Major Infrastructure Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 82

and regional pest management strategy, 62 and Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service stations, xiii and rising sea levels, xv and Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area

Regional Plan, 17 and waste and landfill renovation issues, 100 water and waste management programme, 101 water testing project, 102 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned

commercially viable businesses, 20 Torres Strait Islander Land Act 1991 (Qld), 90 Torres Strait Islanders, 120 Torres Strait Islanders Media Association (TSIMA)

and broadcasting targets, 73 and Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service stations, xiii Torres Strait Islanders’ Regional Education Council (TSIREC), 110 Torres Strait language centre, 33, 34 Torres Strait language charter, 33 Torres Strait Language Reference Group, 33 Torres Strait language strategy, 33 Torres Strait Language Symposium, 6, 33, 34 Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme, 3, 110 and school-based maritime safety education

project, 113

268 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project, viii-ix case study, 46-47 and employment opportunities, 3 and training, 21, 42

Torres Strait region, 120 culture see Ailan Kastom history, 121 map of, iv-v, 120 statistics, 126-30

education, 128-29 employment, 128 health, 130 housing tenure, 130 income, 129 population, 126-27 Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA)

and Aurora Foundation, 25 and Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 25 briefings and information, 135 challenges, xiv-xv corporate governance and accountability,

137-71 and Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 25 enabling legislation, 132 financial reports, 173-220

financial statements, 177-220 formation, 132 functions, 133 highlights and achievements, vii-xi judicial decisions and reviews, 135 and Koeygab Pabai, 47 ministerial directions, 134 role as Native Title Representative Body, 92, 132

see also Native Title Representative Body in the Torres Strait and Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations, 25 opportunities, xiii-xiv organisational structure, 224 outlook, 13 powers, 134 and PBCs, 25 PBCs capacity-building grants, 92 programmes, 132

performance, 15-117 report of operations, 119-35 responsible minister, 134

and Sea Forum Summits, 90-91 Statement of Expectations, 135 Statement of Intent, 135 strategic overview, 1-13 vision, iii Torres Strait Regional Authority Women’s

Leadership Programme, 11 Torres Strait Regional Economic Investment Strategy, 42 Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim, 83

Part A, 5, 12, 81, 82, 91 Part B, 5, 82, 91 Torres Strait Treaty, 7 Torres Strait Treaty Cycle meetings, 7 Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Programme, vii, 73, 74 Torres Strait Young Leaders Programme, 11, 74 Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association, 100, 106-7 traditional ecological knowledge project, 35, 62 Traditional Inhabitant Boat licence fishers, xv, 7, 50 Traditional Inhabitants Meeting, 7 training and development, 95 Training Rural Australians in Leadership, 11, 72, 74 Transferable Vessel Holder licence fishers, 6, 7 transport industry Supply Chain and Logistics annual awards, 47 Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme, 3, 26, 111 TRAWQ (Tamwoy, Rosehill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine), 4 tropical rock lobster fishery, vii, 21 Tropical Rock Lobster Management Plan, 7 TSRA Cultural Protocols Guide for TSRA Staff, 12, 32 TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2011 - 2014, 95, 167 turtle management, vii, 24, 63

U

Ugar community access infrastructure project grants, 102 Ugar Island Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23

infrastructure upgrades, 111 tidal gauge, 26 unemployment, 128 University of Wollongong, 51

SECTION 8 Index 269

V

vision, iii voice and data communications strategy for the Torres Strait area, xiv

W

Warraber community and Ensuring a Strait Start project, 110 and healthy communities workshops, 102 and Strait Smile programme, 100

Warraber Island Indigenous Land Use Agreement, 23 infrastructure upgrades, 111 seawalls and landfill renovation projects, 100

Warraberalgal and Porumalgal Indigenous Protected Area, 7, 68 Warul Kawa Indigenous Protected Area, 68 waste feasibility support project, 101 water and waste management programme, 101 water tanks, 101 water testing project, 102 Williams, Reginald, 142 wind power, xiii Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 167 Work Health and Safety Committee, 167 work, health and safety management

arrangements, 167-68 workforce, 12, 168-69 Workforce Strategy, 167 Working on Country plans, 24 workplace agreement, 95, 167 workplace consultative arrangements, 168 Workplace Consultative Committee, 168 workplace discrimination, 168 workplace diversity, 12, 168

Y

youth leadership programme, 73, 74

Z

Zakazukha Marketing Communications, 72

270 TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Poruma community meeting.