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Australian National Preventive Health Agency Reports 2012-13


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ANNUAL REPORT Australian National Preventive Health Agency

2012|2013 L R l Preventiv

II Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

ABOUT THIS REPORT

This Report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports, as issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit and sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999. The Report is a formal accountability document that details the activities of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency (the Agency) from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013, consistent with section 53 of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010.

The main purpose of this Report is to provide Senators and Members of Parliament with an account of the Agency’s activities during 2012-2013. The Report is intended to be a valuable source of information for the Agency’s stakeholders and those involved in preventive health efforts, along with the general public. It seeks to provide readers with an informative picture of the Agency’s performance over the reporting period.

STRUCTURE OF THIS REPORT The Review by the CEO and 2012-2013 Agency Highlights - provide an outline of the Agency’s operations and achievements over the reporting period.

Part 1: Agency Overview - reports on the Agency’s structure and management arrangements.

Part 2: Report on Strategic and Operational Plans - reports on the Agency’s progress against its Strategic and Operational Plans over the reporting period.

Part 3: Performance Reporting - reports on the Agency’s performance against the deliverables and indicators detailed in the 2012-2013 Health and Ageing Portfolio Budget Statements.

Part 4: Management and Accountability - details the Agency’s people management, corporate planning activities, and information on compliance with external legislative requirements.

Part 5: Financial Statements - contains an account of the Agency’s financial performance as well as a complete set of financial statements for the Agency in 2012-2013.

At the end of the report is a Glossary including abbreviations and a list of requirements to help readers identify all mandatory information now required for inclusion in Annual Reports and an alphabetical index.

ABOUT THIS REPORT

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Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 III

The Hon Peter Dutton MP Minister for Health Minister for Sport Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

In accordance with section 53 of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 and sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999, I am pleased to present you with the annual report of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency for the period 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013, for your presentation to the Parliament.

This report has been prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports, for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies approved on behalf of the Parliament by the Joint Committee of

Public Accounts and Audit, as required under sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999.

I am satisfied that the Agency has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting, and data collection procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the Agency and comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Yours sincerely

Louise Sylvan Chief Executive Officer

October 2013

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

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IV Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

REVIEW BY THE CEO 2

2012-2013 Agency Highlights 6

PART 1. AGENCY OVERVIEW 13

About Us 14

Role and Functions 14

Our Vision and Mission 15

Goals 15

Values 16

Outcome and Program Structure 16

Organisational Structure 17

Governance Framework 18

Minister 18

Governance Team 18

Advisory Council 19

Expert Committees 20

PART 2. REPORT ON STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANS 23 Goal 1: Healthy Public Policy 24

Goal 2: Health Risk Reduction 27

Goal 3: Knowledge Management 33

Goal 4: Information and Reporting 36

Goal 5: Capacity Building 37

Goal 6: Organisational Excellence 38

PART 3: REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 41

Perfomance reporting framework 42

1. Expand and strengthen preventive health research 43

2. Promote health and wellbeing through community preventive health programs 44

3. Implement a national approach to social marketing for preventive health programs 47

4. Advise and make recommendations on matters relating to preventive health 51

PART 4: MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY 55

Overview 56

Corporate Governance 56

ANPHA Legislative Framework 56

Corporate Governance and Planning 56

Governance Team 56

Audit Committee 57

External Security 58

Australian National Audit Office 58

Commonwealth Ombudsman 58

CONTENTS

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Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 V

Legal Actions 58

Judicial or Administrative Decisions 58

Parliamentary Committees 58

Parliamentary Scrutiny 58

Risk Management 59

Business Continuity and Disaster Management 59

Ethics 59

Fraud Control 60

Security 60

Freedom of Information 61

Human Resources Management 61

Workplace Health and Safety 64

Multicultural Access and Equality 64

Social Inclusion 64

Disability 65

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Representation 65

Information Management 65

Records Management 66

Asset Management 66

Legal Services 66

Procurement 66

Grants Programs 67

Advertising and Market Research 68

Ecologically Sustainable Development and Environmental Performance 69

PART 5: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 70

APPENDIX A - AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2012-2013 130

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS 132

GLOSSARY AND ABBREVIATIONS 135

ALPHABETICAL INDEX 136

CASE STUDIES

Case Study: Western Sydney Medicare Local 12

Case Study: Carpentaria Youth Drink Smart Initiative 22

Case Study: Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local 40

Case Study: Nexus Primary Health 53

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2 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

REVIEW OF 2012- 2013

Working with all sectors - private firms, local health organisations, state and territory governments, non-government organisations (NGOs), and many others - was the key feature of the Agency’s work in 2012-2013. This year saw the commencement of a number of significant disease prevention in primary care projects that supported partnerships between Medicare Locals, health services districts, local councils, researchers, chronic disease organisations and other NGOs to deliver preventive health initiatives at the coalface. The projects all focus on supporting people to make important lifestyle changes and are demonstrating effective preventive health approaches in different settings like GP practices, schools, workplaces and community recreational spaces.

As part of the national efforts to reduce smoking, the Agency continued implementation of the National Tobacco Campaign and established the Smoking and Disadvantage Network. The Network is a partnership with the Cancer Councils and state and territory health departments to address the high prevalence of smoking among our most disadvantaged groups - homeless people, those with a mental illness, Indigenous Australians and those living on low incomes. Estimates for the rates of smoking for these groups are between 25% and 85%. The Network coordinates knowledge sharing and action around the important work being undertaken in this area.

With the release of the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18, the continuation of the National Preventive Health Research Grants program and the awarding of three Preventive Health Research Fellowships, the Agency continues to build greater capacity amongst researchers and fosters their collaboration with policy practitioners to deliver practical ways to improve health and prevent chronic disease.

This year also marked the establishment of The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, with the Agency as a major partner. This innovative new partnership - funded by the NSW and ACT health departments, HCF, the Agency and the NHMRC - with its emphasis on a systems approach to prevention, represents a unique opportunity to transform the way prevention research is conducted. It also illustrates how government and the private sector can combine to provide strong useable prevention evidence for the preventive health community.

Other highlights of the year saw the Agency continue to implement and strengthen partnerships through the National Binge Drinking Strategy’s Be the Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking initiative. Working with 16 major sporting organisations, and through them local community based sporting clubs, and the AFL Players Association, this initiative is tackling Australia’s harmful drinking culture, especially among young people, to help reduce the links between binge drinking and sporting activities.

The Agency’s work in the fight against obesity included a collaboration with the South Australian Department of Health to review and report to Health Ministers on findings from monitoring data of children’s exposure to television marketing and advertising of unhealthy food and drinks. The Agency released for public consultation draft frameworks for monitoring television marketing and advertising to children of unhealthy food and drink.

CREATING STRONG PARTNERSHIPS THAT STRENGTHEN AUSTRALIA’S PREVENTION EFFORTS ARE KEY TO SUCCESS

REVIEW BY THE CEO

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 3

The significant undertakings of developing and preparing the State of Preventive Health 2013 report and the planning for the inaugural National Preventive Health Awards occurred during the majority of the 2012-2013 financial year. The State of Preventive Health Report, released in July 2013, provides a comprehensive overview of the health challenges facing Australians, particularly in relation to chronic disease and includes a range of case-studies of preventive health action across Australia. The Awards, presented in July 2013, have promoted leadership in the area of preventive health, and recognised sectors of the Australian community that are working hard to promote the importance of good health and well-being in particular in the workplace.

The next section of this Report presents a snapshot of the Agency’s 2012-2013 highlights. The Report also contains more formal reporting on performance; with the operations during the year contributing extensively to the Agency’s objectives in both its operational and strategic plans.

FINANCIAL RESULTS

This report contains the audited financial statements for 2012-2013, in which the Agency had a small surplus of $0.3 million.

OUTLOOK

Looking ahead for 2013-2014, the key areas of focus are:

• continuing to build results-oriented partnerships with the private sector, NGOs governments and workplaces to promote health improvement and preventive activity in the community;

• disseminating and promoting the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18 and distributing national research priority agendas in obesity, tobacco control and harmful alcohol use;

• acting as a funding and research partner with The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre in its strategic research program;

• continuing to activate the National Binge Drinking Strategy with sports and entertainment partners, focused on young people and harmful drinking;

• strengthening the national co-ordination of preventive health social marketing activities across jurisdictions, including the National Tobacco Campaign and obesity prevention initiatives;

• through our partners in the Smoking and Disadvantage Network, encouraging service providers to assist their clients to quit smoking and provide service environments that encourage smoking cessation;

• continuing the partnership with Medicare Locals and local health organisations to embed evidence-based approaches to prevention in primary health care; and

• providing evidence-based advice to Ministers on key prevention policy and activity.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to once again thank the members of our Advisory Council and Expert Committees for their advice and expertise in matters relating to preventive health. As ever, I’d like to express my sincere thanks to all the dedicated staff of our small Agency, who work tirelessly to achieve our key focus of promoting a healthy Australia.

Louise Sylvan Chief Executive Officer October 2013

4 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

PERSONS OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE

62.8%

ADULT (18+) DAILY SMOKERS

16.1%

ADULTS CONSUMED MORE THAN 2 STANDARD DRINKS PER DAY ON AVERAGE EXCEEDING THE 2009 NHMRC GUIDELINE FOR LIFETIME RISK OF HARM**

19.5%

* Reference for alcohol figure is from Australian Health Survey: First Results (Australian Bureau of Statisitics Publication Number: 4264.0.55.001) * Reference for daily smoking and obese or overweight is from Australian Health Survey: Updated Results, 2011-2012 (Australian Bureau of Statisitics Publication Number: 4364.0.55.003) ** For information on the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Guidelines, www.nhmrc.gov.au

LATEST DATA*

WHERE AUSTRALIA STANDS

RISK FACTORS FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 5

STATE AND TERRITORY COMPARISONS

Source: National Health Survey 2011-12 age standardised to 2001

25.3% 16.9% 66%

19.9% 17.5% 65.4%

24.2%

22.6%

63.7%

18.2% 17.4% 66.1%

18.5% 14.8% 61.1%

21%

13.4%

63.6%

22.8% 23.2% 64.1%

17.5% 16.8% 61.9%

Proportion of obese & overweight (measured) adults (18+)

Proportion of persons (18+) at lifetime risk of harm from alcohol related disease or injury (based on 2009 NHMRC guidelines)

Proportion of persons (18+) who are daily smokers

KEY

6 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

NATIONAL TOBACCO CAMPAIGN The National Tobacco Campaign (NTC) raises awareness of the harms of smoking and discourages its use, promotes quit attempts amongst smokers and provides motivation and support to avoid relapse, through television, radio, print, social and outdoor media.

In April 2013, the Agency launched a new NTC anti-smoking message: Stop before the Suffering Starts. This campaign highlighted the immense suffering people and their families can go through as a consequence of smoking related diseases like emphysema. The focus on suffering, as a result of smoking related illnesses, is an extension of previous NTC anti-smoking messaging and acknowledged the significant impact that these illnesses have on smokers and their families. Visit: www.quitnow.gov.au for more information.

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AN EMPHYSEMA SUFFERER CAN GO ON DYING FOR YEARS.

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AGENCY HIGHLIGHTS

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 7

The NTC’s Quit Now: My QuitBuddy free smartphone app is seeing exceptional success with over 200,000 smokers downloading this app in a year, and with around 40% of those using the app reporting they are remaining quit after six months. Features of the app include quit tips, daily motivational messages, and countdown to quitting reminders.

Quit Now: My QuitBuddy

NATIONAL BINGE DRINKING STRATEGY The National Binge Drinking Strategy (NBDS) initiatives and programs aim to address Australia’s harmful binge drinking culture, especially among young people. Through community organisations, and in settings such as sporting clubs, music festivals and youth clubs, the NBDS Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking initiative is raising awareness of the long and short term impacts of harmful drinking among young people and is encouraging the development of a more responsible drinking culture within Australian society. The Be the Influence social marketing campaign focuses on using social and digital media channels, as well as experiential activities such as crowd sourcing competitions.

BE THE INFLUENCE — TACKLING BINGE DRINKING SPORTS The Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking initiative is also being promoted through 16 leading sports organisations, providing inspiration from sporting heroes to give young people the confidence to make their own decisions about responsible drinking. The positive Be the Influence messages have been seen and heard at over 965 sporting events and by more than 680,000 people through sporting event activations, social media networks and athlete ambassadors. Visit: www.tacklingbingedrinking.gov.au for more information.

8 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

COMMUNITY LEVEL INITIATIVES The National Binge Drinking Strategy’s Community Level Initiatives (third grants round) projects are enabling non-government organisations, local government, police and other community groups to work together to develop local solutions to reduce youth binge drinking across the country. These projects aim to reduce binge drinking by young people, specifically targeting 12 to 24 year olds, and to increase awareness of the risks of binge drinking to individuals and the wider community. All 26 projects have been achieving positive outcomes in their communities by filling gaps in relevant information available about the harms of binge drinking, providing alternative activities, youth outreach services and other opportunities to develop life skills.

GOOD SPORTS The Agency has also managed the continuation and expansion of the Good Sports program, an initiative of the Australian Drug Foundation, to build healthy, safe and family friendly community sporting clubs by helping reduce the harmful effects of alcohol and tobacco and increase awareness of the importance of healthy eating and good mental health. The expansion of Good Sports is increasing the number of sporting clubs participating in the program from 5,000 to 6,500 clubs.

The Good Sports ‘Club of the Year’, North Clare Football Club in South Australia, has developed a standard drink size chart to inform their members about the alcohol content of the different beverages that are sold at the club (pictured below right).

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 9

STATE OF PREVENTIVE HEALTH 2013 The State of Preventive Health 2013 is a comprehensive overview of the health challenges facing Australians, particularly in relation to chronic disease. The Report highlights the substantial leadership and effort that is underway in Australia to reduce the key risk factors for chronic disease, including obesity and physical inactivity, tobacco use and the harmful use of alcohol.

The Report highlights key national figures, most notably that two out of three adults and one in four children are overweight or obese, and that harmful alcohol consumption is widespread in Australia.

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY 2013-18 The National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18 is a national guide for the preventive health research, policy and practice community; it will foster approaches to research and evaluation which better enable all sectors, whether they are workplaces, schools or other institutions, to implement the most effective preventive health programs and enable individual choices to be evidence-informed. The Strategy will build on the already strong research and evaluation capacity in preventive health in Australia and extend this to better support and build policy and program capacity.

PRIORITY-DRIVEN RESEARCH AGENDA FOR TOBACCO CONTROL IN AUSTRALIA The Agency’s Priority-driven Research Agenda for Tobacco Control in Australia final report serves as an annex to the Research Strategy and was developed to help inform future tobacco control policies and programs, enhance the national capacity to respond in a focused and timely fashion to emerging tobacco research needs, and enhance the shared understanding between policy makers, advocates and researchers about research priorities in tobacco control and encourage links between these groups.

TOBACCO CONTROL EVIDENCE BRIEFS The Smoking and Disadvantage Evidence Brief highlights the fact that smoking rates among certain disadvantaged groups of the population are considerably higher than average smoking rates. This work identifies that social and community service providers have an important role to play in tobacco control.

The Tobacco Control and Mass Media Campaigns Evidence Brief highlights Australia as a world leader in the production and broadcasting of mass media campaigns to reduce smoking behaviour and reviews evidence on the effects of these campaigns on youth and adults as well as more recent population-based studies.

SMOKING AND DISADVANTAGE

evidence brief e e ev

10 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

DISEASE PREVENTION IN PRIMARY CARE (MEDICARE LOCALS) The Disease Prevention in Primary Care program supports Medicare Locals to partner with health services, local councils, researchers and other organisations to deliver preventive health initiatives. The program funds Medicare Locals to demonstrate effective preventive health approaches in different settings like GP practices, schools, workplaces and public spaces. All initiatives focus on supporting people to make lifestyle changes, including through the use of supportive technology and apps and in directly addressing health literacy. The Agency’s approach to partnering with local primary care organisations is to build sustainability at the local community level by fostering preventive health collaborations between Medicare Locals and their local partners.

Several initiatives target whole-of-system integration between the Medicare Local and their Local Hospital Network to actively reduce avoidable hospitalisations and improve the prevention and management of chronic disease in primary health care. These Medicare Locals and Local Hospital Networks have targeted diseases and associated risk factors for which their local communities experience the highest prevalence in their States - for instance, diabetes in Western Sydney, and asthma and smoking control in Northern Adelaide. If proven successful, these models should be suitable for rapid deployment nationally to other Medicare Locals and Local Hospital Networks and also applied to other chronic diseases.

The program has also developed a national knowledge network web tool, Preventive Health Matters, for Medicare Locals to share learnings and embed a focus on prevention in primary health care.

SHAPE UP AUSTRALIA To help reduce rates of obesity in Australia the Shape Up Australia initiative was developed to assist Australians to identify credible, evidence-based obesity prevention and healthy lifestyle information, services and programs. Shape Up Australia helps strengthen and better coordinate obesity prevention efforts across Australia.

The initiative brings an integrated approach to the efforts of a range of partners across government and non-government sectors to obesity prevention and physical activity promotion. Organisations that partner in the initiative are able to use the Shape Up Australia brand to raise awareness of their credible and evidence-based services. Visit: www.shapeup.gov.au for more information.

THE AUSTRALIAN PREVENTION PARTNERSHIP CENTRE In June 2013 the Agency became a funding partner of The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre. The Partnership Centre represents a unique opportunity to transform the way research is conducted and used in preventing chronic disease and aims to ensure health policy makers in all states and territories can access the best research evidence about what works to address lifestyle-related chronic disease. It will bring organisations together and help them learn from each other about how best to do prevention work in the community.

Other funding partners in the Partnership Centre are the NHMRC, NSW Ministry of Health, ACT Health and the HCF and the HCF Research Foundation. The Centre is managed by the Sax Institute in partnership with the Centre of Excellence in Intervention & Prevention Science (CEIPS).

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 11

National Symposium On Active Recreation And Sport For Health The National Symposium on Active Recreation and Sport for Health: Barriers to Young People’s Participation brought together experts from health, sport and recreation to consider the issues and identify actions to address barriers to participation. A report including recommendations for opportunities for future action was produced and engagement with key stakeholders has been initiated.

National Preventive Health Research Symposium The National Preventive Health Research Symposium was a forum for research, government, primary care, industry, non-government and advocacy groups. A key highlight of the day was the launch of the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18. The Symposium provided participants the opportunity to showcase leading examples of policy-relevant research for preventive health and to promote the integration of research, policy and practice, and to support the growing dialogue between these domains.

National Symposium On Smoking & Disadvantage The National Symposium on Smoking & Disadvantage addressed tobacco related disparities in health and well-being across Australia and brought together representatives from relevant Australian federal, state & territory government, and non-government agencies involved in supporting disadvantaged groups who have higher smoking rates than the general population. A key highlight of the Symposium was the launch of the Smoking and Disadvantage Network. The Network has been established to address the high prevalence of smoking among Australia’s most disadvantaged groups.

National Symposium On Social Marketing To Reduce Harmful Alcohol Consumption The National Symposium on Social Marketing to Reduce Harmful Alcohol Consumption initiated ongoing national dialogue among government and non-government organisations to identify the scope and priorities for social marketing to reduce harmful consumption of alcohol and explore the most effective methods for alcohol social marketing. The Symposium discussed the need to have a long term strategy of consistent social marketing that focuses on harmful drinking across population segments, not just youth.

MONITORING TELEVISION MARKETING AND ADVERTISING TO CHILDREN OF UNHEALTHY FOOD AND DRINKS The Agency, in collaboration with the South Australian Department of Health, reviewed and reported to all Governments, at their request, on its findings from monitoring data of children’s exposure to television marketing and advertising of unhealthy food and drinks. Draft frameworks for monitoring television marketing and advertising to children of unhealthy food and drinks were released for public consultation in April 2013.

SMOKING AND DISADVANTAGE NETWORK In 2012 the Agency established the Smoking and Disadvantage Network, in partner-ship with Cancer Council Australia. The Network will undertake work to address the high prevalence of smoking among Australia’s most disadvantaged groups. These include people who have drug and alcohol issues, who are experiencing homelessness, who have criminal justice issues, are sole parents, are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, and/or who are experiencing mental health issues. Key evidence clearly indicates that tobacco is a major contributor to the differences in mortality between the least and most advantaged Australians.

MAJOR EVENTS

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CASE STUDY

Western Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program

The Western Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program represents an exciting new development in partnering to leverage additional investment in improving preventive health services to address local health problems.

A solid alliance is being forged amongst key health services organisations in Western Sydney, focused on a “whole of system approach” to increasing protective behaviours amongst high risk populations and reducing the prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

At over $1 million, the total value of the Western Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program more than doubled the Agency’s grant funding through significant additional cash and in-kind contributions from local partners including the Western Sydney Medicare Local, the Western Sydney Local Health District, and the NSW Ministry of Health.

The funding enables lifestyle modification programs to be developed to encourage healthier eating, active living and increased social inclusion in at-risk individuals through a range of targeted community, workforce and general practice-based programs, including GP monitoring and management, face-to-face and online approaches, and increasing access to existing telephone based health coaching.

Resources and programs are also being adapted to the cultural groups prevalent in Western Sydney, ensuring they are appropriate for people with low literacy and are translated into ‘high risk’ population languages.

The Western Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program seeks to better integrate existing programs between the Local Health District, Medicare Locals, GPs, allied health services and other community services to prevent and manage diabetes. The approach calls on the public, private and non-government organisation sectors to work collaboratively on achieving better health outcomes for Western Sydney.

Western Sydney is considered a diabetes hotspot, with four out of five local government areas having prevalence rates well above the state average. The cultural diversity of the region also makes it a high-risk area.

PROJECT PARTNERS

• Australian National Preventive Health Agency

• Western Sydney Medicare Local

• Western Sydney Local Health District

• NSW Ministry of Health

• Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils Ltd

• Inner West Sydney Medicare Local

• Australian Diabetes Council

• Cancer Council NSW

• Sydney University Boden Institute

• Various health organisations and community and multicultural services

DISEASE PREVENTION IN PRIMARY CARE WESTERN SYDNEY MEDICARE LOCAL

AGENCY OVERVIEW

PART 1

14 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

ABOUT US

The Agency commenced operations on 1 January 2011, following the passage of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 by the Australian Parliament in November 2010. The Agency was established as a national body with the capacity to lead, facilitate and coordinate prevention and health promotion efforts across the country.

ROLE AND FUNCTIONS

The Agency advises the Commonwealth Minister for Health about preventive health and may be requested to advise, or make recommendations to the Standing Council on Health (SCoH), a state or territory government or the Australian Local Government Association. This provides a valuable opportunity to influence prevention and health promotion policy and strategy development across the country. The Agency is integrating work already underway by the Commonwealth, states and territories and the non-government and community sectors and for the scale-up of programs and interventions to maximise outcomes for the community.

The Agency is focused on evidence-informed efforts in prevention and the development of integrated approaches to address health risk, including the social determinants of health and through the delivery of primary health care services to the community. The Agency is helping to build an environment to speed up the development of evidence for further action and is providing national leadership in the dissemination of knowledge and, with partners, strengthening national data and information capacity in order to better measure and report on progress.

The Agency is also playing a critical role in ensuring a balance between ‘top down’ approaches (traditionally the role of SCoH, the Commonwealth and state and territory governments) and ‘bottom-up’ approaches (from families, communities and industry) together playing a significant role in achieving progress on strategic priorities. Governments agree that a comprehensive approach to preventive health must include the full range of players that can help make healthy choices easy choices for all Australians.

AGENCY OVERVIEW

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 15

The Agency has six high level strategic goals which capture the scope of its activity and which will, through sustained attention and collaborative action, deliver the vision.

GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY Promote and guide the development, application, integration and review of public, organisational and community-based prevention and health promotion policies.

GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION Provide policy advice and program leadership to support the development, implementation, evaluation and scaling up of evidence-informed health promotion and health risk reduction strategies for population groups across the lifespan and in a range of settings, with an initial focus on obesity, tobacco and harmful alcohol consumption.

GOAL 3: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Drive the development of dynamic knowledge systems that enable evidence-informed policy and practice in prevention and health promotion across Australia.

GOAL 4: INFORMATION AND REPORTING Guide improvements in national surveillance systems for prevention and health promotion and ensure that information on the progress of prevention and health promotion strategies is made readily available and regularly reported.

GOAL 5: CAPACITY BUILDING Build broad and comprehensive prevention and health promotion capacity.

GOAL 6: ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE Establish the Agency as an innovative, reliable, transparent and accountable organisation, highly regarded by governments, partners, staff and the community with a strong national identity.

STRATEGIC GOALS

OUR MISSION To be the catalyst for strategic partnerships, including the provision of technical advice and assistance to all levels of government and in all sectors, to promote health and reduce health risk and inequalities.nitiate actions to promote health across the

OUR VISION A healthy Australian society, where the promotion of health is embraced by every sector, valued by every individual, and includes everybody.

16 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

VALUES

Catalyst - initiate, foster, broker, promote and add value to prevention and health promotion efforts throughout Australia. Collaboration - build and strengthen effective and lasting partnerships across all levels and all relevant portfolios of government and with the health system, the research community, industry, media, and the non-government and community sectors.

Credibility - support and produce well-researched and high quality policies, programs and advice, based on the best available evidence and expertise.

Innovation - facilitate solutions that go beyond the traditional silos and boundaries of institutions and sectors and actively seek new approaches to connect research with policy and practice.

Integrity - be accountable for all facets of the Agency’s work, acting with honesty and transparency in all work.

Learning - foster continuous learning and development.

OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM STRUCTURE The Agency’s outcome and program structure is set out in the 2012-2013 Portfolio Budget Statements for the Health and Ageing portfolio. The outcomes, programs and measures of performance are consistent with those set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements. The report on performance shows a clear relationship between the targets set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements and the results achieved in 2012-2013. The Agency’s single outcome was delivered through Program 1.1: Preventive Health, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Outcomes and programs, 2012-2013

Through Program 1.1, the Australian Government aims to:

Monitor, evaluate and build evidence in relation to health promotion and disease prevention strategies and facilitate rapid and effective dissemination for widespread utilisation and scale-up; reduce harmful alcohol consumption; coordinate and implement a national approach to social marketing for preventive health programs; and establish new partnerships for innovative programs and policy advice.

OUTCOME 1

A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 17

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

At 30 June 2013, the Agency employed 42 staff (39.53 full-time equivalents). The average staffing level for 2012-2013 was 43.01.

Figure 2 sets out the organisational structure of the Agency.

Figure 2: Agency Organisational Chart 2012-2013

KNOWLEDGE & OPERATIONS BRANCH

FINANCE

PROCUREMENT, GRANTS & PROBITY

TOBACCO CONTROL & ALCOHOL POLICY

SOCIAL MARKETING & PARTNERSHIPS

SURVEILLANCE, RESEARCH & EVALUATION

PREVENTION SYSTEMS & OBESITY POLICY

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT & CORPORATE SUPPORT

COMMUNICATIONS

POLICY & PROGRAMS BRANCH

ADVISORY COUNCIL

AUDIT COMMITTEE

EXPERT COMMITTEES RESEARCH ALCOHOL OBESITY TOBACCO

NBDS PROGRAMS: - COMMUNITY LEVEL INITIATIVES - COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIP FUND

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH FUND

LOUISE SYLVAN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

-NATIONAL TOBACCO CAMPAIGN -MEASURE UP OBESITY CAMPAIGN -NBDS SOCIAL MARKETING CAMPAIGN

• w • w • w

MEDICARE LOCALS TASKFORCE

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AWARDS

18 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK MINISTER

During 2012-2013 two Ministers had portfolio responsibility for the work of the Agency; The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP Minister for Health had overall carriage of the Agency, while the Hon. Mark Butler MP, Minister for Mental Health and Ageing, had responsibility for alcohol policy and programs.

GOVERNANCE TEAM

The Governance Team provides the Agency with strategic and operational leadership. The group consists of:

Ms Louise Sylvan, Chief Executive Officer

Ms Sylvan has been Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Agency since 23 September 2011. The ANPHA Act sets out the functions and responsibilities of the CEO. In summary these are as follows:

• advise on, lead and be a catalyst for national prevention and health promotion programs;

• effectively collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate evidence in relation to prevention and health promotion strategies;

• facilitate a national prevention and health promotion research infrastructure;

• generate new and innovative partnerships with workplaces, communities and for schools;

• support the ongoing development of a workforce skilled in prevention and health promotion; and

• lead a national approach to social marketing for prevention and health promotion programs.

Dr Lisa Studdert, Manager, Programs and Policy

The Policy and Programs Branch provides advice and program support on health promotion and disease prevention, particularly regarding obesity, tobacco and alcohol. The teams within the branch are Social Marketing and Partnerships, Alcohol Policy and Tobacco Control, Prevention Systems and Obesity Policy, and Surveillance, Research and Evaluation.

Mr John Kalokerinos, Chief Operating Officer until March 2013

Ms Roz Lucas, Chief Operating Officer (Acting) from April 2013

The Operations and Knowledge Branch maintains the Agency’s governance arrangements. The Branch manages organisational governance including human resources, finance, corporate communications and program governance, including risk management, procurement, probity and grants administration.

•

ADVISORY COUNCIL

The ANPHA Act establishes the Agency’s Advisory Council which has the function of advising the CEO on preventive health matters.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 19

The Act provides that the Advisory Council is to consist of:

• one member representing the Commonwealth; • at least one member, but not more than 2 members, representing the governments of the states and territories; and

• at least 5, but not more than 8, other members with expertise relating to preventive health.

Advisory Council members are appointed by the Minister for Health.

The Advisory Council comprises 11 members, and their remuneration and allowances are determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. The Advisory Council met 4 times during 2012-13 in Canberra, Melbourne, Brisbane and by teleconference. Meetings held in Melbourne and Brisbane enabled the Council to meet with State health ministers and senior State Government staff. In 2012-13 the Advisory Council provided advice on:

• stakeholder engagement, including engagement with industry and monitoring dialogue with industry;

• economic value of prevention; • media engagement; • workforce and research prevention strategies; • social marketing; and

• the Agency’s 2013-14 Operational Plan.

Position Name #

Chair Professor Christine Bennett 4/4

Deputy Chair Professor Rob Moodie 3/4

Member Mr David Butt (Commonwealth representative) 3/4

Member Professor Michael Daube 2/4

Member Dr Tony Hobbs (up to 4 December 2012) 2/2

Member Ms Jude Munro 4/4

Member Dr Lyn Roberts 4/4

Member Dr Roscoe Taylor (state/territory representative) 4/4

Member Ms Pat Turner 1/4

Member The Hon Trish Worth 4/4

Member Dr Jeannette Young (state/territory representative) 3/4

Table 1: Advisory Council Members and meeting attendance 2012-2013

Notes: Unless otherwise stated, members were appointed on 7 July 2011. # Number of meetings attended.

The practice of issuing a communiqué after each meeting promotes communication of the key Advisory Council deliberations. Communiqués are available on the Agency’s website at: www.anpha.gov.au

20 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Member Contributing Expertise

Professor John McCallum - Chair Preventive health research

Professor Peter d’Abbs Indigenous health

Dr Shelley Bowen Prevention and population health

Emeritus Professor Meredith Edwards Translational research

Professor Penny Hawe Population health interventions

Professor Kerin O’Dea Obesity/nutrition/Indigenous health

Professor Melanie Wakefield Tobacco control

Professor Helen Berry Social determinants of health/translational research

Member Contributing Expertise

Professor Margaret Hamilton - Chair Alcohol research/education/clinical work

Ms Donna Ah Chee Indigenous health

Professor Tanya Chikritzhs Alcohol research

Ms Sondra Davoren Legal policy

Dr Steve Hambleton Primary care

Detective Superintendent Jim Migro Law enforcement/alcohol research/education

Professor Rob Moodie Public health promotion

Mr John Pollaers Industry

EXPERT COMMITTEES During 2012-2013 the Agency consulted its four expert committees covering research, alcohol, obesity and tobacco. The CEO is an ex-officio member of each expert committee.

For more information about any of the Expert Committee’s terms of reference visit: www.anpha.gov.au

Expert Committee on Research The Agency’s Expert Committee on Research was established to provide advice to the CEO on issues relating to preventive health research, including the development of the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18, expenditure of the National Preventive Health Research Fund and promotion of the development of preventive health research infrastructure in Australia. The Committee also assists the Agency in its leadership role in knowledge-sharing and research collaboration. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/13) are listed in the table below:

Expert Committee on Alcohol

The role of the Expert Committee on Alcohol is to assist and advise on the Agency’s policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency’s CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on alcohol-related issues. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/13) are listed in the table below:

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 21

Expert Committee on Obesity

The role of the Expert Committee on Obesity is to assist and advise on the Agency’s policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency’s CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on obesity-related issues. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/13) are listed in the table below:

Member Contributing Expertise

Professor Ian Caterson - Chair Research into the causes and prevention of obesity, nutrition and diabetes

Professor Adrian Bauman Physical inactivity/public policy/translational research

Ms Rebecca Boustead Industry, food marketing and reformulation

Mr Todd Harper Social marketing and health promotion

Dr Amanda Lee Obesity prevention within state and territory

governments and issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Ms Jane Martin Advocacy and policy development in obesity prevention

Dr Lyn Roberts Cardiovascular disease programs and policy/community engagement

Professor Boyd Swinburn Community-based obesity prevention research

Expert Committee on Tobacco

The role of the Expert Committee on Tobacco is to assist and advise on the Agency’s policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency’s CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on tobacco-related issues. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/13) are listed in the table below:

Member Contributing Expertise

Professor Melanie Wakefield - Chair Tobacco control policy and program evaluation

Dr Tom Calma Tobacco control in Indigenous communities

Professor Simon Chapman Tobacco-based public health and public health research

Ms Trish Cotter Communication and social marketing

Professor Mike Daube Public health promotion and tobacco control

Dr Caroline Miller Tobacco program evaluation

Ms Kate Purcell Chronic disease prevention and health advancement

Ms Denise Sullivan Chronic disease prevention

22 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

CASE STUDY

Think Smart, Drink Smart

The Carpentaria Youth Drink Smart Initiative (CYDSI) is engaging with the young people of Normanton, in the Gulf of Carpentaria, in activities that provide them with positive life messages, learnings and mentoring from community members in relation to drinking alcohol responsibly.

The core message of the project’s activities is “Think Smart, Drink Smart”. This message is about highlighting to young people the choices they can make when drinking alcohol, which may include choosing not to drink or simply drinking responsibly (smarter).

The CYDSI has provided a range of diverse activities that cater to the different age groups within the target audience. Some of these activities have included:

• Young Ladies’ Leadership Camp for young women aged between 16 and 24 years. The camp focused on health and wellbeing, mentoring with sports people, work experience, team building and general life skills.

• Bull riding practice days for young men aged between 16 and 24 years. The rodeo clinics have had a high level of engagement with the male youth. This activity is catered to both work and leisure interests as the rural cattle station lifestyle provides a focus for the young men who often have aspirations of obtaining employment on stations or participating at a higher level in rodeo and horse sports.

• Hip hop workshops have been held, delivering positive messages and providing education about topical issues such as binge drinking. The workshops have been very popular with numerous requests from the community for repeat visits.

A key project partner of CYDSI is the Normanton Police Station. Senior Sergeant Duane Amos talks about the positive impact CYDSI has had in the Normanton community:

“The partnership of CYDSI and the Normanton Police Station has had direct results on a number of levels within the Normanton community,” Snr Sgt Amos said.

“The partnership enhances our policing capabilities in a proactive, positive community response by actively engaging with the youth in interesting programs instead of law enforcement activities. It is providing youth alternatives, pathways and enhancing their decision making on choosing healthier alternatives.”

“The Normanton Rodeo was provided with CYDSI branded bottled water this year and it received a glowing response from the community. It reinforced the message of choosing the healthier option instead of alcohol and it was pleasing to see the amount of people availing themselves of the free water instead of alcohol. The statistics from our policing of this event showed that only 4 persons were arrested compared to 21 the previous year.”

“The program has complemented the Normanton Liquor Accord, Normanton Police Road Smart Initiative and is an excellent example of a community partnership working to achieve outcomes for youth in rural communities”.

COMMUNITY LEVEL INITIATIVE CARPENTARIA YOUTH DRINK SMART INITIATIVE

REPORT ON

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS

PART 2

24 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

ORGANISATIONAL GOALS

GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY Promote and guide the development, application, integration and review of public, organisational and community-based prevention and health promotion policies.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 1.1

Policy leadership Provide leadership on effective prevention and health promotion policies for application at national, state and local levels

KRA 1.2

Policy Advice

Work with national expert advisory groups and other partners to provide independent, timely and evidence-based advice on effective prevention and health promotion policies

Convened a number of national events to bring key stakeholders together to provide a focus on preventive health research and issues and priorities for action. Events included:

• National Symposium on Alcohol Social Marketing (28 November 2012)

• National Symposium on Active Recreation and Sport for Health: Barriers to Young People’s Participation (6 Dec 2012)

• National Symposium on Smoking and Disadvantage (18 June 2013)

• National Preventive Health Research Symposium (26 June 2013)

Presented addresses at industry, academic, government and non-government forums.

Participated in two inter-jurisdictional ‘Healthies’ meetings to develop co-ordinated policy to promote health. Coordinated state and territory input into the development of the Healthy Workers Awards.

Delivered a report to the Australian Government examining the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price for alcohol.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 25

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 1.3 Partnerships Establish a culture of cooperation, collaboration and dialogue for prevention and health promotion policy development

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Completed a national social marketing stakeholder engagement plan.

Coordinated and completed the national media plan for two further waves of the National Tobacco Campaign.

Progressed opportunities for national collaboration on obesity prevention social marketing as part of the Shape Up Australia initiative, and for national collaboration on obesity and alcohol research with states and territories.

Established a Social Marketing for Obesity Prevention Group (SMOP), including state and territory and non-government members, to facilitate a national approach to social marketing for preventive health and identify opportunities for collaboration to coordinate activities nationally. Initial meetings aimed at further aligning social marketing with broader policy and program approaches.

Conducted workshops for Medicare Locals on their role in addressing the social determinants of health and preventive health evidence generation, held in November 2012 and March 2013 respectively.

Sponsored seven preventive health projects under the Agency’s Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in Medicare Locals program. The projects commenced in February 2013.

Commissioned the Preventive Health Matters knowledge network web tool for Medicare Locals to support their preventive health capability development. The web tool commenced in June 2013.

Implemented, through regular monthly engagement with the Australian Medicare Local Alliance, the aims of a joint policy statement, agreed in June 2012, for the role of Medicare Locals in disease prevention and health promotion.

Supported the establishment of the NHMRC Partnership Centre - The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre - on the theme Systems perspectives on preventing lifestyle-related chronic health problems under a multi-party agreement and with an approved comprehensive 5-year work plan. Lead investigators have met to organise the research operations.

26 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 1.4

Funding models Examine and provide advice to the Commonwealth on future funding models to support enhanced and effective investment in prevention and health promotion

KEY ACHIEVEMENT

Work is progressing as part of he Australian Prevention Partnership Centre.

GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY continued

KEY FACTS - OBESITY & DIABETES

OBESE PEOPLE

4xMORE LIKELY TO DEVELOP DIABETES THAN THOSE WITH NORMAL WEIGHT *Source: Ausdiab 2012

T

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 27

GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION Provide policy advice and program leadership to support the development, implementation, evaluation and scaling up of evidence-informed health promotion and health risk reduction strategies for population groups across the lifespan and in a range of settings, with an initial focus on obesity, tobacco and harmful alcohol consumption.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.1 Integrated response to health risk Develop comprehensive population-health based approaches to health risk that focus on the social and other determinants of disease and risk and associated co-morbidities

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Co-hosted a Grand Challenge Workshop on The Social and Other Determinants of Health: Taking a Systematic Approach to Prevention through Medicare Locals at the

AML Alliance National Primary Health Care Conference.

Provided a submission to the Senate on Community Affairs Inquiry into Australia’s domestic response to the WHO’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health Report, Closing the Gap Within A Generation.

Commissioned the Preventive Health Matters knowledge network web tool for Medicare Locals to support their preventive health capability development. The web tool launched in June 2013.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.2 Reduce obesity Support, extend and improve policies and programs that aim to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity, through research, analysis and advice

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Established a Social Marketing for Obesity Prevention (SMOP) group, including state and territory and non-government members, to coordinate activities nationally. Initial meetings aimed at further aligning social marketing with broader policy and program approaches.

Commissioned and completed formative research into the attitudes and behaviour of Australians towards obesity prevention. Findings used to help develop social marketing activities including Shape Up Australia and other obesity programs.

Launched new social marketing initiative for obesity prevention Shape Up Australia in February 2013. Through Shape Up Australia, the Agency is partnering with organisations to help increase the proportion of Australians at a healthy body weight and reduce the prevalence of lifestyle related chronic disease.

28 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.2 Reduce obesity

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued...

Presented a report on National Seminar on Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising to Children to the Standing Council on Health (SCoH) for its 9 November 2012 meeting.

Released two draft frameworks for monitoring television marketing and advertising to children of unhealthy food and drinks for public consultation in May 2013:

• Framework 1 - Monitoring of total exposure of television marketing and advertising to children of unhealthy food and drinks. • Framework 2 - Monitoring of compliance of the

food industry self-regulation marketing to children initiatives.

Furthered the development of a priority-driven research agenda for obesity prevention. Work is continuing into 2013-14 with the release of a final report in late-2013. This Report will be an annex to the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18.

Commenced the development of three overweight and obesity prevention Evidence Briefs to collate all currently available scientific evidence on the following key areas:

• Sugar sweetened beverages with a focus on, but not limited to, its association with obesity in children • Obesity prevalence trends (including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population data)

• Sedentary behaviour: the emerging scientific evidence

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 29

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Coordinated and implemented the ongoing National Tobacco Campaign, with support from the Campaign Reference Group and the Agency’s Expert Committee on Tobacco, and consultation with wider stakeholders, to continue raising awareness of the harms of smoking and discourage its use, promote attempts to quit and discourage relapse. Campaign activities and initiatives included:

• Delivered national television activity to coincide with new health warnings on cigarette packs in December 2012.

• Developed the new Stop before the Suffering Starts message and delivered national television, outdoor, magazine, radio and online advertising, and public relations activities for this campaign from March to June 2013.

• Developed and promoted the workplace quit smoking initiative - Butt Out at Work on World No Tobacco Day to encourage Australian employers to promote staff quit attempts and discourage tobacco use. World No Tobacco Day is an annual event where smokers across the globe are encouraged to quit smoking and to stay quit. The Butt Out at Work initiative developed a free workplace toolkit with anti-smoking posters, web tools and messaging that could be downloaded and personalised for individual workplaces.

• The Quit Now: My QuitBuddy free smartphone app continued to see exceptional success in the area with over 200,000 smokers downloading it in a year. Around 40% of those using the app report they are remaining quit after six months.

• Supported the 2013 Summernats car festival to promote the Quit Now: My QuitBuddy smart phone app.

• Supported the Driver Reviver roadside rest sites across Australia to promote the National Tobacco Campaign’s Get on the Road to Better Health message. The quit smoking message is being displayed at over 200 Driver Reviver sites across Australia throughout school and major holiday periods in 2013. Over 1 million people stop at Driver Revivers each year.

GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.3

Reduce the use of, and exposure to, tobacco Support evidence-based action to reduce smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke through strong policies and programs

30 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued...

Developed and released the Priority- iven Research Agenda for Tobacco Control in Australia (Final Report) through a consultative process involving Australian and international researchers and tobacco control experts. The Report is an Annex to the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18.

Developed and released a Tobacco Control and Mass Media Campaigns Evidence Brief focusing on mass media campaigns to reduce smoking behaviour and reviewing evidence of the effectiveness of them. This Evidence Brief concentrates on the three most recent reviews of the effects on youth and adults as well as more recent population-based studies.

Convened a National Symposium on Smoking and Disadvantage to address tobacco related disparities in health and well-being across Australia and bring together representatives from relevant Australian federal, state & territory government, and non-government agencies involved in supporting disadvantaged groups who have higher smoking rates than the general population.

Established the Smoking and Disadvantage Network in July 2012 to address the high prevalence of smoking among our most disadvantaged groups including people who have drug and alcohol issues, who are experiencing homelessness, who have criminal justice issues, are sole parents, are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, are unemployed, and/or are experiencing mental health issues.

Developed and released a Smoking and Disadvantage Evidence Brief in June 2013 highlighting that smoking rates among certain disadvantaged groups of the population are considerably higher than average smoking rates, and that targeted support is needed for successful quitting behaviour.

Developed and launched a Smoking and Disadvantage Network online mini-site in June 2013, providing information on Network members and case studies on key projects and initiatives in this area.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.3

Reduce the use of, and exposure to, tobacco

Dr

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 31

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.4 Reduce the harmful consumption of alcohol Promote and support evidence-based approaches to address harmful alcohol consumption through strong policies and programs

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Convened a National Symposium on Social Marketing to Reduce Harmful Alcohol Consumption in November 2012. This event initiated ongoing national dialogue among government and non-government organisations and discussed the need to have a long term strategy of consistent social marketing that focuses on harmful drinking across population segments, not just youth. A Report on Proceedings from the event was circulated to attendees in March 2013.

Developed and released an issues paper on Alcohol Advertising: The effectiveness of current regulatory codes in addressing community concerns in December 2012. The issues paper sought to provide background information on the current state of alcohol advertising and marketing, alcohol advertising regulation and associated current issues in Australia and provided stakeholders with the opportunity to present their views to the Agency.

The primary focus of the paper was the impact of alcohol marketing on children and young people and the effectiveness of current regulation in addressing community concerns. During the consultation period a total of 34 public submissions were received and are being reviewed. A final report is expected to be provided to the Commonwealth Minister for Health during 2013-2014.

Developed and provided the final report and advice to the Government on Exploring the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price for alcohol in May 2013.

Work commenced on the development of a priority-driven research agenda for the prevention of alcohol related harm in Australia and is scheduled for completion by the end of 2013. The Report will be an Annex to the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18.

32 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 2.4 Reduce the harmful consumption of alcohol

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued...

Continued the management and development of initiatives and programs under the National Binge Drinking Strategy (NBDS) which aims to address Australia’s harmful binge drinking culture, especially among young people.

• Through community organisations, and in settings such as sporting clubs, music festivals, youth clubs and national sporting organisations the NBDS Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking initiative focuses on raising awareness of the short and long-term impacts of harmful or ‘risky’ drinking among young people, and over time, contribute to the development of a more responsible drinking culture within Australian society.

• During 2012-2013 a further three national sporting organisations joined the Community Sponsorship Fund, part of the Be the Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking initiative: Australian University Sports, Surfing Australia and Baseball Australia. (Note: shortly after the 2012-2013 reporting period, the Australian Paralympic Committee joined the initiative.)

• Developed and implemented the Be the Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking social marketing campaign to engage with young Australians to bring about a cultural shift, that encourages a more responsible attitude towards alcohol consumption. The campaign focuses on using social and digital media channels as well as experiential activities. The activities include popular events such as music festivals, action sports and crowd sourcing competitions.

• Continued the management of the NBDS Community Level Initiatives (third round grants) projects which have provided a mid-term progress report outlining key achievements and progress made in the reporting timeframe.

• Managed the expansion of the Australian Drug Foundation’s Good Sports program which addresses the adverse aspects of alcohol-related culture in community-based sporting clubs. The program expansion means the number of clubs participating in the program and promoting the positive messages and initiatives of the program will rise from 5,000 to 6,500 and reach over 2 million Australians.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 33

GOAL 3: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Drive the development of dynamic knowledge systems that enable evidence-informed policy and practice in prevention and health promotion across Australia.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 3.1 Prevention and health promotion research Ensure prevention and health promotion policies and programs are underpinned by the best possible evidence with world-class, sustainable research capacity in Australia

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Launched, and circulated to stakeholders, the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-2018 in June 2013. The Strategy was the culmination of a series of consultations with stakeholders and presents a model for collaborative, integrative research for achieving evidence-based solutions to complex preventive health issues.

Continued to manage the Preventive Health Research Fund that supports investigator-driven research projects in priority areas such as tobacco, obesity and harmful use of alcohol. The Fund supports the national evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health. The evaluation will provide information on the effectiveness of partnership activities and programs in sustaining improvements in health risk behaviours in Australia.

Awarded three Preventive Health Research Fellowships which will directly provide for development and translation of evidence related to the Agency’s work program and wider national preventive health program development. The Research Fellows will be required to produce cutting edge and significant new findings in the areas of childhood obesity prevention and reduction of harmful alcohol consumption among young people.

Supported the establishment of the NHMRC Partnership Centre - The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre. The Centre focuses on systems perspectives on preventing lifestyle-related chronic health problems under a multi-party agreement and with an approved comprehensive 5-year work plan.

Convened the National Preventive Health Research Symposium in Canberra in June 2013. A highlight of the event included the launch of the National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18 and presentations from the Agency’s Research Grant and Research Fellowship recipients to a diverse group of over 130 stakeholders.

34 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 3.1 Prevention and health promotion research

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued

Developed a framework to guide a research program on future economic evaluation for preventive health. The framework drew input from an expert economics discussion meeting in August 2012 and the first paper is the essay, The Economic Value of Prevention in the State of Preventive Health 2013 report.

KEY FACTS - SMOKING

18% 14%

ADULTS REPORTED SMOKING ON A DAILY BASIS

MORE MALES SMOKED DAILY THAN FEMALES

2011- 2012

PER CENT 16.1 A CONTINUING DECLINE IN DAILY SMOKING RATES IN AUSTRALIA

THE HIGHEST RATES OF SMOKING ARE IN THE MOST DISADVANTAGED AREAS

Source: Australian Health Survey 2011-12

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 35

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 3.2 Evidence and analysis dissemination Collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate knowledge for improving and expanding prevention and health promotion practice across sectors and settings

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Developed and released a Tobacco Control and Mass Media Campaigns Evidence Brief focusing on mass media campaigns to reduce smoking behaviour and reviewing evidence of their effectiveness. This evidence brief concentrates on the three most recent reviews of the effects on youth and adults as well as more recent population-based studies.

Developed and released a Smoking and Disadvantage Evidence Brief in June 2013 highlighting that smoking rates among certain disadvantaged groups of the population are considerably higher than average smoking rates, and that targeted support is needed for successful quitting behaviour.

Developed and launched a Smoking and Disadvantage Network online mini-site in June 2013, providing information on Network members and case studies on key projects and initiatives in this area.

Commissioned the Preventive Health Matters knowledge network web tool for Medicare Locals to support their preventive health capability development and dissemination of information and resources. The web tool commenced in June 2013.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 3.3 Prevention and health promotion evaluation Promote and support evaluation and the development of an evaluation culture in all programs and policies related to prevention and health promotion in order to build evidence and capacity

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Progressed the National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, including:

• finalised the framework and strategy for evaluation;

• contracted an independent evaluation team; and

• held consultations and an evaluation forum in preparation of the formative phase of the evaluation.

36 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

GOAL 4: INFORMATION AND REPORTING Guide improvements in national surveillance systems for prevention and health promotion and ensure that information on the progress of prevention and health promotion strategies is made readily available and regularly reported.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 4.1 National systems for surveillance Provide advice and support to the ongoing development and improvement of national surveillance systems in all areas related to prevention and health promotion policies and programs

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Developed a review paper on national health prevention and promotion surveillance needs. The paper is due to be released in December 2013.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 4.2 Information analysis and reporting Monitor, synthesise, analyse and disseminate information about prevention and health promotion in Australia and provide timely and authoritative reporting

KEY ACHIEVEMENT

Established a State of Preventive Health Advisory Committee and prepared a draft State of Preventive Health 2013 report (Final Report was launched shortly

after the end of the annual reporting period on 26 July 2013).

The Report provides a comprehensive overview of the health challenges facing Australians, particularly in relation to chronic disease, and the associated risk factors including tobacco consumption, harmful alcohol use and obesity.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 37

GOAL 5: CAPACITY BUILDING Build broad and comprehensive prevention and health promotion capacity.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 5.1 Prevention and health promotion workforce and systems Strengthen the strategic underpinnings and planning for inclusion of prevention and health promotion as a core component of a capable, sustainable and motivated workforce and health care system

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Consultations with jurisdictions and experts identified the need for formative workforce planning research before work on a preventive health workforce strategy could commence. A report summarising the outcomes of the consultations is currently being finalised.

The research is being undertaken by The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre. The Partnership Centre is progressing the work and is due to report back to the

Agency in 2013-2014.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 5.2 Quality Improvement Support and recognise continuous quality improvement, best practice and excellence in prevention and health promotion practices

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

A national preventive health awards program was developed in consultation with key partners. The National Preventive Health Awards ceremony was held shortly after the reporting period, on 26 July 2013.

The Awards have promoted leadership in the area of preventive health, and have recognised sectors of the Australian community that are working hard to promote the importance of good health and well-being and acknowledged excellence and best practice in relation to preventive health issues in four key areas:

• local communities through Medicare Locals; • translational research projects; • journalism; and • healthy workplaces through health and well-being

programs.

In the Healthy Workplace Awards categories Australian businesses and organisations were awarded for their best practice prevention and health promotion workplace programs and initiatives.

38 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

GOAL 6: ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE Establish the Agency as an innovative, reliable, transparent and accountable organisation, highly regarded by governments, partners, staff and the community.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 6.1 Governance Establish robust governance and management systems

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

The financial delegations have been reviewed to reflect the nature of the work of the Agency and to assure a strong control framework for the expenditure of Commonwealth funds. Mandatory quality assurance of all procurement and grant documentation has been fully implemented and this has delivered improvements to agency capability in these areas.

ANAO audits have been reviewed to identify areas of better practice and lessons learned and these have been incorporated into Agency procedures. An ongoing program of coaching for staff in best practice procurement, grants and contract management has been undertaken and elements included in the staff induction program. More than 25 percent of Agency staff received training in one or more of these courses during 2012-2013.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 6.2 Human Resources Attract, retain and develop high performing staff in a healthy work environment

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Regular consultation with staff was achieved through weekly all staff meetings. Workplace Health and Safety Committee meetings were held quarterly to address any health and safety issues.

The Workplace Consultative Forum met quarterly during 2012-2013 and had representation from staff, workplace health & safety committee, union delegates and union officials. The forum discussed and resolved issues raised by staff and was used as a conduit to obtain staff input and feedback on policies and procedures.

The Agency’s Enterprise Bargaining Agreement was approved in October 2012.

The Agency continued to develop policies to ensure robust governance across the Agency. A 2013-2015 workforce plan will be developed based on the likely shape of the agency going forward. This will be finalised in the second half of the 2013-2014 financial year.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 39

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 6.3 Identity and communications Ensure ANPHA’s role in, and approach to, prevention and health promotion is understood and communicated to all partners in all sectors, including for governments.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 6.4 Organisational effectiveness Ensure ANPHA develops as a learning organisation

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Agency Branding Guidelines were developed to ensure consistency in design and formatting of all the Agency’s publications, corporate and online materials. The Agency’s branding reflects a positive and professional approach.

A redesign and content refresh of the Agency website was undertaken to improve search functionality and accessibility in line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.0 that is now a mandatory requirement for all government websites. The redesign of the Agency website also reflects the new branding guidelines and provides a consistent look and feel to all Agency corporate and online materials.

An Agency Facebook page, You Tube and Twitter accounts were created and developed to further promote the Agency’s projects, publications, campaigns and events. The YouTube account hosts videos and transcripts of major Agency events and presentations.

Developed a Multicultural Access and Equity Plan to guide the Agency’s efforts to engage with culturally and linguistically diverse groups.

Drafted a Reconciliation Action Plan that articulates the Agency’s vision for reconciliation, which is to ensure equity in opportunity and access to programs, support and knowledge in relation to the promotion of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

As part of the Agency’s commitment to continuous improvement and sound governance triannual reviews of progress against the Operational Plan are undertaken together with a review of alignment with our overall Strategic Plan. A review of the Strategic Plan was commenced and further work on this will proceed in the latter half of 2013.

The Agency ensures staff have access to a comprehensive suite of internal and external training, that covers induction and broad public service skills.

40 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

CASE STUDY

New mobile site will guide people to better health

The Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local is developing a mobile site to guide people to a healthier life by educating users about disease risk factors and connecting them to services in their local community.

The Health Promotion Navigator Project is supported through the Australian National Preventive Health Agency’s Disease Prevention in Primary Care program, and is partnering with the local Councils, peak bodies, neighbourhood centres and the Metro North Brisbane Health and Hospital Service.

The Project will use smart phone and mobile web technology to reach people who may not otherwise seek advice about how to be healthier. Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local Coordinator Jo Jarden says the Project recognises the need to think outside traditional health promotion methods.

“SMART PHONES AND TABLETS ARE NOW PART OF EVERYDAY LIFE; THIS PROJECT WILL BRING HEALTH CARE TO THE COMMUNITY THROUGH THIS PERSONALISED TECHNOLOGY”

“Our health navigator will give people access to the help they need to make healthier lifestyle choices, at their finger tips,” Ms Jarden said.

The health navigator will provide users with a personalised self-risk assessment as well as information about their risk factors. The technology will guide users to local health professionals or free or low cost lifestyle programs, based on their personal profiles.

Chair of the National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance, Dr Rob Grenfell said the Alliance was pleased to be a Project partner in this “innovative and bold” initiative.

“This Project connects people, at a personal level through an app or mobile site to privately consider and explore their health risk factors and be introduced to a

community of local health professionals and health promotion programs. This app is something of a window to better health,” he said.

The George Institute for Global Health will design and develop the electronic tool, which will include a validated algorithm developed with the National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance that will provide people with an indication of their risk of chronic illness.

“We have a fantastic group of partners who are contributing to the development of the navigator or who will participate by becoming providers of lifestyle modification programs,” Ms Jarden said.

General practitioners will also be offered support in conjunction with the Project to promote healthy lifestyles and implement risk assessment activities in their practices for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and kidney function.

A trial of the mobile site will begin in January 2014 and Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local is providing neighbourhood centres with tablets, so people without smart phones will be able to use the app.

PROJECT PARTNERS

• Australian National Preventive Health Agency • Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local • The George Institute for Global Health • National Vascular Disease Prevention

Alliance • Metro Brisbane Health and Hospital Service • Moreton Bay Regional Council • Somerset Regional Council • Brisbane City Council • Diabetes Queensland • Stroke Foundation • Heart Foundation Queensland • Ethnic Community Council of Queensland • Neighbourhood Centres

Source: Adapted from the Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local Link newsletter

DISEASE PREVENTION IN PRIMARY CARE METRO NORTH BRISBANE MEDICAL LOCAL

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

PART 3

42 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

PERFORMANCE REPORTING FRAMEWORK

This section reports on the Agency’s performance for 2012-2013 based on the performance reporting framework set down in the 2012-2013 Health and Ageing Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Through the PBS, the Government states Outcomes and planned performance for the year. Outcomes are the intended results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Government on the Australian community. Agencies deliver Programs, which are the Government actions taken to deliver the stated Outcomes. Each Outcome is described together with its related Programs, specifying the indicators and targets used to assess and monitor the performance of an agency in achieving Government Outcomes.

The Agency reports against one Outcome, one Program and four deliverables as shown in the following table:

Table 2: Performance Reporting Framework

Drivers ANPHA Act

2012-2013 Portfolio Budget Statements

Outcome 1 A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors

Program 1.1 Preventive Health

Program Objectives • Monitor, evaluate and build evidence in relation to health promotion and disease prevention strategies and facilitate rapid and effective dissemination for widespread utilisation and scale-up • Reduce harmful alcohol consumption

• Coordinate and implement a national approach to social marketing for preventive health programs • Establish new partnerships for innovative programs and policy advice

Major Activities (Deliverables) 1. Expand and strengthen preventive health research 2. Promote health and wellbeing through community

preventive health programs

3. Implement a national approach to social marketing for

preventive health programs

4. Advise and make recommendations on matters relating to preventive health

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 43

1. EXPAND AND STRENGTHEN PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH

QUALITATIVE DELIVERABLE

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY DEVELOPED

2012-13 Reference Point Strategy finalised and disseminated to key stakeholders

Result: Deliverable achieved.

The National Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18 was launched at the National Preventive Health Research Symposium on 26 June 2013.

The Strategy’s model for collaborative, integrative research provides a framework for transforming Australia’s preventive health research infrastructure and capabilities to better meet the needs of policy makers and practitioners. The Strategy guides the Agency’s use of the National Preventive Health Research Fund, but more importantly, is a national guide for the preventive health research, policy and practice community to support a research system that seeks practical solutions to problems.

The Strategy’s primary purpose is to foster approaches to research and evaluation which better enable all sectors, whether they are workplaces, schools or other institutions, to implement the most effective preventive health programs and enable individual choices to be evidence-informed. It will build on the already strong research and evaluation capacity in preventive health in Australia and extend this to better support and build policy and program capacity.

The first of a series of Annexes to the Research Strategy has also been published: A priority-driven research agenda for tobacco control in Australia.

QUALITATIVE INDICATOR

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY IS ACCESSIBLE AND RELEVANT TO KEY STAKEHOLDERS

2012-13 Reference Point Broad range of submissions and other inputs received from research committee and broader public health community

during public consultation phase

Result: Indicator met.

Apart from key stakeholder interviews, 56 written submissions were received in an online consultation and discussions were held in several states and territories, involving local researchers, public health experts and policy officers. A consultation report was prepared and made available on the Agency’s website.

44 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

2. PROMOTE HEALTH AND WELLBEING THROUGH COMMUNITY PREVENTIVE HEALTH PROGRAMS

QUALITATIVE DELIVERABLE

COMMUNITY-BASED AWARENESS, ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION PROGRAMS TO ADDRESS BINGE DRINKING BY YOUNG PEOPLE

2012-13 Reference Point Manage projects funded under third round of community level initiatives and rollout community sponsorship fund

Result: Deliverable achieved.

• The National Binge Drinking Strategy (NBDS) aims to influence the culture of harmful binge drinking, especially among young people, through raising awareness of the short and long-term impacts of harmful or ‘risky’ drinking among young people and, ultimately, contributing to a more responsible drinking culture within Australian society. The Agency manages three programs under the Strategy:

• 1. Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking Social Marketing Campaign

• 2. Community Sponsorship Fund

• 3. Community Level Initiative

•

• 1. Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking Social Marketing Campaign

• The NBDS’s Be the Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking social marketing activities and do not include television or mainstream media campaigns, instead focusing on social and digital media channels. These activities engage young people through popular events such as music festivals, sporting events and education sessions, and seek to influence attitudes and conversations about taking personal responsibility for behaviour and the impact on peers, family and the broader community.

•

• 2. Community Sponsorship Fund

• This Fund recognises the pivotal place of sport and the influence that sporting heroes have as role models for aspiring young sports participants and spectators. Sixteen National Sporting Organisations are sponsored to work with the Agency to promote Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking messages. Sponsorship agreements provide rights to activate anti-binge drinking messages throughout their sporting environments with in-venue signage, promotions, uniform branding, on-screen and PA announcements, and through their wide community networks via newsletters, emails and social media. As a major part of their sponsorship agreements, key athletes serve as campaign ambassadors to further promote anti-binge drinking messages.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 45

• The 16 National Sporting Organisations who have signed sponsorship agreements are:

• 1. Football Federation Australia

• 2. Basketball Australia

• 3. Netball Australia

• 4. Swimming Australia

• 5. Cycling Australia

• 6. Hockey Australia

• 7. Athletics Australia

• 8. Skateboarding Australia

• 9. Volleyball Australia

• 10. Equestrian Australia

• 11. Triathlon Australia

• 12. Canoeing Australia

• 13. Australian University Sports

• 14. Baseball Australia

• 15. Surfing Australia

• 16. Australian Paralympic Committee (joined July 2013)

• From July 2013 the AFL Players’ Association also became involved in promoting the Be The Influence - Tackling Binge Drinking messages.

•

• 3. Community Level Initiative

• This program provides grants for activities in local communities to encourage young people to take personal responsibility for their drinking, and also funds the Australian Drug Foundation’s Good Sports program to assist sporting clubs to reduce risky drinking.

• Twenty-six community based projects have been funded to enable non-government organisations, local government councils, police and other interested parties to collaborate to develop local solutions to reduce youth binge drinking. Grants are for one-off (non-recurrent) projects for up to two years. All current projects will be completed by June 2014.

• The Good Sports program has increased club participation from 4,432 clubs in May 2011 to 5,794 clubs at 30 June 2013, and now covers 70 sporting codes and reaches more than 2 million Australians. The program’s key element is its three level accreditation initiative, including alcohol management standards for clubs that serve and consume alcohol. Clubs are required to advance through the levels over time, while maintaining compliance with criteria from previous levels. Evaluation clearly demonstrates the program’s effectiveness in working to reduce alcohol-related harm in local communities. Participating clubs have reduced the rate of drink driving by 75%, achieved a 15% decrease in short-term risky drinking, and reduced the chance of long-term risky drinking among club members by 14%.

46 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

QUALITATIVE INDICATOR

COMMUNITY LEVEL ACTIVITIES EFFECTIVELY REACH AT-RISK GROUPS AND REDUCE AT-RISK BINGE DRINKING BEHAVIOURS BY YOUNG PEOPLE

2012-13 Reference Point Monitor reports from fund recipients on program effectiveness and behavioural change

Result: Indicator met.

Organisations funded under round three of the Community Level Initiatives are delivering projects to help raise awareness about the harms and risks of binge drinking to young people and others in the community.

The projects are delivering strong community based outcomes with good participation rates.

See case studies on pages 22 and 53.

Project evaluations will be available in June 2014.

KEY FACTS - YOUNG PEOPLE & ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION

The 2009 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) alcohol guidelines state that, for children and young people under 18 years of age, ‘not drinking is the safest option’.

1IN4 HOSPITALISATIONS OF 15-25 YEAR OLDS HAPPEN BECAUSE OF ALCOHOL

HOSPITAL +

It is estimated that in 2011-12 about 31% of males and 14% of females aged 15 to 17 years exceeded alcohol guidelines for single occasion risk in the past year.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 47

3. IMPLEMENT A NATIONAL APPROACH TO SOCIAL MARKETING FOR PREVENTIVE HEALTH PROGRAMS

As part of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, the Australian Government, through the Agency, continued to deliver two major social marketing campaigns related to smoking and obesity in 2012-2013.

National Tobacco Campaign

The Agency manages the mainstream National Tobacco Campaign activities. The focus of these campaign activities is to inform adult smokers (particularly 18-40 year olds) about the harms of tobacco usage and motivate them to make a quit attempt, including referral to the Quitline 13 78 48.

Complementary public relations and sponsorships further extend campaign messaging, e.g. through:

• My QuitBuddy free quit smoking smartphone app, which has been downloaded over 200, 000 times, and around 40% of those using the app report remaining smoke free after six months;

• Butt Out At Work on World No Tobacco Day (31 May each year), which targets public health providers as well as mining, construction, retail, and hospitality industries;

• Sponsorship of Driver Reviver initiative at 220 rest spots across Australia, which aims to leverage off smoking restrictions in vehicles with children; and

• Free tools and resources distributed to GPs and other frontline health service providers.

The range of advertising activity in 2012-2013, which included national TV, outdoor, radio, online and print media) was in the market for 22 weeks at a total investment of $16 million (GST exclusive).

Campaign development is guided by the Agency’s Expert Committee on Tobacco, while the reach of national activities is maximised by coordinating with state and territory jurisdictions through our Campaign Reference Group.

QUALITATIVE DELIVERABLE

UNDERTAKE SOCIAL MARKETING THAT TARGETS TOBACCO USE AND OBESITY

2012-13 Reference Point Deliver comprehensive social marketing activities for National Tobacco Campaign and ‘Measure-Up’ campaign, with at least

two waves of television advertising and accompanying media and information activities

Result: Deliverable achieved.

48 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

‘Measure Up’ Campaign

Delivery of the Measure Up campaign was ceased after funding was withdrawn in the October Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO). The facilitation and coordination of a national approach to obesity social marketing has continued by the Agency with the establishment of a national Social Marketing Obesity Prevention group and the launch of the Shape Up Australia initiative in February 2013.

The Agency developed Shape Up Australia as an overarching brand, similar to ‘Quit’ for tobacco, so consumers can identify credible evidence-based activities that are available for assisting with the challenge of reducing overweight and obesity in Australia.

Shape Up Australia is an overweight and obesity prevention branding initiative, that aims to unite activities, research and resources to raise awareness of the danger of being overweight or obese and to encourage people to make positive and informed choices in relation to their diet and levels of physical activity. The initiative was launched in February 2013 with an aim to partner and co-brand with eligible organisations (including Australian government agencies, state/territory and local government agencies, public health non-government organisations, Medicare Locals and community-based health promotion organisations) to support actions that contribute to increasing the proportion of Australians at a healthy body weight.

Shape Up Australia was developed in consultation with state/territory governments and public health non-government agencies and with guidance from a national research study commissioned by the Agency in 2012 on attitudes and behaviours of Australians towards obesity prevention. The initiative is intended to act as a long-term platform for government and non-government organisations to enable a coordinated and collaborative response to the issue of overweight and obesity within the Australian population.

Underpinned by formative research, the Shape Up Australia initiative has developed a range of consumer focused messages. These form the basis of Shape Up Australia resources such as a website, social media platforms, consumer information resources, and tools for partners to apply the research including a Shape Up Australia Message Guide. In addition to this an iPhone application is currently in development and expected to launch in late 2013.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 49

QUALITATIVE INDICATOR

TOBACCO AND MEASURE-UP CAMPAIGNS ARE SUCCESSFUL IN REACHING TARGET AUDIENCE AND EFFECTING BEHAVIOURAL CHANGE

2012-13 Reference Point Recall and behavioural change indicators on campaign activity are as good as, or improved on, 2011-12 campaign activity

Result: Indicator met.

National Tobacco Campaign

The National Tobacco Campaign (NTC) continues to meet its objectives in relation to reach and message communication. Independent evaluation research conducted the Social Research Centre demonstrates that the campaign appears to have influenced the target audience’s awareness of, and attitudes towards, the negative health consequences of smoking and quitting intentions of smokers.

2012-2013 evaluation research findings around prompted recall showed that overall recognition of the NTC remained very strong, with 96% in December 2012 and 85% in July 2013 of smokers recalling the campaign.

There were strong results for cognitive and behavioural responses for the ‘Breathless’ and ‘Symptoms’ television advertisements with 96% of smokers saying it was “easy to understand,” 91% saying it was “believable, “ and 77 % reporting that it would make them “stop and think”.

Reported action as a result of seeing the campaign:

• 39% of smokers in December 2012 and 33% in July 2013 claimed to have taken some action as a result of seeing the campaign.

• 86% of smokers surveyed in July 2013 said they intended to quit smoking in the next one to six months.

Over the summer of 2012-2013 the Health Benefits: Stop Smoking, Start Repairing advertising continued to make a solid contribution to overall campaign recognition, with the mix of radio and out-of-home advertising. Recognition of the ‘Health Benefits’ outdoor advertising continues to be strong (for the channel) reaching 32% among smokers and 42% among recent quitters in February 2013.

The My QuitBuddy quit smoking smartphone app, after its launch on World No Tobacco Day in May 2012, has been downloaded over 200,000 times, with around 40% of those using the app reporting they are remaining quit after six months.

The My QuitBuddy records personal quitting goals in pictures, words or audio messages and provides a panic button for when craving, providing a range of distractions and games. The app keeps a record of days, hours and minutes smoke free, how many milligrams of tar avoided, number of cigarettes not smoked, and how much money saved from not smoking. Free from the App Store and Google Play, the My QuitBuddy app has an active community board with over 10,000 messages of support posted by people quitting through using the app.

The www.quitnow.gov.au website had nearly one million unique visitors over the year following NTC advertising and public relations activity.

50 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

‘Measure Up’ Campaign

The Measure Up Swap it, Don’t Stop it mass media activities were suspended following the release in October 2012 of the MYEFO. As part of a broader cost saving measure, the MYEFO reduced the Measure Up budget allocation by $10.5 million in 2012-2013 and ceased funding for the initiative from 2013-2014. The Agency continued to support Measure Up campaign activities (including resource distribution, licensing and online communications) until 30 June 2013.

1995 2011-12 56% 63%

OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IN ADULTS HAS INCREASED FROM 56% IN 1995 TO 63% IN 2011-12

A HIGHER PROPORTION OF MALES THAN FEMALES WERE CLASSIFIED AS BEING OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE

OVERWEIGHT

OBESE

70%

18%

8%

56%

OBESITY IS HIGHEST IN AREAS OF GREATEST SOCIOECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE*

* For adults, this difference is more marked in 2011-12 than it was in 1995

CHILDREN 5-18 YEARS

KEY FACTS - OBESITY PREVELANCE

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 51

4. ADVISE AND MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS ON MATTERS RELATING TO PREVENTIVE HEALTH

QUALITATIVE DELIVERABLE

ANPHA PROVIDES TIMELY ADVICE TO GOVERNMENT ON TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND OBESITY-RELATED MEASURES

2012-13 Reference Point Advice to Minister for Health on minimum price for alcohol and unhealthy food and beverage advertising to children

Result: Deliverable achieved.

Minimum Price for Alcohol

Following increasing public concern about the effects of harmful alcohol consumption on individuals and communities, and particularly on young people, the Agency was tasked with providing advice to government on exploring the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price for alcohol.

A transparent consultative approach was adopted for this review which included an Issues Paper, Exploring the Public Interest Case for a Minimum (floor) Price for Alcohol, being released in June 2012. It reviewed the evidence around the harms associated with cheap alcohol and associated consumption patterns and the different mechanisms available to affect this consumption. Thirty-seven submissions were received in August 2012 under this first round of public consultation.

The Draft Report of Exploring the Public Interest Case for a Minimum (floor) Price for Alcohol was released for further public comment in October 2012, and attracted a further 29 submissions in response.

The Final Report and advice was provided to government in-confidence on 2 May 2013. While this report has not been publicly released, the Agency is required under its Act to do so within 12 months from the date that advice was provided to Government.

Unhealthy food and beverage advertising to children

A report on the National Seminar on Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising to Children and follow up actions to reduce children’s exposure to marketing and advertising of unhealthy food and drinks was presented to the Standing Council on Health (SCoH) for its 9 November 2012 meeting.

The report highlighted actions agreed by members of the National Working Group on Marketing Unhealthy Food to Children. The Agency has developed a draft framework to monitor children’s exposure to television marketing and advertising of unhealthy food and drinks.

52 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

QUALITATIVE INDICATOR

ANPHA DISCUSSION PAPERS AND FORMAL ADVICE TO THE MINISTER ARE SUPPORTED BY EXPERT AND COMMUNITY INPUTS AND CONSULTATION PROCESSES

2012-13 Reference Point The Chief Executive Officer meets requests for advice pursuant to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency

Act 2010 in a timely manner

Result: Indicator met.

Advice provided to governments included the report on the public interest case for minimum (floor) price for alcohol and a report to the Ministers at the SCoH, at their request, on monitoring of children’s exposure to television marketing and advertising of unhealthy food and drinks.

Note: Public disclosure on the Agency’s website of preventive health advice to the Minister must occur within 12 months of providing that advice (Section 11A of the ANPHA Act.)

30MINUTES

KEY FACT - PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

60% OF ADULTS

DID LESS THAN 30 MINUTES

OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY A DAY

Source: Australian Health Survey 2011-12

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 53

CASE STUDY

Whenever You’re Likely to Drink

Whenever You’re Likely to Drink (WYLD) is a youth led initiative that works with 16 - 24 years old within the Mitchell and Murrindindi Shires (in Victoria) to raise awareness of the health risks caused by binge drinking and reduce alcohol related violence.

It’s a partnership based project that works in collaboration with local sports clubs, licensed venues, local government, Victoria Police and other key organisations to provide healthy, supportive and safe environments for all community members.

The WYLD project encompasses 3 key areas - policy review, development and recommendations, prevention and education through social media, and a localised service response.

Changing By-Laws

WYLD, on behalf of young people and project partners, made a formal submission to Mitchell Shire and Murrindindi Shire Council’s to change local by-laws in relation to alcohol. Throughout extensive consultations, young people raised several concerns including a lack of alcohol signage in the area, young people are not aware of the local by-laws in regards to alcohol use, young people don’t feel safe in public spaces and the dangers of alcohol related litter.

The submission to both councils was successful and local by-laws were changed prohibiting the consumption of alcohol in public places. In reserves, the new law amendment for both shires also states that public alcohol consumption is authorised between 12 noon and 8.00pm. In real terms this represents a daily reduction of 9 hours exposure to the community, making local by-laws more appropriate to community and family needs.

Youth led campaign

In collaboration with over 250 local young people from community groups, sports clubs and youth groups, the ‘Don’t Let it Get Ugly” campaign was born. Young people have been involved in all aspects of the project, from logo design to the leading faces of the campaign. WYLD has also secured ambassador Melbourne Vixen netballer Tegan Caldwell to join local sports club captains in being champions of the ‘Don’t Let it Get Ugly’ message.

COMMUNITY LEVEL INITIATIVE NEXUS PRIMARY HEALTH

54 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

CASE STUDY

Whenever You’re Likely to Drink

Sports Clubs

WYLD has successfully partnered with 5 local sports clubs (including football/ netball clubs and cricket clubs), delivered drink driving education to 188 players and 70 players have successfully attained their Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA) qualification. RSA training for players within sports clubs allows young people to obtain a better understanding of the effects of alcohol and the issues connected with its use and misuse in a club environment, assists with sustaining the aims of WYLD within the club, as well as obtaining a recognised qualification by the hospitality industry.

These local sports clubs have a demonstrated commitment to providing a healthy environment for their players, members and supporters along with a commitment to linking local health services with their club.

Broadford Cricket Club president stated that since partnering with WYLD “one of the biggest changes I have noticed already within our club is the preparedness of people to now discuss alcohol related issues. People are more aware of some of the issues, and it has led to everyone being much more open and prepared to discuss issues and perceptions. Since becoming a Good Sports club our paperwork and professionalism behind the bar has improved considerably.”

All clubs engaged with WYLD are Good Sport’s clubs. WYLD encourages sports clubs to join the Good Sports program as the program assists sporting clubs to adopt practices which promote the responsible management of alcohol and an inclusive family environment.

Alcohol Retailers

As a member of the local liquor accord WYLD has partnered with a local alcohol retailer to deliver specialised alcohol education sessions to further up skill staff, reduce alcohol related anti-social behaviour and link local health services to the venue. The venue will display ‘Don’t Let it Get Ugly’ campaign and other prevention materials to assist with the aims of WYLD.

COMMUNITY LEVEL INITIATIVE NEXUS PRIMARY HEALTH

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY

PART 4

56 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

In conjunction with the Agency’s audited financial statements, this chapter addresses reporting requirements under the Public Service Act and the Financial Management & Accountability Act 1999 (FMA Act), including the Requirements for Annual Reports for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies as approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act.

The Agency places a strong emphasis on the importance of sound corporate governance in maximising the policy and program outcomes for government. The robust and transparent governance framework adopted by the Agency ensures that its performance is routinely reviewed against its Strategic and Operational Plans and that the Agency’s management supports a culture of continuous improvement and organisational excellence.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE ANPHA’S LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK

The Agency is established under the ANPHA Act. It is a prescribed Agency for the purpose of the FMA Act and a Statutory Agency under the Public Service Act.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND PLANNING

The CEO is responsible for managing the Agency.

During 2012-2013, the Agency operated under its integrated planning framework. The framework, implemented in 2011-2012, established links between the Agency’s five-year Strategic Plan, its annual Operational Plans, and the work plans of its staff.

The Agency’s Strategic and Operational Plans are at: www.anpha.gov.au

GOVERNANCE TEAM

The Agency’s governance team comprises the CEO, the Manager Policy and Programs and the Chief Operating Officer. The governance team meets weekly.

The governance team meets with the Chief Financial Officer for budget and financial management meetings on a monthly basis, or more frequently as required.

The Chief Operating Officer is responsible for advising the CEO on governance, planning, financial management, performance monitoring and corporate matters, including human resources and workplace health and safety.

The governance team enable the Agency to work across organisational boundaries to achieve its objectives and to promote the core principles of good public sector governance, such as leadership, accountability, transparency, integrity, efficiency and risk management.

OVERVIEW

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 57

AUDIT COMMITTEE

The Agency’s Audit Committee comprises an independent Chair, Ms Anne Hazell, FCPA GAICD, Mr Peter Gibson FCA, ACIS, AFAIM and Ms Fran Raymond FCA, FAICD.

Ms Hazell has a strong background in leadership of public sector financial management and accountability and has been acknowledged for her contribution to excellence in public sector financial governance.

Mr Gibson is responsible for Accounting Policy at the Department of Finance and Deregulation, encompassing the establishment and maintenance of accounting and financial reporting requirements for Commonwealth government agencies.

Ms Raymond is General Manager Corporate at the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation and has significant experience as a Chief Financial Officer in the Australian Government.

Participating observers include representatives from the ANAO, the Chief Operating Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, and the Principal Adviser Procurement, Grants and Probity.

The Audit Committee met four times in 2012-2013. The focus for the Committee during the second year of operations has been on providing guidance and support on matters associated with continued compliance with established frameworks and risk management, performance and evaluation of the Agency’s programs. The Committee has reviewed and endorsed the risk management plans for all Agency programs and has closely monitored the Agency’s progress against its Strategic and Operational Plans and the Agency’s internal controls and financial reporting systems.

The Committee received regular briefings on, and reviewed draft governance frameworks and policies, on the risks associated with various aspects of the Agency’s corporate operations, such as the development of Business Rules, the Human Resources Governance Framework, and the Business Continuity Plan. The Committee has reviewed risk management plans associated with Medicare Locals, the National Binge Drinking Strategy (including a briefing from the program manager) and the National Preventive Health Research Fund.

In the context of an increased focus on risk management the Committee raised the importance of post project evaluation and the ongoing review of risk plans to analyse the effectiveness of controls and to bring risk management together at a strategic Agency-wide level.

The Committee also reviewed in detail the risks associated with the financial framework, including preparation of draft budgets, the monthly accounts, plans for preparation of the annual financial statements and action to seek movement of Special Account funds from 2011-2012 into 2013-2014.

In 2012-2013 the Audit Committee was briefed on independent internal performance audits undertaken on the Special Account, the Preventive Health Research Grants Program and the National Binge Drinking Strategy, and on the National Tobacco Campaign. None of these audits highlighted significant deficiencies in policy and practice, but they recommended a number of better practice procedures which the Audit Committee has monitored and the Agency has implemented.

58 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

EXTERNAL SCRUTINY AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE

In 2012-2013, the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) completed a performance audit of the Administration of Commonwealth Responsibilities under the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health. This audit involved both the Agency and the Department of Health and Ageing. The aspects of the audit of particular relevance to the Agency were the assessment of its role in preventing chronic disease and the effectiveness of arrangements that have been put in place to manage the Agency. The report was tabled on 5 December 2012.

The ANAO made one recommendation in respect of the Agency, namely that in its advertising compliance statements, it should clearly list and link the statements appearing in campaign creative materials with the supporting factual references via a matrix format. The Agency has implemented this recommendation. A number of suggestions were made in the report, and all of them have been implemented.

COMMONWEALTH OMBUDSMAN

The Commonwealth Ombudsman review undertaken in 2011-2012 was finalised in early 2012-2013 with no adverse findings. A further Commonwealth Ombudsman review of the Agency’s approach to an application for a grant under the Community Level Initiative program was undertaken in 2012-2013, resulting in no adverse findings.

LEGAL ACTIONS

There were no legal actions against the Agency in 2012-2013.

JUDICIAL OR ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS

There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals affecting the Agency during 2012-2013.

PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES

There were no reports on the operations of the Agency by a parliamentary committee in 2012-2013

PARLIAMENTARY SCRUTINY

The Agency appeared before the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee on 17 October 2012 (Supplementary Budget Estimates), 13 February 2013 (Additional Estimates) and 6 June 2013 (Budget Estimates).

The Agency’s Annual Report 2011-2012 was tabled in the Senate in October 2012.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 59

RISK MANAGEMENT The Agency developed a risk management policy and plan, which provides the foundations and organisational arrangements for implementing, monitoring, reviewing and managing risk in the Agency. The Agency also developed a risk register as a tool to identify and record those financial, governance, operational and policy, program and project risks that could impact on the achievement of the Agency’s objectives. The risk policy and plan were endorsed by the Audit Committee. To ensure that both documents remain contemporary, the plan provides for a process of regular review.

The Audit Committee reviewed and endorsed the risk management plans for all Agency programs during 2012-2013. It reviewed risk management plans associated with Medicare Locals, the National Binge Drinking Strategy and the National Preventive Health Research Fund. It also reviewed in detail the risks associated with the financial framework,

In the context of an increased focus on risk management, the Audit Committee raised the importance of the post project evaluation process and the ongoing review of risk plans to analyse the effectiveness of controls and to bring risk management together at a strategic Agency-wide level.

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING The Agency worked within the business continuity and disaster management framework of the Department of Health and Ageing whilst developing its own arrangements. The Agency’s CEO approved the Agency’s Business Continuity Plan on 30 March 2013. The plan provides for business continuity or business resumption as soon as possible in respect of the Agency’s key business processes and critical business resources, in the event of failure of ICT, loss of the office premises, or loss of the workforce.

ETHICS The CEO and the employees of the Agency are bound by the APS Values and Code of Conduct under the Public Service Act.

Offers of employment are made on condition that applicants agree to uphold the APS Values and adhere to the Code of Conduct. This requirement is reviewed during probationary periods of employment. Induction training for new staff includes awareness training about the APS Values and Code of Conduct, public sector ethical standards and expectations generally and in the context of the Agency’s functions.

The Agency administers grants and sponsorship programs, research funding programs and a range of procurement activities. It interacts with a wide range of stakeholders in public health practice, preventive health practice, and research. Its stakeholders span the public and private sectors. To ensure that it administers its programs to the highest levels of ethics and probity, the Agency has an experienced senior level advisor on procurement, grants and probity on its staff.

The Agency’s Fraud Control Policy and Plan identified undisclosed conflicts of interest as one of the Agency’s potential internal fraud risks.

60 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

The Agency developed guidelines for preventing and managing conflicts of interest, on the parts of its employees, and on the part of its expert committees and Advisory Council members. The guidelines address the obligations upon full time and part time holders of public office, expert committee members, and its APS employees and contractors.

All employees are required to identify and notify their managers about real or potential conflicts of interest as they arise. The CEO, and SES employees, are required additionally to provide written notice of all interests that conflict, or could conflict, with the proper performance of their functions every year.

The ANPHA Act imposes a standing obligation on Advisory Council members to disclose interests that conflict, or could conflict, with the proper performance of the Advisory Council’s function. The Act provides further that members must disclose direct or indirect financial interests in matters being considered at meetings of the Council.

At the commencement of meetings of the Advisory Council and expert committees, members are given the opportunity to declare any interests that may be seen to conflict with any matter on the agenda, and the minutes of meetings are to record any conflict declared, and any decision made in relation to any such declaration. The Council and each expert committee has entered into a deed of undertaking in relation to confidential information and conflict of interest.

FRAUD CONTROL The Agency has developed a robust system of fraud control which complies with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011. A fraud risk assessment has been undertaken, and a Fraud Control Policy and Plan is in place.

The Agency’s Fraud Control policy and plan identifies 9 potential internal fraud risks, and outlines appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection mechanisms and relies on a structured management and reporting regime with varying responsibilities at a number of levels within the Agency. This approach ensures that risk management and fraud control measures remain contemporary and that Agency management and staff take an active role in implementation. No incidents of fraud have been reported since the Agency’s establishment.

SECURITY Initially in 2012-2013 the Agency worked within the security framework of the Department of Health and Ageing. In November 2012, the Agency’s CEO approved a Protective Security Framework (policy and plan) and appointed and trained senior staff members as the Agency’s Security Advisor and Agency Security Executive. The Department of Health and Ageing provides the Agency’s IT, communication and finance and payroll systems.

The Agency is a low risk security environment and complies with the majority of the mandatory Australian Government Protective Security Framework requirements. All Agency staff have undertaken protective security training and training in fraud and risk management within the Agency’s operating environment.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 61

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. Agencies must display on their websites plans showing what information they publish in accordance with the IPS requirements.

The Agency received two FOI requests during 2012-2013. The specific subject matter of the requests required a referral of both requests to other agencies.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT The Agency is committed to ensuring that its workforce is engaged and dedicated to achieving its objectives. Through attracting and recruiting staff with the appropriate skills sets, enthusiasm for the role and potential to develop, since commencing operations in early 2011, the Agency has established a workforce capable of doing this. New staff are provided with an induction program to ensure they not only understand the overarching role of the Agency and its goals but also the role of the APS in general. They are introduced to the APS Values and Code of Conduct and other relevant legislation that governs the Agency and its employees.

The Agency’s audit committee has followed the evolution of a HR Governance Framework and the development of associated policies and procedures. They indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the Agency’s human resource management and the extent of progress it has made to date.

The Director HRM & Corporate Services instigated a forum of Health portfolio small agency HR Directors to reduce duplication of effort in developing policies and procedures. The forum also raises common issues it has under the individual MOUs with the Department of Health & Ageing (DoHA) in a constructive manner, with proposed solutions that will improve the process for both the agencies and DoHA.

Staffing

At 30 June 2013 the Agency employed 42 staff, comprising one full time holder of public office and 41 APS employees; 32 (76%) are ongoing employees and 35 (83%) are employed on a full time basis. The Agency’s staffing profile was predominantly female (35, or 83%). The Agency’s staff turnover for 2012-2013 was 22.1 percent. The Agency has developed flexible work guidelines and a career development program to assist in the retention and engagement of staff.

The following table gives a breakdown of staff by classification and gender. All staff are located in Canberra.

62 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Classification Female Male Total

Ongoing Non- Ongoing Ongoing Non-Ongoing

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

CEO 1 1

SES1 2 2

EL2 4 2 3 9

EL1 9 5 2 2 1 19

APS6 6 2 1 1 10

APS5 1 1

APS4

APS3

APS2

APS1

TOTAL 21 5 7 2 6 1 42

Table 3: Agency Staff Breakdown: Gender and Classification

Employment agreements

The Agency has one full time holder of public office, whose terms and conditions of employment are set by the Remuneration Tribunal.

The Agency’s 2 SES employees’ employment conditions are set out in determinations made under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

The Agency’s non SES staff are employed under the ANPHA Enterprise Agreement 2012-2014. The Agreement commenced on 9 October 2012, and provided a 3% salary increase and a productivity bonus of $500 to all eligible full time employees and pro rata for part time employees on commencement, and a further 2.5% salary increase on 1 July 2013.

The Agreement sets out the Agency’s terms and conditions of employment, including classification structure, remuneration, leave, allowances, performance management arrangements and other working conditions. Under the Agreement, a Workplace Consultative Forum was established and is the primary forum for consultation between the Agency and its employees. It has been particularly active participating in the development of employment related guidelines, procedures and policies.

Performance pay

The Agency does not have a performance pay scheme.

However, three employees received performance pay in the reporting period under grandfathered arrangements from their previous employer. All recipients were EL2 employees, and the total performance pay paid was $40,632.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 63

Learning and Development

The Agency delivered mandatory training on a number of topics to ensure staff were aware of the legal and regulatory requirements associated with these areas. These included:

• Workplace health and safety training for staff and managers; • Security awareness training; • Fraud prevention training; • Risk management training;

• Procurement Rules training; • Grants administration training; • Contract Management training; • Information management and FOI training;

• Training for the upgrade of the desktop system; and • Training in the use of the Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoiP) voice services system.

This training has delivered increased capacity in these areas evidenced through internal and external audits and formal feedback.

TRIM Explorer training was undertaken by staff in preparation for the roll out of TRIM Explorer to the Agency.

The Agency designed and delivered a professional and personal development program for all staff, ‘Career Directions’, which commenced in June 2013. The program will enable staff to be more self-aware and strategically plan for their career aspirations. The program will be formally evaluated on its conclusion in 2014.

Staff participated in a planning day event to consider what constitutes success in Promoting a Healthy Australia and identify the strategies to achieve it, to participate in a panel discussion about what makes for good working relationships between government and industry, and to hear a presentation from Professor Dame Carol Black DBE. Dame Carol was the Department of Health (UK) Expert Advisor on improving the welfare of working people at the time of her visit. She addressed staff on developments in the UK in recognising the role of the employer and the workplace in preventive health.

The Agency’s two SES employees attended the Australian Public Service Commission’s SES orientation program.

The Principal Adviser Procurement, Grants and Probity attended a course on advanced probity for senior procurement and grants administrators.

Staff attended a number of seminars and presentations by distinguished experts and professionals in fields relevant to the Agency’s business.

The Agency registered with the APS Executive Level Leadership Network and one EL2 staff member attended their 2013 annual forum. The program of events are evaluated individually as well as a summative evaluation at the end of the program cycle (annually).

64 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY The Agency is committed to ensuring a safe and healthy work environment for all employees, contractors and visitors and fostering a culture that protects and promotes health, safety and wellbeing and reflects the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

During 2012-2013, the Agency operated under its Health and Safety Management Arrangements. They include a Work Health and Safety Committee, and nominated Health and Safety representatives, First Aid Officers and Harassment Contact Officers.

All staff undertook mandatory workplace health and safety training to inform them of their obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

In consultation with employees a Health and Wellbeing Policy and Plan was developed that outlines the Agency’s commitment to developing a supportive workforce culture that assists staff make healthy lifestyle choices. Activities that have been undertaken during the course of the year have included:

• on site stretch and fit box classes, • healthy communal lunch events; • an information session run by Beyond Blue to raise awareness of anxiety and depression in the workplace;

• free influenza vaccinations for all staff; and • work station assessments for all employees.

There were no notifiable health and safety incidents during 2012-2013.

MULTICULTURAL ACCESS AND EQUITY In response to the Access and Equity in Government Services Report 2010-2012, The Agency established a small working group to assist with the development of its Access and Equity policy and plan. For the next two years the Agency will focus on strengthening its engagement strategy to ensure that culturally diverse communities are engaged and consulted on relevant policies and programs.

SOCIAL INCLUSION The Social Inclusion Measurement and Reporting Strategy agreed by the Government in December 2009 will also include some reporting on disability matters in its regular How Australia is Faring report and, if appropriate, in strategic change indicators in agency Annual Reports. More detail on social inclusion matters can be found at: www.socialinclusion.gov.au

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 65

DISABILITY Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-2008, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at:www.apsc.gov.au

From 2010-2011, departments and agencies are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by a new National Disability Strategy which sets out a ten-year national policy framework for improving life for Australians with a disability, their families and carers. A high-level report to track progress for people with disability at a national level will be produced by the Standing Council on Community, Housing and Disability Services to the Council of Australian Governments and will be available at: www.fahcsia.gov.au

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER REPRESENTATION The Agency is dedicated to advancing reconciliation and to ensuring equity in opportunity and access to programs, support and knowledge in relation to the promotion of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Agency has drafted a Reconciliation Action Plan that articulates the Agency’s vision for reconciliation through:

• Increasing the level of understanding, awareness and knowledge and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures across the Agency

• Increasing national capacity, knowledge and support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to reduce the level of binge drinking, smoking and obesity rates within their communities.

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT The Agency maintains a website where stakeholders and the public can obtain information about the Agency and its activities.

A redesign and content refresh of the Agency website was undertaken during 2012-2013 to improve search functionality and accessibility in line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.0 that is now a mandatory requirement for all government websites.

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is provided by the Department of Health and Ageing under an agreement for the provision of services. The Agency uses virtual desktops with Microsoft Office 2010 and Lotus Notes 8.5 and VoiP.

66 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

RECORDS MANAGEMENT Records management services are provided by the Department of Health and Ageing under a services agreement. The Department manages and maintains the TRIM records management system.

During the year, the Department rolled out TRIM Explorer to its staff and portfolio agencies. The Agency commenced preparations for its roll out in July 2013.

ASSET MANAGEMENT The Agency’s only capital asset is its office fitout, acquired at fair value during 2012-2013.

LEGAL SERVICES The Agency acquires legal services from the Department of Health and Ageing, the Australian Government Solicitor, and from private sector providers. A full account of the Agency’s purchasing of these services is available at: www.anpha.gov.au

PROCUREMENT In 2012-2013, with the exception of those instances reported in its Certificate of Compliance, the Agency complied with the Government’s purchasing policies and its procurement and purchasing activities were conducted in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules (CPRs) to ensure value for money, effective and ethical procurement outcomes.

Framework

The Agency’s procurement framework encourages competition, value for money, transparency and accountability and the efficient, effective, economical and ethical use of resources.

The Agency has established a Procurement, Grants and Probity Service to provide education and training, support to staff and to review all procurement and grant activity within the Agency to ensure compliance with legislative requirements and that such processes maximise best practice. All staff have had access to extensive training in procurement and grants during 2012-2013, to ensure that they are aware of, and adhere to, Government reforms in this area.

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

All contracts or Deeds of Standing Offer awarded by the Agency and valued at $100,000 (GST inclusive) or greater, contain standard clauses granting the Auditor-General access to contractor’s premises.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 67

Exempt Contracts

The sponsorship arrangements entered into between the Agency and the national sporting organisations through the National Binge Drinking Strategy: Community Sponsorship Fund in 2011-2012 were continuing contracts through 2012-2013. These contracts were exempted from the reporting obligations by the Agency’s CEO under the FOI Act, and, therefore, AusTender reporting, as the sponsorship replacement element of the agreement relates directly to the business affairs of the contracted parties, and contains material obtained in confidence.

During 2012-2013, a further four such sponsorship arrangements were entered into and they were similarly exempted by the CEO.

Consultants

During 2012-2013, 18 new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $2,568,920. In addition, 7 ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the 2012-2013 year, involving total actual expenditure of $1,094,692. These amounts include GST.

Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the Austender website: www.tenders.gov.au

The Agency engages consultants where it lacks specialist expertise or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to investigate or diagnose a defined issue or problem, carry out defined reviews or evaluation or provide independent advice, information or creative solutions to assist in the Agency’s decision-making.

Prior to engaging consultants, the Agency takes into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally, and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. The decision to engage a consultant is made in accordance with the FMA Act and regulations (including the CPRs) and relevant internal policies.

GRANTS PROGRAMS The Agency administers the following grants programs:

• Preventive Health Research Grants (under the National Preventive Health Research Fund)

• Preventive Health Research Fellowships (under the National Preventive Health Research Fund)

• Community Level Initiatives - Third Round Grants (under the National Binge Drinking Strategy)

• Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in Medicare Locals Program

Information on grants awarded by the Agency during the period 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013 is available at: www.anpha.gov.au

68 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH In accordance with section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the Agency is required to report on all payments over $11,900 (GST inclusive) to advertising agencies, market research organisations, polling organisations, media advertising organisations, public relations organisations and direct mail organisations. The total payment by the Agency to these organisations in the reporting period was $24,340,774.42 (GST inc.)

Table 4 below shows all organisations the Agency used for these purposes.

COMPANY NAME TYPE OF ORGANISATION PURPOSE AMOUNT $

(GST inclusive)

Blue Moon Trust Market Research Market Research for the National Tobacco Campaign $439,780.00

GFK Australia Pty Ltd Market Research Market Research for the National Tobacco Campaign $333,160.00

The Social Research Centre Pty Ltd Market Research Market Research for the National Tobacco Campaign

$961,494.06

Roy Morgan Research Pty Ltd Market Research Access to consumer database for Tobacco, Alcohol and Food

Consumption

$88,000.00

Blue Moon Unit Trust Market Research Market Research for the Measure Up Campaign $165,626.00

Taylor Nelson Sofres Australia Pty Ltd Market Research Market Research for the Measure Up Campaign

$679,682.30

Taylor Nelson Sofres Australia Pty Ltd Market Research Market Research for the Be the Influence Alcohol Campaign

$111,269.40

J Walter thompson Pty Ltd Advertising Agency Creative Services for the Measure Up Campaign

$520,522.37

AJF Partnership Pty Ltd Advertising Agency Creative Services for the National Tobacco Campaign

$1,284,229.55

BMF Advertising Pty Ltd Advertising Agency Creative Services for the National Tobacco Campaign

$15,074.43

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Media Advertise Television Advertising for the National Tobacco Campaign

$17,671,192.16

Horizon Communication Group Public relations Public Relations for Be the Influence Campaign

$1,023,380.91

Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide Pty Ltd

Public relations Public Relations for the Measure Up Campaign $277,524.94

Table 4: Payments of more than $11,900 for advertising and market research 1 July 2012 - 30 June 2013

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 69

ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) requires Commonwealth agencies to report annually on how their activities and the administration of legislation by it accorded with the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD), as detailed in section 3A of the EPBC Act.

The Agency administers no legislation relevant to the ESD principles. The Agency’s environmental activities relate to reducing the consumption of energy, minimising waste and maximising the efficient use of resources through its business activities. Office waste is segregated into recyclable and non-recyclable. The Agency accesses the whole-of-government electricity supply contract which is managed by the Department of Defence. This includes a supplied 10% of green power.

The Agency offers staff an interest-free loan scheme for the purchase of passes for public transport by employees and provides facilities for the storage of bicycles at the office premises.

COMPANY NAME TYPE OF ORGANISATION PURPOSE AMOUNT $

(GST inclusive)

Haystac Public Affairs Public Relations Public Relations for the National Tobacco Campaign $605,253.00

Ethnic Communications ETCOM/Ogilvy & Mather (SYDNEY) Pty Ltd

Public Relations Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communication Services for the National Tobacco Campaign

$164,585.30

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

PART 5

TABLE OF CONTENTS Audit Report 72

Statement by Officer 74

Statement of Comprehensive Income 75

Balance Sheet 76

Statement of Changes in Equity 77

Cash Flow Statement 78

Schedule of Commitments 79

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income 80

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities & Administered Reconciliation Schedule 81

Administered Cash Flow Statement 82

Schedule of Administered Commitments 83

TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES 84

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 85

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 93

Note 3: Expenses 94

Note 4: Income 96

Note 5: Financial Assets 97

Note 6: Non Financial Assets 98

Note 7: Payables 99

Note 8: Provisions 100

Note 9: Cash Flow Reconciliation 101

Note 10: Contingent Assets and Liabilities 102

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration 103

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors 106

Note 13: Financial Instruments 107

Note 14: Financial Assets Reconciliation 109

Note 15: Administered - Expenses 110

Note 16: Administered - Income 111

Note 17: Administered - Financial Assets 112

Note 18: Administered - Non-Financial Assets 113

Note 19: Administered - Payables 114

Note 20: Administered - Cash Flow Reconciliation 115

Note 21: Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities 116

Note 22: Administered - Financial Instruments 117

Note 23: Administered Financial Assets Reconciliation 119

Note 24: Appropriations 120

Note 25: Special Accounts 123

Note 26: Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 124

Note 27: Compensation and Debt Relief 125

Note 28: Reporting of Outcomes 126

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 128

72 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 73

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

74 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY

STATEMENT BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2013 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister's Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, as amended.

Signed Signed

Louise Sylvan Nathan Boyle

Chief Executive Officer

8 October 2013

Chief Financial Officer

8 October 2013

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 75

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $ $

EXPENSES Employee benefits 3A 5,695,842 3,580,581

Supplier 3B 1,754,527 3,125,453

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 24,772 -

Total expenses 7,475,141 6,706,034

LESS: OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Rendering of services 4A 2,326,844 -

Total own-source revenue 2,326,844 -

Gains Other gains 4B 50,000 42,000

Total gains 50,000 42,000

Total own-source income 2,376,844 42,000

Net cost of services 5,098,297 6,664,034

Revenue from Government 4C 5,431,000 6,915,000

Surplus 332,703 250,966

Total comprehensive income 332,703 250,966

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

76 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

BALANCE SHEET as at 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $ $

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 5A 101,570 1,926

Trade and other receivables 5B 2,975,242 2,216,414

Total financial assets 3,076,813 2,218,339

Non-Financial Assets Property, plant and equipment 6A 184,032 -

Total non-financial assets 184,032 -

Total Assets 3,260,845 2,218,339

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 7A (756,661) (420,509)

Other payables 7B (401,336) (156,429)

Total payables (1,157,998) (576,938)

Provisions Employee provisions 8 (1,131,658) (1,002,916)

Total provisions (1,131,658) (1,002,916)

Total liabilities (2,289,656) (1,579,854)

Net assets 971,189 638,486

EQUITY Retained surplus 971,189 638,486

Total equity 971,189 638,486

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 77

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2013

2013 2012 2013 2012 2013 2012 2013 2012

$ $ $ $ $ $ $$

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 638,485 387,519 - - - - 638,485 387,519

Opening balance 638,485 387,519 - - - -638,485 387,519

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period 332,704 250,966 - - - - 332,704 250,966

Total comprehensive income 971,189 638,485 - - - -971,189 638,485

Closing balance as at 30 June 971,189 638,485 - - - -971,189 638,485

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Total equity Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus Contributed

equity/capital

78 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $ $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 7,297,971 8,066,647

Sale of goods and rendering of services 2,442,131 367,679

Other 98,494 673,841

Net GST received 117,837 -

Total cash received 9,956,433 9,108,167

Cash used Employees ( 5,561,723) (3,461,894)

Suppliers ( 1,508,861) (4,233,066)

Net GST used 0 (126,042)

Cash transferred to the OPA ( 2,762,029) (1,285,328)

Total cash used (9,832,614) (9,106,331)

Net cash from operating activities 9 123,819 1,836

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment (leasehold improvement) ( 24,175) -

Total cash used (24,175) -

Net cash from (used by) investing activities (24,175) -

Net increase in cash held 99,644 1,836

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,926 90

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 5A 101,570 1,926

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 79

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2013

2013 2012

BY TYPE Notes $ $

Commitments receivable Net GST recoverable on commitments1 37,722 43,801

Total commitments receivable 37,722 43,801

Commitments payable Operating leases2 (324,644) -

Other3 (517,085) (501,806)

Total commitments payable (841,729) (501,806)

Net commitments by type (804,007) (458,005)

BY MATURITY Commitments receivable One year or less 37,722 43,801

From one to five years - -

Total commitments receivable 37,722 43,801

Commitments payable Operating lease commitments One year or less (324,644) -

From one to five years - -

Total operating lease commitments (324,644) -

Other commitments One year or less (517,085) (491,806)

From one to five years - (10,000)

Total other commitments (517,085) (501,806)

Total commitments payable (841,729) (501,806)

Net commitments by maturity (804,007) (458,005)

Note: 1. Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

2. Operating Leases: The Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) entered into an operating lease commitment for up to seven years commencing on 1 September 2012. ANPHA can terminate the residency operating lease by giving 365 days written notice.

3. In 2012-13 Other Commitments reflects contracts for the memorandum of understanding with the Department of Health and Ageing for the provision of corporate services ($434,519).

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Australian National Preventive Health Agency

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $’000 $’000

Suppliers 15A (41,654) (27,262)

Grants 15B (13,960) (5,171)

(55,614) (32,433)

LESS: OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Non-taxation revenue Interest 16A - 20

Other revenue 16B 500 5,303

Total non-taxation revenue 500 5,322

Total own-source revenue administered on behalf of Government 500 5,322

500 5,322

Net cost of services (55,114) (27,111)

Total deficit (55,114) (27,111)

EXPENSES

Total expenses administered on behalf of Government

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Total own-source income administered on behalf of Government

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Australian National Preventive Health Agency

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES as at 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 17A - 5,170

Trade and other receivables 17B 31,327 37,438

Total financial assets 31,327 42,608

Non-financial assets Inventories 18 162 301

Total non-financial assets 162 301

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 31,489 42,909

Payables Suppliers 19A (12,687) (1,167)

Grants 19B (2,227) (1,859)

Other 19C (90) (470)

Total payables (15,005) (3,496)

(15,005) (3,496)

Net assets 16,484 39,413

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Opening administered assets less administered liabilities as at 1 July 39,413 8,283

Surplus (deficit) items: Plus: Administered income 500 5,322

Less: Administered expenses (55,614) (32,433)

Payments to CAC Act bodies - -

Administered transfers to/from Australian Government: Appropriation transfers from OPA: Annual appropriations for administered expenses 34,749 60,799

Transfers to OPA (3,002) (3,816)

Administered assets and liabilities appropriations 437 1,258

Closing administered assets less administered liabilities as at 30 June 16,484 39,413

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Administered Reconciliation Schedule

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government

LIABILITIES

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ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2013

2013 2012

Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Interest - 20

Net GST received - 942

Other 500 5,670

Total cash received 500 6,632

Cash used Grant (13,219) (3,481)

Suppliers (30,100) (30,001)

Net GST paid (713) -

Total cash used (44,033) (33,482)

Net cash flows used by operating activities (43,533) (26,849)

Net decrease in Cash Held 20 (43,533) (26,849)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 5,170 -

Cash from Official Public Account for: -Appropriations 38,386 64,121

-Special Accounts 12,008 4,038

55,564 68,159

Cash to Official Public Account for: - Appropriations 11,429 8,080

- Special Accounts 603 28,059

12,032 36,140

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 17A 0 5,170

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2013

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

BY TYPE Commitments receivable Net GST recoverable on commitments 1,293 3,290

Total commitments receivable 1,293 3,290

Commitments payable Other commitments Contracts for services (6,716) (319)

Sponsorships (3,541) (18,150)

Grants (4,595) (17,724)

Consultancy (987) -

Total other commitments (15,839) (36,193)

Total commitments payable (15,839) (36,193)

Net commitments by type (14,546) (32,903)

BY MATURITY Commitments receivable One year or less 1,168 1,777

From one to five years 125 1,514

Total commitments receivable 1,293 3,290

Commitments payable Other commitments One year or less (14,153) (19,542)

From one to five years (1,685) (16,651)

Total other commitments (15,839) (36,193)

Net commitments by maturity (14,546) (32,903)

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The nature of commitments relate to Community Sponsorship Fund contracts, as well as grant amounts payable under agreements in which the funding recipients are yet to provide the services required.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 85

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 93

Note 3: Expenses 94

Note 4: Income 96

Note 5: Financial Assets 97

Note 6: Non Financial Assets 98

Note 7: Payables 99

Note 8: Provisions 100

Note 9: Cash Flow Reconciliation 101

Note 10: Contingent Assets and Liabilities 102

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration 103

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors 106

Note 13: Financial Instruments 107

Note 14: Financial Assets Reconciliation 109

Note 15: Administered - Expenses 110

Note 16: Administered - Income 111

Note 17: Administered - Financial Assets 112

Note 18: Administered - Non-Financial Assets 113

Note 19: Administered - Payables 114

Note 20: Administered - Cash Flow Reconciliation 115

Note 21: Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities 116

Note 22: Administered - Financial Instruments 117

Note 23: Administered - Financial Assets Reconciliation 119

Note 24: Appropriations 120

Note 25: Special Accounts 123

Note 26: Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 124

Note 27: Compensation and Debt Relief 125

Note 28: Reporting of Outcomes 126

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 128

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY

The Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) is a not-for-profit entity controlled by the Australian Government.

The Australian Government established ANPHA on 1 January 2011 to provide a new national capacity to drive preventive health policy and programs. ANPHA provides policy leadership and establishes partnerships with governments, community health promotion organisations, industry and primary health care providers.

The need for a national preventive health agency to drive the preventive health agenda was identified by the Council of Australian Governments in 2008, and further developed in the Government’s response to the National Preventive Health Taskforce’s report, and the report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission. ANPHA fulfils this national commitment by leading, coordinating and facilitating a range of preventive health efforts.

In particular, ANPHA is leading the major social marketing campaigns related to smoking, the National Binge Drinking Strategy, and establishing a national preventive health research strategy and program to focus on the translation of research into practice. ANPHA is also managing, analysing and disseminating information for a wide range of sectors and communities to ensure widespread and effective adoption of prevention and health promotion actions. In 2012-13 ANPHA conducted the National Healthy Workplace Awards as well as the release of the State of Preventive Health 2013 report.

ANPHA is structured to meet one outcome:

Outcome 1: A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors.

Agency activities contributing toward this outcome are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by ANPHA in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by ANPHA, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government.

ANPHA conducts the following administered activities on behalf of the Government:

1. National Binge Drinking Strategy Expansion

2. Social marketing campaigns targetting tobacco, harmful consumption of alcohol and obesity;

3. Preventive health research fund; and

4. Employer workplace rewards

ANPHA is a prescribed Agency under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, and its role and functions are set out in the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010. The Chief Executive Officer leads ANPHA, and is supported by the staff and an Advisory Council of experts and other government representatives.

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The continued existence of ANPHA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for ANPHA’s administration and programs.

The Australian Government continues to have regard to developments in case law, including the High Court’s most recent decision on Commonwealth expenditure in Williams v Commonwealth (2012) 288 ALR 410, as they contribute to the larger body of law relevant to the development of Commonwealth programs. In accordance with its general practice, the Government will continue to monitor and assess risk and decide on any appropriate actions to respond to risks of expenditure not being consistent with constitutional or other legal requirements.

1.2 BASIS OF PREPARATION OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by:

- section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Finance Minister’s Orders (FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar for departmental items and to the nearest thousand dollars for administered items unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the balance sheet when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to ANPHA or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executor contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

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1.3 SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND ESTIMATES

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 NEW AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Revised standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a financial impact, and are not expected to have a future financial impact on the Agency.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No new standards, revised standards, interpretations and amending standards that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the sign-off date, are expected to have a financial impact on the Agency for future reporting periods.

1.5 REVENUE

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when ANPHA gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (refer to Note 1.7).

1.6 GAINS

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

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Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (Refer to Note 1.7).

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 TRANSACTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT AS OWNER

Equity Injections (FMA Act only)

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity. ANPHA currently does not have a DCB.

Restructuring of Administrative Arrangements Net assets received from or relinquished to another Government entity under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are adjusted at their book value directly against contributed equity.

Other Distributions to Owners The FMOs require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend. In 2012-13, there were no distributions to owners (2011-12 Nil).

1.8 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of ANPHA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including ANPHA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

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The liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flow to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2013. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

Staff of ANPHA will ordinarily be members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance and Deregulation as an administered item.

ANPHA makes employer contributions to the employees’ superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. ANPHA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

1.9 CASH

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, cash held with outsiders, demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value, and cash in special accounts.

1.10 FINANCIAL ASSETS

ANPHA classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) held-to-maturity investments;

c) available-for-sale financial assets; and

d) loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at cost - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred, the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 1.11 FINANCIAL LIABILITIES

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

1.12 CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CONTINGENT ASSETS

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the balance sheet but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

As at 30 June 2013, there were no contigent assets or liabilities.

1.13 ACQUISITION OF ASSETS

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

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1.14 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the balance sheet, except for leasehold improvements costing less than $50,000, information technology equipment purchases costing less than $500, and all other purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to ANPHA using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

1.15 TAXATION / COMPETITIVE NEUTRALITY

ANPHA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

b) for receivables and payables.

Competitive Neutrality

ANPHA does not provide services on a for-profit basis.

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1.16 REPORTING OF ADMINISTERED ACTIVITIES

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the schedule of administered items and related notes.

Except where otherwise stated below, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

Revenue collected by ANPHA for use by the Government rather than ANPHA is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance and Deregulation. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by ANPHA on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the statement of cash flows in the schedule of administered items and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Revenue

All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by ANPHA on behalf of the Australian Government.

Grants

ANPHA administers a number of grant schemes on behalf of the Government.

Grant liabilities are recognised to the extent that (i) the services required to be performed by the grantee have been performed or (ii) the grant eligibility criteria have been satisfied, but payments due have not been made. A commitment is recorded when the Government enters into an agreement to make these grants but services have not been performed or criteria satisfied.

Inventories

Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Inventories held for distribution are valued at cost, adjusted for any loss of service potential.

Costs incurred in bringing each item of inventory to its present location and condition are assigned as follows:

a) raw materials and stores - purchase cost on a first-in-first-out basis; and

b) finished goods and work-in-progress - cost of direct materials and labour plus attributable costs that can be allocated on a reasonable basis.

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

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Departmental

On 5 August 2013, the Finance Minister determined a reduction in departmental appropriations. The Instrument to Reduce Appropriations (No. 1 of 2013-14) reduces Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2012-2013 by $25,000.

Administered

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the entity.

NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD

Administered

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the entity.

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NOTE 3: EXPENSES

2013 2012

$ $

Note 3A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 4,173,797 2,549,536

Superannuation: Defined contribution plans 123,335 104,850

Defined benefit plans 644,751 338,397

Leave and other entitlements 753,960 587,797

Total employee benefits 5,695,842 3,580,581

Note 3B: Suppliers Goods and services IT services 335,040 98,709

Travel 276,922 309,750

Contracts for corporate services 146,891 661,760

Accommodation 143,608 410,993

Office consumables 101,089 81,485

Insurance 43,301 38,582

Audit fees 50,000 42,000

Conference / Seminar 67,794 37,023

Legal 55,530 35,259

Property operating expenses 40,396 58,465

Committees 28,269 19,724

Contract for services 58,272 9,000

Training 12,428 14,666

Advertising 12,143 119,756

Recruitment 9,246 41,913

Contractors 8,750 293,019

Security 4,280 5,637

Consultants 3,972 120,496

Seconded employees (from Department of Heath & Ageing) 0 687,965

Other 37,039 17,083

Total goods and services 1,434,969 3,103,286

Goods and services are made up of: Provision of goods - related entities 100,025 781,625

Provision of goods - external parties 38,886 327,654

Rendering of services - related entities 938,682 1,668,448

Rendering of services - external parties 357,376 325,559

Total goods and services 1,434,969 3,103,286

Other supplier expenses Operating lease rentals - external parties: Minimum lease payments 271,706 0

Workers compensation expenses 47,852 22,167

Total other supplier expenses 319,558 22,167

Total supplier expenses 1,754,527 3,125,453

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Notes:

Note 3C: Depreciation Depreciation: Leasehold Improvement 24,772 0

Total depreciation 24,772 -

1. Related entity transactions primarily relate to the provision of corporate services by the Department of Health and Ageing

NOTE 3: EXPENSES CONTINUED

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NOTE 4: INCOME

2013 2012

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE $ $

Note 4A: Rendering of Services Rendering of services- related entities 2,326,844 -

Total other revenue 2,326,844 -

Note 4B: Other Gains Resources received free of charge 50,000 42,000

Total other gains 50,000 42,000

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT

Note 4C: Revenue from Government Appropriations: Departmental appropriation 5,431,000 6,915,000

Total revenue from Government 5,431,000 6,915,000

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NOTE 5: FINANCIAL ASSETS

2013 2012

$ $

Note 5A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 101,570 1,926

Total cash and cash equivalents 101,570 1,926

Note 5B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and Services: Goods and services - related entities 20,000 0

Total receivables for goods and services 20,000 0

Appropriations receivable: For existing programs 2,819,016 1,923,958

Total appropriations receivable 2,819,016 1,923,958

Other receivables: Other 93,625 132,017

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 42,602 160,439

Total other receivables 136,227 292,456

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,975,242 2,216,414

Less impairment allowance account: Other - -

Total impairment allowance account - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,975,242 2,216,414

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 2,975,242 2,216,414

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,975,242 2,216,414

Receivables are aged as follows: Not overdue 2,955,242 2,187,034

Overdue by: More than 90 days 20,000 29,379

Total receivables (gross) 2,975,242 2,216,414

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2013 2012

$ $

Note 6A: Land and Buildings Leasehold improvements: Fair value 208,804 -

Accumulated depreciation (24,772) -

Accumulated impairment losses - -

Total leasehold improvements 184,032 -

Total land and buildings 184,032 -

Leasehold Improvements Total

$ $

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value - -

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - -

Net book value 1 July 2012 - -

Additions: By purchase 24,175 24,175

By lease incentive 184,629 184,629

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - -

Revaluations recognised in the operating result - -

Impairments recognised in the operating result - -

Reversal of impairments recognised in the operating result - -

Assets held for sale or in a disposal group held for sale - -

Depreciation expense (24,772 ) ( 24,772)

Disposals: -

From disposal of entities or operations (including restructuring) - -

Other - -

Net book value 30 June 2013 184,032 184,032

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 Gross book value 208,804

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (24,772)

Net book value 30 June 2013 184,032

There was no non-financial assets in previous years.

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings.

Note 6B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment 2013

NOTE 6: NON FINANCIAL ASSETS

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NOTE 7: PAYABLES

2013 2012

$ $

Note 7A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 756,661 420,509

Total supplier payables 756,661 420,509

Total supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities 633,046 319,911

External parties 123,615 100,598

Total 756,661 420,509

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 7B: Other Payables Salaries and wages 191,475 121,006

Superannuation 19,120 16,109

Lease Incentive 162,725 -

Other 28,017 19,314

Total other payables 401,336 156,429

Total other payables expected to be settled within 12 months: No more than 12 months 401,336 156,429

Total 401,336 156,429

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NOTE 8: PROVISIONS

2013 2012

$ $

Employee Provisions Recreation leave 424,931 427,669

Long service leave 706,727 575,247

Total employee provisions 1,131,658 1,002,916

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:1 No more than 12 months 304,416 212,593

More than 12 months 827,242 790,323

Total employee provisions 1,131,658 1,002,916

Note:

1. Settlement of provision estimates are based on leave taken during 2012-13.

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NOTE 9: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

2013 2012

$ $

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Cash flow statement 101,570 1,926

Balance sheet 101,570 1,926

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities: Net cost of services (5,098,297) (6,664,034)

Add revenue from Government 5,431,000 6,915,000

Adjustment for non cash items Depreciation 24,772 -

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) / decrease in net receivables (758,829) (295,586)

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions 128,742 1,002,916

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables 336,152 (1,101,036)

Increase / (decrease) in other payable 60,279 144,576

Net cash from operating activities 123,819 1,836

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NOTE 10: CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Quantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2013 ANPHA did not have any quantifiable contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2012: Nil)

Unquantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2013 ANPHA did not have any unquantifiable contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2012: Nil)

Significant Remote Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2013 ANPHA did not have any significant remote contingencies. (2012: Nil)

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NOTE 11: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

2013 2012

$ $

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary 361,925 424,041

Annual leave accrued 57,744 75,633

Performance bonuses - -

Other1 70,531 67,453

Total Short-term employee benefits 490,200 567,127

Post-employment benefits:

Superannuation 83,670 82,728

Total post-employment benefits 83,670 82,728

Other long-term benefits:

Long service leave 21,738 9,534

Total other long-term benefits 21,738 9,534

Termination benefits:

Voluntary redundancy payments - -

Total termination benefits - -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 595,608 659,388

• Notes:

• 1. “Other” includes motor vehicle allowances and other allowances.

• 2. Note 11A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed as a senior executive was less than $180,000.

• Note 11A: Senior Executive Remuneration Expenses Paid for the Reporting Period

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Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2013

Average annual reportable remuneration 1 Substantive senior executives R eportable Salary 2

Contributed

superannuation 3

Reportable

allowances 4 Bonus paid 5 Total reportable

remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $180,000 1 129,522 1 9,424 - - 148,947

$210,000 to $239,999 1 194,784 3 2,891 - - 227,675

$330,000 to $359,999 1 284,620 6 8,400 - - 353,020

Total number of substantive senior execuitives 3

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2012

Average annual reportable remuneration 1 Substantive senior executives Reportable Salary 2

Contributed

superannuation 3

Reportable

allowances 4 Bonus Paid 5 Total reportable

remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $180,000 1 158,918 21,026 - - 179,943

$180,000 to $209,999 1 130,450 69,969 - - 200,419

$210,000 to $239,999 1 202,023 27,479 - - 229,502

Total number of substantive senior executives 3

• Notes:

• 1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

• 2. ‘Reportable salary’ includes the following:

• a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column);

• b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ to account for tax benefits);

• c) exempt foreign employment income; and

• d) salary sacrificied benefits.

• 3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to ANPHA for the provision of superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period.

• 4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on the individuals payment summaries.

• 5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in the reportable remuneration band. The ‘bonus paid’ within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving ANPHA during the financial year.

• Note 11B: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

NOTE 11: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION CONTINUED

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• Note 11C: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Other Highly Paid Staff during the Reporting Period

NOTE 11: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION CONTINUED

Average annual reportable remuneration 1

Other highly paid staff

Reportable

Salary 2

Contributed Superannuation 3

Reportable

allowances 4 Bonus Paid 5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements): $180,000 to $209,999 1 162,170 22,340 - 16,473 200,983

$240,000 to $269,999 1 176,281 27,284 - 37,591 241,155

Total number of other highly paid staff 2

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2013

• There were no other highly paid staff in 2011-12.

• 1. This table reports staff:

• a) who were employed by the entity during the reporting period;

• b) whole reportable remuneration was $180,000 or more for the financial period; and

• c) were not required to be disclosed in Table B or director disclosures.

• Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

• 2. ‘Reportable salary’ includes the following:

• a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column);

• b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ to account for tax purposes);

• c) exempt foreign employment income; and

• d) salary sacrificed benefits.

• 3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation benefits to other highly paid staff in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period.

• 4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on individuals’ payment summaries.

• 5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. The ‘bonus paid’ within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the Authority during the financial year.

• 6. Various salary sacrifice arrangements were available to other highly paid staff including superannuation, motor vehicle and expense payment fringe benefits. Salary sacrificed benefits are reported in the ‘reportable salary’ column, excluding salary sacrificed superannuation, which is reported in the ‘contributed superannuation’ column.

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NOTE 12: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

2013 2012

$ $

Financial statement audit services were provided free of charge to the entity by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO).

Fair value of the services provided: Financial statement audit services 50,000 42,000

Total 50,000 42,000

Note:

1. No other services were provided by the auditors of the financial statements.

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NOTE 13: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

2013 2012

$ $

Note 13A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Loans and receivables: Cash and cash equivalents 101,570 1,926

Trade receivables 113,625 132,017

Total 215,195 133,943

Carrying amount of financial assets 215,195 133,943

Financial Liabilities At fair value: Trade Payables (756,661) (420,509)

Other Payables (401,336) (156,429)

Total (1,157,998) (576,938)

Carrying amount of financial liabilities ( 1,157,998) (576,938)

Note 13B: Credit Risk

2013 2012

$ $

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 101,570 1,926

Trade receivables 113,625 132,017

Total 215,195 133,943

Financial liabilities Trade Payables (756,661) (420,509)

Other Payables (401,336) (156,429)

Total (1,157,998) (576,938)

Not past due nor impaired Not past due nor impaired 2013 2012

$ $

Cash and cash equivalents 101,570 1,926

Trade receivables 93,625 102,638

Total 195,195 104,564

90+ days $

Trade receivables 20,000

Total 20,000

Trade receivables past due are leave provisions receivable from other Government Departments

90+ days $

Trade receivables 29,379

Total 29,379

The following table illustrates the entity's gross exposure to credit risk, excluding any collateral or credit enhancements.

ANPHA is exposed to minimal credit risk as loans and receivables are cash at bank and receivables are for leave provisions from other Public Sector departments. Trade payable values are set by the market and validated by invoice. Other payables largely reflects payroll related liabilities which are validated through ANPHA's industrial agreement.

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired

ANPHA holds no collateral to mitigate against risk.

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2013

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2012

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NOTE 13: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS CONTINUED

• Note 13C: Liquidity Risk

• ANPHA’s financial liabilities are payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that ANPHA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and mechanisms available to ANPHA (e.g. Advance to the Finance Minister) and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

• ANPHA had no derivative financial liabilities in either 2013 or 2012.

• Note 13D: Market Risk

• ANPHA’s financial instruments are of a nature that does not expose them to market risk.

• ANPHA is not exposed to ‘currency risk’ or ‘other price risk’.

• ANPHA has no interest bearing items on the Balance Sheet.

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NOTE 14: FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION

2013 2012

$ $

Financial assets Notes

Total financial assets as per balance sheet 3,076,813 2,218,339

Less: non-financial instrument components:

Appropriations receivable 5B 2,819,016 1,923,958

Other receivables (GST receivable) 5B 42,602 160,439

Total non-financial instrument components 2,861,617 2,084,396

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 215,195 133,943

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NOTE 15: ADMINISTERED - EXPENSES

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

Note 15A: Suppliers Goods and services Advertising (15,910) (22,284)

Contract for Services (21,614) (2,188)

Consultants (3,333) (2,085)

Legal Fees (52) (256)

Promotions (55) (104)

Printing (152) (101)

Other (539) (244)

Total goods and services (41,654) (27,262)

Goods and services are made up of: Provision of goods - external parties (15) (22)

Rendering of services - related entities (151) (253)

Rendering of services - external parties (41,488) (26,987)

Total goods and services (41,654) (27,262)

Note 15B: Grants Public sector: Local Governments - (813)

Private sector: Non-profit organisations (8,826) (2,780)

Other (5,134) (1,578)

Total grants (13,960) (5,171)

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NOTE 16: ADMINISTERED - INCOME

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE Non-taxation revenue

Note 16A: Interest Interest (ATO refund delay) - 20

Total interest - 20

Note 16B: Other Revenue Department of Health and Ageing - 4,700

ACT Government - 103

NSW Government 500 500

Total Other Revenue 500 5,303

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NOTE 17: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL ASSETS

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Note 17A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Special Accounts - cash on deposit - 5,170

Total Cash and Cash Equivalents - 5,170

Note 17B: Trade and Other Receivables

Other receivables:

GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office 2,408 1,505

Trade Receivables 35 -

Contribution receivable ACT State Government - 103

Appropriation receivable (Special Account) 28,884 35,831

Total other receivables 31,327 37,438

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 31,327 37,438

Less: impairment allowance account:

Goods and services - -

Other - -

Total impairment allowance account - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 31,327 37,438

Receivables are expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 31,327 37,438

Total trade and other receivables (net) 31,327 37,438

Receivables were aged as follows:

Not overdue 31,327 37,438

Total receivables (gross) 31,327 37,438

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NOTE 18: ADMINISTERED - NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Inventories

Inventories held for distribution 162 301

Total inventories 162 301

Note: During 2012-13, $360,142 of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense (2011-12: $334,829)

No items of inventory were recognised at fair value less cost to sell.

All inventory is expected to be distributed in the next 12 months.

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NOTE 19: ADMINISTERED - PAYABLES

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Note 19A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals (12,687) (1,167)

Total suppliers (12,687) (1,167)

Supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities - (1)

External parties (12,687) (1,166)

Total (12,687) (1,167)

Total supplier (12,687) (1,167)

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 19B: Grants Private sector: Non-profit organisations (1,732) (1,414)

Other (495) (445)

Total grants (2,227) (1,859)

Total grants - are expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months (2,227) (1,859)

More than 12 months - -

Total grants (2,227) (1,859)

Note 19C: Other Payables Other (90) -

GST Payable to the ATO (0) (470)

Total other payables (90) (470)

Total other payables are expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months (90) (470)

Total other payables (90) (470)

Settlement was made according to the terms and conditions of each grant usually within 30 days of performance or eligibility.

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NOTE 20: ADMINISTERED - CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities to Administered Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Schedule of administered cash flows 0 5,170

Schedule of administered assets and liabilities - 5,170

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities: Net cost of services (55,114) (27,111)

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) in net receivables (836) 967

Decrease in inventories 139 (70)

Increase in supplier payables 11,908 (637)

Increase in grant payables 368

Net cash used by operating activities (43,533) (26,849)

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NOTE 21: ADMINISTERED CONTINGENT ASSETS & LIABILITIES

Quantifiable and Unquantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2013 ANPHA did not have any administered contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2012: Nil)

Significant Remote Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2013 ANPHA did not have any significant remote contingencies. (2012: Nil)

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NOTE 22: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

2013 2012

$’000 $’000

Note 22A: Categories of Financial Instruments Loans and receivables: At fair value: Cash and cash equivalents - 5,170

Trade Receivable 35 103

Total 35 5,273

Carrying amount of financial assets 35 5,273

Financial Liabilities At fair value: Trade payables (12,687) (1,167)

Grant payables (2,227) (1,859)

Total (14,914) (3,026)

Carrying amount of financial liabilities (14,914) (3,026)

Note 22B: Credit Risk

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents - 5,170

Trade receivables 35 103

Total 35 5,273

Financial liabilities Trade payables (12,687) (1,167)

Grant payables (2,227) (1,859)

Total (14,914) (3,026)

The following table illustrates the entity's gross exposure to credit risk, excluding any collateral or credit enhancements.

ANPHA holds no collateral to mitigate against risk.

ANPHA is exposed to minimal credit risk as loans and receivables are supported by signed contracts or agreements with other public sector departments and are quantified by invoice. Trade payable values are set by the market and validated by invoice. Grant payables are supported by signed funding agreements.

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NOTE 22: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS CONTINUED

Note 22C: Liquidity Risk

ANPHA's financial liabilities are payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that ANPHA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and mechanisms available to ANPHA (e.g. Advance to the Finance Minister) and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

Note 22D: Market Risk

ANPHA's financial instruments are of a nature that does not expose them to market risk.

ANPHA is not exposed to ‘currency risk’ or ‘other price risk’.

ANPHA has no interest bearing items on the Balance Sheet.

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NOTE 23: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

Financial assets Notes

Total financial assets as per schedule of administered assets and liabilities 31,327 42,608

Less: non-financial instrument components GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office 17B 2,408 1,505

Appropriation receivable (Special Account) 28,884 35,831

Total non-financial instrument components 31,292 37,336

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 35 5,273

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NOTE 24: APPROPRIATIONS Notes:1. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (Nos.1 & 3) 2012-13: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. The reduction in the appropriation is effected by the Finance Minister’s determination and is disallowable by Parliament. In 2013, there was no reduction in departmental appropriations.As with departmental appropriations, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of an administered appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister reduce that appropriation. For administered appropriations reduced under section 11 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1 & 3) 2012-13, the appropriation is taken to be reduced to the required amount specified in Table F of this note once the annual report is tabled in Parliament. All administered appropriations may be adjusted by a Finance Minister’s determination, which is disallowable by Parliament. 2. In 2012-13, there was no adjustment that met the recognition criteria of a formal addition or reduction in revenue (in accordance with FMO Div 101) but at law the appropriations had not been amended before the end of the reporting period. 3. The departmental ordinary annual services variance of ($1,019,702) is the net amount of departmental appropriation available from 2012-13 after adding departmental receipts and subtracting the total amount of departmental appropriations drawn down in 2012-13. The administered ordinary annual services items variance of ($7,015,000) relates to incurred expenses payable from 2012-13 annual administered appropriations. 4. On 5 August 2013, the Finance Minister determined a reduction in departmental appropriations. The Instrument to Reduce Appropriations (No. 1 of 2013-14) reduces Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2012-2013 by $25,000. This is included in the departmental variance balance.

A n n

u a l

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A R T

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in a r y

a

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5,456,000 - - - 2,762,029 - 8,218,029 7,198,327 1,019,702

T

o t a

l d e

p a r t

m e

n t a

l

5,456,000 - - - 2,762,029 - 8,218,029 7,198,327 1,019,702

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Administered items 52,262

(13,500

)

- 3,002 - 41,764 34,749 7,015

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52,262

(13,500

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- 3,002 - 41,764 34,749 7,015

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A n n

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A

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6,915,000 - - - 1,041,410 - 7,956,410 7,694,940 261,470

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6,915,000 - - - 1,041,410 - 7,956,410 7,694,940 261,470

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(480

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- 3,816 12,303 60,799 60,799 -

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45,160

(480

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Notes:

1. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (Nos.1 & 3) 2011-12: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. The reduction in the appropriation is effected by the Finance Minister’s determination and is disallowable by Parliament. In 2012, there was no reduction in departmental appropriations.

As with departmental appropriations, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of an administered appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister reduce that appropriation. For administered appropriations reduced under section 11 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1 & 3) 2011-12, the appropriation is taken to be reduced to the required amount specified in Table F of this note once the annual report is tabled in Parliament. All administered appropriations may be adjusted by a Finance Minister’s determination, which is disallowable by Parliament.

2. In 2011-12, there was no adjustment that met the recognition criteria of a formal addition or reduction in revenue (in accordance with FMO Div 101) but at law the appropriations had not been amended before the end of the reporting period.

3. The departmental ordinary annual services variance of ($261,470) is the net amount of departmental appropriation available from 2011-12 after adding departmental receipts and subtracting the total amount of departmental appropriations drawn down in 2011-12. There was no administered ordinary annual services items variance in 2011-12, as the full appropriation was paid out with in the year.

NOTE 24: APPROPRIATIONS

CONTINUED

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NOTE 24: APPROPRIATIONS CONTINUED

2012-13

Total amount

required 2

Total amount

appropriated 3

Total reduction4

Ordinary Annual Services Act (No.1) A ct (No.3)

Outcome 1 52,262,000.00 - 38,762,000.00 52,262,000.00 13,500,000.00

Notes:

2. Amount required as per Appropriation Act (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12). 3. Total amount appropriated in 2011-2012 4. Total reduction effective in 2012- 2013.

2011-12

Total amount

required 2

Total amount

appropriated 3

Total reduction4

Ordinary Annual Services Act (No.1) Act (No.3)

Outcome 1 49,251,000.00 8,212,000.00 56,983,000.00 57,463,000.00 480,000.00

Notes: 1. Numbers in this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent. 2. Amount required as per Appropriation Act (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12). 3. Total amount appropriated in 2011-2012 4. Total reduction effective in 2012-13.

Amount required 2

- by

Appropriation Act

1. Numbers in this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent.

Amount required3 - by Appropriation Act

2013 2012

$ $

DEPARTMENTAL Appropriation Act (No.1) 2012-2013 (1) 2,945,586 -

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2011-2012 - 1,925,884

Total 2,945,586 1,925,884

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

ADMINISTERED Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2012-13 - 480

Total - 480

Authority

Authority

• Table B: Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

• ANPHA does not have Departmental or Administered Capital Budgets.

•

• Table C: Unspent Annual Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

1. This balance includes an amount of $25,000 which will be reduced in 2013-14 as the Instrument to Reduce Appropriations (No.1- of 2013-14) becomes effective on 13 August 2013.

Table D: Special Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

ANPHA does not have special appropriations.

Table E: Disclosure by Agent in Relation to Annual and Special Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

ANPHA did not make any agency payments in 2012-13 or 2011-12.

Table F: Reduction in Administered Items (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

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NOTE 25: SPECIAL ACCOUNTS

Special Accounts (Recoverable GST exclusive)

2013 2012

$'000 $'000

Balance brought forward from previous period 41,001 11,809

Increases: Appropriation credited to special account - 27,559

Contribution from Department of Health and Ageing - 5,170

Contributions from State Governments 602 500

Total increases 602 33,229

Available for payments 41,603 45,038

Decreases: Administered Payments made to suppliers (12,719) (4,038)

Payments made for employee costs - -

Total administered decreases (12,719) (4,038)

Total decreases (12,719) (4,038)

Total balance carried to the next period 28,884 41,001

Note:

(c) meeting the expenses of administering the Account.

The Australian National Preventive Health Agency

Special Account (Administered) 1

1. Appropriation: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, Section 21.

3. Purposes of the Account:

(a) paying or discharging the costs, expenses and other obligations incurred by the Commonwealth in the performance of the CEO's functions;

(b) paying any remuneration and allowances payable to any person under the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010; and

2. Establishing Instrument: Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010, Section 50.

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NOTE 26: COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTORY CONDITIONS FOR PAYMENTS FROM THE CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND

Section 83 of the Constitution provides that no amount may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund except under an appropriation made by law. The Department of Finance and Deregulation provided information to all agencies in 2011 regarding the need for risk assessments in relation to compliance with statutory conditions on payments from special appropriations, including special accounts.

During 2011-12, ANPHA developed a plan to review exposure to risks of not complying with statutory conditions on payments from appropriations. The plan involved:

- identifying each special appropriation and special account;

- determining the risk of non-compliance by assessing the difficulty of administering the statutory conditions and assessing the extent to which existing payment systems and processes satisfy those conditions; and

- obtaining legal advice as appropriate to resolve questions of potential non-compliance.

At the completion of this reveiw ANPHA assessed the risk of not complying with statutory conditions on payments from appropriations as low.

ANPHA identified one appropriation involving statutory conditions for payment:

- The ANPHA Special Account (Administered).

As at 30 June 2013 this work had been completed in respect of ANPHA’s Special Account appropriation.

The work conducted to date identified no issues of compliance with section 83 of the Australian Constitution.

During 2012-13 additional legal advice was received that indicated there could be breaches of Section 83 under certain circumstances with payments for long service leave, goods and services tax and payments under determinations of the Remuneration Tribunal. ANPHA will review its processes and controls over payments for these items to minimise the possibility for future breaches as a result of these payments.

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NOTE 27: COMPENSATION AND DEBT RELIEF

2013 2012

$ $

Compensation and Debt Relief - Departmental No ‘Act of Grace payments' were expended during the reporting period. - -

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997. - -

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made. - -

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period. - -

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period. - -

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 during the reporting period. - -

Compensation and Debt Relief - Administered 2013 2012

$000 $000

No ‘Act of Grace payments' were expended during the reporting period. - -

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997. - -

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made. - -

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period. - -

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period. - -

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 during the reporting period. - -

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NOTE 28: REPORTING OF OUTCOMES

2013 2012 2013 2012

$ $ $$

Departmental Expenses (7,475,141) (6,706,034) (7,475,141) (6,706,034)

Own-source income 2,376,844 42,000 2,376,844 42,000

Net cost of outcome delivery (5,098,297) (6,664,034) (5,098,297) (6,664,034)

2013 2012 2013 2012

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Administered Expenses (55,614) (32,433) (55,614) (32,433)

Own-source income 500 5,322 500 5,322

Net cost of outcome delivery (55,114) (27,111) (55,114) (27,111)

2013 2012 2013 2012

$ $ $$

Expenses Employee benefits (5,695,842) (3,580,581) (5,695,842) (3,580,581)

Suppliers (1,754,527) (3,125,453) (1,754,527) (3,125,453)

Depreciation (24,772) - (24,772) -

Total (7,475,141) (6,706,034) (7,475,141) (6,706,034)

Income Other revenue 2,326,844 - 2,326,844 -

Other gains 50,000 42,000 50,000 42,000

Total 2,376,844 42,000 2,376,844 42,000

Assets Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 101,570 1,926 101,570 1,926

Trade and other receivables 2,975,242 2,216,414 2,975,242 2,216,414

Non Financial Assets Property, Plant and Equipment 184,032 - 184,032 -

Total 3,260,845 2,218,339 3,260,845 2,218,339

Liabilities Payables Suppliers (756,661) (420,509) (756,661) (420,509)

Other payables (401,336) (156,429) (401,336) (156,429)

Provisions Employee provisions (1,131,658) (1,002,916) (1,131,658) (1,002,916)

Total (2,289,656) (1,579,854) (2,289,656) (1,579,854)

The Australian National Preventive Health Agency contributes to one outcome as described in Note 1.1. All costs and revenues are attributed to this outcome.

Outcome 1 Total

Outcome 1 Total

Note 28A: Net Cost of Outcome Delivery

Note 28B: Major Classes of Departmental Expense, Income, Assets and Liabilities by Outcome

Outcome 1 Total

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NOTE 28: REPORTING OF OUTCOMES CONTINUED

2013 2012 2013 2012

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Expenses Suppliers (41,654) (27,262) (41,654) (27,262)

Grants (13,960) (5,171) (13,960) (5,171)

Total (55,614) (32,433) (55,614) (32,433)

Income Interest - 20 - 20

Other revenue 500 5,303 500 5,303

Total 500 5,323 500 5,323

Assets Cash and cash equivalents - 5,170 - 5,170

Trade and other receivables 31,327 37,438 31,327 37,438

Inventories 162 301 162 301

Total 31,489 42,909 31,489 42,909

Liabilities Suppliers (12,687) (1,167) (12,687) (1,167)

Grants (2,227) (1,859) (2,227) (1,859)

Other (90) (470) (90) (470)

Total (15,005) (3,496) (15,005) (3,496)

Outcome 1 Total

Note 28C: Major Classes of Administered Expenses, Income, Assets and Liabilities by Outcome

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NOTE 29: NET CASH APPROPRIATION ARRANGEMENTS

Note: 1. From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements, where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required. ANPHA does not currently have a departmental capital budget and has no depreciation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation.

2013 2012

$ $

Total comprehensive income (loss) less depreciation/amortisation expenses

previously funded through revenue appropriations 1

332,703 250,966

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation - -

Total comprehensive income - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 332,703 250,966

APPENDIX A: AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2012-2013

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

GLOSSARY AND ABBREVIATIONS

ALPHABETICAL INDEX

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APPENDIX A AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2012-2013

Actual available appropriation for 2012-13 $000

Payments made in 2012-13 $000

Balance Remaining 2012-13 $000

(a) (b) (a - b)

Ordinary Annual Services Departmental appropriation Prior year departmental appropriation1 2,057 2,057 -

Departmental appropriation 2 8,218 5,141 3,077

Total 10,275 7,198 3,077

Administered expenses Administered appropriation3 41,764 34,749 7,015

Total 41,764 34,749 7,015

Total ordinary annual services * 52,039 41,947 10,092

Total available annual appropriations and payments 52,039 41,947 10,092

Special Accounts Opening balance 41,001

Appropriation receipts -

Non-appropriation receipts to Special Accounts4 602 Payments made 12,719

Total Special Account * 41,603 12,719 28,884

Total resourcing A+B 93,642 54,666 38,976

Total net resourcing and payments for ANPHA 93,642 54,666 38,976

1

Appropritaion Bill (No.1) 2010-11 and Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2011-12 and relevant FMA Act section 31 receipts. 2 Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2012-13 and relevant FMA Act section 31 receipts. 3

Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2012-13 and 2012-13 FMA Act section 30 returns. 4 Non-appropriation receipts reflects $500,000 from the NSW State Government and $102,500 from the ACT Government.

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts through annual appropriations - - -

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APPENDIX A AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2012-2013

Expenses and Resources for Outcome 1

Budget* 2012-13 $000 (a)

Actual 2012-13 $000 (b)

Variation# 2012-13 $000 (a)-(b)

Program 1.1: Preventive Health Administered expenses Ordinary Annual Services (Appropriation Bill No.1 and No.3) 52,262 38,762 13,500 Special Accounts 25,215 16,852 8,363

Departmental expenses Departmental appropriation 5,506 7,475 1,969 -

Total for Program 1.1 82,983 63,089 19,894

2011-12 2012-13

Average Staffing Level (number) 35.23 43.01

* Full year budget, including $50,000 to departmental for audit services received free of charge.

# The variation in administered expenses reflects the MYEFO savings measure of $13,500,000 announced in 2012-13. This has been reduced under Section 11 of the Appropriation Act (No.1) 2012-13 at Note 24(F) in the 2012-13 financial statements. The Departmental variance is the difference between the Departmental surplus of $332,703 plus the reduction to the 2012-13 Departmental appropriation determined by the Minister for Finance on 5 August 2013 for $25,000 less own sourced revenue of $2,326,844.

******** ************************************************************** ***** ************************************ ******************************************* ** *************** *********** **************** ********************* *****************

132 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

Part of Report Description Page

Specific Requirements Letter of transmittal ii

Table of contents iii

Index 136

Glossary and Abbreviations 135

Contact officer(s) I.C

Internet home page address and Internet address for report I.C

Review by CEO Summary of significant issues and developments 2

Overview of Agency’s performance and financial results 2-3

Outlook for following year 3

Significant issues and developments - portfolio N/A

Agency Overview Role and functions 14

Organisational structure 17

Outcome and program structure 42

Where outcome and program structures differ from PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

N/A

Report on Performance Review of performance during the year in relation to programs and contribution to outcomes 41

Actual performance in relation to deliverables and KPIs set out in PB Statements 41-52

Where performance targets differ from the PBS details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the change N/A

Narrative discussion and analysis of performance 41-52

Trend information N/A

Significant changes in nature of principal functions/ services N/A

Performance of purchaser/provider arrangements N/A

Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives 59

Social inclusion outcomes 64

Performance against service charter customer service standards, complaints data, and the department’s response to complaints

N/A

Discussion and analysis of the Agency’s financial performance N/A

Discussion of any significant changes from the prior year, from budget or anticipated to have a significant impact on future operations.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 133

Part of Report Description Page

Report on Performance continued Agency resource statement and summary resource tables by outcomes

130-131

Management & Accountability - Corporate Governance

Agency heads are required to certify that their agency comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines. ii

Statement of the main corporate governance practices in place 56-57

Names of the senior executives and their responsibilities 18

Senior management committees and their roles 56-57

Corporate and operational planning and associated performance reporting and review 23-39

Approach adopted to identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk 59

Policy and practices on the establishment and maintenance of appropriate ethical standards 59

How nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers is determined 62

Management & Accountability - External Scrutiny

Significant developments in external scrutiny 58

Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals 58

Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman 58

Management & Accountability - Management of Human Resources

Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing human resources to achieve Agency objectives 61

Workforce planning, staff turnover and retention

Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements, individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs), determinations, common law contracts and AWAs

62

Training and development undertaken and its impact 63

Work health and safety performance 64

Productivity gains N/A

Statistics on staffing 62

Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs, determinations, common law contracts and AWAs 62

Performance pay 62

Management & Accountability - Assessment of effectiveness of assets management

Assessment of effectiveness of assets management 66

61

134 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS Part of Report Description Page

Management and Accountability - Purchasing

Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles 66

Management and Accountability - Consultants

The annual report must include a summary statement detailing the number of new consultancy services contracts let during the year; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were active in the reporting year; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The annual report must include a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website.

67

Management and Accountability - ANAO access clauses

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the Auditor-General 66

Management and Accountability - Contracts exempt from the AusTender

Contracts exempt from AusTender 67

Financial Statements 70

Other Mandatory Information

Work health and safety (schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 64

Advertising and Market Research (section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

68-69

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

69

Compliance with the Agency’s obligations under the Carer Recognition Act 2010 N/A

Grant programs 67

Disability reporting - explicit and transparent reference to agency level information available through other reporting mechanisms

65

Information Publication Scheme statement 61

Spatial reporting - expenditure by program between regional and non-regional Australia N/A

Correction of material errors in previous annual report N/A

List of Requirements 132

Note: I.C: Inside Cover N/A: Not Applicable for the Agency

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 135

GLOSSARY & ABBREVIATIONS

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANPHA Australian National Preventive Health Agency

ANPHA Act Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010

APS Australian Public Service

CEO Chief Executive Officer

CGRs Commonwealth Grants Rules

CLI Community Level Initiatives

COAG Council of Australian Governments

CSF Community Sponsorship Fund

DoHA Department of Health and Ageing

FMA Act Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

FMA Regulations Financial Management and Accountability Regulations 1997

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

ICT Information and communications technology

NBDS National Binge Drinking Strategy

NGO Non-government organisation

NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council

NPAPH National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health

NTC National Tobacco Campaign

Public Service Act Public Service Act 1999

SCoH Standing Council on Health

136 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

ALPHABETICAL INDEX A abbreviations 135 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

representation 65 advertising and market research 68-9 Advisory Council 3, 17, 19 Agency Resource Statement 130-131 asset management 66 Audit Committee 57 Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) 38,

58

access clauses 66 Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) CEO’s review 2-3 about us 14 financial results 3 role and functions 14 governance framework 18-21 2012-2013 highlights 6-11 management and accountability 58-68 mission 15 organisational structure 17 outcomes and program structure 16 outlook 3 overview 14-21 performance reporting 41-52 strategic goals 15 values 16 vision 15 Australian National Preventive Health

Agency Act 2010 14, 18, 42, 42, 52, 60 Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, The 2, 10, 25, 33, 37 B Bauman, Professor Adrian 21 Bennett, Christine 19 Boustead, Rebecca 21 Bowen, Dr Shelley 20 business continuity and planning 59 Butler MP, the Hon. Mark 18 Butt, David 19 Butt Out at Work campaign 29, 47

C Calma, Dr Tom 21 capacity building (goal 5) 37 case studies Western Sydney Medicare Local 12 Carpentaria Youth Drink Smart Initiative

22

Metro North Brisbane Medicare Local 40 Nexus Primary Health 53 Caterson, Professor Ian 21 Chapman, Professor Simon 21 Chee, Donna Ah 20 Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 18 review 2-3 Chikritzhs, Professor Tanya 20 chronic disease 2 collaboration 16 Commonwealth Ombudsman 58 Community Level Initiatives (CLI) 8, 32, 45-

46

case studies 22, 53 Community Sponsorship Fund (CSF) 7, 32, 44-45 consultancies 67 corporate governance 56-7 Cotter, Trish 21 Council of Australian Governments (COAG) National Partnership Agreement on

Preventive Health 33, 35 credibility 16

D Daube, Professor Mike 19, 21 Davoren, Sondra 20 disability 65 disease prevention and health promotion

67

Medicare Locals 2, 10, 12, 25, 67

E ecologically sustainable development 69 Edwards, Emeritus Professor Meredith 20 environmental performance 69 ethics 59-60 Evidence Briefs Smoking and Disadvantage 9, 30, 35 Tobacco Control and Mass Media

Campaigns 9, 30 exempt contracts 67 Expert Committees 3, 20-21, 60 Expert Committee on Research 20 Expert Committee on Alcohol 20

Expert Committee on Obesity 21 Expert Committee on Tobacco 21, 29 Exploring the Public Interest Case for a

Minimum (Floor) Price for Alcohol 31, 51, 24 external scrutiny 58

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F financial results 2 financial statements 70-128 fraud control 60 freedom of information 61

G Good Sports Program 8, 32, 45 governance 38, 56-7 framework 18-21 planning 56 governance team 18, 56-7 grants programs 67

H Hambleton, Dr Steve 20 Hamilton, Professor Margaret 20 Harper, Todd 21 Hawe, Professor Penny 20 Hazell, Anne 57 health funding models 67 health policy advice 24 health policy leadership 24 health risk reduction (goal 2) 27-32 integrated response to health risk 27 reduce obesity 27-28 reduce the harmful consumption of

alcohol 31-32 reduce the use of, and exposure to tobacco 29-30 healthy public policy (goal 1) 24-6 funding models 26 partnerships 25 policy advice 24 policy leadership 24 Hobbs, Tony 19 human resources 38 disability 65 employment agreements 62 learning and development 63 management 61-3 performance pay 62 social inclusion 64 staffing 61 work health and safety 64

I identity and communications 39 information and reporting (goal 4) 36 information analysis reporting 36 national systems surveillance 36 information management 65 innovation 16 integrated response to health risk 27 integrity 16

J judicial or administrative decisions 58

K Kalokerinos, John 18 knowledge management (goal 3) 33-35 evidence and analysis dissemination 35 prevention and health promotion

evaluation 35 prevention and health promotion research 33

L learning 16 staff 63

Lee, Dr Amanda 21 legal actions 58 legal services 66 list of requirements 132-134 Lucas, Roz 18

M McCallum, Professor John 20 management and accountability 55-69 Martin, Jane 21 Measure Up - Swap It Don’t Stop It

campaign 2, 10, 12, 25, 67 Medicare Locals 8, 26-8, 37, 55, 56 Migro, Detective Superintendent Jim 20 Miller, Caroline 21 Minister for Health 14, 18, 31 Minister for Mental Health and Ageing 18 mission 15 Moodie, Professor Rob 19-20 Munro, Jude (AO) 19 My QuitBuddy smartphone app 7, 29, 47, 49

138 Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

N National Binge Drinking Strategy 32-3, 43 Community Level Initiatives (CLI) 8, 22, 32, 45-46, 53

Community Sponsorship Fund (CSF) 7, 32, 44-45 Good Sports Program 8, 32, 45 National Partnership Agreement on

Preventive Health 33, 35 evaluation 35 National Preventive Health Awards 37 National Preventive Health Research

Strategy 2013-18 2, 9, 28, 30, 31, 33, 4334 National Preventive Health Workforce Strategy 37 national systems surveillance 36 National Tobacco Campaign 2, 6, 25, 29, 47,

49

O obesity 10, 27-28, 48, 50 Expert Committee on Obesity 21 O’Dea, Professor Kerin 20 organisational excellence (goal 6) 38-39 governance 38 human resources 38 identity and communications 39 organisational effectiveness 39 organisational structure 17 outcomes and program structure 16 outlook 3 overview 14-21

P Parliamentary scrutiny 58 partnerships 25 performance reporting 41-52 framework 42 Plibersek MP, the Hon. Tanya 18 Policy and Programs Branch 18 Pollaers, John 20 preventive health research 2, 34, 43 expand and strengthen 43 Preventive Health Research Grant Program

33, 67 Preventive Health Research Strategy 2013-18 2, 9, 28, 30, 31, 33, 43

Prevention Systems and Obesity Policy 17 Priority-Driven Research Agenda for Tobacco Control in Australia 9, 30 procurement 66-7 ANAO access clauses 66 consultancies 67 exempt contracts 67 framework 66 Purcell, Kate 21

R Raymond, Fran 59 records management 66 reports 60-1 Research Committee 20 risk management 59 Roberts, Dr Lyn (AM) 19

S security 60 Shape Up Australia 10, 25, 27, 48, 50 social inclusion 64 Social Marketing and Partnerships 17 targeting obesity 48-50 targeting tobacco use 47-49 staff see human resources Standing Council on Health (SCoH) 14 State of Preventive Health Report 9, 34, 36 Strategic and Operational Plans report on 23-39 strategic goals 15 Studdert, Dr Lisa 18 Sullivan, Denise 21 Surveillance, Research and Evaluation 17 Swinburn, Professor Boyd 21 Sylvan, Louise 2, 18 Symposiums National Symposium on Alcohol Social

Marketing 11, 24 National Symposium on Active Recreation and Sport for Health: Barriers

to Young People’s Participation 11, 24 National Symposium on Smoking and Disadvantage 11, 24 National Preventive Health Research

Symposium 11, 24

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 139

T Taylor, Dr Roscoe 19 tobacco 2, 29, 30, 47, 49 Expert Committee on Tobacco 21, 29 2012-2013 highlights 6, 9 social marketing targeting 47, 49 Turner, Pat (AM) 19

V values 16 vision 15

W Wakefield, Professor Melanie 19, 20 work health and safety 64 World No Tobacco Day 29, 47 Worth, the Hon. Trish 19

Y Young, Dr Jeannette 19