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Australian National Preventive Health Agency Reports For the period 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2012


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Australian National Preventive Health Agency

ANNUAL REPORT : 2011-2012

promoting a healthy australia∑ " ∑ " ∑ " ∑© Commonwealth of Australia 2012This work is copyright. Apart from any use perm itted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process w ithout prior permission from the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.ISSN: 2201-0963 (Print)ISSN: 2201-0971 (Online)Published by the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Printed by Bluestar PrintInquiries about the content of this report should be directed to:Director, Communications Operations & Knowledge Branch Australian National Preventive Health Agency GPO Box 462 Canberra ACT 2601Telephone: (02) 6289 2879 Email: anpha@anpha.gov.auThis report is available for download at WWW.anpha.gov.au

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

A

PREFACE

ABOUT THIS REPORT ' ^ ....

This report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports, as issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit and sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999 The report is a formal accountability document that details the activities of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency (the Agency) from its establishment on 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2012, consistent with section 53 of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010

The main purpose of this report is to provide Senators and Members of Parliament with an account of the Agency's activities during 2011-2012. The report is intended to be a valuable source of inform ation for the Agency's stakeholders and those involved in

preventive health efforts, along with the general public. It seeks to provide readers with an informative picture of the Agency's performance over the reporting period

STRUCTURE OF THIS REPORT

The Review by the CEO provides an outline of the Agency's operations and achievements over the reporting period

Part 1: Agency Overview reports on the Agency's structure and management arrangements.

Part 2: Report on Strategic and Operational Plans reports on the Agency s progress

against its Strategic and Operational Plans over the reporting period.

Part 3: Performance Reporting - reports on the Agency's performance against the deliverables and indicators detailed in the 2011-2012 Health and Ageing Portfolio Budget

Statements.

Part 4: Management and Accountability details the Agency s people management, corporate planning activities, and information on compliance with external legislative requirements.

Part 5: Financial Statements contains an account of the Agency's financial performance as well as a complete set of financial statements for the Agency in 2011-2012

The Appendices include a list of grants administered by the Agency during the reporting period and the Agency's Stakeholder Engagement Strategy.

At the end of the report is a Glossary and list of abbreviations a list of requirements to help readers identify all mandatory information now required for inclusion in annual

reports and an alphabetical index

The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP Minister for Health Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 Preventive Health Agency

Dear Minister

In accordance with section 53 of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 and sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999.1 am pleased to present you with the annual report of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency for the period 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2012, for your

presentation to the Parliament.

This report has been prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports, for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies approved on behalf of the Parliament by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit, as required under sections 63 and 70 of the Public Service Act 1999.

I am satisfied that the Agency has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting, and data collection procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the Agency and comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Louise Sylvan Chief Executive Officer

TABLE OF CONTENTS REVIEW BY THE CEO \ 2

First Year Highlights at a Glance 4

PART 1. AGENCY OVER VIEW 9

Our Vision and Mission 9

Establishment 10

Role and Functions 10

Goals 11

Values 12

Outcome and Program Structure 12

Organisational Structure 13

Governance Framework 14

Minister 14

Governance team 14

Advisory Council 15

Members of the Advisory Council 17

Expert Committees 22

PART 2. REPORT ON STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANS 24

Healthy Public Policy 26

i Health Risk Reduction 29

Knowledge Management 34

Information and Reporting 36

Capacity Building 37

Organisational Excellence 38

PART 3: REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 39

Perfomance reporting framework 4 0

Expand and strengthen prevention health research 41

Curb harmful alcohol consumption 43

Social Marketing that targets tobacco use and obesity 48

Establish new partnerships for innovative programs 54

and policy advice

PART 4: M ANAGEM ENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY 57

Overview 58

Corporate Governance 58

ANPHA legislative Framework 58

Corproate governance and planning 58

Governance team 58

External Security 59

Australian National Audit Office 59

Internal audit arrangements 59

Commonwealth Ombudsman 6 0

Legal Actions 6 0

Judicial or administrative decisions 6 0

Reports 60

Parliamentary scrutiny 61

Risk Management 61

Business Continuity and Disaster Management 61

Ethics 61

Fraud Control 62

Security 62

Freedom of Information 62

Human Resources Management 62

Workplace Health and Safety 6 4

Social Inclusion 65

Disability 65

Information Management 65

Records Management 66

Asset Management 66

Legal Services 66

Procurement 66

Grants program 67

Advertising and market research 67

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

PART 5: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS . 69

Appendix A: National Preventive Health Research Grants 128

Appendix B: NBDS Community Level Initiatives Grants 133

Appendix C: Stakeholder Engagement Strategy 137

Appendix D: Agency Resource Statement 2011-12 145

List of Requirements 147

Glossary and Abbreviations 150

Alphabetical Index 151

REVIEW BY THE CEO

IT GIVES ME GREAT PLEASURE TO DELIVER THE FIRST

ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL

PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY. THIS REPORT COVERS

THE PERIOD FROM 1 JANUARY 2011 TO 30 JUNE 2012.

REVIEW OF 2011-12

The Agency was established on 1 January 2011 following the passage of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 by the Australian Parliament in November 2010. 2011-12 was the Agency *s first full year of operations.

The Agency's establishment followed recommendations from the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission and the National Preventative Health Taskforce calling for a national body with the capacity to lead, facilitate, coordinate and be a catalyst for the "ramping up" of prevention and health promotion efforts across the country.

The establishment of a national agency was agreed within the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health.

The Agency has begun delivering a truly national preventive health effort and providing leadership for effective and sustained investment in prevention and health promotion.

Ministers have asked the Agency to focus on the challenges associated with chronic disease and addressing risk factors and behaviours, particularly related to obesity (both nutrition and physical inactivity), smoking and harmful alcohol consumption. These are

the risk factors driving chronic disease prevalence in Australia that account for about 40% of potentially preventable hospitalisations for chronic conditions. Additionally and importantly, the Agency is involved not only in action to help individuals understand the risks and modify their behaviour, but also in supporting efforts to address the broader social, economic and environmental factors that we know also contribute to poor health outcomes.

The next section of this report illustrates key highlights of our first year followed by more formal reporting on performance. The operations during the year contributed extensively to the Agency's objectives, not only in relation to the risk factors which are its focus, but also in regard to the structures for incorporation of expert advice, development of prevention research strategies, and the establishment of good governance and financial measures.

FINA NCIAL RESULTS

The Agency's audited financial statements for 2010-11 (covering the period from the Agency's establishment on 1 January 2011 until 30 June 2011) were provided to the Minister for Health and Ageing in October 2011 For that establishment period, the Agency had a small surplus of $0,388 million. This report contains the audited financial statements for 2011-12, in which the Agency had a small surplus of $0.3 million,

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

OUTLOOK

Looking ahead to 2012-13, the key areas of focus are:

" building results-oriented partnerships with other stakeholders engaged in prevention activity, and particularly with our State and Territory colleagues

" working with Medicare Locals to develop and disseminate evidence-based approaches to disease prevention and health promotion within their local communities

" strengthening the national co-ordination and integration of social marketing activity, particularly in relation to tobacco and obesity, across jurisdictions and organisations

" finalising the National Preventive Health Research Strategy and research priorities for obesity, alcohol and tobacco

" developing the first report on the State of Preventive Health in Australia

1 facilitating the evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health and the dissemination of lessons to enable more effective interventions and better capacity-building through this iterative learning process

" providing evidence-based advice to Ministers on key prevention policy and activity

ACKNOWLEDGEM ENTS

I wish to acknowledge and thank Rhonda Galbally AO, the Interim CEO from January to June 2011, for her contributions in the Agency *s initial establishment phase, and also Lisa Studdert, the Acting CEO between July and September 2011 (and our Manager of Policy & Programs). I would also like to thank the members of our Advisory Council and Expert Committees who provide me with ongoing advice on matters relating to preventive health.

Finally. I would like to thank all the staff for assisting my transition into the Agency, and for their support and dedication since the Agency's establishment. Our staff are a talented and com mitted group of people who wish to make a positive difference to the state of people's health in Australia.

LOUISE SYLVAN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

October 2012

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

FIRST YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

Preventive Health Research Strategy Development

The Agency consulted with key stakeholders on the development of a National Preventive Health Research Strategy to foster research and evaluation in preventive health in Australia. The report of interviews with key stakeholders has been publicly released, prior to distributing the consultation draft of the Strategy to stakeholders.

National Partnership Evaluation Framework

Ihe Agency is charged with overseeing a National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, sought by the national health sector as an important source of evidence in addition to COAG reviews. Phase one of the National Evaluation, the development of the evaluation framework and strategy, is complete. Phase two implementation of the evaluation will commence in early 2013.

Health Promotion Websites Database To support improved health promotion policy and practice, the Agency developed a Health Promotion Websites Database,

available at %† - h that provides resources and practical tools from a comprehensive array of websites.

Preventive Health Research Grant Program 2011-2012

The Agency offered investigator-driven project funding of $3.75 million for translational research in the areas of obesity, smoking and harmful use of alcohol. Funding was awarded to thirteen diverse preventive health projects over three years.

For more information on these grants see Appendix A

Preventive Health Surveillance Forum The Agency held a National Preventive Health Surveillance Forum on 2 April 2012 to gather ideas to guide improvements in national

surveillance systems for prevention and health promotion. The report, with recommendations for action from the Forum, is available at - anpim g .

State of Preventive Health Report The Agency has commenced work on the first biennial State o f Preventive Health report. Due in 2013, the report will ensure that

information on the progress of prevention and health promotion strategies is regularly reported and readily available.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

AT A GLANCE ALCOHOL

National Binge Drinking Strategy: Community Level Initiative

Under Round 3 of the National Binge Drinking Strategy's Community Level Initiative, the Agency is providing funding of up to $10 million for 26 community level projects across Australia to address youth binge drinking.

For more inform ation on these projects see Appendix B

National Binge Drinking Strategy: Good Sports Program Continuation & Expansion

The Agency is managing the $8.9 million continuation and expansion of the successful Good Sports program, an initiative of the Australian Drug Foundation, which supports local sporting clubs around Australia to build a culture of responsible drinking at

the grass roots level. The expansion of Good Sports will increase the number of sporting clubs participating in the program from 5,000 to a minimum of 6,500 clubs by June 2014.

National Binge Drinking Strategy: Community

Sponsorship Fund

The Agency developed and is managing an innovative sponsorship partnership between the Australian Government and 12 national sporting organisations as an alternative to alcohol sponsorship in sport, to address binge drinking and the influence of alcohol promotion on young Australians.

BE THE INFLUENCE The campaign was jointly announced by the Minister for Sport

and the Minister for Mental Health and Ageing in June 2012. The campaign message is Be the Influence: Tackling Binge Drinking and will feature on sporting uniforms, at venues and events across Australia.

The sports involved*:

Football Federation of Australia

Basketball Australia

Netball Australia

Swimming Australia

Athletics Australia

Hockey Australia

Cycling Australia

Canoeing Australia

Skateboarding Australia

Volleyball Australia

Equestrian Australia

Triathlon Australia

as at 30 June 2012

Consultation Issues The Agency has released a consultation issues paper on harmful Paper alcohol use. Exploring The Public Interest Case For A Minimum

(Floor) Price For Alcohol. A final report will be released in late-2012.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / annual REPORT 2011-2012

FIRST YEAR HIGHLIGHTS TOBACCO

National Tobacco The Agency continued the roll out of the National Tobacco Campaign Campaign, including national television, outdoor, magazine, radio and online advertising, and public relations activities. Campaign advertising included the $16 a pack isn't all a smoker coughs up:

Every Cigarette Brings Cancer Closer and the Stop Smoking. Start Repairing: Every Cigarette You Don't Smoke is Doing You Good.

MyQuitBuddy iPhone App

a*Quit Now: My QuitBuddy ihHn∑ OT8´a

The MyQuitBuddy iPhone app and the Butt Out at Work campaign were launched on World No Tobacco Day (31 May 2012) to raise awareness about the dangers of smoking and to assist smokers with their quit attempts. In less than a month, over 8,000 users had downloaded the app. The National

Tobacco Campaign website at vww.quit . %† *ø*Ω .*Ø had over 1.6 million visits between the campaign launch in 2011 and 30 June 2012

YOU AVOIDED

19040MG OF TAR

DAYS:

136SMOKE FREE

DOLLARS

$2176SAVED

CIGARETTES

2720NOT SMOKED

YOU AVOIDED

60DANGEROUS CHEMICALS " All calculations are approximate

Statement released: 50 years on:

Gains and opportunities in tobacco

The Agency released a statement marking the 50th anniversary of the report by the Royal College of Physicians of London, Smoking and Health. This 1962 report is seen as a turning point in the way cigarettes were perceived by governments and the public, through its straightforward documentation of tobacco- related death and disease.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

AT A GLANCE OBESITY

Swap It Don't Stop It Campaign The Agency oversaw two major bursts of Swap It Don't Stop It campaign activity in 2011-12, incorporating national television,

print, outdoor and online advertising, and public relations and local level activities,

From the launch of Swap It Don't Stop It in March 2011 until 30 June 2012. there have been approximately 740,000 visits to the campaign website; over 50,000 people downloaded the iPhone app; 16,500 people followed the campaign on the Swap It

Facebook page; and 6,689 people registered to use the 12 week online planner.

swap it ? *ø*ø*∑ *Æ’ st op it _Seminar: Marketing The Agency worked with the South Australian Department of of Unhealthy Food Health to host a seminar on the advertising and marketing of to Children 'unhealthy' foods to children The seminar included contributionsfrom industry and public health experts, and a presentation by Dr Corinna Hawkes. an international expert from the UK in international food policy and marketing unhealthy food to children, who presented on the regulations and policies that have been imp'emented internationally.The seminar was followed by a discussion about options to strengthen current voluntary industry initiatives to reduce children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food and beverages and a working group has been formed to progress initiatives.Seminar: Causes and Prevention of ObesityThe Agency and the National Health and Medical Research Council hosted a seminar presented by internationally renowned obesity and nutrition expert Professor Kelly Brownell, the Co≠founder and Director of Yale's Rudd Centre for Food Policy and Obesity. Profession Brownell presented on the causes and prevention of obesity from an international perspective.Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

FIRST YEAR HIGHLIGHTS NEW PROJECTS

Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in Medicare Locals

The Agency is working in partnership with the Australian Medicare Locals Alliance (the AML Alliance, formerly the Australian General Practice Network) to support the newly- formed Medicare Locals to pursue disease prevention and health promotion as an integral part of their work.

The Agency and the AML Alliance released a joint statement on disease prevention and health promotion in Medicare Locals, supported by an evidence review monograph. These documents outline the vision and lay the foundation for the Agency to provide support to Medicare Locals in their prevention activities.

Developing The Agency has engaged with key stakeholders on the issues

Healthier Cities and challenges of health prom oting environments. This has and Environments included input to the Urban Design Protocol prepared by the Department of Infrastructure and Transport, and consultations about active travel.

The Agency also hosted a roundtable discussion on healthy places with government, NGO. academic and industry stakeholders.

National Preventive Health Workforce Strategy

The Agency and Health Workforce Australia are working in partnership to progress the development of the National Preventive Health Workforce Strategy. A wide consultation process is planned in 2012/13. The Strategy development is due for completion in June 2013.

Note: This First Year Highlights listing is not. nor is it intended to be, a comprehensive lisitmg of

all the Agency *s achievements during the year, Parts 2 and 3 of this report contain more detailed accounts of the Agency's work during the reporting period.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

PART 1: AGENCY OVERVIEW V'x J

OUR VISION

A healthy Australian society, where the promotion of health 15 embraced by every sectoi valued by every individual, and includes everybody

OUR MISSION

To be the catalyst for strategic partnerships, including the provision of technical advice and assistance to all levels of government and m all sectors, to prom ote health and reduce health risk and inequalities, and to initiate actions to promote health across the entire Australian community

AGENCY OVERVIEW ESTABLISHMENT The Agency was established in January 2011 following the commencement of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 (ANPHA Act). The creation of the Agency was a key recommendation of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission and the National Preventative Health Taskforce. The funding structure of the Agency was agreed with States and Territories through the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health.

The Agency is a statutory authority, in the Health and Ageing portfolio, responsible through its CEO to the Commonwealth Minister for Health. For financial purposes, the Agency operates under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act) and for staffing purposes, under the Public Service Act 1999 (Public Service Act). The ANPHA Act also provides for the Health Minister to appoint an Advisory Council of up to 11 members comprising individuals with a breadth of experience and expertise, including members representing the States and Territories and the Commonwealth.

ROLE AND FUNCTIONS The Agency advises the Commonwealth Minister for Health about preventive health and may be requested to advise, or make recommendations to. the Standing Council on Health (SCoH), a State or Territory government or the Australian Local Government Association. This provides a new opportunity to influence processes in ways that promote cohesive prevention and health promotion policy and strategy development across the country. The Agency is integrating work already underway by the Commonwealth. States and Territories and the non-government and community sectors and for the scale-up of programs and interventions to get the best outcomes from available resources.

The Agency is building on the extensive risk factor work outlined by the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health and in the Government's response to the National Preventative Health Taskforce. A renewed national focus on evidence- informed efforts in prevention and on the development of integrated approaches to address health risk, including the social determinants of health and through primary health care services, should follow. The Agency is developing, supporting and investigating promising approaches to speed up the development of evidence for further action and is providing national leadership in the dissemination of knowledge and. with partners, strengthening national data and information capacity in order to better measure and report on progress.

The Agency is also playing an important role in ensuring a balance between "top- down' approaches - traditionally the role of SCoH, the Commonwealth and State and Territory governments - and *bottom -up' approaches - from families, communities and industry - to altogether play a significant part in achieving progress on strategic priorities. Governments agree that a comprehensive approach to preventive health must include the full range of players that can help make healthy choices easy choices for all Australians.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

STRATEGIC GOALS

THE AGENCY HAS SIX HIGH LEVEL STRATEGIC GOALS WHICH CAPTURE

THE SCOPE OF ITS ACTIVITY AND WHICH WILL, THROUGH SUSTAINED

ATTENTION AND COLLABORATIVE ACTION, DELIVER THE VISION.

r ^

GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY Promote and guide the development, application integration and review of public organisational and community-based prevention and health promotion policies

GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION Provide policy advice and program leadership to support the development, implementation evaluation and scaling up of evidence-informed health promotion and health risk reduction strategies for population groups across the lifespan and m a range of settings with an initial focus on obesity, tobacco and harmful alcohol consumption.

GOAL 3: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Drive the development of dynamic knowledge systems that enable evidence- informed policy and practice in prevention and health promotion across Australia

GOAL 4: INFORMATION AND REPORTING Guide improvements in national surveillance systems for prevention and health promotion and ensure that information on the progress of prevention and health promotion strategies is made readily available and regularly reported

GOAL 5: CAPACITY BUILDING Build broad and comprehensive prevention and health promotion capacity

GOAL 6: ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE Establish the Agency as an innovative, reliable, transparent and accountable organisation, highly regarded by governments, partners, staff and the community with a strong national identity

L __ *õ

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

AGENCY OVERVIEW VALUES

Catalyst - initiate, foster, broker, promote and add value to prevention and health promotion efforts throughout Australia.

C ollaboration - build and strengthen effective and lasting partnerships across all levels and all relevant portfolios of government and with the health system, the research community, industry, media, and the non-government and community sectors.

C re d ib ility - support and produce well-researched and high quality policies, programs and advice, based on the best available evidence and expertise.

Innovation - facilitate solutions that go beyond the traditional silos and boundaries of institutions and sectors and actively seek new approaches to connect research with policy and practice.

In te g rity - be accountable for all facets of the Agency's work, acting with honesty and transparency in all work.

Learning - foster continuous learning and development.

OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM STRUCTURE The Agency's outcome and program structure is set out in the 2011-2012 Portfolio Budget Statements for the Health and Ageing portfolio. The outcomes, programs and measures of performance are consistent with those set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements. The report on performance shows a clear relationship between the targets set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements and the results achieved in 2011 - 2012. In 2011-2012, the Agency's single outcome was delivered through Program 1.1:

Preventive Health, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Outcomes and programs. 2011-2012

OUTCOME 1

A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors

Through Program 1.1, the Australian Government aims to:

Monitor, evaluate and build evidence in relation to health promotion and disease prevention strategies and facilitate rapid and effective dissemination for widespread utilisation and scale-up; reduce harmful alcohol consumption; coordinate and implement a national approach to social marketing for preventive health programs; and establish new partnerships for innovative programs and policy advice.

O Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPOK I 2011-2012

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

At 30 June 2012, the Agency employed 39 staff equivalent to 3677 full-time equivalents. The average staffing level for 2011-2012 was 35.23.

Figure 2 sets out the organisational structure of the Agency and identifies the senior managers responsible for each area.

Figure 2. Agency Organisational Chart 2011-2012

A D VISOR Y

COUNCIL

EXPERT COMMITTEES RESEARCH ALCOHOL OBESITY TOBACCO

AUDIT COMMITTEE

.... <3....

FINANCE

PROCUREMENT,

GRANTS 6 PROBITY

HUMAN

RESOURCES

MANAGEMENT A

CORPORATE

SUPPORT

COMMUNICATIONS

SOCIAL MARKETING

& PARTNERSHIPS

-NATIONAL * -MEASURE L -NBDS SOCii

rOBACCO CAMPAIGN IP CAMPAIGN AL MARKETING CAMPAIGN

TOBACCO CONTROL

a ALCOHOL POLICY

NBDS PROG

Y SPONSORSHIP FUND

SURVEILLANCE RESEARCH A

EVALUATION

NATIONAL I HEALTH RE!

PREVENTION

SYSTEMS 6

OBESITY POLICY

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 o

AGENCY OVERVIEW GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

Minister The Hon. Tanya Plibersek MP became the Agency's responsible minister following her appointment as Minister for Health on 14 December 2012 Prior to that, the Hon, Nicola Roxon MP was the Agency's responsible minister.

Minister Plibersek's portfolio responsibilities include tobacco and obesity policy, while the Hon. Mark Butler MP, Minister for Mental Health and Ageing, is responsible for alcohol policy.

Governance Team

The Governance Team provides the Agency with strategic and operational leadership. The group consists of:

Ms Louise Sylvan, Chief Executive Officer Ms Sylvan has been Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Agency since 23 September 2011. The ANPHA Act sets out the functions and responsibilities of the CEO. In summary these are as follows:

" advise on, lead and be a catalyst for national prevention and health promotion programs;

" effectively collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate evidence in relation to prevention and health promotion strategies;

" facilitate a national prevention and health promotion research infrastructure:

" generate new and innovative partnerships with workplaces, communities and for schools;

" support the ongoing development of a workforce skilled in prevention and health promotion: and

" lead a national approach to social marketing for prevention and health promotion programs.

Dr Lisa Studdert, Manager, Programs and Policy Dr Studdert manages the Policy and Programs Branch which provides advice and program support on health promotion and disease prevention, particularly regarding obesity, tobacco and alcohol. The teams within the branch are Social Marketing and Partnerships, Alcohol Policy and Tobacco Control, Prevention Systems and Obesity Policy, and Surveillance, Research and Evaluation.

Mr John Kalokerinos, Chief Operating Officer Mr Kalokerinos manages the Operations and Knowledge Branch which maintains the Agency's governance arrangements including systems, structures, policies and procedures for human resources, financial, business, procurement, information and communications technology (ICT). legal, information management, risk management, audit, grants administration, communications and managing secretariat functions for the Agency's Advisory Council

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPOR i 2011-2012

CEO and Advisory Council 2011-2012

Back Row: Lyn Roberts, Jude Munro. David Butt. Tony Hobbs. Jeannette Young Mike Daube

Front Row: Roscoe Taylor, Christine Bennett (Chair), Louise Sylvan (CEO). Pat Turner

Absent: Rob Moodie & Trish Worth

Advisory Council The ANPHA Act establishes the Agency's Advisory Council which has the function of advising the CEO on preventive health matters. The Act provides that the Advisory Council

is to consist of:

a) one member representing the Commonwealth

b) at least one member, but not more than 2 members, representing the governments of the States and Territories

c) at least 5, but not more than 8. other members with expertise relating to preventive health

Advisory Council members are appointed by the Minister for Health and consist of Commonwealth. State and Territory government representatives and individuals with preventive health expertise.

The Advisory Council comprises 11 members, and their remuneration and allowances are determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. The Advisory Council met 5 times during 2011 -2012 .

Prom oting a Health-, Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Advisory Council In 2011-12. the Advisory Council provided advice to the CEO on a variety of preventive health matters including:

" the Strategic and Operational Plans

" the Stakeholder Engagement Strategy

" tobacco and obesity prevention social marketing campaigns

" knowledge transfer activities

" preventive health research

" evaluation of the National Partnership on Preventive Health

" prevention through primary care and the Agency's partnership with the AML Alliance

" developing the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price for alcohol

" marketing of unhealthy food to children

AGENCY OVERVIEW

Table 1: Advisory Council Members and meeting attendance 2011-2012

Chair Christine Bennett 4/5

Deputy Chair Rob Moodie 4/5

Member David Butt - Commonwealth representative

(Appointed 20 March 2012)

1/1

Member Michael Daube 5/5

Member Tony Hobbs 5/5

Member Jude Munro 4/5

Member Lyn Roberts 5/5

Member Roscoe Taylor - State/Territory representative

(Appointed 20 March 2012)

1/1

Member Pat Turner 5/5

Member Trish Worth 4/5

Member Jeannette Young - State/Terrrtory representative 3/5

Note 1' Unless otherwise stated, members were appointed on 7 July 2011.

Note 2- Megan Morris was the Commonwealth representative to the Advisory Council until August 2011.

The practice of issuing a communique after each meeting promotes communication of the key Advisory Council deliberations. Communiques are available on the Agency's website at: www.anpha.gov.au

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Mem bers of the Advisory Council

Professor Christine Bennett Professor Christine Bennett was appointed as Chair of the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011 Prof Bennett is Professor and Dean, School of Medicine, Sydney. The University of Notre Dame Australia, and has over 30 years of health industry experience in clinical care, strategic planning and senior management in the public, private and non-profit sectors.

In February 2008. Prof Bennett was appointed Chair of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission that advised governments on a long-term blueprint for the future of the Australian health system.

Prof Bennett has previously held positions as Chief Medical Officer for MBF Australia Limited and subsequently the Bupa Australia Group, Associate Director Health Services Planning in NSW Health; General Manager of the Royal Hospital for Women; Chief Executive of Westmead Hospital and Health Services; Partner for Health and Life Services at KPMG Australia; CEO of Total Healthcare Enterprises - a private primary health care company; and CEO of Research Australia.

Prof Bennett is a specialist paediatrician, a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and is actively committed to medical professional issues, social policy and medical research.

Professor Rob Hoodie Professor Rob Moodie was appointed as Deputy Chair of the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011 Prof Moodie is Professor of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population Health. Prior to this, he was the inaugural Chair of Global Health at the Nossal Institute. University of Melbourne.

In 2007, Prof Moodie was appointed by the Victorian Minister for Planning to chair the Audit Expert Group to review Melbourne *s major urban plan, Melbourne 2030. From 1999≠ 2002, Prof Moodie was Editor-in-Chief of the Health Promotion Journal of Australia, and from 2001-2006 was Vice President of the International Union of Health Promotion and

Education.

Since 1979. Prof Moodie has worked for the Save the Children Fund, Medicins Sans Frontieres, Congress (the Aboriginal Health Service in Alice Springs), the Burnet Institute and for the World Health Organization. Prof Moodie was the inaugural Director of Country Programs at the joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Prof Moodie was the inaugural Director of Country Support for UNAIDS in Geneva from 1995-98, and was CEO of VicHealth from 1998-2007 Prof Moodie chaired the National Preventative Health

Taskforce from 2008-2011

Prof Moodie has written and spoken extensively on preventive health and has co-edited and co-written four books, including Hands on Health Promotion, and his most recent book is Recipes for a Great Life with Gabriel Gate.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

AGENCY OVERVIEW David Butt David Butt was appointed as the Commonwealth representative to the Advisory Council on 20 March 2012.

Mr Butt is Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing with responsibility for national primary health care reform, population health, and regulatory policy and governance. Prior to commencing in this position in August 2011, Mr Butt spent three years as CEO of the Australian General Practice Network, the peak national body for Australia's Divisions of General Practice which are evolving into Medicare Local primary health care organisations.

Mr Butt was also the inaugural National CEO of Little Company of Mary Health Care (the Calvary group of public and private hospitals, aged care and home care services), and CEO of ACT Health and Community Care, including two years as Chair of the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council (AHMAC).

Mr Butt was involved in the introduction of Medicare in 1984, and later in Australia *s initial response to HIV/AIDS, and in the early establishment of the National Campaign Against Drug Abuse. Mr Butt has an MBA and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and Associate Fellow of the Australian College of Health Services Management.

Professor Michael Daube Professor Mike Daube was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011 Professor Daube is Professor of Health Policy at Curtin University where he is Director of the Public Health Advocacy Institute and the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth He has extensive national and international experience in public health.

Professor Daube was Western Australia's first Director General of Health from 2001 - 2005 and Chair of the National Public Health Partnership. Professor Daube has been a consultant for the World Health Organisation, the International Union against Cancer, and governments and NGOs in over 30 countries. He has been honoured for his work by many national and international organisations, including recently the American Cancer Society *s Luther Terry Distinguished Career Award.

Professor Daube is President of the Australian Council on Smoking and Health, Co-chair of the National Alliance for Action on Alcohol, Chair of the WA Network of Alcohol and Other Drugs, Patron of Local Drug Action Groups Inc. and chair or member of many other government and NGO committees. He was previously President of the Public Health Association of Australia and Deputy Chair of the National Preventative Health Taskforce.

Dr Tony Hobbs Dr Tony Hobbs was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011. Dr Hobbs is a rural GP Obstetrician in Cootamundra, NSW, with over 25 years experience.

Dr Hobbs chaired the external Reference Group developing Australia *s first National Primary Health Care Strategy and is a past Chair of the Australian General Practice Network. Dr Hobbs is also the Chair of the Murrumbidgee Medicare Local (formerly the Riverina Division of General Practice and Primary Health) and is a member of the NHMRC Prevention and Community Health Committee and a Director of the Cancer Institute NSW.

O Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Dr Hobbs is committed to improving access to health care and reducing inequitable health outcomes through a comprehensive Primary Health Care approach and has been involved in developing an innovative integrated Primary Health Care Centre in Cootamundra.

Jude Munro AO Jude Munro was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011 Ms Munro has been the Chief Executive Officer of the Brisbane City Council, City of Adelaide, Moreland and St KiIda Councils in Victoria.

Prior to loining local government. Ms Munro was a senior executive in the Victorian Public Service

Ms Munro is a former Chairperson of Queensland Urban Utilities, and is a director of Uniting Care Qld and Airservices Australia. Ms Munro is a member of the COAG Expert Panel on Cities and is the former Chair of the National Local Government Drug and Alcohol Advisory Committee.

Ms Munro has post-graduate qualifications in public policy and business administration and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a National Fellow of the Institute of Public Administration Australia.

Dr Lyn Roberts AM Dr Lyn Roberts was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011. Dr Roberts is the CEO of the National Heart Foundation of Australia and is responsible for the development and implementation of national cardiovascular health programs within Australia.

Prior to joining the Heart Foundation, she worked for nine years at the Cancer Council of South Australia and managed the cancer prevention unit as well as establishing and managing the South Australian Smoking and Health Project. She was Vice President of Family Planning SA (1993-1994) and was also Chair of the Board of Child and Youth Health

Services (1995-1998). From 1998-2001 she was a member of the Pharmaceutical Health and Rational Use of Medicines Committee with the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care.

Dr Roberts is a member of several expert advisory committees for the government and non-government sector and is a current member of the Board of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Dr Roberts was previously a member of the National Preventative Health Taskforce and chaired the overweight and obesity working group. She was Chair and remains a member of the Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance.

Dr Roberts was elected to the Board of the World Heart Federation in 2006 and served as Vice President from 2009-2010. Dr Roberts has over 40 publications in peer-reviewed journals along with authorship of a number of reports prepared for Commonwealth and State Health Departments.

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AGENCY OVERVIEW Or Roscoe Taylor \ Dr Roscoe Taylor was appointed as one of the two State and Territory representatives to the Advisory Council on 20 March 2012. Dr Taylor is Chief Health Officer in the Tasmanian

Department of Health and Human Services and holds the statutory position of Director of Public Health,

Dr Taylor is a public health physician with a broad background and extensive experience, having worked in public and environmental health and health promotion across three jurisdictions.

He has served on the NHMRC Health Advisory Committee, National Public Health Partnership, Australian Population Health Development Principal Committee, and has chaired enHealth, Australia's peak Environmental Health body.

Dr Taylor is also currently a member of the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee and the Community Care and Population Health Committees under SCoH.

Pat Turner AM

Pat Turner was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011, Ms Turner has 40 years experience working primarily in Aboriginal affairs at the local, regional and national levels She has had a long and varied career in the Australian Public Service with senior

roles, including CEO of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, and Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth Departments of Aboriginal Affairs and Prime Minister and Cabinet, with oversight of the establishment of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation and with responsibility for the Office of the Status of Women among other matters,

Ms Turner was also the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Centrelink, and the Head of the Regulatory Reform Taskforce reviewing the administrative arrangements for public health and safety regulation at the federal level with the then Department of Health and Aged Care. For 18 months in 1998-99. Ms Turner held the Monash Chair of Australian Studies, Georgetown University, USA,

Ms Turner holds a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the University of Canberra where she was awarded the University prize for Development Studies.

The Hon. Trish Worth

The Hon. Trish Worth was appointed to the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011. Prior to entering the Australian Parliament as the Member for Adelaide in 1993. Ms Worth worked in acute health settings as a registered nurse and midwife, including ten years in Adelaide's

largest private pathology practice reaching senior management level.

Ms Worth served on a number of House of Representatives Committees and Inquiries. These included Australia's International Health Programs; Home and Community Care Programs; the Management and Treatment of Breast Cancer; Youth Homelessness; and Foreign Affairs. Defence and Trade.

In Government, Ms Worth became the first female whip in the House of Representatives.

In 1997, she was appointed Parliamentary Secretary for Health and Family Services. In this role she had responsibility for the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and all regulatory areas including medicines, food, radiation and medical devices.

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From 1998-2001, Ms Worth was Parliamentary Secretary for Education and Youth Affairs where she was responsible for the Youth portfolio including school drug education. In 2001, Ms Worth returned to the Health Portfolio and once again had responsibility for the regulatory area to which gene technology and chemicals had been added. Ms Worth was also responsible for alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs, mental health and suicide prevention.

Since leaving the Australian Parliament in 2004, Ms Worth has contributed in a number of key health areas, including chairing the NSW Government Alcohol Education Taskforce.

Dr Jeannette Young

Dr Jeannette Young was appointed as one of the two State and Territory representatives of the Advisory Council on 7 July 2011. Dr Young has been the Chief Health Officer for Queensland since August 2005. In this role, Dr Young is responsible for preventive health services, health disaster planning and response, aero-medical retrieval services,

licensing of private hospitals, organ and tissue donation services, cancer screening policy, communicable diseases and environmental health services.

Prior to this, Dr Young held the position of Executive Director of Medical Services at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane and has previously worked in a range of positions in Queensland and Sydney. Dr Young's clinical background is in Emergency Medicine and she has specialist qualifications as a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators and as a Fellow by Distinction of the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom. Dr Young is an Adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology and at Griffith University.

Dr Young is a member of numerous State and national committees and boards, including the Queensland Institute of Medical Research Council, the Queensland Board of the Medical Board of Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian

Health Protection Principal Committee.

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Expert C om m ittees

Research Committee

The Agency's Research Committee was established to provide advice to the CEO on issues relating to preventive health research, including the development of a National Preventive Health Research Strategy, expenditure of the National Preventive Health Research Fund and promotion of the development of preventive health research infrastructure in Australia. The Committee also assists the Agency in its leadership role in knowledge-sharing and research collaboration. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/12) are listed in the table below:

Professor John McCallum - Chair Preventive health research

Professor Ian Anderson indigenous health

Dr Shelley Bowen Prevention and population health

Emeritus Professor Meredith Edwards Translational research

Professor Penny Hawe Population health interventions

Professor Kerin O'Dea Obesity, nutrition and Indigenous health

Professor Melanie Wakefield Tobacco control and cross-reference with NHMRC

Prevention and Community Health Committee

Expert Committee on Alcohol (EGA)

The role of the Expert Committee on Alcohol (EGA) is to assist and advise on the Agency's policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency's CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on healthy lifestyle-related issues. The Committee's advice and recommendations may include more than one option for consideration where the ECA is unable to agree on a single outcome or model for best practice The members of the committee (as at 30/6/12) are listed in the table below:

Professor Margaret Hamilton - Chair Alcohol research, education and clinical work.

Ms Donna Ah Chee Indigenous health

Professor Tanya Chikritzhs Alcohol research

Ms Sondra Davoren Legal policy

Dr Steve Hambleton Primary care

Mr Jim Migro Law enforcement and alcohol research and education

Professor Rob Moodie Public health promotion

Mr John Pollaers Industry

Note: The CEO is an ex-officio member of each expert committee,

For more information on each committee s Terms of Reference and composition requirements visit: www mphn gov au

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2011

Expert Committee on Obesity (ECO)

The role of the Expert Committee on Obesity (ECO) is to assist and advise on the Agency's policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency's CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on healthy lifestyle-related issues. The Committee's advice and recommendations may include

more than one option for consideration where the ECO is unable to agree on a single outcome or .model for best practice. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/12) are listed in the table below:

Professor Ian Caterson - Chair Research into the causes and prevention of obesity, nutrition and diabetes

Professor Adrian Bauman

Ms Rebecca Boustead

Physical inactivity, public policy and translational research

Industry, food marketing and reformulation

Mr Todd Harper Social marketing and health promotion

Dr Amanda Lee Obesity prevention within state and territory

governments and issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Ms Jane Martin Advocacy and policy development in obesity prevention

Dr Lyn Roberts Cardiovascular disease programs and policy,

community engagement

Professor Boyd Swinburn Community-based obesity prevention research

ANPHA Expert Committee on Tobacco (ECT)

The role of the Expert Committee on Tobacco (ECT) is to assist and advise on the Agency *s policy and program directions where requested, to support the Agency's CEO in providing advice to health ministers where necessary, and any other advice requested by the CEO on tobacco-related issues. The Committee's advice and recommendations may include more than one option for consideration where the ECT is unable to agree on a single outcome or model for best practice. The members of the committee (as at 30/6/12) are listed in the table below:

Professor Melanie Wakefield - Chair Tobacco control policy and program evaluation

Dr Tom Calma Tobacco control in Indigenous communities

Professor Simon Chapman Tobacco-based public health and public health research

Ms Trish Cotter Communication and social marketing

Professor Mike Daube Public health promotion and tobacco prevention

Ms Caroline Miller Tobacco program evaluation

Ms Kate Purcell Chronic disease prevention and health advancement

Ms Denise Sullivan Chronic disease prevention

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^ .......

PART 2: REPORT ON

STRATEGIC &

OPERATIONAL PLANS

REPORT ON STRATEGIC

& OPERATIONAL PLANS

The Agency undertook a series of consultations in developing its first Strategic and Operational Plans, and sought comments from a range of individuals and institutions with expertise in prevention and health promotion, as well as senior Commonwealth, State and Territory officials. The Agency's Advisory Council was also consulted on the plans.

The Australian Health Ministers * Conference (now the Standing Council on Health) agreed to the plans and they were approved by the then Minister for Health and Ageing, the Hon Nicola Roxon MP. The plans guided the Agency's operations throughout the period.

The following tables set out, as required by the ANPHA Act, an evaluation of the Agency *s overall performance under its Strategic and Operational Plans.

No variations were made to these plans during the reporting period.

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PROMOTE AND GUIDE THE DEVELOPMENT, APPLICATION, INTEGRATION AND

REVIEW OF PUBLIC, ORGANISATIONAL AND COM MUNITY-BASED PREVENTION

AND HEALTH PROM OTION POLICIES.

GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY

STRATEGIC &

OPERATIONAL PLANS

KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 1.1 POLICY LEADERSHIP

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Met with each State and Territory responsible Minister to: " examine the work taking place on preventive health in each jurisdiction across Australia

Provide leadership on effective prevention and health promotion policies for application at national, state and local levels

KRA 1.2 POLICY ADVICE Work with national expert advisory groups and other partners to provide independent, timely and evidence-based advice on effective prevention and health promotion policies

" outline the Agency's work and establishment

* discuss the Agency's role in supporting the achievement of the jurisdiction's outcomes

Held over 110 consultations with officials from responsible government agencies to discuss preventive health matters.

Liaised on over 200 occasions with non-government organisations and industry bodies on their key issues and concerns for priorities in preventive health policies and

programs.

Conducted roundtables and workshops with Medicare Locals, in conjunction with the Australian Medicare Locals Alliance (AML Alliance), to identify their needs and support them to pursue best practice disease prevention and health promotion as an integral part of their work.

Released an initial consultation issues paper on harmful alcohol use, Exploring the Public Interest Case for a Minimum (Floor) Price for Alcohol.

Provided expert policy advice through submissions to inquiries into:

* tobacco plain packaging, by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health and Ageing

" foetal alcohol spectrum disorders, by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs

Assembled expert advice, including from its expert committees, on national preventive health research priorities, and alcohol, tobacco, and obesity social marketing,

For more details, see KRAs for each specific areas.

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STRATEGIC &

OPERATIONAL PLANS

KEY RESULT AREA

KRA 1.1 POLICY LEADERSHIP

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued

Established the Agency *s policy leadership and expert advice structures, including the Advisory Council and Expert Committees on:

KRA 1.2 POLICY ADVICE

Alcohol

Tobacco

" Obesity

" Research

For more details on the Expert Committees, see KRAs for each of the specific areas of expertise.

The Advisory Council was appointed in July 2011 and met 5 times during the year. The Agency sought the Council's advice on a range of preventive health matters, including:

" the Agency's Strategic and Operational Plans

" tobacco and obesity prevention social marketing campaigns

" knowledge transfer activities

" preventive health research

" evaluation of the National Partnership on Preventive Health

" prevention through primary care and the Agency's partnership with the Australian Medicare Locals Alliance (the AML Alliance, formerly the Australian General Practice Network)

" developing the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price for alcohol

" marketing of unhealthy food to children

" the Agency *s Stakeholder Engagement Strategy

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GOAL 1: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY

Undertook a range of consultations with stakeholders and industry, consistent with the Agency *s Stakeholder and

KRA 1.3 PARTNERSHIPS Industry Engagement Strategy, Establish a culture of cooperation, collaboration and dialogue for prevention and health promotion policy development

Together with the AML Alliance, released a joint statement on disease prevention and health prom otion in Medicare Locals, supported by an evidence review monograph.

The joint statement outlines the vision for prevention in Medicare Locals and each agency's commitment to work collaboratively with partners to improve the health of all Australians, and aims to assist Medicare Locals in developing evidence-based preventive health interventions to improve the health of their communities.

Worked with the Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance to co-host a national symposium on social marketing for obesity prevention.

Launched an innovative funding partnership with 12 national sporting organisations - as an alternative to

KRA 1.4 FUNDING MODELS Examine and provide advice to the Commonwealth on future funding models to support enhanced and effective investment in prevention and health

promotion

alcohol sponsorship in sport - designed to address binge drinking and the influence of alcohol promotion on young Australians. The campaign was jointly announced by the Minister for Sport and the Minister for Mental Health and

Ageing in June 2012.

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GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION PROVIDE POLICY ADVICE AND PROGRAM LEADERSHIP TO SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, EVALUATION AND SCALING UP OF EVIDENCE-INFORMED HEALTH PROMOTION AND HEALTH RISK REDUCTION STRATEGIES FOR POPULATION GROUPS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN AND IN A RANGE OF SETTINGS, WITH AN INITIAL FOCUS ON OBESITY, TOBACCO AND HARMFUL ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION.

Provided input to the Urban Design Protocol prepared by the Department of Infrastructure and Transport, and into

KRA 2,1 INTEGRATED RESPONSE TO HEALTH RISK Develop comprehensive

population-health based approaches to health risk that focus on the social and other determinants

of disease and risk and associated co-morbidities

consultations about active travel.

Hosted a roundtable discussion on healthy places with government, NGOs, academic and industry stakeholders, assisted by a feature presentation from an international expert in the field.

Delivered two bursts of media activity for the Measure Up: Swap It Don *t Stop It campaign, incorporating national

KRA 2.2 REDUCE OBESITY Support, extend and improve policies and programs that aim to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity, through research, analysis and advice

television, print, outdoor and online advertising, public relations and local level activities. The campaign achieved strong results:

" as at 30 June 2012, 6,689 people had registered to use the 12-week online planner

" over 54,000 people had downloaded the Swap It iPhone app

" there were more than 740,000 visits to the Swap It website: www.swapit.gov.au

Evaluation data showed that the campaign succeeded in meeting its objective of promoting behaviour change among the primary target audience (25-50 year olds with children). Data indicated that 38% of this group had taken some action to improve their lifestyle choices or undertaken a swap in line with the campaign's "how to" messages.

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GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION

Convened a national symposium on social marketing for obesity prevention with the Australian Chronic Disease

KRA 2.2 Prevention Alliance in November 2011. Attended by more

REDUCE OBESITY than 60 representatives of Commonwealth, State and

Territory governments, non-government organisations, research institutions and industry, the symposium highlighted the need for stronger messaging of health risks from obesity and greater collaboration between entities working on these programs.

Commissioned a review of data on children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food and beverages on television since the implementation of the food industry *s self≠ regulation initiatives concerning marketing to children.

The report will be finalised in 2012.

Established the Agency's Expert Committee on Obesity in October 2011 The Committee met four times in 2011-12, and the Agency sought its advice on a range of issues, including:

* community-based innovative and multi-sectoral obesity-prevention initiatives and partnerships

* reducing children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food and beverages

- the Measure Up social marketing campaign

* the development of the Preventive Health Research Strategy

* international regulatory developments on healthy living and obesity prevention

Co-convened, with the South Australian Department of Health, a seminar on the advertising and marketing of 'unhealthy' foods to children (May 2012). The seminar, which was attended by over 60 participants, and featured contributions from industry and public health experts including Dr Cormna Hawkes. an international expert in healthy food policy and regulation.

* Led the development of a national working group with government, industry and public health experts following the seminar to consider options to strengthen industry's voluntary initiatives to reduce children's exposure to marketing of energy dense-low nutrient food and beverages.

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Established the Expert Committee on Tobacco in October 2011. The Committee met four times and advised the

KRA 2.3 REDUCE THE USE OF, AND EXPOSURE TO,

TOBACCO

Agency on:

" the National Tobacco Campaign ('NTC')

* the development of the Preventive Health Research Strategy

Support evidence-based action to reduce smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke through strong

policies and programs

the monitoring and review of international tobacco control regulation

approaches to developing a priority research agenda for tobacco control

* the establishment of the National Network on Smoking and Disadvantage

Continued delivering the National Tobacco Campaign, including:

" national television, outdoor, magazine, radio and online advertising, and public relations activities to extend the campaign, As of 30 June 2012, the NTC website www.quitnow.gov.au had over 1,5 million hits

" the launch of an iPhone app, MyQuitBuddy , on World No Tobacco Day (31 May 2012) to assist smokers with quit attempts

" the launch of a quit smoking support kit for

workplaces and a widget for workplace intranet sites that will support quitters with motivational messages and other support devices

Total recognition of the campaign stood at 99% among smokers and recent quitters. Tracking research reported that 47% of smokers and 62% of recent quitters claimed to have taken some action as a result of seeing the campaign. The type of action taken most often was to

quit smoking (13% of smokers and 50% of recent quitters). At 13%. the proportion of smokers who attempted to quit as a result of the campaign was significantly higher than in March 2011 (6%) and July 2011 (9%).

Commenced consultation with government about the inclusion of a smoke-free workplace clause in whole-of- government funding agreements.

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GOAL 2: HEALTH RISK REDUCTION

Issued a statement in March 2012 commemorating the 50th anniversary of the landmark report Smoking and Health, by the Royal College of Physicians of London. The statement acknowledged the significance of the report in galvanising global action to reduce the harms caused by tobacco to individuals, families, communities and health systems around the world.

KRA 2.3 REDUCE THE USE OF, AND EXPOSURE TO, TOBACCO

Established the Expert Committee on Alcohol in November 2011 The Committee met three times, and provided advice on:

" the development of the issues paper on The Public Interest Case fora Minimum (floor) Price o f Alcohol

" the development of the Community Sponsorship Fund program and other National Binge Drinking Strategy (NBDS) expansion measures

1 the development of the Preventive Health Research Strategy

KRA 2.4 REDUCE THE HARMFUL

CONSUMPTION OF

ALCOHOL Promote and support evidence-based approaches to address harmful alcohol consumption through strong policies and programs

" approaches to reviewing alcohol advertising to children

" workplace programs that address the harmful consumption of alcohol

Funded 26 community-based projects across Australia, under the NBDS, to tackle risky drinking by young people. The Minister for Mental Health and Ageing announced the outcome of Round 3 of the Community Level Initiatives in February 2012, with nearly $10 million to support a wide range of community-based projects.

Funded the $8.9 million expansion of the Good Sports program, under the NBDS. Good Sports is an initiative of the Australian Drug Foundation that supports local sporting clubs around Australia to build a healthy culture in relation to alcohol. The funding for Good Sports will support an increase in the number of sporting clubs participating in the program to a minimum of 6,500 clubs by June 2014 and include a roll-out to remote communities. The Minister for Mental Health and Ageing and the Minister for Sport announced the funding in May 2012 .

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY

RESULT AREA

KRA 2.4 REDUCE THE HARMFUL

CONSUMPTION OF

ALCOHOL

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS continued

Launched a partnership program with 12 national sporting organisations, under the NBDS, to provide an alternative to alcohol sponsorship in sport and support sport and athletes to reduce the influence of alcohol promotion

on young Australians through the Be the Influence; Tackling Binge Drinking initiative. The program was jointly announced by the Minister for Sport and the Minister for Mental Health and Ageing in June 2012.

Commenced development of an alcohol social marketing (social media) campaign targeted to young people, for launch in early 2013.

Released an issues paper for public consultation on the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price of alcohol. The Agency received 36 submissions which are currently being reviewed with the aim of providing advice to

Government by the end of 2012.

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GOAL 3: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT DRIVE THE DEVELOPMENT OF DYNAMIC KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS THAT ENABLE EVIDENCE-INFORMED POLICY AND PRACTICE IN PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION ACROSS AUSTRALIA.

Released an interim National Preventive Health Research Strategy as the foundation for grant guidelines to

KRA 3.1 PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION RESEARCH Ensure prevention and health promotion policies and programs are underpinned by the best possible evidence with world-class, sustainable research capacity

in Australia

support a first call for preventive health research project proposals.

Funded 13 research projects ($3.75 million) focused on translational, policy-focused, findings in the areas of obesity, tobacco and the harmful use of alcohol.

Established the Research Committee in June 2011. The Committee met five times, and advised the Agency on:

" the National Preventive Health Research Strategy, including the consultation plan for the development of the strategy, and endorsed the draft strategy

" the development of the Grant Guidelines for the first research grant round

" assessing the research grant applications

Established the National Evaluation Advisory Committee in May 2011. The Committee comprises evaluation experts from the Commonwealth. State and Territory health departments. The Committee met five times, and advised the Agency on the National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health (NPAPH), including:

" the development of the scope of work for the

National Evaluation

" the assessment of tenders to develop the evaluation framework and strategy

" providing feedback on the accepted evaluation framework and strategy

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KEY ACHIEVEMENT STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY

RESULT AREA

KRA 3.2 EVIDENCE AND ANALYSIS DISSEMINATION Collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate knowledge for improving and expanding prevention and health promotion practice across sectors and settings

Developed a Health Promotion Websites Database that provides links to resources and practice tools.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY

RESULT AREA

KEY ACHIEVEMENT

Finalised the evaluation framework and implementation strategy for the National Evaluation of the NPAPH.

KRA 3.3 PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION EVALUATION Promote and support evaluation and the development of an evaluation culture in all programs and policies related to prevention and health promotion in order to build evidence and capacity

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GOAL 4: INFORMATION AND REPORTING GUIDE IMPROVEMENTS IN NATIONAL SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS FOR PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION AND ENSURE THAT INFORMATION ON THE PROGRESS OF PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION STRATEGIES IS MADE READILY AVAILABLE AND REGULARLY REPORTED.

STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANS KEY

RESULT AREA

KRA 4.1 NATIONAL SYSTEMS FOR SURVEILLANCE Provide advice and support to the ongoing development and improvement of national surve llance systems in all areas related to prevention and health promotion policies and programs

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Held a National Preventive Health Surveillance Forum in Canberra in April 2012 with 65 experts gathered to consider options for improving national surveillance systems, and the use of available data, for prevention and health promotion. The report of the forum, together with recommendations for action, is available on the Agency's website at www.anpha.gov.au

Participated in planning for analysis and dissemination of the Australian Health Survey (via the Australian Bureau of Statistics),

Commenced work on the State o f Preventive Health report (due in 2013), to disseminate information on

KRA 4.2 chronic disease and risk factors, health promotion

INFORMATION strategies, innovative programs and policies.

ANALYSIS AND REPORTING Monitor, synthesise, analyse and disseminate information about prevention and health promotion in Australia and provide timely and authoritative reporting

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

GOAL 5: CAPACITY BUILDING BUILD BROAD AND COMPREHENSIVE PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION

Initiated work with Health Workforce Australia to develop a health promotion and prevention workforce strategy

KRA 5.1 PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION WORKFORCE AND

SYSTEMS Strengthen the strategic underpinnings and planning for inclusion of prevention and health promotion as a core component of a

capable, sustainable and motivated workforce and health care system

with program design and delivery, research and evaluation competency needs considered. This work is continuing into 2012-13 with the release of a public consultation discussion paper in late-2012.

Convened workshops (in partnership with the AML Alliance and the Department of Health and Ageing) to build prevention capacity within Medicare Locals and their communities, including:

" a roundtable discussion with key informants in August 2011, to Identify issues and agree on work to develop preventive capability

" a national workshop with Medicare Local CEOs and Chairs in April 2012, to identify preventive health resource needs, priorities and strategies

" the national Partnerships for Prevention Workshop in June 2012, to promote partnerships and evidence- based approaches to prevention

These consultations laid the groundwork for the Agency to identify how best to support capacity development in Medicare Locals through:

" evidence-based strategies and means to improve the health of their communities

" preventive health interventions that address health equity and the full range of behavioural, structural and social determinants of health

Commenced development of an awards program to recognise leadership in population-focused health

KRA 5.2 promotion and disease prevention.

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT Support and recognise continuous quality improvement, best practice and excellence in prevention and health promotion practices

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GOAL 6: ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE ESTABLISH THE AGENCY AS AN INNOVATIVE, RELIABLE, TRANSPARENT AND ACCOUNTABLE ORGANISATION, HIGHLY REGARDED BY GOVERNMENTS,

PARTNERS, STAFF AND THE COMMUNITY.

Established governance and management frameworks under the ANPHA Act. the FMA Act and the Public Service Act. including financial, procurement, contract, grants, audit, fraud control, security, information and risk management systems and processes consistent with better practice public sector standards.

Established a memorandum of understanding with the Department of Health and Ageing for the provision of payroll, accounts processing and ICT.

KRA 6.1 GOVERNANCE Establish robust governance and management systems

Engaged staff under the Public Service Act and the Agency *s staffing determination under section 24 of the Public Service Act. The structure of work units was established and by the end of the reporting year the Agency was fully staffed.

KRA 6.2 HUMAN RESOURCES Attract, retain and develop high performing staff in a healthy work environment

Established the Agency *s website in April 2011 and developed an information and communication strategy.

Developed and rolled out a logo and corporate branding - Promoting a Healthy Australia.

KRA 6.3 IDENTITY AND COMMUNICATIONS Ensure ANPHA's role in. and approach to. prevention and health promotion is understood and communicated to all partners in all sectors, including for governments.

Developed a staff performance development scheme and a learning and development system, and regularly reviewed the progress against the Strategic and Operational Plans.

KRA 6.4 ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS Ensure ANPHA develops as a learning organisation

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PART 3: REPORT ON

PERFORMANCE

PERFORMANCE REPORTING FRAMEWORK \

This section reports on the Agency *s performance for 2011-2012 based on the performance reporting framework set down in the 2011-2012 Health and Ageing, portfolio budget statements (PBS).

Through the PBS, the Government states Outcomes and planned performance for the year. Outcomes are the intended results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Government on the Australian community. Agencies deliver Programs, which are the

Government actions taken to deliver the stated Outcomes. Each Outcome is described together with its related Programs, specifying the indicators and targets used to assess and monitor the performance of an agency in achieving Government Outcomes.

The Agency reports against one Outcome, one Program and four deliverables as shown in the following table:

Table 2: Performance Reporting Framework

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

ANPHA Act 2011-2012 portfolio budget statements

A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle educations campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors

Preventive Health

" Monitor, evaluate and build evidence in relation to health promotion and disease prevention strategies and facilitate rapid and effective dissemination for widespread utilisation and scale-up

" Reduce harmful alcohol consumption

" Coordinate and implement a national approach to social marketing for preventive health programs

" Establish new partnerships for innovative programs and policy advice

1. Expand and strengthen preventive health research 2. Curb harmful alcohol consumption 3. Social marketing that targets tobacco use and obesity 4. Establish new partnerships for innovative programs and

policy advice

DRIVERS

OUTCOME 1

PROGRAM 1.1

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Deliverables)

Prom oting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

1. EXPAND AND STRENGTHEN PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH During the year the Agency commenced strategic expenditure programs for the $13 million committed by the Australian Government to the National Preventive Health Research Fund. The Agency completed an investigator-driven research grants round and developed the framework for the National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement for Preventive

Health that will be a major source of new information about the effectiveness of population- based interventions against chronic disease.

The preventive health research community has been boosted with the awarding of $3.75 million for high quality projects of translational research. The National Evaluation, based on the stakeholder-agreed framework, will provide a wealth of data about nationally-facilitated health promotion programs and bring together individual program evaluation information from a wide variety of activities across the country.

Further programs are being planned mindful of the value in encouraging partnerships and collaborations and in developing skills among the community of preventive health researchers and policy makers in order to maximise investment in preventive health

QUALITATIVE THE PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH FUND LAUNCHED WITH AN DELIVERABLE INITIAL GRANT ROUND FOR INVESTIGATOR DRIVEN PROJECTS

2011-12 Reference Timely distribution of the tund consistent with the Government Point commitment to improve health promotion practice, based on evidence

Result: Deliverable achieved.

$3.75 million in research grants was announced by the Minister for Health in March 2012 for 13 two-to three-year projects in areas including, obesity prevention, harmful alcohol consumption and settings-based health promotion. For more information on the grants awarded see Appendix A.

QUALITATIVE FUNDABLE PROJECTS ATTRACTED IN PRIORITY AREAS OF RESEARCH INDICATOR

2011-12 Reference Available funds are committed to proposals that meet strategic Point ; objectives

Result: Indicator met.

The Agency maintained the emphasis on translational research in the awarding of research grants and is developing additional programs to be announced that will create significant opportunities for researchers, policy makers and practitioners to work together as co≠

creators of preventive health knowledge.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

a

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

2011-12 Reference Point Strategy prepared that identifies preventive health research priorities for 2011-15 through broad consultation and in partnership

with NHMRC by the end of 2011-12

Result: Deliverable achieved.

The Agency developed an Interim Preventive Health Research Strategy in 2011 to guide the first expenditure for the research fund and opened a second phase of development for a broader national strategy through a consultation draft posted on the Agency's website.

2011-12 Reference Point Evaluation activity initiated with evaluation framework completed and baseline data collected following broad consultation with

stakeholders

Result: Deliverable achieved.

The final draft framework, including identification of suitable data sources and stakeholder consultations, was completed. Qualitative data will form the major source of information for the evaluation. The National Evaluation will be completed in 2015 while the NPAPH is extended to 2018.

Prom oting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

2. CURB HARMFUL ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION

Alcohol Advertising

QUALITATIVE THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY DELIVERABLE WILL WORK WITH THE EXPERT COMMITTEE ON ALCOHOL, THE ALCOHOL INDUSTRY, AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS TO ENSURE

THAT ALCOHOL ADVERTISING IN AUSTRALIA IS CONSISTENT

WITH COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND COMPLIES WITH

VOLUNTARY CODES OF PRACTICE

2011-12 Reference The Agency will participate in regular meetings with the Expert Point Committee on Alcohol, the alcohol industry and other stakeholders, including meeting with the Alcohol Beverages Advertising Code Management Committee

Result: Deliverable achieved,

The Agency met with key stakeholders throughout 2011-12 to discuss alcohol advertising induding the Alcohol Beverages Advertising Code Management Committee, alcohol industry representatives, the Advertising Standards Bureau, non-government organisations and its Expert Committee on Alcohol. Following initial consultation with stakeholders, the Agency determined that a formal process of review and consultation was needed in relation to community standards and compliance with voluntary codes of practice.

The Agency's 2012-13 Operational Plan states that the Agency will ''review alcohol industry's voluntary code on advertising and the effectiveness of the code in addressing community concerns *. This will include further consultation with the Expert Committee on Alcohol,

industry and community stakeholders. The Agency will develop an issues paper for public consultation on this topic and report to the Minister for Mental Health and Ageing on the findings.

Community Sponsorhip Fund

QUALITATIVE ESTABLISH A SPONSORSHIP FUND TO REPLACE ALCOHOL DELIVERABLE SPONSORSHIP WITH DISBURSEMENTS TO LOCAL COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS

2011-12 Reference Community Sponsorship Fund established, and first disbursements Point made to community-level sporting and cultural organisations across Australia

Result: Deliverable achieved.

As part of the National Binge Drinking Strategy, the Australian Government allocated $25 million to the Community Sponsorship Fund (CSF), to serve as an alternative to alcohol sponsorship for community sporting and cultural organisations.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

The Community Sponsorship Fund has four objectives:

1. reduce the exposure of young people and children to alcohol imagery and branding

2. reduce the links between alcohol and sporting and cultural activities that young people are often involved in, and to provide support for community-based organisations to educate their members about responsible drinking

3. provide support for community-based organisations to provide alcohol-free environments for minors

4. reduce harmful consumption of alcohol through appropriate responsible service of alcohol provisions at sporting and cultural events

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

QUALITATIVE REDUCED RELIANCE ON ALCOHOL ADVERTISING AND INDICATOR PROMOTIONS AT COMMUNITY SPORTING AND CULTURAL EVENTS

2011-12 Reference Wide interest in, and disbursement of, the Community Sponsorship Fund Point

Result: Indicator met.

The CSF was launched on 23 June 2012. Twelve national sporting organisation sponsorship deals were announced with CSF funds as an alternative to alcohol sponsorship. The national sporting organisations involved are: Football Federation Australia, Basketball Australia, Netball Australia, Swimming Australia, Cycling Australia, Hockey Australia, Athletics Australia,

Skateboarding Australia, Equestrian Australia, Triathlon Australia, Australian Canoeing and Volleyball Australia. The campaign message that accompanies and will be activated through the sponsorship is Be The Influence: Tackling Binge Drinking. It has been designed to encourage young people, particularly sporting heroes, to lead by example without the

influence of alcohol, and includes an emphasis on young people taking responsibility for their behaviour.

Community Level Initiatives

QUALITATIVE PROVIDE ADDITIONAL COMMUNITY LEVEL GRANTS FOR DELIVERABLE PROJECTS THAT ADDRESS BINGE DRINKING BY YOUNG PEOPLE

2011-12 Reference ; Grants round advertised nationally, successful applicants selected, Point and grants made to community organisations

Result: Deliverable achieved.

On 10 February 2012, the Minister for Mental Health and Ageing announced the outcome of the third round of the Community Level Initiatives (CLI). This round of the CLI is providing $9.9 million over two years for 26 projects that enable NGOs, local government, police and interested parties to work together to develop local solutions to reduce youth binge drinking. The objectives of the funded projects are the prevention and reduction of binge drinking by young people, specifically in the age group of 12-24 years. The projects aim to increase awareness of the risk to the drinker and others in the com munity of binge drinking, and thereby have a positive impact in the community.

Prom oting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

On 28 May 2012, the Australian Government announced the expansion of the successful Good Sports program, an initiative of the Australian Drug Foundation that supports local sporting clubs around Australia to build a culture of responsible drinking at the grass roots level.

Sporting clubs which sign up to the Good Sports program work through three levels of accreditation, must provide smoke-free environments, and must develop transport strategies to get people home safely.

The $8.9 million expansion of Good Sports will increase the number of sporting clubs participating in the program to a minimum of 6,500 clubs by June 2014. To date. 5,000 clubs nationwide have signed up to the program.

QUALITATIVE COMMUNITY GRANTS ALLOCATED UNDER THE 2008 INDICATOR NATIONAL BINGE DRINKING STRATEGY MEASURE AND THE 2010 EXPANSION OF THE STRATEGY RAISE AWARENESS OF

THE DANGERS OF BINGE DRINKING

2011-12 Reference Evaluation concludes that community grants meet their objectives Point in raising awareness of the dangers of binge drinking

Note: This indicator will be reported on by the Department of Health and Ageing in its 2011-2012 Annual Report. The Agency will take responsibility for this strategy in 2012-2013.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

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GABBA WORRA

PROJECT DAVID WIRRPANDA ...- "%†'FOUNDATION INC. (WESTERN AUSTRALIA)

THE GWABBA YORGA GABBA WORRA PROJECT IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA IS ENGAGING AND EDUCATING ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER GIRLS BETWEEN 12-17 YEARS THROUGH NETBALL COMPETITIONS AND WITH HIGH PROFILE SPORTING ROLE-MODELS TO MENTOR THEM ABOUT MAKING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE CHOICES.

Lisa Cunningham, CEO of the David Wirrapanda Foundation talks about the project:

*The Gwabba Yorga Gabba Worra Project is im portant for us to be able to get the Aboriginal women together as we value strong family and com m unity connections.

Our sessions gave our participants the opportunity to interact with our David Wirrpanda Foundation role-models Kelly Headland, Bree Franklin, Josie Janz, Kirby Bentley and Netball WA

Community Programs Co-ordinator Chrystal Asiata. Using netball as the driver and utilising our Aboriginal connections we were able to share our

knowledge and experiences w ith the participants and mentor the girls to make healthy lifestyle choices.

Each session consists of a workshop educating on the risk of binge drinking and a netball clinic The health

messages are very powerful when it comes from strong Aboriginal women who play netball at the elite level, the yarning sessions with the girls allow

us to share personal stories about the challenges they may be faced with and also, more im portantly, inform the girls on the health risks of binge drinking.

case s

Many girls in their teenage years will be tem pted to try drugs and alcohol but we believe the more we empower

and enable the girls to stay strong in their Aboriginal identity and lead a positive life the more we will see a

rise in the women being the strong com m unity leaders. We are focusing on building capacity in our young

Aboriginal girls so that when they get older they can lead the way and be

great role models for the future. "

"We see so many talented Aboriginal girls playing in netball carnivals and what we would essentially like to see is the increase in the num ber o f Aboriginal girls participating in netball at grassroots site$> some o f these girls

have had no coaching whatsoever so we w ould really like to support coaches in being able to attract and engage girls in their clubs. It is great

to be able to partner netball with the binge-drinking message as I g et to connect to the girls on a deeper level and understand culturally what is appropriate for them ."

Chrystal Asiata, Netball WA

COMMUNITY LEVEL

INITIATIVES

" t v

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE Enhancement of telephone counselling and referral service

QUALITATIVE PROVIDE ENHANCED TELEPHONE ALCOHOL AND DRUG DELIVERABLE COUNSELLING SERVICES AND REFERRALS

2011-12 Reference National 1800 number established in consultation with states Point and territories, national standards for services and promotional materials under development

Result: Deliverable partly met due to the Government's decision to divert some of these funds into developing an alcohol social marketing campaign that will promote access to, and utilisation of, counselling services as well as other anti-binge drinking messages. The Agency is responsible for reporting on this strategy in 2012-2013.

In relation to enhancing service quality, the National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) was engaged to develop a guide to the provision of quality services for Australia *s alcohol and other drug telephone information, referral, and counselling services.

The purpose of the guide is to provide a benchmark for states and territories to assist them to offer consistent high quality telephone services, whilst recognising that there may be minor variations between services within each jurisdiction. The guide provides a basis on which jurisdictions can appraise their existing policies and service standards and is designed to assist in the provision of appropriate, high quality services to the community.

The Australia's Alcohol and Other Drug Telephone Information, Referral, and Counselling Services: A Guide to Quality Service Provision is available via www.nceta.flinders.edu.au

in relation to social marketing, the Agency is developing a social media based campaign for launch in early 2013.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 20*†-2012

3. SOCIAL MARKETING THAT TARGETS TOBACCO USE AND

OBESITY As part of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, the Australian Government, through the Agency, continued to deliver two major social marketing campaigns related to smoking and obesity in 2011-12.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

National Tobacco Campaign

Deliver the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health tobacco social marketing campaign within agreed timeframes

Result: Deliverable achieved.

In 2011-12, the Agency continued to implement the National Tobacco Campaign, the aim of which is to reduce smoking prevalence among the general population. The primary target audiences for the campaign are smokers and recent quitters aged 18 to 40 years. The campaign aims to encourage current smokers to attem pt to quit, and to support current quit attempts and help reduce their chance of relapse.

National Tobacco Campaign activity in 2011-12 incorporated national television, outdoor, magazine, radio and online advertising. Campaign advertising included the $16 a pack isn *t all a smoker coughs up: Every Cigarette Brings Cancer Closer, and the Health Benefits: Stop Smoking, Start Repairing: Every Cigarette You Don't Smoke is Doing You Good campaign materials. The media activity was supported by licensed television commercials from state jurisdictions and the Department of Health and Ageing's Break the Chain - a national television commercial that specifically targets Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers.

Public relations activities continued in 2011-12 with the launch on World No Tobacco Day (31 May 2012) of the online Quit Now Calculator, the My QuitBuddy iPhone app, and the Butt Out at Work campaign.

National Tobacco Campaign evaluation

2011-12 Reference Point The reach of target groups satisfactory according to cohort survey and repeated cross-sectional surveys of smokers and recent

quitters, with supplementary data from measures such as calls to Quitline and website visits

Result: Indicator met.

Prom oting a Health Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Tracking research conducted by the Social Research Centre demonstrates that the campaign met its objectives in relation to reach and message communication. It also appears to have influenced the target audience's awareness of, and attitudes towards, the negative health consequences of smoking, the health benefits of quitting, intentions to quit and the quitting behaviour of regular smokers, National, State and Territory-based social marketing campaigns have also been effective in mobilising community support to legitimise the passage of tobacco control policies including, most recently, national cigarette plain packaging legislation, and contributing towards shifting cultural and social norms.

201M2 research findings around prompted recall showed that overall recognition of the National Tobacco Campaign remained strong, Total recognition stood at 99% amongst smokers and recent quitters.

Recognition of the Cough television commercial was 86% amongst smokers and 88% amongst recent quitters. The Health Benefits advertising continued to make a solid contribution to overall campaign recognition, with the mix of radio, magazine, out-of-home and online advertising comfortably maintaining the reach of this component of the National

Tobacco Campaign.

Tracking research conducted in July 2012 reported that 47% of smokers and 62% of recent quitters claimed to have taken some action as a result of seeing the campaign. The type of action most often taken was to quit smoking (13% of smokers and 50% of recent quitters).

At 13%, the proportion of smokers who attempted to quit as a result of the campaign was significantly higher than in March 2011 (6%) and July 2011 (9%); an encouraging result that suggests the impact of the campaign strategy on smoking behaviour may be building over time.

The www.quitnow.gov.au website had over 1.6 million visits between the National Tobacco Campaign launch in January 2011 to 30 June 2012.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

4:20 PM

MY

QUITBUDDY

My Qu/tBuddy Settini

Tho Facts

My Goals

11:57 AM

.*ª ", * Virgm

My QuitBuddy

ON WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY

(31 MAY 2012), THE AGENCY LAUNCHED THE MY QUITBUDDY

IPHONE APP TO ENCOURAGE

SMOKERS TO QUIT AND SUPPORT

My QuitBuddy is a personalised interactive app with quit tips, daily motivational messages and a panic button that provides a range of distractions, including a game, to help beat cravings. Users can record their goals on My QuitBuddy in pictures, words or audio messages to help keep their quit attempts on track.

The user can nominate danger times and the My QuitBuddy gets in touch with a series of scheduled alerts and messages. Visual icons allow the user to view their daily progress including how much money they've saved, milligrams of tar avoided, days smoke free, number of cigarettes not smoked, and number of dangerous chemicals avoided.

My QuitBuddy can connect users directly to the Quitline 13 7848, a pre-programmed buddy or the

My QuitBuddy com m unity notice board. The app is available for free from iTunes, with an Android version launching in late 2012.

In one month, over 8,000 users had downloaded the My QuitBuddy app.

*ì YOU AVOIDED 19040m g o f t ar

$2176v o k VFn

DAYS.- 136 SMOKE FREE

YOU AVOIDED

020NOT SMOKED

60 DANGEROUS CHEMICALS * All calculations are approximate

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 3. SOCIAL MARKETING THAT TARGETS TOBACCO USE AND OBESITY

M easure Up - Swap It D on't Stop It social marketing campaign

2011-12 Reference Point Deliver the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health Measure Up social marketing campaign within agreed timeframes

Result: Deliverable achieved.

In 2011-12. the Agency built on the success of phase one of the Government's Measure Up campaign, with the continued roll out of the phase two Swap It, Don *t Stop It activities. The Measure Up - Swap It, Don't Stop It campaign aims to raise awareness of healthy lifestyle choices, the importance of physical activity and nutrition, and the link between lifestyle behaviours and the risks of chronic disease. The campaign employs the animated blue balloon character 'Eric * to deliver messages around *why * healthy behaviour change is necessary, and 'how1 to make swaps in everyday life to support better health outcomes.

Target audiences for the campaign include 25 to 50 years olds with children (primary) and 45 to 65 year olds (secondary).

The Agency oversaw two bursts of Swap It, Don *t Stop It campaign activity in 2011-12, incorporating national television, print, outdoor and online advertising, supported by public relations and local level activities. A feature of the campaign was the use of new media to engage with Australians, including:

" a new free interactive 12-week online planner to help people kick-start a healthier lifestyle and reduce their risk of chronic disease

" a new free activity tracker to help people locate sporting and recreation facilities in their local areas

" a free handy iPhone app which encourages people to make healthier food and lifestyle choices without giving up all the things they love

As of 30 June 2012, 6.689 people had registered to use the 12-week online planner; over 54,000 people had downloaded the Swap It iPhone app; and there were more than 740,000 visits to the Swap It website page (www.swapit.gov.au).

Promoting a Healthy Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

2011 *12 Reference Point Campaign messages have reached the target audience as evaluated by cross sectional surveys of Australian adults repeated over key

periods of campaign activity. Surveys will be supplemented by a process evaluation of implementation of campaign activities

Result: Indicator met,

Evaluation research conducted by the Social Research Centre shows that the Swap It, Don't Stop It campaign continues to meet its objectives in relation to reach and message communication. Following the Spring 2011 media burst, spontaneous recall of the campaign reached 23% among the primary target audience - people aged 25 to 50 years with children, Prompted recognition among this group was 69% (6% higher than after the Autumn 2011 media burst). Message recall was strongly aligned with the campaign *s central messaging, with 90% of the primary target audience recalling the swaps framework.

Evaluation data also show that the campaign has been successful in meeting its objective of promoting behaviour change among the primary target audience, Data indicated that 38% of this target group who saw the Swap It, Don't Stop It campaign had taken some action to improve their lifestyle choices or undertaken a swap in line with the campaign's 'how to' messages.

& Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

IN NOVEMBER 2011, THE AGENCY AND THE AUSTRALIAN CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION ALLIANCE HOSTED A ONE-DAY SYMPOSIUM ON SOCIAL MARKETING FOR OBESITY PREVENTION. THE SYMPOSIUM WAS DESIGNED TO INITIATE AN ONGOING NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON COORDINATION OF SOCIAL MARKETING FOR OBESITY PREVENTION EFFORTS IN AUSTRALIA.

In response to invitations, 60 social marketing and public health professionals from Commonwealth, state and territory health departments, non-government organisations, academia and industry made their way to Canberra.

The day opened with thought-provoking presentations from Dr Tom Carroll and Professor Adrian Bauman, followed by robust table discussions and voting on priority areas in social marketing for obesity prevention programs. Later in the day there were panel sessions and discussion on strategies for action and coordination mechanisms.

NATIONAL

SYMPOSIUM

ON SOCIAL

MARKETING

FOR OBESITY

PREVENTION The symposium highlighted the need to draw greater linkages through social marketing between obesity and the risk of chronic disease. Discussion topics included integrating a social marketing strategy with policy/ advocacy/regulatory levers, campaign coordination, investigating a sugar- sweetened beverage campaign, early policy wins, developing an agreed national framework, agenda setting and sharing and building the evidence.

Overall, there was strong support among the symposium participants for the development of a collective vision for the role of social marketing in contributing to obesity prevention goals across Australia, and for a coordinated approach which maximises the efficiency and effectiveness of social marketing efforts across the government and non-government sectors.

A report on proceedings can be found at: www.anpha.gov.au

case study:

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 4 ESTABLISH new pa r t ner ships f o r inno va t ive

' PROGRAMS AND POLICY ADVICE The development of effective programs and policy requires knowledge to be drawn from a range of sources including experts, government and community and industry groups, In its first year of operations, the Agency established expert advisory committees for the purpose of preparing timely and innovative policy advice and to encourage partnerships with and across sectors, including health, education, sport and industry to generate new approaches to health promotion and disease prevention.

QUALITATIVE ANPHA PROVIDES TIMELY, INNOVATIVE ADVICE TO DELIVERABLE GOVERNMENT ON A RANGE OF TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND OBESITY RELATED MEASURES

2011-12 Reference Strategic partnerships and arrangements established with key Point experts and expert groups

Result: Deliverable achieved.

The Agency established its policy leadership and advice structures, including the Advisory Council and Expert Committees on Alcohol, Tobacco. Obesity, Research and the National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health (NPAPH).

ANPHA Advisory Council The Advisory Council was appointed in June 2011 and met 5 times during the year. The Council provided advice on a range of matters, including the Agency *s Strategic and Operational Plans, the tobacco and obesity prevention social marketing campaigns, preventive health research and prevention through primary care.

Expert Committee on Alcohol The Agency established its Expert Committee on Alcohol in November 2011. The Committee provided advice on the development of the issues paper on The Public Interest Case for a Minimum (floor) Price o f Alcohol, the development of the Community Sponsorship Fund

program and other National Binge Drinking Strategy expansion measures; and approaches to reviewing alcohol advertising to children.

Expert Committee on Tobacco The Agency established its Expert Committee on Tobacco in October 2011. The Committee advised the Agency on the National Tobacco Campaign ; the development of the Preventive Health Research Strategy; and the work of the National Network on Smoking and

Disadvantage.

Expert Committee on Obesity The Agency established its Expert Committee on Obesity in October 2011. The Committee advised the Agency on community-based innovative and multi-sectoral obesity-prevention

initiatives and partnerships; reducing children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food and beverages; and the Measure Up social marketing campaign.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 20*†-2012

Research Committee The Agency established the Research Committee in June 2011. The Committee advised the Agency on the National Preventive Health Research Strategy (including the consultation plan for the development of the strategy, and endorsing the draft strategy); the development of the Grant Guidelines for the first research grant round: and the research grants program, acting as an assessment committee for the research grant applications.

National Evaluation Advisory Committee The Agency established the National Evaluation Advisory Committee in May 2011. The Committee advised the Agency on the National Evaluation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, including the development of the scope of work for the National Evaluation; and the assessment of tenders to develop the evaluation framework and strategy.

Medicare Locals The Agency identified Medicare Locals as a critical platform in the area of primary health through which to plan, coordinate, deliver and monitor effective local and regional preventive interventions to improve health in local communities.

In conjunction with the AML Alliance, the Agency conducted roundtables and workshops with Medicare Locals to identify their needs and support them to pursue best practice disease prevention and health promotion as an integral part of their work.

QUALITATIVE ADVICE FROM ANPHA ON A RANGE OF ISSUES IS SUPPORTED INDICATOR BY FORMAL AND INFORMAL INPUT FROM EXPERTS AND ADVISORY GROUPS AND STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS 2011-12 Reference The Chief Executive Officer to meet requests for advice pursuant to

Point the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010

Result: Indicator met.

Under the ANPHA Act, one of the CEO's functions is to advise on matters relating to preventive health, where requested to do so by the Health Minister, the Standing Council on Health, a State or Territory Government or the Australian Local Government Association.

Exploring the Public Interest Case for a M inim um (Floor) Price for A /cohot In its response to the National Preventative Health Taskforce report, Australia: The Healthiest Country by 2020, the Australian Government requested that the Agency review the public interest case for a minimum (floor) price of alcohol The Agency released the issues paper Exploring the Public Interest Case for a Minimum (Floor) Price for Alcohol for public consultation. The Agency received 36 submissions which are currently being reviewed with the aim of providing advice to Government by the end of 2012.

Food Marketing to Children In August 2011. the Australian Health Ministers * Advisory Council requested the Agency to review recent monitoring of food advertising, related evidence and relevant reports.

In response, the Agency has commissioned a report which reviewed the most recent monitoring research and data on children *s exposure to food and beverage marketing on television. This report will be presented to SCoH by the end of 2012.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

2011-12

Reference Point Stakeholder engagement strategy including new partnerships for workplace, community and school interventions and Medicare Locals

Result: Deliverable achieved

Stakeholder and Industry Engagement Strategy Following a public consultation process, the agency developed a Stakeholder and Industry Engagement Strategy, to guide its engagement with stakeholders and industry.

A copy of the Strategy is at Appendix C in this report.

Medicare Locals The Agency is working in partnership with Medicare Locals to pursue disease prevention and health promotion at the primary level. The Agency and the AML Alliance released a joint statement on disease prevention and health promotion in Medicare Locals, supported

by an evidence review monograph. The joint statement outlines the vision for prevention in Medicare Locals and the partners' commitment to work collaboratively to improve the health of all Australians, and aims to assist Medicare Locals in developing evidence-based preventive health interventions to improve the health of their communities.

Health Workforce Australia The Agency initiated work with Health Workforce Australia to develop a health promotion and prevention workforce strategy, incorporating program design and delivery, research and evaluation competency needs. This work is continuing into 2012-13 with the release of a public consultation discussion paper planned in late-2012.

Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) In November 2011, the Agency co-convened a national symposium on social marketing for obesity prevention with ACDPA, Attended by more than 60 representatives of Commonwealth, State and Territory governments, non-government organisations, research institutions and industry, the symposium highlighted the need for stronger messaging of health risks from obesity and greater collaboration between entities working on these programs.

Marketing of unhealthy food to children seminar In May 2012, the Agency co-convened, with the South Australian Department of Health, a seminar on the advertising and marketing of 'unhealthy' foods to children. The seminar, which was attended by over 60 participants, featured contributions from industry and public health experts. Following the seminar, the Agency led the development of a national working group with government, industry and public health experts to consider options to strengthen industry *s voluntary initiatives to reduce children s exposure to marketing of unhealthy food and beverages.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

OVERVIEW \

In conjunction with the Agency's audited financial statements, this chapter addresses reporting requirements under the Public Service Act and the FMA Act, including the Requirements for Annual Reports for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies as approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act.

The Agency places a strong emphasis on the importance of sound corporate governance in maximising the policy and program outcomes for government. The robust and transparent governance framework adopted by the Agency ensures that its performance is routinely reviewed against its Strategic and Operational Plans and that the Agency *s management supports a culture of continuous improvement and organisational excellence.

Subsection 53(2) of the ANPHA Act provides that the Agency's first annual report is to cover the period commencing 1 January 2011 and ending 30 June 2012. The Agency's financial statements for the 2010-11 year were prepared, audited and certified by the Auditor-General last year and are not included in this report

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

ANPHA *s legislative framework The Agency is established under the ANPHA Act. It is a prescribed Agency for the purposes of the FMA Act and a Statutory Agency under the Public Service Act.

Corporate governance and planning The CEO is responsible for managing the Agency.

During 2011-12, the Agency implemented an integrated planning framework. The framework establishes links between the Agency's five-year Strategic Plan, its annual Operational Plans, and the work plans of its staff.

The Agency's Strategic and Operational Plans are at: www.anpha.gov.au

Governance team The Agency's governance team comprises the Chief Executive Officer, the Manager of Policy and Programs and the Chief Operating Officer. The governance team meets weekly.

The governance team meets with the Chief Financial Officer for budget and financial management meetings on a monthly basis, or more frequently as required.

The team is responsible for advising the CEO on governance, planning, financial management, performance monitoring and corporate matters, including human resources and workplace health and safety.

The executive team comprises the CEO and the SES managers together with the Directors. The executive team meets weekly.

The governance and executive teams enable the Agency to work across organisational boundaries to achieve its objectives and to promote the core principles of good public sector governance, such as leadership, accountability, transparency, integrity, efficiency and risk management.

MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY

Promoting a Australia ANNUAl REPORT 2011-2012

EXTERNAL SCRUTINY

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) In late 2011-12, the ANAO commenced a performance audit of the Administration of Commonwealth Responsibilities under the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health. This audit involved both the Agency and the Department of Health and Ageing.

The aspects of the audit of particular relevance to the Agency was the assessment of its role in preventing chronic disease and the effectiveness of arrangements that have been put in place to manage the Agency, The audit report is expected to be tabled later in 2012.

Internal audit arrangements The Agency *s Audit Committee was formed in mid-2010, and comprises an independent Chair, Ms Anne Hazell, FCPA GAICD, Mr Peter Gibspn FCA, ACI5, AFAIM and Ms Fran Raymond FCA, FAICD.

Ms Hazell has a strong background in leadership of public sector financial management and accountability and has been acknowledged for her contribution to excellence in public sector financial governance.

Mr Gibson is responsible for Accounting Policy at the Department of Finance and Deregulation, encompassing the establishment and maintenance of accounting and financial reporting requirements for Commonwealth government agencies.

Ms Raymond is General Manager Corporate at the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation and has significant experience as a Chief Financial Officer in the Australian Government.

Participating observers include representatives from the ANAO. the Chief Operating Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, and the Principal Adviser Procurement, Grants and Probity.

The Audit Committee first met in June 2011 and met four times in 2011-12. The Committee has provided independent assurance and advice to the CEO on the Agency's compliance framework, including risk management and external accountability responsibilities as well as the preparation of the financial statements. The Chair reports to the CEO after each committee meeting. A focus for the Committee during the Agency's first full year of operations has been risks associated with establishing a new agency.

The Committee received regular briefings on progress against the Strategic and Operational Plans, establishment progress, including the establishment of internal controls and financial reporting systems, development of a communications strategy, independent branding of the agency, accommodation risks and staffing arrangements. The Committee also considered action taken by the Agency to ensure compliance with the new Work Health and Safety Act 2011 .

During the year the Committee was briefed on additional functions as they became the responsibility of the agency and the resulting impact on the Agency's Strategic and Operational Plans.

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MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY Other activities in 2011-12 included review and advice on:

" the Agency's Fraud Control Policy and Plan

" the Agency's risk management policy

" preparation of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 financial statements

" the 2010-11 Certificate of Compliance process

" the operation of the AN PH A Special Account

" a range of the Agency's corporate policy documents to ensure compliance with external accountability requirements.

In 2011-12. the Annual Internal Audit Work Plan, reviewed by the Audit Committee, included an audit of the control framework to review the Agency *s management of its Special Account established under section 50 of the ANPHA Act in the context of the FMA Act and section 83 of the Australian Constitution. This audit, undertaken by an external contracted auditor was completed in June 2012. The audit found that the Agency's management of the Special Account was generally sound and that management controls were appropriate to manage key risks.

Commonwealth Ombudsman The Commonwealth Ombudsman has undertaken one review of the Agency's approach to an application for a grant under the Community Level Initiative program. The findings of this review were not finalised during 2011-12.

Legal Actions There were no legal actions against the Agency in 2011-12.

Judicial or administrative decisions There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals affecting the Agency during 2011-12.

Reports There were no reports on the operations of the Agency by the Auditor-General or a parliamentary committee in 2011-12.

In August 2011, the Agency provided a written submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health and Ageing inquiry into Tobacco Plain Packaging. Agency representatives appeared before the inquiry in August 2011 and the Committee's report was tabled in the same month.

In January 2012, the Agency provided a written submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs inquiry into Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Agency representatives appeared before the inquiry in March 2012. The Committee is yet to table its report.

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Parliamentary scrutiny The Agency appeared before the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee on 19 October 2011 (supplementary estimates hearings), 15 February 2012 (additional estimates hearings) and 31 May 2012 (budget estimates hearings).

RISK MANAGEMENT The Agency developed a risk management policy and plan, which provide the foundations and organisational arrangements for implementing, monitoring, reviewing and managing risk in the Agency The Agency also developed a risk register as a tool to identify and record those financial, governance operational and policy, program and project risks that could impact on the achievement of the Agency's objectives. The risk policy and plan were endorsed by the Audit Committee. To ensure that both documents remain contemporary, the plan provides for a process of regular review.

BUSINESS CONTINUITY AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT The Agency has been working within the business continuity and disaster management framework of the Department of Health and Ageing. Work on an agency-specific Business Continuity Plan incorporating a Disaster Recovery Plan is well advanced.

ETHICS The CEO and employees of the Agency are bound by the APS Values and Code of Conduct under the Public Service Act.

Offers of employment are made on condition that applicants agree to uphold the APS Values and adhere to the Code of Conduct. This requirement is reviewed during probationary periods of employment. Induction training for new staff includes awareness training about the APS Values and Code of Conduct, public sector ethical standards and expectations generally and in the context of the Agency's functions.

The Agency administers grants and sponsorship programs, research funding programs and a range of procurement activities. It interacts with a wide range of stakeholders in public health practice, preventive health practice, and research. Its stakeholders span the public and private sectors. To ensure that it administers its programs to the highest levels of ethics and probity, the Agency has experienced senior level advisor on procurement, grants and

probity on its staff.

In June 2012, the Agency published a strategy for its engagement with the diverse range of stakeholders who can affect, or be affected by, its work. The strategy is focussed on engaging effectively and efficiently with its stakeholders (including industry), but also committing to principles of openness, transparency, accountability, professionalism and

integrity in those engagements. Refer to the Stakeholder Engagement Strategy in Appendix C

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MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY FRAUD CONTROL The Agency has developed a robust system of fraud control which complies with the

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011. A fraud risk assessment has been undertaken, and the agency has a Fraud Control Policy and Plan is in place,

The plan outlines appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection mechanisms and relies on a structured management and reporting regime with varying responsibilities at a number of levels within the Agency. This approach ensures that risk management and fraud control measures remain contemporary and that Agency management and staff take an active role in implementation. No incidents of fraud have been reported since the Agency *s establishment.

SECURITY During the reporting period, the Agency worked within the security framework of the Department of Health and Ageing. The Agency has subsequently developed an agency- specific security plan, taking into account its current operating environment.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION Agencies subject to the Freedom o f Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report Each Agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements.

The Agency received two FOI requests during 2011-12. In both cases, the appplicants were provided with the documents they sought, in compliance with the principles of open public sector information.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

The Agency is committed to ensuring that its workforce is engaged and dedicated to achieving its objectives. Through attracting and recruiting staff with the appropriate skills sets, enthusiasm for the role and potential to develop, since commencing operations in early 2011, the Agency has established a workforce capable of doing this. New staff are provided with an induction to ensure they not only understand the overarching role of the Agency and its goals but also the role of the APS in general. They are introduced to the APS Values and Code of Conduct and other relevant legislation that governs the Agency and its employees.

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Staffing At 30 June 2012 the Agency employed 39 staff, comprising one full time holder of public office and 38 APS employees, 37 (95%) are ongoing employees and 34 (87%) are employed on a full time basis. The Agency's staffing profile was predominantly female (32, or 82%). The following table gives a breakdown of staff by classification and gender.

Table 3: Agency Staff Breakdown Gender and Classification

Ongoing Non- OngoingOngoing Non-Ongoing

Full- Part- Full- Part- Full- Part- Full- Part-

time time time time time time time time

CEO* 1 1

SES1 1 1 2

EL2 5 1 1 2 1 10

ELI 11 3 14

APS6 7 2 9

APS5 2 1 3

APS4

APS3

APS2

APS!

TOTAL 26 4 2 6 1 39

Employment agreements Prior to 29 August 2011 the Agency *s staff were seconded from the Department of Health and Ageing. On 29 August 2011 the Agency made a collective determination under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act, which provided terms and conditions of employment. Staff on secondment from the Department were then transferred to the Agency, and new employees were engaged under the determination. 36 employees are covered by the collective determination.

In May 2012 the Agency commenced negotiations for an enterprise agreement, and it is expected that the proposed agreement will be approved in October 2012.

The Agency *s 2 SES employees * employment conditions are set out in individual subsection 24(1) determinations.

Performance pay No employees received performance pay in the reporting period.

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MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY Learning and Development As a newly-established agency, the focus for learning and development has been on mandatory programs to ensure good governance and compliance with APS requirements in matters of workplace health and safety, security, procurement, etc. This has included:

" Workplace health and safety training for staff and managers

" Security awareness training

" Fraud prevention training

" Risk management training

" Procurement rules training

" Grants administration training

" Information management and FOI training

" Training to prepare for the upgrade of the desktop system

" Training in the use of the Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoiP) voice services system

The Agency's two SES employees attended the Australian Public Service Commission's SES orientation course

The Principal Adviser Procurement. Grants and Probity attended a course on advanced probity for senior procurement and grants administrators.

Staff attended a number of seminars and presentations by distinguished experts and professionals in fields relevant to the Agency's business, as follows:

" National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee Conference: Beyond 2012 - leading the way to action

" Australian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs

" Australian General Practice Network National Forum

" Public Health Association Food Futures Conference

" Oceania Tobacco Control Conference

" Public Sector Marketing and Communications Conference

" Chi dhood Obesity Conference

" Australian Institute of Company Directors Public Sector Governance Conference

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY " The Agency is com mitted to ensuring a safe and healthy work environment for all employees, contractors and visitors and fostering a culture that protects and promotes health, safety and wellbeing and reflects the requirements in the Work Health and Safety

Act 2011.

O Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

" During 2011-12. the Agency developed its Health and Safety arrangements. They included establishing a Work Health and Safety Committee, and appointing Health and Safety representatives. First Aid Officers and Harassment Contact Officers.

" All staff undertook mandatory workplace health and safety training to inform them of their obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011

" Employees were provided with influenza vaccinations.

" There were no notifiable health and safety incidents during 2011-12.

SOCIAL INCLUSION The Social Inclusion Measurement and Reporting Strategy agreed by the Government in December 2009 will also include some reporting on disability matters in its regular How Australia is Faring report and. if appropriate, in strategic change indicators in agency Annual Reports. More detail on social inclusion matters can be found at: www.socialinclusion.gov.au

DISABILITY Since 1994. Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08. reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission's State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, departments and agencies are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by a new National Disability Strategy which sets out a ten-year national policy framework for improving life for Australians with a disability, their families and carers. A high-level report to track progress for people with disability at a national level will be produced by the Standing Council on Community, Housing and Disability Services to the Council of Australian Governments and will be available at www.fahcsia.gov.au

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT The Agency maintains a website where stakeholders and the public can obtain information about it and its activities.

Information and communications technology (ICT) is provided by the Department of Health and Ageing under an agreement for the provision of services. In June, the Agency *s desktops were upgraded. New virtual desktops were rolled out, together with updated software, including Microsoft Office 2010 and Lotus Notes 8.5

This was followed by the implementation of VoiP and the upgrading of desktop voice services,

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RECORDS MANAGEMENT Records management services are provided by the Department of Health and Ageing under a services agreement. The Department manages and maintains the TRIM records management system.

MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY

ASSET MANAGEMENT The Agency has no assets. Its ICT hardware and software, and its furniture and office equipment was provided under a services agreement with the Department of Health and Ageing.

LEGAL SERVICES The Agency acquires legal services from the Department of Health and Ageing, the Australian Government Solicitor, and from private sector providers.

PROCUREMENT In 2011-12, with the exception of those instances reported in its Certificate of Compliance, the Agency complied with the Government's purchasing policies and its procurement and purchasing activities were conducted in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Guidelines (CPGs) to ensure value for money, effective and ethical procurement outcomes.

Framework The Agency's procurement framework encourages competition, value for money, transparency and accountability and the efficient, effective, economical and ethical use of resources.

The Agency has established a procurement, grants and probity service to provide education and training, support to staff and to review all procurement and grant activity within the Agency to ensure compliance with legislative requirements and that such processes

maximise best practice.

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses All the Agency's awarded contracts or Deeds of Standing Offer valued at $100,000 (GST inclusive) or greater, contain standard clauses granting the Auditor-General access to contractor's premises.

Exempt Contracts In 2011-12, the Agency, through the National Binge Drinking Strategy: Community Sponsorship Fund, entered into sponsorship arrangements with twelve national sporting organisations. These contracts have been exempted from the reporting obligations by the Agency's CEO under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. and, therefore, AusTender reporting, as the sponsorship replacement element of the agreement relates directly to the business affairs of the contracted parties, and contains material obtained in confidence.

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Consultancies In the period 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2012, 16 new consultancy contracts were entered into, involving total actual expenditure over the period of $1,887,134.71 (GST inclusive). The total the value of these contracts is $3,204,765.80 (GST inclusive).

The Agency engages consultants where it lacks specialist expertise or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to investigate or diagnose a defined issue or problem, carry out defined reviews or evaluation or provide independent advice, information or creative solutions to assist in the Agency's decision≠ making.

Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the Austender website: www.tenders.gov.au

Prior to engaging consultants, the Agency takes into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally, and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. The decision to engage a consultant is made in accordance with the FMA Act and regulations (including the CPGs) and relevant internal policies.

GRANTS PROGRAMS The Agency administers the following grants programs:

" Research Grants (under the National Preventive Health Research Fund)

" Community Level Initiative (under the Binge Drinking Strategy)

Information on grants awarded by the Agency during the period 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2012 is available in Appendices A and B.

ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH In accordance with section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 , the Agency is required to report on all payments over $11,900 (GST inclusive) to advertising agencies, market research organisations, polling organisations, media advertising organisations, public relations organisations and direct mail organisations. The total payment by the Agency to these organisations in the reporting period was $55,946,560.57 (GST inc.) Table 4 on the following page shows all organisations the Agency used for these purposes.

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Table 4: Payments of more than $11,900 for advertising and market research

MANAGEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY

1 January 2011 - 30 June 2012

Adcorp Australia Limited Advertising agency Print media advertising for the NBDS Community Level

Initiatives program

128.099.21

Blue Moon Unit Trust Market research Market research for the

National Tobacco Campaign 856,471.00

The Campaign Palace Pty Ltd

Advertising agency Advertising services for the National Tobacco Campaign 101.062.50

Campbell Barnett Advertising agency Brand development services 53,543.00

Gusto Ads Advertising agency Edited TV advertising

material for the National Tobacco Campaign

15,335.50

J Walter Thompson Australia Pty Ltd Advertising agency Creative services for the Measure Up Campaign

1. 545,064 64

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Media advertising Television advertising for the Measure Up Campaign and

National Tobacco Campaign

51,864,838.75

Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide Pty Ltd

Public relations Public relations services for

the Measure Up Campaign 620,918.72

The Social Research Centre Pty Ltd Market research Market research for the

Measure Up Campaign

761,227.25

ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) requires Commonwealth agencies to report annually on how their activities and the administration of legislation by it accorded with the principles of ecologically sustainable development (BSD), as detailed in section 3A of the EPBC Act.

The Agency administers no legislation relevant to the ESD principles. The Agency's environmental activities relate to reducing the consumption of energy, minimising waste and maximising the efficient use of resources through its business activities. Office waste is segregated into recyclable and non-recyclable. The Agency accesses the whole-of- government electricity supply contract which is managed by the Department of Defence. This includes a supplied 10% of green power.

The Agency offers staff an interest-free loan scheme for the purchase of passes for public transport by employees.

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PART 5: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS Audit Report 71

Statement by the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer

Statement of Comprehensive Income 74

Balance Sheet 75

Statement of Changes in Equity 76

Cash Flow Statement : 77

Schedule of Commitments 78

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities & Administered Reconciliation Schedule

Administered Cash Flow Statement 81

Schedule of Administered Commitments 82

TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES j 83

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 84

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 92

Note 3: Expenses 93

Note 4: Income 95

Note 5: Financial Assets 96

Note 6: Payables 97

Note 7: Provisions 98

Note 8: Restructuring 99

Note 9: Cash Flow Reconciliation 100

Note 10: Contingent Assets and Liabilities 101

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration 102

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors 104

Note 13: Financial Instruments 105

Note 14 Financial Assets Reconciliation 107

Note 15: Administered - Expenses 108

Note 16: Administered - Income 109

Note 17: Administered - Financial Assets 110

Note 18: Administered - Non-Financial Assets 111

Note 19: Administered - Payables 112

Note 20: Administered - Cash Flow Reconciliation 113

Note 21: Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities 114

Note 22: Administered - Financial Instruments 115

Note 23: Administered Financial Assets Reconciliation 117

Note 24: Appropriations 118

Note 25: Special Accounts 121

Note 26: Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the 122 Consolidated Revenue Fund

Note 27; Compensation and Debt Relief 123

Note 28. Reporting of Outcomes 124

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 126

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT

To the Minister for Health

I have audited the accompanying financial statements of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency for the year ended 30 June 2012, which comprise: a Statement by the Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officer; Statement o f Comprehensive Income; Balance Sheet; Statement o f Changes in Equity; Cash Flow Statement; Schedule o f Commitments; Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income; Administered Schedule o f Assets and

Liabilities; Administered Reconciliation Schedule; Administered Cash Flow Statement; Schedule of Administered Commitments; and Notes comprising a Summary o f Significant Accounting Policies and other explanatory information.

Chief Executive's Responsibility for the Financial Statements

The Chief Executive o f the Australian National Preventive Health Agency is responsible for the preparation o f financial statements that give a true mid fair view in accordance with the Finance Minister *s Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, including the Australian Accounting Standards, and for such internal control as is

necessary to enable the preparation o f the financial statements that give a true and fair view and are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

A uditor *v Responsibility

My responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements based on my audit. 1 have conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. These auditing standards require that I comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor *s judgement, including the assessment of the risks o f material misstatement o f the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor

considers internal control relevant to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency's preparation of the financial statements that give a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose o f expressing an opinion on the effectiveness o f the Australian National Preventive Health Agency *s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness o f the accounting policies used and the reasonableness o f accounting estimates made by the Chief Executive o f the Australian National Preventive Health Agency as well as evaluating the overall

presentation o f the financial statements.

I believe that the audit evidence 1 have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02| 6203 7300 Fax (0?) 6203 7777

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Independence

In conducting my audit, 1 have followed the independence requirements o f the Australian National Audit Office, which incorporate the requirements of the Australian accounting profession.

In my opinion, the financial statements o f the Australian National Preventive Health Agency:

(a) have been prepared in accordance with the Finance Minister's Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, including the Australian Accounting Standards: and

(b) give a true and fair view o f the matters required by the Finance Minister *s Orders including the Australian National Preventive Health Agency *s financial position as at 30 June 2012 and o f its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

Australian National Audit Office

Kristian Gage Audit Principal

Delegate o f the Auditor General Canberra

24 September 2012

Opinion

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AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY

STATEMENT BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2012 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister's Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, as amended.

Signed

Louise Sylvan

Chief Executive Officer

Christopher Payne

Chief Financial Officer

24 September 2012 24 September 2012

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o

STATEMENT OF

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2012

Notes

2012

$

2011

$

EXPENSES Employee benefits 3A 3,580,581 130,474

Supplier 3B 3,125,453 1,348,116

Total expenses 6,706,034 1,478,590

LESS:

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue Other revenue Total own-source revenue

Gains Other gains 4B 4 2 ,0 0 0 40,000

Total gains 4 2 ,0 0 0 40,000

Total own-source income 4 2 ,0 0 0 40,110

Net cost of services 6,664,034 1,438,480

Revenue from Government4C 6,915,000 1,826,000

Surplus 250,966 387,520

Total comprehensive income 250,966 387,520

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

4A *ä*ä0

no

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BALANCE SHEET as at 30 June 2012

Notes

2012

$

2011 $

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 5A 1,926 90

Trade and other receivables 5B 2,216,414 1,920,828

Total financial assets 2,218,339 1,920,918

Total Assets 2,218,339 1,920,918

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 6A (420,509) (1,521,545)

Other payables 6B (156,429) (11,853)

Total payables (576,938) (1,533.398)

Provisions Employee provisions 7 (1,002,916) -

Total provisions (1,002,916) -

Total liabilities (1,579,854) (1,533,398)

Net assets 638,486 387,520

EQUITY Retained surplus 638,486 387,520

Total equity 638,486 387,520

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2012

Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus

Contributed equity/capital Total equity

2012 2011 2012 20*† 2012 2011 2012 2011

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 387,520 387,520

Opening balance 387,520 387,520

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period 250,966 387.520 250,966 387.520

Total comprehensive income 638,486 387.520 638,486 387,520

Closing balance as at 30 June 638,486 387,520 _______ _______ -_______ -________ - 638,486 387,520

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2012

Notes

2012 $

2011 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 8,066,647 35,724

Leave provisions 673,841 -

Other 367,679 no

Total cash received 9,108,167 35.834

Cash used Employees (3,461,894) (35,591)

Suppliers (4,233,066) (153)

Net GST Paid (126,042)

Transfers to OPA (1,285,328) -

Total cash used (9,106,331) (35,744)

Net cash from operating activities 9 1,836 90

Net increase in cash held 1,836 90

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 90 -

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 5A 1,926 90

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2012

BY TYPENotes

2012

$

2011

$

Com m itm ents receivable N et GST recoverable on co m m itm ents * 43,801 5,637

Total com m itm ents receivable 43,801 5,637

Com m itm ents payable Other (501,806 ) (62,011)

Total com m itm ents payable (501,806 ) (62,011)

Net com m itm ents by type (4 5 8 ,0 0 5 ) (56,374)

BY MATURITY

Com m itm ents receivable

One year or less 43,801 5,637

From one to five years - -

Total com m itm ents receivable 43,801 5,637

Com m itm ents payable One year or less (491,806 ) (62,011)

From one to five years (1 0 ,0 0 0 ) -

Total com m itm ents payable (501,806 ) (62,011)

N et com m itm ents by m aturity (4 5 8 ,0 0 5 ) (56,374)

Note:

1. Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

2. In 2011-12 Other Commitments reflects contracts for Internal Audit functions ($67,287) and a

memorandum of understanding with the Department of Health and Ageing for the provision of

corporate services ($434,519)

3. Operating Leases: The Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) has no operating

lease commitments for the period. ANPHA has a memorandum of understanding with the Department

of Health and Ageing for a range of corporate services that might ordinarily be provided under

operating lease arrangements. ANPHA signed a lease for accommodation on 2 July 2012, with a

commencement date of 1 September 2012. The lease term is 7 years at a total cost of $2,298,703.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2012

2012 2011

Notes $O00 $000

EXPENSES Suppliers 15A (27,262) (25,520)

Grants 15B (5,171) -

Total expenses administered on behalf of Government

LESS: OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Non-taxation revenue

(32,433) (25,520)

Interest T6A 20 -

Other revenue 16B 5,303 -

Total non-taxation revenue Total own-source revenue administered on behalf of 5,322 Government 5,322 -

Total own-source income administered on behalf of Government 5,322 -

Net cost of services (27,111) (25,520)

Total deficit (27,111) (25,520)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES at 30 June 2012

Notes

2012 $ O0 0

2011

$ *0 0 0

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 17A 5,170

Trade and other receivables 17B 37,438 14,384

Total financial assets 42,608 14,384

Non-financial assets Inventories 18C 301 231

Total non-financial assets 301 231

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 42,909 14,615

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 19A 0,167) (4.133)

Grants 19B 0,859) -

Other 19C 0,727) (2,199)

Total payables (4,753) (6.332)

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government (4,753) (6,332)

Net assets 38,155 8.283

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Administered Reconciliation Schedule

2012 2011

$ *0 0 0 $'0 00

Opening administered assets less administered liabilities as at 1 July 8,283 -

Surplus (deficit) items:

Plus: Administered income 5,322 -

Less: Administered expenses (32,433) (25,520)

Payments to CAC Act bodies - -

Administered transfers to/from Australian Government:

Appropriation transfers from OPA:

Annual appropriations for administered expenses 60,799 33,803

Transfers to OPA (5,816) _______ -

Closing administered assets less administered liabilities as at 30 June 38,155 8,283

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ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW

STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2012

2012

Notes $ O0 0

2011

$'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Interest 20 -

Net GST received 942 -

Other 5,670

Total cash received 6,632 -

Cash used Grant (3,481) -

Suppliers (30,001) (21,994)

Net GST paid - (2.199)

Total cash used (33,482) (24,193)

Net cash flows used by operating activities (26,849) (24.193)

Net decrease in Cash Held 20 (26,849) (24.193)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period - -

Cash from Official Public Account for1: -Appropriations 64,121 36,002

-Special Accounts 4,038 -

68,159 36,002

Cash to Official Public Account for:

- Appropriations 8,080 -

- Special Accounts 28,059 11,809

36,140 11,809

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period5,170

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Notes:

1. Restatement of 2010-11 Appropriations for Special Accounts

24,193 11,809

36,002

The 2010-11 Statements reported Cash from Official Public Account as follows: -Appropriations -Special Accounts

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SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED

COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2012

2012 2011 $*Ã¥ 00 $'000

BY TYPE C om m itm ents receivable

Net GST recoverable on com m itm ents 3,290 78

Total com m itm ents receivable 3,290 78

C om m itm ents payable Other com m itm ents Contracts for services (319) (863)

Sponsorships (18,150) -

Grants (17,724) -

Total o th e r com m itm ents (36,193) (863)

Total com m itm ents payable (36,193) (863)

N et com m itm ents by type (32,903) (785)

BY MATURITY

C om m itm ents receivable One year or less 1,777 78

From one to five years 1,514 -

Total com m itm ents receivable 3,290 78

C om m itm ents payable Other com m itm ents One year or less (19,542) (863)

From one to five years (16,651) -

Total o th e r com m itm ents (36,193) (863)

N et com m itm ents by m a tu rity (32,903) (785)

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 84

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 92

Note 3: Expenses

Note 4: Income 95

Note 5; Financial Assets 96

Note 6: Payables

Note 7; Provisions 98

Note 8: Restructuring 99

Note 9: Cash Flow Reconciliation j ioo

Note 10: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors 104

Note 13: Financial Instruments

Note 14: Financial Assets Reconciliation

Note 15: Administered - Expenses 108

Note 16: Administered - Income ; 109

Note 17: Administered - Financial Assets no

Note 18: Administered - Non-Financial Assets

Note 19: Administered - Payables

Note 20: Administered - Cash Flow Reconciliation ns

Note 2*ä: Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities n∑

Note 22: Administered - Financial Instruments

Note 23: Administered Financial Assets Reconciliation

Note 24: Appropriations H8

Note 25: Special Accounts

Note 26: Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund

Note 27: Compensation and Debt Relief

Note 28: Reporting of Outcomes |;,4

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH AGENCY

The Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) is a not-for-profit entity controlled by the Australian Government.

The Australian Government established ANPHA on 1 January 20*† to provide a new national capacity to drive preventive health policy and programs, ANPHA will provide policy leadership and establish partnerships with governments, com m unity health promotion organisations, industry and primary health care providers.

The need for a national preventive health agency to drive the preventive health agenda was identified by the Council of Australian Governments in 2008, and further developed in the Government *s response to the National Preventative Health Taskforce's report, and the report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission. ANPHA will fulfil this national com m itm ent by leading, coordinating and facilitating a range of preventive health efforts.

In particular, ANPHA is leading the major social marketing campaigns related to smoking and obesity, and establishing a national preventive health research strategy and program to focus on the translation of research into practice. ANPHA is also managing, analysing and disseminating information for a wide range of sectors and communities to ensure widespread and effective adoption of prevention and health promotion actions.

ANPHA is structured to meet one outcome:

Outcome 1 A reduction in the prevalence of preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action, and by managing lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships with non-government sectors.

Agency activities contributing toward this outcomes are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by ANPHA in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by ANPHA, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or

incurred by the Government.

ANPHA conducts the following administered activities on behalf of the Government:

1 National Binge Drinking Strategy Expansion

4 Social marketing campaigns targetting tobacco and obesity

" Preventive health research fund

4 Health workforce audit

" Employer workplace awards

ANPHA is a prescribed Agency under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997. and its role and functions are set out in the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 . The Chief Executive Officer leads ANPHA. and is supported by the staff and an Advisory Council of experts and other government representatives.

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The continued existence of ANPHA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for ANPHA *s adm inistration and programs.

1.2 BASIS OF PREPARATION OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by:

" section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Finance Minister's Orders (FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar for departm ental items and to the nearest thousand dollars for administered items unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatm ent is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the balance sheet when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to ANPHA or a future sacrifice of economic benefits

will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executor contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of com m itm ents or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatm ent is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.3 SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND ESTIMATES

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, ANPHA has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

For the period ending 30 June 2011 ANPHA did not have a collective determination under which staff could be employed. This means that with the exception of the Chief Executive Officer, ANPHA was staffed by secondees from the Department of Health and Ageing (the

Department), with costs being recovered from ANPHA via a Memorandum of Understanding.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The following judgements have been made to correctly reflect these arrangements:

" Seconded employee costs are recognised as supplier expenses

" Provisions for seconded employees remain the responsibility of the home Department No provisions have been recognised by ANPHA for these employees

For the period ending 30 June 2012 ANPHA had its own collective determination under which staff could be employed Staff were engaged under this determination on a progressive basis from 27 October 2011. Secondee costs incurred for the period ending 30 June 2012 continue

to be reported as supplier expenses. Staff falling under the Agency *s collective determination have had provisions for recreation leave and long service leave recognised.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 NEW AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Revised standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a financial impact, and are not expected to have a future financial impact on the Agency.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No new standards, revised standards, interpretations and amending standards that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the sign-off date, are expected to have a financial impact on the Agency for future reporting periods.

1.5 REVENUE

Revenue from Governm ent

Amounts appropriated for departm ental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when ANPHA gams control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

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Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (refer to Note 1.7).

1.6 GAINS

Resources Received Free of Charge Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (Refer to Note 1.7).

Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 TRANSACTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT AS OWNER

Equity Injections (FMA Act only) Amounts appropriated which are designated as 'equity injections' for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity.

Restructuring of Administrative Arrangements Net assets received from or relinquished to another Government entity under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are adjusted at their book value directly against contributed equity.

Other Distributions to Owners The FMOs require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend. In 2011-12, there were no distributions to owners (2010-11 Nil).

1.8 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Liabilities for *short-term employee benefits * (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and term ination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal am ount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlem ent of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of ANPHA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees * remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including ANPHA's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flow to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2012. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay

increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation Staff of ANPHA will ordinarily be members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance and Deregulation as an administered item.

ANPHA makes employer contributions to the employees" superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. ANPHA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

1.9 CASH

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, cash held with outsiders, demand deposits in bank accounts with an original m aturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value, and cash in special accounts.

1.10 FINANCIAL ASSETS

ANPHA classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

b) held-to-m aturity investments

c) available-for-sale financial assets

d) loans and receivables

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The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Loans and Receivables Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as 'loans and receivables *. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less

impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at cost - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred, the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets.

1.11 FIN A N C IA L LIABILITIES

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities *at fair value through profit or loss' or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon 'trade date'.

Other Financial Liabilities Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recpgnised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest m ethod is a m ethod of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of

the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recpgnised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

1.12 C ON TIN GEN T LIABILITIES AN D CON TIN GEN T ASSETS

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the balance sheet but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

1.13 A C QU ISITION OF ASSETS

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor's accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

1.14 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPM ENT

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the balance sheet, except for leasehold improvements costing less than $50,000, information technology equipment purchases costing less than $500, and all other purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

ANPHA had no property, plant or equipment assets for the period ending 30 June 2012.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are w ritten-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to ANPHA using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

1.15 TAXATION / COM PETITIVE NEUTRALITY

ANPHA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office

b) for receivables and payables

Competitive Neutrality ANPHA does not provide services on a for-profit basis.

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1.16 REPORTING OF ADM INISTERED ACTIVITIES

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the schedule of administered items and related notes,

Except where otherwise stated below, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account Revenue collected by ANPHA for use by the Government rather than ANPHA is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance and Deregulation. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by ANPHA on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the statement of cash flows in the schedule of administered items and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Revenue All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by ANPHA on behalf of the Australian Government.

Grants ANPHA administers a number of grant schemes on behalf of the Government.

Grant liabilities are recognised to the extent that (i) the services required to be performed by the grantee have been performed or (ii) the grant eligibility criteria have been satisfied, but payments due have not been made. A commitment is recorded when the Government enters into an agreement to make these grants but services have not been performed or criteria satisfied.

Inventories Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Inventories held for distribution are valued at cost, adjusted for any loss of service potential.

Costs incurred in bringing each item of inventory to its present location and condition are assigned as follows:

a) raw materials and stores - purchase cost on a first-in-first-out basis

b) finished goods and work-in-progress - cost of direct materials and labour plus attributable costs that can be allocated on a reasonable basis

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are Initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

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NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE

REPORTING PERIOD

No events have occurred after the reporting period that have the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the entity.

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NOTE 3: EXPENSES

Note 5A: Em ployee Benefits

Wages and salaries Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans Defined benefit plans Leave and other entitlem ents Total em ployee benefits

Note 5B: Suppliers Goods and services Seconded em ployees (from the DoHA) C ontracts for corporate services Accom m odation

Travel C ontractors Consultants Advertising IT services Office consum ables Au dit fees

Insurance Property operating expenses R ecruitm ent Conference / Seminar

Legal C om m ittees Training

C ontract for services Security Other Total goods and services

Goods and services are m ade up of:

Provision o f goods - related entities Provision o f goods - external parties Rendering of services - related entities Rendering of services - external parties Total goods and services

Other supplier expenses Total other supplier expenses Total supplier expenses

2012 $

2011 $

2,549,536 95.723

104,850 14.582

338,397 -

587,797 20,170

3,580,581 130,474

687,965 757,013

661,760 114,790

410,993 109,280

309,750 60,556

293,019 21,962

120,496 57,025

119,756 -

98,709 112,201

81,485 36,647

42,000 40,000

60,749 -

58,465 20,865

41,913 -

37,023 3,112

35,259 -

19,724 1,072

14,666 5,412

9,000 -

5,637 33

17,083 8,148

3,125,453 1,348,116

803,792 127,259

327,654 120

1,668,448 1,220,737 325,559 -

3,125,453 1,348,116

3,125,453 1,348,116

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NOTE 3: EXPENSES cont inued

Notes:

1. Related entity transactions primarily relate to the provision of corporate services by the Department of Health and Ageing

2. Other supplier costs were reported as $75,289 in the 2010-11 Financial Statements.

The 2010-11 Other Supplier Costs' have been redistributed for comparative purposes as follows

2011 $

Office consumables 36,647

Property operating expenses 20.865

Conference / Seminar 3.112

Committees 1.072

Training 5.412

Security 33

Other 8.148

75.289

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sJOTE 4: INCOME

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE

2012 $

2011 $

Note 4A: Other Revenue Staff contributions no

Total other revenue - no

Note 4B: Other Gains Resources received free of charge 42,000 40.000

Total other gains 42,000 40.000

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT

Note 4C: Revenue from Government Appropriations: Departm ental appropriation 6,915,000 1,826.000

Total revenue from Government 6,915,000 1,826.000

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NOTE 5: FINANCIAL ASSETS

2012 $

2011 $

Note 5A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 1,926 90

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,926 90

Note 5B: Trade and Other Receivables Appropriations receivable: For existing programs Total appropriations receivable

1.923.958 1.923.958

1790.276 1.790.276

Other receivables: Leave provisions GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office

132,017 160,439 130,552

Total other receivables Total trade and other receivables (gross) 292,456 2,216,414

130,552 1,920,828

Less impairment allowance account: Other Total impairment allowance account - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,216,414 1,920,828

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months Total trade and other receivables (net) 2.216.414

2.216.414

1.920.828 1.920.828

Receivables are aged as follows: Not overdue Overdue by:

More than 90 days

2,187,034

29,379

1,920,828

Total receivables (gross) 2,216,414 1,920,828

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NOTE 6: PAYABLES

2012 2011

$ $

Note 6A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 420,509 1.521.546

Total supplier payables 420,509 1521.546

Total supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities 319,911 1.521,546

External parties 100,598 -

Total 420,509 1.521.546

Settlem ent was usually made within 30 days.

Note 6B: Other Payables Salaries and wages 121,006 3,778

Superannuation 16,109 584

Other 19,314 7,491

Total other payables 156,429 11,853

Total other payables expected to be settled within 12 months: No more than 12 m onths 156,429 11.853

Total156,429 11,853

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NOTE 7: PROVISIONS

Employee Provisions2 Recreation leave Long service leave Total employee provisions

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:1 No more than 12 m onths

More than 12 m onths Total employee provisions

2012 2011

$ $

4 2 7 ,6 6 9 -

575,247 -

1,002,916 -

212,593 -

7 9 0 ,3 2 3 -

1,002,916 -

Note:

1. Settlement of provision estimates are based on leave taken during 2011*12.

2. For the period ending 30 June 2011 ANPHA did not recognise any provisions. With the exception of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), all ANPHA employees were secondees from the Department of Health and Ageing (the Department) and ANPHA made payment for these services each month with no obligation for accrued leave. Provisions for secondees were recognised by the Department The interim CEO ceased em ployment with the Agency on 30 June 2011. Unused leave entitlements associated with the CEO *s employment were recognised as payables.

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NOTE 8: RESTRUCTURING

2011-12

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2011/16 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the Department of Health and Ageing to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 25 August 2011 The effect of this determination was to transfer administered appropriation from Outcome 1, from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1, at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2012/01 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the Department of Health and Ageing to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 20 January 2012. The effect of this determination was to transfer administered appropriation from Outcome 1 from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1. at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.

No departmental expenses or revenues, assets or liabilities, were transferred to ANPHA as part of these determinations.

No administered expenses or revenues, assets or liabilrtes. were transferred to ANPHA as a result of these determinations.

Note

1. AN PH A's outcome and key activities are described in Note 1.1 Appropriation transfers related to these

determinations can be seen at Note 24 Table A

2010-11

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2010/41 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the Department of Health and Ageing to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 1 January 2011. The effect of this determination was to transfer appropriation from Outcome 1, Program 1.6 Public Health, from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1, Program 1.1 Preventive Health, at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.

No departmental expenses or revenues, assets or liabilities, were transferred to ANPHA as part of this determination.

No administered expenses or revenues, assets or liabilites, were transferred to ANPHA as a result of this determination.

ANPHA's outcome and key activities are described in Note 11.

Note:

1. ANPHA *s outcome and key activities are described in Note 1.1. Appropriation transfers related to these

determinations can be seen at Note 24 Table A.

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NOTE 9: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

2012

$

2011 $

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statem ent

Cash and cash equivalents as per:

Cash flow statement Balance sheet Difference

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities:

Net cost of services Add revenue from Government

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) / decrease in net receivables Increase/ (decrease) in employee provisions Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables Increase / (decrease) in other payable Net cash from operating activities

1,926 90

1,926 90

(6 ,6 6 4 ,0 3 4 ) (1,438,480) 6 ,9 1 5 ,0 0 0 1,826,000

(2 9 5 ,5 8 6 ) (1,920,828)

1,002,916 -

(1,101,036) 1,521,545

144,576 11,853

1,836 90

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NOTE 10: CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Quantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2012 ANPHA did not have any quantifiable contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2011: Nil)

Unquantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2012 ANPHA did not have any unquantifiable contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2011: Nil)

Significant Remote Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2012 ANPHA did not have any significant remote contingencies. (2011: Nil)

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NOTE 11: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION Note 11A: Senior Executive Remuneration Expense for the Reporting Period

2012

$

2011 $

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary (including annual leave taken) 499,674 -

Performance bonuses - -

Other 67,453 -

Total Short-term employee benefits 567,127 -

Post-employment benefits.

Superannuation 82,728 -

Total post-employment benefits 82,728

Other long-term benefits:

Long service leave 9,534 -

Total other long-term benefits 9,534

Termination benefits - .

Total employment benefits 659,388

Notes: 1. Note HA is prepared on an accrual basis

2 Note HA excludes acting arrangements and past year service where total remuneration expensed for a senior executive was less than $150,000.

Note 11B: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives During the

Reporting Period1

2012

A v e r a ge a nnua l r e por ta ble

re m une r a tion 1

Se nior

Ex e c utiv e s

R e porta ble

Sa la ry 3

C ontr ibute d

s upe ra nnua tion

1

R e por ta ble

a llowa nc e s 4

B onus

Pa id 1

Tota l

No. $ $ $ $ $

Tota l re m une ra tion (inc luding pa r t ≠

tim e a rra nge m e nts ):

Less than $150,000 $150,000 to $179,999 1 1 5 8 ,9 1 8 2 1 ,0 2 6 . . 1 7 9 ,9 4 4

$180,000 to $209,999 1 1 3 0 ,4 5 0 6 9 ,9 6 9 * - 2 0 0 ,4 1 9

$210,000 to $239,999 1 2 0 2 ,0 2 3 2 7 ,4 7 9 - - 2 2 9 ,5 0 2

Tota l 3

2011

Average annual reportable

remuneration

Senior

Executives

Reportable

Salary -

Contributed superannuation Reportable allowances-5

Bonus

Paid 6

Total

No $ $ $ $ $

Total remuneration (including part' time arrangements):

Less than $150,000 2 57,550 31.437 - - 88.987

Total 2

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Notes:

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following:

a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid * column)

b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits)

3. The 'contributed superannuation' amount is the average actual superannuation contributions paid to

senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period, including any salary

sacrificed amounts, as per the individuals' payslips.

4. "Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on the individuals' payment summaries.

5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable

remuneration band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to

various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

6. Various salary sacrifice arrangements were available to senior executives. Salary sacrifice benefits are reported in the *reportable salary' column, excluding salary sacrificed superannuation, which is reported in

the 'contributed superannuation' column.

Note 11C: Other Highly Paid Staff3

A ve ra ge annual re porta ble

re m une ra tion'

Total rem unera tion (inc luding pa rt≠

tim e arra nge m e nts ):

$150,000 to $179.999_____________

Total * 1 2 3 4 5 6

2012

Sta ff R eportable Salary

N o. 2

C ontribute d

supera nnua tion R eportable a llowa nc e s'1

Bonus

Paid s

Total

NO. $ $ $ $ $

1 137,482 20,607 - 15,464 173,554

1

There were no other highly paid staff in 2010-11,

Notes:

1. This table reports staff:

a) who were employed by the entity during the reporting period

b) whose reportable remuneration was $150,000 or more for the financial period

c) were not required to be disclosed in Tables A or B

Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated

out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid * column): b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to

'grossing up' to account for tax benefits); and c) exempt foreign employment income.

3. The *contributed superannuation' amount is the average actual superannuation contributions paid to

senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period, including any salary sacrificed amounts, as per the individuals' payslips.

4. *Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on

individuals' payment summaries.

5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable

remuneration band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to

various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

6. Various salary sacrifice arrangements were available to other highly paid staff. Salary sacrifice benefits are

reported in the 'reportable salary' column, excluding salary sacrificed superannuation, which is reported in the 'contributed superannuation' column.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 12: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS 2012 $

Financial statement audit services were provided free of charge to the entity by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO).

Fair value of the services provided:

Financial statem ent audit services 42,000

Total 42,000

Note:

1. No other services were provided by the auditors of the financial statements.

2011 $

40.000 40.000

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 13: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

2012 2011

$ $

Note 13A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Loans and receivables: Cash and cash equivalents 1,926 90

Trade receivables 132,017 -

Total 133,943 90

Carrying amount of financial assets 133,943 90

Financial Liabilities At fair value: Trade Payables (420,509) (1,521.546)

Other Payables (156,429) (11,853)

Total (576,938) (1.533,398)

Carrying amount of financial liabilities ( 576,938) (1,533.398)

Note 13B: Credit Risk

ANPHA is exposed to minimal credit risk as loans and receivables are cash at bank and receivables are for leave provisions from other Public Sector departments. Trade payable values are set by the market and validated by invoice. Other payables largely reflects payroll related liabilities which are validated through ANPHA's industrial agreement

The following table illustrates the entity's gross exposure to credit risk, excluding any collateral or credit enhancements.

2012 $

2011 $

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 1,926 90

Trade receivables 132,017 -

Total 133,943 90

Financial liabilities Trade Payables (420,509) (1.521.546)

Other Payables (156,429) (11.853)

Total (576,938) (1,533.398)

ANPHA holds no collateral to mitigate against risk.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 13: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS CONTINUED

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired Not past due Not past due

nor impaired nor impaired 2012 2011

$ $

Cash and cash equivalents 1,926 90

Trade receivables 102,638

Total 104,564 90

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2012 90+ days $

Total

$

Trade receivables 29,379 29,379

Total 29,379 29.379

Trade receivables past due are leave provisions receivable from other Governm ent D epartm ents

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2011 90+ Total days

$ $

Trade receivables - -

Total -

Note 13C: Liquidity Risk ANPHA's financial liabilities are payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that ANPHA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and mechanisms available to ANPHA (e.g. Advance to the Finance Minister) and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2012 On demand $

Within 1 year $

Trade Payables (420,509)

Other Payables (156,429)

Total - (576,938)

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2011 On Within 1

demand year

$ $

Trade Payables (1.521.546)

Other Payables (11,853)

Total - (1,533,398)

ANPHA had no derivative financial liabilities in either 2012 or 2011.

Note 13D: Market Risk ANPHAs financial instruments are of a nature that does not expose them to market risk.

ANPHA is not exposed to *currency risk * or *other price risk *.

ANPHA has no interest bearing items on the Balance Sheet.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 14: FINANCIAL ASSESTS RECONCILIATION 2012 $

2011 $

Financial assets

Total financial assets as per balance sheet Less: non-financial instrument components

Notes

2,218,339 1.920,918

Appropriations receivable 5B 1,923,958 1,790,276

Other receivables (GST receivable) Total non-financial instrument components Total financial assets as per financial instruments note

5B 160,439

2,084,396 133,943

130.552 1,920,828 90

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011 2012

NOTE 15 ADMINISTERED - EXPENSES

20*ä2 2011

$'000 $ '0 0 0

Note ISA^Suppliers Goods and services Advertising (22,284) (25,052)

Contract for Services (2,188) (256)

Consultants (2,085) (118)

Legal Fees (256) -

Promotions (104) -

Printing (101) (94)

Other (244) -

Total goods and services (27,262) (25,520)

Goods and services are made up of: Provision of goods - external parties (22)

Rendering of services - related entities (253) -

Rendering of services - external parties (26,987) (25,520) Total goods and services (27,262) (25,520)

Note *ä5*í: Grants Public sector: Local Governments (813) -

Private sector: Non-profit organisations (2,780) -

Other (1,578) -

Total grants (5,171) -

Note:

Other supplier costs were reported as $25,520 in the 2010-11 Financial Statements. These costs have been redistributed for comparative purposes in 2011-12 as follows:

2011

$000

Advertising (25,052)

Contract for Services (256)

Consultants (118)

Printing (94)

Total (25.520)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 16: ADMINISTERED - INCOME

2012 2011

$'000 $ O 00

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE

Non-taxation revenue

Note 16A: Interest Interest (ATO refund delay) 20 -

Total interest 20 -

Note 16B: Other Revenue D epartm ent o f H ealth and Ageing 4,700

ACT Governm ent 103 -

NSW Governm ent 500 -

Total Other Revenue 5,303 -

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 17: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL ASSETS 2012 $O00

2011

$ '0 0 0

Note *ä7*ë: Cash and Cash Equivalents Special Accounts - cash on deposit 5,170 -

Total cash and cash Equivalents

Note 17B: Trade and Other Receivables

5,170

Other receivables: GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office 1,505 2,575

C ontnbuiton receivable ACT State Governm ent 103 -

Ap p ro p ria tio n receivable (Special Account) 35,831 11,809

Total other receivables 37,438 14,384

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 37,438 14,384

Less: impairment allowance account: Goods and services - -

Other - -

Total impairment allowance account - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 37,438 14,384

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No m ore than 12 m onths 37,438 14,384

Total trade and other receivables (net) 37,438 14,384

Receivables were aged as follows: N ot overdue 37,438 14,384

Total receivables (gross) 37,438 14,384

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 18: ADMINISTERED - NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS 2012 $ *000

2011

$ *0 0 0

Inventories

Inventories held for distribution 301 231

Total inventories 301 231

Note:

During 2011-12, $334,829 of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense (2010-11: $90,875)

No items of inventory were recognised at fair value less cost to sell.

All inventory is expected to be distributed in the next 12 months.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 19 ADMINISTERED - PAYABLES

2012 2011

$*000 $ *00 0

Note 19A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals (1,167) (4,133)

Total suppliers (1,167) (4,133)

Supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities (1) -

External parties (1,166) (4,133)

Total (1,167) (4,133)

Total supplier Settlem ent was usually m ade w ith in 30 days.

(1,167) (4,133)

Note 19B: Grants Private sector: N o n -p ro fit organisations (1,414) -

Other (445) -

Total grants (1,859) -

Total grants - are expected to be settled in: No m ore than 12 m onths (1,859) -

M ore than 12 m onths - -

Total grants (1,859) -

Se ttlem ent was m ade according to the term s and co n d itio n s o f each grant

usually w ith in 30 days o f perform ance or eligibility.

Note 19C: Other Payabjes FM A Act s30A GST repayable to the OPA (1,257) (2,199)

GST Payable to the ATO (470) -

Total other payables (1,727) (2,199)

Total other payables are expected to be settled in: No m ore than 12 m onths (1,727) (2,199)

Total other payables (1,727) (2,199)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

2012 2011 $ O 00 $'000

NOTE 20: ADMINISTERED - CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities to Administered Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Schedule of administered cash flows 5,170

Schedule of administered assets and liabilities 5,170 Difference -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities: Net cost of services (27,111) (25,520)

Changes in assets / liabilities Decrease in net receivables 967 (2,575)

(Increase) in inventories (70) (231)

(Decrease) in supplier payables (637) _____ 4,133

Net cash used by operating activities (26,849) (24,193)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 21: ADMINISTERED CONTINGENT ASSETS & LIABILITIES

Quantifiable and Unquantifiable Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2012 AN PH A did not have any

adm inistered contingent assets or contingent liabilities. (2011: Nil)

Significant Remote Contingencies

For the period ending 30 June 2012 AN PH A did not have any significant

rem ote contingencies. (2011: Nil)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPOR *π 2011-2012

NOTE 22 ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS 2012 2011 $ *000 $000

Note 22A: Categories of Financial Instruments Loans and receivables: At fair value: Cash and cash equivalents 5,170 -

C o n tribu tio n receivable ACT Governm ent 103 -

Total 5,273 -

Carrying amount of financial assets 5,273 -

Financial Liabilities At fair value: Trade payables (1,167) (4,133)

Grant payables (1,859) -

Total (3,026) (4,133)

Carrying amount of financial liabilities (3,026) (4,133)

Note 22B: Credit Risk

AN PH A is exposed to m inim al credit risk as loans and receivables are

supported by signed contracts or agreem ents w ith other public sector

departm ents and are quantified by invoice. Trade payable values are set

by the m arket and validated by invoice. Grant payables are su p p o rte d by

signed funding agreem ents.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

The following table illustrates the entity's gross exposure to credit risk, excluding any collateral or credit enhancements.

NOTE 22: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS cont inued

2012 $'000

2011

$ '0 0 0

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 5,170 -

Trade receivables 103 -

Total5,273 -

Financial liabilities Trade payables (1,167) (4,133)

Grant payables (1,859) -

Total(3,026) (4,133)

AN PH A holds no collateral to m itig a te against risk.

Note 22C: Liquidity Risk ANPHA *s financial liabilities are payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that ANPHA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and mechanisms available to ANPHA (e.g. Advance to the Finance

Minister) and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

Note 22P: M arket Risk ANPHA's financial instruments are of a nature that does not expose them to market risk ANPHA is not exposed to *currency risk * or *other price risk*. ANPHA has no interest bearing items on the Balance Sheet.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 23: ADMINISTERED - FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION

Financial assets

Total financial assets as per schedule of administered assets and liabilities Less: non-financial instrument components GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office

Appropriation receivable (Special Account) Total non-financial instrument components Total financial assets as per financial instruments note

2012 $ '0 0 0

2011

$ '0 0 0

Notes

4 2,608 14,384

17B 1,505

35,831

2,575 11,809

37,336 14,384

5,273 -

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 <9

NOTE 24: APPROPRIATIONS

Total de pa rtm e nta l

D EPA R TM EN TA L

Ordinary annual services

A nnual A ppropriations

A ppropriation reduced

Ap p ro p ria tio n Ac t

2012 A ppropriations

Section 3 0 Section 31

FM A Ac t

1,041,410

1,041,410

Section 32

A ppropriation applied

in 2012 (current and

prior years)12'

7 ,6 9 4 .9 4 0

Variance

261,470

261,470

A D M IN ISTER ED

Total adm inistered

Ordinary annual services

A dm inistered item s

A nnual

A ppropriation

$'00 0

4 5,160

Ap p ro p ria tio n Act

A ppropriations

reduc e d111

$000

(4 8 0 )

AFM

S'OOO

2012 A ppropriations

Section 3 0

$'000

FMA Ac t

Section 31 Section 32 *Æ

$'000__________ S'OOO

12,303

Total

appropriation

S'000

6 0 ,7 9 9 6 0 ,7 9 9

A ppropriation a pplie d

in 2012 (c urrent and

prior years)

$000

60,799^ 6 0 ,7 9 9

Variance

$'000

Notes:

1. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No. 1) 2011-12: section 11. The Administered appropriation reduction of $480,000 reflects the transfer

of the Healthy Workplace Employer Awards from the Department of Health and Ageing to the Agency The Agency was appropriated funding for this

program via a Section 32 Determination which amended Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2011*12 and via Appropriation Act (No. 3) during the Portfolio Additional

Estimates. ANPHA made the Department of Finance and Deregulation aware of the duplicate funding and $480,000 of Appropriation Act (No 1) was

quarantined in 2011-12.

2 The following entities spend money from the CRF on behalf of this entity from an Official Account established for this purpose: Smartsalary Pty Limited

3 Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2011/16 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the Department of Health and Ageing

to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 25 August 2011. The effect of this determination was to transfer $11,823,000 of

administered appropriation from Outcome 1, from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1. at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2012/01 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the Department of Health and Ageing

to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 20 January 2012 The effect of this determination was to transfer $480,000 of

administered appropriation from Outcome 1, from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1, at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency.

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Notes:

1 Staff contributions of $110 were deposited in the Official Departmental Account. The $110 was not receipted in the

appropriation and cash management (ACM) module of the Central Budget Management System and is not reflected in the ACM

appropriation balance. Bank fees of $20 were deducted from the account leaving a year end balance of $90. The variance of

$1,790,366 reconciles with appropriation receivable of $1,790,276 and cash at bank of $90. The $110 was receipted in ACM in

August 2011.

2 The variance of $1,790,366 reflects GST exclusive payables of $1,402,846 to the Department of Health and Ageing, plus the

operating surplus of $387.520.

3. Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2010/41 - Section 32 (Transfer of functions from the

Department of Health and Ageing to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency) took effect on 1 January 2011. The effect

of this determination was to transfer $1,826,000 in Departmental appropriation and $33.803,000 in Administered appropriation

from Outcome 1. Program 1.6 Public Health, from the Department of Health and Ageing to Outcome 1. Program 1.1 Preventive

Health, at the Australian National Preventive Health Agency

NOTE 24: APPROPRIATIONS cont inued

Ta ble B: D e pa rtm e nta l a nd A dm inis te re d C a pita l B udge ts ( R e c ov e ra ble GST e x c lus iv e )

ANPHA does not have Departmental or Administered Capital Budgets.

Ta ble C: U ns pe nt A nnua l A ppropria tions ( R e c ov e ra ble GST e x c lus iv e ')

2 0 1 2 2011

Au thority $ $

DEPARTMENTAL

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2011-2012 Appropriation Act (No.1) 2010-2011

1 ,9 2 5 ,8 8 4

1.790.366

Total 1 ,9 2 5 ,8 8 4 1.790.366

2 0 1 2 2011

A uthority $ '0 0 0 $'000

A D M IN ISTER ED

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2011-12 4 8 0

Tota l 4 8 0 -

Ta ble 0 ; Spe c ia l A ppropria tions ('R e c ov e ra ble GST e x c lus iv e )

AN PH A does not have special appropriations,

Ta ble E: D is c los ure by A ge nt in R e la tion to A nnua l a nd Spe c ia l A ppropria tions ('R e c ov e ra ble GST e x c lus iv e ')

ANPHA did not make any agency payments in 2011-12 or 2010-11.

Ta ble F: R e duc tion in A dm inis te re d Ite m s ('R e c ov e ra ble GST e x c lus iv e ')

2011-12

A m ount r e quir e d1 - by A ppropria tion

A c t

Tota l a m ount

re quire d2

Tota l a m ount

a ppr opria te d5

Tota l

re duc tion *'

Ordina ry A nnua l Se rv ic e s A c t (N o.1 ) A c t (N o.3 )

Outcome 1 4 9 ,2 5 1 ,0 0 0 .0 0 8 ,2 1 2 ,0 0 0 .0 0 5 6 ,9 8 3 ,0 0 0 .0 0 5 7 ,4 6 3 ,0 0 0 .0 0 4 8 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0

Notes 1. Numbers in this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent.

2. Amount reauired as per Appropriation Act (Act I. s 11, Act 2, s 12).

3 Total amount appropriated in 2012

4 Total reduction effective in 2012- 2013

201 0 -1 1

A m ount re quire d1- by A ppropria tion

A c t

Tota l a m ount

re quire d1

Tota l a m ount

a ppropria te d5

Tota l

re duc tion4

Ordina ry A nnua l Se rv ice s A c t (N o.1 ) A c t (N o.3 )

Outcome 1 33,803.000.00 0.00 33.803,00000 33,803.00000 0 0 0

Notes 1. Numbers In this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent.

2 Amount reauired as per Appropriation Act (Act I s 11. Act 2 s 12)

3 Total amount appropriated in 2010-11.

4 Total reduction effective *π*Æ 2011-12

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 25: SPECIAL ACCOUNTS

Special Accounts (Recoverable GST exclusive)

The Australian National Preventive Health Agency Special Account

(Administered)1

2012 $'000

2011

$'000

Balance brought forward from previous period 11,809 -

Increases: Appropriation credited to special account 27,559 11,809

Contribution from Department of Health and Ageing 5,170

Contribution from NSW Government 500 -

Total increases 33,229 11,809

Available for payments 45,038 11,809

Decreases: Administered Payments made to suppliers (4,038) -

Payments made for employee costs - -

Total administered decreases (4,038) -

Total decreases (4,038) -

Total balance carried to the next period41,001 11,809

Note: 1 Appropriation: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 section 21.

2. Establishing Instrument: Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010. section 50

3. Purposes of the Account:

(a) paying or discharging the costs, expenses and other obligations incurred by the Commonwealth in the performance of the CEO's functions;

(b) paying any remuneration and allowances payable to any person under the Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 and

(c) meeting the expenses of administering the Account

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 26: COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTORY CONDITIONS FOR PAYMENTS FROM THE

CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND

Section 83 of the Constitution provides that no amount may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund except under an appropriation made by law. The Department of Finance and Deregulation provided information to all agencies in 2011 regarding the need for risk assessments in relation to compliance with statutory conditions on payments from special appropriations, including special accounts. This was not reported in the notes to ANPHA *s financial statements for 2010-11 as there were no payments made from the special account for that period.

During 2011-12, ANPHA developed a plan to review exposure to risks of not complying with statutory conditions on payments from appropriations. The plan involved:

" identifying each special appropriation and special account:

" determining the risk of non-compliance by assessing the difficulty of administering the statutory conditions and assessing the extent to which existing payment systems and processes satisfy those conditions;

" obtaining legal advice as appropriate to resolve questions of potential non-compliance.

At the completion of this reveiw ANPHA assessed the risk of not com plying with statutory conditions on payments from appropriations as low.

ANPHA identified one appropriation involving statutory conditions for payment:

- The ANPHA Special Account (Administered)

As at 30 June 2012 this work had been completed in respect of ANPHA's Special Account appropriation (representing $4,037,779 out of a total of $4,037,779 for expenditure on a cash basis in 2011-12). There were no payments from the Special Account in 2010-11.

The work conducted to date identified no issues of compliance with section 83 of the Australian Constitution.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 27: COMPENSATION AND DEBT RELIEF 2012 2011 $ $

Compensation and Debt Relief - Departmental No *Act of Grace payments' were expended during the reporting period.

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made.

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period.

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period.

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 during the reporting period,

Compensation and Debt Relief - Administered 2012 2011

$000 $000

No Act of Grace payments' were expended during the reporting period.

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made.

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period.

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period.

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 during the reporting period.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 28: REPORTING OF OUTCOMES The Australian National Preventive Health Agency contributes to one outcome as described in Note 11. All costs and revenues are attributed to this outcome.

Note 28A: Net Cost of Outcome Delivery

Outcome 1 Total

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ $ $ $

Departmental Expenses 6,706,034 1,478,590 6,706,034 1.478.590

Own-source income 42,000 40.no 42,000 40,110

Net cost of outcome delivery 6,664,034 1,438.480 6,664,034 1,438,480

Outcome 1 Total

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ *000 $'000 $ *000 $ *000

Administered Expenses (32,433) (25,520) (32,433) (25,520)

Own-source income 5,322 - 5,322 -

Net cost of outcome delivery (27,111) (25,520) (27,111) (25,520)

Note 28B: Major Classes of Departmental Expense, Income, Assets and Liabilities by

Outcome

Outcome 1

2012 2011

$ $

Total

2012 2011

$ $

Expenses Employee benefits 3,580,581 130,474 3,580,581 130.474

Suppliers 3,125,453 1.348,116 3,125,453 1.348,116

Total6,706,034 1.478,590 6,706,034 1,478.590

Income Other revenue - no - 110

Other gams 42,000 40.000 42,000 40,000

Total42,000 40.110 42,000 40,110

Assets Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 1,926 90 1,926 90

Trade and other receivables 2,216,414 1,920,828 2,216,414 1,920,828

Total 2,218,339 1.920,918 2,218,339 1,920,918

Liabilities Payables Suppliers (420,509) (1.521.545) (420,509) (1,521,545)

Other payables (156,429) (11.853) (156,429) (11,853)

Provisions Employee provisions (1,002,916) - (1,002,916) -

Total(1,579,854) (1,533,398) (1,579,854) (1.533,398)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 28: REPORTING OF OUTCOMES CONTINUED Note 28C: Major Classes of Administered Expenses, Income, Assets and Liabilities by

Outcome 1 Total

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ *0 0 0 $ 0 0 0 $ *0 0 0 $ '0 0 0

Expenses Suppliers (27,262) (25.520) (27,262) (25.520)

Grants (5,171) - (5,171) -

Total (32,433) (25.520) (32,433) (25,520)

Income Interest 20 - 20 -

Other revenue 5,303 - 5,303 -

Total5,322 - 5,322 -

Assets Cash and cash equivalents 5,170 - 5,170 -

Trade and other receivables 37,438 14,384 37,438 14.384

Inventories 301 231 301 231

Total42,909 14.615 42,909 14,615

Liabilities Suppliers 0,167) (4.133) 0,167) (4.133)

Grants (1,859) - (1,859) -

Other 0,727) (2.199) 0,727) (2,199)

Total(4,753) (6,332) (4,753) (6.332)

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NOTE 29: NET CASH APPROPRIATION ARRANGEMENTS 2012 2011 $ $

Total comprehensive income (loss) less depreciation/am ortisation expenses previously funded

through revenue appropriations * 250 ,96 6 387,520

Plus: dep reciation/am ortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation

Total com prehensive income - as per the Statem ent of Comprehensive Incom e 250 ,96 6 587,520

Note:

1. From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements, where revenue

appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital

budget provided through equity appropriations, Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period

when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

Promoting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NATIONAL PREVENTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAM

2011-12 GRANT RECIPIENTS ∑..

The successful projects are listed below.

YOUNG AUSTRALIANS ALCOHOL REPORTING SYSTEM

Steve Allsop, Curtin University, with the University of New South Wales and

In order to effectively respond to risky drinking among young people, we need enhanced information about the nature, patterns and contexts of use. By engaging with young people and ensuring their input, this can assist us to direct policy, prevention and treatment efforts. This project will develop an approach that will be trialled in Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales, in three metropolitan and one country area, with a view to national application thereafter. It will combine information from existing data sources with annual data gathering, targeting at-risk young people (16-19 years old) to provide:

* an early warning system on risky patterns of alcohol consumption, contexts of use and related harms that will also allow tracking of changes in use and harm over time; and,

" timely information on patterns of use and related problems to inform policy, prevention and treatment initiatives.

The establishment of structured target groups of young at-risk drinkers across three jurisdictions will also enable the future development and implementation of other key initiatives and satellite investigations such as assessment of the relationship of risky alcohol use to mental health disorders.

WHAT ROLES DO TIME, MONEY AND SOCIAL POSITION PLAY IN DRIVING PARTICIPATION IN A WORKPLACE HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM

Cathy Banwell. Australian National University $157,450 The study will investigate the temporal and financial barriers to participation in a workplace health promotion program in the ACT and how these barriers affect the participation of different social groups within the workplace. Its purpose is to help employers and employees overcome any barriers these costs impose so that workforce participation in health promotion programs is improved.

APPENDIX A

STEWARD OR NANNY STATE; CONSULTING THE PUBLIC ABOUT THE USE OF REGULATIONS AND LAWS TO ADDRESS CHILDHOOD OBESITY

25% of Australian children are now considered obese, compared to 21% in 1995. How should governments respond to this challenge, particularly concerning the introduction of regulations and laws that may reduce or prevent obesity in children? For example, should governments ban junk food advertising during children *s television, or enforce better labelling on children's foods?

Prom oting a Heathy Australia Z ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

The public debate around these issues is often polarised with some individuals and groups proposing that the government should avoid being a 'nanny state' and cease its intrusions into private life, and others suggesting that it should act as 'steward' and help to provide a healthy environment. The voice of ordinary citizens is rarely heard in this debate. We will systematically review the literature, analyse citizen discussion forums which discuss regulations and laws to prevent childhood obesity, survey the public on childhood obesity, and conduct a citizens' deliberative forum to answer the question: what regulations and laws, if any. are socially acceptable, ethically rigorous, legally sound, and cost-effective for the state to use in preventing childhood obesity in Australia?

THE PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF LIQUOR OUTLETS IN QUEENSLAND COMMUNITIES: OUTLET NUMBERS, ALCOHOL SALES AND ALCOHOL RELATED MORBIDITY

At least 40 potentially fatal conditions are caused in whole or in part by alcohol. These include various cancers, liver disease, falls, road injuries and assaults. Alcohol-related harms can be grouped according to the type of drinking patterns they are associated with. Short-term (acute) harms are most often associated with episodic excessive drinking while long-term (chronic) harms tend to be associated with ongoing high level average exposure to alcohol. It is unclear how the level of alcohol availability within a community may affect the risk of different types of alcohol-related conditions among local residents. This study will assess the association between numbers of licensed outlets, alcohol sales and alcohol-

related hospitalisations in local communities. This study will also be an international first, enabling investigation of the impact of numbers of licensed outlets on short and long-term alcohol-related harms within communities while taking into account the levels of alcohol sales made by liquor outlets.

IDENTIFYING SYSTEMIC DRIVERS OF THE USE OF EVIDENCE TO PREVENT OBESITY: A SERVICE MAPPING APPROACH

This project aims to identify some of the factors that enable or discourage the use of evidence by local policy makers and practitioners. It starts with a description of what is being done currently in the belief that understanding why things look the way that they do now will offer insights into how to do better in the future. The current array of activities

provides a way in to understanding some of the formal and informal system drivers, such as an organisation's attitude to risk, that constrain and shape policy and practice, and help or hinder the uptake of evidence. It also provides the logical starting point for thinking about what to do differently, suggesting where resources might be reallocated to increase effectiveness without increasing cost.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX A LIFESTYLE MEDIA MESSAGE-TESTING: FINDING THE KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL PUBLIC HEALTH CAMPAIGNS PROMOTING HEALTHY WEIGHT

This study will identify existing mass media campaigns promoting healthy weight, physical activity and healthy eating from Australia and internationally. Potentially persuasive advertisements in each of these three domains will be shortlisted based on

their concordance with content and executional characteristics known to exert beneficial influence in mass media advertising on other health topics (e g. smoking cessation). Shortlisted advertisements for each domain will then be tested with target audiences using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques. Persuasive features of advertisements promoting healthy weight, physical activity and healthy eating will identified. This information will be used to inform recommendations for developing and airing successful mass media campaigns on these health topics. The recommendations may identify existing campaigns with potential utility for airing to Australian audiences, or consist of a brief for developing successful advertising on these topics if development of new acvertisements is deemed the most appropriate strategy.

ONLINE FOOD AND BEVERAGE MARKETING TO CHILDREN AND

ADOLESCENTS

There is a growing body of evidence indicating that unhealthy food marketing impacts on childhood obesity, by influencing the food and drinks that children prefer, request and consume. Regulatory interventions to reduce children's exposure to this unhealthy food marketing have also been identified as a cost-effective obesity-prevention strategy. Children are exposed to unhealthy food marketing through many media channels, and increasingly this includes new media such as the Internet and viral marketing. These media channels are particularly salient forms of marketing to children, as 79% of Australian children access the Internet. This project will investigate how the rapid emergence and mass adoption of new media tools, including social networking websites, may be promoting unhealthy foods, influencing dietary choices and contributing to excessive weight gain. This research will explore how effective marketing regulations could be optimally designed to respond to the rapidly changing media landscape.

A COLLABORATIVE MODEL FOR COMBATING NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: COHERENCE BETWEEN REGULATION ON RISK FACTORS AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

Reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases (such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and chronic respiratory diseases) by addressing the key risk factors of tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy diet is a critical challenge for Australian health policy.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are now a global priority, with a High-Level Meeting of the UN General Assembly having been held in September 2011 and a review of progress scheduled in 2014.

Prom oting a Ithy Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

As Australia and other countries develop regulatory measures to combat the key risk factors, they are likely to face legal challenges under international trade and investment law from affected industries such as the tobacco industry, which have the potential to undermine public health initiatives. Through in-depth examination of relevant case law, statutes, regulations, treaties, international 'soft' law, and secondary literature, this project aims to clarify the role of international trade and investment law in this phenomenon to support the development of more effective and robust regulatory strategies for combating

NCD risk factors.

ALCOHOL ADVERTISING AND SPONSORSHIP IN AUSTRALIAN SPORT: ASSOCIATIONS WITH IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT ALCOHOL ATTITUDES AND DRINKING BEHAVIOUR

There is considerable debate in Australia, New Zealand and the UK as to whether a ban on alcohol advertising and sponsorship in sport is warranted. The present project will provide much needed evidence to this debate by examining whether alcohol advertising and sponsorship in Australian sport is related to unconscious (implicit) as well as conscious alcohol-related cognitions/thoughts and alcohol consumption. The research uses more rigorous and novel methods than used before, and will provide important evidence on the impact of alcohol advertising and sponsorship in sport and thus inform alcohol policy.

A COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE MODEL IN SUPPORTING REMOTE RETAIL STORE PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Stores in remote communities have a unique role in delivering preventive health promotion strategies by influencing the primary food supply with positive impacts on indigenous health. Past initiatives have been limited and generally not sustained and therefore health status remains well below the average for Australia. Promoting and making use of evidence-based strategies of effective nutrition promotion in retail outlets, will improve

Indigenous health outcomes through improvements in the food supply from remote Indigenous community stores. Supporting public health nutritionists working in the remote food retail sector, to be able to create sustainable and effective change in the foods in remote stores is key to success. This study will provide a model for workforce development, building much needed evidence and opportunities to sustain improved nutrition and health in remote communities and in addition increase the attraction and retention of public health nutritionists in remote Australia.

THE IMPACT OF OBESITY PREVENTION POLICY ON SOCIAL INEQUALITIES IN OBESITY

The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased greatly in Australia over the past few decades. Government and non-government organisations are calling for wide-ranging policy to prevent obesity, and work is ongoing to evaluate the potential effectiveness of such strategies.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX A Obesity is known to be socially patterned in Australia, with those living with greater disadvantage more likely to be overweight and obese. However, little is known about the potential impact of obesity prevention strategies on this social gradient in obesity. Some strategies may be more likely to work in those with higher socio-economic position, widening the difference between social strata, while others may be more likely to narrow this difference. In this project we aim to evaluate the likely impact of potential obesity prevention policies on this social distribution of overweight and obesity, and to identify strategies more likely to decrease the difference in obesity prevalence between social strata.

DRINKING PATTERNS, REGULATION AND MARKET INFLUENCES IN AUSTRALIA: THE INTERNATIONAL ALCOHOL CONTROL SURVEY

This project involves a large-scale survey of drinking in Australia, with a particular focus on collecting data from heavy drinkers. The project will collect data on drinking, alcohol purchasing, policy attitudes and a range of other relevant issues and respondents will be

re-interviewed to assess changes in these behaviours over time. The study will provide data not previously available in Australia that can be used to better inform alcohol policy by: 1) assessing the impact of any policy changes on drinking, purchasing and harm, 2) estimating the impact of alcohol price on sub-groups of Australian drinkers and 3) measuring stability and change in heavy drinking behaviour over time.

CREATING CHILDCARE ENVIRONMENTS SUPPORTIVE OF CHILD OBESITY PREVENTION EFFECTIVENESS OF AN INTENSIVE POPULATION BASED DISSEMINATION INTERVENTION

Supporting childcare services to implement policies and practices which encourage children to eat healthily and be physically active has the capacity to make an important contribution in reducing the health burden of excessive weight gam in childhood. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an intensive, population-based intervention in increasing the physical activity and healthy eating policies and practices of childcare services.

The study will recruit 200 NSW preschools and long day care services to participate in the study. The childcare services will be randomised to receive the intensive intervention, or a usual health promotion service support comparison group. The intensive intervention will consist of multiple strategies including staff training, incentives, executive support, performance feedback, resources and ongoing support information will be collected about healthy eating and physical activity service policies and practices before and after the intervention to assess the effectiveness of the initiative.

The intervention will be the first of its kind internationally and will provide valuable information for health promotion policy makers and practitioners on ways to support services create environments more supportive of child obesity prevention.

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

NATIONAL BINGE DRINKING STRATEGY COMMUNITY LEVEL

INITIATIVES (CLI) THIRD GRANTS ROUND RECIPIENTS

Almost $10 million has been allocated nation-wide to projects designed to combat binge drinking by young people aged 12 to 24 years in this third round of CLI grants- part of the National Binge Drinking Strategy.

The successful projects are listed below.

APPENDIX B

Location of Project Project

Alice Springs Gap Youth Centre Aboriginal Corporation (NT) - $500,000

Western Australia David Wirrpanda Foundation Inc. (WA) - $500,000

Off The Street The project will provide a safe alcohol-free entertainment venue for young people on Saturday nights in Alice Springs.

Gwabba Yorga - Gabba Warra The program is aimed at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls 12-17 years engaged through netball competitions in

Perth and a number of regional Western Australian towns,

Melbourne The Salvation Army Melbourne Project 614 (VIC) - $495,000

Youth Street Teams The project will employ a multi-faceted early intervention approach to address high-risk activities and the harms associated with young people binge drinking in Melbourne's Central Business District.

Darwin Anglicare NT (NT) - $300,000

Imagine, Create, Inspire The project is an innovative youth engagement and awareness project using peer education strategies and social media to encourage healthier behaviours in Darwin and Palmerston.

Normanton and Karumba Carpentaria Shire Council (OLD) - $493,000

Carpentaria Shire Interagency Binge Drinking Working Group - Community Initiative to Combat Binge Drinking in Youth project. The project will strengthen agency and community networks in Normanton and Karumba to increase participation in social, cultural and sporting activities.

Victoria Incolink (VIC) - $300,000 Drink Safe Mate The project will target 8.000 young workers in the Victorian

building and construction industry through health education and capacity building approaches.

Queenland Queensland Remote Aboriginal Media Aboriginal Corporation (QLD) - $255,610

In Our Own Words: young people working together to address binge drinking in remote Aboriginal communities in Queensland project. The project will being young Indigenous peop e from remote Cape York and Gulf of Carpentaria communities together to produce a series of radio programs for their local communities addressing the issues of binge drinking.

Prom oting a A ustralia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 Prom oting a A ustralia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-201?

APPENDIX B Location of Project Project

Marion and Southern Collaborative Response to Binge Drinking

Onkaparinga The project will provide alcohol-free events and use

Re-Engage Youth Services social media to deliver health promotion messages in the (SA) - $497,445 communities of Marion and Onkaparinga.

Mitchell Shire LGA, Whenever You're Likely To Drink

Broadford, Wallan, The project aims to develop a coordinated community Seymour response to raise awareness of the health risks caused by

Mitchell Community Health binge drinking in the Hume communities of Broadford, Service (VIC) - $500,000 Wallan and Seymour.

Melton, Taylors Hill Saturday Nights!! Live!! Melton Shire Council (VIC) The program will provide a weekly range of alcohol-free - $287282 events for young people in the Melton and Taylors Hill communities while using peer educators to raise awareness

of the harms associated with binge drinking.

Australian Capital Territory The Youth Coalition of the ACT (ACT) - $490,594

Champions ACT The project will increase awareness of alcohol related harm in young people who access entertainment precincts and licensed venues across Canberra.

Kalgoorlie ∑ Boulder stronger Communities Eastern Goldfields YMCA The project will provide a whole of community preventive Inc (WA) - $424,879 approach to binge drinking in Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

Mareeba Mareeba Young and Awesome: makin * music, makin'

Mulungu Aboriginal moves, makin' over and makin * out

Corporation Medical The project will provide a wide range of community activities Centre (OLD) - $280,908 and skills development for young Indigenous Australians in this rural Queensland community.

Wyndham Ngnowar Aerwah Aboriginal Corporation (WA) - $300,000

Wyndham Youth Reconnect The project will target at-risk local youth by providing health education programs and alternative recreation activities.

Kelso, Bathurst and surrounding areas Bathurst Regional Council (NSW) - $495,071

SMARTS - Smashed Arts The program will engage young people in the Bathurst region by providing health education messages and alternative entertainment opportunities.

St Marys, Penrith, Mount D ruitt CuriousWorks (NSW) - $95,439

Western Sydney Alcohol Awareness Video Initiative The project will provide education and skills training for young people in the Penrith area as they develop and produce videos promoting the harms of binge drinking for their peers.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Location of Project Project

Adelaide Adelaide City Council (5A) - $151,018

Green Team West End Youth

The project will extend the voluntary street outreach program currently conducted during Schoolies Week at Victor Harbour to a Saturday night presence in Adelaide's CBD.

Victoria Multicultural Centre for Women's Health (VIC) - $492,267

Healthy Lives, Healthy Futures

The project takes a community development approach across Victoria to improve the capacity of young people from immigrant and refugee backgrounds to reduce their risk of alcohol-related harm.

Cloncurry, Mt Isa Cloncurry PCYC (OLD) - $278,981

Chill Out The project will provide a local solution to binge drinking in Cloncurry and Mt Isa through health awareness sessions and sporting and recreation activities.

National Mushroom Marketing Pty Ltd (National) - $500,000

Live Solution - Have A Better Time With Live Music The project will promote the enjoyment of a better live music experience by avoiding binge drinking.

Miranda and Hurstville Shire Wide Youth Services Inc (NSW) - $500,000

Be A Smarty When You Party The project aims to reduce binge drinking through the provision of street outreach, alcohol free activities and events, and drop-in support services in the Sutherland and St George areas.

New South Wales Youthsafe (NSW) - $556,678

Resilience building approach to the prevention and management of binge drinking among young workers

The project will develop, deliver and evaluate a resilience- based binge drinking program of preventive resources and training to support apprentices and trainees in both work and community settings across Sydney, the Hunter and Far Northern NSW.

Palm Island, Barcaldine and Magnetic Island Australian Red Cross (QLD) - $300,000

Binge on Life Program The program aims to provide alternative arts activities for youth on Palm Island and Central West communities to tackle the issue of binge drinking.

Grafton, South Grafton, Copmanhurst, Coutts Crossing, Yamba and Wool! Clarence Valley Council (NSW) - $497,790

Eyes Wide The project will bring together young people, local service providers and health agemces in a model responsive to a dispersed population with limited youth services in Grafton and the regional towns of the Clarence Valley.

Pro m o tin g a Healths Au s tra lia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 Pro m o tin g a Au s tra lia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX B Location of Project Project

Leeton, Griffith, Narrandera Leeton Shire Council (NSW) - $440,462

: Bidgee Binge

The project is an interactive, multi-faceted program aimed at reducing binge drinking among young people in the Leeton. Griffith and Narrandera areas.

Glenorchy (w ith national applicability) Glenorchy City Council (TAS) - $248,637

Interactive Online The project will use social media to inform and education young people on the risks and consequences of bring drinking.

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX C STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY (INCORPORATING INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES)

JUNE 2012

A. Stakeholder Engagem ent Strategy

I. INTRODUCTION

1. Effective, comprehensive engagement is essential to the Australian National Preventive Health Agency's (ANPHA) vision for a healthy Australian society, where the promotion of health is embraced by every sector, valued by every individual and includes everybody.

2. ANPHA has developed and adopted this strategy in order to actively inform, promote and guide engagement as a means to achieving the vision, mission and strategic goals adopted in ANPHA *s Strategic Plan 2011-15.1

3. The support, advice and guidance that engagement provides enables ANPHA to deliver on its mission to be a catalyst for strategic partnerships, including the provision of technical advice and assistance to all levels of government, to promote health and reduce health risk and inequalities and to initiate actions to promote health across the entire Australian community,1

4. This strategy will guide ANPHA *s engagement with the diverse range of organisations and individuals who can affect - or be affected by - ANPHA's work. As a small organisation, ANPHA will need to make the best use of its time and resources, and of other people's time,

by engaging effectively and efficiently with its stakeholders.

5. This strategy sets out how ANPHA will engage with others to inform action and advice, build strategic partnerships and to support disease prevention and health promotion efforts throughout the Australian community.

II. ANPHA-ENGAGEMENT AND BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

6. Engagement is a two-way process that creates opportunities for ANPHA and its stakeholders to draw on each other *s knowledge and capacity, share lessons, and build partnerships and support for effective disease prevention and health promotion efforts that

can then positively affect health behaviours throughout Australia.

7. Through engagement. ANPHA seeks to harness the best evidence and practice knowledge available, with a focus on innovative practice and new evidence, in order to disseminate it and use it, to achieve ANPHA *s goals and planned results. ANPHA aims to share this evidence and knowledge as a standard part of its work so the broader prevention community has guided access to it. This will encourage awareness and adoption of effective prevention policy and programs, as well as prompting national dialogue around these topics.

8. By developing partnerships and collaborations, ANPHA will broker and add value to the scaling up of evidence-based effort.

Prom oting a Health∑, Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX C III. IDEN TIFYING OUR STAKEHOLDERS \

9. ANPHA needs to engage stakeholders at a national, state and local level, across all levels and portfolios of government, the health system, research community, industry, media and Non-Government Organisation (NGO) and community sectors. Many of these groups already make a significant contribution to population-based disease prevention and health

promotion effort.

10. ANPHA recognises and understands that there is a diversity of interests and influences, including, but not limited to. those represented below:

" Government at all levels and across a range of portfolios has decision-making and funding powers critical to ANPHA's work. They are also large employers that can provide leadership in supporting healthy workplaces and workforces.

- The Australian Government has a key role as a leader, policy-maker, legislator and funder. The Health Minister is a key stakeholder, as is the Department of Health and Ageing, other federal Health Portfolio agencies, Treasury and other Australian Government departments and agencies.

- State and territory governments provide services, initiate preventive health programs and policies and have statutory and funding powers within their jurisdictions. The Standing Council on Health (convening the health ministers from all jurisdictions) and its subsidiary committees will be an im portant mechanism for engagement, as will cross jurisdictional working groups such as the Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs and Australian Health Ministers * Advisory Council committees.

- Local governments control local amenities and environments and partner with local community organisations. The Australian Local Government Association and state peak bodies are also important contact points.

" Health service agencies, particularly those that are involved in primary health care (such as Medicare Locals and Aboriginal community-controlled health services), as well as secondary providers, have im portant opportunities to initiate and support prevention with individual patients and to be a partner in population focused-programs in the communities in which they operate.

" Industry, incorporating a diverse range of entities within and beyond the health sector, is a key stakeholder in building a healthy nation. The objectives and principles for ANPHA's engagement with industry are expanded on in Section B of this paper.

" Research associated bodies, both Australian and international, are sources of evidence, expertise and innovation. They include academia, respected expert national and international entities, and research and development corporations.

" Health promotion foundations, public health advocacy bodies and peak health organisations and alliances including state-based foundations and public health bodies. These are experienced partners whose existing programs and influence will provide opportunities to extend and promote efforts across Australia

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

" Non-Government and community-based organisations, including entities not specifically focused on health, such as sporting clubs, schools, unions, special interest groups, organisations considering gender-based health issues, assisting people with a disability or those living in remote or regional Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups and other groups that have the potential to reach large numbers of people in their daily lives. Other entities, including cultural and faith-based organisations, can facilitate education and associated programs and build an operational culture that supports healthy living and choices.

" Workplaces, workforce development groups and employers across the spectrum of large corporate organisations to small business, and office-based and remote (such as mines transport, tourism and road safety) are also important as ANPHA embraces a settmgs- based approach to partnerships that supports prevention and health promotion.

" Professional associations, including those representing the health professions and health services which have an interest in the capabilities of health professionals *particularly in the area of preventive health and the effectiveness of their training to this end

" The media has a powerful role in educating and influencing culture and opinion and will be a key partner in ANPHA's strategic communications, including social marketing programs and other health promotion aspects of ANPHA's work.

" Consumers and consumer advocacy and representative bodies such as the many groups and organisations working in. or with an interest in, preventive health. ANPHA sees all Australians, regardless of age, health status, physical ability and region of residence or work, as the ultimate consumer and beneficiary of its work. For particular aspects of ANPHA *s work that targets specific consumer groups in the Australian community (e.g. smokers targeted through the National Tobacco Campaign or rural and remote communities), ANPHA will use professional market testing and research processes to ensure appropriateness and efficacy of its campaigns and messages.

IV. PRINCIPLES UNDERPINNING ANPHA *S STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

11. ANPHA's engagement activity will be:

" committed to ensuring stakeholders can inform and contribute to strategic goals

" focussed on ANPHA's strategic goals and will be clear about what is to be achieved

" fit for purpose and proportionate in scope and scale to the purpose of the engagement

" timely so that opportunities to influence and support ANPHA's work are maximised

" open, transparent and accountable, ensuring that no group has undue influence or access, and that a record of discussions and other engagement is maintained

" cost effective, using resources and time to make a difference

" professional and undertaken with integrity and respect for all parties, by placing a high value on the way ANPHA engages and listens and to build stakeholder confidence in its

role

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APPENDIX C " targeting engagement to the needs of stakeholders

" inclusive of a large range of stakeholders

" coordinated cross-jurisdictional approach to engagement

V, HOW WE WILL ENGAGE

12. ANPHA will engage at a number of different levels to maximise the value of the engagement for all parties to achieve the desired outcomes. The forms of engagement will include;

" information sharing - to provide information about ANPHA and its work and to learn about the work of others. This will be achieved through forums and meetings and the information shared will be used by ANPHA to provide issue-based, evidence-informed information and briefings, including to governments and the media, develop targeted information for a diverse range of sectors and communities and to contribute to community-based forums on topics related to disease prevention and health prom otion * particularly in the areas of obesity, alcohol and tobacco

" consultation - to solicit opinions and expert advice about specific areas of ANPHA's work and about the potential, or actual, impact of policies and programs it seeks to promote

" involvement - to engage stakeholders to become part of the development of a healthier Australia, by learning from their views and expertise and to support them to bring about change

" collaboration - to partner with other entities in decision-making, strategy planning and program design and to build relationships with entities or individuals that have particular expertise or comparative advantage in the field of interest and where there is alignment towards common or complementary goals

" empowerment - to support others to take decisions that contribute to building the shared vision for a healthy Australia

13. The form of engagement will vary according to the piece of work ANPHA is undertaking and will be tailored to the scope and scale of that work, While seeking comprehensive engagement to ensure ANPHA's work is well informed and positioned, ANPHA will also ensure all consultation is focused, fit for purpose and cost effective. Examples of engagement include the call for submissions on issues papers, input into national forums and involvement with ANPHA activities.

14. The ANPHA Advisory Council2 will review ANPHA's consultation work on a regular basis. ANPHA's Expert Committees, in a range of technical areas, will provide advice on specific consultation plans,2

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B. Industry Engagem ent

VI. THE CONTEXT FOR INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

15. ANPHA's engagement with industry13 sits within ANPHA's broad engagement strategy. Transparent, appropriate and ethical engagement with relevant industries is important for ANPHA to advance its strategic goals. By clearly articulating its industry engagement strategy. ANPHA acknowledges that industry engagement brings particular knowledge and expertise to the effort to promote health. ANPHA acknowledges that while there are areas of shared interest, there will also be areas in which there are inherent conflicts of interest.

16. ANPHA aims to foster a more conscious health focus within industry and. where possible, to achieve industry buy-in to the vision of a healthy Australia ANPHA recognises that many companies and organisations take their responsibilities and role in Australian lives seriously and are already demonstrating this through a strong corporate social responsibility focus in their business activities and policies.

17. ANPHA acknowledges that the means of achieving its public health objectives will at times be fundamentally different to the aims of some industry groups. There are many areas of common interest between ANPHA and industry, as well as areas where consensus is not likely to be achieved. Both ANPHA and industry need clear expectations about how ANPHA will engage so that engagement is transparent, open to scrutiny and does not mislead any

partners.

18. ANPHA's vision for a healthy Australian society involves reshaping consumer demand towards healthy living choices. Effective communication between ANPHA and industry as a stakeholder group will be important to ensure there is a consistent understanding of the evidence-base for particular actions and so that there is no misunderstanding about the potential opportunities for. and impacts on. industry.

19. Given the priorities in ANPHA *s Strategic Plan 2011-15, the priorities for industry engagement will be those with industries that have a potential impact on reducing obesity, tobacco use and harmful alcohol consumption. The scientific evidence and programmatic experience shows that the major risk factors for chronic disease that can be modified by ANPHA's strategic goals are tobacco smoking, harmful alcohol use, poor dietary behaviours, physical inactivity and unhealthy weight.

20. Tobacco. For engagement with the tobacco industry, ANPHA refers to the guiding principles of WHO *s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), to which Australia is a signatory, which relate to the protection of tobacco control from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry. Specifically, the FCTC Guiding Principles are:

" Principle 1: There is a fundamental and irreconcilable conflict between the tobacco industry's interest and public health policy interests.

" Principle 2: Parties when dealing with the tobacco industry or those working to further its interests should be accountable and transparent.

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<2>

" Principle 3: Parties should require the tobacco industry, and those working to further its interests, to operate and act in a manner that is accountable and transparent.

´%† Principle 4: Because its products are lethal, the tobacco industry should not be granted incentives to establish or run its businesses.c

21 The FCTC further recommends that:

" Parties should interact with the tobacco industry only when and to the extent strictly necessary to enable them to effectively regulate the tobacco industry and tobacco products.

" Where interactions with the tobacco industry are necessary, parties should ensure that such interactions are conducted transparently. Whenever possible, interactions should be conducted in public, for example through public hearings, public notice of interactions or disclosure of records of such interactions to the public.

" The tobacco industry should not be a partner in any initiatives linked to setting or implementing public health polices, given that its interests are in direct conflict with the goals of public health.6

22. ANPHA intends to apply these WHO principles and recommendations in full, ANPHA will not convene a meeting with the tobacco industry unless ANPHA's CEO believes the implementation of specific tobacco control measures requires such a meeting. While ANPHA has no expectations or plans for work that will justify such a meeting, it is intended that ANPHA will not meet with the tobacco industry without providing prior written advice to the Minister for Health and by publishing prior advice on its website.

VII. OBJECTIVES OF INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

23. ANPHA's objectives of engaging with industry include:

" increased understanding of each party's issues:

- a better understanding within ANPHA of industry's perspectives, available knowledge and program experience

- an opportunity for all parties to share information on preventive health issues

" encouraging action by industry to address public health harms

" seeking feedback from industry on the potential impact of different approaches to health promotion measures, acknowledging that there may not be consensus about measures proposed, either within industries, or between industry groups and ANPHA

" consulting with industry about implementation issues that may need to be considered in relation to new approaches

" sharing (and scaling up) good, evidence-based ideas and lessons learnt, e.g. about positive spin-offs for industry in health promotion or healthy workforce programs

" collaborating on strategies such as complementary consumer messaging and marketing strategies

APPENDIX C

Promoting a He,ih Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

VIII. IDEN TIFYING INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS

24 ANPHA will engage with industry at both the individual company and the industry association level as appropriate.

25. A diverse range of companies or industry bodies can affect or be affected by the creation of a healthy Australian society. Given its limited time and resources. ANPHA's focus is on engaging with organisations that are influential in terms of market share or

representative of particular segments of industry. These particular groups or segments include:

" National and multi-national companies that have significant penetration into the Australian market-place, providing product development, retail stores, fast food/ restaurant outlets, entertainment (e.g. sport), energy, agricultural, horticultural and automotive industries. Many large companies combine product development with retail and marketing functions across a number of sectors

" Industry associations are usually formed around the common interests of a particular segment of products or retail settings

" Health services and corporate health and health insurance industries share many objectives with ANPHA, including support for chronic disease prevention and management

" The media, advertising and marketing industries interact with all relevant industry bodies, as well as the not-for-profit and government sectors, to market products

IX. PRINCIPLES AN D PROCEDURES TO GUIDE INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

26 The principles identified in ANPHA's broad engagement strategy also apply to engagement activity with industry. This means engagement activity will be focussed and clear, fit for purpose, timely, open, transparent and accountable, cost effective and professional.

27, The following additional principles and procedures guide ANPHA's engagement with industry:

" ANPHA will consult with and seek feedback from segments of industry that might be impacted by new approaches under consideration, to ensure that a diversity of views are considered and presented;

" conflicts of interest, real or perceived, will be noted and recorded in all dealings

" ANPHA will be explicit about points of difference with industry openly stating when it is necessary to agree to disagree. Meeting minutes and other records of interactions will record these differences, including the details of each group's perspective

" ANPHA will provide industry stakeholders with adequate advance notice of meetings and forums

Promoting a .ill Australia ' ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 &

APPENDIX C " any information of a commercial-in-confidence nature that comes into ANPHA's possession will be respected by ANPHA and handled accordingly, subject of course to the Agency's statutory context (the Australian National Preventive Health Agency

Act 2010, the Auditor-General Act 1997 and the Freedom o f Information Act 1982, in particular)

1 Australian National Preventive Health Agency 2011. Strategic Plan 2011-15 Canberra.

2 The ANPHA Advisory Council is appointed by the Minister for Health and includes members with expertise relating to preventive health, as well as a member representing the Commonwealth and members representing the States and Territories. The list of current members can be found at www.anpha.gov.au

3 ANPHA's Expert Committees are appointed by the CEO under ANPHA's enabling Act The current committees and membership can be found at. www.anpha.gov.au

4 ANPHA considers "industry" to include the entities and persons involved in commercial enterprise.

5 WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Guidelines for implementation of Article 5.3 on the protection

of public health policies with respect to tobacco control from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry, (http://www.who.int/fctc/guidelines/article_S_3.pdf)

6 World Health Organization 2005. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. A56/8. Geneva: WHO Available

at http://www.who.int/fctc/text_downfoad/en/index.html

Promoting a He ill Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

APPENDIX D AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2011-12

Actual available

appropriation for 2011-12 $00 0

Payments

made in

2011-12 $00 0

Ordinary Annual Services Departm ental Appropriation Prior year departm ental appropriation' 1.790 1,790

Departm ental appropriation2 7,956 5,905

Total 9,746 7,695

Administered expenses Adm inistered appropriation3 60,799 60,799

Total 60,799 60,799

Total ordinary annual services A 70,545 68,494

Total available annual appropriations and payments 70,545 68,494

Special Accounts Opening balance Appropriation receipts Non-appropriation receipts to Special Accounts4

Payments made

1*ä,809 27,559

5,670

4,038

Total Special Account B 45,038 4,038

Total resourcing A+B 115.583 72,532

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to Special Accounts through annual appropriations 27,559 27,559

Total net resourcing and payments for ANPHA 88,024 44,973

1 Appropriation Bill (No.l) 2010-11 and relevant FMA Act section 31 receipts.

2 Appropriation Bill (No.l) 2011-12 and relevant FMA Act section 31 receipts.

3 Appropriation Bill (No.l) 2011-12, Appropriation Bill (No.3) 2011-1, and 2011-12 FMA Act section 30

returns.

4 Non- appropriation receipts reflects $5,170,000 from the Department of Health and Ageing and

$500,000 from the NSW State Government.

Promoting a Australia' ANNUAL REPORT 2011-201/ *

AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2011-12

Expenses and Resources for Outcome 1

Outcom e 1: A reduction in the prevalence o f preventable disease, including through research and evaluation to build the evidence base for future action,, and by m anaging lifestyle education campaigns and developing partnerships w ith non-governm ent sectors.

APPENDIX D

Variation

Program 1.1: Preventive Health Adm inistered expenses Ordinary Annual Services (Appropriation Bill No.1 and No.3)

Special Accounts

Departm ental expenses Departm ental appropriation 6,957 6,706 251

Total for Program 1.1 63,960 39,139 24,821

2010-11_________ 2011-12

Average Staffing Level (number)** 0 35.23

%† Full year budget, including addition of $20,000 to administered for delayed BAS refund interest and $42,000 to departmental for audit services received free of charge.

# The variation in administered expenses between $27,628 and $27,559 which was transferred to the Special Account reflects the movement in inventory which is recognised on the balance sheet rather than the income statement. In 2011-12 the movement was $69,000.

'* With the exception of the CEO the Agency was staffed by secondees in 2010-11. The Agency implemented its own industrial instrument on 29 August 2011.

Budget * 2011-12 $000 (a)

57,003

Actual 2011-12

$000 (b)

29,375 3,058

2011-12 $000 (a)-(b)

27,628 - 3,058

Prom oting a Healthy Australia / ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

Specific Requirem ents Letter of transmittal ii

Table of contents ill

Index 151

Glossary and Abbreviations 148

Contact offtcer(s) I.C

Internet home page address and Internet address for report I.C

Review by CEO Summary of significant issues and developments 2

Overview of Agency's performance and financial results 2

Outlook for following year 3

Significant issues and developments - portfolio N/A

Agency Overview Role and functions 10

Organisational structure 13

Outcome and program structure 40

Where outcome and program structures differ from

PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills

(other portfolio statements), details of variation and

reasons for change

N/A

Report on Perform ance Review of performance during the year in relation to programs and contribution to outcomes 40

Actual performance in relation to deliverables and KPIs set

out in PB Statements

40-56

Where performance targets differ from the PBS details of

both former and new targets, and reasons for the change N/A

Narrative discussion and analysis of performance 40-56

Trend information N/A

Significant changes in nature of principal functions/ N/A

services

Performance of purchaser/provider arrangements N/A

Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives 61

Social inclusion outcomes 65

Performance against service charter customer service

standards, complaints data, and the department's response

to complaints

N/A

Discussion and analysis of the Agency's financial

performance

Discussion of any significant changes from the prior year, from budget or anticipated to have a significant impact on

future operations.

N/A

Promoting a althy Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS Part of Report Description Page

R eport on Perform ance Agency resource statement and summary resource tables 145-146 continue d by outcomes

Management & Accountability - Corporate Governance

Management & Accountability - External Scrutiny

Management & Accountability - Management of Human Resources

Management & Accountability - Assessment of effectiveness of assets

management

Agency heads are required to certify that their agency jj

comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Statement of the main corporate governance practices in 58-59 place

Names of the senior executives and their responsibilities 14

Senior management committees and their roles 58-59

Corporate and operational planning and associated 25-38 performance reporting and review

Approach adopted to identifying areas of significant 61 financial or operational risk

Policy and practices on the establishment and maintenance 61 of appropriate ethical standards

How nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers is 63 determined

Significant developments in external scrutiny 60-61

Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals 6 0

Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee 60 or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing 62

human resources to achieve Agency objectives

Workforce planning, staff turnover and retention n /A

Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements. 63

individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs). determinations, common law contracts and AWAs

Training and development undertaken and its impact 64

Work health and safety performance 64

Productivity gains n /A

Statistics on staffing 63

Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs. determinations, 63 common law contracts and AWAs

Performance pay 63

Assessment of effectiveness of assets management 66

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

Part of Report Description Page

Management and Assessment of purchasing against core policies and 66

Accountability - principles Purchasing

Management and Accountability - Consultants

Management and Accountability - ANAO access clauses

Management and Accountability - Contracts exempt from

the AusTender

Financial Statem ents 69

Other M andatory Work health and safety (schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work 64-6 5

Inform ation Health and Safety Act 2011)

Advertising and Market Research (section 311A of the 67-68

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 ) and statement on advertising campaigns

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental 6 8

performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 )

Compliance with the Agency's obligations under the Carer N/A

Recognition Act 2010

Grant programs 67

Disability reporting - explicit and transparent reference to 65 agency level information available through other reporting

mechanisms

Information Publication Scheme statement 62

List of Requirements 147

Note:

I.C: Inside Cover

N/A- Not Applicable for the Agency

The annual report must include a summary statement

detailing the number of new consultancy services contracts

let during the year, the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive

of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts

that were active in the reporting year; and the total

actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing

consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The annual

report must include a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the

AusTender website.

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the 66

Auditor-General

Contracts exempt from AusTender 66

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

GLOSSARY & ABBREVIATIONS

AHMC

AHMAC

AML Alliance

ANAO

ANPHA

ANPHA Act

CGGs

COAG

DOHA

FMA Act

FMA Regulations

FOI Act

HWA

NBDS

NGO

NHHRC

NHMRC

NPAPH

PHIDU

Public Service Act

' - '

Australian Bureau of Statistics j ^ *

Australian Health Ministers' Conference

Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council

Australian Medicare Locals Alliance

Australian National Audit Office

Australian National Preventive Health Agency

Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2070

Australian Public Service

Chief Executive Officer Commonwealth Grants Guidelines

Community Level Initiatives

Council of Australian Governments

Community Sponsorship Fund Department of Health and Ageing

Financial Management ana Accountability Act 1997

Financial Management and Accountability Regulations 1997

Freedom o f information Act 1982

Health Workforce Australia

information and communications technology

National Binge Drinking Strategy

Non-government organisation

National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission

National Health and Medical Research Council

National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health

National Tobacco Campaign

Public Health Information Development Unit University of Adelaide

Public Service Act 1999

btan ling Coi n a.il m Health

ALPHABETICAL INDEX A abbreviations 150 advertising and market research 67-8 Advisory Council 3,14, 15-16, 25. 27, 54

members 17-21 Agency Resource Statement 145-146 alcohol advertising 43 alcohol consumption 2, 32-3

curb harmful 43-7 Expert Committee on Alcohol (EGA) 22, 54

first year highlights 5 foetal alcohol spectrum 26 Alcohol Policy and Tobacco Control 14 Anderson, Professor Ian 22 asset management 66 Audit Committee 59-60 Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) 28, 30. 53, 56 Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council (AHMAC) 18, 25, 55, 138 Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) 59 access clauses 66 Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) CEO's review 2-3 establishment 10 financial results 2 functions 10 governance framework 14-23 highlights 4-8 management and accountability 58-68 mission 9 organisational structure 13 outcomes and program structure 12 outlook 3 overview 10-23 performance reporting 40-56 role 10 strategic goals 11 values 12 vision 9 Australian National Preventive Health Agency Act 2010 2,10. 25

B Bauman, Professor Adrian 23 Bennett, Christine 15,16,17 Boustead, Rebecca 23 Bowen, Dr Shelley 22 business continuity and disaster management 61

Butler MP, the Hon. David 14 Butt, David 15,16,18 Butt Out at Work campaign 6

C Calma, Dr Tom 23 capacity building (goal 5) 11, 37 prevention and health promotion

workforce systems 37 quality improvement 37 case studies community level initiatives 46

My QuitBuddy iphone app 50

National Symposium on Social Marketing for Obesity Prevention 53 Caterson, Professor Ian 23 Causes and Prevention of Obesity Stakeholder Partnership Seminar 7 Chapman, Professor Simon 23 Chee, Donna Ah 22 Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 14 review 2-3 Chikritzhs, Professor Tanya 22 chronic disease 2 collaboration 12 Commonwealth Ombudsman 60 Community Level Initiatives (CL!) 5, 32, 44-6 case study 46 Community Sponsorship Fund (CSF) 5. 43-4 consultancies 67 consultation issues paper alcohol 5. 26. 32, 54, 55 corporate governance 58-9 Cotter. Trish 23 Council of Australian Governments (COAG) National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health 2,10, 27, 34, 54-6 credibility 12 Cunningham, Lisa 46

D Daube, Professor Mike 15,16, 18, 23 David Wirrpanda Foundation 46 Davoren, Sondra 22 disability performance 65 disease prevention and health promotion 35

Medicare Locals 8

E ecologically sustainable development 68 Edwards. Emeritus Professor Meredith 22

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

ALPHABETICAL INDEX E environmental performance 68 establishment of Agency 10 ethics 61-2 exempt contracts 66

Expert Committees 3, 22-3, 27, 54 Expert Committee on Alcohol (EGA) 22. 54 Expert Committee on Obesity (ECO) 23, 30, 54 Expert Committee on Tobacco (ECT) 23, 54 Exploring the Public Interest Case for a

Minimum (Floor) Price for Alcohol 5, 26, 32, 54, 55 external scrutiny 59-61

F financial results 2 financial statements 69-126 food marketing to children 55

Marketing Unhealthy Food to Children Seminar 7, 30, 56 fraud control 62 freedom of information 62 functions of Agency 10

G Galbally, Rhonda (AO) 3 Gibson, Peter 59 Good Sports Program 5, 32, 45 governance 38. 58-9

framework 14-23 planning 58 governance team 14, 58-9 grants programs 67

recipients 128-36 Gwabba Yorga Gabba Worra Project 46

H Hambleton, Dr Steve 22 Hamilton, Professor Margaret 22 Harper, Todd 23 Hawe, Professor Penny 22 Hawkes, Dr Corinna 30 Hazell, Anne 59 health funding models 28 health policy advice 26-7 health policy leadership 26-7 Health Promotion Websites Database 4 health risk reduction (goal 2) 11,29-33

integrated response to health risk 29

reduce obesity 29-30 reduce the harmful consumption of alcohol 32-3 reduce the use of. and exposure to tobacco 31-2 Health Workforce Australia 56 healthier cities and environments 8 healthy public policy (goal 1) 11, 26-8

funding models 28 partnerships 28 policy advice 26-7 policy leadership 26-7 Hobbs, Tony 15, 16, 18-19 human resources 38

disability performance 65 employment agreements 63 learning and development 64 management 62-4

performance pay 63 social inclusion 65 staffing 63 work health and safety 64-5

I identity and communications 38 information and reporting (goal 4) 11, 36 information analysis reporting 36

national systems surveillance 36 information management 65 innovation 12 integrated response to health risk 29 integrity 12

J judicial or administrative decisions 60

K Kalokennos, John 14 knowledge management (goal 3) 11, 34-5 evidence and analysis dissemination 35

prevention and health promotion evaluation 35 prevention and health promotion research 34

L learning 12 staff 64 Lee, Dr Amanda 23 legal actions 60 legal services 66 list of requirements 147-9

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

*ú McCallum. Professor John 22 management and accountability 5S-68 Marketing Unhealthy Food to Children

Seminar 7, 30, 56 Martin, Jane 23 Measure Up - Swap It Don't Stop It campaign 7. 29. 51-2, 54 Medicare Locals 8, 26-8. 37, 55, 56 Migro, Jim 22 Miller, Caroline 23 Minister for Health 10,14,15,142,144 Minister for Health and Ageing 2. 25 Minister for Mental Health and Ageing 5, 14,

28, 32 Minister for Sport 5, 28, 32-3 mission 9 Moodie, Professor Rob 15.16,17, 22 Munro, Jude (AO) 15, 16, 19 My QuitBuddy iphone app 6. 31, 50

N National Binge Drinking Strategy 32-3, 43 Community Level Initiatives (CLI) 5, 32, 44-6

Community Sponsorship Fund (CSF) 5, 43-4 Good Sports Program 5, 32, 45 grant recipients 133-6 National Centre for Education and Training

on Addiction (NCETA) 47 National Evaluation Advisory Committee 34, 55 National Health and Hospitals Reform

Commission 2,10 National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health 2, 10, 27, 54-6 evaluation 4, 34-5, 42 National Preventive Health Research

Strategy 34 National Preventive Health Taskforce 2,10 National Preventive Health Workforce

Strategy 8, 37 National Symposium on Social Marketing for Obesity Prevention 53 national systems surveillance 36 National Tobacco Campaign 6, 31, 48, 54

evaluation 48-9

O obesity 2. 29-33 Expert Committee on Obesity (ECO) 23, 30, 54

first year highlights 7

social marketing targeting 50-53 O'Dea, Professor Kerin 22 organisational excellence (goal 6) 11, 38 governance 38

human resources 38 identity and communications 38 organisational effectiveness 38 organisational structure 13 outcomes and program structure 12 outlook 3 overview 10-23

P Parliamentary scrutiny 61 partnerships 28, 54-6 performance reporting 40-56

framework 40 Plibersek MP, the Hon. Tanya 14 Policy and Programs Branch 14 Pollaers, John 22 preventive health research 4, 34

expand and strengthen 41-2 first year highlights 8 Preventive Health Research Grant Program 2011-2012 4

recipients 128-32 Preventive Health Research Strategy 4. 30 Preventive Health Surveillance Forum 4, 36 Prevention Systems and Obesity Policy 14 procurement 66-7

ANAO access clauses 66 consultancies 67 exempt contracts 66 framework 66 Purcell, Kate 23

R Raymond, Fran 59 records management 66 reports 60-1 Research Committee 22, 34, 55

members 22 risk management 61 Roberts, Dr Lyn (AM) 15, 16,19, 23 Roxon MR the Hon. Nicola 14, 25

Prom oting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

ALPHABETICAL INDEX

S security 62 seminars Causes and Prevention of Obesity Stakeholder Partnership 7

Marketing Unhealthy Food to Children 7, 30, 56 social inclusion 65 Social Marketing and Partnerships 14 targeting obesity 51-53

targeting tobacco use 48-50 staff see human resources Stakeholder and Industry Engagement Strategy 28, 56 Stakeholder Engagement Strategy 27,137-44 Standing Council on Health (SCoH) 10, 25 State of Preventive Health Report 4 Strategic and Operational Plans 38

report on 25

strategic goals 11 Studdert, Dr Lisa 3,14 Sullivan, Denise 23 Surveillance, Research and Evaluation 14 Swmburn, Professor Boyd 23 Sylvan, Louise 3.14,15

T Taylor, Dr Roscoe 15,16, 20 telephone counselling and referral service 47 tobacco 2. 31-2

Expert Committee on Tobacco (ECT) 23, 54 first year highlights 6 plain packaging 26 social marketing targeting 48-9 Turner. Pat (AM) 15,16. 20

U Urban Design Protocol 8, 29

V values 12 vision 9

W Wakefield, Professor Melanie 22, 23 work health and safety 64-5 World No Tobacco Day 6, 31, 50

Worth the Hon. Trish 15,16, 20-1

Y Young Dr Jeannette 15.16. 21

Promoting a Australia ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012

promoting a healthy australia ANPHA

Level 1 Canberra House

40 Marcus Clarke Street / GPO BOX 462

Canberra City ACT 2601

P +61 2 6289 2879

E anpha@anpha.gov.au

www.anpha.gov.au