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Australian Fisheries Management Authority—Report for 2016-17


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ANNUAL REPORT

2016-17

AFMA Fisheries

8 000 000km2

3rd FISHING ZONE in the world, over LARGEST

North West Slope Trawl and the Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery

Southern Squid Jig Fishery

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery

Skipjack Tuna Fishery (West)

South Tasman Rise Fishery

Northern Prawn Fishery

Australia has the

8 000 000km2

3rd FISHING ZONE in the world, over LARGEST

Small Pelagic Fishery

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery

Coral Sea Fishery

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Norfolk Island Fishery

Skipjack Tuna Fishery (East)

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery

© Commonwealth of Australia 2017

ISSN 1039-3099 (Print) ISSN 2205-2739 (Online)

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Commonwealth. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Commonwealth Copyright Administration, Attorney General’s Department, National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600 or posted at http://www.ag.gov.au/cca

Published by the Australian Fisheries Management Authority

Designed by 2B Advertising and Design

Contact officer: V irginia Voce Postal address: P O Box 7051 C anberra Business Centre

C anberra ACT 2610

Office address: 7 3 Northbourne Ave C anberra ACT 2600

Phone enquiries: 0 2 6225 5555 Email: info@afma.gov.au

Website: afma.gov.au

View this report online - Corporate publications & reports - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA)

Front cover photos: Re dfish. P hoto courtesy: AFMA

F isheries officers, Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery.

P hoto courtesy: AFMA

v

21 September 2017

Senator the Hon Anne Ruston Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Assistant Minister

We have much pleasure in presenting to you the annual report of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) for the financial year ended 30 June 2017. This report also includes AFMA’s Annual Performance Statement for 2016-17.

During 2016-17, AFMA continued to efficiently deliver regulatory and management services to Australian fishing operators and the broader community. This has ensured sustainable and profitable Commonwealth fisheries that contributed some $385 million in gross value of production. At the same time AFMA was minimising the risk of unacceptable impacts of Commonwealth fisheries on marine ecosystems and organisms. AFMA also continued to play a key role in the protection of Australia’s marine environment from illegal foreign fishing.

This report has been prepared in accordance with section 87 of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991 and in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Non-corporate Commonwealth Entity Annual Reporting) Rule 2014, approved by the Minister for Finance under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

In addition, and as required under section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, we certify that we are satisfied that AFMA has:

• prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans

• in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, recording or reporting mechanisms that meet the specific needs of the agency

• taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the agency.

We give the report to you for presentation to Parliament as required under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Yours sincerely

Helen Kroger Chairman

Dr James Findlay Chief Executive Officer

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CONTENTS

AFMA Fisheries....................................................................................................................................................................ii

Letter of transmittal .......................................................................................................................................................v

User guide ............................................................................................................................... .................................................. 2

Part 1: Overview................................................................................................................................................................. 5

Chairman’s and Chief Executive Officer’s review ...........................................................................................7

Our Agency ...........................................................................................................................................................................14

Part 2: Performance ..................................................................................................................................................21

Annual performance statement ..............................................................................................................................23

About AFMA’s performance framework ............................................................................................................24

Ensure the ecological sustainability of Commonwealth fisheries for the benefit of present and future generations of Australians ........................................26 Improve net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries to the Australian community ......................................................................................................................30

Deliver effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements .................................................................................................................................46

Part 3: Fishery Reports .........................................................................................................................................53

Introduction ............................................................................................................................... ...........................................55

List of Fishery Reports ...................................................................................................................................................58

AFMA managed fisheries ............................................................................................................................... ...............59

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery ........................................................................................59

Coral Sea Fishery .............................................................................................................................................61

Northern Prawn Fishery ...............................................................................................................................63

North West Slope and the Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries .......................................69 Small Pelagic Fishery ....................................................................................................................................71

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery .................................................................74

Southern Squid Jig Fishery .......................................................................................................................82

Jointly managed fisheries .............................................................................................................................................84

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery ...........................................................................................................84

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery ................................................................................................................87

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery ........................................................................................................ 90

Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery .................................................................................93

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery .................................................................................................... 96

High Seas Permits ...........................................................................................................................................................98

Non-operational fisheries .........................................................................................................................................100

Norfolk Island Fishery ............................................................................................................................... .100

Skipjack Tuna Fishery ................................................................................................................................100

South Tasman Rise Fishery ....................................................................................................................101

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Part 4: Management and Accountability ..................................................................................103

Corporate governance practices ........................................................................................................................105

Internal scrutiny ...............................................................................................................................................................106

External scrutiny ..............................................................................................................................................................107

Corporate planning and reporting .......................................................................................................................108

Risk management ...........................................................................................................................................................109

Audit and Risk Committee ............................................................................................................................... ......... 113

Purchasing ..........................................................................................................................................................................114

Compliance with finance law ................................................................................................................................. 113

People management ................................................................................................................................................... 116

Part 5: Financial Statements ..................................................................................................................... 131

Financial performance reports and statements .........................................................................................134

Part 6: Appendices ..................................................................................................................................................171

Appendix 1: Commission, executive and committees ........................................................................... 172

Appendix 2: Civil litigation outcomes ............................................................................................................... 179

Appendix 3: Management advisory committee meetings and memberships ......................181

Appendix 4: Freedom of information reporting .............................................................................................184

Appendix 5: Work health and safety ................................................................................................................185

Appendix 6: Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance ...188

Appendix 7: Disability reporting ...........................................................................................................................192

Appendix 8: Consultancy services ....................................................................................................................193

Appendix 9: Procurement to assist small business ...............................................................................194

Appendix 10: Total resources and total payments ...................................................................................195

Appendix 11: Expenses by outcomes ...............................................................................................................196

Part 7: Glossary and Indexes ....................................................................................................................199

Compliance index ............................................................................................................................... ............................200

Glossary ................................................................................................................................................................................204

Index ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 211

Image: Erub Arts Centre Seu Gadin ghost net art major wall piece. Artists Jimmy Kenny Thaiday, Ellarose Savage, Racy Oui-Pitt, Nancy Naawi, Lorenzo Ketchell, Lavinia Ketchell, Florence Gutchen, Sarah-Dawn Gela and Ethel Charlie. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

USER GUIDE This report provides details of the operations and performance of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) for the financial year ending 30 June 2017, as forecast in the Agriculture and Water Resources Portfolio Budget Statements 2016-17 and the AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19.

It has been prepared in accordance with Australian Government and legislative requirements, including the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The Annual Report is primarily a mechanism of accountability to the Australian Government. It also provides a valuable resource for AFMA’s clients, government at all levels, industry and the general community.

Part 1 - Overview Provides the Chairman’s and Chief Executive Officer’s review, looking at AFMA’s key achievements in 2016-17, an outlook for 2017-18 as well as explaining our functions, services and stakeholders.

Part 2 - Performance Details AFMA’s Annual Performance Statement 2016-17 explaining our major objectives, performance results and an analysis of those results.

Part 3 - Fishery Reports Describes each fishery’s contribution to the performance results for the year, any significant changes to management arrangements and highlights the opportunities and challenges faced in meeting our objectives as described in the Annual Performance Statement.

Part 4 - Management and Accountability Covers AFMA’s governance arrangements and practices, including financial management, human resource management activities, risk management practices and monitoring and review mechanisms.

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Part 5 - Financial Statements Consists of AFMA’s financial statement for the 2016-17 financial year, as independently audited by the Australian National Audit Office. These statements include financial performance, financial position and cash flows during 2016-17.

Part 6 - Appendices The appendices include reporting requirements such as details of AFMA’s Commission, executive and committees, civil litigation outcomes, management advisory committee meetings and membership, freedom of information, ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, consultancy services, work health and safety, disability reporting, agency resources and payments and a statement of expenses by outcomes.

Part 7 - Glossary and ind exes Provides a list of requirements as set out in the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Non-corporate Commonwealth Entity Annual Reporting) Rule 2014 and the Resource Management Guide no 135 ‘Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities’. The annual reporting requirements of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991 are also shown. A glossary and index are included in this section.

Part 1

Overview Chairman’s and CEO’s overview

Our Agency

Photo opposite: Tuna plated with salad. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

6

Part 1 - Sna PShot

reduction in seabird strikes

Seabird protection measures capable of a

90%

in the South e ast t rawl sector

of commonwealth fishing vessels

e-monitoring cameras installed on

25%

50 either have been or are being implemented (2015-2017)

to cut red tape initiatives

independent recognition of australian fisheries management as some

of the most effective in the world

consecutive years . 4

no stocks subject to overfishing in aFMa solely managed fisheries for

Su Stainable fiS herieS

Australia has the

8 000 000km2

3rd fishing zone in the world, over largest

t he kon’s covered fisheye was trialled as a bycatch reduction device in the northern p rawn Fishery in 2016 with

>35% results showing a

reduction in bycatch of

$385,is the estimated gross value of production for commonwealth fisheries. ,

CHAIRMAN’S AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S REVIEW In 2016-17 the Gross Value of Production for Commonwealth fisheries was some $385 million which included approximately $20 million from Torres Strait fisheries. The Australian Fisheries Management Authority’s (AFMA) overall performance underlines the importance of AFMA continuing to deliver an efficient and responsive regulatory approach that supports a profitable and competitive Commonwealth commercial fishing industry. At the same time, AFMA has effectively pursued the sustainability of Australia’s marine environment for the benefit of present and future generations of Australians.

In this report AFMA also presents an Annual Performance Statement in accordance with the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The statement (Part 2 of this report) provides details of AFMA’s operational objectives, performance results and, together with Part 3 ‘Fishery Reports’, an analysis of those results.

Ecological sustainability The most recent Fishery Status Reports (released by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences on 29 September 2017) found that, for the fourth consecutive year, no stocks managed solely by the Commonwealth (AFMA) were subject to overfishing (a stock that is experiencing too much fishing and the removal rate from the stock is unsustainable). This is a significant achievement and has been reflected in independent recognition of Australian fisheries management as some of the most effective in the world.1 However, seven stocks with shared management remain listed as overfished (a fish stock below the biomass limit reference point) due to historic over harvesting, and AFMA will continue to play its part to pursue management actions to rebuild these stocks. More detail is provided in the individual fishery reports in Part 3 of this report.

This year AFMA reviewed its ecological risk management methodology and drafted an Ecological Risk Management Guide. In April 2017 the Commission approved the methodology and Guide. The identification and treatment of ecological risks are fundamental to protecting the ecological sustainability of

1 Strong fisheries management and governance po sitively impact ecosystem status Fish & Fisheries Volume 18, l, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12184/full Issue 3, May 2017 (pages 412-439) Bundy, A. et a

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OVERVIEW Part 1 - Sna PShot

reduction in seabird strikes

Seabird protection measures capable of a

90%

in the South e ast t rawl sector

of commonwealth fishing vessels

e-monitoring cameras installed on

25%

50 either have been or are being implemented (2015-2017)

to cut red tape initiatives

independent recognition of australian fisheries management as some

of the most effective in the world

consecutive years . 4

no stocks subject to overfishing in aFMa solely managed fisheries for

Su Stainable fiS herieS

Australia has the

8 000 000km2

3rd fishing zone in the world, over largest

t he kon’s covered fisheye was trialled as a bycatch reduction device in the northern p rawn Fishery in 2016 with

>35% results showing a

reduction in bycatch of

$385,is the estimated gross value of production for commonwealth fisheries. ,

8

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Commonwealth fisheries. Ecological risk assessments measure the impacts of fishery practices, identify areas of high risk and provide evidence for the determination of arrangements employed by AFMA to regulate fisheries. The Guide provides fishery operators with an understanding of methods used to manage the impact of fishing on the marine environment. A greater understanding allows operators harvesting marine fishery resources in Commonwealth fisheries to behave in a manner that is consistent with the mitigation of risks as identified and assessed by AFMA.

A Commonwealth Fisheries Marine Mammal Working Group was also established to assist in the development of cross fishery management strategies to mitigate impacts on marine mammals. The group progressed the expansion of the Gillnet Hook and Trap dolphin strategy across the whole fishery and considered what preliminary work may need to be done to develop a Protected Species Strategy for seals.

AFMA continued to work closely with industry and scientists in pursuit of reducing impacts of fisheries on the marine environment. During 2016-17 the Northern Prawn Fishery completed scientific trials with the industry-developed Kon’s Covered Fisheye which can reduce fish bycatch by more than one third, a remarkable accomplishment. The Kon’s Covered Fisheye was approved for use within the Northern Prawn Fishery in April 2017 and is likely to be implemented in the broader Northern Prawn Fishery fleet during 2017-18.

A significant amount of work was undertaken to install bafflers and sprayers on vessels in the South East Trawl and Great Australian Bight Trawl fisheries resulting in a 90 per cent reduction in seabird strikes. This is an outstanding result for the fishery and reflected positive cooperation between industry and AFMA.

Efficient fisheries management and compliance AFMA continued to explore opportunities to streamline fisheries assessment processes under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, working with the Department of Environment and Energy. While there remains significant opportunity for further progress in this area, ten year approvals for the Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery, the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery, the Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery, the Southern Squid Jig Fishery and the Eastern and Western Skipjack Fisheries were granted in October 2016.

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In implementing the National Compliance and Enforcement Program 2016-17, AFMA conducted 55 port visits with 233 boat and 95 fish receiver inspections. The program saw a high level of compliance, with no breaches or further action needed in 89 per cent of the inspections. AFMA also undertook routine daily assessments and real time Vessel Monitoring System and e-monitoring analysis of the Commonwealth fleet. The  Vessel Monitoring System compliance rates remained high with an average of 97.1 per cent of all units being operational at any time. There was no requirement to order any boats to remain in port for Vessel Monitoring System related issues. Out of the 75 vessels fitted with e-monitoring equipment AFMA only needed to investigate three matters concerning non-compliance.

During the reporting period AFMA developed and published an updated Bycatch Handling and Treatment Guide 2016-17 to further assist fishers to meet their obligations when dealing with bycatch. Since the implementation of the concession conditions in October 2016 there has been a 38 per cent drop in the average number of bycatch mishandling reports observed through e-monitoring analysis and reported to the National Intelligence Unit.

Illegal fishing by foreign vessels continues to be a challenge in Australia’s north with 15 foreign fishing vessels apprehended between 1 July 2016 and 30 June 2017. This is a decrease over the 20 apprehended for the same period last year and apprehensions are well down on the record 367 apprehensions in one year a decade ago. This continued low level of incursions can be attributed to the direct deterrence provided as a result of AFMA’s prosecution of offenders and confiscation of their boats, in-country education and outreach programs, and regional cooperation and capacity building initiatives. AFMA, with its partner government agencies, ensures surveillance continues in high threat areas, including the Coral Sea off far north Queensland where eight Vietnamese beche de mer vessels have been apprehended since 1 July 2016.

AFMA continues to assess implementation options for catch traceability through regional organisations such as the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency, parties to the Nauru Agreement and the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission. In addition, AFMA works to support Pacific Island countries’ fisheries enforcement with the development and delivery of training modules on monitoring, control and surveillance methods.

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OVERVIEW

10

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements The services that AFMA provides from the levies it collects enable the fisheries to meet the requirements of relevant Commonwealth legislation and policies. With about 39 per cent of AFMA’s annual budget cost-recovered from industry, we understand the importance of delivering effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements.

In 2010 AFMA made a commitment to industry that it would keep cost recovery at or below the rate applied in 2005-06 once corrected for Consumer Price Index increases. Since making this undertaking in 2010, AFMA has out-p erformed the cumulative Consumer Price Index by some $31.9 million (as at 2016-17) and will aim to continue to meet this commitment while ensuring legislative objectives are pursued.

In March 2017, the Fisheries Management Amendment (Compliance and Enforcement) Regulations 2017 came into force. This resulted in increased penalty units associated with Commonwealth Infringement Notices and broadened the scope of offences under the Fisheries Management Act 1991 to which Commonwealth Infringement Notices can apply. The increase in penalty units will directly impact those responsible for committing offences and should result in an increase in compliant behaviours.

To reduce regulatory burden and increase management efficiencies, AFMA continues to pursue red tape reductions to ensure the best possible value for money, although this may not necessarily always reduce every operator’s costs. More than 50 initiatives to cut red tape for Commonwealth fishers have now been, or are being, implemented. Of particular note are key changes to some Offshore Constitutional Settlement arrangements and joint authority arrangements that are currently being progressed. These will streamline management by, for example, simplifying jurisdictional arrangements between the Commonwealth and NSW for trawl fishing south of Sydney.

AFMA has also worked closely with industry to introduce fully electronic licensing and quota trading services with a greater proportion of industry using them; and promote increased use by fishers of electronic log books in place of paper logs. Such initiatives reduce cost recovered amounts from industry and support operator profitability.

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Recognition During March 2017 a Stakeholder Perceptions Survey was undertaken to measure current perceptions of AFMA’s performance as part of our ongoing commitment to service improvement. Overall satisfaction was moderate, with half of respondents either satisfied or very satisfied, and one quarter being either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. A particular area of strength was the positive perception of AFMA staff as friendly, knowledgeable and responsive. There was room for improvement in the consistency of information provided and expanded communications on reasons behind management decisions.

AFMA will be seeking to expand engagement with stakeholders, particularly individual operators as well as industry associations. To this end e-messaging and more effective port visits are being considered.

Special Thanks AFMA would like to thank the Hon Norman Moore AM, for his substantial contributions as AFMA Commission Chair during his three year term to 30 June 2017. Mr Moore’s leadership, insight and advice have been of great benefit to AFMA and his fellow Commissioners.

We would also like to welcome our new Commission Chairman, Ms Helen Kroger who commenced on 1 July 2017.

Outlook AFMA’s Corporate Plan 2017-20 was approved by the Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources in May 2017. Over the next four years AFMA will implement fisheries management in pursuit of sustainable and profitable fisheries, simplify regulations to reduce operational and cost burdens for industry, manage ecological and compliance risks, deter illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing,

and improve engagement with stakeholders in the responsible management of fisheries. Further information is available from our website afma.gov.au.

During 2016-17 we commenced development of an AFMA specific policy to ensure that fisheries research and scientific information used in our management decision making processes are of a high quality. The policy will provide guidance on what constitutes high quality and reliable scientific information, and best practice. The policy will also align closely to, and reference the key principles and guidelines in, the Guidelines for Quality Assurance of Australian Fisheries

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OVERVIEW

12

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Research and Science Information.2 The draft policy is expected to be considered by the Commission later in 2017 for implementation in 2018.

AFMA will be developing and implementing a new ICT Strategy (over three years) that focuses on the collection, maintenance and management of fisheries related data. This will support sound fisheries management and may reduce service costs for industry in the longer term.

AFMA will also be continuing to pursue a more consistent system for all fishing fleets and boats managed by AFMA. Improved consistency is intended to increase the capacity to respond to changing circumstances (from markets, technology and the environment), maintain sustainable fishing, increase economic returns and enable more effective harvesting of Commonwealth fisheries resources. Extensive consultation with the fishing industry and other stakeholders will be undertaken prior to implementing any significant changes.

At the same time, government policies and legislation for AFMA will be changing.

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, with the assistance of AFMA and the Department of the Environment and Energy, has developed a draft Commonwealth Fisheries Harvest Strategy Policy and Fisheries Bycatch Policy. The public consultation period has closed and responses are being considered.

Legislative amendments are also expected to be considered by Parliament later in the year. These aim to amend the Fisheries Management Act 1991 and the Fisheries Administration Act 1991 to:

• strengthen the engagement of recreational and indigenous fishers in the management of Commonwealth commercial fisheries

• provide an additional objective that AFMA must have regard to ie. that the interests of commercial, recreational and indigenous fishers are taken into account in the context of managing Commonwealth commercial fisheries

• provide for an expanded expertise base for the AFMA Commission regarding recreational and indigenous fisheries.

Successfully adjusting to these developments will ensure AFMA continues to provide world class fisheries management and governance.

2 P enney AJ, D. Bromhead, G. Begg, I. Stobutzki, R. Little and T. Saunders (2016) Development of guidelines for quality assurance of Australian fisheries research and science information. FRDC Project 2014-009, 123 pp.

12

Fisheries officer surveillance at Lakes Entrance. Photo courtesy: Dylan Maskey, AFMA

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

OUR AGENCY

Authority AFMA was established under the Fisheries Administration Act 1991 in February 1992 to manage Australia’s Commonwealth fisheries and apply the provisions of the Fisheries Management Act 1991. Together, these two Acts created a statutory authority model for the day-to-day management of Commonwealth commercial fisheries.

AFMA’s portfolio department, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, retains responsibility for strategic fisheries policy advice and leading international negotiations.

The AFMA Commission is responsible for domestic fisheries management, and the Chief Executive Officer (who is also a Commissioner) is responsible for foreign compliance and assisting the Commission to implement its decisions. AFMA is governed by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Public Service Act 1999.

During the reporting period AFMA’s Minister was the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources. Senator the Hon Anne Ruston was the Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources with responsibility for fisheries.

Role and functions AFMA is the Australian Government agency responsible for the provision of regulatory and other services to ensure efficient and sustainable management of Commonwealth commercial fisheries on behalf of the Australian community. The challenge in delivering these services is to find the right balance between regulating catches of target species and ensuring a profitable and competitive fishing industry while keeping the impacts of commercial fishing on Australia’s marine ecosystems within sustainable and acceptable risk levels.

Our fisheries management practices aim to maintain the ecological sustainability of Commonwealth commercial fisheries for Australians both now and into the future. These practices have regard to the impact of fishing on non-target species and the long-term sustainability of the broader marine environment.

AFMA generally manages commercial fisheries from three nautical miles offshore to the boundary of the Australian Fishing Zone (200 nautical miles offshore), as

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well as Australian boats fishing on the high seas. State and territory governments generally manage fisheries within their borders and inside three nautical miles from shore, except where Offshore Constitutional Settlement agreements exist for the management of fish species between the Commonwealth and state governments.

The Commonwealth is also responsible for international fisheries matters, including preventing illegal foreign fishing in the Australian Fishing Zone. Since ratifying the United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement in 1999, Australia has been actively involved in negotiating regional arrangements to manage a range of highly migratory, straddling stocks and international stocks that are often targeted by Australian operators. AFMA participates in management, monitoring, control and surveillance activities as well as developing capacity building activities, providing advice and training to countries in our region.

AFMA as a regulator pursues efficient and cost effective fisheries management in a way that accounts for the effects of fishing and ensures ecologically sustainable development. AFMA also regulates the use of fisheries resources with the aim of maximising net economic returns to the Australian community. In doing so AFMA is accountable to the community and the fishing industry.

Australia’s Commonwealth commercial fisheries are managed in accordance with the government’s cost recovery policy. The commercial fishing industry pays for costs directly attributed to, and recoverable from, the fishing industry, while the government pays for activities that benefit the broader Australian community. During 2016-17 about 39 per cent of total revenue was from

cost-r ecovered activities.

Stakeholders AFMA’s stakeholders include the commercial fishing industry, researchers, environment and conservation organisations, recreational fishers, indigenous communities and other government agencies. We have built a partnership approach with stakeholders and involve them in developing policies and actions and encouraging them to share responsibility for fisheries management (and the associated risks) where appropriate.

AFMA also provides fisheries management services to Joint Authorities of the Commonwealth and state governments, including the Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority under the Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984. The status of these fisheries and AFMA’s activities in managing them are reported separately through the Protected Zone Joint Authority annual report and relevant Joint Authority reports between the States/Northern Territory and the Commonwealth.

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1

OVERVIEW

16

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Our va lues We individually and collectively underpin our service, partnerships and accountability to stakeholders by adhering to the principles of public sector governance.

We are:

• Impartial - we are apolitical and provide the government with advice that is frank, honest, timely and based on the best available evidence

• Committed to service - we are professional, objective, innovative and efficient, and we work collaboratively to achieve the best results for the Australian community and the government

• Accountable - we are open and accountable to the Australian community under the law and within the framework of Ministerial responsibility

• Respectful - we respect all people, including their rights and their heritage

• Ethical - we demonstrate leadership, are trustworthy, and act with integrity, in all that we do.

AFMA’s Client Service Charter also expresses our ongoing commitment to providing stakeholders with quality service. The Client Service Charter is available at afma.gov.au

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Organisational structure Our organisational structure as at 30 June 2017 is presented below.

Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources

AFMA Commission

AFMA Chief Executive Officer, Dr James Findlay

Fisheries Operations Branch General Manager Mr Peter Venslovas

National Compliance Strategy Senior Manager Mr Tod Spencer

Compliance Operations (Darwin) Senior Manager Mr John Davis

Foreign Compliance Policy Senior Manager Ms Kerry Smith

Corporate Services Branch General Manager Mr John Andersen

Executive Secretariat Senior Manager Mr Andrew Pearson

Business Chief Finance Officer Mr Robert Gehrig

Workplace - Human Resources Senior Manager Ms Libby Jenkins

Workplace - Property, Risk and Security Senior Manager

Mr Scott Connors

Service Senior Manager Ms Jess Tilley

Communications Communications Manager Ms Danielle Kuhn

Fisheries

Management Branch Executive Manager Dr Nick Rayns

Northern Fisheries Senior Manager, Mr Steve Bolton Torres Strait Fisheries Manager, Ms Selina Stoute

Demersal and Midwater Fisheries Senior Manager, Mr George Day

Tuna and International Fisheries Senior Manager, Mr Trent Timmiss

Policy, Environment, Economics Research Senior Manager, Ms Beth Gibson

Fishery Services Senior Manager, Mr Ryan Murphy

AFMA Liaison Officer South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association (SETFIA) Liaison Officer,

Ms Danait Ghebrezgabhier

AFMA Liaison Officer Australian Recreational Fishing Foundation Vacant

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OVERVIEW

18

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Where AFMA operates AFMA has offices at three locations: Canberra, Darwin and Thursday Island. Details of our office locations are provided below.

AFMA office locations

Canberra office

Street address Postal address Enquiries

Level 6, 73 Northbourne Avenue CANBERRA ACT 2600

PO Box 7051 Canberra Business Centre CANBERRA ACT 2610

Ph: (02) 6225 5555 Fax: (02) 6225 5500 AFMA Direct: 1300 723 621

Darwin office

Street address Postal address Enquiries

Level 6, Jacana House 39-41 Woods Street DARWIN NT 0800

GPO Box 131 DARWIN NT 0801

Ph: (08) 8943 0333 Fax: (08) 8942 2897

Thursday Island office

Street address Postal address Enquiries

Level 2, Pearls Building 38 Victoria Parade THURSDAY ISLAND QLD 4875

PO Box 376 THURSDAY ISLAND QLD 4875 Ph: (07) 4069 1990 Fax: (07) 4069 1277

In addition AFMA has an officer undertaking industry liaison located in Lakes Entrance and observers in various locations around Australia.

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OVERVIEW

Part 2

Performance Certification by the Chief Executive Officer

AFMA’s Performance Framework

Ensure the ecological sustainability of Commonwealth fisheries for the benefit of present and future generations of Australians

Improve the net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries to the Australian community

Deliver effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements.

Photo opposite: Coffs Harbour Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery longliners Photo courtesy: Ash Mooney, AFMA

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Part 2 - Su MMar Y

General Deterrence Pro Gra M

89%of domestic vessel

inspections resulted in

no breaches detected and no action required

15 illegal foreign fishing vessels were apprehended all boat S were forfeited to the commonwealth and were either destroyed or disposed of.

97.1% VeSSel MonitorinG

SYSte M compliance

rates in 2016-17

>99%of afMa’s client service charter obligations were met.

a keY Part of

aFMa’s broader risk

management strategy

ecological riSk ManaGeMent Gui De

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

I, James Findlay, as the accountable authority of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), present the 2016-17 annual performance statements of AFMA, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and under paragraph 87 of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991. In my opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Dr James Findlay GAICD Chief Executive Officer and Accountable Authority of AFMA

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ABOUT AFMA’S PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK The Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) operates within the Australian Government’s outcome and performance frameworks. The outcome for each agency articulates the government’s objectives for the agency and provides a basis for budgeting and reporting the use of funds appropriated by government. The agency’s purpose, as stated in its corporate plan sets out why it exists, and identifies the strategic objectives that it intends to pursue.

Outcome and program AFMA’s outcome is:

‘Ecologically sustainable and economically efficient Commonwealth fisheries, through understanding and monitoring Australia’s marine living resources and regulating and monitoring commercial fishing, including domestic licensing and deterrence of illegal foreign fishing.’

AFMA’s objective is to deliver sustainable and efficiently managed fisheries and provide a net economic return to the Australian community. In the Portfolio Budget Statements for 2016-17, AFMA is responsible for a single government program: Program 1.1 Australian Fisheries Management Authority. The performance of this program is measured by a number of deliverables and key performance indicators as outlined in the 2016-19 Corporate Plan. Our performance against these targets, as well as other actions, provides an indication of its success in fulfilling its purpose, and in achieving its outcome for the benefit of the Australian community. These results are provided in AFMA’s annual performance statement on page 25.

The Annual Performance Statement is structured to highlight the major elements of AFMA’s purposes to:

1. Ensure the ecological sustainability of Commonwealth fisheries for the benefit of present and future generations of Australians

2. Improve the net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries to the Australian community including:

- promoting compliance with Australian fishing laws and relevant international fishing obligations and standards using measures that are proportionate to the risk involved

3. Deliver effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements.

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Performance summary For Commonwealth fisheries during 2016-17, AFMA continued to deliver sustainable and efficient management and provide a net economic return to Australia, including through effective deterrence of illegal fishing. All AFMA’s performance targets were either fully or partly met (see performance summary and detailed analysis below):

Results snapshot

Target met Target partly

met

Target not met

1. Ecological sustainability

1.1. For economically significant stocks 1:

a) Maximise the number of key commercial stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy



b) Improve the number of stocks in (a) assessed as being on target 

c) For those stocks in (a) that are assessed as not on target, improve the numbers that are heading towards their target reference point



1.2. For Commonwealth fisheries’ stocks managed solely by AFMA:

a) Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing. 2 

1.3. The number of species assessed as remaining at high risk after mitigation 

1.4. The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished, and, if effectively managed, may lead to the stock to being sustainable



2. Economic returns

2.1. Percentage of treatment targets met for all priority domestic compliance risks 

2.2. Percentage disposal rate of apprehended foreign illegal unreported and unregulated vessels and suspected irregular entry vessels



3. Management

3.1 Red tape reductions 

3.2 Cost Recovery charges 

1 Not all Commonwealth fish stocks can be managed by MEY, for example, those managed under international regional bodies.

2 In AFMA managed fisheries, not including jointly and internationally managed fisheries.

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Ensure the ecological sustainability of Commonwealth fisheries for the benefit of present and future generations of Australians

Purpose The Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy and Guidelines (2007) provide an essential management framework for AFMA’s Commonwealth fisheries. Commonwealth fishery harvest strategies for key commercial stocks guide the setting of total allowable catches and other catch limits. By pursuing targets of maximum economic yield (or proxy), where available, fishing will be more sustainable in the long term (as it requires the same or higher fish stock levels than maximum sustainable yield) and there will be greater returns to the harvesting sector and the Australian community.

At the same time, AFMA pursues the Commonwealth Policy on Fisheries Bycatch to minimise fishing-related impacts on bycatch species in a manner consistent with the principles of ecologically sustainable development and with regard to the structure, productivity, function and biological diversity of the ecosystem. Both these policies are currently under review.

Performance results Of the top 30 stocks ranked by gross value of production, 14 stocks had a biomass level that equated to the maximum economic yield targets (or proxy) during 2016-17. Of the remaining stocks, 12 are subject to international harvest strategies or treaties and four are not currently suited to maximum economic yield for biological or other reasons, so are managed using other sustainability measures.

The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences Fishery Status Reports 2017 reported the number of fish stocks solely managed by AFMA subject to overfishing (a stock that is experiencing too much fishing and the removal rate from the stock is unsustainable) remained at zero (for the fourth consecutive year). The sustainability performance of 93 fish stocks was assessed across 21 fisheries. Sixty-five stocks were assessed across nine fisheries that are managed solely by AFMA on behalf of the Australian Government, and 28 stocks were assessed across 12 fisheries that are managed jointly with other Australian jurisdictions or other countries.

Seven stocks continued to have biomass levels remaining low enough to pose an unacceptable risk to the stock (referred to as overfished). This is the result of historic over harvesting and these stocks are subject to stock rebuilding plans. AFMA spent 2016-17 completing its review of the ecological risk assessment framework which will be implemented in 2017-18. The framework will assist AFMA in pursuing its legislative and corporate objectives related to ecological sustainability. It forms a key part of our broader risk management strategy.

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In October 2016 the Commission endorsed AFMA’s approach to development of the Ecological Risk Management Guide and to its future implementation. Following consultation with management advisory committees, resource assessment groups and the Ecological Risk Assessment Technical Working Group, the Commission approved the final Ecological Risk Management Guide at its April 2017 meeting.

We also developed an Ecological Risk Management Policy which explains why the Ecological Risk Management Guide was developed and how it is to be used. The Commission approved the Ecological Risk Management Policy at its June 2017 meeting.

As part of the update of AFMA’s ecological risk management system, ecological risk assessments have been undertaken for the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery and the Small Pelagic Fishery under the revised methodology. These ecological risk assessments will be completed during 2017-18 and those of other fisheries will follow in future years.

Performance criteria 2016-17

Target3 2016-17 Actual4

Criterion source: The performance criteria below are recorded in AFMA’s chapter in the Agriculture and Water Resources Portfolio Budget Statements 2016-17 p. 200 and in AFMA’s Corporate Plan for 2016-19 p. 11.

1.1 For economically significant stocks 5:  

a) Maximise the number of key commercial stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy.6,7

18 14

b) Improve the number of stocks in (a) assessed as being on target.3 6 4

c) For those stocks in (a) that are assessed as not on target, improve the numbers that are heading towards their target reference point.7 5 4

1.2 For Commonwealth fisheries’ stocks managed solely by AFMA:

a) Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing. 8 0 0

1.3 The number of species assessed as remaining at high risk after mitigation.9 64 72

1.4 The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished, and, if effectively managed, may lead to the stock to being sustainable 7 7

* Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0.

3 The forecast of indicators for 2016-17 targets are based on fishery managers’ expertise and available stock assessment information. Stocks may be above or below these targets.

4 The actual performance indicators for 2016-17 are calculated based on the methodology recommended by Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences in their 2015 review of AFMA’s economic performance indicators.

5 Not all Commonwealth fish stocks can be managed by MEY, for example, those managed under international regional bodies.

6 Where higher and lower value species are caught together, different targets for the lower value species may maximise net economic returns over all.

7 Assessment methodologies are being reviewed. This means projections may vary.

8 In AFMA managed fisheries, not including jointly and internationally managed fisheries.

9 Ecological risk assessments for Commonwealth managed fisheries and sub-fisheries have been completed. Species considered to be potentially at high risk are the subject of mitigation measures and further assessment. This may mean that projections of numbers of high risk species may vary from year to year. In addition, AFMA is in the process of reviewing its environmental risk assessment methodology and fishery assessments which may lead to changes in reported values in the future.

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Assessment of performance against the purpose In 2016-17 no fish stocks solely managed by AFMA were subject to overfishing - a strong reflection of effective fisheries management. However, while our performance in relation to ecological sustainability remained on target, the number of economically significant stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy (14) was lower than the target of 18. This, in large part, reflected variability of catch rates with the stocks making up ‘economically significant stocks’, that is, AFMA’s top 30 stocks by value, changing. As a result, four stocks that were managed to maximum economic yield targets dropped out of the top 30 commercial stocks and four stocks not managed to maximum economic yield targets moved into the top 30 commercial stocks.

While we were completing work on the environmental risk assessment and risk management framework, we maintained existing actions and programs resulting in the same number of species actually or potentially at high risk following mitigation in 2016-17 - refer table below. Please note that this includes protected species which are considered high risk bycatch regardless of the actual level of threat.

Figure 1: Species at potential or actual high risk in 2016-17 after mitigation

Species

Sharks/rays 22

Invertebrates 9

Marine reptiles 1

Bony fish 5

Marine birds 1

Marine mammals* 34

Total 72

* 2 9 Whales/dolphins, 5 seals/sea lions

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Analysis of performance against the purpose

Status of fish stocks

The most recent fisheries stock status report issued by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences shows:

• For the fourth year there are no fish stocks in fisheries solely managed by AFMA where the harvesting level is likely to result in the stock becoming overfished, or prevent the stock from rebuilding from an overfished state.

• There are seven stocks where biomass levels remain low enough to pose an unacceptable risk to the stock. However, the rebuilding of such fish stocks can be a long term exercise, often taking decades to complete. For example, it is only since 2015 that AFMA has been able to re-open the orange roughy fishery off eastern Tasmania following 10 years of closure and monitoring of stock recovery.

Bycatch species at high risk after mitigation

During 2016-17 AFMA continued to apply existing actions and programs to ensure the number of species actually or potentially at high risk following mitigation did not increase (refer figure 2). AFMA’s finalisation of its framework on environmental risk assessment and risk management, together with input into the Commonwealth Policy reviews (see below), should support decreased risks for bycatch species in the future.

Figure 2: Number of species at potential or actual high risk (after mitigation action)

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Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy and Fisheries Bycatch Policy

The purpose of the Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy is to ensure that key commercial fish species are managed for long-term biological sustainability and economic profitability, both of which are central priorities for AFMA. Similarly, the Bycatch Policy’s primary objective is to minimise fishing-related impacts on bycatch species in a manner consistent with the principles of ecologically sustainable development and with regard to the structure, productivity, function and biological diversity of the ecosystem. We continued to work with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources to pursue these policies and their Guidelines, to ensure that they are practical and cost-effectively implemented. Both policies are currently under review. The public consultation period for comment on the new draft policies has closed and release of the finalised policies is expected in 2017-18.

im prove the net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries to the Australian community

Purpose Non-compliance with AFMA’s management rules and regulations undermines the value of fishing concessions which ultimately affects the value and viability of Australia’s fishing industry. Non-compliance can also ultimately lead to the closure of areas and/or fisheries as a result of significant environmental impacts such as depletion of fish stocks.

Performance results

Performance criteria 2016-17

Target 2016-17 Actual

Criterion source: The performance indicators below are recorded in AFMA’s chapter in the Agriculture and Water Resources Portfolio Budget Statements 2016-17 p. 200 and in AFMA’s Corporate Plan for 2016-19 p. 13.

2.1 Percentage of treatments targets met for all priority domestic compliance risks. 90% 85%

2.2 Percentage disposal rate of apprehended foreign illegal unreported and unregulated vessels and suspected irregular entry vessels.

100% 100%*

* T wo of the 15 foreign boats apprehended (one Vietnamese and one Indonesian) sank at sea post apprehension. All 13 boats delivered to AFMA were disposed of.

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Assessment of performance against the purpose AFMA’s performance targets for its domestic and foreign compliance operations were generally met. Maintaining focused actions and high visibility amongst operators are key contributors as we continue to encourage voluntary compliance rather than have to always take enforcement action against conscious non-compliance.

Analysis of performance against the purpose

National (domestic) compliance

AFMA’s National Compliance Operations and Enforcement Policy aims to effectively deter illegal fishing in Commonwealth fisheries and the Australian Fishing Zone. In order to achieve this aim AFMA continues to use a risk based compliance and enforcement program that consists of four major components:

• communication and education;

• general deterrence;

• targeted risks; and

• maintenance.

AFMA domestic compliance officer conducting surveillance activity Lakes Entrance Photo courtesy: AFMA

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Communication and education AFMA has included education and communication programs for stakeholders within its overall 2016-17 program. These included infield education through fisheries officers, monthly compliance articles and feature stories on AFMA’s website.

In particular, in order to assist operators in improving their by-catch handling practices, we developed and provided fishers with a guide to assist in defining the acceptable treatment of bycatch species to ensure the chances of survival. Bycatch species may include fish, crustaceans, sharks, molluscs, marine mammals, reptiles and birds. Bycatch also includes listed protected species under the Environment and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The guide was distributed to all Commonwealth operators and is available on the our website. www.afma.gov.au/sustainability-environment/bycatch-discarding/ bycatch-reports-publications-id-guides/

Since the implementation of the fishing concession bycatch conditions in October 2016 there has been a 38 per cent drop in the average number of bycatch mishandling reports observed through e-monitoring analysis and reported to the National Intelligence Unit.

General Deterrence Program As part of our general domestic deterrence program during 2016-17, AFMA fisheries officers undertook 55 port visits, five sea patrols and ten aerial surveillance flights and conducted 233 boat inspections and 95 fish receiver inspections. The program saw a high level of compliance, with no breaches or further action required in 89 per cent of the inspections. While this was marginally below the program ‘target threshold’ for voluntary compliance of 90-95 per cent, we did undertake 19 per cent more boat inspections and fish receiver premises inspections during 2016-17. This would suggest a positive impact on operators by the General Deterrence Program.

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AFMA fisheries officers undertaking boarding vessels at sea training Photo courtesy: AFMA

Targeted Risk Programs Compliance with AFMA’s satellite based Vessel Monitoring System and/or e-monitoring system, quota evasion and bycatch mishandling were identified as risk areas for the 2016-17 domestic compliance program. A rate of 98 per cent of boats fully compliant with the Vessel Monitoring System was set as the compliance target.

The Vessel Monitoring System compliance rates remained high with an average of 97.1 per cent (a small increase on 2015-16) of all units being operational at any time. There was no requirement to order any boats to remain in port for Vessel Monitoring System related issues. Out of the 75 vessels fitted with e-monitoring equipment AFMA investigated three matters concerning non-compliance. These included one incident involving equipment being tampered with (resulting in a prosecution), one for fishing without an e-monitoring fitted (caution issued) and one for failing to operate/maintain the e-monitoring system (warning issued).

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FEATURE STORY

imp roving Bycatch Handling

AFMA collects visual information from fishing vessels via observers and e-monitoring (cameras). As a result of this monitoring, we became aware of instances of inappropriate handling of fish bycatch. Instances of inappropriate handling include failure to promptly remove and discard bycatch species. For example, leaving bycatch on the deck for extended periods or failure to return bycatch to its natural environment promptly is considered mistreatment. Where bycatch is not discarded immediately due to operational or safety reasons, this is not considered as mistreatment.

As part of our role in ensuring sustainable fisheries AFMA and industry are now increasing measures to reduce the amount of fish bycatch in Commonwealth fisheries. Handling of remaining fish bycatch can significantly affect the chances of the fish’s survival and the sustainability of bycatch species.

As a result of AFMA identifying the risk posed by the inappropriate handling of bycatch, the National Compliance Strategy Section formed a dedicated Compliance Risk Management Team to look at ways of addressing the issue to reduce or eliminate instances of bycatch mishandling. The Compliance Risk Management Team identified a range of approaches to address the issue including:

• Consultation with industry and stakeholders.

• Education and communication including news items and infield education through fisheries officers and AFMA Bycatch staff.

• Development and publication of a Bycatch Handling and Treatment Guide 2016-17.

• Introduction of conditions to all fishing concessions relating to the handling and treatment of bycatch.

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Whilst the program is in its relative infancy it appears that, as a result of the introduction of the Bycatch Handling Condition in October 2016, the rate of alleged incidents of bycatch mishandling has dropped by 23 per cent (see Figure 3 below). The Bycatch Mishandling treatment program, including education programs, will continue in 2017-18 and it is hoped that the reduction in incident rates will continue.

Figure 3: Impact of Bycatch Mishandling treatment program

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Maintenance Programs AFMA implemented a number of maintenance programs to monitor risks which had been targeted in previous years but require ongoing treatment.

These risks include failing to reconcile quota, fishing in closed areas, failing to fit and use bycatch reduction devices to prevent or reduce interactions with threatened, endangered and protected species.

Quota reconciliation non-compliance rates fluctuated during 2016-17 (figure 4). Thirty operators were detected in breach in total.

Figure 4: 28 Quota Reconciliation program results as at 30 June 2017

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The quota reconciliation program has significantly reduced the seriousness of these matters with all operators immediately reconciling once notified by fisheries officers and without the need for further enforcement action.

Fisheries closure monitoring was implemented in July 2010 to address fishing closure compliance. This process continued to be very effective during 2016-17 with the level of non-compliance continuing to remain at all-time lows, with no incidents occurring during 2016-17 (figure 5) as compared with 2015-16 when 10 breaches were detected.

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Figure 5: Results of 2016-17 closure reports

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AFMA domestic prosecutions for 2016-17 During 2016-17, we finalised three prosecution matters resulting in a total of $4500 in fines handed down for three convictions. Offences included quota evasion, failing to report an interaction with a dolphin and tampering with e-monitoring equipment. Sustainability of fish stocks can be significantly impacted by quota evasion. As in 2015-16 AFMA continued to target the issue through the use of data analysis including the use of evasion detection tools to assist in the identification of possible quota evasion. The National Investigations Taskforce continued to work with a range of agencies to investigate possible quota evasion and target systemic cases and/or large scale cases of fraud against the quota system.

Foreign compliance AFMA’s foreign compliance activities ensure that Australia’s fish stocks and the marine environment are not adversely affected by illegal foreign fishing. In conjunction with other Australian Government agencies we applied a multi-f aceted approach to combating illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing that includes on-the-water surveillance and enforcement, in-country education, capacity building and diplomatic representations to flag States and States with links to nationals on board illegal, unreported and unregulated vessels.

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AFMA works closely with other Australian Government agencies in detecting and responding to incidents of illegal foreign fishing within Australian waters and in engaging with other countries in developing regional strategies for combatting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Our engagement with Regional Fisheries Management Organisations and other international fora ensures that Australia’s fisheries management is consistent with actions taken regionally and internationally, particularly in relation to straddling or migratory stocks and in areas adjacent to the Australian Fishing Zone.

AFMA’s participation in the work of these regional fishing bodies includes collaborating with other members to develop regional compliance and management measures and providing annual reports on the implementation of those measures. We also chair working groups, share information on fisheries management and compliance approaches, develop proposals and take action to deter illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

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FEATURE STORY

AFMA across the World

AFMA is well known for international engagement and collaboration with countries in the region, and in February 2017 AFMA stepped up another level in this area. Two officers were deployed on board the French Marine Nationale Frigate Nivôse to patrol both the French and Australian exclusive economic zones and territorial seas in the Southern Ocean.

In addition, two AFMA officers were working with the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency in Suva, Fiji assisting in conducting practical assessments on the Certificate IV - Fisheries Enforcement and Compliance Foundation Officers Course. Two AFMA officers were also embarked on the United States Coast Guard Cutter ‘Sequoia’ targeting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the Federated States of Micronesia. They were accompanied by an officer from Federated States of Micronesia’s National Police, a Mandarin interpreter from the United States Marine Corp and a Vessel Monitoring System analyst from the United States Coast Guard. This was the fourth United States Coast Guard-AFMA patrol of its kind in the past twelve months.

These activities continue to build on the strong relationships that AFMA has with our regional partners, and our officers continue to share their expertise and support other nations to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the region.

AFMA officer (first on left) on board US Coast Guard Sequoia in Guam Photo courtesy: AFMA

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Northern waters AFMA supports the Maritime Border Command through the provision of specialist fisheries officers both in the Australian Maritime Border Operations Centre in Canberra and on board Australian Border Force and Royal Australian Navy patrol boats. Our efforts focused on high risk areas for incursions by illegal fishers and deterred fishers operating in close proximity to the Australian Fishing Zone from conducting illegal fishing operations.

During 2016-17, 15 illegal foreign fishing vessels were apprehended in the Australian Fishing Zone. Eight vessels were from Vietnam, six from Indonesia and one from Papua New Guinea. Following investigation and prosecution by AFMA, the penalties against convicted fishers included fines up to $110 000 for an individual, suspended jail sentences up to nine months and actual jail sentences up to six months. All boats were forfeited to the Commonwealth and were either destroyed or disposed of.

The 15 foreign fishing vessels apprehended in 2016-17 is a decrease from the 20 apprehended in 2015-16 and maintains the downward trend of foreign incursions from the 367 in one year a decade ago. This low level of incursions can be attributed to the direct deterrence provided as a result of the prosecution of offenders and confiscation of their boats; in country education and outreach programs delivered by AFMA along with regional cooperation; and capacity building initiatives directed towards assisting our neighbours in strengthening their fisheries compliance frameworks.

The eight Vietnamese vessels apprehended in 2016-17 is a slight increase over the six apprehended in 2015-16. All were apprehended in the Coral Sea off northern Queensland and were targeting beche de mer or sea cucumber. Vietnamese vessels have also been apprehended by New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia and the Solomon Islands. The increase in activity can be attributed to number of factors including:

• favourable prices for target species

• the depletion of local fisheries and the relative abundance of fish stocks in Australian waters

• the displacement of the illegal vessels from other countries as they tighten their own fisheries enforcement regimes.

AFMA and other Australian agencies are working collaboratively with Vietnam to deter their fishers from embarking on illegal fishing forays.

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FEATURE STORY

Engagement with vi etnam

Over the past few years Australia and Pacific Island nations have been experiencing increasing incidents of illegal fishing by Vietnamese vessels. These vessels travel great distances to target reefs for harvesting sea cucumber, highly prized in Chinese markets, in foreign waters. One trip can fetch the fishermen hundreds of thousands of dollars in profit.

Australia maintains a strong stance on illegal fishing in Australian waters through the detection, apprehension and prosecution of illegal fishers along with the destruction of their vessels. Alternative approaches are also important and in the past, when dealing with illegal fishing vessels from Indonesia, AFMA rolled out a series of Public Information Campaigns to prevent fishers from embarking on illegal forays.

The Public Information Campaigns targeted multiple fishing villages in Indonesia and directly engaged fishermen to outline the implications of fishing illegally in Australia. Now AFMA is developing a similar strategy for working with the Vietnamese Government. Officers from AFMA, who specialise in international engagement, have been travelling to Vietnam to work with members of Vietnam’s Provincial and Central Authorities (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development - Directorate of Fisheries).

This collaboration will result in the delivery of educational seminars and workshops in multiple coastal towns across Vietnam on the potential risks and implications of fishing illegally in foreign nation waters. The program is strongly supported by Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, and with the recent Prime Ministerial Order against illegal fishing by Vietnamese nationals, significant reductions in illegal fishing activity by Vietnamese fishing vessels can be expected.

AFMA Officer with apprehended Vietnamese boat in tow. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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Southern ocean Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the Southern Ocean remains a key area of focus for AFMA. Nearly all known illegal, unreported and unregulated vessels remain out of action as a result of effective regional cooperation involving relevant port States, flag States and States with nationals that control and benefit from the activities of these vessels. We continue to cooperate with our partners and commend those countries that continue to play their part in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

During 2016-17, the FV Sea Breeze was included on the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Non-Contracting Party illegal, unreported and unregulated Vessel List for unauthorised fishing for toothfish in the Southern Ocean. This vessel was sighted by an Australian surveillance aircraft west of Christmas Island in April 2017, transiting north and possibly looking to offload southern ocean catch. Australia notified our regional partners in South East Asia of the sighting (all parties to the Regional Plan of Action - illegal, unreported and unregulated, as well as Korea and China) and alerted them to close their ports to this vessel. No further information on the location of the vessel was forthcoming and AFMA continues to monitor the situation.

AFMA continues to cooperate closely with New Zealand, France, Spain, INTERPOL and our international partners in investigating the activity of illegal, unreported and unregulated vessels and in supporting surveillance operations in the Southern Ocean within Australia’s exclusive economic zones and the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Area.

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Capacity building AFMA’s regional cooperation and capacity building initiatives aim to build collaborative relationships and assist our regional partners in strengthening their fisheries frameworks. This year has seen compliance training delivered throughout the Pacific and South East Asia under the Regional Plan of Action to promote responsible fishing practices including combatting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations’ Port State Measures Agreement and other international agreements.

We also delivered initiatives under the framework of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Government Partnerships for Development program, including collaborating with the Vietnamese Government to address the increasing trend of illegal Vietnamese fishing throughout the Pacific. A key focus for 2016-17 was supporting the South Pacific Forum Fisheries Agency in working with Pacific Island countries to implement the Niue Treaty Subsidiary Agreement. The Niue Treaty Subsidiary Agreement is a multilateral cooperative agreement that seeks to enhance the effectiveness of surveillance and enforcement activity in the Pacific in targeting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and other law enforcement activities.

Multilateral patrols/operations During 2016-17, AFMA participated in 12 operations, comprising five multilateral operations, three United States Coast Guard patrols and bilateral patrols with France, Vanuatu and Indonesia, to detect and deter illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the Pacific. Over 27 international vessels were boarded and inspected by AFMA fisheries officers with several boats found to be in breach of licence conditions and international obligations. AFMA officers were able to use their language skills and subject matter expertise to assist our international partners in achieving significant outcomes.

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FEATURE STORY

China takes tough stance on fishing vessel in the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission

On the high seas, most fisheries are managed cooperatively through Regional Fisheries Management Organisations. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission regulates the taking of tuna and tuna like species in the Pacific Ocean through Conservation and Management Measures. AFMA works closely with our regional partners to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

In September 2016, at the request of AFMA, an Australian Border Force vessel with an AFMA officer on board intercepted the Chinese flagged longliner Yuan Da 19 as it transited the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone. The vessel was known to have operated on the high seas off the Australian east coast.

After an extensive investigation, and confirmation through DNA sampling, it was determined that the Yuan Da 19 was not recording catch of Southern Bluefin Tuna and other by-product species correctly. False reports are a serious violation under the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission Conservation and Management Measures. AFMA provided detailed evidence to China, and requested further investigation of the allegation.

In June 2017 the Chinese authorities advised AFMA that upon receiving the information, the vessel Yuan Da 19 was ordered to return to its home port of Dalian, China and an investigation was conducted. The Chinese authorities took the following actions:

• Permanently disqualified the company, and the vessel owner to engage in any deep sea fishing activities.

• Cancelled the fishing licence of all the company’s fishing vessels.

• Permanently revoked the Captain’s Certificate for Yuan Da 19 .

• Imposed a monetary penalty equivalent to USD$300 000.

• Prohibited the manager(s) of the company responsible for this vessel from engaging in and/or working for any business relating to distant water fishing activities.

AFMA welcomes the decisive actions taken by China as they demonstrate the importance of international cooperation in combating illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, particularly on the High Seas. It also provides another example of how AFMA’s efforts deter these fishing activities.

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Increasing economic returns Complementing this deterrence of domestic and foreign illegal fishing, AFMA has been increasing its capacity to analyse quota market economics and support operators in maximising returns.

To improve the net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries to the Australian community in 2016-17, AFMA made progress:

• in collecting and using economic information including trading prices of quota and gear statutory fishing rights

• in assessing the feasibility and cost effectiveness of individual accounting for discards of quota species from individuals’ quota holdings

• in reviewing overcatch and undercatch provisions in the Quota Administration Policy

• in reviewing management of catch of quota species in overlapping and adjacent fisheries.

Quota and gear statutory fishing rights prices, in combination with other pricing and fishery information, will assist us in assessing the economic impacts on fishing operators of AFMA management decisions.

AFMA is undertaking a cost benefit analysis to assess if it is cost-effective to individually account for discards of quota species from individuals’ quota holdings. Individual accountability for discards of quota species may improve net economic returns of Commonwealth fisheries through:

• reduced and/or avoided discards by individual fishers

• better stock assessment leading to more accurate total allowable catches

• higher asset values of the operators as a result of better management of discards leading to higher capital inflow in the industry

• encouraging trading of statutory fishing rights.

During 2016-17 AFMA continued its review of undercatch and overcatch provisions in AFMA’s Quota Administration Policy. These provisions provide fishers with flexibility to account for fluctuations in stock availability and form a component of how AFMA manages quota. These provisions allow quota holders to carry-over a proportion of unused quota entitlement (undercatch) or above-quota catch (overcatch) from one season to the next. The review of undercatch and overcatch arrangements is expected to be finalised in 2017-18.

Our Quota Administration Policy recognises that fishers incidentally catch quota species managed under separate plans of management in overlapping fisheries.

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During 2016-17 AFMA reviewed these arrangements with the intention that all catches of quota stocks in overlapping fisheries should be covered by quota. However, the extent of the implementation will depend on outcomes from cost benefit analysis due to be completed in 2017-18.

Deliver effective, cost efficient and transparent management and regulator arrangements

Purpose Reducing cost pressures on fishing operators through efficient and effective fisheries management and providing greater insights and accountability for stakeholders into AFMA decisions are key aspects of delivering on this objective and related corporate goals.

Performance results

Performance criteria 2016-17

Target 2016-17 Actual

Criterion source: The performance measures described below are taken from commitments made to the Minister or other stakeholders in support of the above objectives

3.1 R ed tape reduction initiatives completed 13 6

Performance measure measurement method: The red tape reduction register as at 30 June 2017 records estimated completion dates. Note: Since the program’s inception 33 red tape initiatives have been completed, one initiative has been closed. A further 17 initiatives are currently in progress. The Minister may endorse further initiatives in future.

3.2 C ost recovery charges do not exceed the levels derived by increasing the 2005-06 recoveries by the Consumer Price Index each year

$18.1m $31.9m

Performance measure measurement method: Calculated using 2005-06 total cost recoveries and adding CPI adjustment based on CPI data. Forecasted CPI estimates are based on Reserve Bank of Australia data: 2.1% (average estimates for 2016-17), 2.5% (Outyear estimates)

Assessment of performance against the purpose AFMA delivered effective and cost efficient management and regulator arrangements by introducing innovations, removing inefficient practices and ensuring operational costs were within budget. These activities enabled AFMA to continue to meet its cost recovery commitment to operators with AFMA out-performing the cumulative Consumer Price Index by some $31.9 million (as at 2016-17).

While not all red tape initiatives were completed to intended timelines, they continue to be substantively progressed in support of operator profitability.

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The undertaking of a Stakeholder Perceptions Survey in 2017 (to be repeated every two to three years), together with growing communications capabilities, expanded AFMA’s engagement with stakeholders. This will promote information sharing and sourcing of advice from stakeholders to improve our operations and the regulatory arrangements applying to fisheries.

Analysis of performance against the purpose

Red tape reduction initiatives

AFMA is committed to minimising the amount and complexity of regulation through its red tape reduction agenda, while maintaining effective fisheries management. Our red tape reduction agenda provides opportunities for improvement to our systems and services to ultimately benefit our stakeholders. AFMA has worked closely with industry, scientists and state and territory regulators to streamline processes and remove unnecessary fisheries regulations with 50 initiatives that have been or are being implemented since 2015.

Some of the key red tape reductions AFMA has achieved during 2016-17 include:

Removing net length restrictions

The gillnet sector of the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery limits catches by setting a cap on the amount of commercial fish that can be taken, known as a quota. Another way to control fishing effort is to place controls on the fishing gear that is used. As the existing quota controls are effectively limiting the total catch of commercial species permitted by each fisher, the additional effort controls are unnecessary for sustainable management and so the length restrictions placed on gillnets have been removed from the fishery. The removal of net length restrictions allows each fisher to choose the amount of net they use to maximise their efficiency.

Removing trip limits on mahi mahi

Under the previous Memorandum of Understanding with Western Australia, Commonwealth operators in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery were limited to 10 mahi mahi per trip. Mahi mahi are a valuable non-target commercial species when fishing for tuna in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery. Fishers often catch more than 10 mahi mahi in a trip and most of these fish are dead at the time of landing so this results in discarding of otherwise saleable fish. Following consultation with fishers and with agreement of the Western Australian Minister, the trip limit has been increased to 200 mahi mahi, thereby removing instances of discarding of valuable table fish.

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Allowing fishers to add and remove agents online

AFMA has added new functionality to our online licensing portal, GoFish, to allow our clients to better manage their fishing business. This new functionality allows fishers to authorise people to act as an agent on their behalf using the online portal. This change removes the need for fishers to submit paper forms to AFMA thereby allowing fishers to conduct their business more efficiently.

Co-management arrangements Co-management arrangements to encourage greater industry responsibility for fisheries impacts are another approach by AFMA to promote transparent engagement with industry. We are currently reviewing existing co-management arrangements with the Great Australian Bight Fishing Industry Association to maximise the benefits of co-management and to make improvements appropriate given staffing changes at the Great Australian Bight Fishing Industry Association.

The Northern Prawn Fishery industry works closely with AFMA and cooperates through co-management arrangements to assist us with a range of key management functions. For example, the industry manages the collection and provision of catch and effort information, the quality control of the information and its dissemination to all users.

AFMA also developed co-management arrangements with the South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association. A trawl industry advisory group is being established to provide advice to AFMA and the Commission on trawl specific management issues such as research priorities, by-catch, discards, cost recovered levies, species specific area-based management and promotion of industry compliance.

Electronic monitoring (e-monitoring) For two years AFMA has been running a fulltime e-monitoring program in four fisheries: the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery, the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery, the Small Pelagic Fishery (midwater trawl sector) and the Gillnet Hook and Trap sector of the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery. This program follows more than a decade of trials and complements AFMA’s observer program and with the use of feedback reports, has assisted skippers in improving the data AFMA receives from logbooks. The e-monitoring program has also provided an effective and cost efficient means to ensure fishing regulations are being adhered to.

The e-monitoring program has allowed us to continue to implement an individual accountability approach to management in these fisheries. AFMA will continue to apply the most cost efficient monitoring programs to meet regulatory needs.

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Evaluating the cost effectiveness of outsourcing observer program (observer market testing) AFMA’s observer program places observers (independent of the fishing industry) on fishing vessels to provide reliable and verified information on fishing catch, effort, and practices. The program also monitors the impact of fishing on the broader marine environment including protected species.

AFMA reviews the program from time to time to ensure it pursues its legislative objective of sustainable fishing in a cost effective way. While widely recognised for the quality of its service, the cost of the program has changed over the years for a number of reasons including coverage levels, more fisheries requiring the service and changes to the way costs are calculated. The program now makes up approximately 25 per cent of our cost recovered budget, recouped mainly through levies or fee for service on the fishing industry.

Consistent with pursuing cost-effective fishery management, we have decided to test the market. The purpose of testing the market is to see whether an external provider could operate the observer program more cost effectively than AFMA, whilst still ensuring that the quality of the program is not compromised and our ability to pursue its legislative requirements continues. AFMA’s review is in its final stages with a decision anticipated in 2017-18.

Legislative review of penalty provisions The existing offence and penalty regime has been the subject of both internal and external reviews as part of the Review of Commonwealth Fisheries: Legislation, Policy and Management. These reviews recommended the development of a wider range of enforcement tools, the strengthening of existing powers and increase in penalty provisions.

AFMA and the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources adopted a phased approach to amending the legislation and regulations to take into account the recommendations.

Phase one was finalised during 2016-17 and saw increases in penalty units for offences to a level that is consistent with other Commonwealth departments and agencies. This will provide a more effective deterrent to individuals seeking to exploit our fisheries’ resources.

Phase two to modernise the penalty provisions in the Fisheries Management Act 1991 by adopting the Regulatory Powers (Standard Powers) Act 2014 is now underway.

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Stakeholder engagement AFMA engages with a wide variety of stakeholders before making decisions on the management of Commonwealth fisheries, including scientists, commercial fishers and fishing associations, researchers, environment and conservation organisations, recreational fishers and indigenous fishers.

During 2016-17 we achieved successful engagement through a variety of channels, including:

• Management Advisory Committees

• Resource Assessment Groups

• meetings with the Commonwealth Fisheries Association

• port visits and public meetings

• sector/issue specific meetings such as recreational fishing and the Commonwealth Marine Mammal Working Group

• our online systems such as GoFish and the Vessel Monitoring System

• SMS messaging

• our website (including news stories) and social media

• media releases

• direct mail across all major Commonwealth fisheries.

Management Advisory Committees and Resource Assessment Groups are the major source of advice to AFMA and the Commission, reflecting the experience and expertise of the range of stakeholders with interest in the fishery or fisheries. As such they play a vital role in helping us fulfil our legislative functions and effectively pursue its objectives. Regular meetings of these committees and groups were held during 2016-17. Around 80 per cent of management advisory committee recommendations are accepted by the Commission.

As part of AFMA’s ongoing commitment to service improvement, a market research agency was commissioned to conduct research with our stakeholders to measure current perceptions of our performance in a number of domains. The survey was undertaken in March 2017 and involved an online survey of stakeholders identified by AFMA - a total of 124 stakeholders responded to the survey invitation. Overall satisfaction was moderate, with half of respondents either satisfied or very satisfied, and one quarter being either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. A particular area of strength was the positive perception of AFMA officers as friendly, knowledgeable and responsive. There was room for improvement in the consistency of information provided and expanded communications on reasons behind management decisions.

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AFMA intends to expand engagement with stakeholders, particularly individual operators as well as industry associations. Electronic messaging and more port visits are being considered.

Client service charter Our Client Service Charter sets out the services and standards that all clients or stakeholders can expect from AFMA. It applies to all of our fisheries administration and corporate services functions, including our licensing function. Our service charter is available on our website afma.gov.au.

We use our licensing system, GoFish, to record the timeliness of responses for licensing transactions. During 2016-17 more than 99 per cent of licensing correspondence and transactions submitted by concession holders were dealt with in accordance with our Client Service Charter.

During 2016-17 AFMA received one written complaint. As the complaint required consultation with other agencies and review of historical files, we were not able to progress consideration within Client Service Charter timelines. However, this extensive analysis did enable the complaint to be well considered and a written response to be provided to the complainant.

Handlining for yellowfin tuna. Photo courtesy: Georgia Langdon, AFMA

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Part 3

Fishery Reports Introduction

AFMA managed fisheries

Jointly managed fisheries

High seas permits

Non-operational fisheries

Photo opposite: Danish Seiner unloading Lakes Entrance Co-op. Photo courtesy: Georgia Langdon, AFMA

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for c under statutory Fishery Management Plans

WER E ME T I N 2016–17

FISHE RIES MANAGEMENT PLANS

ALL PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

OF COMMO NWEALTH

FISHING

VESSELS

e-monitor ing

cameras

installed on

25%

BIRD BA FFLERS, SEABIRD MITIGAT ION,

GOVERNMENT/ SCIENCE/INDUSTR Y PARTNERSHIPS

can delive r re al conservation solutions

PART 3 - SUMMARY

co nsecutive

YEARS . 4

NO STOCKS SUBJECT

TO OVERFISHING

in aFMa

SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES

the KON’S COVERED FISH EYE was

trialled as a bycatc h red uction device in the Northern Prawn Fisher y in 2016 with

>35% RESULTS SHOWING A

RE DUCTION I N BYCATCH OF

INTRODUCTION Individual Commonwealth fisheries are generally in good shape being both sustainably fished and enabling operators to make a profit.

For the fourth year in a row, no stocks managed solely by AFMA have been classified as subject to overfishing (see Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences Fishery Status Reports 2017). However some species remain under fishing pressure and AFMA has continued to adjust, as appropriate, total allowable catches and operational controls. For example, two key species in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery, flathead and gummy shark, had their total allowable catches reduced for 2017, while the total allowable catch for scallops in the Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery was able to be fished at a maximum level of 4880 tonnes, given biomass levels. For those stocks classified as overfished (generally reflecting past unsustainable fishing practices), AFMA is continuing to pursue recovery to a sustainable biomass that will support fishing operations. A workshop on declining or non-recovering stocks was facilitated by AFMA in 2016 and as a result a research proposal to further mitigate the reason for declining or non-recovering stocks was approved for funding by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation.

The formation of a new industry body, Tuna Australia, which is working with AFMA on issues in the Eastern and Western Tuna and Billfish Fisheries, will help to improve industry advice on the operational appropriateness of our management. Broader AFMA fisheries administration should also be more cost effective following approval of a new Cost Recovery Implementation Statement by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, in December 2016.

In regard to minimising fisheries’ impacts on the marine environment, AFMA and the fishing industry have made significant progress with implementing measures to reduce unintended interactions with marine protected species. There was a particular focus on seabirds and dolphins during 2016-17. New mitigation measures in the South East Trawl Sector are aimed at reducing interactions of deepwater trawlers with seabirds by more than 90 per cent.

Dolphin mitigation strategies introduced in the midwater trawl sector of the Small Pelagic Fishery and the Gillnet, Hook and Trap sector of the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery seek to minimise all dolphin interactions. The strategies require fishers to take action after even a single non-lethal interaction and establish escalating responses by AFMA to any further

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for C under statutory Fishery Management Plans

we re met in 201 6 – 1 7

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT PLANS all performance criteria

of commonwe alth

fishing vessels

E-monitoring cameras installed on

25%

bird bafflers, seabird mitigation, government/ science/ industry partnerships can deliver real conservation solutions

PART 3 - SUMMARY

consecutive y ears. 4

no stocks subject to overfishing in AFMA

SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES

The kon’s covered fisheye was trialled as a bycatch reduction device in the Northern Prawn Fishery in 2016 with

>35% results show ing a

reduction in by catch of

interactions. This includes a maximum interaction rate for the midwater trawl sector of the Small Pelagic Fishery of one dolphin interaction per 50 trawl gear sets. Our confidence in accurate reporting is very high due to the presence of electronic monitoring equipment (boat based cameras) on all fishing vessels in these fishing sectors.

The Northern Prawn Fishery also completed scientific trials with the Kon’s Covered Fisheye, which indicated reduced fish bycatch of more than one third. The Kon’s Covered Fisheye was approved for use within the Northern Prawn Fishery in April 2017 and will be taken up by some operators in the fishery during 2017-18 with some further experimental trials taking place.

AFMA’s new Ecological Risk Assessment and Ecological Risk Management framework for Commonwealth fisheries was also approved by the AFMA Commission in 2017. The effective identification and management of the risks posed by fishing to the environment are central to AFMA pursuing its ecologically sustainable development and other objectives. Not dealing with these risks effectively would be detrimental to the health of the marine environment and the economic viability of the fishing industry.

For 2017-18, we will be looking to further increase positive fisheries sustainability and economic outcomes. Priority work is expected to include implementation of the Fisheries Legislation Amendment (Representation) Bill 2017 which, if passed by Parliament, requires AFMA to have regard to accounting for the interests of commercial, recreational and indigenous fishing sectors in managing Australian fisheries. The reviews of the Commonwealth’s Harvest Strategy Policy and Bycatch Policy are likely to be finalised by the end of 2017. These may impact on AFMA’s Ecological Risk Assessment and Ecological Risk Management framework. Other strategic work will establish Commonwealth fishery economic performance indicators and continue to implement more cost-effective and efficient management.

Gross va lue of Production The gross value of production is an indication of the economic value of fisheries. The estimated gross value of production for all Commonwealth fisheries is approximately $385 million for 2016-17.

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Performance results discussed in fishery reports

Estimated catch totals for 2016-17 Estimated catch totals are taken from data compiled by AFMA from catch and effort logs and Catch Disposal Records sourced from fishers in Commonwealth managed or jointly managed fisheries. These catch totals represent ‘trunked’ (processed) weight for the financial year July 2016 to June 2017.

Performance results The sources of information presented in the fishery performance results shown are:

• Maximum economic yield data presented in the reports are based on Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences’ gross value of production data for Commonwealth fisheries and AFMA stock assessments.

• Data on fishing mortality and biomass are taken from Fishery Status Reports 2017 prepared by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences.

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LIST OF FISHERY REPORTS

Bigeye Tuna Bermagui. Photo courtesy: Clayton McCloud, AFMA

AFMA managed fisheries:

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery

Coral Sea Fishery

Northern Prawn Fishery

North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries

Small Pelagic Fishery

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery

Southern Squid Jig Fishery

Joint managed fisheries:

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery

High seas permits

Non-operational fisheries:

Norfolk Island Fishery

Skipjack Tuna Fishery

South Tasman Rise Fishery

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Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Commercial Scallop (Pecten fumatus)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

2,998 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements The Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Management Plan 2002. The Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery is managed through open and closed seasons, area closures, catch limits and size limits. Fishers must hold statutory fishing rights to fish in this fishery. The Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery is exclusively a commercial fishery with no recreational or indigenous catches recorded.

The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17. A requirement for fishers to accurately weigh scallops at the point of unload before transporting them to an authorised fish receiver was introduced for the 2016 season to support the maintenance of an effective quota management system.

Analysis of performance

Status of fish stocks Due to intermittent recruitment and naturally sporadic and fluctuating availability, commercial scallops are not managed to a specific biomass target.

A 2016 pre-season survey identified a large biomass of scallops of suitable density to support spawning for future seasons as well as the highest total allowable catch (a maximum of 5000 tonnes) in six years. The season lived up to expectations with operators enjoying good catches of high quality scallops.

The pre-season survey undertaken during May and June 2017 indicated that good catches are likely to continue for the 2017 season with biomass estimates and bed densities similar to those identified in the 2016 survey, albeit in different areas. A Total Allowable Catch of a maximum of 4880 tonnes was again set for 2017.

Economic returns The Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Harvest Strategy focuses on ensuring the sustainability of the stock by protecting areas of spawning biomass each season, thereby staying above the limit reference point proxy. This approach allows industry flexibility to catch scallops from various different beds, thereby improving economic returns while ensuring continued ecological sustainability.

The catch for the 2016-17 season was the highest in more than a decade and on par with that from 2010 when a third more boats were operating. The lower boat numbers should result in increased returns from fishing as remaining operators are able to increase catch per unit effort.

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Coral Sea Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Sea cucumber sector:

Black teatfish ( Holothuria whitmael)

Prickly redfish ( Thelenota ananas)

Surf redfish ( Actinopyga mauritiana)

White teatfish (Holothuria fuscogilva)

Sea cucumber sector:

Other sea cucumber species (11 spp.)

Aquarium sector:

Multiple species

Lobster and Trochus sector:

Tropical rock lobster (Panulirus ornatus) possibly other species

Line and Trap sector:

Mixed reef fish and sharks

Trawl and trap sector:

(Numerous fish, shark and crustacean species)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

53 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements There is no statutory management plan for the Coral Sea Fishery. The fishery has five sectors:

• Sea cucumber

• Aquarium

• Lobster and trochus

• Line and trap

• Trawl and trap.

These are managed through input and output controls including limited entry, catch limits, spatial closures, move-on provisions, size limits and catch and effort triggers that are used to initiate further analysis and assessment. Fishers must hold permits to fish in this fishery.

There were no changes to management arrangements during 2016-17.

Analysis of performance There has been little activity in the Coral Sea Fishery in 2016-17. To ensure the ecological sustainability of the fishery, AFMA continues to monitor limits in the Coral Sea Fishery. The limits, described in the Coral Sea Fishery Harvest Strategy, were reviewed by an expert panel meeting in September 2016. The Line, Trap and Trawl Sectors Harvest Strategy will be updated during 2017-18 to take into account outcomes from the review.

The successful detection of a number of illegal Vietnamese fishing vessels during the year should also help to avoid pressures on fish stocks - refer Feature Story on page 41.

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Northern Prawn Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 1 2016-17 Actual

For economically significant stocks managed solely by AFMA:

a. N umber of key commercial stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy2 3 3

b. i mprove the number of stocks in (a) assessed as being on target 1 1

c. f or those stocks in (a) that are assessed as not on target, improve the number that are heading towards their target reference point. 0 1

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing 3 (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

White banana prawn (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis)

Brown tiger prawn (Penaeus esculentus)

Grooved tiger prawn (Penaeus semisulcatus)

Blue endeavour prawn (Metapenaeus endeavouri)

Red endeavour prawn (Metapenaeus ensis)

Red-legged banana prawn (Fenneropenaeus indicus)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

1 2 016-17 Agriculture Portfolio Budget Statements p. 200

2 W here higher and lower value species are caught together, different targets for the lower value species may maximise net economic returns over all.

3 I n AFMA managed fisheries, not including jointly and internationally managed fisheries.

7,524 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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FISHERY REPORTS

Management Plans/Arrangements The principal legal framework for the management of the fishery is specified in the Northern Prawn Fishery Management Plan 1995. The Northern Prawn Fishery is a multi-species fishery managed through input controls including limited entry, season length and individual transferable effort units - based on fishing gear size. The fishery relies on a size and sex-based stock assessment model for brown and grooved tiger prawns; a biomass dynamic assessment model for blue endeavour prawns; and a quarterly age-based biological stock assessment model for red-legged banana prawns. There is currently no formal stock assessment for the white banana prawn fishery as the species is short lived and its abundance is driven by environmental factors, principally rainfall. This level of variability means no clear stock-recruitment relationship can be developed and reliance on catch rate as an index of abundance is questionable. The operational objective of the white banana prawn harvest strategy is to allow sufficient escapement to ensure an adequate spawning biomass of banana prawns (based on historical data), and to achieve the maximum economic yield from the fishery.

Analysis of performance

Performance - status of fish stocks In 2016 the stock abundance levels for grooved and brown tiger prawns were slightly less than the previous year ranging from 151 per cent to 185 per cent of the spawning stock capable of generating maximum sustainable yield. All 52 boat statutory fishing rights were utilised during the 2016 tiger prawn season. Decision rules were applied during the season with average catch rates not meeting the required trigger points for the fishery to remain open for the maximum 17 week season and the fishery was closed on 20 November 2016.

As with the tiger prawn fishery, all 52 boat statutory fishing rights were utilised during the 2017 banana prawn season (1 April to 15 June 2017). Total catch in the 2017 banana fishery was higher than 2016 increasing to 4 756 tonnes.

During 2016, fishing catch and effort in the red-legged banana prawn fishery was similar to the previous year. The catch and effort levels in 2015 and 2016 were well below that of previous years, with catches in 2016 being the lowest on record since the early 1980s. The most plausible reason for this was that alternative fishing options were again more attractive in 2016 - in particular, the consistent, unusually high catch rates of tiger prawns elsewhere in the Northern Prawn Fishery. The low effort level (79 boat days) was less than

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64

the trigger amount used in the harvest strategy and provided insufficient data for an indication of abundance. As this is the second year in a row where there has been insufficient data, the red-legged banana prawn harvest strategy is being reviewed to account for years when there is less than 100 boat days fishing effort.

Performance - status of bycatch The reduction of bycatch in the Northern Prawn Fishery has remained the focus for industry and AFMA during 2016-17 with significant progress being made toward achieving the objectives of the Northern Prawn Fishery Bycatch Strategy 2015-18. The Kon’s Covered Fisheye was trialled as a bycatch reduction device in 2016 with results showing a reduction in bycatch of over 35 per cent. At the beginning of 2017, the Kon’s Covered Fisheye was added to the list of approved bycatch reduction devices and industry is on track to achieving a 30 per cent reduction in bycatch by July 2018.

Performance - economic returns In the 2016 calendar year the Northern Prawn Fishery was the highest valued Commonwealth managed fishery with a total value of $98 million. This was around 10 per cent lower than the previous year, which is attributed to the drop in the first season banana prawn catch for 2016.

The fishery broadly (across the two key species groups - banana and tiger prawns) is managed to pursue maximum economic yield. Effort limits in the fishery have been set on the result of outputs from the bio-economic model for tiger and endeavour prawns and season length is controlled by catch- rate triggers in the banana prawn fishery to keep the fleet profitable. Recent assessments of economic performance by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences indicates that the level of fishing effort in the fishery is close to maximum economic yield targets. Net economic returns have been positive and improving since 2012-13 from around $5m to over $12m in 2014-15. This trend has continued into 2015-16 with higher catches of both tiger and banana prawns and favourable economic conditions. Economic conditions have remained favourable for 2016-17, including lower diesel costs and strong prawn prices. However, overall prawn catches in 2016-17 were lower than in 2015-16. Tiger prawn catch in 2016 was around 34 per cent lower and banana prawn catch in 2017 was around 58 per cent higher than in 2016.

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Tiger prawns. Photo courtesy: AFMA

in novations The Northern Prawn Fishery industry works closely with AFMA and cooperates through co-management arrangements to assist us with a range of key management functions. For example, the industry manages the collection and provision of catch and effort information, the quality control of the information and its dissemination to all users.

As part of these co-management arrangements, the industry undertakes additional crew-based observations of interactions with protected species and provides these records directly to the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation for assessment. The industry also assists in facilitating annual, independent scientific monitoring of the fishery by Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation scientists.

These co-management measures add value to the management of the fishery and are cost effective for industry and AFMA. They increase stewardship outcomes in the fishery and provide valuable information which will enhance future management decisions.

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There has also been some progress towards the development of indicators to show trends in the fishery that can forewarn the fishing industry and AFMA of an impending need for autonomous adjustment.

We have continued to focus on reducing red tape in the Northern Prawn Fishery by developing specifications for turtle exclusion devices to achieve consistency with adjoining fisheries while maintaining accreditation standards. New turtle excluder device specifications implemented in 2017 now allow the same device to be used across multiple fisheries in Commonwealth and Queensland fishery jurisdictions.

External reviews The Northern Prawn Fishery remains accredited under Part 13 and is approved as a wildlife trade operation under Part 13A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The fishery is also certified as a sustainable fishery by the Marine Stewardship Council, which is an independent global certifier of sustainable fisheries. In January 2017, reassessment began to evaluate the fishery’s compliance with the Marine Stewardship Council’s standard for well-managed and sustainable fisheries. The reassessment is now in its final stages of completion.

In July 2016, officers from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration visited Australia to conduct inspections of Australia’s turtle excluder devices. AFMA and industry collaborated to design a device that adheres to US standards and in early 2017 the Northern Prawn Fishery was again certified as meeting the world class standards in turtle excluder device design.

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FEATURE STORY

AFMA Bycatch and Discard Program - working with industry to make a difference (part one)

The 2016-17 financial year saw the AFMA bycatch program undertake a number of key projects across the Northern Prawn, South East Trawl and Great Australian Bight trawl fisheries as well as working on overarching bycatch and protected species strategies for all fisheries.

In the Northern Prawn Fishery, AFMA collaborated with the Northern Prawn Fishery Industry Pty Ltd (NPFI), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, A. Raptis and Sons Pty Ltd. and Tropic Ocean Prawns to undertake what was one of the largest and most successful Bycatch Reduction Device trials in the Northern Prawn Fishery since the development of turtle excluder devices in the 1990s. The trials, part of the NPFI voluntary Bycatch Reduction Strategy 2015-2018, tested the industry-designed Kon’s Covered Fisheye against the most commonly used square mesh panel Bycatch Reduction Device while targeting tiger prawns in the Gulf of Carpentaria.

The Kon’s Covered Fisheye is a revised version of the existing fisheye Bycatch Reduction Device, with the main difference being the Kon’s Covered Fisheye incorporates a ‘cone’ inside the fisheye frame. The cone has greatly enhanced the design of the traditional fisheye, allowing bycatch to escape without prawn loss. One of the key advantages to the revised design is that it can be placed far closer to the end of the net (codend), where the catch accumulates, and where a square mesh panel could not be used. This has contributed to a far greater reduction in fish bycatch.

Results from the trial indicated a reduction in bycatch of approximately 36 per cent with no prawn loss. The total data-set included just under 70 trawl shots with the contents of each net cod-end being weighed individually. As prawn trawlers in the Northern Prawn Fishery primarily tow quad-rigged gear (four nets), this equated to the contents of almost 280 codends being analysed. AFMA Bycatch officers and observers spent approximately

1200 hours in the field on this project whilst on-board the industry trawlers.

It is anticipated that further trialling will be undertaken during the 2017 tiger prawn season to determine the optimal position in the codend for the Kon’s Covered Fisheye and other potential operational improvements.

The final report on the work undertaken during 2017 trialling the Kon’s Covered Fisheye is available here: http://www.afma.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Kons-Covered-Fisheyes-BRD-Trial-Report-Northern-Prawn-Fishery-2016_FINAL.pdf

Kon’s Covered Fisheye’s stitched into net prior to trialling. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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North West Slope and the Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

North West Slope Trawl Fishery

Scampi (Metanephrops australiensis, M. boschmai, M. velutinus)

Western Deepwater Trawl Fishery

Bugs (Ibacus spp.)

Ruby snapper (Etelis carbunculus)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

NWSTF

WDTF

Confidential Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements There is no formal management plan for the North West Slope Trawl or the Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries. The Fisheries are managed by granting a limited number of fishing permits consistent with the provisions provided by the Fisheries Management Act 1991 and the Fisheries Management Regulations 1992.

There are 11 permits allowed in the Western Deepwater Trawl Fishery and seven in the North West Slope Trawl Fishery, all of which are valid for a maximum of five years. Fishers must adhere to a number of permit conditions aimed at protecting stocks and ecosystems. The permit conditions include specific gear limitations to reduce bycatch and move on provisions if fishing gear interacts with sponges or corals.

Analysis of performance During the past five years, North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl have experienced little, but stable levels of fishing effort. This trend continued in the 2016-2017 season. The limited levels of effort are due in part to permit holders accessing more lucrative fisheries that are adjacent to the North West Slope Trawl

or Western Deepwater Trawl fishery areas (eg. Northern Prawn Fishery to the north or the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery in the south).

In November 2016 the North West Slope Trawl and the Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries applied for reassessment under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The assessment is ongoing and is expected to be released in late October 2017.

In early 2017 the boundaries of the North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries were amended to better reflect updated bathymetric information. This change was enacted by amending the existing Offshore Constitutional Settlement agreement between the Commonwealth and Western Australia. These amendments are viewed as good progress for the fisheries and collaboration between the Commonwealth and Western Australia.

Under the existing harvest strategy, analysis of catch and effort data is conducted annually to assist in the management of the fisheries. The recent boundary changes and the forthcoming release of the new Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy have delayed a planned review of the harvest strategy for the fisheries. Instead, the North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries will undergo re-evaluation under AFMA’s new Ecological Risk Assessment and Ecological Risk Management Framework in 2017-2018. The results will be used to inform a review of the harvest strategies for these fisheries.

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Small Pelagic Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target4 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing 5 (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Australian sardine (Sardinops sagax)

Blue mackerel, east/west (Scomber australasicus)

Jack mackerel, east/west (Trachurus declivis)

Redbait, east/west (Emmelichthys nitidus)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

4 2 016-17 Agriculture Portfolio Budget Statements p. 200

5 I n AFMA managed fisheries, not including jointly and internationally managed fisheries.

6,096 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements

Management Plan The fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Small Pelagic Fishery Management Plan 2009. The management arrangements include the allocation of statutory fishing rights, rules governing gear that may be used and catch limits. There were no changes to the Small Pelagic Fishery Management Plan 2009 in 2016-17.

The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17.

Analysis of performance

Harvest Strategy Under the harvest strategy, analysis of catch and effort data is conducted annually to inform the setting of catch limits for commercially caught species in the fishery.

The Small Pelagic Fishery Harvest Strategy was updated in 2017 following additional testing undertaken during 2016. Consultation on the revised harvest strategy occurred during 2016 and 2017 with the Small Pelagic Fishery Scientific Panel, key stakeholders and the South East Management Advisory Committee. All aspects of the harvest strategy have now been tested and the reference points and harvest rates have been found to meet the biological, ecological and economic requirements of the fishery.

Performance - sustainability and economic returns The recently completed surveys for blue mackerel east and Australian sardine moved these stocks into the highest tier of the harvest strategy with the updated biomass estimates informing the total allowable catches for the 2017-18 season. A survey was undertaken for western jack mackerel in 2016-17 with the results expected to become available in 2017-18.

The total allowable catches for 2016-17 of some 39,000 tonnes for the seven target species were largely uncaught (only some 21 per cent) due to limited fishing effort.

In December 2016, AFMA received an application to pair trawl in the Small Pelagic Fishery, a method not automatically permitted under the fishery management plan. In early 2017 the independent AFMA Commission

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approved the determination of mid-water pair trawling as an approved fishing method in the Small Pelagic Fishery until October 2018, subject to conditions and review. The Commission’s decision took into consideration the best available science and advice from the South East Management Advisory Committee, the Small Pelagic Fishery Scientific Panel, seabird and marine mammal experts, key stakeholders and the public.

Like all fishing operations in Commonwealth managed fisheries, any mid-water pair trawling operation will be subject to strict rules and conditions, including protected species mitigation, monitoring and reporting requirements. Within this framework, this decision provides fishers with the ability to determine when and how they fish their quota.

Performance - status of bycatch In May 2017 AFMA implemented the Small Pelagic Fishery Dolphin Mitigation Strategy which aims to minimise dolphin interactions in the trawl sector of the fishery by creating incentives for fishers to innovate and adopt best practice to minimise interactions. This individual responsibility approach recognises that those who do not catch dolphins should be able to continue to fish, while those who do catch dolphins receive increased management action.

In 2016-17 AFMA and the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation updated the methodology for conducting ecological risk assessments for Commonwealth fisheries. The ecological risk assessment for the Small Pelagic Fishery was updated under the revised methodology with results expected to be published in 2017-18.

External reviews On 13 September 2016 the Senate agreed to re-adopt the Senate Standing Committee on Environment and Communication’s inquiry ‘Environmental, social and economic impacts of large-capacity fishing vessels commonly known as ‘super trawlers’ operating in Australia’s marine jurisdiction’. In November 2016 AFMA presented updated information to the Committee. The Committee released its findings and final recommendations in November 2016. A Coalition Senators’ dissenting report and Labor Senators’ additional comments were also published.

The government is preparing a response to the inquiry report.

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Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Sectors:

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target6 2016-17 Actual7

For economically significant stocks managed solely by AFMA: Number of key commercial stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy8

14 10

improve the number of stocks in (a) assessed as being on target 4 2

for those stocks in (a) that are assessed as not on target, improve the number that are heading towards their target reference point. 5 4

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing 9 (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 7

6 2016-17 Agriculture Portfolio Budget Statements p. 200

7 The reason the 2016-17 actual number of stocks dropped to 10 from target 14 in SESSF is that four stocks that are managed to maximum economic yield targets have dropped off from the top 30 commercial stocks and four non-SESSF stocks that are not managed to maximum economic yield targets have moved into the top 30 commercial stocks.

8 Where higher and lower value species are caught together, different targets for the lower value species may maximise net economic returns over all.

9 In AFMA managed fisheries, not including jointly and internationally managed fisheries.

16,657 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

• Commonwealth South East Trawl Sector

• East Coast Deepwater Trawl Sector

• Great Australian Bight Trawl Sector

• Gillnet Hook and Trap sector

- Shark Gillnet Sector

- Trap Sector

- Scalefish Hook Sector

- Shark Hook Sector

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Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook sectors

Blue grenadier (Macruronus novaezelandiae)

Eastern school whiting (Sillago flindersi )

Gemfish, western zone ( Rexea solandri)

Jackass morwong (Nemadactylus macropterus)

Ribaldo (Mora moro)

Commonwealth Trawl Sector

Flathead (Neoplatycephalus richardsoni and 4 other spp.)

John dory (Zeus faber)

Mirror dory (Zenopsis nebulosa)

Ocean jacket, eastern zone(Nelusetta ayraud)

Orange roughy, Cascade Plateau (Hoplostethus atlanticus)

Oreodory: 5 spp.

Royal red prawn (Haliporoides sibogae)

Silver trevally (Pseudocaranx georgianus)

Silver warehou (Seriolella punctata)

East Coast Deepwater Trawl Sector

Alfonsino (Beryx splendens)

Great Australian Bight Trawl Sector

Bight redfish ( Centroberyx gerrardi)

Deepwater flathead ( Neoplatycephalus conatus)

Ocean jacket, west (Nelusetta ayraud)

Shark Gillnet and Shark Hook sectors

Elephantfish (Callorhinchus milii)

Gummy shark (Mustelus antarcticus)

Sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus, P. nudipinnis)

Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook sectors

Blue-eye trevalla (Hyperoglyphe antarctica)

Ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri,H. percoides)

Commonwealth Trawl Sector

Orange roughy, eastern zone (Hoplostethus atlanticus)

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Commonwealth Trawl Sector

Orange roughy, southern & western zones (Hoplostethus atlanticus)

Redfish, eastern ( Centroberyx affinis )

Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook sectors

Gemfish, eastern zone ( Rexea solandri)

Blue warehou (Seriolella brama)

Gulper sharks (Centrophorus harrissoni,

C. moluccensis, C. zeehaani)

Shark Gillnet and Shark Hook sectors

School shark (Galeorhinus galeus)

Commonwealth Trawl Sector

Deepwater sharks, eastern & western zones (18spp.)

Great Australian Bight Trawl Sector

Orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)

Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook sectors

Pink ling (Genypterus blacodes)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

Management Plans/Arrangements The principal legal framework for the management of the fishery is specified in the Fisheries Management Act 1991 and the Fisheries Management Regulations 1992. The Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery has seven sectors that are managed through input and output controls including limited entry, catch limits, spatial closures, size limits and catch-and-effort triggers that are used to initiate further analysis and assessment. Fishers must hold a valid fishing concession to fish in this fishery.

The fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Management Plan 2003 . The management arrangements include the allocation of statutory fishing rights, catch limits and rules governing gear that may be used.

The performance criteria in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Management Plan 2003 were met noting that, where reference points have been determined for fish stocks relevant to the Southern and Eastern

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76

Scalefish and Shark Fishery, all stocks are either above the target reference point or have management arrangements in place to return stocks to target levels.

Analysis of performance

Performance - status of fish stocks All quota species in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery are managed to a biological target reference point, or a proxy thereof, based on either maximum economic yield or maximum sustainable yield.

During 2016-17 AFMA implemented the Redfish Stock Rebuilding Strategy. Redfish was assessed in 2014 as being at 11 per cent of its unfished biomass. The objective of the strategy is to rebuild the species to above its limit reference point of 20 per cent within 27 years from 2015, or approximately 2042. To support rebuilding of the stock, an incidental bycatch total allowable catch of 100 tonnes has been implemented. Approximately 40 tonnes was caught during the 2016-17 season.

Rebuilding strategies are also in place for blue warehou, eastern gemfish, school shark and orange roughy. Each of these strategies implements incidental catch total allowable catches in addition to management arrangements such as gear requirements, limited entry to the fishery, and independent research to better inform the status and recovery of the stocks.

Performance - economic returns For the purposes of reporting economic key performance indicators, AFMA considers its key commercial stocks as the top 30 by value. In 2016-17, 10 of the top 30 species were Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery quota species, all of which have maximum economic yield based targets. The economic performance of those species is measured based on the five year average stock biomass relevant to the maximum economic yield target. Three of those species, deepwater flathead, eastern school whiting and tiger flathead are assessed as being ‘on target’ or within 20 per cent of their target biomass on average over the past five years. Three stocks, while above their target biomass, are considered

underutilised - bight redfish, blue grenadier and pink ling west. Two stocks - blue-eye trevalla and pink ling east - while between the limit reference point and target reference point, are considered over utilised. However they are both assessed as ‘heading towards the target’ at a rate that is consistent with the Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy 2007. School shark is on a recovery

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program and is assessed as below the limit reference point, noting that a new assessment based on ‘close-kin’ genetics is due to be completed in 2017-18.

Furthermore, several total allowable catches for species in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery remain significantly undercaught. AFMA and the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation have recently agreed on a research project to better understand the reasons for the undercatch.

Performance - reliability of information Vessel specific discard reporting performance of Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery vessels continued to be monitored in 2016-17 through comparison of logbook reported discards against electronic monitoring reviews or estimated discards from the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Integrated Scientific Monitoring Program.

Mirror Dory and Royal Red Prawn. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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Performance - status of bycatch AFMA implemented the Gillnet Dolphin Mitigation Strategy in May 2017 to minimise dolphin interactions with gillnets in the shark gillnet sector. The strategy adopts an individual responsibility approach to create incentives for fishers to innovate and adopt best practices. Under the individual responsibility approach, fishers are responsible for their actions to minimise interactions and stay within defined performance criteria. The performance criteria and management responses ensure that a fisher cannot continue fishing unchecked if they continue to have dolphin interactions. For each dolphin interaction there is an associated management response that escalates to the point where an individual fisher cannot continue fishing with gillnets in the fishery.

Also in May 2017, AFMA implemented new management arrangements for seabirds for trawl fisheries. The arrangements focus on ‘bird bafflers’ which is a curtain like device which has been designed to deter seabirds from foraging in between the stern of the vessel and where the warps enter the water - see feature story overleaf.

External reviews Monitoring and assessment in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery required to meet the objectives of fisheries management, including those in the Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy 2007 and Policy on Fisheries Bycatch 2000 were reviewed in 2016-17. The main objective of the project, named the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Strategic Monitoring and Assessment Review Project, was to identify and evaluate the most cost-effective monitoring and assessment options that meet the requisite policy needs. The outcomes of the project are expected to be published in 2017-18 with implementation to begin in 2018-19.

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FEATURE STORY

AFMA Bycatch and Discard Program - working with industry to make a difference (part two)

In 2016-17 the AFMA bycatch program undertook a number of key projects across the Northern Prawn, South East Trawl and Great Australian Bight trawl fisheries as well as working on overarching bycatch and protected species strategies for all fisheries.

The bycatch program also undertook an extensive project, in close collaboration with industry, in the South East Trawl and Great Australian Bight Trawl fisheries, with the implementation of ’bird bafflers’. A bird baffler is a system of droppers arranged off a rigid frame to create a curtain around the area where trawl warp wires enter the water. This area is identified as the danger zone for seabirds foraging for bits of food at the back of trawl boats.

Trials undertaken during 2014 demonstrated that the bird baffler and the seabird sprayer (a similar system to the bird baffler, but the ’curtain’ is created by spraying jets of water around the trawl warps) both drastically reduced seabird interactions with trawl warp wires when compared to the existing mitigation device used (600mm warp deflector, known as a ‘pinky’). Pinkies had also caused some workplace health and safety concerns for a number of operators as attaching the buoy onto the warps is far easier on some vessels than others.

On the back of the success of these sea trials, the South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association asked AFMA to strengthen seabird bycatch mitigation measures in the southern trawl fisheries to demonstrate that industry was serious about reducing seabird bycatch. AFMA subsequently mandated that, from the commencement of the 2017 fishing season, all vessels must install bird bafflers or seabird sprayers, or have demonstrated to AFMA that they can fish using pinkies without discarding offal whilst trawl gear was under tow.

Of the three mitigation options, 30 vessels fitted bafflers, one vessel fitted a sprayer system and one vessel is operating with pinkies under an offal retention regime.

Image top: FV Explorer S with bafflers stowed in port.

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The AFMA bycatch program undertook extensive consultation with industry, which included the development of an instructional video on how to construct bird bafflers, and in excess of 20 port visits and over 250 phone calls were made.

AFMA would like to congratulate industry for the significant amount of work undertaken to install bafflers and sprayers on vessels in the South East Trawl and Great Australian Bight Trawl fisheries. This is an outstanding result for the fishery and demonstrates industry’s willingness to address interactions with seabirds. The project was also an excellent example of how government/science/industry partnerships can deliver real conservation solutions.

The AFMA Bycatch and Discards team also recently developed Fishery Management Paper Number 15 - AFMA Bycatch Strategy. The Bycatch Strategy has been developed to guide consistency in the management of bycatch across all Commonwealth fisheries. The strategy is based on a set of principles that link our operational environment with government and legislative requirements. The strategy also aims to achieve more transparency and practicality to bycatch management along with improved monitoring and reporting of bycatch interactions in Commonwealth fisheries. The document sets out our commitment and approach to minimising and reducing bycatch in Commonwealth managed fisheries.

Leading on from the strategy, a number of Protected Species strategies are being developed to operationalise the principles of the bycatch strategy. These will include strategies for a number of key Threatened, Endangered and Protected species such as seabirds, seals and dolphins.

Image top-left: FV Western Alliance with bafflers deployed whilst fishing. Image top-right: Light-mantled Sooty Albatross. Photo courtesy: Alex Inwood, observer

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Southern Squid Jig Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name ) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Gould’s squid (Nototodarus gouldi)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

Management Plans/Arrangements The Southern Squid Jig Fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Southern Squid Jig Fishery Management Plan 2005 and the Arrow Squid Fishery Harvest Strategy. The management arrangements include restricting how many boats can fish in the fishery and regulating the type and amount of fishing gear they can use. There were no changes to the Southern Squid Jig Fishery Management Plan 2005 in 2016-17.

205 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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82

The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17 noting that a bycatch action plan is not in place for the Southern Squid Jig Fishery. This reflects the low incidence of bycatch in the fishery and the ecological risk assessment finding of no bycatch species at high or moderate risk. We anticipate updating the ecological risk assessment for the Southern Squid Jig Fishery in 2017-18 which will identify any bycatch issues. AFMA will develop and implement an appropriate management response to reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

Analysis of performance Gould’s squid (also known as arrow squid) is a highly productive and relatively short lived species. This species is not managed to a target reference point but rather the harvest strategy is based on a series of catch and effort triggers which, if reached, will trigger further analyses and management responses.

Effort and catch in the fishery varies between seasons and has been relatively low in recent years resulting in no catch or effort trigger being reached.

The research project ‘Improving the location and targeting of economically viable aggregations of squid available to the squid jigging method and the fleet’s ability to catch squid’ started in 2016-17 aimed at improving industry’s ability to locate and target squid aggregations. This project is due to be completed in 2017-18, and with a better understanding of how to locate squid, it is hoped that it will result in more profitable fishing, more consistent supply (to both domestic and overseas markets) and new/previous fishers entering the underexploited squid fishery.

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Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target10 2016-17 Actual

For economically significant stocks managed solely by AFMA:

a. number of key commercial stocks with harvest strategy targets based on maximum economic yield or the best available proxy11 1 1

b. improve the number of stocks in (a) assessed as being on target 1 1

c. for those stocks in (a) that are assessed as not on target, improve the number that are heading towards their target reference point 0 0

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 1

Stock status of target species Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax)

Albacore (Thunnus alalunga)

Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares)

Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus)

Swordfish ( Xiphias gladius)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

10 2016-17 Agriculture Portfolio Budget Statements p. 200

11 Where higher and lower value species are caught together, different targets for the lower value species may maximise net economic returns over all.

4,537 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements The fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Management Plan 2010 , and conservation and management measures mandated by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission of which Australia is a member.

The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17.

Analysis of performance

Status of stocks Overall, Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery catches were lower in the 2016-17 season relative to the previous season, largely due to significantly reduced catches of yellowfin tuna and to a lesser degree, broadbill swordfish. At the end of the 2016-17 season, the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery had taken close to 70 per cent of the total allowable commercial catch of each of yellowfin tuna (down from 99 per cent in 2015-16), broadbill swordfish, striped marlin and bigeye tuna.

The reduction in yellowfin tuna catch is thought to be related to a reduced availability of yellowfin in the fishery area, possibly due to regional oceanographic processes. There is currently genetic research underway to assess connectivity between target species in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery and the broader Pacific Ocean. We are also seeking to investigate oceanographic impacts on the fishery to better understand inter-annual variations in catches. Finally, while the fishery caught only 39 per cent of the albacore tuna total allowable commercial catch, this represented the highest catch of albacore tuna in more than five years.

Domestically, the total allowable commercial catches of all the key commercial species are currently considered to be appropriate and of no concern to the regional status of these regional stocks. A recent downturn in broadbill swordfish catch rates (which resulted in a reduction in the total allowable commercial catch for the 2017-18 season) will continue to be monitored and managed by us under the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Harvest Strategy.

However, as the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery target species are also managed internationally there are concerns regarding the stock status of bigeye tuna in particular, as it is currently assessed to be overfished and subject to overfishing within the Western and Central Pacific Ocean. Updated stock assessments for both bigeye tuna and yellowfin tuna in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean and broadbill swordfish in the South Pacific are due later in 2017.

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Fishery management arrangements In July 2015 a major management change in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery was the implementation of e-monitoring and this program continued through the 2016-17 season. All full-time (fish for more than 30 days per season) active boats in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery now have a system of cameras and sensors installed to monitor all fishing operations. Footage is recorded when fishing operations are occurring to verify the logbook records. All fishing operations on full-time boats are now monitored, with 10 per cent of all longline shots (minimum of one shot per boat, per month) reviewed and compared to the logbook reports. Regular feedback reports are provided back to Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery operators to inform them of their reporting performance. Since the implementation of e-monitoring, preliminary analysis has indicated an improvement in logbook reporting.

During May to November 2016, AFMA also implemented the annual southern bluefin tuna zone in the fishery to ensure that any southern bluefin tuna caught was covered by quota. To enter the zone, Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery operators were required to hold a minimum amount of southern bluefin tuna quota and meet a certain level of observer coverage. The southern bluefin tuna zone location was updated weekly using sea surface temperature maps and industry catch information.

In 2016-17 we started the process of reviewing and updating the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Harvest Strategy. A revision of the ecological risk assessment and development of an integrated Fisheries Management Strategy will combine existing fishery strategies and action plans into a single strategy to operationalise the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Management Plan. It is expected these processes will be finalised during the 2017-18 season.

In relation to protected species, an increase in seabird interactions in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery was reported in the 2016-17 summer season and AFMA is currently responding to that increase as required under the Seabird Threat Abatement Plan 2014. We also investigate any Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery interactions with marine mammals, although these are uncommon.

External reviews Compliance by the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery with Conservation and Management Measures of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission is reviewed on an annual basis under the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission Compliance Monitoring Scheme. In 2016-17, as in previous years, Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery management arrangements were consistent with Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission measures.

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

n/a n/a

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable 1 1

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Southern Bluefin tuna ( Thunnus maccoyii)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

Management Plans/Arrangements The fishery continues to be managed in accordance with the Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery Management Plan 1995. The fishery is managed through a system of output controls in the form of individually transferrable quotas which are allocated as statutory fishing rights under the fishery management plan. The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17.

Prior to the commencement of each season (1 December to 30 November), AFMA determines a total allowable catch of southern bluefin tuna for the domestic fishery based upon Australia’s national allocation from the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna. Each statutory fishing right entitles the holder to receive an equal portion of the total allowable catch set by AFMA for this period.

5,511 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Analysis of performance

Performance - quota setting The domestic total allowable catch for the 2015-16 Southern Bluefin Tuna fishing season was 5665 tonnes.

The total catch in the fishery, for the 2015-16 fishing season, was 5636 tonnes. Concession holders in the ranching sector of the fishery took approximately 89 per cent of the catch. The remaining catch was taken by longline.

Performance - status of fish stocks The Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna management procedure specified that a full quantitative stock assessment should be undertaken every three years. The first full assessment since the 2011 adoption of the management procedure was in 2014.

The 2014 stock assessment suggested that the southern bluefin tuna stock remains at a very low level of biomass, estimated to be nine per cent of the initial spawning stock biomass, and below the level to produce maximum sustainable yield (33 000 tonnes). However there has been some improvement since the 2011 stock assessment and fishing mortality is below the level associated with maximum sustainable yield. There are indicators of higher recruitment in recent years. This suggests that some relatively strong cohorts are moving through the fishery, though have yet to contribute to the spawning stock.

There still remains a level of uncertainty around unaccounted mortality and its impact on the recovery of the stock. This will be further investigated in the next full stock assessment that will be conducted later in 2017.

Performance - economic returns The majority of the southern bluefin tuna total allowable catch continues to be taken by the purse seine sector in the Great Australian Bight for subsequent grow out by the ranching sector. However, in recent years an increasing amount has been taken by pelagic longline vessels operating in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery. The longline catch of southern bluefin tuna in 2015-16 was approximately 731 tonnes, up from 580 tonnes the previous season. The amount taken by longliners on the east coast depends primarily on access to available quota from the ranching sector and the seasonal availability of fish.

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External reviews

Environmental Assessment of the Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery In late 2016 the Department of the Environment and Energy assessed the operation of the Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery for the purposes of Parts 13 and 13A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The Department declared the fishery an approved wildlife trade operation until 13 December 2019. Conditions placed on the export approval include increasing confidence in the estimates of purse-seine catches, and for management arrangements to start accounting for Australia’s attributable catch, including recreational and indigenous catch, by 2018.

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Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

n/a 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Albacore (Thunnus alalunga)

Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares)

Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus)

Swordfish ( Xiphias gladius)

Striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

344 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements The fishery continued to be managed in accordance with the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery Management Plan 2005 and resolutions mandated by the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission of which Australia is a member.

The performance criteria detailed in the fishery management plan were all met in 2016-17.

Analysis of performance

Status of fish stocks The Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery has continued to operate at low levels of effort, largely due to economic conditions. In 2016-17, catch levels for each of the four main target species were slightly lower than in 2015-16 but were consistent with average levels.

Domestically, the total allowable commercial catches for all the key commercial species are currently considered to be appropriate and of no concern to the regional stock status. However, as the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery target species are managed internationally, there are concerns regarding the stock status of striped marlin and yellowfin tuna. Both are considered to be subject to overfishing within the wider Indian Ocean. Updated stock assessments for both striped marlin and yellowfin tuna are due to be completed in 2018.

Albacore tuna. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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Fishery management arrangements In July 2015 a major management change in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery was the implementation of e-monitoring and this continued through 2016-17. All full-time (fish for more than 30 days per season) active boats in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery now have a system of cameras and sensors installed to monitor all fishing operations. Footage is recorded when fishing operations are occurring to verify logbook records. All fishing operations on full-time boats are now monitored, with 10 per cent of all longline shots (minimum of one shot per boat, per month) reviewed and compared to the logbook reports. Regular feedback reports are provided back to Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery operators to inform them of their reporting performance. Since the implementation of e-monitoring, preliminary analysis has indicated an improvement in logbook reporting.

AFMA continues to monitor protected species interactions in the fishery. In the 2016-17 summer season, an increase in seabird interactions was reported in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery and AFMA is responding to that increase as required under the Seabird Threat Abatement Plan 2014.

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Heard isl and and McDonald isl ands Fishery

Performance results

Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Mackerel icefish ( Champsocephalus gunnari)

Patagonian toothfish ( Dissostichus eleginoides)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

3,632 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Management Plans/Arrangements The Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery is managed in accordance with the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery Management Plan 2002 and the conservation measures mandated by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. All operations conducted in the fishery were in compliance with the performance criteria outlined in the management plan. Four vessels operated in the fishery during 2016-17. Three vessels were longliners and one vessel was a trawler/longliner.

There were no changes to the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery Management Plan 2002 during the 2016-17 period.

Analysis of performance

Performance - status of fish stocks In November 2016, the AFMA Commission set the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery total allowable catches at 3405 tonnes for patagonian toothfish and 561 tonnes for mackerel icefish for the 2016-17 fishing year. While recognising that there had been a drop in recent catch rates that was raising some concerns, Commissioners also recognised that the current total allowable catch level set by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (to which Australia is a member country), should not unreasonably impact on long term sustainability of patagonian toothfish stocks.

The Sub-Antarctic Resource Assessment Group and Sub-Antarctic Management Advisory Committee supported the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery total allowable catches for the 2016-17 fishing year.

Performance - status of bycatch To allow vessels access to more fishing time, the 2016-17 Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery longline fishing season was extended under a trial arrangement. The core longline fishing season extends from 1 May to 14 September. Under the trial, longlining can occur from 1 April 2017 to 30 November 2017 for approved vessels. Strict rules are in place around interactions with seabirds during the autumn and spring extension periods, when seabird activity increases around Heard Island and McDonald Islands. If three or more seabirds are caught and killed by fishing gear during the trial extension periods, that vessel can no longer fish by longline in the extension periods.

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External reviews Management of the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery is reviewed internationally by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. The Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery lies within the area of Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources meets each year and, among other things, considers catch limits and bycatch management for the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery.

The Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery stock assessment for patagonian toothfish is considered and endorsed by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources.

During 2016-17 the patagonian toothfish assessment also underwent an independent scientific review conducted by Dr Tony Smith. A number of recommendations from this review will be implemented in 2017-18 and beyond to improve the stock assessment.

Iceberg off Heard Island in the southern ocean. Photo courtesy: Alex Inwood, observer

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Macquarie isl and Toothfish Fishery

Performance results Performance criteria (AFMA Corporate Plan 2016-19)

2016-17 Target 2016-17 Actual

Number of fish stocks subject to overfishing (The number of stocks where the level of catches by fishery operators is likely to result in stock becoming overfished)

0 0

The number of stocks that are assessed as overfished and, unless effectively managed, may lead to the stock not being sustainable n/a 0

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Patagonian toothfish ( Dissostichus eleginoides)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

Management Plans/Arrangements The Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery is managed in accordance with the Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery Management Plan 2006 . All operations conducted in the fishery were in compliance with the performance criteria outlined in the management plan. As at June 2017, one vessel had operated in the fishery during 2016-17 fishing season.

There were no changes to the Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery Management Plan 2006 during the 2016-17 period.

316 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Analysis of performance

Performance status of fish stocks In March 2016, the AFMA Commission set the Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery total allowable catch for patagonian toothfish at 450 tonnes. Catch limits for bycatch species were set at 50 tonnes for each other species, consistent with previous years.

The Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery has been divided into three regions, noting that toothfish within these three regions are considered to be a single stock. Industry agreed to, as far as possible, adopt a fishing strategy endorsed by the Sub-Antarctic Fisheries Resource Assessment Group which spreads fishing effort across the three regions. The voluntary strategy allows more tags to be deployed in the Northern Macquarie Region where the Sub-Antarctic Fisheries Resource Assessment Group agreed tagging would be most useful in improving scientific knowledge and reducing uncertainty in the stock assessment.

External reviews There has been no external review of the fishery in 2016-17.

Patagonian Toothfish. Photo courtesy: AFMA

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High Seas Permits

Major species:

Insufficient information is available to enable the fishery-wide determination of stock status for any of the high-seas demersal fish stocks in the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation and the Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement areas of competence.

Management Plans/Arrangements High seas permits continue to be managed consistent with conservation and management measures applying under the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation and the Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement. AFMA implemented new conservation and management measures (see paragraph below) applying under the Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement in 2016. Operational requirements are implemented through conditions on high seas permits.

High seas permits allow Australian flagged vessels to fish for non-highly migratory species outside the Australian Fishing Zone in the Southern Indian and South Pacific Oceans. The fishing areas are designated through the Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement and the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation, to both of which the Australian Government is a party.

• Orange roughy

• Alfonsino

• Blue-eye trevalla

• Jackass morwong

• Yellowtail kingfish

• Smooth oreodory

• Spikey oreodory

• Redthroat emperor

• Boarfish

• Cardinal fish

• Rubyfish.

264 tonnes Estimated catch 2016-17

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Analysis of performance New conservation and management measures relating to the prohibition of deepwater gillnets and large-scale pelagic driftnets, the management of bottom fishing and data standards were adopted by the Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement meeting of the parties in July 2016. These measures are important to ensure the ecological sustainability of fisheries in this area and have been implemented through High Seas Permits.

Australia hosted the 2017 South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation Commission in Adelaide in January 2017, preceded by a meeting of the Compliance and Technical Committee. A key outcome from this meeting was progressing the establishment of a Vessel Monitoring System as a critical tool to ensure compliance with conservation and management measures and in combating illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the convention area.

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Non-operational fisheries Commercial operators were not working in the following Commonwealth fisheries during 2016-17.

Norfolk island Fishery The Norfolk Island Fishery has no formal management plan and there are currently no commercial fishing concessions in this fishery. The fishery is managed by the Norfolk Island Regional Council in accordance with the Norfolk Island Inshore Fishery Policy 2009. The associated Memorandum of Understanding has enabled AFMA to provide management expertise and guidance to the Norfolk Island Regional Council and the Norfolk Island Fishing Association as required.

We are working with the Norfolk Island Fishing Association and other government agencies on future management arrangements following the reforms to the governance of Norfolk Island in 2015.

No stock assessments or biomass estimates for species taken within the Norfolk Island Fishery have been made. No stock status classifications have been given to this fishery as there are no defined stocks for management purposes.

Skipjack Tuna Fishery

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Latest available status assessment

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Indian Ocean skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis)

Western and Central Pacific Ocean skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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The fishery is managed in accordance with the Skipjack Tuna Harvest Strategy, the statement of fishery management arrangements and fishing concession conditions.

Effort in the fishery has remained at very low levels since 2008 for economic reasons. There were no new management arrangements implemented in the fishery in 2016-17. There are 19 Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery permits and 14 Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery permits. However no Australian vessels are currently targeting skipjack tuna.

South Tasman Rise Fishery

Stock status of target species

Common name (scientific name) Status

2015 2016

Fishing mortality Biomass Fishing mortality

Biomass

Orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)

Biomass Not overfished Fishing Mortality Not subject to overfishing Uncertain Biomass Overfished

Fishing Mortality Subject to overfishing

Source: Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Larcombe, J and Curtotti, R 2017. Fishery status reports 2017, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 4.0

The South Tasman Rise Fishery forms part of Australia’s fishing footprint under the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation but has been closed to fishing since 2007. The area is also subject to a memorandum of understanding for cooperative management between Australia and New Zealand established in 1998. New Zealand has not fished the South Tasman Rise since the end of the 2000-01 fishing season.

Resumption of fishing will require prior agreement between Australia and New Zealand on issues such as an appropriate total allowable catch setting and a new harvest strategy.

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Part 4

Management and Accountability Corporate governance practices

Purchasing

People management

Photo opposite: French ship Nivose Possession Island. Photo courtesy: Cameron James, AFMA

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Part 4 - Su MMarY

staff were employed in 2016-17

our staff

186

107 men 79 women

staff by gender

compliance with finance lawno significant matters reported under finance law.

covering leadership, recruitment practices, mental health, behavioural profiling, resilience, giving and receiving feedback, unconscious bias, cultural effectiveness and a mentoring program

in-house courses

13 144 attended by employees

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE PRACTICES

Governing body As provided for in the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, AFMA was established to manage Commonwealth commercial fisheries. As a non-corporate government entity, AFMA as a statutory body forms part of the Commonwealth government and therefore can sue and in turn be sued. As such AFMA does not hold money and all financial liabilities are taken to be liabilities of the Commonwealth.

Domestic fisheries management functions and powers are the responsibility of the AFMA Commission. The Chief Executive Officer is responsible for assisting the Commission, including giving effect to its decisions. The Chief Executive Officer is separately responsible for exercising AFMA’s foreign compliance functions and powers.

The Commission is subject to limited government policy direction as stated in s91 of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991. The minister is the approving authority for AFMA’s Corporate Plan, Annual Operational Plan and all Fishery Management Plans determined by AFMA.

The Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources appoints the chairman, part-t ime commissioners and the Chief Executive Officer. Following advice from the chairman, the minister appoints a part-time commissioner as deputy-ch airperson.

The Chief Executive Officer is the Accountable Authority under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and is the Agency Head under the Public Service Act 1999.

The Chief Executive Officer is subject to Ministerial Direction with regard to the Authority’s foreign compliance functions, and under the Public Service Act 1999 is required to be responsive to government in implementing the government’s policies and programs.

For more information about AFMA’s Commissioners, see Appendix 1 to this report.

Disclosure of interests Commissioners must disclose to the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources any pecuniary or other interest that may relate to their AFMA functions, both prior to appointment and if such interests arise during their terms of office. Disclosures of interests are kept on a register of interests held

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staff were employed in 2016-17

our staff

186

107 men 79 women

staff by gender

compliance with finance lawno significant matters reported under finance law.

covering leadership, recruitment practices, mental health, behavioural profiling, resilience, giving and receiving feedback, unconscious bias, cultural effectiveness and a mentoring program

in-house courses

13 144 attended by employees

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

by AFMA. Where a commissioner declares they have an interest in a matter for consideration by the Commission it will initiate a procedure to determine the action required to safeguard the integrity of the Commission’s decisions.

Performance review The Commission reviews its performance at each Commission meeting. Matters reviewed address the effectiveness of the Commission in its decision making, corporate governance and maintenance of stakeholder relationships.

in ternal scrutiny AFMA strives to ensure that governance arrangements, together with the associated systems and processes used, are the best they can be. To this end we utilise internal audits as an essential tool to independently identify any deficiencies in these processes and control systems whilst at the same time providing opportunities to deliver better practices that will improve the efficiency, cost effectiveness and transparency of our management and regulatory arrangements.

During 2016-17, after a competitive procurement process, AFMA engaged a new independent auditor for three years, due to the previous internal auditor contract expiring.

In June 2017, the internal auditor in collaboration with AFMA management and the AFMA Audit and Risk Committee established a new Strategic Internal Audit Plan. The Strategic Internal Audit Plan outlines the intended audits that will be conducted over the next three years. These proposed audits are intended to address high level risks that have been identified as part of our Risk Management Process.

Prior to finalising the Strategic Internal Audit Plan, the independent auditor completed two interim audits in the latter half of 2016-17 on the following areas of AFMA’s business operations:

• Quality Management System readiness review

- An assessment of AFMA’s readiness to implement an ISO 9001 compliant Quality Management System

• Research Program review

- A review of the processes and procedures AFMA uses in the management of contracted research.

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The recommendations from these audits will be considered by AFMA management and work undertaken to implement them monitored by the AFMA Audit and Risk Committee during 2017-18.

We have also established a number of standing committees which provide oversight and governance over other key operational activities. These committees include the Project Governance Committee and the Information Governance Committee. The Chief Executive Officer has maintained the Audit and Risk Committee to also provide internal scrutiny of AFMA operations. Descriptions of these committees are provided in Appendix 1.

External scrutiny AFMA’s financial statements are audited annually by the Australian National Audit Office. The Office examines the strength of our internal controls to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the annual financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement. The results of their audit are presented in their report on the financial statements accessible in part 5 of this report.

The Audit Office retains an understanding of AFMA, the environment in which we operate, our objectives and strategies and internal controls. This includes acquiring an understanding of the information systems and related business processes relevant to our financial reporting objectives (including the accounting system) and how we have responded to any related financial reporting risks. Relevant Audit Office performance audits or internal audit activity are considered as part of this process.

AFMA’s performance is also subject to review through Senate Estimates. Parliament may also review and disallow legislative instruments proposed by AFMA as part of its delegated functions.

Outcomes of judicial and administrative tribunals are referenced at Appendix 2: ‘Civil Litigation Outcomes’.

In October 2016 we responded to the Productivity Commission’s draft report on the inquiry on Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture, which looked at ways to improve the regulation of Australia’s marine fisheries so as to enhance their productivity. The Australian Government’s response to the Productivity Commission report: Inquiry into regulation of the Australian marine fisheries and aquaculture sectors was released in May 2017.

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AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Corporate planning and reporting AFMA’s Planning and Reporting Framework is consistent with the obligations under the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, whole-of-government requirements under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and Public Governance Performance and Accountability Rule 2014. These obligations together with our own internal documents support good governance. The key elements are:

Legislation: Fisheries Administration Act 1991 P ublic Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

Portfolio Budget Statements The Portfolio Budget Statement (PBS) informs Senators and Members of Parliament of the proposed allocation of resources to government outcomes, by agency, within a Ministerial portfolio. It describes the outcome sought by the legislation administered by AFMA, AFMA’s strategic direction and the manner in which AFMA will measure performance over the next four financial years. The PBS also describes the financial resources that AFMA expects to use over the next four years.

Corporate Plan The Corporate Plan describes, in greater detail than the PBS, AFMA’s corporate goals, the strategies we will focus over the next four financial years to achieve these goals and the manner in which AFMA will measure performance over the next four years.

Annual Operational Plan The Annual Operational Plan (AOP) is a legislative olbligation under the Fisheries Administration Act 1991. It explains the actions that AFMA will undertake in 2017-18 to pursue the areas of focus and deliver on the goals and strategies identified in the Corporate Plan. The AOP identifies Plans of Management, if any, which AFMA intends to determine or implement in the year. The AOP also identifies performance measures that will assess how well we are delivering the strategies described in the Corporate Plan. AFMA must submit an AOP to the Minister by 1 June each year.

Annual Performance Statement/Annual Report The annual performance statement is included as part of the entity’s Annual Report and produced at the end of the reporting cycle. The statement provides an assessment of the extent to which an entity has succeeded in achieving its purposes.

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Section Plans Every business unit within AFMA is required to develop section plans. These plans ensure that business activity across the agency is both coordinated and focused on delivering directly to AFMA’s objectives as outlined in our annual operating plan. These plans form the basis of allocating resources to the various business activities and/or specific projects that directly support the outcomes of the Annual Operational Plan. The section plans also inform individual staff performance plans against which officers are assessed throughout the reporting period in accordance with our performance development scheme.

Risk management AFMA’s corporate risk management procedures were reviewed in 2015 and a new Risk Management Framework approved in November 2016. The framework incorporates a Risk Management Policy and Risk Management Guidelines that are consistent with the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy and international standards (ISO 31000:2009). The framework is aligned with AFMA’s corporate goals to ensure all staff remain focused on achieving those goals while managing the identified risks associated with them. This approach ensures that staff at all levels of the agency are responsible for participating in risk management processes and delivers cost-efficient fisheries management by allowing our managers to make informed decisions and assign resources effectively.

As part of the review, AFMA also established in early 2017, a two tier risk monitoring and reporting process in accordance with our Risk Management Policy and Risk Management Guidelines.

The lower tier level Enterprise Risk Register forms the nucleus to identifying and monitoring risks throughout the agency associated with its operational activities. This ‘living’ document will assist AFMA officers to address risks posed by their operational activity and feeds into the higher tier Strategic Risk Register. The Strategic Risk Register has been designed to align/map identified risks outlined in the Enterprise Risk Register to the corporate goals as set out in the AFMA Corporate Plan. Both registers have been endorsed by the AFMA Commission and the AFMA Audit and Risk Committee.

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Our risk management process is illustrated below:

Establish Goals and Context CEO and

Commission

Audit and Risk Committee

Risk

Management Committee

Risk Manager

Risk

Identification

Risk Analysis

Risk Appetite

Treatment

Tolerance

Risk Owner

Update

Present and Escalate

Risk Process Escalation

Position Descriptions

Section Plans

Branch Plans

Risk Appetite

Corporate Goals

Risk Register

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Business Continuity AFMA’s business continuity plan identifies a tiered response to essential business activities that we consider are critical to maintain and provides guidance to AFMA management in establishing alternative arrangements in the event of unexpected disruption to normal service delivery. The plan enables the priority allocation of resources to critical business processes to ensure that AFMA continue to function effectively following a significant disruption. The plan includes emergency contacts, cyclone response procedures for our Darwin and Thursday Island offices and information and communications technology disaster recovery protocols. The business continuity plan is tested, reviewed and updated annually, and monitored by the AFMA Audit and Risk Committee.

During 2016-17 an incident at AFMA’s Canberra office on 3 April 2017 prompted the activation of the business continuity plan. The incident involved fumes from a defective battery in our computer server room which polluted the air on level four of the office. Officers were evacuated from the immediate area and relevant maintenance contractors contacted. No officers were hurt during the incident and the problem was quickly identified and corrected. AFMA conducted a post incident assessment following this incident noting that the business continuity procedures operated effectively with only minor improvements required.

Project Management Framework In April 2017, AFMA implemented a new approach to the governance arrangements around projects we undertake. We developed a new strategic delivery framework which supports the delivery of all major projects across the organisation in line with the outcomes of our Annual Operational Plan or corporate plan.

The framework has been developed to support improved governance oversight and increased accuracy in relation to resourcing and managing major project work we undertake. The focus is on detailed planning, reporting and governance. A review Committee, made up of AFMA’s Executive, oversees the delivery of relevant project work.

Development of the framework has provided defined project management processes and systematic reporting. Co-ordination of this function is undertaken through the Committee Secretariat, based in AFMA’s Corporate Risk Team.

Information Management AFMA has fully implemented an Electronic Documents and Records Management System. All staff have access to the Electronic Documents and Records Management System and have been trained in its use. Training continued with one to one sessions or in small groups being provided for new starters or staff

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who needed a refresher course. The Electronic Documents and Records Management System has provided opportunities to review some internal current paper based processes and change over to a digital based process.

The Electronic Documents and Records Management System is and will be a key element in the efficient storage, retrieval and use of information in AFMA and an important means of meeting the requirements of the Government’s Digital Continuity 2020 Policy and related standards. The Electronic Documents and Records Management System will also support our objective of utilising more of our digital information to enable more efficient digital service delivery, increasing opportunities for information sharing and to improve business decisions based on good information.

Work has commenced on reviewing the information governance documents such as the framework and policy to ensure that a complete digital recordkeeping environment is achieved within AFMA. Work has also commenced on the development of an information management strategy.

Fraud Control In February 2017, AFMA finalised a new Fraud Policy which complements the new Fraud Control Plan for 2017-2019. The Fraud Policy applies to AFMA staff (and contractors) and outlines our zero tolerance policy to fraud. AFMA has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures that meet the specific needs of the organisation. These mechanisms and procedures are regularly tested to ensure that they remain relevant and fit for purpose for AFMA. Both the new Policy and Control Plan meet AFMA’s requirements under section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

The Fraud Policy does not apply to fraud committed by parties external to AFMA, such as domestic or foreign fishers operating in the Australian Fishing Zone. The investigation of such fraud is undertaken by investigating officials within AFMA’s Fisheries Operations Branch, or in some cases the Australian Federal Police.

Domestic matters AFMA investigated 162 new external fraud related matters during 2016-17. These were primarily associated with breaches of the domestic quota management arrangements, failure to fit AFMA’s Vessel Monitoring System, e-monitoring system or have it operating at all times, breaching species trip

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limits, failure to report interaction/retention of protected or prohibited species, mishandling of bycatch, retaining ‘no-take’ species, unauthorised and unlicensed fishing and failure to accurately complete logbooks. An additional 25 external fraud matters were carried over from the previous year.

We finalised 163 external fraud matters as a result of instituting either administrative or prosecution action. There are still 24 matters currently under investigation, referred to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions, in court or otherwise in the process of finalisation.

Foreign matters In 2016-17, 15 foreign fishing vessels were apprehended in Australian waters. Six were from Indonesia, one Papua New Guinea and eight from Vietnam. Of the total 192 foreign fishers detained from these vessels, 137 were prosecuted and convicted for offences relating to the illegal use of a foreign fishing vessel in the Australian Fishing Zone. All matters were finalised by 30 June 2017.

Audit and Risk Committee AFMA’s Audit and Risk Committee provides independent assurance and advice to the Chief Executive Officer and the AFMA Commission on AFMA’s financial reporting, performance monitoring, systems of risk oversight and management and systems of internal control.

For further information on the Audit and Risk Committee see Appendix 1.

Compliance with finance law In accordance with paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 AFMA must include a statement in the annual report on any significant issues reported to the responsible minister that relate to non-c ompliance with the finance law in relation to the entity. If such a statement has been included in the annual report, the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 also requires the annual report to include an outline of the actions taken to remedy the non-compliance.

AFMA’s review of compliance for 2016-17 with finance law (the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and associated rules and instruments) indicates that there are no significant matters that warrant reporting to the minister.

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PURCHASING During 2016-17 AFMA has made a concerted effort to review and update our policies and procedures around procurement and contract management to drive improved performance with respect to our responsibilities under the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Our approach to procurement and contract management is based on a self-s ervice model enabling officers at all levels within the organisation to undertake procurement and contract management activities within a clearly defined framework.

The relevant policies, procedures, tools and process maps are all easily accessible on our intranet for staff to utilise. Importantly, a procurement and contract management training package has been developed and delivered across the organisation. To further support procurement and contract management capabilities within AFMA, a Community of Practice has been fostered so that experience can be shared across the agency.

Contracts

ANAO Access clauses All contracts valued at $100 000 or more (GST inclusive) let during the year allow the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

Exempt Contracts The Chief Executive Officer did not exempt any contracts let during 2016-17 from being published on AusTender on the basis that publication would disclose exempt matters under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

Advertising campaigns AFMA did not conduct any advertising campaigns during the year.

Discretionary grants AFMA did not administer any grants during the year.

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FEATURE STORY FEATURE STORY

Please like me! Six months on social media.

In December 2016, AFMA dared to go where it hadn’t ventured before. Into that unknown, previously unexplored galaxy of…. (insert Star Wars music) social media… (Check out our Star Wars inspired ‘May the Fourth be with you’ post on 4 May!)

That’s right on 5 December 2016, AFMA established its first social media presence with the introduction of a Facebook account.

The growth of the page has been steady since its introduction. As at 30 June 2017, the page had just over 1000 followers.

Increased stakeholder engagement was one of the main drivers for AFMA’s social media presence. In the past six months, posts have been made about public comment periods, illegal fishing apprehensions, and general ‘did you know?’ about Commonwealth fisheries and their management (and even the occasional 90s pop culture reference inspired by our 25th birthday celebrations this year!).

The tool is also being used to communicate that the reason Australians have a sustainable supply of local, Australian seafood is thanks to the strict and science based management of Commonwealth fisheries. Each Friday, this is celebrated with ‘Fish Friday’, whereby a recipe ‘starring’ one of the many Commonwealth species is featured.

In 2017-18 AFMA will look at additional social media channels like Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram to help provide information to stakeholders.

Find us at facebook.com/AustralianFisheriesManagementAuthority/ or @australianfisheriesmanagementauthority

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PEOPLE MANAGEMENT

Our employees As at 30 June 2017, AFMA employed 186 employees (based on head count): 163 were ongoing and 23 were non-ongoing. These numbers do not include six employees on long-term leave.

There were 139 employees located in AFMA’s Canberra office, 23 employees located in the Darwin office, six employees on Thursday Island and one employee in Lakes Entrance undertaking industry liaison. A further 17 casual field observers undertake duties on commercial fishing vessels around Australia.

Our employment profile has not significantly changed from 2015-16. The proportion of part-time employees (excluding casual observers) has decreased slightly to 9.6 per cent in 2016-17 compared to 11.6 per cent in 2015-16.

The proportion of females has increased to 42.4 per cent from 38 per cent in the previous financial year. The percentage of women at EL1-2 levels for 2016-17 has increased to 34.6 per cent from 27 per cent in the previous year.

There has been an increase in the number of employees from non-English speaking backgrounds with ten employees in 2016-17, up from seven in 2015-16.

As a comparison with the 2015-16 financial year, the number of employees who have at least one parent from a non-English speaking background has decreased from 29 to 25 with the number of employees members identifying as being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander increasing from four employees to six. In addition, employees who identified themselves as having a disability remained at one in 2016-17.

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Equal opportunity profile of AFMA employees as at 30 June 2017

Level NESB1 NESB2 People

with

disability

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Women Men Total

employees at level

APS 2-4 2 5 0 4 24 30 54

APS 5-6 8 13 1 1 37 39 76

EL1 0 5 0 1 13 25 38

EL2 0 0 0 0 5 9 14

SES 0 2 0 0 0 4 4

Total 10 25 1 6 79 107 186

NESB1: Persons from a non-English speaking background who were born overseas.

NESB2: Persons whose parent/s is/are from a non-English speaking background.

Non-ongoing employees employed by location, gender and employment status as at 30 June 2017

Level Location Women Men Total

employees at level

Part time Full time Part time Full time

APS 1-2 Canberra 0 0 12 0 12

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 1 0 0 0 1

APS 3-4 Canberra 0 1 5 0 6

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

APS 5-6 Canberra 1 0 0 2 3

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

EL1 Canberra 0 0 0 0 0

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

EL2 Canberra 0 0 0 1 1

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

SES Canberra 0 0 0 0 0

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

Total 2 1 17 2 23

* T hese figures include 17 observers who are engaged as APS 2/3 casual employees and are reported in the Canberra ‘part time’ figures.

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Ongoing employees employed by location, gender and employment status as at 30 June 2017

Level Location Female Male Total

employees at level

Part time Full time Part time Full time

APS 1-2 Canberra 0 2 0 0 2

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3-4 Canberra 4 13 0 8 25

Darwin 0 3 0 4 7

Thursday Island 0 0 0 1 1

APS 5-6 Canberra 7 26 0 24 57

Darwin 0 3 0 11 14

Thursday Island 0 0 0 2 2

EL1 Canberra 4 9 1 23 37

Darwin 0 0 0 0 0

Thursday Island 0 0 0 1 1

EL2 Canberra 0 4 0 7 11

Darwin 0 0 0 1 1

Thursday Island 0 1 0 0 1

SES Canberra 0 0 0 3 3

Darwin 0 0 0 1 1

Thursday Island 0 0 0 0 0

Total 15 61 1 86 163

This table excludes six employees on long term leave. These figures relate to the nominal occupants of the position and not employees who may be acting as at 30 June 2017. The SES figure also includes AFMA’s CEO. The APS5-6 figure for Canberra includes an officer undertaking industry liaison located in Lakes Entrance.

Terms and conditions of employment

AFMA’s Enterprise Agreement 2016 AFMA’s Enterprise Agreement 2016 came into effect on 23 June 2016 and has a nominal expiry date of 22 June 2019. The agreement states the terms and conditions for all AFMA employees, excluding Senior Executive Service Officers.

Our Enterprise Agreement 2016 contains provisions that enable the CEO and an employee covered by the agreement to enter into an individual flexibility

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agreements to vary the effect of terms of the agreement. The terms in which an employee may vary under the Enterprise Agreement include (but are not limited to) hours of work, overtime rates, penalty rates, allowances, remuneration and leave.

AFMA entered into 37 individual flexibility agreements for 30 employees during 2016-17 as outlined in the table below. Seven employees entered into multiple agreements therefore the number of agreements is higher than the number of employees.

Individual flexibility agreements for 2016-17

Classification Number

APS 1 0

APS 2 1

APS 3 2

APS 4 5

APS 5 5

APS 6 9

EL1 13

EL2 2

Remuneration AFMA’s salary ranges are contained in AFMA’s Enterprise Agreement 2016. The salary minimum and maximum amounts at each classification as at 30 June 2017 are shown in the table below.

Enterprise agreement salary ranges as at 30 June 2017

Classification Minimum Maximum

APS 1 $42 981 $50 228

APS 2 $53 850 $57 477

APS 3 $58 945 $64 062

APS 4 $66 619 $71 226

APS 5 $73 419 $77 761

APS 6 $82 100 $90 788

EL1 $100 995 $112 250

EL2 $118 488 $138 139

AFMA does not have performance bonuses.

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AFMA’s salary ranges for Senior Executive Service employees (three) are contained in our Executive Remuneration Policy. The salary range amounts as at 30 June 2017 are shown in the table below.

Salary ranges for Senior Executive Service employees

Classification Minimum Maximum

SES Bands 1 and 2 $165 529 $232 529

The remuneration of senior executives is determined with reference to the remuneration survey published by the Australian Public Service Commission and is commensurate with the assessed complexity of their work. Senior executives are not eligible for a bonus payments. In addition to the salary ranges above, and as part of their total remuneration package, senior executive officers are also eligible to access other provisions including salary in lieu of a vehicle and car parking. Due to the small numbers of senior executives within AFMA, further breakdown of senior executive remuneration packages is not made available to avoid identification of individuals.

Remuneration for the CEO is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. Details are available from the Remuneration Tribunal website.

AFMA did not make use of any non-salary benefits in 2016-17.

Human resource management

Ethical Standards In working towards AFMA’s goals and objectives, staff are expected to maintain the highest standards of business and personal ethics. These expectations are underpinned by:

• APS Code of Conduct

• APS Values

• AFMA’s Conduct and Ethics Policy

• AFMA’s Respect: ensuring a positive workplace culture free from bullying and harassment policy.

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Australian Public Service Employee Census Each year, AFMA employees are invited to participate in the Australian Public Service Commission’s Employee Census. The census gathers feedback and allows us to address specific issues and shape future priorities. For 2017, AFMA’s response rate to this survey was 75 per cent, slightly down from 79 per cent in 2016. This was above the average of the Australian Public Service which saw an overall participation rate of 71 per cent.

Results from the 2016 census (latest available) indicated that we performed well against the areas of workplace culture and agency engagement. The results showed the majority of employees enjoyed working in their current role.

In response to other less positive survey results, AFMA established five key improvement groups with the aim of seeking continuous improvement for the agency in the areas of performance management, health and wellbeing, professional development, recruitment and bullying and harassment. Each of the key improvement groups developed a number of recommendations which resulted in the development of an action item plan.

In accordance with the plan, we have implemented a number of training programs including Mental Health First Aid Training (mandatory for Executive Level employees), Resilience Training, Unconscious Bias, Cultural Effectiveness, Getting that Selection Right (recruitment) and Giving and Receiving Feedback.

A review of the Recruitment and Selection Policy has also taken place with the new policy being implemented from 1 July 2017. The new policy focuses on a streamlined approach to recruitment and the introduction of new templates and advice for selection panels.

AFMA has an ongoing commitment to improve and will continue to implement the action plan in 2017-18.

AFMA Rewards and Recognition Program The AFMA achievement awards recognise individual and team achievements throughout the year and are determined by the Chief Executive Officer and branch heads upon the recommendation of any member of staff. The awards are presented in a ceremony each year which is hosted by the Chief Executive Officer. We recognise that building a culture that values its employees and recognises performance is critical to retaining the best people. The 2016 achievement awards were presented in December 2016. A total of 23 nominations were received with 18 individual and 5 team nominations.

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The individual achievement recipients for 2016 were Ms Natalie Couchman and Mr Don Bromhead. Ms Couchman was recognised for her valuable contribution as a team player who was instrumental in progressing several key initiatives in the Foreign Compliance area. Mr Bromhead was recognised for his exceptional work developing the Ecological Risk Management Guide for fisheries.

The 2016 team achievement award recipient was the Ecological Risk Assessment and Management Team. This team demonstrated its high level of commitment to AFMA’s mission and purpose and is recognised for its work producing the Ecological Risk Management guide. The team’s successful interactions and negotiations with supporting agencies ensured AFMA’s efforts relating to the protection of fish stocks and marine resources were widely acknowledged and supported.

In 2016 AFMA introduced four additional award categories. These were Unsung Hero, Good Citizenship, Collaboration/Helping/Mentoring and Bright Idea/Creativity.

Mr Luke Lamb received the Unsung Hero award and was recognised for working collaboratively throughout AFMA and providing recruitment services to employees.

Mr Scott Connors received the Good Citizenship award and was recognised for embodying all the characteristics of good citizenship and providing support across the agency.

Mr Brendan Rayner received the Collaboration/Helping/Mentoring award and was recognised for providing exceptional leadership and for his positive influence across AFMA.

Mr Andrew Powell received the Bright Idea/Creativity award and was recognised for driving the red tape reduction process over a number of years.

At the same ceremony, AFMA recognised 21 employees who have contributed more than ten of service to AFMA and two employees who had provided twenty years of service.

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Officers receiving ten year awards. Photo courtesy: AFMA

Each year AFMA offers employees the opportunity to nominate for an annual development award. The intention of the awards is to recognise and reward performance on the part of the individual whilst providing an opportunity for personal development that ultimately benefits both the individual and AFMA. We awarded development awards which supported employees to attend:

• the Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society International Symposium of Forensic Sciences (Auckland, New Zealand),

• the Eighth International Fisheries Observer and Monitoring Conference (San Diego, United States of America)

• a Certificate IV course in Human Resources (Sydney, Australia)

• HR Vision and Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development Annual Conference and Exhibition (United Kingdom)

• CFO Rising Conference (Singapore).

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FEATURE STORY

Turning trash into treasure

Ghost nets are lost or abandoned fishing nets that drift with ocean currents (sometimes man hundreds of kilometres) and have the potential to entangle and kill marine life including seabirds, fish, sea turtles, dugongs and dolphins. They are largely found in Australia’s northern waters after they have either been abandoned by illegal fishers or drifted in from foreign fishers operating further to the north of the Australian Fishing Zone.

In conjunction with other Australian Government agencies and local indigenous communities, AFMA detected 21 ghost nets across northern Australia during 2016-17. Fourteen nets were retrieved representing a retrieval rate of 67 per cent, a ten per cent increase on 2015-16. Rather than sending the retrieved nets to landfill, AFMA has begun providing art galleries and indigenous art centres with nets to be recycled as art.

To help raise awareness of ghost nets AFMA has commissioned several pieces from Erub Arts Centre, Pormparraaw Arts Centre and Gapuwiyak Culture and Arts Aboriginal Corporation to take pride of place in three AFMA offices in Thursday Island, Darwin and Canberra.

Commissioning indigenous artists to turn ghost nets into artwork not only produces wonderful creative pieces depicting the marine environments at the heart of their communities, but raises awareness about this important environmental issue.

Images (top to bottom): Crayfish and artist Solomon Charlie from Erub Arts. Ancestral Turtle and Artist Marrawakamirr (Susan) Marrawunggu from Gapuwiyak Culture and Arts.

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Performance management All employees are required to participate in AFMA’s Performance and Development Scheme. The scheme ensures that:

• employees know what is expected of them

• individual and AFMA goals are aligned

• employees receive continuing feedback and improvement advice

• employees identify, plan and deliver on areas for individual learning, capability and career development.

To support the performance management process, we offered a range of training programs, including Giving and Receiving Feedback, Resilience in the Workplace and the AFMA Leadership and Talent Management Program to assist employees successfully undertake the requirements of the scheme.

Training and development AFMA continued to invest in the learning and development of all employees through a range of in-house learning and development programs, including formal induction for all new employees.

Our 2016-17 corporate training plan clearly articulated our approach to learning and development. The plan identified a number of development priorities through capability plans submitted by employees, input from our Executive group and the Women in AFMA committee, along with those identified from results of the 2016 APS Employee Census and subsequent recommendations from the Key Improvement Working Groups.

AFMA provided in-house courses on 13 occasions during 2016-17 in accordance with the corporate training plan. These courses were attended by 144 employees in total (with some attending more than one course) and covered a range of issues including leadership, recruitment practices, mental health, behavioural profiling, resilience, giving and receiving feedback, unconscious bias, cultural effectiveness and a mentoring program.

A highlight this year was the completion of the mentoring program in June 2017. AFMA partnered with the Murray-Darling Basin Authority to offer Canberra based employees a collaborative Mentoring Program which took place over 12 months. There were 25 participants from AFMA who were required to have

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regular meetings with their mentors/mentees in addition to attending three workshops which focused on:

• Personal Development

• Building Confidence

• Leadership.

Through this program, mentees were able to obtain guidance from their mentors and broaden their understanding of organisational issues and approaches. Mentors were able to gain insight into current issues for employees at lower levels and look at a different perspective on issues that may be facing them. Both mentors and mentees were provided the opportunity to develop skills in coaching and building relationships.

Study Assistance Program AFMA’s study assistance program assists employees to pursue studies that are directly related to our business, including assistance in the form of funding and/or study leave. In 2016-17, the program supported eight employees for studies in various areas including applied science, communications, commerce, government investigations and legal studies.

Employment programs

2016 Graduate Development Program

AFMA partners with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources in recruitment and delivery of the Graduate Development Program. The program includes a combination of on-the-job-training, mentoring, a one week industry visit and a formal training program. AFMA engaged one graduate in 2016 who completed the following rotations:

• Rotation 1 - Northern Fisheries Section (AFMA)

• Rotation 2 - Human Resources Section (Department of Agriculture and Waters Resources)

• Rotation 3 - Communications Section (AFMA).

We also hosted two graduates from the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources during the second rotation.

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Australian Public Service Commission Indigenous Traineeship Program

In focusing on building a more diverse workforce, AFMA participated in the Australian Public Service Commission Indigenous Traineeship Program (Trainee Program). The Trainee Program is an entry level employment program for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are interested in working in the Australian Public Service. It provides a structured introduction to the skills and knowledge necessary to commence a rewarding career in the Service. We engaged an employee under the program in February 2016 who undertook a combination of on-the-job-training, mentoring and formal training. The trainee completed the Trainee Program in February 2017 and graduated with a Certificate IV in Government.

Stepping Into Program The Stepping Into Program is an internship designed specifically for university students with a disability. In 2016 AFMA hosted one university student for paid work experience during the winter university break. The internship was undertaken within the Tuna and International Fisheries Section. The project involved researching the history of seabird catches and management changes in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery over the last 15 years and the success story of mitigating seabird bycatch in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery.

The program is coordinated through the Australian Network on Disability and has been well received within AFMA.

Australian National University Internships Program The Australian National Internships Program gives undergraduate and postgraduate students an opportunity to work with Commonwealth agencies. During 2016-17, AFMA hosted one student who contributed to the following project - the examination of policy and operational practices that key overseas fishery management agencies use to encourage reduced discarding of commercial species.

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Diversity AFMA continued its commitment to build and provide opportunities for women as future leaders within the agency. The Women in AFMA Group is championed and chaired by Dr Nick Rayns, Executive Manager Fisheries Management Branch, and includes staff from a range of classification levels.

In recognition of the 2017 International Women’s Day, AFMA partnered with the Murray Darling Basin Authority to present an all staff event. We were extremely honoured to welcome the following speakers:

• Katrina Cooper from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) who spoke about DFAT’s “Women in Leadership Strategy”

• Her Excellency Mrs Menna Rawlings CMG, British High Commissioner who gave her insights on Women in Diplomacy - Look How Far We’ve Come

• Senator the Hon Anne Ruston, Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, who shared some of her experiences and insights.

During the year AFMA extended the opportunity for a number of employees to attend a variety of workshops focussing on women’s issues and diversity in general. These workshops included:

• YWCA She Leads Conference 2017

• Women in Leadership Summit 2016

• Cultural Effectiveness Training

• Unconscious Bias Training

• AHRI Inclusion and Diversity Conference 2017.

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Part 5

Financial performance report and statements Statement of financial performance

Australian National Audit Office report

Financial statements

Photo opposite: Tridacna maxima - Giant clam. Photo courtesy: Georgia Langdon, AFMA

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Financial Results AFMA reported a deficit of $1.4 million for the 2016-17 financial year, well within the approved operating loss of $2.1 million. AFMA’s total departmental expenditure was $39.0 million against budget expenditure of $40.3 million or $1.3 million lower than budget.

Employee expenditure was some $1.1 million lower than budget, mainly due to lower Average Staffing Levels (ASL) across the agency. Lower ASL, particularly in fishery operations, also resulted in lower operational allowances which further lowered employee expenditure.

Supplier expenditure was broadly on budget. Depreciation and amortisation expenditure was $0.4 million lower than budget as a result of: lower leasehold improvement depreciation due to changed accommodation arrangements in the Darwin office; and lower intangibles amortisation as some computer software assets were not replaced during the year.

AFMA’s administered expenditure relating to the caretaking and disposal of illegal foreign fishing vessels was $3.2 million, $2.1 million lower than budget. However, this was some $1.1 million higher than the previous year, which is indicative of considerably higher interception activity during the year.

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Part 6

Appendices

Appendix 1: Commission, executive and committees

Appendix 2: Civil litigation outcomes

Appendix 3: Management advisory committee memberships and meetings

Appendix 4: Freedom of information

Appendix 5: Work health and safety

Appendix 6: Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Appendix 7: Disability reporting

Appendix 8: Consultancy services

Appendix 9: Procurement to support small business

Appendix 10: Total resources and total payments

Appendix 11: Expenses by outcomes

Photo opposite: Bermagui Wharf sunset. Photo courtesy: Clayton McCloud, AFMA

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APPENDIX 1 Commission and executive AFMA Commissioners are appointed for their high level of expertise in one or

more of the fields of fisheries management, fishing industry operations, science, natural resource management, economics, business or financial management, law, public sector administration or governance.

AFMA Commissioners at 1 January 2017 from left to right: Mr Ian Cartwright, Dr James Findlay (CEO), Mr Richard Stevens OAM, Ms Renata Brooks, Ms Catherine Cooper (Deputy Chair), Hon Norman Moore AM (Chairman), Prof Keith Sainsbury

The following Commissioners held appointments during the reporting period 2016-17:

Hon Norman Moore AM - Chairman Norman is a member and Chair of a number of boards including: Chair, Cannings Purple Strategic Communications; Deputy Chair Sir Charles Court Foundation (Chair, Education Trust sub-committee); and Chair, Patrons Group of Western Australian School of Mines Graduates Association. He was previously Western Australian Minister for Mines and Petroleum; Fisheries, Electoral Affairs (Minister for Justice - June 2012) and Leader of the Government in the Legislative Council.

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Dr James Findlay - Chief Executive Officer James is an AFMA Commissioner and AFMA’s Chief Executive Officer. He has a PhD in fisheries biology and has held senior government roles across fisheries science, policy and management. He has also held senior government roles in other natural resource management areas including climate adaptation and sustainable water use. He was a research consultant in aquatic animal health for the aquaculture industry and was a senior lecturer in genetics at the University of Tasmania.

Mr Richard Stevens OAM Richard has been involved in the Australian seafood industry since 1977, holding senior executive positions at both the State and Commonwealth level. Since 2001, he has undertaken numerous reviews of fisheries management arrangements, including in South Australia, New South Wales and the Torres Strait. He currently chairs a number of fishery related committees, including the New South Wales Ministerial Fisheries Advisory Council and the Northern Territory Recreational Fishing Advisory Committee. Richard’s expertise covers natural resource management, policy and planning, and economics.

Mr Ian Cartwright Ian has a Master of Science in Economics, is Chair of the Tasmanian Fisheries Research Advisory Board and Chair of various fisheries committees. His expertise covers commercial fishing, fisheries science, natural resource management, economics and business management.

Professor Keith Sainsbury Keith is Director of SainSolutions, Professor of Marine Systems Science (University of Tasmania) and Vice-Chair of the Board of the Marine Stewardship Council. His internationally recognised expertise covers fisheries science, natural resource management and marine ecology.

Ms Catherine Cooper Catherine currently chairs the South Australian Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Advisory Committee and Aquaculture Advisory Council. Catherine is an industry leader and she was a finalist in both the 1997 and 1998 Telstra Business Women’s Awards. She has extensive committee and board experience including as former Chair of the Fisheries Council of South Australia.

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Mr David Hall to 30 September 2016 David is the Managing Director of fish tag manufacturing company Hallprint P/L. David was formerly Executive Director, Grape and Wine Research and Development Corporation and Director of Fisheries in South Australia and the Northern Territory.

Ms Renata Brooks from 1 October 2016 Renata is an independent director and consultant. Previously she was Deputy Director General, Land and Natural Resources in the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, with responsibility for the NSW crown land estate, natural resource policy and programs, and coordination of primary industry policy. She has held senior executive positions within the NSW Department of Primary Industries in the areas of science and research, agriculture, fisheries, biosecurity, compliance and mine safety.

AFMA Commissioners - Attendance at Commission meetings Five Commission meetings were held in 2016-17. The table below shows the number of meetings Commissioners attended.

Commissioner Commission

Hon Norman Moore AM 5

Dr James Findlay 5

Mr Richard Stevens OAM 5

Mr Ian Cartwright 5

Prof Keith Sainsbury 5

Ms Catherine Cooper 5

Mr David Hall 1

Ms Renata Brooks 4

Executive

Role and function The Executive is AFMA’s senior management team responsible to the Chief Executive Officer for the effective operation and performance of the agency.

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Membership • Dr James Findlay - Chief Executive Officer

• Dr Nick Rayns - Executive Manager, Fisheries Management Branch

• Mr Peter Venslovas - General Manager, Fisheries Operations Branch

• Mr John Andersen - General Manager, Corporate Services Branch

• Mr Andrew Pearson - Executive Secretary

• Mr Robert Gehrig - Chief Finance Officer

• Ms Danielle Kuhn - Communications Manager.

Audit and Risk Committee

Role and function The Audit and Risk Committee operates in line with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and provides independent advice and assurance of the appropriateness of AFMA’s:

• financial reporting including the annual audited financial statements

• performance reporting including the framework for developing, measuring and reporting

• systems of risk oversight and management including AFMA’s risk management and fraud control framework

• systems of internal control - governance, risk management, compliance and business continuity management arrangements.

Membership The current Committee comprises one AFMA Commissioner and three independent members. These members are:

• Ms Catherine Cooper - Chair (Commissioner)

• Ms Mary Harwood

• Mr Geoff Knuckey

• Ms Kate Freebody.

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Regular Observers The Committee also invites regular observers to attend including:

• AFMA’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Finance Officer, General Manager of Corporate Services Branch; and

• Audit representatives from Bellchambers Barrett (internal audit providers), KPMG (contracted external auditors) and the Australian National Audit Office.

AFMA’s Executive Secretariat provides administrative support for the Audit and Risk Committee.

Research Committee

Role and function The role of AFMA’s Research Committee is to advise the AFMA Commission on the strategic directions, priorities and funding for monitoring and research relevant to meeting AFMA’s information needs and objectives. In doing so the primary functions of the Committee are to:

• review and advise on research, monitoring and assessment priorities for Commonwealth fisheries

• review AFMA’s five year research plans for Commonwealth fisheries managed by AFMA

• provide advice to the AFMA Commission on allocation of AFMA research funds

• assess research, monitoring and assessment investments for the Commonwealth fisheries for consistency with management needs.

The Committee held two face-to-face meetings and one out-of-session meeting in 2016-17.

Membership • Mr Ian Cartwright (Chair and Commissioner)

• Prof Keith Sainsbury (Commissioner)

• Ms Renata Brooks (Commissioner)

• Dr James Findlay (Chief Executive Officer)

• Dr Nick Rayns (Executive Manager, Fisheries Management Branch )

• Dr Jane Chimungeni-Brassington (Secretary to the Committee).

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Permanent Advisors • Ms Beth Gibson (Senior Manager, Policy, Environment, Economics and Research)

• Ms Yvonne Zunic (Manager, Research).

Regular Observers The Committee also invites regular observers from the following agencies and departments to attend and provide expert advice:

• Fisheries Research and Development Corporation

• Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Oceans and Atmosphere

• Commonwealth Fisheries Association

• Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Project and Governance Committee The AFMA Projects and Governance Committee was established to consider business cases and project plans for approval, oversight the management of these projects and provide guidance to manage each project’s risk, budget, timeframes, expectations and impact.

During 2016-17 AFMA re-defined the scope of the Project and Governance Committee and implemented a Strategic Development Framework to support the delivery of projects across the organisation. The framework has been developed to support improved oversight and increased accuracy in resourcing and managing project work, supporting a focus on planning and governance. A new committee, the Strategic Delivery Committee, made up of AFMA’s Executive, will oversee the delivery of relevant project work. The Strategic Delivery Committee held one meeting during the reporting period, largely to familiarise members with the process as well as review projects identified through section planning. Future meetings will review the business cases prepared by project managers and initiate the reporting process.

Development of a Strategic Delivery Framework has provided defined project management processes, systematic reporting and co-ordination of this function through the Committee Secretariat, based in AFMA’s Corporate Risk Team.

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in formation Governance Committee The AFMA Information Governance Committee is responsible for ensuring that appropriate governance arrangements exist around the information it collects, stores and uses in support of its organisational outcomes. In line with the Australian Government’s Digital Continuity 2020 Policy, AFMA in 2016-17 commenced implementation of an agency wide digital recordkeeping system or Electronic Document and Records Management, to reduce paper records and improve efficiency in data and information management.

The Committee is considering a range of initiatives to improve AFMA’s information governance processes and is exploring opportunities to link these to the AFMA ICT Strategy Plan. A focus of the Plan is to look at our core data and the way the business interacts with it and to make improvements to its structure to better support users and stakeholders alike. The Committee will continue to be consulted as part of this process in 2017-18.

Existing information governance documents held by AFMA are being reviewed and a consultant has been engaged to assist in the development of an overarching Information Management Strategy which will provide a pathway for meeting the requirements of the Digital Continuity 2020 Policy and the Australian Government’s data initiatives and policies.

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APPENDIX 2 Civil litigation outcomes The following table identifies civil litigation outcomes for matters open in 2016-17.

Matter Fishery Outcome/Status

Federal Court

Mustafa & Ors v Commonwealth of Australia and Anor.

Attempts to challenge a foreign fishing vessel apprehension.

Foreign Matter finalised

Consent order made by the court on 17 August 2016 dismissing claims, (no payment made).

Aregar & Damaryanta v the Commonwealth & AFMA

Attempts to challenge a foreign fishing vessel apprehension.

Foreign Matter is ongoing.

Civil Litigation matter adjourned pending Criminal Appeal proceedings (31 August 2017)

Statutory Fishing Rights Allocation Review Panel

Nil

Administrative Appeal Tribunal

Whish-Wilson; Australian Fisheries Management Authority and (Freedom of Information) [2017] AATA 1098 (10 July 2017)

Small Pelagic

Matter finalised pending expiration of appeal period on 7 August 2017.

Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

Environment Tasmania and Australian Fisheries Management Authority

AFMA refused access to some of the documents sought based on s47 (trade secrets etc), s47E (prejudice or have a substantial adverse effect on agency operations), s47F (personal privacy) and s47G (business information) of the FOI Act.

Small Pelagic Ongoing Applicant appealed

to the Information Commissioner - awaiting decision.

Greenpeace (EDO) and Australian Fisheries Management Authority

AFMA refused access to some of the documents sought based on s47 (trade secrets etc), s37 (prejudice an investigation), Section 47E (prejudice or have a substantial adverse effect on agency operations), s47F (personal privacy) and s47G (business information) of the FOI Act.

Small Pelagic Finalised - no information released

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Matter Fishery Outcome/Status

Australian Conservation Marine Society (EDO) and Australian Fisheries Management Authority

AFMA refused access to some of the documents sought based on s47 (trade secrets etc.), Section 47E (prejudice or have a substantial adverse effect on agency operations, s47F (personal privacy) and s47G (business information) of the FOI Act.

Small Pelagic Finalised - some information (redacted)

released to applicant.

Hon. Andrew Wilkie MP

AFMA refused access to some of the documents sought based on s47 (trade secrets etc), s47E (prejudice or have a substantial adverse effect on agency operations, s47F (personal privacy) and s47G (business information) of the FOI Act

Small Pelagic Finalised - no information released.

Significant matters Aregar & Damaryanta v the Commonwealth & AFMA - Attempts to challenge a foreign fishing vessel apprehension. There have been a number of directions hearings - all for the purposes of adjourning the Civil Proceedings pending outcome of Criminal Proceedings.

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APPENDIX 3 Management advisory committee meetings and memberships Management Advisory Committees are statutory committees established by AFMA under section 56 of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991.

The committees provide advice to AFMA on the preparation of management arrangements, the operation of the relevant fishery and reporting to AFMA on scientific, economic and other information on the status of fish stocks, substocks, species (target and non-target species) and the impact of fishing on the marine environment. This advice is required to be evidence-based and address biological, economic and wider ecological factors affecting the performance of the fishery. Committee advice assists AFMA in its role to regulate commercial fishing in Commonwealth fisheries.

The membership of Management Advisory Committees is available on AFMA’s web page: http://www.afma.gov.au/fisheries/committees/

Tropical Tuna Management Advisory Committee The committee met twice in Canberra during 2016-17. The committee made recommendations to the AFMA Commission on total allowable commercial catch limits for the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery species. The committee also discussed:

• the tuna fishery budgets, protected species issues

• the development of an Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery management strategy and progress towards a revised Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery ecological risk assessment

• overcatch provisions, electronic monitoring and outcomes of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission and Indian Ocean Tuna Commission meetings.

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Great Australian Bight Trawl Management Advisory Committee The committee met once in Adelaide during 2016-17. It made recommendations to the AFMA Commission in relation to total allowable catches for quota species. In addition, the committee discussed:

• the complexities of managing western gemfish across the Great Australian Bight Trawl and Commonwealth Trawl Sector

• the future management of bight redfish under Offshore Constitutional Settlement fisheries arrangements with South Australia.

Northern Prawn Management Advisory Committee The committee met twice in Brisbane during 2016-17. At both meetings the committee discussed and made recommendations about improving management arrangements for the Northern Prawn Fishery. In particular the committee recommended changes to the Northern Prawn Fishery Management Plan 1995 to provide an autonomous mechanism for fishery restructure if fishing capacity becomes excessive through effort creep. The committee also made recommendations for minor improvements to the Plan that will simplify and bring it more in line with other fishery management plans.

During its second meeting for the period the committee also considered the current arrangements in place to manage the collection of prawn broodstock in the fishery and made recommendations about improving this process. At this meeting there was also discussion about the development of future co-management arrangements.

Southern Bluefin Tuna Management Advisory Committee The committee met twice in 2016-17 in Canberra and Port Lincoln. The committee discussed among other things the outcomes of various Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna meetings.

The committee also discussed monitoring arrangements in the Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery, the proposed 2016-17 observer program and the status of the 2016-17 Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery budget.

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Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Management Advisory Committee The committee met twice during 2016-17, once via a teleconference and once face to face in Melbourne.

The committee made recommendations to the AFMA Commission for the 2017 season on total allowable catch and closures in accordance with the harvest strategy for the Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery. In the last few years the commercial fishery has operated between July and December, requiring decisions on total allowable catches to be made in the preceding financial year. The committee also provided advice regarding research priorities for the fishery.

South East Management Advisory Committee The committee met three times in 2016-17, all of which were face-to-face meetings in Canberra.

The committee made recommendations to the AFMA Commission on total allowable catches and effort controls for the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery, the Small Pelagic Fishery and the Southern Squid Jig Fishery. The committee also considered and made recommendations regarding:

• changes to the Small Pelagic Fishery and the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery harvest strategies;

• the strategic and annual research plans for the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery, Small Pelagic Fishery and Southern Squid Jig Fishery, the Gillnet Dolphin Mitigation Strategy; and

• the proposal to use the mid-water pair trawl method in the Small Pelagic Fishery.

Advice from individual management advisory committee members was sought regarding the Small Pelagic Fishery Dolphin Mitigation Strategy.

Sub-Antarctic Management Advisory Committee The committee held two meetings in 2016-17, one meeting via teleconference and one meeting in Hobart.

The committee made recommendations to the AFMA Commission on total allowable catches for patagonian toothfish and mackerel icefish and catch limits for bycatch species in the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery.

The committee also discussed the outcomes of the 2016 meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and expressions of interest for exploratory fisheries for 2017-18.

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APPENDIX 4 Freedom of information reporting Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme. This requirement is in Part II of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the Information Publication Scheme requirements.

Information on AFMA’s Freedom of Information reporting can be found at afma.gov.au

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APPENDIX 5 Work health and safety

Work health and safety performance AFMA’s Work Health and Safety Committee is a joint management and staff committee established in accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. The committee is primarily responsible for developing, implementing, reviewing and updating policies and procedures. The committee also reviews reported incidents and subsequent implementation of preventative measures. It is also responsible for improving the cooperation between AFMA and its staff to promote a positive work, health and safety work environment and address any issues proactively. The committee met four times during 2016-17.

During the reporting period the committee endorsed a number of work, health and safety policies including First Aid Management at AFMA policy. This document was implemented in May 2017 and provides staff with key information regarding the management and provision of first aid within AFMA.

The committee also supported the implementation of the AFMA Observer Workplace Health Policy and Safety Risk Assessment Guidelines. This document provides AFMA observers with a summary of tools and resources to ensure they carry out their duties safely.

Health and safety initiatives AFMA continued to recognise the importance for a heathy workplace including mental health and general wellbeing. The 2016-17 health and wellbeing program offered staff specific initiatives including onsite health checks and influenza vaccinations. The program also included various lunch time seminars and workshops on topics such as mental health awareness, breast cancer awareness, community gardens, healthy heart, being sun smart and a healthy eating seminar. In addition, a presentation was delivered by Heads Up, a Beyond Blue initiative, which focused on creating mentally healthy workplaces by offering free tools and resources for staff.

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In supporting AFMA’s approach to managing mental health in the workplace, Mental Health First Aid training was offered to all staff. The initial focus has been for all Executive Level employees to complete this training to ensure they are equipped with the necessary tools to be able to support someone within their team who may have a mental health issue and to reduce the stigma attached to mental illnesses. This training will be expanded in 2017-18 to include all AFMA staff.

All new starters to AFMA are provided with an assessment of their workstation as part of their new starter induction. The Workplace Group-Human Resources Section undertook initial workstation assessments for all new starters and other staff as requested. Twenty-six workstation assessments were conducted in 2016-17 by an external assessor resulting in a variety of measures being implemented, including providing specialised equipment for staff.

In addition to conducting workstation assessments, AFMA installed sit-stand workstations across all AFMA offices which can be used by all staff on a booking basis. There is a growing body of evidence that high levels of sedentary behaviour and sitting, in particular, are emerging risk factors for chronic disease and it is anticipated that the installation of these workstations will avoid periods of prolonged periods of sitting and related injuries.

Accident or dangerous occurrence statistics In 2016-17 AFMA recorded 14 minor incidents relating to accidents or near- misses (see Figure 6). This rate is down from 17 in 2015-16. There was only one personal injury resulting in two or more week’s absence.

Figure 6: AFMA work health and safety incident reports comparison

0

5

10

15

20

Number of incidents in 1/7/2015 to 30/6/2016

Number of incidents in 1/7/2016 to 30/6/2017

total number of incidents

body

stressing

Falls, trips and slips

Psychological Hazard other

* O ther includes office based employees working in the field or defensive tactics training

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Notifiable in cidents during the year In accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, AFMA is required to report ‘notifiable incidents’ which include the death of a person, serious injury or illness, or a dangerous incident which arises out of AFMA conducting its business. In 2016-17 there were four incidents that were required to be notified to Comcare as they fell within the definition of a Dangerous Occurrence under the Work Health and Safety legislation.

There were no notices issued in relation to these incidents and no prohibition notices issued.

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APPENDIX 6 Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Ecologically sustainable development principles AFMA’s implementation of the ecological component of ecologically sustainable development is based on ecosystem elements relating to:

• target and by-product species

• bycatch

• threatened, endangered and protected species

• habitats and ecological communities.

To support and implement an ecologically sustainable development approach, AFMA draws upon ecological risk assessments for each Commonwealth fishery. Ecological risk assessments involve a number of methods, including comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analyses. This approach screens out low risk activities, focusing on higher actual and potential risks within Commonwealth fisheries.

The results of these risk assessments for each fishery are consolidated into a priority list upon which an ecological risk management strategy is focused. A detailed ecological risk management strategy for each AFMA-managed fishery has been prepared, clearly identifying how each species or group of species will be managed.

Key management policy initiatives include:

• the Commonwealth Fisheries Harvest Strategy Policy and Guidelines

• the Australian Sea Lion Management Strategy

• the Upper-Slope Dogfish Management Strategy

• Bycatch and Discard Program

• the Chondrichthyan Guide for Fisheries Managers

• Dolphin Management Strategy based on individual responsibility

• Seabird Management Plan based on individual responsibility.

AFMA has completed and published ecological risk management reports for all Commonwealth fisheries where risks have been identified. The number of

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species remaining at high potential risk across all Commonwealth fisheries is 72, which is 3.6 per cent of all species assessed. It is expected that this will reduce as the mitigation measures outlined in ecological risk management reports are implemented.

Outcome contributing to ecologically sustainable development AFMA’s outcomes are directed at Commonwealth fisheries being ecologically sustainable, improving the net economic returns from Commonwealth fisheries and managing efficiently and effectively.

This approach reflects AFMA’s commitment to pursuing management of Commonwealth fisheries in accordance with our legislative objectives and in partnership with others who also have an interest in sustainable management.

Effect of actions on the environment All of AFMA’s managed fisheries are currently accredited under three parts of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Part 10 of the Act requires that all Commonwealth and Torres Strait Fisheries must be strategically assessed before a management plan is determined (s148) or where a determination is made, that a management plan is not required for a Commonwealth fishery (s149). If a management plan is amended or replaced, or management arrangements change significantly in a fishery without a management plan, then a further assessment is required (s152). If a management plan remains unchanged no further strategic assessment is required. This process involves assessment of the impact of the fishery on matters of national environmental significance with particular emphasis on the impact on the Commonwealth marine environment. Without this approval a management plan cannot take effect.

Part 13 of the Act defines a number of offences in relation to listed threatened species and ecological communities, and also provides for accreditation of management plans or regimes (Sections 208A, 222A, 245, 265). The effect of accreditation is that certain actions are not offences if they are carried out in accordance with those management plans or regimes. There is no requirement to remake the accreditation decisions unless the management plans or regimes change. These accreditations impose a requirement on fishers to report any interactions with protected species. As fishers are also required to report interactions to AFMA through logbooks, we regularly report these interactions to

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the Department of the Environment and Energy on fishers’ behalf thus reducing unnecessary duplication of reporting.

Part 13A of the Act covers the international movement of wildlife specimens. It provides for controls over the movement of regulated native specimens that are not on the list of exempt native specimens. Currently products from all assessed Commonwealth fisheries are on the list of exempt native specimens, although some are subject to the condition that the listing applies only while a wildlife trade operation is in force. This allows exports of marine species to be carried out while ensuring that they have been taken sustainably.

Actions to minimise impact on environment AFMA takes an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management to minimise the impact of commercial fisheries on the marine environment. The Ecological Risk Management Policy, and accompanying Ecological Risk Management Guide, provide a science and evidence based structure for managing the impact of fishing on the marine environment. The framework uses Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fishing as the primary means of assessing the risks that fisheries may pose and provides a mechanism for the identification and management of any identified risks.

During 2016-17 AFMA commenced a trial of the revised methodologies in the Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fishing framework on the Small Pelagic Fishery midwater trawl sector and the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery. These are expected to be finalised during 2017-18. Further research into the identification and management of risks posed to habitats and communities is planned for the 2017-18 financial year.

Mechanisms for reviewing A number of mechanisms exist for reviewing the effect of fishing on the environment.

AFMA reviewed its Ecological Risk Management Framework and the Commission approved the Ecological Risk Management Guide and Ecological Risk Management Policy in April and June 2017 respectively. AFMA also regularly reviews individual elements of the Ecological Risk Management Framework, with fishery management strategies and ecological risk assessments reviewed every five years and Bycatch and Discard Workplans reviewed every two years.

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AFMA is also subject to reassessment of all its fisheries under Part 13A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The Department of Environment and Energy undertake the reassessments on a regular basis, ranging from a ten year review cycle for fisheries granted exemptions to a more regular review process for fisheries granted wildlife trade operations.

Our Environmental Footprint Consistent with our legislative objectives, AFMA also promotes a clean and green operating environment when conducting its operations to minimise our impact on the environment. To achieve this we are constantly reviewing our operational activities to look for opportunities to minimise waste and limit the impact of our environmental footprint.

AFMA currently purchases approximately 25 per cent of green electricity for our Canberra office as part of the Commonwealth energy contract, and our Thursday Island office utilises a mixture of wind and diesel power. AFMA continues to review and implement regular energy improvements across our Canberra, Darwin and Thursday Island sites. This has included automatic shutdown of staff computers daily and purchasing more energy efficient equipment when required.

AFMA’s Canberra office has an overall 4.5 star energy rating; the Darwin office has a 5.5 star National Australian Built Environment Rating System energy rating and a five Star Green star rating. AFMA buildings include zoned air-conditioning and lighting and automatic light dimming in response to daylight sensors. Additionally, intermittently used rooms and spaces are motion sensor activated to reduce energy consumption. AFMA also participates in Earth Hour annually.

AFMA currently uses 100 per cent recycled paper in printers and copiers at all AFMA sites. In addition we make use of portable technology for staff to access documents via portable devices such as iPads to further reduce the reliance on paper documents. 

Nationwide AFMA has leased five motor vehicles. We have recently changed internal policy allowing staff to use our energy efficient vehicles on more extended trips. As these leases fall due for renewal we will look for more energy efficient vehicles that meet our needs.

AFMA continued to make other changes around its offices that have important impacts in reducing AFMA’s environmental footprint. For example, a composting system is in place for the Canberra office which reduces general office waste and is proving successful.

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APPENDIX 7 Disability reporting Since 1994, Commonwealth non-corporate entities have reported on their

performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the Australian Public Service Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, entities have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a ten year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. Details of the strategy and associated reports can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

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APPENDIX 8 Consultancy services During 2016-17, 36 new consultancy contracts were entered into and this resulted in expenditure of $3.685 million for the period. In addition, 24 ongoing consultancy contracts were active during 2016-17 resulting in expenditure of $1.549 million.

All consultancy contracts entered into by AFMA above the value of $10 000 are available via the Austender website tenders.gov.au.

The selection and engagement of consultants The majority of consultancy services engaged during the 2016-17 were for fisheries research purposes. The selection and engagement of research consultants was primarily conducted through a limited tender because of the small pool of qualified vendors for these specific services.

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APPENDIX 9 Procurement to assist small business AFMA supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and medium enterprises and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website: finance.gov.au/procurement/statistics-on-commonwealth-purchasing-contracts

How AFMA’s procurement practises support small and medium enterprises As an organisation that interfaces with many small and medium enterprises as part of our engagement role with the fishing industry and broader community, AFMA has procurement policies that do not unfairly discriminate against small and medium enterprises and provide appropriate opportunities for small and medium enterprises to compete. AFMA’s procurement policies specify that, officials should consider, in the context of value for money:

• the benefits of doing business with competitive small and medium enterprises when specifying requirements and evaluating value for money

• barriers to entry, such as costly preparation of submissions, that may prevent small and medium enterprises from competing

• small and medium enterprises capabilities and their commitment to local or regional markets

• the potential benefits of having a larger, more competitive supplier base.

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APPENDIX 10 Total resources and total payments

Australian Fisheries Management Authority Resource Statement 2016-17

Actual available

appropriation 2016-17 $’000

Payments made 2016-17 $’000

Balance remaining   2016-17 $’000

Ordinary annual services  

Departmental appropriation  

Departmental appropriation 20,922 20,628 294

s. 74 Retained revenue receipts 3,931 3,931 -

Total 24,853 24,559 294

 

Administered expenses  

Outcome 1 5,354 3,085 2,269

Total 5,354 3,085 2,269

Total ordinary annual services A 30,207 27,644 2,563

 

Special Accounts  

Opening balance 13,863    

Appropriation receipts 34,856    

Non-appropriation receipts to    

Special Accounts 3,931    

Payments made   38,614  

Total Special Accounts B 52,650 38,614 14,036

Total resourcing and payments (A+B) 82,857 66,258 16,599

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts and/or payments to corporate entities through annual appropriations

(24,825) (24,531) (294)

Total net resourcing for AFMA   58,032 41,727 16,305

Reader note: All figures are GST exclusive.

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APPENDIX 11 Expenses by outcomes

Expenses for Outcome 112

Outcome 1: Ecologically sustainable and economically efficient Commonwealth fisheries, through understanding and monitoring Australia’s marine living resources and regulating and monitoring commercial fishing, including domestic licensing and deterrence of illegal foreign fishing.

2016-17 Budget     $’000

2016-17 Actual expenses   $’000

2016-17 Variance     $’000

Programme 1.1: Australian Fisheries Management Authority

(a) (b) (a) - (b)

Administered expenses      

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 5,354 3,085 2,269

Departmental expenses      

Departmental appropriation1 23,438 24,213 (775)

Special accounts 14,704 14,227 477

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2 2,144 1,694 450

Total for Programme 1.1 45,640 43,219 2,421

       

Outcome 1 Totals by appropriation type      

Administered expenses      

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 5,354 3,085 2,269

Departmental expenses      

Departmental appropriation1 23,438 24,213 (775)

Special accounts 14,704 14,227 477

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2 2,144 1,694 450

Total expenses for Outcome 1 45,640 43,219 2,421

       

Average staffing level (number) 176.2 173.5 2.7

Note: Departmental appropriation splits and totals are indicative estimates and may change in the course of the budget year as government priorities change.

1 D epartmental appropriation combines “Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)” “Retained Revenue Receipts under s74 of the PGPA Act 2013”.

2 E xpenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year’ is made up of depreciation expense and amortisation expense for both Departmental and Administered items.

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Glossary and Indexes Compliance index

Glossary

Index

Photo opposite: Seabirds Torres Strait Photo courtesy: Matt Daniel, AFMA

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COMPLIANCE INDEX Description Page

Letter of transmittal  v

Table of contents vii

Index 209

Glossary 202

Contact officer(s) iv

Internet home page address and internet address for report iv

Review by accountable authority 7

Overview for the period

Role and functions 14

Organisational structure 17

Outcome and programme structure 24

Purposes 24

Where outcome and programme structures differ from Portfolio Budget Statements/ Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

n/a

Annual Performance Statement 25

Report on Financial Performance

Discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance 132

Table summarising the total resources and total payments 193

If there are significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss and how the entity responses to that loss and any matter that will have a significant impact on the entity’s future financial operations.

n/a

Corporate Governance

Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) 112

Certification by accountable authority in accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 v

An outline of structures and processes in place to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance 105-128

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under section 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance (if applicable)

113

External scrutiny

Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny 107

198

Description Page

Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity

177

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman. (if applicable)

n/a

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period (if applicable) n/a

People

An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. 116-128

Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis 117-118

Information on any enterprise agreements, Individual Flexibility Agreements, common law contracts and determinations under 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999, Australian workplace agreements

118-119

Information on the number of SES and non SES employees covered by agreements 119-120

The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. 119

A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. 118-120

Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. (if applicable) n/a

Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level (if applicable) n/a

Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. (if applicable) n/a

Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. n/a

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities (if applicable) n/a

An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules 114

Consultants

A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants let during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

191 

A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

191 

199

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

200

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

A summary of the policies, procedures and main categories for which consultants were selected and engaged  191

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

191

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses: If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract. (if applicable)

114

Exempt contracts: If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters. (if applicable)

114 

Small business

A statement that: that “[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

192

An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises 192

Annual financial statements

If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.” or

If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

114

A statement that “Information on grants awarded to [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].” n/a

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information n/a

Correction of material errors in previous annual report n/a

Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found 182

200

Description Page

Information required by other legislation

Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 183

Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns 114

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

186

List of Requirements

Fisheries Administration Act 1991

Assessment of the extent to which operations have contributed to AFMA’s legislative objectives

Performance against performance indicators set out in the corporate plan and annual operational plan  

23-51

23-51

Variations of the corporate plan and the annual operational plan n/a

Significant changes to plans of management n/a

The introduction of new plans of management n/a

Effectiveness of plans of management 59-101

201

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

202

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

GLOSSARY

Australian Fishing Zone Under the Fisheries Management Act 1991, the Australian fishing zone means:

1. the waters adjacent to Australia within the outer limits of the exclusive economic zone adjacent to the coast of Australia; and

2. the waters adjacent to each external territory within the outer limits of the exclusive economic zone adjacent to the coast of the external Territory;

but does not include:

• coastal waters of, or waters within the limits of, a State or internal Territory; or

• waters that are excepted waters.

Biomass Total weight of a stock or a component of a stock.

Biomass limit reference point The point beyond which the risk to the stock is regarded as unacceptably high.

Bycatch Species taken incidentally in a fishery where other species are the target, and which are always discarded.

Byproduct Any part of the catch that is kept or sold by the fisher but is not the target species.

Demersal Found on or near the sea floor (c.f. Pelagic).

Discard Any part of the catch returned to the sea, whether dead or alive.

202

Effort A measure of the resources used to harvest a fishery’s stocks. The measure of effort appropriate for a fishery depends on the methods used and the management arrangements. Common measures include the number of vessels, the number of hooks set or the number of fishing days.

Electronic monitoring Electronic monitoring uses sensors and cameras to monitor and record information on fishing activity in a targeted way. Sensor data and video footage is analysed retrospectively to provide information and verify logbooks according to the needs identified for that fishery.

Fisheries Management Act 1991 One of the two main pieces of legislation (along with the Fisheries Administration Act 1991) that detail AFMA’s responsibilities and powers.

Fishing concession A Statutory Fishing Right, or a fishing permit, or a foreign fishing boat licence granted under the provisions of the Fisheries Management Act 1991.

Fishing permit A type of fishing concession granted under Section 32 of the Fisheries Management Act 1991 to a person, authorising the use of a specified Australian boat by that person, or a person acting on that person’s behalf, for fishing in a specified area of the Australian Fishing Zone or a specified fishery for specified species, using specified equipment.

Fishing season The period during which a fishery can be accessed by fishers.

Gillnet Type of passive fishing gear consisting of panels of net held vertically in the water column, in contact with the seabed, such that fish attempting to swim through the net are entangled. The mesh size of the net determines the size range of fish caught, as smaller fish can swim through the meshes and larger fish are not enmeshed.

203

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

204

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

GoFish GoFish is AFMA’s online business facility for fishers to submit their applications, view their record of fishing concessions as held by AFMA, keep their contact details up to date, view quota and catch information, receive messages from AFMA and monitor progress of applications lodged with AFMA.

Harvest strategy Strategy outlining how the catch in a fishery will be adjusted from year to year depending on the size of stock, the economic or social conditions of the fishery, conditions of other interdependent stocks or species, and uncertainty of biological knowledge. Well-managed fisheries have an unambiguous (explicit and quantitative) harvest strategy that is robust to the unpredictable biological fluctuations to which the stock may be subject.

Incidental catch Any part of the catch that is not the target species, including bycatch and by-pr oduct.

Individual transferable quotas Individual portions of a total allowable catch - units of quota - that allow the holder to catch that portion of the total allowable catch each season. The weight value of the individual transferable quotas changes in proportion to changes in the total allowable catch set for a species each season.

Individual transferable quotas are fully tradeable and can be sold or leased to other fishers.

Key commercial species A species that is, or has been, specifically targeted and is, or has been, a significant component of a fishery.

Logbook Official record of catch-and-effort data completed by fishers. In many fisheries, a licence condition makes the return of logbooks mandatory.

204

Longline Fishing gear in which short lines (branchlines or droppers) carrying hooks are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals. Pelagic longlines are suspended horizontally at a predetermined depth with the help of surface floats. The main lines can be as long as 100 kilometres and have several thousand hooks. Droppers on demersal longlines (set at the seabed with weights) are usually more closely spaced.

Maximum economic yield The sustainable catch or effort level for a commercial fishery that allows net economic returns to be maximised. Note that for most practical discount rates and fishing costs maximum economic yield will imply that the equilibrium stock of fish is larger than that associated with maximum sustainable yield. In this sense maximum economic yield is more environmentally conservative than maximum sustainable yield and should in principle help protect the fishery from unfavourable environmental impacts that may diminish the fish population.

Maximum sustainable yield The maximum average annual catch that can be removed from a stock over an indefinite period under prevailing environmental conditions.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) box The area of the Australian Fishing Zone where traditional fishing by Indonesian nationals is permitted.

Nautical mile A unit of distance derived from the angular measurement of one minute of arc of latitude, but standardised by international agreement as 1852 metres.

Net economic returns A fishery net economic returns over a particular period are equal to fishing revenue less fishing costs.

Non target species Species that are unintentionally taken by a fisher or not routinely assessed for fisheries management. See also Bycatch.

205

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

206

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Offshore Constitutional Settlement An agreement between one or more states and the Australian Government giving individual or joint jurisdiction for a particular fishery that is in both coastal waters and the Australian Fishing Zone.

When no Offshore Constitutional Settlement agreement has been reached, the fishery remains under the jurisdiction of the state out to three nautical miles, and of the Australian Government from three nautical miles to 200 nautical miles.

Output controls Restrictions imposed on the quantity of fish that can be taken from a fishery within a specified period of time. This can be by either a competitive total allowable catch or a total allowable catch allocated to participants as individual transferable quotas.

Overfished A fish stock with a biomass below the biomass limit reference point. ‘Not overfished’ implies that the stock is not below the threshold, and is now used in place of the status classification of ‘fully fished’ or ‘underfished’.

Pelagic fish Inhabiting surface waters rather than the sea floor: usually applied to free swimming species such as tunas and sharks.

Precautionary principle A principle asserting that a degree of scientific uncertainty should not be used as a reason for postponing measures to prevent environmental degradation in situations where there are threats of serious or irreversible environmental damage.

Quota Amount of catch allocated to a fishery as a whole (total allowable catch) or to an individual fisher or company (individual transferable quota).

Quota management A method of management based on output controls that allocates the total allowable catch among eligible operators as shares in the annual total allowable catch.

206

Reference point An indicator of the level of fishing (or stock size), used as a benchmark for interpreting the results of an assessment.

Statutory Fishing Rights Rights granted under Section 21 of the Fisheries Management Act 1991. The nature of Statutory Fishing Rights in a fishery is detailed in the plan of management that creates those rights. A Statutory Fishing Right may be a right to use a boat, a unit of fishing gear or a quantity of catch, or other rights as identified in the management plan.

Species Members of a species of fish that can breed with one another and produce fertile (capable of reproducing) offspring. In this way, a species maintains its ‘separateness’ from other species; for example, the yellowfin tuna and bigeye tuna are two distinct tuna species whereas the general term ‘tuna’ includes all tuna species.

Stock A functionally discrete population of a species that is largely distinct from other populations of the same species. Such a population may be regarded as a separate entity for management or assessment purposes. Some species form a single stock (e.g. southern bluefin tuna) while others form several stocks (e.g. albacore tuna in the Pacific Ocean are divided up into separate Northern Pacific and Southern Pacific stocks).

Targeting Fishing selectively for particular species or sizes of fish.

Target species The species being actively sought by fishers.

207

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

208

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority An authority comprising the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Water Resources (Chairperson), the Queensland Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry and the Chair of the Torres Strait Regional Authority. The authority is responsible for monitoring the condition of the jointly managed fisheries in the Torres Strait and the formulation of policies and plans for their management.

Torres Strait Treaty The treaty between Australia and Papua New Guinea concerned with sovereignty, management and maritime boundaries in the area between the two countries and the protection of the way of life and livelihood of traditional inhabitants and the marine environment.

Total allowable catch The amount of fish of a particular species that can be taken from a fishery in a prescribed period. Total allowable catches are set for fish species managed either through individual transferable quotas or through competitive total allowable catches.

Uncertain Status of a fish stock for which there is inadequate or inappropriate information to make a reliable assessment.

Undercatch and overcatch Undercatch and overcatch provide for ‘carry over’ or ‘carry under’ of an amount of end of season quota between fishing seasons thereby allowing fishers the flexibility to catch a certain amount of fish over or under their quota, and debit or credit this to or from the following season’s quota

Vessel monitoring system Electronic device that transmits the identity and location of a vessel.

208

INDEX Description Page

A

A. Raptis and Sons Pty Ltd 68

accountability and management 103-29

summary 104

advertising 114

advisory committees see management

advisory committees

agency resource statements 193

agents, online addition and removal of 48

alfonsino 75

Anderson, John 17, 173

Annual Operational Plan (AOP) 105, 108, 109, 111

Annual Performance Statement v, 2, 7, 24, 108

certification 23

Annual Report 108

Arrow Squid Fishery Harvest Strategy 82

Audit and Risk Committee 106, 107, 109, 111, 113, 174

membership 173

regular observers 174

role and function 173

Australian Border Force 40, 44

Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences 7, 26, 29, 55, 57, 65

Australian Federal Police 112

Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA)

Chairman’s review 7-12

Chief Executive Officer’s review 7-12

cost-efficiency 10, 15, 45, 46-51, 56

establishment 14

fisheries management and compliance 8-9

management arrangements 10

office locations 18

organisational structure 17

outlook 11-12

performance framework 24, 25

purposes 24

209

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

210

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

recognition 11

regulatory arrangements 10, 46-51

role and functions 14-15

snapshot 6

stakeholders 15

values 16

Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) Commission

17, 72-3, 94, 109, 181

Commissioners 105, 170-2

meetings 172

responsibilities 14, 105

Australian Fishing Zone 14, 15, 31, 38, 40, 98,

112, 113, 124

Australian Maritime Border Operations Centre 40

Australian National Audit Office 107, 174

contract access clauses 114

Australian National University Internships Program 127

Australian Network on Disability 127

Australian Public Service Commission Indigenous Traineeship Program

127

Australian Public Service Employee Census 121, 125

Australian sardine 71

Australian Sea Lion Management Strategy 186

B

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery ii, 8, 55, 58, 181

analysis of performance 60

economic returns 60

estimated catch 59

fish stocks, status of 60

management plans/arrangements 60

stock status of target species 59, 60

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Harvest Strategy 60

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Management Advisory Committee

181

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery Management Plan 2002

60

Bellchambers Barrett 174

bird bafflers 54, 79, 80, 81

blue grenadier 75, 77

210

Description Page

blue-eye trevalla 75, 77, 98

boarfish 98

Bolton, Steve 17

Bromhead, Don 122

Brooks, Renata 170, 172, 174

bugs 69

business continuity 111

bycatch 32

Commonwealth Fisheries Bycatch Policy 12, 26, 30, 56

handling, improving 34-5

Heard Island and MacDonald Islands Fishery 94

mishandling reports 9

Northern Prawn Fishery 6, 8, 56, 65, 68

Policy on Fisheries Bycatch 2000 79

reducing 6, 54

Small Pelagic Fishery 73

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery 79

Southern Squid Jig Fishery 83

species at high risk after mitigation 29

Bycatch and Discard Program 68, 80-1, 186

Bycatch Handling and Treatment Guide 2016-17 9, 34

Bycatch Handling Condition 35

Bycatch Mishandling treatment program 35

Bycatch Reduction Device trials 68

C

capacity building 43

cardinal fish 98

Cartwright, Ian 170, 171, 172, 174

Catch Disposal Records 57

catch totals, estimated 57

catch traceability 9

Chimungeni-Brassington, Jane 174

China 44

Chondrichthyan Guide for Fisheries Managers 186

civil litigation 177-8

Client Service Charter 16, 22, 51

co-management arrangements 48

211

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

212

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

Comcare 185

commercial species 47, 85, 91, 127

Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 42, 94, 95, 181

Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Non-Contracting Party

Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Vessel list 42

Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna 87, 88, 180

Commissioners 105, 170-2

disclosure of interests 105-6

meeting attendance 172

Commonwealth Disability Strategy 190

Commonwealth fisheries

illegal fisheries 40

Marine Mammal Working Group 8, 50

net economic returns, improving 30-1, 45-6

Commonwealth Fisheries Association 175

Commonwealth Fisheries Bycatch Policy 12, 26, 30

Commonwealth Fisheries Harvest Strategy Policy 12, 56, 70

Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy and Guidelines 2007, Commonwealth Harvest Strategy Policy 2007 26, 30, 70, 77, 79, 186

Commonwealth Policy on Fisheries Bycatch 26, 79

Commonwealth Procurement Rules 114

Commonwealth Risk Management Policy 109

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

66, 68, 73

Oceans and Atmosphere 175

Commonwealth South East Trawl Sector 74, 75

Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook sectors 75, 76

Commonwealth Trawl Sector 180

communication 32

compliance and enforcement

capacity building 43

domestic see National Compliance and

Enforcement Program

finance law 104, 113

foreign 37-8

multilateral patrols/operations 43

compliance index 198-201

212

Description Page

Compliance Risk Management Team 34

Connors, Scott 17, 122

consultancy services 191

selection and engagement 191

contracts 114

Cooper, Catherine 170, 171, 172, 173

Cooper, Katrina 128

Coral Sea

illegal foreign fishing vessels 40

Coral Sea Fishery ii, 58

analysis of performance 62

estimated catch 61

management plans/arrangements 62

performance results 61

stock status of target species 61

Coral Sea Fishery Harvest Strategy 62

corporate governance 105-13

disclosure of interests 105-6

external scrutiny 107

governing body 105-6

internal scrutiny 106-7

performance review 106

Corporate Plan 2016-19 2, 24

Corporate Plan 2017-20 11, 24, 105, 109

corporate planning and reporting 108-9

Corporate Risk Team 111, 175

cost recovery 10, 15, 46, 48, 49

Cost Recovery Implementation Statement 55

Couchman, Natalie 122

D

Davis, John 17

Day, George 17

Department of Agriculture and Water Resources 12, 14, 30, 175

employment programs 126

penalty provisions, legislative review 49

Department of Environment and Energy 8, 12, 89, 188, 189

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Government Partnerships for Development program 43

213

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

214

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

Digital Continuity Policy 2020 112, 176

disability reporting 190

discarded fish 34, 45, 47, 127

Bycatch and Discard Program 68, 80-1, 186

reporting 78

disclosure of interests 105-6

Dolphin Management Strategy 186

dolphin mitigation strategies 55

Small Pelagic Fishery Dolphin Mitigation Strategy 73

dolphins

Gillnet Dolphin Mitigation Strategy 79, 181

Gillnet Hook and Trap strategy 8

interaction reduction strategies 55-6, 73

domestic compliance see National Compliance and

Enforcement Program

domestic matters 112-13

dory

john 75

mirror 75

E

East Coast Deepwater Trawl Sector 74, 75

eastern school whiting 75

Eastern Skipjack Fisheries 8

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery ii, 27, 55, 58, 127, 179, 188

analysis of performance 84

e-monitoring 48, 86

estimated catch 84

external reviews 86

fish stocks, status of 85

management plans/arrangements 84, 86

performance results 84

stock status of target species 84

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Harvest Strategy 86

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Management Plan 2010 85, 86

ecological risk assessment 8, 26, 27, 186

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery 86, 179

Small Pelagic Fishery 73

Southern Squid Jig Fishery 83

214

Description Page

Ecological Risk Assessment and Management Team 122

Ecological Risk Assessment and Risk Management Framework

56, 70

Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fishing framework

188

Ecological Risk Assessment Technical Working Group 27

ecological risk management 7, 8

Ecological Risk Management Guide 7-8, 22, 27, 122, 188

Ecological Risk Management Policy 27, 188

ecological sustainability 7-8

analysis 29-30

assessment 27-8

performance results 25

purpose 24

ecologically sustainable development 56, 186-9

effect of actions on the environment 187-8

environmental footprint 189

minimising impact on environment 188

outcome contributing to 187

principles 30, 186-7

review mechanisms 188

economic returns 30-1, 45-6

education 32

Electronic Documents and Records Management System 111-12

electronic monitoring (e-monitoring) 6, 9, 34, 48, 54, 56,

78, 86, 179

compliance rates 33

elephantfish 75

employees see staff

Enterprise Agreement 2016 118-19

Enterprise Risk Register 109

environment see ecologically sustainable

development

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 8, 32, 67, 70, 89, 187, 188, 189

Erub Arts Centre 124

ethical standards 120

Executive

membership 173

215

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

216

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

remuneration 120

role and function 172

training 184

exempt contracts 114

expenses

outcomes, by 194

resource statement 193

external scrutiny 107

F

Facebook 115

Federated States of Micronesia 39, 40

Fiji 39

finance law

compliance 104, 113

financial performance statement 132

financial results 132

financial statements 3, 133-67

Findlay, Dr James v-vi, 17, 23, 136, 170, 171,

172, 173, 174

fish stocks, status of 27, 29

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery 59, 60

Eastern Tuna and Billfish fisheries 85

ecological risk assessment 27

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery 8, 97

Northern Prawn Fishery 64

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery 77

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery 88

Southern Squid Jig Fishery 82

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery 91

Fisheries Administration Act 1991 v, 3, 12, 14, 23, 105, 108, 179

fisheries closure monitoring 36-7

Fisheries Legislation Amendment (Representation) Bill 2017 56

fisheries management 8-9

arrangements 10

capacity building programs 43

outcomes 24

plans 54

quota management system 60

216

Description Page

Fisheries Management Act 1991 10, 12, 14, 49, 70, 76

Fisheries Management Amendment (Compliance and Enforcement) Regulations 2017

10

Fisheries Management Regulations 1992 70, 76

Fisheries Operations Branch 112

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation 55, 78, 175

fishery reports

list 58

performance results 57

Fishery Status Reports 7, 26, 57

flathead 55, 75

deepwater 75

foreign apprehensions 9, 41

foreign compliance 37-8

foreign matters 113

France 43

fraud control 112

Fraud Control Plan 112

Fraud Policy 112

Freebody, Kate 173

Freedom of Information Act 1982 114, 178, 179, 182

freedom of information reporting 182

G

Gapuwiyak Culture and Arts Aboriginal Corporation 124

Gehrig, Robert 17, 136, 173

gemfish 75

eastern 76

general deterrence program 22, 32

Ghebrezgabhier, Danait 17

ghost nets

feature story 124

Gibson, Beth 17, 175

Gillnet Dolphin Mitigation Strategy 79, 181

Gillnet Hook and Trap dolphin strategy 8

Gillnet, Hook and Trap sector 55, 74, 75, 76

gillnet length restrictions 47

glossary 3, 202-8

GoFish 48, 50, 51

217

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

218

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

governing body 105-6

disclosure of interests 105-6

performance review 106

Graduate Development Program 126

grants, discretionary 114

Great Australian Bight trawl fisheries 68

Great Australian Bight Trawl Fishery Industry Association 48

Great Australian Bight Trawl Fishery Management Advisory Committee

180

Great Australian Bight Trawl Sector 74, 75, 76, 180

gross value of production 2016-17 6, 7, 56

Guidelines for Quality Assurance of Australian Fisheries Research and Scientific Information

11-12

H

Hall, David 172

Harvest Strategies

Arrow Squid Fishery 82

Bass Strait Central Zone Scallop Fishery 60

Coral Sea Fishery 62

Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery Harvest Strategy 86

Line, Trap and Trawl Sectors 62

Skipjack Tuna Fishery 101

Small Pelagic Fishery 71

Harwood, Mary 173

Heard Island and MacDonald Islands Fishery i, 8, 58, 181

analysis of performance 94

bycatch, status of 94

estimated catch 93

external reviews 95

management plans/arrangements 94

performance results 93

stock status of target species 93

Heard Island and McDonald Islands Fishery Management Plan 2002

94

High Seas Permits

analysis of performance 99

estimated catch 98

management plans/arrangements 98

218

Description Page

I

ICT Strategy Plan 176

illegal fishing

feature stories 41, 44

foreign vessels 9, 22, 40

Indian Ocean Tuna Commission 91, 179

Indonesia 40, 41, 43

Information Governance Committee 107, 176

information management 111-12, 176

Information Management Strategy 176

Information Publication Scheme 182

internal scrutiny 106-7

International Criminal Police Organisation (INTERPOL) 42

international engagement

feature story 39

International Women’s Day 128

J

jackass morwong 75, 98

Jenkins, Libby 17

Joyce MP, the Hon Barnaby 14, 55

K

Knuckey, Geoff 173

Kon’s Covered Fisheye 6, 8, 54, 56, 65, 68

KPMG 174

Kroger, Helen v-vi, 11

Kuhn, Danielle 17, 173

L

Lamb, Luke 122

Leadership and Talent Management Program 125

legislative review

offence and penalty regime 49

letter of transmittal v-vi

licensing

online portal (GoFish) 48

Line, Trap and Trawl Sectors Harvest Strategy 62

litigation

civil 177-8

219

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

220

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

significant matters 178

lobster 61, 62

tropical rock 61

M

mackerel

blue 71

icefish 93, 94

Jack 71

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery ii, 8, 58

analysis of performance 97

estimated catch 96

external reviews 97

fish stocks, status of 97

management plans/arrangements 96

performance results 96

stock status of target species 96

Macquarie Island Toothfish Fishery Management Plan 2006 96

mahi mahi

removing trip limits 47

maintenance programs 36-8

management see accountability and

management

management advisory committees 50

meetings and membership 50, 179-81

marine mammal interactions, mitigating 8, 55-6, 73

Marine Mammal Working Group 8, 50

Marine Stewardship Council 67

Maritime Border Command 40

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources 14, 17, 55, 105

Ministerial Direction 105

Moore AM, the Hon Norman 11, 170, 172

multilateral patrols/operations 43

Murphy, Ryan 17

Murray Darling Basin Authority 128

N

National Compliance and Enforcement Program 2016-17 9, 31

National Compliance Strategy Section 34

National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 190

220

Description Page

National Intelligence Unit 9, 32

National Investigations Taskforce 37

Net length restrictions, removing 47

New Zealand 101

Niue Treaty Subsidiary Agreement 43

Nivôse 39

Non-Contracting Party Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Vessel list

42

non-operational fisheries 100-1

Norfolk Island Fishing Association 100

Norfolk Island Fishery ii, 58, 100

Norfolk Island Fishery Policy 100

North West Slope and Western Deepwater Trawl Fisheries i, 58

analysis of performance 70

estimated catch 69

management plans/arrangements 70

performance results 69

stock status of target species 69

Northern Prawn Fishery ii, 58, 70, 180

analysis of performance 64-5

bycatch 6, 8, 56, 65

co-management arrangements 48

economic returns 65

estimated catch 63

fish stocks 64-5

innovations 66-7

management plans/arrangements 64

performance results 63

stock status of target species 63

Northern Prawn Fishery Bycatch Strategy 2015-18 65

Northern Prawn Fishery Industry Pty Ltd 68

Northern Prawn Management Advisory Committee 180

Northern Prawn Management Plan 1995 64, 180

northern waters protection 40

O

observer market testing 49

Observer Workplace Health Policy and Safety Risk Assessment Guidelines

183

221

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

222

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

ocean jacket 75

ocean perch 75

offices

environmental impact 189

locations 18

Offshore Constitutional Settlement arrangements 10, 15, 70, 180

orange roughy 29, 75, 76, 77, 98, 101

oreodory 75

smooth 98

spikey 98

organisational structure 17

overcatch 45, 78

overfishing 6, 7, 28, 54, 59, 61, 69, 71, 74,

82, 84, 87, 90, 93, 96

P

Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency 9, 39

Papua New Guinea 40, 113, 208

Patagonian toothfish 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 181

Pearson, Andrew 17, 173

penalty provisions

legislative review 49

people management see staff

Performance and Development Scheme 125

performance framework 24

outcome and program 24

summary 25

performance management 125

pink ling 76, 77

Pormparraaw Arts Centre 124

port visits 32, 50, 51

Portfolio Budget Statements 108

Powell, Andrew 122

prawns

banana 64, 65

blue endeavour 63

brown tiger 63, 64

grooved tiger 63, 64

red endeavour 63

222

Description Page

red-legged banana 63

royal red 75

tiger 64, 65

white banana 63

procurement 114, 192

Productivity Commission inquiry 107

Project and Governance Committee 107, 175

project management framework 111

prosecutions 37, 113

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 v, vi, 2, 7, 14, 23, 105, 108, 113, 173

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Non-corporate Commonwealth Entity Annual Reporting) Rule 2014

v, 3

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 vi, 108, 112, 113

Public Service Act 1999 14, 105

purchasing 114

Q

Quota Administration Policy 44

quota reconciliation program 36

quota setting

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery 88

R

ranching sector 88

Rawlings, Her Excellency Menna 128

Rayner, Brendan 122

Rayns, Nick 17, 128, 173, 174

Recruitment and Selection Policy 121

red tape reductions 6

initiatives 10, 47-8, 67

redbait 71

redfish

bight 75, 77

Eastern 76

prickly 61

surf 61

Redfish Stock Rebuilding Strategy 77

223

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

224

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

redthroat emperor 98

regional cooperation 9, 50, 42, 43

Regional Fisheries Management Organisations 38

Regional Plan of Action to Promote Responsible Fishing Practices

43

regulator arrangements 10, 46-51

analysis 47-8

assessment 46-7

Client Service Charter 16, 51

cost recovery 10, 15

performance results 46

purpose 46

results 46

stakeholder engagement 50-1

Regulatory Powers (Standard Powers) Act 2014 49

remuneration 119-20

reporting

disability 190

freedom of information 182

internal 109

reports see fishery reports

Research Committee

membership 174

permanent advisors 175

regular observers 175

role and function 174

Resource Assessment Groups 50

Resource Statement 193

Review of Commonwealth Fisheries: Legislation, Policy and Management

49

rewards and recognition program 121-3

risk management 109-12

Risk Management Committee 111

Risk Management Guidelines 109

Risk Management Policy 109

Royal Australian Navy patrol boats 40

ruby snapper 69

rubyfish 98

224

Description Page

Ruston, Senator the Hon Anne v, 14, 128

S

Sainsbury, Professor Keith 170, 171, 172, 174

scallop, commercial 59

scampi 69

scientific panel and stakeholder forums 72

scientific research policy 11-12

Sea Breeze 42

sea cucumber 61, 62

Seabird Management Plan 186

Seabird Threat Abatement Plan 2014 86, 92

seabirds 79, 80, 92, 94

mitigation 54, 80, 81

strike reduction 6, 8

seals

Protected Species Strategy 8

section plans 109

Senate Estimates 107

Senate Standing Committee on Environment and Communication inquiry

73

‘Sequoia’ 39

shark

deepwater 76

gulper 76

gummy 55, 75

sawshark 75

school 76

silver trevally 75

Skipjack Tuna Fishery i, ii, 58, 100-1

permits 101

stock status of target species 100

Skipjack Tuna Harvest Strategy 101

small business procurement 192

Small Pelagic Fishery ii, 27, 55, 56, 177, 178, 181, 188

analysis of performance 72-3

bycatch, status 73

estimated catch 71

external reviews 73

225

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

226

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

harvest strategy 71

management plans/arrangements 72

marine mammal interactions 73

performance results 71

scientific panel and stakeholder forum 72, 73

Senate Inquiry 73

stock status of target species 71

sustainability and economic returns 72-3

Small Pelagic Fishery Dolphin Mitigation Strategy 73

Small Pelagic Fishery Harvest Strategy 71

Small Pelagic Fishery Scientific Panel 72, 73

Smith, Kerry 17

Smith, Tony 95

social media 115

Solomon Islands 40

South East Management Advisory Committee 73, 181

South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association 80

co-management arrangements 48

South East Trawl sector 55, 68

South Pacific Forum Fisheries Agency 43

South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation 98, 99, 101

South Tasman Rise Fishery i, 58, 101

stock status of target species 101

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery ii, 55, 58, 70, 181

analysis of performance 77

bycatch, status of 79

discard reporting 78

e-monitoring 48

economic returns 77-8

estimated catch 74

gillnet length restrictions 47

management plans/arrangements 76-7

performance results 74

stock status of target species 77

wildlife trade operation, approved 67

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Integrated Scientific Monitoring Program

78

226

Description Page

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Management Plan 2003

76

Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Strategic Monitoring and Assessment Review Project

79

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery i, 58, 180

analysis of performance 88

economic returns 88

environmental assessment 89

estimated catch 87

external reviews 89

fish stocks 88

management plans/arrangements 87

performance results 87

quota setting 88

stock status of target species 87

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery Management Plan 1995 87

Southern Bluefin Tuna Management Advisory Committee 180

Southern Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement 98, 99

Southern Ocean

illegal fishing 42

Southern Squid Jig Fishery i, 8, 58, 181

analysis of performance 83

estimated catch 82

fish stocks 82

management plans/arrangements 82-3

performance results 82

stock status of target species 82

Southern Squid Jig Fishery Management Plan 2005 82

species at high risk after mitigation 28, 29

Spencer, Tod 17

squid

arrow 83

Gould’s 82, 83

staff 104, 116-28

Commissioners 105, 170-2

diversity 128

employment programs 125, 126-7

Enterprise Agreement 2016 118-19

227

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

228

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

executive see Executive

gender, by 104, 116, 117, 118

human resource management 120-3, 125

Internships Program 127

performance management 125

profile 116-18

remuneration 119-20

rewards and recognition program 121-3

statistics 104, 116, 121

Stepping Into Program 127

study assistance 126-7

terms and conditions of employment 118-19

training and development 104, 121, 125-6, 184

women 104, 116, 128

Stakeholder Perception Survey 11, 50

stakeholders 15

engagement 50-1

statutory fishing rights 45, 60, 64, 72, 76, 87

Stepping Into Program 127

Stevens, Richard 170, 171, 172

stewardship 66, 67

Stoute, Selina 17

Strategic Delivery Committee 175

Strategic Development Framework 175

Strategic Internal Audit Plan 106

Strategic Risk Register 109, 111

striped marlin 84, 85, 90

study assistance 126

Sub-Antarctic Management Advisory Committee 94, 181

Sub-Antarctic Resource Assessment Group 94, 97

‘super trawlers’ inquiry 73

sustainable fisheries 6

stock levels 27

swordfish 84, 90

broadbill 85

T

target species, stock status see by fishery

targeted risk programs 33

228

Description Page

teatfish

black 61

white 61

Tilley, Jess 17

Torres Strait fisheries 7, 17, 187, 208

Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984 15

Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority 15, 208

training and development 104, 121, 125-6, 184

trochus 61, 62

Tropic Ocean Prawns 68

Tropical Tuna Management Advisory Committee 179

tuna

albacore 84, 85, 90

bigeye 84, 85, 90

Indian Ocean skipjack 100

southern bluefin 44, 86, 87, 88

Western and Central Pacific Ocean skipjack 100

yellowfin 84, 85, 90

Tuna and International Fisheries Section 127

Tuna Australia 55

turtle exclusion devices 67

U

undercatch 45, 78

United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement 1999 15

United States (US)

Coast Guard 39, 43

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 67

unreported fishing 11, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 99

Upper-Slope Dogfish Management Strategy 186

user guide 2-3

V

values 16

Vanuatu 43

vehicles 189

Venslovas, Peter 17, 173

Vessel Monitoring System 9, 22, 39, 50, 99, 112

compliance rates 22, 33

Vietnam 9, 40, 41, 43, 62, 113

229

7

GLOSSARY AND INDEXES

230

AFMA ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Description Page

W

warehou

blue 75, 76

silver 75

Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission 9, 44, 85, 179

Conservation and Management Measures 44, 86

Western Skipjack Fisheries 8

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery i, 58

analysis of performance 91

e-monitoring 48

estimated catch 90

fish stocks, status of 91

mahi trips limits 47

management plans/arrangements 91, 92

performance results 90

stock status of target species 90

Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery Management Plan 2005 91

wildlife trade operation, approved 67

Women in AFMA Group 128

work health and safety 183-5

accident statistics 184

dangerous occurrence statistics 184

initiatives 183-4

notifiable incidents 185

performance 183

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 183, 185

Work Health and Safety Committee 183

Workplace Group-Human Resources Section 184

Y

yellowtail kingfish 98

Yuan Da 19 44

Z

Zunic, Yvonne 175

230