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Environment and Communications Legislation Committee—Senate Standing—Examination of annual reports—No. 2 of 2014, dated August 2014


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The Senate

Education and Employment

Legislation Committee

Annual reports (No. 2 of 2014)

August 2014

© Commonwealth of Australia

ISBN: 978-1-76010-057-5

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.

The details of this licence are available on the Creative Commons website:

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/.

This document was produced by the Senate Standing Committee on Education and Employment and printed by the Senate Printing Unit, Parliament House, Canberra.

MEMBERSHIP OF THE COMMITTEE

Members

Senator Bridget McKenzie, Chair, NATS, VIC

Senator Sue Lines, Deputy Chair, ALP, WA

Senator Lee Rhiannon, AG, NSW

Senator Deborah O'Neill, ALP, NSW

Senator Barry O'Sullivan, NATS, QLD

Senator Anne Ruston, LP, SA

Secretariat

Ms Julia Agostino, Secretary

Ms Natasha Rusjakovski, Principal Research Officer

Ms Jessica Strout, Senior Research Officer

Ms Elise Williamson, Research Officer

Ms Sarah Bainbridge, Administrative Officer

PO Box 6100 Ph: 02 6277 3521

Parliament House Fax: 02 6277 5706

Canberra ACT 2600 E-mail: eec.sen@aph.gov.au

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MEMBERSHIP OF THE COMMITTEE ...................................................... iii

CHAPTER 1 ........................................................................................................ 1

Introduction .............................................................................................................. 1

Terms of reference .................................................................................................. 1

Role of annual reports ............................................................................................ 2

Annual reports referred ........................................................................................... 2

Reports not examined ............................................................................................. 2

Method of assessment ............................................................................................. 3

Timeliness in tabling annual reports ...................................................................... 3

General comments on reports ................................................................................. 4

CHAPTER 2 .............................................................................................................. 5

Review of annual reports ........................................................................................ 5

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations ....................... 5

Fair Work Commission .......................................................................................... 7

Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation ....................... 8

Safe Work Australia ............................................................................................... 8

Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal ...................................................................... 9

Australian National University ............................................................................. 10

Workplace Gender Equality Agency .................................................................... 10

Comments made in the Senate ............................................................................. 11

Bodies not presenting annual reports to the Senate .............................................. 11

APPENDIX 1 ..................................................................................................... 13

Allocation of annual reports to the committee .................................................... 13

APPENDIX 2 ..................................................................................................... 15

Compliance table of annual reports referred ...................................................... 15

APPENDIX 3 ..................................................................................................... 17

Administrative Arrangements Order for the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations ................................................................ 17

CHAPTER 1 Introduction

1.1 This is the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee's (the committee) second report on annual reports for 2014.1 It provides an overview of the committee's examination of annual reports for the 2012-13 financial year.

Terms of reference 1.2 This report was prepared pursuant to Standing Order 25(20) relating to the consideration of annual reports by committees. The Standing Order states:

Annual reports of departments and agencies shall stand referred to the committees in accordance with an allocation of departments and agencies in a resolution of the Senate. Each committee shall:

(a) Examine each annual report referred to it and report to the Senate whether the report is apparently satisfactory.

(b) Consider in more detail, and report to the Senate on, each annual report which is not apparently satisfactory, and on the other annual reports which it selects for more detailed consideration.

(c) Investigate and report to the Senate on any lateness in the presentation of annual reports.

(d) In considering an annual report, take into account any relevant remarks about the report made in debate in the Senate.

(e) If the committee so determines, consider annual reports of departments and budget-related agencies in conjunction with examination of estimates.

(f) Report on annual reports tabled by 31 October each year by the tenth sitting day of the following year, and on annual reports tabled by 30 April each year by the tenth sitting day after 30 June of that year.

(g) Draw to the attention of the Senate any significant matters relating to the operations and performance of the bodies furnishing the annual reports.

(h) Report to the Senate each year whether there are any bodies which do not present annual reports to the Senate and which should present such reports.2

1 See Education and Employment Legislation Committee, Annual reports (No. 1 of 2014).

2 Amended 24 August 1994, 13 February 1997, 11 November 1998, 3 December 1998, 13 February 2002, 19 November 2002, 14 August 2006: with effect from 11 September 2006, 13 May 2009: with effect on 14 May 2009, 29 September 2010, 8 February 2012, 13 November 2013.

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Role of annual reports 1.3 Annual reports place a great deal of information about government departments and agencies on the public record. Accordingly, the tabling of annual reports is an important element of accountability to Parliament, assisting in the effective examination of the performance of departments and agencies, and the administration of government programs.

Annual reports referred 1.4 In accordance with Senate Standing Order 25(20)(f) this report examines those annual reports tabled between 1 November 2013 and 30 April 2014. The committee examined the following reports:

Departmental Reports

 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations — Annual Report for 2012-13.3

Statutory authorities/bodies

 Fair Work Commission - Report for 2012-13

 Safe Work Australia - Report for 2012-13

 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal - Report for 2012-13

 Workplace Gender Equality Agency - Report for 2012-13

Commonwealth companies under the Commonwealth Authorities Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act)

 Australian National University - Report for 2013

 Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation - Report for 2012-13

1.5 The tabling dates of these reports are listed at Appendix 2. Details of all annual reports referred to the committee are set out at Appendix 1.

Reports not examined 1.6 The committee is not obliged to report on Acts, statements of corporate intent, surveys, corporate plans or errata. The following documents were referred to the committee but not examined:

 Schools Assistance Act 2008—Report on financial assistance granted to each state in respect of 2011;

 Education and Care Services Ombudsman, National Education and Care Services Freedom of Information and Privacy Commissioners—Report for 2012-13.

3 Under the Administrative Arrangement Order on 18 September 2013, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations became two separate departments, the Department of Education and the Department of Employment.

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Method of assessment 1.7 Senate Standing Orders require the committee to examine the annual reports referred to it to determine whether they are timely and ‘apparently satisfactory’. In making this assessment, the committee considers whether the reports comply with the relevant requirements for the preparation of annual reports of departments and authorities.

1.8 The requirements are set down in the following instruments:

 for portfolio departments: the Public Service Act 1999, sub sections 63(2) and

70(2), and the Requirements for Departmental Annual Report, for Departments, Executive Agencies and Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act) Bodies, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, revised May 2014;

 for Commonwealth authorities and companies: the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, in particular sections 9, 36 and 48, the Commonwealth Companies (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, and the Corporations Act 2001; and

 for non-statutory bodies: the guidelines are contained in the Government

response to the Senate Standing Committee on Finance and Public Administration Report on Non-Statutory bodies.4

Timeliness in tabling annual reports 1.9 Standing Order 25(20)(c) requires the committee to report to the Senate on the late presentation of annual reports.

1.10 Annual reports must be tabled in Parliament by 31 October each year, except where an agency's own legislation specifies a timeframe for its annual report.5 Those agencies reporting under the CAC Act are required to provide their annual reports to the minister by the 15th day of the fourth month after the end of the financial year. Where the financial year ends on 30 June, this deadline translates to 15 October.6

1.11 The committee recognises that some agencies are required to comply with other timeframes stipulated in their enabling legislation, for example as soon as practicable after 30 June. Nonetheless, the committee reminds all agencies that the government considers it best practice for annual reports to be tabled by 31 October each year.

4 Senate Hansard, 8 December 1987, pp 2643-45.

5 Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Requirements for Annual Reports for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies, June 2012, p. 2.

6 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, s9.

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General comments on reports 1.12 The committee has found, under the terms of Standing Order 25(20), that the reports described in chapter 2 are apparently satisfactory except for timeliness in some cases.

CHAPTER 2 Review of annual reports

2.1 This chapter examines the following annual reports in greater detail, and provides the Senate with information that may be of particular interest:

 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations;

 Fair Work Commission;

 Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation;

 Safe Work Australia;

 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal;

 Australian National University; and

 Workplace Gender Equality Agency.

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2.2 The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) was the Australian Government department responsible for supporting the Commonwealth's policies and programs in the education, employment and workplace relations portfolio. Under the Administrative Arrangement Order on 18 September 2013, DEEWR became two separate departments, the Department of Education and the Department of Employment.1

2.3 The DEEWR Secretary, Ms Lisa Paul AO, noted that 2012-13 was one of the most significant years for achievements for DEEWR across the department's four areas of responsibility — early childhood, school education and youth, employment and workplace relations.2 Ms Paul highlighted the delivery of reforms to provide quality early childhood education and creating greater opportunities of sustained employment for job seekers with a disability. The Secretary noted that DEEWR recorded an operating budget surplus of $1.4 million for 2012-13.3

2.4 With an increasing number of families relying on early childhood education and care services to support workforce participation and to help balance their work and family responsibilities, the department facilitated more than 40 Early Childhood Education and Care Regional Roundtables across Australia.4 The roundtables were an

1 Administrative Arrangement Order, 18 September 2013, (viewed 10 July 2014), http://www.dpmc.gov.au/parliamentary/docs/aao_20130918.pdf

2 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 2.

3 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13,

pp. 2-3.

4 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13,

p. 15.

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initiative to bring together early childhood service providers, educators and other community and training stakeholders to develop local solutions to workforce challenges.5

2.5 DEEWR worked to close the gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in educational outcomes. This included supporting 526 participants in the Youth Mobility Program which supports young people from remote communities with post-school pathways.6 DEEWR also initiated 70 new projects in 2012 through the Parental and Community Engagement Program to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders parents to be involved in their children's education and schooling.7

2.6 Through the Disability Employment Broker program DEEWR aimed to create employment outcomes for Disability Employment Services participants in small to medium sized businesses in a regional location and industry sector. The program aimed to foster awareness of the advantages of employing people with a disability and focusing on ability rather than disability. The program started on

1 July 2012 and was completed by 30 June 2013. The program found jobs for 68 people with a disability, placements for work experience for 37 people and training for 20 people.8

2.7 DEEWR represented the Australian Government at the 102nd session of the International Labour Conference in Geneva in June 2013 as well as representing Australia at three International Labour Organization (ILO) governing body meetings. Departmental delegates discussed measures to improve social dialogue and the role of jobs in achieving environment sustainability. The delegates were also influential in the conference's decision to adopt a resolution to discontinue ILO sanctions in Myanmar.9

2.8 The committee notes that on 11 October 2013 DEEWR wrote to the Ministers for Education and Employment advising that the department's report would be tabled on 28 November 2013 and that the delay was a result of administrative adjustments due to machinery of government changes. Both Ministers agreed to the extension.

2.9 The committee considers the DEEWR 2012-13 annual report to be well presented and easy to navigate and in compliance with reporting requirements.

5 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 15.

6 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 26.

7 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 26.

8 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 70.

9 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 91.

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Fair Work Commission 2.10 The Fair Work Commission (the Commission) is Australia's national workplace relations tribunal. Under section 577 of the Fair Work Act, the Commission exercises its power in a way that is fair and just, open and transparent and promotes harmonious and cooperative workplace relations. The Commission has the power under the Fair Work Act to resolve unfair dismissal claims, set the minimum wage and approve enterprise agreements.10

2.11 The annual report for 2012-13 outlined the Commission's launch of Future Directions in October 2012. Future Directions contains 25 initiatives aimed at improving quality and performance of the services provided by the Commission and in the eight months since its release, 20 of the 25 initiatives have been implemented. Justice Iain Ross AO, President, highlights that as with any justice institution, the Commission is accountable to the community it serves and as a part of providing accountability, the Commission is committed to providing regular reports on the progress of implementing Future Directions.11

2.12 Ms Bernadette O'Neill, General Manager of the Commission, discussed the Commission's role as the regulator of registered organisations and the completion of the investigations into the Health Services Union (HSU). The investigations and subsequent litigation in relation to the HSU brought the role of the Commission in relation to registered organisations to the forefront. It also demonstrated the complexity and importance of their regulatory work.12 Over the reporting year, substantial cultural change has taken place for the Commission to become a more proactive and effective regulatory. The Regulatory Compliance branch has taken into account the challenges and issues from the HSU matter, initiating a large number of inquiries and investigations into registered organisations.13

2.13 During the annual reporting period, the Commission implemented a new organisational structure, with four branches instead of six. The Commission maintained a very high settlement rate of 81 per cent in unfair dismissal conciliations while achieving high client satisfaction levels.14 The workload of the Commission was much the same as the previous year with the number of applications decreasing slightly but the number of hearings and conferences conducted by the Members increased slightly.15

2.14 The committee notes that the Commission sought an extension to table the annual report prior to 8 November 2013, which was granted by the Minister for Employment, Senator the Hon. Eric Abetz.

10 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, pp. 10-11.

11 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, p. 3.

12 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, p. 4.

13 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, p. 4.

14 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, p. 5.

15 Fair Work Commission, Annual Report 2012-2013, p. 2.

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Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation 2.15 The Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation, established in 1992, provides reimbursement payments to employers providing long service leave to workers in the black coal mining industry in New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania.

2.16 The Corporation's investment objective is to obtain a net return from investment that exceeds inflation by at least four per cent per annum over rolling five year periods, as measured against the Consumer Price Index.16 Another Corporation's investment objective is that the Corporation's assets be invested such that there is a less than a 1/3 probability of the employer levy recommended by the actuary rising above 2.7 per cent per annum. The Coal Mining Industry reported that the annual average return of the last five years is 7.48 per cent with an average real rate of 5.12 percent, after adjustment for movement in inflation.17

2.17 The committee notes there is no information on the Corporation's environmental performance, disability strategy or its occupational health and safety strategy. The annual report does not include a glossary or an alphabetical or compliance index. The committee also notes the page numbers were hard to follow, starting again from Financial Statements. The committee suggests that the Corporation should take action to address these shortcomings in the next report. The committee also notes the annual report was received by the Minister outside the reporting requirements on 2 December 2013, but is aware that the timing of the federal election may have affected timeliness.

Safe Work Australia 2.18 Safe Work Australia is a statutory agency that was established on 1 November 2009 under the Safe Work Australia Act 2008. Safe Work Australia is the principal body leading the development of national policy to improve health and safety and workers compensation but does not undertake any regulatory functions.18

2.19 The Chief Executive Officer, Mr Rex Hoy outlined that 2012-13 was a great year for Safe Work Australia and for work health and safety in Australia. For the fourth consecutive year, Safe Work Australia has met all of its key performance indicators against their three outcome areas in the Portfolio Budget Statements.19 In June 2013 a final review of the National Occupational Health and Safety Strategy 2002-2012 was published, recognising the significant reduction in the number of work related fatalities and injuries over the last 10 years. Mr Hoy notes that there was a 47 per cent decrease in the number of work related fatalities in Australia, more than twice the strategy's target of 20 per cent over the ten years.20

16 Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation, Annual Report 2013, p. 9.

17 Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation, Annual Report 2013, p. 10.

18 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 8.

19 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 9.

20 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 9.

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2.20 In 2012-13, Safe Work Australia focused on two major work health and safety issues in the community, quad bike safety and workplace bullying. In July 2013 after an Australian Government roundtable on quad bike safety, Safe Work Australia launched the QuadWatch initiative.21 With more than 150 Australians dying from quad bike incidents since 2001, the online QuadWatch initiative hosts information on quad bike safety and design and engineering controls to generate community and industry engagement.22 Safe Work Australia has been asked to action 10 of the 23 recommendations listed in the Parliamentary Inquiry into Workplace Bullying 'We Just Want it to Stop', including to urgently progress the draft model Code of Practice: Managing the Risk of Workplace Bullying.23

2.21 The committee finds the Safe Work Australia annual report to be well presented, informative and easy to navigate. The committee encourages timeliness in the presentation of annual reports and notes that this annual report was tabled on 18 November 2013.

Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal 2.22 The Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal (the Tribunal) was established by the Road Safety Remuneration Act 2012 and commenced operation on 1 July 2012. The Tribunal is an independent national tribunal with the objective of promoting safety and fairness in the road transport industry.24

2.23 The Tribunal has four specific functions: making road safety remuneration orders (RSROs); approving road transport collective agreements; dealing with certain disputes relating to road transport drivers; and conducting research into road remuneration-related matters that may affect safety. The Tribunal consulted and published its 1st Annual Work Program, identifying the retail, livestock, bulk grain, interstate long distance and intrastate long distance sectors of the road transport industry as those proposed by the Tribunal to have priority, with a view of making a RSRO.25

2.24 The Tribunal is funded through an appropriation to the Fair Work Commission (the Commission) while remaining a separate entity. From the outset, it was decided that an integrated model of support for the Tribunal and the Commission would be the most efficient, drawing on experience and knowledge from the Commission staff and avoids duplication on staff functions and other resources. Administrative support is shared across information technology, communications, website design and support, human resources and research.26

21 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p.10.

22 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p.10.

23 Safe Work Australia, Annual Report 2012-13, p.10.

24 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 2.

25 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 2.

26 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 4.

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2.25 The committee congratulates the Tribunal on the presentation of its inaugural annual report. The committee notes that the annual report meets the requirements of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and is well presented. The committee notes that the Tribunal sought an extension to table the annual report prior to 8 November 2013, which was granted by the Minister for Employment, Senator the Hon. Eric Abetz.

Australian National University 2.26 Under the Administrative Arrangement Order on 18 September 2013, the Australian National University (ANU) became a part of the Education Portfolio, moving from the Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education Portfolio.

2.27 Professor Ian Young AO, Vice-Chancellor and President, said in his introduction that responding to the financial situation resulting from the Commonwealth reduction in funding was the biggest issue the ANU faced in 2013. The budget challenges were addressed by engaging directly with staff and students, seeking their suggestions on how to address the issues.27 This led to the Budget Solutions package which will see a reduction in professional staff numbers and a program to reinvest in academic staff. ANU has identified a need to make changes to administrative functions, with their priority remaining to ensure that the challenges do no impact the quality of ANU's research and education.28

2.28 In 2013, it was announced that ANU would be the first Australian university to join edX, the Massive Online Open Course provider set up by MIT and Harvard. Two ANUx courses are being developed, the first on Astronomy and Astrophysics led by Nobel Laureate Professor Brian Schmidt AC, and the second on India, which will be the first edX course delivered in multiple languages.29

2.29 The committee is pleased to see that the annual report covers areas such as work health and safety, the environment and access for people with a disability in great detail. The committee recommends the inclusion of a compliance index to enhance the report's accessibility.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2.30 On 6 December 2012 the passage of the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 received Royal Assent, replacing the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act 1999 and resulting in a name change, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (the Agency).30 Under the new legislation, focus has moved from equal opportunity for women to gender equality in the workforce, recognising equal remuneration between

27 Australian National University, Annual Report 2013, p. 8.

28 Australian National University, Annual Report 2013, p. 8.

29 Australian National University, Annual Report 2013, p. 9.

30 Workplace Gender Equality Agency, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 6.

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women and men and family and caring responsibilities of women and men as central to achieving gender equality.31

2.31 The Agency noted that the number of employers who registered with the Agency for the purpose of reporting in 2012-13 has significantly increased from 2011-12, up from approximately 70 per cent to 94 per cent. To help relevant organisations prepare for reporting under the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, the Agency developed and published educational materials, including videos and podcasts. The Agency also launched a new website in March 2013, making it more informative, easier for users to navigate and compliant with accessibility requirements.32

2.32 The committee congratulates the Agency on its first annual report under its new name. The committee finds the report to be well presented and informative.

Comments made in the Senate 2.33 The committee is obliged, under Senate Standing Order 25(20)(d), to consider any remarks made about these reports in the Senate. The committee is satisfied that there were no such comments to include.

Bodies not presenting annual reports to the Senate 2.34 The committee is required to report to the Senate each year on whether there are any bodies not presenting annual reports to the Senate which should. The committee is satisfied that there are no such bodies at this time.

Senator Bridget McKenzie Chair

31 Workplace Gender Equality Agency, Annual Report 2012-13, p. 6.

32 Workplace Gender Equality Agency, Annual Report 2012-13, p.8.

APPENDIX 1

Allocation of annual reports to the committee Annuals reports from the following agencies were allocated to the committee during the reporting period.

Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Portfolio

 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Education

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority

 Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership Ltd (AITSL)

 Australian National University (ANU)

 Australian Research Council

 Schools Assistance Act 2008-Report on financial assistance granted to each state in respect of 2011

 Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)

Employment

 Air Passenger Ticket Levy (Collection) Act 2001

 Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation

 Defence Force Remuneration Tribunal 1

 Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (Workplace Gender Equality Agency)

 Fair Work Building Inspectorate

 Fair Work Commission

 Fair Work Ombudsman

 Remuneration Tribunal

 Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal

 Safe Work Australia

 Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission and Comcare

Seafarers Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority (Seacare Authority)

1 Also forwarded to Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee.

APPENDIX 2

Compliance table of annual reports referred

List of annual reports referred by the Senate to the committee during the period 1 November 2013 to 30 April 2014

Education, Employment portfolio

Body/Report Enabling legislation and timeliness Letter of Transmittal

Date

Submitted to/Received by Minister

Presented out of session Tabled Timeliness

Australian National University Australian National University Act 1991 28/03/2014 11/04/2014 Reps:

16/06/2014

Senate:

17/06/2014

On time

Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave Funding) Corporation

Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave) Administration Act 1992

3/10/2013 2/12/2013 Reps:

11/02/2014

Senate: 11/02/2014

Late

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Public Service Act 1999 17/10/2013 16/10/2013

17/10/2013

Reps:

13/11/2013

Senate:

13/11/2013

Extension granted

Page 16

Body/Report Enabling legislation and timeliness Letter of Transmittal

Date

Submitted to/Received by Minister

Presented out of session Tabled Timeliness

Fair Work Commission Fair Work Act 1999 23/10/2013 23/10/2013 04/11/2014 Reps:

13/11/2013

Senate:

12/11/2013

Extension granted

Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal Road Safety Remuneration Act 2012

23/10/2013 23/10/2013 04/11/2014 Reps:

13/11/2013

Senate:

12/11/2013

Extension granted

Safe Work Australia Safe Work Australia Act 2008 1/10/2013 22/10/2013 Reps:

18/11/2013

Senate: 3/12/2013

Late

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

4/11/2013 4/11/2013

6/11/2013

Reps:

2/12/2013

Senate:

3/12/2013

On time

APPENDIX 3

Administrative Arrangements Order for the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Extract from the Administrative Arrangements Order, made on 16 May 2013. These orders were in place during the reporting period covered.

PART 6 THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND WORKPLACE RELATIONS

Matters dealt with by the Department

 Schools education policy and programs, including vocational education and training in schools, Indigenous school education, but excluding migrant adult education

 Schooling transitions policy and programs including career pathways

 Education and training transitions policy and programs

 Employment policy, including employment services

 Job Services Australia

 Labour market and income support policies and programs for people of working age

 Workplace relations policy development, advocacy and implementation

 Promotion of flexible workplace relations policies and practices, including

workplace productivity

 Co-ordination of labour market research

 Occupational health and safety, rehabilitation and compensation

 Equal employment opportunity

 Work and family programs

 Services to help people with disabilities obtain employment, other than supported employment

 Youth affairs and programs, including youth transitions

 Early childhood and childcare policy and programs

 Co-ordination of early childhood development policy and responsibilities,

including Indigenous early childhood development