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Wednesday, 28 September 1910


Senator DE LARGIE (Western Australia) . - So far as crimping is concerned, very little fault can be found with Australian ships. It has been principally confined to foreign ships.


Senator Guthrie - To foreign and British ships.


Senator DE LARGIE - Yes. There has been very little, if any, crimping done in connexion with Australian shipping.


Senator Turley - There is none.


Senator DE LARGIE - I have not heard of any. The necessity for applying this division of the Bill to foreign and British ships must be very apparent when we recall the notorious state of affairs which obtained at Newcastle. The Navigation Commission discovered there what very few persons would imagine could be permitted to exist. The extent of this evil was very fully debated on a previous occasion, and I feel sure that every honorable senator thought that stringent steps should be taken to put it clown. It had become a scandal which, I think, no one could justify, and if it is to be put down we must have an effective law.

Senator Lt.-Colonel Sir ALBERTGOULD (New South Wales) [9.0].- I can indorse a good deal of what Senator de Largie has said in regard to crimping.

We are all prepared to use our utmost endeavours to discourage such a deplorable state of affairs as existed in some of our ports some years ago. I notice that under the Merchant Shipping Act, provision is made for a person to be entitled to supply seamen under licence from the Board of Trade. Why is it considered desirable to make the clause so restrictive? Would it not be possible to extend it so as to take power to grant licences to selected persons to supply seamen?


Senator Turley - That matter arises rather under clause 26.

Clause agreed to.

Clause 26 -

(1)   No person other than a superintendent, or the owner, master, mate, or engineer of a ship, shall engage or supply a seaman or apprentice to be entered on board the ship.

(2)   No person shall employ, for the purpose of engaging or supplying a seaman or apprentice to be entered on board a ship, any person, other than a superintendent, or the owner, master, mate, or engineer of the ship.

Penalty : Fifty pounds or three months' imprisonment.

Senator Lt.-Colonel Sir ALBERTGOULD (New South Wales) [9.2].- I again direct attention to the fact that under the Merchant Shipping Act, licences may be granted to persons to supply seamen to ships. Why has it been considered undesirable to do the same under this Bill? It ought not to be made more restrictive than is absolutely necessary to prevent crimping.







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