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Wednesday, 1 December 1971
Page: 3967


Mr Kennedy asked the Minister for Immigration, upon notice:

What methods does his Department usetokeep under surveillance the health of immigrants after their arrival in Australia.


Dr Forbes - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

The relevant legislation (Migration Act Section 16 (1) (c) and Regulation 26 under that Act) provides for the control of entry to Australia of people who suffer from specific medical disabilities. Refusal of entry is not mandatory, however, and discretion is exercised on the basis of a number of factors including risks to public health, the probability of the person' concerned becoming a charge on public funds and the capacity of the person concerned to integrate into the community. Medical disqualifications are weighed against family reunion and other humanitation considerations. Applicants for assisted passages are requiredto meet even more exacting criteria, including higher physical and medical standards, but generally the consequences are that migrants on arrival are free of disabilities which would make them unemployable or lead to such deterioration of health as would require prolonged institutional care or medical attention.

Normally therefore there are no special medical checks required or imposed on migrants after arrival in Australia. Any minor conditions from which they suffer, or disabilities which are contracted after arrival, would be treated through the ordinary medical facilities available to Australian citizens.

Migrants who have tuberculosis which is healed or has been effectively treated are an exception to the statement above. Tuberculosis is a ubiquitous disease with a tendancy to relapse after successful recovery from the initial infection. The Commonwealth. Department of Health refers details of such cases to State Directors of Tuberculosis for action. This affords opportunity to reinforce immunity by appropriate methods in members of a sponsoring family, where this is considered necessary. The State Directors also are sent the relevant medical reports and X-rays' of such migrants who are kept under surveillance for a period determined by the Directors.

In addition to these measures, under State legislation all migrants are required to undergo chest X-ray within one month of arrival in Australia unless this condition is waived by the State Director of Tuberculosis.

Migrant Emergency Fund (Question No. 4604)


Dr Klugman (PROSPECT, NEW SOUTH WALES) asked the Minister for

Immigration, upon notice:

(1)   How many claims were made on the Migrant Emergency fund in each State during each of the last three years.

(2)   What sum was (a) disbursed and (b) recovered in each State in each of those years.


Dr Forbes - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   The number of claims resulting in approved loans which were made on the Migrant Emergency Fund in each State during each of the last three financial years were:

 

(2)   The sums (a) disbursed and (b) recovered in each State in each of these years were:

 







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