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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Monday, 13 August 2018

The Federation Chamber meets at 10.30 am

 

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY FOR THIS SITTING

11 AM TO 1.30 PM

Notices

    †1    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Prime Minister’s persistent failure to resolve the ever growing gas crisis in Australia;

(b)         that this gas crisis is hurting Australian households and threatening manufacturing jobs all over the nation, especially in Victoria, NSW and Queensland;

(c)         that manufacturing companies around the nation have experienced:

(i)           between a tripling and quadrupling of the price they pay for Australian gas; and

(ii)         upwards of a 200 per cent increase in the price they pay for electricity;

(d)         that cost increases are seriously impacting on the ability of manufacturing companies to continue operations; and

(e)         that manufacturing companies around the nation are still unable to secure affordable gas supply contracts despite the Prime Minister’s handshake agreement with the gas companies in September 2017;

(2)         condemns the Prime Minister for failing to pull the export control trigger by November 2017 to ensure that Australian households and manufacturers are not being charged exorbitant prices for Australian gas;

(3)         recognises that the responsibility for every job lost in the manufacturing industry due to the skyrocketing price of Australian gas falls squarely with the Prime Minister and the Minister for the Environment and Energy; and

(4)         calls on the Government to act decisively now and find a solution to the gas crisis which is threatening jobs in the electoral division of Bruce and countless others around the nation.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †2    Mr Wallace : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that mental health is a crucial area that needs attention;

(2)         notes that the Government has made mental health a priority and is a key pillar of the National Long Term Health Plan with a record investment of $4.3 billion;

(3)         further notes that Australians with severe mental health illness will now receive more support services in their communities following an agreement between the Australian Government and state and territory governments; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for investing $160 million in the new national psychosocial support measure.

              ( Notice given 26 June 2018. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †3    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government last year released draft legislation concerning pay day lending which would have capped the maximum amount a consumer could repay on a small loan of less than $2,000 at 10 per cent of their net income;

(b)         the draft legislation also called for pay day lenders to be barred from making continued offers of credit to vulnerable borrowers;

(c)         there is no legislation before Parliament despite the Government in late 2016 flagging new laws to protect consumers and releasing draft legislation;

(d)         people continue to get into financial difficulty because of high-interest contracts;

(e)         the 2016 Review of the Small Amount Credit Contract laws found payday loans were being inappropriately handed to low-income and vulnerable Australians—the high-interest, high-fee cash advances continue to trap people in cycles of debt; and

(f)          Good Shepherd, St Stephens and other consumer advocates are concerned about the impact of the delay in presenting this legislation to the Parliament; and

(2)         calls on the Government to bring the draft legislation before the Parliament as soon as possible in order to give consumer advocates an assurance that legislative change will be considered to address the increasing number of vulnerable borrowers impacted by these lending practices.

              ( Notice given 26 June 2018. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †4    Mr Morton : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         funding is available in the 2018-19 federal budget for the Australian Government’s contribution to the construction of the Roe 8 and 9 extensions to complete the Perth Freight Link (PFL), despite the decision of the Western Australian Government to not proceed with the project; and

(b)         the Australian Government will provide $1.2 billion to the first Western Australian Government willing to build the PFL by constructing the Roe 8 and 9 extensions and is therefore recording this commitment as a contingent liability in the federal budget;

(2)         acknowledges the real benefits of these projects including 15 sets of traffic lights bypassed, 7,000 trucks and 74,000 cars off local roads each day, freeway access and travel time savings and a reduction of 450,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions;

(3)         welcomes strong community support for Roe 8 and 9;

(4)         condemns the Western Australian Government for not accessing the federal funding and building this critical infrastructure that will improve freight efficiency, make local roads safer and create local jobs in Western Australia;

(5)         calls on the Western Australian Government to:

(a)         consider all options that allow Roe 8 and 9 to proceed, like a longer bridge over the wetlands or a longer tunnel; and

(b)         immediately access the $1.2 billion available in the federal budget and build this critical infrastructure; and

(6)         calls on the federal Opposition to explain if it will keep or remove this critical funding from the federal budget if elected.

              ( Notice given 26 June 2018. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 1.30 pm. )

4.45 PM TO 7.30 PM

Orders of the day

      †1    Live Sheep Long Haul Export Prohibition Bill 2018 ( Ms Ley ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 June 2018 ).

              ( Time allowed—15 minutes. )

Notices —continued

    †5    Mrs Marino : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         1,000,000 jobs have been created since the election of the Government in 2013; and

(b)         the creation of jobs can only occur when the Government sets the right economic framework;

(2)         congratulates the Government on its strong economic management and its plans to reduce the tax burden on individuals and business; and

(3)         acknowledges that the Opposition Leader’s policies of higher taxation on individuals, businesses, retirees and pensioners would severely jeopardise further job creation in Australia.

              ( Notice given 29 May 2018. Time allowed—50 minutes. )

Orders of the day continued

      †2    Home care packages: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Hart —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are almost 300 older Australians who have waited more than two years for their approved home care package, without any care;

(b)         a further 636 older Australians have waited more than a year for care and they currently have no care at all and there are thousands more getting less care than they need;

(c)         the latest waiting list for home care packages indicates that more than 100,000 older Australians are waiting for the package they have been approved for; and

(d)         the latest figures show that the waiting list grew by more than 20,000 between 1 July and December 2017 and it is likely to continue growing without funding for the release of more packages;

(2)         recognises the Government’s response in its budget of 14,000 home care packages is woefully inadequate;

(3)         condemns the Government for the aged care crisis it has made on its watch; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately invest in fixing the home care package waiting list and properly address this growing crisis.

              ( Time allowed—40 minutes. )

      †3    Great Barrier Reef: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms M. L. Landry —That this House:

(1)         notes that the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef is the planet’s greatest living wonder;

(2)         further notes that it supports 64,000 jobs and contributes an estimated $6.4 billion to our economy; and

(3)         welcomes the Government’s record $500 million boost for Reef protection which will:

(a)         invest in a $444 million partnership with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation;

(b)         spark new and innovative investment in Reef protection measures;

(c)         deliver on projects which are proven to boost the health of the Reef;

(d)         improve water quality;

(e)         tackle the crown-of-thorns starfish; and

(f)          work with traditional owners on this vital project.

              ( Time allowed—20 minutes. )

         4    Universities funding: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government’s short-sighted $2.2 billion in cuts to universities are equivalent to more than 9,500 Australians missing out on a university place in 2018, and again in 2019;

(b)         across the country this month, students will be attending university, with orientation periods beginning, and that these students are faced with more uncertainty about how the cuts will affect their student experience; and

(c)         the Government’s short-sighted cuts will hurt regional and outer metropolitan universities and their students the most; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reverse its short-sighted, unfair cuts to universities, which are closing the door of opportunity to thousands of Australians.

              ( Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 7.30 pm. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Closing the Gap: Prime Minister’s Report 2018—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018—Mr Wallace ) on the motion of Dr Gillespie —That the House take note of the document.

       2    Response to Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee’s report on the inquiry into suicide by veterans and ex-service personnel—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 December 2017—Mr K. J. Andrews ) on the motion of Mr Tehan —That the House take note of the document.

       3    Veterans and their families—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 August 2017—Ms Flint ) on the motion of Mr C. A. S. Laundy —That the House take note of the document.

       4    Conclusion of the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 August 2017—Mr Entsch ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

       5    National security update to Parliament—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 June 2017—Mr Burke ) on the motion of Dr Gillespie —That the House take note of the document.

       6    50th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum and 25th Anniversary of the Mabo High Court decision—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 August 2017—Mr Hastie ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

       7    Last veterans’ mission to Korea—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 March 2017—Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

       8    Agreement to amend the Singapore-Australia Free Trade Agreement—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2017—Mr Falinski ) on the motion of Mr Ciobo —That the House take note of the document.

       9    Recent military commemorations—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2017—Mr Crewther ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

     10    Closing the Gap—Prime Minister’s Report 2017—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr C. A. S. Laundy —That the House take note of the document.

     11    Auditor-General—Audit report No. 38 of 2016-2017—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 February 2017—Mr Albanese, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

      12    Domestic and family violence: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2016 —Mr Littleproud ) on the motion of Mr Turnbull —That the Parliament:

(1)         acknowledge that violence against women is a national issue that requires a whole of community response;

(2)         acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 34 times more likely to experience violence;

(3)         call on all men to take action, call out violence, and link arms and say ‘No More’ to domestic violence; and

(4)         stand united in its commitment to eliminate violence against women.

     13    Infrastructure—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 30 November 2016—Mr Morton ) on the motion of Mr Fletcher —That the House take note of the document.

     14    Investment—Working in the national interest—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2016—Mr Drum ) on the motion of Mr Ciobo —That the House take note of the document.

     15    National Security—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 November 2016—Mr Drum ) on the motion of Ms Ley —That the House take note of the document.

      16    Equal rights for all Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2016 —Mr Alexander ) on the motion of Mr Turnbull —That this House: 

(1)         reaffirms its commitment to the right of all Australians to enjoy equal rights and be treated with equal respect regardless of race, colour, creed or origin;

(2)         reaffirms its commitment to maintaining an immigration policy wholly non-discriminatory on grounds of race, colour, creed or origin;

(3)         reaffirms its commitment to the process of reconciliation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, in the context of redressing their profound social and economic disadvantage;

(4)         reaffirms its commitment to maintaining Australia as a culturally diverse, tolerant and open society, united by an overriding commitment to our nation, and its democratic institutions and values; and

(5)         denounces racial intolerance in any form as incompatible with the kind of society we are and want to be.

     17    National security—Statement by the Prime Minister, 1 September 2016—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 September 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

      18    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  27 June 2018 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Interim report: Legal foundations of religious freedom in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 December 2017— Mr Dick ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 13 August 2018. )

       2    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Hidden in plain sight: An inquiry into establishing a Modern Slavery Act in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 December 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 13 August 2018. )

       3    Agriculture and Water Resources—Standing Committee Making every drop count: Inquiry into water use efficiency programs in agriculture —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       4    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the four major banks: Third report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr Wallace ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       5    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee A better family law system to support and protect those affected by family violence: Recommendations for an accessible, equitable and responsive family law system which better prioritises safety of those affected by family violence —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr Howarth ) on the motion of Ms Henderson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       6    Communications and the Arts—Standing Committee Report on the inquiry into the Australian film and television industry —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr Perrett ) on the motion of Mr Howarth —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       7    National Disability Insurance Scheme—Joint Standing Committee Provision of services under the NDIS Early Childhood Early Intervention approach —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr R. J. Wilson ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       8    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Powering our future: Inquiry into modernising Australia’s electricity grid —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr T. R. Wilson ) on the motion of Mr Broad —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       9    Indigenous Affairs—Standing Committee The power of education: From surviving to thriving —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr T. R. Wilson ) on the motion of Mrs Sudmalis —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     10    Migration—Joint Standing Committee No one teaches you to become an Australian: Report of the inquiry into migrant settlement outcomes —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr Irons ) on the motion of Mr Wood —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     11    Regional Development and Decentralisation—Select Committee Interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 February 2018— Mr Irons ) on the motion of Ms Swanson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     12    Corporations and Financial Services—Parliamentary Joint Committee Life insurance industry —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 March 2018— Mr Gosling ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     13    Health, Aged Care and Sport—Standing Committee Report on the inquiry into the use and marketing of electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 March 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     14    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia annual report 2017 (first report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 May 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Henderson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     15    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Advisory report on the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Bill 2017 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 May 2018— Mr Laming ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

     16    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Excluded: The impact of section 44 on Australian democracy —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

   *17    Northern Australia—Joint Standing Committee Northern horizons-Unleashing our tourism potential —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

   *18    Regional Development and Decentralisation—Select Committee Regions at the ready: Investing in Australia's future —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Drum —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Orders of the day continued

         1    Rakhine State in Myanmar: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 —Mr K. J. Andrews ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Amnesty International has evidence that hundreds of Rohingya women, men and children have been killed since the escalation of a violent assault in Northern Arakan/Rakhine State, Myanmar, since 25 August 2017;

(b)         the United Nations has estimated that since August 2017, over 589,000 Rohingyas have been forced to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh;

(c)         there are at least another 20,000 Rohingyas being detained at the borders;

(d)         the United Nations Human Rights team has witnessed accounts and heard testimonies of the Myanmar security force setting villages on fire and injuring, torturing, raping, killing and executing innocent victims;

(e)         214 villages have been destroyed through fire and will be taken over by the Myanmar Government because burnt land becomes government-managed land;

(f)          the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Prince Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, has called these government attacks ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’;

(g)         approximately 600,000 people are still deadlocked inside Rakhine State with limited access to food, medical care or humanitarian assistance;

(h)         despite the history of the Rohingya Muslims in the Rakhine region extending back to the post-colonial era, this community has been denied citizenship and most basic government services since 1982; and

(i)           the treatment of Rohingya Muslims in the Rakhine region is an issue that deeply concerns the Australian community; and

(2)         urges:

(a)         the Government of Myanmar to:

(i)           recommit to the pursuit of peace and national reconciliation; and

(ii)         allow access to all parts of Rakhine State to allow for the provision of humanitarian aid;

(b)         the Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs to:

(i)           do everything in her power to help alleviate the suffering in Rakhine State;

(ii)         lead the push for a strong United Nations General Assembly resolution on the violence in Rakhine State; and

(iii)        work to establish an independent United Nations investigation into human rights abuses in Myanmar; and

(c)         the Australian Government to:

(i)           support unimpeded humanitarian access to the Rohingya population;

(ii)         maintain pressure on the Myanmar Government, particularly the military and security forces, by condemning the persecution, attacks, killings and human rights abuses of the Rohingyas; and

(iii)        stand up for the moderate voices in Myanmar which are being widely suppressed by the threat of persecution by the Myanmar military.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         2    City Deals: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         welcomes the Government’s action to make our cities better places to live in and do business through ongoing City Deal developments in Townsville, Launceston, Western Sydney and Darwin;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         City Deals:

(i)           bring together all three levels of Government to develop collective plans for growth with a focus on jobs, housing, transport and the environment; and

(ii)         are already delivering firm commitments and real benefits for communities, including the $250 million North Queensland Stadium, the Townsville Eastern Access Rail Corridor, movement of the University of Tasmania’s main campus and the rejuvenation of the CBD in Launceston; and

(b)         further benefits through City Deals are under development, including the Western Sydney Housing Package and the redevelopment of Paterson Barracks in Launceston;

(3)         commends the Government for continuing to encourage and pursue new City Deals with other regional cities around Australia, including areas such as the Sunshine Coast; and

(4)         encourages state and territory governments and local councils in regional cities, especially on the Sunshine Coast, to work closely with their local Members of Parliament and the Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation to develop City Deals for their eligible communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         3    Aviation rescue and fire fighting services: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Albanese —That this House:

(1)         declares:

(a)         its support for the vital work performed each and every day by the highly trained professionals providing aviation rescue and fire fighting (ARFF) services to ensure the safety of the flying public;

(b)         that the ARFF service is particularly important to the safe operation of airports in regional Australia where it also responds to non-aviation emergencies within its local communities; and

(c)         that the presence of the ARFF service is key to safeguarding the safety and security at major metropolitan and regional airports around the country, which is critical for international and domestic tourism; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reject any proposal to increase the threshold for the provision of ARFF services at airports from the existing 350,000 passenger movements annually, noting that this would preclude the establishment of these services at Proserpine Whitsunday Coast Airport and lead to the removal of these services from the following regional communities: Ballina; Coffs Harbour; Ayres Rock; Gladstone; Hamilton Island; Broome; Karratha; Newman; and Port Hedland. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         4    Exports: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Coulton —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the important contribution that the Export Finance and Insurance Corporation (Efic) makes to supporting Australian exporters;

(2)         notes the recent passage of the Insurance Corporation Amendment (Support for Commonwealth Entities) Bill 2016 through the Parliament with bipartisan support, helping Efic keep pace with Australia’s changing exports; and

(3)         commends the Government for issuing a new Statement of Expectations for Efic, re-enabling it to support onshore resource projects, and related infrastructure.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         5    Plastic bags: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         plastic bags are detrimental to the environment;

(b)         Australians use an estimated 5 billion plastic bags a year, which represents over 20 million bags used every day;

(c)         research has indicated that as of 2013, approximately 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic have been floating in our world’s oceans—these are mostly microplastics of less than 5 millimetres in size and are regularly eaten by marine life, through which they enter the global food chain and are consumed by humans;

(d)         thousands of marine mammals and seabirds die every year around the world as a result of plastic litter;

(e)         plastic bags are particularly bad for the environment because they take from between 20 and 1,000 years to biodegrade and can travel long distances via air and water;

(f)          South Australia led the nation with the phasing out of lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags, which state legislation defines as a carry bag, the body of which comprises (in whole or in part) polyethylene with a thickness of less than 35 microns and includes handles;

(g)         South Australia’s ban on plastic shopping bags came into force on 4 May 2009; and

(h)         the South Australian Environmental Protection Authority estimates that the state’s ban on plastic shopping bags has resulted in almost 400 million fewer plastic bags in that state each year; and

(2)         calls on the:

(a)         state governments yet to enact a ban on lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags to do so with speed and urgency; and

(b)         Australian Government to work with the state Governments to implement a national ban on lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags by the end of 2018.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         6    Cambodian elections: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr M. C. Butler —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the role of Australia in helping to broker the Paris Peace Accords (PPA); and

(b)         that one of the core promises of the PPA was to provide the Cambodian people with free and fair elections;

(2)         expresses serious concerns about:

(a)         political suppression in Cambodia, including the closure of media outlets such as the Cambodia Daily; and

(b)         the arrest and trial of the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) leader, Kem Sokha, arising from a speech he delivered in Australia in 2013;

(3)         calls for:

(a)         the immediate release of Kem Sokha from detention and the removal of restrictions on civil society; and

(b)         greater transparency and assurance of due process in proceedings against political prisoners and dissidents;

(4)         condemns the move to disband the CNRP and redistribute seats to minor parties without by-elections;

(5)         expresses serious concerns about the timing of the actions against the CNRP and Kem Sokha in light of the impending 2018 general election; and

(6)         calls upon the Australian Government to impress upon the Cambodian Government the importance of free and fair elections for the Cambodian people.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         7    Tax and superannuation systems: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         recognises positive effect of the Government’s measures to assist more hard working Australians to:

(a)         earn more through the tax system, in particular by:

(i)           legislating tax cuts for middle income earners to ensure they are not pushed into the second highest tax bracket;

(ii)         introducing to Parliament the Enterprise Tax Plan, which will extend small business tax concessions to businesses up to $10 million from the outdated $2 million threshold; and

(iii)        supporting employers to invest more, provide more hours and increase wages through a more competitive international tax rate;

(b)         save more for their retirement through increased flexibility in the superannuation system, in particular by:

(i)           abolishing the so called ‘10 per cent rule’, which prevents anyone earning more than 10 per cent of their income from salary and wages from claiming a deduction for personal superannuation contributions; and

(ii)         introducing catch up concessional contributions to provide assistance to those—particularly women—who have interrupted work patterns, whether to raise children, look after elderly parents, or seek to boost their retirement savings just before retirement; and

(2)         notes with deep concern that the Opposition:

(a)         refuses to support tax relief for small business, while at the same time advocating tax cuts for foreign workers;

(b)         seeks to abolish measures to improve the retirement savings of hard working Australians, particularly those on low incomes and with interrupted work patterns; and

(c)         has no plan for jobs and growth, despite having previously advocated for a more competitive tax rate for employers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         8    Leadership and gender diversity: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         among 15 rural research and development corporations which receive statutory levies partly matched by the Commonwealth, the representation of women is no higher than 44 per cent, is as low as 11 per cent, and averages 26 per cent;

(b)         the Australian Institute of Company Directors (Institute) says its quest for 30 per cent female representation across ASX 200 boards by 2018 has stalled;

(c)         the Institute’s latest gender diversity report shows that as of 31 August 2017 there were 25.4 per cent female directors, only marginally higher than the 25.3 per cent reached at the end of 2016;

(d)         at the time of the publication of the Institute’s latest gender diversity report, 11 ASX 200 companies had no women on their boards; and

(e)         the Institute says that the Government may be forced to intervene with quotas to force companies to appoint more female directors;

(2)         acknowledges the Diversity in Agriculture Leadership Program (Program) initiative launched by the National Farmers’ Federation and AACo on 15 October 2017, which asks organisations to commit to auditing the gender diversity within their leadership teams and pledge to make ‘meaningful change’ towards achieving enhanced gender equality; and

(3)         calls on the:

(a)         Government to support the Program and similar initiatives to ensure that companies appoint more female directors; and

(b)         Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources to outline to the Parliament a plan to increase the representation of women to a minimum of 30 per cent on all agricultural boards over which the Government has some level of influence, including rural research and development corporations, agricultural committees, panels and councils. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         9    Relocation of Commonwealth agencies: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         8 million Australians live outside our capital cities; and

(b)         while some regions like the Sunshine Coast are experiencing strong economic growth, others are not enjoying the same levels of economic activity;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         many regions, including the Sunshine Coast, can supply substantially lower office accommodation costs and lower operating costs;

(b)         regions such as the Sunshine Coast can offer a highly educated workforce, high quality business facilities, first class health and transport infrastructure, as well as innovative start-up communities;

(c)         regions, including the Sunshine Coast, can offer lifestyle benefits like lower cost housing, short commute times and a family-friendly environment; and

(d)         research suggests that highly skilled people are taking increasing account of lifestyle factors when choosing their employer;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s pursuit of a policy of decentralisation of public sector agencies, and the recent relocation of some parts of the Murray-Darling Basin Authority to Wodonga; and

(4)         encourages the Government to continue to explore further options for the relocation of Commonwealth agencies to the regions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      10    South Australia and Commonwealth funding: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has delayed release of the Productivity Commission’s review of the GST distribution until after the South Australian state election on 17 March 2018;

(b)         the Productivity Commission’s draft report recommended changes to the distribution of GST revenue that would see South Australia lose up to $557 million in the first year alone;

(c)         South Australia did not receive one new dollar of infrastructure funding in the 2017-18 budget;

(d)         education funding to South Australia has been cut by $210 million by the Government; and

(e)         the Government’s failure to support Holden has resulted in thousands of job losses in South Australia; and

(2)         calls on the Government to provide South Australia with its fair share of Commonwealth funding and to release the Productivity Commission’s report prior to 17 March.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      11    International Mother Language Day: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in 1999, the 30th General Conference of UNESCO proclaimed annual observance of International Mother Language Day (IMLD) on 21 February; and

(b)         about 200 different languages are spoken throughout Australia;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the significance of preserving Indigenous languages as a link to Indigenous culture and histories and as an expression of identity;

(b)         the social, cultural and economic benefits of multilingualism to the Australian community; and

(c)         that encouraging Australians to learn a language other than English should be a priority for all levels of government; and

(3)         calls on the Government to observe IMLD on 21 February across Australia and to promote the preservation and protection of all languages used by the people around the world through:

(a)         promoting the active participation, revitalisation and maintenance of local Indigenous languages;

(b)         continuing the National Library of Australia’s collection of oral history and available alphabets of spoken languages as a means of preserving the multi-lingual inheritance of the people of Australia; and

(c)         supporting second language instruction in Australian educational institutions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      12    Travel Insurance: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)         notes the release on 5 October 2017 of the Consular State of Play 2016-17 (State of Play), which provides an overview of the Government’s provision of consular assistance to Australians in the last financial year;

(2)         acknowledges the hard work and dedication of Australian consular officials who have provided high-quality assistance to Australians in distress in 12,454 cases during 2016-17;

(3)         notes with concern that a significant number of Australian travellers are travelling overseas without insurance;

(4)         reiterates the Minister for Foreign Affairs’ remarks in launching the State of Play that if travellers cannot afford travel insurance, they cannot afford to travel;

(5)         acknowledges that the Australian Government will provide consular assistance where possible, while noting there are limits to what it can do to assist Australians in trouble overseas; and

(6)         calls on Australians to:

(a)         draw on resources such as Australian Government Smartraveller advice to inform themselves about their destination; and

(b)         purchase insurance appropriate to their activities and circumstances.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      13    United Nations World Radio Day: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Albanese —That this House:

(1)         observes:

(a)         United Nations World Radio Day (WRD) on 13 February 2018;

(b)         this year’s WRD theme of ‘Radio and Sports’ which calls on us to:

(i)           celebrate the role of radio in promoting Australian sports and the inspiring stories of our high achieving sportspeople and teams;

(ii)         support and promote the grassroots sports that anchor us within our communities;

(iii)        be inspired by the stories that challenge gender stereotypes; and

(iv)       equally cover both men’s and women’s sports events;

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         unique ability of sport to unite and inspire Australians of all backgrounds, and the iconic nature of many Australian sporting events;

(b)         power of radio to unite, inform and entertain Australians throughout the nation and across commercial, public and community broadcasting;

(c)         particular importance of publicly funded radio in regional and remote Australia, especially during natural disasters;

(d)         critical importance of publicly funded radio for our culturally and linguistically diverse communities through the SBS; and

(e)         role of community broadcasters in nurturing new Australian talent including sports broadcasters, journalists and producers;

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         the significant disparity between the coverage of men’s and women’s sports in Australia in radio broadcasting, as well as television, print and online; and

(b)         the need to address this disparity to encourage greater participation in women’s sports and to recognise the achievements of our women athletes; and

(4)         calls for:

(a)         commercial, public and community radio broadcasters to cover more women’s sports and to ensure there is a diversity of voices in sports commentary; and

(b)         greater recognition of the extraordinary achievements of our women’s sports teams in the media, including by ensuring equal public funding.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      14    Regional public sector jobs: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms O’Toole —That this House:

(1)         notes that ongoing cuts to public sector jobs in regional cities like Townsville have had a detrimental impact on the local economy and include:

(a)         the relocation of Royal Australian Air Force’s 38 Squadron King Air fleet from Townsville to East Sale in Victoria resulting in the loss of more than 40 aviation jobs in Townsville;

(b)         the Government’s change of process in second division resulting in the loss of up to 10 Townsville Australian Public Service defence support staff;

(c)         Townsville having 50 fewer defence staff in June 2017 than it had in December 2012;

(d)         19 jobs having been cut from CSIRO in Townsville over the last few years;

(e)         regional Queensland Customs staffing being cut by 50 per cent with 30 job losses from Gladstone to Thursday Island with Townsville being one of the hardest hit; and

(f)          the consolidation of the Australian Taxation Office in 2014 resulting in the loss of 110 jobs in Townsville;

(2)         acknowledges that maintaining public sector jobs is important in regional Australia and notes that job cuts are harmful to regional cities like Townsville; and

(3)         calls on the Government to ensure the coming federal budget puts a moratorium on these regional jobs cuts in public sector agencies.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      15    Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That this House:

(1)         supports the Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project because:

(a)         its proponents, Adani Australia, already employ 800 workers in Queensland;

(b)         it will open up the Galilee Basin and lead the way in creating as many as 15,000 jobs across five potential mines for the workers of Central and North Queensland; and

(c)         it will improve the lives of millions of Indians by providing their country with affordable and safe electricity; and

(2)         notes that the Opposition is now opposed to the project, endangering both existing and future jobs in regional Queensland as evidenced by:

(a)         the Leader of the Opposition stating that ‘Labor is increasingly sceptical and today’s revelation, if true, is incredibly disturbing, and if Adani’s relying on false information, that mine does not deserve to go ahead’;

(b)         Senator Singh stating that ‘I believe the Adani coal mine is a big mistake for this country’;

(c)         the Shadow Minister for Environment and Water stating that the Carmichael coal mine ‘will simply displace existing coal operations elsewhere in Australia. There will be jobs lost elsewhere in Queensland or there will be jobs lost in the Hunter Valley...The demand for thermal coal exports around the world is in rapid decline and I think instead we should be talking about other economic developments and job opportunities for North Queensland’; and

(d)         the Member for:

(i)           Charlton tweeting that ‘Hunter coal mining jobs are endangered by the Adani project’; and

(ii)         Gellibrand stating that ‘the reality is, the Adani coal mine has always been something that regional Queenslanders know well: snake oil’.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      16    Home Care Packages: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         notes that the latest:

(a)         waiting list for Home Care Packages (HCP) indicates that more than 100,000 older Australians are waiting for the package they have been approved for; and

(b)         figures showed that the HCP waiting list grew by more than 12,000 between 1 July and 30 September 2017 and it is likely to continue growing without funding for the release of more packages;

(2)         recognises that the majority of older Australians on the waiting list are those seeking level three and level four packages, who have high care needs including many with dementia;

(3)         condemns the Government for failing to stop the waiting list from growing; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately invest in fixing the HCP waiting list and properly address this growing crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      17    Trade: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of open trade and investment policies in growing the Australian economy and creating local jobs;

(2)         commends the Government for leading efforts to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership 11 nation (TPP-11) agreement;

(3)         welcomes the recent conclusion of this landmark deal which will eliminate more than 98 per cent of tariffs in a trade zone with a combined GDP of AUD $13.7 trillion;

(4)         notes the significant opportunities offered by new trade agreements with Canada and Mexico and greater market access to Japan, Chile, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Brunei;

(5)         recognises the importance of the agreement for Australia’s farmers, manufacturers and service providers in increasing their competitiveness in overseas markets;

(6)         notes indicative modelling by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, which found that the TPP-11 agreement would boost Australia’s national income by 0.5 per cent and exports by 4 per cent; and

(7)         encourages the Parliament to work co-operatively to ratify the TPP-11 agreement so that Australian exporters can take advantage of the many benefits it delivers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      18    ISIL’s crimes against the Yazidis: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         genocide is a crime under international law, which has been enacted into Australian law through Division 268 of the Australian Criminal Code; and

(b)         the Iraqi Council of Ministers, United Nations institutions, and many parliaments have recognised that ISIL’s crimes against the Yazidis constitute genocide;

(2)         welcomes the Government’s decisive action in resettling Yazidi refugees;

(3)         condemns the genocide perpetrated against Yazidis by ISIL;

(4)         calls for continued support for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIL and efforts to liberate Yazidis in ISIL captivity;

(5)         recognises the importance of justice for Yazidi victims and survivors of ISIL and calls on the Government to continue to support accountability for the perpetrators of serious international crimes against the Yazidis, including, where appropriate, in Australian courts and in other jurisdictions, where these are consistent with international standards;

(6)         calls on the Government to continue supporting the formation of an investigative team pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution 2379 (2017) and, once established, to support it in the collection, preservation and storage of evidence of acts that may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide; and

(7)         supports the:

(a)         continued efforts to defeat ISIL militarily and ideologically via de-radicalisation and countering violent extremism programs;

(b)         continued consideration of the plight of the Yazidis in the development of Australian humanitarian policies and programs;

(c)         continued provision of psychological and other social support services for Yazidi refugees living in Australia;

(d)         right of the Yazidis and all minorities to live in peace, safety and freedom in Syria and Iraq and to participate in relevant political processes; and

(e)         protection of Yazidis, Christians and other minorities in Iraq, under United Nations supervision and in cooperation with relevant authorities and minorities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      19    Order of Australia honours: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the Order of Australia is the highest national honour award and the pre-eminent way Australians recognise the achievements and service of their fellow citizens;

(2)         recognises that since being established by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1975, there have been more than 500 recipients of Companion of the Order of Australia, almost 3,000 awarded Officers of the Order of Australia, more than 10,000 inducted as Members of the Order of Australia and more than 23,000 honoured as recipients of the Medal of the Order of Australia;

(3)         notes the almost 900 recipients in the General Division of the Order of Australia on Australia Day in 2018, from an array of fields including education, arts, sport, science and social work; and

(4)         encourages all Members to congratulate recipients from their electorates on this immense achievement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      20    Eureka Stockade flag: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         both the Building Code 2013 (2013 Code) and the Code for the Tendering and Performance of Building Work 2016 (2016 Code) require code covered entities to protect freedom of association on building and construction worksites;

(b)         the 2016 Code includes requirements in respect of building association logos, mottos or indicia; and

(c)         the Australian Building and Construction Commission’s fact sheet Freedom of Association—Logos, Mottos and Indicia specifies that ‘logos, mottos and indicia’ that would breach the 2016 Code include ‘the iconic symbol of the five white stars and white cross on the Eureka Stockade flag’;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         the Eureka Stockade flag was:

(i)           first used in 1854 at Ballarat; and

(ii)         a symbol of resistance of the gold miners during the rebellion;

(b)         beneath the Eureka Stockade flag, the leader of the Ballarat Reform League, Peter Lalor, said ‘We swear by the Southern Cross to stand truly by each other and fight to defend our rights and liberties’;

(c)         the people at the Eureka Stockade defending the original flag came from nearly forty nations from around the world; and

(d)         the Eureka Stockade flag design has gained wider acceptance in Australian culture as a symbol of democracy, protest and the notion of the Australian ‘fair go’;

(3)         further notes that:

(a)         freedom of speech and freedom of association are valued by all fair-minded Australians;

(b)         the Eureka Stockade flag has been a symbol associated with building and construction unions for over 40 years;

(c)         restricting an individual’s right to wear union logos or preventing a construction site from displaying a union flag implies that workers cannot join a union; and

(d)         it is an attack on:

(i)           an individual’s freedom of association to prevent them from wearing the Eureka Stockade flag on their clothing; and

(ii)         freedom of association to prevent a construction site from displaying the Eureka Stockade flag; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately act to protect the rights of workers in the construction industry by making clear that displaying the iconic symbol of democracy, the Eureka Stockade flag, is not a breach of the 2016 Code.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      21    International Women's Day: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         International Women’s Day is celebrated on 8 March;

(b)         the theme for 2018 is ‘Press for Progress’, recognising the strong and growing global momentum striving for gender equity; and

(c)         now more than ever, governments must recommit to addressing entrenched gender inequities including:

(i)           high rates of family and domestic violence, sexual violence and harassment;

(ii)         pay inequity and the undervaluation of work in traditionally female industries; and

(iii)        the under-representation of women in Australian public life and leadership; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         end its complacency and ensure gender equality is a central priority for government; and

(b)         commit to urgent action to improve Australian women’s:

(i)           safety and physical security;

(ii)         economic security and retirement incomes;

(iii)        health and reproductive rights; and

(iv)       representation in Australian parliaments.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      22    World Tuberculosis Day: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis Day, and marks the anniversary of German Nobel laureate Dr Robert Koch’s 1882 discovery of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis;

(b)         tuberculosis is contagious and airborne, ranking as the world’s leading cause of death from a single infectious agent;

(c)         in 2016, 1.7 million people died from tuberculosis worldwide and 10.4 million people became sick with the disease, with over 60 per cent of cases occurring in countries in our region;

(d)         large gaps in tuberculosis detection and treatment remain with 4.1 million cases of active tuberculosis that were not diagnosed and treated in 2016, including 600,000 children;

(e)         Papua New Guinea (PNG) had one of the highest rates of tuberculosis infection in the Pacific in 2016, with an estimated 35,000 total cases including 2,000 drug-resistant cases, not taking into consideration the large number of cases that go unreported in many regions; and

(f)          tuberculosis is:

(i)           the leading cause of death among HIV positive people globally—HIV weakens the immune system and is lethal in combination with tuberculosis, each contributing to the other’s progress;

(ii)         now linked to non-communicable diseases like diabetes; and

(iii)        considered a preventable and treatable disease, however many current treatment tools—drugs, diagnostics and vaccines—are outdated and ineffective;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the funding that Australia is providing to support the testing and treatment of tuberculosis in PNG, including the joint program with the World Bank, is already leading to an initiative to achieve universal testing for tuberculosis in Daru;

(b)         the commitment of up to $75 million over five years for Product Development Partnerships in the Indo-Pacific Health Security Initiative to accelerate access to new therapeutics and diagnostics for drug resistant tuberculosis, and malaria and mosquito vector control—an increase in funding to build on the successes of Australia’s previous investments;

(c)         Australia’s three year $220 million pledge to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (2017-2019)—a fund that has supported tuberculosis testing and treatment to 17.4 million people since 2002, including over 8.2 million people in the Indo-Pacific region;

(d)         that through our endorsement of the Sustainable Development Goals in September 2015, we made a bold commitment to end the tuberculosis epidemic by 2030; and

(e)         the scheduling of the first United Nations High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis in September 2018, which will set out commitments to accelerate action towards ending tuberculosis as an epidemic and provide Australia with an opportunity to showcase the success of our investment in tuberculosis in our region; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to attend the United Nations High-Level Meeting this year, and commit to increased Australian action and leadership on research and development, prevention, testing and treatment as part of the global effort to eradicate tuberculosis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      23    Age pensions: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         OECD:

(i)           calculates that the average old age dependency ratio in Australia was 25 in 2017, and is projected to increase to 41 by 2050;

(ii)         calculates that Australia’s expenditure on age pensions is currently 4 per cent of public spending, and is projected to be 4 per cent in 2050—this compares with 9 per cent and 10 per cent respectively for the OECD;

(iii)        stated that ‘The old age income poverty rate in Australia is high at 26% compared to 13% across the OECD in 2015’; and

(iv)       further stated that ‘While taking out lump sums create flexibility in retirement it can also increase the risk of falling into poverty in case retirees outlive their assets’; and

(b)         Benevolent Society:

(i)           released ‘The Adequacy of the Age Pension in Australia’ report in September 2016, concluding from its research that ‘The Aged Pension in Australia is inadequate’; and

(ii)         concluded that ‘Home ownership constitutes the single biggest factor contributing to financial hardship among pensioners. Age pensioners who are renting, in particular those who are single, are the worst off’; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         establish an independent tribunal to assess the base rate of the pension and determine the best mechanism for annual review;

(b)         increase the maximum rate of Commonwealth Rent Assistance to reduce the gap between aged pensioners who are home owners and those who are renters; and

(c)         establish a roundtable to review services provided to age pensioners.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      24    Small businesses and Government defence contracts: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government’s record $200 billion investment in the Australian Defence Force (ADF) capabilities represents a unique opportunity for Australian businesses;

(b)         many Australian businesses who first supplied defence materials to the Australian Government go on to export these products overseas; and

(c)         Australia ranks thirteenth in the world for defence expenditure, but is only the twentieth largest exporter;

(2)         congratulates the Government on its activities to date to encourage local small businesses to bid for Government defence contracts, including the 2016 Defence White Paper, the Integrated Investment Program, the Defence Industry Policy Statement and the Centre for Defence Industry Capability (CDIC);

(3)         welcomes the Government’s efforts to develop a Defence Export Strategy to plan, guide and measure defence export outcomes that will support our foreign and trade policies, defence industry, defence capability and national security objectives; and

(4)         encourages small and medium enterprises all over Australia to explore the opportunity to supply products and services for the ADF, and to contact the CDIC to learn more.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      25    National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2018 ( Mr Hammond ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      26    Israel: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That this House:

(1)         notes that 14 May 2018 is the 70th anniversary of the creation of the modern state of Israel, a seminal event that occurred in 1948, and congratulates Israel on an amazing seventy years of democracy, growth and prosperity;

(2)         recognises that 15 July 2018 marks the 80th anniversary of the end of the fateful Évian Conference, convened by President Roosevelt in 1938 in Évian-les-Bains, France, with 31 countries, to discuss the issue of the plight of Jewish refugees fleeing the horror of Nazi persecution;

(3)         further notes that:

(a)         the Australian Minister for Trade and Customs in 1938, Lieutenant Colonel T.W. White, declined to further assist the Jewish people, stating ‘Australia has her own particular difficulties...migration has naturally been predominantly British, and it (is not) desired that this be largely departed from while British settlers are forthcoming. Under the circumstances Australia cannot do more, for it will be appreciated that in a young country manpower from the source from which most of its citizens have sprung is preferred, while undue privileges cannot be given to one particular class of non-British subjects without injustices to others. It will no doubt be appreciated also that as we have no real racial problem, we are not desirous of importing one by encouraging any scheme of large-scale foreign migration...I hope that the conference will find a solution of this tragic world problem’;

(b)         post Kristallnacht, when the Nazis burned Jewish synagogues, businesses and books, Australia did reassess its policy to admit 15,000 refugees over three years, compared to the previous quota of 1,800 per year;

(c)         an estimated 6 million Jews and millions of others died during the Holocaust, exacerbated by the failure of Australia and other nations of the world to more fully protect the Jewish people; and

(d)         Lieutenant-Colonel White’s statement on behalf of the Government of Australia is still visible at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, as a representative response for all other nations’ responses of indifference at the Évian Conference;

(4)         states that this Parliament, as representative of all political parties and the people of Australia, issues a profound apology and says ‘sorry’ to the Jewish people for the indifference shown by the Parliament in 1938 that worsened the impact of the Holocaust; and

(5)         notes that:

(a)         in doing so, we seek to honour the memory of all those who lost their lives in the Holocaust and make right, a great wrong, perpetuated by Australia on the Jewish people;

(b)         a request will be made for this motion to be presented to Yad Vashem this 70th year asking that the parliamentary apology be displayed beside Lieutenant-Colonel White’s statement of 1938 that he issued on behalf of the Government of Australia; and

(c)         this motion will be provided to the Knesset this 70th year, one parliament to another.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      27    National Partnership on Remote Housing: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Burney —That this House:

(1)         observes:

(a)         the National Partnership on Remote Housing (NPRH) is an agreement between the Australian Government and state/territory governments to deliver new and refurbished housing for remote and Indigenous communities; and

(b)         that the NPRH agreement is due to expire on 30 June 2018;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         over the last ten years, the NPRH has delivered in Queensland almost 1,150 new homes and 1,500 refurbished homes;

(b)         the Australian Government’s independent review into the partnership has highlighted the achievements of the Queensland Government;

(c)         this program has built upon the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander councils who, along with Indigenous businesses now deliver 80 per cent of housing construction and repairs; and

(d)         nationally, an additional 5,500 homes are required by 2028 to account for population growth and to continue to reduce overcrowding;

(3)         acknowledges that:

(a)         without continued funding, loss of hundreds of local jobs and apprenticeships will occur;

(b)         without funding, significant levels of violence—domestic and otherwise—will arise from overcrowded living conditions in some of the communities; and

(c)         secure housing is a key element of the Australian Government’s priority of ‘Closing the Gap’ responsibilities; and

(4)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         urgently restore commitment to this program, in order to reduce overcrowding in discrete and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, through building new dwellings and continuing to maintain and refurbish existing dwellings; and

(b)         commit to a ten-year continuation of Commonwealth funding in real terms, matching the same level as provided over the last ten years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      28    ThinkUKnow program: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Mrs Marino —That this House:

(1)         recognises the:

(a)         importance of educating and protecting our children in the online space; and

(b)         work of the Australian Federal Police through the ThinkUKnow program, a free, evidence based cyber safety program, to provide educational presentations to parents, carers and teachers, and students across Australia;

(2)         congratulates the Australian Government on passing the Criminal Code Amendment (Protecting Minors Online) Act 2017 , also known as Carly’s Law, which targets online predators preparing or planning to cause harm to, procure or engage in sexual activity with a child; and

(3)         recognises the new law is a testament to Sonya Ryan, who has advocated for this since her 15 year old daughter Carly was murdered a decade ago by an online predator posing as a teenage boy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      29    2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games: Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Husar —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the XXI Commonwealth Games will commence on the Gold Coast with the opening ceremony on Wednesday, 4 April 2018 and the closing ceremony on Sunday, 15 April 2018;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         more than 6,600 athletes and team officials from 70 Commonwealth Nations and Territories will be competing;

(b)         the athletes will compete in 275 events in 18 different sports and seven para-sports; and

(c)         beach volleyball, para triathlon and women’s Rugby Sevens will make their Commonwealth Games debuts and for the first time at a Commonwealth Games, an equal number of men’s and women’s medal events will be contested;

(3)         acknowledges that this year the Commonwealth Games motto will be ‘Share the Dream’; and

(4)         encourages all Members of Parliament to support the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games and the Australian sports people representing Australia at the Commonwealth Games.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      30    Suicide prevention in rural and regional areas: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         expresses its support for continued trials into suicide prevention in rural and regional Australia;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the huge toll suicide takes on regional communities;

(b)         that people in regional areas are more likely to take their own lives than those in metropolitan areas;

(c)         that suicide is the leading cause of death in people aged between 15 and 44; and

(d)         that regional communities are affected by economic stress, the effects of natural disasters, isolation and loneliness, leading to increased risk of suicide;

(3)         encourages the National Suicide Prevention Strategy to:

(a)         commission regionally appropriate suicide prevention activities; and

(b)         identify young people at high risk of self-harm or suicide and support them; and

(4)         supports funding into mental health research and trials in electoral divisions across regional Australia, such as those conducted in Whyalla, Port Augusta, Port Pirie, Port Lincoln and Yorke Peninsula, in the electoral division of Grey.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      31    Australia and Indonesia: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Gosling —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of Australia’s bilateral relationship with Indonesia;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         two-way investment between Australia and Indonesia was valued at $10.4 billion in 2016;

(b)         16,200 Indonesian tourists visited Australia and 1.248 million Australians visited Indonesia in 2016, making Indonesia Australia’s second most popular holiday destination;

(c)         cultural engagement programs like those fostered by the Australia-Indonesia Institute, the Australia-Indonesia Centre and CAUSINDY: the Conference of Australian and Indonesian Youth, are paramount to continuing to develop strong people-to-people links;

(d)         Darwin has a key role to play in Australia’s relationship with Indonesia through:

(i)           educational opportunities such as Charles Darwin University’s exchange programs, research groups, and international student places;

(ii)         assisting Indonesia in building their emergency and disaster management capacity;

(iii)        quick-response health resources like the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre; and

(iv)       further strengthening trade capabilities and opportunities in the cattle industry, with Indonesia taking approximately 60 per cent of Australia’s overall live cattle exports and more than a third of Australia’s live cattle exports currently shipped through the Port of Darwin; and

(e)         there are many areas in which cooperation between Indonesia and Australia could be strengthened for mutual benefit, including:

(i)           countering transnational crime through cyber-security capacity building;

(ii)         improving Defence capabilities and humanitarian aid/disaster relief assistance;

(iii)        sharing the expertise of NT health professionals through clinical training and trainee/specialist exchange programs;

(iv)       partnering on tourism initiatives like Indonesia’s Beyond Bali campaign to provide opportunities to regional areas such as Eastern Indonesia; and

(v)         expanding trilateral cooperation with Timor-Leste to improve humanitarian aid/disaster relief and strengthen maritime security, with opportunity for inclusion of other nations;

(3)         encourages Members to reflect on recent occasions when the strength of the Australia-Indonesia relationship has been strained by decisions that, with the benefit of hindsight, didn’t adequately balance all aspects of the relationship between our nations; and

(4)         calls on Members to ensure our words and actions at all times demonstrate our deep, enduring respect for Indonesia and the value we place in maintaining a positive relationship.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August  2018. )

      32    Mental health: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         according to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures one in five Australians report having a mental or behavioural condition, while the prevalence is highest among people aged 18 to 24; and

(b)         data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare suggests that 54 per cent of people with a mental illness do not access treatment;

(2)         congratulates the Government for its engagement with the mental health community and for its measures to support mental health in Australia including:

(a)         additional investment of $170 million in mental health programs in the 2017 budget including $80 million to maintain community psycho-social services for people with mental illness who are not eligible for the National Disability Insurance Scheme, $11.1 million to prevent suicide in specific locations where it is a frequent occurrence, $15 million to support mental health research initiatives such as the Thompson Institute on the Sunshine Coast and $50 million for mental illness prevention and support for serving Australian Defence Force members, veterans and their families; and

(b)         investment of:

(i)           $9.5 million to expand mental health first aid training in 14 high risk communities; and

(ii)         $9.1 million to support rural telehealth services for mental health and the appointment of the first National Rural Health Commissioner;

(3)         encourages the Government to continue this focused work and to seek additional ways to support the mental health of Australians; and

(4)         further encourages anyone who believes that they might be suffering from a mental illness to seek immediate help from their General Practitioner or a qualified mental health practitioner.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      33    Human rights in Rakhine State: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         recognises the deteriorating humanitarian crisis that has ensued between the Myanmar security forces in Rakhine State and Rohingya Muslims, since 25 August 2017;

(2)         notes with grave concern, evidence from Human Rights Watch of a series of brutal crackdowns carried out by security forces against ethnic Rohingya Muslims, including:

(a)         extrajudicial killing;

(b)         the torture and suffering of Rohingya women, men and children;

(c)         the forced displacement of more than 600,000 Rohingya into Bangladesh;

(d)         the destruction, arson and takeover of more than 300 villages by the Myanmar military; and

(e)         endemic rape and sexual violence;

(3)         further notes:

(a)         that Myanmar was home to an estimated 1.3 million Rohingya Muslims;

(b)         the long history and persecution of the Rohingya population, including the denial of citizenship under the 1982 Citizenship Law and the denial of most basic government services;

(c)         the poor living conditions and widespread inequality facing Rohingya Muslims isolated in Rakhine State and those now living in Bangladesh, including limited access to food, water, shelter, medical treatment and humanitarian assistance; and

(d)         that the United Nations and Human Rights Watch have described the situation in Rakhine State as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing;

(4)         urges the government of Myanmar to:

(a)         recommit to the pursuit of peace and national reconciliation;

(b)         allow unfettered humanitarian access to all parts of Rakhine State; and

(c)         unconditionally release the two Reuters reporters currently detained in Myanmar; and

(5)         echoes the voices of the international community and calls on Australia to:

(a)         consider providing additional humanitarian assistance in response to the Rohingya crisis, particularly to assist Bangladesh in responding to the unprecedented levels of Rohingya refugees that have moved across its border;

(b)         ensure that the development assistance that Australia provides to Myanmar is appropriately targeted to those most in need, and does not risk contributing to the further suffering of minority groups in Myanmar such as the Rohingya;

(c)         exert maximum pressure on the Myanmar authorities to allow independent examination of claims of human rights abuses in Rakhine State, and to hold those responsible for abuses to account; and

(d)         continue condemnation of the human rights abuses against the Rohingya.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      34    M1 Motorway funding: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Australian Government:

(a)         is acting to provide critical upgrades to the M1 Motorway to deliver safer, less congested roads for the people of Queensland, which will mean people spend less time in traffic and more time with their families;

(b)         is delivering a $1 billion upgrade including between Varsity Lakes and Tugun on the Gold Coast end of the M1 corridor, and between Eight Mile Plains and Daisy Hill within the Brisbane urban area; and

(c)         has previously committed funding to two projects on the M1 which are scheduled to commence construction in coming weeks, being:

(i)           $115 million for the M1 Pacific Motorway-Gateway Merge; and

(ii)         $110 million for the M1 Pacific Motorway-Mudgeeraba to Varsity Lakes project; and

(2)         calls on the Queensland Government to match the funding on a 50:50 basis.

And on the amendment moved thereto by Mr Albanese, viz —That all words after paragraph 1(b) be omitted and the following be inserted:

 (c)       regrets that only 1 per cent of this federal funding is available in 2018-19; and

 (d)       also regrets that 85 per cent of the federal funding is outside the four-year forward estimates; and

 (2)       calls upon the Government to not fund projects in to the never never.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      35    Public transport infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role of Government leadership in ensuring the productivity and liveability of Australian cities; and

(2)         notes:

(a)         the importance of public transport infrastructure in shaping cities and regions;

(b)         the record funding commitments for urban public transport infrastructure made under the previous Labor government, including $3.2 billion for the Regional Rail Link project and a further $3 billion committed to the Melbourne Metro rail project (Metro Tunnel);

(c)         the recent Infrastructure Australia report Future Cities: Planning for our growing population , which highlights the need for Australian governments to increase investment in public transport in areas experiencing rapid population growth, including in Melbourne’s west;

(d)         that if an appropriate route is selected, the construction of an airport rail link to Melbourne Airport through Melbourne’s west has the potential to create social and economic benefits across the region; and

(e)         that further public transport infrastructure projects for fast growing regions like Melbourne’s west will be needed in the near future to meet the challenge of population growth.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      36    Infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mrs Marino —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of infrastructure to the future prosperity of our nation;

(2)         acknowledges the actions the Government is taking in delivering a record $75 billion investment in infrastructure and transport projects focused on building local communities, connecting the regions and our cities, busting congestion and boosting productivity, while creating local jobs;

(3)         notes that for the first time, the Government has committed to a 10 year infrastructure investment pipeline with the recently announced significant infrastructure projects; and

(4)         congratulates the Government in working to deliver the infrastructure that will help secure Australia’s prosperity into the future.

And on the amendment moved thereto by Mr Albanese, viz —That all words after paragraph (1) be omitted and the following be inserted:

(2)         condemns the Government for cutting infrastructure investment from $8 billion in 2017-18 to $4.5 billion in 2021-22;

(3)         notes research from the Parliamentary Budget Office which has found Commonwealth investment will fall from 0.4 to 0.2 per cent of GDP over the next decade;

(4)         condemns the Government for its incompetence in underspending by $4.7 billion on its own infrastructure investment commitments in its first four budgets;

(5)         notes that off budget financing of public transport projects is misleading; and

(6)         condemns the Government for failing to deliver investment to construct the Melbourne airport rail line, Western Sydney rail or Brisbane cross-river rail project.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      37    Fiftieth anniversary of the Battles at Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms O’Toole —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the battles of Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral during the Vietnam War;

(b)         on 12 May 1968 two battalions, 1st Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) and 3rd Battalion RAR with Attachments, were deployed as the 1st Australian Task Force (Forward) to Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral, approximately 20 kilometres north of Biên Hòa City, and were involved in a series of actions until 6 June 1968; and

(c)         the series of battles were incredibly fierce and costly, claiming the lives of 26 Anzacs, with up to 100 wounded and an estimated 300 North Vietnamese combatants killed during the almost one month of fighting;

(2)         acknowledges all of the units and elements that comprised the 1st Australian Task Force (Forward) that deployed to Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the Defence Honours and Awards Appeals Tribunal recently wrote to the Minister for Defence Personnel recommending: ‘That the 1st Australian Task Force (Forward) be awarded the “Unit Citation for Gallantry” for extraordinary gallantry in action at the Battles of Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral, between 12 May and 6 June 1968.’;

(b)         on 13 May 2018 the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs announced that the Governor-General had approved the awarding of the Unit Citation for Gallantry to the 1st Australian Task Force (Forward) group and all those associated units who participated in that battle;

(c)         this announcement had been long awaited and much anticipated;

(d)         on this day, the 50th anniversary of the commencement of fighting, the Commanding Officer of the 3rd RAR during the battle, Brigadier Jeffrey James ‘JJ’ Shelton DSO MC passed away while watching the ceremony from his hospital bed;

(e)         ‘Jim’ Shelton, who had been unwell for some time, closed his eyes and passed away peacefully at 92 years of age; and

(f)          the RAR Association noted that Brigadier Shelton will be remembered by those who knew him and those who served with him as a true gentleman and a soldier’s soldier;

(4)         remembers those who lost their lives serving our country and all who came home wounded, or bearing the hidden scars of war; and

(5)         recognises those who returned to life in Australia, that their journey from battlefield to towns and suburbs can be a difficult one and we must continue to support those who served and the people who love and care for them.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      38    Perth Airport: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House:

(1)         notes the recent decision of the Western Australia Government to grant approval for a third runway at Perth Airport;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         this decision will trigger a flight path review in metropolitan Perth;

(b)         the last time flight paths were altered in Western Australia was 2008 by the then Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government as part of the Western Australian Route Review Project; and

(c)         in 2010 a Senate inquiry into the effectiveness of Airservices Australia’s management of aircraft noise found that community consultation was inadequate; and

(3)         calls on the current Minister for Infrastructure and Transport to instruct Airservices Australia to commence a review as soon as possible, which includes adequate community consultation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      39    Financial Assistance Grants: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Commonwealth’s Financial Assistance Grants are a key source of revenue for local governments, especially for regional and rural councils;

(b)         the impact of the indexation freeze in the 2014-15 budget meant that local councils missed out on $925 million in funding to provide better infrastructure and better services for our local communities—in Victoria this equated to $200 million in cuts to funding for local roads and community services;

(c)         the impact of the indexation freeze was magnified in rural and regional areas where local governments have small ratepayer bases and ageing infrastructure and these councils cannot afford a repeat of the indexation freeze;

(d)         cost shifting onto local governments places them under increasing pressure to deliver services and maintain assets previously provided by other tiers of government and for rural and regional councils the impact is magnified due to their limited ability to increase revenue;

(e)         the two main sources of funding for councils are rates and grants and as grant income declines, councils have had to fill the revenue gap by increasing rates or reducing services;

(f)          the ability of rural and regional councils to increase revenue via rates is limited due to a high proportion of ‘non-rateable’ land and a smaller population, and revenue raising via user charges for facilities, parking fees and development applications adopted by metropolitan councils is not an option for regional councils; and

(g)         rural and regional councils often have higher costs per capita than metropolitan councils, with:

(i)           older, more disadvantaged or more vulnerable populations, who require more services from councils;

(ii)         larger asset bases relative to the population;

(iii)        an environmental stewardship role, including responsibility for weed and pest animal management and flood mitigation infrastructure;

(iv)       more dispersed populations, which increase the amount of travel needed to deliver services or which require duplicate facilities to be provided in multiple locations to meet local needs; and

(v)         reduced competition among service providers and suppliers, which can increase costs for councils when purchasing goods and services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         commit to the sustainability of rural and regional councils by guaranteeing the Financial Assistance Grants will not be subject to another indexation freeze;

(b)         work with the states and territories and local governments to review the funding methodology of Financial Assistance Grants so that distribution of funds supports the sustainability of rural and regional councils; and

(c)         support the development of regional strategic plans with the states and territories and local governments to guide investment and avoid cost shifting and duplication.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      40    GST on women’s sanitary products: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that for nearly two decades a 10 per cent GST has been applied to women’s sanitary products;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         this is an unfair and discriminatory tax on women;

(b)         tampons and pads are not luxury items but rather essential items;

(c)         Australian women are fed up with paying extra for items that they need to live and work;

(d)         Labor has announced a concrete plan to scrap the GST on sanitary products; and

(e)         Labor’s plan:

(i)           would restore equity but also save a woman up to $1,000 over her lifetime; and

(ii)         has already attracted the support of a number of state and territories, putting progress within reach; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately adopt Labor’s plan to abolish the tax on women’s sanitary products; and

(b)         work with the states and territories to end this tax once and for all.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      41    Energy: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         recognises the need for households and small businesses to access affordable, reliable energy;

(2)         notes that the Government’s National Energy Guarantee is recommended by the independent Energy Security Board and that it:

(a)         involves no taxes, subsidies or trading schemes;

(b)         creates a level playing field that ensures all types of energy are part of Australia’s mix;

(c)         provides certainty for investors in new and existing power plants; and

(d)         reduces price volatility; and

(3)         condemns the Opposition’s plan to replicate South Australia’s 50 per cent renewable energy target, which will mean more subsidies and therefore higher prices.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      42    Home care package waitlist: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Hart —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the public release of the latest quarterly data on the home care package waitlist has been delayed by the Government;

(b)         there was a commitment to release the data two months after the period that the data covers, but this timeframe has now not been met; and

(c)         the data has been sitting on the desk of the Minister for Aged Care without any action being taken;

(2)         further notes the:

(a)         latest figures showed around 105,000 older Australians are now waiting for a home care package they were approved for;

(b)         average wait time for a high level package has blown out to more than a year; and

(c)         demand for home care packages grew by 20,000 older Australians in the last six months of 2017 alone;

(3)         condemns the Government for the aged care crisis it made on its watch; and

(4)         calls on the Government to be honest with older Australians and immediately release the latest round of data on the waitlist for home care packages.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      43    Australia’s relief efforts to Armenia: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the first major international humanitarian effort of the Commonwealth of Australia following Federation was to mount relief efforts for orphans and other survivors of the Armenian Genocide;

(b)         Australia’s relief efforts were supported by Armenian relief committees established across the nation;

(c)         the Australian Government made available the government steamer Hobsons Bay , to support those humanitarian relief efforts; and

(d)         an Australasian Armenian relief committee was established by Reverend James Cresswell in 1922 to coordinate Australian relief efforts;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the extraordinary humanitarian efforts of the then newly formed Commonwealth of Australia for the orphans and other survivors of the Armenian Genocide, as well as the other Christian minorities of the Ottoman Empire including Greeks and Assyrians, as one of Australia’s first major international humanitarian campaigns, which set a proud tradition of international humanitarian efforts by Australia;

(b)         the tireless efforts of all of those Australian individuals and organisations involved in this historic humanitarian effort mobilising a broad spectrum of political, civic and religious leaders, including James Cresswell, Edith Glanville, Jessie Webb, Stanley Savage, Isobel Hutton and Cecilia John, as documented in the University of NSW Press publication Armenia Australia & The Great War authored by Professor Peter Stanley and Vicken Babkenian; and

(c)         the special bond between Australia and Armenia forged by the humanitarian efforts of the newly formed Australian nation to support the Armenian people during one of the darkest chapters of modern human history; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to ensure that this important part of Australia’s history and the role of individual Australians supporting the victims of the Armenian genocide is properly commemorated.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      44    International Olympiads for science, maths and technology: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the six teams comprising Australia’s brightest high school students chosen to compete in the International Olympiads for science, maths and technology;

(2)         recognises the work and effort these students put in to win the coveted spots in the team;

(3)         notes that the Australian Government has committed a total of $4.1 million over four years to help our best and brightest compete globally; and

(4)         looks forward to hearing about the performance of the teams following the Olympiad.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      45    Car manufacturers sharing technical information: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         declares that:

(a)         given new cars have multiple onboard computers, real time access to digital files and codes—which vary from car to car—are needed to complete many aspects of a repair or service;

(b)         car manufacturers generally own and control this technical information and in many cases are the only sources of re-initialisation codes and software upgrades;

(c)         independent car repairers—who comprise the vast majority of Australian mechanics—are at a competitive disadvantage, since most car manufacturers do not supply the same information to independent mechanics that they provide to authorised dealers;

(d)         the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s report New car retailing industry market study   (14 December 2017) concluded that the industry’s voluntary code has failed to address the problem; and

(e)         failure to address this problem is hurting small businesses, increasing prices for consumers, and providing less choice, with the impact being most acute in regional areas; and

(2)         calls on the Government to adopt Labor’s policy of mandatory information sharing, which would:

(a)         require car manufacturers to share technical information with independent mechanics on commercially fair and reasonable terms;

(b)         create safeguards that enable environmental, safety and security related technical information to be shared with the independent sector; and

(c)         provide a level playing field, benefiting consumers and independent mechanics alike.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      46    Farm Household Allowance: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Gee —That this House:

(1)         notes that a significant part of rural Australia is currently drought declared;

(2)         further notes that farming families and the agriculture sector more widely are a vital part of the Australian economy as well as the Australian psyche;

(3)         recognises the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources for their efforts in touring drought declared areas in NSW and Queensland;

(4)         congratulates the Government for deciding to extend the Farm Household Allowance from three years to four years; and

(5)         acknowledges that this assistance will help the nation’s farmers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      47    National Disability Insurance Scheme: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Husar —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS):

(a)         supports a better life for hundreds of thousands of Australians with a significant and permanent disability, and their families and carers; and

(b)         will provide about 460,000 Australians under the age of 65 with a permanent and significant disability with the reasonable and necessary supports they need to live an ordinary life;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the NDIS began in a number of trial sites around Australia from July 2013;

(b)         the NDIS is now operational across Australia;

(c)         as at 31 December 2017, there were 132,743 participants with an approved plan with the NDIS and 9,523 children receiving support through the Early Childhood Early Intervention approach; and

(d)         the NDIS roll-out in Western Australia will commence 1 July 2018;

(3)         calls on the Government to urgently address delays and inadequacies in the NDIS operations and roll-out, including:

(a)         funding adequacy and access to the scheme;

(b)         NDIS plan approvals and plan renewals;

(c)         access to adequate health services, care and supports, housing and other essential services; and

(d)         ensuring that the pricing structure of the NDIS enables service providers to deliver high quality support to participants in the scheme including for group activities that are being threatened by the current model;

(4)         reaffirms its commitment to:

(a)         ensuring Australians with a disability continue to get the support they need;

(b)         the scheme roll-out continuing to ensure a smooth transition for people with disability and support providers; and

(c)         an adequately funded and resourced NDIS; and

(5)         encourages all Members of Parliament to support the NDIS roll-out and the access to support it provides to people with disability.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      48    Local governments: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         recognises the important role that local government plays in Australia;

(2)         notes the continuing support that the Australian Government provides to local governments around Australia including:

(a)         Black Spot Program funding;

(b)         the Bridges Renewal Program; and

(c)         the Roads of Strategic Importance initiative; and

(3)         recognises that strong local government is important for strong and healthy communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      49    Financial management: Resumption of debate ( from  26 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         recognises the positive effect of the Government’s measures to ensure that it lives within its means, in particular by:

(a)         legislating tough measures against multinational tax avoidance;

(b)         delivering disciplined financial management, including through a tax-to-GDP cap of 23.9 per cent and the lowest rate of spending growth of any government in more than 50 years; and

(c)         maintaining the integrity of the welfare system so that support goes to those who need it most; and

(2)         notes with deep concern that the Opposition:

(a)         opposed our multinational anti-avoidance legislation in Parliament;

(b)         refuses to commit to spending restraint or a tax cap so that the economy is not burdened with higher taxes; and

(c)         has no plan to support Australians to get off welfare and into work.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      50    Violence against women: Resumption of debate ( from  26 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Husar —That this House:

(1)         notes that the rape and murder of Eurydice Dixon is the 30th instance of a woman being killed by men’s violence against women in 2018;

(2)         recognises the importance of providing strong leadership in changing men’s behaviour towards women to prevent such behaviour by men;

(3)         understands that:

(a)         at least one woman a week in Australia is killed at the hands of a man, usually a current or former partner;

(b)         one in three Australian women has experienced physical violence since the age of 15; and

(c)         one in five women has experienced sexual violence;

(4)         acknowledges the social and economic impact that violence against women has on our communities; and

(5)         encourages all Australians to not wait until International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (White Ribbon Day) in November to be active, engage on this issue and take action.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      51    Tax system: Resumption of debate ( from  26 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the positive effect of the Government’s measures to assist more hard working Australians to earn more through the tax system, in particular by introducing to Parliament legislation to provide tax relief that encourages and rewards working Australians; and

(b)         the Government’s measures to deliver a stronger economy through tax relief for businesses so that they have the opportunity to invest more, hire more people and pay higher wages; and

(2)         notes with deep concern that the Opposition:

(a)         sought to reverse $70 billion in tax relief for working Australians;

(b)         refuses to rule out reversing the tax relief already legislated for small and medium businesses with up to $50 million turnover; and

(c)         plans to tax Australians and the economy with more than $290 billion of higher taxes.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )