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8       Notices

Senator Smith: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       10 October 2017 was the 15th World Day Against the Death Penalty,

                                    (ii)       the aim of the 2017 World Day Against the Death Penalty was to raise awareness about the reasons why people living in poverty are at a greater risk of being sentenced to death and executed, and

                                  (iii)       this year marks 50 years since Australia’s last execution, which sparked nationwide protests and eventually lead to the abolition of the death penalty in Australia;

               (b)       acknowledges the continued strong opposition by the Australian Government to the death penalty;

                (c)       congratulates the Australian Government in securing a place on the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), and acknowledges its commitment to make advocacy for global abolition of the death penalty a priority during its tenure on the UNHRC; and

               (d)       welcomes the Australian Government’s commitment to the development of a whole-of-government Strategy for the Abolition of the Death Penalty, which was a key recommendation from the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade inquiry into Australia’s advocacy for the abolition of the death penalty. ( general business notice of motion no. 523 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its most common form, heart disease, causes one-fifth of all deaths in Australia, and it affects more Australians than any other disease,

                                    (ii)       inequality is rife in CVD, with the huge impact of this disease disproportionately borne by those already facing socio-economic disadvantage, those in remote locations, women, and those with lack of access to health services,

                                  (iii)       the inequality in heart disease is most significant for Indigenous Australians,­ with Indigenous CVD sufferers more likely to develop severe heart disease complicated by diabetes, renal disease and other forms of vascular disease at a much younger age, and

                                  (iv)       despite progressive improvements in treatment of acute CVD events, those who survive their first cardiac event will inevitably develop a chronic form of heart disease that will reduce their quality of life, and reduce longevity - increasing the need for prevention, as well as treatment; and

               (b)       calls on the Government to address both the staggering rates of CVD and the entrenched inequality in heart disease by implementing the recommendations of the final report of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease, The Heart of Inequality , including:

                                     (i)       establishing an Inequality in Heart Disease Advisory Group to provide independent recommendations,

                                    (ii)       investing in definitive studies into cardiovascular risk and disease in Australia to more accurately guide cost-effective prevention, treatment and management programs in high-risk populations, and

                                  (iii)       funding a national campaign to raise awareness of CVD in high-risk populations, including, in particular, a targeted campaign for women given their higher risk. ( general business notice of motion no. 524 )

Senators Carr and Xenophon: To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)       That the Senate notes that:

(a)       on 29 June 2017, the Joint Select Committee into Government Procurement tabled its report, Buying into our future: Review of amendments to the Commonwealth Procurement Rules ; and

(b)       among other things, the report found that ‘Economic benefit, in particular, requires explicit definition and weighting to properly assess suppliers claims’.

(2)       That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Finance, by no later than 3.30 pm on 19 October 2017, a copy of the report commissioned by the Department of Finance entitled Template for tender responses regarding economic benefit to the Australian economy . ( general business notice of motion no. 525 )

The Minister for Communications (Senator Fifield): To move on the next day of sitting—

No. 1—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend legislation relating to the duties of the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and for other purposes. Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Fair and Balanced) Bill 2017 .

No. 2—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 , and for other purposes. Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Rural and Regional Measures) Bill 2017 .

Senators Singh and Moore: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       12 October 2017 marked World Sight Day 2017,

                                    (ii)       the international theme for World Sight Day 2017 was ‘Make Vision Count’,

                                  (iii)       the Lancet Global Health Journal reported, in 2017, that globally 253 million people are vision-impaired, while the prevalence of blindness is five times higher in low income countries than in high income countries,

                                  (iv)       89% of visually-impaired people live in low and middle-income countries, and 55% of visually-impaired people are women,

                                   (v)       recent global estimates suggest that up to 80% of vision impairment and blindness is avoidable through the appropriate implementation of cost-effective prevention and treatment strategies, and

                                  (vi)       the American Journal of Ophthalmology estimates that the Global VISION 2020 eye care program could prevent more than 100 million cases of blindness between 2000 and 2020; and

               (b)       urges the Australian Government to work closely with VISION 2020 members on improving eye health and vision care outcomes across health, ageing, disability and international development to eliminate preventable blindness and vision loss in Australia and in the Asia-Pacific region. ( general business notice of motion no. 526 )

Senator Moore: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       the International Day of the Girl is celebrated each year on 11 October and the focus of this day is on unleashing the power and potential of girls all over the world,

                                    (ii)       as part of 2017 Day of the Girl, Plan International Australia partnered with Wellcom Worldwide to interview more than 1700 Australian girls aged between 10 to 17 years - the report gives rare insight into how girls experience their world and the areas where they want to see change to improve the opportunities available to them to live rich and fulfilling lives: girls want to see action, including to:

                                                       (A)       address sexist advertising, to prevent girls and boys growing up with unhealthy and restrictive gender stereotypes,

                                                        (B)       fight the gender pay gap, which continues to demonstrate that women are valued less than men, and

                                                        (C)       measure our progress towards eliminating all forms of discrimination against women and girls,

                                  (iii)       despite a commitment to gender equality, set out in the Sustainable Development Goals, there is an absence of evidence about the situation for girls,

                                  (iv)       this year, Girls Take Over Parliament has involved 17 girls aged between 18 to 24 years, with the support and participation of members and senators from across the Parliament, and

                                   (v)       the Girls Take Over Parliament program:

                                                       (A)       takes in the possibilities of what girls can achieve when they break the stereotypes that hold them back,

                                                        (B)       shows that when girls have a political voice, they can demand action to ensure that all girls can learn, lead, decide and thrive, and

                                                        (C)       shows that empowerment is not enough; instead significant political and social change is needed that makes girls and their lives visible to governments and policy makers; and

               (b)       calls on the Australian Government to listen, count and consider girls’ experiences and unique needs, and to work to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women and girls. ( general business notice of motion no. 527 )

Senator Bernardi: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       commends the Institute of Public Affairs for its research report, The rise of identity politics: An audit of history teaching at Australian universities in 2017 ;

               (b)       expresses concern at the reduced teaching in universities about the benefits of Western civilisation, the Enlightenment and the Reformation;

                (c)       expresses concern at the increased teaching in universities about divisive topics of race, gender, environment and sexuality in the history curriculum; and

               (d)       calls upon the Australian Government to review the history curriculum to ensure it reflects Australian heritage and values. ( general business notice of motion no. 528 )

Senator Bernardi: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       acknowledges that Australia has secured a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC);

               (b)       notes that some past and present UNHRC member states have poor human rights records themselves;

                (c)       further notes the inordinate amount of time the UNHRC has devoted to criticising Israel; and

               (d)       urges the Australian Government to use its term to focus the UNHRC on genuine abuses of human rights, failing which the Government should reconsider its engagement with the United Nations altogether. ( general business notice of motion no. 529 )

Senator Bernardi: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       takes note of an event scheduled to occur on 26 October 2017 at the Australian National University entitled ‘Celebrating the 1917 Russian Revolution’, organised by Socialist Alternative;

               (b)       observes that this year marks 100 years since that revolution, which led to a litany of human rights abuses and approximately 10 million deaths;

                (c)       notes that the 1917 revolution promoted Leninist and Marxist teaching to the broader world; and

               (d)       rejects any assertion that the teachings of Lenin or Marx should be celebrated in a liberal democracy. ( general business notice of motion no. 530 )

Senator Singh: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes:

                                     (i)       that 10 October 2017 marked World Day Against the Death Penalty,

                                    (ii)       that it is 40 years since the landmark Declaration of Stockholm, the first international abolitionist manifesto on the death penalty,

                                  (iii)       the important work of the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty in campaigning for the universal abolition of capital punishment, and

                                  (iv)       that 40 years ago, only 16 countries had fully abolished the death penalty - now this figure stands at 105;

               (b)       further notes the recommendations made in the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade, A world without the death penalty: Australia’s advocacy for the abolition of the death penalty , including that:

                                     (i)       the Attorney-General’s Department conduct a review of the current legislative arrangements for extradition and mutual assistance to ensure that they uphold Australia’s obligations as a signatory to the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,

                                    (ii)       Australian approaches to advocacy for abolition of the death penalty be based on human rights arguments,

                                  (iii)       the Australian Government provide dedicated and appropriate funding to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, including adequate staffing, to resource the preparation and implementation of the Strategy for Abolition of the Death Penalty, and to fund grants to civil society organisations, scholarships, training, research and/or capacity building projects aimed at the abolition of the death penalty, and ongoing operational funds,

                                  (iv)       the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade coordinate the development of a whole-of-government Strategy for Abolition of the Death Penalty, which has as its focus countries of the Indo-Pacific and the United States of America, and

                                   (v)       the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade commit to having a publicly-releasable document finalised by mid-2017; and

                (c)       noting the Parliament’s bipartisan support for the abolition of the death penalty:

                                     (i)       urges the Government to develop and release a public policy and strategy document to guide its efforts to promote abolition of the death penalty, and

                                    (ii)       calls on the Government to provide the Senate with an update on progress of the strategy. ( general business notice of motion no. 531 )

Senator McKim: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       on 2 October 2017, the Hobart City Council supported a motion in relation to cruise ship fuel in Hobart,

                                    (ii)       the City of Hobart resolved to urgently write to the Federal Government to request that, through appropriate legislative directives, the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport set an upper limit of 0.1% for fuel oil sulphur content for bunker fuel while cruise ships are berthed in the Port of Hobart,

                                  (iii)       the bunker fuel burned by cruise ships in the Port of Hobart can currently have up to 3.5% sulphur content in contrast to Sydney Harbour, where cruise ships have a legislated limit of less than 0.1% sulphur content, and

                                  (iv)       the legislated limit for Sydney Harbour of 0.1% was enacted due to public concern over the harmful effects on human health of high sulphur content in bunker fuel affecting air quality in Sydney Harbour; and

               (b)       calls on the Government to urgently respond to the City of Hobart and set an upper limit of 0.1% fuel oil sulphur content for cruise ships berthed in the Port of Hobart. ( general business notice of motion no. 532 )

Senator Bernardi: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       congratulates Mr Sebastian Kurz and the Austrian People’s Party on their election result, which sees Mr Kurz poised to become both Chancellor of the Republic of Austria, and the world’s youngest national leader;

               (b)       notes the rising voices in support of conservative principles, like that of Mr Kurz and his party, in Europe; and

                (c)       further notes the similar voices also growing in support for sovereign nations withdrawing from the European Union. ( general business notice of motion no. 533 )

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       on 18 October 2017, 17 young women who are interested in a career in politics stepped into the shoes of members of Parliament for a day, to get valuable insight into political life as part of a global movement for girls’ leadership, hosted by Plan International in celebration of International Day of the Girl and to support women’s representation in politics,

                                    (ii)       Plan International Australia surveyed more than 500 young people about Australian politics in a report released today, She Can Lead , and

                                  (iii)       almost half the young women surveyed for the report (45%), felt there were not enough opportunities for them to become politicians and one in three women (34%) felt their gender was a barrier; and

               (b)       calls on all parliamentarians to heed the recommendations of the report, She Can Lead , and commit to supporting young women’s aspirations and contributions to politics and public life. ( general business notice of motion no. 534 )

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       this week there has been a groundswell of people sharing on social media their #MeToo accounts of harassment, intimidation and violence by men,

                                    (ii)       according to research in 2015, 87% of Australian women have experienced at least one form of verbal or physical street harassment, and 40% of Australian women do not feel safe when walking alone at night in the area where they live, compared to 17% of men,

                                  (iii)       one in three Australian women has experienced physical violence since the age of 15,

                                  (iv)       at least one woman a week is killed by a partner or former partner in Australia, and

                                   (v)       women should not have to publicly share their stories of personal trauma and distress in order for our society to act on these issues;

               (b)       calls on all parliamentarians to support and model meaningful cultural change in Australia that values and respects women, so we can eliminate sexism and misogyny from our society; and

                (c)       calls on the Government to take decisive action to properly fund and support frontline services for women fleeing violence, as well as primary prevention programs to address gender inequality and other drivers of violence. ( general business notice of motion no. 535 )

The Chair of the Environment and Communications References Committee (Senator Rice): To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by the second last sitting day in March 2018:

The adequacy of the regulatory framework governing water use by the extractive industry, with particular reference to:

               (a)       the social, economic and environmental impacts of extractive projects’ take and use of water;

               (b)       existing safeguards in place to prevent the damage, contamination or draining of Australia’s aquifers and water systems;

                (c)       any gaps in the regulatory framework which may lead to adverse social, economic or environmental outcomes as a result of the take and use of water by extractive projects;

               (d)       any difference in the regulatory regime surrounding the extractive industry’s water use, and that of other industries;

                (e)       the effectiveness of the ‘water trigger’ under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 , and the value in expanding the ‘trigger’ to include other projects, such as shale and tight gas; and

                (f)       any other related matters.

The Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale): To move on the next day of sitting—That—

               (a)       the Senate notes the Government’s claims that its National Energy Guarantee will reduce household bills by an average of $110 to $115 per year over the period between 2020 to 2030; and

               (b)       there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for the Environment and Energy, by no later than 12.45 pm on 19 October 2017, documents and detailed modelling that support the Government’s claims of a reduction in household energy bills. ( general business notice of motion no. 536 )

Senator Rhiannon: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate notes that—

               (a)       the Melbourne Cup is known as the ‘race that stops the nation’;

               (b)       according to the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses’ analysis of stewards’ reports, from 1 August 2016 to 31 July 2017, 137 horses were killed on the track;

                (c)       according to Professor Ray Geor from the University of Michigan, studies show that almost 90% of racehorses suffer exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH), otherwise known as bleeding in the respiratory system, at least once after three races;

               (d)       a 2005 report, for the Australian Government’s Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation, notes EIPH as cause of morbidity and its high prevalence in racing thoroughbreds; and

                (e)       according to veterinarians Dr Leanne Begg and Dr Chris O’Sullivan, from the Randwick Equine Centre, the prevalence of gastric ulceration, otherwise known as stomach ulcers, in thoroughbred racehorses is reported to be between 66% and 93%, increasing to 80% to 100% as duration in training increases and horses commence racing. ( general business notice of motion no. 537 )

Senator Siewert: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that the Turnbull Government cut nearly 1200 jobs from the Department of Human Services in the 2017-18 Budget;

               (b)       acknowledges that 42 million calls to Centrelink hit a busy signal between 1 July 2016 and 30 April 2017;

                (c)       notes that the Government is engaging private contractor Serco to supply 250 call centre workers to answer Centrelink calls from income support recipients;

               (d)       condemns allowing a private contractor to run a critical government service involving access to the personal information of Centrelink clients; and

                (e)       calls on the Government to reinstate the jobs cut from the Department of Human Services, and act on the recommendations of the report of the Community Affairs References Committee, Design, scope, cost-benefit analysis, contracts awarded and implementation associated with the Better Management of the Social Welfare System initiative , as soon as possible. ( general business notice of motion no. 538 )

Senator Hanson-Young: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by 9 May 2018:

The economic and cultural value of Australian content on broadcast, radio and streaming services, with particular reference to:

               (a)       the current state and operation of the market for the Australian television and music industry, including competition issues relating to the relative market power of producers and broadcasters for traditional, streaming and catch up viewing;

               (b)       the contribution the Australian television and music industries make to the economy;

                (c)       the value and importance of:

                                     (i)       local content requirements for television, radio and streaming services in Australia, and

                                    (ii)       Australian children’s television and children’s content;

               (d)       related inquiries including:

                                     (i)       recent international reviews and reports, in particular, from the United Kingdom and Canada, and

                                    (ii)       submissions made to:

                                                       (A)       the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Communications and the Arts inquiry into factors contributing to the growth and sustainability of the Australian film and television industry, and

                                                        (B)       the Australian and Children’s Content Review, undertaken by the Department of Communications and the Arts, the Australian Communications and Media Authority and Screen Australia; and

                (e)       any other related matters.

Senator Hanson-Young: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes:

                                     (i)       the overwhelming public support for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) in providing news services, quality programming, including for children, and online catch up services iView and SBS On Demand, and

                                    (ii)       that the ABC and SBS should not contemplate releasing the salaries of its staff, based on the ideological war the One Nation Political Party and the Liberal/National Government are waging on public broadcasting; and

               (b)       agrees it will not support legislation that forces the ABC or SBS to publicise the salaries of its staff, breaching their right to privacy. ( general business notice of motion no. 539 )

The Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister (Senator McGrath): To move on the next day of sitting—That the provisions of paragraphs (5) to (8) of standing order 111 not apply to the following bills, allowing them to be considered during this period of sittings:

Defence Legislation Amendment (Instrument Making) Bill 2017

Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Fees Imposition Amendment (Vacancy Fees) Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals Charges (Customs) Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals Charges (Excise) Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals Charges (General) Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals (Consequential Amendments and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2017

Industrial Chemicals (Notification and Assessment) Amendment Bill 2017

Treasury Laws Amendment (2017 Measures No. 6) Bill 2017

Treasury Laws Amendment (Housing Tax Integrity) Bill 2017.

Documents : Senator McGrath tabled the following documents:

Consideration of legislation—Statements of reasons [4] for introduction and passage of bills in the 2017 spring sittings.