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9       Notices

Senator McCarthy: To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)       That the Senate—

(a)       acknowledges the historic agreement between First Nations people, the Gumatj, and Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA), which has secured land in North East Arnhem Land to establish Australia’s first commercial space centre;

(b)       commends the Northern Territory Government, the Gumatj, ELA and Developing East Arnhem Limited on their partnership for including the world’s oldest culture in the creation of the newest technologies; and

(c)       congratulates the work of the Gumatj clan and the Northern Land Council for securing a 99 year head lease for the township of Gunyangara, and the future economic opportunity and security this represents.

(2)       That governments across Australia continue to work with First Nations people for the betterment of their communities and the nation as a whole. ( general business notice of motion no. 644 )

Senator Cameron: To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)       That the Senate—

(a)       notes the claim for public interest immunity that the Minister for Employment (Senator Cash) has made relating to matters concerning the raid by the Australian Federal Police on the offices of the Australian Workers’ Union;

(b)       further notes that Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice states that ‘for this ground to be invoked it should be established that there are investigations in progress by a law enforcement agency, such as the police, and the provision of the information sought could interfere with those investigations’ and that ‘this is a matter for the law enforcement agency concerned to assess, this ground should normally be raised directly by the law enforcement agency, not by some other official who can merely speculate about the relationship of the information to the investigation’;

(c)       calls on the Australian Federal Police to provide a statement to the Senate substantiating the claim of public interest immunity and outlining the scope of the investigation, its expected duration and the potential harm that could be caused by questions in this area;

(d)       notes that the Minister for Employment also asserted that it was not possible to provide answers to questions on the basis of the sub judice convention;

(e)       further notes that Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice states that ‘the sub judice convention applies to proceedings in committees, but not so as to prevent an inquiry which the Senate has directed’ and that it ‘is a restriction on debate which the Senate imposes upon itself, whereby debate is avoided which could involve a substantial danger of prejudice to proceedings before a court, unless the Senate considers that there is an overriding requirement for the Senate to discuss a matter of public interest’;

(f)        regards these matters as matters of public interest that may be discussed without restriction; and

(g)       reaffirms the values contained in section 10 of the Public Service Act 1999 , in particular subsection (5), concerning impartiality, which states that ‘The APS is apolitical and provides the Government with advice that is frank, honest, timely and based on the best available evidence’.

(2)       That the Minister for Employment (Senator Cash) be required to attend the Senate at 9.30 am on Thursday, 7 December 2017 to make a statement of not more than 20 minutes, addressing:

(a)       why the Senate should accept the Minister’s claims of public interest immunity and sub judice; and

(b)       her competence to administer her portfolio responsibilities given she has:

                                                        (i)       presided over the resignation of the Australian Building and Construction Commissioner (Mr Hadgkiss) for breaching the law he was supposed to uphold,

                                                      (ii)       presided over the resignation of the Australian Building and Construction Commission Deputy Commissioner (Mr Southall) in order ‘to totally disassociate himself from the conduct of Mr Hadgkiss’,

                                                     (iii)       without a proper assessment of the grounds for his defence, approved taxpayers paying almost half a million dollars for Mr Hadgkiss to drag out his defence for more than 12 months before admitting breaching the Fair Work Act,

                                                    (iv)       lost an adviser for leaking a federal police investigation to the media, which has resulted in an Australian Federal Police investigation into her office’s conduct,

                                                      (v)       misled the Senate five times, and

                                                    (vi)       fatally politicised each of the regulators she is responsible for.

(3)       That any senator may move a motion to take note of the Minister for Employment’s statement and any such motion have precedence over all government business until determined. ( general business notice of motion no. 645 )

Senators Brown, Hinch and Rice: To move on 7 February 2018—That items 1, 3 to 8, 11 to 13, 16 to 19, 21 to 25, 28 to 30 and 33 to 36 of Schedule 1 of the Illegal Logging Prohibition Amendment (Due Diligence Improvements) Regulations 2017, made under the Illegal Logging Prohibition Act 2012 , be disallowed [F2017L01338].

Senators Fierravanti-Wells, Pratt and Moore: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       on 5 December 2017, the world will observe International Volunteer Day, an opportunity for Australia to thank all our volunteers - past and present, both in Australia and overseas - for their selfless contributions to worthy causes, including Australia’s aid program,

                                    (ii)       the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals (the global plan to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change) explicitly recognises volunteer groups as stakeholders to achieve the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),

                                  (iii)       this year’s theme for International Volunteer Day, ‘Volunteers Act First, Here, Everywhere’, is a reflection of how volunteers around the world are responding in times of crisis and supporting longer-term social and economic development, at home and abroad,

                                  (iv)       Australia has a long and proud history of volunteering, with the 2016 Census revealing that around 3.6 million Australian volunteers give their time to support local and regional communities and those in need overseas - since 1951, when our first international volunteers went to Indonesia, successive Australian Governments have supported more than 14,000 Australians to volunteer through Australia’s aid program,

                                   (v)       the 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper recognises the importance of Australian volunteers creating links between communities and people in our region - advancing Australia’s reputation overseas,

                                  (vi)       each year, through the Government’s flagship Australian Volunteers Program, over 1000 Australians offer their time and skills to volunteer in developing countries - through this program, skilled Australian volunteers share their knowledge with people and organisations in about 25 developing countries by contributing to global economic growth and poverty reduction, and Australian volunteers are helping make our region more stable, secure and prosperous,

                                (vii)       by helping our neighbours to be healthier, well-educated and able to make a meaningful contribution to the economy, support for Australian volunteers across successive governments ensures less reliance on aid in the future, and

                               (viii)       Australian volunteers give a lot to their host communities but they also receive a lot in return - Australian volunteers increase their understanding of our region and bring new knowledge, skills and relationships back to Australia - these life-long personal and professional relationships are building strength and diversity in Australia’s connections to the world; and

               (b)       recognises:

                                     (i)       United Nations (UN) resolution, Integrating volunteering into peace and development: the plan of action for the next decade and beyond, adopted in November 2016 by consensus by the UN General Assembly, which recognises that volunteering can be a powerful means of implementation for the SDGs,

                                    (ii)       that through Australia’s aid program, Australian volunteers play a valuable part in contributing to regional development and stability, and

                                  (iii)       the strong commitment from Australian volunteers, business, government and non-government organisations to support volunteers to share our culture, our values and our multicultural way of life with the world. ( general business notice of motion no. 646 )

Senator Polley: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       there are currently 413,106 Australians living with dementia, with around 244 people diagnosed with dementia each day,

                                    (ii)       more than 500,000 Australians will have dementia by 2025 and more than 1 million by 2050, and

                                  (iii)       dementia is the leading cause of death for Australian women and, within the next five years, will be the leading cause of death for all Australians;

               (b)       acknowledges that:

                                     (i)       people living with dementia, their families and carers are significantly lonelier than the general public, and

                                    (ii)       for many of us, Christmas represents joy, happiness and time with family and loved ones, but for others it can be a very sad and lonely time; and

                (c)       urges all levels of government to:

                                     (i)       keep those living with dementia, their families and carers in mind this Christmas, and

                                    (ii)       continue raising awareness of dementia within their communities so that people living with dementia and their families feel less isolated and alone. ( general business notice of motion no. 647 )

Senators Williams and Hinch: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee for inquiry and report by 20 September 2018:

The need for regulation of mobility scooters, also known as motorised wheelchairs, including:

               (a)       the number of deaths and injuries attributed to accidents involving mobility scooters in Australia since their introduction;

               (b)       the causes of these accidents;

                (c)       any current regulations governing the use of mobility scooters throughout Australia;

               (d)       comparison of Australian regulations with international standards;

                (e)       what support structures are in place to ensure the safe operation of mobility scooters;

                (f)       the regulatory role of government and non-government bodies; and

                (g)       any related matter.

Senator Bernardi: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that 5 December 2017 marked the 45th anniversary of the swearing-in of the first Whitlam Labor Government;

               (b)       also notes that spending as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product:

                                     (i)       soon after Mr Whitlam’s swearing-in, rocketed from 18.9% that financial year to 24.3% the year Mr Whitlam left office in 1975,

                                    (ii)       had been reduced to lower than that level when the Howard Government left office in 2007, and

                                  (iii)       now sits at higher levels than when Mr Whitlam left office, at a budgeted 25.2% and projected to remain at a similar level into forward estimates; and

                (c)       expresses its in-principle support for legislative measures that will help chart a pathway to budget surplus achieved by reducing spending and waste, not by increasing taxes. ( general business notice of motion no. 648 )

The Minister for Education and Training (Senator Birmingham): To move on the next day of sitting—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 , and for related purposes. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (Authority Governance and Other Matters) Bill 2017 .

The Minister for Indigenous Affairs (Senator Scullion): To move on the next day of sitting—

No. 1—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 , and for related purposes. Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Amendment Bill 2017 .

No. 2—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 , and for related purposes. Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Amendment Bill 2017 .

The Minister for Communications (Senator Fifield): To move on the next day of sitting—

No. 1—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend legislation relating to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation, and for other purposes. National Broadcasters Legislation Amendment (Enhanced Transparency) Bill 2017 .

No. 2—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Copyright Act 1968 , and for related purposes. Copyright Amendment (Service Providers) Bill 2017 .

No. 3—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend legislation relating to communications, and for other purposes. Communications Legislation Amendment (Regional and Small Publishers Innovation Fund) Bill 2017 .

No. 4—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the law relating to communications, and for other purposes. Communications Legislation Amendment (Online Content Services and Other Measures) Bill 2017 .

No. 5—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 , and for other purposes. Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Foreign Media Ownership and Community Radio) Bill 2017 .

No. 6—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the law relating to broadcasting, and for other purposes. Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Digital Radio) Bill 2017 .

No. 7—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015 , and for other purposes. Enhancing Online Safety (Non-consensual Sharing of Intimate Images) Bill 2017 .

The Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its most common form, heart disease, causes oneĀ­-fifth of all deaths in Australia, and it affects more Australians than any other disease,

                                    (ii)       inequality is rife in CVD, with the huge impact of this disease disproportionately borne by those already facing socio-economic disadvantage, those in remote locations, women, and those with lack of access to health services and, most significantly, for Indigenous Australians, as made clear in a report earlier this year by the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease, The heart of inequality ,

                                  (iii)       an estimated 970,000 Australians (13% of 45 to 74 year olds) are at high risk of a CVD event within the next five years and many are receiving suboptimal care - heart health checks have not been incorporated well in routine general practice and Australia’s performance on CVD risk reduction compares poorly with that of other countries, and

                                  (iv)       recent work by a network of leading Australian health experts and organisations, with the Australian Health Policy Collaboration, a public policy ‘think tank’ at Victoria University, has compiled the evidence for a national screening program for all Australians to directly reduce preventable cardiovascular disease for all and, particularly, for those groups that are most at risk; and

               (b)       calls on the Government to implement the recommendations of the recent report, Heart health: the first step to getting Australia’s health on track , for a national screening program to be implemented as an urgent priority, comprising:

                                     (i)       a national screening program to promote uptake of the heart health screening tool, Absolute Cardiovascular Risk Assessment, through promotion, training and decision-support software for all general practices,

                                    (ii)       amendment of the current Medicare Benefits Schedule health assessment items to include Absolute Cardiovascular Risk Assessment, with a management plan for all assessed as at risk,

                                  (iii)       establishment of a target for population coverage rates, and with a national aim to achieve assessment of more than 90% of 45 to 74 year olds within five years, and

                                  (iv)       the involvement of Primary Health Networks in the support of general practices and through public annual reporting on the population assessed in their areas. ( general business notice of motion no. 649 )

Senators Griff and McKim: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       acknowledges that 10 December 2017 is Human Rights Day, which represents the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Rights, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, which established the equal dignity and worth of every person;

               (b)       recognises that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights represents a milestone document in the history of human rights, which proclaimed the inalienable rights that everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being, regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status;

                (c)       observes that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world and sets out universal values and a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations;

               (d)       notes that:

                                     (i)       children, as well as adults, have human rights and children also have the right to special protection because of their vulnerability to exploitation and abuse,

                                    (ii)       December also commemorates Australia’s ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1990, and

                                  (iii)       Australia’s ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child means that Australia has a duty to ensure that all children in its care enjoy the rights set out in the treaty;

                (e)       further notes that:

                                     (i)       it has been over three years since the publication of ‘The Forgotten Children’ report - the report revealed that the prolonged, mandatory detention of asylum seeker children causes them significant mental and physical illness and developmental delays,

                                    (ii)       at the time of the report’s publication there were 132 children in detention in Nauru and 39 children remain in detention in Nauru, according to the Government’s statistics, published on 31 October 2017,

                                  (iii)       section 4AA(1) of the Migration Act 1958 explicitly states that ‘a minor shall only be detained as a measure of last resort’, and

                                  (iv)       whilst the Government has reduced the number of children in detention, the fact that children remain in detention is unacceptable; and

                (f)       calls on the Government, as a matter of urgency, to end the prolonged and mandatory detention of asylum seeker children in Nauru. ( general business notice of motion no. 650 )

The Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong): To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters for inquiry and report by 6 February 2018:

The implications of recent decisions by the Court of Disputed Returns concerning section 44 of the Constitution on questions referred by the Parliament under section 376 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 , with particular reference to:

               (a)       the decisions in connection with the disqualification of former Senators Bob Day and Rodney Culleton;

               (b)       a regime for disclosing information relating to aspects other than section 44(i), for which the Parliament has already provided;

                (c)       the form such a process might take and how it could be implemented; and

               (d)       any related matters. ( general business notice of motion no. 651 )

The Attorney-General (Senator Brandis): To move on the next day of sitting—

No. 1—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend legislation relating to family law, and for related purposes. Family Law Amendment (Family Violence and Other Measures) Bill 2017 .

No. 2—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Family Law Act 1975 , and for related purposes. Family Law Amendment (Parenting Management Hearings) Bill 2017 .

No. 3—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend legislation relating to the criminal law and law enforcement, and for related purposes. Crimes Legislation Amendment (Combatting Corporate Crime) Bill 2017 .

Senators Siewert and Di Natale: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       acknowledges that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples are the First Peoples of these lands and waters;

               (b)       recognises that 26 January is considered a day of mourning for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as it represents the beginning of colonisation;

                (c)       acknowledges the growing calls from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and organisations, local governments and the community to change the date;

               (d)       urges all Australians to respectfully engage in conversations about changing the date of Australia Day; and

                (e)       calls on the Federal Government to engage and consult with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples about changing the date of Australia Day, so that all Australians can participate in celebrating this national day. ( general business notice of motion no. 652 )

Senator Rhiannon: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

               (a)       notes that:

                                     (i)       the 2016 Senate committee inquiry into contamination of Australia’s Defence Force facilities and other Commonwealth, state and territory sites in Australia concluded that there were many points of failure in the Department of Defence’s response to PFOS/PFOA contamination at RAAF Williamtown, and

                                    (ii)       on 19 November 2017, the New South Wales Environment Protection Authority announced that the investigation area adjacent to RAAF Williamtown, known as the ‘red zone’, had been expanded by 50%, drawing in a further 250 households; and

               (b)       calls on the Federal Government to:

                                     (i)       coordinate urgent action to stop the continued contamination around RAAF Williamtown,

                                    (ii)       extend and improve testing regimes for blood and the surrounding environment, and

                                  (iii)       investigate financial arrangements for affected properties adjacent to RAAF Williamtown. ( general business notice of motion no. 653 )

Senator Fawcett: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Education and Employment References Committee for inquiry and report by 28 February 2018:

               (a)       the failures in TAFE SA that have resulted in suspension of courses, as well as quality issues with the provision of training;

               (b)       the effective use by the South Australian Labor Government of $771 million, provided over six years, from the Federal Government to support vocational education and training in South Australia;

                (c)       the role and impact of the scrapped Skills for All policy;

               (d)       the role and impact of the replacement WorkReady policy, and the associated decision to award TAFE SA, from June 2015, 46,000 of the 51,000 new training places in South Australia to the detriment of private training providers;

                (e)       the impact and frequency of changes made by the South Australian Government to their Training Subsidy List;

                (f)       the adequacy of the oversight of TAFE SA by its leadership, board and the South Australian Government, as well as national regulatory oversight by the Australian Skills Quality Authority and other agencies; and

                (g)       any other relevant matters.

Senator Hanson-Young: To move on the next day of sitting—That—

               (a)       the Senate notes comments made, on 5 December 2017, by the Acting Special Minister of State (Senator Cormann) that the current regulatory regime surrounding foreign donations risks the ‘inappropriate foreign interference in our democratic system’; and

               (b)       there be laid on the table by the Acting Special Minister of State, by no later than 6.30 pm on 7 December 2017, documents relating to all donations to the Liberal Party of Australia and state branches, made between 1 January 2015 and 5 December 2017, by Chinese national Ms Sally Zou or by entities owned or operated by her. ( general business notice of motion no. 654 )