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Thursday, 6 May 1982
Page: 2330


Mr KEATING —I ask the Prime Minister whether in 1977 he prevailed upon the right honourable member for Flinders, the present Minister for Industry and Commerce, who was then the Treasurer, to accept certain revenue assumptions as the basis of the 1977 Budget so that the Government could offer tax cuts at an election? Did the right honourable member for Flinders object to this approach, preferring to stand by the Treasury assumptions? Did the Prime Minister arrange for the Budget Cabinet to be addressed by Mr Carmody, the then head of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and by his own appointee, Mr Besley-one of his favourites-the Secretary of the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs, and not Treasury officers, to sell the Cabinet a Budget based upon revenue assumptions he knew to be wrong? Is it not a fact that the tax cuts given in February 1978 were removed in July, when the Budget deficit blew out, as the Prime Minister knew it would? Will the Prime Minister give an undertaking to the House that the 1982 Budget will be based on actual estimates from the Government 's advisers-that is, Treasury advisers-and not on the basis of tax cuts promised in the Party room and granted on the basis of phoney Budget figures?


Mr MALCOLM FRASER —Whatever is done by Budget Cabinet is done by Budget Cabinet as a whole and is a Cabinet decision. If all that the Australian Labor Party--

Opposition members interjecting-


Mr SPEAKER —Order! The right honourable gentleman will resume his seat. The question was asked in silence and the answer should be heard in silence. I call the Prime Minister.


Mr MALCOLM FRASER —If all that the members of the Australian Labor Party can do is to try to talk about things that might have happened five years ago--

Opposition members interjecting-


Mr SPEAKER —Order! The right honourable gentleman will resume his seat. I indicate to the House that, if that noise level continues, I will suggest to the Prime Minister that he ask that all further questions be put on the Notice Paper . I call the Prime Minister.


Mr MALCOLM FRASER —Let me repeat that decisions taken in relation to Budgets are taken by the Cabinet as a whole, and that is it. There will not be any discussion of those Cabinet processes in this House. If all that the members of the Australian Labor Party can do is to try to dredge up questions about events that might have occurred, or not occurred, five years ago, very plainly they will stay where they are.


Mr Keating —Mr Speaker, I take a point of order. I asked the Prime Minister to give an undertaking to the House about the 1982 Budget.


Mr SPEAKER —The honourable gentleman will resume his seat.


Mr Keating —We know this is true.


Mr SPEAKER —The honourable gentleman will resume his seat.


Mr Keating —Look at the guilty men on the other side. They are all guilty.


Mr SPEAKER —I name the honourable member for Blaxland. I have named the honourable member for Blaxland for refusing to sit down when I called upon him to do so.


Mr Keating —You would name me to protect this stinking, corrupt Government. It falsified the Budget document.

Motion (by Mr Sinclair) put:

That the honourable member for Blaxland be suspended from the service of the House.

The House divided.

The bells being rung-

Mr Keating-This place is being run like a banana republic.

Mr SPEAKER-That is not so. The honourable gentleman will resume his seat.

Mr Keating-You know that charge to be true. You know the Prime Minister falsified the 1977 Budget; you know the then Treasurer accepted that falsification.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable gentleman will resume his seat.

Mr Keating-You know they are guilty of falsification in regard to the 1977 Budget. You know the Prime Minister will stop at nothing. You know what he did to two Ministers over a television set, yet he falsified a Budget of the Commonwealth. You know these things to be true and yet you penalise me because, Mr Speaker, you are biased.

Mr Sinclair-The honourable member for Blaxland is using the microphone, making false statements. I suggest that he be asked to sit down.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable member for Blaxland should resume his seat.

Mr Keating-You have exercised your authority over me. You will not have that authority while you protect this corrupt Government.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable gentleman knows that what he is saying is a travesty of the Parliament.

Mr Keating-Look at him. Look at the guilty men of his Government. And you penalise me when you know damn well you should not have done so.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable gentleman will resume his seat.

Mr Keating-Out of respect for the House I will resume my seat, but let the guilty men protect themselves by this device.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable gentleman is taking an advantage that he knows he should not have. Lock the doors.

Dr Klugman-Mr Speaker, on a point of order--

Mr SPEAKER-The question is: 'That the honourable member for Blaxland be suspended from the service of the House'.

Dr Klugman-Mr Speaker, a point of order.

Mr SPEAKER-The ayes will pass to the right of the Chair, the noes to the left. I appoint the honourable members for Petrie and Mallee tellers for the ayes; I appoint the honourable members for Griffith and Hughes tellers for the noes.

Mr Les Johnson-Mr Speaker, I refuse to respond to your call because you declined to listen to points of order. Otherwise, I will not dignify these reprehensible arrangements.

Mr SPEAKER-Under the Standing Orders I declare that the question is resolved in favour of the ayes. The honourable member for Blaxland is suspended from the service of the House.

Mr Keating-I will leave the House out of respect to it but I have no respect for you or the Prime Minister or the crooked Government behind him.

Mr SPEAKER-The honourable gentleman will remove himself from the House.

The honourable member for Blaxland thereupon withdrew from the chamber.

Mr SPEAKER-Does the honourable member for Prospect wish to raise a point of order?

Dr Klugman-The only point I was wishing to make is that the microphones do not appear to be turned on and we could not hear what was going on in the exchange in front of us.

Mr SPEAKER-That was because of the noise level, I think. I call the honourable member for Dundas.