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Australian Sports Commission—Report for 2019-20


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ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Acknowledgement of Country

The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands where its offices are located, the Ngunnawal, Cadigal, Wurundjeri and the Yugambeh People, and pays its respects to all Elders past, present and emerging.  

The ASC also recognises the outstanding contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make to sport in Australia and celebrates the power of sport to promote reconciliation and reduce inequality.

Ngunnawal Language Acknowledgement of Country

Dhawura ngunna dhawura Ngunnawal

Yaangu ngalawirri

Dhunimanyin ngunna walwarii dhawurawarii

Nginggada dindi dhawura ngunnawalbuun

Translation

This is Ngunnawal Country.

Today we are gathering on Ngunnawal Country.

We will always pay respects to Elders. Both Women and Men and Ngunnawal Country.

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This report

This report has been prepared in accordance with parliamentary reporting and legislative requirements and provides details of the ASC’s performance and operations for the financial year ending 30 June 2020. The report details how effective the ASC has been at achieving its outcomes for the year as outlined in the ASC 2019-2023 Corporate Plan and the 2019-20  Portfolio Budget Statements.   

Ownership of intellectual property rights in this publication

Unless otherwise noted, copyright (and any other intellectual property rights, if any) in this publication is owned by the ASC.

Creative Commons licence

With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and photographic images, this publication is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence.  

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence is a standard form license agreement that allows you to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt this publication, provided you attribute the work. 

A summary of the licence terms is available from http://creativecommons.org.licenses/by/3.0/au/deed/en

The full license terms are available from:

http://creativecommons.org.licences/by/3.0/au/legalcode. 

The ASC’s preference is that you attribute this publication (and any material sourced from it) using the following wording: 

Source: Licensed from the Australian Sports Commission under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.O Australia Licence.

Produced by the ASC’s Production and Design, and Governance teams.

For general enquiries:

Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Email: communication@sportaus.gov.au Telephone: (02) 6214 1111  Website: sportaus.gov.au

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Senator the Hon. Richard Colbeck Minister for Youth and Sport Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

On behalf of the Board of the Australian Sports Commission, I am pleased to submit our 36th Annual Report for the financial year ended 30 June 2020. This report has been prepared in accordance with Government legislative requirements including section 48 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989, sections 38, 39, 42 and 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

The Australian Sports Commission is established in accordance with the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989. The Commissioners of the Board are responsible, as the accountable authority under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, for the preparation and content of the annual report, including both financial and performance reporting. This report provides a comprehensive review of the Australian Sports Commission’s performance in relation to the accountability framework agreed with the Australian Government and highlights the success of its programmes.

This report has been approved for presentation to you by the Australian Sports Commission Board on 25 September 2020. I hereby submit this report to you as a true and accurate record of our compliance and achievements.

Yours sincerely

John Wylie am Chair Australian Sports Commission

25 September 2020

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CONTENTS CHAPTER 1: WHO WE ARE 8

Chair’s report 10

Sport Australia executive report 14

AIS executive report 16

About us 18

ASC staff and program locations 19

Our purpose 20

The Australian sporting environment 21

CHAPTER 2: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS 22

Statement by the Commissioner 24

Our performance 25

CHAPTER 3: OUR ORGANISATION 40

Our organisation structure 42

Our people 43

Work health and safety 50

Reconciliation Action Plan 51

Corporate partners 52

Our operations 53

Authority and directions 58

Board and committees 60

Governance 76

External scrutiny 82

CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE 84

Summary of financial outcomes 86

Independent Auditor’s Opinion 88

Statement from the Commissioner, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer 90 Financial statements 91

Relevant mandatory tables 123

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS FOUNDATION 128

APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES 130

Appendix 1: High performance results 132

Appendix 2: ASC award recipients 136

Appendix 3: Funding to sports 140

Appendix 4: Contact officers 145

Appendix 5: Summary of Compliance 146

Shortened forms 151

Index 152

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CHAIR’S REPORT 10

SPORT AUSTRALIA EXECUTIVE REPORT 14

AIS EXECUTIVE REPORT 16

ABOUT US 18

ASC STAFF AND PROGRAM LOCATIONS 19

OUR PURPOSE 20

THE AUSTRALIAN SPORTING ENVIRONMENT 21

WHO WE ARE

John Wylie am

Chair

Chair’s report

It is hard to imagine a more challenging year than 2020. Australia had just started recovering from January’s catastrophic bushfires when the COVID-19 pandemic upended life for everyone. 

Sport has felt the impact, like all elements of Australian life. It’s been the most complex and challenging time in sport in most of our lifetimes — Olympic and Paralympic Games deferred for the first time absent war; blanket cancellation of community sport; athletes trying to stay fit and motivated while unable to train or compete; and revenues hard hit across the board. 

The Australian Sports Commission (ASC), comprising Sport Australia and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), has risen to the challenge of helping our sporting system in this time of crisis. 

We have continued to increase our investment in sport. We are proud that high performance funding delivered by the AIS for Australian sports this year at $145 million is 38% per cent higher than the $105 million a year invested at the time of the London Olympics in 2012.

We have done a lot for community sport. Some 24,000 grants were delivered this year by Sport Australia to grassroots and community sport. 

We have looked to the future by investing $54 million over two years in athlete pathways, which gives emerging young talent every opportunity to develop and achieve their full potential. 

We have provided greater financial assistance for athletes, most of whom earn little, to help them achieve excellence. Direct grants to athletes, known as dAIS, have increased 61 per cent from $9 million a year in 2012 to more than $14 million this year.

And we have substantially increased our investment in athlete wellbeing — especially important in the current environment. We owe it to our athletes to invest in their skills development and mental health so they can achieve life success long after their sporting career has finished. 

These increased investments have been possible with the strong support of the Australian Government, and by reducing costs in our organisation. Since 2012 the ASC’s operating expenditure has decreased by 20 per cent, enabling greater investment in sport. 

The ASC welcomed the recent decision by the Australian Government to extend $25 million per year of high-performance funding to 2022. This was due to expire in June 2020 and has allowed the AIS to maintain, and in some cases increase, funding for sports through to the postponed Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games and beyond.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

Australia is a passionate sporting nation, and nothing compares to sport for its ability to unite and inspire us and to change society for the better. No better example exists than women’s and Paralympic sports. 

The ASC has proudly been a champion of women’s and girls’ sport for many years, so it’s been thrilling to see the breakthroughs now happening all around us — two examples this year being Australia winning the World T20 cricket title in front of a world-record crowd of more than 86,000 at the MCG, and football’s Matildas named Australia’s favourite sporting team. The ASC has played a pivotal leadership role in creating better opportunities for females in all areas of sport — as competitors, coaches, administrators, board members, and through better commercial support. Our 2013 goal of 40 per cent overall female representation on sport boards has been achieved. Momentum continues to build with Australia winning the rights to host the 2022 FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup and the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Equally important has been our role as steadfast believers in, and champions of, our Paralympians — they are role models and an inspiration for us all. The rise of the Paralympic movement since the Sydney 2000 Games has been one of the greatest forces for good in the world, and we’re proud to have substantially increased our investment in Paralympic sports. 

Behind the scenes, one of our most important roles is in helping sports modernise their governance structures. This involves change which can be unsettling, and it doesn’t always make us popular. It’s vital, however, because our national love of sport and small domestic market make Australia’s sports commercial market the most competitive in the world today. 

Traditional federated structures in Olympic sports have benefits but often lead to cumbersome decision-making, instability, duplicated administration, and lost national revenue opportunities. Without change and progress, many smaller sports will struggle to survive,  and Australia will in the long term have a sporting system that offers a narrower range of opportunities for young Australians. This makes it more important now than ever that sports’ governance structures enable them to be well-run, united, competitive and stable.

Two other elements of the AIS’s work merit mention. 

The AIS has in recent times united the national high-performance sports institute system  with a single National High-Performance Sport Strategy 2024. This is a very important step to making our system, which is fragmented and dispersed by world standards, work better for our athletes. 

We have made excellent progress with the Australian Government towards a renewal of the world-famous AIS campus in Canberra. This site has served Australian sport well for nearly 40 years; investment and modernisation are now essential for it to do so for the next 40. We are pleased with its recent listing by Infrastructure Australia as a nationally significant initiative. 

All at the ASC mourned this year the untimely passing of our Board colleague Andrea Mitchell. Andrea had a lifelong commitment to advancing sport in Australia. She was a talented,  well-liked and valued Board member and sports administrator, and is deeply missed. 

This will be my last report as Chair of the ASC — my third term finishes in November 2020, and I will be stepping down after more than eight years in the role. 

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Sport is without doubt the greatest passion in Australian life, and it has been a huge honour and privilege to serve it as Chair of the ASC. I thank the Australian Government for this great opportunity, and members of the ASC Board and staff — you have been terrific contributors to Australian sport and a pleasure to work with.

I also acknowledge and thank the millions of Australians who share our national love of sport and who do so much for our country through sport — through their feats in the arena, their work in boardrooms, or as one of more than three million volunteers who are coaching, managing or otherwise helping out our grassroots local clubs and communities, providing opportunities for our youth to play and enjoy the rewards of sport and physical activity. They represent in so many ways the best of our country and are an inspiration. 

On behalf of the ASC Board, I thank you all for your ongoing commitment to the advancement of Australian sport.

John Wylie am Chair

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

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Delivering more for sport (ASC’s progress since 2011-2012)

MORE FOR SPORT

PARTICIPATION

24,000 GRANTS THIS YEAR  FOR COMMUNITY SPORT

$240M SPORTING SCHOOLS PROGRAM Launched in 2015, has funded 7,900 SCHOOLS (75% of Australian schools)  and averages 486,000 CHILDREN PARTICIPATING each Term

$5.67m reaching more than 9,000 TEENAGE RECIPIENTS

LOCAL SPORTING CHAMPIONS GRANTS

158%

MORE EFFICIENT BUSINESS

FUNDING TO SPORT

52%

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

20%

MORE FOR

HIGH PERFORMANCE

$54m OVER 2 YEARS ANNOUNCED IN 2019

INCREASED INVESTMENT IN ATHLETE WELLBEING AND PATHWAYS

$105m → $145m

AIS GRANTS TO SPORTS

38%

PARALYMPIC FUNDING

40%

$9M → OVER $14m

DIRECT ATHLETE GRANTS (DAIS)

61%

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Rob Dalton

Acting Chief Executive Officer

Sport Australia

Sport Australia executive report

Life is better with sport. And sport is better when we are working together.

These two points will stick with me when I reflect on an immensely challenging 2019-20 year for Australian sport, but also as we move forward with optimism. 

The COVID-19 pandemic stopped sporting competition all around the world, but it did not stop our Australian sporting industry from working tirelessly behind the scenes.  

I am proud of the way Australian sport has been innovative and collaborative to protect our industry as best we can. So often sport is defined by competition. But this was a period where Australian sport came together and generously shared ideas to help each other through. 

Sports found innovative ways to connect with their participants, members and fans, especially  with online engagement. There were collective forums to discuss governance models and alternative revenue streams. Ideas were shared, as were lessons learned. 

Through this hardship it has set the scene for how Sport Australia intends to work more closely and directly with sports going forward. 

Our two key aims remain clear: to help drive sport participation so we become the world’s most active sporting nation; and supporting the growth of sport industry capability. 

These two goals go hand-in-hand. A critical project Sport Australia led this year was the development of a Return to Sport Toolkit, applicable to sports at every level. The Toolkit was aimed at supporting our administrators, many of them volunteers, to put plans in place for a safe return to sport. This capability, in turn, gives participants confidence they can return  to safe and enjoyable sporting environments. 

Sport Australia has consulted with sports on financial challenges, guiding them through the available Australian Government stimulus packages. We estimate our funded Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games sports are forecast to receive $17 million in financial support via JobKeeper and the cash flow boost by the end of September 2020. This has been vital to stabilising the financial positions of many sports and saving jobs.

Many Australians have no doubt adapted their physical activity during COVID-19. This cannot replace the broader benefits sport provides. Apart from physical health, sport has the ability to build confidence, self-esteem, teamwork, communication, social skills, leadership, goal setting and resilience. 

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

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Sport is for life and we have enhanced programs to deliver on this. 

In August 2019, we launched a national a Physical Literacy Framework. This is about building the skills, knowledge and behaviours that give us the confidence and motivation to lead active lives.  

We have embedded this in our national Sporting Schools program, which provides fun and free sporting opportunities and has now funded in excess of 7500 schools since its inception in mid-2015. Sporting Schools Plus has been introduced too, to try and better connect these school experiences with and community sporting clubs.  

Our Participation Grants and Better Ageing Grants programs continue to offer greater opportunities to be active, the national launch of Walking Football in partnership with Football Federation Australia just one example of traditional sports adapting to be more inclusive. 

The COVID-19 crisis has reinforced why Sport Australia continues to focus on supporting sports to build their capability and governance models. Governance models are not one-size fits all. A wonderful example is our work with the national sporting organisations for people with disability (NSODs) sector during the year. In November 2019, for the first time, the nine NSODs formalised a partnership to embed cooperative practices, while also retaining the individual identities of each specialised organisation. They have worked together in the best interest of providing sporting opportunities for the 5 million Australians with a disability. 

At the end of the financial year we announced a partnership with Suncorp to expand their Team Girls initiative, which aims to build a nation of more confident girls and women through a connection with sport. Almost half of girls between the ages of 15-17 drop out of sport. This is a time when we want to encourage Australian girls to remain involved in sport, for the benefits mentioned above. We look forward to developing this partnership further in 2020-21. 

I would like to thank the ASC Board for their support and commend Chair John Wylie for his tireless efforts in that role since 2012.

Thank you to everyone who contributes to Australian sport. Keep playing, keep volunteering, and keep contributing in whatever way you can. As we emerge from this challenging year, sport will again play a prominent role in lifting the nation’s energy and spirits. 

Rob Dalton Acting Chief Executive Officer Sport Australia

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Peter Conde

Chief Executive Officer

Australian Institute of Sport

AIS executive report

The leadership role of the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) has been more important than ever during what has been an extraordinarily difficult 2019-20. Following the devastating summer bushfires and the smoke pollution that affected many parts of the country, the once-in-a-lifetime COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted every industry across the globe, and sport is not immune. 

Sport in this country prides itself on being strong, agile and when pushed to the brink, able to dig even deeper to overcome challenges. During one of the biggest threats we have faced in modern times, the way in which high-performance sport has united and embraced adversity can only be described as inspirational.  

The very best high-performance athletes and coaches train to navigate their way through unpredictable circumstances. I’d like to applaud everyone within the high-performance sport sector for the way in which they’re managing their way through this unusual environment, whether it be adapting training, embracing new technologies, re-setting goals or navigating the financial impacts. 

With the historic announcement to postpone the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, our Executive team continues to work tirelessly to provide expertise and programs to connect and support our athletes, coaches, and high-performance  staff during this sustained period of upheaval. 

The AIS aims for the agility required to be responsive to the sector needs as they arise and change. A significant example of this was the timely development of the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment to provide a clear path forward for a safe return to sport at all levels, and on which the Government’s return to sport guidelines were based. The AIS team, led by Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Dr David Hughes, developed this Framework in collaboration with sport CMOs around Australia and in consultation with the Federal Government’s CMOs. 

While this year saw a multitude of challenges, crippling not only the sport sector but also bringing the broader community internationally to a stand-still, there have been some key achievements that should not be forgotten.  

The National High-Performance Sports Strategy (NHPSS) was endorsed by Federal and State Governments in November 2019 and is a critical step in uniting the sector towards the common goal of building sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes. I would like to thank our National Institute Network (NIN) colleagues for collaborating to develop this strategy and for the ongoing work to produce NIN-endorsed supporting documentation and policies. 

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

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This united approach was also exhibited as athletes, NSO and NIN representatives engaged with the Federal Minister for Youth and Sport in February 2020 to articulate their vision of a world-leading AIS high-performance facility of the future.   

Funding provided by Government for 2019-20 and 2020-21 has enabled the AIS to extend the Mental Health Referral Network (MHRN) to our alumni and talented pathway athletes, coaches and staff.  This has proven invaluable during COVID-19 and has been complemented by extending mental health literacy services to the sector, to support the understanding of how to refer into the network, and to look after themselves and their peers. 

Supported by Government funding, $35.31 million will be provided in grants across 2019-20 and 2020-21 directly to NSOs to develop and improve their high-performance pathways to successfully identify, develop, support and progress talented athletes to achieve medal-winning performances in the future. This funding will increase the capacity and capability of a dedicated coaching and leadership workforce, alongside funding to address gaps and opportunities identified within their strategic pathway plans.

In June 2020, the Federal Government announced a funding boost of $54 million over two years to high performance and this was welcome news for the sector. The investment included $50.6 million over two years as direct grants to NSOs and enabled the AIS to increase funding allocations to Rugby 7s, Football, Paralympic sports and Surfing and provide 34 NSOs with much-needed certainty as they reset for the Tokyo Games in 2021.  

Much of what has been achieved in the past 12 months in the high-performance sector, and indeed during my role to date as AIS CEO, would not have been possible without the support of ASC Chair, John Wylie. I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank John for his passion, enthusiasm and unrelenting belief that sport, at all levels, can genuinely change lives. 

We know the current circumstances are impacting everyone differently, but we do believe that together we will get through this and be at our best for 2021 and beyond.

Peter Conde Chief Executive Officer AIS

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About us

The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is a corporate Commonwealth entity within the Australian Government’s Department of Health portfolio. It was established on 13 September 1984 and operates under the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 (the ASC Act) and is governed by a Board of Commissioners appointed by the Minister for Sport. The Board determines the ASC’s overall direction, decides on allocation of resources and policy for delegated decisions, and is accountable to the Minister for Sport.   

The ASC operates strategic sports training facilities at Pizzy Park (Gold Coast) and at Varese in Italy and operates from leased premises in Melbourne and Sydney. Our headquarters are located at the AIS Campus in Canberra. The AIS Campus is a 65-hectare multipurpose facility with sporting, administration, commercial and residential functions.

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

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ASC staff and program locations

Note: Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees as at 30 June 2020. FTE is drawn from payroll data and is a calculation of the number of employees receiving salary or paid leave at a single point in time. Part-Time and casual employees are converted to a FTE based on the hours they work divided by a Full-time 37.5 hour week. This figure differs to the Average Staffing Level (ASL) which is the sum of all the individual fortnightly FTE averaged over the financial year.

Offices in Brisbane and Perth were closed by 31 July 2019 and Adelaide was closed on 31 December 2019.

454 TOTAL

Italy

Varese / 04

Melbourne / 38

Gold Coast / 01

Sydney / 12

Brisbane / 03

Canberra / 392

Perth / 02 Adelaide / 02

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Our purpose

Our vision is for Australia to be the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world-leading sports industry.

The ASC comprises:

Sport Australia — responsible for driving the broader sport sector including participation, supporting activities linked to sport and sport industry growth; and the

Australian Institute of Sport — leading our high-performance sports system

From grassroots right up to the pinnacle of elite international competition, we work together with the sport industry and the wider community to champion the role sport can play in engaging every Australian.

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have a direct impact on physical activity and physical

literacy levels

Building workforce capability across the sector

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes

to achieve podium success

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

These strategies are underpinned and enabled by a seventh, internally focused strategy of driving a leaner and more efficient organisation and building a strong workforce culture.

In 2019-20, work across these six strategic areas has shaped the ASC’s approach to achieving its outcome under the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements.

PBS Outcome 1: Increased participation in organised sport and continued international sporting success including through leadership and development of a cohesive and effective sports sector, provision of targeted financial support, and the operation of the Australian Institute of Sport.

These outcomes are delivered through six important strategies:

As outlined in the ASC Corporate Plan 2019-2023 the ASC is delivering three key outcomes:

MORE

AUSTRALIANS MOVE MORE OFTEN

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST CONNECTED INDUSTRY

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 WHO WE ARE

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The Australian sporting environment

The past year has been an unprecedented challenge for Australian sport.

The COVID-19 pandemic shut down sport at all levels, in Australia and abroad. As well as forcing the postponement of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, Australia’s high-performance athletes have had to abandon competitions and reset training goals. Domestic competitions and community sport have been at a virtual stand-still, with some sports cancelling entire seasons for the year.

The affect this will have on the Australian sport and physical activity sector — which contributes around $83 billion of economic, health and education value for the Australian economy every year* — will be difficult to gauge for some time. One thing is clear, sport will be a vital part of Australia’s economic and health recovery.

Federal Minister for Youth and Sport, Senator the Hon. Richard Colbeck says the Government believes sporting clubs and organisations across Australia will play an enormous part in getting the nation back on track as we recover from the impact of COVID-19.

In spite of these challenges, the Australian sporting community has shown genuine resolve and determination to keep moving. Sports and clubs are working hard to engage with their members and get back to sport as soon as possible.

The ASC is determined to help all Australians become more active through sport, whether it’s getting involved in a local sporting club or aspiring to represent Australia.

Even before the pandemic, the characteristics, habits and attitudes of Australian society have been evolving and so is the way in which Australians interact with sport. Data indicates only 35.9 per cent of Australians aged 15 and above are meeting physical activity guidelines for their age group.

Research into the sports market tells us Australians are increasingly time poor, have limited budgets and are consumed by new digital ways of interacting and socialising. With these changes, new preferences are emerging; Australians want greater flexibility, more tailored products and activities that fit their busy lifestyles.

AusPlay data shows that in the past year about 4.6 million adults (15 and over) participated in club sport at least once (22 per cent of the population) while about 2.3 million children under the age of 15 (47.4 per cent) participate in club sport. The rate of participation in club sport peaks in the 9-11 age-group at around 70 per cent.

Just as Australian lifestyles are changing, so too is the sport industry. There is greater variety in the industry, and many levels of government and non-government support. The ASC aims to increase consistency and reduce inefficiencies across the sector, to transform the industry to better support sport in the community.

On the international stage, competition is continually intensifying and improving. While the Olympic and Paralympic Games have been postponed to 2021, we are optimising all our resources to maximise outcomes for next year.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought significant challenges to the sport sector and international sport more broadly. The AIS remains confident that a united high-performance system has the expertise and capacity to emerge from this crisis, continue to re-build and deliver international sporting success.

* Boston Consulting Group (2017) Intergenerational Review of Australian Sport 2017.

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STATEMENT BY THE COMMISSIONER — ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS 24

OUR PERFORMANCE 25

More Australians move more often 25

Building the capability of sport to create a robust, connected industry 30

Creating national pride and inspiration through international sporting success 33

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 ABN 67 374 695 240

+61 2 2614 1111 info@sportaus.gov.au sportaus.gov.au

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Statement by the Commissioner — Annual Performance Statements

On behalf of the Board of the Australian Sports Commission, I am pleased to submit the Annual Performance Statements for the year ended 30 June 2020, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

In my opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act and section 16F of the PGPA Rule.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Commissioners.

Yours sincerely,

John Wylie am Chair Australian Sports Commission

25 September 2020

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Our performance

This reporting period has seen two significant and unprecedented events.

During the summer enormous bushfires tore through the country burning more than 19 million hectares and killing 33 people. Smoke haze from bushfires caused air quality to deteriorate to levels never seen before with Canberra’s air quality rated as ‘worst in the world’ during January 2020. As a result, sporting events were cancelled, and training venues closed.

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation declared a global COVID-19 pandemic and on 17 March all public facing facilities on the AIS Site were closed. On 24 March the Japanese Government, the International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee officially agreed to postpone the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games to 2021.

In Australia, the introduction of mandatory government restrictions, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19, resulted in all sport being placed on hold.

The ASC has adapted and responded to these challenges, harnessing the strength of our mobile workforce to lead the sector through these unprecedented times.

MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVE MORE OFTEN

Key activities

In 2019-20, the national Move It AUS physical activity awareness campaign continued to encourage all Australians to find time to be physically active. Advertising to support the awareness campaign was in market from October through to March 2020 but the Move It Month initiative, that was developed and planned for delivery in April 2020, was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Key activities undertaken during 2019-20 included:

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

> Delivery of the Sporting Schools program funded 6,513 schools and provided 1,846,720 participation opportunities

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels 

> Round 1 of the Move it AUS Participation Grants program was completed with $18 million invested to support 62 Move It AUS participation projects.

> $11.2 million was invested over two years to July 2019-20 to support Move It AUS Better Ageing projects.

> Almost $9 million was allocated in participation grants.

> Supporting the delivery of projects funded under the Community Sport Infrastructure Grant Program.

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Our results

Table 1: Our results against Strategic Priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

Increase in children aged 5-14 years participating in physical activity  

Target 30 per cent of children in Australia aged 5 to 14 years participate for at least 3.2 hours per week in organised physical activity outside school hours. 

Result 29.3 per cent*

Supporting statement

Organised physical activity outside school hours is slightly up from 28.8 per cent  12 months ago.   

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 20.

*Launched in October 2015, AusPlay is a national population tracking survey delivered by the ASC. It provides data on sport and physical activity participation for the government, sport sector and Australian public, to help them better understand the sport participation landscape and inform decision-making. In 2019-20, AusPlay published two releases, covering the 2018-19 financial year (released November 2019) and the 2019 calendar year (released April 2020).

Table 2: Our results against Strategic Priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

An increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity in primary schools 

Target 60 per cent of funded* primary schools report an increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity compared to the previous year.

Result 67 per cent

Supporting statement

The target of 60 per cent was achieved in 2019-20, with 67 per cent of schools on average reporting an increase in sport and physical activity at the end of term one 2020.

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 20.

*Schools funded under the Sporting Schools Program.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Table 3: Our results against Strategic Priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels 

Performance criteria

Increase in Australians, aged 15 and above, participating in physical activity 

Target An increase of 207,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group, when compared to 2018-19. 

Result 406,531

Supporting statement

The target was achieved. 35.9 per cent of Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group.

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 22.

Case Study: Clearinghouse for Sport

The ASC’s Clearinghouse for Sport (Clearinghouse) is a sector-wide information and knowledge sharing strategy. The Clearinghouse brings together Australia’s leading sport and active recreation agencies—using the ASC as the principal information coordination point—to share news, evidence and insights about sport and human performance to ensure the Australian sport sector maintains equitable access to high quality information and evidence based resources.

The Clearinghouse is used by a broad range of people engaged in sport, including Australia’s leading coaches, athletes, sport scientists, administrators, officials and community volunteers. The Clearinghouse website plays a central role in activating the knowledge sharing community and connecting people with complementary expertise to the sector’s information and evidence base resources. 

> During the 2019-20 reporting period, Clearinghouse members performed 1,105,303 information transactions on the website.

> Clearinghouse membership continued to grow by approximately 300 new members per month, taking the total active members to 25,733 at 30 June 2020.

> The Clearinghouse Daily Sports News with its 14,829 subscribers continues to be the leading information and news alerting service to the sector.

In response to COVID-19, the Clearinghouse continues to collect and disseminate critical information resources across all sport and recreation jurisdictions.

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Table 4: Our results against Strategic Priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

Performance criteria

Build awareness in all Australians, particularly parents, about the ways they can introduce sport and physical activity into daily living 

Target 4 per cent of Australians recall the Move It AUS campaign on a prompted basis. 

2 per cent of Australians recall the Move It AUS campaign on an unprompted basis. 

Result 29 per cent prompted

21 per cent unprompted

Supporting statement

The Move It AUS campaign was delayed in early January due to bushfires in New South Wales and Victoria and was suspended in mid-March due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 22.

Case Study: Sporting Schools

Sporting Schools is an Australian Government initiative designed to help schools to increase children’s participation in sport, and to connect them with community sporting opportunities.

Research shows that quality sport and physical activity in schools has a positive influence on children’s confidence, competence and motivation to be active at school and throughout their life. Sporting Schools programs are provided free to children and their families to help students build capability to be active for life. 

Since Sporting Schools started in 2015, over 7,500 schools have received funding. This has provided more than 7 million participant opportunities to get students active, engaged and having fun while sampling a variety of different sports.

To help achieve this, Sport Australia has partnered with more than 30 NSOs. There is a program for primary schools, and a targeted program for Year 7 and 8 students in secondary schools.

The Sporting Schools program distributed $40 million during 2019-20, to address a number of important goals. These are:

> to improve children’s fundamental movement skills

> to encourage lifelong participation in physical activity

> increase the awareness of the value of sport in schools

> engage children in high quality sporting programs

> connect children with sport in their local communities

> to develop the capability and capacity of sport to drive nationwide participation growth.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

School: Adelaide East Education Centre, SA  Funded amount: $1,800  Number of students: 50 Sport: Golf 

In Term 1 2020 the school was awarded $1,800 in funding to deliver a minimum of four sessions of golf to 50 students. With limited resources and space to deliver physical activity programs, the school relied on an oval provided by a nearby secondary school, a half-sized basketball court in their grounds, and equipment brought in by external coaches.

Jenny Bonnett, a teacher at Adelaide East Education Centre, said:  “We have been spoilt by the Sporting Schools grants [which allowed us] to bring in coaches with their equipment to deliver sporting programs to our students. The school designated an afternoon each week to sport, with a professional golf coach coming into the school to deliver a program [Sporting Schools] is a true blessing to our school. We designated Wednesday afternoons to sport coaching for the whole school — a great move which got all students active and all classes integrating with each other. You have made 50 special kids so happy.”

School: St Clare of Assisi Primary School, ACT Funded amount: $2,400 Number of students: 134  Sport: AFL

Alison Graeber from the school wrote saying: “we were successful in securing funding for AFL clinics for our students … and [I] easily organised our Kinder and Year 1 students to participate in four weeks of AFL clinics with an amazing coach, Tim, who made the sessions great fun and an amazing physical and learning experience every Thursday; the students were so excited. They were taught techniques and received great guidance in kicking and handballing. We shared our successful program with all school parents in our newsletter, which also encouraged all students and parents to find their 30.”

School: St Joseph’s School, QLD Funded amount: $2,500 Number of students: 72  Sport: Gymnastics

Petrea Hass from the school commented: “Sporting Schools has provided an opportunity for every student to participate in professionally delivered sports programs. We do not have a [health and physical education] HPE teacher at our school due to the small number of students and without Sporting Schools our students would not have (had) this opportunity to learn new skills and develop their interest in different sports.”

School: St Monica’s Primary School, VIC Funded amount: $2,000 Number of students: 135 Sport: Badminton

Kristian Manche from the school commented: “Many of our students have limited opportunities to engage in sports programs and sports clubs outside of school. Sporting Schools programs are a brilliant way to give our students these opportunities, and for our families to become more aware of the local clubs in our community and increase awareness of the physical, social and mental health benefits of joining these sports clubs.”

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BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

Key activities

In 2019-20, Sport Australia focused on supporting the sport industry by helping sports to use contemporary business models and implement more efficient systems of governance and management. The focus in 2019-20 was on the areas of strategy, workforce and financial management.

Modern technology continues to disrupt and revolutionise the world of sport and Sport Australia is setting the standard digitally. Sport Australia created SportAUS Connect, a shared platform to connect the sector’s organisations and software vendors through data and analytics, to help enable sports to respond to consumers’ needs and ultimately improve commercial outcomes.

Key Activities undertaken in 2019-20 included:

Building workforce capability across the sector

> The Sport Governance Principles were updated using an extensive consultation process. This included: face to face co-design workshops in each state and territory, online jams for the whole sport sector, and targeted design labs in three jurisdictions. More than 380 people from over 70 sports were involved in the process. 

> Supporting governance reform for national sporting organisations for people with a disability (NSODs) and supporting targeted national sporting organisations (NSOs) with business transformation. 

> Developed and launched a Return to Sport Toolkit with Hockey Australia. The toolkit, focuses on giving community sporting clubs and associations a roadmap for the safest return to sport at all levels.

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

> Released a co-designed cloud-based data platform template that is currently being piloted with Cycling Australia.

> Piloted SportAUS Connect platform and co-designed cloud-based sport data model template with Cycling Australia to enable them to integrate their third-party membership, event and customer relationship management systems so that Cycling can better understand and engage with their customers.

> Continued development of a Sport Design System to enable sporting organisations to launch new digital services quickly and professionally: and a Digital Marketing Playbook to help sports activate and measure customer engagement activities and grow participation. 

> Promoted the Play for Purpose raffle to NSOs, state sporting organisations (SSOs) and sporting clubs. The raffle is free for clubs to join and provides an online platform to support fundraising. There was an increase in sporting clubs signing up over the year with the number going from 195 in July 2019 to 304 by 30 June 2020.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Our results

Table 5: Our results against Strategic Priority: Building workforce capability across the sector 

Performance criteria

Improving the organisational capability of targeted NSOs 

Target Four sports transition to a whole-of-sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams of strategy, workforce and financial management. 

Result Two sports have transitioned to a whole-of-sport business model incorporating the three operating streams of strategy, finance and workforce. Another six sports have transitioned to a whole-of-sport model for at least one operating stream and are actively working towards transition for the remaining streams. 

Supporting statement

Sport Australia has focused on supporting NSOs to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in their whole-of-sport operating model. Over 2019-20, Sport Australia  supported 22 sports to consider opportunities for a whole-of-sport business model. 

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 28.

Case Study: Return to Sport Toolkit

Sport Australia, in partnership with Hockey Australia, developed a Return to Sport Toolkit to give sporting organisations a set of resources to support the safe return to sport at all levels. The Toolkit resources built on the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment and the Australian Government’s National principles for the resumption of sport and recreation activities by giving operational guidance and considerations that organisations should take into account to appropriately resume sport and their club operations.

The Toolkit contained comprehensive checklists, templates and guides for all sized sporting organisations. The Toolkit works through four stages:

> Plan — implement plans, processes and systems to provide safe sport environments

> Prepare — ensure safe facility and participant practices

> Respond — be prepared for management of a COVID-19 outbreak

> Recover — consideration of protocols to optimise good public and participant health into the future.

The static documents were supported by four videos presented by sector representatives from NSO, SSO and community sport. There was extensive national media coverage featuring the Sport Australia CEO and Director of Sport Governance and Strategy.

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Table 6: Our results against Strategic Priority: Building workforce capability across the sector

Performance criteria

Improving the financial performance and financial capability of NSOs 

Target Less than 15 per cent of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated as Higher Risk or Extreme Risk under the annual financial assessment tool. 

Result 23.3 per cent of NSOs and NSODs were rated as Higher Risk or Extreme Risk.* 

Supporting statement

Sport Australia continued to support NSOs and NSODs to strengthen their financial performance and financial capability.

The ASPR includes an annual financial assessment tool, which reviews the financial position, financial performance and financial capability and management of funded NSOs and NSODs. Those rated as Higher Risk or Extreme Risk are monitored more frequently.

Sport Australia facilitated fortnightly forums to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and collaborated with NSOs and NSODs on the Sport COVID-19 Financial Data Collection project to support evidence based decision-making with regard to the pandemic response.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 28.

* Sport Australia updated its sport financial risk categories in 2019-20 to include four risk ratings (up from three in 2018-19). The new ratings are: Lower Risk; Moderate Risk; Higher Risk; and Extreme Risk (new). In addition, Sport Australia streamlined the reporting metrics that underpinned the ASPR ratings.

Table 7: Our results against Strategic Priority:  Improving the digital capability of the

Australian sports sector

Performance criteria

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector 

Target 30 per cent of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above. 

10 per cent of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above. 

Result Sport.Scan was not conducted this year. 

Supporting statement

Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic an assessment of NSOs digital maturity was deferred to the 2020-21 reporting cycle.

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019-23 Page 30.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

Key activities

The unprecedented challenges of 2019-20 required the AIS to utilise our relationships and network across NSOs, NIN and our Games partners to identify and be responsive to the sector needs as each new hurdle arose. The impact of the extensive bushfires and related smoke pollution, and the COVID-19 pandemic have provided significant stress and uncertainty for athletes, coaches, support staff and high-performance sports programs internationally.   

The AIS response required an agile approach and refinement to our planned activities for 2019-20, originally intended to be an Olympic/Paralympic Games final preparation year, to address the immediate health and wellbeing concerns across the sector. 

Restrictions as a result of COVID-19 have significantly impacted programs including athlete training and qualification. The AIS has reprioritised support to the high-performance sector in light of the Tokyo 2021 announcement, with initial focus on athlete wellbeing and support.   

The Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) manager network has been a critical resource for athletes, coaches and support staff within NSOs and the National Institute Network (NIN). The AW&E managers embedded in sports provide a known and independent contact point, which is of particular importance for athletes. 

Key activities undertaken in 2019-20:

Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high-performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

> The AIS team, led by CMO Dr David Hughes, developed the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in collaboration with sport CMOs around Australia and in consultation with the Federal Government’s CMOs. 

> The NHPSS was endorsed by Federal and State governments in November 2019. 

> The AIS delivered an expanding base of high-performance camps on site and at the AIS European Training Centre (ETC). Due to the COVID-19 outbreak all high-performance camps were cancelled or postponed for a number of months. However, the AIS has commenced development of a digital engagement platform resource that will support and supplement future athlete and coach camps on site through the delivery of virtual offerings. 

> The majority of planned high-performance capability and capacity initiatives (across people, process and system development) met their objectives and timelines, with a shift to virtual delivery in response to COVID-19.   

> The AIS established a panel of providers who can provide core competency learning and development packages for utilisation across the sector, which will reduce complexity risks associated with procurement activities. 

> The Federal Government announced in June 2019 an additional funding boost of $54.14 million for high performance sport over two years for Performance Pathways and Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E), came as welcome news to the sector. 

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> Developed and implemented the National Performance Pathways Strategy. The Performance Pathway system capability support series (AIS ELEVATE) was adapted to support and connect the workforce virtually to address impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Key activity continued during this period including a successful e-Forum series, local pathway e-networking events and engagement with international pathway networks.  

> Implemented a Gold Medal Ready (GMR) Digital Transformation Strategy with the aim of connecting more than 300 Athletes, Coaches and Performance Staff already involved in GMR Activities (including special operations camps, educational workshops, alumni forums and question and answer panels, Alumni Connect One to One Guidance) to our online platform to be called GMR Online. 

> Leading the high-performance sector on health systems design across NSOs and NIN — more than 140 athletes planned to undertake the Athlete Availability Program. A number of planned Athlete Availability projects with specific NSOs were postponed following the COVID-19 pandemic. 

> Commenced work on the Australian Sport Data Network (ASDN) to offer Sport and the NIN shared access to cloud-based infrastructure for data lake, data warehouse and data base storage retention and quality assurance. By building authentication, authorisation and appropriately governed access — Australian coaches, athletes, researchers and scientists can utilise data to generate success for our athletes. Properly engineered data systems permit longitudinal usage of significant datasets and allows researchers to develop the next generation of advantage for our athletes. ASDN incorporates existing data sources e.g. Athlete Management System, and adds others data sources as required.

> Utilising cutting edge rapid build technology, AIS engineers built and delivered more than 300 individualised pieces of equipment to para and able athletes.

> Delivered complete Swimming Analysis tool based on video machine learning that generates 1,250 data points per lap per athlete for all athletes in the pool real-time. Previous solution delivered 3-10 data points per lap for one athlete an hour after competition, highlighting the significant increase in data capability.

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community 

> The Mental Health Referral Network (MHRN) was expanded to cover our alumni and talent pathway athletes, coaches and staff. This has proven invaluable during COVID-19 and has been complemented by extending mental health literacy services to help the sector to understand how to refer into the network, and to look after themselves and their peers. 

> Despite travel limitations and COVID-19 protocols, the AW&E team effectively connected athletes with the community including launching three national community engagement programs — Share a Yarn with 10 athletes, Bite Back with 30 athletes, and Lifeline Community Custodians with 20 athletes. Four community events for NSOs were developed and two were launched to assist in system capability: Clean Up Australia Day, ANZAC Day, National Volunteers Week and NAIDOC Week. 

> For the first time, a critical incident framework has been developed and is being implemented across high-performance funded NSOs and the NIN. The framework takes a whole-of-organisation approach including business, technology and high-performance sport-specific scenarios. While smoke and bushfires and now COVID-19 have impacted our ability to deliver face-to-face education and implementation support, the AIS has taken an agile approach and delivered key components of the program via virtual workshops.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Our results

Table 8: Our results against Strategic Priority: Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high-performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Percentage of high-performance funded sports rated by the AIS as achieving their benchmark targets 

Target On average, 85 per cent of high-performance funded NSOs performance outcomes are achieved. 

Result 77 per cent* of sports who had a benchmark event before the end of March 2020 achieved performance outcomes. 

Supporting statement

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on international competition around the world is well known, unprecedented and affected nearly a fifth of sports. There were 50 new world champions across Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games sports in 2019—20, however, the high-performance sport system was not on track to meet the target in this strategic priority. 

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019—23 Page 42.

*Due to restrictions as a result of COVID-19, all NSOs suspended or significantly modified their high-performance programs.  There has been no change in benchmark event results since March 2020 due to the cancellation of international competitions across all sports, and there were no further opportunities for NSOs to achieve other targets up to the end of 2019—20. 

Australia had qualified 414 athlete quota spots for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Remaining qualification events for Tokyo in 2021 are being defined in the context of travel restrictions.

Table 9: Our results against Strategic Priority: Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high-performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Community Perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success 

Target Improvement in public perception of Australia’s international sporting success as measured through the Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor. 

Result 80 per cent of respondents who were thinking about Australia’s athletes and teams overall said that they could make them feel pride ‘at least quite a bit’, and 15 per cent said they could be made to feel ‘extremely’ proud.  The equivalent figures for feeling inspired were slightly lower, at 71 per cent and 11 per cent respectively. 

Supporting statement

High-performance sport can and does create feelings of pride and inspiration in the community and data shows that these feelings are more strongly evoked by the Olympic/ Commonwealth Games/Paralympics facets of high-performance sport compared to other high-level sporting activities. 

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019—23 Page 42.

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Case Study: COVID Reboot Leadership and Innovation

The AIS Medical team, led by CMO Dr David Hughes, developed the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment, with sport CMOs across Australia and in consultation with the Federal Government CMOs. The Framework formed the basis of the Federal Government’s Return to Sport Principles across high-performance and community sport. The AIS was the first organisation in the world to publicly release and publish an evidence-based process for safely resuming sport in a COVID-19 environment (https://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(20)30527-2/fulltext).  

AIS Medicine expertise has been integral in advising NSO/NIN partners in addressing complex concerns and challenges. The AIS has been agile in response to matters raised by high-performance partners, developing and providing guidance with short turnaround times. AIS Medicine continues to lead the high-performance system on COVID-19 related issues such as interstate travel, overseas travel, COVID-19 screening of athletes and preparation for the Tokyo Games.  

AIS Medicine is working with ACT Health, the Commonwealth Deputy Chief Medical Officer and others in using mobile technology, with the ambition of having in-house COVID-19 testing capability deployed for the Australian Olympic and Paralympic teams in Tokyo.

Case Study: A unified and collaborative National High-Performance Sports Strategy

The NHPSS was endorsed by Federal and State governments in November 2019. The release of the strategy signals the first time that all Federal and State governments have united to deliver an integrated approach to provide opportunities for aspiring athletes moving through the development pathway and to foster the common goal of national pride and inspiration through international sporting success. 

Aligned with Sport 2030, the NHPSS clearly articulates the prime responsibilities and shared commitment of the sports, Federal, State and Territory government agencies to develop and operate a world-leading high-performance system for Australian sport. 

The NHPSS revolves around athletes, coaches and sports and sets out principles, policies and practices that clarify and simplify system partner roles in delivering our mission to achieve sustained international sporting success. The NHPSS recognises our champion athletes as role models as we inspire physical activity for future generations. 

The commitment and collaboration achieved through the NHPSS is a critical step in uniting and leveraging these innovative approaches across the sector towards the common goal of building sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Table 10: Our results against Strategic Priority: Develop system capability to provide for athlete personal development and wellbeing 

Performance criteria

Develop system capability to provide for athlete personal development and wellbeing 

Target All NSOs receiving AW&E specific funding implement priority recommendations from their respective national framework. 

Result Of the 27 NSOs that have received AW&E funding:  

> 24 have a National AW&E Manager in place

> 26 will have a completed (or are awaiting sign-off by their board) AW&E Framework

> Of those sports with completed Frameworks, 71 per cent of framework priorities have been completed or commenced 

Supporting statement

The COVID-19 Pandemic has impacted NSO resources during this reporting period, however, the remaining NSO is currently developing an AW&E Framework and is expected to have it completed by the end of 2020. 

Source:  ASC Corporate Plan 2019—23 Page 44.

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Case Study: Mental Health Referral Network

The AIS MHRN has continued to grow and evolve over the past year. This has seen the network expand to more than 40 practitioners, across disciplines including Psychology, Neuropsychology, and Psychiatry. In response to the growing demand for specialist support for athletes with disordered eating, the MHRN has also recruited psychologists and dieticians with specific experience in treating disordered eating. In line with increased government support for eating disorder treatment in the general community, the availability of support for athletes with disordered eating was expanded to offer athletes a expedited referral process that ensures they are quickly triaged into appropriate support.  

Asking for help for a mental health issue can be confronting, and sometimes approached with ambivalence. This is often true for individuals experiencing an eating disorder, where accessing treatment can feel like a loss of control of food and weight. Individuals sitting on waiting lists for this type of treatment, means more time to waver in their determination to seek treatment and more time to consolidate unhelpful behaviours around food and weight. The research tells us that the earlier the intervention, the better the outcomes, and the MHRN is committed to intervening at the earliest possible stage.  

Over the past year, the MHRN has assisted a number of athletes presenting with disordered eating behaviours through this program. Earlier in the year an athlete who had been contemplating treatment for some time, self-referred to the MHRN in the context of restricted eating, over-exercising, body checking, and distress around body image. Upon receiving this call, the MHRN organised for this individual to be assessed the following day. Following this assessment, the individual was accepted for treatment the following week under the MHRN Disordered Eating criterion, meaning access of up to 20 sessions with a psychologist, 10 sessions with a dietician, and psychiatric support at no cost to the athlete.  

The AIS Mental Health Team is proud to be able to offer meaningful and readily-available mental health support to athletes, coaches, and high-performance staff, and look forward to continuing this important work in the year ahead.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

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Case Study: Share a Yarn

In May 2020, AIS Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement launched a community engagement initiative designed to connect high-performance athletes with Indigenous communities to learn about country, traditional owners of the land, history and culture, and to assist athletes to be better role models for the Australian community. 

Thirteen athlete ambassadors were selected to be involved in Share a Yarn. The ambassadors are a combination of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) athletes and non-ATSI athletes and will be involved for a 12-month period that will involve community visits, follow-up contact and support to communities through online video messaging, community event appearances and sharing their learning back to their sport. 

As part of National Reconciliation Week, the ambassadors took part in activities with the Indigenous youth of Arlparra, a remote community 200km from Alice Springs, Northern Territory. 

With physical visits to communities on hold as a result of COVID-19 restrictions, athletes utilised the Share a Yarn online video platform to ask questions of youth in Arlparra through the engagement programs offered by Wanta Aboriginal Corporation, seeking to learn about aspects of culture, land, history and peoples and how they can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia. 

“As a proud Indigenous woman I am excited to see the AIS develop the Share a Yarn initiative, and prioritise the importance of learning and engaging with the different Indigenous cultures within Australia.”

Olympian race-walker and Share a Yarn ambassador Beki Smith.

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OUR ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE 42

OUR PEOPLE 43

Supporting our staff through the global COVID-19 Pandemic 44

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY 50

Notifiable incidents 50

RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN 51

Key RAP activities for 2019-20 51

CORPORATE PARTNERS 52

OUR OPERATIONS 53

Operational highlight 53

Site management 56

Environment and heritage 57

AUTHORITY AND DIRECTIONS 58

Enabling Legislation 58

Ministerial direction 59

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 60

Board members 60

Board activity 67

Finance, Audit and Risk committee 71

Governance and Executive Performance Committee 72

Executive remuneration 72

GOVERNANCE 76

Planning and accountability 76

Risk management 76

Strategic risks 77

Internal audit 81

Fraud 81

Compliance 81

Indemnities and insurance 81

EXTERNAL SCRUTINY 82

Reports by the Australian National Audit Office 82

Reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman 82

Decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner 82

Judiciary 82

Privacy 82

Freedom of information 82

OUR ORGANISATION

Our organisation structure

Australian Institute

of Sport

Chief Executive Officer Peter Conde

Sport Business General Manager Andrew Larratt

Marketing, Customer Insights

& Analytics

A/g General Manager Brooke Sawyer

AIS Operations Chief Operating Officer Robert Medlicott

Industry Capability Deputy General Manager Cameron French

Strategic

Engagement & Marketing Deputy General Manager Fiona Boughton

Business

Operations Deputy General Manager Geoff Howes

AIS Site Strategy Deputy General Manager Fiona Johnstone

Applied Technology & Innovation Director Ian Burns

Participation, Infrastructure &

Physical Activity Deputy General Manager James Ceely

Digital Strategy

& Insights Deputy General Manager Wing Cheung

People & Culture Deputy General Manager Alison Halpin

Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement Director Matti Clements

Finance & Commercial Deputy General Manager, Chief Financial Officer

Peter Dunlop

Performance People & Teams A/g Director Matti Clements

Sport Strategy

& Investment Director Alex Newton

Infrastructure & Facilities Services Project Director Luke Jansen

Corporate

Chief Operating Officer Luke McCann

Australian Sports Commission

and Sport Australia A/g Chief Executive Officer Rob Dalton

Australian Sports Commission Board

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 OUR ORGANISATION

Chief Executive Officer Kate Palmer AM completed a three-year term which expired on 31 January 2020.

On behalf of the ASC Board, Chair John Wylie said “Ms Palmer has achieved many significant milestones over the past three years. The Board thanks her for all her work and wish her all the best for the next chapter of her career. We know she will continue to make her mark in Australian sport and as a role model for women in leadership.”

Acting Chief Executive Officer Rob Dalton commenced on 3 February 2020.

Rob brings a wealth of experience to Sport Australia, with 25 years as a Senior Partner at EY where he focused on leadership, governance, strategy, audit and entrepreneurship. Rob has also been actively involved in sport having been a representative hockey player for 15 years, non-Executive Director of the Richmond Football Club for 15 years and Chair of Hockey Victoria. Rob has stood down from his Hockey Victoria role while Acting CEO of Sport Australia.

Rob has also worked closely with the ASC having been an independent member of the organisation’s Finance Audit and Risk committee for the past eight years.

Our people

The ASC has a highly adaptable, capable and diverse workforce. The average staffing level of the ASC in the 2019-20 financial year was 454 full time equivalent staff employed on an ongoing, non-ongoing and casual basis.

Our workforce has access to:

> Technology that allows them to work anytime, anywhere, delivered as part of our Technology Investment Roadmap.

> An Enterprise Learning and Leadership Program which is building workforce capability through our Workforce Development Strategy.

> A culture framework with our values of respect, integrity, teamwork and excellence in action embedded in our recruitment, induction, policy, learning and performance activities.

> Diversity and inclusion strategies delivered through our Reconciliation Action Plan, human resource policies and culture framework.

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Supporting our staff through the global COVID-19 Pandemic

In response to the declaration of a global pandemic by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020 the ASC enacted its Business Continuity and Pandemic Plans.

The ASC’s Business Continuity Plan (BCP) provides a timely and coordinated response to emergencies and business impact events for ASC employees, contractors, athletes and support staff and members of the public at the AIS Bruce Campus, State Offices and the European Training Centre in Italy.

Enacted as part of the BCP, the ASC’s Pandemic Plan (PP):

> Assisted in reducing the impacts of a pandemic on the site, its staff and users.

> Raised awareness and promoted preventative measures.

> Provided support throughout the duration of the pandemic.

> Ensured response activities were consistent with wider government and community responses.

Following enactment of the PP the Pandemic Sub-Committee was convened to provide a coordinated response to all Pandemic related risks across the organisation. Multiple activities were implemented to support the ASC workforce during COVID-19 including:

> Flexible working arrangements supported by ICT technology which enabled the workforce to quickly transition to work from home.

> Dedicated online COVID-19 resource centre providing guidance and support materials e.g. leave arrangements, health assessment forms, return to work matrix.

> An online form completed by staff to capture their weekly working arrangements e.g. on site, at home.

> Periodical wellbeing staff surveys.

> Webinars and training materials.

> Weekly enterprise-wide communications.

> Mobility program to mobilise the workforce to meet changing needs, internally or as part of the Australian Public Service mobility program.

> Contribution to broader Government strategies.

The ASC’s Pandemic Sub-Committee continues to monitor Government messages and directions and continues to develop guidance material for staff consistent with advice from the Australian Government Department of Health.

From 1 July 2018 the ASC became a participating institution in the National Redress Scheme.

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Table 11: Employee classification by gender

Classification Female (%) Male (%)

Executive 20 80

ASC 8 42 58

ASC 7 49 51

ASC 6 46 54

ASC 5 55 45

ASC 4 63 37

ASC 3 38 62

ASC 2 47 53

ASC 1 50 50

Total 50 50

Table 12: ASC employee age breakdown*

Under 30 13%

30-39 34%

40-49 34%

50-59 14%

60+ 5%

Table 13: Years of service*

0-6 months 6%

7-12 months 12%

1-2 years 21%

2-5 years 16%

5-10 years 17%

10-15 years 13%

15+ years 15%

*FTE employees excluding Board, casual, coach, postgraduate or locally engaged

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Mandatory Tables — PGPA Rule Section 17BE (ka) — Management of Human Resources Table 14: All ongoing employees current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW - - - 3 - 3 - - - 3

Qld - - - - - - - - - -

SA - - - - - - - - - -

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 6 - 6 6 1 7 - - - 13

WA - - - - - - - - - -

ACT 119 5 124 110 15 125 - - - 249

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

TOTAL 125 5 130 119 16 135 - - - 265

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Table 15: All non-ongoing employees current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 3 - 3 - 1 1 - - - 4

Qld 2 - 2 - - - - - - 2

SA - - - - - - - - - -

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 14 - 14 6 2 8 - - - 22

WA - - - - - - - - - -

ACT 55 5 60 53 17 70 - - - 130

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas 3 - 3 1 - 1 - - - 4

TOTAL 77 5 82 60 20 80 - - - 162

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Table 16: All ongoing employees previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 1 - 1 3 - 3 - - - 4

Qld - - - - - - - - - -

SA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 4 - 4 7 - 7 - - - 11

WA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

ACT 121 5 126 110 23 133 - - - 259

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

TOTAL 126 5 131 122 23 145 - - - 276

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49

Table 17: All non-ongoing employees previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 5 - 5 - 2 2 - - - 7

Qld 4 - 4 - - - - - - 4

SA 4 - 4 1 - 1 - - - 5

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 9 1 10 7 2 9 - - - 19

WA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

ACT 52 4 56 42 14 56 - - - 112

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas 3 - 3 1 - 1 - - - 4

TOTAL 77 5 82 52 18 70 - - - 152

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Work health and safety

The ASC Work Health and Safety (WHS) Policy outlines the ASC’s commitment to providing a safe and healthy workplace for staff and visitors and our approach to the continuous improvement of health and safety. The WHS Policy and operations are overseen by the ASC Worksafe Committee.

Key initiatives during 2019-20 included:

> Continued monitoring and review of the WHS and rehabilitation management systems and performance reporting.

> Continuation of the early intervention scheme which has had a positive impact on the Comcare premium.

> Focused psychological and wellbeing support activities during the 2019-20 bushfires and global COVID-19 Pandemic.

> Continued review and updating of policies and procedures.

> Provision of education and training for First Aid Officers and Fire Wardens.

Notifiable incidents

A total of seven incidents arising from the conduct of ASC business were reported to the regulator during 2019-20. It was determined that the ASC had ensured, as far as reasonably practicable, the health and safety of workers and others, and no further action was required. No incidents occurred that required investigation in 2019-20 under Part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

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51

Reconciliation Action Plan

The ASC’s Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) was endorsed by Reconciliation Australia in February 2019. The ASC continued to develop and grow its RAP capabilities, with the support of Reconciliation Australia, as a tool to help the organisation build positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. The RAP is a practical plan built on relationships, respect and opportunities. During 2019-20 the ASC has been working towards the next stage with plans for an Innovate RAP for 2020-21.

The ASC continues to commit to the Australian Government’s goal to make significant and measurable improvements in Indigenous health and wellbeing and understands that sport plays an important role in achieving this goal. As outlined in our current RAP, the ASC is working to increase the involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in sport through our programs and services.

Key RAP activities for 2019-20

> Promoted and celebrated NAIDOC Week 2019.

> Developed and conducted online activities for National Reconciliation Week 2020 due to COVID-19 which involved more than 90 staff.

> Developed and delivered cultural awareness training for ASC staff.

> Continued to promote the Yulunga Traditional Indigenous Games, which were downloaded 80,000 Times. Produced and distributed new videos featuring the games.

> Provided pro-bono activities for Indigenous organisations.

> Held a book sale with donations going to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation.

> Became a member of Supply Nation and sought to increase our procurement through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses.

> Created physical and digital exhibits to promote the story of Indigenous sport achievement in the AIS Visitor Centre.

> Promoted education and awareness raising on Indigenous history and culture through ASC staff networks.

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Corporate partners

The ASC has a strong history of successful commercial partnerships with a range of high-profile Australian consumer brands. Most of these partnerships are built on two key elements:

> Brand endorsement — the opportunity to leverage the power of the AIS brand to endorse consumer products

> Product validation — testing provided by the AIS research team, to enhance ongoing product development and validate product claims.

The ASC is delighted to partner with organisations who share a similar passion for sport and a commitment to driving innovation and excellence.

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Our operations

Operational highlight — AIS Childcare Centre

Top Rating for AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre — Exceeding National Quality

The AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre has maintained its Excellent rating under the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education, which is the highest national standard that a childcare service can achieve under the framework.

The centre is one of 42 education and care services which have the Excellent rating nationwide.

The Centre completed a Compliance Audit in 2019 and all audit requirements were met.

The AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre is a work-based service offering care for children aged under five. The service is available to parents employed at the ASC and NSO staff and athletes who work on site.

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tour participants

93,000

visits to the AIS

campus in Bruce

total event

tickets sold

403,000 27,000

SITE SIZE > 65 HECTARES

38 number

of buildings

and venues

Bruce > 35 Yarralumla > 1 Pizzey Park > 1

ETC > 1

NSOS ON SITE

19 16 > Bruce 1 > Yarralumla 1 > Pizzey Park

1 > ETC

62,000 total number of bed nights

INCLUDING 37,000 HIGH PERFORMANCE BED NIGHTS

customer

satisfaction

86%

The number of visitors to the AIS Site has been impacted by the global Covid-19 Pandemic during this reporting period.

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Site management

The ASC operates facilities, residential services and other activities for high-performance programs at the AIS Canberra campus. The campus is also used by a variety of community, sporting and commercial groups and is a popular national attraction for visitors. The ASC also operates strategic sports training facilities at Pizzey Park (Gold Coast) and at Varese in Italy and operates from leased premises in Melbourne and Sydney.

In 2019-20, the ASC continued to work with Government to develop options for new infrastructure to ensure that the AIS can meet its obligations under the NHPSS to lead the high-performance system to be a source of Australian sporting pride, inspiration and international success. The modernisation of the AIS project was included within the Infrastructure Australia National Priority Initiative in 2020. This is independent validation by a Government infrastructure advisory body of the need for further investment in infrastructure and technology to ensure that the AIS becomes a world-leader again in sport and will inspire generations of Australians in the future.

Site operations continued to operate in increasingly ageing facilities with a focus on safety, compliance and meeting high-performance sport outcomes. Critical infrastructure decision-making is being considered in conjunction with the likely long-term functionality of each of the assets. In 2019-20, the ASC undertook several key facility refurbishment projects in line with our strategic direction, including:

Completed projects:

> Procurement and engagement of contractors for the replacement of mechanical systems for the Testing and Training Pool/Recovery Centre and Multi Sports Hall and Visitor Centre, with construction work leading up to the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games.

> Large LED lighting upgrade program to facilities.

> Aluminium composite panels to the facade of the Residence of Champions.

> Replacement of lift in the Administration Spine building.

> Detailed design and procurement for new amenities for the basketball centre and engagement of contractor.

Commenced Projects:

> Upgrade of air handling units in the Residence of Champions.

> Completed detailed design and procurement for replacement of AIS rowing amenities to fit-for-purpose standards and construction commenced.

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Gas consumption (GJ)

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

40,000

50,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0

Electricity consumption (kWh)

2010-11 2009-10 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

10,000,000

8,000,000

6,000,000

2,000,000

4,000,000

0

Water consumption (KL)

2010-11 2009-10 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

100,000

120,000

80,000

60,000

20,000

40,000

0

Note that icon water only estimated water consumption from 2014-2016, with actual water readings resuming on 1 January 2017.

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Environment and heritage

The ASC Environmental Management System is based on the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems (ISO 1401:2004). It comprises policy objectives, targets and procedures for monitoring and review. A fundamental goal of the ASC’s Environmental Policy is to comply with Australian Government environmental policies, initiatives and legislative requirements.

During 2019-20, the ASC continued to monitor its energy and water usage and implemented specific environmental initiatives. Key activities included:

> Continued LED lighting upgrades as part of project work or end of life replacement, to install energy efficient LED light fittings and improve lighting controls.

> Continued monitoring of water, gas and electricity usage.

> Continued identification as an accredited recycler by ACTSmart.

> Ongoing operation of the organic waste recycling program, which is breaking down 1,000kg of waste per week across four worm farms.

> Improved waste infrastructure to assist in waste segregation and minimise contamination of waste streams.

> Introduction of E-Waste and battery hazardous waste to the Sport Australia/AIS waste streams.

> Continued staff and visitor waste education to highlight the high volume diversion of waste through nine waste streams, with overall waste to landfill now at 29.7 per cent.

The ASC continued to enhance its capability to identify and manage its buildings and artefacts of heritage or cultural significance. In 2019-20, the ASC:

> Continued operation of the Heritage and Culture Committee to oversee the ASC’s heritage commitments.

> Continued to review and add items to the ASC Heritage Collection.

> Continued publishing the online history of AIS scholarship holders.

> Held a Remembrance Day presentation of the historical Kings Cup for rowing, as well as adding a copy of the history of the Kings Cup to the heritage collection.

> Held a multi-sports day to celebrate Indigenous culture and reconciliation under the Reconciliation Action Plan.

> Carried out maintenance on the statues and static displays.

No property with heritage value was acquired or disposed of during 2019-20.

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Authority and directions

Enabling legislation

The ASC’s enabling legislation is the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 (ASC Act), which defines the Commission’s role, corporate governance and financial management framework. As a corporate Commonwealth entity, the ASC is accountable to the Minister for Sport.

The ASC’s delivery of its outcomes is guided by its governance framework. This framework includes the ASC’s enabling legislation and other legislative instruments, managerial and organisational structures, corporate policies and strategies, and resource management practices.

The objects of the ASC are set out in section 6 of the ASC Act. They are:

(a) to provide leadership in the development of sport in Australia

(b) to encourage increased participation and improved performance by Australians in sport

(c) to provide resources, services and facilities to enable Australians to pursue and achieve excellence in sport while also furthering their educational and vocational skills and other aspects of their personal development

(d) to improve the sporting abilities of Australians generally through the improvement of the standards of sports coaches

(e) to foster cooperation in sport between Australia and other countries through the provision of access to resources, services and facilities related to sport

(f) to encourage the private sector to contribute to the funding of sport to supplement assistance by the Commonwealth.

The functions of the ASC are set out in section 7 of the ASC Act. They are:

(a) to advise the Minister in relation to the development of sport

(b) to coordinate activities in Australia for the development of sport

(c) to develop and implement programmes that promote equality of access to, and participation in, sport by all Australians

(d) to develop and implement programmes for the recognition and development of:

(i) persons who excel, or who have the potential to excel, in sport

(ii) persons who have achieved, or have the potential to achieve, standards of excellence as sports coaches, umpires, referees or officials essential to the conduct of sport

(e) to initiate, encourage and facilitate research and development in relation to sport

(f) to undertake research and development related to sports science and sports medicine

(g) to provide sports medicine services and sports sciences services to persons participating in programmes of the Commission

(h) to establish, manage and maintain facilities for the purpose of the Commission

(j) to collect and distribute information, and provide advice, on matters related to the activities of the Commission

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(k) for the purpose of fostering cooperation in sport between Australia and other countries, to provide access to persons from other countries to the resources, services and facilities of the Commission

(m) to raise money through the Australian Sports Foundation, or by other means, for the purpose of the Commission

(n) to administer and expend money appropriated by the Parliament, or raised in accordance with paragraph (m), for the purpose of the Commission

(p) to consult and cooperate with appropriate authorities of the Commonwealth, of the states and of the territories, and with other persons, associations and organisations in matters related to the activities of the Commission

(q) to provide advice on matters related to sport to the Australian Olympic Federation or other persons, bodies or associations

(r) to cooperate with national and international sporting organisations in aiming to foster a sporting environment that is free from the unsanctioned use of performance enhancing drugs and doping methods.

Ministerial direction

For the 2019-20 reporting period Senator the Hon. Richard Colbeck was the Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians, Minister for Youth and Sport.

No directions under ASC subsection 11(1) of the ASC Act were made during the reporting period.

No government policy orders were issued to the ASC under section 22 of the PGPA Act during the reporting period.

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Board and committees

The ASC Board is the accountable authority under the PGPA Act. The ASC Act provides for between eight and 13 members, appointed by the responsible Minister, and the Secretary of the Department embracing the Federal Sport portfolio.

At the commencement of the year the Board comprised 13 members, including the ex-officio member. The ex-officio member position was held by Ms Glenys Beauchamp until her retirement from the role of the Secretary of the Department of Health in February 2020. Ms Caroline Edwards was her successor as the ex-officio member for remainder of the financial year.

Vale Andrea Mitchell

A Board member since 2017, Ms Mitchell showed a passion for sport and physical activity throughout her life and helped enrich it at all levels with her service.

Ms Mitchell made a long and outstanding contribution to sport, in particular to her great love, tennis. An Australian Sports Medal in 2000 recognised her service to, and leadership of the sport as President of Tennis West from 1996-2008, as a Director of Tennis Australia from 1997-2008 and as a Director of the Hopman Cup.

Ms Mitchell was the first female President of Tennis West and the first woman to attend a Tennis Australia Board Meeting in a representative capacity. The ASC has long advocated for the increasing recognition of women in all roles across sport, but it is leaders like Ms Mitchell who have truly set this foundation.

Her service to sport reflected her lifelong commitment to the community, for which she was widely admired. The ASC Board extends our deepest condolences to Ms Mitchell’s family and loved ones; her passing is a great loss for Australian sport.

Board members

John Wylie am — Chair

John Wylie is Principal of investment firm Tanarra Group and his previous business roles include CEO of global financial services firm Lazard, co-founder of advisory and investment firm Carnegie Wylie & Company, and Chair of investment bank Credit Suisse First Boston in Australia. 

In addition to his role as Chair of Sport Australia, he is President of the Library Board of Victoria. Previous not-for-profit roles include being a Trustee of the Rhodes Trust at Oxford University and Chairman of the Melbourne Cricket Ground Trust.

Mr Wylie holds a Master of Philosophy degree from Oxford University where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a Bachelor of Commerce with First Class Honours from the University of Queensland. He was made a member of the Order of Australia in 2007.

Mr Wylie was appointed Chair of the ASC Board in September 2012.

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Stephen Moneghetti am — Deputy Chair

Steve Moneghetti served as Chair of the Board of the Victorian Institute of Sport from 2001 to 2010 and chaired the Victorian state review into physical and sport education in schools — also known as the Moneghetti Report. Mr Moneghetti was Mayor of the Commonwealth Games Village at the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, and the Australian Team’s Chef de Mission for the Delhi 2010, Glasgow 2014 and Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. He was recently appointed to the Board of Commonwealth Games Australia; is active in the corporate community and runs a sports consultancy and coaching business.

Mr Moneghetti represented Australia at four Commonwealth Games, winning gold (1994), silver (1990) and two bronze (1986 and 1998) medals; and achieved three top-10 finishes in his four appearances at the Olympic Games (1988, 1992, 1996 and 2000). He also attended six World Athletics Championships, winning a bronze medal in the marathon event in Athens in 1997.

Mr Moneghetti received an Australian Sports Medal in 2000 and a Centenary Medal in 2001. In 2014 he was awarded an Order of Australia medal for significant service to athletics as a marathon runner, administrator and mentor to young athletes.

Mr Moneghetti was appointed to the Board in June 2015 and in December 2018 was appointed as the Deputy Chair for a period of three years. He also is a member of the Governance and Executive Performance Committee.

Gabrielle Trainor ao

Gabrielle Trainor was a founding member of the Greater Western Sydney Giants and was appointed an AFL Commissioner in 2016.

A former lawyer, journalist and public sector executive, Ms Trainor has served on boards in the public and private sectors for more than 20 years across areas such as sports, infrastructure, urban development, public transport, tourism, construction, arts and culture, Indigenous advancement and welfare.

Ms Trainor was appointed to the ASC Board in October 2017 and in August 2018 appointed as a member of the Governance and Executive Performance Committee.

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Andrew Plympton am

Andrew Plympton has held senior positions in the insurance and risk sector and in recent years has been active as Chair/Director of nine ASX listed companies. Andrew also held a number of positions in sport administration, including chairman/president of Australian Football League club St Kilda for eight years before retiring in 2000. He was the president of Yachting Australia for more than seven years and was elected to the Australian Olympic Committee in 2008. He was a director of the Australian Olympic Foundation Limited and Chair of the Audit Committee.

Andrew Plympton has a lifelong passion for sport, particularly sailing, where he has been competing at the highest level for more than 45 years. He has won a world championship and numerous national and state titles in international classes and ocean-racing yachts.

Mr Plympton was appointed to the ASC Board in January 2011 and is the Chair of the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee.

Jennifer Morris oam

Jennifer Morris is the National Director of Strategy for Cannings Purple, one of Australia’s leading fully integrated strategic communications consultancies and is a non-executive Director of the Fortescue Metals Group; where she chairs the Remuneration and People Committee and is a member of the Audit and Risk Management Committee.

Prior to joining Cannings Purple, Ms Morris was a consulting partner at Deloitte, and the CEO of the Minderoo Foundation’s global initiative against slavery, Walk Free. Minderoo is the private philanthropic foundation of Andrew and Nicola Forrest.

Ms Morris has key experience in advising government entities and corporations on strategy development, governance controls, complex large-scale business transformation, the embedding of ESG (environment, social and governance) related policies and the understanding of high-performance environments.

A former member of the Australian Women’s Hockey Team, Ms Morris won Olympic gold medals at the Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. In 1997, she was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM).

Ms Morris is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a Fellow of Leadership WA and a member of the Vice Chancellor’s List, Curtin University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Psychology and Journalism) received with Distinction and has completed Finance for Executives at INSEAD.

Ms Morris was appointed to the ASC Board in June 2015.

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The Hon. Pat Farmer am

Pat Farmer served eight years as the Federal Member for Macarthur; with three years as Parliamentary Secretary for Education, Science and Training and two years as Shadow Minister for Sport and Youth.

Mr Farmer is a multiple world record holder for endurance running. He has run from the North Pole to the South Pole, around Australia and across New Zealand, Vietnam, The Middle East, India, Uganda and North America.

Winner of Achiever of the Year (2000) and Adventurer of the Year (2012), Mr Farmer was also awarded the AM, Order of Australia for significant service to the community through fundraising support for charitable organisations, to ultramarathon running and to the Australian parliament.

Mr Farmer was appointed to the board in November 2014.

Pippa Downes

Pippa Downes is a respected Non-Executive Director with more than 25 years of distinguished career achievements in the international business and finance sector. Ms Downes sits on the board of the Australian Technology Innovators (Infotrack, LEAP legal software), ALE Property Group and Ingenia Communities Group.

Ms Downes has had a successful international banking and finance career and has led the local derivative and investment arms of several of the world’s premier investment banks. Her most recent role was as a Managing Director and Equity Partner of Goldman Sachs in Australia. She is a former Director of Windlab Limited, the ASX Clearing and Settlement companies, and the Sydney Olympic Park Authority. Ms Downes is also a former member of the ASX Disciplinary Tribunal; and a former Director of Swimming Australia and the Swimming Australia Foundation.

Ms Downes is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and Women Corporate Directors and in 2016 was named as one of the Westpac/ Australian Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence for her work in diversity. She holds a Master of Applied Finance from Macquarie University and Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) from University of California, Berkeley.

Ms Downes was a dual international athlete having been a member of the Australian swim team and represented Hong Kong at the International Rugby Sevens.

Ms Downes commenced as a Commissioner of the Board in December 2018 and was appointed to the Finance Audit and Risk Committee in February 2019.

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Kurt Fearnley ao

Kurt Fearnley is a board member of the Australian Paralympic Committee, Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation and member of the International Paralympic Committee’s Athlete Advisory Council.

Mr Fearnley is an icon and advocate for people with disabilities in sport and the broader community. He is a three-time Paralympic gold medallist and two-time Commonwealth Games gold medallist. His incredible athletics career for Australia spanned five Paralympic Games campaigns, culminating with his wheelchair marathon victory at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. He has won more than 40 marathons, including New York, Chicago and London, and is the 2019 NSW Australian of the Year. In 2009, he crawled the Kokoda track in Papua New Guinea to raise awareness of men’s health.

He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2018, and the same year received an Honorary Doctorate from Griffith University for his contribution to sport and disability advocacy. He has a Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Human Movement from Charles Sturt University.

Mr Fearnley commenced as a Commissioner of the Board in December 2018.

Andrew Ireland

Andrew Ireland is a former AFL player and former highly successful football administrator who was involved with several premierships throughout his career.

Mr Ireland joined the Sydney Swans in 2002 as General Manager of Football before taking over as CEO in September 2009, a role he held until his retirement in December 2018. During his time at the Swans he oversaw a strong and successful football program, along with outstanding growth in commercial areas of the club. Prior to these positions, he held the role of CEO at the Brisbane Bears and Brisbane Lions between 1990 and 2001.

Mr Ireland holds a Bachelor of Science, is a Graduate Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a Life Member of the AFL, the Sydney Swans and the Brisbane Lions.

Mr Ireland was appointed as Commissioner of the ASC in December 2018 and is a member of the Finance Audit and Risk Committee.

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Amanda Laing

Amanda Laing is currently the Chief Commercial Officer of Foxtel and is an experienced media executive who has worked across free to air television, subscription television, print, digital and video on demand. Throughout her career Ms Laing has advised Boards on a broad variety of legal, regulatory and commercial issues and held Board positions with media companies and industry bodies. Her particular expertise is in the management and exploitation of content and rights, the structuring and negotiation of sports rights deals, and media mergers and acquisitions.

Ms Laing began her media career as General Counsel for ACP Magazines, with responsibility for the legal affairs of its businesses in Australia, New Zealand, South East Asia and the United Kingdom. She was then Group General Counsel across the magazine, television, digital, ticketing and events businesses of Nine Entertainment. Following the listing of the Nine business on the Australian Stock Exchange, Ms Laing was appointed Commercial Director and then Managing Director of Nine Entertainment Co. (owner of Channel 9). She was also on the Board of Nine’s subscription video on demand business, Stan and was a member of the Australian Rugby League Commission until March 2020.

Ms Laing commenced as a Commissioner of the ASC Board on 13 December 2018.

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty

Hugh Delahunty is a former AFL player and politician with extensive experience in board governance, sport policy, and professional and grassroots sport. Mr Delahunty was elected a Member of the Victorian State Parliament from 1999 to 2014 and served as Minister for Sport and Recreation and Minister for Veterans’ Affairs.

Hugh served on the board of VicHealth from 2003 to 2010 and has a wide variety of experience and knowledge regarding regional and rural issues. As Chairman of Commissioners at Mildura Rural City Council in 1995 and 1996 he oversaw the amalgamation of three councils and was the first mayor of the restructured Horsham Rural City Council.

Mr Delahunty played for Essendon in the Victorian Football League in the 1970s and has played and coached sports including football, basketball, tennis, swimming and golf.

Mr Delahunty was appointed to the ASC Board in May 2019.

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Glenys Beauchamp psm — Ex Officio

Glenys Beauchamp has had an extensive career in the Australian Public Service at senior levels and delivered a number of significant government programs covering the areas of economic and social policy. Ms Beauchamp was appointed Secretary of the Department of Health in September 2017.

Prior to her current role, Ms Beauchamp was Secretary, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science (2013-17) and Secretary of the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport (2010-13). She has served as Deputy Secretary in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (2009-10) and the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (2002-2009). Ms Beauchamp has held a number of executive positions in the ACT Government including, Deputy Chief Executive, Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services and Deputy CEO, Department of Health. She also held senior positions in housing, energy and utilities functions with the ACT Government.

Ms Beauchamp received a Public Service Medal in 2010 for coordinating Australian Government support during the 2009 Victorian bushfires, and has an economics degree from the Australian National University and an MBA from the University of Canberra.

Ms Beauchamp was appointed as the ASC Board ex-offico member until her retirement from the role of the Secretary of the Department of Health in February 2020.

Caroline Edwards

Caroline Edwards was recalled from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet in response to the COVD19 pandemic to act as Secretary, Department of Health, from 24 February to 12 July 2020. On 10 August Caroline commenced as Associate Secretary, Department of Health. As the Associate Secretary, Ms Edwards has responsibility for whole of portfolio strategic policy and relations, health economics and medical research, sport and the strategic and corporate operations of the Department.  

Ms Edwards was previously the Deputy Secretary of Health Systems Policy and Primary Care Group, responsible for strategic matters across the portfolio, including hospital funding, medical research, international engagement and Commonwealth-state relations on health matters. She was also responsible for leading the Department’s work on policies relating to mental health, primary care, health economics and research, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Before joining the Department in 2017, Ms Edwards held a range of senior Australian Public Service strategic social policy roles, including Deputy Secretary at the then Department of Human Services, Chief Advisor in the International Tax Division at the Treasury and several years located in the Northern Territory focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs.

Ms Edwards holds a Bachelor of Laws with first class Honours from Monash University and was appointed as the ASC Board ex-officio member in March 2020.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 OUR ORGANISATION

Board activity

The role of the ASC Board is to guide the strategic direction of the ASC, influence the development of its policies and make decisions regarding the overall management of its activities. Over the course of the year the Board fulfilled a range of governance and compliance responsibilities including; endorsement of the ASC’s Financial and Performance Statements, the Corporate Plan and the Annual Report.

The Board had oversight of several significant administrative matters throughout the year. It welcomed the Functional Efficiency Review as an opportunity to consider the scope of the ASC’s activities and their alignment with achieving government policy, and to identify opportunities for efficiencies and streamlining of processes. The Board provided guidance in response to the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) Audit report Award of Funding under the Community Sport Infrastructure Grants Program, and supported recommendations to strengthen a range of ASC policies, procedures, and decision-making processes. The Board also supported significant advancements to ICT systems and cyber security protocols to address current and future IT vulnerabilities.

As part of its commitment to the sustainable future of the AIS, the Board continued to support the development of the Detailed Business Case to present options for new functionality and infrastructure. This work assists the AIS to deliver its role; and supports best outcomes for athletes and sport in Australia for the longer term.

The Board also focussed its efforts on leading a united and collaborative high-performance sport system through the National High-Performance Sport Strategy 2024. The Board played an integral role in supporting the ongoing work of the AIS to secure high-performance funding and re-prioritising budgets to secure support for sports and athletes through to the postponed 2021 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. In the context of the delay to the Olympics, the Board continued their support for the extensive work around athlete wellbeing and engagement through the expansion of the MHRN, new initiatives in professional pathway learning and opportunities for sporting champions to positively influence the community.

In unprecedented times with the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Board focussed on supporting the sporting sector and athletes with their return to sport through best practice information and toolkits in the form of the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment and the National Principles for the resumption of sport. The pandemic highlighted the importance of modernising traditional governance structures within sports and the Board continued to advocate for and support sports to build and implement sustainable and efficient structures.

With a view to driving greater engagement and participation in sport across Australia, the Board continued to explore options for an enhanced Sporting Schools program that delivers sustainable outcomes for all children and to focus on organised sport with measurable transitions to community-based club sport.

The Board met on eight occasions in the 2019-2020 period and held a strategy session in April 2020.

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Table 18: ASC Board meeting attendance

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend* Meetings attended

John Wylie AM Chair 8 8

Stephen Moneghetti AM Deputy Chair 8 8

Gabrielle Trainor AO Member 8 5

Andrew Plympton Member 8 8

Jennifer Morris OAM Member 8 6

The Hon. Pat Farmer AM Member 8 8

Pippa Downes Member 8 8

Kurt Fearnley AO Member 8 7

Andrew Ireland Member 8 8

Amanda Laing Member 8 8

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty Member 8 7

Andrea Mitchell Member 7 7

Glenys Beauchamp PSM (or proxy) Ex-officio 5 4

Caroline Edwards (or proxy) Ex-officio 3 1

*Includes the April 2020 strategy session.

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Table 19: Mandatory Table — PGPA Rule Section 17BE (j),(i)-(v) — Accountable Authority, details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period current report period (2019-20) 

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Name

Qualifications of the Accountable Authority

Experience of the Accountable Authority

Position Title/ Position held Executive/ Non-Executive

Date of Commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of accountable authority attended

John Wylie AM Master of Philosophy, Oxford University

Bachelor of Commerce, First Class Honours, University of Queensland 

See page 60 Chair 10/09/2012 N/A 8

Steve Moneghetti AM Bachelor of Engineering, Federation University

Diploma Education (Maths/Science), Federation University 

See page 61 Deputy Chair 22/06/2015 N/A 8

Gabrielle Trainor AO LLB (Melb)

MA (Cultural and Creative Practice), WSU

Admitted barrister and solicitor, Supreme Court of Victoria 1979, FAICD.

See page 61 Board Member 5/10/2017 N/A 5

Andrew Plympton AM See page 62 Board Member 18/01/2011 N/A 8

Jennifer Morris OAM Bachelor of Arts (Psychology and Journalism) with Distinction, Curtin University of Technology

Finance for Executives, INSEAD Fontainbleau, France

See page 62 Board Member 22/06/2015 N/A 6

The Hon Pat Farmer AM Executive Master of Business, University of Technology, Sydney 2018

Certificate 4 in Fitness Training, Australian Institute of Fitness, 2016

Mechanical Engineer, Granville TAFE, 1983

See page 63 Board Member 7/11/2014 N/A 8

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Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Name

Qualifications of the Accountable Authority

Experience of the Accountable Authority

Position Title/ Position held Executive/ Non-Executive

Date of Commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of accountable authority attended

Pippa Downes Masters Applied Finance, Macquarie University

Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) University of California, Berkeley.

See page 63 Board Member 13/12/2018 N/A 8

Kurt Fearnley AO Honorary Doctorate, Griffith University

Bachelor of Education, Charles Sturt University.

Bachelor of Human Movement, Charles Sturt University

See page 64 Board Member 13/12/2018 N/A 7

Andrew Ireland Bachelor of Science, La Trobe University Melbourne. See page 64 Board Member 13/12/2018 N/A 8

Amanda Laing Stanford Executive Program, Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Company Directors Course, Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Legal Practicing Certificate, College of Law.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Laws (First Class Hons). Australian National University

See page 65 Board Member 13/12/2018 N/A 8

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty See page 65 Board Member 3/5/2019 N/A 7

Andrea Mitchell Bachelor Physical Education, UWA

Diploma Education, UWA

Fellow Australian institute of Company Directors

See page 60 Board Member 15/11/2017 3/04/2020 7

Glenys Beauchamp PSM Bachelor of Economics, Australian National University

MBA, University of Canberra

See page 66 Ex-officio 18 /9/2017 February 2020 4

Ms Caroline Edwards Bachelor of Laws with first class Honours, Monash University See page 66 Ex-officio 1/3/2020 N/A 1

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Finance, Audit and Risk Committee

The ASC Finance, Audit and Risk Committee (FAR Committee) provides independent advice and assurance to the Board on matters relating to: ASC financial management and strategic planning, efficiency, physical assets, risk management, all aspects of internal and external audit, compliance matters, NSO finances.

During the reporting period the Committee, chaired by Andrew Plympton, continued to focus on: reviewing and reporting on NSO finances, reviewing the ASC’s financial statements, reviewing the appropriateness of the ASC’s annual performance statements, monitoring the ASC’s PGPA Act legislative compliance, risk management, cyber security, oversight of the ASC’s capital and infrastructure projects, the Child Safety Implementation Plan, the AIS site strategy, overseeing the internal audit and ANAO audit programs.

Mr Robert Dalton, Independent Member, attended his last Committee meeting in December 2019. The FAR Committee met formally on seven occasions during 2019-20.

Table 20: ASC Finance, Audit and Risk Committee meeting attendance PGPA rule section Mandatory Table: 17BE(taa) — Audit Committee

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend Meetings attended

Andrew Plympton Chair 7 7

Andrew Ireland Member 7 7

Pippa Downes Member 7 7

Robert Dalton Independent Member 4 4

For total annual remuneration of Audit Committee members see Table 22.

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Governance and Executive Performance Committee

The ASC Governance and Executive Performance Committee (GEP Committee) provides independent advice to the Board on better practice corporate governance for the ASC and NSOs, and on executive performance and remuneration issues.

During the reporting period the GEP Committee:

> managed the Sport Australia CEO and AIS CEO performance reviews

> oversaw the approach to the ASC’s cultural and learning development initiatives including; the launch of a new culture framework and program, a refreshed learning and leadership program and new performance management system

> advanced governance reform adoption and implementation for NSOs and guided NSO organisational development projects including a remodelled, world leading, Sports Governance Framework

> provided guidance and assistance to NSOs to stabilise their organisations in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic

> continued to monitor the Board and ASC senior management conflict of interest process and endorsed updated guidelines and strengthening of internal processes.

The GEP Committee met formally on five occasions in 2019-20.

Table 21: ASC Governance and Executive Performance Committee meeting attendance

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend Meetings attended

John Wylie AM Chair 5 5

Jennifer Morris OAM Member 5 3

Steve Moneghetti AM Member 5 5

Gabrielle Trainor Member 5 4

Executive remuneration

Key Management Personnel (KMP) include members of the ASC Board, the CEO of Sport Australia, and the CEO of the AIS.

In accordance with Section 17 of the ASC Act, remuneration for KMP is set through Determinations issued by the Remuneration Tribunal*. Salary increases within the reference rates set by the Remuneration Tribunal for the Chief Executive Officer Sport Australia and Chief Executive Officer AIS are set by the GEP Committee.

The Chief Executive Officer Sport Australia and Chief Executive Officer AIS determine remuneration for Deputy General Managers and General Managers through common law contracts that mirror standard terms and conditions in the ASC Enterprise Agreement and in accordance with the ASC salary classification band.

*The Remuneration Tribunal is the independent statutory body that handles the remuneration of key commonwealth offices.

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Table 22: Mandatory Table — PGPA Rule Section 17 BE (ta) — Executive remuneration — Information about remuneration for key management personnel

Short-term

benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service

leave

Other

long-term benefits

John Wylie AM Chair 94,951 - - 8,951 - - - 103,902

Stephen Moneghetti AM Deputy Chair 71,213 - - 6,714 - - - 77,927

Gabrielle Trainor AO Board Member 47,475 - - 4,476 - - -  51,951

Andrew Plympton AM Board Member 47,475 - - 6,026 - - - 53,501

Jennifer Morris OAM Board Member 47,475 - - 4,476 - - - 51,951

The Hon. Patrick Farmer AM Board Member 46,026 - - 4,338 - - - 50,364

Pippa Downes Board Member 47,475 - - 5,251 - - - 52,726

Kurt Fearnley AO Board Member 47,475 - - 4,476 - - - 51,951

Andrew Ireland Board Member 47,475 - - 6,053 - - - 53,528

Amanda Laing Board Member 47,475 - - 4,476 - - - 51,951

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty Board Member 40,636 - - 3,826 - - - 44,462

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Short-term

benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service

leave

Other

long-term benefits

Andrea Mitchell Board Member 36,964 - - 4,013 - - - 40,977

Kate Palmer CEO Sport Australia 229,917 - - 12,925 21,612 - - 264,454

Robert Dalton CEO Sport Australia 173,933 - 5,981 8,886 1,939 - - 190,738

Peter Conde CEO AIS 357,392 - 33,461 25,000 12,716 - - 428,569

Total 1,383,360 - 39,442 109,885 36,267 - - 1,568,954

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Table 23: Mandatory Table: Information about remuneration for senior executives  

Short-term

benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number

of Senior Executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average

superannuation contributions

Average long service leave Average other long-term benefits

Average

termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0-$220,000 5 66,375 - - 6,424 5,628 - 3,319 81,746

$220,001-$245,000 6 203,068 - - 27,821 6,218 - - 237,107

$245,001-$270,000 2  218,107 - - 35,041 6,684 - - 259,832

 $270,001-$295,000 5  236,682 - - 33,108 6,885 - -  276,674

 $295,001-$320,000 2  233,604 - -  19,048  7,701 -  55,029  315,382

 $320,001-$345,000 3 231,337 - - 21,672  9,477 -  79,050  341,536

Table 24: Mandatory table: Information about Remuneration for Other Highly Paid Staff 

Short-term

benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number

of Senior Executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average

superannuation contributions

Average long service leave Average other long-term benefits

Average

termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$245,001-$270,000 1 205,270 - - 37,643 7,633 - - 250,546

$320,001-$345,000 1 271,010 - - 41,259 12,984 - - 325,253

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Governance

Planning and accountability

The ASC’s planning and accountability approach supports the organisation to effectively deliver outcomes and meet legislative responsibilities as set out in the PGPA Act and the ASC Act.  

The ASC planning and reporting framework is based on the principle of continuous improvement and the requirements set out in the PGPA Act and ASC Act. Key elements of the ASC planning and reporting framework include the annual cycle of planning, an enterprise-wide approach to performance reporting and annual external reporting through the Annual Performance Statements.  

The Corporate Plan is our primary planning document and covers a rolling four-year period. This is complemented by the Portfolio Budget Statements, division planning and the employee performance management framework.  

Reporting against progress and performance measures occurs internally and externally. Reporting allows the Board, management and staff to monitor progress towards achieving our organisational objectives, the range of work delivered and impacts for the Australian public. Internal reporting, including Board and Executive-level dashboards, bring together relevant organisational performance results, operational data and organisational health and financial information. These reports are designed to aid in decision-making and provide an enterprise-level view of performance. External reporting is addressed through the Annual Performance Statements and the Annual Report.

Risk management

The ASC Risk Management Framework is consistent with the principles of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and PGPA Rule (2014), the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy and is based on current best practice. Our Strategic Risk Register has been informed by our Risk Appetite Statement which identifies the risk trade-offs to implement our strategic objectives and helps us to understand what constitutes acceptable risk taking when assessing opportunities. 

Through the FAR Committee and our internal audit program, the ASC is committed to the effective identification, monitoring and management of risk and assisting the organisation to optimise opportunities and minimise adverse consequences. We regularly review our risk profile to identify new and emerging risks, and use the biennial Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey to monitor the performance of our risk management function against requirements. In 2019 the survey assessed our overall risk management maturity level as Advanced.  

The ASC’s approach to managing risk focuses on: managing potential impacts on the realisation of our strategic objectives, embedding risk management within our planning and reporting processes, using risk management to support decision making, and developing a risk culture where the management of risk is understood to be everyone’s responsibility. 

Risk management is included in our staff engagement survey to provide greater transparency on how risk is understood across the ASC. The results of this survey will continue to be used to inform new risk management education and awareness strategies to complement risk training currently being delivered through our Enterprise Learning and Leadership program. 

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Strategic risks Table 25: Strategic risks Risk description   Impact   Current challenges   Mitigation Strategies   Collaboration  

The ASC operating model is exposed to governance and oversight risk if internal and external collaboration is not consistently planned and managed.  

Non-compliance with the ASC Act 1989.  

Duplication of effort and inefficiencies.  

Loss of key stakeholder confidence.  

Inability to meet duty of care obligations.  

 

 

As a result of the global COVID-19 Pandemic staff have transitioned to working from home resulting in a reduction in the benefits of face-to-face collaboration with our internal workforce and external stakeholders.  

The requirement to quickly adapt to the changed work environment and embrace technology to enable virtual collaboration has caused some disruption and reduced visibility.  

ASC staff and athletes have faced many challenges through the impacts of the bushfires, hailstorms and the continuing global COVID-19 Pandemic.  

AIS site operations have been impacted due to shut down during global COVID 19 Pandemic impacting revenue streams.  

We are implementing an enhanced Customer Relationship Management System.  

We have aligned our 2020-24 Corporate Plan with the National High-Performance Sports Strategy and the Australian Government’s strategic sports plan — Sport 2030.  

Implementation of our Technology Roadmap has enabled remote working and virtual collaboration via Microsoft Teams.  

We are working with mental health partners in the development of athlete, staff and community mental health and wellbeing initiatives, and continue to promote a collaborative and connected culture through  

the SportAus behaviours  

and the SportAus Way.  

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Risk description   Impact   Current challenges   Mitigation Strategies   Sport Sector  

Our ability to identify opportunities to support and influence the sport sector impacts our efforts to engage and partner with our stakeholders.  

Unable to increase sector capability in the priority areas of:  

> Governance  

> Workforce capability  

> Integration of core tools, systems and data  

> Unable to contribute to positive outcomes for sport 

Lack of agreement and clarity of the role of the Australian Sports Commission.  

Declaration of a global COVID-19 Pandemic has brought significant challenges to the Sport Sector with some global and domestic professional competitions paused or cancelled, and some Australian community sport on hold.  

The ongoing viability of sporting organisations due to reduced community participation compounded by uncertainty around future funding support.  

 

 

 

We will continue to play a central leadership role across the broader sport sector building collaboration, alignment and effectiveness.  

We have developed the AIS Framework for Rebooting of Sport — a key resource for the sport sector to leverage during the global COVID-19 Pandemic.  

We continue to raise awareness of the importance of sport and support participation through an enhanced Sporting Schools program and promoting access to sport for all Australians.  

We continue to assist National Sporting Organisations to transition to a whole of sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams: Strategy, Workforce and Financial Management whole of sport business model.  

We continue to identify opportunities to enhance sector capability through the integration of systems/data and shared platforms.  

We continue to support National Sporting Organisations in delivering agreed participation outcomes by using insights from research and leading practices in sport that are fit for purpose in the current environment.  

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Risk description   Impact   Current challenges   Mitigation Strategies   High Performance System  

Inability to build sustainable winning systems for Australian Athletes.  

Adverse impact on the wellbeing and mental health of athletes, coaches and support staff.  

Unable to deliver on the key priorities of:  

> supporting Australian athletes to consistently win medals at major international events  

> athlete well-being  

> athletes positively influencing the Australian Community  

Funding uncertainty for Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) specific programs and programs for Talent Pathways athletes, which ceases at the end of 2020-21. These programs are critical in developing athletes for future cycles.  

Current postponement and potential cancellation of Olympic and Paralympic games to 2021 due to the global COVID-19 Pandemic.  

Restricted travel, training and competition preparation due to global COVID-19 Pandemic.  

Athlete engagement with communities is restricted due to global COVID-19 Pandemic. 

The AIS Campus is aged and no longer meets international standards.  

We will advocate with Government for the extension of the AW&E and Talent Pathways athlete funding.  

During this difficult year, this funding has enabled the AIS to:  

> extend the Mental Health Referral Network to support alumni and talent pathways athletes, high performance coaches and staff.  

> extend mental health literacy services to the high-performance sector to promote understanding of self-care and access the Mental Health Referral Network.  

> extend the Career Practitioner Referral Network to coaches and talent pathway athletes.  

We have developed the AIS Framework for Rebooting of Sport which provides guidance on returning safely to training and competition during the global COVID-19 Pandemic.  

We have enacted our Pandemic Management Plan which includes continued monitoring of AIS site operations to ensure adherence to safety protocols. 

We have developed the AIS Site Revitalisation Capital Investment Proposal and continue to work with Government developing options to ensure the AIS remains a source of pride, inspiration and international success.  

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Risk description   Impact   Current challenges   Mitigation Strategies   Reputation

Increased need to respond to media and public scrutiny impacts our capacity to deliver on strategic priorities.  

The ASC is unable to adequately plan for and respond to stakeholder and Government expectations  

Reduced capacity to deliver on strategic priorities. 

Unable to meet legislative obligations. 

Loss of key stakeholder confidence. 

Uncertainty across the organisation resulting in low staff morale and reduced ability to attract/retain high calibre staff.  

Negative stakeholder and public perception in relation to the outcomes of the Australian National Audit Office report into the Community Sports Infrastructure Grants Program.  

Implication for the ASC as a result of the renewed focus on athlete experiences at the AIS.  

We are strengthening our ability to govern and manage by embedding new systems and practices that support evidence-based decision making.  

We have implemented the recommendations of the ANAO report into the Community Sports Infrastructure Grants Program and continue to fully cooperate with external independent reviews and audits. 

We have developed a rolling program of internal audits to ensure rigour and compliance across business functions. 

We have strengthened our Conflict of Interest Policy and Guidelines.  

We have adopted the Commonwealth Child Safe Framework.  

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Internal audit

The ASC’s internal audit program provides independent, management-orientated advice on the ASC’s operations and performance. The objective of internal audit is to: 

> provide assurance to the ASC Executive and the FAR Committee that the key risks to achieving the ASC’s objectives are being appropriately mitigated and our internal controls are effective 

> assist management to continuously improve business performance. 

Throughout the year the FAR Committee maintained oversight of the implementation of open internal audit recommendations, including implementation of recommendations from the  review into child safe practices at the ASC. 

Fraud

The ASC continued to fulfil its requirements in relation to fraud control, taking all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud and to investigate, and to the extent possible, recover the proceeds of fraud against the ASC. The ASC has a documented Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes to meet the specific needs of the ASC.   

During the 2019-20 reporting period, there were no identified instances of fraud that caused a loss to the ASC. The ASC referred one external fraud attempt to the Australian Federal Police. 

Compliance

The ASC utilises a combination of self-reporting and periodic reviews to monitor and report on compliance. Any instances of non-compliance with PGPA legislation are reported to the ASC Executive and the FAR Committee. The ASC mitigates non-compliance through the publication of delegation schedules and Financial Management Instructions to support decision-making.  

For the 2019-20 reporting period, the ASC did not have any significant issues reported to the Minister for Sport or the Minister for Finance that related to non-compliance with the finance law. 

Table 26: Mandatory Table — PGPA Rule Section 17BE (h) — (i) Significant non-compliance with the Finance Law  

Description of non-compliance   Remedial Action  

 N/A

Indemnities and insurance

The ASC is insured through the Australian Government’s self-managed fund, Comcover. Insurance includes directors’ and officers’ liability cover to the extent permitted by the PGPA Act. The entire premium is paid by the ASC. In 2019-20, the ASC did not give any indemnity to either current or former officers of the ASC.

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External scrutiny

The ASC’s operations are subject to scrutiny from external bodies such as; the ANAO, the Commonwealth Ombudsman and the Australian Information Commissioner.   

Reports by the Australian National Audit Office

In 2019-20 the ANAO tabled two performance audit reports concerning the ASC. The report on the Award of Funding under the Community Sport Infrastructure Grants Program made three recommendations for Sport Australia relating to; the design of grant programs, the framework for managing conflicts of interest, and recording the reasons for grant assessment scores. The ASC has and is continuing to take action to address all recommendations. 

The report on the Implementation of ANAO and Parliamentary Committee recommendations — Health and Education portfolios made two recommendations for the ASC. The ASC is in the process of implementing these recommendations.

Reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman

In 2019-20 the Commonwealth Ombudsman did not undertake any investigations or make any decisions that involved the ASC in 2019-20.

Decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner

The Australian Information Commissioner did not make any decisions that involved the ASC in 2019-20.

Judiciary

There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals during 2019-20 that had, or may have, significant impact on the operations of the ASC.

Privacy

In 2019-20 the ASC notified the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) of a suspected privacy breach under the Notifiable Data Breaches Scheme. The ASC supplied a breach report to the OAIC at the culmination of its investigation. On 17 February 2020, the OAIC closed the incident.

Freedom of information

In 2019-20 the ASC received 61 FOI requests: 12 requests were released in full, 14 requests were released in part, 13 requests were denied, 12 requests were refused, three requests were transferred, one request was withdrawn, one request is in Information Commissioner review and five requests remain open.  

As defined by section 8(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 1982, the ASC continued to publish on its website the information required by the Information Publication Scheme. 

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83

84 84

85

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL OUTCOMES 86

Financial position 86

Asset management 86

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT 88

STATEMENT FROM THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 90

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 91

Relevant mandatory tables 123

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

85

Summary of financial outcomes

The ASC incurred an operating surplus of $37.649m in 2019-20, primarily relating to the timing of revenue associated with the Community Sport Infrastructure (CSI) grants and programs delayed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Table 27: 2019-20 results to 2018-19 and to the 2019-20 Original Budget estimates

Actual 2019-20 $m

Actual 2018-19 $m

Variance $m

Actual 2019-20 $m

Original Budget

2019-20 $m

Variance $m

Income 418.7 402.1 16.6 418.7 368.6 50.1

Expenses 381.1 442.5 (61.4) 381.1 377.6 3.5

Surplus/(Deficit) 37.6 (40.3) 77.9 37.6 (9.0) 46.6

Note: Original Budget figures are based on the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Key elements of financial statement results are primarily associated with revenue from Government and grant expenses. The increase in revenue since 2018-19 is mainly due to the new measures introduced in 2019-20, such as Athlete Wellbeing and Pathways. The overall decrease in grant expense was in large part related to decreased CSI grants.

The overall ASC performance against the Original Budget position is detailed with the Statement of Comprehensive Income in the financial statements.

Financial position

Key indicators defining the health of the ASC’s financial position are demonstrate our ability to pay debts as they fall due in the short term and maintain prudent levels of financial assets to cover long-term liabilities and the replacement of ASC non-financial assets. The ASC is committed to managing within resources provided by government and remains in a positive net asset position as at 30 June 2020.

Asset management

The ASC holds financial and non-financial assets. Financial assets include cash, receivables and term deposits.

Non-financial assets support the operations of the ASC and include; land and buildings, computing software, hardware and infrastructure, and plant and equipment. Consideration of whole-of-life asset management is undertaken in the context of the ASC’s strategic direction to ensure investments in assets support the achievement of the ASC’s objectives.

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INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Sport

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission for the year ended 30 June 2017:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Australian Sports Commission as at 30 June 2017 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2017 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, comprising significant accounting policies and other

explanatory information.

Basis for Opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Australian Sports Commission in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997 (the Code). I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Australian Sports Commission the Board is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under that Act. The Board is also responsible for such internal control as the Board determines is necessary to enable the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Board is responsible for assessing the Australian Sports Commission’s ability to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Board is also responsible for disclosing matters related to going concern as applicable and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

Independent auditor’s report

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue FORREST ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Youth and Sport

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission (the Entity) for the year ended 30 June 2020:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2020 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Chair of the Commission, Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Cash Flow Statement; • Statement of Changes in Equity; and • Notes to the financial statements.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Board is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Board is also responsible for such internal control as the Board determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Board is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Board is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional skepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control; • obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that

are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of

accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Josephine Bushell

Senior Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

24 August 2020

89

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 ABN 67 374 695 240

+61 2 2614 1111 info@sportaus.gov.au sportaus.gov.au

Statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the Australian Sports Commission for the year ended 30 June 2020 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Commission will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Commissioners.

Signed: ………………………. Signed: ………………………. Signed: ……………………….

John Wylie AM

Chair of the Board

*** August 2020

Robert Dalton Peter Dunlop

Chief Executive Officer (Acting) Chief Financial Officer

** August 2020 ** August 2020

……………………

90

Financial statements

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2020

3

Budget Actual Actual

2020 2020 2019

$'000 NET COST OF SERVICES Notes $'000 $'000

EXPENSES

60,651 Employee benefits 1.1A 59,010 55,451

47,351 Suppliers 1.1B 42,807 57,727

244,939 Grants 1.1C 252,824 306,629

24,657 Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 24,088 21,749

- Finance costs 1.1D 81 -

- Impairment loss on financial instruments 1.1E 462 4

- Write-down and impairment of other assets 1.1F 1,401 463

- Loss from sale of assets 217 -

- Resources provided free of charge - 88

- Other expenses 1.1G 162 340

377,598 Total expenses 381,052 442,451

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

16,920 Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 14,498 20,641

- Contributions from Government entities 11,085 2,266

1,796 Interest 1,744 3,202

250 Rental income 1.2B 538 603

3,321 Other revenue 1.2C 2,333 1,008

22,287 Total own-source revenue 30,198 27,720

Gains

- Reversals of impairment losses - 4

- Gain from sale of assets - 59

- Total gains - 63

22,287 Total own-source income 30,198 27,783

355,311 Net cost of service 350,854 414,668

346,353

Revenue from Government (corporate Commonwealth entity payment) 388,503 374,346

(8,958) Surplus/(Deficit) 37,649 (40,322)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to Net cost of services

- Changes in asset revaluation reserve (850) 15,597

- Total other comprehensive income (850) 15,597

(8,958) Total comprehensive income / (loss) 36,799 (24,725)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

91

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2020

4

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Expenses

Suppliers ($4.544m less than budget) comprises decreases in the following:

AIS property costs - $1.534m following reduced activity on site throughout the year as a result of bushfire smoke and COVID-19.

Operating lease rentals - $1.029m due to the introduction of AASB 16 Leases on 1 July 2019, property and vehicle leases previously recognised as an expense are now recognised as a reduction in principal of a lease liability.

Contractors and consultants - $1.359m largely due to a decision to delay a number of projects following the COVID-19 outbreak.

Travel - $0.566m due to the restrictions associated with COVID-19.

Write-down and impairment of other assets ($1.401m greater than budget): largely due to the impairment on software and of ASC facilities for the AIS site campus in Bruce, ACT.

Grants ($7.885m greater than budget): due to grants delivered in 2019-20 that were agreed after the 2019-20 Budget was finalised in May 2019, including Government election commitments funded directly via the Department of Health, Community Sport Infrastructure grants which were delayed from 2018-19. This was partially offset by grants which will now be delivered in 2020-21 for programs impacted by COVID-19 including Sporting Schools, Community Sport Infrastructure and Better Ageing.

Income

Revenue from contracts with customers ($2.072m less than budget): due to a reduction in commercial activity resulting from bushfire smoke and the temporary suspension of commercial activities in response to COVID-19. Both events resulted in the temporary closure of the AIS Site impacting on revenue generated from accommodation and facility hire, retail and café and childcare.

Contributions from Government entities ($11.085m greater than budget): funding is received from Federal and State and Territory government agencies to assist in delivering sport outcomes. The majority of 2019-20 contributions relate to funding received from the Department of Health to deliver grants to various National Sporting Organisations.

92

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2020

5

Budget Actual Actual

2020 2020 2019

$'000 ASSETS Notes $'000 $'000

Financial Assets

2,682 Cash and cash equivalents - on hand and deposit 3 10,488 11,849

8,610 Trade and other receivables 2.1A 6,230 9,294

45,000 Term deposits 3 95,000 45,000

563 Loans 2.1B 532 610

56,855 Total financial assets 112,250 66,753

Non-financial Assets1

210,236 Land and buildings 2.2A 197,794 205,845

10,505 Infrastructure, plant and equipment 2.2A 10,240 10,809

9,507 Intangibles 2.2A 4,434 5,553

690 Inventories 561 477

1,550 Prepayments 1,687 2,017

232,488 Total non-financial assets 214,716 224,701

289,343 Total assets 326,966 291,454

LIABILITIES

Payables

3,938 Suppliers 2.3 2,847 2,577

- Grant payables 1,288 9,097

1,611 Other payables 2.3 1,301 2,525

5,549 Total payables 5,436 14,199

Interest bearing liabilities

- Leases 2.5 6,500 -

- Total interest bearing liabilities 6,500 -

Provisions

12,089 Employee leave provisions 5.1 12,667 11,526

309 Other provisions 2.4 89 254

12,398 Total provisions 12,756 11,780

17,947 Total Liabilities 24,692 25,979

271,396 Net Assets 302,274 265,475

EQUITY

152,135 Contributed equity 152,135 152,135

195,052 Asset revaluation reserve 209,799 210,649

(75,791) Retained surplus / (accumulated deficit) (59,660) (97,309)

271,396 Total Equity 302,274 265,475

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Right-of-use assets are included in the following line items - Land and buildings, and Infrastructure, plant and equipment

93

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2020

6

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position

Assets

Financial Assets ($55.395m greater than budget): this is due to a higher Cash and Term deposits balance as at 30 June 2020. This has resulted predominantly from the unbudgeted year end surplus of $36.799m compared with a budgeted deficit of $8.958m due to the timing of revenue and expenditure across years. In addition, the timing of capital expenditure has resulted in a higher cash balance than originally budgeted.

Non-Financial Assets

Land and buildings and Intangibles ($17.515m less than budget): capital expenditure was scaled back in response to COVID-19 which impacted timing of capital expenditure.

Liabilities

Leases ($6.500m more than budget): with the implementation of AASB 16 Leases on 1 July 2019, the ASC recognised a lease liability, and corresponding right-of-use asset, associated with tenancies held in Australia and at the European Training Centre, Varese, Italy. This liability will reduce over the life of the lease as both principal and interest payments are recognised.

94

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2020

7

Budget Actual Actual

2020 2020 2019

$'000 Notes $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

20,013 Sale of goods and rendering of services 19,431 27,607

142 Contributions from Government entities 11,085 2,266

388,893 Receipts from Government 388,503 374,346

1,750 Interest 1,872 3,503

- Net GST received 26,738 23,094

410,798 Total cash received 447,629 430,816

Cash used

(61,312) Employees (59,170) (56,437)

(47,015) Suppliers (48,528) (67,424)

- Interest payments on lease liabilities (81) -

(244,939) Grants (280,510) (321,227)

(353,266) Total cash used (388,289) (445,088)

57,532 Net cash from (used by) operating activities 59,340 (14,272)

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

-

Proceeds from sales of infrastructure, plant and equipment 48 249

102 Repayments of loans and interest 78 22

102 Total cash received 126 271

Cash used

(34,270) Purchase of infrastructure, plant and equipment (9,342) (12,011)

(34,270) Total cash used (9,342) (12,011)

(34,168) Net cash from (used by) investing activities (9,216) (11,740)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

- Appropriations - contributed equity - 856

- Total cash received - 856

Cash used

- Principal payments of lease liabilities (1,485) -

- Total cash used (1,485) -

- Net cash from (used by) financing activities (1,485) 856

23,364 Net increase (decrease) in cash held 48,639 (25,156)

24,318

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 56,849 82,005

47,682

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 3 105,488 56,849

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

95

Australian Sports Commission CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2020

8

Budget Variances Commentary

Cash Flow Statement

Operating cash received

Sale of goods and rendering of services ($1.251m less than budget): due to a reduction in commercial activity resulting from bushfire smoke and the temporary suspension of commercial activities in response to COVID-19. Both events resulted in the temporary closure of the AIS Site impacting on revenue generated from accommodation and facility hire, retail and café and childcare.

Contributions from Government entities ($10.943m greater than budget): funding is received from Federal and State and Territory government agencies to assist in delivering sport outcomes. The majority of 2019-20 contributions relate to funding received from the Department of Health to deliver grants to various National Sporting Organisations.

Operating cash used

Employees ($3.443m less than budget): resulting from lower average staffing numbers than provided for in the Budget mainly as a result of the temporary suspension of commercial operations and lower variable labour costs.

For budget variance commentary in relation to Suppliers and Grants, refer commentary for the Statement of Comprehensive Income on previous pages.

Investing cash used

Purchase of infrastructure, plant and equipment ($24.928m less than budget): capital expenditure was scaled back in response to COVID-19 which impacted timing of capital expenditure.

Financing cash used

Principal repayments of lease liabilities ($1.485m greater than budget): due to the introduction of AASB 16 Leases on 1 July 2019, property and vehicle leases previously recognised as a supplier expense are now recognised as a reduction in principal of a lease liability.

96

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2020

9

Retained surplus (accumulated

deficit)

Asset revaluation reserve

Contributed equity/capital

Total equity

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

2020

2019

2020

2019

2020

2019

2020

2019

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

(97,309)

(56,987)

(66,833)

210,649

195,052

195,052

152,135

151,279

152,135

265,475

289,344

280,354

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 1058

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Adjusted opening balance

(97,309)

(56,987)

(66,833)

210,649

195,052

195,052

152,135

151,279

152,135

265,475

289,344

280,354

Comprehensive income

Surplus (Deficit) for the period

37,649

(40,322)

(8,958)

-

-

-

-

-

-

37,649

(40,322)

(8,958)

Other comprehensive income

-

-

-

(850)

15,597

-

-

-

-

(850)

15,597

-

Total comprehensive income

37,649

(40,322)

(8,958)

(850)

15,597

-

-

-

-

36,799

(24,725)

(8,958)

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget funding

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

-

-

856

-

Total transactions with owners

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

-

-

856

-

Closing balance as at 30 June

(59,660)

(97,309)

(75,791)

209,799

210,649

195,052

152,135

152,135

152,135

302,274

265,475

2 71,396

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy

Equity injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

97

11

Overview

Basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

• the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Significant Accounting Judgments and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

a) The fair value of buildings has been taken to be the depreciated replacement cost as determined by an independent valuer. The ASC uses this valuation methodology as the buildings are purpose built and may in fact realise more or less than the market value.

b) The ASC assesses impairment of all assets at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the ASC and to the particular asset that may lead to impairment. If an impairment trigger exists then the recoverable amount is restated.

Impact of COVID-19

The economic uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic (COVID-19) has resulted in the ASC reviewing and assessing all aspects of business, particularly those that may impact the users of the financial statements or give question to the going concern of the entity.

As a corporate Commonwealth entity (CCE), the ASC is primarily funded by the Australian government to support and invest in sport and physical activity at all levels. This funding has continued to ensure the success of Sport 2030, the Australian Governments strategic Sports Plan.

The ASC has a significant non-financial asset base which is subject to the ASC revaluation policy. In 2019-20 the ASC has worked closely with the valuer and has taken the position that while there is recognisable market uncertainty as at reporting date, this is not measurable due to the inability to observe and reconcile the impact on market prices.

The ASC has conducted a sensitivity analysis over the next accounting periods forecast and over a range of possible scenarios in relation to the ASC’s asset base. The ASC considers the impact of this analysis low on the going concern considerations of the ASC. On this basis, the ASC has made no accounting assumptions or estimates that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

The ASC generates independent Income from the commercial activities of the AIS site which in 2019-20 represented less than 4% of income. Whilst a number of these activities have been impacted by the temporary

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

12

closure of ASC sites, steps have been taken to reduce the impact on the ASC. In 2019-20, the ASC took proactive steps to address the impact of COVID-19 on the business, including delaying non-essential capital expenditure to strengthen the ASC’s balance sheet and with that, the ASC’s liquidity and solvency position. In addition, the ASC paused a number of programs and projects to ensure the ASC remains a going concern. The ASC has taken a conservative approach to forecasting over the following 12 months and has assumed COVID-19 will continue to impact the ASC’s operations for a significant portion of 2020-21, especially in relation to non-high performance usage of AIS facilities. The ASC is managing this risk closely through reserves and tighter selection of project considerations to ensure the ASC is a going concern in the next accounting period.

Past the next accounting period the ASC will continue to work closely with government to refine a program of capital works as scheduled asset replacements exceed available cash. This program of work is essential to ensure the ASC remains a going concern in future years.

Further disclosures relevant to COVID-19 may be found in the appropriate Accounting Policy in the notes to the financial statements.

New Australian Accounting Standards

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

The ASC adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under

the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the ASC shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the ASC applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the ASC shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

In relation to AASB 15, the ASC elected to apply the new standard to all new and uncompleted contracts from the date of initial application. The ASC is required to aggregate the effect of all of the contract modifications that occur before the date of initial application.

In terms of AASB 1058, the ASC is required to recognise volunteer services at fair value if those services would have been purchased if not provided voluntarily, and the fair value of those services can be measured reliably.

Set out below are the amounts by which each financial statement line item is affected as at and for the year ended 30 June 2020 as a result of the adoption of AASB 15 and AASB 1058. The first column shows amounts prepared under AASB 15 and AASB 1058 and the second column shows what the amounts would have been had AASB 15 and AASB 1058 not been adopted:

99

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

13

AASB 15 / AASB 1058 Previous AAS

Increase/ (decrease)

$'000 $'000 $'000

Expenses

Employee benefits 59,010 59,010 -

Suppliers 42,807 42,807 -

Grants 252,824 252,824 -

Depreciation and amortisation 24,088 24,088 -

Finance costs 81 81 -

Impairment loss on financial instruments 462 462 -

Write-down and impairment of other assets 1,401 1,401 -

Loss from sale of assets 217 217 -

Other expenses 162 162 -

Total Expenses 381,052 381,052 -

Revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 14,498 - 14,498

Sale of goods and rendering of services - 15,361 (15,361)

Contributions from Government entities 11,085 11,085 -

Interest 1,744 1,744 -

Rental income 538 538 -

Other revenue 2,333 1,470 863

Total Revenue 30,198 30,198 -

Net (cost of)/contribution by services (350,854) (350,854) -

Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 10,488 10,488 -

Trade and other receivables 6,230 6,230 -

Term deposits 95,000 95,000 -

Loans 532 532 -

Non-Financial assets 214,716 214,716 -

Total Assets 326,966 326,966 -

Liabilities

Trade creditors and accruals 2,202 2,202 -

Contract liabilities 375 - 375

Refund liabilities 270 - 270

Grant payables 1,288 1,288 -

Other payables 1,301 1,946 (645)

Interest bearing liabilities 6,500 6,500 -

Provisions 12,756 12,756 -

Total Liabilities 24,692 24,692 -

Retained earnings 302,274 302,274 -

Upon implementation of AASB 15 and 1058, the ASC reviewed all income streams to ensure that each was recognised correctly for the purposes of the financial statements. Income assessed as being recognised under AASB 15 is now presented as Revenue from Contracts with Customers, with revenue falling under AASB 1058 presented as Other revenue.

Further, income previously received in advance and presented as Other Payables, was assessed to identify whether the transaction should be recognised under AASB 15 as a contract or refund liability. Any income recognised under AASB 1058 remained as Other Payables.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

14

Application of AASB 16 Leases

The ASC adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The ASC elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard. The ASC applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117:

• Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics;

• Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right-of-use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-of-use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date;

• Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application; and

• Applied the exemption not to recognise right-of-use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, the ASC previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the ASC recognises right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the ASC has elected not to

recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the ASC recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of office space, heavy equipment and automobiles, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the ASC’s incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. The ASC’s incremental borrowing rate is the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied was 0.09% per month.

The right-of-use assets were measured as follows:

a) Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments.

b) All other leases: the carrying value that would have resulted from AASB 16 being applied from the commencement date of the leases, subject to the practical expedients noted above.

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15

Impact on transition

The impact on transition to AASB 16 is summarised below:

Impact on Transition of AASB 16

Departmental 1 July 2019

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment 7,533

Lease liabilities 7,649

Retained earnings -

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity's 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

1 July 2019

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019 1,961

Less: short-term leases not recognised under AASB 16 -

Less: low value leases not recognised under AASB 16 -

Plus: effect of extension options reasonable certain to be exercised 6,142

Undiscounted lease payments 8,103

Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application (454)

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019 7,649

Taxation

The ASC is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Events after the Reporting Period

There were no events occurring after reporting date which would significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the ASC.

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16

Note 1: Departmental Financial Performance This section analyses the financial performance of Australian Sports Commission for the year ended 2020. Expenses 2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1A: Employee Benefits

Wages and salaries 46,174 42,599

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 5,056 4,677

Defined benefit plans 2,116 1,988

Leave and other entitlements 4,805 4,444

Separation and redundancies 859 1,743

Total employee benefits 59,010 55,451

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and Relationships section.

Note 1.1B: Suppliers

Goods and services

Contractors and consultants

Contractors 2,778 6,340

Consultants 3,598 3,996

ASC Site Project 544 2,232

Sports Sector support 8,624 6,925

Advertising and Media

MoveitAUS campaign 1,024 6,511

Other 116 1,802

Travel 2,633 2,966

AIS Property Costs 14,595 16,737

Communications and IT 4,273 3,529

Other 4,165 5,299

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 42,350 56,337

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals1 457 1,390

Total other suppliers 457 1,390

Total suppliers 42,807 57,727

1 The ASC has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

The ASC has no short-term lease commitments as at 30 June 2020. The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1D, 2.2A and 2.4A.

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The ASC has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The ASC recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1C: Grants

Public sector:

Australian Government entities (related parties) - -

State and Territory Governments 19,558 19,698

Local Governments 8,869 24,851

Private sector:

Non-profit organisations 204,082 242,354

Other 20,315 19,726

Total grants 252,824 306,629

Note 1.1D: Finance Costs

Interest on lease liabilities 81 -

Total finance costs 81 -

The ASC has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1B, 2.2A and 2.4A.

Note 1.1E: Impairment Loss on Financial Instruments

Impairment of financial instruments 462 4

Total impairment loss on financial instruments 462 4

Note 1.1F: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets

Non-financial assets:

Write-down and impairment - land and buildings 334 111

Write-down and impairment - infrastructure, plant and equipment 8 147

Write-down and impairment - intangibles 1,054 197

Write-down and impairment - inventory 5 8

Total write-down and impairment of assets 1,401 463

Note 1.1G: Other Expenses

Sponsorship in kind 138 333

Other 24 7

Total other expenses 162 340

The above lease disclosure should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1B, 1.1D, 2.2A and 2.4A.

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18

Own Source Revenue and Gains

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods and rendering of services 14,498 20,641

Total revenue from contracts with customers 14,498 20,641

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Major product / service line:

Accommodation and facilities hire 7,765 -

AIS Site Tours 1,061 -

Aquatic and Fitness programs 1,854 -

Childcare fees 1,087 -

Contributions and cost recovery 982 -

Medical and Allied Health services 522 -

Retail and café 1,227 -

14,498 -

Type of customer:

Non-government entities 14,498 -

14,498 -

Timing of transfer of goods and services:

Over time 2,941 -

Point in time 11,557 -

14,498 -

Accounting Policy

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the customer.

The ASC recognises income under AASB 15 if the performance obligations are required by an enforceable contract and they are sufficiently specific to enable the ASC to determine when they have been satisfied.

The ASC recognises income for Childcare and Aquatic and Fitness programs over time, as these services are simultaneously received and consumed by the customer. These services are provided for a specific, nominated period and recognised over the period that the obligations are met.

For all other services, the ASC recognises income at the point in time that the service is obligation is satisfied. The customer obtains control of these promised goods or services at the point of sale.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the ASC expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

19

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 1.2B: Rental Income

Operating leases

Rental Income 538 603

Total rental income 538 603

Operating Leases

The ASC in its capacity as lessor has rental agreements with National Sporting Organisations to access specified facilities and services in various locations. The ASC also leases the Canberra Stadium and associated parking facilities to the ACT Government. The leases to the National Sporting Organisations are not subject to annual increases. The lease payments for the Canberra Stadium are subject to annual increases in accordance with upward movements in the Consumer Price Index.

In response to COVID-19, the ASC has offered rent relief to the National Sporting Organisations for the period 1 March - 31 December 2020.

Maturity analysis of operating lease income receivables:

Within 1 year 313

One to two years -

Two to three years -

Three to four years -

Four to five years -

More than 5 years -

Total undiscounted lease payments receivable 313

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1B, 1.1D, 1.1G, 2.2A and 2.4A.

Note 1.2C: Other Revenue

Other Revenue 1,331 1,008

Sponsorship 1,002 -

Total other revenue 2,333 1,008

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20

Note 2: Departmental Financial Position This section analyses Australian Sports Commission assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships. Financial Assets

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1A: Trade and Other Receivables

Goods and services receivables

Goods and services 3,084 2,494

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 3,467 6,558

Interest 118 246

Total goods and services receivables 6,669 9,298

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 6,669 9,298

Less impairment loss allowance:

Goods and services (439) (4)

Total goods and services supplied or rendered (net) 6,230 9,294

Refer Note 2.3A for information relating to contract liabilities.

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance account

Opening balance (4) (22)

Amounts written-off 27 17

Amounts recovered and reversed - 3

Decrease (increase) in impairments recognised in net surplus (462) (2)

Closing Balance (439) (4)

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21

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1B: Loans

Cycling Australia 1,321 1,399

Total loans (gross) 1,321 1,399

Less impairment allowance:

Cycling Australia (789) (789)

Total loans (net) 532 610

Reconciliation of impairment allowance account:

Opening balance (789) (789)

Increase in impairments recognised in net surplus - -

Closing balance (789) (789)

Cycling Australia Ltd Loan

The ASC has two loans receivable from Cycling Australia, which were provided to assist them with restructuring and other financial assistance.

In prior years, the ASC recognised an impairment allowance in connection with the loans. The ASC has assessed the impairment allowance and has determined that it remains appropriate as at 30 June 2020. The ASC continues to work closely with Cycling Australia to address the financial situation.

Accounting Policy

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, other receivables and loans that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest that are not provided at below-market interest rates are classified as subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Loans and other receivables that are provided on more favourable terms than the borrower could obtain in the market place contain a concessional discount. The ASC does not adjust the fair value for the concessional component unless it is considered material.

Concessional loans are measured at fair value at initial recognition and classified as subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, adjusted for any loss allowance.

Impairment

All financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. When recovery of a financial asset is assessed as unlikely, an impairment allowance is made. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the assets carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an impairment allowance, recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

As at 30 June 2020, the ASC has also considered whether there is any increased uncertainty on the collection of receivables due to the impact of COVID-19. Although the ASC has not changed the payment terms and conditions of receivables, there has been objective evidence that future collections may be impacted, which has been reflected in the impairment allowance.

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22

Non-Financial Assets

Note 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Buildings, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment and Intangibl

es

Land

Buildings &

land

Improvements

Total land, buildings &

land

improvements

Infrastructure,

plant &

equipment

Purchased software

Internally developed software

Total

Computer Software

Total

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value

12,030

576,946

588,976

26,706

5,986

8,629

14,615

630,297

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment

-

(383,131)

(383,131)

(15,897)

(5,092)

(3,970)

(9,062)

(408,090)

Net book value 1

July 2019

12,030

193,815

205,845

10,809

894

4,659

5,553

222,207

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16

-

7,487

7,487

46

-

-

-

7,533

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2019

12,030

201,302

213,332

10,855

894

4,659

5,553

229,740

Additions

By purchase

-

5,486

5,486

2,484

156

-

156

8,126

By internal development

-

-

-

-

-

1,216

1,216

1,216

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income

-

(850)

(850)

-

-

-

-

(850)

Write

-down and

impairments recognised in net cost of services

-

(333)

(333)

(8)

(76)

(978)

(1,054)

(1,395)

Write

-down and impairments on right

-of -use assets recognised

in net cost of services

-

(98)

(98)

-

-

-

-

(98)

Depreciation and amortisation

-

(18,659)

(18,659)

(3,011)

(255)

(1,176)

(1,431)

(23,101)

Depreciation on right

-of -use assets

-

(959)

(959)

(28)

-

-

-

(987)

Prior year WIP reclassified to other asset classes

-

-

-

-

(205)

205

-

-

Disposals

-

(125)

(125)

(15)

(6)

-

(6)

(146)

Written

-down value of assets

sold

-

-

-

(37)

-

-

-

(37)

Net book value 30 June 2020

12,030

185,764

197,794

10,240

508

3,926

4,434

212,468

Net book value 30 June 2020 represented by

Gross book value

12,030

586,149

598,179

27,291

5,514

9,072

14,586

640,056

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment

-

(400,385)

(400,385)

(17,051)

(5,006)

(5,146)

(10,152)

(427,588)

Total as at 30 June 2020

12,030

185,764

197,794

10,240

508

3,926

4,434

212,468

Carrying amount of

right

-of -use assets

-

6,430

6,430

18

-

-

-

6,448

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

23

The above carrying values include work in progress costs for buildings and land improvements $1.754m (2019: $1.705m) and computer software $0.407m (2019: $3.785m).

Revaluations of infrastructure, plant and equipment

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in the Overview. An independent valuer conducted a revaluation of land and buildings as at 31 May 2019, and a desktop review of land and buildings and infrastructure, plant and equipment as at 30 June 2020.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of infrastructure, plant, equipment and intangibles

The ASC had $0.504m outstanding contractual commitments for infrastructure, plant, equipment and intangibles as at 30 June 2020 (2019: $1.026m). Contractual commitments primarily relate to equipment purchases. The ASC expects all contractual commitments to be settled within 12 months

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of infrastructure, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold for the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total or are purchases of computer equipment).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make-good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the ASC where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the ASC’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the make-good recognised.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the ASC has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

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24

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Sub-Class

Land Market selling price

Land improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Building (excluding leasehold

improvements)

Depreciated replacement cost

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Infrastructure, plant and

equipment

Market selling price and depreciated replacement cost

Following initial recognition at cost, infrastructure, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value). Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at

the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised through operating result. Revaluation decrements for a class of asset are recognised directly through the operating result except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its re-valued amount.

Impact of COVID-19

A desktop review of land and buildings, and infrastructure, plant and equipment was undertaken by an independent valuer as at 30 June 2020, with consideration given to the uncertain conditions that COVID-19 has caused. Whilst the valuer has advised that there is market uncertainty as at reporting date, this is not measurable due to the inability to observe and reconcile the impact on market prices.

Intangibles

The ASC’s intangibles comprise purchased and internally-developed software.

Purchases of intangibles are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold of the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the ASC’s software are 3 to 7 years (2019: 3 to 7 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2020.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indicators of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

Derecognition

All assets are derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

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25

Depreciation

Depreciable infrastructure, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the ASC using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each sub-class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset Class Sub-class 2020 2019

Buildings Buildings 3 - 75 years 3 - 75 years

Land improvements Land improvements 15 - 40 years 15 - 40 years

Leasehold improvements Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Furniture, fittings, plant and equipment

4 - 25 years 4 - 25 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Computer hardware 3 - 5 years 3 - 5 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Marine fleet 2 - 20 years 2 - 20 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Motor vehicles 2 - 10 years 2 - 10 years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

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26

Payables

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.3A: Suppliers

Contract liabilities 375 -

Refund liabilities 270 -

Trade creditors and accruals 2,202 2,577

Total supplier payables 2,847 2,577

The contract liabilities are associated with: • Sponsorships - whilst the majority of Sponsorship agreements are recognised under AASB 1058 due to the inability to assign specific transaction prices to performance obligations, there are some performance obligations that are sufficiently specific to be able to determine an obligation period and a transaction

price against that performance obligation and are therefore recognised under AASB 15. The ASC has determined that any variable considerations associated with these obligations is highly unlikely to result in a reversal of the recognised revenue

• Seconded staff - An ASC staff member has been seconded to another government department. The ASC has determined that any variable considerations associated with these obligations is highly unlikely to result in a reversal of the recognised revenue.

The refund liabilities relate to contracts recognised under AASB 15 that have a variable consideration element in the agreements in the form of refund clauses. COVID-19 has resulted in a significant increase in cancellations due to the temporary closure of commercial operation at the AIS facilities. To assess the refund liability as at 30 June 2020, the ASC has applied the expected value method in estimating the amount of variable consideration in relation to the arrangements below:

• Accommodation and facilities hire - The ASC has determined that there is a 60% chance of event cancellation and refund, with the remainder treated as a contract liability.

• Aquatic and fitness programs - the ASC has determined that there is a 20% chance of event cancellation and refund, with the remainder treated as a contract liability. The lower probability reflects the fact that many customers have already sought refunds with the remainder of customers holding their accounts in credit until swim classes resume.

Refer Note 2.1A for information relating to contract assets

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.3B: Other Payables

Wages and salaries 696 424

Superannuation 111 54

Unearned income 24 1,091

Separation and redundancies 358 857

Other 112 99

Total other payables 1,301 2,525

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

27

Provisions

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.4: Other Provisions

Provisions for makegood 89 138

Provision for lease incentive - 116

Total other provisions 89 254

Provision for

makegood

Provision for lease incentive Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2019 138 116 254

Additional provisions made - - -

Amounts used (49) - (49)

Amounts reversed - - -

Amounts reversed against Right-Of-Use Asset on initial application of AASB 16 - (116) (116)

Total as at 30 June 2020 89 - 89

Interest Bearing Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 2.5: Leases

Lease Liabilities

Buildings 6,484 -

Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment 16 -

Total leases 6,500 -

The ASC has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Accounting Policy

Refer Overview section for accounting policy on leases.

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28

Note 3: Cash Flow Reconciliation

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Statement of Financial Position to Cash Flow Statement

Statement of Financial position items comprising cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 10,488 11,849

Term deposits 95,000 45,000

Total cash and cash equivalents per Cash Flow Statement 105,488 56,849

Note 4: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

Total comprehensive income less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations 22,656 (36,628)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 14,143 11,903

Plus: depreciation on right-of-use assets 987 -

Less: principal repayments - leased assets (1,485) -

Total comprehensive income - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 36,301 (24,725)

The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principal repayment amount reflects the cash impact on implementation of AASB 16 Leases, it does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

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29

Note 5: People and Relationships This section describes a range of employment and post-employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people. Employee Provisions

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 5.1: Employee Provisions

Leave 12,667 11,526

Total employee provisions 12,667 11,526

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the ASC is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the ASC’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave and annual leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2020 and management assessments relating to salary growth rates. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and general pay increases.

Impact of COVID-19

The ASC has considered the impact of COVID-19 on employee benefits by reference to the work of an actuary. Whilst there has been consideration given to current travel restrictions and precarious social and economic environment, no adjustment has been made as at reporting date.

Separation and redundancy

A liability is recognised for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The ASC recognises a liability for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations or when an offer is made to an employee and is accepted.

Superannuation

Staff of the ASC are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The remaining funds are defined contribution schemes.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The ASC makes employer contributions to the employee superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the ASC’s employees. The ASC accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the year.

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30

Key Management Personnel Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any Director of that entity. The ASC has determined the key management personnel to be the statutory position holders as per the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989, and the Portfolio Minister. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2020 2019

$ $

Short-term employee benefits 1,422,802 2,422,867

Post-employment benefits 109,885 189,634

Other long-term employee benefits 36,267 54,396

Termination benefits - -

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses 1,568,954 2,666,897

The total number of key management personnel (noting this includes Commissioners) in the above table is 15 individuals (2019: 23). The total number of substantive key management positions (noting this includes Commissioners) in the above table is 15 individuals (2018: 18). The variance between these figures reflects the maturing of the new operating model during the financial year, whereby the Sport Australia and AIS Executive are involved in strategic decisions related to their own operating stream. As such, it is only the Executive Director (the Chief Executive Officer, Sport Australia), the Director of the Institute (Chief Executive Officer, AIS) and the Commissioners who are responsible for collectively implementing the direction and strategy across the ASC.

The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the ASC.

Note 5.2 is prepared on an accruals basis and excludes short-term acting arrangements (less than three months).

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Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships

The ASC is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the ASC are Key Management Personnel (KMP) (refer definition at Note 5.2) and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with Commonwealth controlled entities

During the year, the ASC had arrangements with government entities including the Department of Health to assist with the delivery of the ASC's activities and programs. The income received from government entities is disclosed as 'Contributions from Government entities' in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. All expenses paid to government entities are under normal terms and conditions.

Loans to Key Management Personnel related entities

There were no loans made to KMP or related entities.

Contributions to related organisations

Contributions are made to various sporting organisations as part of the ASC’s normal course of business. They were approved and made on normal terms and conditions.

KMP are required to register conflicts of interest in any sporting organisations or related parties of the ASC’s business. KMP are not part of decisions where there is a real or perceived conflict. The table below represents payments made during the period the KMP were related to the entity.

Entity

Key Management Personnel

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Sports Australia Hall of Fame Ms Louise Eyres1 - 155

Paralympics Australia Mr Kurt Fearnley AO2 2,109 11,506

Australian Football League Ms G Trainor AO 28 263

Australian Rugby League Commission Ms A Laing - 425

Foxtel Ms A Laing 13 -

Central Goldfields Shire The Hon. Hugh Delahunty 114 -

Sailing Australia Ms K Bates 3 - 4,601

There were also payments to KMP to reimburse costs incurred on behalf of the ASC. These and the transactions referred to above were conducted with conditions no more favourable than would be expected if the transactions occurred at arm’s length.

Individual KMP may hold professional engagements with related parties. Such engagements are not reported in this note as they are not required to be disclosed as related party transactions under Australian Accounting Standards.

Transactions reported for KMP are limited to direct interests where holdings are greater than 50%.

Transactions exclude GST where relevant.

1

Ms Eyres ceased to be a member of Key Management Personnel on 1 July 2019 (refer Note 5.2). 2 Mr Fearnley ceased to be related to Paralympics Australia in December 2019. 3

Ceased to be related to the ASC in December 2018.

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Note 6: Managing Uncertainties This section analyses how the Australian Sports Commission manages financial risks within its operating environment. Contingent Assets

Unquantifiable Contingencies

At 30 June 2020, the ASC had an outstanding claim with Comcover in relation to works done to replace external combustible cladding used on the facades of some of the buildings across the AIS site. As at 30 June 2020 this claim is still being assessed. It was not possible to estimate the amounts of any eventual payments that may be required in relation to these claims.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

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Financial Instruments 2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 6.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents 10,488 11,849

Trade and other receivables 2,645 2,490

Interest receivable 118 246

Loans 532 610

Investments under s59 of the PGPA Act 95,000 45,000

Total financial assets at amortised cost 108,783 60,195

Total financial assets 108,783 60,195

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Suppliers 2,847 2,577

Grant payables 1,288 9,097

Other payables 1,301 2,525

Total financial liabilities at amortised cost 5,436 14,199

Total financial liabilities 5,436 14,199

Note 6.2B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

Impairment of financial instruments (462) (4)

Interest revenue 1,744 3,202

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets at amortised cost 1,282 3,198

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets 1,282 3,198

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the ASC classifies its financial assets into the following categories:

a) financial assets at amortised cost; b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and c) financial assets at fair value through profit and loss.

The classification depends on both the ASC’s business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics of the item at initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the ASC becomes party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon a trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect contractual cash flows; and 2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets, and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

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Any gains or losses as result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit and Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified at fair value though profit and loss where the financial assets either do not meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Impact of COVID-19

The ASC has considered the impact of COVID-19 on the impairment allowance, and has assessed that there has been a minor increase in the risk of default in certain debt groups. This has been reflected in the allowance as at reporting date.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (an irrespective of having been invoiced).

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Note 7: Other Information Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 7.1: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 113,817 68,727

More than 12 months 213,149 222,727

Total assets 326,966 291,454

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 11,314 18,873

More than 12 months 13,378 7,106

Total liabilities 24,692 25,979

Assets Held in Trust

Promoters Trust Account

Purpose - The ASC operates a Promoters Trust Account into which it deposits monies received in the course of conducting events at the ASC. These monies are held until such time as the events are completed and all costs associated with the events have been finalised. The remaining funds are then apportioned between the promoter and the ASC in accordance with the terms of each agreement. These monies are not available for other purposes of the ASC and are not recognised in the financial statements.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Total amounts held at the beginning of the reporting period 621 564

Receipts 774 3,159

Payments (1,382) (3,102)

Total amounts held at the end of the reporting period 13 621

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Relevant Mandatory Tables

Table 28: Statement of Comprehensive Income current report period (2019-20)  in Financial Statements

NET COST OF SERVICES 

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

EXPENSES       

Employee Benefits Expense  59,010 55,451 60,651

Suppliers Expense  42,807 57,727 47,351

Depreciation and Amortisation Expense  24,088 21,749 24,657

Total Expenses  381,052  442,451 377,598

INCOME       

Total Own-Source Income  30,198 27,720 22,287

NET COST OF SERVICES       

Net cost of services  350,854 414,668 355,311

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT       

Revenue from Government  388,503 374,346 346,353

SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) AFTER TAX        

Surplus/(Deficit) after Tax   37,649 (40,322) (8,958)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME       

Total comprehensive Income/(Loss)  36,799 (24,725) (8,958)

 

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Table 29: Statement of Financial Position current report period (2019-20) in Financial Statements

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

ASSETS       

Total Financial Assets  112,250 66,753 56,855

Total Non-Financial Assets  214,716 224,701 232,488

Total Assets  326,966 291,454 289,343

LIABILITIES       

Total Payables  5,436 14,199 5,549

Total Interest Bearing Liabilities  6,500 0 0

Total Provisions  12,756 11,780 12,398

Total Liabilities  24,692 25,979 17,947

Net Assets  302,274 265,475 271,396

EQUITY       

Total Equity  302,274 265,475 271,396

 

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Table 30: Statement of Changes in Equity current report period (2019-20) in Financial Statements

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

OPENING BALANCE     

Balance Carried Forward from Previous Period  265,475 289,344 280,354

Adjusted Opening Balance  -  -  - 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME       

Total Comprehensive Income  36,799 (24,725) (8,958)

Closing Balance as at 30 June   302,274 265,475 271,396

 

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Table 31: Cash flow Statement current report period (2019-20) in Financial Statements

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

OPERATING ACTIVITIES       

Total Cash Received (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)  447,629 430,816 410,798

Total Cash Used for (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)  (388,289) (445,088) (353,266)

Net Cash from OPERATING ACTIVITIES  59,340 (14,272) 57,532

INVESTING ACTIVITIES       

Total Cash Received (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)  126 271 102

Total Cash Used (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)  (9,342) (12,011) (34,270)

Net Cash from INVESTING ACTIVITIES  (9,216) (11,740) (34,168)

Purchase of Property, Plant and Equipment  -  -  - 

Purchase of Intangibles  -  -  - 

FINANCING ACTIVITIES       

Total Cash Received (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)  0 856 0

Total Cash Used (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)  (1,485) 0 0

Net Cash from FINANCING ACTIVITIES  (1,485) 856 0

CASH AT THE END OF THE REPORTING PERIOD       

Cash at the End of the Reporting Period  105,488 56,849 47,682

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Table 32: Notes to the Financial Statements (Departmental) (2019-20) Aggregate Assets and Liabilities 

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

Assets — No more than 12 months   113,817 68,727 0

Liabilities — No more than 12 months   11,314 18,873 0

Table 33: Commonwealth Lessees — Departmental Leases under AASB 16 (2019-20) 

30 June 2020 $’000 

30 June 2019 $’000 

Budget 

30 June 2020 $’000 

Note to Depreciation —  Depreciation on right-of-use assets 

(987) 0 0

Cash Flow — Operating Activities —  Interest Payments on Lease Liabilities  (81) 0 0

Cash Flow — Financing Activities —  Principal Payments of Lease Liabilities  (1,485) 0 0

 

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The Australian Sports Foundation Ltd (ASF) was established in 1986 to raise funds for the development of sport in Australia. The ASF is a Commonwealth Company governed by the PGPA Act and is not a subsidiary of the ASC.

Section 48(a) of the ASC Act requires that the ASC’s annual report must specify the financial transactions and the state of affairs of the ASF.

In 2019-20, the ASF prepared and published an Annual Report in line with PGPA Act requirements. Details of the ASF operations and a range of financial and performance information can be found in the ASF’s Annual Report and have not been reproduced here.

For copies of the ASF Annual Report, refer to the foundation’s website www.asf.org.au or contact the distributions officer:

Australian Sports Foundation Leverrier St Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: 02 6214 7868 Email: info@asf.org.au

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS FOUNDATION

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130

131

APPENDIXES & REFERENCES APPENDIX 1: HIGH PERFORMANCE RESULTS 132

World champions 132

APPENDIX 2: ASC AWARD RECIPIENTS 136

AIS Sport Performance Awards 136

ASC Media Awards 139

APPENDIX 3: FUNDING TO SPORTS 140

APPENDIX 4: CONTACT OFFICERS 145

Chair/ASC CEO/AIS CEO 145

Distribution officer 145

APPENDIX 5: SUMMARY OF COMPLIANCE 146

SHORTENED FORMS 151

INDEX 152

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Appendix 1: High performance results

World champions

Australia celebrated 50 new world champions in 2019-20. Australia had 19 new able-bodied athletes or teams across 11 sports, six of whom won multiple world champion titles at their world championships. In six Paralympic sports, 31 Paralympic athletes or teams were crowned as world champions, with nine athletes wining multiple world champion titles.

Table 34: 2019-20 World Champions at Benchmark Events

Sport Event Athlete

Athletics Javelin Throw — Women Kelsey-Lee Barber

Canoe — Slalom C1 Team — Women Jessica Fox

Noemie Fox

Rosalyn Lawrence

Cricket Twenty20 World Cup Team — Australia

Cycling — BMX Freestyle Freestyle Park — Men Brandon Loupos

Cycling — Road Individual Time Trial — Men Rohan Dennis

Cycling — Track Scratch — Women Ella Sibley

Diving 3M Springboard Synchro — Mixed Maddison Keeney

Matthew Carter

Freestyle Skiing Aerials — Women Laura Peel

Rowing Four Women Katrina Werry

Lucy Stephan

Olympia Aldersey

Sarah Hawe

Sailing 470 — Men Matthew Belcher

William Ryan

Sailing Laser — Men Tom Burton

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Sport Event Athlete

Shooting Trap — Team — Mixed James Willett

Laetisha Scanlan

Snowboard Freestyle Overall — Men Scott James

Snowboard Halfpipe — Men Scott James

Swimming 4 x 100m Freestyle Relay — Women Brianna Throssell

Bronte Campbell

Cate Campbell

Emma McKeon

Madison Wilson

Swimming 4 x 100m Medley Relay — Mixed Bronte Campbell

Cate Campbell

Emma McKeon

Matthew Temple

Matthew Wilson

Minna Atherton

Mitch Larkin

Swimming 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay — Men Alexander Graham

Clyde Lewis

Jack McLoughlin

Kyle Chalmers

Mack Horton

Thomas Fraser-Holmes

Swimming 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay — Women Ariarne Titmus

Brianna Throssell

Emma McKeon

Kiah Melverton

Leah Neale

Madison Wilson

Swimming 400m Freestyle — Women Ariarne Titmus

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Table 35: 2019-20 World Champions at Benchmark Events — Paralympic disciplines

Sport Event Athlete

Athletics — Para 100M T36 — Men James Turner

Athletics — Para 400M T36 — Men James Turner

Athletics — Para 800M T53 — Women Madison De Rozario

Athletics — Para 1500m T13 — Men Jaryd Clifford

Athletics — Para 500m T13 — Men Jaryd Clifford

Athletics — Para Javelin Throw F38 — Men Corey Anderson

Athletics — Para Long Jump T63 — Women Vanessa Low

Athletics — Para Shot Put F38 — Men Cameron Crombie

Canoe Sprint — Para Canoe Single VL3 200m — Men Curtis McGrath

Canoe Sprint — Para Kayak Single KL2 200m — Men Curtis McGrath

Cycling Road — Para C2 — Time Trial — Men Darren Hicks

Cycling Road — Para C3 — Time Trial — Men David Nicholas

Cycling Road — Para C3 — Time Trial — Women Paige Greco

Cycling Road — Para C4 — Time Trial — Women Emily Petricola

Cycling Road — Para C5 — Time Trial — Men Alistair Donohoe

Cycling Road — Para H1 — Road Race — Women Emilie Miller

Cycling Road — Para H1 — Time Trial — Women Emilie Miller

Cycling Road — Para T2 — Road Race — Women Carol Cooke

Cycling Road — Para T2 — Time Trial — Women Carol Cooke

Cycling Track — Para C2 — 500m Time Trial — Women Amanda Reid

Cycling Track — Para C2 — Scratch Race — Women Amanda Reid

Cycling Track — Para C3 — 3km Pursuit — Men David Nicholas

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Sport Event Athlete

Cycling Track — Para C3 — 3km Pursuit — Women Paige Greco

Cycling Track — Para C4 — 3km Pursuit — Women Emily Petricola

Cycling Track — Para C4 — Omnium — Women Emily Petricola

Cycling Track — Para C4 — Scratch Race — Women Emily Petricola

Cycling Track — Para C5 — Scratch Race — Men Alistair Donohoe

Rowing — Para PR2 — Single Sculls — Women Kathryn Ross

Swimming — Para 100M Breaststroke SB7 0 Women Tiffany Thomas Kane

Swimming — Para 400M Freestyle S9 — Women Lakeisha Patterson

Triathlon — Para PTWC — Women Lauren Parker

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Appendix 2: ASC Award recipients

AIS Sport Performance Awards  

Sport Personality of the Year (People’s Choice) 

Ash Barty (Tennis)  

The Queenslander’s breakthrough French Open singles triumph was the first by an Australian woman since Margaret Court in 1973; two weeks later the 23-year-old became the world No. 1, joining a national honour roll completed by Evonne Goolagong Cawley, John Newcombe, Pat Rafter and Lleyton Hewitt. 

Sporting Moment of the Year (People’s Choice) 

Ash Barty (Tennis)  

With clay her least favoured surface, the French Open was never Barty’s preferred major, yet the world No.8 progressed irresistibly through a wide-open draw to become Australia’s first singles champion at Roland Garros in 46 years. In her maiden grand slam singles final, the Queenslander dominated unseeded Czech teenager Marketa Vondrousova 6-1, 6-3. 

Male Athlete of the Year 

Scotty James (Snowboard) 

James enjoyed another exceptional snowboard season, winning every event he entered — including an unprecedented third consecutive halfpipe title at the FIS World Championships in Park City, Utah. A young veteran of 25, James finished the season with wins at The Dew Tour, X Games, US Grand Prix, Laax Open and the US Burton Open. 

Female Athlete of the Year 

Ash Barty (Tennis) 

The Queenslander’s breakthrough French Open singles triumph was the first by an Australian woman since Margaret Court in 1973 and, two weeks later, the 23-year-old became just the nation’s fifth No.1 since rankings began. Top spot was where Barty would finish 2019, too, as the first Australian woman to do so, having earned four titles, including the prestigious season-ending WTA Finals in Shenzhen. 

Male Para-athlete of the Year 

Curtis McGrath (Para-canoe)  

McGrath lived up to expectations in 2019 by successfully defending his KL2 200m and VL3 200m world titles at the 2019 ICF Para-canoe World Championships in Hungary. These were his ninth and 10th consecutive world titles. The 31-year-old drew the curtain on 2019 with gold in the VL3 200m and silver in the KL200m at the Olympic test event in Tokyo. 

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Female Para-athlete of the Year 

Melissa Perrine (Para-skiing)  

A triple Paralympian and dual medallist from Pyeongchang in 2018, Perrine partnered with sighted guide Bobbi Kelly to deliver a stand-out international season. Together, they earned 12 medals on the Para Alpine World Cup Circuit competing in the B2 visually impaired category, while finishing second on the overall Para Alpine Standings for the year. At the 2019 Para-alpine World Championships in Slovenia, they won four medals — gold in the Super Combined, silver in the Giant Slalom and Super G, and a bronze in Slalom. 

Emerging Athlete of the Year 

Amy Lawton (Hockey) 

Recognition comes early sometimes, and the national selectors had clearly identified a special talent when they chose the 17-year-old high school student to make her debut for the Hockeyroos in the Pacific leg of the FIH Pro League. Having scored a goal in that Anzac Day match in New Zealand, the VIS scholarship-holder was then selected for the Oceania Cup Olympic qualification event, and later played against Russia in Perth, where, in the opening match, Lawton continued an impressive run of scoring.  

Athlete Community Engagement Award 

Jenna O’Hea (Basketball) 

The late-2018 suicide of her uncle took a huge toll on O’Hea’s family, but it was also the genesis of the WNBL’s “Lifeline Round”. In what will become an annual event, each three-point shot made by every team prompted a $100 donation that was matched by the league. The result: over $15,000 was donated to Lifeline Australia to assist in the training of crisis staff. Determined to raise suicide awareness and de-stigmatise mental health issues, O’Hea is also an AIS and Lifeline Community Custodian. 

Coach of the Year Award 

Michael Blackburn (Sailing) 

As head coach of the Laser Class for the Australian Sailing Team, Blackburn leads a squad of five athletes, including Tokyo-bound soon-to-be Olympian Matt Wearn and celebrated Rio Olympic Laser gold medallist Tom Burton. Within a small group resides vast talent, though, for both Wearn and Burton’s results have been world-leading. At least one of the pair, who filled the top two placings at the 2019 world championships in a rare Australian quinella, has featured on the podium at the majority of international regattas over the past 12 months. 

Award for Leadership 

Lynne Anderson (Paralympics Australia)  

As CEO of Paralympics Australia since 2015, Anderson has led a management team that has made significant progress addressing organisational reform, including rebuilding its financial strength and consolidating its position as Australia’s peak body for disability sport. Indeed, the beginning of a new era was hailed in 2019 with the rebranding of the organisation formerly known as the Australian Paralympic Committee.

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Sport Australia Award 

Hockeyroos  

Season one of hockey’s pro-league saw both our men’s and women’s teams enjoy success but it was one moment in a game between the Hockeyroos and Belgium that deserved celebration. Just before half-time, a goal was awarded to Australia with both the field referee and subsequent video referral in agreement, however, Hockeyroo Emily Chalker admitted she did not touch the ball and forced the decision to be overturned, as there was no attacking touch in the scoring circle. Australia went on to lose the game but won the respect of the hockey community for displaying the true spirit of sport. 

Team of the Year 

Mat Belcher and Will Ryan (Sailing)  

Belcher and Ryan continued to re-write the history books with another dominant year in the 470 Class to maintain their world No. 1 ranking. At the 2019 Open 470 World Championship in Japan, Mat notched his eighth world title and Will his fifth in what was the pair’s fifth crown as a team — the most ever in the 470 class. The Rio Olympics silver medallists were pre-selected in the team for Tokyo 2020. 

High Performance Program of the Year 

Rowing Australia  

Australia won 15 gold, 13 silver and nine bronze medals during the 2019 season, including world championship-winning performances from Lucy Stephan, Katrina Werry, Sarah Hawe and Olympia Aldersey in the Women’s Four in Austria, and from Kathryn Ross, who returned from a post-Rio break to win the Para PR2 Women’s Single sculls on the same course in August. Australia’s overall performances at the two 2019 World Cups delivered 3 of 3 the coveted 2019 World Rowing Cup for the first time.

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ASC Media Awards

The 17th Annual ASC Media Awards were held in Sydney on 13 February 2020, recognising excellence in sports journalism and broadcasting and the role of the media in connecting Australians with sport. The awards focus on analytical and insightful reporting and the presentation of sport and sporting issues, with the ultimate aim of fostering improved coverage of key issues within sport.   

Sixteen awards were presented, including the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Table 36: ASC Media Awards recipients

Award 2018 Winner

Lifetime achievement award for sports journalism  Karen Tighe

Best reporting of an issue in sport  Shark Island Productions, ‘The Final Quarter’

Best sport coverage by an individual — broadcast Gerard Whateley, SEN Radio and Fox Footy

Best sport coverage by an individual — written Konrad Marshall, Good Weekend

Best sport coverage by an individual — digital  Mary Konstantopoulos, Ladies Who League

Best coverage of a sporting event The Age & The Sydney Morning Herald, ‘The Ashes’

Best sport profile — broadcast Josh Cable, Marcus Cobbledick, ‘Collingwood:

From the Inside Out’, Good Thing Productions

Best sport profile — written Samantha Lane, ‘Adam Goodes’, The Sydney Morning

Herald & The Age

Best coverage of sport for people with disability ABC, ‘Invictus Games 2018’

Best regional, rural and suburban sport coverage Stuart Walmsley, RUGBY.com.au

Best depiction of inclusive sport Media Stockade, ‘Power Meri’

Best contribution to sport via digital media The Herald Sun, ‘Sacked’

Best analysis of sport business Tracey Holmes, The Ticket, ABC

Best sports photography Michael Willson, ‘The Kick’, AFL Photos

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Appendix 3: Funding to sports Table 37: 2019/20 Funding to Sports Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Paralympics Australia 8,334,280 300,000 0 8,634,280 Archery 1,545,685 100,000 75,000 1,720,685

Athletics 10,742,326 450,000 391,000 11,583,326

Badminton 710,000 325,000 0 1,035,000

Baseball 954,804 812,500 0 1,767,304

Basketball 6,660,029 950,000 867,500 8,477,529

BMX 0 200,000 125,000 325,000

Bocce 0 50,000 0 50,000

Bowls 1,027,200 650,000 745,000 2,422,200

Boxing 1,248,436 50,000 0 1,298,436

Paddle 8,288,359 200,000 183,500 8,671,859

Cycling 10,790,825 450,000 350,000 11,590,825

Diving 4,126,194 50,000 0 4,176,194

141

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Equestrian* 3,022,234 450,000 0 3,472,234

Fencing 300,000 50,000 0 350,000

Football 2,203,749 0 1,169,000 3,372,749

Golf 1,319,500 650,000 700,000 2,669,500

Gymnastics 2,536,322 950,000 620,000 4,106,322

Hockey 7,460,961 650,000 545,000 8,655,961

Ice Racing 0 50,000 0 50,000

Judo 1,259,252 100,000 0 1,359,252

Karate 0 100,000 0 100,000

Lacrosse 0 100,000 0 100,000

Modern Pentathlon 69,150 0 0 69,150

Motor Sport 0 200,000 19,530 219,530

Motorcycling 0 100,000 0 100,000

Mountain Bike 0 0 57,500 57,500

Netball 2,841,789 950,000 2,600,000 6,391,789

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Olympic Winter Institute 5,252,645 0 20,000 5,272,645

Orienteering 0 100,000 0 100,000

Polocrosse 0 50,000 0 50,000

Pony Club 0 100,000 87,500 187,500

Rowing 12,218,793 200,000 145,500 12,564,293

Rugby League 0 0 375,000 375,000

Rugby Union 2,721,520 0 350,000 3,071,520

Sailing 8,736,000 650,000 158,272 9,544,272

Shooting 3,010,250 200,000 50,000 3,260,250

Skate 908,000 0 0 908,000

Snow 2,856,079 450,000 150,000 3,456,079

Softball 2,214,354 450,000 0 2,664,354

Squash 1,160,000 450,000 106,500 1,716,500

Surf Life Saving 0 650,000 265,000 915,000

Surfing 1,977,993 450,000 398,600 2,826,593

143

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Swimming 11,245,670 650,000 375,000 12,270,670

Artistic Swimming 300,000 0 0 300,000

Table Tennis 966,947 200,000 183,000 1,349,947

Taekwondo 723,004 200,000 60,000 983,004

Tenpin Bowling 0 450,000 175,000 625,000

Touch Football 0 650,000 125,000 775,000

Triathlon 3,197,286 450,000 225,000 3,872,286

University Sport 0 50,000 225,000 275,000

Volleyball 2,751,513 225,000 125,000 3,101,513

Water Polo 3,806,927 200,000 0 4,006,927

Waterski & Wakeboard 0 100,000 0 100,000

Weightlifting 662,600 50,000 0 712,600

Wrestling 0 50,000 0 50,000

NSO TOTALS 140,150,676 15,962,500 12,047,402 168,160,578

Sport Inclusion Australia 0 100,000 302,500 402,500

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Blind Sports 0 65,000 0 65,000

Deaf Sports 0 85,000 0 85,000

Disability Sports 0 210,000 217,000 427,000

Disabled Wintersport 0 60,000 0 60,000

Riding for the Disabled 0 100,000 0 100,000

Special Olympics 0 545,000 800,000 1,345,000

Transplant 0 70,000 0 70,000

NSOD TOTALS 0 1,235,000 1,319,500 2,554,500

OVERALL TOTALS 140,150,676 17,197,500 13,366,902 170,715,078

Notes:

High Performance includes — High Performance (incl. $1m to Diving, $240k to Judo, $2.5m to Rowing and $470k to Sailing for 2020/21 activities), Performance Support, Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement, Performance Pathways (for a two-year period commencing in 2019/20), Performance Pathways Solutions, Rapid Impact Investment Fund, High Performance Infrastructure funding and other high performance related one-off initiatives.

Investment to Modern Pentathlon includes all assistance made directly to elite athletes and coaches.

Combat Centre — funding paid to Judo.

*An amount of $754,543 was returned to the AIS and has been ring-fenced for High Performance Equestrian outcomes.

Participation includes — Participation and Core Participation (incl. $162.5k to Baseball for 2020/21 activities).

Other includes — One Management, Women Leaders in Sport, Move it AUS-Better Ageing grants, Move it AUS-Participation grants, AIS Research grants and other one-off initiatives.

145

Appendix 4: Contact officers

Chair/ASC CEO/AIS CEO

Australian Sports Commission Leverrier Street BRUCE ACT 2617

or

PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Fax: (02) 6214 1836

Distribution officer

Governance Australian Sports Commission PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Fax: (02) 6214 1836 Email: publications@sportaus.gov.au

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Appendix 5: Summary of Compliance The ASC is bound by legislative requirements to disclose certain information in its annual report. The main requirements are detailed in the PGPA Act, Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) and the ASC Act. Table 38: Mandatory Table — Summary of Compliance PGPA Rule Reference  Part of Report  Description  Requirement  17BE  Contents of Annual Report    17BE(a)  In’About Us’ Details of the legislation establishing the body  Mandatory 

17BE(b)(i)  Enabling Legislation A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in

legislation 

Mandatory 

17BE(b)(ii)  Our Purpose The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for

the reporting period 

Mandatory 

17BE(c)  Ministerial Direction The names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or

responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers 

Mandatory 

17BE(d)  Ministerial Direction Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument

during the reporting period 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(e)  Ministerial Direction Any government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during

the reporting period under section 22 of the Act 

If applicable, mandatory 

147

PGPA Rule Reference  Part of Report  Description  Requirement  17BE(f)  Not Applicable Particulars of noncompliance with: 

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or 

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(g)  Our Performance Annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of

the Act and section 16F of the rule 

Mandatory 

17BE(h), 17BE(i) 

Compliance A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under

paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to noncompliance with finance law and action taken to remedy noncompliance 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(j)  Mandatory Table included in Board Activity Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period  Mandatory 

17BE(k)  Our Organisation Structure Outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any

subsidiaries of the entity) 

Mandatory 

17BE(ka)  Our People except for staff location which is

under ‘About Us’

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non ongoing basis, including the following: 

(a) statistics on fulltime employees; 

(b) statistics on parttime employees; 

(c) statistics on gender; 

(d) statistics on staff location 

Mandatory 

17BE(l)  About Us Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or

facilities of the entity 

Mandatory 

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

PGPA Rule Reference  Part of Report  Description  Requirement  17BE(m)  Planning and Accountability Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period  Mandatory 

17BE(n), 17BE(o) 

Financial Statements For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST): 

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and 

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(p)  Our Organisation Structure Any significant activities and changes that affected the operation or

structure of the entity during the reporting period 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(q)  Judiciary Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals

that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity  If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(r)  Reports by the ANAO

Decisions by the Commonwealth Ombudsman

Decisions by the Australian information Commissioner

Particulars of any reports on the entity given by: 

(a) the Auditor General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or 

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or 

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or 

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(s)  The Australian Sports Foundation — while

not a subsidiary of the ASC, the ASC Act requires us to report on the state of affairs of the ASF

An explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report  If applicable, mandatory 

149

PGPA Rule Reference  Part of Report  Description  Requirement  17BE(t)  Indemnities and Insurance Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs) 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BE(taa)  Finance Audit and Risk Committee —

includes mandatory table

The following information about the audit committee for the entity: 

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee; 

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee; 

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee; 

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee; 

(e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee 

Mandatory 

17BE(ta)  Mandatory Tables included in Board Activity

Section

Information about executive remuneration  Mandatory 

17BF  Disclosure requirements for government business enterprises  

17BF(1)(a)(i)  N/A An assessment of significant changes in the entity’s overall financial

structure and financial conditions 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BF(1)(a)(ii)  N/A An assessment of any events or risks that could cause financial

information that is reported not to be indicative of future operations or financial conditions 

If applicable, mandatory 

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

PGPA Rule Reference  Part of Report  Description  Requirement  17BF(1)(b)   N/A Information on dividends paid or recommended  If applicable, mandatory 

17BF(1)(c)  N/A Details of any community service obligations the government business

enterprise has including: 

(a) an outline of actions taken to fulfil those obligations; and 

(b) an assessment of the cost of fulfilling those obligations 

If applicable, mandatory 

17BF(2)  N/A A statement regarding the exclusion of information on the grounds that

the information is commercially sensitive and would be likely to result in unreasonable commercial prejudice to the government business enterprise 

If applicable, mandatory 

151

Shortened forms

AIS Australian Institute of Sport

APC Australian Paralympic Committee

ASC Australian Sports Commission

ASF Australian Sports Foundation

ASPAs AIS Sport Performance Awards

ASPR Annual Sport Performance Review

AW&E Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement

BCP Business Continuity Plan

CMO Chief Medical Officer

CSI Community Sport Infrastructure

ETC European Training Centre

FTE Full-time Equivalent

HSRs Health and Safety Representatives

IC Information Commissioner

IPC International Paralympic Committee

MHRN Mental Health Referral Network

NHPSS National High-Performance Sports Strategy

NSOD National sporting organisation for people with disabilities

NSO National sporting organisation

OAIC Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

PA Paralympics Australia

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability

PP Pandemic Plan

RAP Reconciliation Action Plan

WHS Work health and safety

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Index

A

abbreviations 151

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 39, 51, 57

accountability 77

accountable authority details 69-70

aggregate assets and liabilities 127

air quality 16, 25, 33, 34

AIS see Australian Institute of Sport

AIS ELEVATE 34

AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment 16, 31, 33, 36, 78, 79

AIS Medicine 36

AIS Site Revitalisation Capital Investment Proposal 79

AIS Sport Performance Awards see ASPAs

Aldersey, Olympia 138

Anderson, Lynne 137

annual performance statements 23-39

Annual Sport Performance Review (ASPR) 32

ASC see Australian Sports Commission

ASC Enterprise Agreement 72

ASC Media Awards 139

ASPAs (AIS Sport Performance Awards) 136-138

ASPR see Annual Sport Performance Review

asset management 86

Athlete Availability Program 34

Athlete Community Engagement Award 137

athlete wellbeing 10, 13, 33

see also Mental Health Referral Network

Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) 33, 37, 79

athletes with a disability see NSODs; para-sports

Auditor-General’s report 88-89

audits 80, 81, 88-89

AusPlay survey 21, 26

Australian Information Commissioner 82

Australian Institute of Sport (AIS)

athlete experiences at 80

campus (Canberra) 18, 79

Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre 53

effect of COVID-19 on 16

executive report 16-17

high-performance camps 33

modernisation project 11, 17, 55

National High-Performance Sport Strategy 2024 11, 16, 33, 36, 55

organisational structure 42

purpose 20

scholarship holders online history 57

Site Revitalisation Capital Investment Proposal 79

see also Australian Sports Commission (ASC); European Training Centre; high-performance sport; Pizzey Park training centre; Sport Australia

Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) see Paralympics Australia

Australian Sport Data Network (ASDN) 34

Australian sporting environment 21

Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 18, 58

Australian Sports Commission (ASC)

about 18

functions of 18, 58-59

governance 18, 72, 76-81

153

history 18

objects of 58

office closures 19

organisational structure 20, 42

progress 13

risk to reputation 80

staff and program locations 18-19

vision 20

see also Australian Institute of Sport (AIS); Sport Australia

Australian Sports Commission Board

activity 67-68

committees 71-72

members 60-66

Australian Sports Foundation Ltd (ASF) 129

authority and directions 58-59

Award of Funding under the Community Sport Infrastructure Grants Program report 82

Award for Leadership 137

awards 136-139

B

Barty, Ash 136

basketball 11, 137

Beauchamp, Glenys 66

Belcher, Mat 138

benchmark events 132-135

Better Ageing grants program 15, 25

Bite Back program 34

Blackburn, Michael 137

broadcasting of sport see media; sports broadcasting

budget estimates 86

Building the capability of sport... outcome

case study 31

key activities 30

results 31-32

bushfires

effect on ASC staff and athletes 77

effect on sport 10, 16, 25

Business Continuity Plan 44

C

Career Practitioner Referral Network 79

cash flow statement 95-96, 126

Chair’s Report 10-12

Chalker, Emily 138

Chief Executive Officer’s report 14-15

childcare centre 53

children’s participation in sport see Local Sporting Champions grants; physical literacy; Sporting Schools program

Clearinghouse for Sport 27

Coach of the Year award 137

coaching 17, 79

Colbeck, Richard 21, 59

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework 80

Commonwealth Ombudsman 82

Community Perceptions of Sport Survey 105

Community Sport Infrastructure Grants Program 25, 80, 82

compliance 81

compliance summary 146-150

Conde, Peter 16-17

Conflict of Interest Policy and Guidelines 80

contact officers 145

corporate governance see governance

corporate partners 52

Corporate Plan (2019-2023) 20

Corporate Plan (2020-2024) 77

154

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

COVID-19 pandemic

closure of AIS due to 25

economic effect on ASC 98-99

effect on ASC staff 77

effect on athletes 78, 79

effect on sport 14-15, 16, 21, 25, 32, 33

online engagement during 14

support for ASC staff during 44

see also Return to Sport Toolkit

Creating national pride... outcome

case studies 36, 38

key activities 33-34

results 35-37

cricket, T20 women’s 11

critical incident framework 34

Customer Relationship Management System 77

Cycling Australia 30

D

dAIS (athlete incentive funding program) 10, 13

Dalton, Rob 14-15, 43, 71

decision making 80

Delahunty, Hugh 65, 70

departmental leases 127

digital capability of NSOs 30

disability sports see NSODs; para-sports

Downes, Pippa 63, 70

E

eating disorders 38

Edwards, Caroline 66, 70

electricity usage 56

Emerging Athlete of the Year 137

employees see staff

energy usage 56

Enterprise Learning and Leadership Program 43

environmental initiatives 56-57

Environmental Management System 57

equity, statement of changes in see statement of changes in equity

European Training Centre (Varese, Italy) 18, 33, 55

evidence-based decision making 80

executive remuneration 72-75

executive reports 14-17

external scrutiny 82

F

Farmer, Pat 63, 69

Fearnley, Kurt 64, 70

Female Athlete of the Year 136

female athletes see women’s sport

Female Para-athlete of the Year 137

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 11

Finance, Audit and Risk Committee 71

financial outcomes summary 86

financial statements 91-127

Football Federation Australia 15

football (soccer) 11, 15, 17

Fraud Control Plan 81

Freedom of Information Act 1982 82

freedom of information requests 82

funding of athletes see dAIS

funding of sports 140-144

see also grants and grant allocations

155

G

gas usage 56

GMR Online 34

Gold Medal Ready (GMR) Digital Transformation Strategy 34

governance 76-81

Governance and Executive Performance Committee 72

Governance Principles see Sport Governance Principles

governance reform, for NSOs and NSODs 30

grants and grant allocations 13, 15, 25, 80, 140-144

H

Hawe, Sarah 138

heritage 57

Heritage and Culture Committee 57

High Performance Program of the Year 138

high-performance sport

AIS camps 33, 34

AIS grants to 13

coaching 16, 34, 36, 79

funding for 33, 37, 79, 140-144

grants to NSOs for 17

mental health in 10, 34, 38, 79, 137

results 132-135

hockey 137, 138

Hockey Australia 30, 31

Hockeyroos 138

Hughes, David 16, 33, 36

human resources management

tables 46-49

see also staff

I

inclusive sport 15

indemnities and insurance 81

independent auditor’s report 88-89

Indigenous Australians 39, 51, 57

Indigenous Literacy Foundation 51

Information Publication Scheme 82

insurance 81

integrity in sport 20

internal audit program 80, 81

investment in sport 10-11

Ireland, Andrew 64, 70

J

James, Scotty 136

JobKeeper financial support 14

judicial decisions 82

junior sport see children’s participation in sport; Sporting Schools program; youth sport

K

key activities

Building the capability of sport... 30

Creating national pride... 33-34

More Australians move more often 25

key management personnel remuneration 73-75, 117

key outcomes 20

Building the capability of sport... 30-32

Creating national pride... 33-39

More Australians move more often 25-29

Kings Cup for rowing 57

156

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

L

Laing, Amanda 65, 70

Lawton, Amy 137

letter of transmittal 3

Lifeline Community Custodian Program 34, 137

Local Sporting Champions grants 13

M

McGrath, Curtis 136

Male Athlete of the Year 136

Male Para-athlete of the Year 136

mandatory data tables 146-150

marketing of sport 30

Matildas football team 11

media 139

mental health

of athletes 10, 17, 34, 38, 79

of staff 77, 79

Mental Health Referral Network (MHRN) 17, 34, 38, 79

Minister for Sport 59

ministerial directions 59

Mitchell, Andrea 11, 60, 70

Moneghetti, Stephen 61, 69

More Australians move... outcome

case studies 27-29

key activities 25

results 26-27

Morris, Jennifer 62, 69

Move It AUS campaign 13, 15, 25, 28

N

National High-Performance Sport Strategy 2024 11, 16, 33, 36, 55

National Institute Network (NIN), input on renewal of AIS facilities 17

National Performance Pathways Strategy 33, 34

National principles for the resumption of sport and recreation activities 31

National Reconciliation Week 39, 51

National Redress Scheme 44

national sporting organisations see NSOs

national sporting organisations for people with disability see NSODs

NIN see National Institute Network

notifiable WHS incidents 50

NSODs (national sporting organisations for people with disability) 15, 30, 32, 143-144

NSOs (national sporting organisations)

delivering participation outcomes 78

digital capability of 78

funding for 140-143

grants for high-performance pathways 17

input on renewal of AIS facilities 17

transition to whole of sport business model 30, 78

workshops for 30

see also Annual Sport Performance Review; Community Sport Infrastructure grants program; SportAUS Connect platform; Sporting Schools program; Sport.Scan

157

O

office closures 19

O’Hea, Jenna 137

Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo, 2020), postponement of 10, 16, 21, 25, 79

online engagement during COVID-19 14

operational highlights 53-54

organisation chart 42

Outcome: Building the capability of sport...

case study 31

key activities 30

results 31-32

Outcome: Creating national pride...

case studies 36, 38-39

key activities 33-34

results 35-37

Outcome: More Australians move...

case studies 27-29

key activities 25

results 26-27

P

Palmer, Kate 43

Pandemic Management Plan 44, 79

Pandemic Sub-Committee 44

Para-athletes of the Year 136-137

para-canoeing 136

para-skiing 137

para-sports 11, 13, 17

awards 136-137

funding for 143-144

world champions 134-135

see also NSODs; Olympic and Paralympic Games

Paralympics Australia 137, 140

Participation grants program 13, 15, 25, 140-144

participation in sport see AusPlay survey; Move It AUS campaign; Physical Literacy Framework; Sport 2030; Sporting Schools program

performance against deliverables

analysis 25

key outcome — Building the capability of sport... 30-32

key outcome — Creating national pride... 33-39

key outcome — More Australians move... 25-29

performance highlights 132-135

Performance Pathways funding 33

performance statements 24-38

Perrine, Melissa 137

PGPA Act see Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

physical activity guidelines 21, 25-29

physical literacy 15, 25, 27-28

Physical Literacy Framework 15

Pizzey Park (Gold Coast) sports training centre 18, 55

planning and accountability 77

Play for Purpose charity raffle 30

Plympton, Andrew 62, 69, 71

Portfolio Budget Statements (2019-20), Outcome 1 20

privacy 82

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 24, 77-81

158

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

R

Reconciliation Action Plan 43, 51, 57

recycling 57

related party disclosures 118

remuneration of key management personnel 72-75, 117

Return to Sport Toolkit 14, 30, 31

risk management 77-80

Ross, Kathryn 138

Rowing Australia 138

rugby 7s 17

Ryan, Will 138

S

sailing 137, 138

schools

sport and physical activity in 26, 29

see also Sporting Schools program

senior Australians’ participation 15, 25

Share a Yarn program 34, 39

shortened forms 151

site management 55

Smith, Beki 39

smoke haze 16, 25, 33, 34

snowboarding 136

Sport 2030 (national sports plan) 36, 77

sport, community perceptions of 35

Sport Australia

executive report 14-15

organisational structure 42

responsibilities 20

see also Australian Institute of Sport (AIS); Australian Sports Commission (ASC)

Sport Australia Award 138

Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor 35

Sport Design System 30

Sport Governance Principles 30

Sport Personality of the Year award 136

SportAUS Connect platform 30

sporting environment 21

Sporting Moment of the Year 136

sporting organisations see NSODs; NSOs

Sporting Schools program 13, 15, 25, 28-29, 78

sports broadcasting 139

sports funding 140-144

sports governance structures 11, 15, 30

sports journalism 139

Sport.Scan (organisational development tool) 32

staff

ASC Enterprise Agreement 72

employment conditions 43

gender profile 45

location of 19

profile 45-49

support for during COVID-19 pandemic 44

work health and safety 50

working from home 77

statement by the Commissioner re annual performance statements 24

statement of changes in equity 97, 125

statement of comprehensive income 91-92, 123

statement of financial position 93-94, 124

statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer 90

Stephan, Lucy 138

159

strategies 20

summary of compliance 146-150

summary of financial outcomes 86

Suncorp 15

Supply Nation 51

surfing 17

Swimming Analysis tool 34

T

T20 cricket 11

Talent Pathways 34, 79

Team Girls initiative 15

Team of the Year 138

technology 30, 34, 36, 43, 44, 55, 77

Technology Roadmap project 77

tennis 136

Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games see Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo, 2020)

Trainor, Gabrielle 61, 69

V

Varese (Italy) sports training centre see European Training Centre

W

Walking Football 15

waste management and recycling 57

water usage 56

Werry, Katrina 138

Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022 11

women’s sport 11, 15, 136

work health and safety 50

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 50

Work Health and Safety Policy 50

workforce 43-49

working from home 77

WorkSafe Committee 50

world champions 132-135

Wylie, John 10-12, 24, 60, 69

Y

youth sport 13, 15

see also Local Sporting Champions grants; Sporting Schools program

Yulunga Traditional Indigenous Games 51

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO BOX 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 +61 2 6214 1111

SportAUS.gov.au