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Australian War Memorial—Report for 2019-20


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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2019-20

Annual report for the year ended 30 June 2020, together with the financial statements and the report of the Auditor-General

Australian War Memorial Annual Report 2019-2020 Annual report for the year ended 30 June 2020, together with the financial statements and the report of the Auditor-General

Copyright © Australian War Memorial

ISSN 1441 4198

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced, copied, scanned, stored in a retrieval system, recorded, or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Cover image: The Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial before the 2020 Anzac Day Dawn Service. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the ceremony was attended by a small number of dignitaries including the Governor-General, the Prime Minister, the Chief of the Defence Force and the Chairman of the Australian War Memorial, and was nationally televised. Projected on the building was the name Private George William Harold Manning, who is listed on the Memorial’s Roll of Honour. Manning was wounded during the Gallipoli landing, and later died of wounds received at Lone Pine. Photographer: Sean Davey AWM2020.4.37.317.

Australian War Memorial GPO Box 345 Canberra, ACT 2601 Australia

02 6243 4211

www.awm.gov.au

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ACCEPTANCE OF THE REPORT

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Table of Contents Acceptance of the report ..................................................................................................................................... 1

Governance................................................................................................................................................................ 4

Enabling legislation .......................................................................................................................................... 4

Governance structure....................................................................................................................................... 4

Purpose.................................................................................................................................................................. 4

Location ................................................................................................................................................................. 5

Responsible Minister ........................................................................................................................................ 5

Accountable authority ..................................................................................................................................... 6

Members of Council ...................................................................................................................................... 7

Organisation structure .............................................................................................................................. 12

Organisation chart...................................................................................................................................... 12

Organisational demographics ................................................................................................................... 13

Current period (2019-2020) ................................................................................................................... 13

Previous period (2018-2019) .................................................................................................................. 13

Executive remuneration ............................................................................................................................... 14

Information about remuneration for senior executives ................................................................ 15

Information about remuneration for key staff ................................................................................. 15

Audit committee ............................................................................................................................................. 16

Annual performance statements ................................................................................................................... 17

Outcome 1 ........................................................................................................................................................ 17

Output 1.1 Commemorative events ...................................................................................................... 17

Output 1.2 The National Memorial and grounds .............................................................................. 19

Output 1.3 The National Collection ....................................................................................................... 21

Output 1.4 Exhibitions ............................................................................................................................... 23

Output 1.5 Interpretive services ............................................................................................................. 25

Output 1.6 Promotions and community services ............................................................................ 27

Output 1.7 Research, information and dissemination .................................................................... 29

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Output 1.8 Visitor Services ...................................................................................................................... 31

Annual financial statements ............................................................................................................................ 33

Legislative compliance ....................................................................................................................................... 62

Advertising and Marketing ...................................................................................................................... 62

Energy consumption and environmental management ............................................................... 62

Appendix A: List of requirements - corporate commonwealth entities ........................................ 64

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GOVERNANCE

Enabling legislation

The Australian War Memorial is established as a corporation by the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 (the Act). The Memorial’s functions and powers, its ministerial oversight, and the role and functions of its Council, Chair, and Director are outlined in the Act.

Governance structure

The Act allows for the appointment of a Council and a Director as Chief Executive Officer of the Memorial.

The performance of the Memorial and the accountability of its Council and management are subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, which imposes key reporting, financial, and pecuniary obligations on the Memorial and its Council members. Many of these are modelled on provisions which apply under corporations law, particularly those for directors.

The Memorial is subject to other acts that bear on its operation, and is accountable to government through the Minister for Veterans' Affairs and Minister for Defence Personnel. It has a strong link to the Department of Finance for budgetary processes, appropriations, grants, and financial management processes, and it follows the advice and guidance provided by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). The Memorial adheres to Australian accounting standards in the preparation of its financial reports and follows best practice in its financial management.

Purpose

Drawing from the functions of the Memorial as described in the Australian War Memorial Act 1980, the purpose of the Australian War Memorial is to commemorate the sacrifice of those Australians who have died in war or on operational service and those who have served our nation in times of conflict.

The Australian War Memorial Act 1980 Part II, section 5, states:

1. The functions of the Memorial are:

a) to maintain and develop the national memorial referred to in subsection 6(1) of the Australian War Memorial Act 1962 as a national memorial of Australian who have died:

i. on or as a result of active service; or ii. as a result of any war or warlike operations in which Australians have been on active service;

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b) to develop and maintain, as an integral part of the national memorial referred to in paragraph (a), a national collection of historical material;

c) to exhibit, or to make available for exhibition by others, historical material that is otherwise in the possession of the Memorial;

d) to conduct, arrange for and assist in research into matters pertaining to the Australian military history; and

e) to disseminate information relating to:

i. Australian military history; ii. the national memorial referred to in paragraph (a); iii. the memorial collection; and iv. the Memorial and its functions.

2. The Memorial shall use every endeavour to make the most advantageous use of the material collection in the national interests.

These functions provide the framework around which the Memorial undertakes its core functions of commemoration, education, and research. As the custodian of Australia’s military history, the Memorial works to maintain a place for solemn reflection; develop, maintain and exhibit a collection of historically significant material; provide an authoritative reference facility; and conduct, disseminate, and assist with research into Australia’s military history.

Location

The Memorial's main site is located at the northern end of Anzac Parade in Campbell in the Australian Capital Territory, with storage and collection facilities approximately nine kilometres away in the northern Canberra suburb of Mitchell.

Responsible Minister

The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Minister for Defence Personnel has portfolio responsibility for the Memorial. During the reporting year the Honourable Darren Chester MP was the minister responsible for the Memorial.

Minister Chester has the following portfolio responsibilities:

• Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and • Minister for Defence Personnel

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Accountable authority

The Council of the Australian War Memorial is established by section 9 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980. The Council is responsible for the conduct and control of the affairs of the Memorial, and the policy of the Memorial with respect to matters as determined by the Council.

Name Position

title/Position held

Executive/Non-Executive

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Date of commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of accountable authority attended

Mr Kerry Stokes AC Council

(Chairman); Remuneration Committee

Aug-07 4

The Honourable Anthony (Tony) Abbott AC Council Oct-19 3

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Sharon Bown Council; FACC Jun-16 4

Lieutenant General Rick Burr AO DSC MVO Council Ex Officio

Jan-18 4

Ms Gwen Cherne Council Feb-19 4

Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld AO, DSC Council Ex Officio

Jul-19 4

Ms Margaret Jackson AC Council Jun-17 Jun-20 4

Mr Daniel Keighran VC Council Jun-16 4

Mr James McMahon DSC DSM Council; FACC (Deputy Chair) Oct-15 4

Major General (Ret’d) Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC Council; FACC (Chair),

Remuneration Committee

Mar-15 4

Colonel (Ret’d) Susan Neuhaus AM CSC Council Apr-18 4

Vice Admiral Michael Noonan AO RAN Council Ex Officio

Jul-18 4

Mrs Josephine Stone AM Council; FACC Feb-15 4

*Two meetings over the financial year were conducted via video conference due to COVID-19 restrictions.

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Members of Council CHAIR

Mr Kerry Stokes AC was elected as Chairman of the Australian War Memorial on 10 November 2015 with his term commencing on 12 November 2015. He was reappointed to Council in June 2017 for a further three-year term commencing in August 2017. Mr Stokes was previously appointed to Council in August 2007, April 2011, and August 2014. On 11 November 2015, he was inducted as a Fellow of the Australian War Memorial.

Mr Stokes is Chairman of Seven West Media. He is also Chairman of Seven Group Holdings. Through his private company, Australian Capital Equity, Mr Stokes has broad business interests. Mr Stokes was the recipient of the Companion in the General Division in the Order of Australia (AC) in 2008, having earlier been awarded the Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia (AO) in 1995. He holds a Centenary Medal for Corporate Governance, and presented the Boyer Lectures in 1994 and the Andrew Olle Lecture in 2001. Mr Stokes holds an Honorary Life Membership of the Returned and Services League of Australia and received an RSL Commendation Award for outstanding service rendered to the ex-service community. He is a recipient of the Rotary Paul Harris Fellow Award and is also a former Chairman of the National Gallery of Australia and former Chairman of the Canberra Theatre Trust.

COUNCIL MEMBERS

The Honourable Anthony (Tony) Abbott AC was appointed by the Governor-General of Australia to the Council of the Australian War Memorial on 1 October 2019 for a three-year term. Tony Abbott was elected Prime Minister by the Australian people on 7 September 2013, and served for two years. In his time as Prime Minster, the carbon tax and mining tax were repealed, free trade agreements were finalised with China, Japan and Korea; the people smuggling trade from Indonesia to Australia was halted and Australia became the second largest military contributor to the US-led campaign against Islamic State in Iraq. In 2014, and again in 2015, he spent a week running the government from a remote Indigenous community. Tony Abbott served as the member for Warringah in the Australian Parliament between 1994 and 2019. As the local MP, he was instrumental in the creation of the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust to preserve the natural and built heritage of his electorate. Prior to entering parliament, he was a journalist with The Australian, a senior adviser to opposition leader John Hewson, and director of Australians for Constitutional Monarchy. He has degrees in economics and law from Sydney University and in politics and philosophy from Oxford which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. Since 1998, he has convened the Pollie Pedal annual charity bike ride which has raised nearly $7 million for organisations such as Soldier On and Carers Australia, He still does surf patrols with the Queenscliff Surf Life Saving Club and serves as a deputy captain with the Davidson Rural Fire Brigade. He is married to Margaret and they are the parents of three daughters - Louise, Frances and Bridget.

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Sharon Bown was appointed to Council in June 2016 for a three-year term and re-appointed for a further three-year term in 2019. Wing Commander Bown served as a nursing officer in the Royal Australian Air Force for 16 years, discharging from service in 2015. Wing Commander Bown deployed to Timor-Leste in 2000 and 2004; Afghanistan in 2008 as Officer-in-Charge of the Australian Medical Task Force in Tarin Kowt, Afghanistan; and on various aeromedical evacuation tasks, including Papua New Guinea in 2001, Solomon Islands in 2003, and Bali following the terrorist bombings in 2005. Having

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cared for Australian Defence Force personnel and their families in Australia and overseas, Wing Commander Bown is a passionate advocate within the field of military and veteran's health, and demonstrates a unique insight into the welfare and healthcare needs of those adversely affected by their service. Wing Commander Bown has a Bachelor of Psychological Science and is the author of One Woman's War and Peace: A Nurse's Journey in the Royal Australian Air Force.

Lieutenant General Rick Burr AO DSC MVO joined Council in July 2018 when he assumed command of the Australian Army. He joined the Army in 1982, graduating from the Royal Military College, Duntroon in 1985 to the Infantry Corps. He has seen service in the 8th/9th Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment and the Special Air Service Regiment, which he commanded in 2003-04. His senior leadership roles have been diverse. He was previously the Deputy Chief of Army, and prior to that had unique service as Deputy Commanding General US Army-Pacific, the first foreign officer to hold such a position. In 2011-12 he was commander of the 1st Division and Deployable Joint Force Headquarters. His operational commands include the theatre-level multinational command of all Special Forces assigned to the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2008, and command of the Australian Special Forces Task Group in Afghanistan 2002 and Iraq 2003. In addition to his command roles, he gained broad experience across army, defence and government in a range of staff, training and representational appointments. Committed to the development of our future leaders, he has been an instructor at the Royal Military College, Duntroon, and Chief Instructor of the Australian Defence Force Warfare Centre, responsible for the education and training of ADF officers in planning joint operations. In key staff roles he was the senior operations and plans officer in Special Operations Headquarters in 2001-02, and Military Assistant to the Chief of the Army in 2005. As a colonel he served as Director of Force Structure and then Director General Preparedness and Plans in Army Headquarters. In 2007 he was seconded as a senior adviser to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and was Director General Military Strategic Commitments in 2009-10. In a key representational appointment, he was the Equerry to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for the Royal Visit to Australia in 2000. Lieutenant General Burr is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College and graduate of the USMC School of Advanced Warfighting. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New South Wales, a Master of Military Studies from the Marine Corps University, and has completed the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program. His personal awards include Officer of the Order of Australia, Distinguished Service Cross, Member of the Royal Victorian Order and a number of foreign awards for distinguished service. He is Patron of Defence Australian Rules Football.

Ms Gwen Cherne was appointed to Council for a three-year term in February 2019. Gwen is an Australian war widow. Following the death of her husband to suicide in 2017, she has provided essential advocacy for all Australian war widows and defence families. She was appointed to the National Council for Women and Families United by Defence Service, serves as a member director for the Australian War Widows, NSW, and is an ambassador for the Commando Welfare Trust and Gotcha4Life. In 2018, Gwen was appointed as an Invictus Games ambassador for Clubs NSW. Born in the United States, her career has spanned a diverse geographical area, including the US, Australia, Afghanistan, Africa, Central and South America, and the Caribbean, with a focus on stability, relief, and development for youth, women, and families living in crisis and extreme poverty. In her early career she co-founded a school for low-income children with the New York Nativity Centers, an organisation she helped restructure. She has worked in Afghanistan as an international development worker,

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and then at IDS International as a senior trainer and manager for curriculum and training for both the military and civilians. More recently, she spent seven years working at the Australian Civil-Military Centre as a Program Manager. Gwen has a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in women’s studies and a master’s degree in public administration with a concentration in international policy from the NYU Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service.

Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld AO, DSC joined the Royal Australian Air Force as an RAAF academy cadet in January 1980, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in 1983. His early career was spent in a variety of flying positions on Mirage and F/A-18 aircraft, before qualifying as a fighter combat instructor in 1989. In 1997 Air Marshal Hupfeld was selected to attend the Royal Air Force Advanced Staff Course, graduating with a Master of Arts in Defence Studies from King's College, London before posting to the Deputy Director in Aerospace Development Branch. In 2001 he took command of No. 75 Squadron and led the squadron on Operations BASTILLE and FALCONER (Middle East) where he was awarded a Distinguished Service Cross. On promotion he was appointed Director Aerospace Combat Development (Australian Defence Headquarters) before appointment as Officer Commanding No. 81 Wing in 2006. Promoted to air commodore in 2007, he became the Director of the Combined Air Operations Centre in the Middle East Area of Operations, before returning to Australia as the Director-General Air. In December 2009, he took command of Air Combat Group where he oversaw the RAAF's fast-jet combat aircraft. Air Marshal Hupfeld became Air Commander Australia on 3 February 2012, providing specialist air advice on raise, train and sustain issues to the joint environment. In 2014 he was appointed Head Capability Systems. In 2015 he received an appointment as Officer of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to the Australian Defence Force. In August 2015 he was appointed to the role of Acting Chief Capability Development Group. Air Marshal Hupfeld then took up the position of Head Force Design in Vice Chief of Defence Force Group in 2016. On promotion, he was appointed Chief Joint Operations in May 2018 and subsequently Chief of Air Force in July 2019. Air Marshal Hupfeld is married to Louise, and his interests include running, fishing, and sailing.

Ms Margaret Jackson AC was appointed to Council for a three-year term from 27 June 2017. Margaret is Chairman of Ansett Aviation Training Limited and is also a director of the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Barefoot to Boots and a member of Monash University’s Industry Council of Advisors. Margaret has also served as Chairman of Spotless, Qantas, FlexiGroup Ltd, the Victorian Transport Accident Commission, and a director of the Broken Hill Proprietary Company Limited, the Australian and New Zealand Banking Corporation, Pacific Dunlop Limited, John Fairfax Holdings Limited, Billabong International Ltd, Telecom Australia, West Gippsland Healthcare Group, and President of Australian Volunteers International. She is a former partner of KPMG Advisory and BDO Nelson. Margaret was awarded Companion of the Order of Australia in the General Division (AC) in June 2003 for service to business in diverse and leading Australian corporations and to the community in the area of support for medical research, the arts and education, and was awarded the Centenary Medal in 2001 for service to Australian society in Business. Margaret holds an honorary Doctorate of Laws from Monash University. She is the former chairman of the Advisory Board for the Salvation Army Southern Territory, the Playbox Theatre Company, and Methodist Ladies’ College, as well as Prince’s Charities Australia.

Mr Daniel Keighran VC was appointed to Council in June 2016 for a three-year term, and re-appointed to Council in May 2019 for a further three years. Mr Keighran enlisted in the Australian Army at 17 and served his country as part of the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian

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Regiment (6RAR), discharging from full-time service in 2011. Mr Keighran deployed to Rifle Company Butterworth, Malaysia, in 2001 and 2004; Timor-Leste (East Timor) in 2003-04; Iraq in 2006; and Afghanistan in 2007 and 2010. Mr Keighran is the only Victoria Cross recipient from the Royal Australian Regiment in its proud 67-year history, with his citation reading, “For the most conspicuous acts of gallantry and extreme devotion to duty in action in circumstances of great peril at Derapet, Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, as part of the Mentoring Task Force One on Operation SLIPPER”. Since completing his full-time service Mr Keighran has held various private sector roles including his current association with Thales Australia.

Mr James McMahon DSC DSM was appointed to Council in October 2015. James is currently the Chief Operating Officer at Australian Capital Equity. Prior to this he was the Commissioner for the Department of Corrective Services in Western Australia and Chief Operating Officer at Azure Capital, a corporate advisory firm. James’s corporate and public sector experience followed a 22-year full-time career in the Australian Defence Force. As an SAS squadron commander, James’s squadron was awarded the Meritorious Unit Citation for exemplary performance. During James’s time as commanding officer, the SAS Regiment was awarded the Meritorious Unit Citation. James was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal for leadership and command in action in Timor-Leste, Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2019 he was named Western Australian of the Year for his service to the community. Board memberships include the West Coast Eagles Football Club 2007-2015, where he also served as deputy chairman and remains a current member of the Leadership Subcommittee, the SAS Resources Trust Board, the St John of God Health Care Board and the Investment Advisory Group Committee for RSL WA. He is also an ambassador for the Fathering Project. Education qualifications include a Masters in Management and a Masters in Business Administration.

Major General (Ret’d) Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC was appointed to Council in March 2015. He is a Hobart-based senior counsel who was a member of the ADF Reserves from 1966 to 2018. He commanded at all levels from section to brigade before becoming Australia's most senior reserve officer in 2007, and later becoming the ADF's Head of the Centenary of Anzac Planning Team in 2011. Units in which he served included 2nd Battalion, Royal New South Wales Regiment and One Commando Company and units/ formations he commanded included 12th/40th Battalion, Royal Tasmania Regiment, 6 Training Group and 8 Brigade. He is the Colonel Commandant of 1st Commando Regiment and also President of the Australian Commando Association. He has been a Principal Crown Counsel in the Tasmanian Crown Law Office, a statutory member of the National Crime Authority and the NSW Casino Control Authority. He was appointed part-time Deputy President of the AAT in September 2014 and the part-time Chief Commissioner of the Tasmanian Integrity Commission in 2015. He has conducted several investigations including the one into the Beaconsfield mine collapse, and is Cricket Australia's anti-corruption special investigator. He was elected President of the International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law in 2017, is a former chairman of the board of St John Ambulance (Tasmania) and in 2019 was elected National President of the RSL. He is patron of Friends of the 2nd Infantry Battalions, Army Museum Tasmania and ADF Cricket.

Colonel (Ret’d) Susan Neuhaus AM CSC was appointed to Council for a three-year term from 27 April 2018. Susan is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, holds an adjunct appointment as Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Adelaide and is a practicing surgeon and surgical oncologist. Susan has completed a career spanning 20 years in both the Regular Army and Army Reserve. She is a graduate of Australian

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Command and Staff College (Res). Her operational service includes deployments to Cambodia, Bougainville and Afghanistan. She was the Commanding Officer, 3rd Health Support Battalion, promoted to colonel in 2008 and awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross in 2009 for military service. Susan has held significant board appointments, predominantly in the not-for-profit sector and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Her former roles include Chair of the Repat Foundation - the Road Home, member of the South Australian Veterans Health Advisory Council and Co-Chair of the South Australian PTSD Centre of Excellence Ministerial Advisory Panel (now established as the Jamie Larcombe Centre). Susan is the currently Chair of the Veterans’ Advisory Council, South Australia and Patron of the Virtual War Memorial, Australia. In the adjunct position of Associate Professor Conflict Medicine at the University of Adelaide, Susan led a developing national research collaborative investigating the gender-specific effects of military service and deployment. She is widely published in areas of operational health care and co-author of Not for Glory: A Century of Service by Medical Women to the Australian Army and its Allies. Susan was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2020 for services to medicine and veterans and their families.

Vice Admiral Michael Noonan AO RAN joined Council in July 2018 upon assumption of command of the Royal Australian Navy. Joining the Royal Australian Navy in 1984, he initially trained as a seaman officer and then completed the Principal Warfare Officer course, specialising in Air Direction and Above Water Warfare. Throughout his career, he has experienced a wide range of Navy and ADF operations through various posting and operational roles. Highlights have included deployments to the Middle East, Southern Ocean and being the Commissioning Commanding Officer of the ANZAC-class frigate HMAS Parramatta. He has fulfilled leadership positions at all levels of the Australian Defence Force, with senior positions including the Director of Military Strategic Commitments, Director General of Operations at HQJOC, Command of Maritime Border Command and Deputy Chief of Navy. In June 2018, he was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia in recognition of his distinguished service in significant senior ADF command roles. Vice Admiral Noonan assumed command of the Royal Australian Navy on 7 July 2018 and is the 32nd professional head of the Australian Navy. In this role, he is entrusted by government as its principal naval advisor, charged with the responsibility to raise, train and sustain Australia’s naval forces to execute Navy’s mission as part of the joint force in an increasingly dynamic global region.

Mrs Josephine Stone AM was appointed to Council on 26 February 2015 and reappointed in 2018 for a three-year term. Mrs Stone is a graduate of the Melbourne Law School and has worked in a number of legal institutions, both public and private, in Victoria and the Northern Territory of Australia. Previous professional involvements include being a statutory member of the Regional Telecommunications Independent Review Committee (CWTH), Professional Standards Manager at the Northern Territory Law Society, Assignments Director at the Northern Territory Legal Aid Commission, solicitor with the Australian Government Solicitor and with private firms in Melbourne, Alice Springs and Darwin. Currently, Mrs Stone is a director of a private family company. Community engagements include Zonta Alice Springs, Darwin Private Hospital Advisory Board, NT Women’s Advisory Board, Chairman of the Red Cross (Katherine) Flood Appeal, together with a number of roles in school parents and friends committees and boards in Darwin and Brisbane. Additional personal interests have included instigating the 100-year history of St Marys Primary School in Darwin and the political advancement of women, which has involved a number of appearances at international conferences as moderator and speaker. Mrs Stone was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2006 for services to the law and the community.

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Organisation structure

Day-to-day corporate operations are conducted in accordance with the policies and strategic direction set by the Council of the Memorial and its management team.

The management structure of the Memorial comprises three branches based on functional responsibilities with outputs achieved by cross-branch activities. Additionally, a separate project team has been established for the life of the Memorial’s Development Project from 2019-2027.

Project teams for particular tasks are established as required, drawing on staff from sections across the Memorial managed and coordinated by the Memorial's senior executive committee, the Corporate Management Group (CMG), which is comprised of the Director and the three Assistant Directors. Meeting weekly, CMG is responsible for the overall leadership, management and implementation of strategies and policies, and the regular review of performance.

Organisation chart

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Organisational demographics

The following is an overview of the metrics of the staff at the Memorial, as at 30 June 2020.

Current period (2019-2020) All ongoing employees

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part-time

Total male Full-time

Part-time

Total female Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

ACT 120 4 124 127 12 139 0 0 0 263

Total 120 4 124 127 12 139 0 0 0 263

All non-ongoing employees

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male Full-time

Part-time

Total female Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

ACT 19 12 31 15 20 35 0 0 0 66

Total 19 12 31 15 20 35 0 0 0 66

*Includes 32 Casuals (part-time). Excludes Statutory Officer(s)

Previous period (2018-2019) All ongoing employees

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part-time

Total male Full-time

Part-time

Total female Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

ACT 122 5 127 130 16 146 0 0 0 273

Total 122 5 127 130 16 146 0 0 0 273

All non-ongoing employees

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part-time

Total male Full-time

Part-time Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

ACT 23 0 23 33 3 36 0 0 0 59

Total 23 0 23 33 3 36 0 0 0 59

*Includes 33 casuals (full-time). Excludes statutory officer(s)

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Executive remuneration

Name Position title Short-term benefits Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Base salary Bonuses Other

benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions Long service leave

Mr Matt Anderson PSM (Commenced 7/4/2020)

Director $80,204 0 $4,665 $9,920 $2,914 0 $97,703

Ms Anne Bennie Assistant Director (Branch Head)

$207,648 0 $15,718 $43,069 $7,073 0 $273,508

Maj Gen (Ret’d) Brian Dawson AM CSC

Assistant Director (Branch Head)

$218,333 0 $16,505 $33,614 $7,427 0 $275,879

Dr Brendan Nelson AO(Ceased 31/12/2019)

Director (former)

$213,797 $33,265 $11,774 $11,305 $7,405 $192,995 $470,541

Ms Leanne Patterson Assistant Director (Branch Head)

$210,952 0 $16,015 $39,441 $7,207 0 $273,615

Mr Wayne Hitches Executive Director (Development)

$334,352 0 $26,070 $54,108 $11,732 0 $426,262

Note: Variance to financial statements: Excludes Council members as remuneration is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal and is below the reporting threshold The Director’s remuneration is set by the Remuneration Tribunal and authorised by Council Other benefits and allowance reporting includes annual leave accrual for the reporting period

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Information about remuneration for senior executives

Total remuneration bands Number of senior

executives

Short-term benefits Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration

Average base salary

Average bonus Average other

benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave Average other long-

term benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$270,001 - $295,000 3 $212,311 0 $16,079 $38,708 $7,236 0 0 $274,334

$420,001 - $445,000 1 $334,352 0 $26,070 $54,108 $11,732 0 0 $426,262

$470,001 - $495,000 1 $213,797 $33,265 $11,774 $11,305 $7,207 0 $192,995 $470,541

Information about remuneration for key staff No other Memorial staff met the reporting threshold during the reporting period.

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Audit committee

Member name Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant) Number of meetings attended/total number of

meetings

Total annual remuneration

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Sharon Bown Bachelor of Nursing (1995) /Registered Nurse (1995 ongoing);ISO Internal Auditor Course (2001); Bachelor of Psychological Science (2017); Graduate of the

Australian Institute of Company Directors’ Company Directors’ Course (2017); Air Force Association (National Vice President (2020 - ); Member of National Joint Board Steering Group (2019 - ) ACT Division Director (2019 - ))

4 of 4 $40,268

Mr James McMahon DSC DSM Master’s in Business Administration, USQ, 2007. Masters in Management (Defence), UC, 2001, Graduate of the Australian Defence College - Staff College, 2001, Graduate Diploma in Management, UNSW, 1996. Graduate of the Officer Cadet School NZ as an Australian student, 1987. 2013-2017: Commissioner for the Department of Corrective Services, Western Australia, 2007-2013: Azure Capital: Chief Operating Officer, Corporate Advisory Firm (2007-2012); Managing Director, Management Consulting Division (Chauvel Group) (2012-2013); 1985-2007: Australian Defence Force: Operational deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan and Timor Leste; Commanding Officer of the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) (2005-2006).

4 of 4 $40,268

Major General (Ret’d) Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC Senior Counsel with experience with corporate law, past and present Commonwealth and State statutory officer.

4 of 4 $40,268

Mrs Josephine Stone AM LLB, company director 4 of 4 $40,881

Matthew Broadfoot (independent)

Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia and NZ (FCA) Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (FAICD) Retired partner of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (32 years)

4 of 4 $4,780

Direct link to the AWM’s Finance, Audit and Compliance Committee of Council Terms of Reference: https://www.awm.gov.au/sites/default/files/Finance%20Audit%20and%20Compliance%20Committee_Terms%20of%20Reference_April%202020%20updat e.pdf

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Following are the performance statements against each of the Memorial's key outcome deliverables.

Outcome 1

Australians remembering, interpreting and understanding the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact through maintaining and developing the National Memorial, its collection and exhibition of historical material, commemorative ceremonies, and research.

Output 1.1 Commemorative events A range of commemorative ceremonies will be delivered, including three major ceremonies (Anzac Day Dawn Service, Anzac Day National Ceremony, and Remembrance Day ceremony), other ceremonies linked to key anniversaries, a school wreath-laying program, and the daily Last Post ceremony.

1.1.1 Deliver major commemorative ceremonies and events as scheduled

Target: All major commemorations delivered as scheduled

Analysis:

Anzac Day

The Memorial delivered alternate Anzac Day commemorations on 25 April 2020. For the first time since the Second World War, the ceremonial program was unable to proceed due to COVID-19 restrictions. Fifteen invited guests attended the Dawn Commemorative Service in the Commemorative Area, which was broadcast nationally.

The National Ceremony and veterans’ march were also affected and did not take place.

In recognition that people could not visit the Memorial in person on Anzac Day, nor place a poppy on the Roll of Honour, an online hub Anzac at Home was developed to support personal commemoration, The Virtual Poppy Wall received 2,162 poppies posted by members of the public (as at 26 April 2020).

Anzac at Home user survey indicated that:

· 83 per cent of those viewing were doing so alone, with 13 per cent viewing with family.

· 49 per cent had no connection with the Australian Defence Force. Twenty-seven per cent were family or friend of an ADF member or veteran, 12 per cent current or former ADF, and ten per cent were veterans.

On Anzac Day, there were more than 1.66 million website page views, a 50 per cent increase on last year.

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The web pages most viewed were the Anzac At Home pages, viewed more than 500,000 times on Anzac Day, with the main landing page having 73,001 visits during the six-day campaign leading up to Anzac Day.

The Anzac at Home user survey indicated that:

· 78 per cent of visitors to the Anzac at Home webpages said that the content exceeded their expectations, 35 per cent of these said it “far exceeded” their expectations.

Remembrance Day

An estimated 2,700 attended Remembrance Day National Ceremony in November 2019. This is 9,300 less than 2018, where the National Ceremony marked the end of the First World War commemorative program.

Source: Australian War Memorial attendance records and Australian War Memorial online Anzac at Home user survey.

1.1.2 Deliver minor commemorative ceremonies and events as scheduled

Target: All minor commemorations delivered as scheduled

Analysis: In a private ceremony on 10 November 2019, the names of Squadron Leader (Chaplain) Garry Doecke and Leading Seaman Cameron Gurr were added to the Roll of Honour.

A total of 7,483 visitors attended one of the 25 minor commemorations or ceremonies that were conducted at the Memorial between 1 July 2019 and 24 March 2020.

Source: Australian War Memorial attendance records

1.1.3 Deliver daily Last Post ceremonies

Target: Last Post Ceremony delivered daily

Analysis: The Memorial’s Last Post Ceremony (LPC) was affected by major events of early 2020 including bushfires and the closure of the Memorial due to COVID-19.

Total number of LPCs conducted was 266, 19 of which were moved to Anzac Hall due to poor air quality associated with the bushfires.

During the closure period, streaming of archived ceremonies assisted in highlighting anniversaries and important occasions that would have been commemorated if the Memorial were open. This practice continued until the revised pre-recorded LPC launched on 4 June.

Total attendance at the Last Post Ceremony for this financial year was 88,445, with 477,532 online visitors through Facebook and YouTube.

Source: Australian War Memorial attendance records

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Output 1.2 The National Memorial and grounds The Memorial building and grounds are conserved and developed as a dignified, moving, and impressive national memorial to Australians who served and died at war.

1.2.1 Continued development and maintenance of Memorial building and grounds consistent with high standards, ensuring that all works comply with standards and that major works are communicated to visitors prior to commencement and with the impact on the visitor experience minimised as far as possible

Target: The buildings and grounds are kept in a state consistent with a pre-eminent national institution

Analysis:

Ninety-eight per cent of visitors who included the Memorial’s grounds and Sculpture Garden during their visit stated that they were very satisfied or satisfied; 80 per cent gave the rating of very satisfied.

Visitation to the grounds and sculpture garden continued during the COVID-19 closure with the Roll of Honour projections continuing.

Source: General Visitor Survey 2019-20

1.2.2 Staged implementation of the detailed Australian War Memorial Development (Memorial Master Plan)

Target:

(a) Commencement of project works at Campbell under an approved site development plan

(b) Completion of logistics and accommodation upgrades at Mitchell site

(c) Completion of facilities strategy including storage and accommodation for all sites; implementation from 2020-21

Analysis:

a) Project planning at the Campbell site commenced in accordance with the principles established in the Site Development Plan 2017 and the project Detailed Business Case as delivered to government in 2018. Major design consultancies, in particular architectural and engineering disciplines, were engaged and major design packages have been approved at schematic design.

Gallery master planning and initial curatorial research commenced in Q2 2019-20. The Gallery Master Plan was completed in April 2020.

Site activity for early and enabling project works was undertaken throughout the year under a Parliamentary Works Committee (PWC) Medium Works Approval. Key activities included modifications to Aircraft Hall, completion of a dedicated Development Information Gallery for stakeholder engagement and commencement of the Poppy’s Café Car Park extension.

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The project designs were submitted for assessment under two key approvals processes - Parliamentary Works Committee Major Works Approval (February 2020) and Environmental Protection Biodiversity and Conservation Act heritage and environment impact approvals (June 2020).

As of 30 June 2020 the project is on budget and on schedule.

b) The logistics and accommodation upgrades at the Mitchell site, including design and manufacture of supports for storage of existing Large Technology Objects (LTO) and new LTO acquisitions for the year such as the AP-3C Orion aircraft, was completed in Q3 2019-20. Refurbished offices for both the registration and LTO teams were completed during the financial year which enables teams to be co-located, thus creating efficiencies and better communication. Work has commenced to revise and improve the storage infrastructure in Treloar C. This will include pallet racking and compactus to facilitate art and small object storage as well as flexible storage areas to better accommodate medium and large objects. This work is expected to be complete by June 2021.

c) Due to the need to integrate storage and accommodation matters with the new spaces and facilities delivered by the Development Project this strategy was not finalised in 2019-20. The Memorial has commenced implementation of discrete elements of the strategy such as the staff accommodation and storage plan.

This strategy will be integrated with a Digital Facilities Management Framework (DFMF) and associated support systems in future reporting periods. This framework is designed to integrate new spaces or systems delivered by the Development Project with existing and/or enhanced facilities management systems across both Memorial sites to reduce future operating costs, lower risks around vendor dependency and increase security and regulatory compliance.

Source: Quarterly report against the Australian War Memorial Business Plan; Quarterly Reporting against Australian War Memorial Corporate Plan; Development Project Annual Project Update Report (2019)

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Output 1.3 The National Collection An outstanding national collection of historical material with provenance that is related to Australia’s military history and heritage.

1.3.1 Continued development and maintenance of a National Collection of items relating to Australia’s military history, including collecting from recent and current conflicts and operations including peacekeeping and some peacetime operations that add to the story of Australia’s military history and heritage

Target: Items appropriate for the National Collection are identified, acquired and conserved in accordance with AWM policy

Analysis: Major acquisitions/commissions in the reporting period included:

• Two curatorial deployments undertaken to Middle East Region - OPERATIONS Paladin (UNTSO Israel) and Mazurka (MFO Sinai) and identified key items for collection, with 17 oral histories collected and 200 photographs accessioned into the National Collection

• The Military Working Dog memorial sculpture, Circling into sleep by Steven Holland, was completed and dedicated on 24 February 2020

• Acquired 11 art works (from Napier Waller Art Prize 2019, including the winning submission Natalie Duncan’s You are in danger and I am far away)

• Accepted donation of the 1885 NSW Sudan Contingent uniform of Private Arthur Barrett. The first military force ever raised and deployed overseas by an Australian colony, this is the only known complete surviving example of uniform worn by a member of the contingent

• Received commissioned series of work Flight or Fight by Megan Cope, the Memorial’s first female Aboriginal official war artist

• Received transfer of research papers of Brigadier Sir Neil Hamilton Fairley, Australian Army Medical Corps in both World Wars, covering medical research in tropical medicine and malaria control

• Received transfer of official records of the Australian Army in East Timor of the INTERFET period

• Accepted donation of the medals of First World War pilot Captain Alfred Youdale MC and two bars from his descendants; they had previously been on display in New Zealand

• Bronco aircraft restoration project completed in December 2019

• Commissioned Australian composer Max Lyandvert’s audio-visual work entitled Witness to highlight the Memorial’s Holocaust collection and to note the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp

Total new acquisitions for the National Collection: 16,804

Source: Australian War Memorial corporate reporting against business plan, and Collection Management System reporting

1.3.2 Implementation of a comprehensive collection management strategy including regular reviews of collection priorities and setting of long term conservation and digitisation standards and targets

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Target: Collection Management Strategy implemented; reduction in frequency and severity of unplanned conservation activities and costs

Analysis: Collection Management Strategy implemented in accordance with the 2018-19 ANAO audit recommendations to include:

• National Collection Preservation Plan implemented to prioritise collection preservation programs and plan resourcing in line with upcoming strategic priority project

• National Collection Documentation Plan implemented to set documentation standards, review and ongoing management framework. This plan also prioritises strategic documentation projects to continually improve the standard of collection documentation

• Treloar Logistics Project continued to implement storage plan for the National Collection to allow for growth and upcoming logistics movements associated with the Memorial Development Program

Source: Australian War Memorial corporate reporting against business plan

1.3.3 The Memorial maintains a cost recovery based outwards loans and digital access program to support other organisations in telling stories of Australian service and sacrifice through the use of elements of the National Collection

Target: National Collection material is used by museums, media and others to enrich and enhance exhibitions, articles and online material to tell stories of Australia at war

Analysis: The Memorial continued to share the Australian experience of war and to tell the stories of Australian’s service and sacrifice:

• The Memorial’s outward loans program has delivered or maintained 425 loans to 53 institutions both within Australia and overseas during the reporting period

• The Memorial’s official establishment loans program has installed or maintained 127 loans to 27 government and military offices both within Australia and overseas during the reporting period

Source: Australian War Memorial corporate reporting against business plan.

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Output 1.4 Exhibitions Development and maintenance of outstanding permanent, temporary and travelling exhibitions.

1.4.1 Permanent exhibitions to be maintained and refreshed, as required, educating Australians on the Australian experience of war

Target: Qualitative and quantitative survey data shows evidence of strong visitor understanding of Australia’s experience of war

Analysis:

Ninety six per cent of visitors said they included a permanent gallery as part of their visit. One hundred per cent of these visitors said they were satisfied with the permanent exhibitions, 87 per cent were very satisfied.

The overall satisfaction rating with a visit to the Memorial for 2019-20 was 100 per cent; 86 per cent were very satisfied.

Source: General Visitor Survey 2019-2020

1.4.2 Temporary and touring exhibitions to further tell stories of Australian experience of war that are additional to and expand upon the permanent exhibitions

Target: Delivery of special exhibition The Courage for Peace and feedback from host venues for touring exhibitions demonstrates community engagement with Memorial exhibitions

Analysis:

The Memorial featured two special exhibitions this financial year:

After the War opened as part of the Centenary of Armistice program and closed on 15 September 2019. An exit survey was conducted providing the following results:

• 60 per cent of visitors said they learned something new

• 89 per cent said the exhibition gave them a better understanding of the Australian experience of war

• 93 per cent said the exhibition gave them a realistic insight into the impacts of war on Australian servicemen and servicewomen

The Courage for Peace opened to the public on 18 October 2019 and closed on 25 May 2020. A visitor exit survey was conducted and provided the following results:

• 71 per cent of visitors found this exhibition exceeded their expectations

• 92 per cent of respondents said the exhibition gave them a better understanding of the subject

• 92 per cent of respondents said the exhibition gave them a realistic insight into the impacts on Australian servicemen and servicewomen

The Memorial’s touring exhibitions this financial year were postponed during the second half of the year due to COVID-19. Exhibitions included:

Reality in Flames toured three locations nationally, with an estimated visitation of 6,806.

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• Blue Mountains Cultural Centre (NSW), SAMSTAG Museum of Art (SA) and the Glasshouse, Port Macquarie (NSW)

For Country for Nation toured four locations nationally with a total visitation of 18,356.

• The Glasshouse, Port Macquarie (NSW), Tweed Regional Gallery, Murwillumbah (NSW), SAMSTAG Museum of Art (SA) and Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs (NT)

Visitor feedback received by the host venue, Tweed Regional Gallery (NSW), showed that both the venue and its visitor’s valued this travelling exhibition, with a range of comments including:

• “thought provoking and well laid out, with personal stories as well as artefacts” (Trip Advisor reviewer)

• “this painting (the dance) make me immediately just cry just now, which was shocking and embarrassing as its never happened to me before” (Instagram reviewer)

• “thank you for recognising our Indigenous diggers” (on site reviewer)

Reality in Flames and For Country for Nation were both on display at the SAMSTAG Museum of Art in Adelaide during July 2019. Visitor feedback received at this location showed that those exiting these exhibitions were all satisfied, most very satisfied, and two-thirds thought their expectations were exceeded:

• “It is a very important and challenging look at these events, true historic accounts of the war … We had not realised the contribution made by contemporary artists to the preservation of these historic events.” Female, South Australia

• “A good variety of works showing a good cross section of artistic styles and wartime experiences.” Male visitor, South Australia

Hearts and Minds toured three locations in Victoria and Queensland, with a total visitation of 1,963.

• Whitehorse Artspace (VIC), Wangaratta Art Gallery (VIC) and Redcliffe Museum (QLD)

Source: The Courage for Peace and After the War special exhibitions visitor exit surveys, Touring Exhibition host venue report and Australian War Memorial statistical data and attendance records.

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Output 1.5 Interpretive services Provision of interactive interpretation, including the delivery of innovative on-site, outreach and online education and public program as well as special events.

1.5.1 Deliver a range of public programs and events for visitors to the Memorial

Target: Qualitative and quantitative survey data shows evidence of strong visitor understanding of Australia’s experience of war

Analysis: COVID-19 had significant impacts on public programs and events, with a large number of visits and programs cancelled from 24 March. Visitation to the Memorial totalled 705,692 which is a 44 per cent decrease when compared with 2018/19.

Big Things in Store saw the Memorial’s new storage facilities at Mitchell open to the public in October for a collection-based experience. The majority of visitors interviewed were local residents from the Australian Capital Territory.

Ninety three per cent of visitors to Big Things in Store 2019 rated the display of the collection as good, 56 per cent as extremely good or very good.

One hundred per cent of visitors to Big Things in Store rated the staff assistance as good, 90 per cent rated the staff as extremely good or very good.

Visitor feedback included:

• “I am glad to see that there are things from Afghanistan, the fact that we are bringing the more recent events into the light, not just hyper focused on First World War and Vietnam”.

• “I enjoyed how tough the Mac truck was that ran over the IED and they didn’t notice, and I was astonished by how big the bronco’s wing was.”

Source: Australian War Memorial statistical data and attendance records and Big Things in Store exit survey.

1.5.2 Deliver a series of quality, engaging curriculum-related school education programs for on-site education groups

Target: More than 135,000 students (and teachers) visit the organisation

Analysis: The Memorial welcomed a total of 104,377 school audience visitors, 94,875 were students and 9,502 were accompanying adults. This was a 30.5 per cent decrease when compared to the previous years, due to the bushfires and COVID-19 restrictions which saw the Memorial close from 24 March.

Source: Australian War Memorial attendance records

1.5.3 Deliver a range of quality, engaging, curriculum-related online and digital school education resources for teachers and students

Target: Online and digital education resources aligned with Australian curriculum requirements

Analysis: The Memorial continues to produce online and digital education resources aligned with Australian curriculum requirements.

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All resources are linked to the Australian Curriculum, and are designed to highlight the valuable primary and secondary source material in the Memorial’s collection.

Page content 2019/20 page views 2019/20 unique page views

2018/19 page views 2018/19 unique page views

Visits/schools 11,420 4,180 23,995 9,333

/Learn 1,130,378 439,867 1,131,402 447,877

Total 1,141,798 440,047 1,155,397 457,210

During the year 34 virtual excursion programs were delivered to more than 1,500 students from across Australia. These included mainstream and special needs schools, along with students in distance education or learning remotely from home due to COVID-19 school closures.

Education’s online learning resources expanded to include a new unit on Australian involvement in the conflict in Indonesia, along with additional activities related to Memorial Box content. The Memorial Box program included two new Victorian agents in Sovereign Hill and Swan Hill.

Review of the Anzac Diversity resource has continued, ensuring that the language is culturally appropriate and that the activities are relevant to the Australian curriculum. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander section is now complete and online. A Learn from home hub was established to provide resources to teachers and families during COVID-19-related school closures. It included numerous resources on Anzac Day, personal stories of service, and related craft activities. The Google Street View gallery tours and Google Arts and Culture inclusions were also highlighted, encouraging visitors to take a “virtual tour”.

Source: Australian War Memorial corporate records

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Output 1.6 Promotions and community services Promotion of the Memorial as an outstanding national institution and assistance to the community to understand the Memorial’s roles, activities, programs, relevance and future. Through the provision of high-quality promotion and community services, the program provides a necessary foundation for other programs to function effectively.

1.6.1 Further refine the AWM online presence aligned to the Digital Strategy to facilitate greater involvement and outreach

Target: Strong website visitation and digital outreach including collection searches and continued social media engagement

Analysis: The Memorial has engaged the public online with

• 5,177,880 sessions and 40,744,664 page views of the Memorial’s website.

• A total of 451,371 object records available on the Memorial’s website.

• 138,793 Facebook followers by end of financial year.

• A total of 18,540,557 views over the lifetime of the Memorial’s Flickr account.

“Places of Pride: the national register of war memorials” interactive database grew by more than 27%, and now comprises 8,426 and 1032 registered website users. On Anzac Day a special live stream was set up on the Places of Pride website to stream the sunrise from prominent memorials across Australia. This live stream was watched by 5,306 people.

The Memorial delivered a range of digital outreach initiatives including;

• The “Anzac At Home” content hub on the Memorial’s website and supporting social media campaign encouraged personal commemoration by Australians, including students, who were not able to visit memorials around the nation on Anzac Day 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. This website content received 1.64 million page views and social media content reached 1.12 million on Facebook, 600,000 on Instagram and 180,534 on Twitter.

• Podcast program: During 2019-20 the Memorial published two podcast series. 12 episodes of the monthly “Collected: Stories from the Australian War Memorial” podcast were released and has had16,293 unique downloads. The 6 part podcast series “Trapped” was released in February 2020 and has had 36,292 unique downloads.

Source: Website user analytics and social media analytics

1.6.2 Increase the AWM profile through proactive media outreach

Target: Strong media presence at and coverage of AWM, including events, generated through proactive media strategy and outreach

Analysis: During the reporting period, the Memorial received and responded to 878 media enquiries and issued 65 media releases and alerts. In this period, the Memorial received more than 16,000 mentions in the media, as recorded by media monitoring consultant iSentia.

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The authoring of detailed and personal stories continued to be published. These articles are based on interviews with veterans, Memorial events, anniversaries, Last Post ceremonies and the collection and have a high level of engagement across a range of channels. They were shared through the Memorial’s social media and featured within news media publishing.

Source: Australian War Memorial statistical data

1.6.3 Develop enhanced program delivery options for onsite visitors

Target: Enhanced tour programs delivered

Analysis: The Memorial refined a number of enhanced program offerings developed in the previous financial year and transitioned them to ‘business as usual’ with the following results:

Signature Series special experience

The Signature Series tour, which involves a tailored private tour of the Commemorative Area followed by a behind-the-scenes curator-led experience through the Photo, Film and Sound labs; the Art store; or the Research Centre collection was developed and delivered across the 2019-2020 financial year.

Highlights Audio Tour

The Highlights Audio Tour (HAT) was introduced in the previous financial year and provides visitors with insights into the First and Second World War galleries, the Hall of Valour, and Conflicts 1945 to Today galleries. The tour is available in English, Mandarin, and Hindi, as well as Auslan. A total of 2,276 users participated in the HAT program during the 2019/20 financial year, with participation affected by visitation declines due to both bushfires and COVID-19 pandemic closures.

Conducted paid tours

Conducted paid tours were introduced in the previous financial year to provide visiting groups with tailored tour options of the Memorial and galleries. Whilst impacted by the summer bushfires prior to the closure of the Memorial due to COVID-19 this program had exceeded its year to date revenue target by 9.5 per cent.

Source: Commemoration and Visitor Engagement team, Australian War Memorial

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Output 1.7 Research, information and dissemination The stimulation of an interest in and understanding of Australia’s military history by the production of and dissemination in print, broadcast and online media of articles, papers and presentations, conferences, publications and encouraging the conduct of historical research and dissemination of knowledge and understanding of Australia’s military history.

1.7.1 Support for research about Australian military history including:

• The Memorial’s ongoing publications program

• Encouragement, fostering and contribution to research to further promote the understanding of Australian military history

• Facilitating access to collection items and military history information including:

o Reading room facilities

o An authoritative research enquiry service

o Online research facilities

• Retail and online sales channels providing quality military history books and exhibition publications

• The provision of expert advice to internal and external stakeholders

• Maintain and grow an online repository of military history articles and resources made available through the Memorial’s website

• Support for and publication of academic and online articles, Wartime magazine and books by Memorial staff featuring original research and writing

Target: Continued strong demand for Memorial historical advice, uptake of Memorial research facilities, and as evidenced by statistical analysis relating to Research Centre and online records access and successful publication of original research

Analysis:

• The Research Centre, supported by subject matter experts in other Memorial Sections including the Photo, Film and Sound, Military History and Military Heraldry and Technology sections, continued to facilitate access to collection items and military history through:

o 10,882 research enquiries were answered by the Research Centre, with 95,278 pages copied, a 240 per cent increase

• Four editions of Wartime Magazine were produced over the period, with 21,886 distributed across all editions.

• Publications being finalised include The Long Shadow: Australia’s Vietnam Veterans since the war and For Gallantry: Australians awarded the George Cross and Cross of Valour.

• Memorial staff continued to publish online articles; contribute to conference papers and book chapters, and present original research, for example:

o Original publication with In from the cold: reflections on Australia’s Korean War (ANU Press, 2020) edited by John Blaxland, Michael Kelly (AWM) and Liam Brewin Higgins

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o Convening a special half-day symposium titled ‘Reflections on INTERFET’ to recognise 20 th anniversary of Australia’s contribution to East Timor (now Timor-Leste)

o Book chapter in The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites

o A lecture titled ‘Australians in the Pacific war, 1944-45'

o Article titled 'From Great War to Obscurity: Diggers who fought Lenin' in The Weekend Australian

Source: Australian War Memorial corporate reporting against business plan

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Output 1.8 Visitor Services Visitors to both the Memorial and its outreach programs are provided with a standard of service that enhances their experience and encourages them to re-use services and promote them to others. Through the provision of high-quality visitor services, this program component provides a necessary foundation for other program components to function effectively.

1.8.1 Front-of-house staff trained and supported to deliver high level customer service and voluntary guides trained to an introductory level of military history and to deliver high level customer service.

Target: At least 90 per cent of surveyed visitors state that their visit has met or exceeded their expectations

Analysis: 58 per cent of visitors indicated they had received Memorial staff assistance during their visit and 19 per cent participated in a guided tour. 99 per cent of visitors were satisfied with their Memorial staff assistance, 83 per cent were very satisfied

100 per cent of Memorial visitors were satisfied with their visit overall, with 86 per cent were very satisfied

43 per cent were first time visitors to the Memorial, 57 per cent were returning visitors. 23 per cent of these were returning within 12 months and 41 per cent had not been for ten years or more.

98 per cent of those who participated in a Guided tour were satisfied, and 88 per cent were very satisfied.

86 per cent of those who used an audio tour were satisfied, with 71 per cent of these were very satisfied

Source: General Visitor Survey 2019-2020

1.8.2 High quality and suitable public facilities such as restrooms, seating, and way-finding signs

Target: At least 80 per cent of surveyed return visitors state that the Memorial has maintained or improved its standard of service since their last visit.

Analysis:

43 per cent of visitors this year were attending the Memorial for the first time. Of the 57 per cent who were returning to the Memorial 36 per cent rated the Memorial as exceeding their expectations and 21 per cent rated it as meeting their expectations. Only 1 visitor said it did not meet their expectations.

87 per cent of visitors who used one of the Memorials two cafes were satisfied, 58 per cent were very satisfied with these facilities.

93 per cent of visitors who attend the Memorial shop were satisfied with this outlet. 69 per cent were very satisfied.

100 per cent of visitors who used the disability facilities said they were very satisfied with these facilities.

Source: General Visitor Survey 2019-2020

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1.8.3 Opportunities for visitor feedback such as Service Charter, Visitors’ Book; evaluation services; and the AWM website

Target: Feedback and rankings through external surveys (eg. TripAdvisor) remains positive

Analysis: Visitor survey samples were low and incomplete this financial year due to lower survey rates during the smoke affected school holidays in January 2020, followed by the expanding international travel restrictions leading up to the closure of the Memorial on 24 March 2020 as part of the COVID19 response.

In house and onsite surveys conducted this financial year were;

• General Visitor Survey n=322

• After the War special exhibition exit survey n=226

• Courage for Peace special exhibition exit survey n=134

• Café performance exit survey n=382

• Big Things in Store exit survey n=42

• Anzac at Home online user survey n=123

• Last Post Ceremony trial survey n=30

• External research studies conducted n=2

• Social Heritage Values Research n=514

Source: Evaluation and Visitor Research, Australian War Memorial

1.8.4 Cafes, Retail and Online Sales facilities that enhance the visitor experience and generate revenue to help support broader Memorial priorities

Target: Revenue generation across retail and cost recovery lines meets or exceeds targets

Analysis:

Net average return per visitor for the 2019-20 period decreased by 40 per cent on the cumulative average for the previous three financial years. The variance is due to a low net operating profit result from the Memorial retail operation due to a one-off aged inventory write off and reduced earnings from the catering contract due to the closure of the Memorial for COVID-19.

Source: Australian War Memorial financial reports

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ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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LEGISLATIVE COMPLIANCE

Advertising and Marketing

In accordance with section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the following is a summary of amounts paid by the Memorial to advertising agencies, media advertising organisations, and market research organisations. The Memorial made no payments to polling organisations or direct mail organisations in the current reporting period. As required, particulars of payments of less than $13,800 have not been included.

Service provider Total amount

paid (inc GST) General advertising Market research

iSentia $46,200 $46,200

Canberra FM Radio Pty Ltd $14,255 $14,255

Fairfax Media Ltd $23,916 $23,916

Hardie Grant Media Pty Ltd $17,193 $17,193

Medium Rare Content Agency Pty Ltd $56,870 $56,870

Stackla Pty Ltd $33,000 $33,000

TripAdvisor Singapore Pty Ltd $25,833 $25,833

Fivefold Creative Pty Ltd $42,042 $42,042

Cre8ive $89,584 $89,584

Total $348,893 $302,693 $46,200

Energy consumption and environmental management Protection of the environment and sustainable development remain key objectives for the Memorial and are applied to the development of plans for the enhancement and maintenance of the Memorial’s buildings, grounds, and operations.

The Energy and Environment Committee (EEC) oversees and monitors the Memorial’s energy use and the resultant impact upon the environment. The EEC meets quarterly and reports to the Senior Management Group and the Corporate Management Group providing focus and continuous improvement in managing water consumption, energy efficiency, waste disposal (including chemicals), and the appropriate control of hazardous materials (including asbestos and radiation).

The Memorial does not administer any legislation or have any appropriation directly related to the principles of environmental sustainability and development.

During the reporting period, the Memorial’s activities have accorded with the principles of ecologically sustainable development by striving to reduce the Memorial’s carbon footprint, and reduce reliance on non-renewable resources. The introduction of newly available data analytics software has allowed the Memorial to manage the energy consumption in detail. This detailed management has seen noticeable reductions in the energy consumption of

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Treloar E and energy usage of other buildings are being investigated. The data analytics software has the capacity to monitor electricity, water and gas usage and can expand to include any new infrastructure as part of the Development Project. The ongoing upgrading of old lighting to LED technology continues with the reduction of energy and zero ultra-violet emission for collection protection. The process of ‘recycle and reduce use where possible’ continues with the most recent example being the introduction of a system to recycle disposable gloves.

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APPENDIX A: LIST OF REQUIREMENTS - CORPORATE COMMONWEALTH ENTITIES

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report

Description Requirement

17BE Contents of annual report

17BE(a) Governance Details of the legislation establishing the body. Mandatory

17BE(b)(i) Governance A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in legislation. Mandatory

17BE(b)(ii) Governance The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for the reporting period. Mandatory

17BE(c) Governance The names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers.

Mandatory

17BE(d) Governance Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period. If applicable, mandatory

17BE(e) N/A Any government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(f) N/A Particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(g) Annual Performance Statements

Annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule. Mandatory

17BE(h),17B E(i) Financial Statements

A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j) Governance Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period.

Mandatory

17BE(k) Governance Outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any subsidiaries of the entity). Mandatory

17BE(ka) Governance Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees;

Mandatory

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(c) statistics on gender; (d)

statistics on staff location.

17BE(l) Governance Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity. Mandatory

17BE(m) Legislative Compliance Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period.

Mandatory

17BE(n),17B E(o) N/A For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if

there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(p) N/A Any significant activities and changes that affected the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(q) N/A Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(r) N/A Particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(s) N/A An explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(t) N/A Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs).

If applicable, mandatory

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17BE(taa) Governance The following information about the audit committee for the entity: (a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee;

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee;

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee;

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee; (e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee.

Mandatory

17BE(ta) Governance Information about executive remuneration. Mandatory