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Cancer Australia—Report for 2020-21


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Annual Report 2020-21

Statement of Acknowledgement We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia, and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to them and their cultures, and to elders both past and present.

Cancer Australia acknowledges that there is no single Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture or group and that there are many diverse communities, language groups and kinships throughout Australia.

About this report The annual report is available online at

canceraustralia.gov.au/about-us/

accountability-and-reporting

Contact us

If you have any queries about this report,

please contact:

Ms Jane Salisbury

General Manager, Health Promotion

and Communication

Cancer Australia

Locked Bag 3

STRAWBERRY HILLS NSW 2012

Internet: canceraustralia.gov.au

Email: enquiries@canceraustralia.gov.au

Freecall 1800 624 973 +61 2 9357 9400

ABN 21 075 951 918

Print ISBN: 978-1-74127-361-8

Online ISBN: 978-1-74127-362-5

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Paper-based publications

© Cancer Australia 2021

This work is copyright. You may reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for internal use within your organisation, but only if you or your organisation do not use the reproduction for any commercial purpose and retain this copyright notice and all disclaimer notices as part of that reproduction. Apart from rights to use as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved and you are not allowed to reproduce the whole or any part of this work in any way (electronic or otherwise) without first being given the specific written permission from Cancer Australia to do so. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights are to be sent to the Publications and Copyright contact officer, Cancer Australia, Locked Bag 3, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012.

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© Cancer Australia 2021

This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for internal use within your organisation, but only if you or your organisation do not use the reproduction for any commercial purpose and retain this copyright notice and all disclaimer notices as part of that reproduction. Apart from rights to use as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved and you are not allowed to reproduce the whole or any part of this work in any way (electronic or otherwise) without first being given the specific written permission from Cancer Australia to do so. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights are to be sent to the Publications and Copyright contact officer, Cancer Australia, Locked Bag 3, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012.

All information in this publication is correct as at 22 October 2021.

Letter of transmittal

Dear Minister,

I am pleased to present Cancer Australia’s Annual Report for the year ended

30 June 2021.

This Report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, which requires that

an annual report be given to the entity’s responsible Minister for presentation

to the Parliament. It reflects the requirements for Annual Reports approved by

the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under sections 63(2) and

70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999.

The Report has also been prepared to be consistent with the requirements for

annual reporting of the Cancer Australia Act 2006.

In compliance with section 10 of the Public Governance Performance and

Accountability Rule 2014, I certify that:

i. a fraud risk assessment and fraud control plan has been prepared for

Cancer Australia;

ii. appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting, investigating or

otherwise dealing with and reporting of fraud that meet the needs of

Cancer Australia are in place; and

iii. all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud

relating to Cancer Australia.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Dorothy Keefe PSM MD

Chief Executive Officer

Cancer Australia

i

Content

Statement of Acknowledgement

About this report

Letter of transmittal i

Overview 2

Chief Executive Officer’s Review 3

Advisory Council Chair Review 11

Cancer Australia Advisory Council 13

About Cancer Australia 16

About Cancer Australia 17

Report on performance 22

Annual Performance Statement 23

Report on financial performance 35

2020-21 Annual Report — Highlights 37

Management and accountability 40

Management and Accountability 41

Corporate Governance 41

Financial overview 44

Management of human resources 44

Ministerial and parliamentary coordination 58

Appendices 60

Appendix A: Audited Financial Statements 61

Appendix B: Mandatory Reporting Information 105

Appendix D: List of Requirements 121

Glossary 129

Abbreviations 132

Index 133

ii

Tables and figures

Table 3.1: Cancer Australia’s Resource Statement 2020-21 35

Table 4.1: Cancer Australia’s Audit and Risk Committee 43

Table 4.2: All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21) 45

Table 4.3: All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21) 46

Table 4.4: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21) 47

Table 4.5: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21) 48

Table 4.6: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Current Report Period (2020-21) 49

Table 4.7: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Current Report Period (2020-21) 50

Table 4.8: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Report Period (2020-21) 50

Table 4.9: Australian Public Service Act Employment salary ranges by classification level (Minimum/Maximum) Current Report Period (2020-21) 51

Table 4.10: All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20) 52

Table 4.11: All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20) 53

Table 4.12: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20) 54

Table 4.13: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20) 55

Table 4.14: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Previous Report Period (2019-20) 56

Table 4.15: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Previous Report Period (2019-20) 57

Table 4.16: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Previous Report Period (2018-19) 57

Table B.1: Advertising agencies used by Cancer Australia in 2020-21 106

Table B.2: Market Research undertaken by Cancer Australia in 2020-21 107

Table B.3: Cancer Australia Consultancy contracts in 2020-21 108

Table B.4: Summary of Cancer Australia Consultancy contracts in 2020-21 108

Table B.5: Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 109

Table B.6: Cancer Australia Non-Consultancy contracts in 2020-21 109

Table B.7: Summary of Cancer Australia non-consultancy contracts in 2020-21 112

Table B.8: Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 113

Table B.9: Key Management Personnel (2020-21) 116

Table B.10: Summary information about Remuneration for Key Management Personnel (2020-21) 116

Table B.11: Information About Remuneration for Key Management Personnel (2020-21) 117

Table B.12: Information about remuneration for senior executives (2020-21) 118

Table B.13: Details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period Current Report Period (2020-21) 118

iii

1

Overview

Chief Executive Officer’s Review

It is with great pleasure that I present

Cancer Australia’s Annual Report 2020-21 and

reflect on the agency’s accomplishments and

efforts to reduce the impact of cancer and

improve the outcomes of people affected by

cancer in Australia.

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia’s work was

underpinned by the agency’s strong

performance framework, which included:

Cancer Australia’s Portfolio Budget

Statement 2020-21; Corporate Plan 2020-21;

and Business Plan 2020-21. Cancer Australia’s

Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 2019-21 also

informed the work undertaken by the agency.

In 2020-21 and in accordance with the

agency’s key delivery objectives, Cancer

Australia: provided leadership in national

cancer control; developed and promoted

evidence-based best practice cancer care;

funded priority research and strengthened

national cancer data capacity; and provided

consumer and health professional cancer

information and resources.

The results achieved in regard to these

objectives are discussed in Part 3 of this

Annual Report. Information on Cancer

Australia’s management and accountability,

including financial results, is provided in Part 4.

Cancer Australia demonstrated its leadership

in national cancer control through a number

of initiatives in 2020-21 including: convening

a Ministerial Roundtable as the first step

towards developing the Australian Cancer

Plan; completing an enquiry into lung

cancer screening; leading the development

of the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap;

establishing Australia’s first clinical study to

better understand the safety and efficacy of

the COVID-19 vaccines in people with cancer;

and providing evidence-based guidance on

COVID and cancer care. Cancer Australia also

undertook initiatives to address disparities

in outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander people with cancer and provided

funding for priority cancer research.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 3

Australian Cancer Plan In 2020-21, Cancer Australia commenced the

development of an Australian Cancer Plan,

which will set key national cancer priorities

and action areas over the next 10 years across

the cancer control continuum.

As a first step, the agency convened a

Ministerial Roundtable which brought

together 80 leaders in national cancer

control including: consumers, peak national

clinical bodies, peak cancer and health

organisations, industry and private sector

representatives, State and Territory Health

Departments, Australian Government and

jurisdictional representatives.

Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry Cancer Australia provided national leadership

in cancer control through the completion of

its enquiry into the prospects, process and

delivery of a national lung cancer screening

program in Australia. Cancer Australia delivered

its report on the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry

to the Minister for Health in October 2020.

The findings of this report demonstrate

the benefits of a targeted lung cancer

screening enquiry for high-risk individuals,

being Australians aged between 55 and 74

and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

aged between 50 and 74, who are current or

former smokers. The national and international

evidence supported a screening program in

asymptomatic high-risk Australians which

could detect cancers in their early stages and

reduce lung cancer mortality in Australia by

around 20 per cent in the screened population.

Cancer Australia will continue its efforts in lung

cancer screening in 2021-22 to investigate the

feasibility of implementing a national program,

in partnership with the Department of Health.

The activities will involve the early and further

engagement of stakeholders focussing on key

feasibility issues. A scoping and consideration

of the Information Communications and

Technology requirements of a potential

national program will also be undertaken.

Cancer Australia will develop the Australian Cancer Plan within two years and will continue its comprehensive and inclusive engagement of stakeholders.

Overview 4

National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap Cancer Australia has continued to lead the

development of the National Pancreatic Cancer

Roadmap (the Roadmap) in partnership with

the Department of Health. The Roadmap

will identify key priority areas for action over

the next five years, across the continuum

of pancreatic care and research to improve

outcomes and survival for people affected

by pancreatic cancer. Throughout 2020-21,

Cancer Australia progressed the Roadmap

through: public and targeted consultations

to identify and refine key priorities;

reviewing national and international evidence

on pancreatic cancer care; and mapping

cancer care pathways for pancreatic cancer.

Cancer Australia plans to finalise the Roadmap

in December 2021.

COVID-19 Cancer Australia has continued to provide

national leadership in cancer control in

the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic by

establishing Australia’s first clinical trial to

study COVID-19 vaccines and cancer patients.

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia funded the

SerOzNet clinical trial, a prospective clinical

trial based on the United States’ National

Cancer Institute (NCI) SeroNet study protocol.

This study will help build vital global evidence

about the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19

vaccines for people with cancer. The results of

these studies will inform policy and practice for

the delivery of COVID-19 vaccines for people

with cancer in Australia.

Cancer Australia has continued to build on its

work in COVID-19 and cancer care throughout

2020-21. The agency advanced the national

policy and quality care agenda through the

publishing of a report COVID-19 Recovery:

Implications for cancer care. The report identifies

12 elements of cancer care which have changed

during COVID-19, describing targeted strategies

to enhance and embed high-value changes to

cancer care. Cancer Australia has also published

three reports informed by analysis of MBS data

to enhance the understanding of the impact

of COVID-19 on cancer-related services and

procedures for the top five incidence cancers.

Additionally, Cancer Australia has continued

to update the information on its COVID-19

information hub. This included: publishing

shared follow-up care resources which identify

the roles and responsibilities of each member of

the shared follow-up and survivorship care team,

to support best practice cancer follow-up care

during the COVID-19 pandemic; and providing

evidence-based responses to frequently

asked questions regarding COVID-19 vaccines

and cancer.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer Cancer Australia continued its important work

in addressing disparities in cancer outcomes

by raising awareness and supporting increased

uptake within health systems and among health

professionals of the Optimal Care Pathway for

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with

cancer (OCP) and its companion guide A guide

to implementing the optimal care pathway

for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

with cancer. Both the OCP and the guide are

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 5

designed to support culturally appropriate

and responsive health care, health services,

and clinicians, in the planning and delivery of

culturally safe cancer care.

Cancer Australia is developing a new website

to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people affected by cancer. The Cancer in

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

website information hub is an evidence-based

information and resources hub, which brings

together the latest statistics and information on

cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people. In addition, the Agency’s National

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer

Control Indicators website is a unique, national

resource which brings together trusted

national data. It provides Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander cancer data

in one location and is designed for

use by policymakers, governments,

cancer organisations, researchers,

health professionals, and consumers.

In 2020-21, to further enhance this website,

Cancer Australia has entered into an agreement

with the Australian National University to

collect and report data on currently unreported

indicators and measures for Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander people through

Mayi Kuwayu — The National Study of Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing.

Through the Supporting People with Cancer

Grant Initiative (SPWC), Cancer Australia

awarded grants totalling over $1 million in

the 2021 round. These grants were provided

to community organisations and aim to reduce

the burden of cancer and improve support

for people affected by cancer in a respectful

and culturally appropriate way. Six of the eight

grants were awarded to improve the outcomes

and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander people with cancer through:

optimising access to cancer research,

building capacity for Elders and community

to provide support through culturally

traditional knowledge, the development of

culturally responsive resources and tools,

supporting people with cancer in regional and

remote areas, and establishing a yarning circle.

Cancer Australia also ran its Yarn for Life

campaign which aimed to reduce the impact

of cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

communities, particularly remote Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander communities,

by raising awareness and encouraging

and normalising discussions about cancer.

During the 6-week campaign, radio ads were

played 330 times nationally. Television ads

were aired during National Indigenous

Television’s (NITV) highest rating shows,

and 20,000 unique views were achieved

on the campaign web page.

Cancer Australia maintained its ongoing

commitment to reconciliation. As an agency

we continued our journey of ensuring

reconciliation is an increasingly lived and

vital element in our projects, engagement

and organisational processes. This journey

is supported by the agency’s Reconciliation

Action Plan (RAP) 2019-21, which outlines ways

the agency collectively, and staff individually,

can contribute to closing the gap in health

outcomes. The RAP represents the views,

ideas and values of the agency with ownership

of the RAP being embraced by all staff at

Cancer Australia.

Overview 6

Activities undertaken in 2020-21 under the

RAP include: observing key Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander dates, such as NAIDOC

Week and National Reconciliation Week

through presentations from key Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander leaders; engagement

of an Indigenous contractor to facilitate staff

involvement in the development of our new

RAP as well as guidance on how to further

implement the RAP in daily responsibilities;

and working towards creating a culturally

safe workplace for staff, stakeholders and

visitors. Creating a culturally safe workplace

was supported through the selection of

Indigenous artworks, development of

culturally-appropriate room names in

consultation with an Aboriginal specialist,

and engagement with the Metropolitan Local

Aboriginal Land Council. Cancer Australia

where possible, makes an effort to procure and

engage the services of Indigenous businesses

in project work and asset management.

I have a strong personal commitment to

reconciliation, and I am proud to be the CEO

of an agency which champions reconciliation

and is committed to the ongoing process of

achieving cultural competency.

Priority Cancer Research Cancer Australia continued to fund priority

cancer research in 2020-21 through a number

of initiatives, including: the awarding of

research grants through Cancer Australia’s

Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research

Scheme (PdCCRS); providing funding support

to Australia’s 14 Multi-Site Collaborative

Cancer Clinical Trials Groups and four National

Technical Services; and by continuing to

lead the implementation of the Australian

Brain Cancer Mission, in collaboration with

the Department of Health, on behalf of the

Australian Government.

Through the PdCCRS, Cancer Australia

partnered with non-government organisations

to coordinate and maximise funding of

cancer research at a national level. In 2020-21

Cancer Australia, together with seven

national and international Funding Partners,

awarded 17 cancer research grants totalling

$6.30 million in priority areas covering a range

of cancers, including primary prevention

and health services research, as well as

research projects in specific tumour types:

breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer,

multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and brain

cancers including paediatric brain cancers.

Cancer Australia continued its support

for 14 Australian Multi-site Collaborative

Cancer Clinical Trials Groups (CTGs) and

four National Technical Services (NTSs).

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia provided

a total of $6.06 million in funding to

the Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials

Groups to support the development of

industry-independent cancer clinical trial

protocols to the stage of applications for

grant funding. A further $1.08 million was

provided to four National Technical Services

to assist in building the capacity of CTGs to

develop industry-independent cancer clinical

trial protocols. Together, the work of the

CTGs and NTSs contribute to generating the

evidence base for best-practice care for people

diagnosed with cancer.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 7

Australian Brain Cancer Mission Cancer Australia continued to drive the

implementation of the Australian Brain Cancer

Mission (the Mission) in collaboration with the

Health and Medical Research Office of the

Department of Health, on behalf of the Medical

Research Future Fund (MRFF). During 2020-21,

through the Mission, $2.61 million was

awarded to the University of Melbourne for

Responding to need: technology-enhanced

brain cancer survivorship through the MRFF’s

Survivor Grant Opportunity. Cancer Australia

also completed its Analysis of Australian brain

cancer platforms and technologies to inform

future infrastructure requirements to support

brain cancer. As at 30 June 2021, the Mission

has 12 funding partners with contributions

totalling $72.75 million.

Strengthening national cancer data capacity To strengthen national cancer data capacity,

Cancer Australia published updated

sociodemographic data analyses for a range

of cancer control measures on its National

Cancer Control Indicators Website (NCCI),

including: smoking, diet, alcohol consumption,

childhood cancer, mortality-to-incidence ratio,

and 5-year relative survival for all cancers

combined and 17 individual cancer types.

Further to this, Cancer Australia has continued

to finalise ethics and data custodian approvals

with states and territories to enable linkage

of data on cancer stage at diagnosis with

treatments received and subsequent

survival outcomes.

Cancer Australia has also strengthened

national cancer data capacity in relation to

people affected by pancreatic cancer. As part

of the development of the National Pancreatic

Cancer Roadmap, the agency undertook a

Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MAPID)

with the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

to enable analysis of linked data to identify

sociodemographic characteristics of people

with pancreatic cancer.

To promote cancer awareness and provide

information about cancer to the community,

Cancer Australia utilised multiple approaches

and communication tools, including the

Cancer Australia website and social media

(including Twitter, YouTube and e-alerts).

The Cancer Australia website continued

to provide a centralised source of trusted,

evidence-based information for consumers,

health professionals, researchers, educators,

decision makers and the community.

In 2020-21, the Cancer Australia website

achieved 1,192,761 visits and 48 new

evidence-based resources were added.

A total of 467 resources were available to the

community through the Cancer Australia

website on 30 June 2021.

Thank you In closing, I would like to acknowledge and

sincerely thank the many people, organisations

and entities which have supported the work of

Cancer Australia throughout 2020-21.

I extend my thanks to the Minister for Health

and Aged Care, the Hon Greg Hunt MP,

for his continued support of Cancer Australia

and its work.

I also extend my thanks to the members of the

Cancer Australia Advisory Council for its valued

guidance throughout 2020-21.

Overview 8

I also wish to commend Professor Tracey

O’Brien who was appointed Advisory Council

Chair in March 2021. In particular, I extend my

sincere thanks to the immediate past Chair of

the Advisory Council, Professor Robert Thomas

OAM, for his outstanding contribution made

to cancer care in Australia, not only in his role

as Chair of Cancer Australia’s Advisory Council,

but also over the course of his career as an

eminent surgical oncologist, a passionate

advocate for patient-centred cancer care

and as an influential leader in cancer system

reform. I wish him all the very best for the

future, and again thank him for his outstanding

contribution to cancer care in Australia.

I would like to thank the members of

Cancer Australia’s strategic advisory groups,

the members of the agency’s various project

working groups, steering committees,

and assessment panels. Their guidance and

expertise has been invaluable in helping

Cancer Australia deliver on its bodies of work

and identify emerging issues in cancer control

and future priorities for the agency.

I wish to thank the many health professionals,

professional colleges and organisations which

have supported Cancer Australia with their

valuable insights.

Cancer Australia has continued its

patient-centr ed approach to its work by

engaging with people affected by cancer.

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia had 117

consumers represented on its strategic

advisory groups, working and reference groups,

steering committees, assessment panels and

grant review panels. I wish to thank each

and every one of them for their valuable

perspectives and advice.

I would also like to acknowledge our PdCCRS

funding partners in 2020-21: Australian Lions

Childhood Cancer Research Foundation,

Cure Cancer Australia, Leukaemia Foundation,

My Room, National Breast Cancer Foundation,

The Kids’ Cancer Project, and Worldwide

Cancer Research.

I extend my thanks to the executive and

staff of the Department of Health for

their continued support, partnership,

and valued contribution to Cancer

Australia’s achievements. I would also like

to acknowledge our fellow Health agencies,

the Australian Institute of Health and

Welfare (AIHW), the National Health and

Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the

Australian Commission on Safety and Quality

in Health Care (ACSQHC) for their support

and collaboration throughout the year.

It gives me great pleasure in acknowledging

the Executive and the staff of Cancer Australia

for their extraordinary efforts, professionalism

and commitment to our cancer control efforts.

Their tenacity, resilience, and ability to adapt to

the changing work environment caused by the

ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, enabled us to

deliver on our important work.

Professor Dorothy Keefe PSM MD

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 9

Overview 10

Advisory Council Chair Review

In 2020-21, the Cancer Australia Advisory

Council (the Council) provided strategic advice

and guidance to Cancer Australia to strengthen

the agency’s ability to provide national

leadership in cancer control. The Council was

engaged in, and provided advice on, a range

of areas of focus for the agency, including:

• Cancer Australia’s future strategic directions

in the context of global health and the

impact of cancer;

• Cancer Australia’s Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander initiatives and future

strategic directions in Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander cancer control;

• Cancer Australia’s approach to the

development of the Australian Cancer Plan;

• Cancer Australia’s initiatives to support

optimal cancer management during the

COVID-19 pandemic;

• The key considerations relating to the

findings of Cancer Australia’s report on

the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry; and

• Cancer Australia’s approach to and

development of Australia’s first

National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 11

I want to thank Council members for

their guidance, advice and valuable insights

throughout 2020-21. Members of the Council

bring a wealth of knowledge and expertise

including basic and translational cancer

research, epidemiology, clinical practice

(primary care, radiation oncology, medical,

paediatric and surgical oncology), health policy,

health service delivery, and an understanding

of the experience of cancer, which provides

a significant contribution to Cancer Australia

and its role in national cancer control.

On behalf of past and current Council

members, I wish to express my gratitude

to the immediate past Chair, Professor

Robert Thomas OAM, who stepped down

in December 2020 after being appointed

Chair in March 2016. Throughout this

period, Professor Thomas provided strategic

guidance and wise counsel, guiding the

work of the Council, supporting members

and expertly facilitating discussion. I wish

you all the very best for the future and thank

you for your contribution to the Council and

Cancer Australia. I would also like to thank

and acknowledge the valued contributions

over the last six years of outgoing Council

members, Ms Perry Sperling PSM and

Dr W illiam Glasson AO.

Finally, I would like to acknowledge

CancerAustralia’s CEO, Professor Dorothy

Keefe PSM, for her exceptional leadership as

CEO of Cancer Australia in 2020-21. Under her

stewardship, Cancer Australia has continued

to deliver on its program of work and its role

as the national cancer control agency. I would

also like to commend the agency’s senior

management and staff for their high-level

of expertise and dedication.

The Council looks forward to continuing to

work productively with Professor Keefe and

supporting the agency in its efforts to minimise

the impact of cancer, address disparities,

and improve the health outcomes of people

affected by cancer in Australia by providing

national leadership in cancer control.

Professor Tracey O'Brien

On behalf of the Council, I also wish to thank the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for Health and Aged Care, for his continued support of Cancer Australia’s work and the Council.

Overview 12

Cancer Australia Advisory Council

Establishment and Function The Advisory Council is established under the

Cancer Australia Act 2006 to “give advice to the

Chief Executive Officer about the performance

of Cancer Australia’s functions”. During 2020-21,

the Advisory Council comprised one

chair and eleven members, as appointed

by the Minister for Health. The Advisory

Council met three times during the year

and provided valuable advice in relation to

Cancer Australia’s work. Council members

bring to their role considerable breadth

and depth of expertise, including in cancer

research, translation science, clinical practice

(epidemiology, radiation oncology,

medical oncology and surgical oncology),

health policy, health service delivery and an

understanding of the experience of cancer.

Membership The 2020-21 members of the Advisory

Council were:

• Associate Professor Tracey O’Brien (interim

Chair from 1 January 2021 to 31 March 2021;

Chair from 1 April 2021)

• Professor Robert Thomas OAM

(Chair from 2016 to 30 December 2020)

• Dr Benjamin Brady

• Dr William Glasson AO

• Dr Elizabeth Marles

• Associate Professor Chris Milross

• Ms Perry Sperling PSM

• Professor Joanne Aitken

• Associate Professor Penny Blomfield

• Associate Professor Kelvin Kong

• Ms Lillian Leigh

• Dr Serena Sia

• The Honourable Jillian Skinner

Advisory Council members are appointed

for a term of three years. Remuneration of

members of the Advisory Council is governed

by the Cancer Australia Act 2006 (section 30).

Advisory Council members’ remuneration is

determined by the Remuneration Tribunal.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 13

Overview 14

2

About Cancer Australia

About Cancer Australia

Cancer Australia is a specialist agency within

the Australian Government’s Health portfolio.

Cancer Australia provides national leadership

in cancer control for Australians affected

by cancer.

Cancer Australia achieves its purpose

(see below) by: developing and promoting

evidence-based best practice cancer care;

providing consumer and health professional

cancer information; funding priority cancer

research; and strengthening national cancer

data capacity.

In 2021, an estimated 150,782 new cases

of cancer will be diagnosed in Australia,

excluding basal and squamous cell carcinomas

of the skin.1 Cancer remains a leading cause

of death in Australia, with 49,221 people

expected to die from cancer in 2021.1 Cancer is

also the leading cause of fatal disease burden

in Australia, accounting for 34% of the fatal

burden of disease in 2015.2

This notwithstanding, it should be noted that

more people in Australia are living longer

after a diagnosis with cancer. Since 1988,

Australia has seen the five-year relative survival

for all cancers combined increase from 51.3%

in 1988-92 to 69.7% in 2013-17.1

Cancer Australia operates in a dynamic and

complex environment with current and

emerging challenges in cancer control. In order

to meet these challenges and improve cancer

outcomes, it is imperative Cancer Australia

remains agile, strategic and collaborative in its

approach. The agency proactively liaises with

a wide range of stakeholder groups with an

interest in cancer. Cancer Australia partners

with consumers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander peoples, health professionals,

professional colleges, researchers,

research funding bodies, non-government

organisations, other health portfolio agencies,

and state and territory governments to

address disparities and drive improvements

in outcomes for people affected by cancer

in Australia.

Cancer Australia will continue its collaborative

approach to leverage and maximise

partnerships by building on and developing

new collaborations both nationally and

internationally, across public, private and

community sectors to deliver evidence based

best-practice care improve cancer outcomes

and enhance the patient experience.

1 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2021. Cancer data in Australia. Cat. no. CAN 122. Canberra: AIHW. Accessed June 2021; https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/cancer/cancer-data-in-australia

2 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019. Australian Burden of Disease Study in 2015: Interactive data on disease burden. Accessed June 2021 from: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/

burden-of-disease/abds-2015-interactive-data-disease-burden/ contents/overview

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 17

Purpose Cancer Australia’s purpose is to

minimise the impact of cancer,

address disparities, and improve the

health outcomes of people affected

by cancer in Australia by providing

national leadership in cancer control.

Functions and role Cancer Australia is an agency of the health

portfolio. It was established by the Australian

Government under the Cancer Australia Act

2006 and is a Non-corporate Common wealth

Entity under the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act). Cancer Australia is subject to

the Auditor-General Act 1997, and its staff are

employees of the Australian Public Service

under the Public Service Act 1999.

The role and functions of Cancer Australia are set

out in the Cancer Australia Act 2006. Its functions,

as prescribed by the Act, are:

• to provide national leadership in

cancer control

• to guide scientific improvements to

cancer prevention, treatment and care

• to coordinate and liaise between the wide

range of groups and health care providers

with an interest in cancer

• to make recommendations to the

Australian Government about cancer

policy and priorit ies

• to oversee a dedicated budget for

research into cancer

• to assist with the implementation of

Commonwealth Government policies

and programs in cancer control

• to provide financial assistance, out of money

appropriated by the Parliament, for research

into cancer covered by the dedicated

budget, and for the implementation of

policies and programs referred to above

• any functions which the Minister, by writing,

directs Cancer Australia to perform.

Cancer Australia’s CEO reports to the

Minister for Health.

Organisational structure Cancer Australia is led by the CEO,

Professor Dorothy Keefe PSM MD. Professor

Keefe is supported by the Deputy CEO,

Associate Professor Cleola Anderiesz who

also has responsibility for Policy and Strategy.

The Division Head and General Manager

responsibilities are set out below:

National Cancer Control Division

— Dr Anna Boltong

National Research and Data Division

— Dr Paul Jackson

Health Promotion and

Communication portfolio

— Ms Jane Salisbury

Policy and Strategy portfolio

— Ms Geraldine Daly

Finance and Corporate Affairs portfolio

— Mr Elmer Wiegold. Mr Wiegold is also

the agency’s Chief Financial Officer.

About Cancer Australia 18

At 30 June 2021, Cancer Australia had

68 employees, of whom 58 were ongoing.

Cancer Australia has structures,

systems and processes in place to ensure

that its governance, compliance and

accountability responsibilities are met

(see Part 4 of this report).

Cancer Australia’s head office is located

in Sydney. Cancer Australia also maintains

offices in Canberra and Melbourne through

shared accommodation and service level

agreements with the National Health and

Medical Research Council (Canberra) and

the Department of Health (Melbourne).

The Cancer Australia Advisory Council Cancer Australia draws on the broad

diversity of expertise, skills and experience

Council members bring to the organisation.

The Council consists of a Chair and up to

12 members appointed by the Minister for

Health. The Council Chair’s review is in Part 1

of this report.

Audit and Risk Committee Cancer Australia benefits from advice and

counsel provided through a standing

Audit Committee, whose members are

Ms Gayle Ginnane (Chair), Ms Carol Lilley

and A/Associate Professor Christine Giles.

Advisory Groups Cancer Australia acknowledges the significant

input and valuable advice extended to the

agency by strategic and tumour-specific advisory

groups. Appendix C provides further information

about the roles of these groups.

Outcome and program structure The outcome of Cancer Australia’s work in

the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements is:

Minimised impacts of cancer,

including through national

leadership in cancer control with

targeted research and clinical

trials; evidence informed clinical

practice; strengthened national data

capacity; community and consumer

information and support (Page 253)

The program attached to this outcome

is Program 1.1: Improved cancer control.

The full Agency Budget Statement for 2020-21

is available at: https://www.health.gov.au/sites/

default/files/documents/2020/10/budget-2020-21-health-portfolio-budget-statements.pdf

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 19

About Cancer Australia 20

3

Report on performance

Annual Performance Statement

As the accountable authority of

Cancer Australia, I present the 2020-21

Annual Performance Statements of Cancer

Australia, in accordance with paragraph 39(1)

(a) of the Public Governance, Performance

and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

In my opinion, these Annual Performance

Statements are based on properly

maintained records, accurately reflect the

performance of the entity and comply with

subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

These Annual Performance Statements

are presented in the context of Cancer

Australia’s purpose and program objectives.

They demonstrate the outcomes achieved by

the agency against the intended outcomes

outlined in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget

Statements and 2020-21 Corporate Plan.

Purpose Cancer Australia’s purpose is to minimise

the impact of cancer, address disparities

and improve the health outcomes of

people affected by cancer in Australia

by providing national leadership in

cancer control (Outcome 1: Health Policy,

Access and Support).

Cancer Australia’s program of work contributes

toward the achievement of the following

outcome: Minimised impacts of cancer,

including through national leadership in

cancer control with targeted research and

clinical trials; evidence informed clinical practice;

strengthened national data capacity;

community and consumer information

and support. (PBS 2020-21; page 253)

Cancer Australia’s program objectives for 2020-21 were:

A. Provide national leadership in cancer control

B. Develop and promote evidence-based best

practice cancer care

C. Fund cancer research and strengthen

national data capacity

D. Provide consumer and health professional

cancer information and resources. (2020-21

PBS page 253; 2020-21 Corporate Plan

pages 15-18)

Cancer Australia’s performance in relation to

these program objectives, and the performance

criteria associated with them, is provided in the

tables below. There is a separate table for each

program objective. The agency has met all its

2020-21 reference points or targets.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 23

A. Provide national leadership in cancer control

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Lead a shared agenda to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Progress priority initiatives in collaboration with key stakeholders.

Program 1.1 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements, page 253; 2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 16

Achieved. See below

In 2020 -21, Cancer Australia led a shared agenda to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander Australians. Throughout 2020-21, Cancer Australia: supported optimal cancer

care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer; advanced community and consumer

knowledge and understanding of cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;

consulted with and incorporated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in its priority work

such as the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap and the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry; and updated

and enhanced the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control Indicators website.

To support optimal cancer care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer,

Cancer Australia released and promoted A guide to implementing the Optimal Care Pathway for

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer (the Guide). The Guide is designed to support

health services and clinicians to plan and deliver culturally safe and responsive cancer care. The Guide

uses Cancer Australia’s Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer

(OCP) as the foundation for best practice, and contains priorities for consideration at a system level,

practical strategies to help health services plan for improvement, and guidance for health

professionals to consider in relation to their own practice.

Report on performance 24

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia advanced community and consumer knowledge and understanding of

cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through the Yarn for Life campaign and by

publishing new information for COVID-19 and cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

• Yarn for Life is a national communications campaign which aims to increase awareness of cancer,

normalise conversations about cancer and encourage early detection of cancer among

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The 2020-21 Yarn for Life campaign differs from the

previous campaign conducted in 2019. It includes additional assets and is designed to resonate

with remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. During the 6-week campaign

in 2020-21, radio ads were played 330 times nationally and television ads were aired during

NITV’s highest rating shows. The campaign ads were also played 175,000 times on catch-up

TV/ Nine Now and 7 Plus. The digital activity achieved 1,579,723 impressions across Facebook

and Instagram and there were over 20,000 unique views on the campaign web landing page.

• Cancer Australia also developed a dedicated section on the Cancer Australia website —

Cancer and COVID-19 — what it means for our Mob and developed an animated video titled

Act early for our Mob’s health, both of which encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people to keep taking care of their health during COVID-19. Both were very successful

and achieved 300,000, and over 1 million digital impressions, respectively, in 2020-21.

Additionally, Cancer Australia developed tailored information on the COVID-19 vaccines

for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer including:

› An animation about the COVID-19 vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people affected by cancer.

› A radio grab, using the voiceover for the animation, to be broadcast on the National

Indigenous Radio network across Australia.

› Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the COVID-19 vaccines for Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer (consumer and healthcare team versions).

Cancer Australia enhanced and updated the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control

Indicators website, a unique, national resource that brings together trusted, national data that was

developed to monitor progress and identify potential areas for action in Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander cancer control. The website provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer data in one

location and is designed for use by policymakers, governments, cancer organisations, researchers,

health professionals, and consumers. In 2020-21, the website was enhanced with updated data

and information in the priority areas of screening and immunisation, diagnosis, and treatment

and support. Additionally, Cancer Australia commenced an agreement with the Australian National

University to report on a range of currently-unreported indicators and measures. These will be

reported on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander National Cancer Control Indicators website

through Mayi Kuwayu — The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 25

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Conduct an enquiry, as requested by the Minister for Health, into the prospects, process and delivery of a national lung cancer screening program in Australia

Complete enquiry into the prospects, process and delivery of a national lung cancer screening program in Australia by October 2020

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 16 Achieved. See below

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia completed its comprehensive enquiry into the prospects, process and

delivery of a national lung cancer screening program in Australia. The Enquiry involved a multifaceted

body of work underpinned by extensive stakeholder consultation and found there is global evidence

to demonstrate the benefits of targeted lung cancer screening for high-risk individuals.

The Report on the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry was provided to the Minister for Health on

13 October 2020 and released on Cancer Australia’s website in November 2020. The report is

available at: https://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/publications-and-resources/cancer-australia-publications/report-lung-cancer-screening-enquiry.

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Drive the implementation of the Australian Brain Cancer Mission to improve outcomes for Australians diagnosed with brain cancer

Implementation of the Australian Brain Cancer Mission’s national initiatives

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 16 Achieved. See below

Cancer Australia continues to drive the implementation of the Australian Brain Cancer Mission to

improve outcomes for Australians diagnosed with brain cancer. In 2020-21 Cancer Australia:

• Awarded $2.61 million to the University of Melbourne for Responding to need: technology-enhanced

brain cancer survivorship through the MRFF’s Survivor Grant Opportunity. This grant is aimed at:

› supporting the development of new approaches and the use of technologies to improve

communications between brain cancer survivors, their families, carers and health care

professionals; and understanding how information technologies and platforms can be used

to support people with brain cancer, their families and carers, and their impact on the physical,

psychosocial and economic sequelae of a brain cancer diagnosis.

› Cancer Australia has opened a second call for grant applications through the MRFF to

improve understanding of survivorship and better understand the lifelong impact of a

brain cancer diagnosis.

• Completed an Analysis of Australian brain cancer platforms and technologies (the Analysis).

The Analysis informs understanding of future infrastructure requirements to support brain

cancer research, clinical trials, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and clinical care in Australia,

which will inform future investments under the Mission.

Report on performance 26

At 30 June 2021, there were 15 active research projects funded by grants awarded under

the Mission. Currently, the Mission has 12 funding partners with partner commitments totalling

$72.75 million. The funding partners are: ACT Health and Canberra Health Services, Carrie’s

Beanies 4 Brain Cancer, Children’s Hospital Foundation Queensland, Cure Brain Cancer Foundation,

Financial Markets Foundation for Children, Mark Hughes Foundation, Minderoo Foundation’s

Collaborate Against Cancer, NeuroSurgical Research Foundation, Robert Connor Dawes Foundation,

The Kids’ Cancer Project, the State of New South Wales, and the State of Victoria.

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Lead the development of a National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap, as requested by the Minister for Health, to improve outcomes and survival for people with pancreatic cancer

Design and progress an approach to the development of a National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap that leverages the efforts and expertise of the non-government sector

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 16 Achieved. See below

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia continued to lead the development of a National Pancreatic Cancer

Roadmap (the Roadmap), which is expected to be finalised in December 2021. The Roadmap

aims to identify key clinical practice and research priority areas for action over the next five years,

across the continuum of pancreatic care to improve outcomes and survival for people affected by

pancreatic cancer.

To progress the development of the Roadmap, key pieces of work undertaken by Cancer Australia

included a review of pancreatic cancer research funding and clinical trials activity across the

pancreatic cancer continuum and an analysis of the current evidence to identify gaps and

opportunities in pancreatic treatment and care. This analysis examined variations in care,

sociodemographic characteristics and opportunities for strategic investment, including research

and clinical trials, and was guided by an expert Steering Group.

The development of the Roadmap has been underpinned by comprehensive stakeholder

engagement with broad public and targeted consultations to leverage the expertise of governments,

non-government organisations, researchers, health professionals, clinical colleges, pancreatic cancer

organisations, peak bodies, and people affected by cancer with a focus on priority populations.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 27

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Administered program implemented efficiently

Administered program implemented on time and within budget (target 95%)

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 16 Achieved. See below

Total Administered Program expenses in 2020-21 were 18.361 million, $0.002 million lower than

budget of $18.363 million. Cancer Australia has achieved the 95% target of administered expenses

in 2020-21 by efficiently administering its administered program on time and within budget.

This on-budget result was driven by effective governance and management of program and project

activities during the year. Where planned activities were affected during the COVID-19 pandemic,

mitigating measures were implemented in a timely manner.

B. Develop and promote evidence-based best practice cancer care

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Analyse, interpret and translate evidence to inform best practice cancer care

Research translated

into evidence-ba sed information, to assist and inform policy and clinical practice.

Program 1.1 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements, page 253; 2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 17

Achieved. See below

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia analysed, interpreted and translated evidence to inform best practice

cancer care. Cancer Australia released several resources regarding COVID-19 and cancer care to

inform best practice, these included:

• Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data:

Skin, breast and colorectal cancers, and telehealth services. This report provides findings from an

analysis of Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) for the months January 2020 to June 2020 to

understand where changes in the number of cancer-related services (diagnostic and treatment

procedures) have occurred, and the types of services affected during the COVID-19 pandemic.

• Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data:

Lung and prostate cancers. This report provides findings from an analysis of Medicare Benefits

Schedule (MBS) data for the months January 2020 to June 2020 to understand where changes

in the number of cancer-related services (diagnostic and treatment procedures) have occurred,

and the types of services affected during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Report on performance 28

• National and jurisdictional data on the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures

in Australia: Breast, colorectal, lung, prostate and skin cancers. This report provides findings

from an analysis of Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) data for the months January 2020 to

September 2020 to understand where changes in the number of cancer-related services

(diagnostic and treatment procedures) have occurred, and the types of services affected

at both the state and national level, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

• Responses to Frequently Asked Questions about the COVID-19 vaccines for people affected by

cancer in Australia based on current Australian and international evidence and developed in

consultation with the cancer community and the Commonwealth Department of Health.

These COVID-19 resources and FAQs can be found at Cancer Australia’s website:

https://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/affected-cancer/COVID-19_and_cancer

In addition, in 2020-21, Cancer Australia undertook an analysis of cancer research funding in Australia

by reviewing funding awarded directly to national cancer research projects and cancer research

programs for the period 2012-2020. This analysis will inform Cancer Australia’s research priorities

for the 2022-2024 rounds of the Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme (PdCCRS).

Cancer Australia plans to publish a report on the findings of this analysis in 2021-22.

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Lead the development, dissemination and implementation of evidence-based models of cancer care to support improved patient outcomes and safe and sustainable clinical practice

Evidence-based models of shared follow-up and survivorship care promoted, disseminated and/or implemented

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 17 Achieved. See below

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia developed guidance for models of shared follow-up care during the

COVID-19 pandemic. This included the publication of:

• COVID-19 Recovery: Implications for cancer care. This report describes the nature and

impact of high-value changes relating to shared follow-up and survivorship care and other

evidence-based models of care during COVID-19 pandemic, with targeted strategies to

embed high-value changes into practice. This report can be found at Cancer Australia’s website:

https://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/affected-cancer/information-about-cancer-and-covid-19/

covid-19-recovery-implications-cancer-care

• Shared follow-up and survivorship care resources to support to support best practice follow-up

care during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. These resources were promoted in response to

increased pressures on the health system during the COVID-19 pandemic. These resources can

be found at Cancer Australia’s website: https://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/clinical-best-practice/

shared-follow-care

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 29

C. Fund cancer research and strengthen national data capacity

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Fund priority cancer research

through the Priority-d riven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme

Award ≥9 cancer research grants in areas of identified priority

Program 1.1 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements, page 254

Achieved. See below

The Australian Government is committed to ensuring Australia remains internationally competitive

and at the forefront of research and discovery regarding cancer, its origins, treatment and the care

of people affected by cancer.

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia has continued to provide funding to cancer research through the

Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme (PdCCRS). In the 2020 round, Cancer Australia

partnered with seven national and international organisations to collaboratively fund cancer research

projects and maximise the Australian Government’s investment in priority areas of cancer research.

The seven national and international organisations included: Australian Lions Childhood

Cancer Research Foundation; Cure Cancer; Leukaemia Foundation; My Room; National Breast

Cancer Foundation; The Kids’ Cancer Project; and Worldwide Cancer Research.

Seventeen grants were awarded for a total value of $6.3 million ($5.2 million from Cancer Australia

and $1.1 million from Funding Partners). These grants covered research in a range of priority areas

including: primary prevention and health services research, as well as research projects in specific

tumour types: breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and brain

cancers including paediatric brain cancers.

Report on performance 30

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Provide high quality cancer data to inform national cancer control Publish data analyses and insights on the

National Cancer Control Indicators website.

Program 1.1 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements, page  254

Achieved. See below

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia published updated data analyses and insights on its National Cancer

Control Indicators (NCCI) website (https://ncci.canceraustralia.gov.au/). The website is a dynamic

national cancer resource that brings together data from 15 authoritative sources and covers 31 key

indicators across the continuum of cancer care.

Data were updated for a range of measures across the cancer continuum including breast screening,

smoking, diet, alcohol consumption, childhood cancer, mortality-to-incidence ratio, and 5-year

relative survival for all cancers combined and 17 individual cancer types.

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia was in the process of finalising ethics and data custodian approvals

with states and territories. This will enable linkage of data on cancer stage at diagnosis in 2011

with treatments received and subsequent survival outcomes. It will also allow analysis and reporting

of patterns of national treatment activity by stage at diagnosis and survival outcomes for the top 5

incident adult cancers.

Additionally, Cancer Australia is progressing development of methodologies for collection of stage at

diagnosis for additional cancer types, to include pancreas, liver, stomach, ovary, and uterus. This will

build on the 2011 stage at diagnosis data for the top 5 incident cancers.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 31

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Provide funding to brain cancer clinical trials through the Australian Brain Cancer Mission in partnership with the Department of Health and Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF)

Fund up to two new and/or expanded brain cancer clinical trials

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 18 Achieved. See below

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia continued to provide funding to support brain cancer research though

the Australian Brain Cancer Mission, with the MRFF budget of $5 million for 2020-21 having been

fully committed.

Through the Australia New Zealand Children’s Haematology/Oncology Group (ANZCHOG)

grant opportunity, Cancer Australia approved the clinical trial CONNECT-1903 to open with support

provided by the MRFF. The purpose of the ANZCHOG grant opportunity is to improve treatments

and outcomes for children with brain cancer through increasing access to high quality international

cancer clinical trials. CONNECT-1903 aims to inform future treatment for children newly diagnosed

with high grade gliomas (HGG) with an NTRK fusion.

Additionally, through the Fighting Childhood Cancer Measure, Cancer Australia together with the

Robert Connor Dawes Foundation and Carrie’s Beanies 4 Brain Cancer, continued to provide funding

support to ANZCHOG for the Access to Innovative Molecular diagnostic Profiling for paediatric

brain tumours (AIM BRAIN) project. Cancer Australia and its funding partners have provided a total

of $1,742,898 to the project, which aims to accelerate Australia’s capacity to undertake advanced

molecular testing for paediatric brain tumours. Through AIM-BRAIN, every child with a CNS tumour

in Australia can now access the most accurate molecular profiling worldwide.

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Support Australia’s national Multi-site Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Groups (CTGs)

Fund 14 CTGs through the Supporting Cancer Clinical Trials program

2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 18 Achieved. See below

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia supported Australia’s 14 Multi-site Collaborative Clinical Trials

Groups (CTGs). Through its Support for Cancer Clinical Trials program, Cancer Australia provides

funding to CTGs to build capacity to develop industry-independent cancer clinical trial protocols

and to generate evidence for best-practice care for people diagnosed with cancer. This has facilitated

the development of over 50 new clinical trials/studies in 2020-21

Report on performance 32

D. Provide consumer and health professional cancer information and resources.

Performance criterion 2020-21 Target Criterion Source Result

Provide evidence-ba sed cancer information, resources and data to cancer consumers, health professionals and the community

>350 resources available on the Cancer Australia website.

Program 1.1 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements, page 253; 2020-21 Corporate Plan, page 17

Achieved. See below

The Cancer Australia website (www.canceraustralia.gov.au) provides a centralised source of trusted

information for consumers, health professionals, researchers, educators, decision makers and the

community. Cancer Australia’s website has information on a wide range of topics related to cancer and

facilitates access to evidence-based information, resources, data and research for a variety of audiences.

As at 30 June 2021, there were 467 resources available on the Cancer Australia website. These include

a number of new resources released in 2020-21, such as:

• Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry Report

• National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap web hub

• Guidance for the management of early breast cancer web hub

• Shared follow-up and survivorship care for low-risk endometrial cancer resources

• Shared follow-up and survivorship care for early breast cancer: Information for women on shared follow-up

and survivorship care for early breast cancer

• COVID Recovery — Changes to cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic web hub

• 3 reports providing national and jurisdictional data on the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and

procedures in Australia: breast, colorectal, lung, prostate and skin cancers

• COVID-19 vaccine and cancer web hub

• Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 vaccines for people affected by cancer

• Resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people including Act early for our Mob’s Health

cancer awareness video, information about COVID-19, including COVID-19 vaccines — Help Protect

Our Mob video and Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander people affected by cancer

• Guide to implementing the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer

• Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) resources, including Cancer won’t wait, a cancer awareness

video translated into 10 languages

• Cancer awareness videos including bowel, breast, brain, cervical, pancreatic, oesophageal and

prostate cancers, sarcoma and all cancers.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 33

Analysis Cancer Australia met or exceeded all performance criteria relating to its 2020-21 program objectives

as outlined in its 2020-21 PBS chapter and Corporate Plan. The agency’s 2020-21 program objectives

were: provide national leadership in cancer control; develop and promote evidence-based best

practice cancer care; fund cancer research and strengthen national data capacity; and provide

consumer and health professional cancer information and resources.

Cancer Australia’s operating environment continued to be impacted by the COVID-19

global pandemic. The agency continued to respond well to the challenges associated with the

COVID-19 pandemic through the development and implementation of the COVID-19 Workplace

Management Plan, and the Pandemic Business Continuity Plan, and as a result has successfully

achieved its purpose and delivered on all its performance criteria in 2020-21.

There were no changes to Cancer Australia’s purpose or overall organisational capability in

2020-21, although there was some change the internal organisational structure of the agency

— the establishment of two new divisions (National Cancer Control and National Research and Data)

— to support the agency’s current and future program of work.

Cancer Australia’s work was supported through its 2020-21 budget allocation.

Cancer Australia carefully defined, planned and prioritised work in light of its purpose,

program objectives and budget allocation. The agency’s robust performance reporting and

monitoring framework enabled it to effectively report, analyse and monitor its performance

for Financial Year 2020-21. This framework, coupled with Cancer Australia’s strategic approach

to business planning, ensured the alignment of effort with the agency’s purpose.

Report on performance 34

Report on financial performance

Table 3.1: Cancer Australia’s Resource Statement 2020-21

Actual available appropriation current year (A)

Payments made (B)

Balance remaining (A)-(B)

$’000 $’000 $’000

DEPARTMENTAL

Prior year appropriation available 4,165 1,817 2,348

Annual appropriations — ordinary annual services

11,134 8,030 3,104

Annual appropriations — other services — non-operating 6,624 6,624 -

Departmental capital budget 84 84 -

Total departmental annual appropriations 22,007 16,555 5,452

Total departmental resourcing (A) 22,007 16,555 5,452

ADMINISTERED

Prior year appropriation available 1,500 1,500 -

Annual appropriations — ordinary annual services

18,363 13,996 4,367

Total administered annual appropriations 19,863 15,496 4,367

less administered appropriations drawn from annual/special appropriations and credited to special accounts

- - -

less payments to corporate entities from annual/special appropriations

- - -

Total administered resourcing (B) 19,863 15,496 4,367

Total resourcing and payments for Cancer Australia (A + B)

41,870 32,051 9,819

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 35

Report on performance 36

2020-21 Annual Report — Highlights

Provided leadership in national cancer control

Convened Ministerial Roundtable with 80 national leaders in cancer control to commence development of the Australian Cancer Plan

Progressed development of the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap to identify key priority areas for action across the continuum of pancreatic cancer care and research

Minimised the impact of cancer

Advanced national policy and quality care agenda by identifying 12 elements of cancer care which have changed during COVID-19, describing targeted strategies to enhance and embed high-value changes t o cancer care

Improved health outcomes and addressed disparities

Achieved over 1 million digital impressions with launch of Act early for our Mob's health animated video that encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to keep taking care of their health during COVID-19

Funded priority research

Awarded 17 research grants worth $6.3 million through the Priority driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme

Strengthened national data capacity

Undertook analysis of Medical Benefits Schedule data for top five incidence cancers to assess COVID-19 impact on cancer- related services

Promoted cancer awareness and provided evidence-based information

Undertook 78 cancer awareness campaigns, achieving over 14.7 million digital impressions

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 37

Provided leadership in national cancer control • Convened Ministerial Roundtable with 80 national leaders in cancer control

to commence development of the Australian Cancer Plan

• Released Report on the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry

• Established Australia’s first clinical trial to study COVID-19 vaccines in cancer patients

• Progressed development of the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap to identify key priority areas for action across the continuum of pancreatic cancer care and research

• Administered the Australian Brain Cancer Mission with the aim of doubling survival rates and improving the quality of life of people with brain cancer over the 10 years to 2027

• Achieved over 1.5 million digital impressions with the Yarn for Life campaign which aimed to reduce impact of cancer across Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities by raising awareness, encouraging and normalising discussions about cancer

Minimised the impact of cancer • Advanced national policy and quality care agenda by identifying 12 elements

of cancer care which have changed during COVID-19, describing targeted strategies to enhance and embed high-value changes to cancer care

• Awarded over $1 million in grants to eight community organisations to reduce the impact of cancer and better support people affected by cancer

Improved health outcomes and addressed disparities • Achieved over 1 million digital impressions with launch of Act early for

our Mob's health animated video that encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to keep taking care of their health during COVID-19

• Achieved over 1.1 million digital impressions with launch for Cancer Won’t Wait video in 10 languages to urge people of all ages and backgrounds to see their doctor with any new or persistent symptoms that could be cancer

Funded priority research • Awarded 17 research grants worth $6.3 million through the Priority driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme

Strengthened national data capacity • Undertook a Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MAPID) to identify

sociodemographic characteristics of people affected by pancreatic cancer

• Undertook analysis of Medical Benefits Schedule data for top five incidence cancers to assess COVID-19 impact on cancer-related services

Promoted cancer awareness and provided evidence-based information • Undertook 78 cancer awareness

campaigns, achieving over 14.7 million digital impressions

• Published 48 new resources on the Cancer Australia website, and 10 peer-reviewed journal articles

• Delivered 31 oral presentations, poster and plenary presentations at 18 national and 13 international forums or conferences

Report on performance 38

4

Management and accountability

Management and Accountability

This section outlines Cancer Australia’s

corporate governance arrangements,

financial performance, management of

human resources, ministerial and parliamentary

coordination, compliance and other

accountability obligations.

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia’s Finance and

Corporate Affairs portfolio was responsible

for organising and complying with relevant

legislation and Commonwealth policy

regarding the management of financial

resources, asset management, business

continuity planning, fraud control, freedom

of information, grants, human resources,

information technology, procurement,

records management, security, and general

administrative services required to support the

agency’s operations.

Cancer Australia’s audited financial statements

are at Appendix A. Other mandatory

information can be found at Appendix B,

and covers:

• advertising and market research

• Australian National Audit Office access

• competitive tendering and contracting

• Consultancy and non-consultancy contracts

• disability reporting

• ecologically sustainable development and

environmental performance

• exempt contracts

• external scrutiny

• freedom of information (FOI)

• grant programs

• purchasing

• small business

• work health and safety

• executive renumeration.

Corporate Governance

Strategic and business planning

All Cancer Australia projects in 2020-21 were

underpinned by a robust business planning

framework which incorporated the agency’s

Portfolio Budget Statement 2020-21, Corporate

Plan 2020-21 and Business Plan 2020-21.

Cancer Australia’s Corporate Plan 2020-21

articulated the agency’s purpose and strategic

outlook, as well as strategies for achieving its

Purpose and how success will be measured.

The Cancer Australia Business Plan 2020-21

supported Cancer Australia’s strategic direction

as outlined in its 2020-21 Corporate Plan.

The 2020-21 Business Plan identified the

agency’s project deliverables, incorporating

the deliverables and key performance

indicators listed in both the Corporate Plan

and the Portfolio Budget Statement 2020-21.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 41

Through this process of alignment,

Cancer Australia ensures its resources and

investments are delivering value for money and

improving outcomes for people with cancer,

their families and carers.

Cancer Australia’s Annual Performance Statement,

published in this Annual Report (see Part 3),

acquits the agency’s performance against the

performance measures included in the 2020-21

Corporate Plan and the agency’s deliverables

and key performance indicators outlined in the

Portfolio Budget Statement 2020-21.

Compliance reporting

There were no instances of significant

non-compliance with finance law related

to the entity in 2020-21.

Internal audit arrangements

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia’s auditor, Protiviti,

conducted the internal audit function.

These audits were conducted in compliance

with the risk-based internal audit plan, which

had been endorsed by the Audit and Risk

Committee. See page 43 for more information

on Cancer Australia’s Audit and Risk Committee.

Fraud control

Cancer Australia has in place appropriate

fraud prevention, detection, investigation,

monitoring and reporting mechanisms which

meet the specific needs of the agency.

Cancer Australia has also taken all reasonable

measures to minimise and appropriately deal

with fraud relating to the agency, to comply

with the Commonwealth Fraud Control

Framework 2017.

The Framework consists of: Section 10 of

the Public Governance, Performance and

Accountability Rule 2014; the Commonwealth

Fraud Policy; and Resource Management Guide

No. 201, Preventing, detecting and dealing

with fraud.

During 2020-21, Cancer Australia’s fraud

control plan and fraud risk assessments were

reviewed and updated by the Executive

Leadership Team and staff were trained in

fraud awareness. Fraud awareness is also a

mandatory item within the Cancer Australia

Induction Program for all new employees.

Ethical standards

Cancer Australia, as an Australian Government

agency, is bound by the Public Service Act 1999

and the guidelines of the Australian Public

Service Commission for the management and

development of its people.

During 2020-21 Cancer Australia continued

to reinforce its internal guidelines and policies

to ensure consistency with appropriate

ethical standards.

Cancer Australia provided all new employees

with a copy of the Australian Public

Service Values and Code of Conduct to

ensure awareness of ethical standards and

organisational expectations.

Remuneration for Senior Executive Service officers

The Chief Executive Officer is a Full-time Public

Office holder, as defined in the Remuneration

Tribunal Act 1973. The position’s remuneration

is set by the Minister for Health within the

salary determination set by the Remuneration

Tribunal determination.

Management and accountability 42

Senior Executive Service (SES) officers employed under the Public Service Act 1999 have conditions set out

under the Cancer Australia SES Handbook. Remuneration is determined by the Chief Executive Officer,

in accordance with remuneration guidelines promulgated by the Department of Health.

Further detail on Chief Executive Officer and SES remuneration is provided on pages 115 - 118

of Appendix B.

Audit and Risk Committee

Cancer Australia’s Audit and Risk Committee met four times during the year to provide independent

advice and assistance to the Chief Executive Officer on Cancer Australia’s risk control and compliance

framework, and its external accountability responsibilities, in accordance with the Audit Committee

Charter December 2020.

The three independent Audit and Risk Committee Members were appointed from outside

Cancer Australia. Members details are outlined within the table below.

Table 4.1: Cancer Australia’s Audit and Risk Committee

Member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Ms Gayle Ginnane (Chair)

Ms Gayle Ginnane has over 30 years experience in the Public Sector, including 12 years as the CEO of the Private Health Insurance Administration Council (PHIAC). Ms Ginnane also has significant experience as a Chairperson and a director in both the private and public sector and currently chairs a number of audit committees in both the private and public sector.

4/4 $13,974.42

Ms Carol Lilley Ms Carol Lilley’s background is in financial statements, internal audit and risk management. Ms Lilley is currently serving on a range of Commonwealth Government audit committees including for the Department of Home Affairs, Services Australia, Australian Federal Police and Austrade. She also currently holds various executive and directorship roles in the private sector. Ms Lilley has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Western Australia and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a Fellow of Chartered Accountants Australia New Zealand and a certified internal auditor.

4/4 $9,240.00

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 43

Member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Adjunct Associate Professor Christine Giles

Adjunct Associate Professor Christine Giles has deep senior executive organisational and policy experience in the health sector at the Commonwealth and State level and across the public and private sectors. Holding a Master of Public Policy from the Economics Faculty, School of Business and Government, University of Sydney, Associate Professor Giles is an experienced

non-e xecutive Director and currently serving Board member.

4/4 $6,000

Financial overview

The 2020-21 departmental expenses were $15.740 million (GST exclusive).

The 2020-21 administered expenses were $18.361 million (GST exclusive).

Cancer Australia delivered a planned program of work in 2020-21 in line with the Departmental and

Administered funding appropriated by the Australian Government.

Further information on Cancer Australia’s financial performance is available in the financial statements

and accompanying notes of this annual report. Cancer Australia’s audited financial statements are at

Appendix A.

Management of human resources

At 30 June 2021, Cancer Australia had 68 employees, of whom 58 were ongoing and 10 were

non-ongoing. Most staff were located in Sydney, with five based in Melbourne and ten in Canberra.

The workforce was predominantly female (87 per cent).

Cancer Australia staff have a diverse range of skill sets, with expertise in areas including

epidemiology, clinical practice, research, data analysis, population health, public health, public policy,

communications, project management, human resources management and financial management.

Cancer Australia Staffing statistics

Tables 4.2 to 4.9 provide information relating to the distribution and classification of Cancer Australia

staff as at 30 June 2021 for the 2020-21 Financial Year.

Tables 4.10 to 4.16 provide information relating to the distribution and classification of

Cancer Australia staff for the 2019-20 Financial Year.

Management and accountability 44

Table 4.2: All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Indeterminate

NSW

5

0

5

33

7

40

0

0

0

45

Qld

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tas

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Vic

2

0

2

2

1

3

0

0

0

5

WA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

ACT

1

0

1

3

4

7

0

0

0

8

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

External

Territories

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Overseas

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

8

0

8

38

12

50

0

0

0

58

Notes: • The figures in Table 4.2 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the

Cancer Australia Act 2006

.

• The figures in Table 4.2 include: - headcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021; - staff on leave and secondment; and - staff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 45

Table 4.3: All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

NSW 0 0 0 8 0 8 0 0 0 8

Qld 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Vic 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

WA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ACT 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 1 0 1 9 0

9 0 0 0 10

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.3 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.3 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 46

Table 4.4: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 1 0 1 8 0 8 0 0 0 9

EL 1 2 0 2 7 2 9 0 0 0 11

APS 6 4 0 4 14 10 24 0 0 0 28

APS 5 1 0 1 7 0 7 0 0 0 8

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 8 0 8 38 12 50 0 0 0 58

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.4 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.4 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 47

Table 4.5: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 6 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 4

APS 5 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 1 0 1 9 0 9 0 0 0 10

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.5 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.5 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 48

Table 4.6: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full

- t

ime and Part-time Status Current Report Period (2020-21)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing

Total

Full-time Part-time

Total Ongoing

Full-time Part-time

Total Non-Ongoing

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 2

EL 2 9 0 9 0 0 0 9

EL 1 9 2 11 1 0 1 12

APS 6 18 10 28 4 0 4 32

APS 5 8 0 8 2 0 2 10

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 1 0 1 1 0 1 2

Total 46 12 58 10 0 10 68

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.6 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.6 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 49

Table 4.7: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Current Report Period (2020-21)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

NSW 45 8 53

Qld 0 0 0

SA 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0

Vic 5 0 5

WA 0 0 0

ACT 8 2 10

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 58 10 68

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.7 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.7 include: - headcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021; - staff on leave and secondment; and - staff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Table 4.8: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Report Period (2020-21)

Total

Ongoing 0

Non-Ongoing 0

Total 0

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.8 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.8 include: - headcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021; - staff on leave and secondment; and - staff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 50

Table 4.9: Australian Public Service Act Employment salary ranges by classification level (Minimum/Maximum) Current Report Period (2020-21)

Minimum Salary Maximum Salary

SES 3 N/A N/A

SES 2 $238,990 $251,230

SES 1 $178,241 $205,000

EL 2 $124,377 $147,254

EL 1 $104,246 $118,896

APS 6 $84,831 $95,704

APS 5 $76,897 $81,163

APS 4 $70,700 $74,702

APS 3 $62,403 $69,169

APS 2 $53,999 $58,926

APS 1 $46,204 $51,888

Other N/A N/A

Minimum/ Maximum range

$46,204 $251,230

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.9 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.9 include: - h eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2021; - s taff on leave and secondment; and - s taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2021 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 51

Table 4.10: All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 2 0 2 6 0 6 0 0 0 8

EL 1 2 0 2 6 3 9 0 0 0 11

APS 6 3 0 3 17 10 27 0 0 0 30

APS 5 1 0 1 8 0 8 0 0 0 9

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 8 0 8 41 13 54 0 0 0 62

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.10 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.10 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2020 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 52

Table 4.11: All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 3

APS 6 2 0 2 6 0 6 0 0 0 8

APS 5 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 4 0 4 10 0 10 0 0 0 14

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.11 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.11 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2020 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 53

Table 4.12: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 2 0 2 6 0 6 0 0 0 8

EL 1 2 0 2 6 3 9 0 0 0 11

APS 6 3 0 3 17 10 27 0 0 0 30

APS 5 1 0 1 8 0 8 0 0 0 9

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 8 0 8 41 13 54 0 0 0 62

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.12 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.12 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2020 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 54

Table 4.13: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time

Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 3

APS 6 2 0 2 6 0 6 0 0 0 8

APS 5 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Total 4 0 4 10 0 10 0 0 0 14

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.13 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.13 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2020 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 55

Table 4.14: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full

- t

ime and Part-time Status Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing

Total

Full-time Part-time

Total Ongoing

Full-time Part-time

Total Non-Ongoing

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 8 0 8 0 0 0 8

EL 1 8 3 11 3 0 3 14

APS 6 20 10 30 8 0 8 38

APS 5 9 0 9 2 0 2 11

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 1 0 1 1 0 1 2

Total 49 13 62 14 0 14 76

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.14 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.14 include:

- h

eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020;

- s

taff on leave and secondment; and

- s

taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 2020 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Management and accountability 56

Table 4.15: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

NSW 48 12 60

Qld 0 0 0

SA 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0

Vic 6 0 6

WA 0 0 0

ACT 8 2 10

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 62 14 76

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.15 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.15 include: - h eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020; - s taff on leave and secondment; and - s taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 202 0 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Table 4.16: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Previous Report Period (2019 - 20)

Total

Ongoing 1

Non-O ngoing 0

Total 1

Notes:

• The figures in Table 4.16 exclude the Cancer Australia CEO and Advisory Council members, who are appointed under the Cancer Australia Act 2006 .

• The figures in Table 4.16 include: - h eadcount figures of Cancer Australia staff as at 30 June 2020; - s taff on leave and secondment; and - s taff acting at a higher level, for any period as at 30 June 202 0 (that is, these staff are listed against their higher classification).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 57

Employment arrangements

Cancer Australia staff at non-Senior Executive

Service (non-SES) level are employed

under the terms and conditions of the

Cancer Australia Enterprise Agreement

2016-19. A Determination under subsection

24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 was

established in August 2019 to provide

non-SES staff with increases to their existing

salaries and to allowances for which they are

eligible under the terms of the Enterprise

Agreement. The increases in pay and

allowance were effective from 24 December

2019 to 24 December 2021. At 30 June 2021,

Cancer Australia had 65 non-SES staff, and 3 SES

staff (excluding Cancer Australia’s CEO and

Advisory Council members). Eight staff are in

receipt of individual flexibility arrangements

under clause 25 of the Enterprise Agreement.

Non-salary benefits provided during the period

by Cancer Australia to its staff were motor

vehicle allowances to four officers.

Performance pay

No member of Cancer Australia’s staff

was employed under performance-based

remuneration conditions in 2020-21.

Training and development

Cancer Australia provides financial and leave

assistance to its staff enrolled in external study

or training that is relevant to the operational

needs of the agency. Each staff member

can identify and access appropriate training

through the organisation’s Performance

Development Program.

During 2020-21, Cancer Australia continued

the Australian Public Service Development

Strategy, which included training programs

in the areas of project management and

leadership. Cancer Australia’s training was

delivered online through a variety of training

providers such as AIM (Australian Institute of

Management) and APSC (Australian Public

Service Commission). The Agency’s compulsory

training program, comprising of both face to

face and virtual, during 2020-21 included: fraud,

security awareness, data security, procurement,

personal privacy principles and work health

and safety. Cancer Australia provided staff with

additional development opportunities through

project work and assignment of higher duties.

Ministerial and parliamentary coordination

During 2020-21, Cancer Australia provided

high-quality, timely and evidence-based

information to the Minister for Health and

the Department of Health on national cancer

control related issues. The agency continued

to collaborate closely with the Department of

Health to support the Minister and implement

Australian Government policies.

Management and accountability 58

5

Appendices

Appendix A: Audited Financial Statements

Independent Audit Report

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 61

Appendices 62

Financial Statements Table of Contents

Independent Audit Report 61

Statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer 64

Statement of Comprehensive Income 65

Statement of Financial Position 67

Statement of Changes in Equity 69

Cash Flow Statement 71

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income 74

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities 75

Administered Reconciliation Schedule 76

Administered Cash Flow Statement 77

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 78

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 63

Statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer

Appendices 64

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 3A 9,223,248 9,160,564 9,087,000

Suppliers 3B 4,594,367 4,641,255 2,997,000

Grants 3C 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

Depreciation and amortisation 7 905,274 305,774 953,000

Finance costs 3,012 2,562 -

Interest on ROU 10,285 - 35,000

Losses from asset disposals 3,830 - -

Total expenses 15,740,016 15,110,155 14,072,000

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Rendering of services 4A 5,427,799 3,662,118 2,584,000

Other revenue 4B 151,969 137,410 66,000

Total own-source revenue 5,579,768 3,799,528 2,650,000

Net cost of services 10,160,248 11,310,627 11,422,000

Revenue from Government 4C 11,134,000 11,086,000 11,134,000

Surplus/(Deficit) 973,752 (224,627) (288,000)

Total comprehensive income/(loss) 973,752 (224,627) (288,000)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 65

Budget Variance Commentary

Explanations are only provided where the variance is greater than 10% of the Original Budget. If the

variance is greater than 10%, but small in the overall context of the financial statements, judgement

was used to determine if an explanation would be useful in analysing Cancer Australia’s performance.

Suppliers

After the Original Budget was first presented to Parliament, Cancer Australia received the

Minister for Finance's approval to utilise funds received in the prior years, which is from two

Memorandum of Understanding agreements, for activities relating to Australian Brain Cancer Mission

and development of the Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap. Cancer Australia's activities also increased as

a result of additional funds from various Memorandum of Understanding agreements for initiatives

and activities as outlined in the agreements, that resulted in higher than budgeted expenditure.

Rendering of services

At the time of budget preparation, additional funding of approximately $2.6m received through

Memorandum of Understanding agreements with another Government Department was unknown.

The additional funding received was partially utilised in FY2020 -21 and is expected to be fully utilised

in FY2021 -22 through the payment of operational and project costs.

Appendices 66

Statement of Financial Position for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 112,758 113,028 113,000

Trade and other receivables 6 5,518,387 5,286,431 5,283,000

Total financial assets 5,631,145 5,399,459 5,396,000

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 7 5,064,742 262,182 3,139,000

Intangibles 7 191,745 346,887 305,000

Prepayments 178,092 96,135 96,000

Total non-financial assets 5,434,579 705,204 3,540,000

Total assets 11,065,724 6,104,663 8,936,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 8A 577,557 1,074,891 1,084,000

Other payables 8B 217,009 160,125 160,000

Total payables 794,566 1,235,016 1,244,000

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 9 4,374,762 - 3,027,000

Total interest bearing liabilities 4,374,762 - 3,027,000

Provisions

Employee provisions 10A 2,360,552 2,322,156 2,322,000

Other provisions 10B 260,601 330,000 330,000

Total provisions 2,621,153 2,652,156 2,652,000

Total liabilities 7,790,481 3,887,172 6,923,000

Net assets 3,275,243 2,217,491 2,013,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity 1,475,160 1,391,160 1,475,000

Retained surplus 1,800,083 826,331 538,000

Total equity 3,275,243 2,217,491 2,013,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020 -21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 67

Budget Variance Commentary

Property, plant and equipment, and intangibles

The higher than budgeted amount is primarily due to the recognition of Sydney office fitout and

additional Information and Communications Technology (ICT) hardware refresh, which were not

included in the Original Budget.

Suppliers and other payables

The budget variance relates to the timing of payments. Higher than expected deliverables were

finalised and paid before 30 June 2021, resulting in a lower than expected payables balance at

year end.

Leases

The variance is due to the recognition of the Sydney office lease incentives received, which was

agreed and finalised after the submission of the Original Budget.

Retained surplus

The impact of utilising funds received in the prior years, which is from Memorandum of

Understanding agreements from prior years and additional funding received through Memorandum

of Understanding agreements with another Government Department were not included in the

Original Budget.

Appendices 68

Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 1,391,160 1,310,160 1,391,000

Opening balance 1,391,160 1,310,160 1,391,000

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget 84,000 81,000 84,000

Total transactions with owners 84,000 81,000 84,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,475,160 1,391,160 1,475,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 826,331 123,669 826,000

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 1058 - 927,289 -

Adjusted opening balance 826,331 1,050,958 826,000

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period 973,752 (224,627) (288,000)

Total comprehensive income 973,752 (224,627) (288,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,800,083 826,331 538,000

TOTAL EQUITY 3,275,243 2,217,491 2,013,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020 -21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 69

Accounting Policy

Equity injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal

reduction) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity

in that year.

Budget Variance Commentary

Surplus /(Deficit) for the period

Retained earnings is higher, being reflective of the surplus reported for FY2020-21. The surplus

reflects additional funding received through Memorandum of Understanding agreements with

another Government Department partially offset by utilisation of funding balance of Memorandum

of Understanding agreements from prior years. These were approved after the Original Budget was

tabled in Parliament.

Appendices 70

Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 12,646,306 12,021,855 11,137,000

Rendering of services 5,418,869 2,890,514 2,584,000

Net GST received 344,255 381,177 268,000

Fundraising 85,869 71,310 -

Lease incentive received 1,215,726 - -

Total cash received 19,711,025 15,364,856 13,989,000

Cash used

Employees (9,153,868) (9,237,022) (9,087,000)

Suppliers (4,802,653) (4,549,965) (2,922,000)

Interest payments on lease liability (10,285) - (35,000)

Grants (1,000,000) (1,499,864) (1,000,000)

Net GST paid - - (268,000)

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA (2,799,113) - -

Total cash used (17,765,919) (15,286,851) (13,312,000)

Net cash from operating activities 1,945,106 78,005 677,000

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment (1,487,048) (251,200) (96,000)

Purchase of intangible assets (36,258) (102,877) -

Total cash used (1,523,306) (354,077) (96,000)

Net cash (used by) investing activities (1,523,306) (354,077) (96,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Departmental capital budget 84,000 81,000 84,000

Total cash received 84,000 81,000 84,000

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 71

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

Cash used

Lease principal repayments (506,070) - (665,000)

Total cash used (506,070) - (665,000)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities (422,070) 81,000 (581,000)

Net (decrease) in cash held (270) (195,072) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 113,028 308,100 113,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 112,758 113,028 113,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020 -21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Budget Variance Commentary

Appropriations

The 2019-20 and 2020-21 appropriations were budgeted to be drawn in full. The variance

represents the timing difference of payments to employees, suppliers and additional section

74 revenue received.

Rendering of services and section 74 receipts transferred to OPA

At the time the Original Budget was prepared, the timing of additional funding through

Memorandum of Understanding agreements with Department of Health was unknown resulting

in a higher than anticipated inflow of funds. The additional funds were subsequently transferred back

to the Official Public Account (OPA).

Net GST received and paid

Cancer Australia is required to make Goods and Services Tax (GST) payments on eligible goods

and services. The net GST received represents the refund of those amounts from the Australia

Taxation Office (ATO). GST estimates are based on prior years' trends and fluctuate from year to year

based on the payments for goods and services. In 2020-21, Cancer Australia claimed more GST from

the ATO due to higher than anticipated payments to suppliers. The net GST received was used to

settle commitments, rather than drawing on additional funding.

Appendices 72

Lease incentive received

During 2020-21, a new lease contract for Cancer Australia's Sydney office has been signed. A landlord

contribution to the office fitout has been successfully negotiated, which was not included in the

Original Budget.

Suppliers

Funding of supplier payments through Memorandum of Understanding agreements with

Department of Health was unknown at the time the Original Budget was prepared. The utilisation

of funding balance of Memorandum of Understanding agreements from prior years also contributed

to higher than budgeted expenditure.

Purchase of property, plant and equipment and intangibles

The recognition of Sydney office fitout, which was fully recovered by newly agreed lease incentives,

was not known when the Original Budget was prepared. In addition, Cancer Australia staff have been

required to work from home due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic during 2020-21. This has

meant Cancer Australia's digital transformation continued to progress since 2019-20, with purchases

of laptops, commissioning of new information technology infrustucture and enhancement of

security related Hardware and Software.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 73

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Suppliers 15A 5,490,930 5,487,832 3,766,000

Grants and service delivery contracts 15B 12,870,089 14,434,823 14,597,000

Total expenses 18,361,019 19,922,655 18,363,000

Income

Revenue

Non-taxation revenue

Return of grant monies 2,119 11,128 -

Total non-taxation revenue 2,119 11,128 -

Total revenue 2,119 11,128 -

Net cost of services (18,358,900) (19,911,527) (18,363,000)

Deficit on continuing operations (18,358,900) (19,911,527) (18,363,000)

Total comprehensive loss (18,358,900) (19,911,527) (18,363,000)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Budget Variance Commentary

Suppliers and Grants and service delivery contracts

At the time of the preparation of the Original Budget, Suppliers and Grant payments were estimated.

Actual expenditure may vary from year to year depending upon Grant applications received

and awarded. The level of grant expenditure incurred impacts the level of payments made to

other suppliers.

Appendices 74

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities as at 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original Budget1 $

ASSETS

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 16A 57,379 30,000 30,000

Trade and other receivables 16B 147,553 1,001,699 297,000

Total financial assets 204,932 1,031,699 327,000

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 204,932 1,031,699 327,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 17A 1,444,582 2,052,271 158,000

Grants 17B 3,029,968 268,900 169,000

Total payables 4,474,550 2,321,171 327,000

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government 4,474,550 2,321,171 327,000

Net assets/(liabilities) (4,269,618) (1,289,472) -

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 Budget reported in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements published in October 2020.

Budget Variance Commentary

Trade and other receivables

Trade and other receivables is mainly GST receivable from the ATO.

Suppliers

Supplier payables vary year to year dependent on the timing of work delivered by suppliers and the

payment terms of contracts. In 2020-21, a number of deliverables were finalised, but not paid before

30 June 2021.

Grants

Due to the impact of COVID-19, grant contracts were executed later than expected, which resulted in

a higher payable at the end of the reporting period when compared to the Original Budget.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 75

Administered Reconciliation Schedule as at 30 June 2021

2021 $

2020 $

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July (1,289,472) (1,065,895)

Net cost of services

Income 2,119 11,128

Expenses

Payments to entities other than Commonwealth entities (17,806,358) (19,232,972)

Payments to Commonwealth entities (554,661) (689,683)

Transfers from/(to) the Australian Government

Appropriation transfers from Official Public Account

Payments to entities other than Commonwealth entities 15,380,873 19,699,078

Appropriation transfers to Official Public Account

Receipts from entities other than Commonwealth entities1 (2,119) (11,128)

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June (4,269,618) (1,289,472)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1 In 2020-21, $2k of Grant funding paid out of Administered Appropriation in previous financial years was returned to Cancer Australia. For various reasons the recipient of the Grant was not able to utilise the funds as originally planned. The repayments were receipted and paid into the Official Public Account (OPA) during the current financial year.

Accounting Policy

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account 

Revenue collected by Cancer Australia on behalf of the Government is Administered revenue.

Collections are transferred to the OPA maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is

drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government.

These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the entity on

behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in

the administered reconciliation schedule.

Appendices 76

Administered Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Net GST received 595,933 316,938

Other 2,119 11,128

Total cash received 598,052 328,066

Cash used

Grants (10,109,021) (14,647,383)

Suppliers (5,840,406) (5,407,414)

Total cash used (15,949,427) (20,054,797)

Net cash (used by) operating activities (15,351,375) (19,726,731)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 30,000 68,781

Cash from Official Public Account

Appropriations 15,380,873 19,699,078

Cash to Official Public Account

Administered receipts (2,119) (11,128)

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 16A 57,379 30,000

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 77

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Note 1: Overview 79

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 80

Note 3: Expenses 81

Note 4: Own-Source Income 84

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements 86

Note 6: Financial Assets 87

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets 88

Note 8: Payables 91

Note 9: Interest Bearing Liabilities 91

Note 10: Provisions 92

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities 93

Note 12: Key Management Personnel Remuneration 93

Note 13: Related Party Disclosures 94

Note 14: Financial Instruments 95

Note 15: Administered — Expenses 96

Note 16: Administered — Financial Assets 97

Note 17: Administered — Payables 98

Note 18: Administered — Contingent Assets and Liabilities 98

Note 19: Administered — Financial Instruments 99

Note 20: Appropriations 100

Note 21: Information furnished under the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) 103

Note 22: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities 104

Appendices 78

Note 1: Overview

1.1 O bjectives of Cancer Australia

Cancer Australia is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a non-corporate

Commonwealth entity and a not-for-profit entity. The objectives of Cancer Australia as specified

in the Cancer Australia Act 2006 are to: provide national leadership in cancer control, guide scientific

improvements to cancer prevention, treatment and care; coordinate and liaise between the wide

range of groups and health care providers with an interest in cancer care and provide advice

and make recommendations to the Australian Government on cancer policy and priorities.

1.2 B asis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of

the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act).

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

• Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations — Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued

by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the

historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated,

no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

1.3 N ew Accounting Standards

No new, revised, amending standards and/ or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off

date and were applicable to the current reporting period had a material effect on the entity’s

financial statements:

AASB 1059 Service Concession Arrangements: Grantors

AASB 1059 became effective from 1 July 2020.

AASB 1059 addresses the accounting for a service concession arrangement by a grantor that is a

public sector entity by prescribing the accounting for the arrangement from a grantor’s perspective.

Cancer Australia does not have service concession arrangements therefore AASB 1059

is not applicable.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 79

1.4 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, Cancer Australia has

made judgements that would have a significant impact on the amounts recorded in the

financial statements.

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a

material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

In accordance with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement Cancer Australia has applied estimations of

assets at fair value. Estimations of employee long service leave entitlements have also been applied

in accordance with AASB 119 Employee Benefits. Cancer Australia uses the short-hand method to

calculate employee long service leave entitlements, discounted using the government bond rate

issued by the Department of Finance.

1.5 Taxation

Cancer Australia is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods

and Services Tax (GST).

1.6 Reporting of Administered Activities

The Administered Schedules of Comprehensive Income, Assets and Liabilities,

Administered Reconciliation Schedule and Administered Cash Flow Statement reflect the

Government’s transactions, through Cancer Australia, with parties outside the Government.

Except where otherwise stated, administered items are accounted for on the same basis

and using the same policies as for Departmental items, including the application of

Australian Accounting Standards.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period Cancer Australia is not aware of any events occurring after 30 June 2021 that have the potential to

significantly affect the on-going structure or activities of either Cancer Australia's Administered or

Departmental functions.

Appendices 80

Note 3: Expenses

2021 $

2020 $

Note 3A: Employee Benefits

Wages and salaries 7,202,947 6,993,619

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 1,015,670 1,005,343

Defined benefit plans 151,700 190,998

Leave and other entitlements 852,931 970,604

Total employee benefits 9,223,248 9,160,564

Accounting Policy Liabilities for ‘short-term' employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months

of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined

benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting

period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave and entitlements

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary

rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including Cancer Australia’s employer

superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service

rather than paid out on termination.

The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases

through promotion and inflation.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 81

Superannuation

Cancer Australia's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS),

the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other

superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined

contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian

Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in

the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

Cancer Australia makes employer contributions to the employees' defined benefit superannuation

scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the

Government. Cancer Australia accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to

defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for

the final fortnight of the year.

Appendices 82

2021 $

2020 $

Note 3B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 652,907 193,534

Contractors 1,662,835 1,751,372

Information technology and licenses 802,270 636,815

Property and office 618,567 511,493

Travel 121,536 219,094

Learning and development 44,396 28,585

Media and other promotional 62,611 198,275

Other 372,759 274,123

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 4,337,881 3,813,291

Goods supplied 1,462 3,244

Services rendered 4,336,419 3,810,047

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 4,337,881 3,813,291

Other suppliers

Workers compensation expenses 44,440 47,247

Short term leases - 212,046 780,717

Total other suppliers 256,486 827,964

Total suppliers 4,594,367 4,641,255

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 7 and 9.

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets 

Cancer Australia has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term

leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less. The entity recognises the lease payments

associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

2021 $

2020 $

Note 3C: Grants

Private sector:

Non-profit organisations 1,000,000 1,000,000

Total grants 1,000,000 1,000,000

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 83

Note 4: Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Note 4A: Rendering of services

Rendering of services 5,427,799 3,662,118

Total Rendering of services 5,427,799 3,662,118

Disaggregation of Rendering of services

Type of customer:

Australian Government entities (related parties) 5,427,799 3,662,118

State and Territory Governments - -

Non-government entities - -

5,427,799 3,662,118

Accounting Policy

Rendering of services

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

In relation to AASB 1058, Cancer Australia recognises the revenue when control of the cash

is obtained.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms (2019-20: 30 days), are recognised at

the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed

at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no

longer probable.

Appendices 84

Own-source revenue Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Note 4B: Other revenue

Fundraising 21 85,869 71,310

Resources received free of charge — audit fees 66,100 66,100

Total other revenue 151,969 137,410

Accounting Policy

Resources received free of charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can

be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated.

Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Fundraising revenue

Fundraising revenue is recognised when Cancer Australia obtains control over the funds.

Own-source revenue Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Appropriations:

Departmental appropriations 11,134,000 11,086,000

Total revenue from Government 11,134,000 11,086,000

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for Departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal

additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when Cancer Australia

gains control of the Appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that

are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 85

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2021 $

2020 $

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 5,064,742 262,182

Non-financial liabilities

Make good provision 260,601 330,000

Notes:

1. There has been no change to valuation techniques.

2. Cancer Australia's assets are held for operational purposes and not held for the purposes of deriving a profit. The current use of all controlled assets is considered their highest and best use.

3. The remaining assets reported by Cancer Australia are not measured at fair value in the Statement of Financial Position.

Accounting Policy Cancer Australia performs an internal management review of the fair value of its fixed assets at

least once every 12 months. If a particular asset class experiences significant and volatile changes

in fair value (i.e. where indicators suggest that the value of the class has changed materially since

the previous reporting period), that class is subject to specific valuation in the reporting period,

where practicable, regardless of the timing of the last review. The nature of Cancer Australia's assets

are predominantly low value assets with a useful life of between 3 to 10 years.

Appendices 86

Note 6: Financial Assets

2021 $

2020 $

Note 6: Trade and other receivables

Goods and services 43,489 1,200,849

Total goods and services receivables 43,489 1,200,849

Appropriation receivable

Appropriation receivable 5,338,751 4,051,944

Total appropriation receivable 5,338,751 4,051,944

Other receivables

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 136,147 33,638

Total other receivables 136,147 33,638

Total trade and other receivables (net) 5,518,387 5,286,431

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2019-20: 30 days).

No allowance for impairment was required at reporting date (2019-20: nil).

Accounting Policy

Trade and other receivables

Trade and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash

flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided

at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective

interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 87

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles for 2021

Buildings $

Plant & Equipment $ Intangibles

$

Total $

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value 478,874 979,596 1,046,798 2,505,268

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (471,541) (724,747) (699,911) (1,896,199)

Total as at 1 July 2020 7,333 254,848 346,887 609,069

Additions 1,129,448 357,600 36,258 1,523,306

Right-of-use assets 4,033,216 - - 4,033,216

Losses from asset disposals - (3,830) - (3,830)

Depreciation and amortisation (75,309) (161,816) (191,400) (428,525)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets (476,749) - - (476,749)

Total as at 30 June 2021 4,617,939 446,802 191,745 5,256,487

Total as at 30 June 2021 represented by:

Gross book value 5,191,569 949,094 1,063,420 7,204,083

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (573,630) (502,291) (871,675) (1,947,596)

Total as at 30 June 2021 4,617,939 446,803 191,745 5,256,487

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 4,509,965 4,509,965

Accounting Policy Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes

the fair value of assets transferred in exchange for consideration and liabilities undertaken.

Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income

at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of

administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by

owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor's accounts immediately prior

to the restructuring.

Appendices 88

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of

Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of

acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Leased right-of-use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the

initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease

incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset

classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the

corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

An impairment review is undertaken for any ROU lease asset that shows indicators of impairment

and an impairment loss is recognised against any ROU lease asset that is impaired. Leased ROU assets

continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole

of Government financial statements.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment are carried at fair value less

subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuation reviews

are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not

differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent

valuations depends upon the nature of the assets and volatility of movements in market values for

the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity

under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous

revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values

over their estimated useful lives to Cancer Australia using, in all cases, the straight-line method

of depreciation.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 89

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date

and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods,

as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2021 2020

Property, Plant & Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end

of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2021. Where indications of impairment exist,

the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s

recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount. No indicators of impairment were identified.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its

value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from

the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s

ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if Cancer Australia were

deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future

economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

Cancer Australia’s intangibles comprise purchased software and website costs. These assets are

carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software and website costs are amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life.

The anticipated useful life of Cancer Australia’s intangibles is three years (2019-20: three years).

All software and website assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2021.

No indicators of impairment were identified.

Appendices 90

Note 8: Payables

2021 $

2020 $

Note 8A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 577,557 1,074,891

Total suppliers 577,557 1,074,891

Settlement is usually made within 30 days (2019-20: 30 days).

Note 8B: Other payables

Salaries and wages 147,732 119,563

Superannuation 21,665 18,851

Other 47,612 21,711

Total other payables 217,009 160,125

Note 9: Interest Bearing Liabilities

2021 $

2020 $

Leases

Lease liabilities 4,374,762 -

Total leases 4,374,762 -

Total cash outflow for long term lease for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $569,299.

Maturity analysis — contractual undiscounted cash flows

Within 1 year 641,793 -

Between 1 to 5 years 3,643,921 -

More than 5 years 132,677 -

Total leases 4,418,391 -

Cancer Australia, in its capacity as lessee has entered into a lease agreement for Sydney office in 2020-21 with a seven (7) year lease term without extension options.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 3B and 7.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 91

Accounting Policy

Leases

For all new contracts entered into, Cancer Australia considers whether the contract is, or contains

a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset

(the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially

measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date,

discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the

department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased

for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease

liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit

and loss depending on the nature of the reassessment or modification.

Note 10: Provisions

2021 $

2020 $

Note 10A: Employee provisions

Leave 2,360,552 2,322,156

Total employee provisions 2,360,552 2,322,156

Provision for make good $

Provision for make good $

Note 10B: Other provisions

As at 1 July 2020 330,000 195,383

Additional provisions made 257,589 132,055

Amounts used (330,000) -

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 3,012 2,562

Total as at 30 June 2021 260,601 330,000

Cancer Australia, in its capacity as a lessee, has entered into one lease agreement (2019-20: one agreement) for office accommodation. The lease agreement includes a provision requiring Cancer Australia to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. Cancer Australia recognises a "Provision for make good" to reflect the present value of the obligation. During the year, the provision was amended due to a reduction of the Sydney office footprint.

Appendices 92

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities Cancer Australia has not identified any quantifiable, unquantifiable or significant remote contingent

assets or liabilities as at 30 June 2021 (2019-20: Nil).

Accounting Policy Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position

but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or

asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent

liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

Note 12: Key Management Personnel Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning,

directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director

(whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. Cancer Australia has determined the key

management personnel to be the Chief Executive Officer, Deputy CEO/Executive Director,

Senior Executive Service Officers, General Manager Finance and Corporate Affairs and Chief Financial

Officer and Ministers. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2021 $

2020 $

Short-term employee benefits 1,534,355 1,446,025

Post-employment benefits 162,769 164,335

Other long-term employee benefits 47,719 43,358

Termination benefits 125,751 -

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 1,870,594 1,653,718

The total number of key management personnel included in the above table are six (2019-20: six).

1 The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Ministers. The Ministers' remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by Cancer Australia.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 93

Note 13: Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships

Cancer Australia is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to this entity

are Key Management Personnel, including the Ministers and Executive, and other Australian

Government entities.

Transactions with related parties

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector

in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes,

receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately

disclosed in this note.

Significant transactions with related parties can include:

• the payments of grants or loans;

• purchases of goods and services;

• asset purchases, sales transfers or leases;

• debts forgiven; and

• guarantees.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during

the reporting period by Cancer Australia, it has been determined that there are no related party

transactions to be separately disclosed.

Appendices 94

Note 14: Financial Instruments

2021 $

2020 $

Financial assets measured at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents 112,758 113,028

Trade receivables 43,489 1,200,849

Total financial assets measured at amortised cost 156,247 1,313,877

Total financial assets 156,247 1,313,877

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors and accruals 577,557 1,074,891

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 577,557 1,074,891

Total financial liabilities 577,557 1,074,891

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

Cancer Australia is a non-financial entity whose financial assets are limited to trade receivables

and bank deposits. Cancer Australia’s trade receivables relate to services provided and do not arise

as a result of their primary business objectives. Accordingly, the receivables are more aligned to

a basic lending arrangement whereby cash flows will be generated through the collection of the

amounts outstanding.

Cancer Australia’s business model is to hold financial assets to collect the contractual cash flows

and the cash flows relate solely to payments of interest and principal amounts.

Based on the above, Cancer Australia’s financial assets should subsequently be measured at

amortised cost.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective interest method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised

at amortised cost.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on

Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based

on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased,

or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 95

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always

measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross

carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and

derecognised upon 'trade date'.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilites are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are

subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense

recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent

that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Note 15: Administered — Expenses

2021 $

2020 $

Note 15A: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 534,381 466,908

Contractors 3,969,310 3,957,930

Sitting and advisory fees 616,227 592,907

Travel 1,005 212,448

Printing 10,554 5,456

Other 359,453 252,183

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 5,490,930 5,487,832

Goods and services are made up of:

Goods supplied 11,268 15,099

Services rendered 5,479,662 5,472,733

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 5,490,930 5,487,832

Total suppliers 5,490,930 5,487,832

Appendices 96

2021 $

2020 $

Note 15B: Grants and service delivery contracts

Public sector

State and Territory Governments 1,128,984 560,142

Private sector

Not-for-profit organisations 11,741,105 13,874,681

Total grants and service delivery contracts 12,870,089 14,434,823

Accounting Policy

Grants

Cancer Australia administers a number of grants on behalf of the Commonwealth.

Grant liabilities are recognised to the extent that (i) the services required to be performed

by the grantee have been performed or (ii) the grant eligibility criteria have been satisfied,

but payments due have not been made. When Government enters into an agreement to make

these grants and services, but services have not been performed or criteria satisfied, this is

considered a commitment.

Note 16: Administered — Financial Assets

2021 $

2020 $

Note 16A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 57,379 30,000

Total cash and cash equivalents 57,379 30,000

Note 16B: Trade and other receivables

Net GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office 147,553 296,375

Other receivables - 705,324

Total trade and other receivables 147,553 1,001,699

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2019-20: 30 days).

No allowance for impairment was required at reporting date (2019-20: nil).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 97

Accounting Policy

Trade and other receivables

Trade and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash

flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided

at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the

effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Note 17: Administered — Payables

2021 $

2020 $

Note 17A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 1,444,582 2,052,271

Total suppliers 1,444,582 2,052,271

Settlement is usually made within 30 days (2019-20: 30 days).

Note 17B: Grants

Non-profit and profit organisations 3,029,968 268,900

Total grants 3,029,968 268,900

Settlement is usually made according to the terms and conditions of each grant. This is usually within 30 days of performance or eligibility (2019-20: 30 days).

Note 18: Administered — Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Cancer Australia has not identified any quantifiable, unquantifiable or significant remote contingencies as at 30 June 2021 (2019-20: Nil).

Appendices 98

Note 19: Administered — Financial Instruments

2021 $

2020 $

Financial assets measured at amortised cost

Cash on hand or on deposit 57,379 30,000

Trade and Other Receivables

Other receivables - 705,324

Trade and Other Receivables - 705,324

Total financial assets measured at amortised cost 57,379 735,324

Total financial assets 57,379 735,324

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors 1,444,582 2,052,271

Grants payable 3,029,968 268,900

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 4,474,550 2,321,171

Total financial liabilities 4,474,550 2,321,171

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 99

Note 20: Appropriations Table A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive') Annual Appropriations for 2020-21 Annual Appropriation

1

$

Adjustments to Appropriation

2

$

Total

Appropriation $

Appropriation Applied in 2021 (current and prior years $ Variance

3

$

Departmental Ordinary annual services 11,134,000 6,623,763 17,757,763 16,471,226 1,286,537

Capital Budget

4 84,000 - 84,000 84,000 -

Total departmental

11,218,000 6,623,763 17,841,763 16,555,226 1,286,537

Administered

Ordinary annual services

Administered items

18,363,000 - 18,363,000 15,496,464 2,866,536

Total administered

18,363,000 - 18,363,000 15,496,464 2,866,536

Notes: 1 T here were no amounts withheld against current financial year ordinary annual services Appropriation under Section 51 of the PGPA Act. There were no amounts quarantined from prior financial year Administered Appropriations. 2 A

djustments to Appropriation including PGPA Act Section 74 receipts. 3 T he departmental variance primarily represents the timing difference of payments to suppliers and employees and section 74 receipts. The administered variance is mainly due to the timing difference of payments to suppliers. 4 D

epartmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the annual Appropriation Acts.

Appendices 100

Annual Appropriations for 2019-20

Annual

Appropriation

1

$

Adjustments to Appropriation

2

$

Total

Appropriation

$

Appropriation Applied in 2021

(current and prior years

$

Variance

3

$

Departmental Ordinary annual services

11,086,000

3,757,545

14,843,545

12,021,855

2,821,690

Capital Budget

4

81,000

-

81,000

81,000

-

Total departmental

11,167,000

3,757,545

14,924,545

12,102,855

2,821,690

Administered Ordinary annual services

Administered items

19,946,000

-

19,946,000

19,589,303

356,697

Total administered

19,946,000

-

19,946,000

19,589,303

356,697

Notes: 1 There were no amounts withheld against current financial year ordinary annual services Appropriation under Section 51 of the PGPA Act. There were no amounts quarantined from prior financial year Administered Appropriations. 2 Adjustments to Appropriation including PGPA Act Section 74 receipts. 3 The departmental variance primarily represents the timing difference of payments to suppliers and employees and section 74 receipts. The administered variance is mainly due to the timing difference of payments to suppliers. 4 Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the annual Appropriation Acts.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 101

Table B: Unspent Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2021 $

2020 $

Departmental

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018-19 - 832,949

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019-20 2,347,580 3,332,022

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2020-211 3,103,929 -

Total departmental 5,451,509 4,164,971

Administered

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2017-18 - 53,227

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018-19 - 424,481

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019-20 - 1,075,959

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2020-211 4,366,975 -

Total administered 4,366,975 1,553,667

1 Appropriation Act (No.1) 2020-21 includes cash and cash equivalents at 30 June 2021.

Table C: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

2021 $

2020 $

Total comprehensive income/(loss) — as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 973,752 (224,627)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation of assets funded through appropriations (departmental capital budget funding and/or equity injections)1 428,525 305,774

Plus: depreciation of right-of-use assets2 476,749 -

Less: lease principal repayments3 (506,070) -

Net Cash Operating Surplus/ (Deficit) 1,372,956 81,147

1 From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses of non-corporate Commonwealth entities and selected corporate Commonwealth entities were replaced with a separate capital budget provided through equity injections. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure

is required.

2 The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to right-of-use leased assets and the lease liability principal repayment amount reflects the impact of AASB 16 Leases, which does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

Appendices 102

Note 21: Information furnished under the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) Cancer Australia is registered under the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) to conduct

fundraising activities.

Note 21A: Fundraising appeals conducted during the financial period

Donations received to improve outcomes for Australians affected by breast cancer in 2020-21.

Note 21B: Details of aggregated gross income and total expenses of fundraising appeals 2021 $

2020 $

Donations

Gross proceeds of fundraising appeal 85,869 71,310

Total direct costs of fundraising appeal - -

Net surplus from fundraising appeal 85,869 71,310

Net margin from fundraising appeals 100% 100%

Note 21C: Statement demonstrating how funds received were applied to charitable purposes

All funds received from fundraising appeals are used to fund breast cancer project work. No funds are used for the purpose of administration.

Note 21D: Comparison by monetary figures and percentages 2021 $ 2020

$

Total cost of fundraising appeals - -

Gross income from fundraising appeals 85,869 71,310

Percentage 0% 0%

Net surplus from fundraising appeals 85,869 71,310

Gross income from fundraising appeals 85,869 71,310

Percentage 100% 100%

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 103

Note 22: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

Note 22A: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities 2021 $

2020 $

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 112,758 113,028

Trade and other receivables 5,518,387 5,286,431

Prepayments 178,092 96,135

Total no more than 12 months 5,809,237 5,495,594

More than 12 months

Property, plant and equipment 5,064,742 262,182

Intangibles 191,745 346,887

Total more than 12 months 5,256,487 609,069

Total assets 11,065,724 6,104,663

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Suppliers 577,557 1,074,891

Other payables 217,009 160,125

Leases 629,147 -

Employee provisions 552,948 604,493

Other provisions 260,601 330,000

Total No more than 12 months 2,237,262 2,169,509

More than 12 months

Leases 3,745,615

Employee provisions 1,807,604 1,717,663

Total more than 12 months 5,553,219 1,717,663

Total liabilities 7,790,481 3,887,172

Note 22B: Administered — Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities 2021 $

2020 $

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 57,379 30,000

Trade and other receivables 147,553 1,001,699

Total no more than 12 months 204,932 1,031,699

More than 12 months - -

Total more than 12 months - -

Total assets 204,932 1,031,699

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Suppliers 1,444,582 2,052,271

Grants 3,029,968 268,900

Total no more than 12 months 4,474,550 2,321,171

More than 12 months - -

Total more than 12 months - -

Total liabilities 4,474,550 2,321,171

Appendices 104

Appendix B: Mandatory Reporting Information

Advertising and market research During 2020-21, Cancer Australia undertook

advertising to provide information about

cancer to health professionals and the

community. Additionally, Cancer Australia

used market research activities to seek the

community’s views on the most effective

methods to deliver cancer information.

During 2020-21, Cancer Australia conducted

the following advertising campaigns:

• Act Early for Our Mob’s Health campaign

• Bladder Cancer Awareness Month

• Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

• Brain Cancer Awareness Month

• Breast Cancer Awareness Month

(Lots to Live For campaign)

• Cancer Won’t Wait campaign

• Children’s Cancer website campaign

• COVID-19 Vaccine Campaign

(for new information about COVID-19

vaccines for people with cancer)

• COVID-19 Vaccines - Help protect

our Mob campaign

• Guidance for the Management of Early

Breast Cancer (GEBC) website campaign

• Gynaecological Cancer Awareness Month

• Lung Cancer Awareness Month

• Melanoma Awareness

• National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap

Consultation Hub campaign

• Oesophageal Cancer Awareness Month

• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

• Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

• Sun Safety Awareness

• The Jeannie Ferris Cancer Australia

Recognition Award campaign

• World Cancer Day campaign

• Yarn for Life campaign

Further information on these advertising

campaigns is available at canceraustralia.gov.au

and in the reports on the Department of

Finance’s website. The report on Campaign

Advertising by Australian Government

Departments and Agencies, prepared by the

Department of Finance provides details of

campaigns for which expenditure was greater

than $250,000 (including GST).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 105

Table B.1: Advertising agencies used by Cancer Australia in 2020-21

Organisation Service Provided

Amount paid (GST inclusive)

Australian Doctor Group (ADG)

Digital banner advertising campaign and print advert for the promotion of the “Guidance for the Management of Early Breast Cancer” (GEBC) website, targeting health professionals.

Digital advertising campaign for the promotion of frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccines and cancer.

$44,031

Cox Inall Ridgeway

Online social media, email marketing, and national radio campaigns targeted to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to promote information about the COVID-19 vaccines for people affected by cancer.

$52,100

Etcom

Online social media promotion, advertising, translation, and other services to:

• encourage people to continue to see their doctor during the COVID-19 pandemic with any symptoms or signs that may be due to cancer and;

• culturally and linguistically diverse audiences to increase awareness of the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap.

$32,905

Paper Moose Pty Ltd

Develop a new breast cancer in young women animation, You know your breasts best, and digitally promote the animation during Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October 2020).

$29,999

Romanava

Online social media advertising to increase awareness of the symptoms and risk factors of prostate cancer, gynaecological cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, melanoma, ovarian cancer, oesophageal cancer, brain cancer and bowel cancer. There was also a campaign for World Cancer Day and sun safety awareness for cancer prevention. Romanava was also engaged to promote the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap Consultation Hub, the Children’s Cancer website, the Jeannie Ferris Cancer Australia Recognition Award. Additionally, there were two unique campaigns for COVID-19 related messaging, including the “Cancer Won’t Wait” campaign and another campaign for information about the COVID-19 vaccine for people with cancer.

$126,435

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP News GP Medical Media advertising $30,360

Web Marketing Workshop Pty Ltd

Google Ad campaigns for the Guidance for the Management of Early Breast Cancer (GEBC) website, the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap Consultation Hub, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Melanoma Cancer Awareness, Brain Cancer Awareness Month, Bladder Cancer Awareness Month, Bowel Cancer Awareness Month and the Cancer Australia website optimization campaign.

$72,363

Appendices 106

Table B.2: Market Research undertaken by Cancer Australia in 2020-21

Organisation Service Provided

Amount paid (GST inclusive)

Access Testing Pty Ltd

User research and design of a new Information Architecture (IA) for the Cancer Australia website. $77,304

ResearchCrowd

Focus testing of website content and creative concepts with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people nationwide. Deliverables included discussion guides, Interim Report and Final Report.

$31,075

Australian National Audit Office Access All Cancer Australia contracts contain provisions

allowing access by the Auditor-General.

Competitive tendering and contracting All open tenders and contracts over $10,000

(GST inclusive) awarded by Cancer Australia

during 2020-21 were published on AusTender.

Consultancy and non-consultancy contracts Annual Reports contain information about

actual expenditure on reportable consultancy

contracts and non-consultancy contracts.

Information on the value of reportable

consultancy and non-consultancy contracts

is available on the AusTender website

tenders.gov.au.

During 2020-21, there were twelve (12)

new reportable consultancies entered into

totalling actual expenditure of $0.693 million

(GST incl). Twelve (12) ongoing reportable

consultancy contracts were active during

2020-21, involving total actual expenditure of

$0.613 million (GST incl). The total number of

reportable consultancies (24) recorded in financial

year 2020-21 amounted to $1.306 million in total

expenditure (GST incl).

Additionally, there were forty-seven (47) new

reportable non-consultancies entered into

totalling actual expenditure of $6.412 million

(GST incl). Twelve (12) ongoing reportable

non-consultancy contracts were active during

2020-21, involving total actual expenditure of

$2.883 million (GST incl). The total number of

reportable non-consultancies (59) recorded

in financial year 2020-21 amounted to

$9.295 million in total expenditure (GST incl).

Cancer Australia engages consultants as required

to acquire specialist expertise, and to undertake

research and investigation of particular cancer

control issues to inform and assist in the agency’s

decision making.

Prior to engaging consultants, the agency takes

into account the skills and resources required

for the task, the skills available internally, and the

cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise.

The decision to engage a consultant is made

in accordance with the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and

regulations (including the Commonwealth

Procurement Rules) and relevant internal policies.

Cancer Australia is a non-corporate

Commonwealth entity. Cancer Australia’s

reportable contract data for 2020-21 is as follows:

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 107

Table B.3: Cancer Australia Consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Organisation Service Provided

Amount paid (GST inclusive)

PriceWaterhouseCoopers Consulting (Australia) Pty Limited

Professional Services for Australian Cancer Plan (ACP) Development with Cancer Ecosystem mapping 417,380

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Consultancy services and professional advice on systems, accounting standards and reporting 254,899

Alison Evans Consulting

Audit of National Care Standards, Support for development of consultation questions on Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap and Planning and reporting of comments during research works

92,994

Sustainable Health System Solutions Pty Ltd Economic health policy advice on a range of complex cancer issues

92,400

Stephen Ackland

Professional technical service and senior clinical oncology expert advice 64,999

Michael Reid and Associates

Consultancy services for the prospects, process and delivery of a national targeted lung cancer screening program in Australia 38,500

Concur Consulting SAP Concur Implementation and Support 35,422

Associate Professor Christine Giles General cancer policy advice and member of the Cancer Australia Audit and Risk Committee

32,400

Protiviti Internal Audit Review Provision of services for Cancer Australia internal audit program

21,887

Dr Alia Kaderbhai

Professional services for Breast Cancer online learning modules 20,900

Nyuka Wara Consulting Provision of services for delivery of Reconciliation Action Plan for Cancer Australia, including staff consultation 19,525

Ginnane Consulting Provision of services as Chair of the Cancer Australia Audit and Risk Committee 15,372

Table B.4: Summary of Cancer Australia Consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Reportable consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 12 692,833

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 12 613,184

Total 24 $1,306,017

Appendices 108

Table B.5: Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-211

Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure $

Proportion of 2020-21 total spend (%)

PriceWaterhouseCoopers Consulting (Australia) Pty Limited 417,380 32%

Deloitte Touché Tohmatsu 254,899 20%

Alison Evans Consulting 92,994 7%

Sustainable Health System Solutions Pty Ltd 92,400 7%

Stephen Ackland 64,999 5%

Total of the Largest Shares $922,672 71%

Total consultancy contract expenditure in 2020-21 $1,306,017

1 Lists organisations who received the five (5) largest shares of Cancer Australia’s expenditure on consultancy contracts, and those organisations who received 5% or more of Cancer Australia’s expenditure on consultancy contracts.

Table B.6: Cancer Australia Non-Consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Organisation Service Provided

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

IA Group Pty Ltd Provision of services for the design, project management and office fit -out costs of the Sydney Offices 1,446,404

Evolve FM Lease costs and property services for the Sydney Offices 1,042,462

Chill IT Pty Ltd

Provision of ICT network services, equipment and software for Cancer Australia 884,511

University of Technology Sydney

Investigation into the mapping of cancer treatment pathways using supervised and automated data analysis; NPCR Literature Review; National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap Literature Review

455,804

National Health and Medical Research Council

Services to support Cancer Australia applications under Ideas Grants Scheme 333,297

University of Sydney Support for Cancer Clinical Trials Program 315,229

Australian National University

Procurement of services for the development of the unreported measures through a longitudinal cancer study for Aboriginal people 275,000

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 109

Organisation Service Provided

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

The Cancer Council Victoria Improving childhood cancer data to identify disparities in outcomes

275,000

University of South Australia

Professional epidemiological data services 266,476

Healthcare Management Advisors

Analysis of Brain Cancer Platforms and Technologies 256,960

Carbon Creative Procurement of services for Yarn for Life campaign 231,000

IPSOS Public Affairs PTY LTD Yarn for Life Campaign Evaluation Project professional services 224,145

Cancer Council Victoria

Procurement of services for Stage, Treatment and Recurrence project Contract Execution 220,000

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Professional Service Fees for Strategic Directions Support 219,183

Menzies School of Health Research Provision of Services for National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap 200,405

Monash Health

National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap — Mapping — Deliverables and Trial 182,877

Link Digital Cancer Australia Website Support & Maintenance 166,024

Biotext Pty Ltd

Cancer Australia Online Redevelopment Phase II — medical writing - breast cancer content 160,182

Hays Specialist Recruitment

Contract for services 157,274

Flinders University Provision of services for Lung Cancer Screening in Australia 115,479

University of Queensland

Provision of Telehealth services for delivery of cancer care in Australia 111,045

Growth Ops Services Pty Ltd Design, build and implementation of the National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap interactive digital tool

108,569

Blaque Digital Pty Ltd Provision of services for Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 99,286

Telstra Provision of phone, data and mobile services 96,297

Romanava

Promotional social media services for cancer campaign initiatives by social media campaign 95,942

Federation of Ethnic Communities Councils of Australia Provision of services for National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap 92,700

Michael Reid and Associates

Provision of services for the Lung Cancer Screening enquiry 90,490

Appendices 110

Organisation Service Provided

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

Web Marketing Workshop Australia Google ad campaign development on various cancer subjects 85,463

Gilimbaa Pty Ltd Delivery and acceptance of final videos and supporting documentation for Leadership group 84,896

Lung Foundation Australia Provision of services regarding lung cancer 80,000

Aurion Corporation Pty Ltd Provision of payroll processing and maintenance services 67,144

Access Testing Pty Ltd

Development of Cancer Australia's Online Redevelopment plan

65,880

Yulang Indigenous Evaluation Pty Ltd Revision of articles for the Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people website project

56,430

University of Melbourne

Provision of services for national cancer data on stage, treatment and recurrence 52,166

The Nous Group Provision of services for ministerial roundtable — delivery of final report and communique 48,950

Cox Inall Ridgeway Provision of promotional information for cancer patients on COVID-19 48,510

Randstad Contractor for services 47,932

Concur Consulting Provision of services to support the SAP Concur system 44,505

Silver Sun Productions Pty Ltd T/As Silver Sun Pictures

Children's Cancer Website Animated Video preparation and Bowel Cancer Awareness 44,455

Australian Doctor Group

Provision of promotional via digital networks services media for cancer care 42,625

Griffith University Provision of services for Supporting women to live well with gynaecological cancers 38,500

Australian Bureau of Statistics Provision of services for Multi-Agency Data integration Project

36,901

Kapish

Records management system license and support services FY2021-22 34,270

Access Testing Pty Ltd

Provision of services for Cancer Australian Online Platform Redevelopment

32,230

K2 Strategies

Provision of services regarding Clinical Engagement and Promotion of Optimal Care Pathways 28,215

DFP Recruitment Contractor for services 27,163

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 111

Organisation Service Provided

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

Dr Anne Nelson

Provision of servicers for Cancer Australia's conceptual framework for cancer during a pandemic 26,125

Cancer Institute NSW Provision of services for cost of lung cancer care 24,473

HG Leadership Pty Ltd

Executive Learning program services 22,440

Alison Evans Consulting

Provision of services for engagement activities — Pancreatic Cancer roadmap and technical support for the analysis of brain cancer platforms 19,041

ResearchCrowd

Provision of services for the report on Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 18,975

Metro South Hospital & Health Service Provision of services for national cancer data on stage, treatment and recurrence

18,398

NSW Multicultural Health Communication Services

Providing communication services for NSW Multicultural Health 16,500

Elite Event Technology

Provision of audio-visual services 13,065

Jennifer Henwood Providing services on Breast Cancer Optimal Care 12,628

Research Crown Pty Ltd Provision of services for cancer research activities 12,100

LexisNexis

Annual subscription fee for Parliamentary media monitoring service

11,945

The Cancer Council QLD

Provision of services for Improving Childhood Cancer data outcomes 11,000

Table B.7: Summary of Cancer Australia non-consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Reportable non-consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number

Expenditure $ (GST inclusive)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 47 6,411,618

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 12 2,883,352

Total 59 $9,294,970

Appendices 112

Table B.8: Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-211

Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure $

Proportion of 2020-21 total spend (%)

IA Group Pty Ltd 1,446,404 16%

Evolve FM 1,042,462 11%

Chill IT Pty Ltd 884,511 9%

University of Technology Sydney 455,804 5%

National Health and Medical Research Council 333,297 5%

Total of the Largest Shares $4,162,478 45%

Total non-consultancy contract expenditure in 2020-21 $9,294,970

1 Lists organisations who received the five (5) largest shares of Cancer Australia’s expenditure on consultancy contracts, and those organisations who received 5% or more of Cancer Australia’s expenditure on consultancy contracts.

Disability reporting

The National Disability Strategy is Australia’s

overarching framework for disability reform.

It acts to ensure the principles underpinning

the United Nations Convention on the Rights

of Persons with Disabilities are incorporated

into Australia’s policies and programs that affect

people with disability, their families and carers.

All levels of government will continue to be

held accountable for the implementation

of the strategy through biennial progress

reporting to the Council of Australian

Governments. Progress reports can be found

at dss.gov.au. Disability reporting is included

the Australian Public Service Commission’s

State of the Service reports and the APS

Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available

at www.apsc.gov.au.

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance Section 516A of the Environment Protection

and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 requires

Australian Government entities to detail their

environmental performance and contribution

to ecologically sustainable development in

their annual reports.

In 2020-21 Cancer Australia maintained a range

of measures which contributed to ecologically

sustainable development, including:

• adopting a paper light office, going digital

where possible but still preserving certain

paper records

• using ecologically friendly printer paper,

paper-based stationery items and

cleaning products

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 113

• recycling of paper, cardboard,

printer cartridges and waste

• setting printers to default to print on both

sides of the paper and in black and white

• ensuring equipment such as laptops,

photocopiers, dishwashers and printers

incorporate energy-saving features.

All buildings in which Cancer Australia leases

its office accommodation have a minimum

National Australian Built Environment Rating

System (NABERS) energy rating of 4.5 stars.

Cancer Australia will continue to consider

ecologically sustainable development as part

of its business management approach.

Exempt contracts There were no contracts in excess of

$10,000 entered into by Cancer Australia

during 2020-21 that were exempt from

being published on AusTender due to

Freedom of Information (FOI) reasons.

External scrutiny No judicial or administrative tribunal

decisions relating to Cancer Australia were

handed down during 2020-21. There were

no reports by the Auditor-General on

the operations of the agency, other than

the report on the financial statements at

Appendix A. In 2020-21 there were no

reports on the operations of Cancer Australia

conducted by a Parliamentary Committee

or the Commonwealth Ombudsman and no

capability reviews were conducted or released.

Freedom of information Entities subject to the Freedom of Information

Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish

information to the public as part of the

Information Publication Scheme (IPS).

This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and

has replaced the former requirement to publish

a section 8 statement in an annual report.

Each agency must display on its website a

plan showing what information it publishes

in accordance with the IPS requirements.

Cancer Australia displays an Information

Publication Scheme Plan on its website

listing the information it publishes and how

it proposes to comply with IPS requirements.

This is available at canceraustralia.gov.au/IPS.

Grant programs The following grant programs were

administered by Cancer Australia during

the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021:

• Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer

Research Scheme

• Support for Cancer Clinical Trials program

• Supporting people with cancer Grant Initiative.

Information on grants awarded by Cancer

Australia during the period 1 July 2020 to

30 June 2021 is available at canceraustralia.gov.au.

Appendices 114

Purchasing

In 2020-21, Cancer Australia sourced goods and

services in accordance with the principles set

out in the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

The agency continued to reinforce procurement

policies and procedures reflecting the need for

compliance with these guidelines, focusing on:

• value for money

• encouraging competition

• efficient, effective, ethical and economical

use of Australian Government resources

• accountability and transparency

• compliance with other Australian

Government policies.

The agency also provides training and

education, and support for staff in procurement

and grants. All procurement and grant activity

within the agency is reviewed to ensure

compliance with legislative requirements

and to maximise best practice.

Small Business Cancer Australia supports small business

participation in the Commonwealth

Government procurement market. Small and

Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise

participation statistics are available on the

Department of Finance’s website: finance.gov.

au/procurement/statistics-on-commonwealth-

purchasing-contracts.

To ensure Small and Medium Enterprises

can engage in fair competition for Australian

Government business, Cancer Australia’s

procurement practices include use of:

the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for

low-risk procurements valued under $200,000;

and electronic systems and other processes

to facilitate on-time payment performance,

including payment cards.

Work health and safety During 2020-21, the following initiatives were undertaken in relation to work health and safety:

• Influenza vaccinations were offered for Workstation assessments were carried out for employees.

• An Employee Assistance Program continued to be offered for employees and their immediate family members.

• Since March 2020 to June 2021 Cancer Australia developed and implemented a COVID-19 Workplace Management Plan, in accordance with the National COVID-19 Safe Workplace Principles, Safe Work Australia Guidelines and Cancer Australia’s Pandemic Business Continuity Plan. The Crisis Management Team and WHS Committee conducted a COVID-19 Risk Assessment for Cancer Australia, to ensure the health and wellbeing of staff and compliance with Safe Work Australia’s requirements.

Executive Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity.

Cancer Australia has determined the key management personnel to be the Chief Executive Officer, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Senior Executive Service Officers, General Manager Finance and Corporate Affairs and Chief Financial Officer and Ministers.

The key management personnel remuneration information provided below excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Ministers. The Ministers’ remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not

paid by Cancer Australia.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 115

Table B.9: Key Management Personnel (2020-21)

Name Position Term as KMP

Dorothy Keefe Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Full year

Cleola Anderiesz Deputy Chief Executive Officer (DCEO) Full year

Paul Jackson Division Head - National Research and Data Four months

Anna Boltong Division Head - National Cancer Control Three months

Elmer Wiegold General Manager (GM)/ Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Full year

Jennifer Chynoweth General Manager (GM) Six months

Table B.10: Summary information about Remuneration for Key Management Personnel (2020-21)

2021 $

SHORT-TERM EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Base Salary 1,326,245

Bonus -

Motor vehicle and other allowances 208,110

Total short-term employee benefits 1,534,355

POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

Superannuation 162,769

Total post-employment benefits 162,769

OTHER LONG-TERM BENEFITS

Long-service leave 47,719

Total other long-term benefits 47,719

TERMINATION BENEFITS

Termination Benefits 125,751

Total termination benefits 125,751

Total employment benefits 1,870,594

Appendices 116

Table B.11: Information About Remuneration for Key Management Personnel (2020-21)

1

2020-21 Key Management Personnel Remuneration Name Position Title Short term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

2

Total renumeration

Base Salary

3

Bonuses

Other benefits & allowances

4

Superannuation contributions Long service leave

5

Other long

-

term benefits

Keefe, Dorothy

CEO 428,230

-

105,110 47,798 15,255

-

-

596,393

Anderiesz, Cleola DCEO 301,757

-

28,000 30,030 10,633

-

-

370,420

Chynoweth, Jennifer GM 117,283

-

25,000 16,380 4,284

-

125,751 288,698

Wiegold, Elmer

GM/CFO 218,812

-

-

36,760 8,190

-

-

263,762

Jackson, Paul

Division Head /GM 203,084

-

25,000 23,301 7,255

-

-

258,640

Boltong, Anna

Division Head

57,079

-

25,000 8,500 2,102

-

92,681

Total 1,326,245

-

208,110 162,769 47,719

-

125,751 1,870,594

1

A ppendix 2 of the RMG-No. 139 2 R edundancy benefit - tax-free 3

B ase salary includes gross payments, salary sacrifice, annual leave provision movement, prior years accrued annual leave paid out on termination, salary sacrifice super which was $NIL for all KMPs based on the Reportable Employer Superannuation Contribution reported on PAYG Payment Summaries. 4

O ther benefits and allowances include Motor vehicle allowance and car parking. 5 L ong service leave provision movement (accrued long service leave less leave paid during the year).

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 117

Table B.12: Information about remuneration for senior executives (2020-21)

Short term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination

benefits

Total

renumeration

Total remuneration bands

Number of senior executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average

superannuation contributions

Average LSL leave

Average other

long

- t

erm

benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0- $220,000

1 57,079 25,000 8,500 2,102 92,681

$220,001- $245,000

$245,001- $270,000

2 210,948 12,500 30,031 7,723 261,202

$270,001- $295,000

1 117,283 25,000 16,380 4,284 125,751 288,698

$295,001- $320,000

$320,001- $345,000

$345,001- $370,000

$370,001- $395,000

1 301,757 28,000 30,030 10,633 370,420

$395,001- $420,000

$420,001- $445,000

$595,001 - $620,000

1 428,230 105,110 47,797 15,255 596,392

Table B.13: Details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period Current Report Period (2020-21) Name Position Title/Position held Date of Commencement Date of cessation Professor Dorothy Keefe Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 1 July 2020 Specified term

Appendices 118

Appendix C: Cancer Australia Advisory Groups

Cancer Australia’s Advisory Group structure

supports the agency’s leadership role in

national cancer control and the fulfilment

of the agency’s purpose.

Advisory Group members represent a broad

range of expertise, experiences and sectors.

Cancer Australia’s Advisory Groups all have

consumer representation.

Strategic Advisory Groups Cancer Australia values the advice and

support provided to the organisation by its

four Strategic Advisory Groups: the Australian

Brain Cancer Mission Strategic Advisory Group,

the Intercollegiate Advisory Group, Leadership

Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Cancer Control, and the Research and Data

Advisory Group.

Australian Brain Cancer Mission Strategic Advisory Group

The Australian Brain Cancer Mission Strategic

Advisory Group, established in January 2018,

provides strategic advice and guidance to

Cancer Australia on achieving the Mission’s

goal, including: providing guidance on the

alignment of key initiatives with the Mission’s

objectives; providing advice on emerging

issues nationally and internationally to inform

the work of the Mission; identifying and

advising on collaborative opportunities and

approaches to achieving the Mission’s goal;

and identifying and advising on leveraging

opportunities and investments while

ensuring there is no duplication of initiatives,

infrastructure or platforms.

The group was chaired by

Professor Adele Green AC.

Intercollegiate Advisory Group

The Intercollegiate Advisory Group provides

expert advice to Cancer Australia across the

spectrum of cancer control to: inform national

approaches to reduce variations in cancer

outcomes; promote the use of best available

evidence to achieve effective cancer care;

identify collaborative approaches across

the system to address cancer challenges;

and provide advice on emerging issues

nationally and internationally to inform

Cancer Australia’s work.

The group was chaired by

Professor Sandra O’Toole.

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 119

Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control

The Leadership Group on Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control

(Leadership Group) provides strategic advice

and national cross sector influence to improve

cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander people. The Leadership Group:

champions cross-sector collaboration in

addressing the priorities in the National

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Cancer Framework; identifies and leverages

opportunities to improve cancer outcomes

at system, service and community levels;

and identifies emerging issues of national

importance in Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander cancer control.

The group was chaired by

Professor Jacinta Elston.

Research and Data Advisory Group

The Research and Data Advisory Group

provides expert advice to Cancer Australia

about the strategic and priority areas of

focus in cancer research and data including:

current and emerging issues in national and

international cancer research and clinical

trials; priorities for cancer research in Australia;

Cancer Australia’s research priorities; priorities

for Cancer Australia’s work in data; and key

national and international partnerships and

collaborations which support Cancer Australia’s

leadership role in research and data.

The group was chaired by

Professor Adele Green AC.

Tumour-specific Advisory Group Cancer Australia also acknowledges the

important contribution of its tumour-specific

Advisory Group:

Lung Cancer Advisory Group

The Lung Cancer Advisory Group:

provides high-level expert advice to inform

Cancer Australia’s work in promoting best

practice lung cancer care and improving

lung cancer outcomes; and identifies ways

Cancer Australia can work effectively with

stakeholders including consumers, cancer

organisations and professional groups to

determine approaches to lessen the impact

of lung cancers in Australia.

The group was chaired by

Associate Professor Paul Mitchell.

Appendices 120

Appendix D: List of Requirements

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 121

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI Page i

A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) Page ii - iii Table of contents. Mandatory

17AJ(b) Pages 133 - 139 Alphabetical index. Mandatory

17AJ(c) Pages 129 - 131 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory

17AJ(d) Page 121 List of requirements. Mandatory

17AJ(e) Inside Front Cover Details of contact officer. Mandatory

17AJ(f) Inside Front Cover Entiy's website address. Mandatory

17AJ(g) Insdie Front Cover Electronic address of report. Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) Pages 3 - 9

A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) Page 18

A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) Page 18

A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) Page 19

A description of the outcomes and programs administered by the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) Page 18

A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) Page 118

Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) Page 118

Position of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) Page 118

Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) Not applicable An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity.

Portfolio departments - mandatory

17AE(2) Not applicable

Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F Pages 23 - 34 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a) Pages 34, 44 A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) Pages 35 - 36 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory

17AF(2) Not applicable

If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

Appendices 122

17AD(d) Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) Page 42

Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) Page i

A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) Page i

A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) Page i

A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) Page 41

An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d) - (e)

Page 42

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) Page 43

A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) Page 43

The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) Page 43

The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(d) Page 43

Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) Page 43

The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 123

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) Page 114

Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity's response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) Not applicable

Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) Page 114

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c) Page 114

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period.

If applicable, Mandatory

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) Pages 44, 58 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) Pages 45, 46, 52, 53

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following: - (a) statistics on full-time employees; - (b) statistics on part-time employees; - (c) statistics on gender; - (d) statistics on staff location.

17AG(4)(b) Pages 47 - 50; 54 - 57

Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following: - Statistics on staffing classification level; - Statistics on full-time employees; - Statistics on part-time employees; - Statistics on gender; - Statistics on staff location; - Statistics on employees who identify

as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) Page 58

Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) Page 58

Information on the number of SES and -SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

Appendices 124

17AG(4)(c)(ii) Page 51

The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) Page 58

A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) Page 58

Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) Not applicable Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) Not applicable Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) Not applicable Information on aggregate amount of performance payments.

If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5) Not applicable

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

If applicable, Mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) Page 115

An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Reportable consultancy contracts

17AG(7)(a) Page 107

A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7)(b) Page 107

A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 125

17AG(7)(c) Page 107

A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) Page 107

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) Page 107

A summary statement detailing the number of new reportable non-consultancy contracts entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on such contracts (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting period on those ongoing contracts (inclusive of GST).

17AG(7A)(b) Page 107

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable non- consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

17AD(daa)

Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AGA Pages 108 - 113

Additional information, in accordance with section 17AGA, about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts.

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) Page 107

If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

Appendices 126

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) Page 114

If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) Page 115

A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) Page 115

An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) Not applicable

If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

Financial Statements

17AD(e) Pages 61 - 104

Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act.

Mandatory

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) Pages 115 - 118 Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule.

Mandatory

Cancer Australia Annual Report 2020-2021 127

17AD(f) Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i) 105

If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) Not applicable If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) Page 114

A statement that “Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c) Page 113

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) Page 114

Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) Not applicable Correction of material errors in previous annual report.

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2)

Pages 11 - 12, Advisory Council Chair’s review as per section 37 of Cancer Australia Act 2006.

Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

Appendices 128

Glossary

Term Description

Cancer A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control. Cancer cells can invade nearby tissues and spread through the bloodstream and lymphatic system to other parts of the body. There are several main types of cancer. Carcinoma is cancer that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover internal organs. Sarcoma is cancer that begins in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels or other connective or supportive tissue. Leukaemia is cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow and causes large numbers of abnormal blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream. Lymphoma and multiple myeloma are cancers that begin in the cells of the immune system.

Cancer control All actions undertaken by all stakeholders that aim to reduce the burden of cancer on individuals and the community, such as research; prevention; early detection and screening; treatment; survivorship issues; palliation; education and support for people with cancer and their families; and monitoring cancer outcomes.

Cancer journey An individual’s experience of cancer, from detection and screening, diagnosis and treatment to relapse, recovery and/or palliative care.

Cancer of unknown primary A case in which cancer cells are found in the body, but the place that the cells first started growing (the origin or primary site) cannot be determined.

Clinical trial Research conducted with the patient’s permission, which usually involves a comparison of two or more treatments or diagnostic methods. The aim is to gain better understanding of the underlying disease process and/or methods to treat it. A clinical trial is conducted with rigorous scientific method for determining the effectiveness of a proposed treatment.

Collaborative National Cancer Clinical Trials Groups

Networks of institutions and researchers who conduct studies jointly, use identical protocols and pool their data.

Consumer A term that can refer to people affected by cancer; patients and potential patients; carers; organisations representing cancer consumer interests; members of the public who are targets of cancer promotion programs; and groups affected in a specific way as a result of cancer policy, treatments or services. See also People affected by cancer.

Continuum of care The full spectrum of cancer control services from prevention and early detection efforts, through diagnosis and treatment, to rehabilitation and support services for people living with cancer and/or in palliative care.

Epidemiology The study of the patterns and causes of health and disease in populations and the application of this study to improve health.

Evidence-based Integrating the best available current research in information, resources and decisions relating to diagnosis, patient care and practice.

Gynaecological cancers Cancers of the female reproductive tract, including cancers of the uterus, ovary, cervix, vagina, vulva, placenta and fallopian tubes.

129

Term Description

Health outcome A health-related change due to a preventive or clinical intervention or service. The intervention may be single or multiple and the outcome may relate to a person, group or population or be partly or wholly due to the intervention, with either positive or neutral result(s).

Incidence The number of new cases of a disease diagnosed each year.

Lymphoma A cancer of the lymph nodes. Lymphomas are divided into two broad types: Hodgkin’s lymphomas and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas.

Melanoma A cancer of the body’s cells that contain pigment (melanin), primarily affecting the skin.

Morbidity The incidence of disease in a geographical location or specific group of people.

Mortality The death rate or the number of deaths in a certain group of people in a certain period of time. Mortality may be reported for people who have a certain disease; live in one area of the country; or are of a certain sex, age, or ethnic group.

Palliative care An approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with a life-threatening illness. Prevention and relief of suffering is provided through early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual problems.

Pathology The scientific study of the nature, causes and effects of disease, and the diagnosis of disease, through the analysis of tissue, cell and fluid samples. Pathology may also refer to the predicted or actual progression of disease.

People affected by cancer People who have had a personal experience of cancer, including patients, people living with cancer, cancer survivors, caregivers and family members.

Policy A plan or course of action intended to influence and determine decisions, actions and other matters.

Prevention Action to reduce or eliminate the onset, causes, complications or recurrence of disease or ill health.

Primary care First level of health care, outside of hospitals. For example, a GP is a primary health care practitioner.

Prostate cancer Cancer of the prostate — the male organ that sits next to the urinary bladder and contributes to semen (sperm fluid) production.

Psycho-oncology Concerned with the psychological, social, behavioural and ethical aspects of cancer. This subspecialty addresses the two major psychological dimensions of cancer: the psychological responses of patients to cancer at all stages of the disease and that of their families and caretakers; and the psychological, behavioural and social factors that may influence the disease process.

Psychosexual Concerned with the mental, emotional, and behavioural aspects of sexual development or sexuality, or attitudes relating to sexual activity.

Psychosocial Concerned with mental, emotional, social, and spiritual well-being, or issues relating to these states. Psychosocial treatment is intended to address psychological, social and some spiritual needs.

130

Term Description

Quality of life An individual’s overall appraisal of their situation and subjective sense of wellbeing. Quality of life encompasses symptoms of disease and side effects of treatment, functional capacity, social interactions and relationships and occupational functioning. Key psychological aspects include subjective distress, satisfaction with treatment, existential issues and the impact of illness and treatment on sexuality and body image.

Radiotherapy or radiation oncology The use of radiation, usually x-rays or gamma rays, to kill tumour cells.

Screening The presumptive identification of unrecognised disease or defects by means of tests, examinations or other procedures.

Staging Conventionally refers to the allocation of categories (0, I, II, III, IV) to groupings of tumours defined by internationally agreed criteria. Frequently these are based on the tumour, the nodes and the metastases. Staging may be based on clinical or pathological features.

Support networks People on whom an individual can rely for the provision of emotional caring and concern and reinforcement of a sense of personal worth and value. Other components of support may include provision of practical or material aid, information, guidance, feedback and validation of the individual’s stressful experiences and coping choices.

Stakeholder Any person or organisation that has a vital interest in Cancer Australia and its operations and programs.

Tumour An abnormal growth of tissue. It may be localised (benign) or invade adjacent tissues (malignant) or distant tissues (metastatic).

131

Abbreviations

Term Description

the Council Cancer Australia Advisory Council

ACSQHC Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care

AIHW Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

ANZCHOG Australian and New Zealand Children’s Haematology/Oncology Group

APS Australian Public Service

BCNA Breast Cancer Network Australia

CEO Chief Executive Officer

COGNO Cooperative Group for Neruro-Oncology

EL Executive Level

FOI Freedom of Information

GST Goods and Services Tax

HPV Human Papillomavirus

IPS Information Publication Scheme

the Mission The Australian Brain Cancer Mission

MRFF Medical Research Future Fund

NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council

PdCCRS Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

SES Senior Executive Service

SME Small and Medium Enterprises

132

Index

A abbreviations, 132

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer, 5-7, 24-25, 33, 38, 120

Access to Innovative Molecular diagnostic Profiling for paediatric brain tumours (AIM BRAIN) project, 32

accountability. See management and accountability

accountable authority, 23, 64

Act early for our Mob’s health animated video, 25, 37, 38

address and contact details, inside front cover

administrative tribunal decisions (none taken), 114

advertising and market research, 6, 25, 105-107

Advisory Council, 8, 13, 19

Chair’s annual review, 11-12

membership, 13

advisory groups, 9, 19, 119-120

Agency Budget Statement, 19

AIM-BRAIN project, 32

Anderiesz, Cleola, 18

annual performance statements, 23-34

Audit and Risk Committee, 19, 42, 43

Auditor-General. See Australian National Audit Office

Auditor-General Act 1997, 18

audits, 114

independent auditor’s report, 61-62

internal arrangements, 42

AusTender, 107

Australia New Zealand Children’s Haematology/ Oncology Group, 32

Australian Brain Cancer Mission, 8, 26-27, 32, 38

Strategic Advisory Group, 119

Australian Cancer Plan, 4, 37, 38

Australian Government funding, 44

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), 61-62, 107, 114

Australian National University agreement, 6, 25

B best-practice cancer care, 17, 28-29, 32

brain cancer, 8, 26-27, 32, 38

analysis of platforms and technologies, 26

budget statement, 19

burden of disease, 17

business performance. See finances

Business Plan 2020-21, 41

C Cancer and COVID-19 — what it means for our Mob web pages, 25

Cancer Australia

annual performance statements, 23-34

corporate governance, 41-44

financial overview, 44

financial performance, 35

organisation and structure, 18-19

overview, 37-38

program objectives, 23

purpose and roles, 17, 18, 23

133

review of the year, 3-9

Cancer Australia Act 2006, i, 13, 18

Cancer Australia Advisory Council. See Advisory Council

Cancer Australia Enterprise Agreement, 58

cancer awareness programs. See public education and engagement

cancer care, best-practice, 17, 28-29, 32

cancer care, evidence-based models of, 29, 33

cancer control initiatives, 3-9, 24-28, 37, 38

cancer data. See data collection and analysis

Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people website information hub project, 6

cancer incidence statistics, 17

cancer indicators, 6, 24, 25, 31

cancer research funding and programs review, 29, 30

cancer screening programs, 4

Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW), 103

Chief Executive Officer, 42-43, 64

review of the year, 3-9

Chief Financial Officer, 64

childhood cancer, 32

classification levels of staff, 47-49

See also senior executive service (SES) officers

clinical trials, 7, 27, 32, 38

code of conduct, 42

Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Groups, 7

committees and working groups, 9

Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework 2017, 42

Commonwealth Ombudsman, 114

communication campaigns, 6, 8, 25

compliance reporting, 42

CONNECT-1903 clinical trial, 32

consultancy contracts, 107-109, 113

consumer representatives, 9, 17

contact details, inside front cover

contracting. See purchasing

contracts, 107, 109-112

corporate governance, 41-44

Corporate Plan 2020-21, 41

Council. See Advisory Council

COVID-19 pandemic, 5, 28-29

Cancer and COVID-19 — what it means for our Mob web pages, 25

cancer care during, 37, 38

clinical vaccination trial, 38

COVID-19 Recovery: Implications for cancer care, 5, 29

impact on agency operations, 28, 34

online resources, 33

shared follow-up and survivorship care, 29

work health and safety response, 115

Workplace Management Plan, 34

D data collection and analysis, 6, 8, 25, 31, 37, 38

Department of Health, 4, 5, 7, 9, 43, 58

disability reporting, 113

134

E ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, 113-114

Employee Assistance Program, 115

employees. See staff

enterprise agreement, 58

entity status, 107

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 113

ethical standards, 42

ethics and data custodian approvals, 31

evaluations. See reviews and evaluations

evidence-based models of cancer care, 29, 33

executive remuneration, 115-118

exempt contracts, 114

external scrutiny, 61-62, 114

F fatal disease burden, 17

Fighting Childhood Cancer Measure, 32

finance

annual statements, 65-104

discretionary grants, 6, 26-27, 30, 37, 38, 114

employee benefits, 81

fraud risk management, 42

independent audit report, 61-62

key management personnel remuneration, 93

overview, 44

performance report, 35

position statement, 67

Finances and Corporate Affairs portfolio, 41

five-year survival rates, 17

follow-up care, 29

fraud risk and control, 42

freedom of information, 114

Freedom of Information Act 1982, 114

full-time staff, 49

functions. See roles and functions

funding partners, 7, 8, 9

fundraising report, 103

future. See plans and planning

G gender of staff, 45-48

glossary, 129-131

governance, 41-44

grants, discretionary, 6, 26-27, 30, 37, 38, 114

A guide to implementing the optimal care pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer, 5-6, 24

H head office, 19

human resources. See staff

135

I independent auditor’s report, 61-62

indicators, cancer data, 6, 24, 25, 31

Indigenous advancement and employment, 6-7

Indigenous health, 24-25

See also Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer

Information Publication Scheme, 114

Intercollegiate Advisory Group, 119

internal audit arrangements, 42

internet home page, inside front cover

J judicial decisions (none made), 114

K Keefe, Dorothy, 3-9, 12, 18

key management personnel remuneration, 115-118

key performance indicators. See performance

L Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, 120

learning and development. See training

legislation, 41

letter of transmittal, i

list of requirements, 121-128

location of staff, 45-46

Lung Cancer Advisory Group, 120

Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry, 4, 24, 26

M management and accountability, i, 41-58

market research, 107

Mayi Kuwayu — The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing, 6, 25

Medical Benefits Schedule data analysis, 37, 38

Medical Research Future Fund, 8

Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, 7

Minister for Health and Aged Care, 8, 12, 18, 58

Ministerial Roundtable, 37, 38

Multi-Agency Data Integration Project, 8, 38

Multi-Site Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Groups, 7, 32

N National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control Indicators website, 6, 24, 25

National and jurisdictional data on the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia: Breast, colorectal, lung, prostate and skin cancers, 29

National Cancer Control Indicators website, 8, 31

national cancer data capacity, 8

National Disability Strategy, 113

National Pancreatic Cancer Roadmap, 5, 8, 24, 27, 37, 38

National Technical Services, 7

non-consultancy contracts, 107, 109-112

non-ongoing staff, 46, 48

non-salary benefits, 58

136

O Objective A outcomes, 24-28

Objective B outcomes, 28-29

Objective C outcomes, 30-32

Objective D outcomes, 33-34

objectives, 3, 34

O’Brien, Tracey, 9

occupational health and safety. See work health and safety

office locations, 19

Ombudsman, 114

ongoing staff, 45, 47

Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer, 5-6, 24

organisation and structure, 18-19, 34

outcomes and programs, 19, 23, 37-38

Objective A outcomes, 24-28

Objective B outcomes, 28-29

Objective C outcomes, 30-32

Objective D outcomes, 33-34

P pancreatic cancer, 5, 8, 27, 37, 38

pandemic. See COVID-19 pandemic

Pandemic Business Continuity Plan, 34

part-time staff, 49

pay. See remuneration

performance, 23-34, 37-38

analysis of criteria, 34

environmental, 113-114

performance pay, 58

personnel. See staff

plans and planning, 5, 8, 26, 29, 34, 41

Portfolio Budget Statements, 19

previous report period staffing statistics (2019-20), 52-57

Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme, 7, 29, 30, 37, 38

procurement. See purchasing

program objectives, 34

programs. See outcomes and programs

public education and engagement, 6, 8, 24-25, 37, 38, 105

web resources, 33

See also publications and resources; websites

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 18, 23, 107

Public Service Act 1999, 18, 42, 58

publications and resources, 5, 8, 29, 33, 38

COVID-19 Recovery: Implications for cancer care, 5, 29

impact on medical services and procedures, 28, 29

National and jurisdictional data on the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia: Breast, colorectal, lung, prostate and skin cancers, 29

Report on the Lung Cancer Screening Enquiry, 26

Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data: Lung and prostate cancers, 28

Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data: Skin, breast and colorectal cancers, and telehealth services, 28

purchasing, 115

advertising and market research, 105-107

consultancy contracts, 113

consultants, 107-109

non-consultancy contracts, 107, 109-112

small business, 115

tendering and contracting, 107

purpose statement, 17, 18, 23

137

R Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 2019-20, 6-7

remuneration, 58

Advisory Council members, 13

audit committee, 43

key management personnel, 93, 115-118

non-salary benefits, 58

SES officers, 42-43, 115-118

Research and Data Advisory Group, 120

research funding and programs, 7, 27, 30, 32, 37, 38

review, 29

resource statement, 35

Responding to need: technology-enhanced brain cancer survivorship, 8, 26

Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data: Lung and prostate cancers, 28

Review of the impact of COVID-19 on medical services and procedures in Australia utilising MBS data: Skin, breast and colorectal cancers, and telehealth services, 28

reviews and evaluations

of cancer research funding, 27, 29

of fraud control plan, 42

of procurement and grant activity, 115

risk management, 19, 43

roles and functions, 18, 34

Advisory Council, 11, 13

senior executive, 115

S salaries. See remuneration

scrutiny. See reviews and evaluations

senior executive service (SES) officers, 43

remuneration, 42-43, 115-118

SerOzNet clinical trial, 5

shared follow-up and survivorship care, 29

small business procurement, 115

social media, 8, 25

staff, 44-58

classification levels, 47-49

Employee Assistance Program, 115

employee benefits, 81

employment arrangements, 58

by employment type and location, 50

Enterprise Agreement 2016-19, 58

ethical standards, 42

full-time, 49

gender, 45-48

Indigenous, 50

induction program, 42

locations of, 45-46

non-ongoing, 46, 48

non-salary benefits, 58

numbers and workforce composition, 19, 45-51

part-time, 49

performance pay, 58

previous report period statistics (2019-20), 52-57

salary ranges by classification level, 51

SES officers, 42-43

training and development, 58

See also Chief Executive Officer

138

staff training, 42, 58

stakeholders, 4, 9, 17

strategic advisory groups, 9

Strategic Advisory Groups, 119-120

structure. See organisation and structure

Support for Cancer Clinical Trials program, 32

Supporting People with Cancer Grant Initiative, 6

Survivor Grant Opportunity, 8

survivorship care, 8, 29

T tendering. See purchasing

Thomas, Robert, 9, 12

Total Administered Program expenses, 28

training and development (staff ), 42, 58

U University of Melbourne, 8, 26

V vaccination studies, 5

video, Act early for our Mob’s health, 25, 37, 38

W websites, 8, 33, inside front cover

Cancer and COVID-19 — what it means for our Mob, 25

Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people website information hub, 6

COVID-19 vaccination FAQs, 29

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control Indicators, 6, 24

National Cancer Control Indicators, 8

work health and safety, 115

workplace agreements, 58

Y Yarn for Life campaign, 6, 25, 38

139

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