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Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies—Report for 2019-20


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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT2019-2020

Produced by: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Location: 51 Lawson Crescent, ACTON ACT 2600

Postal address: GPO Box 553, CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: +61 2 6246 1111

Facsimile: +61 2 6261 4285

Email: ExecutiveCoordination@aiatsis.gov.au

Home page: www.aiatsis.gov.au

Annual report: www.aiatsis.gov.au/corporate-information/annual-reports

www.transparency.gov.au

Cover image: Ocean Guardian, 2017, Brian Robinson, Kala Lagaw Ya/Maluyligal/ Wuthathi/Dayak people, cast aluminium with incised decoration (minaral), 110 x 155 cm. AIATSIS, AIAS585.210619_001. Photograph: AIATSIS.

ISSN (print) 2204-0196x

ISSN (digital) 2204-020X

© Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth), no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE ARE ADVISED THAT THIS PUBLICATION MAY CONTAIN IMAGES OR NAMES OF DECEASED PEOPLE.

We acknowledge the traditional owners and custodians of country throughout Australia and acknowledge their continuing connection to land, waters and community. We pay our respects to the people, the cultures and the elders past, present and emerging.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER STUDIES

Annual Report 2019-2020

Annual Report

2019-2020

A world in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and cultures are recognised, respected, celebrated and valued.

The AIATSIS logo is derived from the Koko Bera-Kungen Shield created by George Wilson, Claude Ponto and John William Malcolm. The logo was first published by the Institute’s Council in 1963. Today, AIATSIS continues to work with the families of the creators to develop the story of the Koko Bera-Kungen Shield.

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

E Ex xe ec cu ut tiiv ve e

51 Lawson Crescent, Acton ACT 2601 GPO Box 553, Canberra ACT 2601 P 02 6246 1111 E executive@aiatsis.gov.au

aiatsis.gov.au

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP Minister for Indigenous Australians Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I am pleased to submit the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (‘the institute’) Annual Report for the year ending 30 June 2020 under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). The report has been prepared in accordance with Resource Management Guide No. 136 - Annual reports for corporate Commonwealth entities, issued by the Department of Finance.

This annual report includes the institute’s audited financial statements, as required by section 43(4) of the PGPA Act.

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I certify that the institute has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans, and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting mechanisms that meet its specific needs. Reasonable measures have also been taken to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the institute.

This report details our ongoing efforts for a world in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and cultures are recognised, respected, celebrated and valued.

Yours sincerely

J Jo od diie e S Siiz ze er r Chairperson AIATSIS Council 31 September 2020

Table of contents

Chairperson’s statement 1

Chief Executive Officer’s report 3

About this report 5

Introduction and summaries Snap shot of AIATSIS 9

Annual performance statement

Introductory statement 22

Performance framework 24

Strategic priorities

1. Build and preserve a national collection and make it accessible 28

2. Promote better understanding of Indigenous people’s cultures and heritage 50

3. Lead and influence on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, ethics, protocols and collections 70

4. Partner and collaborate with our communities, partners and governments 90

5.

and heritage 1

Advise on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture 08

Our organisation

Governance structure 115

Business planning and risk management 119

Managing our people 122

Audited financial statements Auditors report 129

Statement—Chair, CEO and CFO 131

Statement of comprehensive income 133

Statement of financial position 134

Statement of changes in equity 135

Cash flow statement 136

Overview 137

Notes 139

Appendices

Appendix A: Governance 153

Appendix B: Partnerships 165

Appendix C: Research project summaries 167

Appendix D: Publications and presentations 172

Appendix E: Key management personnel remuneration 179

Aids to access

Compliance index 185

Index 189

List of features, figures and tables 6 19

198 Abbreviations and acronyms

1

Chairperson’s statement

2019-2020 has been a year of achievement, as well as challenge, for AIATSIS.

The Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition at the National Museum of Australia was one such achievement, emblematic of how AIATSIS works to preserve, research and promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Curated by AIATSIS, this exhibition told stories that affirm connections to country and celebrate the survival of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Material in AIATSIS’ collection joined new acquisitions and items loaned by cultural centres and community members, all backed by deep and rigorous research. It was my great pleasure to open the exhibition on 5 December 2019 in Canberra.

AIATSIS also continued celebrations for International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019. Activities included the Ngalipa Nyangu Jaru: Pirrjirdi Ka Ngalpa Mardani Our Language, Keeping Us Strong exhibition in the AIATSIS foyer gallery, the Paper and Talk Summit for community language researchers, publication of four more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language dictionaries, ongoing development of the Austlang database and digitisation of language materials in the AIATSIS collection, particularly fragile audio recordings on magnetic tape. The preservation and propagation of Australia’s wealth of Indigenous languages has always been part of AIATSIS’ business, and the International Year shone a spotlight on the institute’s longstanding efforts and precious collection. We welcome the United Nations General Assembly resolution on 18 December 2019 proclaiming the International Decade of Indigenous Languages 2022-2032, which will help keep attention and resources focused on this important work. Languages are a living thing, and their resurgence is ongoing.

AIATSIS’ work to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as they claim, preserve, and celebrate their heritage in the face of historical dispossession made great strides this year. After laying the groundwork with research and relationship-building in 2018-19, the Return of Cultural Heritage Pilot Project secured the return of 85 culturally significant objects to five Aboriginal language groups. The announcement by the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP, on 15 July 2020, of $9.99 million over four years for the Return of Cultural Heritage initiative means that AIATSIS can continue this inestimably valuable work.

A number of new Council members joined AIATSIS in 2019-2020 and we are very fortunate to have each of you with us. I welcome Bart Pigram (WA), Sue Kee (WA), Ashley Walker (NSW), Henrietta Marrie AM (QLD), Judith Ryan AM (VIC) and Murray Saylor (QLD), who now lend their expertise and experience to the stewardship of the institute. I offer my sincere gratitude and appreciation to departing Council members Rachel Perkins, Stephen Kinnane, Donisha Duff and Geoffrey Winters, for their work and collegiate support over recent years.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-20

Australia’s terrible bushfire season, which peaked in December and January, disrupted business for AIATSIS in Canberra, and affected a number of our community partners. The emerging COVID-19 pandemic then transformed AIATSIS’ operating environment, as well as that of communities, peer organisations and colleagues around Australia and the world. I want to acknowledge the hard work of AIATSIS CEO Craig Ritchie and AIATSIS’ management and employees in adapting to these challenges, and their flexibility and good grace in finding ways to continue AIATSIS’ important functions in the face of such obstacles.

In 2019-2020 we saw AIATSIS deliver on a commitment to increase accessibility to its collection and further deepen our valued relationship with our primary stakeholders, Aboriginal people and communities. The changing environment, including the ongoing impact of the pandemic, means that AIATSIS will keep finding new ways to protect the collection, engage with our partners and reach out to the Australian community. Alongside the other Council members, I look forward to meeting this challenge in 2020-2021

Jodie Sizer

Chairperson AIATSIS Council

There is no doubt that 2019-2020 has been a challenging year. In spite of the environmental and other challenges, this year has seen AIATSIS achieve many goals, including the celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages, engineering, agriculture, art and culture. We have also seen the departure of a number of AIATSIS Council members, and the commencement of new members.

The July 2019 launch of the educational resource Our Land, Our Stories, has created unprecedented opportunities for school students to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures through the stories and contributions of 36 Indigenous Australians, supplemented with hundreds of items from the vast AIATSIS collections.

Our program of activities to celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019 was incredibly successful, concluding with the high-level event for the closing on 17 December 2019 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. As co-chair of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) steering committee for the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019, I led a delegation to Mexico for the UNESCO high-level event ‘Making a decade of action for indigenous languages’ and the International Congress of Endangered Languages at Risk in February 2020. The resulting declaration of the International Decade of Indigenous Languages 2022-2032 recognises that the rejuvenation and advancement of language—an essential element of culture—is an urgent and long-term enterprise.

In 2019-2020 AIATSIS continued to lead the evolution of ethical best practice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research and cultural collections with the development of a new draft Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research. After a highly engaged consultation process, the new code will be released early in 2020-2021, replacing the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies, which have set the standards for ethical research for more than 20 years.

December 2019 also saw the launch of the first AIATSIS-curated exhibition installed in the National Museum of Australia, Ngulla Wellamunagaa: Trees That Have Survived and Revived. The exhibition told stories of the survival, continuity and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, using materials from the extensive collections at AIATSIS and generous contributions from communities around Australia.

While the second half of the year presented a series of challenges, many important events occurred before these disruptions. These included the Australian National Indigenous Research Conference in July 2019, the Paper and Talk Summit for community language researchers in September 2019, the Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition, the AIATSIS Art Market in December 2019, and the Nyiyanang Wuunggalu Policy Symposium in February 2020.

3

Chief Executive Officer’s report

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-20

The Return of Cultural Heritage Pilot Project was a success founded on our growing international relationships and deep community partnerships. This two-year project enabled AIATSIS to pursue the return of cultural heritage materials held overseas to their custodians in Australia. At the completion of the pilot project term on 30 June 2020, 85 culturally significant objects had been returned to five communities from two international institutions: the Museum of Manchester, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); and the Illinois State Museum (United States of America).

Consistent with the AIATSIS theme for 2020, ‘Brilliant: Indigenous Genius Then and Now’, we celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language, engineering, agriculture, art and culture. One example, only now receiving recognition, is the story of Jimmie Barker and his remarkable innovations in sound recording, brought to light through AIATSIS research in collaboration with Jimmy’s family. With the resources of our collection, our research expertise and our rich partnerships with other organisations and community, we look forward to celebrating many more such stories, both past and present, in 2020-2021.

Even in the face of the year’s challenging events, the critical everyday work of AIATSIS continued in the workplace, and in people’s homes. I want to thank all the staff of AIATSIS once again for their dedication, perseverance and teamwork. I also thank AIATSIS Chairperson Jodie Sizer and all the members of the AIATSIS Council for their leadership and contribution throughout the year.

Craig Ritchie

Chief Executive Officer AIATSIS

*Photo: Gunther Hang/ James Horan Pty Ltd for Sydney Living Museums

5

About this report

This report describes the performance and operations of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) during 2019-2020. It was prepared to meet legislated reporting requirements set out in Resource Management Guide No. 136—Annual reports for Corporate Commonwealth entities, issued by the Department of Finance.

The reporting demonstrates our role in furthering the understanding of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, past and present, through undertaking and publishing research, and providing access to print and audiovisual collections.

The style of the report celebrates our brand personality and our extraordinary collection including Brian Robinson’s sculpture ‘Ocean Guardian’.

Review

• includes both the AIATSIS Council Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer’s (CEO’s) reports for 2019-2020 as a foreword.

Features, figures and tables

• throughout the report:

o 15 standalone features provide detailed descriptions of people, projects and events

o 3 figures illustrate our strategic intent, timeline and organisation

o 33 tables support, summarise and comply with our reporting obligations.

Introduction and summaries

• provides a brief guide to AIATSIS, including our purpose and outcomes

• summarises our performance in 2019-2020

• provides an overview of financial results for 2019-2020

• looks forward to 2020-2021 and beyond.

Our performance

• summarises our performance in the Annual Performance Statement 2019-2020

• discusses our performance against the five strategic priorities in the AIATSIS Corporate Plan 2019-2023 and shares how we strive to realise our vision and mission.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-20

Our organisation • outlines management and accountability matters including:

o governance structures

o external accountability mechanisms

o people management activities

o financial management activities

o other mandatory information.

Financial statements • presents our audited financial statements for 2019-2020.

Appendices • provides additional information on governance, partnerships, projects, publications, presentations and remuneration to support our reporting.

Aids to access • delivers materials that can help the reader to access and interpret the report.

7

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Introduction and summaries

9

Comparing 2019-2020 to 2018-2019 Despite the impacts of COVID-19, the bushfires and hailstorm, AIATSIS continues to strengthen its strategic intent detailed in Figure 1.

Funding

Less direct funding yet growth in other sources of revenue — $17 thousand less funding than the previous year, while revenue generated was up by approximately $3.17 million.

• $20.445 million in 2019-2020, $17,000 less than the previous year ($20,462 million)

• An impressive increase in revenue of $3.169 million derived from the sale of goods and services, grants and other sources — $8.030 million in 2019-2020 compared to $4,861 million last year.

Staff

Growth in staff and those who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

• 4 additional staff members who identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander — up from 36

• 121 ongoing and 14 non-ongoing employees — up from 116 ongoing and 7 non-ongoing last year.

Committees

Growth in advisory committees.

• 2 new committees, the Indigenous Advisory Committee for the National Resting Place and Knowledge and Culture Centre scoping project and the COVID-19 Taskforce — totalling 15 committees of which 3 operate under a Board of Directors structure

• 66 highly regarded Australians, who are not AIATSIS staff, participating in committees — a significant increase up from 44 in the previous year.

Publications and presentations

An increase of activity —compared to the previous year.

• 65 presentations at conferences, seminars and inquiries — compared to 57

• 8 workshops and conferences convened — compared to 6

• 30 contributions to journals, articles and reports

• 2 multimedia publications and exhibitions.

Research

A small decrease in research projects — 24 compared to 29.

• 6 major research projects completed — the same as the previous year

• 16 continuing research projects — compared to 10

• 2 new research projects — compared to 13.

Partnerships

Stable partnerships and networks — approximately 34.

• 4 new strategic partnerships — compared to 3

• 12 ongoing strategic partnerships

• 12 networks

• 6 other partnerships.

Snap shot of AIATSIS

10

AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Performance

Each year we perform exceptionally well above targets. In 2019-2020 examples include:

• the number and the types of activities with an education focus including the utilisation of our products and curriculum resources

• the number of AIATSIS led events with the majority of attendees stating their satisfaction level was excellent

• increasing the collection catalogue records and photographic descriptions

• the total number of publications with the majority of authors being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

• our bookshop activity increasing by as much as 300 per cent

• the use and influence of our Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies

• doubling the number of ethics clearances through our Research Ethics Committee

• the number of new members of AIATSIS

• the number of submissions and times that we have engaged with decision makers, policy leaders, senior bureaucrats and politicians. For example, initiatives such as the Return of Cultural Heritage Project and the delegation to Latin America supported by the Council on Australia Latin America Relations resulted in high levels of engagement (27 interactions) with governments internationally, increasing our global influence and networks.

Legislation and purpose AIATSIS is established by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Act 1989 (Cth). AIATSIS’ purpose, as set out in this Act, is to:

a. develop, preserve and provide access to a national collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage;

b. use that collection to strengthen and promote knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage;

c. provide leadership in the fields of:

i. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research; and

ii. ethics and protocols for research and other activities relating to collections related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage; and

iii. use (including use for research) of the national collection and other collections containing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage;

d. lead and promote collaborations and partnerships among the academic, research, non-government, business and government sectors and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in support of other functions of the Institute;

e. provide advice to the Commonwealth on the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage.

AIATSIS is a statutory agency under the Public Service Act 1999, (Cth), and a corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth).

11

OUR VISION A world in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and cultures are recognised, respected, celebrated and valued.

OUR MISSION

Tell the story of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia. 1

Create opportunities for people to encounter, engage with and be transformed by that story.

2

Support and facilitate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural resurgence.

3

Shape our national narrative. 4

About AIATSIS

Our strategy, planning and performance

The AIATSIS Strategic Plan 2018-2023 explains our strategic directions, priorities and commitments for the next four years. The Corporate Plan 2019-2023 sets out the context in which we are implementing our strategy, our goals and the key actions we will take to achieve our strategy, and the performance criteria we will use to monitor the outcomes achieved. More detail about the strategies and actions set out in the Corporate Plan, and our performance against its targets, is described in the Annual Performance Statement.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

OUR STRATEGIES Build and preserve a national collection, and make it accessible.

Promote better understanding of Indigenous peoples’ cutures and heritage.

Lead and influence on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, ethics, protocols, and collections.

Partner and collaborate with our communities, partners, and governments.

Advise on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage.

Ensure that our collection is representative, relevant and diverse.

Optimising appropriate accessibility.

Maximise opportunities provided by digital innovation.

GOALS GOALS

Positioning AIATSIS as the national forum for dialogue on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Delivering transformative experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, histories, and heritage.

Delivering high quality exhibitions, products and publications.

GOALS

Speaking authoritively through evidence based research and culturally based representative networks.

Articulating national priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research.

Positioning AIATSIS as the arbiter of standards in relation to research ethics, Indigenous research, management of Indigenous Collections.

Fostering innovation in ethical, impactful research and collection practice.

GOALS

Actively building diverse and enduring relationships domestically and internationally.

Being responsive and professional, with culturally competent work practices.

Building and active network of corporate partners.

Engaging our network of members, friends, volunteers, visitors and affiliates.

Helping to develop community capability in relevant areas.

GOALS

Positioning AIATSIS as a trusted advisor.

Building our policy capacity and capability to deliver world class expertise.

Reporting regularly on the situation and status of Indigenous culutre and heritage.

DISCOVERY RESURGENCE TRANSFORMATION EXTENDING OUR REACH SPECIAL

PROJECTS

Help Australians discover the richness of the histories, cutures and heritage of our First Nations people.

This initiative includes a new, state-of-the-art home for AIATSIS.

Contribute to the ongoning cultural resurgence across Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia.

Projects include the publication of Indigenous language dictionaries and the Songlines critical project.

Transform peoples’ understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia.

Measures include developing teaching resources for schools and corporate Australia.

Extending the reach of AIATSIS, both in presence and influence, through physical and digital means.

Initiatives include an impactful web presence and potential physical presence beyond Canberra.

2019 UNESCO International year of Indigenous languages.

Return of Cultural Heritage Project.

PRIORITIES

AIATSIS expertise and capability is sustained for national and regional impact.

AIATSIS is characterised by an indigenous voice in all that it does.

AIATSIS is a financially sustainable organisation.

AIATSIS operates cohesively as a single entity embodying the concept of Yindyamarra.

AIATSIS is positioned to influence across a range of sectors.

AIATSIS is an innovative and felxible institution.

AIATSIS is a proactively engaged and outwardly looking institution.

UNDERPINNING COMMITMENTS

Figure 1: Our strategic intent

13

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Portfolio and responsible Minister

During 2019-2020 the Minister responsible for AIATSIS was the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Indigenous Australians. AIATSIS was part of the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio.

Also within the portfolio is the National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA) which was established in May 2019 to influence policy across the entire Australian Government. We regularly liaise with the NIAA.

Funding

AIATSIS receives most of its funding from Australian Government appropriation ($20.445 million in 2019-2020).

Additional revenue is derived from revenue from contracts with customers, grants and other sources ($8.030 million in 2019-2020).

More information is provided in the ‘Financial resource management’ introduction to the financial statements.

Our people

As at 30 June 2020, we had 121 ongoing employees based in Canberra. More information can be found in in ‘Our organisation’.

Our values

The Australian Public Service (APS) values apply to our staff. We are impartial, committed to service, accountable, respectful, and ethical.

These are central to the way we work with our Minister, colleagues and stakeholders.

Our underpinning commitments

We pride ourselves in our commitment to:

• technical expertise and capability sustained for national and regional impact

• reflect an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voice in all that we do

• performing as a financially sustainable organisation

• operating cohesively as a single entity embodying the concept of Yindyamarra—a Wiradjuri word meaning honour and respect, more broadly it implies thoughtfulness, graciousness, and kindness

• positioning ourselves to influence across a range of sectors

• behaving as an innovative and flexible institution

• proactively engaging and being outward-looking.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Where we work Our administrative and operational headquarters are in Canberra at 51 Lawson Crescent, Acton, ACT, 2601.

Our challenges Over the next few years, our challenges include:

• preserving, managing and growing our collection, independently assessed as the world’s most significant collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander materials

• contributing to active and ongoing discussion about Australia’s identity and narrative, through the story of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

• providing strategic input to policy that affects, or is informed by, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage

• extending our leadership role in best practice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, publishing and cultural collections, which supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander control, self-determination and cultural resurgence

• growing and managing partnerships and public engagement that connect with a larger and more diverse range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, national and international institutions and organisations and the Australian public, while managing demand and expectations

• finding ways to undertake all of our functions, in the post-COVID-19 environment, that minimise risk to all our clients, partners and stakeholders, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Our history AIATSIS was originally established in 1964 to preserve as many components of traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures as possible before they were lost forever.

After 56 years, and in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural and social resurgence, we stand as a testament to the living and vibrant story of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the important place this has in our nation’s story.

Our timeline Highlights of our timeline are shown in Figure 2.

Organisational structure Our entity is one of the many entities and companies within the portfolio of Prime Minister and Cabinet. We are led by the CEO reporting to the AIATSIS Council and supported by external and internal expert committees. We operate across three groups: Strategic Operations, Research and Education, and Collections. Our organisational structure as at 31 June 2020 is shown at Figure 3. More information is in the section ‘Our organisation’.

15

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

More than fifty scholars establish an institute and interim Council in Canberra, aiming to record endangered Aboriginal cultures.

Over 90% of Australians vote ‘Yes’ to give Aboriginal people legislative and constitutional recognition.

Alawa man Philip Roberts becomes the first Aboriginal member of the AIAS Council.

Ephraim Bani becomes the first Torres Strait Islander appointed to the AIAS Council.

The AIAS becomes the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS).

1961 1967 1970 1976 1986

1964 1974 1984 1992

Act of Parliament passed to establish the Australian Institute of

Aboriginal Studies (AIAS) to preserve as many components of traditional Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander cultures as possible, before they were lost forever.

The Council approves funding for the training of Aboriginal people

involved in AIAS research projects.

The AIAS provides a small grant to Edward Koiki Mabo to record traditional

boundaries on Mer Island in the Torres Strait.

Terra Nullius is overturned when the High Court upholds Eddie Mabo and

Meriam plaintiffs’ claim on Mer Island.

Bidjara woman Marcia Langton becomes the first Female Chair of the

AIATSIS Council.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Figure 2: AIATSIS timeline

AIATSIS produces the award winning The Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia, with 2000 entries from 200 researchers on all known aspects of Indigenous history, society and culture.

The Governor-General, the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove launch the AIATSIS Foundation to develop partner-ships and raise funds to support and extend the institute’s work.

CEO, Craig Ritchie, leads the Australian Government delegation to the tenth session of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

First observance of UN International Year of Indigenous Languages. CEO, Craig Ritchie, co-chairs the UNESCO steering committee.

1994 2015 2017 2019

2008 2016 2018 2020

The Australian Parliament apologises to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander peoples for profound grief, suffering and loss inflicted by

national law and policy.

Reflecting its credibility in growing, building and promoting

understanding of Indigenous culture and heritage, AIATSIS is given

an explicit role in providing advice to the Commonwealth on the situation and

status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage.

Working towards the establishment of a National Resting Place for Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander remains.

Start Return of Cultural Heritage initiative, returning material held

overseas to Australia.

17

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Figure 3: Organisational Structure

ADVISING THE CEO

Indigenous Research Exchange Advisory Board

The National Resting Place Project Indigenous Advisory Committee

Native Title Advisory Committee

Collections Advisory Committee

Publishing Advisory Committee

Research Advisory Committee

STRATEGIC OPERATIONS

BUSINESS INNOVATION & PARTNERSHIPS

BUSINESS SERVICES

COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING, PUBLIC PROGRAM & PUBLISHING

EXECUTIVE SUPPORT UNIT

PEOPLE, FACILITIES & SECURITY

STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

RESEARCH & EDUCATION

INDIGENOUS CULTURE & HERITAGE

INDIGENOUS COUNTRY & GOVERNANCE (NATIVE TITLE RESEARCH UNIT)

EDUCATION, ETHICS & RESEARCH, LEADERSHIP/ RESEARCH EXCHANGE

COUNCIL

MINISTER FOR INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS

COLLECTIONS

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT & MANAGEMENT

PRESERVATION & DIGITISATION

COLLECTION ACCESS & SUPPORT

OFFICE OF CEO

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

NATIONAL INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS AGENCY

Relationship with

Accountable to

ADVISING THE COUNCIL Membership Standing Committee

Audit and Risk Committee

Foundation Board

COLLECTIONS TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY PROJECT

WORKING TOWARDS THE NATIONAL RESTING PLACE & KNOWLEDGE

& CULTURAL CENTRE PROJECT

RETURN OF CULTURAL HERITAGE PROJECT

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INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

20

AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Annual performance statement

21

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

I, Jodie Sizer, on behalf of the AIATSIS Council, the accountable authority of AIATSIS, present the institute’s 2019-2020 Annual Performance Statement.

This statement is presented as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The Annual Performance Statement:

• is based on properly maintained records

• accurately reflects AIATSIS’ performance in the reporting period

• complies with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Yours sincerely

Jodie Sizer Chairperson AIATSIS Council

30 September 2020

Introductory statement

23

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

23

Contents

Performance framework 24

Strategic priority 1: Build and preserve a national collection and make it accessible 28

Introduction 28

Goals 28

Key actions and activity 28

Performance criteria 43

Analysis 47

Strategic priority 2: Promote better understanding of peoples’ cultures and heritage 50

Introduction 50

Goals 50

Key actions and activity 50

Performance criteria 64

Results 64

Analysis 64

Strategic priority 3: Lead and influence on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, ethics, protocols and collections 70

Introduction 70

Goals 70

Key actions and activity 70

Performance criteria 85

Results 85

Analysis 87

Strategic priority 4: Partner and collaborate with our communities, partners and governments 90

Introduction 90

Goals 90

Key actions and activity 90

Performance criteria 103

Results 103

Analysis 105

Strategic priority 5: Advise on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage 108

Introduction 108

Goals 108

Key actions and activity 108

Performance criteria 111

Results 112

Analysis 112

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Performance framework

Portfolio Budget Statement 2019-2020 Our statement sets out how we intend to expend our annual appropriation.

AIATSIS was appropriated $20.371 million to support our functions as we pursue the strategic goals set out in the AIATSIS Corporate Plan, and deliver the outcome expressed in the statement.

The statement sets a single outcome for AIATSIS:

Further understanding of Australian Indigenous cultures, past and present, through undertaking and publishing research, and providing access to print and audiovisual collections.

Corporate Plan 2019-2023 Our corporate plan sets out how we intend to achieve our vision and fulfil our mission.

The plan outlines the operating environment and key challenges and identifies five strategic priorities, with key outcomes, planned actions (strategies), and performance criteria, measures and targets.

These strategic priorities are:

1. Build and preserve a national collection and make it accessible.

2. Promote better understanding of Indigenous peoples, cultures and heritage.

3. Lead and influence on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, ethics, protocols, and collections.

4. Partner and collaborate with our communities, partners and governments.

5. Advise on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage.

Summary analysis of performance Results over the past year are consistent with our strategic priorities.

• We continued growing our collection, progressing its digitisation and making the collection discoverable and accessible

• Significant results in the promotion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage through education were the launch of two major new school education resources and the ongoing rollout of AIATSIS Core Cultural Competency online training for the workplace

• Our achievements and leadership in research practice and standards were recognised in the demand for our ethics review services, and the establishment of an Indigenous Research Exchange. Our partnership approach supported outcomes across our business, including the achievements of the Return of Cultural Heritage Project and the formation of new strategic partnerships and partnership projects with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and peer organisations

• Goals for input to relevant policy were also achieved.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Factors affecting our performance included the pandemic and bushfires, increasing demand for preservation and access to our collection, the shifting ethical framework for collecting and research, growing self-determination in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, increasing domestic and international demand for all of our services and pressures on our technical, human and space resources.

• COVID-19 pandemic. Measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, both in Canberra and into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, affected our business on a number of fronts. The Stanner reading room was closed from March 2020 until the end of the financial year and the National Native Title Conference scheduled to be held in for Tweed Heads (NSW) in May 2020 was postponed. Measures to protect staff included working from home which affected productivity during the transition and had an ongoing impact on work that requires the use of specialised onsite equipment. Travel restrictions and other precautions prevented field research and events from March onward.

• Natural disasters. The bushfires during December and January and the subsequent smoke haze over Canberra affected some communities that we are in partnership with for research projects, as well as presenting challenges and pressures for the protection and safety of our collection. Smoke haze necessitated the closure of the reading room for a period in January.

• Increased pressure for preservation and access. While we are making good progress in many areas, pressure still grows to achieve preservation of the most fragile and vulnerable materials within the collection. There is also an increased expectation of digital delivery of, discoverability of and access to the collection.

• A changing environment for ethical practice in collections and research. Expectations for the ethical management of cultural material and information continue to shift. The ethical implications of the collection, and the management and use of data is an area of ongoing development, and communities and individuals increasingly demand control and management of their own data and information. This was reflected in very high levels of engagement in consultation on the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies.

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination. There is growing demand from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities for control and management of their own materials held within cultural collections. Collection management and research is expected to occur in partnership, with shared priority-setting, design and decision-making.

• Increasing demand for AIATSIS expertise, resources, advice and information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, traditions, history and cultural heritage. There is an ever-growing demand in Australia, and internationally, for authoritative content and advice on research and collection management. This is driven by growing interest and expectations across the community, including the education sector, and by the resurgence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and society.

• Limits to capacity. We are responding to opportunities and threats through evolving technologies and technical capabilities, but still dealing with limits to physical storage capacity and technological and human resources.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

The UNESCO-declared International Year of Indigenous Languages continued in the second half of 2019, and we continued our program of activities designed to raise awareness, inform and educate Australians about the history, use and resurgence of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages, and to promote, support and celebrate their use and growth. These included:

• the Dictionaries Project - publication of an additional four Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language dictionaries during the 12 month reporting period

• Ngalipa Nyangu Jaru: Pirrjirdi Ka Ngalpa Mardani Our Language, Keeping Us Strong exhibition in our foyer gallery

• Paper and Talk Workshops bringing together community researchers from five language groups to explore the archives, research historical records

Our Language: Keeping Us Strong exhibition display

Tess Napaljarri Ross with granddaughter Bethalia Kelly reading a Warlpiri children’s book as part of the Our Language: Keeping Us Strong exhibition.

Photographs: AIATSIS

Feature 1: International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019

and repatriate important material back to their communities

• further development of the Austlang database

• continuing digitisation of audio material in the collection making progress towards the complete digitisation of the vulnerable audio tape collections, which contain a wealth of invaluable language materials spoken and detailed by community members. Related print and manuscript materials from the languages collection have also been digitised and returned to communities.

On 18 December 2019, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming and International Decade of Indigenous Languages from 2022 to 2032. The achievements of the past year are just the start of a decade when Indigenous languages are in the spotlight.

AIATSIS CEO Craig Ritchie, Alicia Payne MP and Senator Patrick Dodson at the Our Language: Keeping Us Strong launch

Visitors at the launch of the Our Language: Keeping Us Strong exhibition

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

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Introduction The AIATSIS Collection contains over one million items, including film and video, photographs, audio, art, material culture objects, manuscripts and published materials.

The majority of our collection consists of unique materials—stories, oral histories, language, songs, ceremony and traditions. These materials are invaluable, not only to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities, but also to the national and international community.

We continue to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities to grow this collection and ensure it is preserved, discoverable, understood, accessible and valued by all.

Goals • Ensuring that our collection is representative, relevant and diverse

• Optimising appropriate accessibility

• Maximising opportunities provided by digital innovation

KEY ACTIONS AND ACTIVITY

1A. Collection growth and research to promote the value, significance and understanding of the collection

Collection growth and development

Collection growth continued in line with our Collection Development Plan, following its refocus in 2018-2019. Accessioning materials that have been deposited, donated or acquired into the collection and creating the records and finding aids that allow them to be found and searched is essential in opening up the value of the collection to the community and to researchers. Notable examples of this work during the year included:

• arrangement and description of the papers of David Horton, the publisher of The Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia and the AIATSIS languages map

• arrangement and description of the papers of Marella Mission Farm, containing the administrative records of this ‘home’ in Kellyville (NSW) from the 1950s to the 1980s, including many personal records of children sent as NSW state wards

• arrangement and description of Dermot Smyth’s papers relating to his transect study of Cape York ecology, part of his significant contribution to the study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander land and sea management

• accessioning and description of 4,516 images comprising the Pallottines (Tardun School) photographic collection, the final step in preparations to return material from this collection to former students of the school

• accessioning the Howard Creamer collection of more than 2,500 photographic negatives taken while Creamer was working on the New South Wales National Parks and

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 1 Build and preserve a national collection and make it accessible

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Wildlife Service survey of Aboriginal sacred and significant sites from 1973 to 1983— complementing the 33 hours of audio recordings that Creamer deposited with AIATSIS in the late 1970s and 1980s

• accessioning the Alan Butcher collection, which features 293 colour transparencies (slides) taken during Butcher’s time working as a carpenter for the Uniting Church across Goulburn, Milingimbi and Elcho Islands between 1963 and 1970, documenting community life at various island missions

• accessioning the Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre audiovisual archive, which features 325 videocassettes and 112 audio cassettes documenting the history and cultural practices of the Kimberley region, recorded at Fitzroy Crossing and in the Kimberley region (WA) from 1984 to 2012.

Schoolchildren boarding the fortnightly mail plane going to a yearly eisteddfod in Darwin (Alan Butcher, Milingimbi (NT), c1967)

Elevated view of the settlement with mothers and their children playing on the basketball court (Alan Butcher, Elcho Island (NT), c1965)

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

The re-association of collections containing different media through the creation of composite finding aids has also been a priority, for collections such as:

• the manuscript and audio collections of ethnomusicologist Alice Moyle

• the deposits of material by ethnomusicologists Richard Moyle and Linden Moyle

• the collection of educationalist Julia Koppe from work in Queensland between the 1960s and 1990s, which included manuscript, photographic and audiovisual media. This collection also became the focus of a preliminary investigation into data visualisation as a potential means to make a collection more accessible for clients who prefer images rather than text, and to visibly reveal the connections and relationships within a mixed-media collection.

Research to inform the exhibition Ngulla Wellamunagaa: Trees That Have Survived and Revived (National Museum of Australia (NMA)) drew on the AIATSIS collection and enriched it by extending and adding collection items, interpretive material and metadata.

Native title research

The Native Title Research Unit continued to support access to our collection for research by individuals, claimant groups, native title representative bodies, government departments and lawyers to assist in the native title claiming process. During 2019-2020 there were 58 requests for access to the collections to research native title claims. The service has also been opened to registered native title bodies corporate and the registered holders of native title, to support their native title and land management work.

The Native Title Research Unit also added to the collection in 2019-2020. The pilot stage of the Preserve, Strengthen and Renew project in Western Australia with the Karajarri Traditional Lands Association, the Kiwirrkurra community (via Desert Support Services) and the Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre contributed metadata for a previously undescribed photographic collection of over 400 images recorded with senior Karajarri traditional owners, and significant corrections to the Kiwirrkurra After 200 Years collection. Materials from the Taungurung Land and Waters Decision Making Project were also offered to the collection. It is hoped that the Return of Native Title Materials project may offer some solutions in dealing with some of the historical access restrictions of native title and land claim based material already in the collection.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Eden whaling oral history videos This collection contains over 20 hours of oral history interviews about south-east coast historical whaling practices from the perspectives of Yuin community members and colonists in Eden. The relationship between the Yuin community and killer whales has a deep cultural and spiritual significance that continues to this day. Footage includes interviews with Yuin community members including Elder ‘Guboo’ Ted Thomas and with descendants of white fishermen and whalers. This collection was donated by Greg McKee.

Arrernte watercolour landscape painters Donated by Dr Jenny Green, this collection consists of documentation— including audio recordings, transcripts in Arrernte and English, and digital images—created as part of a watercolour project with artists from central Australia in 1988. The recordings feature Arrernte watercolourists including Wenton Rubuntja, Jillian Namatjira and Douglas Kwarlpe Abbott from the Hermannsburg School in central Australia, which is internationally renowned for the style made famous by Albert Namatjira. These recordings provide the artists’ insights into the stories, connections and representations of their watercolours.

Papers of Richard Broome This highly significant collection of research materials by Professor Richard Broome includes oral history recordings with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professional boxers, in addition to original manuscripts for the book Slideshow Alley which Broome co-authored with Alick Jackomos.

Dialects of western Kulin, western Victoria Linguist Barry Blake has compiled a manuscript focusing on south-eastern languages Yartwatjali, Tjapwurrung and Djadjawurrung, based on early historical materials collected in the 19th and early 20th centuries. This addition provides a written record of languages from western Victoria to complement AIATSIS’ UNESCO Memory of the World registered language collection.

Feature 2: Significant additions to the collection

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples The National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples was a peak representative body for Australia’s First Peoples which advocated for self-determination, with a membership of over 180 organisations and over 10,000 individual members. Following the closure of Congress, we are now the custodian of this collection, with material representing its activity over the course of its operation between 2010 and 2017.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Arone Meeks, Gathering (acrylic on canvas), 2013, AIAS319.070618_001. Photograph: AIATSIS

Included in the Congress material is Gathering (2013), a painting by Arone Meeks, which was commissioned for use as the company’s logo. The work represents a meeting place, with outstretched hands representing family: the elders, men, women and children.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Art acquisitions for Ngulla Wellamunagaa In line with the Collection Development Policy, works from south-eastern Australia were purchased to fill gaps in the collection and to help strengthen stories within the Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition.

To acknowledge Ngunnawal Country and the traditional owners of the land where AIATSIS is situated, a large painting was commissioned from Ngunnawal artist Richie Allan and his family. Bulu Murra Ngunna Dhaara (Always a Pathway on Ngunnawal People’s Country) depicts Ngunnawal songlines and significant sites connected to the Molonglo River, recognising the Ngunnawal people’s ongoing connection to the land and water.

The purchase of leewurré—Fire Stick (2019) by trawlwoolway artist David mangenner Gough increased the representation of cultural material from Tasmania. This fire stick is used

as a tool, as a torch or to smoke and cleanse country.

A large carved sculpture, Fire Spirit (2017), was acquired from artist Uncle Noel Butler, Budawang Elder from the Yuin Nation on the NSW south coast. To complement Fire Spirit, Noel Butler also included a fire-lighting kit which is used for healing and smoking ceremonies, as well as to burn country. The fire kit contributes to the narrative of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander land management and cultural practice, an especially significant issue after the 2019-2020 bushfire season.

The woven Shrimp Scoop (2017) by Ngarrindjeri artist Yvonne Koolmatrie was also purchased, the second work by Yvonne to be acquired for the collection. This is a contemporary version of scoops used by generations of Ngarrindjeri people along the Murray River.

Gabriel Bani and David mangenner Gough, looking at David’s leewurré—Fire Stick in Ngulla Wellamunagaa, NMA, 2019. Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

1B. Upgrade and maintain capable digital infrastructure and appropriate physical storage for the expanding collection

After major investments in digitisation equipment and digital infrastructure and storage over recent years, further investments in 2019-2020 were limited to upgrades to document scanning systems, with higher resolution and larger format capability, plus improvements to photographic studio lighting.

Physical storage was the priority in 2019-2020. Capacity in existing physical storage was nearly exhausted, and environmental emergencies across the year threatened the safety of the collection. Throughout the summer bushfires, the January 2020 Canberra hailstorm and the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, AIATSIS staff assessed the risks and took action to ensure the collection was not affected by threats including smoke and ash deposits, extreme heat, overloading of air-conditioning systems, water damage and mould outbreaks.

When the ACT Government declared a public health emergency due to COVID-19 on 16 March 2020, the Acton building was closed to the public and staff numbers in the building reduced. Controls were introduced to mitigate the risks arising from reduced human presence, such as increased pest activity, potential mould outbreaks and a secondary disaster (such as fire or flood) occurring when fewer staff trained in disaster response are present. Plans were made for safe handling of collection materials when public access is resumed.

Such events are expected to become more prevalent over the next 10 years according to CSIRO (State of the Climate 2018), and we can expect an increased risk profile as a result. This is being addressed by expediting existing plans to move items to the new Mitchell repository and to rehouse collection materials.

We secured a six-year lease of a state-of-the-art vault at the National of Archives of Australia’s Mitchell repository. Collection material previously held off site has been relocated to the 580 square metre vault, relieving pressure on our Acton vaults and enabling safe storage and care of the growing collection for the next six years. The lease on this vault cannot be extended, so planning towards a long-term solution will continue.

In preparation for the move of collection material to the Mitchell storage facility, an audit of the Rare Book collection was undertaken. This was the first full audit of the Rare Book collection, which includes 3,752 books and 498 folios. The audit was intended to:

• physically account for items in the collection

• assess their condition and determine any action required for protection and preservation

• clarify the definition of a rare item in the context of our functions

• evaluate the reliability of catalogue and other records

• assess the security and risk profile

• improve practices and planning for access and handling, care and cultural safety

• establish a baseline of information that can be used for future surveys and work programs.

Alongside implementation of recommendations from the audit for managing and handling the Rare Book collection, random selections are being tested periodically to assess any changes in condition.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Rare book from the collection: George French Angas, South Australia illustrated (London: 1847). Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

1C. Improved preservation, discoverability, accessibility and use of the collection through the development of an appropriately resourced, long range Digital Transformation Plan

Digital Transformation Plan—Collections Transformation Program

In January 2020 we began the first phase of a Collections Transformation Program designed to:

• harness digital tools to better serve the collection and its users, with innovative systems that improve the speed and quality of access to the collection

• broaden and deepen audience reach by making the collection appropriately available by digital means, for both onsite and remote users

• improve intellectual control over the collections through the consistent application of established, specialised collection management and information standards, and systems designed for multi-format archives management.

The first research phase, from January to July, included desktop research; workshops to identify and prioritise requirements; engagement with peer organisations who have undertaken similar transformative programs; and consultation with archival, data science and digital preservation experts. The first Collections Transformation Strategy will be presented to the AIATSIS Council in December 2020, with initial scoping and a proposal to progressively enhance the accessibility of our collection through improvements in the digital collection control, preservation, and discoverability environments.

A Collections Transformation Strategy Project workshop over Zoom with the Moving Image Digital Preservation Team. Photograph: AIATSIS

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

In recent years we have focused on the collection of contemporary artworks by established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, such as Brian Robinson’s wall based sculpture Containment of the Seven Seas. Made of Palight plastic, enamel spray paint, raffia, cassowary feather and cowrie shells, and spanning four horizontal metres, this work presented AIATSIS’ photographic digitisation team with a challenging project: to document all seven elements of this complex sculpture, as well as capturing the whole work in its entirety.

Individual images were made of each element from the exact same angle and lighting conditions. Each element was placed on a prepared white floor with the camera above to minimise the effects of and variation in shadows. The continuity in exposure, scale and colour fidelity between the seven elements enabled a single composite image to be created in post-production that faithfully represents the entire work, viewed as the artist intended, as if it were hung on a white gallery wall.

Ancient manuscripts and rock art paintings foretell of a great event that occurred during the creation of Earth, a time where cultural heroes travelled across a formless land, creating sacred sites and significant places of interest in their travels. This event, which marks the fifth day of creation in the biblical sense is when swarms of living creatures including a multitude of marine life and great sea monsters populated the waters of the world and birds of every kind flew across the dome of the sky.

Containment of the seven seas is a contemporary retelling of this creation myth that amalgamates with the Book of Genesis, effectively layering the whole of the world’s waters with cultural nuance and deeper meaning, and empowering our ancient ancestors with the accumulated wisdom and knowledge back to time immemorial.

(Brian Robinson, artwork statement, 2018)

Feature 3: Documenting Brian Robinson’s sculpture Containment of the Seven Seas

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Brian Robinson, Containment of the Seven Seas (Palight plastic, enamel spray paint, raffia, cassowary feather, cowrie shells), 2018. Photograph: AIATSIS

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Digitisation program

Our engineering and digitisation teams continued to maintain, repair and operate equipment ranging from some of the very oldest recording and playback machinery, now considered antique, to the latest state-of-the art technology. This enables the oldest audiovisual and motion picture recordings to be played, and for these media, as well as images, documents and art objects, to be digitised for preservation and access.

The device developed by our engineers in 2018-2019 to automatically lubricate old and degraded cassette tapes is creating interest among other collecting bodies and was used by a visiting archive technician from PARADISEC (the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures), a digital archive of records of some of the many small cultures and languages of the world. The device allowed them to replay some severely degraded tapes from their collections for digitisation and preservation.

We also completed the digitisation of all material currently in the collection on early reel-to-reel Sony ‘J’ format video tapes. We are one of the few organisations in Australia that still have a functioning Sony EIAJ format reel-to-reel video player. Our engineers rebuilt and modified it with modern components to enable the digitisation of this videotape format at very high quality. ‘J’ format was first released to the market 51 years ago, so this format was high risk and high priority. The several hundred items of ‘J’ format tapes have now been digitally preserved, such as 14 30-minute black-and-white recordings shot in 1981-1982 from Megan Morais’ collection of Yawulyu (women’s songs) recorded at Yuendumu (NT).

Film sound is also a vulnerable medium. Historically, commercial motion picture film cameras did not record audio directly onto the film stock, but onto a separate magnetic tape which would later be synchronised and combined by the film lab into a motion picture film with a corresponding soundtrack. This separate magnetic soundtrack was low cost and prone to deterioration. After a dedicated campaign over recent years, we have now preserved 94 per cent of the current holdings.

Rebuilt and modified Sony EIAJ format reel-to-reel video player. Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Discoverability and accessibility

Preparation of finding aids for all media continued to increase the searchability and discoverability of the collection. Progress in digitisation also contributed to greater accessibility, and saw some significant returns of material to community , such as the return of Tardun School records to former students in Geraldton.

All issues of the Aboriginal Publications Foundation magazine Identity were digitised in preparation for 15 July 2021, the 50th anniversary of its launch. In February 2020, a display featuring Identity was mounted in the Stanner Reading Room to coincide with the launch of the book Does the media fail Aboriginal political aspirations?: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments. An online exhibition will be developed to promote and provide access to this collection in time for the anniversary.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

In 2017 a significant collection of archive materials relating to the Pallottine Mission in Western Australia was donated to our collection so that they could be available to Aboriginal people as a priority. The collection includes documents, photos and film that record work by the Pallottine Fathers as linguists and as teachers in the Tardun Mission School, and a complete set of the school’s administrative records from 1984 to 2004.

Over two years, we reviewed, organised and described the collection, in consultation with organisations including Mackillop Family Services, the National Archives and the National Library, the Care Leavers Australasia Network and the National Redress Scheme. In May 2019, AIATSIS met with Aboriginal people who attended Tardun School;

representatives from Kinchela Boys Home, Cootamundra Domestic Training Home for Aboriginal Girls and the Care Leavers Australasia Network; Find and Connect staff; and researchers to explore how people who had attended Tardun might like to complete their school records.

The culmination was a visit by an AIATSIS delegation to Geraldton, where a large community of former Tardun School students still live, in March 2020. Our staff set up an ‘AIATSIS in Geraldton’ display in a welcoming space, with access to the photographic database, the catalogue and samples from the collection related to the local area, with a focus on the Pallottines collection. Yamatji Elder Dawn Gilchrist gave our staff a private Welcome to Country and endorsed our invitation to local community members to visit.

Feature 4: Taking the Pallottines Tardun School records home to Geraldton

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Opposite page:

Geraldton visit—community members viewing AIATSIS collections material. Photograph: AIATSIS

This page:

Leonie Boddington viewing AIATSIS collections material. Photograph: AIATSIS

Over two days, more than 70 community members visited, including many former Tardun School students. We identified and provided copies of relevant documents and images to individuals and communities, and explained their ‘right to reply’—their right to speak back to the records made by the Pallottine Fathers and school administrators. Family History Unit staff provided research assistance and social support to people reconnecting with their past.

The entire Pallottines photographic collection, 4,516 colour slides, was digitised and available for viewing.

The original metadata relating to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who are the main subjects was sparse, with most labelled ‘unidentified’. Many of the former students provided additional information including nicknames, maiden names, and information on what life was like at Tardun. In all, 283 previously unknown individuals were identified in 246 photographs, making those images more accessible for generations to come.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Performance criteria • Collection growth

• Collection accessibility

Results

Table 1: Collection Growth

Performance criterion: Collection growth

Performance measure: Percentage increase in collection growth from 2018-19 baseline

Target: Growth from 2018-2019 baseline

Growth in media type: Size of collection 30 June 2019 2019-2020

growth

Growth (% increase)

Printed and published media (titles) 59,910 867 1.45%

Manuscripts

12,269 titles

(9,171,300 est. pages)

243 titles

(355,415 est. pages)

1.98%

Audio (hours) 41,323 527 1.28%

Pictorial (items) 708,665 10,635 1.50%

Film (feet) 6,788,451 0* 0.00%

Video (hours) 14,449 259 1.79%

Art and object (items) 6,508 45 0.69%

Average growth across media 1.32%

Outcome: Growth was seen across the collection in all media.

*Large donations of film received in 2019-2020 are still in process and will be included in subsequent years’ reporting.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Table 2: Collection accessibility—discovery aids

Performance criterion: Collection accessibility

Performance measure: Number of requests met and items provided by source and location

Target: 1.5% increase in online collection discoverability and accessibility

Number of finding aids, descriptions, catalogue records

2018- 2019 result

2019-2020 results by media

2019- 2020 result

Change from 2018- 2019

Audio

Film/ video

Photograph Print/ manuscript Art and

object

Catalogue records created 1,146 56 243 86 867 24 1,276 +11%

Catalogue records upgraded 4,203 22 176 137 5,821 42 6,198 +47%

Finding aids created 51 4 9 N/A 35 N/A 48 -6%

Photographic item level descriptions created

10,115 N/A N/A 16,539 N/A N/A 16,539 +64%

Audition sheets

124 30 3 N/A N/A N/A 33 -276%

Outcome: The target was greatly exceeded for catalogue records and photographic descriptions, but the number of new finding aids and audition sheets declined.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Table 3: Collection accessibility—accessibility

Performance criterion: Collection accessibility

Performance measure: Number of requests met and items provided by source and location

Target: 1.5% increase in online collection discoverability and accessibility

Number of collection searches, enquiries and requests 2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result % change

Enquiries and requests received (email/phone/ in-person/online form) 3,255 3,046 -6%

Complex user requests including Return of Material to Indigenous Communities (ROMTIC) completed 1,378 1,256 -9%

Collection items supplied* 4,585 4,023 -12%

Onsite visitors/clients 1,410 1,317 -7%

Items used in reading room 5,358 3,615 -33%

Outcome: Searches, enquiries and requests declined in all forms during 2019-2020 relative to 2018-2019.

Table 3a: Collection accessibility—number of collection items supplied by source of request

Number of collection items supplied by source of request

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individual

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation or community

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individual

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation or community

Total

2,093 270 1,566 94 4,023

Table 3b: Collection accessibility—number of collection items supplied by location of requestor

Number of collection items supplied by location of requestor

ACT NSW NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA Overseas Total

740 927 366 670 125 85 316 125 670 4,023

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Table 4: Collection accessibility—requests accessed within service standard

Performance criterion: Collection accessibility

Performance measure: Proportion of requests actioned within 60 days (service standard)

Target: 100%

Proportion of requests actioned within 60 days in 2019-2020 97%

Outcome: Requests accessed within service standard was 3% less than the targeted, 100%.

Table 5: Collection growth and accessibility—proportion of collection digitised by format

Performance criterion: Collection growth and accessibility

Performance measure: Proportion of collection digitised by format

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Size of collection 2018-2019

% of items digitised 2018-2019

% of items digitised 2019-2020

% change in items digitised 2019-2020

Manuscripts

12,268 titles (9,171,300 est. pages)

3.72 4.22 0.50

Audio (hours) 41,323 hours 87.97 88.97 +1%

Pictorial (items) 708,665 items 56.33 60.93 +4.6%

Film (feet) 6,788,451 feet 29.57 32.84 +3.3%

Video (hours) 14,449 hours 48.10 54.24 +6.1%

Film sound (hours) 1,075 hours 83.63 93.69 +10.1%

Art and object (items) 6,508 items 20.74 27.32 +6.6%

Total collection +4.6%

Outcome: The proportion of collection digitised by format increased by 4.6%.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Analysis As for many organisations, 2019-2020 has been a challenging year for us and our clients, and this is reflected in outcomes for the growth and use of the collection. Capital works to the AIATSIS building during 2019 required relocations and disrupted work areas including digitisation. Bushfires around Australia through late 2019 and early 2020 affected many organisations and communities. The dense smoke haze in Canberra affected our operations, with some activities reduced to prevent impact on our staff and the collection. This was followed by the January 2020 hailstorm which damaged the roof of the AIATSIS building. From March, COVID-19 social distancing requirements saw 50 per cent of staff working from home at any one time, slowing work that requires specialised onsite equipment, such as digitisation.

Growth in the collection was seen in all media except for motion picture film. The low apparent film collection growth reflects the fact that although there were some significant donations, they have not yet been finalised due to their size and complexity. They will be reflected in future years’ results.

There was an overall increase in the rate of discoverability aids produced compared with 2018-2019, including an 11 per cent increase in catalogue records created. There were also increases in the creation of print and published catalogue records, photographic item level descriptions and manuscript finding aids , as these activities were compatible with COVID-safe working arrangements. However, those same arrangements limited staff access to audiovisual collection material and systems, which decreased the production of finding aids and audition sheets.

Access to and use of the collection by our clients on site increased early in the year but dropped during the second half, resulting in an overall decrease. This was due to the challenges mentioned above, including the forced closure of the reading room for some days due to bushfire smoke, and subsequently due to the pandemic. The number of phone, email and other online enquiries continued growing until the last three months of the financial year, when it declined due to the impact of the pandemic on our clients.

During 2019-2020, compared to the last financial year, the number of information requests completed increased in the first half of the year but decreased in the second half, resulting in an annual decrease of 11 per cent. The great majority of access requests were actioned within the 60-day service standard, and generally within a much shorter time.

Regardless of the many impediments to digitisation of the collection during the year, and accounting for new deposits, 89 per cent of the audio holdings, 54 per cent of the video holdings and 61 per cent of the 720,000 images in the photographic collection have now been digitised.

UNESCO has indicated that digital preservation of magnetic tape collections should occur by 2025, when, it has estimated, their routine transfer will end due to their deterioration combined with the absence of operational playback equipment. We have now preserved 79.6 per cent of the highly at-risk magnetic material in the collection, which includes 788 hours of audio and video material accepted into the collection during 2019-2020.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY 2 Promote better understanding of Indigenous peoples’ cultures and heritage

Introduction AIATSIS is uniquely positioned to transform the nation’s understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture, with the tremendous resource of the collection, the institute’s strong and growing relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and other institutions, and the knowledge produced through the institute’s research leadership and activities. This rich source of stories, images, sounds and experiences can be shared with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities to strengthen their identity and ownership of their history, and with the broader population and our institutions to improve understanding and ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage is appropriately recognised, respected, celebrated and valued.

Goals • Provide a national forum for dialogue on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture

• Deliver transformative experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, histories and heritage

• Deliver high quality exhibitions, products and publications

KEY ACTIONS AND ACTIVITY

2A. Produce online content and communications collateral and engage Indigenous peoples and communities to tell the story of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia

The communications campaign to raise awareness about the crucial role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages to people’s lives, marking International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019 (IYIL19), continued throughout 2019 alongside exhibitions and events. In developing this campaign, AIATSIS engaged with the then Department of Communications and the Arts, and with a number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to tell the story of their language.

The AIATSIS monthly e-newsletter was issued throughout the year to 4,500 subscribers. AIATSIS’ social media presence further extended its communications reach.

Media opportunities were generated for a range of activities including IYIL19, progress and achievements in the Return of Cultural Heritage pilot project, the Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition, the announcement of the Indigenous Research Exchange Grants program, and AIATSIS’ program of public events.

AIATSIS also undertook strategic planning for communications during the year, developing a Communication Strategy 2019-2023 and a website refresh, both of which apply a user design methodology. Internal and external consultation was undertaken to inform the website refresh and a refresh of the AIATSIS brand.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

AIATSIS CEO, Craig Ritchie and Collection Development Manager Dr Charlotte Craw show Their Excellencies General the Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Retd), the Governor-General, and Mrs Linda Hurley drawings by Mickey of Ulladulla (approximately 1820-1891) held in the AIATSIS collection. Photograph: AIATSIS

AIATSIS Indigenous Art Market, December 2019. Photograph: Nathan Dukes

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

2B. A public program to strengthen community participation, and attract partners and sponsors

AIATSIS’ program of public events during 2019-2020 achieved high levels of participation and engagement, despite the challenges emerging in early 2020. Events celebrating IYIL19 (see the Feature 1) included the launch of a Welcome to Country in Ngunnawal, the traditional Aboriginal language of the ACT region, at the Canberra International Airport; and the Our Language: Keeping Us Strong exhibition presented in the AIATSIS foyer and online.

AIATSIS’ annual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Market took place from 6 to 7 December 2019, presenting work from a range of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and art centres from around Australia. The 2019 event saw 21 art centres and a range of artists from remote, regional and metropolitan Australia come to Canberra to showcase their works, attracting over 2,500 visitors over the two-day event. The event also featured musical performances, including from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander singer Isaiah Firebrace.

Tiwi artist Mrs Miriam Styassi with Kulama Design (2019) by Lidwina Tepomitari (left), and her own work Paminjini (2019) (right). Photograph: Nathan Dukes

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander performer Isiah Firebrace at the AIATSIS Art Market. Photograph: Nathan Dukes

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

AIATSIS held its International Women’s Day event on 6 March 2020, including presentation of the annual Shirley Ann Williams award for an exemplary female employee to AIATSIS staff member Jenny Wood.

More than 120 people attended the 2019 Wentworth Lecture, ‘Innovation—Indigenous Genius Then and Now’, delivered by Professor Marcia Langton AM on 25 September at the National Press Club of Australia. The Wentworth Lecture is held in honour of the Hon W.C. Wentworth AO. Established in 1978, the lecture series pays tribute to Mr Wentworth’s contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander studies and encourages Australians to gain a better understanding of issues at the heart of the nation’s development.

2019 AIATSIS Wentworth Lecture, presented by Professor Marcia Langton AO at the National Press Club of Australia. Photograph: AIATSIS

2C. Draw on the collection and AIATSIS expertise to deliver resources for and services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and organisations

AIATSIS is providing resources and services to individuals and organisations through a number of significant projects. The return of Tardun School images and records from the Pallottine collection to former students is one example.

Work also continued under AIATSIS’ 2018 memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Cultural Centre (KALACC) to digitise their collection, containing nearly 30 years of footage capturing the rich, unique culture and history of the Kimberley region of Western Australia, so that digital copies of audio and video materials can be returned to KALACC. The originals will remain housed at AIATSIS to best ensure their long-term preservation. In November 2019, AIATSIS staff travelled to Fitzroy Crossing to attend KALACC’s annual general meeting to present the directors with copies of the more than 400 audio and video tapes that had been digitised.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

In September 2019, AIATSIS technicians presented workshops on the preservation of documents, photographs and moving image media at the 20th Remote Indigenous Media Festival hosted by First Nations Media Australia on Waiben (Thursday Island).

The Paper and Talk workshop, building research and archival skills among community researchers from five language groups , was another event that supported capacity and self-determination for communities.

2D. Deliver a robust publishing program

The AIATSIS Stanner Award is presented biennially to the best academic manuscript written by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander author. In August, the 2019 Award went to Kamilaroi and Wonnarua author Dr Debbie Bargallie for her manuscript Maintaining the racial contract: everyday racism and the impact of racial microaggressions on Indigenous employees in the Australian Public Service. The book was published by Aboriginal Studies Press in June 2020 as Unmasking the racial contract: Indigenous voices on racism in the Australian Public Service.

Five other books were published by Aboriginal Studies Press in 2019-2020, including four dictionaries that are part of AIATSIS’ Dictionaries Project. They were:

• Mudburra to English dictionary (November 2019)—presenting Mudburra words with English translations, illustrations and encyclopaedic information about plants, animals and cultural practices, plus a guide to Mudburra grammar, an English index, and hand signs used by Mudburra people

• Does the media fail Aboriginal political aspirations? (February 2020)—a team of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers examine 45 years of media responses to Aboriginal initiatives seeking justice and self-determination, from the 1972 Larrakia petition to the Queen to the 2017 Uluru Statement from the Heart

• Gurgun Mibinyah (April 2020)—a dictionary of the northern varieties of the language Yugambeh-Bundjalung, or Bandjalangic, spoken from the Tweed River area of the north-east corner of New South Wales to the Logan River area in the Gold Coast area of southern Queensland

• Dhurga dictionary and learners grammar: a south-east coast NSW Aboriginal language (June 2020)—a concise compilation of the Dhurga language, spoken from south of Nowra to Narooma and west to Braidwood and Araluen, with over 730 words including informant and recorder details as a validation of authenticity

• Ngiyampaa wordworld: thipingku yuwi, maka ngiya: names of birds and other words (second edition, June 2020)—stories, example sentences and songs in the Wangaaypuwan dialect of Ngiyampaa, language of the Pilaarrkiyalu, Nhiilyikiyalu and Karulkiyalu people from western New South Wales.

Two issues of Australian Aboriginal Studies journal were also published during the year: 2019 Issue 2 in December 2019, and 2020 Issue 1 in June 2020.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

From 2 to 13 September 2019, AIATSIS worked with 15 community researchers from five language groups—the Yorta (VIC/NSW), Wergaia (VIC), Anaiwan (NSW), Wakka (QLD) and Ngunnawal (ACT/NSW)—to explore the archives, research historical records and repatriate important material to their communities.

The workshop was the result of a collaboration between AIATSIS and Living Languages, inspired by the United States’ Breath of Life Institute—which was in turn inspired by the original Paper and Talk workshop run by Nick Thieberger at AIATSIS in 1993. Ngunnawal researchers, the traditional owners of the land on which AIATSIS stands, welcomed participants to

AIATSIS, leading a special on-country trip and closing the workshop with a moving smoking and water ceremony.

The researchers delved into archives at AIATSIS, the National Library of Australia and other institutions, discovering and reconnecting with family histories, cultural information and descriptions of their languages. Linguists and other experts shared skills in working with archives and understanding linguistic methods and terminology. The ongoing impacts of colonisation, and what decolonising language work means, were the subject of much discussion. Findings presented at the end of the fortnight included new language teaching resources, the discovery of old word lists, and plans for future language work.

Paper and Talk participants touring the National Library of Australia. Photograph: AIATSIS

Feature 5: Paper and Talk workshop

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Paper and Talk workshop participants at AIATSIS in Canberra. Photograph: AIATSIS

Wotjobaluk (Wergaia) community members Robyn Lauricella and Ben Muir working through language materials from the AIATSIS collection with the assistance of their linguistic partner Harley Dunolly-Lee. Photograph: AIATSIS

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

2E. Identify opportunities that draw on the collection to produce exhibitions, products and publications that strengthen and share knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, histories and cultures

Exhibitions in 2019-2020 presented knowledge from AIATSIS’ collection and expertise to the world in engaging and captivating ways. One was the Our Language: Keeping Us Strong exhibition, presented in the AIATSIS foyer and online. Another was Ngulla Wellamunagaa: Trees That Have Survived and Revived, presented at the National Museum of Australia First Australians Focus gallery from 5 December 2019 until 23 March 2020.

AIATSIS supplied rare historical footage that was screened in the Nirin: 22nd Biennale of Sydney contemporary art exhibition (June-September 2020). Shot by H.R. Balfour in 1949, the footage documents the removal of sacred dendroglyphs (carved trees) from the Kalimangl Bora Ground in northern New South Wales. AIATSIS facilitated permission from the Kamilaroi community to exhibit the film and arranged community screenings prior to the film’s public exhibition. This project was the first collaboration between AIATSIS and the Biennale of Sydney under a recently signed MoU.

In another small and unique project, AIATSIS worked with the Australian Embassy in Vietnam to license the use of an image of an artwork by Aboriginal artist Jimmy Pike, Partiri—Flowers, on greeting cards produced in celebration of the Tet (lunar new year). These images will be seen by the embassy’s clients and contacts across Vietnam and other countries. AIATSIS holds the largest collection of Pike’s original artworks, donated in 2016 by Pat Lowe, the artist’s wife and long-time collaborator.

Pat Williamson, Senior Curator (right) and Paris Norton, Curator (left) at Ngulla Wellamunagaa (NMA, 2019), featuring Bulu Murra Ngunna Dhaara (Always a Pathway on Ngunnawal People’s Country) by Allan family, acrylic and ochre on canvas, 2019. Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

The exhibition Ngulla Wellamunagaa presented 16 stories that affirm ongoing connections to country and celebrate the survival, continuity and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Material from across the AIATSIS collection was presented alongside items lent by cultural centres, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and community members, including Link-Up SA, Gab Titui Cultural Centre, Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre and the Barker family.

Extensive curatorial research and community engagement was carried out in preparation for the exhibition. Research focused on the theme of ‘Resurgence’—the way in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures have continued and flourished in contemporary Australia. AIATSIS staff visited communities in Queensland and NSW, and held workshops at AIATSIS

with visiting artists and family members as part of the exhibition development consultation and engagement process. Creators, community members and knowledge holders were involved in the development of the exhibition and the display and interpretation of their stories and collection items. This approach has allowed our understandings of the collections to transform and further reflect the continuity of cultural knowledge and ongoing connections to collection materials.

While visitor numbers were affected by the bushfires and smoke and the closing date was brought forward by a week due to the closure of the National Museum of Australia (NMA) under COVID-19 restrictions, 17,390 people visited the permanent galleries while the exhibition was open. Further activities based on the exhibition’s content are planned for 2020-2021, including digital versions of the stories and 11 education packages.

Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition display (NMA, 2019). Photograph: AIATSIS

Feature 6: Ngulla Wellamunagaa— Trees That Have Survived and Revived

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Roy Barker Junior (right) and Kaylan Barker (left) at the opening of Ngulla Wellamunagaa (NMA, 2019). Photograph: AIATSIS

Guests at the opening of Ngulla Wellamunagaa (NMA, 2019). Photograph: AIATSIS

AIATSIS Chairperson, Jodie Sizer opening the Ngulla Wellamunagaa Exhibition at the National Museum of Australia (NMA), 2019. Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Grow educational resources

In the culmination of three years of work, Our Land, Our Stories was launched at Parliament House on 30 July 2019 by the Hon Dan Tehan MP, Minister for Education, and the Hon Linda Burney MP, Shadow Minister for Indigenous Australians.

Our Land, Our Stories is a media-rich educational series for lower, middle and upper primary school students, exploring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, peoples and cultures, created by Nelson, a Cengage company in partnership with AIATSIS. More than 35 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people contributed stories to this groundbreaking resource.

The series aligns with the central cross-curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories. It comprises three books each for lower, middle and upper primary stages, with themed student cards, teacher resource books and an online gallery of our collections material. The majority of the content has been written by Aboriginal and

The Hon Dan Tehan MP, Minister for Education, at the Our Land, Our Stories launch at Parliament House. Photograph: AIATSIS

Josie, Orlando and Shae with the Our Land, Our Stories ‘Big Books’ at the launch at Parliament House. Photograph: AIATSIS

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Shae with the Hon Linda Burney MP at the Our Land, Our Stories launch at Parliament House. Photograph: AIATSIS

Torres Strait Islander authors and is supported with images from our collections. The series is designed to educate non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students about Australia’s First Peoples and their cultures and heritage, and to provide an opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to see themselves in the curricula.

We also released free online teaching resources for The Little Red Yellow Black Book, to assist secondary educators to implement and embed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cross-curriculum priority into their planning, teaching and assessment. The resources include activities, worksheets and suggestions on assessment, with step-by-step instructions on how to deliver the classroom lessons. They build on teachers’ intercultural understanding and support their professional knowledge and proficiency. Each resource includes links to the national curriculum and the organising ideas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.

We also contributed to education programs and outcomes through existing products and a range of on-demand activities including school visits to our location in Canberra, lectures and presentations to academic and tertiary student audiences, responses to student enquiries, and hosting student interns.

Core Cultural Learning

The Core Cultural Learning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia Foundation Course (Core) is an innovative online course developed to strengthen individual and organisational cultural capability. Core was developed by AIATSIS in partnership with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Department of Social Services, building on our years of research and involvement in cultural competence initiatives and informed by our research collaboration with the University of Sydney’s National Centre for Cultural Competency.

Core is currently available free of charge to the APS, with six additional agencies subscribing during the year.

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

Each year, Cherrybrook Technology High School students travel from Sydney to Canberra to carry out research at AIATSIS for their HSC Aboriginal Studies course.

In December 2019, 11 students conducted research on topics including storytelling, incarceration; Aboriginal people in entertainment, birthing on country, Aboriginal students in the education system, what makes health services work for Aboriginal people, Aboriginal music, and gender and sexuality. AIATSIS staff prepared handouts for the students to help them research their topic, including suggested catalogue searches, a list of relevant items in the collection, and links to pertinent online resources. They gave the students instruction on locating resources in the collection, and on using AIATSIS’ Mura catalogue and TROVE.

The teacher said:

… the students were so appreciative of your support they wanted to go back. The students believe the first visit we had was so good it needed to be followed up with another visit at the end of the trip. You really helped them get underway with their topics. Their enthusiasm has grown.

A former student said:

I have found Aboriginal Studies to be interesting and worthwhile and important not only as a student, but also as a person and as an Australian.

AIATSIS staff also find these visits rewarding and inspiring.

Cherrybrook Technology High School students researching in the reading room. Photograph: Juliet Navarro

Feature 7: Cherrybrook Technology High School students visit to AIATSIS 2019

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We have commenced commercialisation of Core, offering licences on a fee-for-service basis

to governments and organisations outside the Commonwealth. Twelve non-APS clients

subscribed to Core during 2019-2020, a testament to the reputation Core has already

established, and discussions with more prospective clients are underway. New clients

included the Australian National University (ANU) (ACT), the Victorian Ombudsman, Lifeline,

the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, HealthDirect (NSW),

Savannah Guides (QLD) and Pivot Support Services (WA).

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Performance criteria • Communication

• Engagement with education—increased contribution to Australian curriculum and cultural learning

• Public events

• Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP) publishing

Results

Table 6: Communications—number and quality

Performance criterion: Collection growth

Performance measure: Number and quality of public communication, education and engagement

Target: 70% of respondents assess AIATSIS communication, education and engagement provide high level impact

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

Number of public communications:

• Media releases, alerts and web news stories 35 24

• Media interviews with AIATSIS staff or affiliates 43 14

• Requests for content or information by media 66 170

• E-newsletter—issues distributed 10 12

• Newsletter subscribers Not reported 4,409

• Media mentions (hard copy and digital) 928 1,843

• Social media audience (LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) 39,122 47,549

• Surveys distributed (internal and external) Not reported 9

+70% in online engagement

Quality of public communications, assessed through surveys/feedback channels—percentage of respondents who agreed ‘high level impact’ Not reported

Evaluation process still being developed

Outcome: While the number of outward communications declined, reflecting that AIATSIS was focused this year on a smaller number of large projects (rather than many small projects), the number of incoming enquiries in response increased dramatically, indicating high levels of interest and engagement. Online engagement increased significantly. The evaluation process to ascertain public assessment of the quality of AIATSIS communications is still being developed.

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Table 7: Engagement with education

Performance criterion: Engagement with education—increased contribution to Australian curriculum and cultural learning

Performance measure: Number and type of activities with an education focus

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

Core Cultural Learning—institutional uptake 92 110

Utilisation of AIATSIS education products— purchases/downloads of curriculum resources

• Existing resources (The Little Red Yellow Black Book and AIATSIS map of Indigenous Australia)

• New resources (Little Red Yellow Black Book teaching resources, Our Land, Our Stories)

25,866

25,866

N/A

N/A

30,585

20,647

1,509

8,429

New educational activities and resources introduced New measure 2

Outcome: The target was exceeded—both the number and the types of activities with an education focus increased relative to the previous year.

Table 8: Public events

Performance criterion: Public events

Performance measure: Number and satisfaction of attendees at AIATSIS events

Target: 5 individual events

Measure

2019-2020 result

Number of AIATSIS public events 9

Number of attendees at AIATSIS public events 3,700

Satisfaction levels reported by attendees at AIATSIS events. Majority ‘excellent’

Outcome: The target of 5 events was exceeded, despite challenges to public events in this financial year. Satisfaction levels were high. This was a new measure and target in 2019-2020

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Table 9: Publication program

Performance criterion: Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP) publications program

Performance measures:

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander author engagement

• Majority Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors

Target:

• Publish up to 8 publications annually across all types

• Majority Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors

Measure

2019-2020 result

Number of publications (books, journal editions, other publications) 13

No. of ASP authors—Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander/total 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors or contributors/6 books

Outcome: The total number of publications exceeded the target, and the majority of authors were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

Analysis The targets for the public program, publishing, media and digital engagement were tracking well up to March 2020, from which time outputs were impacted by responses to COVID-19 measures. Across nearly all performance criteria the 2019-2020 results were exceeded.

Media activity reflected the impact of COVID-19, though media requests for content or information doubled from the previous year due to the strong media interest in the UN International Year of Indigenous Languages and the Return of Cultural Heritage Project. The communications team continued to reach journalists and monitor mentions, which across traditional and social media more than doubled from the previous year.

The AIATSIS website continues to be our central communication channel, extended and amplified by social media channels. Online engagement increased by nearly 70 per cent across all social media channels and website searches.

All public events were either cancelled or postponed between March and the end of the financial year, due to COVID. Nevertheless, at the end of February nearly 4,000 people had participated in events and a majority of attendees rated them as ‘excellent’. Towards the end of 2019, the move of the public program and marketing units to the communications team enabled ease of cross-activity and far more effective promotions.

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Our publishing arm, Aboriginal Studies Press, maintained its output of high-quality publications and saw strong bookshop activity from March 2020, with sales and revenue exceeding projections. In the month of June alone, 14,293 customer visits were recorded (an increase of over 300 per cent from 2019) and there were 1,029 orders, the highest on record. Combined with other AIATSIS publications, total publications exceeded the target.

The expansion of our contribution to education was evident. Alongside take-up of established education resources, two significant new educational resources targeted at supporting school curricula were published this year: online resources based on The Little Red Yellow Black Book, and Our Land, Our Stories. Institutional licensing of Core Cultural Learning has grown across non-government agencies, including universities, schools, not-for-profit organisations and corporations.

Our different educational products and services now target all education levels: preschool, school, and tertiary and professional/adult education.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

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AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 3 Lead and influence on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, ethics, protocols and collections

Introduction

We are at the forefront of research led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who are involved as researchers, partners and drivers of our research priorities and projects. Our research is high quality, contributing to the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and directly benefiting the communities we work with.

We lead by example in conducting research to the highest ethical standards and are committed to promoting and propagating best practice among other research, cultural and collecting institutions. Our work allows us to build upon and contribute to the knowledge contained within our collections.

We have a genuine commitment to building pathways for knowledge exchange.

Goals

• Lead through evidence-based research and culturally based representative networks

• Articulate national priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research

• AIATSIS is the arbiter of standards in relation to research ethics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research and management of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collections

• Foster innovation in ethical, impactful research and collection practice

KEY ACTIONS AND ACTIVITY

3A. Increase take up, training, resources, external clearances, best practice advice and forums to support the Guidelines for Ethical Research and the Publishing Guidelines

We continued to provide the National Indigenous Australians Agency with ethics review services, advice on evaluations, and workshops on ethical evaluation.

AIATSIS Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research

On 1 July 2019, a consultation draft of the AIATSIS Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research (the Code) was released following a comprehensive review of the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS) in 2018-2019. The consultation draft included the Code itself, with four principles for ethical Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research; and a practice guide for implementing the Code, with advice on applying those principles. The principles are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership; impact and value; and sustainability and accountability.

The Code supersedes and replaces the GERAIS.

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The response to the consultation draft was considerable. After an extended consultation period, further discussion and synthesis of feedback has proceeded on topics including compliance and enforceability; institutional responsibilities; the relationship with other codes and guides; and specific application in fields such as native title.

The final Code is due for release in September 2020, after which we will continue to work with the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the Australian Research Council (ARC) and Universities Australia to ensure that the Code is integrated with the broader framework for ethical and responsible conduct of research in Australia. We will also continue to build the community of practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ethical research and deliver tools, resources and training to support the implementation of the Code.

Roundtable of Pro Vice Chancellors Indigenous on the AIATSIS Code of Ethics, and NHMRC and ARC representatives. Photograph: AIATSIS

AIATSIS Code of Ethics Workshop at the Australian National Indigenous Research Conference 2019. Photograph: AIATSIS

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AIATSIS co-convened the Australian National Indigenous Research Conference (ANIRC) with the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) from 1 to 3 July 2019 at QUT’s Gardens Point campus in Brisbane. The theme was ‘Research for the 21st century’. The conference built on previous themes of impact and engagement, to explore

the interweaving strands of capacity of research and the transformative capability of research for the 21st century. There were 421 delegates in attendance, including people representing 102 Indigenous Nations. Two-thirds of the presenters and three-quarters of the session chairs were Indigenous.

The AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference (ANIRC) 2019 at QUT in Brisbane. Photograph: AIATSIS

Distinguished Professor Aileen Moreton-Robinson delivering her keynote address on the final day of ANIRC 2019. Photograph: AIATSIS

Feature 8: Australian National Indigenous Research Conference 2019

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The Malu-Kiai Mura Buai Torres Strait Islander Dance Company perform at the ANIRC conference dinner in Brisbane. Photograph: AIATSIS

Associate Professor Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews, AIATSIS CEO Craig Ritchie, Professor Maggie Walters, Professor Tahu Kukutai, Dr Vanessa Lee and Dr Ray Lovett after their plenary panel ‘Delivering Indigenous Data Sovereignty’. Photograph: AIATSIS

Conference participants in a breakout session at ANIRC 2019 in Brisbane. Photograph: AIATSIS

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3B. Advise government on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research priorities

The first application of new understanding of gaps and priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research identified through the Indigenous Research Exchange was in determining priorities for the Exchange’s first research grant round in 2019-2020. With the Exchange Advisory Board’s strategic guidance, the first funding round is supporting research related to:

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander governance and prosperity

• cultural resurgence and resilience.

More information about the exchange and the grant funding is below.

3C. Share and promote the results and impact of AIATSIS research and collections programs

Indigenous Research Exchange

We received $10 million in funding over three years from 2018-2019 to develop an Indigenous Research Exchange—an aggregator, facilitator and disseminator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge for the primary benefit of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The Exchange also administers a research-based grants program, distributing $6.5 million over three years, designed to add to the collective knowledge that empowers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led decision-making and planning. The first Indigenous Research Exchange grant round opened on 13 December 2019 and closed on 28 February 2020. External experts assessed the applications for quality, impact and contribution under identified research priorities, and more than $2 million was granted for 12 diverse projects, nine of which are administered by Aboriginal organisations. The projects will support robust research and generate evidence-based solutions with wide relevance and impact which can inform future decision-making by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and policy-makers.

The first commissioned research project under the Indigenous Research Exchange also began, in partnership with Illawarra Local Aboriginal Land Council. The project is investigating a case study under the Mt Keira Aboriginal Cultural Tourism and Cultural Connection Project, linking datasets to strengthen Aboriginal cultural identity and improve economic development opportunities through cultural tourism.

If you can bring Indigenous knowledge together and create a framework around that, and training and governance, it’s going to be a lot easier for communities to access this and understand ways they can use data to improve their own outcomes. (Paul Knight, CEO Illawarra Local Aboriginal Land Council)

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Native Title Research Unit

The Native Title Research Unit (NTRU) provides the native title sector with high-quality research, policy advice and information resources. The NTRU supports native title holders by carrying out research and developing resources on native title law and policy, options for leveraging native title rights and interests, and Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBC) governance and economic development, providing access to our records and collections, and hosting events such as the National Native Title Conference and workshops on topical issues including compensation and commercial rights.

In 2019-2020 the NTRU has contributed to a number of significant sector reviews including reforms to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, planning and consultation for the Reef 2050 plan, and the Pathways and Participation Opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in Employment and Business inquiry.

Greg McIntyre SC presenting on the Love v Commonwealth case at the 2020 NTRB Legal Workshop. Photograph: Stacey Little

Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) Legal Workshop participants. Photograph: Stacey Little

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The annual Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) Legal Workshop took place in Perth from 19 to 21 February. The workshop is a key professional development opportunity for native title legal practitioners to share and develop their knowledge of contemporary native title legal issues. The 2020 workshop included a focus on native title compensation, alternative settlements and future matters in the Native Title Act 1993, as well as updates on significant cases.

The PBC website www.nativetitle.org.au provides clear and practical information for native title corporations and links to online resources. In 2019-2020 it had 55,315 users, a 170 per cent increase from 2018-2019, of which 83.3 per cent were new users. There was also a 133 per cent increase in page views from last year, 75 per cent of which were unique page views.

In 2019-2020 the PBC website was updated with additional resources to support PBCs to access funding and training opportunities and stay up to date with developments in the sector, including the impacts of COVID-19. It was also migrated to a new Drupel 8 platform to ensure longevity and simplify editing procedures.

To support information-sharing across the sector, a consultation process with PBCs and NTRBs began in May 2020 to gather input on sector needs for information, resources and templates.

Work to support decision-making and dispute management in native title governance during the year included the co-design of decision-making guides for PBC members and directors with the Taungurung Clans Aboriginal Corporation (and Right People for Country, Aboriginal Victoria). These guides are available on the AIATSIS website. The Youth Engagement in Native Title project also had significant achievements .

3D. Continue to implement best practice and tools for assessing research impact and engagement

The Preserve, Strengthen and Renew project, which is progressively building and testing methods and approaches to understanding and measuring research impact, is now in its second phase: Preserve, Strengthen and Renew South Coast. A final discussion paper has been completed for the pilot project with the Kiwirrkurra, Karajarri traditional owners and Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre, reflecting on how impact can be achieved through community co-design and partnership. One of the most significant conclusions is that ethical partnerships are fundamental to working through the complexities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander decision-making, law-making, dispute resolution and conflict management, to resolve historical questions of access and ownership. Our work demonstrates the benefits of reinforcing ethical behaviour, supporting archive management practices and reinforcing knowledge generation and practice when connecting communities with archives. We hope to continue to refine our impact assessment methodology through the project’s second phase.

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During 2018-2019 the Youth Engagement in Native Title project was established to address the opportunities and challenges for youth in native title and what younger people need to participate further in native title. The project involves a research collaboration with Macquarie Law School and the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at the Australian National University and a community partnership with Bigambul Native Title Aboriginal Corporation (BNTAC) in Queensland.

In 2019-2020, facilitation training was delivered to the BNTAC youth directors, and workshops on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander governance and the native title system were held for young Bigambul people at the inaugural Bigambul Youth Summit, held in Goondiwindi in September 2019. The summit program and facilitation plan were co-designed with BNTAC, and the AIATSIS project team provided facilitation training and mentored BNTAC’s two youth directors,

who took on leadership roles at the summit. One of the youth directors said afterwards:

I loved being back on Country with everybody and seeing people’s faces who’d never been on Country before and hearing all the stories, I really did enjoy facilitating and working with you because that was a very different experience that I’ve never done before, but it’s definitely given me the confidence to want to do it again.

BNTAC have since been asked to assist other PBCs in southern Queensland to develop their own youth summits and will share their work with other PBCs and traditional owner corporations.

Further case studies are in development with Aboriginal Affairs NSW Local Knowledge Exchange, the First People’s Assembly of Victoria and Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation (QLD), although progress has been slowed by COVID-19 travel restrictions limiting fieldwork.

Young Bigambul people at the Bigambul Youth Summit. Photograph: Andrew Turner

Feature 9: Youth Engagement in Native Title project

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Jess Doumany, Lilly Graham, Brenton Sefo-Wallace and Justin Saunders during the Bigambul Youth Summit planning workshop at AIATSIS. Photograph: Andrew Turner

Bigambul youth learning from their Elders during the Bigambul Youth Summit. Photograph: Andrew Turner

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3E. Provide leadership and guidance on culturally appropriate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection management, preservation and access principles and practices

Austlang

After Austlang was implemented as the authoritative international resource on Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages in 2018-2019, AIATSIS has led its adoption for coding and describing language materials in other institutions such as the National Library of Australia, State Library of New South Wales, University of Western Australia and University of Sydney. More institutions are expected to follow as talks with National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) progress.

We collaborated closely with the National Library in implementing the Austlang codes in catalogue records, including through the July 2019 NAIDOC Week ‘codeathon’ when NSLA libraries recruited volunteers to apply Austlang Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language codes to as many catalogue records as possible through TROVE. During the codeathon, 9,117 individual Austlang codes were added to 8,017 records in the Australian National Bibliographic Database, making information about Australian languages easier to find.

During the year, our staff have presented on Austlang through webinars and at academic and industry symposia and conferences, and discussions are in train with colleagues in North America and the NSLA about future collaborations.

Participation in networks and forums on cultural collections practice

We have also provided leadership through participation in networks and forums including the PULiiMA 2019 Indigenous Languages and Technology Conference, the Australian Digital Alliance Copyright Forum and the International Cultural Institutions Working Group Examining Traditional Knowledge and Bio-cultural Labels, and co-designing training with the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee.

Return of Native Title Materials pilot study

A new project providing leadership in recognising the rights of Aboriginal communities to control their knowledge, culture and stories began in partnership with La Trobe University in October 2019—Aboriginal Land Claims in the Northern Territory: Documenting and Preserving Records and Memories. This will support research practitioners to prepare their materials so that the relevant Aboriginal communities can access them.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Since the late 1970s, anthropological, linguistic, historical, archaeological and legal research material has been generated in preparing claims under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act (Northern Territory) 1976 (Cth). Some is housed in the National Archives of Australia, but much of the supporting research and ‘backstory’ records are dispersed across the personal collections of those involved in the original research.

Many practitioners have culturally significant documents, photographs, audio and video recordings and other records. Claimants and practitioners also have memories that provide

valuable data to establish the provenance of materials, informing the rich history of land claims in the Northern Territory. After 40 years, collections are in danger of becoming damaged and indecipherable.

In October 2019 AIATSIS and La Trobe University held a meeting of land claim researchers, including anthropologists, historians, linguists and lawyers, who have relevant archives, along with archivists and staff from the National Archives of Australia, the Northern and Central land councils, the Office of the Aboriginal Lands Commissioner and the Aboriginal Areas Protection

Land claims research focus group participants posting ‘Talking Paper’ for discussion from breakout groups. Photograph: Toni Bauman

Feature 10: Aboriginal land claims in the northern territory: documenting and preserving records and memories

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Authority. The focus group explored the value and the vulnerability of the records; issues around depositing and returning materials; questions of access, ownership, copyright and intellectual property rights; and the possibility of a distributed archive.

During 2020 we began a pilot study to develop a user-friendly do-it-yourself guide and template for collection holders to prepare their archives for depositing into collecting institutions and returning to Aboriginal communities. The guide and template will support the broad assessment of an archive, and discussions about potential deposits and returns.

Land claims research focus group participants, Canberra, 2019. Photograph: Saskia Roberts

Future phases will develop guidance on identifying, sorting, documenting, facilitating access and returning materials from the personal archives of those involved in land claim research, so that Aboriginal communities can access the records for generations to come.

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An example of AIATSIS leading best practice in culturally appropriate collection management is the reattribution of Jimmie Barker’s audio recordings and the belated recognition of his groundbreaking innovation in developing sound recording technology with his brother Billy Barker.

Jimmie Barker (1900-1972) was the first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Australian to use recorded sound as a tool to preserve and document Aboriginal culture. As early as the 1920s he recorded King Clyde of the Barwon Blacks. In the first decades of the 20th century Jimmie came into contact with Muruwari elders at Aboriginal reservations at Mundiwa and later at Brewarrina Mission. Through these connections Jimmie had direct exposure to pre-contact knowledge systems and cultural practices reaching back deep into the early part of the 19th century and beyond. Many of Jimmie’s recordings include detailed descriptions of, and reflections upon, what he often refers to as ‘the old ways’. They represent a crucial link with pre-colonial Muruwari and Ngemba culture.

As featured in last year’s AIATSIS annual report, we have been working with Barker’s descendants to review the recordings he made in northern New South Wales in the 1960s and 70s that had been deposited by Janet Mathews, with the aim of appropriately attributing Barker for his parts of the collection that had previously been attributed to Mathews. This year, after a thorough investigation of both the content and the circumstances in which the recordings

were made, it was determined that the naming and other associated rights for the majority of these recordings should be attributed to Jimmie Barker.

It became clear not only that Barker was the first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Australian to use recorded sound to document Aboriginal culture but that with his brother Billy he had independently developed a technique to make sound recordings, without a priori knowledge of the work of Edison and others in the development of sound recording technology. The collection documents have been found to include detailed descriptions of their experiments, with their first successful recording taking place in 1909.

AIATSIS invited Jimmie Barker’s grandson, Roy Barker Jr, to present the Alice Moyle Memorial Lecture at the 2019 Australian Sound Recordings Association Conference in Canberra in November. This was the first public announcement of Jimmie Barker’s claim to have invented sound recording in Australia, and caused quite a sensation, potentially rewriting the history of sound recording in Australia.

Feature 11: Reattribution of Jimmie Barker recordings and recognition of his technological innovation

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Roy Barker Jr (left) presenting the Alice Moyle Lecture with AIATSIS staff members Barton Staggs, 2019 Australasian Sound Recordings Association Conference, Canberra Photograph: Melinda Barrie, courtesy of Australian Sound Recordings Association

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Performance criteria • Use and influence of Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS)

• External use of Ethics clearances through Research Ethics Committee

• Take up of AIATSIS collection protocols and standards

• AIATSIS influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research

Results

Table 10: Use and influence of Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies

Performance criterion: Use and influence of Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS)

Performance measure: Number of times GERAIS utilised

Target: 5,000

Measure

2019-2020 result

Downloads of GERAIS 7,095

Outcome: Downloads of GERAIS significantly exceeded the target of 5,000. This measure is in transition, as the new Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research will shortly replace GERAIS. The consultation draft of the new Code was downloaded an additional 1,238 times, not included in this total.

Table 11: Ethics clearances by external clients through the Research Ethics Committee

Performance criterion: External use of Ethics clearances through Research Ethics Committee

Performance measure: Number of Ethics clearances annually

Target: 20 annually

Measure

2019-2020 result

Number of ethics clearances for external clients 49

Outcome: The target was exceeded by a very significant proportion.

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Table 12: Take up of our collections protocols and standards

Performance criterion: Take up of AIATSIS collection protocols and standards

Performance measure: AIATSIS collections’ protocols and standards adopted

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

% change

Austlang dataset downloads from data.gov.au New measure 2,403 N/A

Outcome: Austlang dataset downloads are a new measure. The result indicates that institutions are adopting and implementing Austlang codes, which most accurately describe collection materials in or about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages.

Table 13: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research—requests for advice

Performance criterion: AIATSIS influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research

Performance measure: Requests for advice and input (number and type of requests)

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

Difference

Requests for advice and input on research* Not reported 521 N/A

Outcome: The outcome relative to the target cannot be determined for this year, as it is a new measure.

*Includes requests for advice on ethical research practice; particular areas of expertise such as language and native title; participation on research advisory boards; and staff contributions to peer review, grant assessment and higher degree by research supervision and examination (excludes student inquiries).

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Table 14: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research— research partnerships

Performance criterion: AIATSIS influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research

Performance measures: Number and value of research partnerships

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

Change

Number of research partnerships

14 20 +6

Value of partnerships $2,407,150 $11,960,748 ($9,553,598)

Outcome: There was an increase in the number and a new measure has been introduced to measure the value of those partnerships.

Table 15: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research—research publications

Performance criterion: AIATSIS influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research

Performance measures: Number of publications and presentations by staff by type

Target: AIATSIS has 100 publications and presentations by staff

Measure

2019-2020 result

Number of staff publications 26

Number of staff presentations 65

Total 89

Outcome: Total publications and presentations were slightly down from 2018-2019 numbers, and did not meet the target of 100.

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Analysis We have maintained our place at the forefront of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research practice in 2019-2020 through projects including the implementation of the Indigenous Research Exchange, Youth Engagement in Native Title, and Preserve, Strengthen and Renew South Coast. The authority that these boundary-pushing projects confer is reflected in the high number of requests for our advice and guidance on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research matters. The numbers of publications and presentations reflect our leadership in disseminating research principles, methods and findings. The fieldwork for some research projects was disrupted late in the reporting year due to bushfires and COVID-19, and adjustments are being made to timeframes and methods to respond to constraints on travel and face-to-face interaction in 2020-2021.

As well as findings made through the application and extension of ethical standards and principles in our own research, there were several projects specifically designed to update and extend our influence in regard to standards and protocols for ethics and standards for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research and collections. The consultation process for the review of the GERAIS in 2018-2019 elevated the number of downloads that year, leading to a significant drop in 2019-2020, although the target of 5,000 downloads was greatly exceeded. Downloads of the consultation draft of the new Code during the year have not been included in the reported figure. The new Code will shortly be finalised, replacing GERAIS in practice and future reporting. It is expected that, after an initial bulge in downloads when the new Code is released, download rates will stabilise, reflecting regular use.

The target for external ethics clearances was also greatly exceeded, which demonstrates continuing growth in demand for our ethics services, including growth in new sectors, particularly government evaluations. Since the service was first offered, external clearances have risen from three in 2015 to 49 in 2020. This shows that awareness of our value, expertise and authority on the subject of research ethics is growing.

Publications and presentations by our staff saw a slight decline, reflecting the disruptions to business, particularly conferences, seminars and live events, in the final quarter of the year.

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY 4 Partner and collaborate with our communities, partners and governments

Introduction Partnership and collaboration is at the core of our business. The needs and priorities of communities in terms of culture, heritage and wellbeing are cross-sectoral. Our research, research leadership and custodianship of the collection as research infrastructure is cross-disciplinary. Our role in providing advice on the state of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage touches all jurisdictions and levels of government. As an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage collection and research institution, we are part of a global community. Building strong networks and partnerships across stakeholders of all levels underpins our fulfilment of all of AIATSIS’ legislated functions.

Goals • Actively building diverse and enduring relationships domestically and internationally

• Being responsive and professional, with culturally competent work practices

• Build an active network of corporate partners

• Engage our network of members, friends, volunteers, visitors and affiliates

KEY ACTIONS AND ACTIVITY

4A: Increase engagement and collaboration with peer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research and collections organisations especially through established Memoranda of Understanding and other mechanisms

The Return of Cultural Heritage Project was a major exercise in partnership and relationship-building after the Australian Government provided $2 million over two years in the 2018-2019 Budget to allow AIATSIS to pursue the return of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage materials held overseas to their custodians in Australia. Good relationships were established with a range of institutions and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, as outlined below.

The complementary missions of AIATSIS and the Manchester Museum, University of Manchester, resulted in the negotiation of a formal MoU to support current and future collaboration. The MoU was executed at the official handover ceremony of Nyamal and Gangalidda material on 22 November 2019 at Australia House in London.

This complements a range of existing MoUs with other cultural and collecting institutions including Te Papa and the Smithsonian—see Appendix B for a list of AIATSIS’ current strategic partnerships.

We received $63,000 from the Council on Australia Latin America Relations in 2018-2019 to support a two-way learning exchange on Indigenous and cultural policy with Peru, Colombia and Mexico. Visits were designed in consultation with the relevant embassies in Australia and the Australian embassies overseas. Delegates exchanged knowledge with government agencies and Indigenous organisations and gave various seminars and conference presentations and media interviews.

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April 2020 marked the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s first voyage to the east coast of Australia. This anniversary also marked the beginning of the large-scale removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage material to collections institutions overseas. The Return of Cultural Heritage Project, a scoping project of two years duration, was established to build relationships between overseas collecting institutions, AIATSIS and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities; develop a database of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collections held overseas; and ultimately facilitate and secure the return of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage materials from overseas.

Building on foundations laid in the previous year, 2020 saw returns of cultural heritage material comprising 85 culturally significant objects to

five Aboriginal language groups—the Aranda (central Australia), Bardi Jawi (Kimberley), Gangalidda and Garawa (north-west Queensland), Nyamal (Pilbara) and Yawuru (Kimberley). The material was returned from two institutions: Illinois State Museum (US), and Manchester Museum, University of Manchester (UK).

The returned material comprises secret/sacred, ceremonial and secular items including boomerangs, shields, spears, clap sticks, body ornaments and necklaces. Each return to country event was different and powerful in its own way, as traditional owners and communities gathered together to welcome their material home.

Throughout the year, AIATSIS corresponded with overseas collecting institutions to develop and maintain relationships, to research collection holdings and to support the

Gangalidda cultural items in archival boxes at the Manchester Museum. Photograph: AIATSIS

Feature 12: Return of Cultural Heritage Project

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development of the project database. Over 100,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage objects were identified during the project. Of the 199 institutions identified as having Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collections, AIATSIS made contact with 194. Of those, 146 responded and 124 were willing to share information about their collections. Half of those expressed an interest in working with AIATSIS and/ or First Nations communities in some capacity, and 45 institutions expressed a willingness to consider a return request. This information has been collated in a database which will be made appropriately accessible in 2021.

Strong community partnerships based upon reciprocity and respect were critical to this success, ensuring that AIATSIS had the cultural authority to facilitate returns and that all material was handled and transported

appropriately. When possible, international delegations of AIATSIS staff and community representatives accompanied the material home. Unfortunately the third and final delegation was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

AIATSIS’ relationships with other Australian Government organisations helped to ensure the logistics of returning cultural heritage from overseas was as smooth as possible.

The project concluded on 30 June 2020. As well as achieving significant returns and compiling extensive information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander material in overseas collections, this project has demonstrated the willingness of overseas collecting institutions to respond to the strong desire of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to have their material returned.

AIATSIS and Institute of Aboriginal Studies Logistics staff with Gangalidda material after its arrival in Sydney before being returned to Moungibi (Burketown, QLD). Photograph: AIATSIS

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Professor Nalin Thakker, Vice President for Social Responsibility of The University of Manchester, and Craig Ritchie, CEO of AIATSIS, execute the MoU on 22 November 2019 at Australia House, London. Photograph: David Tett

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The Gangalidda dancers perform a ceremony at the on-country return event in Moungibi (Burketown, QLD). Photograph: AIATSIS

The AIATSIS staff, Aranda and Bardi Jawi delegation and Illinois State Museum staff. Photograph: AIATSIS

Yawuru Senior Cultural Leader collecting the repatriated Yawuru items from the Western Australian Museum (left to right): Brett Nannup (WA Museum), Christopher Simpson (AIATSIS), Neilø McKenzie (Yawuru) and Ross Chadwick (WA Museum)). Photograph: AIATSIS

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With support from the Council on Australia Latin America Relations, we undertook a two-way learning exchange on Indigenous and cultural policy with Peru, Colombia and Mexico in September 2019.

A delegation from AIATSIS visited Mexico between 2 and 7 September 2019. This unique opportunity to exchange best practices and discuss public policy of mutual interest resulted in a collaboration network that will continue to exchange knowledge into the future.

Visits to Peru and Colombia followed, from 14 to 30 September 2019. In both countries there is strong interest in Australian laws and policies relating to prior consultation for development on Indigenous lands, and land-based economies such as carbon farming and land and sea rangers. Other areas of

common interest include Indigenous ecological knowledge approaches to truth-telling, constitutional recognition, and legal recognition of cultural and linguistic diversity. The trip culminated in the Regional Congress on Indigenous Languages for Latin America and the Caribbean, held in Cusco, Peru, from 25 to 26 September 2019, where Dr Lisa Strelein gave presentations on language revitalisation and research ethics.

As co-chair of the UNESCO steering committee for the International Year of Indigenous Languages our CEO, Mr Craig Ritchie, led a delegation to Mexico City in February for the UNESCO high-level event on ‘Making a decade of action for indigenous languages’ and International Congress of Endangered Languages at Risk. On this visit, Mr Ritchie signed an MoU with Mexico’s National Institute of Indigenous People.

Dr Lisa Strelein and Mr Nolan Hunter with staff of the National Centre for Historical Memory (Bogota, Colombia)

Feature 13: Council on Australia Latin America Relations funding for learning exchange

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Regional Congress on Indigenous Languages for Latin America and the Caribbean (Cusco, Peru)

Dr Lisa Strelein (AIATSIS) and Mr Nolan Hunter (CEO, Kimberley Land Council) visiting the Asociación de Artistas Populares de Sarhua (Lima, Peru)

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4B: Develop research collaborations across our partners and stakeholders

Our ongoing research program includes a wide range of partnerships with other research organisations and institutions and other stakeholders—especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community research organisations and researchers. Some significant new partnerships and developments are discussed here, and Appendix C lists our current research projects and indicates the partners for each project.

A partnership with the Research Network for Linguistic Diversity (now known as Living Languages) underpinned delivery of the Paper and Talk: The Australian Breath of Life Institute pilot project. Community researchers from five language groups , each with few or no speakers, came together for a two-week skills development workshop at AIATSIS in September 2019.

The NTRU has continued its strong research partnership with the National Native Title Council, the peak body for Australia’s native title organisations, including NTRBs, native title service providers and PBCs. The partnership includes shared delivery of research and engagement activities. AIATSIS is currently finalising an MoU with the National Native Title Council to collaborate on research and outreach activities and on information and resources. This will be signed in July 2020.

The Return of Native Title Materials project and the Youth Engagement in Native Title projects have also involved deep collaboration with research, community and industry partners including La Trobe University, Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation, Robe River Kuruma Aboriginal Corporation, Esperance Tjaltjraak Native Title Aboriginal Corporation, Bigambul Native Title Aboriginal Corporation and the National Native Title Council.

4C: Network and collaborate with relevant partners and stakeholders in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage

We work in partnership with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) and the National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA) on a range of projects and programs, such as the development and rollout of Core Cultural Competency training. We also provide ethics approval and advice to PM&C and NIAA. Through these partnerships, and direct relationships where appropriate on a specific issue or project, we work to support good practice across the Australian Government through engagement, inclusion and co-design with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Family History Unit Our Family History Unit is actively involved with the work of the sector to ensure the best outcomes for members of the Stolen Generations and their families. The unit works closely with Link-Up organisations and the Link-Up leadership group to support their clients, including through the provision of research support and the delivery of the Certificate IV in

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The Australian Government announced a key election commitment to support the establishment of a National Resting Place, following a report from November 2018 from the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. The report recommended that the Commonwealth Government consider the establishment of a National Resting Place for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ancestral remains, in Canberra.

The Minister for Indigenous Australians tasked AIATSIS, in conjunction with the National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA), to coordinate the development of the National Resting Place proposal. The initial phase of this project was for AIATSIS to undertake a scoping study and consultation to complete an initial business case (IBC).

As part of the consultation process and governance arrangements, a National Resting Place Indigenous Advisory Committee was established in October 2019. Details of the members are at

Appendix A. This Advisory Committee provided guidance to AIATSIS, the National Resting Place project team and the Commonwealth Agencies Senior Officials Group on matters relating to cultural sensitivities and appropriateness.

The IBC was completed by AIATSIS and provided in March 2020 to NIAA, who had the lead role in managing government consideration of the National Resting Place proposal. The National Resting Place project team finalised completion of preparatory activities for a stage two detailed business case.

The project team, established by AIATSIS to complete the scoping study and consul-tation, returned to their home workplaces leaving behind a strong foundation for the progression of future activities.

AIATSIS will continue to advocate for the National Resting Place and have indicated to NIAA our willingness to take a lead role in progressing a future detailed business case when a decision by government is known.

An artist’s impression of the proposed National Resting Place; the final design will be decided through a national competition

Feature 14: The National Resting Place project

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Stolen Generations Family Research and Case Management.

In October 2019 we received reaccreditation from the Australian Skills Quality Authority for the Certificate IV in Stolen Generations Family Research and Case Management (10814NAT). The course was developed by AIATSIS to provide Link-Up caseworkers, counsellors and Bringing Them Home workers with a qualification that covers social and emotional wellbeing, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family history research and case management skills. It is supported by Stolen Generations organisations nationally.

The Family History Unit’s MoUs with Canberra-based record-keeping agencies (including the National Archives of Australia, Australian War Memorial and Noel Butlin Archives Centre at ANU) were renewed for a further three years. The MoUs facilitate access to records for research on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people separated from their families. The national partnership agreements with Link-Up groups around Australia were also renewed, to build and strengthen relationships between the unit and Link-Ups through training, research assistance, consultation and collaboration.

Ngunnawal Winanggaay Language Working Group We continued to work with the Ngunnawal Winanggaay Language Working Group this year. A ‘Welcome to Country’ was installed at Canberra International Airport’s international arrivals area and launched in July 2019, the outcome of a partnership between the working group, AIATSIS and the airport. Linguist Dr Louise Baird was commissioned by AIATSIS to write up a sketch grammar of Ngunnawal, based on historical materials, and met regularly with the group to assist with their language revival work.

Ngunnawal Elder, Caroline Hughes speaking at the launch of the Ngunnawal greeting at the Canberra airport. Photograph: AIATSIS

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We joined the True Echoes project, led by the British Library, which is engaging a range of international partners in reconnecting Indigenous communities with historical audio records of the sung and spoken cultures of Australia and Oceania. It involves the exchange of recordings, metadata and knowledge related to collections of Oceanic recorded sound. We are working to create metadata for a 1889 wax cylinder collection held by the British Library, of great importance to us because they are currently the earliest known recordings of Torres Strait Islander song and oral stories.

Working from digital copies, our process will provide a case study for digital metadata mapping and transformation, and the basis for a shared approach among the project’s international partners. Future steps will involve the Torres Strait Islander community, developing and fostering the Torres Strait Islander cultural memory held within AIATSIS.

Charles Myers recording the sacred songs of the Malu ceremony, with Ulai singing into the phonograph and Gusu playing the drum Wasikor (Anthony Wilkin, Mer/Murray Island, Torres Strait, July 1898)

Feature 15: True Echoes

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Ngunnawal elder Caroline Hughes at the Ngunnawal greeting launch at Canberra Airport. Photograph: AIATSIS

4D: Develop and implement a funding strategy to seek input from corporate, private and philanthropic sources

The AIATSIS Foundation was established in 2015 to support our work by developing the AIATSIS collection, digitising and preserving material, supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and visiting fellows, and conducting special projects such as the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language dictionaries and the recording of song traditions.

AIATSIS and the Foundation completed key funding strategy deliverables during 2019-2020, including development of a fundraising prospectus and delivery of a campaign to support the development of a national school visit program. Currently 160,000 students visit Canberra every year and are unable to see a dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural and learning package.

The AIATSIS Foundation also progressed the development of social impact measurement plans to determine:

• the impact and significance of the AIATSIS collection

• the potential impact and benefits of a school visit program

• the potential impact and benefits of a new building and exhibition space for AIATSIS.

These measurement plans will be used to support and target our work and attract new revenue streams and partnership opportunities.

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4E: Engage membership in supporting and participating in strategic thinking

We value the expertise and experience of our members, and sought their input during consultation on the 2019 revision of our GERAIS, now known as the AIATSIS Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research. At least 10 members provided significant feedback and input on the draft Code.

Members also participated in the AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference 2019 in Brisbane in July. Two events for members planned for 2020 were postponed or cancelled due to COVID-19.

Members were kept up to date on AIATSIS projects and activity through a monthly newsletter.

4F: Maintain and develop partnerships for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to identify, conduct and communicate outcomes of projects and programs

The Preserve, Strengthen and Renew project is about ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are involved in the design of research that is related to them, are given the findings and outcomes in relevant and useful forms, and are able to apply and benefit from that research. The Preserve Strengthen and Renew South Coast (NSW) case study involves the digital return of collections material, revision of access protocols for existing material, recording of new cultural material, and impact evaluation. The case study was designed to allow us to measure the project’s impact, improve its processes and continue to develop best practice.

Progress has been limited in 2019-2020, with fieldwork and community engagement restricted by the damaging bushfires in the region, shortly followed by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, work to update and refine the community resource ‘South Coast Voices’ has continued. ‘South Coast Voices’ was a CD-ROM compilation of material from collections relevant to the NSW south coast which was prepared almost 20 years ago but was not ultimately returned to the community. A new version will be published and made available to the community later in 2020.

A selection of our collection material, including print and photographic content, was sent to the Mogo Local Aboriginal Land Council in response to bushfires that affected both the area and the physical home of the land council.

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Performance criteria • AIATSIS membership

• Research collaborations

• Networks

• Interaction with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

• Partnerships in place

Results

Table 16: AIATSIS Membership

Performance criterion: AIATSIS Membership

Performance measure: Number and engagement of AIATSIS members

Targets:

• Increase by 10 new members each year

• 3 members’ events annually

Measure

2019-2020 result

New AIATSIS members 18 new members

Members events—total 1

Outcome: The target of 10 new members was exceeded. The target of 3 member’s events was not achieved.

Table 17: Research collaborations

Performance criterion: Research collaborations

Performance measure: Type, number and level of interactions in research collaborations

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

change

No. of research collaborations* New measure 26 N/A

Outcome: Change from the baseline cannot be measured until next year—this is a new measure designed to capture research collaborations that are not underpinned by research agreements.

*Includes multi-party projects, co-convened or co-authored publications and joint presentations.

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Table 18: Networks

Performance criterion: Research collaborations

Performance measure: Number and type of networks

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

change

Number of networks New measure 12 N/A

Outcome: Change from the baseline cannot be measured until next year—this is a new measure designed to capture networks that share information and good practice.

*Formal or informal coordination with an organisation for the purposes of information-sharing or community of practice.

Table 19: Interaction with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Performance criterion: Interaction with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Performance measure: Interactions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities by type

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

change

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as project partners New measure 44 N/A

AIATSIS conference stalls/booths at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community events New measure 6 N/A

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sponsored delegates at AIATSIS conferences/events New measure 12 N/A

Community visits by AIATSIS New measure 11 N/A

Family History Unit workshops New measure 3 N/A

Community visits to AIATSIS New measure 22 N/A

TOTAL 98 N/A

Outcome: Change from the baseline cannot be measured until next year—this is a new measure designed to capture interaction with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

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Table 20: Partnerships

Performance criterion: Partnerships in place

Performance measure: Number of partnerships by type

Target: Increase from 2018-2019 baseline

Measure

2018-2019 result

2019-2020 result

change

Partnership projects* 27 29 +2

Strategic partnerships^ 11 16 +4

Outcome: An increase in partnerships was achieved in 2019-2020. The definitions of partnership projects and strategic partnerships have been clarified this year. The results therefore cannot be compared precisely with last year’s but they do indicate the making of new partnership agreements.

**Project partnerships entail a service/collaboration agreement with specific services/value.

^Strategic partnerships are those established with broad goals of mutual benefit by MoU or other non-legally-binding arrangement.

Analysis Our investment in cultivating partnerships and sustaining them over the long term continues to pay dividends in burgeoning international relationships, productive working relationships with peer research and collecting institutions, and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities that support cultural resurgence and continue to extend the frontier of excellence in collaborative and ethical research and collections practice.

Although two events to engage AIATSIS members had to be cancelled due to COVID-19, the target for attracting new members was exceeded, and the review of the GERAIS was a major focus for members’ strategic input.

A number of new measures have been introduced to more clearly monitor different types of partnerships, formed with different functions and mechanisms. Because these measures are new, direct comparisons to past years cannot be made in all cases. But as well as seeing the formation of important new strategic partnerships this year with the Manchester Museum and the Sydney Biennale, the benefit of our long investment in building trust and collaborative work practices with both institutional and community partners is evident.

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY 5 Advise on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage

Introduction Since AIATSIS’ role as an adviser on the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage was made explicit in amendments to its statutory functions in 2016, we have been building up infrastructure and capacity to support the provision of regular and structured advice and assessments in the form of an Indigenous Research and Reporting Framework. We have also provided advice on an as-needs basis.

Goals

• Deliver world-class expertise on policy and provide trusted advice on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage

• Report regularly on the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage

KEY ACTIONS AND ACTIVITY

5A: Develop a schedule of regular reporting to support transparency of advice

The Research and Reporting Framework in development will include a recommended program and priorities for reporting on the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage.

5B: Proactively participate in national and international policy debate, expert mechanism and forums relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage

On 19-20 February 2020, we hosted a Culture and Policy Symposium, Nyiyanang Wuunggalu, at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. In the Dhanggati language, nyiyanang wuunggalu means ‘Let’s work together’. This symposium focused on effective policy engagement and design, exploring ways to develop policy in genuine partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Nineteen Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policy-makers and influencers shared their insights with over 230 attendees .

Speakers across diverse perspectives stressed the importance of policy innovations undertaken by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, whether through nation-building programs, community-controlled organisations, or decisions about a growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander estate. Many emphasised that a shift to true partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities requires a paradigm based on strengths, long-term investment and a focus on relationships, and must build on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values and frameworks. Post-event feedback was very positive— the vast majority of respondents would attend future events focused on similar themes.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Graphic by visual recorder Sarah Firth at the Nyiyanang Wuunggalu Culture and Policy Symposium at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. Photograph: AIATSIS

Symposium MC Shelley Ware sharing symposium findings. Photograph: AIATSIS

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Dr Kris Wilson, Aurora Milroy, Casey Millward, Leila Smith and Olivia Slater at the Nyiyanang Wuunggalu Culture and Policy Symposium at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. Photograph: AIATSIS

Attendees at the symposium. Photograph: AIATSIS

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

We made submissions to six policy inquiries and consultative processes during the year— see Appendix D for more detail.

Our CEO, Craig Ritchie, was co-chair of the UNESCO steering committee for the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019, and led a delegation to Mexico City for the UNESCO high-level event on ‘Making a decade of action for indigenous languages’ and ‘International Congress of Endangered Languages at Risk’ in February 2020. This event resulted in the declaration of the International Decade of Indigenous Languages 2022-2032.

5C: Develop a framework to report and advise on the state of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage

Research and Reporting Framework Building on the preliminary literature review and project methodology developed in 2018-2019, we worked closely with consultants from the Nous Group to develop the first iteration of the Research and Reporting Framework, which was delivered in December 2019. This initial version includes the design of the ‘domains’ of culture on which the framework for reporting on the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage will be based. Initial consultations with field experts and individuals were conducted to inform the development and structure of the framework, and our work with them to finalise the framework has continued prior to consultation with peak Indigenous representative bodies and individuals regarding the situation and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage.

National Indigenous Languages Report Using data gathered in the National Indigenous Languages Survey completed in 2018-2019, we worked with the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications (formerly the Department of Communications and the Arts) and the ANU during the year to prepare the National Indigenous Languages Report. The report will be released in July 2020.

Performance criteria • AIATSIS reports and policy briefs produced

• Engagement with decision makers, policy leaders, senior government officials and politicians

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Results

Table 21: AIATSIS reports and policy briefs produced

Performance criterion: AIATSIS reports and policy briefs produced

Performance measure: Number of reports, policy briefs and requests for advice

Target: 5 annually

Measure

2019-2020 result

Number of submissions, reports and advice 6

Outcome: The target of at least 5 reports and briefs was achieved.

Table 22: Engagement with decision makers and policy leaders

Performance criterion: Engagement with decision makers, policy leaders, Senior Bureaucrats and Politicians (number and type)

Performance measure: Number and type of engagements with decision makers

Target: 10 engagements per year

Measure

2019-2020 result

Engagements with Australian governments, including appearances before parliamentary committees and inquiries 14

Outcome: The target of 10 engagements was exceeded.

Analysis

Steady progress was made towards establishing a formalised framework and schedule to advise government on the state and status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage. The targets for providing advice through submissions on relevant matters of policy and engaging with government were both exceeded. Initiatives such as the Return of Cultural Heritage Project and the delegation to Latin America supported by the Council on Australia Latin America Relations resulted in high levels of engagement (27 interactions) with governments internationally, increasing our global influence and networks .

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Our

organisation

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OUR ORGANISATION

Our structure

Refer to Figure 3 for our organisational structure.

Committees supporting our business

The AIATSIS Council meets four times each year to consider strategic directions and matters of operational significance. It operates under a charter.

A number of committees are established to provide the AIATSIS Council and the CEO with advice about particular issues and areas of business. These committees are listed, along with their membership during 2019-2020, in Appendix A.

The Senior Executive Board is the organisation’s main internal governance forum. It comprises the group heads from across AIATSIS, with other members and attendees by invitation of the CEO. The board meets monthly to advise the CEO on strategy and operational matters.

In 2019-2020, we did not make any related entity transactions.

In 2019-2020, we did not issue any indemnities to the AIATSIS Council, to its members or to any officers of AIATSIS.

AIATSIS Council

The AIATSIS Council is the accountable authority under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) (PGPA Act). It consists of nine members.

Four members are elected from and by AIATSIS members. At least two of the elected members must be Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and two must be women.

Five members are appointed by the Minister. The Minister’s appointments must ensure a majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation and take into account gender balance, skills and experience.

Council members are appointed or elected for four-year terms and may not serve more than two consecutive terms.

Council members are remunerated in accordance with the Remuneration Tribunal determination for part-time statutory office holders. All members of the AIATSIS Council are non-executive members.

In accordance with PGPA Rule section 17BE(j)(i)-(v)—Accountable Authority—Details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period (2019-2020), Table 23 provides information on each of the AIATSIS Council members during 2019-2020. Additional information about their residency, gender and entitlement to attend meetings is in Table 24.

Governance structure

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Table 23: AIATSIS Council members 2018-19

Name

Qualifications of the accountable authority

Experience of the accountable authority

Position title / position held Executive / Non-

executive

Date of

commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of accountable authority

attended

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Jodie Sizer

Bachelor of Commerce. Certified Practising Accountant (CPA)

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

10/02/2015 01/07/2024 4

Rachel Perkins

Film Director -

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

17/05/2017 20/01/2020 2

Donisha Duff

Master of Business Administration and Bachelor of

Arts (Honours)/ Law

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

10/02/2015 12/01/2020 3

Steve Kinnane

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Sustainability Over 25 years

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

17/05/2017 28/03/2020 3

Myfany Turpin

PhD Linguistics, Honours Linguistics, Bachelor of Arts/

Music

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

17/05/2017 16/05/2021 4

Geoffrey Winters

Master of Public Policy and Bachelor of Arts (Honours)/Law

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

10/02/2015 12/01/2020 1

Clint Bracknell

Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate Diploma of

Education, Bachelor of Arts

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

21/05/2019 16/05/2021 4

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Name

Qualifications of the accountable authority

Experience of the accountable authority

Position title / position held Executive / Non-

executive

Date of

commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of accountable authority

attended

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Ashley Walker

Masters of Business Administration and Bachelor of Laws/Commerce

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

24/12/2019 01/07/2024 1

Henrietta Marrie, AM

Master of Environmental and Local Government

Law, Diploma and Graduate Diploma of Arts

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

12/01/2020 01/07/2024 1

Judith Ryan, AM

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Fine Arts and English Literature,

Certificate in Education

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

24/12/2019 01/07/2024 1

Murray Saylor

Procurement supplier diversity and community development

professional

Over 20 years

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

12/01/2020 01/07/2024 1

Bart Pigram

Cert 3 Tour Guiding Over 6 years

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

29/03/2020 16/05/2021 1

Sue Kee

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Anthropology and Bachelor of

Law (Honours)

-

Council Chairperson

Non-executive

17/02/2020 16/05/2021 1

Table 23: AIATSIS Council members 2018-19, cont.

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Table 24: Gender, residency and meeting details of Councillors

Name Gender State Meetings eligible Meetings attended

ELECTED COUNCILLORS

Mr Stephen Kinnane M WA 3 3

Ms Rachel Perkins F NT 3 2

Dr Myfany Turpin F NT 4 4

Mr Clint Bracknell M WA 4 4

Mr Bart Pigram M WA 1 1

Ms Sue Kee F WA 1 1

APPOINTED COUNCILLORS

Ms Jodie Sizer F VIC 4 4

Mr Ashley Walker M NSW 1 1

Ms Henrietta Marrie AM F QLD 1 1

Ms Judith Ryan AM F VIC 1 1

Mr Murray Saylor M QLD 1 1

Ms Donisha Duff F QLD 3 3

Mr Geoffrey Winters M NSW 3 1

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Policy, business and operational environment There are no government policy orders in effect that applied to us during 2018-2019, including significant judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals; and reports by the Auditor-General, any parliamentary committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

We were not subject to any ministerial directions made under an Act or instrument during 2019-2020.

Corporate planning and evaluation The AIATSIS Corporate Plan is updated in line with the PGPA Act and published via our website by 31 August each year.

A quarterly evaluation and assessment of targets and measures is completed by the AIATSIS Council and the Senior Executive Board.

Financial resource management AIATSIS total financial result is a deficit of $0.389 million. This has resulted from a timing difference in the recognition of revenue as a result of the introduction of AASB 1058 Income of NFP Entities.

In response to PGPA Rule section 17BE(h)-(i), the Minister received no reports relating to significant noncompliance with the finance law involving AIATSIS in 2019-2020.

External scrutiny Our operations are scrutinised by external entities such as the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), the Commonwealth Ombudsman and committees of the Australian Parliament.

On 13 February 2020, senior executives from AIATSIS appeared before the Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs to provide a private briefing.

On 6 March 2020, senior executives from AIATSIS attended the Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee Senate Estimates hearing concerning cross-portfolio Indigenous matters. This was just a normal estimates hearing but it touched on the National Resting Place in the line of questioning.

The Australian National Audit Office is responsible for auditing AIATSIS’ annual financial statements. An unqualified audit opinion precedes the annual financial statements.

Risk management The Deputy CEO oversees our risk management framework, which aligns with the principles of the PGPA Act and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy.

Our Audit and Risk Committee provides independent advice and assurance to the AIATSIS Council on the appropriateness of our accountability and control framework of risk oversight and management. Committee members are detailed in Appendix A.

Business planning and risk management

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The framework provides a solid foundation for ensuring a consistent approach to the identification, treatment and monitoring of risks by all staff on an ongoing basis. Documents that assist staff and management to incorporate risk effectively into decision-making include our Risk Appetite Statement, Strategic Risk Assessment, Risk Management Policy, Human Resource Policy, Fraud Control Plan, Business Continuity Plan and Disaster Recovery Plan.

The AIATSIS Council’s Risk Appetite Statement reflects the acceptable level of risk taking and tolerance to achieve a specific objective or to manage a category of risk. AIATSIS is committed to ensuring the incorporation of risk management into the culture and everyday business operations.

Business continuity management is integral to our risk management framework. It ensures careful planning to enable continuation or timely resumption of critical functions and eventual restoration to normal operations following a Business Interruption Event (BIE). If a BIE occurs, our Business Continuity Management team is convened by the CEO. The team is the central point of communications and coordination for our response and recovery.

Our Internal Audit (IA) function is established under the authority of the AIATSIS Council. The Chief Audit Executive is responsible for managing IA effectively while reporting to the Senior Executive Board and Audit and Risk Committee. Our IA function provides independent, objective assurance designed to add value and improve AIATSIS operations. Through the IA Plan we strive to accomplish our objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of risk management, internal controls and governance. We currently contract Curijo to provide IA services along with other management-initiated reviews.

Fraud management

We are subject to the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework 2017. As a corporate Commonwealth entity we must also comply with the Fraud Rule and utilise the Resource management guide No. 201—Preventing, detecting and dealing with fraud as better practice guidance. The key governance elements of our Fraud Control Framework include a Fraud Control Policy, Fraud Control Plan, Fraud Risk Assessment and the AIATSIS Code of Conduct.

Overseen by our Senior Executive Board, we promote fraud prevention and awareness to staff through mandatory fraud awareness training and executive messaging on a regular basis. We use a range of strategies to prevent and respond to internal fraud—internal and external reporting; rigorous exercise and monitoring of delegations; and use of established systems and processes for prevention, detection, monitoring, evaluation and reporting of and response to fraud within the organisation.

There have been no instances of fraud for the 2019-2020 year.

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Environmental sustainability We contribute to ecological sustainability through both collection and research programs.

Our research activity includes projects related to land and water, culture and heritage and native title that continue to contribute an understanding of social, cultural and economic factors.

The Collection Group continues to utilise conservation and management practices and products that meet world’s best practice and, where possible, are environmentally responsible. As an example, our motion picture film cleaning solvents are water based and represent the lowest possible impact on the environment both in their use and eventual disposal.

We maintained our accreditation under the ACT Government ACTSmart Business Recycling Program in 2019-2020.

Advertising and market research We made no payment to advertising agencies, market research organisations, media advertising organisations, polling organisations or direct mail organisations that are reportable under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Cth).

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Employees As at 30 June 2020, AIATSIS had 121 ongoing and 14 non-ongoing employees. Of these, 121 employees worked full time and 14 part time; and 40 employees identified as Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander. Of these, 37 are employed in ongoing arrangements and three are non-ongoing. This was an increase of four Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander ongoing staff members from the previous reporting year.

PGPA Rule section 17BE(ka)—Management of Human Resources requires reporting in four separate tables on:

• all ongoing employees for the current report period (2019-2020)

• all non-ongoing employees for the current report period (2019-2020)

• all ongoing employees for the previous report period (2018-2019)

• all non-ongoing employees for the previous report period (2018-2019).

Because of our size and place of work, we can combine this information in Table 25.

Table 25: AIATSIS employees

Ongoing employees Non-ongoing employees Total

30 June 2019 30 June 2020

30 June 2019

30 June 2020

30 June 2019 30 June 2020

Full-time employees 103 108 6 13 109 121

Part-time employees 13 13 1 1 14 14

Female employees 60 69 7 9 67 78

Male employees 56 52 0 5 56 57

Total 116 121 7 14 123 135

*Note: To comply with the PGPA Rule, additional information is at Appendix E.

Managing our people

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Table 26: Key management personnel (KMP)

Name Position Term as KMP

Jodie Sizer Council Chairperson Full year

Rachel Perkins Council member Part year—departed 20 January 2020

Donisha Duff Council member Part year—departed 12 January 2020

Stephen Kinnane Council member Part year—departed 28 March 2020

Myfany Turpin Council member Full year

Geoffrey Winters Council member Part year—departed 12 January 2020

Clint Bracknell Council member Full year

Ashley Walker Council member Part year—appointed 24 December 2019

Henrietta Marrie, AM Council member Part year—appointed 12 January 2020

Judith Ryan, AM Council member Part year—appointed 24 December 2019

Murray Saylor Council member Part year—appointed 12 January 2020

Bart Pigram Council member Part year—appointed 29 March 2020

Sue Kee Council member Part year—appointed 17 February 2020

Craig Ritchie Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Full year

Michael Ramalli Deputy CEO / Chief Operating Officer

Full year

Leonard Hill

Executive Director, Collections

Full year

Lyndall Ley

Executive Director, Return of Cultural Heritage Project Full year

Lisa Strelein

Executive Director, Research and Education Full year

John Gibbs

Project Lead—National Resting Place Project Part year—appointed 4 October 2019

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Key management personnel remuneration During the reporting period ending 30 June 2019, we had 13 AIATSIS Council members and six executives who met the definition of key management personnel.

PGPA Rule section 17BE(ta)—Executive Remuneration requires us to report on information about remuneration for:

• key management personnel

• senior executives

• other highly paid staff.

Appendix E details this information for key management and senior executives. AIATSIS does not have other highly paid staff paid in the same remuneration bands as senior executives.

In the notes to the financial statements for the period ending 30 June 2020, we disclose the key management personnel expenses shown in Table 27.

Table 27: Summary of key management personnel remuneration

Name Position

Short-term employee benefits 1,130,740

Post-employment benefits 158,431

Other long-term employee benefits 44,278

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses 1,333,449

Capability development

A Learning and Development Plan and Indigenous Pathway and Cultural Competency Project were originally due to be implemented in 2018-2019 but were deferred due to other priorities. The Learning and Development Plan, including an in-house staff development program, was put off until early 2020. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic preventing face-to-face training, we developed alternative online training to meet remote working requirements. The Indigenous Pathway and Cultural Competency Project is ongoing, with the launch delayed until the end of 2020 due to the impacts of COVID-19.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander apprenticeship program

During 2019-2020 we participated in Services Australia’s 2020 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Apprenticeship Program. The program aims to provide a pathway for

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OUR ORGANISATION

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to start their careers in the Australian Public Service and to attain a nationally accredited qualification in government within the first 12 months of commencement.

We engaged two apprentices on an ongoing basis. Both are studying for a Diploma in Government while learning on the job in their respective roles in publishing and collections management program areas.

This contributes to our longer term strategy of increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment and development opportunities within AIATSIS and supporting the need for a diverse workforce to better serve the diversity of its stakeholders and community. Over the next 12 months we will assess and evaluate the outcomes of this program to determine our future needs and continued participation.

Work health and safety

We acknowledge and are committed to fulfilling our responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth), the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 and the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (Cth).

Our achievements include:

• sustaining a low number of workers’ compensation claims submitted in 2019-2020— one claim

• maintaining a low number of accepted workers’ compensation claims in 2019-2020— one claim

• a Comcare workers’ compensation premium rate of 0.61 per cent compared to the scheme average of 0.85 per cent.

We continue to focus on encouraging early identification, reporting and response to workplace hazards and injuries in the workplace to further improve work health and safety and return to work performance.

Other initiatives implemented in 2019-2020 to ensure the health, safety and welfare of our workers include:

• formation of a taskforce to coordinate a whole of institution response to COVID-19

• introduction of a rostering system to reduce the number of staff on site at any one time and to ensure physical distancing

• providing the option for staff in high-risk groups to work from home on a continuing basis during the pandemic

• providing access to 10 days of paid leave to all staff to enable self-isolation or quarantining, in line with government direction to reduce the spread of COVID-19

• providing a reimbursement of up to $300 to staff working from home as a contribution to maintaining an ergonomic working environment while away from the office

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• creation of a dedicated mailbox for staff to direct any COVID-19 related queries to

• creation of a dedicated COVID-19 page on the institute’s intranet to provide staff updates and advice

• working with our managers in supporting ill or injured employees through our early intervention program to help them remain at work or return to work safely

• promoting and encouraging employees to access the services of our Employee Assistance Program to support positive physical and mental health and wellbeing

• developing a Family and Domestic Violence Policy and guidance material that will include family and domestic violence training

• inviting our employees to participate in the annual influenza vaccination program to reduce unscheduled absences during the influenza season.

Notifiable incidents

In 2019-2020, there were no notifiable incidents in relation to a serious injury of a person.

No investigations were carried out under part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Carer recognition

AIATSIS is not responsible for the development, implementation, provision or evaluation of policies, programs or services directed to carers or the persons for whom they care. Our people are entitled to carers leave.

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Audited financial statements

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue FORREST ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Indigenous Australians

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (the Entity) for the year ended 30 June 2020:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2020 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Accountable Authority, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to the financial statements, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other

explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Council is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Council is also responsible for such internal control as the Council determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Council is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Council is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditors report

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Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control; • obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are

appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting

and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Mark Vial Senior Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

27 August 2020

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Statement—Chair, CEO and CFO

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Contents

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Statement of comprehensive income

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Statement of financial position

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Statement of changes in equity

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Cash flow statement

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Overview

138

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Notes

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Appendices

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About our Councillors Jodie Sizer

Jodie Sizer is a Djap Wurrung/Gunditjmara woman and part of the Framlingham Community of south-west Victoria.

Jodie is one of the co-founders and co-CEOs of PwC’s Indigenous Consulting—a majority Aboriginal owned, purpose-led organising professional services firm leading innovation, impact and change with and for Aboriginal communities across Australia. Jodie is also Director on the boards of Wathaurong Glass and Arts, the Ebony Institute and the Collingwood Football Club.

Jodie commenced her career in the community controlled sector and then graduated to work as an auditor and certified practising accountant (CPA). She possesses a strong background in corporate governance and is a graduate of the University of Melbourne Asia-Australia New Leaders Program.

Jodie has also worked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and government. She was an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) Regional Councillor and a finalist in the Telstra Business Women’s Awards. She was listed in the Who’s Who of Australian Women publication, was inducted to the Victorian Honour Roll of Women, received the Prime Minister’s Centenary Medal and was listed as one of the Australian Financial Review 100 Women of Influence.

Ashley Walker

Ashley Walker is a Dharawal/ Dhurga man belonging to the La Perouse Aboriginal community in coastal Sydney and works in the Investment Team of Yamanah Investments. Previously, Ashley worked as a management consultant at Boston Consulting Group, a corporate lawyer at Gilbert + Tobin and Acting CEO of the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council.

Ashley holds a Master of Business Administration (Distinction) from the University of Oxford and a Bachelor of Laws / Bachelor of Commerce from the University of New South Wales.

Dr Clint Bracknell

Dr Clint Bracknell is a proud Wirlomin Noongar musician and researcher from the south coast of Western Australia.

He is currently Associate Professor at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts and Kurongkurl Katitjin Centre for Indigenous Australian Education and Research, Edith Cowan University.

Henrietta Marrie, AM

Henrietta Marrie AM is an Elder of the Gimuy Walubara Yidinj people, traditional owners of the land on which Cairns now stands. Along with wide experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural and natural resource management and impact assessment, intellectual property law, heritage legislation and philanthropy, she holds a Master of Environmental and

Appendix A: Governance Committees

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Local Government Law and a Diploma and Graduate Diploma of Arts (Indigenous Studies) and has had over 50 papers published in academic books and journals. She is currently a Member of the Queensland Human Rights Commission’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Group and the Commonwealth’s National Cultural Heritage Committee.

Previously, Henrietta served six years in the United Nations Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity in Montreal (1997-2003) and nine years as Program Manager Northern Australia with The Christensen Fund—a California-based private philanthropic fund (2003- 2012). She was a Visiting Fellow with United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, based in Tokyo (2012-2016). She is also Patron First Nations of the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair.

In 2018 Henrietta was made a Member of the Order of Australia and recognised as a ‘Queensland Great’. In the same year, her life and accomplishments were dramatised in the play Bukal, produced by the JUTE Theatre Company (Cairns) in association with Central Queensland University.

Judith Ryan, AM

Judith Ryan AM holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Fine Arts and English Literature from the University of Melbourne (1970) and a Certificate in Education from the University of Oxford (1972). She began her art museum career in 1977 at the National Gallery of Victoria, where she is currently the Senior Curator of Indigenous Art. Judith’s special interest is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian art of the 20th and 21st centuries and its diversity, dynamism and transformation in the face of social change.

Judith has curated about 50 exhibitions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and has published widely in the field. Judith is currently working on TIWI—a major exhibition and publication scheduled for release between 18 September 2020 and 31 January 2021. In 2017 Judith was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia in the General Division ‘For significant service to the visual arts, particularly to the museums and galleries sector, as a curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander exhibitions and as an author’.

Murray Saylor

Murray Saylor is a Samsep man from Erub (Darnley Island) in the Torres Strait. Murray’s passion and drive are focused on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural, ecological and economic sustainability. Murray has over 20 years of diverse experience in the fields of government, defence, community development, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and resource sectors.

Murray is the founder / Managing Director of Tagai Management Consultants—a company that works respectfully with clients in the Australia and Asia-Pacific region to deliver market-leading procurement/supply chain management, business advisory, innovative futures and stakeholder engagement services. In 2019 Tagai Management Consultants was presented with the Innovation in Business award by the Ipswich Business Chamber, and in 2018 it was selected as one of 100 faces of small business in Queensland.

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Bart Pigram

Bart Pigram, a proud Wajarri/Yawaru man from Broome, Western Australia, is the owner/ operator of Narlijia Experiences—one of the few Aboriginal experiences on offer in Broome.

Bart is currently a Director of Goolarri Media Enterprises and formerly a Yawaru Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC) Director. Bart has been involved in several successful cultural heritage projects in Broome over the past six years including the award-winning Lustre—Pearling and Australia travelling exhibition with the WA Museum.

Sue Kee

Sue Kee is a longstanding AIATSIS member. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Anthropology and a Bachelor of Law (Honours).

Sue has been a Council member at the Law Institute of Victoria and is currently a Senior Lawyer at 32 Degrees South Law. She brings a unique combination of professional skills in anthropology/archaeology and commercial law.

Steve Kinnane

Steve Kinnane has been an active researcher and writer for more than 25 years as well as lecturing and working on community cultural heritage and development projects. Steve is a Marda Marda man from Miriwoong country in the East Kimberley. His interests are diverse, encompassing Aboriginal history, creative documentary (both visual and literary), and tensions surrounding the ideals of sustainability and the relationships between individuality, community, country, economy and human development.

Steve lectured at Murdoch University in Australian Indigenous Studies and Sustainability; completed a Visiting Research Fellowship at AIATSIS, Canberra; and was Senior Researcher for the Nulungu Research Institute of the University of Notre Dame Australia, Broome. Steve is currently a PhD candidate with the ANU Research School of Social Sciences and a member of the Curatorial Team of the New Museum Project (WA). He also serves on the boards of Magabala Books and the Australian Dictionary of Biography (ANU) and is Chair of the AIATSIS Foundation Board.

Dr Myfany Turpin

Dr Myfany Turpin is a linguist and ethnomusicologist at the University of Sydney. She holds an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship to investigate the relationship between words and music in Aboriginal songs in central Australia. She has been conducting research with Aboriginal communities since 1994, focused on Aboriginal song-poetry and Arandic languages.

Her research on the Kaytetye language resulted in an encyclopaedic dictionary, picture dictionary and collection of stories co-authored with Kaytetye speaker Alison Ross. She has written scholarly articles in the areas of semantics, music, phonology and ethnobiology and produced audiovisual publications of Aboriginal songs.

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Myfany supports school language and culture programs in central Australia. She works with local organisations to produce resources and provide opportunities for Aboriginal people to assist them in their struggle for cultural and linguistic survival.

She is a member of the Musicological Society of Australia, the Australian Linguistics Society and the organising committee for the Conference of the Australian Linguistics Society 2017 (50th Anniversary).

Rachel Perkins

Rachel Perkins has served on a number of federal agencies, including Screen Australia, the Australian Film Commission and the Australian Film Television and Radio School. She was a founding board member of NITV, which she was instrumental in establishing, and has served on the boards of various Aboriginal organisations and industry associations, including Bangarra Dance Theatre. She currently serves on the board of the Australian Heritage Commission, Jawun, Uphold and Recognise and the Charles Perkins Scholarship Trust.

Her company Blackfella Films, established in 1993, is a leader in the creation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content, including the series First Contact, Redfern Now, First Australians, Ready for This and its latest production, DNA Nation. Her work as director includes documentaries such as Freedom Ride and the more recent Black Panther Women, as well as the movies Bran Nue Dae, One Night the Moon, Mabo and Jasper Jones and the TV series Mystery Road. She has served as an executive producer at both SBS and ABC, presiding over the management of their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Program Units.

She also works in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural sector, directing festivals such as the Yeperenye Festival for the Centenary of Federation. In more recent times she has focused on the development of Arrernte culture. The first project was an Arrernte Women’s Camp, which recorded and revived the repertoire of Arrernte women’s traditional musical heritage.

Donisha Duff

Donisha Duff is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander woman from Thursday Island in the Torres Strait. She has familial links with Moa and Badu Islands (Torres Strait) and is a Yadhaigana/Wuthathi Aboriginal traditional owner (Cape York).

Donisha holds a Master of Business Administration (ANU) and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from Griffith University. She has 20 years of experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy, planning and management within the public sector, not-for profit sector and Community Controlled Health.

Donisha is the General Manager, Preventative Health/Deadly Choices, at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

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Geoffrey Winters

Geoffrey Winters is a descendant of the Kamilaroi nation from Walgett in north-west New South Wales. He is currently an associate in Sydney at international law firm Clyde & Co LLP. He was judicial associate to the Honourable Justice Basten of the New South Wales Court of Appeal and to the Honourable Justice Wright of the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

Mr Winters graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Political Economy and Laws from the University of Sydney, where he was President of the Australian Law Students’ Association.

Committees advising the AIATSIS Council

Audit and Risk Committee

The Audit and Risk Committee provides independent assurance and advice to the AIATSIS Council to assist management to meet their duties and obligations under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) (PGPA Act) and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 in the areas of financial reporting, performance reporting, risk oversight and management and internal controls.

The charter for the Audit and Risk Committee can be found at: www.aiatsis.gov.au.

The committee comprises at least three independent members. Two of the members must be AIATSIS Council members. In accordance with PGPA Rule section 17BE(taa)—Audit Committee, the names of the 2019-2020 members and their qualifications, meeting attendance and remuneration are set out below.

Table 28: Audit and Risk Committee

Member name Qualifications

2019-2020 eligible meetings

2019-2020 meetings attended

Remuneration 2019-2020

Ms Karen Hogan

FCPA, GAICD Chair

Independent member

Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting), Fellow of CPA Australia and graduate of the Institute of Company Directors.

5 5 $15,000

Mr Andrew Cox

Independent member

Corporate governance professional with extensive experience in governance, audit and risk management. Master of Business Administration, Master of Electronic Commerce, Graduate Diploma in Science, Graduate Certificate in Performance Audit and Associate. Diploma in Accounting.

5 5 $5,375

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Member name Qualifications

2019-2020 eligible meetings

2019-2020 meetings attended

Remuneration 2019-2020

Ashley Walker

Deputy Chair AIATSIS Council member

(from 8 May 2020)

Master of Business Administration and Bachelor of Laws/Commerce.

1 1 $0

Sue Kee

AIATSIS Council member

(from 8 May 2020)

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Anthropology and Bachelor of Law (Honours).

1 0 $0

Murray Saylor

AIATSIS Council member

(from 8 May 2020)

Procurement supplier diversity and community development professional with over 20 years’ experience.

1 1 $0

Mr Stephen Kinnane

AIATSIS Council member

(until 20 March 2020)

Active researcher and writer for more than 25 years as well as lecturing and working on community cultural heritage and development projects.

4 4 $3,154

Mr Geoffrey Winters

AIATSIS Council member

(until 12 January 2020)

Master of Public Policy and Bachelor of Arts (Honours)/Law. 3 0 $0

Ms Donisha Duff

AIATSIS Council member

(until 12 January 2020)

20 years’ experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy, planning and management. Master of Business Administration and Bachelor of Arts (Honours).

3 2 $0

Table 28: Audit and Risk Committee cont.

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AIATSIS Foundation

The AIATSIS Foundation works to raise funds to secure the future of the world’s largest and most significant collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian culture, history and heritage. During 2019-2020, AIATSIS Foundation Board members were:

• Mr Steven Kinnane (Chair) until May 2020

• Dr Clint Bracknell (AIATSIS Council Board member) (Chair from May 2020)

• Ms Henrietta Marrie (Deputy Chair) from May 2020

• Dr Myfany Turpin (AIATSIS Council Board member)

• Professor Tony Dreise (Foundation Board member)

• Mr Glenn Johnson (Foundation Board member)

• Mr Craig Ritchie (CEO)

• Mr Michael Ramalli (Deputy CEO).

AIATSIS Membership Standing Committee

The AIATSIS Membership Standing Committee provides advice to the AIATSIS Council on membership applications and engagement. At 30 June 2020, AIATSIS had 652 total members, including 18 new members during the year. During 2019-2020 Membership Standing Committee members were:

• Mr Bart Pigram (Chair) from 29 March 2020

• Ms Judith Ryan (AIATSIS Council member)

• Dr Myfany Turpin (AIATSIS Council member)

• Ms Donisha Duff (Chair) until 12 January 2020

• Mr Steve Kinnane (AIATSIS Council member) until 28 March 2020

• Ms Rachel Perkins (AIATSIS Council member) until 20 January 2020

• Mr Michael Ramalli (Deputy CEO) from 17 September 2019.

Committees advising the CEO and the business of AIATSIS

Senior Executive Board

The Senior Executive Board supports the CEO in the leadership and strategic management of AIATSIS’ operations. During 2019-2020 members were:

• Mr Craig Ritchie (Chair, CEO)

• Mr Michael Ramalli (Deputy CEO/Chief Operating Officer)

• Dr Lisa Strelein (Executive Director, Research and Education)

• Mr Leonard Hill (Executive Director, Collections)

• Ms Lyndall Ley (Executive Director, Return of Cultural Heritage Project).

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Research Ethics Committee

The AIATSIS Research Ethics Committee is a registered Human Research Ethics Committee that provides independent review of the ethical aspects of research projects, against the National Statement on Human Research Ethics and the AIATSIS Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies. The committee receives internal and external applications.

Membership of the committee is in line with categories established by the National Health and Medical Research Council. In addition, the committee must include a majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members and, as far as practicable, should reflect a gender and age balance. Members normally serve for three-year terms. Members are appointed by the AIATSIS CEO. During 2019-2020 members were:

• Mr Kevin Williams (Chair) from November 2019

• A/Professor Andrew Crowden (Deputy Chair) from November 2019

• Mr Robert Kelly from November 2019

• Ms Helen McHugh from November 2019

• Ms Mandy Downing from November 2019

• Dr Rowan Savage from November 2019

• Mr Trent Shepherd from November 2019

• Ms Tara Harriden from November 2019

• Ms Kay Blades from November 2019

• Dr Tracey Powis from November 2019

• Dr Areti Metuamate from November 2019

• Ms Teela Reid from November 2019

• Ms Melanie Gentgall from May 2014

• Ms Caroline Hughes from November 2019

• Dr Margaret Raven until July 2020

• Cheyne Halloran from November 2019

• Ms Kerry Sculthorpe (Chair) until November 2019

• Mr Rob Clifton-Steele until November 2019

• Dr Lorraine Muller until November 2019

• Ms Caroline Marsh until November 2019.

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Collections Advisory Committee

The Collections Advisory Committee (CAC) was established to provide advice to the AIATSIS CEO and the Executive Director, Collections on matters in relation to collection development, management and access. This includes providing advice on proposals for major donations or deposits, policy development, risks to the collections, major projects and strategic issues.

The CAC is currently in recess while the Collections Transformation Strategy is undertaken. This will inform new terms of reference, a work program and membership composition to better reflect contemporary issues impacting the AIATSIS collection.

Native Title Research Advisory Committee

The Native Title Research Advisory Committee (NTRAC) provides advice to the CEO on AIATSIS native title activities. In 2019-2020 the NTRAC met twice, on 6 May 2020 and 11 December 2019.

During 2019-2020 members were:

• Mr Craig Ritchie (Chair, CEO)

• Dr Lisa Strelein (Executive Director, Research and Education)

• Mr Wayne Beswick (National Indigenous Australians Agency representative)

• Ms Natalie Rotumah (NTSCORP)

• Dr Valerie Cooms (Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation)

• Mr Jason Behrendt (Chalk & Behrendt)

• Ms Kaylene Malthouse (North Queensland Land Council)

• Ms Debra Pigram (Yawuru Prescribed Body Corporate)

• Mr Ned David (Gur A Baradharaw Kod Torres Strait Sea and Land Council).

Publishing Advisory Committee

The Publishing Advisory Committee (PAC) is an independent advisory group that reports to the AIATSIS CEO, who is also the PAC Chairperson. The PAC evaluates all manuscripts submitted and assessed and makes publishing recommendations to the PAC Chairperson.

In 2019-2020 the PAC met twice, on 22 October 2019 and 18 June 2020.

The PAC comprises:

• Mr Michael Ramalli, PAC Chairperson (Deputy CEO, AIATSIS)

• Dr Lisa Strelein (Executive Director, Research and Education, AIATSIS)

• Dr Sandy O’Sullivan (University of the Sunshine Coast)

• Associate Professor Tess Lea (University of Sydney)

• Dr Shino Konishi (University of Western Australia)

• Ms Marie Ferris (Director, Communications, Marketing, Public Program and Publishing AIATSIS).

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Research Advisory Committee

The Research Advisory Committee provides advice to the CEO on strategic research matters and research priorities. During 2019-2020 members were:

• Mr Craig Ritchie, Chair from September 2018 (CEO, AIATSIS) • Dr Lisa Strelein from September 2018 (Executive Director, Research and Education, AIATSIS) • Blair Exell from April 2020 (Deputy CEO, National Indigenous Australians Agency) • Professor Bronwyn Fredericks from September 2018 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Indigenous

Engagement, The University of Queensland) • Professor Maggie Walter from September 2018 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Aboriginal Research and Leadership, University of Tasmania) • Professor Colleen Hayward from September 2018 (Honorary Professor, School of Education,

Edith Cowan University) • Professor Peter Anderson from September 2018 (Executive Director, Curumba Institute, Queensland University of Technology) • Professor Jacinta Elston from February 2020 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Indigenous, Monash

University) • Professor Braden Hill from February 2020 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Equity and Indigenous, Edith Cowan University).

Indigenous Research Exchange Advisory Board

The Indigenous Research Exchange was established to build the evidence base to support policy and practice that improves outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Its advisory board comprises:

• Mr Craig Ritchie, Chair from September 2018 (CEO, AIATSIS) • Dr Lisa Strelein from September 2018 (Executive Director, Research and Education, AIATSIS) • Professor Bronwyn Fredericks from September 2018 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Indigenous Engagement, The University of Queensland)

• Professor Maggie Walter from September 2018 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Aboriginal Research and Leadership, University of Tasmania) • Professor Colleen Hayward from September 2018 (Honorary Professor, School of Education, Edith Cowan University) • Professor Peter Anderson from September 2018 (Executive Director, Curumba Institute,

Queensland University of Technology) • Mr Kenny Bedford from May 2019 (Director, My Pathway) • Ms Michelle Deshong from May 2019 (CEO, Australian Indigenous Governance Institute) • Professor Jacinta Elston from February 2020 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Indigenous, Monash

University) • Professor Braden Hill from February 2020 (Pro-Vice Chancellor—Equity and Indigenous, Edith Cowan University).

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Indigenous Caucus

The Indigenous Caucus consists of a voluntary membership of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff members. It is an energetic, supportive and cohesive network supporting AIATSIS. The Indigenous Caucus’ key roles are to:

• promote and monitor progress towards cultural competency within AIATSIS

• promote and monitor recruitment at all levels

• provide advice to management on tender and consultancy appointments

• participate in AIATSIS planning workshops

• lead relevant AIATSIS policy and procedure development

• promote AIATSIS in relevant forums

• where required, broker cultural knowledge on issues such as artefacts and their storage

• coordinate a range of public forums.

Consultative Committee

The AIATSIS Consultative Committee is a joint employee, management and union committee established under the AIATSIS Enterprise Agreement (EA). The purpose of the committee is to discuss matters affecting employment. They work within the framework of the EA and the committee’s charter to progress employment matters for AIATSIS employees, exercise functions under the EA, and address such matters as are agreed to at the request of the CEO.

The committee comprises representatives of employees, management and union. There are up to four employee representatives elected by AIATSIS employees, including one representative from the AIATSIS Indigenous Caucus.

National Resting Place Project Indigenous Advisory Committee

AIATSIS established the National Resting Place team in October 2019. At the same time, the CEO of AIATSIS invited the following key experts to be included on a new Indigenous Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC was established to provide guidance to AIATSIS on the National Resting Place project.

• Professor Ian Anderson—Deputy CEO, National Indigenous Australians Agency

• Dr June Oscar—Social Justice Commissioner

• Professor Marcia Langton—Academic

• Neil Carter—Repatriation Officer for the Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre

• Dr Lyndon Ormond Parker—Academic

• Phillip Gordon—Co-chair, Advisory Committee for Indigenous Repatriation

• Christine Grant—Co-chair, Advisory Committee for Indigenous Repatriation

• Ned David—Former Co-chair, Advisory Committee for Indigenous Repatriation

• Professor Colleen Hayward—Academic.

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COVID-19 Taskforce

An AIATSIS COVID19 Taskforce was established on 23 March 2020 at the request of the CEO to:

• coordinate a whole of institution response regarding COVID-19

• distribute advice to staff regarding COVID-19 based on advice from relevant federal and state and territory departments

• Provide advice to the Senior Executive Board (SEB).

The taskforce includes staff from program areas across the institute, the Consultative Committee, the Indigenous Caucus and the Community and Public Sector Union, as well as AIATSIS’ Risk Manager, IT Manager and Facilities Manager. Membership representation includes members of AIATSIS’ Business Continuity Management team. The Chair is the Director of the Human Resources unit.

The taskforce provides advice to the SEB and staff, monitors external advice, manages emerging and ongoing risk, and facilitates staff input. It meets twice weekly to discuss staff concerns, review and discuss new information, and provide input and advice for consideration by the SEB.

Health and Safety Committee

The Health and Safety Committee (HSC) is a joint management and worker consultative forum established in accordance with section 75 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. The role of the HSC is to facilitate co-operation and consultation between the institute and workers in instigating, developing and carrying out measures designed to ensure the health and safety of workers at work.

In particular, the HSC provides a forum for:

• raising, discussing and resolving work health and safety (WHS) issues that are raised by workers, identified through risk and hazard inspections, or derived from incident and accident statistics

• examining and considering WHS audit or performance reports, information or reports provided by Comcare, and any WHS reports that Health and Safety Representatives may wish to submit

• considering how changes to the institute’s workplaces, including changes to the nature of institute work, may impact on the health and safety of workers

• considering WHS training and awareness needs and providing feedback to the institute on the effectiveness of WHS training and awareness initiatives.

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Appendix B: Partnerships

Strategic partnerships These are high-level agreements for mutual benefit, generally formalised in an MoU.

New strategic partnerships

1. Manchester Museum, University of Manchester

2. Biennale of Sydney

3. National Institute of Indigenous People (INPI), Mexico

4. University of Queensland

Ongoing strategic partnerships

1. Australian National University

2. University of Sydney MoU

3. Te Papa

4. Parliamentary Friends

5. Pitt Rivers Museum (The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford)

6. Kings College, Cambridge

7. The Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian

8. First Nations Media

9. National Museum of Australia

10. National Film & Sound Archive

11. Family History Access MoU with National Library of Australia, National Archives of Australia, Australian War Memorial, Noel Butlin Archives Centre—ANU, and ACT Territory Records/Heritage Library

12. First Languages Australia

Networks

1. Maiam nayri Wingara Indigneous Data Sovereignty Collective

2. National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network

3. Research Agencies Meeting

4. Pro Vice Chancellors (Indigenous) Network

5. Indigenous Data Network

6. Australian Research Data Commons communities of interest—sensitive data

7. Australian Research Data Commons communities of interest—data management planning

8. National Network for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researchers

9. Indigenous Desert Alliance

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10. Cross-agency geospatial working group

11. Biocultural and traditional knowledge labels network

12. First Languages Australia

Research project partnerships

See Appendix C, ‘Research project summaries’.

Other partnerships

1. NTSCORP and the Minjungbal Bundjalung people and their Elders to co-convene the National Native Title Conference in 2019-2020

2. Queensland University of Technology to co-convene the AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference in July 2019

3. Link-Up organisations, through the Family History Unit, to support family history research for the Stolen Generations (MoUs renewed in 2018-2019)

4. Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Cultural Centre (KALACC) to support the preservation and return of cultural heritage materials

5. ArtSound FM community radio—creating a series of podcast programs that showcase items from the AIATSIS collection

6. Council on Australia-Latin-American Relations—cultural exchange program between AIATSIS and organisations in Mexico, Colombia and Peru relating to cultural preservation and collections, Indigenous languages, Indigenous policy-making, research and Indigenous community engagement

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Appendix C: Research project summaries

New projects

Table 29: New research projects

Title Start date Completion date

Continuous Improvement Process— Always Be You Resources (Beyond Blue) May 2020 December 2020

Partners

Beyond Blue Ltd

Project summary

Review and evaluate the current Beyond Blue ‘Always Be You’ resources and provide recommendations for the development of new materials to support teachers to understand Indigenous mental health and social and emotional wellbeing.

Title Start date Completion date

Online Ethics module June 2020 June 2021

Partners

University of Sydney, University of Queensland

Project summary

Develop a research ethics module that will include: The research ethics framework in Australia and why it’s important; An introduction to the new AIATSIS Code of Ethics (previously the Guidelines for Ethical Research for Australia Indigenous Studies); Practical application of the principles in the new Code; Case studies and analysis of common issues; and Learning activities.

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Table 30: Continuing research projects

Name

Start year

End year

Preserve, Strengthen, Renew: South Coast—building practice for supporting preservation and management of, and access to, cultural material* 2019 2020

Indigenous youth in governance and political processes—engaging young people for success and sustainability* 2019 2021

National Indigenous Australians Agency Ethics service—provision of ethics reviews and ethics training* 2019 2021

Indigenous Research Exchange—aggregator and access hub for Indigenous research* 2019 2022

AIATSIS Dictionaries Project—publication of Indigenous language dictionaries in partnership with 21 communities. Extended by 1 year 2018 2021

Return of Native Title Materials projects—review and development of best practice for management and return of materials collected and created during native title claim processes. Projects: Monash, Esperance, Yamatji* 2018 2021

National Indigenous Languages Report—third national survey and report on the state of Australia’s Indigenous languages* 2018 2020

Review of Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS)—review and public consultation to ensure the guidelines remain at the forefront of best ethical practice 2018 2020

Culture in Policy and Practice—developing an approach to engaging with culture and heritage in Australian policy 2018 2020

Songlines—reviving, recording and strengthening the songs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples* 2018 Ongoing

Restoring Dignity: Networked Knowledge for Repatriation Communities (Return, Reconcile, Renew)*—building a digital facility to record repatriation information worldwide 2017 2021

Core Cultural Competency E-Learning—ongoing development and rollout 2015 Ongoing

Mayi Kuwayu—national longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health and wellbeing* 2014 Ongoing

Ngaiyuriija Ngunawal language revitalisation project* 2014 Ongoing

PBC Prosperity: A Longitudinal Study (PBC Survey Project)* 2018 2021

Livelihood values of Indigenous customary fishing* 2016 2021

NSW Aborigines Protection/Welfare Board 1883-1969: A History 2015 2020

* partnership project

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Table 31: Research projects completed

Title Start date Completion date

Paper and Talk: The Australian Breath of Life 1 October 2018 1 December 2019

Partners

Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD)—now known as Living Languages

Project summary

This project supports Indigenous peoples to strengthen or revitalise their languages through learning how to navigate archival collections and building their linguistic and other skills to use the materials discovered to develop language resources. It also engages them in working with collecting institutions and linguists.

Title Start date Completion date

State Library of NSW Waking Up Languages 2019 exhibition September 2018 December 2019

Partners

Aboriginal communities in New South Wales (NSW) and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research at the University of Technology and the Languages and Practitioners Reference Group

Project summary

In support of the UNESCO’s International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019, the State Library of NSW developed a major language exhibition, Waking Up Languages, to highlight the dynamic and resilient language communities of NSW and the ACT. The exhibition provides a collection of narratives which will tell the story of Aboriginal languages of NSW and the ACT.

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Title Start date Completion date

Our Land Our Stories School Curriculum Resources September 2018 December 2019

Partners

Nelson Cengage

Project summary

In partnership with educational publisher Nelson Cengage, AIATSIS has produced an educational series for primary schools entitled Our land, our stories: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, histories and cultures. The series aligns with the central cross-curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories. The majority of the content has been written by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors and is supported with images from the AIATSIS collections.

Title Start date Completion date

Little Red Yellow Black Book online teacher’s resource January 2018 October 2019

Partners

N/A

Project summary

AIATSIS has developed a series of free online resources to assist secondary educators to implement and embed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cross-curriculum priority into their planning, teaching and assessment, including activities, worksheets and suggestions on assessment with step-by-step instructions on how to deliver the classroom lessons.

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Title Start date Completion date

Return of Cultural Heritage September 2018 June 2020

Partners

Initial case studies were with five Indigenous communities: Aranda (central Australia), Bardi Jawi (Kimberley), Gangalidda and Garawa (North West Queensland), Nyamal (Pilbara) and Yawuru (Kimberley); and two institutional partners: the Illinois State Museum (United States of America); and Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom).

Eight international cultural collecting institutions and 26 Australian Indigenous language organisations and groups have been identified for potential pilot projects in total.

Project summary

Funding of $2 million over two years was provided in the 2018-19 Budget to scope, facilitate and secure the return of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage material from overseas collecting institutions back to country to support the cultural resurgence and maintenance of Indigenous cultures.

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Appendix D: Publications and presentations

Publications

Journal articles (peer reviewed)

Blackburn, Fiona, 2020, ‘Cultural competence: toward a more robust conceptualisation’, Public Library Quarterly, Vol. 39, Issue 3, 229-245, DOI: 10.1080/01616846.2019.1636750.

Articles and reports (non-peer reviewed)

1. Barcham, C., 2019, ‘Native Title Law Database’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 20-21.

2. Bauman, T. & Tearle, J., 2019, ‘Aboriginal land rights in the Northern Territory: documenting and preserving the records and memories’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 8-9.

3. Bauman, T. & Parsons, D., 2019, Aboriginal Land Claims in the Northern Territory: Documenting and Preserving the Records and Memories, Report of a Focus Group Meeting, 1-2 October, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/ docs/research-and-guides/native-title-research/ALReport_final_2632020.pdf.

4. Bauman, T., Keller, C. & Rubinich, O., 2020, Aboriginal Land Claims in the Northern Territory: Documenting and Preserving the Records and Memories, Report of a Focus Group Meeting, 1-2 October, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS. https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/docs/research-and-guides/native-title-research/RNTM%20Community%20Report_WEB.pdf.

5. Burbidge, B. & Bauman, T. 2019, Taungurung Decision-making Guide, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/products/pbc_guide/tlawc_decision_ making_guide_combined_web.pdf.

6. Burbidge, B., 2019, ‘Project update: PBC survey 2019’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 6.

7. Butcher-Cornet, T., 2020, ‘Recognising Indigenous conception of custodianship in environmental law’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 7-8.

8. Keller, C., 2020, ‘Climate change’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 4.

9. Keller, C. & Paul, J., 2020, Returning Native Title Materials: Robe River Kuruma Aboriginal Corporation Workshop Summary, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/ default/files/docs/research-and-guides/native-title-research/RRKAC_Report_V4_ webupload.pdf.

10. Keller, C. & Little, S., 2020, Returning Native Title Materials: YMAC Workshop Summary, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/docs/research-and-guides/native-title-research/RNTM%20YMAC%20workshop%20report%20YMAC%20 webupload.pdf.

11. Kenny, B.T. & Nicholson, K., 2019, ‘Rangers in the desert: an interview with Benjamin Thomas Kenny’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 4-5.

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12. Lembit, C., 2020, ‘Ocean Guardian—Malu Yawa Garka’, AIATSIS blog post, 18 March, https://aiatsis.gov.au/news-and-events/blog/ocean-guardian-malu-yawa-garka.

13. Little, S., 2020, ‘“Dire consequences”: NSW coalmine refused on climate change grounds’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 12-13.

14. Martin, J., 2019, ‘A new AIATSIS Code of Ethics’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 10-11.

15. Mongta, T., 2019, ‘PBC access services’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 23.

16. Morgan, D. & Keller, C., 2020, ‘Cultural burning at the south coast of NSW: an interview with Dan Morgan’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 9-11.

17. Mosby, Y. & Keller, C., 2020, ‘Getting heard on climate change: an interview with Yessie Mosby’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 14-16.

18. Nicholson, K., 2019, ‘Native title snapshot 2019’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 12-13.

19. Strelein, L. & Burbidge, B., 2019, ‘Treaty and sovereignty in Australia’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 2, 16-18.

20. Tran, T., 2020, ‘Love and Thoms in the High Court: Aboriginal Australians cannot be “Alien”’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 17-18.

21. Williams, P.J., 2020, ‘We are struggling if the Galri Bila, the Lachlan River, isn’t flowing’, NTRU Native Title Newsletter, AIATSIS, Issue 1, 5-6.

Submissions

Strelein, L. & Burbidge, B., 2020, AIATSIS submission: Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (CATSI Act) review—Phase 1, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, February.

Strelein, L., Hassing, C., Smyth, L. & Barcham, C., 2019, AIATSIS submission: Inquiry into the opportunities and challenges of the engagement of Traditional Owners in the economic development of Northern Australia, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, November, https://aiatsis.

gov.au/publications/products/aiatsis-submission-inquiry-opportunities-and-challenges-engagement-traditional-owners-economic-development-northern-australia.

Strelein, L. & Tran, T., 2020, AIATSIS submission: Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs: pathways and participation opportunities for Indigenous Australians in employment and business, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, March.

Strelein, L., Tran, T. & Wang, T., 2020, AIATSIS submission: Independent Review of the EPBC Act 1999, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, April, https://aiatsis.gov.au/publications/products/ aiatsis-submission-independent-review-epbc-act-1999.

Strelein, L., Burbidge, B., Martin, J. & Wang, T., 2019, AIATSIS submission: Productivity Commission Issues—Indigenous Evaluation Strategy, Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS, August, https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/products/submission/aiatsis_-_pc_-_indigenous_ evaluation_submission.pdf.

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Multimedia publications and exhibitions

Ngulla Wellamunagaa exhibition, National Museum of Australia. Australia, 5 December 2019 - 23 March 2020.

McLaughlin, A. & National Library of Australia, 2019, Indigenous Australian languages Code-a-thon, webinar, 1 July.

Presentations and workshops

Presentations at conferences, seminars and enquiries

1. Blackburn, F., 2019, ‘Power in the archive’, Who Do We Think We Are? Using Archives and Special Collections, Centre for Museum and Cultural Heritage, Australian National University, Canberra, July.

2. Blackburn, F. & Moloney, K., 2019, ‘Indigenous archives and archiving’, Postgraduate Student Seminar for Masters of Museum and Heritage Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, July.

3. Burbidge, B., Bauman, T. & Keller, C., 2019, ‘Return of native title materials’, Annual Australian Anthropological Society Conference, Native Title Workshop, Canberra, 2 December.

4. Chewying, R., Stewart, W. & Smyth, L., 2019, ‘Aboriginal values in fish and fishing’, Australian Society for Fish Biology Conference 2019, National Library of Australia, Canberra, 15 October.

5. Dean, S., 2019, ‘AIATSIS Family History Unit’, Department of Justice and Community Safety—Aboriginal Employee Network Conference, Melbourne, September.

6. Little, S. & Williamson, B., 2019, ‘Youth engagement in native title: exploring the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth’, AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference 2019, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, 3 July.

7. Little, S. & Williamson, B., 2019, ‘Youth engagement in native title: exploring the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth’, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research Seminar, Canberra, 18 September.

8. Lissarrague, A., 2019, Austlang presentation. Third Indigenous Spatial Forum, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 3 December.

9. Marmion, D. & Bell, T., 2019, ‘The Ngunnawal acknowledgement of country’, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, 16 July.

10. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Australian languages, their endangerment, status, current activities’, INALI (Mexican National Institute of Indigenous LanguagesSan Andrés Chicahuaxtla, Putla Villa de Guerrero, Oaxaca, 4 September.

11. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Introduction to Australian languages’, ACT Education Directorate, Canberra, 17 September.

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12. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Introduction to Australian languages’, ACT Education Directorate, Canberra, 24 September.

13. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Introduction to Australian languages’, Australian Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Canberra, 11 July.

14. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Introduction to Australian languages’, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, junior diplomats, Canberra, 24 September.

15. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘Overview of Australian languages and their status’, Australian Embassy, Mexico, 2 September.

16. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘The Paper and Talk workshop’, Foundation for Endangered Languages Conference (FEL2019), Sydney, 14 December.

17. Marmion, D., 2019, ‘The Paper and Talk workshop’, Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Conference (ALAA2019), Perth, 26 November.

18. Martin, J., 2019, ‘AIATSIS Code of Ethics’, Australasian Research Management Society Conference, Adelaide, 17-20 September.

19. McLaughlin, A. & Wood, J., 2019, ‘Implementing codes in MARC records to identify individual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages’, Customers of SirsiDynix Australasia Conference, Sydney, October..

20. McLaughlin, A. & Wood, J., 2019, ‘Austlang and Pathways thesaurus in describing Indigenous resources’, Data Quality, Systems & Standards, Metadata Frameworks Workshop, State Library of NSW, Sydney, 1 November.

21. McLaughlin, A. & Lissarrague, A., 2020, ‘Austlang’, Parliamentary Library, Australian Parliament House, Canberra, 29 January.

22. McLaughlin, A., 2020, ‘Surfacing Indigenous Australian languages’, RMIT University Libraries and the Community Symposium, Melbourne, 27-28 February.

23. Moloney, K. & Tapumanaia, N.P., 2019, ‘The repatriation of historical records from Kiribati to Tuvalu: Indigenous priorities and self-determination in action at the Tuvalu National Library and Archives’, joint presentation, Australian Society of Archivists and International Council on Archives Conference, Adelaide, 21-25 October.

24. Martin, J., 2019, AIATSIS Ethics workshop, Human Research Ethics Committee, Australian National University, Canberra, 12 August.

25. Morseu, J., 2020, ‘Trove’s next chapter’, panel discussion, National Library of Australia, Canberra, June.

26. Payne, M., 2019, ‘Indigenous Research Exchange’, AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference, Brisbane, July.

27. Ritchie, C., 2019, Keynote address, AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, 1 July.

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28. Ritchie, C., 2019, ‘Our land, our stories’, address, Our Land, Our Stories launch, Australian Parliament House, Canberra, 30 July.

29. Ritchie, C., 2019, Address, Puliima International Languages and Technology Conference, Darwin, 22 August.

30. Ritchie, C., 2019, Panel discussion, Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities Conference, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 27 September.

31. Ritchie, C., 2019, Introductory remarks, Understanding Indigenous Australia workshop, Canberra, 4 October.

32. Ritchie, C., 2019, ‘Repatriation of ancestral remains’, Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand, Canberra, 15 October.

33. Ritchie, C., 2019, Keynote address, School Leader C (SLC) Cultural Immersion program, Canberra, 23 October.

34. Ritchie, C., 2019, Opening remarks and panel discussion, Asia-Pacific Creative Cities Conference, Adelaide, 24 October.

35. Ritchie, C., 2019, Keynote address, ICA Indigenous Matters Summit, Adelaide, 25 October.

36. Ritchie, C., 2019, Address, High-level event for the closing of the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019, New York, USA, 17 December.

37. Ritchie, C., Hill, L. & Strelein, L., 2020, Private briefing, Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs, Australian Parliament House, Canberra, 13 February.

38. Ritchie, C., 2020, Address, International Congress on Endangered Languages, Mexico City, Mexico, 26 February.

39. Ritchie, C., 2020, ‘Return of Cultural Heritage Project’, University of British Columbia, Canada, 2 March.

40. Schilling, A., 2019, ‘Designing archives in a global world: challenges of the Indigenous archive’, International Council on Archives New Professionals Program, Australian Society of Archivists Conference, Adelaide, 24 October.

41. Schilling, A., 2019, ‘Alice Moyle project: rebuilding dissociated collections at AIATSIS’, Australasian Sound Recordists Association Conference, Canberra, November.

42. Smith, L. & Zdanowicz, C., 2019, ‘Intellectual processes in arranging and describing collections: parallel provenance and completing the record’, presentation to students of the Australian National University Centre for Museum and Heritage Studies, AIATSIS, Canberra, 16 July.

43. Smith, L. & Price, G., 2019, ‘Architectural material in AIATSIS’ manuscript collection’, presentation to students of the UTS Masters of Architecture, AIATSIS, Canberra, 23 August.

44. Smyth, L., 2019, ‘AIATSIS Code of Ethics’, ACT Human Research Ethics Committees roundtable, 25 November.

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45. Smyth, L. & Mongta, T., 2019, ‘Findings and lessons from a cross-sectional study of native title corporations’, AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, 3 July.

46. Staggs, B. & Wie, J., 2019, Panel discussion in conjunction with Roy Barker Jnr, Alice Moyle Lecture, ‘The many worlds of Jimmy Barker’, Australasian Sound Recordings Association ‘Sounds of Silences’ Conference, Australian National University School of Music, Canberra, 13 November.

47. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Ethics discussion in Indigenous Legal Research. Indigenous Legal Research Workshop’, Sydney Law School, Sydney University, Sydney, 8 July.

48. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Setting standards for ethical conduct in Indigenous research’, Congreso Regional de Lenguas para America Latina y el Caribe, Cuzco, Peru, 26 September.

49. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Strengthening and revitalising Indigenous Australian languages’, Congreso Regional de Lenguas para America Latina y el Caribe, Cuzco, Peru, 26 September.

50. Strelein, L. & Hunter, N., 2019, Symposium on Indigenous peoples, industry and development, Australian Embassy, Bogata, Colombia, 18 September.

51. Strelein, L. & Hunter, N., 2019, Presentation on Indigenous peoples’ land titles in Australia, Land Restitution Unit, Government of Colombia, Bogata, Colombia, 18 September.

52. Strelein, L. & Hunter, N., 2019, Presentation on Indigenous peoples in Australia, National Centre for Historical Memory, Bogata, Colombia, 18 September.

53. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Revised Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies’, Deputy Vice Chancellors Forum, Universities Australia, Melbourne, 6 July.

54. Strelein, L. & Raven, M., 2019, ‘The revised Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies’, Australian National Indigenous Research Conference, Brisbane, 1 July.

55. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Introduction to principles of ethical research’, Indigenous Legal Research Workshop, University of Sydney, Sydney, 8 July.

56. Strelein, L., 2020, ‘AIATSIS Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research’, Native Title Representative Body Legal Workshop, Perth, 18 February.

57. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Griffiths: developing strategies in compensation litigation and negotiation’, Native Title Representative Body Legal Workshop, Perth, 18 February.

58. Strelein, L., 2019, ‘Revised Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies’, Australian Department of Social Services, Canberra, 7 August.

59. Tran, T., 2019, ‘Understanding the connection between society and land through the perspective of Indigenous communities: a comparative analysis of Australia and peninsular Malaysia’s Indigenous communities’ customary right to land’, Diskusi Kases 7/2019, Lestari UKM (via Zoom), 20 December.

60. Tran, T. & Pollock Harris, A., 2020, ‘Return of materials: utilising repatriated material for cultural revitalisation in community’, Intangible Cultural Heritage (HUMN8035), Australian National University, Canberra (via Zoom), 21 March.

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61. Wilson, M., 2020, ‘Intangible cultural heritage and disasters’, lecture to Masters students, Centre for Museum and Heritage Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, 17 March.

62. Wiltshire, K., 2019, ‘Two AIATSIS projects: Return, Reconcile, Renew and Restoring Dignity (LIEF)’, AIATSIS National Indigenous Research Conference, Brisbane, July.

63. Wiltshire, K., 2019, Untitled seminar presentation (and film screening) focusing on PhD research and her work with anthropologist Betty Meehan, Seminar for Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Heritage, James Cook University, Cairns, August.

64. Wiltshire, K. & Cooper, V., 2019, ‘From ruin to revitalisation: using archival footage to revisit and respond to the repainting of rock art in Kakadu National Park’, Histories of Australia Rock Art Research Symposium, Griffith University, Gold Coast, 8 December.

65. Wright, H., 2019, ‘Return of native title materials’, National Native Title Conference board meeting, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 20-21 November.

Workshops and conferences convened

AIATSIS Native Title Research Unit, 2020, Fourth Native Title Representative Body Legal Workshop, Perth, 19-21 February.

AIATSIS, 2020, Second Symposium on Culture and Policy: Nyiyanang Wuunggalu, AIATSIS, Canberra, 19-20 February.

AIATSIS, 2019, Ethics workshop, Human Research Ethics Committee, Australian National University, Canberra, 12 August.

AIATSIS, 2019, Ethics workshop, Link-Up program, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 12 February.

AIATSIS, 2019, Ethics workshop, Employment programs, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 12 February.

AIATSIS, 2019, Ethics workshop, Land programs, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 24 July.

AIATSIS, 2019, Ethics workshop, Employment programs, National Indigenous Australians Agency, Canberra, 24 July.

AIATSIS, 2019, Revised Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies, Australian National Indigenous Research Conference, Brisbane, 1 July.

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Appendix E: Key management personnel remuneration Table 32: Key management personnel remuneration

Short term benefits

Post

Employment Benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination Benefits Total remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other long term benefits

Jodie Sizer Council Chairperson 4,184 - - 397 - - - 4,581

Rachel Perkins

Council member

1,391 - - 132 - - - 1,523

Donisha Duff Council member

2,267 - - 215 - - - 2,482

Steve Kinnane Council member

6,793 - - 645 - - - 7,439

Myfany Turpin Council member

3,143 - - 299 - - - 3,441

Geoffrey Winters Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Clint Bracknell Council member

2,628 - - 405 - - - 3,033

Ash Walker

Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Henrietta Marrie, AM Council member

876 - - - - - - 876

Judith Ryan, AM Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Murray Saylor

Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Bart Pigram

Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Sue Kee

Council member

876 - - 83 - - - 959

Craig Ritchie

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

251,197 34,543 - 36,675 7,803 - - 330,218

Michael Ramalli

Deputy CEO / Chief Operating Officer

170,558 - 45,186 26,483 4,333 - - 246,560

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Short term benefits

Post

Employment Benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination Benefits Total remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other long term benefits

Leonard Hill

Executive Director, Collections 214,894 - - 31,942 23,919 - - 270,755

Lyndall Ley

Executive Director, Return of Cultural Heritage Project

164,245 - 23,115 26,131 3,848 - - 217,339

Lisa Strelein

Executive Director, Research and Education

171,644 13,825 14,997 34,606 4,375 - - 239,447

Table 32: Key management personnel remuneration cont.

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Table 33: Information about remuneration for senior executives

Short term benefits

Post

Employment Benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination Benefits Total remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number of senior executives

Average base salary

Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

Average other long term benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0 - $220,000 1 164,245 - 23,114 26,132 3,848 - - 217,339

$220,001 - $245,000 1 171,644 13,825 14,997 34,606 4,375 - - 239,447

$245,001 - $270,000 1 170,558 45,186 26,483 4,333 - - 246,560

$270,001 - $295,000 1 214,894 - - 31,942 23,919 - - 270,755

$295,001 - $320,000 - - - - - - - - -

$320,001 - $345,000 1 251,197 34,543 - 36,675 7,803 - - 330,218

$345,001 - $370,000 - - - - - - - - -

$370,001 - $395,000 - - - - - - - - -

$395,001 - $420,000 - - - - - - - - -

$420,001 - $445,000 - - - - - - - - -

$445,001 - $470,000 - - - - - - - - -

$470,001 - $495,000 - - - - - - - - -

$495,001 - … - - - - - - - - -

Note: During the 2019-2020 financial year, an SES officer from a Commonwealth Government agency was seconded to AIATSIS to lead the National Resting Place project. Executive remuneration information for this individual has been disclosed in the home agency’s annual report.

During the reporting period, we had no senior staff paid in the remuneration bands in Table 33.

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APPENDICES

Aids to access

185

Compliance index

This table indicates where in this report you can find the information required to be included in the annual report of a corporate Commonwealth entity under the PGPA Act and PGPA Rule. It complies with Resource Management Guide No. 136, updated 3 July 2020, issued by the Department of Finance.

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17BE Contents of annual

report

17BE(a) INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Page 10

Details of the legislation establishing the body Mandatory

17BE(b)(i) INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Page 10

A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in legislation Mandatory

17BE(b)(ii) ABOUT AIATSIS

Page 11

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Pages 24

The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(c) INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Page 13

The names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers

Mandatory

17BE(d) N/A Directions given to the entity by the

Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(e) N/A Any government policy order that applied

in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(f) N/A Particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

If applicable, mandatory

186

AIDS TO ACCESS

17BE(g) ANNUAL

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Pages 22-112

Annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule

Mandatory

17BE(h), 17BE(i)

N/A A statement of significant issues

reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j) OUR

ORGANISATION

Page 10

APPENDIX A

Pages 153-164

Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(k) INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Page 17

Outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any subsidiaries of the entity)

Mandatory

17BE(ka) OUR

ORGANISATION

Pages 122

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees;

(b) statistics on part-time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17BE(l) INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARIES

Page 14

Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity

Mandatory

17BE(m) OUR

ORGANISATION

Pages 115-126

APPENDIX A

Pages 153-164

Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

187

AIDS TO ACCESS

17BE(n), 17BE(o)

N/A For transactions with a related

Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(p) N/A Any significant activities and changes

that affected the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(q) N/A Particulars of judicial decisions or

decisions of administrative tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(r) N/A Particulars of any reports on the entity

given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(s) N/A An explanation of information not

obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report

If applicable, mandatory

188

AIDS TO ACCESS

17BE(t) N/A Details of any indemnity that applied

during the reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs)

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(taa) APPENDIX A

Pages 157-158

The following information about the audit committee for the entity:

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee;

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee;

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee;

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee;

(e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee

Mandatory

17BE(ta) OUR

ORGANISATION

Page 124

APPENDIX E

Pages 179-181

Information about executive remuneration

Mandatory

189

AIDS TO ACCESS

Index

A

abbreviations and acronyms, 174-5

Aboriginal Studies Press, 49, 61

access requests, 24, 41

accountable authority, 18

acquisition priorities, 23

advertising and market research, 113

advice to government, 20, 74

AIATSIS Collection, 5, 19, 112

access and use policy, 79

acquisitions, 40

enquiries and requests, 39, 40

Jimmy Barker sound recordings review, 77

online catalogue, 29

performance measures and results table, 37

priorities, 40

significant additions 2019-20, 26-7

AIATSIS Council, 23, 33, 78, 104-9

indemnities, 112

remuneration, 115

AIATSIS Foundation, 92, 146

AIATSIS newsletter, 64

AIATSIS website, 31, 40

user numbers, 57, 66

anthropological and archaeological research, 25, 28

Anzac Day Ode of Remembrance translation, 46

APS Values, 6

archival materials, 26

Arrernte women’s song project, 33

Art and Object collections, 35, 37

catalogue, 29

Art Market, AIATSIS, 55

artworks, 19, 23, 37, 63

acquisitions 2019-20, 26-7

Torres Strait Islander, 26

Atlas and Illustrated Dictionary of the Crocodile Islands, 44

ATSIC collection, 40

audio recordings, 19

acquisitions 2019-20, 26

Betty Meehan collaboration, 25

digital preservation, 30, 33, 40, 91

Jimmy Barker’s sound recordings, 77

Miriwoong Language Cards, 27

performance measures and results tables, 37-8

Audit and Assurance Committee, 146

audit, external, 112

audition sheets, 77

AUSTLANG database and datasets, 14, 29, 31-2, 46, 48

coding activities, 31

map and language list, 32

Australia Post, 46

Australia Preserves, 75

Australian Aboriginal Studies journal, 62, 64

Australian Academic Research Network, 76

Australian Archaeological Association, 25

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 71, 90

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, 73

Australian Indigenous Languages Playlist, 12, 43

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 1989, 4, 115

Australian National Audit Office, 112

Australian National Indigenous Research Conference, 78

Australian National University, 25, 49, 56, 90

Australian Research Council, 33

Australian War Memorial, 56

Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation, 26

authority, 4

awards and recognition, 8

B

Barker, Jimmy, 76

Baymarrwana, Laurie, 12, 44, 57

Betty Meehan collaboration, 24-5

Bigambul Native Title Aboriginal Corporation, 73, 89

book launches, 56

Broadbeach burial site, Queensland, 28

190

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C

catalogues, 29, 39

new and updated records, 38

upgrades, 24

user numbers, 40

Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, 73, 89

ceramic works, 26

ceremonies, traditional, 19

Chairperson

statement 2019-20, 12-13

challenges, future, 5

Chief Executive Officer

advisory committees, 147-50

report 2019-20, 14-15

Church, Lynnice, 26

Citizen’s Statement on Native Title, 26

Closing the Gap Refresh, 98

Code for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research, 15, 78, 81

collaborative events, 75-6

Collection Development Policy, 40

Collection Development Strategy 2017-2021, 23

Collections Advisory Committee, 148

Collections Disaster Recovery Plan, 35

commemorative coin and stamp, 12, 14, 45-6

communications campaigns, 57

community engagement, 23, 53

community visits, 24, 40, 47

conferences, meetings and other forums, 31, 71, 73, 74, 168-71

Consultative Committee, 150

Core Cultural Competency Program, 15, 86-7, 88, 90

Core for Correctional Facilities, 87

corporate governance, 112-16

corporate partners, 5, 83, 92, 95

Corporate Plan 2018-19 to 2021-22, 5, 19, 20, 112

Council on Australia Latin America Relations, 86

courses see training and development

Crocodile Islands dictionary, 44

CSIRO, 89

CSIRO/Data, 61, 71, 90

cultural and intellectual property, 75, 77, 78, 98

cultural competency training, 15, 87

cultural resurgence exhibition, 23-4

cultural safety training, 88

culturally sensitive content, 75, 77

culture and heritage advice, 97

culture and heritage research and reporting framework, 98, 99

Culture and Policy Symposium, 97

Culture in Policy and Practice project, 99

curriculum see training materials and curriculum

D

data and information network, AIATSIS, 70, 76

databases, 29

Department of Communications and the Arts, 49, 75, 90

Department of Health and Human Services Victoria, 76

Department of Parliamentary Services, 54

Department of Social Services, 86

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Charles Perkins video, 63

cultural capability program development, 86, 90

ethics review services to, 78, 81, 158

funding, 49, 92

Dickens, Karla, 26

Dictionaries Project, 20, 49-50, 81, 92, 95, 161

digital infrastructure, 34

digital platforms optimisation, 29

digital storage

replacement, 40

digitisation, 28-30, 33, 35, 92

collaboration on, 75-6, 91

performance analysis, 40

performance measures and results table, 37

discoverability, 20, 24, 29

languages, 48

performance measures and results table, 38

donations, 23, 26-7, 57

drawings, 27

191

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E

ecologically sustainable development, 113

educational resources see training materials and curriculum

electronic direct mail campaigns, 59

employees

statistics, 111

Enterprise Agreement, 15, 21, 114

environmental performance, 113

ethical guidance, 19, 20, 23, 78-9

Ethical Publishing Guidelines, 79

ethical publishing webinar pilot, 57

ethical standards in research, 70

ethics approvals and advice, 78, 81, 90

executive remuneration, 115-16

exhibitions, 47, 53, 54

F

Fake Art Harms Culture campaign, 75

Family History Unit, 89

family trees, 24

film and video, 19, 25, 37, 40, 63, 91

acquisitions 2019-20, 26

financial management, 113

finding aids, 38

foyer displays, 26

Frances Calvert Collection, 26

fraud management, 112-13

Free, Prior and Informed Consent principles, 85

funding, 6, 20

Dictionaries Project, 49

Indigenous Research Exchange, 70, 81

Mexico learning exchange, 86

Return of Cultural Heritage Project, 85

G

goals

Strategic Priority 1, 23

Strategic Priority 2, 53

Strategic Priority 3, 70

Strategic Priority 5, 97

governance, 104-9

governance committees, 112, 146-50

Governor-General, swearing in of, 89

grants, 70, 79

Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies, 15, 78-9, 81, 85

Gurrmanamana, Frank, 25

H

Halloran, Loretta (nee Bell), 26

headquarters, 7

Historical Records Taskforce, 75

history, 7-9

I

Illustrated Handbook of Yolnu Language of North East Arnhem Land, 44, 57

Indigenous Apprenticeships Program, 88

Indigenous Caucus, 150

Indigenous communities, engagement with, 5

Indigenous data, 71

Indigenous Data Sovereignty Network, 74

Indigenous employees, 88

Indigenous Pathway Program, 88, 114

Indigenous Research and Reporting Framework, 97

Indigenous Research Exchange, 70, 74, 75, 98, 100

funding, 20, 81

project summary, 156

Indigenous Research Exchange Advisory Board, 149

Indigenous Youth in Governance and Political Processes, 158

Indigenous Youth in Native Title project, 89

infrastructure enhancements, 41

intellectual property see cultural and intellectual property

International Science Council Committee, 74

International Women’s Day, 12, 44, 57

International Year of Indigenous Languages, 12, 14, 19, 26, 42, 48, 57, 99

commemorative coin and stamp, 12, 14, 45-6

interviews, media, 46, 65

IP Australia, 75, 98

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J

Jackomos genealogy collection, 24

Joint Council on Closing the Gap, 98

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research, 97

K

Karajarri Traditional Lands Association, 93

key management personnel, 116-17

Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, 91

Knowledge Circle, 75

L

Lake Eyre Basin ‘Aboriginal Way’ Map, 89

land councils, 71

languages, 33, 47, 48-50, 57, 92, 93

AUSTLANG database, 31-2

Baymarrwana, Laurie, 44

Betty Meehan collaboration, 25

commemorative coin and stamp, 12, 14, 45-6

Jimmy Barker’s recordings, 77

language slip conservation, 35

Mexico learning exchange, 86

Miriwoong Language Cards, 27

research skills training, 47

Spotify playlist, 12, 43, 59

training, 89

see also International Year of Indigenous Languages; National Indigenous Languages Report; National Indigenous Languages Survey

lantern slide digitisation, 30

leadership changes, 13

Learning and Development Plan, 114

Learning Ground online learning management system, 87

legislation, 4

linguistics, 47, 48

Link-Up, 89

location, 7

M

Macquarie Law School, 73, 89

magnetic stripe language cards, 27

Maiam nayri Wingara, 74

manuscripts, 19, 35, 37

map of Indigenous Australia use and value study, 63

maps, 32, 63, 89

Marella Mission Farm Collection, 26

material culture objects collection, 19

media engagement, 57, 59, 65

media releases, 65

Meltwater media management program, 59

Membership Standing Committee, AIATSIS, 146-7

memberships, AIATSIS, 94, 95

Mexico learning exchange, 15, 86

microfilm and microfiche, 35

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, 6

Minister for Indigenous Australians, 6, 12

Miriwoong Language Cards, 27

mission, 4

Monsido website quality control program, 59

Mura catalogue, 29, 39

upgrades, 24

user numbers, 40

My Voice for My Country exhibition, 54

N

National Archives of Australia, 35

National Data Network, 74

National Indigenous Australians Agency, 21, 63, 75, 78, 90

National Indigenous Languages Report, 90, 99

National Indigenous Languages Survey, 14, 31, 48-9, 99

National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network, 74

National Indigenous Research Conference, 74, 95

National Library of Australia, 31, 76

National Museum of Australia, 47, 56, 88

National Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, 14-15, 84, 95

193

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National Native Title Conference, 73, 74, 91, 95

National Native Title Conference Youth Forum, 73

National Native Title Council, 72, 89

National Reconciliation Week, 54

native title, 24, 59, 73

case and legislation summaries, 71

training on, 72

website, 71

Native Title Law Database, 71, 72, 81

Native Title Newsletter, 59, 71

Native Title Operations and Management Training, 72

Native Title Representative Bodies, 24

Legal Workshop, 97

Native Title Research Advisory Committee, 148

Native Title Research Unit, 24, 59, 71, 81

advice to government, 100

funding, 20

research partnership, 89

newsletter, AIATSIS, 59

Ngaiyuriija Ngunawal Language Group, 89

O

offsite storage, 34

online content, 57

oral histories, 19, 56, 91

organisation structure, 110

Our mob served publication, 56, 61

outcome, 6

P

Pallottine collection, 40

Paper and Talk pilot project, 90, 159

Paper and Talk workshops, 47

parliamentary committees, 98

Parliamentary Friends of AIATSIS, 12, 54, 90, 95

partnerships and collaboration, 5, 20, 73, 83-4, 88-91, 151-5

digital preservation, 75-6

native title, 73

performance measures and results table, 94

research, 80, 81

payroll shared services, 88

people management, 114

performance analysis

Strategic Priority 1, 40-1

Strategic Priority 2, 68

Strategic Priority 3, 81

Strategic Priority 4, 95

summary, 19-21

performance criteria, measures and targets, 19, 20

performance results tables

Strategic Priority 1, 37-9

Strategic Priority 2, 64-7

Strategic Priority 3, 79-80

Strategic Priority 5, 99

Perkins, Charles, 63

philanthropy, 5

photographic collection, 29, 33, 36, 40, 56, 63

acquisitions 2019-20, 27

culturally sensitive material, 75

performance measures and results table, 37-8

physical storage, 34

Pike, Jimmy, 63

Pitt Rivers Museum, UK, 84

policy inquiries and consultative processes, 98

policy submissions, 99

portfolio, 6

Portfolio Budget Statement, 19

posters, 57, 58

Prescribed Bodies Corporate, 71, 72, 89

survey of, 89, 159

presentations, 79, 81, 99, 168

preservation and conservation, 20, 30, 36, 75-6, 91, 92

performance measures and results page, 37

see also digitisation

Preserve, Strengthen and Renew, 75, 93, 156

Prison to Work report, 87

promotional materials, 31, 59

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 4

publications, 5, 19, 53, 81

194

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books, 25, 59-64

journal articles, 167

performance measures and results tables, 37-8, 64-5

physical storage, 35

submissions, 168

see also Dictionaries Project

Publishing Advisory Committee, 148

R

Reconciliation Australia, 73

related entity transactions, 112

remuneration, 115-16

repatriation of cultural heritage material, 81, 85

research, 5, 19, 24, 53, 70-1

contracts, 80

ethics, 78-9, 81

impact assessments, 80

partnerships, 90

performance results tables, 79

project summaries, 156-66

publications, 71

resurgence exhibition, 23-4

revenue, 81

Research Advisory Committee, 78, 149

Research Agencies Meetings, 74

Research Ethics Committee, AIATSIS, 78, 81, 147

Research Impact Framework, 75

Research Network for Linguistic Diversity, 90

responsible Ministers, 6

Return of Cultural Heritage project, 12, 14, 81, 85, 95, 157

Return of Material to Indigenous Communities (ROMTIC) requests, 39

revenue, 5, 6

risk management, 118

Ritchie, Craig (Chief Executive Officer), 12, 14-15, 46, 57

Robinson, Brian, 26

Rom ceremony materials, 24, 36, 47

Royal Australian Mint, 45

S

school visit program, 92

Scullion, Senator the Hon Nigel, 6

Sea of Hands installation, 26

Senior Executive Board, 112, 113, 147

shared services arrangements, 21, 88

Shell bed to shell midden publication, 25

Shirley Ann Williams Award, 8

sign languages, 33, 44, 57

Sizer, Jodie (Chairperson), 12-13, 106

Smithsonian National Museum of Native America, 84

social media, 55, 57, 66-7

Social Ventures Australia, 72

songlines and trade routes map, 89

songs, traditional, 19, 33, 92

South Coast Voices CD Rom, 93

Spotify playlist, 12, 43, 59

staff, 6

cultural safety, 88

Indigenous recruitment and retention, 88

Stanner Reading Room, 41

Stolen Generations, 89

access to records, 75

storage see offsite storage; physical storage

stories, traditional, 19, 24

Strategic Plan 2018-2023, 5, 21, 54, 88

strategic priorities, 5, 19

students see training materials and curriculum

surveys, 14, 31, 48-9, 89, 99

T

teachers see training materials and curriculum

The difference identity makes publication, 56, 62

The Little Red Yellow Black Book, 60-1

The Sydney language publication, 49-50, 62, 92

thesis ethics guidelines, 57

training and development, 73, 86-7, 88

cultural competency, 90

Stolen Generations family research, 89

training materials and curriculum, 57, 60, 92

Trove, 31

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U

underpinning commitments, 7

UNESCO International Steering Committee, 12

UNESCO Memory of the World, 40

University of Melbourne, 33, 72, 75, 76, 91

University of Queensland, 28

University of Sydney, 33

US Library of Congress, 31

V

values, 6

vision, 4

visitors and clients, on-site, 33, 39, 40, 83

volunteers, 83

W

Walter Barry Wood collection, 28

Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre, 93

war and defence service, Indigenous, 61

war service, Indigenous, 56

webinars, 31

What Do Young Fellas Reckon issues paper, 73

What’s new in native title publication, 71, 81

Who’s Ya Mob Reconnection Program, 89

Wilson, Rejina Pilawuk, 27

window decals, 47

work health and safety, 113, 114

Workforce Management Program, 88

workshops, 24, 47, 55, 78, 90, 97, 99, 171

World Digital Preservation Day, 76

Wyatt, the Hon Ken MP, 6, 12

Y

younger Indigenous people, 73

Youth Engagement in Native Title project, 73

Youth in Governance Masterclass, 73

text for index

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Features Feature 1: International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019

Feature 2: Significant additions to the collection

Feature 3: Documenting Brian Robinson’s sculpture Containment of the Seven Seas

Feature 4: Taking the Pallottines Tardun School records home to Geraldton

Feature 5: Paper and Talk workshop

Feature 6: Ngulla Wellamunagaa—Trees That Have Survived and Revived

Feature 7: Cherrybrook Technology High School students visit to AIATSIS 2019

Feature 8: Australian National Indigenous Research Conference 2019

Feature 9: Youth Engagement in Native Title project

Feature 10: Aboriginal land claims in the Northern Territory—documenting and preserving records and memories

Feature 11: Reattribution of Jimmie Barker recordings and recognition of his technological innovation

Feature 12: Return of Cultural Heritage Project

Feature 13: Council on Australia Latin America Relations funding for learning exchange

Feature 14: The National Resting Place project

Feature 15: True Echoes

Figures Figure 1. Our strategic intent

Figure 2. AIATSIS timeline

Figure 3. Organisational structure

Tables Table 1: Collection growth

Table 2: Collection accessibility—discovery aids

Table 3: Collection accessibility—accessibility

Table 3a: Collection accessibility—number of collection items supplied by source of request

Table 3b: Collection accessibility—number of collection items supplied by location of requestor

Table 4: Collection accessibility—requests accessed within service standard

List of features, figures and tables

197

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Table 5: Collection growth and accessibility—proportion of collection digitised by format

Table 6: Communications—number and quality

Table 7: Engagement with education

Table 8: Public events

Table 9: Publication program

Table 10: Use and influence of Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies

Table 11: Ethics clearances by external clients through the Research Ethics Committee

Table 12: Take up of our collections protocols and standards

Table 13: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research—requests for advice

Table 14: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research—research partnerships

Table 15: Our influence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research—research publications

Table 16: AIATSIS membership

Table 17: Research collaborations

Table 18: Networks

Table 19: Interaction with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Table 20: Partnerships

Table 21: AIATSIS reports and policy briefs produced

Table 22: Engagement with decision makers and policy leaders

Table 23: Details of AIATSIS Council members

Table 24: Gender, residency and meeting details of Councillors

Table 25: AIATSIS employees

Table 26: Key management personnel

Table 27: Summary of key management personnel remuneration

Table 28: Audit and Risk Committee

Table 29: New research projects

Table 30: Continuing research projects

Table 31: Research projects completed

Table 32: Key management personnel remuneration

Table 33: Information about remuneration for senior executives

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Abbreviations and acronyms

ACT

AIAS

AIATSIS

AIATSIS Act s

AM

ANU

APS

ARC

CEO

Core

CSIRO

Cth

EA

Ed(s)

FCPA

GAICD

GERAIS

KALACC

MoU

MP

NIAA

NSW

NITV

NT

NTRB

NTRU

NTSCORP

Australian Capital Territory

Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies (now AIATSIS)

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Act 1989 (Cth)

Member of the Order of Australia

Australian National University

Australian Public Service

Australian Research Council

Chief Executive Officer

Core Cultural Learning Program / Core Cultural Competency Program

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Commonwealth

Enterprise Agreement

editor(s)

Fellow of CPA Australia

Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors

Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies

Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre

Memorandum of Understanding

Member of Parliament

National Indigenous Australians Agency

New South Wales

National Indigenous Television

Northern Territory

native title representative body

Native Title Research Unit (AIATSIS)

Native Title Service Provider for Aboriginal Traditional Owners in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory

199

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N/A

PBC

PBS

PGPA Act

PM&C

QLD

SA

TAS

UTS

VIC

WA

WHS

Not Applicable

Prescribed Body Corporate

Portfolio Budget Statement

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth)

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Queensland

South Australia

Tasmania

University of Technology Sydney

Victoria

Western Australia

Work Health and Safety

3

AIATSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2019-20

Published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

GPO Box 553, Canberra ACT 2601 Tel 02 6246 1111 Fax 02 6261 4285

www.aiatsis.gov.au

© AIATSIS