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Department of Social Services—Report for 2020-21


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Australian Government

Department of Social Services

Annual Report 2020-21

© Commonwealth of Australia 2021

ISSN: 2203 9880 (print) ISSN: 2203 9899 (online)

Copyright notice—2021 This document, Department of Social Services Annual Report, is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence

Licence URL: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode

Please attribute: © Commonwealth of Australia (Department of Social Services) 2021

Notice:

1. If you create a derivative of this document, the Department of Social Services requests the following notice be placed on your derivative: Based on Commonwealth of Australia (Department of Social Services) data.

2. Inquiries regarding this licence or any other use of this document are welcome. Please contact: Branch Manager, Communication Services Branch, Department of*Social Services. Phone: 1300 653 227. Email: communication@dss.gov.au

Notice identifying other material or rights in this publication:

1. Australian Commonwealth Coat of Arms—not Licensed under Creative Commons, see https://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm

2. Certain images and photographs (as marked)—not licensed under Creative Commons

If you are deaf or have a hearing or speech impairment, you can use the National Relay Service to contact any of the Department of Social Services listed phone numbers.

TTY users—phone 133 677 and ask for the phone number you wish to contact

Speak and Listen users—phone 1300 555 727 and ask for the phone number you wish*to*contact

Internet relay users—visit the National Relay Service at http://relayservice.gov.au

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this publication may contain images or names of deceased people.

Contact us:

For enquiries regarding this report, please contact:

Branch Manager, Government and Executive Services, Department of Social Services

Mail: GPO Box 9820, Canberra ACT 2601

Email: annual.report@dss.gov.au

Phone: 1300 653 227 or international +61 2 6146 0001

This annual report is available online. For further information, go to dss.gov.au/annual report or transparency.gov.au

Cover images: top left (L-R) Samson Hailu and Anthony Risoli; top right (L-R): Ricky Diou, Ruben Diou, Sonaah Diou and Katie Diou; bottom left (L-R): William Brown and Narelle Brown; bottom right (L-R): Miki Okabe and Yujiro Okabe

Australian Government

Department of Social Services

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Annual Report 2020-21

About this report This report describes the operations and performance of the Department of Social Services during 2020-21. It was prepared to meet legislated reporting requirements.

Part

Introduces the Department of Social Services with a description of our department and*the*portfolio.

Presents our annual performance statement for 2020-21.

Provides the annual report on the operation of the National Redress Scheme consistent with the requirements of section 187f of the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018.

Details our management and accountability processes, including corporate governance, external scrutiny, human resources, and a review of financial management for the past year.

Presents our audited financial statements for 2020-21.

Provides additional information including an index of requirements and where to find this information in the report.

Acknowledgement of Country The Department of Social Services acknowledges the traditional owners of country throughout Australia, and their continuing connection to land, water and community. We pay our respects to them and their cultures, and to Elders both past and present.

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Contents

Letter of transmittal vi

Secretary’s review 1

Part 1 Overview 5

Chapter 1.1 Our department 6

Chapter 1.2 The portfolio 11

Part 2 Annual performance statement 17

Chapter 2 Our performance 21

Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security 26

Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and Communities 66

Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and Carers 104

Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing 139

Chapter 2.5 Cross Outcome - Program Support 153

Part 3 National Redress Scheme 157

National Redress Scheme - Annual report 2020-2021 158

Part 4 Management and accountability 165

Chapter 4.1 Governance structure 166

Chapter 4.2 External scrutiny 177

Chapter 4.3 Managing our people 181

Chapter 4.4 Managing our finances 190

Part 5 Financial statements 197

Financial statements 198

Part 6 Appendices 253

Appendix A Resource statements 254

Appendix B Advertising and market*research 263

Appendix C Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance 268

Appendix D Compliance with the Carer Recognition Act 271

Appendix E Disability reporting 273

Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities 274

Appendix G Glossary of abbreviations and*acronyms 294

Appendix H Compliance index 297

Alphabetical index 305

Outcome and program structure Figure 1: Outcome and program structure as at 30 June 2021

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Social Families and

Security Communities

Encourage self-reliance and Contribute to stronger support people who cannot and more resilient fully support themselves individuals, families*and by providing sustainable communities by social security payments and providing targeted assistance services*and*initiatives

Programs Programs

» Family Tax Benefit » Families and Communities

» Child Payments » Paid Parental Leave

» Income Support for » Social and Community Services

Vulnerable People » Program Support for Outcome 2

» Income Support for People in Special Circumstances

» Supplementary Payments and Support for Income

» Support Recipients

» Income Support for Seniors

» Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

» Income Support for People with Disability

» Income Support for Carers

» Working Age Payments

» Student Payments

» Program Support for Outcome 1

» Rent Assistance (Cross Program)

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Disability and Carers

Improve independence of, and participation by, people with disability, including improved support for carers, by providing targeted support and services

Housing

Increase housing supply, improved community housing and assisting individuals experiencing homelessness through targeted support and services

Programs

» Disability Mental Health and Carers

» National Disability Insurance Scheme

» Program Support for Outcome 3

Programs

» Housing and Homelessness

» Affordable Housing

» Program Support for Outcome 4

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Australian Government

Department of Social Services

Ray Griggs AO CSC Secretary

Senator the Hon Anne Ruston Minister for Families and Social Services Minister for Women’s Safety Manager of Government Business in the Senate Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme Minister for Government Services Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Ministers

I am pleased to present the Department of Social Services’ (the department’s) Annual Report (the report) for the year ending 30 June 2021 under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The report has been prepared in*accordance with Resource Management Guide No. 135— Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities issued by the Department of Finance.

This report includes the department’s audited financial statements, as required by section 43(4) of the PGPA Act. The report meets the reporting requirements under the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, the A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999, the Child Support (Assessment) Act 1989 and the Child Support (Registration and Collection) Act 1988. The report also includes the third annual report of the National Redress Scheme Operator on the operation of the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse, under section 187 of the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018.

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I certify that the department has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans, and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and reporting mechanisms that meet its specific needs. All reasonable measures have been taken to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the department.

Yours sincerely

15 October 2021

GPO Box 9820, Canberra ACT 2601 • Tel (02) 6146 0010 • Facsimile (02) 6204 4505 Internet www.dss.gov.au

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Secretary’s review 2020-21 was a challenging year for most Australians. During this time, we continued to face the impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic making this department’s work more important than ever.

Our commitment to improving the wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities remains steadfast. Our focus in 2020-21 was to work with our portfolio agencies to deliver essential services to support Australians.

The Department of Social Services (the department) worked collaboratively with other government agencies to develop and implement a rapid and dynamic response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The*social security system was adapted to provide expanded access to income support payments. Since the start of the pandemic, we have worked with Services Australia to deliver more than $20 billion to income support recipients through the Coronavirus Supplement and four Economic Support Payments that provided around $12 billion of additional assistance to Australian households. These temporary measures were adjusted throughout the year in response to the recovering economy.

Under the Government’s $200 million Community Support Package, we oversaw the distribution of additional funding for Emergency Relief, Food Relief, Commonwealth Financial Counselling and No Interest Loans to support vulnerable people impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This funding has gone towards supporting over 600,000 people experiencing financial stress, including those affected by various lockdowns, to improve their financial wellbeing.

We also implemented a $150 million Domestic Violence Support Package, over two years, 2019-20 and 2020-21, which provided an additional $130 million to states and territories for frontline service delivery under a National Partnership, and an additional $20 million for other existing and new initiatives to address family and domestic violence.

We contributed to the Closing the Gap Commonwealth Implementation Plan with responses to Targets 9 (overcrowded housing), 12 (out-of-home care) and 13 (family violence), the priority reforms and the cross-cutting outcome of disability. This*included $98 million in new investment to address Targets 12, 13 and disability.

Support for people with disability during the pandemic has been a priority and our focus has been on connecting individuals with appropriate information and relevant services in their area. This was possible through the introduction of the new Disability Gateway that was launched January 2021.

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In June 2021, the Australian Government (the Government) launched the NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 which aims to attract a wide range of disability sector workers while improving existing workers’ access to training and development opportunities.

In partnership with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and the Department of Health, we developed the Younger People in Residential Aged Care Strategy 2020-25 (the Strategy). This Strategy will help us achieve the target of having no people under the age of 65, except in exceptional circumstances, living in residential aged care by the end of 2025.

We also continue to support the Government’s response to the 2019 Review of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013, development of a draft bill for consultation and introduction later in 2021, including a Participant Service Guarantee.

In July 2020, we introduced Flexible Parental Leave Pay arrangements that allow mothers and fathers greater choice in how they utilise Parental Leave Pay to fit with their work and caring responsibilities. This was in addition to temporary measures to ensure most families who were or became pregnant in the early stages of COVID-19 and had their employment affected, remained eligible.

We supported Income Management participants in the Cape York region to transition to the Cashless Debit Card. This is also available to Income Management participants in the Northern Territory. Improvements in Cashless Debit Card technology have resulted in Product Level Blocking being enabled at over 7,000 merchant stores.

This technology improves the effectiveness of the program, increases the number of merchants that participants can shop at, while reducing red tape for merchants. To date, four banks have completed and implemented PIN Pad development to support Product Level Blocking.

We released A Decade of Data: Findings from the first 10 years of Footprints in Time, a 2020 report, which follows the developmental pathways of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, including school engagement, sleep, diet, exercise and dental health. Since the inception of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children, more than 1,250 families from 11 remote, regional and urban Australian communities have participated in the annual survey.

We also provided support to Ms Robyn Kruk AO to deliver the Second Anniversary Review of the National Redress Scheme. Her final report was released in June 2021. The independent review heard from survivors and survivor advocacy groups, states and territories, non-government institutions and support services.

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Looking forward In 2021-22, we will continue to support the Government in its response to the ongoing social and economic impacts from COVID-19.

The department is implementing 16 initiatives starting in 2021-22 that focus on supporting women and children escaping violence and building the evidence base for future policies.

The Government is prioritising the implementation of the Escaping Violence Payment (EVP) to provide financial assistance to eligible women who are escaping a violent relationship. The EVP will support women to connect to other appropriate services to assist in establishing a home free of violence.

The department has Commonwealth lead responsibility for three socio-economic targets in the Commonwealth Closing the Gap Implementation Plan, Target 9 (overcrowded housing), Target 12 (out-of-home care) and Target 13 (family violence), and is working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and communities on strategies for achieving these targets, including sector strengthening work.

We will continue to develop the successor plan to the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-20 in conjunction with state and territory governments and key stakeholders. Final consultations are being conducted in readiness for the new plan to be endorsed in late 2021.

We will work to develop Australia’s next National Disability Strategy to drive action towards a more inclusive society for people with disability over the next decade. The*new Strategy will be launched in late 2021.

Our people are integral to the positive impact that we aim to have on improving the wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities. I look forward to the ongoing work of the department as we focus on delivering our diverse range of government policies, programs, services and payments.

Ray Griggs AO CSC

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Part 1

Overview

Chapter 1.1 Our department 6

Chapter 1.2 The portfolio 11

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.1 Our department

Chapter 1.1

Our department The Department of Social Services (the department) is responsible for a diverse range of policies, payments, programs, and services that improve the wellbeing of people and families in Australia.

We fund services and payments that assist families, children and older people, provide a safety net for those who cannot fully support themselves, enhance the wellbeing of people with high needs, assist those who need help with care, help those with injury, disability or illness to overcome barriers to securing employment, and support a diverse and harmonious society.

Our mission Our mission is to improve the wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities.

Our purpose The department’s enduring purpose is to improve the economic and social wellbeing*of individuals and families in Australian communities, which we achieve through the implementation of a diverse range of government policies, programs, services and payments.

Matters dealt with by the department are set out in the Administrative Arrangement Orders as*follows:

■ income security and support policies and programs for families with children, carers, the aged, people with disabilities and people in hardship

■ income support policies for students and apprentices

■ income support and participation policy for people of working age

■ services for families with children, people with disabilities, and carers

■ community mental health

■ community support services

■ family relationship, family and children’s support services

■ social housing, rent assistance and homelessness

■ child support policy

■ services to help people with disabilities obtain employment

■ non-profit sector and volunteering

■ whole of government service delivery policy

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Our outcomes The department’s purpose is delivered under four outcomes, including:

Outcome 1: Social Security Encourage self-reliance and support people who cannot fully support themselves by*providing sustainable social security payments and assistance.

Outcome 2: Families and Communities Contribute to stronger and more resilient individuals, families and communities by*providing targeted services and initiatives.

Our department

Outcome 3: Disability and Carers Improved independence of, and participation by, people with disability, including improved support for carers, by providing targeted support and services.

Outcome 4: Housing Increase housing supply, improved community housing and assisting individuals experiencing homelessness through targeted support and services.

Our priorities We deliver our mission and purpose through:

Quality policy advice - providing timely, evidence-based, social policy advice to our Ministers and the broader government with a focus on ensuring the long-term sustainability of the welfare system.

Effective program design and management - ensuring government policies and programs achieve intended outcomes through effective program planning, design, implementation, ongoing monitoring, and evaluation.

People, culture and performance - building a productive, safe, diverse and respectful workplace, effectively managing risks and resources, and ensuring we are curious, decisive, action-oriented and builders of productive working relationships, with the capability to deliver government priorities now and into the future.

Our values Our values are those of the Australian Public Service (APS). The APS values require us to be impartial, committed to service, accountable, respectful, and ethical. These values are central to the way we work with our Ministers, colleagues, and stakeholders.

Organisational structure Our department is led by the Secretary and supported by deputy secretaries operating across four streams. Our organisational structure as at 30 June 2021 is shown at Figure 2.

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.1

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Figure 2: Organisational structure as at 30 June 2021 Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.1 Our department

Kathryn Campbell Secretary

Social Security

Matt Flavel Deputy Secretary

Participation Family Payments Data and Evaluation Redress Communities

Jo Evans, GM Flora Carapellucci, GM Emma Kate McGuirk, GM Mary McLarty, A/g GM

Participation and Policy Analysis and Policy Strategy and Design Community Cohesion

Supplementary Payments Reporting Sharon Stuart, BM Sarah Guise, BM

Kath Paton, BM Jenny Humphrys, BM

Study and Compliance Data Exchange Enabling Services Cashless Welfare Policy

Lydia Ross, BM Nerissa Stewart, A/g BM Sarah Peascod, BM and Technology

Libby Cremen, A/g BM

Families and Payment Support Data Strategy and External Engagement Financial Wellbeing

Nerida Hunter, BM Development andCommunications Chris D’Souza, BM

Annette Neuendorf, A/g BM John Riley, BM

Pensions, Housing and Chief Finance Officer Service Delivery Cashless Welfare Engagement

Homelessness Finance Bruce Young, BM and Support Services

Troy Sloan, GM Andrew Harvey, GM Mike Websdane, BM

Older Australians Budget Development Community Grants Hub Families

Caitlin Delaney, BM Ross Schafer, BM Mark le Dieu, GM Shane Bennett, GM

Carer and Disability Payments Financial Services Hub Operations Family Policy

Andrew Seebach, BM Vanessa Berry, BM Catherine Nelson, A/g BM Lisha Jackman, BM

Housing and Financial Management Grants Services Office Family Safety

Homelessness policy Cheryl-Anne Navarro, BM Jodi Cassar, BM Greta Doherty, BM

Sidesh Naikar, BM

Housing and Homelessness Health Grants Family Safety

Program Delivery Warren Pearson, BM Implementation

Rob Stedman, BM Alexis Diamond, A/g BM

Central and Children’s Policy

Southern Region Tim Crosier, BM

Evan Trevor-Jones, A/g BM

Northern and Western Region Christian Callisen, BM

Families and Communities

Liz Hefren-Webb Deputy Secretary

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Chief Operating Officer Adrian Hudson

Corporate Portfolio Coordination

Richard Baumgart, A/g GM Bruce Taloni, GM

Communication Services Portfolio Governance Melissa Evans, BM Kristen Owen, A/g BM

People Services Government and

Katrina Jocumsen, BM Executive Services Catherine Reid, BM

Property and Security Audit and Assurance Chris Mitchell, BM Jennie Armstrong, BM

Chief Counsel Legal Services Bronwyn Worswick, GM

Legal Services Charmaine Sims, A/g BM

Disability and Carers

Catherine Rule Deputy Secretary

Market Capability Participants and

Luke Mansfield, GM Performance

Peter Broadhead, GM

Market Development Participant Outcomes Thomas Abhayaratna, BM Sarah Hawke, BM

Market Quality NDIS Finance and

Valerie Spencer, BM Performance

Emily Hurley, BM

Disability and Carers Reform NDIS Governance Mitchell Cole, BM Julie Yeend, BM

Disability Employment Commonwealth/State Policy Services Taskforce Karen Pickering, GM

George Sotiropoulos, GM

Disability Employment Services Mainstream Policy Tarja Saastamoinen, BM Katrina Chatham, BM

Disability Policy Stephen Moger, BM

Information, Linkages and Capacity Building Michele Legge, A/g BM

Advocacy and Inclusion Anita Davis, BM

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.1 Our department

Legend A/g Indicates the employee is temporarily acting in the role BM Branch Manager GM Group Manager NDIS National Disability Insurance Scheme

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.1 Our department

Our people We operate across Australia with 72.4 per cent of our staff based in our national office located in Canberra and 27.6 per cent in the service delivery network located in state, territory, and regional offices.

Figure 3: Our national presence as at 30 June 2021

State Number of staff % of staff

ACT 1,747 72.4

NSW 174 7.2

NT 29 1.2

QLD 113 4.7

SA 93 3.8

TAS 53 2.2

VIC 133 5.5

WA 72 3.0

Total 2,414 100

72.4%

■ National Office 1,747 72.4% ■ Delivery Network 667 27.6%

27.6%

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Chapter 1.2

The portfolio As at 30 June 2021, three Ministers and one Assistant Minister had responsibilities in*the Social Services Portfolio:

■ Senator the Hon Anne Ruston, Minister for Families and Social Services, Minister*for Women’s Safety, Manager of Government Business in the Senate

rtfolio

■ Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC, Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme, Minister for Government Services

■ The Hon Michael Sukkar MP, Assistant Treasurer, Minister for Housing, Minister*for*Homelessness, Social and Community Housing

■ The Hon Michelle Landry MP, Assistant Minister for Children and Families, Assistant Minister for Northern Australia.

The department is established as a Department of State under the Administrative Arrangements Order.

In addition to the department, the portfolio comprises the following portfolio bodies:

■ Australian Institute of Family Studies, established under the Family Law Act 1975

■ National Disability Insurance Agency, established under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013

■ NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission, established under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013

■ Services Australia, established as an Executive Agency under the Public Service Act 1999

■ Hearing Australia, established under the Australian Hearing Services Act 1991.

Changes to the portfolio 2020-21 Responsibility for the Digital Transformation Agency was transferred from the Department of Social Services to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet on 15 April 2021.

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.2 The po

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.2 The portfolio

Portfolio bodies Services Australia Outcome: support individuals, families, and communities to achieve greater self-sufficiency; through the delivery of advice and high quality accessible social, health and child support services and other payments; and support providers and businesses through convenient and efficient service delivery.

servicesaustralia.gov.au

National Disability Insurance Agency Outcome: implement a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) that provides individual control and choice in the delivery of reasonable and necessary supports to improve the independence, social and economic participation of eligible people with disability, their families and carers, and associated referral services and activities.

The National Disability Insurance Agency, established under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013 (NDIS Act), has responsibility for administering the NDIS. The NDIS Act (in conjunction with other laws) gives effect to Australia’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

ndis.gov.au

NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission Outcome: promote the delivery of quality supports and services to people with disability under the NDIS and other prescribed supports and services, including through nationally consistent and responsive regulation, policy development, advice, and education.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (the NDIS Commission) is a statutory body established to improve the quality and safety of NDIS supports and services. The NDIS Commission is responsible for ensuring NDIS providers comply with regulatory standards and the NDIS Code of Conduct in the course of delivering supports and services to NDIS participants. The NDIS Commission also promotes safety and quality services, resolves problems, and identifies areas for improvement.

The NDIS Commission commenced operations in New South Wales and South*Australia on 1 July 2018 and in all other states and territories except Western*Australia on 1 July 2019. The NDIS Commission commenced in Western*Australia on*1 December 2020.

ndiscommission.gov.au

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Australian Institute of Family Studies Outcome: increase understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers, and the broader community.

The Australian Institute of Family Studies provides advice, shares knowledge, and builds evidence about what works for families to accelerate positive outcomes.

aifs.gov.au

Hearing Australia Mission: provide world leading research and hearing services for the wellbeing of all Australians. Hearing Australia is a Public Non-financial Corporation (Trading) entity established under the Australian Hearing Services Act 1991. Accordingly, Hearing Australia is not reported in the Portfolio Budget Statements or Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements. Hearing Australia is a corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and is governed by a board that is appointed by the Minister for Government Services.

hearing.com.au

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.2 The portfolio

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 1 - Overview Chapter 1.2 The portfolio

Ministers and portfolio responsibilities

Figure 4: Social Services portfolio as at 30 June 2021

Social Services Portfolio

Minister for Families and Social Services

Minister for Women’s Safety

(Manager of Government Business in the Senate)

Minister for Government Services

Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme

Senator the Hon Anne Ruston Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC

Assistant Treasurer

Minister for Housing

Minister for Homelessness, Social and Community Housing

Assistant Minister for Children and Families

Assistant Minister for Northern Australia

The Hon The Hon

Michael Sukkar MP Michelle Landry MP

Portfolio Bodies

Portfolio Secretary Kathryn Campbell AO CSC

Department of Social Services

Services Australia

National Disability Insurance…Agency

Secretary Chief Executive Officer Chief Executive Officer

Ms Kathryn Campbell AO CSC Ms Rebecca Skinner Mr Martin Hoffman

NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission Australian Institute of Family Studies

Hearing Australia

Acting Commissioner Acting Director Managing Director

Ms Samantha Taylor Mr Andrew Whitecross Mr Kim Terrell

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21 15

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Part 2

Annual performance statement

Chapter 2 Our performance 21

Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security 26

Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities 66

Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers 104

Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing 139

Chapter 2.5 Cross Outcome - Program Support 153

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2

Statement of preparation I, Ray Griggs, as the accountable authority of the Department of Social Services, present the 2020-21 Annual Performance Statement of the Department of Social Services, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In my opinion, this Annual Performance Statement is based on properly maintained records, accurately reflects the performance of the entity, and complies with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Ray Griggs AO CSC

Secretary

15 October 2021

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Introduction The Annual Performance Statement provides information about the department’s performance in achieving its outcomes. This completes the cycle of performance reporting that commenced at the start of the reporting period with the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statement, published on 6 October 2020, and the 2020-21 Corporate Plan, published on 31 August 2020.

The Annual Performance Statement reports the actual results achieved against the performance measures and targets in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statement and the 2020-21 Corporate Plan. The measurement and assessment of performance in the Annual Performance Statement relates only to the 2020-21 reporting period, even though the 2020-21 Corporate Plan sets out how the department’s performance will be measured and assessed over four reporting periods.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2

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Figure 5: Connection between the Portfolio Budget Statement, Corporate Plan, and*Annual Performance Statement. Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2

2020-21

Portfolio Budget Statement (October 2020)

a

2020-21 Corporate Plan (August 2020)

Outcome 1 Social Security

Encourage self-reliance and support people who cannot fully support themselves by providing

sustainable social security payments and assistance.

• 12 programs

• 20 key activities

Outcome 2 Families and Communities

Contribute to stronger and more resilient individuals, families and communities by providing

targeted services and initiatives.

• 3 programs

• 10 key activities

Outcome 3 Disability and Carers

Improve independence of, and participation by, people with disability, including improved

support for carers, by providing targeted support and services.

• 2 programs

• 7 key activities

Outcome 4 Housing

Increase housing supply, improved community housing and assisting individuals experiencing

homelessness through targeted support and services.

• 2 programs

• 2 key activities

Performance Measures and Targets

Purposes

The Department of Social Services’ enduring purpose is to improve the economic and social well-being of individuals and families in Australian communities which we achieve through the implementation of a diverse range of government policies, programs, services and payments.The department’s purposes are set out in the Administrative Arrangement Orders.

Performance Measures and Targets

Reports the actual results achieved against the performance measures and targets. 2020-21 Annual Performance Statement (October 2020) a Portfolio Budget Statements are normally published in May, but in March 2020 the Government decided to defer

the 2020-21 Budget to October 2020 to allow more time for the economic and fiscal impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic to be better understood.

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Our performance

Performance Framework The department’s approach to measuring and reporting performance has significantly changed from the 2019-20 Annual Report. This is reflected in the new performance measures and performance framework in the 2020-21 Corporate Plan. The measures were developed to assess achievement of the department’s purposes through the delivery of our key activities, and to meet the requirements of section 16EA of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, which came into effect in February 2020.

Figure 6: Department of Social Services 2020-21 Performance Framework

Purpose

Performance

of our purpose the achievement

contributes to of activities

Line of sight between our strategic objectives and

performance

Programs

Activities

Performance

Source: Department of Social Services 2020-21 Corporate Plan

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2 Our performance

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2 Our performance

Purposes and outcomes include our objectives, functions and roles, and are the strategic objectives that we intend to pursue, or make a significant contribution to achieving, over the reporting period. The department’s outcomes are included in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statement, and our purposes are detailed in the 2020-21 Corporate Plan.

Programs are activities that deliver benefits, services or transfer payments to individuals and the community as a whole, with the aim of achieving the intended outcomes in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statement.

Key activities are distinct, significant programs or areas of work undertaken by the department to assist in achieving our purposes in the 2020-21 Corporate Plan.

Performance measures, measure and assess the department’s performance in achieving our purposes.

The performance measures included in the Corporate Plan and Portfolio Budget Statements are consistent and work together to enable a coherent set of performance results to be included in the Annual Performance Statement. Each performance measure relates directly to one or more of the department’s purposes or*key activities, and aligns to government priorities.

Targets are included in each performance measure to compare performance information qualitatively and quantitatively against particular performance levels. The targets have been developed by considering our key activities in 2020-21 and their past performance. The chosen targets are challenging but achievable, and are specific, measurable, time-bound and reportable.

The methodology outlines the data and calculation the department uses for assessing the achievement of targets. The performance measures use sources of information and methodologies that are reliable and verifiable. To avoid false conclusions, the performance measures provide an unbiased basis for assessment of*the department’s performance.

Analysis of performance, the Annual Performance Statement includes an analysis of the factors that contributed to the department’s performance in achieving its purposes.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Performance Measures The department uses a range of qualitative and quantitative measures and targets to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and outputs of the department’s performance in achieving its outcomes over the short, medium and long term.

The department’s performance measures include a mix of qualitative and quantitative measures to capture the multiple dimensions of the department’s performance and to help Australians gain a more complete understanding of our performance. When selecting qualitative or quantitative measures to measure the performance of our key activities, the department considered the cost of data collection, the value of the data to the department and the needs of our stakeholders. For example, key activities that include a focus on policy development have used qualitative measures, and key activities that focus on the outputs of our policies or service delivery have used quantitative measures wherever possible.

The department’s performance measures include a mix of of effectiveness, outputs and efficiency, and assess how our key activities support the achievement of our purposes.

Figure 7: The department’s mix of performance measuresa

Quantitative - 38

Qualitative - 5

Quantitative - 34

Efficiency - 3

Output - 6 Short Term - 5

Medium Term - 4

Long Term - 34

a The PGPA Rule 16EA sets out the requirements of performance measures for Commonwealth entities.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2 Our performance

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2 Our performance

Effectiveness The majority of our performance measures are measures of effectiveness, and assess how well the department has delivered on its purposes and whether our key*activities have had their intended impact. The effectiveness of our key activities is measured in quantitative and qualitative terms.

Outputs The department has used output measures to assess the achievement of key activity deliverables which contribute to the achievement of our purposes.

Efficiency In addition to the measurement of outputs and effectiveness, and to provide a complete picture of the department’s performance, we have used timeliness as a proxy for efficiency.

Overview of performance The environment in which the department operates is complex, interconnected and evolving. Our success is measured in terms of our ability to anticipate and adapt within this changing environment, while maintaining our strategic direction and focus on improving the wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities.

During 2020-21, the department achieved most targets across the four outcomes. Overall, we met 42 performance measure targets, partially met three, and did not meet 10.

The Annual Performance Statement is prepared at a time of significant challenge in Australia. The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to the 2021 eastern Australia storms and floods have required urgent responses from the department and significantly impacted our operations and capacity to meet targets. The department developed new policy to enable existing payments and grants to be adapted, and was responsive in facilitating temporary payments and ad-hoc grants to support Australians in these unprecedented times.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

■

■

■

Met

Partially Met

Not Met

Met

Partially Met

Not Met

Outcome 1 Outcome 2

Met or ongoing

Partially Met

Not Met

Outcome 3 Outcome 4 Program Support

Met

Partially Met

Not Met

Met

Partially Met

Not Met

76%

18%

6% Met

Partially Met

Not Met

Figure 9: Performance measure target results per outcome

14

12

10

8

6

4

2

0

Figure 8: Performance measure target results overview

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2 Our performance

2

25

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Chapter 2.1

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Outcome 1: Social Security

Purpose Encourage self-reliance and support people who cannot fully support themselves by*providing sustainable social security payments and assistance.

Programs and activities Outcome 1 comprises 12 programs and a number of activities contributing to the achievement of the social security outcome. The diagram below depicts how this purpose is translated into measurable activities.

OUTCOME 1 - SOCIAL SECURITY

Program 1.1 Family Tax Benefit

Program 1.2 Child Payments Program 1.3 Income Support

for Vulnerable People

Program 1.4 Income Support for People in Special

Circumstances

Program 1.5 Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support

Recipients

Program 1.6 Income Support for Seniors

Key activities Key activities Key activities Key activities Key activities Key activities • Family Tax • Stillborn Baby • Special • Payments • Utilities • Age Pension

Benefit (FTB) Payment (SBP) Benefit (SB) under Special Allowance (AP)

• Child Support Scheme (CSS) • Double Orphan Pension (DOP)

Circumstances (PUSC) (UA)

• Assistance for Isolated Children (AIC)

Program 1.7 Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

Program 1.8 Income Support for People with Disability

Program 1.9 Income Support for Carers

Program 1.10 W

orking Age Payments

Program 1.11 Cross-Program Student Rent Assistance Payments

Key activities • Energy Supplement for Commonwealth

Seniors Health Card Holders (ES)

Key activities • Disability Support Pension (DSP)

Key activities • Carer Payment (CP) • Carer

Allowance (CA)

Key activities • Jobseeker Payment (JP) • Parenting

Payment (PP) • Youth Allowance

(Other) (YA)

Key activities Key activities • ABSTUDY • Rent

Assistance (RA)

• Austudy • Youth Allowance (Student) (YA)

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Summary and analysis of Outcome 1 performance In 2020-21, the department achieved most targets across Outcome 1. Overall, we*met 12 of the 13 performance measure targets.

The social security system promotes self-reliance and aims to break the cycle of long-term welfare dependence, while providing adequate support for those who need it.

The sustainability of the social security system and the capacity of people to achieve and maintain financial self-reliance over their lifetime relies on many factors, some beyond the direct influence of the department. These factors include labour market conditions, availability and alignment of education and job opportunities and increasing life expectancy. We work in close partnership with other Australian Government agencies to deliver an efficient and effective social security system.

In the past year, the social security system has demonstrated its flexibility and responsiveness to supporting Australians in need. A key feature of 2020-21 was the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic that resulted in significant numbers of Australians losing their jobs or having their working hours reduced. For people who were ineligible to receive JobKeeper Payment, JobSeeker Payment1 was the main avenue to receive support from Government. A rebound in the economy as businesses started to reopen, as well as changes in policy settings, such as ending the assets test waiver and reducing the amount of the Coronavirus Supplement, assisted in reducing the number of people reliant on income support. By 30 June 2021, the number of working age payment recipients was around 500,000 less than at the same time in June 2020.

The social security system was able to rapidly respond to the economic impacts resulting from health measures put in place to protect Australians from the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of Austudy and Youth Allowance (student) recipients has increased on the previous year. These results can, in part, be explained by the economic downturn that occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic that reduced opportunities for people to work. Youth Allowance (student), and Austudy were the most commonly accessed student payments and provided financial assistance for people who undertook study in this period.

There was an increase in Age Pension expenditure due to the three Economic Support Payments paid to Age Pensioners in 2020-21. There has also been an increase in the number of senior Australians over pension age remaining in the workforce longer. However, there is a long-term trend of a gradual reduction in the proportion of senior Australians receiving the Age Pension, driven by a range of factors including new retirees having more assets at retirement due to the maturation of the superannuation system. The number of Age Pension recipients has remained steady over 2020-21.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

1 JobSeeker is the main income support payment for recipients aged between 22 years to Age Pension qualification age who have capacity to work. The JobKeeper Payment scheme was a subsidy for businesses significantly affected by coronavirus.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Key achievements

In the past year, some of our contributions to improving outcomes for sustainability of the social security system included:

■ From 1 April 2021, a series of permanent changes ensured job seekers have the best opportunity to secure employment, including:

- The rate for payments such as JobSeeker, Youth Allowance and other working age payments, increased by $50 a fortnight

- The income free area for working age payments was permanently increased to $150 per fortnight. These changes allow payment recipients to keep more of what they earn while receiving income support.

■ Improving and simplifying the way that employment income is reported and assessed for social security purposes. Income support recipients now report the gross amount paid to them during their reporting period. These changes make reporting easier for payment recipients, meaning people receive the right amount of income support and are less likely to incur a debt.

■ In response to the unprecedented health and economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, additional financial support was provided through the social security system, including:

- a series of Economic Support Payments for eligible income support and Family*Tax Benefit recipients and concession card holders from 31 March 2020

- a temporary Coronavirus Supplement for eligible recipients from 27 April 2020

- temporary changes to the partner income test for JobSeeker Payment from*27 April 2020

- a reduction in social security deeming rates to reflect changed market conditions.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Outcome 1 key performance results

2

Program Key Activities Target Result

1.1 Family Tax Benefit Payment targeted to low income Met

Family Tax Benefit families (67% of support received by

families under the Family Tax Benefit lower income free area).

Child Support At least 85% of Family Tax Benefit Met

Scheme children of separated parents meet the maintenance action test requirements.

1.2 Stillborn Baby 100% of eligible families receive Not met

Child Payments Payment assistance through Stillborn Baby Payment or Parental Leave Pay.

1.3 Special Benefit The average duration of recipients Met

Income Support for Payment on*special benefit remains below Vulnerable People 130*weeks.

1.4 Payments 100% of payments are made in Met

Income Support for under Special accordance with the individual People in Special Circumstances agreements. Circumstances

1.5 Utilities Allowance Changes in Utilities Allowance recipient Met

Supplementary numbers align with movements in

Payments and the total number of people receiving

Support for Income Partner Allowance, Widow Allowance

Support Recipients and Disability Support Pension (who

are younger than 21 with no dependent children).

1.6 Age Pension 75% or below of people of age pension Met

Income Support age are supported by the Age Pension

for*Seniors or other income support.

1.7 Energy Supplement 100% of eligible Commonwealth Met

Allowances and for Commonwealth Health Card holders receive the Energy Concessions for Seniors Health Card Supplement each year. Seniors Holders

1.8 Disability Support 90% of people with a profound or Met

Income Support Pension severe disability of working age are

for People with supported by the Disability Support

Disability Pension.

1.9 Carer Payment 70% of primary carers in Australia are Met

Income Support Carer Allowance supported by Carer Payment and/or for*Carers Carer Allowance.

1.10 JobSeeker Payment Changes in recipient numbers align with Met Working Age Parenting Payment movements in the unemployment rate. Payments Youth Allowance

(other)

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program Key Activities Target Result Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Proportion of Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and ABSTUDY recipients who are not receiving income support

3/6/12 months after exiting student payments align with movements in the unemployment rate.

Of the individuals and families renting and receiving Rent Assistance, the proportion experiencing rental stress after receipt of Rent Assistance is at least 25 percentage points lower than it would be without Rent Assistance.

Outcome 1: Key activity performance

Table 2.1.1: Key activity performance

Met

Met

1.11 Austudy

Student Payments Youth Allowance (student)

ABSTUDY

Cross-Program Rent Assistance Rent Assistance

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit

This program aims to make payments to assist low and medium income families with the direct and indirect costs of raising dependent children.

Key Activity - Family Tax Benefit

The Family Tax Benefit Part A and B are key activities of the Family Tax Benefit Program. The Family Tax Benefit key activity aims to make payments to eligible families to help with the cost of raising children. It is made up of two parts:

• Family Tax Benefit Part A is paid per child and the amount paid is based on the family’s circumstances.

• Family Tax Benefit Part B is paid per family and gives extra help to single parents and some couple families with one main income.

Family Tax Benefit can be paid either fortnightly or as a lump sum at the end of the financial year. Families who are eligible for Family Tax Benefit may also be eligible for other payments and supplements. Family Tax Benefit Part A recipients also have to meet immunisation and health check requirements.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing the Family Tax Benefit key activities, including program policy, program implementation and management, program performance, monitoring and meeting all relevant deliverables and key performance indicators as detailed in the department’s Portfolio Budget Statements, and providing guidance and advice to Services Australia. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Family Tax Benefit key activity on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing payment applications and delivering payments.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit

Performance Measure

Extent to which families with lower incomes are supported with the costs of raising children through Family Tax Benefit.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 48, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 9

Target

Payment targeted to low income families 2020-21

(67% of support received by families under the Family Tax Benefit lower*income free area).

Target

* 67%

Result

67.2%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which families with lower incomes are supported with the costs of raising children through Family Tax Benefit aims to demonstrate how low-income families are financially assisted through this program. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Family Tax Benefit in achieving the objective of the key activity: eligible families are helped with the costs of raising children.

Targeting 67 per cent of total payments are provided to low-income families demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the extent to which families with lower incomes are supported in comparison to the support provided to medium-income families. The intent of the policy is for low-income families to receive the majority of assistance provided by the government under this program.

Methodology

The number of families with lower incomes supported through Family Tax Benefit is calculated using the total number of Annual Family Tax Benefit recipients. The Annual Family Tax Benefit recipients are filtered by annual family adjusted taxable income:

• Equal to, or less than, the Lower Income Free Area (low-income families)

• Greater than the Lower Income Free Area.

This is used to evaluate the per cent of support, measured in entitlement amounts, that is received by those families with income under the Family Tax Benefit Lower Income Free Area

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

31

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Family Tax Benefit Part A $14,787.78m $14,567.42m

Family Tax Benefit Part B $3,577.17m $4,054.21m

Number of recipients

Entitlement yeara

2018-19 2017-18b

Family Tax Benefit Part A 1,549,969 1,603,755

Family Tax Benefit Part B 1,274,061 1,314,135

Number of children

Entitlement yeara

2018-19 2017-18b

Number of eligible Family Tax Benefit Part A children 3,077,039 3,177,506

Number of children in eligible Family Tax Benefit Part B familiesc 2,380,381 2,454,687

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

Family Tax Benefit 1,512 97.23% 1.15%

Program Analysis

Family Tax Benefit has undergone successive policy changes, such as pausing indexation of income thresholds, which have tightened access to the payment. This has resulted in a downward trend in the number of Family Tax Benefit families receiving fortnightly payments since*2004-05, which has continued.

This downward trend is expected to plateau slightly in 2020-21 due to more families accessing Family Tax Benefit as a result of the impacts of COVID-19.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Reconciliation data reported at June 2021 for 2018-19 and June 2020 for 2017-18. Family Tax Benefit reconciliation recipient information is reported after two years to capture future actions in respect of the financial year. The two-year period allows time for the data to capture many recipients lodging income tax returns and undertaking the reconciliation process or claiming a lump sum payment.

b Figures for 2017-18 have been updated and may differ from those previously published due to the remediation of a data integrity issue.

c Family Tax Benefit Part B is a per family payment.

32

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table 2.1.2: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit

This program aims to make payments to assist low and medium income families with the direct and indirect costs of raising dependent children.

Key Activity - Child Support Scheme

The Child Support Scheme aims to ensure children continue to receive support from their parents following separation. The Child Support Scheme interacts with the Family Tax Benefit Part A program, which makes payments to assist low and medium income families with the direct costs of raising dependent children.

Child support payments are calculated according to an administrative formula that is based on research into the cost of raising children in Australia, and uses both parents’ adjusted taxable incomes and the level of care they provide for their children to calculate child support payments. Child support payments can be transferred privately, or Services Australia can collect and transfer the payments on parents’ behalf.

Child support payments and Family Tax Benefit Part A are closely linked. To receive more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A for a child from a previous relationship, a Family Tax Benefit recipient is generally required to apply for a child support assessment through Services Australia. This is known as the Maintenance Action Test. A parent who has applied for, or who has an active child support assessment, or is exempt from taking maintenance action is considered to be meeting the requirement to take reasonable action for maintenance. The amount of child support that parents pay or receive can also affect their rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A.

The department is responsible for the administration of child support and family assistance legislation and works to develop and improve child support policy to enable more effective delivery of the scheme by Services Australia. Services Australia delivers the scheme and provides services to parents and carers. Services Australia assists separated parents to apply for a child support assessment, assesses the amount of child support payable, and facilitates the collection and transfer of child support payments between separated parents. Where payments are not made voluntarily, Services Australia has a range of powers to enforce the collection of child support.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

33

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Performance Measure

Extent to which separated parents in the child support system are supporting their children.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 48, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 9

Target

At least 85% of Family Tax Benefit 2020-21

children of separated parents meet the maintenance action test requirements. Target 85%

Result

86.2%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

The Family Tax Benefit Part A Maintenance Action Test has a mutual obligation objective that supports the principle that parents are primarily responsible for the financial support of their children, with the Australian Government (the Government) providing family assistance where needed to help families meet the costs of raising their children.

Measuring the extent to which separated parents in the child support system are supporting their children, demonstrates how Family Tax Benefit Part A can influence parents to engage with*the Child Support Scheme to maximise the economic resources the parents have to raise their children.

As at 25 June 2021, the median income of a child support payee was $29,316. The measure demonstrates the appropriateness of influencing payees to take action to ensure they receive the maximum amount of financial assistance they are eligible to receive (from the payer and the Government) to ensure they can provide a basic and acceptable standard of living for their children. Where it is not appropriate for a payee to seek a child support assessment, they may be able to apply for an exemption from the Maintenance Action Test and rely solely on Family Tax Benefit.

Requiring parents to apply for a child support assessment, in order to receive the maximum rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A, supports the effectiveness of the Child Support Scheme in achieving the objective of the key activity: children continue to receive support from their parents following separation.

Targeting 85 per cent of Family Tax Benefit children of separated parents that meet the maintenance action test requirements demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing:

• The proportion of children of separated parents in the Family Tax Benefit system who have taken action to obtain a child support assessment (i.e. those who meet the Family Tax Benefit Maintenance Action Test requirements)

• A significant per cent of these children continue to receive financial support from their parents following separation.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.1 - Family Tax Benefit

Methodology

The number of Family Tax Benefit children of separated parents that meet the maintenance action test requirements is based on the number of children subject to the Maintenance Action Test that:

• meet Maintenance Action Test requirements

• are exempt from meeting Maintenance Action Test requirements.

The percentage is based on the number of children that satisfy the Maintenance Action Test, plus the number of children who are exempt from the Maintenance Action Test, as a proportion of all children subjected to the Maintenance Action Test.

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data as at 25*June 2021 (the last Friday of the financial year).

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of Cases a

2020-21 2019-20

Child Support Scheme 755,077 759,931

Program Analysis

This is the first financial year that this measure has been reported as a key performance measure. The measure focuses on the proportion of recipients who meet the Maintenance Action Test requirement whereas in previous financial years the department has reported on those who do not. Analysis of this measure for the 2018-19 to 2020-21 financial years shows that the department continues to exceed its target of 85 per cent.

The 2020-21 result of 86.2 per cent is slightly better than the result in 2019-20 of 86.1 per cent. The improvement is primarily due to an increase in the number children exempt from the Maintenance Action Test. Family Tax Benefit Part A recipients may be exempt from the Maintenance Action Test due to the risk of family and domestic violence, harmful or disruptive effect on the payee or payer, the identity of the other parent is unknown, the payer is deceased or other exceptional circumstance. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic may be partially responsible for the increase.

As at 30 June 2021:

• the median income of a payee was $29,316, the median income of a payer was $49,577

• a Family Tax Benefit Part A family with one child would receive the Family Tax Benefit Part A Base*Rate, regardless of any maintenance income, when family income reaches $72,398, and*would cease to receive payment from family income of $104,281.

The Maintenance Action Test seeks to influence low to middle income payees to apply for a child support assessment to ensure their children receive financial support from both parents and through Family Tax Benefit.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Data for number of cases is point-in-time as at the last Friday in June of the relevant financial year.

35

2

Table 2.1.3: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Program 1.2 - Child Payments

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to make payments to families in certain circumstances to assist with the costs of children.

Key Activities - Stillborn Baby Payment, Double Orphan Pension and Assistance for Isolated Children

The Stillborn Baby Payment, Double Orphan Pension and Assistance for Isolated Children are key activities of the Child Payments Program.

• The Stillborn Baby Payment aims to make payments to eligible individuals where they, or their partner, would have been the primary carer of a child who was stillborn. To meet the eligibility requirements to receive the Stillborn Baby Payment, a parent who has had a stillborn child must have lodged a claim for payment within 52 weeks of the baby’s delivery, be under the income test limits or eligible for Family Tax Benefit Part A, and not receiving Parental Leave Pay for the same baby.

• Double Orphan Pension aims to make payments to eligible carers of a child whose parents cannot care for the child or who have died. To qualify for Double Orphan Pension, an individual must be caring for a young person who is a double orphan, and be eligible for the Family Tax Benefit.

• Assistance for Isolated Children aims to make a group of payments to parents and carers of children who cannot go to a local state school. This could be because of geographical isolation, disability or special needs. Families in isolated areas incur additional costs to educate their children. Assistance for Isolated Children provides financial assistance in the form of allowances to alleviate such costs.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Government in relation to Child*Payments and implementing decisions of Government through program policy, implementation, management and performance; meeting all relevant deliverables and key performance indicators; and providing guidance and advice to Services Australia. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Child Payments on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

36

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.2 - Child Payments

Performance Measure

Proportion of stillbirths for which the Stillborn Baby Payment of Parental Leave Pay is paid.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 49, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 9

Target

100% of eligible families receive 2020-21

assistance through Stillborn Baby Payment or Parental Leave Pay. Target 100%

Result

74%

Outcome

Not Met

Rationale

Measuring the proportion of stillbirths for which the Stillborn Baby Payment of Parental Leave Pay is paid aims to demonstrate the proportion of people who receive support who are eligible. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Stillborn Baby Payment in achieving the objective of the key activity: eligible individuals are assisted with payments where they, or their partner, would have been the primary carer of a child who was stillborn.

Targeting 100 per cent of eligible families that receive assistance through Stillborn Baby Payment or Parental Leave Pay demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the proportion of eligible families who are supported by receiving government assistance after a stillbirth. The measure of coverage used in the result includes all known stillbirths in Australia and is not limited to those eligible for the payment. A person may not be eligible due to the income, work or residency requirements of Parental Leave Pay and Stillborn Baby Payment or may simply not want to engage with the social security system. Families impacted by stillbirth must lodge a claim for either Stillborn Baby Payment or Parental Leave Pay to allow their eligibility for payment to be assessed. The department aims to support 100 per cent of eligible families either through Stillborn Baby Payment or Parental Leave Pay.

Methodology

The percentage is based on the number of Stillborn Baby Payments, plus the number of Parental Leave Pay payments for stillbirths, as a proportion of the total number of stillbirths in*Australia.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Perinatal dataset.a

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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38 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

2

Program 1.2 - Child Payments

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Double Orphan Pension $3.07m $3.17m

Single Income Family Supplementb $11.05m $17.51m

Stillborn Baby Payment $2.30m $1.78m

Assistance for Isolated Children $84.04m $82.69m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Double Orphan Pension 808 906

Single Income Family Supplementb - c 41,604

Stillborn Baby Payment 822 796

Assistance for Isolated Childrend 13,112 12,353

Number of children

2020-21 2019-20

Double Orphan Pension 1,141 1,311

Program Analysis

There has been increased public interest in assistance to families affected by stillbirth following the establishment by the Senate of the Select Committee on Stillbirth Research and Education on 27 March 2018 and subsequent tabling of the Committee’s report on 4 December 2018. It was against this background of heightened public interest in government assistance provided to the families of stillborn babies that the decision to report on the performance of Stillborn Baby Payment was made ahead of other payments with larger outlays within the Child Payments Program.

The target of 100 per cent has not been met, however, this is largely due to the denominator (all known stillbirths) being applied as a proxy for all eligible stillbirths (which cannot be predicted or measured). As mentioned above the target it is not intended to measure coverage of all stillbirths in Australia, but to measure the number of families who are eligible for assistance based on the eligibility rules.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Australian Institute of Health and Welfare notes that it cannot verify the completeness of the dataset used as the denominator in this calculation. While it is not a conclusive list of all stillbirths in Australia, it is the best available source of stillbirth data in Australia at the time of reporting.

b The Single Income Family Supplement is closed to new entrants. Recipients eligible on 30 June 2017 may continue to receive the supplement if they remain continuously eligible.

c Family Tax Benefit recipients ar e automatically assessed for Single Income Family Supplement when their Family Tax Benefit entitlement is reconciled. Data for 2020-21 is not available as the reconciliation process for Family Tax Benefit is not yet finalised. Data for 2019-20 captures one year of FTB reconciliation, FTB recipient information is generally reported after two years of reconciliation.

d These figures are for the month of December each year due to the natur e of the payment.

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table 2.1.4: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.3 - Income Support for Vulnerable People

This program aims to make payments to financially assist eligible people in severe financial hardship who do not have any other means of support.

Key Activity - Special Benefit

Special Benefit is a key activity of the Income Support for Vulnerable People Program. Special Benefit aims to make payments to assist eligible people in financial hardship who do not have any other means of support due to circumstances outside their control. People may get Special Benefit if they are:

• in financial hardship

• unable to earn a sufficient livelihood for themselves and their dependants because of age, physical or mental disability or domestic circumstances, or for any other reason over which they have no control

• unable to receive any other income support payment

• an Australian resident or the holder of a certain temporary visa.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Government and implementing Government decisions in relation to Special Benefit including legislation, policies and guidelines. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering Special Benefit on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which payments are made to recipients who are unable to fully support themselves or access another payment.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 50, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 10

Target

The average duration 2020-21

of recipients on Special Benefit remains below Target Result Outcome

130 weeks. < 130 weeks average 111 weeks average Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which payments are made to recipients who are unable to fully support themselves or access another payment aims to demonstrate that people in financial hardship who are unable to support themselves are financially assisted until they have another means of support and no longer need the payment. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Special Benefit in achieving the objective of the key activity: payments to assist eligible people in financial hardship who do not have any other means of support.

Targeting an average duration of recipients on Special Benefit of below 130 weeks demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the payment is a short to medium term transitional payment until recipients become employed or are eligible to receive another income support payment.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

39

2

Program 1.3 - Income Support for Vulnerable People

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Methodology

The average duration of recipients on Special Benefit is provided in DSS Payment Demographic*Data.

The data source used for this result is data.gov.au, DSS Payment Demographic Data.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Special Benefit $204.29m $151.12m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Special Benefita 8,451 9,638

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence interval

recipients +/-

surveyed

Special Benefit 354 92.15% 3.07%

Program Analysis

The majority of people are granted Special Benefit because they do not meet the residency requirements for another income support payment, for example, those of Age Pension age who have not lived in Australia long enough to qualify for the Age Pension. Other recipients have experienced a change in circumstances that is beyond their control since coming to Australia, for example, a relationship breakdown as a result of domestic violence.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Special Benefit recipients as at 25 June 2021.

40

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table 2.1.5: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.4 - Income Support for People in Special Circumstances

This program aims to make payments to financially assist eligible people in severe financial hardship who do not have any other means of support, and to make payments to Australians in circumstances beyond their control to support them in overcoming those circumstances and maintaining their financial wellbeing.

Key Activity - Payments Under Special Circumstances

Payments under Special Circumstances is a key activity of the Income Support for People in Special Circumstances Program. The key activity aims to make payments and provide support to eligible people in circumstances beyond their control to support them in overcoming those circumstances and maintain their financial wellbeing. This includes:

• Act of Grace Payments made in special circumstances, where an entity’s conduct or Commonwealth legislation or policy has resulted in an unintended, inequitable, anomalous or otherwise unacceptable impact on the claimant’s circumstances. Act of grace payments are made in circumstances where the main obligation to the applicant is moral, rather than legal.

• Ex-Gratia Payments which deliver financial relief when urgent, unforeseen and exceptional circumstances arise, and generally are paid only after full consideration of all other possible alternative compensation mechanisms, including existing Commonwealth legislative provisions have been explored.

• Set-off or Waiver of Debts made in special circumstances by the Minister for Finance, to waiver amounts owing, and on setting-off amounts owed to the Commonwealth.

• Reconnecting People Assistance Package - Individual Community Care Package which*provides assistance to people who have been adversely affected as a direct result of their inappropriate immigration detention within Australia.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing Payments under Special Circumstances, including managing agreements and making payments to recipients for the Ex-Gratia Payments and the Reconnecting People Assistance Package. Services Australia is responsible for administering the Act of Grace components of the Payments under Special Circumstances key activity, on the department’s behalf, including managing and making payments.

Performance Measure

Agreements are in place (where relevant) with providers to ensure Payments under Special Circumstances are made in accordance with relevant legislation, policy, guidelines and contractual arrangements.

Source: PBS 2020-21 Page 51, Corporate Plan 2020-21 Page 10

Target

100% of payments are made in 2020-21

accordance with the individual agreements.

Target

100 %

Result

100%

Outcome

Met

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Program 1.4 - Income Support for People in Special Circumstances

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Rationale

Measuring that agreements are in place (where relevant) with providers, aims to demonstrate that payments are made in accordance with relevant legislation, policy, guidelines and contractual arrangements, to support eligible individuals who are ineligible for any other form of support. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Payments Under Special Circumstances in achieving the objective of the key activity: People in circumstances beyond their control are supported in overcoming those circumstances and maintain their financial wellbeing.

Targeting 100 per cent of payments are made in accordance with the individual agreements, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the proportion of payments which are made in accordance with the individual agreements. Agreements specify the entitlements for payments to people in special circumstances who do not have any other means of support.

Methodology

The number of payments that are made in accordance with the individual agreements is based on an audit of each invoice received by the department, to confirm the related payments are made by the department in accordance with the agreements and individual plans.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Department of Social Services administrative data

• Services Australia administrative data

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Bereavement Allowancea - $3.06m

Payments under Special Circumstances $1.08m $0.67m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Bereavement Allowancea 0 641

Payments under Special Circumstancesb 95 35

Program Analysis

Under this program payments have been made in a timely manner to support people in special circumstances. This includes providing assistance with living expenses and support to address individual circumstances and maintain financial wellbeing.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Bereavement Allowance closed to new recipients on 20 March 2020 and ceased when all recipients completed their bereavement period. No recipients received Bereavement Allowance in 2020-21.

b These figures are unique counts of recipients across the financial year.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table 2.1.6: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.5 - Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients

This program aims to make payments and subsidise services to certain income support recipients and low income households to assist them financially and to help them continue to participate economically and socially.

Key Activity - Utilities Allowance

Utilities Allowance is a key activity of the Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients Program. Utilities Allowance assists eligible income support recipients with household expenses. To qualify for Utilities Allowance, a person must be in receipt of the Disability Support Pension (under the age of 21 without children), Partner Allowance (under Age Pension age) or Widow Allowance (under Age Pension age).

• Widow Allowance is an income support payment that provides financial assistance to eligible older women who have lost the support of a partner through death, divorce or separation and who have no recent workforce experience. Since 1 July 2005, new Widow Allowance grants were only made to women who were born on or before 1 July 1955. From 1 July 2018, no new claims for Widow Allowance can be made. Women receiving Widow Allowance immediately before 1 July 2018 can continue to receive Widow Allowance. Once recipients reach Age Pension age, they transfer to Age Pension, provided they meet the Age Pension residency requirements. To receive Utilities Allowance, recipients of Widow Allowance have to be below Age Pension age. Widow Allowance recipients of Age Pension age receive the Pension Supplement.

• Partner Allowance is an income support payment that provides financial assistance for older people who are partners of income support recipients and face barriers to finding employment because of their lack of recent workforce experience. There have been no new grants of Partner Allowance since 20*September 2003 and Partner Allowance will cease completely from 1 January 2022. To receive Utilities Allowance, recipients of Partner Allowance have to be below Age Pension age. Partner Allowance recipients of Age Pension age receive the Pension Supplement.

• Disability Support Pension is an income support payment for people who are unable to work due to permanent physical, intellectual or psychiatric impairment. Only Disability Support Pension recipients under 21 years old and with no dependent children can receive Utilities Allowance to help with household expenses. Disability Support Pension recipients with children or who are over 21 years receive the Pension Supplement.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Government and implementing Government decisions including through legislation, policies and guidelines for Utilities Allowance. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Utilities Allowance on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

43

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.5 - Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Performance Measure

Extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, people unable to fully support themselves.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 57, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 11

Target

Changes in Utilities Allowance recipient numbers align with movements in the total number of people receiving Partner Allowance, Widow Allowance and Disability Support Pension (who are younger than 21 with no dependent children).

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

Changes in recipient numbers align with movements

Changes in recipient numbers aligned with movements

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, people unable to fully support themselves aims to demonstrate that eligible income support recipients are financially assisted with household expenses. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Utilities Allowance in achieving the objective of the key activity.

Targeting changes in Utilities Allowance recipient numbers align with movements in the total number of people receiving Partner Allowance and Widow Allowance recipients under Age Pension age and Disability Support Pension (who are younger than 21 with no dependent children) demonstrates the effectiveness by showing Utilities Allowance is only being paid to those who are eligible for the payment.

Methodology

The number of people receiving Partner Allowance, Widow Allowance and Disability Support Pension (who are younger than 21 with no dependent children) is calculated using the number of recipients of:

• Partner Allowance (under Age Pension age)

• Widow Allowance (under Age Pension age)

• Disability Support Pension (who are younger than 21 with no dependent children).

The number of Utilities Allowance recipient numbers is based on the number of Utilities Allowance recipients by eligible payment type. The number of eligible payment recipients must align with the number of Utilities Allowance recipients.

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.5 - Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Utilities Allowance $15.09m $17.45m

Essential Medical Equipment Payment $8.15m $7.91m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Utilities Allowancea 29,989 32,985

Essential Medical Equipment Payment (number of payments) 48,557 48,311

Program Analysis

The number of recipients paid Utilities Allowance in 2020-21 fell by 9.1 per cent compared to the previous financial year. Most of the decline in numbers is attributable to the decrease in the number of Partner Allowance and Widow Allowance recipients. As both payments have been closed to new recipientsb, and the number of those eligible (under Age Pension age) is getting much smaller, their populations have been trending downwards without a corresponding increase in the number of Disability Support Pension recipients under 21 with no dependent children.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The figures represent a unique count of Utilities Allowance recipients in the financial year.

b On 1 January 2022, Partner Allowance and Widow Allowance will cease. Consequently, from this date, Utilities Allowance will only be paid to Disability Support Payment recipients under 21 years with no dependent children.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Table 2.1.7: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Program 1.6 - Income Support for Seniors

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to make payments to senior Australians to assist them financially in a manner that encourages them to productively manage resources and life transitions.

Key Activity - Age Pension

The Age Pension is a key activity of the Income Support for Seniors Program. The key activity aims to provide income support to senior Australians who need it, while encouraging pensioners to maximise their overall incomes. The Age Pension is paid to people who meet age and residency requirements, subject to a means test. Pension rates are indexed to ensure they keep pace with Australian price and wage increases.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing the key activity, including policy development and advice and ongoing monitoring and analysis. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the key activity on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which people over the Age Pension qualification age are supported in their retirement through the age pension or other income support.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 53, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 11

Target

75% or below of people of age pension 2020-21

age are supported by the Age Pension or other income support. Target * 75%

Result

70.7%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which people over the Age Pension qualification age are supported in their retirement through the Age Pension, or other income support aims to demonstrate that senior Australians with low to moderate means are assisted financially. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Age Pension in achieving the objective of the key activity: senior Australians are assisted financially in a manner that encourages them to productively manage resources and life transitions.

Targeting 75 per cent or below, of people of Age Pension age that are supported by the Age Pension or other income support demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing:

• funding is targeted to senior Australians with low to moderate means to maintain their financial wellbeing, in a manner that encourages self-reliance during retirement

• the remaining proportion of senior Australians not receiving a payment can fully support themselves due to the level of their income and assets, consistent with the objective of self-reliance.

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2

Program 1.6 - Income Support for Seniors

Methodology

The number of people supported by the Age Pension or other income support is calculated using the number of:

• age pension recipients

• DVA Service Pension and Income Support Supplement recipients over pension age

• other Income Support recipients over pension age.

The number of people over pension age uses the Australian Bureau of Statistics population projection.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• DVA administrative data

• Australian Bureau of Statistics data - Population Projections, Australia 2017-2066,*which draws on the base population data set released on 20 September 2018.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Age Pension $52,695.74m $50,077.91m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Age Pension 2.60m 2.56m

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

Age Pension 2,731 97.13% 0.60%

Program Analysis There is a long-term trend of a gradual reduction in the proportion of senior Australians receiving the Age Pension, driven by a range of factors. New retirees have more assets at retirement than previous cohorts due to the maturation of the superannuation system. There has also been an increase in the number of senior Australians over pension age remaining in the workforce longer. The number of Age Pension recipients has remained steady over 2020-21. There was an increase in Age Pension expenditure due to the three Economic Support Payments paid to Age Pensioners in 2020-21.

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Table 2.1.8: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Program 1.7 - Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to make payments and provide services to senior Australians to assist with household expenses, enabling them to maintain their standard of living.

Key Activity - Energy Supplement for Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders

The Energy Supplement is a key activity of the Allowances and Concessions for Seniors Program. The Energy Supplement aims to make payments to eligible senior Australians to assist with their household expenses including energy costs.

The Energy Supplement is paid to Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders who have maintained eligibility for the payment since 19*September 2016. Eligible Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders receive the Energy Supplement quarterly in arrears. People who became eligible for the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card from 20 September 2016 are not eligible for the Energy Supplement.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Government and implementing decisions of Government including through legislation, policies and guidelines designing and implementing the Energy Supplement. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Energy Supplement, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Performance Measure

To provide financial support to eligible senior Australians to assist with their household expenses.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 54, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 11

Target

100% of eligible Commonwealth 2020-21

Health Card holders receive the Energy Target Resulta Outcome

Supplement each year.

100% 100% Met

Rationale

Measuring financial support to eligible senior Australians to assist with their household expenses aims to demonstrate that senior Australians have been assisted financially with their energy costs. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Energy Supplement in achieving the objective of the key activity: eligible senior Australians are assist with their household expenses including energy costs.

Targeting 100 per cent of eligible Commonwealth Health Card holders receive the Energy Supplement each year demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing that all payments are provided to financially support eligible people with their household expenses*including energy costs, according to the legislation. Where the measure falls below 100 per cent, it signifies that the payment is not being effectively delivered in accordance with the legislation.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.7 - Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

Methodology

The percentage is based on the proportion of eligible Commonwealth Health Card holders that receive the Energy Supplement each year. The methodology is a count of Commonwealth Seniors Health Care Card holders who were entitled to the card on 19 September 2016, compared to the number of card holders who received the Energy Supplement for the financial*year.

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Energy Supplement $587.53m $378.73m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Energy Supplement 267,394 281,651

Program Analysis

The legislation implemented from 20 September 2016 restricts payment of Energy Supplement to those who have continually received the payment prior to and since 19 September 2016. This means the number of recipients of Energy Supplement continues to decrease each year consistent with the number of eligible Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders who have continually received the payment since the policy change on 19*September*2016.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The result is based on data from Services Australia for the 2020-21 March and June quarters. Following automatic payment for each quarter, Services Australia conducts a manual check of all instances where the Energy Supplement has not been paid to eligible Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders. Those who are determined to be eligible but have not yet been paid are identified and paid in arrears. This process was underway at the time of reporting.

• Eligible recipients do not include Commonwealth Seniors Health Care Card holders who qualified for the card from 20 September 2016 and those who may be temporarily ineligible for reasons such as being overseas at the time.

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Table 2.1.9: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Program 1.8 - Income Support for People With Disability

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to make payments to eligible people with a disability who are unable to support themselves to achieve financial independence.

Key Activity - Disability Support Pension

The Disability Support Pension is a key activity of the Income Support for People with Disability. The key activity aims to make payments to eligible people with a disability who cannot fully support themselves.

The Disability Support Pension is an income support payment, paid fortnightly, to people who are unable to work for at least 15 hours per week for the next two years due to permanent physical, intellectual or psychiatric impairment.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing the Disability Support Pension, including policy development, legislation, advice, ongoing monitoring and analysis. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Disability Support Pension on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering the Disability Support Pension at the correct rate.

Performance Measure

Extent to which people of working age with a pr

ofound or severe disability are paid Disability

Support Pension.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 55, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 12

Target

90% of people with a profound or severe 2020-21

disability of working age are supported by Target Result Outcome

the Disability Support Pension.

*90% 95.5% Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which people of working age with a profound or severe disability are paid Disability Support Pension

aims to demonstrate eligible people with a disability who cannot fully support themselves are being financially assisted. That is, that those with sufficient means should not receive Disability Support Pension. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Disability Support Pension in achieving the objective of the key activity: to make payments to eligible people with disability who cannot fully support themselves.

Targeting 90 per cent of people with a profound or severe disability of working age to be supported by the Disability Support Pension demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing:

• a significant percentage of the eligible people with a severe disability who are unable to support themselves are in receipt of financial support

• funding is targeted to financially assist people with disability who are unable to support themselves to achieve financial independence.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.8 - Income Support for People With Disability

Methodology

The number of People receiving Disability Support Pension is based on the number of people receiving Disability Support Pension aged 16-64 inclusive who are manifestly eligible or have an assessed work capacity of 0 to 14 hours.

The number of people with a profound or severe disability of working age is based on the number of Australians who are severely or profoundly disabled between the age of 15-64.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Australian Bureau of Statistics Survey - Disability, Ageing and Carers Australia. Released 2018.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Disability Support Pension $18,361.70m $17,739.32m

Mobility Allowance $36.18m $41.74m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Disability Support Pension 753,009 754,181

Mobility Allowance a 12,412 13,463

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

Disability Support Pension 1,900 97.12% 0.76%

Program Analysis

The number of people receiving Disability Support Pension has decreased slightly from 2019-20, noting total recipients has fluctuated in recent years. This follows a reduction in total recipients since 2013-14 following multiple changes to assessment processes and eligibility. In recent years, the proportion of claims granted has increased. This, coupled with the increasing pension age, has contributed to a slowdown in exits, which has resulted in total recipient numbers being relatively stable over the past five years.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The decrease is due to recipients transitioning to the National Disability Insurance Scheme as the roll out was completed. Mobility Allowance is not payable to those in receipt of a National Disability Insurance Scheme package.

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Table 2.1.10: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Program 1.9 - Income Support for Carers

This program aims to make payments and allowances to financially assist eligible carers of people with disability or a severe medical condition.

Key Activities - Carer Payment and Carer Allowance

The Carer Payment and Carer Allowance are key activities of the Income Support for Carers Program and provide payments to eligible carers of people with disability or a severe medical condition.

Carer Payment may be paid where the constant care a carer provides to a child (under 16 years) or an adult with a disability or medical condition, prevents them from supporting themselves through paid employment. The care must be required for at least six months unless the condition is terminal, or if caring for a child, short term (between 3-6 months) or episodic. Carer Payment recipients automatically qualify for a Pensioner Concession Card and short term or episodic carers a Health Care Card. Carer Payment is income and assets tested and paid at the same rate as other social security pensions. Carer Payment recipients may also qualify for Carer Allowance.

Carer Allowance is a fortnightly payment for carers who provide daily care and attention to a child (under 16 years) or an adult. The care must be provided in a private home and a partnered income test of $250,000 per annum applies. Carer Allowance can be shared by two people who are not members of the same couple, if both provide qualifying care. A carer can qualify for Carer Allowance for an unlimited number of children and up to two adults.

The department is responsible for policy development and program management of Carer Payment and Carer Allowance, including policy development, legislation, advice, ongoing monitoring and analysis. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the Carer Payment and Carer Allowance on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and making payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, carers unable to fully support themselves.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 56, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 12

Target

2020-21

Target Result

70% 75.2%

70% of primary carers in Australia are supported by Carer Payment and/or Carer Allowance.

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, carers unable to fully support themselves aims to demonstrate carers of people with disability or a severe medical condition are financially assisted. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of carer payments in achieving the objectives of the key activities.

Targeting 70 per cent of primary carers in Australia are supported by Carer Payment and/or Carer Allowance demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing a significant per cent of eligible carers who are unable to fully support themselves are in receipt of financial support.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.9 - Income Support for Carers

Methodology

The number of primary carers in Australia that are supported is calculated using the number of payment recipients of Carer Payment and/or Carer Allowance.

The number of primary carers in Australia is based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics - Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Australian Bureau of Statistics - Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers. Released 2018.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Carer Payment $6,519.64m $6,144.30m

Carer Allowance (Adult) $1,875.15m $1,783.41m

Carer Allowance (Child) $650.47m $631.13m

Carer Supplement $594.47m $587.33m

Child Disability Assistance Payment $186.73m $181.81m

Wife Pension (Disability Support Pension)a - $47.84m

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Carer Payment 300,121 294,272

Carer Allowance (Adult and Child)b 623,742 619,038

Carer Supplement 645,605 638,761

Child Disability Assistance Payment 162,182 158,308

Wife Pension (Disability Support Pension)a - -

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

Carer Payment 1,059 94.81% 1.39%

Carer Allowance 354 95.34% 2.36%

(Adult and Child)

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Program 1.9 - Income Support for Carers

Program Analysis

There was a slight increase in Carer Payment and Carer Allowance populations, with growth of almost two per cent. The increase is due, in part, to a reduction in people leaving Carer Payment and/or Carer Allowance in 2020-21. The Economic Support Payments paid to carers in 2020-21 contributed to the increase in expenditure.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Wife (Age & Disability Support) Pension and Widow B Pension closed on 20 March 2020.

b Excludes carers whose care receiver qualified for a Health Care Card only.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table 2.1.11: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.10 - Working Age Payments

This program aims to assist people who are temporarily unable to support themselves through*work or have a limited capacity to work due to disability or caring responsibilities for young children.

Key Activities - JobSeeker Payment, Parenting Payment & Youth Allowance (other)

The JobSeeker Payment, Parenting Payment & Youth Allowance (other) are key activities of the Working Age Payments Program.

Working age payments assist people who are temporarily unable to support themselves through work or who have a limited capacity to work due to disability or caring responsibilities as well as bereaved partners. Eligibility for payments is targeted with means testing and supplementary payments are available where people have additional costs, ensuring that assistance is directed to those with the greatest need. Recipients who have the capacity to work are required to actively seek it and may be required to attend training or work experience to improve their job prospects.

JobSeeker Payment aims to provide income support for eligible people aged between 22*years and Age Pension qualification age who are looking for work, who temporarily cannot work or study because of an injury or illness, or bereaved partners in the period immediately following the death of their partners. The creation of the JobSeeker Payment was part of working age payment reforms legislated in 2018. As part of the reforms, seven payments were progressively ceased and JobSeeker Payment created. Payments that were ceased or scheduled to be ceased include Newstart Allowance, Wife Pension and Widow B Pension on 20*March 2020; Bereavement Allowance and Sickness Allowance on 20 September 2020; as well as, Widow Allowance and Partner Allowance (1 January 2022).

Parenting Payment aims to provide income support for single parents, partnered parents, or guardians with parenting responsibilities for a young child and provides them with incentives to increase their workforce participation.

Youth Allowance (other) aims to make payments to eligible young people 16-21 years of*age, who are looking for full time work or undertaking approved activities.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Government and implementing Government decisions including through legislation, policies and guidelines. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the key activities on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.10 - Working Age Payments Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Performance Measure

Extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, people unable to fully support themselves.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 57, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 13

Target

Changes in recipient numbers align with 2020-21

movements in the unemployment rate. Target Result Outcome

Changes align Changes aligned Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which payments are made to, or with respect to, people unable to fully support themselves aims to demonstrate that people who are temporarily unable to support themselves through work, or have a limited capacity to work due to a disability or caring responsibilities, are assisted financially. This measure demonstrates that Jobseeker Payment, Parenting Payment and Youth Allowance (other) are responsive to changes in the economy. This linkage between economy and recipient numbers achieves the objective of the key activities: to financially assist people who are temporarily unable to support themselves through work or have a limited capacity to work.

Targeting changes in recipient numbers align with movements in the unemployment rate demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activities, by showing the system responds to need in the community when unemployment rates are high and that those leaving working age payments are able to support themselves through work when unemployment rates are low. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of payment policy in providing the right incentives for income support recipients to take up available work.

Methodology

The number of people supported by working age payments is calculated using the number of recipients of:

• JobSeeker Payment

• Parenting Payment (Partnered and Single)

• Youth Allowance (other)

The unemployment rate uses the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Labour Force Survey - Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Australian Bureau of Statistics, Labour Force Survey - Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate. Released 15 July 2021.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

2

Program 1.10 - Working Age Payments

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

JobSeeker Payment $27,409.40m $18,528.09m

Parenting Payment (Partnered) $1,591.14m $1,113.98m

Parenting Payment (Single) $6,200.18m $5,183.56m

Partner Allowance $8.14m $14.58m

Pensioner Education Supplement $34.44m $37.43m

Sickness Allowancea - $93.52m

Widow Allowance $88.82m $138.41m

Youth Allowance (other) $2,370.48m $1,726.72m

Number of recipients

2020-21b 2019-20

JobSeeker Payment 1,001,253 1,441,287

Parenting Payment (Partnered) 83,518 92,022

Parenting Payment (Single) 237,478 243,433

Partner Allowance 56 652

Pensioner Education Supplement 21,775 22,530

Sickness Allowancea 0 6

Widow Allowance 1,253 5,549

Youth Allowance (other) 107,885 173,125

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

JobSeeker Payment 4,878 83.26% 1.19%

Parenting Payment (Partnered) 1,106 83.82% 2.81%

Parenting Payment (Single) 2,117 93.43% 1.49%

Partner Allowance 353 96.23% 1.96%

Widow Allowance 354 95.97% 1.94%

Youth Allowance (other) 1,900 82.94% 2.03%

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security

Program 1.10 - Working Age Payments

Program Analysis

The performance target for 2020-21 was achieved for Program 1.10 as the number of working age payment recipients and the unemployment rate, as measured by Australian Bureau of Statistics, trended downwards and were therefore aligned.

A key feature of 2020 was the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic that resulted in significant numbers of Australians losing their jobs or having their working hours reduced. For people who were ineligible to receive JobKeeper Payment, JobSeeker Payment was the main avenue to receive support from Government. A number of temporary measures were implemented, including the waiver of the assets test and a number of waiting periods and changes to income tests and eligibility rules all of which were intended to allow as many people as possible to access the income support system in a time of economic uncertainty. The COVID-19 pandemic and resultant policy changes meant that the number of payment recipients increased significantly, along with the unemployment rate. A rebound in the economy, as businesses started to reopen, as well as changes in policy settings such as ending the assets test waiver and reducing the amount of the Coronavirus Supplement assisted in reducing the number of people reliant on income support.

Except for a few, most temporary measures ended on 31 March 2021. The remaining measures, such as waiver of the Ordinary Waiting Period, ended on 30 June 2021, by which time the number of working age payment recipients was around 500,000 less than at the same time in June 2020.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Sickness Allowance and Bereavement Allowance ceased on 20 September 2020, following closure to new recipients from 20 March 2020, as part of the Welfare Reform measures that also closed or ceased Newstart Allowance, Wife Pension, Widow B Pension, Partner Allowance and Widow Allowance and created JobSeeker Payment.

b Recipients as at 25 June 2021

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Table 2.1.12: Key activity performance

2

Program 1.11 - Student Payments

This program aims to achieve growth in skills, qualifications and productivity through providing income support and other financial assistance to students to assist them to undertake further education and training. The program also aims to increase access and participation by Indigenous Australian students in school education, vocational education and training and higher education and accelerate their educational outcomes.

Key Activity - Austudy, Youth Allowance (Student) and ABSTUDY

Austudy, Youth Allowance (Student) and ABSTUDY are key activities of the Student Payments Program.

Austudy aims to make payments to eligible students or apprentices aged 25 years and over who are in need of financial assistance to undertake education or training.

Youth Allowance (student) aims to make payments to eligible students or apprentices aged 16-24 years who are in need of financial assistance to undertake education or training.

ABSTUDY aims to provide a group of payments to eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students or apprentices to address the particular educational disadvantages faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The department is responsible for providing advice to Government on policy and legislation for the key activities, including setting guidelines and providing advice on eligibility criteria. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering the key activities on the department’s behalf, including managing applications and making payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which payment recipients have improved financial self-reliance.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 58, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 13

Target

Proportion of Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and ABSTUDY recipients who are not receiving income support 3/6/12 months after exiting student payments align with movements in the unemployment rate.

Target

Movements align

2020-21

Result

Movements aligned

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which payment recipients have improved financial self-reliance aims to demonstrate that students receive income support and other financial assistance to achieve growth in skills, qualifications, and productivity and have improved self-reliance. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of student payments in achieving the objectives of the key activities: recipients have improved financial self-reliance.

Targeting a proportion of recipients who are not receiving income support after exiting student payments, aligns with movements in the unemployment rate demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing that those leaving the temporary payments are able to support themselves through employment.

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Methodology

The number of recipients exiting student payments is calculated using the number of:

• recipients that exit from Austudy, Youth Allowance (Student) and ABSTUDY over a 12 month calendar year, where the recipient has been on a student payment for more than three months

• recipient numbers for the 12 months following the calendar year of exit.

The unemployment rate uses the annual average of the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate, Australian Bureau of Statistics, National Accounts, Labour Force Australia.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Australian Bureau of Statistics, National Accounts - Labour Force, Australia. Released June 2021.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Austudy $832.55m $609.15m

Youth Allowance (student) $3,459.58m $2,685.77m

ABSTUDY (Secondary) $225.66m $178.63m

ABSTUDY (Tertiary) $174.14m $143.83m

Student Start-up Loan a - -

Student Start-up Loan (ABSTUDY) a - -

Number of recipients

2020-21 2019-20

Austudy b 41,870 34,360

ABSTUDY- Secondary b 19,095 18,201

ABSTUDY-Tertiary b 10,904 10,470

Youth Allowance (student) bc 210,833 177,700

Student Start-up Loan de 96,250 101,115

Student Start-up Loan - ABSTUDY d 2,267 2,373

Payment accuracy

2020-21

Number of Accuracy Confidence

recipients interval +/-

surveyed

ABSTUDY (Secondary and Tertiary) 496 73.93% 4.45%

Austudy 691 80.56% 3.23%

Youth Allowance (student) 1,297 85.31% 2.07%

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Program 1.11 - Student Payments

Program Analysis

The performance target for 2020-21 was achieved for Program 1.11. The movement in people exiting payment and not receiving income support aligned with movements in the annual average of the unemployment rate as measured by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The proportion of people exiting Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and ABSTUDY and not receiving income support 3/6/12 months after exiting payment decreased compared to the previous year. The annual average unemployment rate for the 2020 calendar year, increased in the same period showing the alignment between student payments, study outcomes and the economic environment.

The number of Austudy and Youth Allowance (student) recipients has increased on the previous year while other payment recipient numbers have remained relatively stable. These results can, in part, be explained by the economic downturn that occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic that reduced opportunities for people to work. The labour market downturn over the year may have encouraged people to take up study, increase study or continue in study due to limited employment prospects. Youth Allowance (student), and Austudy are the most commonly accessed student payments and provided financial assistance for people who undertook study in this period. A number of policy changes were made to payments under Program 1.11, such as the introduction of the Coronavirus Supplement of (initially) $550 a fortnight in April 2020, and*subsequently extended at varying amounts to 31 March 2021, to existing recipients of income support payments including Youth Allowance (student), Austudy and ABSTUDY (Living Allowance). Some waiting periods, such as the Liquid Assets Waiting Period (LAWP) and the Seasonal Work Preclusion Period (SWPP) were also waived. The majority of these temporary measures have now ceased. A permanent increase to working age payment rates, including Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and ABSTUDY (Living Allowance), was implemented from 1*April 2021.

Other temporary policy changes were made to ABSTUDY in 2020-21 to support secondary students and their families who were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This included supporting boarding students to travel home because of COVID-19 lockdowns and to return to school when it was safe to do so, and continuing payments to schools, boarding providers and families to allow secondary students to remain engaged and remotely access education.

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Program 1.11 - Student Payments

Percentage of recipients who are not receiving income support 3/6/12 months after exiting Student Payments f

2020-21 2019-20

Austudy

within 3 months 67.3% 69.1%

within 6 months 61.4% 71.4%

within 12 months 57.8% 75.3%

Youth Allowance (student)g

within 3 months 75.7% 77.5%

within 6 months 69.1% 80.5%

within 12 months 68.1% 84.0%

ABSTUDY (Secondary and Tertiary) h

within 3 months 58.1% 60.9%

within 6 months 49.9% 58.6%

within 12 months 45.9% 57.7%

Caveats and Disclosures

a Nil expenses for 2020-21 and 2019-20 due to the implementation of AASB9 - Financial Instruments.

b These figures are monthly averages due to the seasonal nature of Student Payments.

c Includes Australian apprentices.

d These figures are unique counts of recipients across the calendar year due to the nature of the payment.

e Youth Allowance and Austudy recipients only.

f Group comprises recipients who exited from Student Payments in calendar years 2019 and 2018.

g Includes Australian apprentices.

h ABSTUDY Living Allowance only.

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Table 2.1.13: Key activity performance

2

Cross-Program - Rent Assistance

This program aims to assist Australians receiving income support or family assistance payments with the cost of their private rental or community housing.

Key Activity - Rent Assistance

Rent Assistance is a supplementary payment for eligible income support recipients and families renting in the private rental market or community housing. Individuals receiving the following payments may be eligible for Rent Assistance:

• Age Pension, Carer Payment or Disability Support Pension

• ABSTUDY Living Allowance, Austudy or Youth Allowance

• Widow Allowance

• Partner Allowance or Special Benefit

• Family Tax Benefit (FTB) - Part A

• Parenting Payment, partnered and single

• JobSeeker Payment or Farm Household Allowance.

Rent Assistance cannot be claimed on its own. It is only paid if a person is receiving a social security pension, allowance or FTB Part A. In addition, the person must be paying rent above a minimum threshold amount.

Rent Assistance is paid at the rate of 75 cents for each dollar of rent paid above the rent threshold, up to the maximum rate. Rent thresholds and maximum rates of Rent Assistance vary depending on the person’s family circumstances and whether their Rent Assistance is added on a social security payment or FTB Part A. For single people without children, the maximum rate also varies according to whether or not accommodation is shared with others.

Rent Assistance is paid fortnightly with the recipient’s main payment and may be reduced due to the income and asset test rules applying to that payment.

The department’s role is policy development and program management of Rent Assistance, including to undertake:

• policy development, legislation and advice

• ongoing monitoring and analysis.

Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering Rent Assistance on the department’s behalf, including:

• receiving, processing and managing payment applications

• delivering rent assistance at the correct rate to each recipient.

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Cross-Program - Rent Assistance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.1 Outcome 1: Social Security Performance Measure

Extent to which income support or family payment recipients are assisted with the costs of renting private or community housing.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 60, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 14

Target

Of the individuals and families renting and receiving Rent Assistance, the proportion experiencing rental stress after receipt of Rent Assistance is at least 25 percentage points lower than it would be without Rent Assistance.

2020-21

Target Resulta Outcome

Rental stress at least 25 percentage points lower than it would be without

26.8 percentage points lower Met

Rent Assistance

Rationale

The effectiveness of Rent Assistance in achieving its objective can be estimated by measuring the extent to which rental stress is reduced. Measuring the proportion of individuals and families receiving Rent Assistance experiencing rental stress and setting the benchmark to reducing rental stress by at least 25 percentage points, than it would be without rent assistance will demonstrate the extent people who cannot fully support themselves are supported with the costs of renting.

The department directly contributes to achieving this target because it is responsible for implementing, monitoring Rent Assistance activities and providing advice to government.

Methodology

Rental stress is defined as a rent assistance recipient paying more than 30 per cent of their household income on rent. The proportion of individuals and families experiencing rental stress after receipt of Rent Assistance is calculated using:

1. percentage of Rent Assistance recipients paying more than 30 per cent of their income in rent excluding Rent Assistance

2. percentage of Rent Assistance recipients paying more than 30 per cent of their income in rent including Rent Assistance

3. calculate the difference between (1) and (2).

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Housing Data Set.

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Cross-Program - Rent Assistance

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Rent Assistance Income Unitsb

2020-21c 2019-20d

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Number of Commonwealth Rent Assistance income units 1,491,092 1,700,166

Program Analysis

Rent Assistance recipient households increased from 1.3 million in March 2020 to around 1.5 million in June*2021. This resulted in an increase in Commonwealth Rent Assistance expenditure by 12.8 per cent from $4.7 billion in 2019-20 to $5.4 billion in 2020-21. Total Commonwealth Rent Assistance recipients increased to 1.7 million in 2019-20, from 1.3 million in 2018-19. This was mainly driven by Rent Assistance expenditure for recipient households receiving JobSeeker Payment, which grew by around 43.4 per cent (from 291,539 in March 2020 to 417,971 in June 2021) due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The percentage of Commonwealth Rent Assistance income units in rental stress before and after receiving Commonwealth Rent Assistance for 2018-19 were 68.9 per cent before and 40.5 per cent after. The results for 2017-18 were 68.3 per cent before and 40.3 per cent after.

As the economy recovers, total Commonwealth Rent Assistance expenditure for JobSeeker is projected to fall in 2021-22 by 20.2 per cent from the previous year. In 2021-22, the Australian Government expects to spend around $5.3 billion on Rent Assistance to assist around 1.5 million eligible households pay their rent. The latest data (June 2021) shows Rent Assistance reduced the proportion of households in rental stress by 26.8 percentage points, from 72.5 per cent to 45.7 per cent.

Percentage of Commonwealth Rent Assistance income units in rental stress before and after receiving Commonwealth Rent Assistance

2020-21 2019-20e

Before 72.5% 55.4%

After 45.7% 29.4%

Caveats and Disclosures

a Refers to last fortnight during the reporting year.

b A recipient household or ‘income unit’ comprises a single person (with or without dependent children) or a couple (with or without dependent children) receiving a social security or family assistance payment and expected to share financial resources. Single social security recipients living together in the same dwelling are regarded as separate recipient households.

Refers to last Friday in June during the reporting year.

d Refers to last fortnight during the reporting year.

e The decrease in rental stress for the fortnight ending 26 June 2020 was most likely due to factors, including Government support, relating to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

Chapter 2.2

Outcome 2: Families and Communities

Purpose Contribute to stronger and more resilient individuals, children, families and communities by providing targeted supports.

Programs and activities Outcome 2 comprises three programs underpinned by a number of activities that seek to contribute to stronger and more resilient individuals, children, families and communities. The diagram below depicts how this purpose is translated into measurable activities.

OUTCOME 2 - FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES

Program 2.1

Families and Communities

Program 2.2 Paid Parental Leave

Program 2.3

Social and Community Services

Key activities Key activities Key activities

• Families and Children • Parental Leave Pay • Social and Community Services

• Family Safety • Dad and Partner Pay Pay Equity Account

• Protecting Australia’s Children • Financial Wellbeing and Capability • Volunteering and Community

Connectedness • Cashless Debit Card • National Redress Scheme for

Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

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■

■

■

2

Summary and analysis of Outcome 2 In 2020-21, the department achieved most targets across Outcome 2. Overall, we*met 13 performance measure targets, partially met one, and did not meet three.

We deliver our targeted supports in an environment where outcomes for children, families and communities are impacted by other factors, such as individual aspirations, the resources available to them, and their capabilities in relation to parenting, relationships and financial management. Our focus is on supporting individuals, children and families to develop these capabilities to help them build resilience and be independent and active contributors to our community.

We support individuals, children and families to improve their lifetime wellbeing by targeting our activities to address specific needs that have been identified by them, and in ways that the evidence demonstrates will work. We do this through a range of grants programs, procurements and subsidies that are delivered directly to individuals, or through non-government providers.

Our performance in supporting individuals, children, families and communities is complemented by the contributions made by other government agencies, states and territories, and families and local communities themselves.

Figure 10: Outcome 2 performance measure target results

76%

18%

6% Met

Partially Met

Not Met

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

In supporting vulnerable individuals, children, families and communities in 2020-21, we have worked in partnership with government and non-government organisations, community leaders, business and the public, including survivors of abuse and violence and those with lived experience.

Through these partnerships, we have delivered strategies to contribute to ending violence against women and their children and reducing child abuse and neglect.

We have supported individuals and families to navigate financial crisis and build financial capability, including through our work with states and territories on reducing gambling harm through the National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering and our investment in cashless welfare. We have provided immediate financial or material aid assistance to Australians in need through the Emergency Relief and Food Relief programs, and in 2020-21 we have continued to support the National Coordination Group, which was established in early 2020 to provide advice to Government on the delivery of Emergency Relief and Food Relief nationally in response to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.

We have supported increased access to volunteering opportunities for vulnerable people and communities through the Volunteer Management Activity. Through the Strong and Resilient Communities Activity, we have supported local level activities that aim to build community resilience, cohesion and harmony.

In 2020-21, we continued to support survivors of childhood abuse through the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse.

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Key achievements

In the past year, our contributions to improving the outcomes for families and communities included:

■ Supporting 3,225 survivors to access redress through the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Abuse, with 491 non-government organisations now participating in the Scheme including 268 and on-boarding in 2020-21.

■ Delivering the Cashless Debit Card in existing sites and implementing the card in the Northern Territory and Cape York.

■ Allocating an additional $44.5 million through the community sector to provide further front-line assistance to vulnerable people in response to the COVID-19 pandemic through the Emergency Relief and Food Relief.

■ Delivering key activities under the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020 and working with states and territories, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership Group and the community sector on developing the next national successor framework, expected to be in place in the second quarter of 2021-22.

■ Supporting development of the Government’s $1.1 billion investment in women’s safety announced in the 2021-22 Budget, including $600 million from 2021-22 to 2024-25 in the Social Services portfolio.

■ Delivering improvements to the Families and Children Activity where more than $1.2 billion over five years has been allocated to 230 providers, with program enhancements including strengthened outcomes and data reporting.

■ Contributing to the Closing the Gap Commonwealth Implementation Plan with responses to Targets 9 (overcrowded housing), 12 (out-of-home-care) and 13 (family violence), the priority reforms and the cross-cutting outcome of disability. This included $98 million in new investment to address Targets 12, 13 and disability.

■ Delivered changes to the Paid Parental Leave Scheme to support working parents impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, by allowing time spent on the JobKeeper Payment to count towards the Paid Parental Leave work test.

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Outcome 2 key performance results Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program Key Activities Target Result

2.1 Families and Communities

Families and Children At least 75% of clients in reporting services have improved family functioning.

Met

At least 90% of members are satisfied with support received from funded service providers.

Not Met

Family Safety Successful implementation of departmental actions to contribute towards a reduction in women experiencing family, domestic and sexual violence and a reduction in attitudes supportive of violence.

Met

Protecting Australia’s Children A new children's strategy is approved/ adopted by Commonwealth, State and

Territory First Ministers, by June 2021.

Partially Met

Financial Wellbeing and Capability At least a 20% reduction in the number of people with multiple requests for

Emergency Relief.

At least 70% of people report an improvement in their financial well-being following engagement with a funded service.

Met

Met

Volunteering and Community Connectedness

80% of surveyed grant recipients considered the grants assisted in meeting their objective.

Met

At least 85% of participants report satisfaction with the quality of the Be Connected program supports.

Met

At least 80% of participants report satisfaction with the quality of FriendLine support.

Met

Cashless Debit Card Evaluation results show improvements in social outcomes.

95% of Cashless Debit Card participants have activated their card and are using their card to purchase non-restricted items.

Met

Met

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Program Key Activities Target Result

National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

Parental Leave Pay

At least 80% of applications lodged between 1 July 2020 and 31 December 2020 that name institutions that participate in the Scheme have a decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received by the Scheme.

In the prior six month period at least 80% of applications lodged in that period that name institutions that participate in the Scheme have a decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received by the Scheme.

Engagement of newly named institutions continues, and current participation is maintained, with institutions on board to cover 90% of*applications received.

95% of eligible Parental Leave Pay families access payment.

Not Met

Not Met

Met

2.2 Paid Parental Leave

Met

Dad and Partner Pay 95% of eligible Dad and Partner Pay claimants access payment. Met

2.3 Social and Community Services

Social and Community Services Pay Equity Account

100% of eligible grant recipients will receive the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account payments as required by legislation by 30 June 2021.

Met

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

Outcome 2: Key activity performance

Table 2.2.1: Key activity performance

Program 2.1 - Families And Communities

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Families and Children

Families and Children is an activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Families and Children activity aims to provide services and initiatives to support families, strengthen relationships, improve the wellbeing of children and young people, enhance family and community functioning and build capacity within the families and communities sector.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing the Families and Children key activity, including designing policy and legislation and designing and managing grants. The department provides grants to:

• families and children service providers and families

• families and communities service improvement peak bodies and representative organisations.

Families and children service providers deliver early intervention and prevention activities to improve the wellbeing of families and children, including after separation, enhance family functioning and strengthen communities.

Families and communities service improvement peak bodies and representative organisations inform the Australian Government’s social policy and support and encourage the continuous improvement of Government grant funded services.

Performance Measure

Extent to which individuals have improved individual and family functioning.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 69, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 16

Target

2020-21

Target Result

At least 75% of clients in reporting services have improved family*functioning. * 75 % 75%

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which individuals have improved individual and family functioning aims to demonstrate that families and children service providers have strengthened family and community functioning. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Families and Children in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide services and initiatives to support families, strengthen relationships, improve the wellbeing of children and young people, enhance family and community functioning, and build capacity within the families and communities sector.

Targeting 75 per cent of clients in reporting services have improved family functioning demonstrates the effectiveness and proportion of clients reporting improved individual and family functioning.

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Program 2.1 - Families And Communities

Methodology

Funded service providers conduct an assessment with a sample of clients to whom they provide a service. Client circumstances data is based on an assessment of the client’s functioning: pre-service to establish a base-line and post service to record the outcome achieved.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Data Exchange, Standard Client / Community Outcome Reporting (SCORE) - Client Circumstances and Client*Goals.

Performance Measure

Extent to which families and communities service improvement organisations support and drive continuous improvement of member organisations.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 69, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 16

Target

At least 90% of members are satisfied 2020-21

with support received from funded service providers. Target * 90%

Result

84.3%

Outcome

Not Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which families and communities service improvement organisations support and drive continuous improvement of member organisations aims to demonstrate that families and communities service improvement organisations are sufficiently driving and promoting continuous improvement.

This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of the Families and Children in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide services and initiatives to support families, strengthen relationships, improve the wellbeing of children and young people, enhance family and community functioning, and build capacity within the families and communities sector.

Targeting 90 per cent of surveyed members are satisfied with support received from funded service providers demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing families and communities service improvement organisations have supported and driven their members to*improve.

Methodology

The department combines annual member satisfaction survey results from member surveys received from families and communities service improvement organisations, and formulates an overall average. The proportion of members that are satisfied with support received from funded service providers is based on total survey results divided by the number of families and communities service improvement organisations that provide survey results. In 2020-21, four of the six families and communities service improvement funded organisations either conducted satisfaction surveys or provided these survey results to the department.

The data sources used for this calculation are the voluntary member satisfaction surveys conducted by four of the six families and communities service improvement organisations.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

Program 2.1 - Families And Communities

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Families and Children 444,270 457,612

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

2020-21 2019-20

Families and Children 451

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Families and Children $295.04m $290.99m

Families and Communities Service Improvement $2.62m $2.73m

Program Analysis

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact service delivery to Australian families and children. Some referral pathways for vulnerable clients were disrupted as services responded to restrictions, and in-person activities were significantly curtailed. A significant number of service providers responded to COVID-19-related restrictions with rapid changes to service delivery arrangements, demonstrating their agility and ability to innovate to ensure vulnerable clients continued to be supported. The primary example was transitioning to online service delivery or, more simply, moving indoor activities to outdoor locations where social distancing could be more easily observed. Other examples included:

• purchasing necessary technology for client households to enable online delivery and to respond to increased demand for learning support, backed with training for parents and carers new to online technology

• diversifying contact methods to support the increased need for 1-to-1 contact to alleviate isolation and supplement limited face-to-face contacts through increased phone contact, texting, and email

• incorporating activities like video-gaming to support children and young people to maintain contact with friends and continue to participate in support activities with staff

• delivering activity packs for younger children to encourage participation in online activities, and provide a break for parents and carers

• increasing contact with other stakeholders including schools to support home schooling

• providing assistance to access everyday essentials like food.

430

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Program 2.1 - Families And Communities

Some service providers reported the transition to online service delivery opening up opportunities to extend their reach to regional areas, improving access for those clients. Later in the year, some reported their client groups (e.g. families with children with chronic health conditions) have embraced these changes, finding the switch to online or blended approaches a*positive change that works for them.

Internally, organisations were swift to adjust by reallocating staff from non-essential tasks, enabling staff to work from home, and redirecting funds to implementing the alternative delivery modes. While service providers and clients have demonstrated resilience to the pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic, it impacted, and is likely to continue to impact, the efficacy of services and the number and experiences of clients.

Additional funding allocated to ensure continued delivery of vital programs like Specialised Family Violence Services saw client numbers for those programs remaining steady. While client numbers declined overall slightly, services saw an improvement in outcomes, with the proportion*of clients reporting an improvement in family functioning, increasing from 74 per cent to 75 per cent in 2020-21.

This overarching measure is drawn from outcomes reported through nine circumstances including physical health, personal and family safety, and family functioning, and three Goal domains including behaviours, skills and knowledge, to truly reflect the nature of family functioning. Measuring change across multiple domains that reflect the resources, attributes and influences on family functioning helps the department to better understand outcomes. Data collection will continue to improve with families and children service providers required to report client outcomes data (Standard Client/Community Outcome Reporting) from 1 July 2022, a change that has occurred as part of a range of reforms to the Families and Children Activity.

Over the past year, the department has been working with families and children support services to continue building an evidence-based approach. This includes discussing service delivery improvements such as enhanced outcomes reporting, and the development of program logics and an outcomes framework. The department has also continued to work with peak bodies to support the sector, through sharing of information, research and strategic support through reform measures such as the Families and Children Program reform.

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Table 2.2.2: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.1 - Families And Communities

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Family Safety

Family Safety is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Family Safety key activity aims to implement the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-22 (National Plan), which includes strategies and initiatives by the Commonwealth, state and territory governments.

The department is the lead agency overseeing the National Plan and Fourth Action Plan. The*department is*also responsible for designing and implementing national services and national initiatives under the National Plan and Fourth Action Plan. The department’s role is to:

• implement 21 initiatives under the Fourth Action Plan and related policy

• design, manage and review grants

• set the national policy agenda, according to the direction of the Commonwealth Government

• provide national services that can assist people experiencing family or domestic violence.

There are 21 initiatives under the Fourth Action Plan, including:

• additional funding for 1800RESPECT

• additional Specialised Family Violence Services

• DV-alert

• enhancing data and reporting

• extending the Support for Trafficked People program

• identification of service gaps for people of diverse sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status

• Keeping Women Safe in their Homes program

• MensLine Australia’s Changing for Good program

• national standards for sexual violence responses

• Safe Places Emergency Accommodation program

• sexual violence community awareness activities.

• Stop it at the Start campaign.

State and territory governments are primarily responsible for:

• delivering frontline services, including specialist domestic violence services, perpetrator programs, emergency accommodation and generalist services such as health and family relationships

• administering justice and child protection responses through the police and the court system.

The department provides grants to service providers to deliver some of the services and projects under the 21 initiatives of the Fourth Action Plan.

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Performance Measure

Extent of contribution to a reduction in violence through successful implementation of the National Plan to reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-22.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 16

Target

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

Successful implementation a of departmental actions to contribute towards a reduction in women experiencing family, domestic and sexual violence and a reduction in attitudes supportive of violence.

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

Successful 90% of Met

implementation of departmental initiatives

departmental initiatives were implemented successfully or are on track to be implementedb

Rationale

Measuring the extent of contribution to a reduction in violence through successful implementation of the National Plan aims to demonstrate that the department has effectively implemented the initiatives it is responsible for to contribute to a reduction in violence. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of*the Family Safety key activity in achieving its objective: to implement the National Plan, which includes strategies and initiatives by the Commonwealth, state and territory governments.

Targeting successful implementation of departmental actions demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the extent that the department has contributed to successfully implementing the National Plan.

Methodology

There is a range of information used to assess measures relating to the actions or initiatives the department is directly responsible for under the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan. The majority of measures involve qualitative information provided by the Department of Social*Services program or policy area responsible for the particular departmental initiative. Information gathered includes:

• the department’s program and policy area advice on the implementation status and progress on their initiatives

• service providers contracted by Department of Social Services providing status reports or relevant data as required under a relevant grant or contract.

In some cases, some Department of Social Services Fourth Action Plan programs use the department’s data and reporting exchange system to collect information on grant’s delivery services and programs.

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Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

National Initiatives

Number of contacts (phone and online chat) 286,546c 267,869c

answered by 1800RESPECT - the National Sexual*Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service.

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

2020-21 2019-20

National Initiatives d 92

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

National Initiatives $120.17m $102.76m

Program Analysis

Violence against women and children is a complex problem that requires significant attitudinal and behavioural change to solve. Australians’ attitudes towards violence against women and gender equality are improving (2017 National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey). Despite this, the prevalence of family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia remains unacceptably high.

In 2020-21, the department continued implementation of the Fourth Action Plan, provided additional support in response to the impacts of COVID-19, and progressed development of the next National Plan.

The most recent Fourth Action Plan progress report shows 75 per cent of the 160 initiatives are ‘in progress, on track’ (August 2020). None of the delayed initiatives presented a significant risk to the successful implementation of the Fourth Action Plan.

Of the 21 initiatives that the department are directly responsible for, 19 (90 per cent) were ‘in*progress, on track’. The remaining two (10 per cent) departmental initiatives were delayed due to COVID-19 impacts (DV-alert and the Stop it at the Start Campaign). They are back on track and continuing to progress as at August 2021. The department responded to COVID-19 challenges by developing adaptive service models, including a shift to online service delivery, consultations, and training which in some cases has enabled broader access to services.

Progress against the overall National Plan is measured against four headline measures (indicators of change):

• reduced prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault

• increased proportion of women who feel safe in their communities

• reduced deaths related to domestic violence and sexual assault

• reduction in the proportion of children exposed to their mother’s or carer’s experiences of*violence.

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In regards to indicator one, there were statistically significant increases in the proportion of women reporting sexual violence and emotional abuse from 2012-2016, though the proportion of women experiencing violence from a partner they live with remained stable. This could reflect actual changes to rates of violence and/or reflect that people are more likely to feel supported to identify and report their experiences. As such, short and medium term increases are to be expected as awareness improves and there is enhanced support for people experiencing violence. The August 2020 progress report (available at https://plan4womenssafety.dss.gov.au/ first-progress-report-for-the-fourth-action-plan-2019-2022/) shows promising results against all the other indicators of change (2 to 4), with data generally trending in the intended direction. This includes an increased proportion of women who feel safe in their communities and a significant decrease in the proportion of children exposed to violence against their mothers or*carers.

The next progress report is underway, and an independent impact evaluation on the Fourth Action Plan and National Plan is due in May 2022.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Successful implementation is defined as the majority of departmental actions delivered according to specified timeframe, budget and expectations, with outputs delivered as intended.

b According to the last Fourth Action Plan progress report (August 2020), 75% of the over 160 initiatives are on track. Of the 21 initiatives that the Department of Social Services is responsible for, 19 are in progress, ‘on track’ and only 2 are ‘in progress delayed’ (DV-alert and Stop it at the Start Campaign). This 90% figure is based on the progress of the 21 initiatives the department is responsible for.

These numbers include every contact to the service, including hang-ups, pranks and wrong numbers.

d This figure includes organisations contracted or receiving grant funding under both the National Plan to*Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022, and the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020.

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Table 2.2.1c: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.1 - Families and Communities

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Protecting Australia’s Children

Protecting Australia’s Children is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Protecting Australia’s Children key activity aims to implement strategies focused on national efforts to improve the wellbeing of Australia’s children, with particular focus on the reduction of*child abuse.

The department is responsible for leading finalisation of the new National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2021-2031, which is the successor to the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020. This includes:

• drafting the content of the National Framework in collaboration with the Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care to ensure the National Framework aligns with the National Agreement on Closing the Gap

• seeking input from, and collaborating with the National Forum for Protecting Australia’s Children on the draft National Framework. The National Forum is a tripartite body that includes representatives from the Australian Government, state and territory governments, key non-government organisations and the National Children’s Commissioner

• seeking approval of the National Framework by Commonwealth, state and territory Community Services Ministers and relevant Commonwealth Ministers.

Performance Measure

Extent of contribution to creating and implementing a national children’s strategy and related*initiatives.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 77, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 17

Target

A new children's strategy is approved/adopted by Commonwealth, State and Territory First Ministers, by June 2021.

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

A new children’s strategy is approved/ adopted by June 2021.

The scope of the Partially Met

National Framework has been agreed with state and territory governments, and the National Framework is now in the final stages of agreement.

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Rationale

Measuring the extent of contribution to creating and implementing a national children’s strategy and related initiatives aims to demonstrate the department’s leadership role and contribution to delivering an agreed National Framework. This measure demonstrates achievement of the key output of the Protecting Australia’s children key activity: a new children’s strategy.

Targeting a new children’s strategy is approved/adopted by Commonwealth, State and Territory First Ministers, by June 2021 demonstrates achievement of the key output of the Protecting Australia’s Children key activity, by showing the department has made a significant contribution towards progressing agreement of the new strategy.

Methodology

A new National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2021-2031.

The data source used for this calculation is program administrative data, including:

• published National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children

• State and territory First Minister’s agreement of final strategy

• records of meetings, for example,. among Community Services Ministers and Children and Families Secretaries

• Community Services Ministers communiques.

Program Analysis

This target has been partially met. The scope of the National Framework has been agreed with state and territory governments, and the National Framework is now in the final stages of agreement. The department is continuing to work closely with a wide range of stakeholders to finalise agreement of the new National Framework through Australian, state and territory governments.

Community Services Ministers met on 29 July 2020, 11 September 2020, 27 November 2020 and 9 April 2021 to discuss the National Framework. Ministers have agreed to the vision, goal, target cohort and priority groups for the National Framework.

The National Framework will focus on children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or are vulnerable. The National Framework will also focus on areas where there will be a demonstrable benefit in having a national approach, and will include four priorities:

• national approach to early intervention and targeted support for children and families

• addressing the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection

• improving information sharing, data development and analysis

• strengthening the child and family sector workforce.

Over May and June 2021, the department engaged with states and territories, Commonwealth departments, non-government organisations and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sector leaders and experts to finalise drafting of the National Framework. A further draft will be considered by Community Service Ministers on 27 August 2021.

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Table 2.2.1d: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.1 - Families and Communities

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Financial Wellbeing and Capability

Financial Wellbeing and Capability is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Financial Wellbeing and Capability key activity aims to provide services and initiatives to provide support to vulnerable individuals and families to navigate financial crises, address financial stress and hardship, and increase financial literacy for individuals and families.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing services and initiatives for Financial Wellbeing and Capability. The department’s role is to:

• design and implement policy

• research and evaluation

• design and management of grants.

The department provides grants to Financial Wellbeing and Capability Service providers to*deliver:

• financial crisis and material aid, including the provision of emergency relief and food relief

- emergency relief provides immediate financial and/or material support to people in financial crisis

- food relief increases emergency relief organisations’ access to a cost-effective supply of food items which is provided to people in need across Australia

• financial counselling, capability and resilience provides financial counselling, financial literacy education, and access to financial services including microfinance products such as low or no interest loans

- Commonwealth Financial Counselling helps people in financial difficulty to address their financial problems and make informed choices

- financial capability services aim to help people build longer-term capability to budget and manage their money better and make informed choices

- financial resilience offers a variety of financial services and products targeted at financially vulnerable people that helps build self-reliance and provide access to financial products.

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Performance Measure

Extent to which individuals and families can navigate through financial crisis, build financial resilience and reduce vulnerability to financial shock.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 16

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

1. At least a 20% reduction in the number of people with multiple requests for Emergency*Relief.

* 20% 63% Met

2. At least 70% of people report an imrpovement in their financial well-being following engagement with a funded service.a

* 70% 73% Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which individuals and families can navigate through financial crisis, build financial resilience and reduce vulnerability to financial shock aims to demonstrate that services and initiatives have provided support to vulnerable individuals and families to navigate through financial crises and reduce vulnerability to financial shock. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Financial Wellbeing and Capability in achieving the objective of the key activity: to support vulnerable individuals and families to navigate financial crises, address financial stress and hardship, and increase financial literacy for individuals and families.

Targeting at least a 20 per cent reduction in the number of people with multiple requests for Emergency Relief demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing people who have experienced financial crisis (i.e. require Emergency Relief) reduce their subsequent reliance on Emergency Relief, indicating they are more financially resilient and have navigated through financial crisis.

Targeting at least 70 per cent of people report an improvement in their financial well-being following engagement with a funded service demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing improvements in ‘financial wellbeing’ of services clients as they navigate life transitions and/or financial stress or crisis.

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Program 2.1 - Families and Communities Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Methodology

The percentage for Emergency Relief is based on the cohort of clients that had at least five sessions of Emergency Relief within a 90 day period in the previous reporting year, and of these same clients, also had at least five sessions of Emergency Relief in a 90 day period in the current reporting year.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Data Exchange using Statistical Linkage Key match of de-identified clients.

The percentage for financial wellbeing is based on improved financial wellbeing measured as a positive change in financial wellbeing circumstances during the assistance period as compared to initial circumstances, recorded on the five-point Data Exchange Client Circumstances Standard Client/Community Outcome Reporting. The circumstance domain Standard Client/ Community Outcome Reporting used in this measure are Financial Resilience and Material Wellbeing and Basic Necessities.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Data Exchange Standard Client/Community Outcome Reporting.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Financial Wellbeing and Capability b 606,743 581,837

Income Management 29,163 26,649

• Vulnerable Welfare Payment Recipient Measure 417 1,755

• Long-term Welfare Payment Recipient Measure 18,775 16,867

• Disengaged Youth Measure 5,456 4,550

• Voluntary Income Management 2,191 3,168

• Child Protection Measure 22 124

• Cape York Welfare Reform - Income Management 0 135

• Supporting People at Risk Measure 40 50

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

Financial Wellbeing and Capability

2020-21 2019-20

• Unique count of delivery organisations 261 331

• Count of provider organisations delivering FWC activities 313 -

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

cd

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Financial Wellbeing and Capability e $216.16m $218.42m

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Program Analysis

In 2019-20, 49,915 clients accessed Emergency Relief services five or more times within a 90*day period. Of these clients, only 18,445 also accessed Emergency Relief services five or more times within 2020-21, within a 90-day period, resulting in a 63 per*cent reduction between the two financial years.

This reduction may be attributed to the impact of the increased rate of all government supports provided in 2020-21 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The department will review the measure to determine whether adjustments to the target and/or methodology are appropriate, for future performance reporting.

The department supported 606,743 clients in 2020-21 to access services under the Financial Wellbeing and Capability Activity in 2020-21. This included 460,990 Emergency Relief clients who received immediate financial or material aid, such as food, clothing, vouchers or help paying*a bill.

A sector led National Coordination Group is providing advice on the delivery of Emergency Relief and Food Relief nationally in response to the unprecedented challenges and demands presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020-21, the department delivered more than $44.5 million in grants under the Government’s $200 million Community Support Package, which is helping Emergency Relief and Food Relief providers to help those who need assistance with bills, food, clothing or petrol to increase workforce capacity (including volunteers), and to provide home delivery services.

A total of 153,398 clients accessed other Financial Wellbeing and Capability activities. This included Commonwealth Financial Counselling and Financial Capability, Financial Counselling to Help Problem Gamblers, the Financial Counselling Helpline and Financial Resilience projects. Calls to the National Debt Helpline (NDH) decreased by 30 per cent in 2020-21 compared to 2019-20, which can also be attributed to additional supports provided in 2020-2021.

Clients reported a 73 per cent improvement in financial wellbeing including in programs such as Emergency Relief where the provision of Standard Client/Community Outcome Reporting data is not mandated in grant agreements.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Performance measure 2 is calculated using individual clients only. Group (unidentified) clients are not included in the calculations for this performance measure as the Circumstance domain Standard Client/Community Outcome Reporting, which was used for this assessment, cannot be recorded for unidentified clients.

b The total clients figure is total of unique individual clients and group clients across all Financial Wellbeing and Capability activities. Clients may return several times for service but have only been counted once.

The number of delivery organisations is the unique organisations delivering Financial Wellbeing and Capability activities. This is a count of organisations delivering the program as reported through the Data Exchange. This includes organisations operating under consortium arrangements. Some organisations deliver more than one Financial Wellbeing and Capability activity but are only included once in this figure.

d The count of provider organisations includes organisations delivering multiple activities so organisations may be counted several times in this figure. The dash indicates that this was not reported for 2019-20.

e Funding is for the Financial Wellbeing and Capability Activity and Welfare Quarantining.

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Table 2.2.1e: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.1 - Families and Communities

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Volunteering and Community Connectedness

Volunteering and Community Connectedness is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Volunteering and Community Connectedness key activity aims to provide services and initiatives to strengthen communities and promote inclusion and participation in community life.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing Volunteering and Community Connectedness, which includes the following:

• volunteer grants

• volunteer management activity

• strong and resilient communities grant activity

• Be Connected

• Seniors Connected program

• designing and managing grants

• detting guidelines and determining eligibility criteria.

The department provides grants to volunteering and community connectedness service providers and community organisations to encourage, support and increase participation in volunteering.

Volunteer Grants provide funding between $1,000 and $5,000 for eligible not-for-profit community organisations to encourage volunteering and assist their volunteers in various ways.

The Volunteer Management Activity aims to create a thriving volunteering culture, which meets the changing demands for capable and committed volunteers in local communities across Australia. Funding is provided to Volunteering peak bodies to develop and implement strategies to build the capacity of Volunteer Involving Organisations (VIOs) through online volunteer management services, and break down barriers to volunteering for identified priority*groups.

Strong and Resilient Communities aims to build strong, resilient, cohesive and harmonious communities to ensure that individuals, families and communities have the opportunity to thrive, be free from intolerance and discrimination, and have capacity to respond to emerging needs and challenges.

Be Connected (Digital Literacy for Older Australians) is an Australian Government initiative aimed at increasing the confidence, skills and online safety of older Australians in using digital technology. Be*Connected adopts a community-centred approach to assist individuals aged 50 years and over, who have little or no experience with digital technology. Be Connected is delivering a range of resources specifically designed to support older Australians.

Seniors Connected aims to address loneliness and social isolation experienced by older Australians aged over 55 living in the community (or Indigenous Australians aged 50 or over). It includes Seniors Hubs being implemented, and a phone line:

- FriendLine - Friends for Good will increase the capacity of their existing telephone service FriendLine (1800 4 CHATS) offering older Australians an opportunity to call and have a free, anonymous, friendly chat with a volunteer over the phone.

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Performance Measure

Extent to which volunteer grant recipients are satisfied with the program.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 17

Target

80% of surveyed grant recipients 2020-21

considered the grants assisted in meeting their objective. Target * 80%

Result a

99.23%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which volunteer grant recipients are satisfied with the program aims to demonstrate that volunteer grants support eligible not-for-profit community organisations to encourage volunteers and volunteering. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Volunteering and Community Connectedness in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide services and initiatives to strengthen communities and promote inclusion and participation in community life.

Targeting at least 80 per cent of grant recipients demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the proportion of Volunteer Organisations recipients who report the grants assisted in meeting their objective.

Methodology

The number of surveyed grant recipients is based on the number of grant recipients that complete the survey. The number of surveyed grant recipients who considered the grants assisted in meeting their objective is based on the results of the survey.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Volunteer Grant Recipient Satisfaction Survey. The survey was opened to grant recipients on 29 April 2021 and closed on 30 June 2021.

Performance Measure

Extent to which participants are satisfied with the support received through the Be Connected program to develop their digital skills, confidence and online safety.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 17

Target

At least 85% of participants report 2020-21

satisfaction with the quality of the Be*Connected program supports. Target * 85%

Result

89.12%

Outcome

Met

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Rationale

Measuring the extent to which participants are satisfied with the support received through the Be Connected program to develop their digital skills, confidence and online safety aims to demonstrate Be Connected supports older Australians to increase digital technology confidence, skills and online safety. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Volunteering and Community Connectedness in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide services and initiatives to strengthen communities and promote inclusion and participation in community life.

Targeting at least 85 per cent of participants who report satisfaction with the quality of the Be Connected program demonstrates the effectiveness of the proportion of participants that are satisfied with the support received through the Be Connected program.

Methodology

The number of participants the Be Connected program supports is based on the number participants of the Esafety commission survey and the Good Things Foundation survey. The number of participants which report satisfaction with the quality of the Be Connected program is*based on the results of the surveys.

The data sources used for this calculation are the E-Safety Commission survey and Good Things Foundation survey.

Performance Measure

Extent to which participants (seniors connected) are satisfied with the support received through Friend Line to help address loneliness and social isolation.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 17

Target

At least 80% of participants report 2020-21

satisfaction with the quality of FriendLine support. Target * 80%

Result

99.75%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which participants (Seniors Connected) are satisfied with the support received through FriendLine to help address loneliness and social isolation aims to demonstrate Seniors Connected supports service providers to provide resources to older Australians to mitigate loneliness and social isolation. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Volunteering and Community Connectedness in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide services and initiatives to strengthen communities and promote inclusion and participation in community life.

Targeting at least 80 per cent of participants who report satisfaction with the quality of FriendLine support demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing eligible older Australians are satisfied with the support received through FriendLine.

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Methodology

The number of participants of FriendLine support is based on number of participants of the FriendLine satisfaction survey. The number of participants who report satisfaction with the quality of Friend Line support is based on the results of the FriendLine satisfaction survey

The data source used for this calculation is the FriendLine satisfaction survey.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Strong and Resilient Communities b - 525,854

Volunteer Management Activity c 122,945 106,900

Volunteer Grants d - 245,855

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

2020-21 2019-20

Strong and Resilient Communities e 3,803 3,413

Volunteer Management Activity 52 52

Volunteer Grants d - 2,711

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Strong and Resilient Communities $51.90m $57.45m

Volunteer Management Activity $9.04m $5.54m

Volunteer Grants d - $12.39m

Program Analysis

Many of the projects funded under Strong and Resilient Communities were impacted by COVID-19. Many had to adapt to alternative service delivery methods and revisit project timelines. This may have impacted the number of individuals assisted in 2019-20.

FriendLine met its target of 20,000 calls taken in the 2020-21 financial year which was the first year of operation. To meet this target FriendLine significantly scaled up their operations, which involved recruitment and training of new volunteers and expansion of their service delivery model to new locations. This is a solid achievement given the ongoing disruption of COVID-19 on call takers and the strong demand for friendly conversations by Australians experiencing loneliness.

The Be Connected program (Digital Literacy for Older Australians) started providing services in 2017-18, was fully implemented in 2018-19, and has expanded reach of its network across 2019-20 and 2020-21 resulting in an increased number of individuals assisted, including in priority groups.

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Program 2.1 - Families and Communities Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities The Volunteer Management Activity was established in 1992 to provide dedicated funding for volunteer management. Through the Volunteering Management Activity, the department funded

52 volunteer support services, to deliver volunteer management support across Australia. The 52 volunteer support services have provided support to an increased number of volunteers from 2019-20 to 2020-21. In response to an independent review of the Volunteering Management Activity a new model has been developed. From 1 July 2021, the Australian Government will distribute up to $33.5 million (excluding GST) over five years under the new Volunteer Management Activity to the state and territory volunteering peak bodies. The new model will focus on volunteering peak bodies developing and implementing strategies to build the capacity of Volunteer Involving Organisations, through online volunteer management services, and breaking down barriers to volunteering for identified priority groups. These priority groups include people with disability, First Nation peoples and newly arrived migrants.

No data has been recorded for Volunteer Grants for 2020-21 as there was no grant round run in this financial year. The funding has been moved into 2021-22 to be run as a $20 million double round in 2021-22.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Results are collected from a survey of the 2018 Volunteer Grants round recipients.

b Data relates to Digital Literacy for Older Australians and Strong and Resilient Communities Activity.

c Data consistency and quality continues to improve over time as providers get used to using the Data Exchange.

d There was no Volunteer Grants round in 2020-21.

e This figure includes 197 organisations for Strong and Resilient Communities and Mutual Understanding, Support, Tolerance, Engagement and Respect (MUSTER), 3,605 for Be Connected and one for Seniors Connected.

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Table 2.2.1f: Key activity performance

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Program 2.1 - Families and Communities

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - Cashless Debit Card

Cashless Debit Card is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Cashless Debit Card key activity aims to reduce the levels of harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling.

The Cashless Debit Card looks and operates like a regular bank card, except it cannot be used by eligible income support recipients to buy alcohol or gambling products, some gift cards or to withdraw cash. As part of the Cashless Debit Card program, participants receive an interest bearing, fee free account which is where a portion of their income support payments are deposited. Participants can use internet banking and make contactless payments through the Cashless Debit Card.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing services and initiatives for the Cashless Debit Card. Services Australia is responsible for making support payments into participants’ personal bank accounts and their Cashless Debit Card account. Indue is responsible for providing the Cashless Debit Card service to participants, including providing participants with a cashless debit card and associated account, and customer support.

Performance Measure

Extent to which the Cashless Debit Card supports a reduction in social harm in communities.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 18

Target

Evaluation results show improvements 2020-21

in*social outcomes. Target Result Outcome

Improvements in Findings made Met social outcomes in relation to improvements in social outcomes.

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which the Cashless Debit Card supports a reduction in social harm in communities aims to demonstrate that income support payments are spent in responsible and meaningful ways and not spent on products and activities that contribute to social harm.

This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Cashless Debit Card in achieving the objective of the key activity: to reduce the levels of harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling.

Targeting whether evaluation results show improvements in social outcomes demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing reduced levels of harm for people, families and communities associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling.

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Program 2.1 - Families and Communities Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Methodology

Data was obtained by the University of Adelaide for the Evaluation of the Cashless Debit Card in Ceduna, East Kimberley and the Goldfields Region: Consolidated Report. There are three associated reports:

1. Evaluation of the Cashless Debit Card in Ceduna, East Kimberley and the Goldfields Region: Consolidated Report - in which findings were made which contribute to the target: evaluation results show improvements in social outcomes.

2. Quantitative Supplementary Report - providing an understanding of collection and use of data contributing to the evaluation.

3. Qualitative Supplementary Report - providing an understanding of collection and use of data contributing to the evaluation.

Completion of the evaluation which made findings in relation to improvements in social outcomes (and recommendations for further improvements) is considered to have met the target.

The data source used for this target is the Evaluation of the Cashless Debit Card in Ceduna, East*Kimberley and the Goldfields Region: Consolidated Report undertaken by University of Adelaide.a

Performance Measure

Extent to which participants are using their Cashless Debit Card to direct income support payments to essential goods and services, including to support the wellbeing of the participant.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 18

Target

95% of Cashless Debit Card participants have 2020-21

activated their card and are using their card to Target Result Outcome

purchase non-restricted items.

95% Met 95%

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which participants are using their Cashless Debit Card to direct income support payments to essential goods and services, including to support the wellbeing of the participant aims to demonstrate that welfare payments are spent in responsible and meaningful ways and not spent on products and activities that contribute to social harm.

This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Cashless Debit Card in achieving the objective of the key activity: to reduce the levels of harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling.

Targeting 95 per cent of Cashless Debit Card participants have activated their card and are using their card to purchase non-restricted items demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing participants are spending their income support payments in responsible and meaningful ways and not on products and activities that contribute to social harm. This is because participants who have activated and are using their card are unable to spend their welfare payments on restricted items when using the card.

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Methodology

The number of Cashless Debit Card participants who have activated their card is based on the number of participants who have activated their card. The number of Cashless Debit Card participants who have activated their card and are using their card to purchase non-restricted items is based on the number of transactions on non-restricted and restricted items.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia administrative data

• Indue administrative data.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of people

2020-21 2019-20

Number of people on the Cashless Debit Card b 14,788 12,577

Program Analysis

Through monitoring Cashless Debit Card program data and analysis of regular community engagement, we can gain insights into a participant’s experience on the program and how to further its improvement.

The Cashless Debit Card has been able to maintain a high rate of participation due in part to support provided to communities during the implementation phase in new sites. Staff provided on-the-ground support to assist new participants to understand the changes to their banking setup, to explain the intent of the program and to quell any fears they may have regarding policy parameters or use of the card. This has further been improved since the transition of program delivery to Services Australia, who maintain service centres in most communities. Successful adoption includes activating cards, using the card or account to pay bills, schedule payments, shop online and in stores, use online banking features and treat the Cashless Debit Card as they*would any other banking product. For some participants, this is their first exposure to card-based or electronic banking.

As the Cashless Debit Card is a technology-based solution, the restrictions to targeted goods and services are predominately handled automatically, behind the scenes. The department receives data and reporting from Indue to assist in monitoring any attempts to circumvent the program policy or to identify any new or potential trends that need attention.

The department is in regular contact with community leaders and reference groups to monitor and discuss how the Cashless Debit Card is working in their communities.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Evaluation of the CDC in Ceduna, East Kimberley and the Goldfields Region: Consolidated Report is available at dss.gov.au

b Income Management and Cashless Debit Card data is a point in time snapshot as at 25 June 2021.

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Table 2.2.1g: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.1 - Families and Communities

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to strengthen relationships, support families, improve wellbeing of children*and young people, reduce the cost of family breakdown, strengthen family and community functioning.

Key Activity - National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

The National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse (the Scheme) is a key activity of the Families and Communities Program. The Scheme aims to provide support to people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse. The Scheme:

• acknowledges that many children were sexually abused in Australian institutions

• recognises the harm caused by this abuse

• holds institutions accountable for this abuse

• helps people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse gain access to counselling and psychological care, a direct personal response and a monetary payment.

The Scheme has been developed with the needs of survivors at the core. The Scheme provides support to people applying to the Scheme, including through free access to Redress Support Services and independent legal support. Eligible people will be able to access the three components of redress; counselling, a redress payment and a direct personal response from an*institution (e.g. an apology).

The department is responsible for:

• policy, guidelines, eligibility criteria, and legislation for the activity

• processing and managing applications:

- compiling all the relevant information on an application to allow an independent decision maker to decide if an applicant can access redress, the level of payment and which institution(s) are responsible for the abuse

- asking the institution(s) relevant to the application for information

- communicating with the applicant, including requesting more information where necessary and advising them of the outcome of their application (an offer of redress).

• providing free access to Redress Support Services

• working with institutions to join the Scheme and supporting them once they join

• data, reporting and continuous improvement.

The institutions are responsible for:

• joining the scheme

• providing information to the department about relevant applications

• when required, providing redress to people who experienced child sexual abuse while in the care of their institution (paying for the costs of counselling and a redress payment and delivering a direct personal response).

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Performance Measure

Timely finalisation of National Redress Scheme applications and offers made to survivors.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 70, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 18

Target

1. At least 80% of applications lodged 2020-21

between 1 July 2020 and 31 December 2020 that name institutions that participate in the Scheme have a

Target

* 80%

Result

27%

Outcome

Not Met

decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received by the Schemea

2. In the prior six month period at least * 80% 22% Not Met

80% of applications lodged in that period that name institutions that participate in the Scheme have a decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received by the Schemea

Rationale

Measuring the timely finalisation of National Redress Scheme applications and offers made to survivors aims to demonstrate the department has efficiently processed and managed applications. This is a measure of proxy efficiency that demonstrates achievement of a key output of the National Redress Scheme key activity: The department has called or sent the applicant a letter about the outcome of their application.

Targeting at least 80 per cent of applications that name institutions that participate in the Scheme have a decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received by the Scheme demonstrates proxy efficiency of the key activity by showing, applications are processed within a timely and reasonable timeframe, and is reflective of the complexity of the assessment process, available resources to process applications, and institutions that have joined the scheme.

Methodology

The percentage is based on the number active applications that name participating institutions received in the reference period, and the proportion of those applications that have a decision communicated to the applicant within six months of being received.

The data source used for this calculation is the IBM Case Manager Platform, accessed via Services Australia Enterprise Data Warehouse.

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Program 2.1 - Families and Communities Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Performance Measure

Maximise engagement of institutions with the National Redress Scheme.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 71, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 18

Target

Engagement of newly named institutions 2020-21

continues, and current participation is maintained, with institutions on board to Target Result Outcome

cover 90% of applications received. * 90% 95% Met

Rationale

Measuring maximise engagement of institutions with the National Redress Scheme aims to demonstrate the department effectively worked with institutions to join the Scheme. This measure demonstrates achievement of a key output of the National Redress Scheme key activity: Institutions have joined the Scheme and provide redress.

Targeting engagement of newly named institutions continues, and current participation is maintained, with institutions on board to cover 90 per cent of applications received demonstrates achievement of a key output of the key activity, by showing a significant per cent of people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse are supported by the institutions who have joined the scheme and are providing redress.

Methodology

The percentage is based on the number of applications with ‘on-hold’ status (due to institution not having opted in to the scheme) as a proportion of the total number of applications.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia Enterprise Data Warehouse

• Department of Social Services Administrative Data

• CRM Siebel system.

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Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals who have received a payment under the National Redress Scheme

2020-21 2019-20

Number of individuals 3,251 2,504

Number of applications received for the National Redress Scheme

2020-21 2019-20

Number of applications 3,773 3,127

Number of institutions that have joined the National Redress Scheme

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Number of institutions or groups of institutions that 268 177

have joined the National Redress Scheme during the*year b

Program Analysis

This is the first year this key performance measure has been reported. The measure focuses on the proportion of applications that received an outcome within the first 6 months of the application being lodged with the National Redress Scheme. While in the third year of the National Redress Scheme’s operation, substantial improvements in application processing have been made, this target was not met.

The National Redress Scheme continued to focus on prioritising and finalising older applications over progressing new applications received during this time. The National Redress Scheme also continued to be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in a number of ways, including telephony disruptions and the time it has taken institutions in jurisdictions affected by lockdown requesting more time to respond to requests for information, therefore delaying timely outcomes to individuals. These factors have contributed to not achieving the target of issuing 80 per cent of outcomes within six months of receipt of the application.

Despite these challenges, in 2020-21, 3,251 individuals received a payment under the National Redress Scheme, averaging 270 payments per month, compared with 2,568 in 2019-20 averaging 208 payments per month.

The National Redress Scheme experienced an increase in the number of applications received in 2020-21, and was also able to progress more applications including older applications, due to the substantial increase in the number of institutions participating. This resulted in more decisions being made and fewer applications being placed on hold and not able to progress.

The number of institutions that are participating in the National Redress Scheme has continued to increase throughout the year. From 1 January 2021, when the Scheme receives an application that names an institution which had not previously been named, the institution will have six months from their first engagement to join the National Redress Scheme. Failure to join the Scheme within six months means that such institutions may be publically named and have financial consequences applied, including not being eligible for future Commonwealth grant funding and being a risk of losing their charitable status.

Caveats and Disclosures

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities

a The sample period must end at the point 6 months prior to the date of calculation to allow accurate measurement of the performance target (to have progressed from initiation to decision within 6 months).

b Reflecting total number of non-government institutions or groups of institutions. All Commonwealth and state and territory governments are also participating in the Scheme.

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Table 2.2.2a: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.2 - Paid Parental Leave

This program aims to provide financial support to parents to help them take time off work following the birth or adoption of a child.

Key Activity - Parental Leave Pay

Parental Leave Pay aims to provide financial support to eligible primary carers (usually birth mothers) to allow them to take time off work to care for a newborn or recently adopted child, to enhance the health and development of mothers and their children. It also aims to encourage women’s workforce participation and help employers retain skilled staff. Parental Leave Pay provides up to 18 weeks pay at the rate of the national minimum wage. To be eligible for Parental Leave Pay, a claimant must meet the scheme’s work test, income test, and residency*requirements.

The department is responsible for designing and implementing Parental Leave Pay, including providing advice to Government on policy and legislation, and setting guidelines and providing advice on eligibility criteria. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering Parental Leave Pay on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which parents take Parental Leave Pay.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 72, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 19

Target

2020-21

Target Result

* 95 % 99.4%

95% of eligible Parental Leave Pay families access*payment.a

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which eligible parents access Parental Leave Pay aims to demonstrate that eligible primary carers of newborn and recently adopted children are financially assisted to take time off work following the birth or adoption of a child. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Parental Leave Pay in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide financial support to eligible primary carers (usually birth mothers) to allow them to take time off work to care for a newborn or recently adopted child, to enhance the health and development of mothers and their children, and to encourage women’s workforce participation.

Targeting 95 per cent of eligible Parental Leave Pay claimants that access the payment demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the proportion of eligible primary carers that take the full 18 weeks Parental Leave Pay out of those who access the payment.

Methodology

Eligibility is defined as Parental Leave Pay claimants that receive the Parental Leave Pay payment.*Access is defined as the receipt of the payment for the entire 18 week entitlement.

The percent is based on the number of Parental Leave Pay claimants that took the full 18 weeks of Parental Leave Pay as a proportion of the total number of Parental Leave Pay claimants whose payments were finalised during the year.

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data.

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Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Parental Leave Pay $2,255.35m $2,269.88m

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Parental Leave Pay b 169,029 171,712

Program Analysis

In 2020-21, the Parental Leave Pay population slightly decreased, with a total of 169,029 claimants assisted, compared to 171,712 claimants assisted in 2019-20. It is likely that COVID-19 impacted claimants’ ability to meet the work test and qualify for Parental Leave Pay. This impact was largely mitigated by the introduction of measures to allow JobKeeper Payment to count towards the Parental Leave Pay work test and the temporary changes to the work test period for people whose employment was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 2020-21, of the 154,972 primary carers who completed their Parental Leave Pay 154,106 primary carers accessed the full 18 weeks resulting in more than 99 per cent of claimants using the full entitlement.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Total Claims are the number of claims with a claim level cancellation in the 2020-21 financial year. Claim level cancellations are those where a claimant can no longer make any changes to their PPL (e.g. add/change future flex days). Note that this will contain a mix of flexible and non-flexible PPL claims, and claims where payment started in the 2019-20 financial year and the cancellation was in the 2020-21 financial year.

• Claimants who have flex days still left to claim are not included in these counts as they have up until the child’s second birthday to claim those days.

b This is the number of individuals and families who started receiving payment in the financial year.

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Table 2.2.2b: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.2 - Paid Parental Leave

This program aims to provide financial support to parents to help them take time off work following the birth or adoption of a child.

Key Activity - Dad and Partner Pay

Dad and Partner Pay is a key activity of the Paid Parental Leave Program. Dad and Partner Pay aims to provide financial support to help eligible fathers and partners to increase the time they take off work around the time of the birth or adoption. The objective of the payment is to create further opportunities for eligible fathers and partners to bond with their child and to take a greater share of caring responsibilities and support their partners from the beginning of a child’s life. Dad and Partner Pay provides up to two weeks’ pay at the rate of the national minimum wage. To be eligible for Dad and Partner Pay, a claimant must meet the scheme’s work test, income test and residency requirements.

The department is responsible for providing policy advice to Commonwealth Government in relation to Dad and Partner Pay and implementing Government decisions through setting policy, guidelines, eligibility criteria, and legislation. Services Australia is the primary portfolio agency responsible for administering Dad and Partner Pay on the department’s behalf, including receiving, processing and managing applications and delivering payments.

Performance Measure

Extent to which parents take Dad and Partner Pay.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 72, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 19

Target

2020-21

Target Result

95% 97.8%

95% of eligible Dad and Partner Pay claimants access paymenta

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which parents take Dad and Partner Pay aims to demonstrate that fathers and partners caring for a newborn or newly adopted child are financially assisted to increase the time they take off work around the time of the birth or adoption. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Dad and Partner Pay in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide financial support to help eligible fathers and partners to increase the time they take off work around the time of the birth or adoption, to create further opportunities to bond with their child, and to allow fathers and partners to take a greater share of caring responsibilities and support their partners from the beginning.

Targeting of 95 per cent of eligible Dad and Partner Pay claimants that access the payment demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the proportion of eligible fathers*and partners that take the full two weeks Dad and Partner Pay out of those who access the payment.

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Program 2.2 - Paid Parental Leave

Methodology

Eligibility is defined as Dad and Partner Pay claimants who receive the Dad and Partner Pay payment. Access is defined as the receipt of the payment for the entire two week period for which the payment is available.

The percentage is based on the number of Dad and Partner Pay claimants that took the full two weeks of Dad and Partner Pay as a proportion of the total number of Dad and Partner Pay claimants whose payment was finalised during the year.

The data source used for this calculation is Services Australia administrative data.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Dad and Partner Pay $135.94m $129.68m

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Dad and Partner Pay b 89,784 92,343

Program Analysis

In 2020-21, the Dad and Partner Pay population decreased slightly, with a total of 88,437 claimants receiving Dad and Partner Pay, compared to 92,343 claimants who received the payment in 2019-20.

It is likely that COVID-19 impacted claimants’ ability to meet the work test and qualify for Dad and Partner Pay. This impact was largely mitigated by the introduction of measures to allow JobKeeper Payment to count towards the Dad and Partner Pay work test and the temporarily changes to the work test period for people whose employment was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 2020-21, the number of fathers and partners who accessed the full two weeks of Dad and Partner Pay increased to 97.8 per cent, from 96.9 per cent in 2019-20.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Eligibility is defined as Dad and Partner Pay claimants who receive and complete the Dad and Partner Pay payment. Access is taken to be the receipt of the payment for the entire two week period for which the payment is available.

b This is the number of individuals and families who received payment in the relevant financial year.

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Table 2.2.3: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.2 Outcome 2: Families and*Communities Program 2.3 - Social And Community Services

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to set aside funding for the implementation period of Fair Work Australia’s Social, Community and Disability Services Industry Equal Remuneration Order.

Key Activity - Social and Community Services Pay Equity Account

The Social and Community Services (SACS) Pay Equity Account is a key activity of the SACS Program. The SACS key activity aims to set aside funding for the implementation period of Fair Work Australia’s Social, Community and Disability Services Industry Equal Remuneration Order.

The department holds overall responsibility for the financial management and accounting of the SACS Pay Equity Special Account.

Performance Measure

Funds appropriated to the department for the Social and Community Services pay equity order are issued to meet the Australian Government’s share of the pay increases.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 73, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 19

Target

100% of eligible grant recipients will receive 2020-21

the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account payments as required by legislation by 30 June 2021.

Target

100%

Result

100%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring funds appropriated to the department for the SACS pay equity order are issued to meet the Australian Government’s share of the pay increases aims to demonstrate that sufficient funds have been set aside for SACS grant recipients. This measure demonstrates the achievement of key output of SACS.

Targeting 100 per cent of eligible grant recipients will receive the SACS Pay Equity Special Account payments as required by legislation by 30 June 2021 demonstrates the achievement of key output of the key activity, by showing that SACS payments have been issued to meet the Australian Government’s share of the pay increases.

Methodology

The department conducts monthly and annual reconciliations, to verify grant recipients are receiving accurate payments as required by legislation, eligibility and entitlement.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Grants Processing System.

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Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Social and Community Services Pay Equity Account $488.61m $411.92m

Program Analysis

The department implemented the SACS Pay Equity Special Account policy and eligibility criteria on every departmental grant agreement created or varied during the year. Eligibility was considered for each grant, and when applicable, the correct amount of SACS Pay Equity Special Account payments were included in eligible grant agreements.

The department recorded the SACS Pay Equity Special Account in all financial reporting on administered funds in 2020-21. To ensure compliance with legislative and policy requirements, the Special Account was validated through a monthly SAP and Central Budget Management System reconciliation.

The department also provided advice and support to other departments on the policy and implementation of eligibility criteria. The department supported the Department of Health by considering eligibility and where applicable, undertaking calculations of SACS Pay Equity Special Account payments for inclusion in eligible grant agreements. The department provided advice to other departments with experienced staff providing references to the relevant parts of the SACS*Pay Equity Special Account Operational Guidelines and discussions on specific questions on eligibility.

The SACS Pay Equity Special Account ceased on 30 June 2021 as per the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012 (Cth).

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

Chapter 2.3

Outcome 3: Disability and Carers

Purpose Improved independence of, and participation by, people with disability, including improved support for carers, by providing targeted support and services.

Programs and activities Outcome 3 comprises two programs and a number of activities which contribute to the achievement of the disability and carers outcome. The diagram below depicts how this purpose is translated into measurable activities.

OUTCOME 3 - DISABILITY AND CARERS

Program 3.1

Disability Mental Health and Carers

Program 3.2

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

Key activities Key activities

• Disability Employment Services • NDIS Transition (including Commonwealth Programs) • Support for Carers • Development of the NDIS Market • Advocacy support for people with disability • NDIS Participant Plans • Disability Strategy

Summary and analysis of Outcome 3 In 2020-21, the department achieved most performance measure targets across Outcome 3. Overall, 13 targets were met or are ongoing, two targets were partially met, and five targets were not met.

Through the provision of targeted supports and services for people with disability and carers, the department works to improve their independence and participation in community and economic life. We operate in an environment in which a range of factors impact the opportunities available for people with disability to improve their wellbeing.

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■

■

■

2

Many mainstream policies and programs are run by state jurisdictions and Australian Government agencies other than the department. Our performance is reliant on influencing other jurisdictions, agencies and employers to reduce barriers to social and economic participation for people with disability and to improve their access to support.

Figure 11: Outcome 3 performance measure target results

65%

10%

25%

Met

Partially Met

Not Met

The department, in partnership with all Australian Governments, is working to implement a new National Disability Strategy by the end of 2021 to succeed the 2010-20 Strategy. This will provide the overarching framework for all Australian disability policy, to guide governments in developing policies and programs that help improve the lives of people with disability. The department is playing a key role in supporting people with disability through the ongoing implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Opportunities for people with disability, their families and carers to access the workforce and participate in the community are a critical aspect of improving outcomes throughout their lives. Australian Government agencies and state and territory governments will coordinate policies and programs to support the participation of people with disability, their families and carers. The department plays an important role in this, including through its administration of the Disability Employment Services program.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

Key achievements

In the past year, our contributions to improving outcomes for people with disability and carers included:

■ supporting the disability and carers sectors in a collaborative, timely, and coordinated manner to provide assistance to people with disability and carers in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

■ cooperation with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and state and territory governments to implement the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) across Australia

■ delivering supports as part of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, including trauma-informed counselling services, individual advocacy support, Indigenous-specific individual advocacy, and systemic advocacy support for organisations and individuals

■ continuing implementation of the reforms to the Disability Employment Services (DES), which saw a significant increase in the number of people with disability, illness and injury accessing assistance by 11.2 per cent (or 31,954) from 283,981 to 315,926 between June 2020 and June 2021

■ co-designing and launching the Disability Gateway to assist all people with disability, their families and carers to locate and access services across Australia

■ transitioning to a new carer support system with centralised access points. Over 2 million people accessed Carer Gateway through the website and 1800 phone number, an increase of nearly 39 per cent from the previous year

■ launching the NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 which will support the sector to attract a wide range of workers as the NDIS continues to grow while improving new and existing workers’ access to training and development opportunities

■ cooperation with the NDIA and NDIS Commission on the continued implementation of the NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Framework to provide a nationally consistent approach to help empower and support NDIS participants to exercise choice and control, while ensuring appropriate safeguards are in place and established expectations for providers and their staff to deliver high quality supports

■ cooperation with the NDIA, Department of Health, the states and territories and disability stakeholders to make progress towards targets set under the Younger People in Residential Aged Care Strategy 2020-2025, released by the Australian Government in September 2020

■ continuing extensive co-design of the next 10 year National Disability Strategy with states and territories, the disability sector, the broader public and with people with disability.

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Outcome 3 Key performance results

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Program Key Activities Target Result

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

3.1 Disability At least 40% of job placements

Disability Mental Employment sustained to 13 weeks. Health and Carers Services At least 30% of job placements sustained to 26 weeks.

At least 20% of job placements sustained to 52 weeks.

At least 90% of Disability Employment Services Providers met service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and DSS.

Support for Carers At least 10% annual increase in people accessing Carer Gateway (website and 1800 number).

Advocacy support At least 75% of people who accessed Not met for people with National Disability Advocacy Program disability reported improved choice and control

Met

Met

Met

Met

Met

to make their own decisions.

Number of individual NDIS Appeals clients is less than 1 per cent of active NDIS participants.

Disability Strategy A new National Disability Strategy is finalised by the Commonwealth, State and Territory First Ministers by the end of 2021.

Met

Partially met

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

2

Program Key Activities Target Result

3.2 National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

NDIS Transition (including Commonwealth Programs)

500,000 NDIS participants by 30*June 2023. Met

Complete the transition of DSS Commonwealth program clients to the NDIS by 31 December 2020.

Partially met

Development of the NDIS Market

NDIS Participant Plans

At least 75% market utilisation rates by 30 June 2021.

At least 10% improvement in NDIS market concentration in remote areas by 30 June 2021.

At least 60% of NDIS participants aged school age to 14 attend school in a mainstream class.

At least 70% of NDIS participants with disability aged 18 - 24 have completed secondary school.

At least 80% of NDIS participants report satisfaction with the scheme planning process.

At least 25% of working age NDIS participants in paid employment.

At least 45% of NDIS participants involved in community and social activities.

No people under 65 years entering residential aged care by the end of 2022 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

No people under 45 years living in residential aged care by the end of 2022 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

No people under 65 years living in residential aged care by the end of 2025 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

Not met

Not met

Met

Not met

Met

Not met

Met

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

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Outcome 3: Key activity performance

Table 2.3.1a: Key activity performance

Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

This program aims to provide support and community-based initiatives for people with disability, mental illness and carers, so they can develop their capabilities and actively participate in community and economic life.

Key Activity - Disability Employment Services

Disability Employment Services is a key activity of the Disability Mental Health And Carers Program. Disability Employment Services aims to help individuals with injury, disability or a health condition to secure and maintain sustainable open employment. Through Disability Employment Services, people with disability, injury or health condition may be able to receive assistance to prepare for, find and keep employment.

The department’s role is to:

• manage the grants process for Disability Employment Services

• conduct the assurance and compliance program

• manage service providers against the Disability Employment Services performance service framework

• design and implement the Disability Employment Services Funding Model, including setting the pricing structure base and setting milestones for providers

• manage the JobAccess website and telephone service.

Disability Employment Services providers are a mix of large, medium, and small, for-profit and*not-for-profit organisations that are experienced in supporting people with disability as well*as providing assistance to employers to put in place practices that support the employee in*the workplace.

Disability Employment Services providers deliver two services:

1. Disability Management Service, which is for job seekers with a disability, injury or health condition*who need assistance to find employment and occasional support in the workplace to keep a*job.

2. Employment Support Service, which provides assistance to job seekers with permanent disability to find employment and who need regular, ongoing support in the workplace to keep*a job.

When a person with disability has been placed in a job, a Disability Employment Services provider will give them employment support for at least 52 weeks. Support may also be available to help both the employee and employer beyond this time, where it is needed.

For employers, Disability Employment Services can provide a range of free services, including help to employ and retain workers with disability and access to a range of financial incentives and support.

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Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Performance Measure

Extent to which people with a disability are supported to find and maintain employment through Disability Employment Services.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 83, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 21

Target

2020-21

Target Outcome Result

1. At least 40% of job placements sustained to 13 weeks. * 40% 44% Met

2. At least 30% of job placements sustained to 26 weeks. * 30% 36% Met

3. At least 20% of job placements sustained to 52 weeks * 20% 21% Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which people with a disability are supported to find and maintain employment through Disability Employment Services aims to demonstrate that Disability Employment Services has assisted people with disability, injury or health condition, to secure and maintain sustainable open employment. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Disability Employment Services in achieving the objective of the key activity: to help individuals with injury, disability or a health condition to secure and maintain sustainable open employment.

Targeting at least 40, 30 and 20 per cent of job placements sustained to 13, 26, and 52 weeks respectively demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the extent to which the disability service providers have provided support to individuals with injury, disability or a health condition to secure and maintain sustainable open employment.

Methodology

The percentage is the proportion of job placements sustained to 13, 26, and 52 weeks.

The data for this calculation is sourced from the Employment Business Intelligence Warehouse (administered by the Department of Education, Skills and Employment).

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Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Performance Measure

Delivery by Disability Employment Services Providers is in accordance with the specified requirements, including service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and DSS.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 83, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 21

Target

At least 90% of Disability Employment 2020-21

Services Providers met service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and DSS.

Target

* 90%

Result

100%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the delivery by Disability Employment Services Providers is in accordance with the specified requirements, including service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and DSS aims to demonstrate that the department has effectively managed agreements with Disability Employment Services providers.

This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Disability Employment Services in achieving the objective of the key activity: to help individuals with injury, disability or a health condition to secure and maintain sustainable open employment.

Targeting at least 90 per cent of Disability Employment Services Providers met service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and DSS demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the department has managed grants processes and conducted the assurance and compliance program on processed claims.

Methodology

The number of Disability Employment Services providers that meet service level standards of the contracts and agreements between organisations and the department, is based on the number of Disability Employment Services providers with current certification against the National Standards for Disability Services.

The data for this calculation is sourced from the Community Grants Hub’s Grants Payment System (administered by the Department of Social Services).

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Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of participants

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Number of Disability Employment Services 315,926 283,981

participants a

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

2020-21 2019-20

Disability Employment Services b 109 110

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Disability Employment Services c $1,229.38m $1,201.12m

Employer Assistance and Other Services d $28.65m $30.29m

Program Analysis

Between June 2020 and June 2021, the number of Disability Employment Services participants increased by 11.2 per cent (or 31,954) from 283,981 to 315,926. Despite the challenging economic and labour market conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, this rate of increase is slower than in the same period between June 2019 and June 2020 (where the increase was 19.2 per cent or 45,654 from 238,327 to 283,981).

One of the most noticeable impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Disability Employment Services program was on the number of placements of Disability Employment Services participants into employment.

From July 2019 to just before the national lockdown due to COVID-19 in March 2020, the average weekly number of anchored employment placements (i.e. employment placements that*Disability Employment Services providers are confident will result in longer employment) was*1,654. This dropped by 31 per cent (or 513) to 1,141 a week in the three months (April to June 2020) following the lockdown.

The lifting of the national lockdown had a positive impact of the number of Disability Employment Services participants being placed into employment. In a period comparable to that before the national lockdown, i.e. from July 2020 to March 2021, the average weekly number of anchored employment placements was 1,853 - an increase of 12 per cent (or 198 a*week) from 1,654.

In the last three months of 2020-21 (April to June 2021), this increasing trend accelerated to 2,310 a week and more than doubled the average weekly number (1,141 a week) in the period from April to June 2020.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The number of Disability Employment Services participants on the caseload as at 30 June in 2021 and 2020.

b The number of Disability Employment Services providers (distinct count) as at 30 June in 2021 and 2020.

c Includes Disability Employment Services, ongoing support assessments and JobAccess.

d Includes Employment Assistance Fund, Supported Wage System, Wage Subsidy Scheme and National Disability Recruitment Coordinator.

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Table 2.3.1b: Key activity performance

2

Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

This program aims to provide support and community-based initiatives for people with disability, mental illness and carers, so they can develop their capabilities and actively participate in community and economic life.

Key Activity - Support for Carers

Support for Carers is a key activity of the Disability Mental Health And Carers Program. Support*for Carers aims to provide assistance, support and services for carers.

The department is responsible for managing activities providing supports and services to carers under the Integrated Carer Support Service (ICSS), publicly branded as the Carer Gateway.

Through the Carer Gateway, carers can access a range of tailored supports and services to help them manage their daily challenges, reduce stress and plan for the future. The services, delivered face-to-face and through digital channels, focus on providing carers with access to early-intervention, preventative and skill building supports, to improve well-being and long-term outcomes.

The Carer Gateway was rolled out in a two-phase approach, with the first phase implemented in July 2019 and the second from April 2020.

Phase one saw the introduction of the national digital counselling, online peer support, online self-guided coaching and practical educational resources. These supports aim to improve carer wellbeing, skills and knowledge.

Phase two followed a grant round to select ten lead Carer Gateway service providers to deliver the in-person supports and services across Australia, including:

• carer needs assessment and support planning

• in-person and phone-based counselling

• in-person peer support

• targeted financial support packages with a focus on employment, education, respite and transport

• emergency respite

• information and advice

• assistance with navigating relevant, local services available to carers through federal, state and local government and non-government providers, including the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), My Aged Care and palliative care

• other programs supporting carers under ICSS include the Young Carer Bursary Program and Young Carer Network, and the Tristate Vocational Outcomes Pilot Program.

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Performance Measure

Extent to which carers access information, supports and services.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 83, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 21

Target

At least 10% annual increase in people 2020-21

accessing Carer Gateway (website and 1800 number). Target * 10%

Result

39%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which carers access information, supports and services aims to demonstrate that the Carer Gateway is reinforcing carer resilience through effective preventative support services. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Carer Gateway in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide assistance, support and services for carers.

Targeting at least 10 per cent annual increase in people accessing the Carer Gateway demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by measuring the extent to which carers access information, supports and services through the two primary Carer Gateway access points over time.

Methodology

The total number of carers accessing the Carer Gateway each year is the total of the following two values added together:

• total Carer Gateway website page views over the reporting period

• total successful calls to the Carer Gateway phone number over the reporting period

The per cent of annual increase is calculated by comparing the current reporting period and the previous reporting period.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• Services Australia Google Analytics

• Telstra telephony system.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of individuals assisted

2020-21 2019-20

Number of carers assisteda 62,131 73,005

Number of people accessing Carer Gatewayb 2,024,223 1,453,373

Number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding to deliver services

2020-21 2019-20

Support for Carersc 13

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Disability and Carer Support $195.19m $181.65m

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c

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Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Program Analysis

Until 2019-20, the Department of Social Services funded a large number of community organisations through multiple activities under Program 3.1 to support Australia’s informal carers by providing access to information, advice and supports including respite care. This was a complex and inefficient system with each activity having its own eligibility requirements that carers were required to meet.

In 2019-20, funding for many carer support activities under Program 3.1 was consolidated into the new ICSS and the National Disability Insurance Scheme, simplifying arrangements and reducing the number of organisations contracted or receiving grant funding in 2019-20 to deliver services supporting informal carers. More carers were assisted in 2019-20 than in 2020-21 as carers could still access services through the previous carer support system until 31 May 2020, in*addition to accessing Carer Gateway services progressively introduced from 1 July 2019.

The 2020-21 financial year is the first reporting period where carers can now access carer support services through two national access points. This includes the Carer Gateway website for information and access to online supports, and the Carer Gateway phone number for digital counselling and face-to-face services arranged through Carer Gateway service providers.

In 2020-21, over 2 million people accessed Carer Gateway through the website and 1800 phone*number, an increase of nearly 39 per cent from the previous year. An increase was expected as carers transitioned to a new carer support system with centralised access points, but the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic likely contributed to more carers interested in supports. Carer*Gateway service providers have adapted to service delivery challenges in response to regional lockdowns and restrictions impacting on service delivery to continue supporting carers.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The figure for 2020-21 refers to the number of clients supported through the Integrated Carer Support Service and reported within the Data Exchange for 2020-21, including Carer Gateway service provider supports, Carer Gateway digital counselling, Young Carer Bursary Program and Tristate Vocational Outcomes Pilot Program. From 2020-21, this figure was expanded to include registrations for the Carer Gateway online coaching and peer support services. The figure for 2019-20 comprised of performance data for additional carer support activities operating until 31 May 2020, where funding transitioned to the Integrated Carer Support Service.

b The figure for 2020-21 refers to the number of people accessing Carer Gateway face-to-face and digital services through visits to the Carer Gateway website and calls to the Carer Gateway 1800 phone number. The*figure for 2019-20 includes comparable measures.

This measure refers to the number of organisations contracted or receiving carer support grant funding through the Integrated Carer Support Service. The figure for 2019-20 included service providers previously funded to deliver carer support activities until 31 May 2020, where funding transitioned to the new Integrated Carer Support Service and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

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Table 2.3.1c: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to provide support and community-based initiatives for people with disability, mental illness and carers, so they can develop their capabilities and actively participate in community and economic life.

Key Activity - Advocacy Support for People With Disability

Advocacy Support for People With Disability (Advocacy Support) is a key activity of the Disability Mental Health And Carers Program. Advocacy Support aims to provide people with disability with access to effective disability advocacy.

The department is responsible for managing Advocacy Support, including developing Disability Advocacy policy, guidelines, eligibility and criteria, and managing service providers for the National Disability Advocacy Program (NDAP) and the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Appeals program. The department also works with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to develop demand projection for NDIS appeals.

NDAP providers provide people with disability access to effective disability advocacy that promotes, protects and ensures their full and equal enjoyment of all human rights, enabling community participation.

NDIS Appeals providers provide assistance to NDIS applicants, and others affected by reviewable NDIA decisions, to navigate the external merits review process.

Performance Measure

Number of people with disability provided with direct advocacy support through the National Disability Advocacy Program (NDAP).

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 83, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 22

Target

At least 75% of people who accessed 2020-21

NDAP reported improved choice and control to make their own decisions.a Target Result Outcome

* 75% 62.2%b Not Met

Rationale

Measuring the number of people with disability provided with direct advocacy support through the National Disability Advocacy Program aims to demonstrate that NDAP has assisted people with disability to enjoy choice, wellbeing and to pursue their life goals. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of NDAP in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide people with disability with access to effective disability advocacy.

Targeting at least 75 per cent of people who accessed NDAP reported improved choice and control to make their own decisions demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing that people with disability who access NDAP services are experiencing improved choice and control.

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Methodology

The per cent is based on the number of people that were assessed by NDAP providers as reporting an overall positive change within the financial year.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Data Exchange - Standard Client/Community Outcomes Reporting (SCORE) system.

Performance Measure

Number of people with disability provided with direct advocacy support through the NDIS Appeals program.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 91, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 21

Target

Number of individual NDIS Appeals 2020-21

clients is less than 1% of active NDIS participants.c Target * 1%

Result

0.5%

Outcome

Met

Rationale

Measuring the number of people with disability provided with direct advocacy support through the NDIS Appeals program aims to demonstrate that funding is adequate to meet the demand for NDIS appeals services. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of NDIS appeals in achieving the objective of the key activity: to provide people with disability with access to effective disability advocacy.

Targeting the number of individual NDIS Appeals clients is less than 1 per cent of active NDIS*participants demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing there is sufficient funding to provide a number of people with direct advocacy support through the NDIS*Appeals program.

Methodology

The per cent is based on the total number of appeals clients for the financial year as a proportion of the total number of active participants in the NDIS scheme.

The data sources used for this calculation are the:

• Department of Social Services Data Exchange - NDIS Appeals

• NDIS quarterly reports - Active NDIS participants.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of people with disability provided with direct advocacy support:

2020-21 2019-20

National Disability Advocacy Program 13,816 12,316

NDIS Appeals program 2,424 2,931

Program Analysis

There are 59 organisations funded under NDAP and 50 organisations funded under NDIS Appeals. The demand for the individual disability advocacy support, provided through NDAP and NDIS Appeals, is largely driven by experiences that people with disability have with both disability-specific and mainstream services and systems. As part of the process of supporting an advocacy client to address their presenting issue or problem, individual advocates work to support the client to understand their rights and options and, where possible, develop their ability to advocate for themselves.

In 2020-21 for NDAP, there was an increase of around 1,500 individual advocacy clients on the previous year. This represents the largest number of individual clients recorded for the program and is consistent with qualitative reporting about increased demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the complexity around some service systems. It is likely the challenges of delivery during a pandemic such as reduced face-to-face service, combined with the complexity of the presenting issue or problem may have contributed to the below target outcome for the target.

In 2020-21, NDIS Appeals individual client numbers were slightly lower than the previous year. This likely reflects the increased complexity of the cases and situations NDIS Appeals clients are bringing to advocates for assistance. This increases the length of time required to finalise cases and contributes to fewer cases logged in the last 12 months.

In 2020-21, the number of NDIS Appeals individual clients represented approximately 0.5% of all active NDIS Participants. This is lower than the 1% target and reflects the increased complexity of the cases described above. The department continues to work with the NDIA to monitor and understand individual advocacy support demand and complexity related to NDIS*Appeals.

Caveats and Disclosures

a This is a new program performance target.

b The measurement of client outcomes through the Data Exchange only began as a mandatory requirement of funded providers on 1 January 2021. Given this is a new requirement, and became mandatory part way through the reporting period, the population on which this year’s results are based, is not considered to be a representative sample.

c This is a new program performance target.

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Table 2.3.1d: Key activity performance

2

Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

This program aims to provide support and community-based initiatives for people with disability, mental illness and carers, so they can develop their capabilities and actively participate in community and economic life.

Key Activity - National Disability Strategy 2021-2031

The department has lead responsibility for finalising the new National Disability Strategy 2021-2031 (the Strategy) in collaboration with Commonwealth, state and territory governments and the Australian Local Government Association. The Strategy will provide a national framework for improving the life outcomes of people with disability in Australia and replace the original National Disability Strategy 2010-2020.

As a high-level policy framework, the Strategy is a key cross program activity of programs 3.1 Disability Mental Health And Carers and 3.2 National Disability Insurance Scheme.

On 4 December 2020, Disability Ministers from across Australia issued a Statement of Continued Commitment. The statement is a commitment to continue efforts to uphold the rights of people with disability between the expiry of the original Strategy at the end of 2020, and the finalisation of the new Strategy in late 2021.

To ensure safe and effective public consultation, Disability Ministers agreed to delay stage two public consultations due to COVID-19. This decision was strongly supported by key stakeholders and the sector. The new Strategy is on track to be finalised in late 2021 (pending agreement to the new Strategy by all levels of government).

The department has collaborated and engaged extensively with people with a disability, their families, carers, and representative organisations, Ministers, and states and territories on the development of the new Strategy. This includes a range of governance and stakeholder groups that have been involved in the development of the Strategy.

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers

Performance Measure

Extent of contribution to creating and implementing national disability policy and reform initiatives.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 83, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 21

Target

A new National Disability Strategy is finalised by the Commonwealth, State and Territory First Ministers by the end of 2021.

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

Draft National On track to finalise Partially Met

Disability Strategy National Disability 2021-2031 for Strategy by the consultation with Commonwealth, Commonwealth, State and Territory State and Territory First Ministers by the First Ministers end of 2021 a

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Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Rationale

Measuring the extent of contribution to creating and implementing national disability policy and reform initiatives aims to demonstrate the department’s role in achieving a key output of the key activity by leading finalisation of the new National Disability Strategy, including collaborating with stakeholders on the development of the new strategy.

Targeting whether a new National Disability Strategy is expected to be finalised by the Commonwealth, State and Territory First Ministers by the end of 2021 demonstrates achievement of a key output of the key activity, by showing that the department has effectively contributed to creating the new strategy.

Methodology

The department will use the following data sources to make a qualitative assessment of the department’s contribution to creating and implementing national disability policy and reform initiatives:

• Disability Reform Ministers’ meetings communiques housed on the DSS website

• Statement of continued commitment housed on the DSS website

• National Disability Strategy consultation reports housed on the DSS website.

Program Analysis

During 2020-21, the department progressed the development of the new Strategy. Stage two public consultation was conducted from July to December 2020 and included a Position Paper, agreed by Australian, state and territory disability ministers. The Position Paper set out how all levels of government propose to take forward the new Strategy and the key features proposed. Consultations also included an introductory paper on an Outcomes Framework to strengthen reporting and measuring of outcomes achieved under the Strategy.

Stage 2 consultations were inclusive of people with disability, ensuring their voices have been at the centre of the development of the new Strategy. A total of 237 submissions were received on the Position Paper and 74 submissions received on the draft Outcomes Framework. Consultations included 18 targeted focus groups reaching 131 people with a disability; five cross-sector forums in which more than 100 participants from industry, business, academia and people with disability worked together to co-develop and prioritise actions for improving outcomes for people with disability; a webinar facilitated by the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Centre of Research Excellence in Disability and Health; and community led consultations held with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability in remote locations in Queensland and Northern Territory. Findings from the consultations were released in May 2021 and are available on the department’s website.

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Program 3.1 - Disability Mental Health And Carers

Stage 2 consultation on the strategy was noted by Ministers at the Disability Reform Ministers’ (DRM) meeting in December 2020. Ministers committed to finalising a new Strategy in 2021, and released a joint Statement of Continued Commitment to cover the period between the expiry of the current NDS and the completion of the new strategy. The gap in timing is a result of a pause on public engagement due to COVID-19. Ministers agreed to establish an NDS Advisory Council that will advise Ministers on the implementation of the new Strategy once it commences in 2021. In April 2021, Ministers discussed the status and progress of the new Strategy and agreed to the development of Targeted Action Plans, which are expected to include deliverables in relation to employment, community attitudes, early childhood, emergency management and safety.

It is expected the National Disability Strategy will proceed as planned through formal approvals by all Governments and the Australian Local Government Association and be launched by the end of the 2021.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The new National Disability Strategy work is on track for delivery and implementation within the stipulated timeframe by the end of 2021. The department cannot report on the finalisation of the Strategy as this is expected to occur in the first half of the 2021-22 financial year.

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Table 2.3.2a: Key activity performance Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to improve the wellbeing and social and economic participation of people with disability, and their families and carers, by building a NDIS that provides funds to people with significant and permanent disability to purchase reasonable and necessary supports through an insurance approach. This program also includes funding for existing Commonwealth programs that are transitioning into the NDIS in a phased approach and the Jobs and Market Fund.

Key Activity - NDIS Transition

NDIS Transition is a key activity of the NDIS Program. NDIS Transition supports transitioning people from state, territory and Commonwealth programs to the NDIS.

The department supports transition arrangements from Commonwealth, state and territory programs to the NDIS through bilateral agreements between the Commonwealth and state and territory governments. As NDIS support is extended to more people and they start accessing supports funded through the NDIS, Commonwealth, state and territory programs of specialised disability support superseded by the NDIS will end.

There are two types of transitions:

• people who access an identified Commonwealth, state or territory government disability program and are found eligible for the NDIS, transition to the NDIS and purchase services and supports using funds from their NDIS plan, to meet their individual needs.

• Commonwealth program clients who are not eligible for the NDIS have access to the same or similar supports through Continuity of Support (CoS) arrangements (this can be through existing arrangements where programs continue to operate).

Transition to the NDIS or to continuity of support for clients of Commonwealth programs administered by the department was completed on 31 March 2021. This included:

• engaging with clients and providers to encourage and support clients to apply to become NDIS participants.

• implementing continuity of support arrangements for existing clients ineligible for the NDIS.

• working with providers to close or reduce programs as clients transitioned to the NDIS or continuity of support.

The department funded service providers to support the transition of people in the following programs to the NDIS until 31 March 2021:

• Disability Employment Assistance (Australian Disability Enterprises) in New South Wales and South Australia

• Work Based Personal Assistance

• National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service

• Outside School Hours Care for Teenagers with Disability

• Remote Hearing and Vision Services for Children

• Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program

• Helping Children with Autism (HCWA)

• Better Start for Children with Disability (Better Start) programs.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

CoS is available to existing Commonwealth program clients who are not eligible for the NDIS. This includes people who do not meet the NDIS access requirements for residence, age or disability. CoS includes the following departmental programs:

• Respite and Carer Support, Respite Support for Carers of Young People with Severe or Profound Disability, and Young Carers Respite and Information Services will receive continuity of support through the Integrated Carer Support Service

• Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program

• Better Start for Children with Disability

• Helping Children With Autism

• Work Based Personal Assistance

• Australian Disability Enterprises

• Mobility Allowance recipients, ineligible for the NDIS, continue to receive their payment until they no longer meet the eligibility criteria or exit the program

• Users of the National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service who are over 65 years or otherwise ineligible for the NDIS receive continuity of support through a contracted National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service provider

• Partners in Recovery, Personal Helpers and Mentors, and Support for Day to Day living participants receive CoS through the Primary Health Network administered by the Department*of Health.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Performance Measure

Number of people supported through the NDIS.

Source: PBS 2020-21 Page 84, Corporate Plan 2020-21 Page 23

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

500,000 NDIS 400,000 NDIS As at 30 June 2021, 466,619 Met

participants by participants by people with disability were

30 June 2023. 30 June 2021 being supported by the NDIS

and NDIA projects 596,600 participants by 30 June 2023.

Complete the Complete transition by transition of DSS 31 December 2020 Commonwealth program clients to the NDIS by 31 December 2020.

Clients have successfully transitioned from DSS programs to the NDIS or to continuity of support arrangements. The target of 31 December 2020 was set as an aspirational target to complete the transition for the majority DSS program clients by 31 December 2020 and to allow three-months for complex clients to transition until 31 March 2021. The Department did not complete the transition by 31 December 2020 but did complete the transition of DSS transitioning clients by 31 March 2021.

Partially Met

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Rationale

Measuring the number of people supported through the NDIS, aims to demonstrate that people with disability who are eligible for the NDIS are in the NDIS, including those from transitioning programs. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of NDIS Transition in achieving the objective of the key activity: To support people transitioning from state and territory, and Commonwealth programs to the NDIS.

1. Targeting 500,000 NDIS participants by 30 June 2023, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the number of people supported through the NDIS.

2. Targeting completion of the transition of DSS Commonwealth program clients to the NDIS by 31 December 2020, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing that the department’s transition scheme has supported a number of people to transition from Commonwealth programs to the NDIS on time. It is estimated around 170,000 Commonwealth clients have transitioned to the NDIS since Trial. Some may have been clients of more than one program and/or clients of state/territory programs and/or have exited the Scheme.

Methodology

1. The number of NDIS participants is based on the number of active participants in the scheme at a point-in-time.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIS Quarterly Report to Disability Reform*Ministers.

2. The target result is based status of transitioning DSS programs at the end of 30 June 2021.

The data source used for this calculation is DSS Administrative Data - Qualitative Assessment.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

NDIS Transition $20.81m $190.15m

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

Program Analysis

In May 2019, then Minister for the NDIS, the Hon Stuart Robert MP, committed to the NDIS supporting 500,000 Australians by 2024-25. As at 30 June 2021, the Scheme is well on its way to achieving this target with 466,619 people with disability being supported by the NDIS, excluding 13,400 children in the Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) Gateway, with a net increase of more than 74,000 participants in the scheme compared to 392,000 participants at 30 June 2020. Between 2017-18 to 2019-20, the NDIS population increased at an average of more than 100,000 participants per annum, an exceptional rate of growth during transition.

Commonwealth programs transitioning clients to the NDIS ceased effective from 31 March 2021. CoS arrangements for Commonwealth program clients commenced from 1 April 2021. At 30 June 2021, more than 220,000 Commonwealth and state program clients have transitioned to the NDIS, 40,000 exclusively from Commonwealth programs.

With the NDIS available to people across the entire country from 1 July 2020, the number of participants continued to increase through 2020-21 by an average of more than 6,000 people per month. This compares to an average of almost 9000 per month in 2019-20. Nevertheless the NDIA estimates, using data to December 2020 update, that NDIS participant numbers could be as high as 596,600 participants by 30 June 2023, almost 100,000 more participants than projected for that year in the 2017 Productivity Commission’s study into NDIS costs and over 60,000 more than the NDIA’s projection in June 2020.

Caveats and Disclosures

a The target of 500,000 people with disability being supported by the NDIS by 2023-24 is derived from estimates of*scheme participants by the Productivity Commission in 2011 indexed at a population growth rate of around 1 per cent per annum. The financial year of 2023-24 was the anticipated year the scheme would reach maturity once all states and territories, including Western Australia, had transitioned their eligible clients from state and territory programs of specialist disability support into the NDIS. The existing eligible population had become participants, with new participants being only those newly acquiring or being born with*significant and permanent disability, or acquiring citizenship or relevant visa status.

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Table 2.3.2b: Key activity performance

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

This program aims to improve the wellbeing and social and economic participation of people with disability, and their families and carers, by building a NDIS that delivers individualised support through an insurance approach. This program also includes funding from existing Commonwealth programs that are transitioning into the NDIS in a phased approach and the Jobs and Market Fund.

Key Activity - Development of the NDIS market

Development of the NDIS market is a key activity of the NDIS Program. Development of the NDIS market aims to support the development of an efficient, effective and mature market and*workforce for the NDIS.

The department is responsible for managing the Development of the NDIS Market. The department’s role is to:

• implement the Growing the NDIS Market and Workforce Strategy

• develop and implement the NDIS National Workforce plan in close consultation with the disability sector, state and territory governments, the NDIA and the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission

• develop market roles and responsibilities with the states and territories, NDIA and NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission

• production of quarterly market effectiveness reports, including deep dive analysis and measurement against market key performance indicators (based on the NDIS Market KPI Framework agreed by the then Disability Reform Council)

• support the implementation of the Thin Markets Framework

• administer the Boosting the Local Care Workforce Program

• administer the Jobs and Market Fund and actively engage with provider peaks, participant peaks, and providers.

The Boosting the Local Care Workforce Program aims to develop the capacity of disability and aged care service providers to operate effectively and expand their workforce.

Jobs and Market Fund service providers contribute to increasing the number and capability*of NDIS workers. Examples of projects that may be funded under the Jobs and Market Fund include:

• work to support the development of an e-marketplace

• initiatives to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to provide NDIS services

• projects to develop new delivery models for rural and remote communities

• development of frameworks and resources to assist providers to train NDIS workers

• information and programs that link jobseekers with NDIS career opportunities.

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Market indicators signal that participants have improved opportunity to access services in the*market.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 84, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 23

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

1. At least 75% market utilisation rates by 30*June 2021.ab * 75% 68% Not Met

2. At least 10% improvement in NDIS market concentration in remote areas by 30 June 2021.ab * 10% 1% Not Met

Rationale

Measuring market indicators demonstrate that participants have improved opportunity to access services in the market. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of Development of the NDIS market in achieving the objective of the key activity: to support the development of an efficient, effective and mature market and workforce for the NDIS.

Targeting at least 75 per cent market utilisation rates by 30*June 2021 demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity. Utilisation rates are a market indicator which demonstrates the percentage of the NDIS market and workforce which has transitioned and matured, showing the change in opportunities to access services in the market.

In 2020-21 the COVID-19 pandemic saw reductions to certain NDIS services typically provided face-to-face. This contributed to a decline in market utilisation rates across all participant plan cohorts from the high of 69 per cent in 2019-20, regardless of whether participants were on their first or subsequent plans.

Targeting at least 10 per cent improvement in NDIS market concentration in remote areas by 30*June 2021 demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity. This target measures the change in NDIS market concentration in remote areas. Market concentration is correlated with the existence of thin markets. Market concentration is correlated with the existence of thin markets.

Market concentration measures firms’ respective shares of the total revenue in a market or the extent of dominance in the market. A market with higher concentration may be less competitive (higher prices and less diverse services offered). Remote markets are persistently concentrated, dominated by a small number of providers relative to larger and more competitive city and regional markets.

In 2019-20, prior to COVID-19, there had been an improvement of 22 per cent year-on-year in remote markets. However, in 2020-21 progress to decrease in market concentration (or increased market competition) in remote locations was slow due to COVID-19 restrictions as many communities restricted access.

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Methodology

The calculation is based on the number of scheme participants, funding spent and funding plan approved - based on providers’ claims against participant plans, excluding in-kind supports. The per cent of market utilisation rates by 30 June 2021 is based on the monthly plot over time and tracking of market trends. This value is compared against the target directly.

The data source used for this calculation is NDIS authorised datasets.

The calculation of market concentration in each NDIS service district uses the Herfindahl-Hirshman Index. National remote market concentration is an average of market concentration in remote areas, weighted by the total value of payments spent in each region. The per cent improvement in NDIS market concentration in remote areas by 30 June 2021 is based on market concentration, which is weighted according to the value of the district. The remote concentration is presented as the change in market concentration.

The data source used for this calculation is NDIS authorised datasets.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Value and number of Jobs and Market Fund projects supporting the market, sector, and workforce to transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme

2020-21 2019-20

Valuec and numberd of Jobs and Market Fund $12.26m $10.26m

projects supporting the market, sector, and 25 projects 22 projects

workforce to transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme

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Program Analysis

The NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 (the Plan) was launched on 10 June 2021, by the Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC. The plan was developed through extensive stakeholder consultation in 2019 and 2020 including workshops, meetings and an open survey. The plan was endorsed by state and territory Disability Ministers in May 2021.

The department is leading implementation of the plan which will enable workforce growth in the NDIS, and support the sector to attract a wide range of workers while improving existing workers’ access to training and development opportunities.

Following approval by state and territory Disability Ministers, the NDIS Market Roles and Responsibilities document was published on the department’s website on 1 April 2021. The NDIS Market Roles and Responsibilities document outlines the role of governments in supporting and developing the NDIS market and building a responsive and capable NDIS workforce that supports NDIS participants to meet their needs and achieve their goals.*

The Boosting the Local Care Workforce program employs up to 25 Regional Coordinators to help local providers build sustainable businesses and grow their workforce by providing localised support and gathering intelligence on workforce issues. To date, the Australian Government has invested $41.5 million in the program. The Program website provides resources to assist organisations to transition to the NDIS, including forecast demand for services through the Demand Map. In 2020-21, the Boosting Local Care Workforce website had approximately 36,022 unique users. On average, the website attracts 3,002 new unique users each month.

The NDIS Jobs and Market Fund was announced as a terminating measure in the 2018-19 Budget to ensure the disability workforce and market can meet growing demand as the NDIS reaches full scheme. It provides $64.3 million from 2017-18 to 2023-24, of which $45.6*million was provided to*support the growth of the NDIS provider market and workforce in capacity and capability to meet the needs of NDIS participants. The Jobs and Market Fund is advancing these goals using a*combination of procurements and open grant rounds. The Jobs and Market Fund Grant Round 1 awarded 16 grants to 15 service providers from across the care and support sector. The total funding for these grants is $9,944,468 (excluding GST). Jobs and Market Fund funds are also being utilised to support the implementation of a number of initiatives under the NDIS National Workforce Plan.

Caveats and Disclosures

a NDIS authorised datasets from July 2021 were used for the analysis and are subject to data lag. Actual utilisation may be larger than the reported result and actual market concentration may be lower than the reported result.

b This may be temporary and reflect the impact of COVID-19. Overall, national average utilisation declined 1*percentage point, after sustained growth and stability throughout the 2019-20 financial year.

c Includes actual spending in the relevant period only.

d This figure captures all projects that were current during the 2020-21 financial year, including projects that may have been fully funded in previous financial years.

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Table 2.3.2c: Key activity performance

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

This program aims to improve the wellbeing and social and economic participation of people with disability, and their families and carers, by building a NDIS that provides funds to people with significant and permanent disability to purchase reasonable and necessary supports through an insurance approach. This program also includes funding for Commonwealth programs that are transitioning into the NDIS in a phased approach and the Jobs and Market Fund.

Key Activity - National Disability Insurance Scheme Participant Plans

NDIS Participant Plans is a key activity of the NDIS Program. NDIS Participant Plans funds people with significant and permanent disability to purchase supports that enable them to participate in and contribute to their community. The NDIS is Australia’s first national scheme to enable a broad range of supports for people with disability. It moves away from the previous individual state and territory approaches of providing block funding to agencies and community organisations, to funding people with disability directly to purchase their own supports.

In 2020-21, the NDIS provided more than $23 billion to more than 466,000 Australians who have permanent and significant disability. For many people, it is the first time they are able to access the disability supports and services they need.

Participants in the NDIS identify their goals, and develop plans for the supports they need, and are allocated funds to purchase those supports. Goals may include independence, involvement in their community, education, employment and improved health and wellbeing. The NDIS enables participants to have greater choice and control over how, when and from whom they receive support over their lifetime. It also enables early intervention where early support can reduce the impact of disability for participants.

The department is responsible for advising the Minister for the NDIS and the government on:

• the legislative framework, including the NDIS Act 2013 and relevant rules, which underpin the governance and operations of the NDIS

• the appropriation of funding for the NDIS

• the scheme’s interface with other more general service systems such as health, education and transport, working with Commonwealth, state and territory agencies

• developing the NDIS market and workforce

• implementing the Younger People in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) Strategy 2020-25, jointly with the Department of Health and the NDIA.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers The National Disability Insurance Agency is responsible for administering the scheme under the NDIS Act (2013) including decision making in respect of access to the scheme; undertaking individual planning with participants and allocating funding to participants for reasonable and

necessary supports which will assist people with disability to participate in economic and social life. The functions of the Agency are to:

• deliver the NDIS

• manage, and to advise and report on, the financial sustainability of the NDIS

• develop and enhance the disability sector, including by facilitating innovation, research and contemporary best practice in the sector

• collect, analyse and exchange data about disabilities and supports (including early intervention supports) for people with disability

• undertake research relating to disabilities, supports for people with disability, and social contributors to disability

• implement the YPIRAC Strategy 2020-25 to achieve the YPIRAC targets, jointly with the departments of Social Services and Health.

The states and territories’ role in governing and implementing the NDIS, include:

• transitioning people with disability from their state disability support programs to the NDIS

• delivering in-kind supports to NDIS participants, phasing out by June 2023

• providing agreed financial contributions to the NDIS

• monitoring and contributing to the management of the outcomes and financial sustainability of the NDIS

• providing ongoing support via continuity of support arrangements for people not eligible for NDIS

• providing accommodation support, community support, community access and respite for people with disability

• providing affordable and accessible accommodation options for NDIS participants, including YPIRAC, not eligible for housing supports under the NDIS

• implementing priority actions contained in the YPIRAC Strategy 2020-25 for people with disability not eligible for the NDIS and NDIS participants not eligible for SDA.

The Department of Health’s role in implementing the NDIS is to:

• set policy and guidelines for people eligible for aged care, including people with disability, and the interface between aged care and the NDIS

• implementing the YPIRAC Strategy 2020-25 to achieve the YPIRAC targets, jointly with the Department of Social Services and NDIA.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

Performance Measure

Extent to which outcomes for children with disability more closely align with outcomes for all*children.

Source: PBS 2020-21 Page 84, Corporate Plan 2020-21 Page 23

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

1. At least 60% of NDIS participants of school age to 14 attend school in a mainstream class.

* 60 % 70% Met

2. At least 70% of NDIS participants with a disability aged 18-24 have completed secondary school.

* 70 % 69% Not Met

Rationale

Measuring the extent to which outcomes for children with disability more closely align with outcomes for all children, aims to demonstrate the department has effectively bridged this gap and enabled children with a disability to ‘live an ordinary life’. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of NDIS Participant Plans in achieving the objective of the key activity: To provide support to people with disability to participate in and contribute to their community.

Targeting 60 per cent of NDIS participants aged school age to 14 that attend school in a mainstream class, and 70 per cent of NDIS participants with a disability aged 18 to 24 that have completed secondary school, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing the per cent of eligible NDIS participants accessing education to a level similar to those without a disability. This is a direct measure of how closely the impact of the NDIS improves the educational participation of participants to align with educational outcomes for all children.

Methodology

The percentage of NDIS participants of school age to 14 attend school in a mainstream class is based on the proportion of parents of children of school age to 14 who have responded ‘Yes’ to ‘My child is enrolled in a mainstream class’ from the survey.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIA Short-Form Outcomes Framework Survey.

The percentage of NDIS participants with a disability aged 18-24 have completed secondary school is based on the proportion of participants aged 18-24 who have responded ‘Yes’ to ‘Have you completed secondary school?’ as part of the survey.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIA Short-Form Outcomes Framework Survey.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme

Performance Measure

Extent to which NDIS participant outcomes are met.

Source: PBS 2020-21 Pages 92-93, Corporate Plan 2020-21 Page 24

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

1. At least 80% of NDIS participants report satisfaction with the scheme planning process.

* 80% 83% Met

2. At least 25% of working age NDIS participants in paid employment. * 25% 22% Not Met

3. At least 45% of NDIS participants involved in community and social activities. * 45% 45% Met

Target

2020-21

Result Outcome

4. No people under 65 years of age entering residential aged care by the end of 2022 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

164 people aged under 65 entered residential aged care in the March 2021 quarter, a decrease from 282 entering a year ago in the March 2020 quarter.

Ongoing

5. No people under 45 years of age living in residential aged care by the end of 2022 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

105 people aged under 45 were living in residential aged care at 31 March 2021, a decrease from 139 people a year ago 31 March 2020.

Ongoing

6. No people under 65 years of age living in residential aged care by the end of 2025 apart from in exceptional circumstances.

4105 people aged under 65 were living in residential aged care at 31 March 2021, a decrease from 5113 people a year ago at 31 March 2020.

Ongoing

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Rationale

Measuring the Extent to which NDIS participant outcomes are met, aims to demonstrate that NDIS participants are provided with appropriate services and support for their individual needs (i.e. meet their individual outcomes), particularly for social and economic participation. This measure demonstrates the effectiveness of NDIS Participant Plans in achieving the objective of the key activity: To provide support to people with disability to participate in and contribute to their community.

Measuring the following targets will demonstrate if the NDIS is sufficiently funded to provide reasonable and necessary supports, including early intervention supports, to participants in the pursuit of their goals:

1. Targeting at least 80 per cent of NDIS participants report satisfaction with the scheme planning process, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing NDIS participants reporting satisfaction with the scheme planning process. Participation satisfaction rates are an indicator of whether NDIS participants are satisfied with NDIA’s planning process.

2. Targeting at least 25 per cent of working age NDIS participants in paid employment, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing working age NDIS participants in paid employment. This will demonstrate if participants are achieving their ‘employment’ outcomes.

3. Targeting at least 45 per cent of NDIS participants involved in community and social activities, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing NDIS participants involved in community and social activities. This will demonstrate if participants are achieving their ‘social participation’ outcomes.

4. Targeting no people under 65 years entering residential aged care by the end of 2022, apart from in exceptional circumstances, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing whether younger people who are NDIS participants living in residential aged care are achieving their ‘living arrangement’ goals and outcomes. This is a YPIRAC Strategy target.

5. Targeting no people under 45 years living in residential aged care by the end of 2022, apart from in exceptional circumstances, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing whether younger people who are NDIS participants living in residential aged care are achieving their ‘living arrangement’ goals and outcomes. This is a YPIRAC Strategy target.

6. Targeting no people under 65 years living in residential aged care by the end of 2025 apart from in exceptional circumstances, demonstrates the effectiveness of the key activity by showing whether younger people who are NDIS participants living in residential aged care are achieving their ‘living arrangement’ goals and outcomes. This is a YPIRAC Strategy target.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Methodology

1 The percentage of NDIS participants report satisfaction with the scheme planning process is based on the proportion of survey respondents reporting their experience with the planning process as good or very good.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIS Outcomes Framework Survey.

2 The 25 per cent of working age NDIS participants in paid employment is based on the proportion of participants aged 16 and over who have been in the scheme for at least two years in paid work at their latest plan review.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIS Outcomes Framework Survey.

3 The 25 per cent of working age NDIS participants in paid employment is based on the proportion of participants aged 16 and over who have been in the scheme for at least two years participating in community and social activities as at their latest plan review.

The data source used for this calculation is the NDIS Outcomes Framework Survey.

4-6 The number of people under 65 years entering, and under 65 years and 45 years living, in residential care, is based on Department of Health and NDIA data. NDIS participants currently account for around 88 per cent of younger people residing in residential aged care facilities.

The data source used for this calculation is Department of Health and NDIS administrative data.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Administered outlays

2020-21 2019-20

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

National Disability Insurance Scheme Participant Plans $12,654.98m $6,754.76m

Program Analysis Developing Individual participant plans is a key activity of the NDIS as it directly ties government funding for the NDIS to reasonable and necessary supports required by participants. The department’s role in participant plans is to design the legislative framework, such as the NDIS (Supports for Participants) Rules 2013, which prescribe how assessments and determinations are made by the NDIA for reasonable and necessary supports funded for participants under the NDIS.

Measuring plan effectiveness is complex because a participant’s requirement for disability supports will differ based on their disability, their goals, and their personal and external circumstances. The department seeks to measure the effectiveness of participant plans based on outcomes achieved from funded supports, particularly in social, educational and economic participation, and participant satisfaction with the planning process administered by the NDIA.

The targets set by the department reflect the levels of participation observed for people not in the NDIS. That is, the NDIS should help people with disability achieve participation outcomes similar to people not in the NDIS. Achievement of these outcomes is reliant upon various factors beyond the department’s control, including the administration of the NDIS by the NDIA and intersections with mainstream services delivered by states and territories, such as the education system.

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At 30 June 2021, 70 per cent of NDIS participants of school age to 14 attended school in a mainstream class (10 per cent higher than the 60 per cent target) and 69 per cent of NDIS participants aged 18-24 completed secondary school (slightly lower than the 70 per cent target), consistent with levels observed a year ago at June 2020. NDIA longitudinal data highlight almost half of the parents and carers of NDIS children of school age to 14 (46 per cent) agree the NDIS has improved their child’s access to education. These statistics indicate funded supports in participant plans are improving the educational participation for NDIS children, though further work can be done to improve their completion of secondary school.

The NDIS continues to deliver significant improvements to social and community participation outcomes for their participants. At 30 June 2021, 45 per cent of NDIS participants aged 15 and over who have been in the scheme for at least two years were involved in social, community and religious activities, an increase from 36 per cent at baseline when these participants first entered the NDIS. After four years in the scheme, participants involved in social, community and religious activities increases to 49 per cent, which highlights participant outcomes do improve the longer participants remain in the scheme.

Rates of employment for participants have not increased. For participants aged 15 and over who have been in the scheme for at least two years, 22 per cent of participants were in paid work at scheme entry and this percentage has not improved after two years in the scheme. Employment rates increased for younger participants aged 15 to 24 from 12 per cent at scheme entry to 21*per cent after two years in the scheme but decreased for participants aged 25 and over from 25 per cent at scheme entry to 23 per cent after two years in the scheme. The department is working closely with the NDIA on enhancements to its NDIS Participant Employment Strategy and the department’s development of a National Disability Employment Strategy to ensure the roles and responsibilities of the two agencies are complementary and work to benefit the employment of people with disability. Note employment outcomes are also affected by broader economic circumstances, which in 2020-21 includes the effects of COVID-19 on economic activity and unemployment.

In the June 2021 quarter, 83 per cent of participants rated the planning process as either good or very good, with a further 10 per cent rating the experience as neutral. Participant satisfaction with the planning process has remained stable between 80 to 85 per cent since the September 2018 quarter.

The Australian Government is committed to ensuring no person under the age of 65 lives in residential aged care unless there are exceptional circumstances by end of 2025. The aged care system is designed to support the needs of older people and is not designed for younger*people.

A Joint Agency Taskforce (JATF), between the Department of Social Services, Department of Health and the NDIA, has been established to drive implementation of the YPIRAC Strategy 2020-25 to achieve the targets. The JATF will continue for the life of the targets.

The Australian Government is also working in collaboration with states and territories, sector stakeholders and younger people to reduce the number of younger people entering, and living in residential aged care. Working across systems will ensure there are appropriate and effective pathways to accommodation and supports.

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Program 3.2 - National Disability Insurance Scheme Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.3 Outcome 3: Disability and*Carers Significant progress has been made against the YPIRAC targets. Key factors contributing to this progress include:

• revised Aged Care Assessment Supplementary Guidelines that make aged care a last resort

• a detailed analysis and report on the characteristics and circumstances of younger people living in residential aged care

• quarterly reporting by AIHW against the YPIRAC targets as well as investigating data linkages to identify pathways and outcomes for younger people

• streamlined NDIS access decisions and planning processes to strengthen pathways to accommodation other than residential aged care

• establishment of a dedicated team of NDIA YPIRAC Planners who support younger NDIS participants in residential aged care

• rolling out NDIA Health Liaison Officers across Australia to enhance connections between hospitals and the NDIA

• funding medium-term housing supports for YPIRAC NDIS participants awaiting confirmed longer-term accommodation

• funding of $10.1 million in the 2020-21 Budget to establish the YPIRAC System Coordinator Program to help younger people find age-appropriate accommodation and supports.

The ability to meet the YPIRAC targets will be largely dependent on continued collaboration with states and territories and clearly defined roles and responsibilities as it relates to the provision of accommodation for YPIRAC, and the creation of accessible and well-designed housing to ensure alternative options are available to divert younger people from entering residential aged care.

Caveats and Disclosures

NDIA’s Short-Form Outcomes Framework (SFOF) Survey Figures on participant outcomes (educational, social and economic participation) are sourced from the NDIS Outcomes Framework questionnaires developed by the NDIA to measure the outcomes for participants and families/carers. The NDIS Outcomes Framework measures progress towards a common set of accepted goals for each participant to provide an aggregate picture of how the scheme is making a difference. It includes a SFOF, which is a census for all NDIS participants administered once per plan review (generally annually), and a Long Form Outcomes Framework (LFOF), which is an extension of the SFOF survey provided to a longitudinally consistent sample of participants and their families/carers, administered in addition to the SFOF survey.

The NDIA publishes data from the NDIS Outcomes Framework quarterly as part of the NDIS Quarterly Report to Disability Reform Ministers (DRM), and annually as part of its annual participant and carer outcomes report.

NDIA Satisfaction Survey Figures on participant satisfaction with the NDIS planning process are sourced from the NDIS Participant Satisfaction Survey administered by Australian Healthcare Associates (AHA) on behalf of the NDIA.

Survey responses are collected throughout the year from participants and their nominees about their recent NDIS experience during access, pre-planning, planning or plan review process.

Every month the NDIA provides AHA with the entire population of participants who had a recent interaction in any of the participant pathway steps. The AHA contacts participants or their nominees by phone, email or SMS to take part in their survey. Families and carers are also be asked about their experience. AHA may ask parents to complete the participant survey on behalf of their child. Participants can also nominate a person to respond on their behalf.

Younger people in residential aged care Figures on younger people in residential aged care are provided by the Department of Health to the NDIA, which is then subsequently report in the NDIS Quarterly Report to Disability Ministers, to monitor the progress of the Younger People in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) Strategy 2020-25.

The three YPIRAC targets are for all younger people living in residential aged care, they do not apply only to NDIS participants.

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Chapter 2.4

Outcome 4: Housing

Purpose Increased housing supply, improved community housing and assisting individuals experiencing homelessness through targeted support and services.

Programs and activities Outcome 4 comprises two programs and a number of activities which contribute to the achievement of the housing and homelessness outcome. The diagram below depicts how this purpose is translated into measurable activities.

OUTCOME 4 - HOUSING

Program 4.1

Housing and Homelessness

Program 4.2 Affordable Housing

Key activities Key activities

• National Housing and Homelessness Agreement • National Rental Affordability Scheme

Summary and analysis of Outcome 4 In 2020-21, the department achieved all targets across Outcome 4.

The policy tools to support the availability of affordable and stable housing for low and moderate-income households are shared between Commonwealth Government and state and territory jurisdictions. These tools include financial, regulatory and tax settings, and planning and zoning policy. More broadly, factors such as housing market performance and labour market conditions are important influences on housing opportunities and outcomes.

The National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) has increased the availability of affordable rental housing to low and moderate-income households and has reduced the rent for dwellings in the Scheme. NRAS makes dwellings available at reduced rents for eligible low and moderate income households by issuing incentives to approved participants. The department measures the compliance outcomes of approved participants to ensure they meet the regulatory requirements of the NRAS. There will be a continued focus on delivering the NRAS in compliance with legislation, including processing of compliance statements within 60 days.

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We work with the Treasury and state and territory housing departments, including through the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA) to improve housing outcomes. The Australian Government spends around $1.6*billion a year under the NHHA, which commenced on 1 July 2018. This included $129*million in homelessness funding in 2020-21, which the states must match. On 23 April 2021, the Council on Federal Financial Relations endorsed the department led Commonwealth-state Data Improvement Plan under the NHHA. The Data Improvement Plan is a multi-year project seeking to deliver improved, nationally consistent housing and homelessness data to strengthen the Australian Government’s ability to reliably measure state performance in meeting NHHA outcomes. Implementation of data improvement activities is expected to be completed by 30 June 2023.

Key achievements

In the past year, some of our contributions to improving outcomes for increasing housing supply, improving community housing and assisting individuals experiencing homelessness include:

■ together with the Australian Government Treasury, delivering around $1.6 billion each year through the NHHA to improve housing and homelessness outcomes across Australia. Through the NHHA, the Australian Government is providing ongoing and indexed funding for housing initiatives delivered by state partners. The NHHA also includes dedicated homelessness funding that must be matched by states and territories

■ leading development of a housing and homelessness Data Improvement Plan with states and territories and Commonwealth agencies, to ensure housing outcomes can be reliably measured in the future and government funds can be effectively distributed

■ delivered over $5.4 billion in Commonwealth Rent Assistance payments to help more than 1.49 million individuals and families renting in the private rental market or living in community housing. Outcome 1 (Table 2.1.13) reports on the impact of Commonwealth Rent Assistance in reducing the incidence of rental stress for social security payment or Family Tax Benefit recipients

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Program Key Activities Target Result

Met

Met

Met

Met

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4.1 Housing and Homelessness

National Housing and Homelessness Agreement

100% of states and territories meet their requirements under the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement by: • having a publicly available housing

strategy

• having a publicly available homelessness strategy

• contributing to the ongoing collection and transparent reporting of agreed data

• providing annual statement of assurance reports outlining their housing and homelessness expenditure.

States and territories report on the number of dwellings for social housing and the number of specialist homelessness services delivered.

4.2 National Rental 90% of statements of compliance are

Affordable Affordability Scheme processed within 60*days. Housing 90% of allocations set under the

Scheme are active and receiving incentive payments

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Outcome 4: Key activity performance

Table 2.4.1: Key activity performance

Program 4.1 Housing

Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

This program aims to provide support for affordable housing and homelessness prevention initiatives, including the design and implementation of innovative early stage projects.

Key Activity - National Housing and Homelessness Agreement

The National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA) is a key activity of the Housing Program. The NHHA is an agreement between the Australian Government and the states and territories. The NHHA aims to contribute to improving access to affordable, safe and sustainable housing across the housing spectrum, including to prevent and address homelessness, and to support social and economic participation.

The department is responsible for managing the NHHA with states and territories. The*department’s role is to:

• conduct monitoring and compliance

• conduct payments assurance

• review annual statements of assurance

• actively engage with states and territories.

The states and territories are responsible for allocated funding and delivering services in accordance with the terms of the NHHA, including:

• publishing housing and homelessness strategies

• providing annual statement of assurance reports

• contributing to the ongoing collection and transparent reporting of agreed data

• matching Commonwealth homelessness funding

• Social housing and homelessness services, administration and delivery to support local needs

• The NHHA provides funding to support the delivery of housing and homelessness services, projects, reforms or initiatives. As part of its reviews of nationally significant sector-wide agreements between the Commonwealth and States and Territories, the Productivity Commission will review the NHHA. This review is expected to be completed at least 12 months prior to 30 June 2023, and periodically thereafter.

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Program 4.1 Housing

Performance Measure

Standard of delivery by states and territories and organisations is in accordance with the terms and conditions of contracts and agreements with the department

Source: PBS 2020-21 Page 88, Corporate Plan 2020-21 Page 26

Target

100% of states and territories meet their 2020-21

requirements under the National Housing and Target Resulta Target

Homelessness Agreement by:

100% 100% 100% • having a publicly available housing strategy • having a publicly available homelessness strategy

• contributing to the ongoing collection and transparent reporting of agreed data

• providing annual statement of assurance reports outlining their housing and homelessness expenditure.

Rationale

Targeting 100 per cent of states and territories meeting their requirements under the NHHA demonstrates the effectiveness of the department’s role in ensuring states and territories meet their agreed commitments to improve housing and homelessness outcomes.

Methodology

The per cent of states and territories that meet their requirements is based on the number of State and territories that have:

• published a housing strategy

• published a homelessness strategy

• transparent reporting of agreed data

• annual statement of assurance reports outlining jurisdictional housing and homelessness expenditure.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• state and territory relevant government department website where housing and homelessness strategies are published

• the Productivity Commission’s annual Report on Government Services

• the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s (AIHW) Housing Assistance and Specialist Homelessness Services dataset

• NHHA statements of assurance, submitted to the department by the states and territories.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing

Program 4.1 - Housing

Performance Measure

National reporting by states and territories on the number of dwellings for social housing and the number of specialist homelessness services delivered.b

Source: New measure added to complement existing compliance measure on NHHA

Target

2020-21

Target Result Outcome

The national reporting on the number of dwellings for social housing and the number of specialist homelessness services delivered is an output measure and therefore a specific target has not been set.c

States and territories report on the number of dwellings for social housing and the

number of specialist homelessness services delivered

Refer output Met

data tables below

Number of social housing dwellings by category as at 30 June 2020d

Social housing category NSW Vic Qld WA SA Tas ACT NT Aus

4,911 300,403 Public housing dwellings

State owned 4,560 - 3,242 - 1,388 218 - 5,231 14,639

and managed Indigenous housing dwellings

Community 49,509 14,857 11,054 8,005 12,151 6,919 936

housing dwellings

Indigenous community housing dwellings

96,939 64,072 51,890 32,409 32,147 7,050 10,985

5,011 1,670 5,238 2,699 890 87 - 1,801 17,396

464 103,895

Note:

• For a full list of explanatory notes, refer to explanatory notes on the AIHW housing data tables. https://www. aihw.gov.au/getmedia/1c4d25dd-102f-4cb8-bc3c-f20d92665d9f/AIHW-HOU-325-Data-tables-Social-housing-dwellings-2.xlsx.aspx

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Number of specialist homelessness services clients by priority cohort as at 30 June 2020e

Priority Cohorts

NSW Vic Qld WA SA Tas ACT NT National

Indigenous clients

20,475 10,398 14,715 12,110 4,824 983 624 8,741 71,582

Young people (15-24 presenting alone)

13,673 13,702 5,153 2,878 3,547 1,464 772 1,777 42,387

Repeat clients (where clients reported as homeless, then as having a dwelling, and then as homeless)

2,316 2,808 1,480 569 561 364 182 206 8,486

Older clients 5,012 11,848 2,709 2,302 1,133 630 294 657 24,421

Women and children affected by family and domestic violence (FDV)

25,503 49,307 14,528 9,974 6,192 1,583 1,447 4,358 112,892

Clients exiting custodial and care arrangements

3,932 7,217 1,730 1,038 1,154 527 313 499 16,180

Note:

Cohort definition may not directly match the priority cohorts as defined in the NHHA.

The number of specialist homelessness service clients does not serve as a proxy for number of people experiencing homelessness.

As clients may be represented in a number of priority cohorts, the overall number of SHS clients cannot be taken from the above table.

For a full list of explanatory notes, refer to explanatory notes on the AIHW specialist homelessness services data tables.

https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/50d20979-6f26-4d45-97dd-912ed011731f/AIHW-HOU-322-Specialist-olhomelessness-services-data-tables-2019-20.xlsx.aspx

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing Rationale

National reporting on the number of social housing dwellings and the number of specialist homelessness services delivered aims to demonstrate the department’s contribution through the administration of the NHHA to a key output of the key activity.

Methodology

The number of social housing dwellings by category is based on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Housing Assistance annual report 2020.

The number of specialist homelessness services clients by cohort is based on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Specialist Homelessness Service annual report.

The data sources used for this calculation are:

• state and territory relevant government department website where housing and homelessness strategies are published

• the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Housing Assistance annual report

• the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Specialist Homelessness Services annual report

• NHHA annual statements of assurance, submitted to the department by the states and territories.

Program Analysis

The focus of social housing and homelessness sector services for states and territories is to ensure that Australians have access to affordable, safe and sustainable housing.

The NHHA commits funding each year to states and territories to contribute to improving access to affordable, safe and sustainable housing, including to prevent and address homelessness and to support social and economic participation. The requirement for having publicly available strategies under the NHHA, has improved the transparency and accountability on state and territory housing and homeless expenditure and therefore outputs and outcomes.

Total Australian, state and territory government recurrent expenditure for housing and homelessness services (including social housing and specialist homelessness services) was $6.5 billion in 2019 20f. The Australian Government share of this expenditure under NHHA was $1.6 billion. States and territories are responsible for how funding is allocated, including determining priorities and the type and locations of services funded.

While the work on data improvementg continues to progress, the annual Statements of Assuranceh, serve as a proxy indicator for the effectiveness of the NHHA’s contribution to the housing and homelessness outputs and outcomes for states and territoriesi. The Statements of Assurance are compared to national data published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and by the Productivity Commission.

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Program 4.1 - Housing

Housing

Funding provided to states and territories through the NHHA contributes towards the provision of social housing. Social housing is subsidised rental housing provided by not-for-profit, non-government or government organisations to assist people who are unable to access suitable accommodation in the private rental market. In 2019-20, the Productivity Commission Report on Government Servicesj reported all jurisdictions made a significant investment in public housing, however it also shows the number of social housing dwellings in the states and territories has remained relatively stable over the past ten years to 2020 (increasing by around 14,000). Additionally, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s housing data dashboardk shows an increase in the number of social housing occupants with the greatest need in 2019-20 (as a proportion of new allocations for community housing, public housing and state-owned and managed Indigenous housing). State and territory government net recurrent expenditurel on social housing was $4.3 billion in 2019-20, an increase in real terms from $4.1 billion in 2018-19. In terms of outputs for social housing, the Productivity Commission has*reported:m

• ‘Greatest need allocations as a proportion of all new allocations’ indicates assistance is provided to those most at risk. (Table 18A.22/23/24)

• ‘Proportion of gross household income spent on rent’ indicates the change in affordability of the social housing system over time. (Table 18A.22/23/24)

• ‘Customer satisfaction’ rates with provided housing indicates change in tenant sentiment over time and the ability to provide housing fit for purpose and needs. (Table 18A.40/41/42)

• ‘Average turnaround times for vacant stock’ indicates the flexibility of the social housing system overall. (Table 18A.13/14)

• ‘Government recurrent expenditure per dwelling’ indicates the sustainability of the social housing system at scale. (Table 18A.43/44/45/46)

Homelessness

The Australian Government contributes to funding for specialist homelessness services through the NHHA. In 2019-20, the Australian Government provided $125.0 million, which was required to be matched by states and territories. Specialist homelessness services respond to and support priority homelessness cohorts identified in the NHHA who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The priority cohorts are women and children affected by domestic violence; children and young people; people experiencing repeat homelessness; older people; Indigenous Australians; and people leaving institutions or care. The 2019-20 Statements of Assurance show that all jurisdictions (with the exception for Northern Territory, which does not report by cohorts) made a significant investment in homelessness services targeting the priority cohorts.

In terms of outputs for specialist homelessness services, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has reported:n

• During 2019-20 the number of priority homelessness cohort clients accessing state and territory homelessness services was 290,462.

• Every month during 2019-20, between 80,000 and 90,000 people received support for specialist homelessness service agencies.

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Program 4.1 - Housing Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing Caveats and Disclosures

a Results reported at 30 June 2021 are for 2019-20. The 12 month lag is to allow for completion of submission of statements of assurance by states and territories by the end October of each year. The statements of assurance are published in the Federal Financial Relations website by the department. https://federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/agreements/national-housing-and-homelessness-agreement-0.

b As states and territories are responsible for the delivery of social housing and homelessness services, states hold most of the information, which underpins national reporting for social housing and homelessness. In particular, states contribute reporting on the number of dwellings for social housing and number of specialist homelessness services delivered.

c Under the NHHA, the day-to-day delivery of social housing and homelessness services is a responsibility of state and territory governments. No target is be set for this measure as states and territories are responsible for determining their own priorities as well as the type and locations of services funded. This includes social housing and homelessness services, administration and delivery to support local needs. States and territories are required to have a publicly available housing strategy and homelessness strategies that set out how they will respond to demand in their respective jurisdiction.

d Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2021. Housing assistance in Australia. https://www.aihw.gov.au/ reports/housing-assistance/housing-assistance-in-australia.

e Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2020. Specialist homelessness services annual report. https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/homelessness-services/specialist-homelessness-services-annual-report.

f Statements of assurance provided by states and territories during 2019-20. The Statements of Assurance are published in the Federal Financial Relations website by the department. https://federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/ agreements/national-housing-and-homelessness-agreement-0.

g Recognising the limitations of data available to assess housing and homelessness outcomes, in 2019-20, under the NHHA, the department led the development of a Commonwealth-State Data Improvement Plan (DIP) for improved, nationally consistent data on housing and homelessness. Work on data improvement activities has commenced, undertaken by agencies including the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare as well as external research organisations.

h When comparing state and territory reporting through the Statement of Assurance to the Productivity Commission Report on Government Services, there is often discrepancies due to differing data definitions and reporting methodologies between jurisdictions. The department follows up with the relevant jurisdiction to try and clarify any discrepancies.

i There are a number of other factors including state’s own investment, which significantly influence housing and homelessness outcomes.

j Productivity Commission Report on Government Services 2021 Part G, Section 18, Housing, released January 2021 (housing data tables) https://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/report-on-government-services/2021/ housing-and-homelessness/housing.

k Australian Institute of Health and Welfare housing data dashboard https://www.housingdata.gov.au/.

l Productivity Commission Report on Government Services 2021 Part G, Section 18, Housing, released January 2021 https://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/report-on-government-services/2021/housing-and-homelessness/housing.

m Productivity Commission Report on Government Services 2021 Part G, Section 18, Housing, released January 2021 (housing data tables) https://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/report-on-government-services/2021/ housing-and-homelessness/housing.

n Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2020. Specialist homelessness services annual report. https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/homelessness-services/specialist-homelessness-services-annual-report.

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Table 2.4.2: Key activity performance

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Program 4.2 - Affordable Housing

This program aims to improve the supply of affordable rental housing to low and moderate income households.

Key Activity - National Rental Affordability Scheme

The National Rental Affordability Scheme (the Scheme) is a key activity of the Affordable Housing*Program.

Under the National Rental Affordability Scheme, the Australian Government in conjunction with the states and territories is providing financial incentives to:

• increase the supply of affordable rental housing

• reduce the rental costs for low to moderate income households

• encourage the large-scale investment and innovative delivery of affordable rental housing.

The Scheme, which commenced in 2008, provides an annual, financial incentive for up to 10*years for approved participants who rent dwellings to eligible people on low to moderate incomes at a rate at least 20 per cent below market rent.

As announced in the 2014-15 Budget, there will be no further funding rounds or new allocations of National Rental Affordability Scheme incentives beyond those allocated in the Scheme and held by approved participants at that time.

Performance Measure

Delivery complies with relevant legislation to ensure that incentives are issued accurately to approved participants.

Source: PBS 2020-21 page 92, Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 26

Target

2020-21a

Target Result Outcome

* 90 % 94.3% Met

90% of statements of compliance are processed within 60 days.

Rationale

Measuring the delivery complies with relevant legislation to ensure that incentives are issued accurately to*approved participants aims to demonstrate the department has efficiently processed statements of*compliance. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of the program as each statement of compliance is only issued on proof of an affordable dwelling tenanted to an eligible tenant.

This measure demonstrates achievement of a key output of the National Rental Affordability Scheme key activity: statements of compliance are processed and financial incentives are issued accurately to approved participants.

Targeting 90 per cent of statements of compliance are processed within 60 days demonstrates the efficient achievement of a key output by showing the department, in its role as the administrator of the National Rental Affordability Scheme, provided timely incentives to approved participants who rent dwellings to eligible tenants at a rate at least 20 per cent below market rent.

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing Methodology

The per cent of statements of compliance processed within 60 days is based on the date:

• an approved participant submits a statement of compliance

• funds are released or the refundable tax offset certificate is issued for the relevant statement of*compliance.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services’ Grant Payment*System.

Performance Measure

Incentives delivered through the scheme are maximised to improve the supply of affordable rental housing to low and moderate income households.

Source: New output measure added to complement existing measure for NRAS

Target

90% of allocations set under the 2020-21a

Scheme are active and receiving incentive payments Target * 90 %

Result

94.5%

Outcome

Met

Calculation

Total allocations receiving a payment in*NRAS year 2019-20 34,014

Maximum allocations available for NRAS year 2019-20

35,989

94.5%

Output data for NRAS quarterly summary

NRAS Quarterly Summary

Jun Qtr 2019

Sep Qtr 2019

Dec Qtr 2019

Mar Qtr 2020

Jun Qtr 2020

Active allocations 34,501 34,191 33,844 33,743 33,468

Provisional allocations 1,488 1,404 1,325 1,257 1,189

Total 35,989 35,595 35,169 35,000 34,657

Note:

• The total for June Qtr 2019 forms the basis of maximum allocations available for NRAS year 2019-20

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Program 4.2 - Affordable Housing

Rationale

Measuring the allocations (output) that received an incentive payment within the framework of the Scheme aims to demonstrate the department is improving the supply of affordable rental housing to low and moderate income households.. While the department does not control whether an approved participant of the Scheme will act in accordance with the regulations to receive an incentive payment, the department seeks to maximise the proportion of active allocations and payments issued to maximise the supply of affordable rental housing to low and moderate income households.

Targeting 90 per cent of allocations set under the Scheme being active and receiving an incentive payment demonstrates the achievement of the key outcome of the Scheme, within the legislative allocation cap set by Government.

Methodology

The active, provisional and total allocations under the Scheme are reported quarterly, while incentives are paid on a yearly basis. For the purposes of this measure, the maximum number of allocations in the year is used (35,989). Please note:

• Results for the 2019-20 National Rental Affordability Scheme year (1 May 2019 to 30 April 2020) and the correlated 2019-20 financial year are reported, as full payment data for the 2020-21 National Rental Affordability Scheme year was not available at time of publication.

• Note: the number of incentives issued within the Program Outputs section (35,073) differs from the number of allocations receiving an incentive payment (34,014), to remove double counting for multiple incentives being issued to a single allocation and remove allocations that were issued a nil incentive payment.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services’ Grant Payment System.

Program Outputs

Output data sets that support the performance report for the program.

Number of National Rental Affordability Scheme incentives issued for the relevant National Rental Affordability Scheme year (Cash and Refundable Tax Offsets (RTO))

2019-20a 2018-19

Cash 12,244 12,385

RTO 22,829 22,124

Total 35,073 34,509

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Part 2 - Annual performance statement Chapter 2.4 Outcome 4: Housing

Program 4.2 - Affordable Housing

Program Analysis

These indicators measure the outcomes of approved participants to ensure they meet the regulatory requirements of the Scheme and deliver affordable rental housing to low and moderate-income households. This is the first year these measures have been reported.

The National Rental Affordability Scheme has increased the availability of affordable rental housing to low and moderate-income households. The National Rental Affordability Scheme makes dwellings available at reduced rents for eligible low and moderate income households by issuing incentives to approved participants. Results provided relate to compliance being met by the National Rental Affordability Scheme Regulations 2020 (NRAS Regulations).

In assessing the 2019-20 National Rental Affordability Scheme year statements of compliance, the department’s performance was impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and amendments to the NRAS Regulations and National Rental Affordability Scheme Act 2008 (NRAS Act). The department consulted with approved participants and peak bodies throughout this period. The department exercised all powers under the NRAS Regulations to allow greater flexibility in the regulatory environment. This included:

• extending the deadline to submit statements of compliance from 30 June 2020 to*30*September*2020

• extending the submission of other documents from 28 April 2020 to 30 November 2020

• engaging with state and territory governments on changes to tenancy laws and eviction moratoriums due to the COVID-19 pandemic

• modifying internal processes whilst departmental staff worked from home.

There will be a continued focus on delivering the National Rental Affordability Scheme in compliance with legislation, including processing of compliance statements within 60 days and seeking to maximise use of the Scheme by approved participants.

Caveats and Disclosures

a Results for the 2019-20 National Rental Affordability Scheme year (1 May 2019 to 30 April 2020) are reported, as full payment data for the 2020-21 National Rental Affordability Scheme year was not available at time of publication.

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Chapter 2.5

Cross Outcome - Program Support

Program Outcome key performance results

Program Key Activities Target Result

- a

Expenditure (taking into account, to the extent possible, all government decisions and other circumstances that may have a material effect) and explanations are provided where variances are equivalent to or greater than 2% between budgeted expenses and Final Budget Outcome for all Department of Social Services Outcomes.

Advice and support At least 95% of ministerial briefs and Not met to Ministers and correspondence across the four Assistant Ministers outcomes are provided on time.

Program Support Departmental Budget estimates are accurate

a The department’s financial performance is reported in the 2020-21 Annual Report, Financial Statements.

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Cross Outcome - Key activity performance

Table 2.CO.1: Key activity performance

Program Support

Key Activity - Advice and Support to Ministers and Assistant Ministers

Advice and support to Ministers is a key activity of Program Support. The key activity aims to support programs across the outcomes to ensure that Ministers and the Assistant Minister are provided with timely advice and support from the department.

Performance Measure

Timeliness of advice and support provided to Portfolio Ministers and Assistant Ministers by the department across the four outcomes.

Source: PBS 2021-22 pages 59, 74, 86 and 93; Corporate Plan 2020-21 page 27

Target

At least 95% of ministerial briefs and 2020-21

correspondence across the four outcomes are provided on time. Target Outcome Result

* 95 % 81% No Met

Rationale

Measuring timeliness of advice and support provided to Portfolio Ministers and Assistant Ministers aims to demonstrate the department has efficiently provided advice and support in order to allow Ministers and Assistant Ministers to make decisions that support the department to achieve its objectives. This is a measure of proxy efficiency that demonstrates achievement of a key output in achieving an objective of the key activity: timely advice and support provided to ministers and assistant ministers.

Targeting at least 95 per cent of ministerial briefs and correspondence across the four outcomes are provided on time, demonstrates proxy efficiency of the key activity by showing the ministers and the assistant minister are provided with timely advice and support from the department the majority of the time.

Methodology

An audit is undertaken by the department to filter records not relevant to the evaluation of the performance measure. The number of records provided on time is based on the associated critical date.

The data source used for this calculation is the Department of Social Services Parliamentary Document Management System (PDMS).

Program Analysis

In 2020-21, the department implemented a new process to proactively monitor, report and manage the timeliness of advice and support provided to Portfolio Ministers. In 2020-21 there has been an 11 per cent increase in the level of ministerial briefing being actively managed, as the department continues to provide policy and program advice to support government decision making as a result of the ongoing pandemic and the rapidly changing environment.

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Part 3

National Redress Scheme

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Part 3 - National Redress Scheme National Redress Scheme-Annual report 2020-2021 National Redress Scheme- Annual report 2020-2021

The National Redress Scheme (the Scheme) was created in response to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child*Sexual Abuse. The Scheme commenced on 1 July 2018 and will operate for 10*years. The Scheme acknowledges that many children were sexually abused in Australian institutions and seeks to hold institutions to account for this abuse and help people who have experienced abuse to gain access to redress.

The Scheme operates under the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018 (the Act). The Act was passed by the Parliament in June 2018 following consultation with state and territory governments, institutions, survivors, support groups and advocates. Under the Act, the Secretary of the department is the Scheme operator.

Section 75 of the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Rules*2018 (the Rules) sets out what must be included in the report. The Minister must present the report to Parliament.

This annual report describes the key operations of the Scheme in its third year of operation (from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021) as required by the Act and the Rules.

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How the Scheme operates Under the Scheme, a person can apply for redress if they:

■ experienced institutional child sexual abuse before 1 July 2018

■ are aged over 18 or will turn 18 before 30 June 2028

■ are an Australian citizen or permanent resident

Under the Scheme, an offer of redress consists of three components:

■ a counselling and psychological care component

■ a redress payment

■ a direct personal response from each participating institution responsible for the*abuse.

A redress monetary payment is calculated in accordance with the Scheme’s Assessment Framework (the framework). The framework considers the person’s individual circumstances and the nature of abuse they experienced as a child. The maximum redress payment a person can receive is $150,000, with any relevant prior payments related to the abuse deducted from this amount.

Counselling and psychological care services differ depending on where the person lives at the time of applying for redress. In most states and territories, they are offered state based counselling and psychological services. For those residing in South Australia, Western Australia or overseas, a direct payment is offered to support access to services in their local area.

A direct personal response is an opportunity to have the experience of abuse and its impacts recognised by the responsible institution(s) in a manner that is meaningful to the applicant. The applicant decides if, how, and when their direct personal response will happen. A direct personal response can involve a senior official or representative from the responsible institution(s) listening, acknowledging, and apologising for the harm they caused. The representative of the responsible institution(s) may also outline what steps the institution has taken to prevent future abuse.

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Summary of Scheme operations Part 3 - National Redress Scheme National Redress Scheme-Annual report 2020-2021 In its third year of operation, the Scheme has continued to deliver on key

recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child*Sexual Abuse.

During the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 20211:

■ 3,773 people applied to the Scheme for redress2

■ 3,240 determinations were made and of these:

- 3,174 people were determined as eligible for redress

- 66 applications were deemed ineligible

■ 3,225 people accepted an offer of redress

■ 13 people declined an offer of redress

■ 1,209 institutions were found responsible for abuse

■ 3,283 applications were finalised, including 3,251 redress payments ranging from less than $10,000 to $150,000, with an average payment of $85,048

■ the total value of redress monetary payments was $285,005,565

■ 2,334 people accepted the offer of counselling and psychological care services as part of their redress outcome:

- 220 people were provided a total of 2,395 hours of counselling and psychological care services nationally with an average of around 10 hours provided per person

■ 1,922 people accepted the offer of a direct personal response from an institution:

- 188 people completed their direct personal response with an institution 284*people made contact with an institution to begin the process to receive their direct personal response

■ 73 per cent of applications name more than one institution in their application and*27 per cent of applications name four or more institutions.

Institutions joining the Scheme As at 30 June 2021, all Commonwealth and state and territory government institutions and 491 non-government institutions, or groups of institutions, were participating in the Scheme. This includes 268 non-government institutions that joined the Scheme during 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021. This brings the total number of sites (such as churches, schools, and community groups) covered by the Scheme to over 66,000 across Australia.

1 The figures provided represent a snapshot of the Scheme operations between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021. These include outcomes provided to people who applied for redress in first year of the Scheme’s operation

2 This represents the number of new applications received between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021. Some of these applications are currently being assessed by the Scheme.

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Since the commencement of the Scheme to 30 June 2021, there have been 24*institutions declared under the funder of last resort arrangements across all States and the Commonwealth, an increase of 16 on the same time last year. In 2020-21, a*number of steps have been taken to encourage institutions to join the Scheme:

■ In December 2020, the Minister for Families and Social Services extended the date for institutions to join the Scheme, until the end of the Scheme. As survivors can apply for redress at any time until 1 July 2027, this ensures that institutions are able to do the right thing by survivors and join the Scheme.

■ Institutions that refuse to join the Scheme within six months of their first engagement with the Scheme after being named in an application may be publicly named and subject to a range of financial consequences, including:

- being restricted from accessing future Commonwealth grant funding, from 1*January 2021

- possible loss of charitable status and the associated tax concessions and benefits (effective from 25 February 2021), and Basic Religious Charity Status (effective from 17 March 2021).

Applications finalised From 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, the Scheme finalised a total of 3,283 applications, with an average of 273 per month over the period. This is compared to 2,537 applications, with an average of 211 outcomes made per month in 2019-20.

For applications received in the first two years of the Scheme, 5,396 applications have been finalised3, with a further 520 outcomes advised to applicants who are still considering the offer4, 1,054 applications have yet to progress to an outcome as at 30 June 2021.The delay in finalising these applications is largely due to institutions that have not yet joined the Scheme or only recently joined, applications having been placed on hold at the request of an applicant and difficultly contacting applicants for further information.

Part 3 - National Redress Scheme National Redress Scheme-Annual report 2020-2021

3 Finalised is the definition given to an application which has been accepted and paid (including nil payments).

4 An outcome is where applications have reached the stage just before payment and contact is made with the applicant to advise them of their outcome and provide them with an acceptance letter.

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Part 3 - National Redress Scheme National Redress Scheme-Annual report 2020-2021

Second anniversary review Ms Robyn Kruk AO was appointed to conduct an independent review (the review) of*the National Redress Scheme.

In March 2021, Ms Kruk delivered the final report to the Australian Government. The review made 38 recommendations to increase access to redress and improve the Scheme’s operation, making it more trauma-informed, efficient, and survivor-focused.

On 23 June 2021, the Interim Australian Government response was published and is available on the National Redress Scheme’s website. Many of the recommendations will require the agreement of state and territory governments. For this reason, the Government’s interim response only reflects the Australian Government’s views.

The Australian Government is prioritising action on 25 of the 38 recommendations in full or in part. The remaining recommendations constitute major changes to the Scheme and require further detailed development. The department has commenced development work and consultation with state and territory governments, survivors, institutions and other stakeholders, to support future decisions of the review recommendations.

Redress support services and COVID-19 Despite the continued challenging servicing environment arising from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, cumulative figures to the end of June 2021 showed that more than half of all applicants to the National Redress Scheme were indicating they are being supported to apply. Of those who indicated they had support in preparing their application, approximately 30 per cent were supported by a Redress Support Service and approximately 25 per cent were supported by knowmore Legal Services. knowmore Legal Services assists survivors with free legal advice and a range of support services.

Importantly, additional help continues to be provided to the groups most likely to need it, with around two thirds of people being supported falling into one or more of the following categories: former state wards, people with disability, and Indigenous Australians.

Key statistics Of the applications received for the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021

Of the applications received 2 out of 5 applicants identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

2 out of 3 applicants are male

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• ···· ··· ··· ·········· ··· ·····

~ ~

~ ~

■ ■

Figure 12: Applications received by State/ Territory for the period 1 June 2020 to 30 June 2021

3

21% (19%) Western Australia

1% (2%) Australian

(17%) Capital Territory <1%

1%

7%

32%

18%

13%

Northern Territory

Queensland

New South Wales

South Australia

(8%)

(1%)

(17%)

(29%)

Victoria

(1%) 7%

Overseas Unknown (6%)

Tasmania

Note: Figures in brackets relate to 2019-20

Figure 13: Applications received by gender and age for the period 1 June 2020 to 30 June 2021

6 91+

26 81-90 17

184 71-80 129

61-70 348 467

636 51-60 457

448 279 41-50

215 31-40 293

21-30 125 97

14 0-20 16

Male Female

Note: 16 applicants (0.43%) have identified as “Indeterminate/Intersex/Unspecified” of which most are within the 21-70 year age bracket.

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Part 4

Management and accountability

Chapter 4.1 Governance structure 166

Chapter 4.2 External scrutiny 177

Chapter 4.3 Managing our people 181

Chapter 4.4 Managing our finances 190

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Part 4 - Management and accountability Chapter 4.1 Governance structure

Chapter 4.1

Governance structure

Committees supporting our business At 30 June 2021, our governance committee structure included the Executive Management Group and four supporting committees that provided advice and assurance to the Secretary on the administration and operation of the department.

Executive Management Group The Executive Management Group is the most senior governance committee. This*group comprises the Secretary as Chair and deputy secretaries as members. It provides the department with guidance on overall strategic direction, priorities, management, and performance and oversees our financial position by allocating resources, monitoring performance and risks, as well as ensuring our accountability and regulatory requirements are met.

Audit and Assurance Committee This committee provides independent assurance and advice to the Secretary on financial and performance reporting responsibilities, risk oversight and management, and our system of internal control. The Audit and Assurance Committee Charter provides further information. This committee has an independent Chair, three external experts and three internal members appointed by the Secretary. It meets up to six times a year.

The Audit and Assurance Committee Charter is reviewed annually and was updated on 30 June 2021 as a result of changes to the PGPA Rule 2014 that came into effect 1 July 2021.

For further information on the Audit and Assurance Committee Charter, go to https://www.dss.gov.au/publications-articles-corporate-publications/audit-committee-charter

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Figure 14: Audit and Assurance Committee - PGPA Rule Section 17AG (2A)(b)-(e) - Audit and Assurance Committee

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Member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Mr Nick Baker Bachelor of Arts in

Computing*Studies Graduate Diploma in Professional*Accounting Certificate IV Commonwealth Fraud*Investigations Fellow Certified Practising Accountant Australia Member Australian Computer Society

Six of six $27,270

Ms Jenny Morison Bachelor of Economics Fellow - Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Fellow the Australian Institute of Management Specialist in government financial reforms, governance and consulting Independent member and chair of Commonwealth audit and risk committees and financial statement sub-committees for large and small government entities

Six of six $27,270

Mr Ian McPhee Bachelor of Business Five of six

Bachelor of Arts Financial management and budget experience, Department of Finance Fellow of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Fellow CPA Australia, and the Institute of Public Administration Australia Financial statement and performance audit experience with Australian National Audit Office

$18,370

Ms Susan Page Former Deputy Secretary for the Department of Infrastructure and the Department of Finance Six years’ experience with Audit and Assurance Committees Member Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications Audit and Assurance Committee

Six of six $23,580

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Member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

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Mr Matt Flavel Master of Financial Management Bachelor of Economics (Hons) Previous experience as a Chief Operating Officer managing large complex budgets, audit, IT and security related issues

Five of six $0

Ms Flora Carapellucci Graduate and member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors Master of Public Policy Special appropriations management and administered budgets

Six of six $0

Ms Sarah Guise Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of*Arts (Hons) Master of Arts (Strategy and Policy) Executive Masters of Public Administration Risk and budget management skills*through project manager, project sponsor and program management roles

Six of six $0

Committees reporting to the Executive Management Group

Policy and Evaluation Committee This committee considers early stage major policy proposals, emerging strategic issues and oversees the department’s evaluation strategy, ahead of consideration by the Executive Management Group. The committee is responsible for supporting the development of robust policy proposals that align with the department’s policy agenda. The Deputy Secretary, Social Security chairs the committee.

People and Culture Committee This committee provides advice to the Secretary through the Executive Management Group. It is responsible for ensuring delivery of government requirements through improved oversight of our workforce. Its remit includes work health and safety, workforce strategy, diversity and inclusion, and other priorities as directed by the Executive Management Group. The Deputy Secretary, Families and Communities chairs the committee.

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Implementation Committee This committee provides advice to the Secretary through the Executive Management Group. It is responsible for ensuring effective design and delivery of government requirements through improved oversight of the department’s implementation activities. In the context of the Corporate Plan and Portfolio Budget Statements, the committee’s remit includes performance monitoring and reporting of election commitments, budget measures, enterprise risk management, and other priorities as directed by the Executive Management Group. The Deputy Secretary, Disability and Carers chairs the committee.

Figure 15: Our governance structure as at 30 June 2021

Financial Statements

Chair: External

Performance Statements

Chair: External

Audit Chair: External

Policy and Evaluation Chair: Deputy Secretary

People and Culture Chair: Deputy Secretary

Implementation Chair: Deputy Secretary

Secretary

Executive Management Group Chair: Secretary

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Business planning and risk management Strategic and business planning Our planning process engages staff at all levels to understand how they contribute to delivering on required outcomes. There is a clear pathway from our key corporate documents through to each staff member’s individual performance plan.

Our Corporate Plan outlines our purpose, priorities, and performance objectives and guides the way in which we achieve results. For further information on our Corporate Plan, go to https://www.dss.gov.au/about-the-department/publications-articles/ corporate-publications/department-of-social-services-corporate-plans

Risk management Effective risk management is fundamental to ensuring we can deliver on the Government’s priorities for our department. Working in an environment where third parties deliver our programs requires us to understand how best to manage shared risks. As a result, we require the right evidence, at the right time, to make sound management decisions regarding the development and implementation of policy outcomes.

Risk management is governed by legislation and regulation that includes Section*16 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy, and the Australian and New Zealand accepted international standard ISO31000:2018 Risk Management-Guidelines.

The enterprise risks are reviewed annually to assess currency, relevance and the status of the key controls and progress of treatment actions. Outcomes of the annual risk review are provided to the senior governance committees to ensure senior executive oversight. The annual risk review is also aligned to our corporate planning cycle to strengthen the management of risk by integrating risk into our governance and enterprise planning models. This ensures management of risk is incorporated into decision-making at all levels.

Business continuity management We are committed to managing business interruptions that may affect critical services and assets of the department. Our Business Continuity Management Framework provides the necessary structure to ensure we can deliver our critical work in the event of a disruption and where required, contribute to the Australian Government Crisis Management Framework.

The Pandemic Action Plan, developed and activated in early 2020, is part of the department’s Business Continuity Management Framework. We regularly reviewed the Pandemic Action Plan throughout the year updating and refining it to meet the evolving developments of the pandemic including incorporating relevant jurisdictional requirements.

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We review and test business continuity plans regularly to ensure the safety, security, and wellbeing of staff in the event of an emergency or disaster.

In 2020-21, we conducted a review of our critical business functions, which will inform the development of localised branch-level business resumption plans, further refining our approach to maintaining business continuity.

Internal audit assurance activities Internal Audit is an important component of our governance arrangements and the Department has an active Internal Audit program.

Internal Audit provides assurance services, including reasonable assurance engagements as defined in the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, Resource Management Guide 210.

Internal Audit is an independent assurance and advisory function designed to strengthen accountability of our activities and functions and improve risk-based, decision-making across our operations.

The 2020-21 Audit Work Plan considered our risk profile and was approved by the*Secretary following consideration by the Audit and Assurance Committee. In 2020-21, 13 audits and two management-initiated reviews were undertaken across our policy, program, and enabling activities.

The Head of Internal Audit is independent from the department’s policy and program management activities. To strengthen accountability, the Head of Internal Audit provides the Audit and Assurance Committee with all internal audit findings and advises them on progress towards implementing audit recommendations. The independence of the Head of Internal Audit allows the position to provide objective insights into the state of our governance, performance, risk management and internal controls, systems, policies, processes, and practices.

Compliance framework We promote a strong compliance culture which enables us to deliver outcomes effectively and achieve high levels of performance.

Our Enterprise Compliance Framework (the framework) establishes a foundation for*a*strong compliance culture enabling us to deliver outcomes effectively and achieve high levels of performance in a manner consistent with relevant legal and policy obligations.

It forms part of a broader, coordinated approach to promote good governance underpinned by principles such as accountability, transparency, integrity, efficiency, and leadership.

This framework complements other key governance frameworks, including those addressing security, risk and fraud.

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Fraud and corruption control Under section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (the Fraud Rule) we are required to have in place mechanisms to prevent, detect, and deal with fraud.

The department is committed to preventing fraud against the department, our programs, and operations.

Fraud is managed through a number of strategies, including:

■ educating our employees on risk management

■ identifying and mitigating our fraud, compliance, security, and privacy risks

■ making our employees aware of their fraud control responsibilities

■ integrating fraud prevention, detection and investigation arrangements and using data analysis to identify trends and issues

■ ensuring fraud reporting is transparent and accountable.

The department reviewed our Fraud Control Plan to ensure it continues to reflect our business activities.

Regular assessments of fraud risks are undertaken to improve understanding of our exposure to fraud. These risk assessments involve identifying areas where fraud could be committed, evaluating existing risk mitigation strategies, and identifying possible new or emerging risks that may require treatment. These fraud risk assessments form an integral part of our overall risk assessment framework.

Fraud and compliance awareness In 2020-21, online fraud awareness training was mandatory for all staff. In addition, face-to-face fraud and compliance awareness sessions resumed in 2021 following the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. Fraud and compliance awareness training strengthens our staff’s ability to identify fraud and non-compliance. The training enhances staff understanding of their responsibilities in relation to fraud risk management including what to do if they suspect fraud or serious non-compliance and how to report it. Training includes communicating definitions of fraud and compliance, why people might commit fraud, what fraud could look like in the department, different approaches to prevent and respond to fraud or serious non-compliance and reporting procedures. It provides staff with an opportunity to learn through case studies and to ask questions about our approach to fraud and compliance.

In 2020-21 we also communicated a series of messages on fraud and compliance to encourage staff to learn about fraud and report suspicious behaviour.

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Fraud investigation In 2020-21, we assessed 34 suspected internal and external fraud incidents through established referral mechanisms in accordance with paragraph (d) of the Fraud Rule. These mechanisms allow officials, clients, and members of the public to confidentially report incidents of suspected fraud. One matter was successfully prosecuted before the courts.

In circumstances where there was not sufficient evidence of criminal offending, there were appropriate referrals to relevant entities or programs for consideration of compliance and/or other preventive actions.

In 2020-21, we worked in partnership with other agencies to initiate information sharing to improve inter-agency responses to fraud. The development of these partnerships aligns with the aims of managing risk and incidents of fraud across the department and the Commonwealth.

We undertake all investigations in accordance with the Australian Government Investigation Standards and all departmental investigators have at least the minimum qualifications stipulated in the standards.

In 2020-21, we continued to participate as member of the Australian Federal Police hosted multi-agency taskforce, Operation Ashiba.

Agreements with third parties To enable effective delivery of outcomes, the department enters into a range of agreements with third parties, including other Australian Government entities, state and territory government entities and external organisations. These agreements govern the way in which one party delivers programs, payments, and services on behalf of the other.

Ethical standards Ethical standards and behaviours relating to our workplace and employment are promoted across the department. This includes:

■ the APS Code of Conduct, the APS Values, and the APS Employment Principles

■ information on bullying and harassment, including dedicated Harassment Contact*Officers

■ guidance on acceptance of gifts and benefits

■ information on conflict of interest and outside employment

■ guidance on ethical behaviour in practice.

We incorporate the APS Code of Conduct and the APS Values in each employee’s individual performance agreement. Staff can access a range of courses relating to ethical and respectful behaviours through our learning management system.

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Service Charter Our Service Charter sets out the standards of service our clients can expect and ways to help us improve our customer service. The Charter also helps our staff understand their roles and responsibilities.

For further information on our Service Charter, go to https://www.dss.gov.au/about-the-department/publications-articles/corporate-publications/dss-service-charter

Complaints management We value feedback on the experiences the public has with our department or department-funded service providers. This enables us to improve our quality of service to all Australians.

In 2020-21, the department received 977 formal complaints through our Feedback Management System. The top three areas of complaint were about:

■ Social Security Payments

■ The National Redress Scheme

■ Disability Employment Services.

Freedom of Information We are subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and we comply with the requirement to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. To view the department prepared IPS agency plan, go to https://www.dss.gov.au/ about-the-department/freedom-of-information/information-publication-scheme

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Privacy We are bound by the provisions of the Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Act), the Australian Privacy Principles (APP), and the Australian Government Agencies Privacy Code (Privacy Code), which regulate the collection, storage, use, disclosure, and disposal of personal information by Commonwealth agencies. The department requires staff to be mindful of their obligations under the Privacy Act, requires privacy incidents to be reported as soon as possible, and considers requests to access personal information under the Privacy Act.

The department’s privacy management is guided by its privacy policy. The privacy policy sets out how we deal with personal information in respect of our functions and activities. For further information on our privacy policy, go to https://www.dss.gov.au/ privacy-policy

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) may look into a privacy issue, including breach notifications and complaints, and issue a report or determination.

The OAIC made preliminary inquiries in relation to 21 privacy breaches and two privacy complaints in 2020-21. No reports or determinations relating to these matters were made.

Privacy incidents We investigate all privacy incidents reported internally and externally, including privacy*incidents reported by individuals.

In 2020-21, we determined 35 privacy breaches to have met the Notifiable Data Breach Scheme criteria for notifiable data breaches and, as required by the Scheme, the OAIC was notified.

The majority of privacy incidents assessed by the department are due to system errors or inadvertent disclosures by departmental staff through the use of email.

Where a privacy breach occurred, staff involved in the breach were required to complete privacy refresher training and were counselled about the importance of exercising care when dealing with personal information. Where appropriate, changes were made to departmental practices to minimise the risk of future incidents occurring, including reviewing quality assurance processes, reviewing operational policy, and updating relevant internal procedures and guidance material.

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Privacy Impact Assessments The Privacy Code requires us to undertake a Privacy Impact Assessment for all ‘high privacy risk’ projects or initiatives that involve a new or changed way of handling personal information.

We finalised two Privacy Impact Assessments in 2020-21. One assessment was in relation to the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse and was undertaken to update the original assessment conducted in March 2019 by Services Australia following the transfer of responsibility for the Scheme to the department in February 2020. The second assessment was in relation to the privacy impacts of the Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Student Assistance and Other Measures) Bill 2021.

Details of these assessments are available on our department’s website at Privacy Impact Assessment Register, Department of Social Services, at https://www.dss.gov. au/about-the-department/privacy-impact-assessment-register

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner In 2020-21, we were notified of two privacy complaints made to the OAIC. The OAIC found that the department had not interfered with the complainants’ privacy and that investigations were not warranted.

The OAIC did not issue any privacy determinations in relation to the department during 2020-21, and there were no reports made to the Minister for Families and Social Services under section 30 of the Privacy Act about any act or practice of the department.

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Chapter 4.2

External scrutiny Our operations are scrutinised by external entities such as the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), the Commonwealth Ombudsman, and committees of the Australian Parliament.

Reports by the Australian National Audit Office In 2020-21, the ANAO did not table any cross agency or specific related performance audit reports involving the department.

The following ANAO audits are currently in progress:

■ Operation of Grants Hubs

■ Government Advertising.

Completed audits can be found on the ANAO website. To view the completed audits, go to anao.gov.au

Reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman In 2020-21, the Commonwealth Ombudsman did not release any reports relevant to our department.

For further information, go to ombudsman.gov.au

Judicial decisions On 11 June 2021, Justice Murphy of the Federal Court of Australia approved a settlement in Katherine Prygodicz & Ors v Commonwealth of Australia (VID1252/2019).

The proceedings relate to a class action commenced pursuant to Part IVA of the Federal Court of Australia Act 1976 seeking declarations, restitution, damages and other relief involving some 648,000 group members who had debts raised based on averaged Australian Taxation Office (ATO) income information. This process was part of the Income Compliance Program.

The agencies responsible for the Income Compliance Program were the Department of Social Services and Services Australia.

During the proceedings, the Commonwealth accepted that there was no proper legal basis under which to use averaged ATO income data to raise and recover debts.

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The Commonwealth had previously announced, in May 2020, that it would refund debts raised wholly or partially using averaged ATO income data. Under the Deed of Settlement, the Commonwealth agreed to pay a settlement sum of $112 million (inclusive of legal costs), to be distributed to eligible Group Members. This sum is in addition to the value of debts to be refunded to customers. Any person that opted out of the class action is not a Group Member and will not receive any distribution under the settlement. An independent scheme assurer has been appointed to manage the calculation and distribution of class members’ entitlements under the settlement agreement.

Since 18 November 2019, the Commonwealth no longer raises debts based solely on averaged ATO income data.

Since 7 December 2020, the way that employment income is reported and assessed for social security purposes has changed. Under changes introduced by the Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Simplifying Income Report and other Measures) Act 2020, income is now assessed once it is paid to a social security recipient. This provides a more accurate picture of employment income.

Administrative tribunal decisions No decisions of an administrative tribunal significantly impacted our operations during*the year.

Reports by parliamentary committees The Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs The Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs covers the Health and Social Services Portfolios. Its work is divided between two committees - the Legislation Committee and the References Committee. During 2020-21, we had the following engagement with the Committees:

The Legislation Committee ■ On 22 October 2020, we provided a submission to the Inquiry into the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Amendment (Technical Amendments) Bill 2020. The Committee tabled its report on 5 November 2020.

■ On 23 October 2020, we provided a submission for the Inquiry into the Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020.

■ On 20 November 2020, we provided a submission into the Inquiry into Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Extension of Coronavirus Support) Bill 2020.

■ On 9 March 2021, we attended a hearing for the Inquiry into the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Strengthening Income Support) Bill 2021.

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■ On 12 March 2021, the Committee tabled its report on the Social Services related*bill, Social Services Legislation Amendment (Strengthening Income Support) Bill 2021, and recommended that the bill be passed.

■ On 29 April 2021, we provided a submission into the Inquiry into the Interactive Gambling Amendment (Prohibition on Credit Card Use) Bill 2020.

The References Committee ■ On 11 February 2021, the Government response was tabled for the Inquiry into Centrelink’s compliance program (second interim report).

■ On 19 March 2021, we attended a hearing for the Inquiry into Centrelink’s compliance program.

■ On 10 March 2021, we attended a public hearing for the Inquiry into the effective approaches to prevention and diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and*Legal Affairs The House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs may inquire into and report on any matter referred to it by either the House of Representatives or a Minister, including any pre-legislation proposal, bill, motion, petition, vote or expenditure, other financial matter, report or document. During 2020-21, we had the following engagement with the Committee:

■ On 10 August 2020, there was a multi-Agency Government Submission made to*the Inquiry into Family, domestic and sexual violence.

■ On 7 September 2020 and 4 December 2020, we attended a hearing into the Inquiry Family, domestic and sexual violence.

■ On 7 July 2021, we attended a hearing for the Inquiry into Homelessness in*Australia.

The Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance*Scheme The Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) initiates inquiries into various aspects of the NDIS, including the Scheme’s operation and performance. Either House of Parliament can refer these inquiries. During 2020-21, we had the following engagement with the Committee:

■ On 24 August 2020, the Government response was tabled for the Inquiry into the NDIS report, Supported Independent Living.

■ On 12 October 2020, we attended a hearing to the Inquiry into General issues around the implementation and performance of the NDIS.

■ On 12 October 2020, we attended a hearing to the Inquiry into NDIS Planning.

■ On 23 February 2021, the Government response was tabled for the Inquiry into NDIS Planning.

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■ On 9 March 2021, we provided a submission for the Inquiry into Independent Assessments.

■ On 18 May 2021, we attended a hearing for the Inquiry into Independent Assessments.

■ On 19 May 2021, the Government response was tabled for the Inquiry into the General issues around the implementation and performance of the NDIS.

The Joint Select Committee on Implementation of the National Redress Scheme ■ On 16 September 2020, 16 October 2020, 8 December 2020, 22 January 2021, and 25 June 2021, we attended hearings (private and public) for the Inquiry into

the Implementation of the National Redress Scheme.

The Joint Select Committee on Australia’s Family Law System ■ On 7 October 2020, 23 November 2020, 10 May 2021, and 19 May 2021, we attended hearings (private and public) for the Inquiry into the Australia’s Family Law System.

Other Parliamentary Inquiries ■ On 21 July 2020, we provided a submission to the Senate Select Committee for the Inquiry into the services, support, and life outcomes for autistic people in Australia.

■ On 30 July 2020, 18 August 2020, and 17 September 2020, we attended public hearings for the Senate Select Committee on COVID-19.

■ On 31 March 2021, we provided a submission to the Senate Select Committee for the Inquiry into Job Security.

■ On 27 April 2021, the Government response was tabled for the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, - Report on Public hearing 5: Experiences of people with disability during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

■ On 16 June 2021, we provided a submission to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee for the Inquiry into the Family Law Amendment (Federal Family Violence Orders) Bill 2021.

■ On 18 June 2021, we attended a hearing for the Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs into the Inquiry into Pathways and Participation Opportunities for Indigenous Australians in Employment and Business.

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Chapter 4.3

Managing our people Overview During 2020-21, we implemented a number of initiatives, and reviewed strategies and action plans to support the workforce. We also took the opportunity to reflect on the impact of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and prepared ourselves to support the APS for future surge workforces.

Key actions undertaken include:

■ support for Government priorities by providing staff to the Department of Health and Services Australia to support surge workforces

■ implementation of Microsoft Teams software to increase collaborative ways of working and information sharing, and upgrading the intranet to provide information to staff on the department, the work we do, and the tools to do it

■ launch of a Leaders Resource Menu, an online resource to provide staff with practical leadership ideas, hints, and tips relevant for all staff

■ launch of a Mental Health Information line and resources

■ development of an Employee Engagement Action Plan, in response to the APS Employee Census results, which will be updated in response to staff pulse surveys and future APS Employee Census results

■ introduction of a new online mandatory training package to ensure staff have core corporate knowledge to perform their roles to the highest standards and meet compliance and legislative requirements

■ facilitation of an in-house Diploma of Government program to build capability in APS and Executive Level staff

■ development and launch of a new stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2021-2024.

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Effectiveness in managing and developing staff Workforce planning Our Workforce Strategy 2019-2022 is set around five key themes that drive employee engagement and performance: leadership, adaptability, inclusion, capability and wellbeing.

Workforce Planning is a component of the annual business planning process. Additionally, the Executive Management Group reviews and acts on workforce reports which highlight key workforce metrics and trends. Workforce data, provided through an online Executive Dashboard is available to all Senior Executives, and additional trend analysis and reporting, such as results from the APS Employee Census, inform workforce decisions.

Leadership and capability development In response to physical distancing requirements, our face-to-face learning and development programs continued to be adapted to suit various methods of learning.

Staff participated in 2,370 face-to-face learning programs and completed 25,556 eLearning courses in 2020-21. Additionally, staff accessed 18,657 high-quality, video tutorials. Staff have demonstrated a willingness to adapt their learning to different delivery models and we continue to develop flexible learning options to meet current and emerging needs. We launched the Mandatory Training Program, which consisted of nine core APS skill eLearning modules, to support the department in meeting its legislative and policy obligations.

The study assistance program enabled staff to undertake approved study to develop and strengthen their capability in delivering the work of the department.

We continued to invest in developing capable leaders and provide high-value learning opportunities to our APS staff. In 2020-21, 58 staff participated in accredited learning pathways such as Diploma of Government and a range of highly regarded leadership and management programs including the Jawun APS Secondment Program, the Sir Roland Wilson Scholarship, the Australian and New Zealand School of Government Executive Masters of Public Administration Program and Executive Fellows Program.

Senior Executive Service (SES) staff attended targeted SES development programs including Indigenous Cultural Awareness Training, Australian Public Service Commission SES Leadership Development Programs, and SES Orientation.

We continued to acknowledge and recognise outstanding staff performance and contribution through our annual Secretary’s Excellence Awards and NAIDOC Awards.

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Workplace diversity We continued to support a diverse and inclusive workplace. Our Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021 outlines how we will foster inclusion across the department to ensure all employees are treated equitably and respectfully.

The Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021 guides the development of key diversity and inclusion action plans within the department that build on our existing framework and commitment to diversity and inclusion.

We continued to strive to provide a work environment for all staff to thrive and succeed through the following objectives:

■ inclusive culture that celebrates diversity

■ engage diversity through our people

■ improved capability

■ leadership that drives cultural change.

To support our staff and ensure ongoing engagement with internal and external programs and policies, we have the following staff diversity committees.

■ Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Network Committee

■ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff National Committee

■ Disability and Carers Committee

■ Pride Committee (LGBTIQ)

■ Gender Equality Network.

Diversity committees regularly collaborated to ensure inclusion and representation of all staff, including those who experience intersectional diversity. Executive diversity champions are appointed to support diversity within the department.

We also maintained memberships with the following diversity organisations:

■ Australian Network on Disability (Gold membership)

■ Diversity Council of Australia

■ Pride in Diversity

■ Reconciliation Australia.

In 2020-21, our staff participated in International Day of People with Disability, World Hearing Day, NAIDOC Week, National Reconciliation Week, National Carers Week, Harmony Day, Wear it Purple Day, Mental Health Week, International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT), and National Families Week.

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Culturally and Linguistically Diverse The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Network Committee was previously established as part of our Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021 and our ongoing commitment to support staff from CALD backgrounds.

The Committee continued its support and commitment by representing CALD interests, perspectives, and concerns. The Committee also provided strategic advice to the department to enable, encourage, and deploy diverse experiences to our work environment.

Employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples We value, acknowledge, and respect diversity and actively use life experiences, skills, and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as a source of advice on policy, service delivery, and capability development.

As at 30 June 2021, 138 (5.7 per cent) of our staff identified as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

On 1 June 2021, our new stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2021-2024 (RAP) was launched confirming our commitment to the recruitment, retention, and career development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff across all policy and program areas.

In addition, our new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Workforce Action Plan was launched with three priority goals, cultural integrity, strengthening career pathways, and inclusive leadership and voice. We are committed to including representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, providing rewarding career pathways, establishing the department as an employer of choice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and embracing cultural diversity.

We continued to participate in entry-level recruitment programs to provide employment pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This included 10 participants in the Indigenous Apprenticeships Program, coordinated by Services Australia and our department-specific Indigenous Internship Program.

Support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and their supervisors was provided through our Indigenous Liaison Officer, who coordinated initiatives from our Reconciliation Action Plan 2021-2024 and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Workforce Strategy.

Our Indigenous Champion, a role performed at the deputy secretary level, provided senior leadership support to implement our Indigenous employment strategies. Our Indigenous champion also worked with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff National Committee to provide strategic advice on workforce initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees. Our Indigenous Champion is also our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) Champion and chairs a senior executive level steering group which oversees the implementation of the RAP to support its success. The Indigenous Champion is also a member of the APS Indigenous Champions Network.

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The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff National Committee represents the interests, perspectives, and concerns of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff through, advocacy and engagement and by providing advice on issues that impact staff. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff National Committee provided input into all our strategies and action plans.

Employment of people with disability Increasing employment outcomes for people with disability continued to be a priority. In total, 164 (6.8 per cent) of our staff identified as a person with disability as at 30*June 2021.

Our Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021 guided our approach to recruiting, developing, and retaining people with disability.

We also applied APS RecruitAbility to all our recruitment processes.

In July 2019, we recruited six data analyst trainees through our Autism@Work program in partnership with Dandelion.

Having the right supports in place to help people with disability enter the workforce and develop their careers was a key element of our mission to improve the wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities. We provided support and guidance to employees with disability and their managers through:

■ a dedicated Disability Liaison Officer

■ centralised funding to provide reasonable adjustment for employees with disability

■ specialised training for managers of staff with disability, including those with intellectual disability.

Our Disability and Carers Committee represented the interests, perspectives, and concerns of staff with disability and those that are carers. The Disability and Carers Network is open to anyone interested in disability issues and provides input and recommendations to the Disability and Carers Committee.

Our Disability Champion, a role performed at the deputy secretary level, drove workforce initiatives for employees with disability. Our Disability Champion is a member of the APS Disability Champions Network and the Australian Network on Disability.

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Support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer*staff In the 2020 APS Employee Census 152 (7.2 per cent) of respondents identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and/or queer (LGBTIQA+). We have an established Pride Committee and Network, as well as champions to support LGBTIQA+ staff and their allies at work.

We participated in the Australian Workplace Equality Index, a national benchmark for LGBTIQA+ workplace inclusion, and in 2021, we achieved Bronze employer status.

Our Pride Committee worked to ensure all employees are valued for their differences, all policy and programs created by the department were inclusive of LGBTIQA+ people in Australia, and we strive to lead the APS in LGBTIQA+ social policy. While the Pride Committee and departmental documentation may refer specifically to LGBTIQA+, the Pride Committee represented all people of diverse sexualities and gender even if they were not specifically identified in the LGBTIQA+ acronym.

The Pride Network is open to all staff, including allies of LGBTIQA+ staff. The Pride Network received regular information about issues relevant to gender and sexual orientation. Membership of the Pride Network is confidential and open to both allies and LGBTIQA+ staff.

Figure 16: Diversity in our people

Disability Employment Levels

DSS 6.8%

APS 4.0%

Indigenous Employment Levels

DSS 5.7%

APS 3.4%

LGBTIQA+

DSS 7.2%

APS 6.0%

Female SES

DSS 60.7%

APS 48.9%

Employment ages over 55

DSS 19.0%

APS 19.5%

Department of Social Services figures as at 30 June 2021.

APS figures as at 31 December 2020 (sourced from the Australian Public Service Employment Database).

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Graduate Development Program Our Graduate Development Program participants undertake a 10-month program that offers comprehensive internal and external training, including a service delivery placement, networking opportunities, and broad opportunities for career development.

In 2020-21, we recruited a cohort of 78 graduates, with the following diversity representation.

■ 63% female

■ 15% identified with disability

■ 37% identified as CALD

■ 1% as Indigenous.

The program exposes participants to social policy development and programs that improve the wellbeing of people and families in Australia. Graduates are provided with opportunities to formulate and support government initiatives and influence the social policy agenda.

In 2020-21, members of the graduate cohort were seconded to Services Australia as part of the Australian Government Disaster Recovery Payment process for the NSW floods and WA cyclone, enabling them to experience direct service delivery to*Australians.

Workplace arrangements Enterprise agreement The Department of Social Services Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021 commenced on 21 January 2019 and covers non-SES employees. The agreement has a nominal expiry date of 21 January 2022.

Individual Flexibility Arrangements for non-Senior Executive Services (SES) employees In accordance with the Fair Work Act 2009, Individual Flexibility Arrangements can be used to provide varied terms and conditions for non-SES employees. We also use Individual Flexibility Arrangements to attract and retain staff, to recognise highly valued skills and critical roles.

As at 30 June 2021 we had 20 Individual Flexibility Arrangements in place.

Performance pay No performance payments were made to departmental employees in 2020-21.

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Secretary remuneration The Secretary is remunerated under the Remuneration Tribunal (Departmental Secretaries - Classification Structure and Terms and Conditions) Determination 2020, which is made under Division 4 of Part II of the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973.

Senior Executive Service remuneration On 21 March 2020, the then Minister for Finance, Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann and the then Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service and Cabinet, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, wrote to the Australian Public Service Commissioner requesting a stay on increases to remuneration, entitlements and allowances for all Senior Executive Service public servants until such a time as the challenges arising from the COVID-19 pandemic have been resolved. For this reason, the department did not review SES remuneration in 2020.

As at 30 June 2021, 68 SES employees were remunerated through a section 24(1) determination. This includes SES employees on temporary transfer, secondment, or*leave.

Common law contracts The department does not use common law contracts to engage employees.

Non-salary benefits to employees The Department of Social Services Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021 offers a range of non-salary benefits to our people, including leave, flexible working arrangements, access to salary packaging, and remote locality assistance.

Work health and safety We acknowledge and are committed to fulfilling our responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 and the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988.

Our strong focus on work health and safety and early intervention has resulted in sustainable reductions in workers’ compensation claims.

Our achievements include:

■ sustaining a low number of workers’ compensation claims submitted in 2020-21

■ maintaining a low number of accepted workers’ compensation claims in 2020-21

■ maintaining a decrease in our Comcare workers’ compensation premium rate to 0.40 per cent for 2020-21 compared to the Commonwealth rate of 0.85 per cent.

We will continue to focus on encouraging early identification, reporting, and response to workplace hazards and injuries to further improve work health and safety and return to work performance.

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Other initiatives implemented in 2020-21 to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of our workers included:

■ working with our managers to support ill or injured employees to remain at work or return to work safely through our early intervention program

■ continuing to promote and encourage employees to access the services of our Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to support positive physical and mental health and wellbeing

■ encouraging staff to participate in NewAccess workplaces by Beyond Blue, which is an additional service to EAP and provides staff with mental health coaching for early intervention support

■ implementing a Mental Health First Aid Information Line for employees and managers to connect with a departmental Mental Health First Aid trained responder, to provide advice and options for internal and external supports

■ launching dedicated training to SES staff on their Workplace Health and Safety due diligence obligations

■ targeted mental health training for managers through Lifeline’s ‘The Working Mind for Managers’ program

■ inviting our employees to participate in the annual influenza vaccination program

■ developing a suite of documentation which provides guidance to managers and staff on how to safely work from home

■ enabling business areas to reintroduce travel in a COVIDSafe manner through comprehensive risk assessment processes

■ conducting an audit of our work health and safety management arrangements and systems, and developing a 12-month program of corrective actions to improve the way safety is managed and delivered

■ monitoring and enhancing the department’s COVIDSafe Risk Assessment and Action Plan, to ensure the protection of staff from COVID-19 within the workplace.

Notifiable incidents In 2020-21, there were no notifiable incidents in relation to a serious injury of a*person.

One investigation was carried out under part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act). The regulator found the department had complied with its duties under the WHS Act.

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Part 4 - Management and accountability Chapter 4.4 Managing our finances

Chapter 4.4

Managing our finances Financial Overview In 2020-21, the department reported a departmental surplus of $8.5 million and administered $162.1 billion of expenses on behalf of the government. Personal benefits expenses increased from 2019-20 by $15.6 billion to $144.9 billion reflecting increased social security payments during 2020-21 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Payments to the National Disability Insurance Agency increased to $13.9*billion from $8.3 billion in 2019-20 as a result of a combination of higher average costs per participant as well as higher participant numbers.

Further information on the department’s 2020-21 financial performance, position and*cash flows is available in Part 5 Financial Statements.

Table 4.4.1: Trends in departmental finances

2020-21 $ million

2019-20 $ million

Change $ million

Revenue from the Australian Government 385.0 411.9 (26.9)

Other revenue 80.5 54.2 26.3

Total income 465.5 466.1 (0.6)

Employee benefits 269.9 288.5 (18.6)

Suppliers 158.2 146.3 11.9

Other expenses 47.3 88.0 (40.7)

Total expenses 475.4 522.8 (47.4)

Deficit attributed to the (9.9) (56.7) 46.8

Australian*Government

Add back non-appropriated depreciation 38.7 73.2 (34.5)

and amortisation expense

Less principal repayments - leased assets (20.3) (20.8) 0.5

Surplus attributed to the department 8.5 (4.3) 12.8

Financial assets A 96.7 91.0 5.7

Non-financial assets B 538.9 583.9 (45.0)

Liabilities C 630.2 668.5 (38.3)

Net assets (A+B-C) 5.4 6.4 (1.0)

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Table 4.4.2: Trends in administered finances

4

2020-21 2019-20 Change

$ million $ million $ million

Recoveries 270.4 226.4 44.0

Interest 7.7 53.5 (45.8)

Other revenue 153.3 296.6 (143.3)

Total revenue 431.4 576.5 (145.1)

Suppliers 126.8 128.2 (1.3)

Subsidies 85.3 118.2 (32.9)

Personal benefits 144,863.0 129,233.0 15,629.9

Grants 2,767.5 2,723.5 44.0

Payments to corporate Commonwealth entities 13,887.8 8,302.7 5,585.2

Other expenses 412.2 463.9 (51.8)

Total expenses 162,142.6 140,969.5 21,173.1

Financial assets 6,275.8 6,398.4 (122.6)

Liabilities 6,889.9 8,866.1 (1,976.2)

Assets management Our assets are managed under the authority of section 20A of the PGPA Act, relevant accounting standards and Department of Finance requirements.

We invest in new assets to improve our systems and processes. We manage capital investment through an annual capital plan that reflects both government priorities and ongoing business needs.

Consultants During 2020-21, 67 new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving a total spend of $13.5 million. In addition, 69 reportable ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving a total spend of $21.6 million.

The Department engages consultants when it requires specialist expertise or when independent research, review, or assessment is required. Decisions to engage consultants were made after considering the skills and resources required for the task, internal capacity, and the cost effectiveness of contracting an external service provider. Consultants were engaged in line with the PGPA Act and related regulations.

Annual reports contain information about actual spend on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Summary information on consultancy services is set out in Tables 4.4.3 and 4.4.4.

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Table 4.4.3: Consultancies in 2020-21 Part 4 - Management and accountability Chapter 4.4 Managing our finances Number

Expenditure

($ million, GST incl.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period

67 13.5

Ongoing contracts entered into during 69 21.6

a previous reporting period

Total 136 35.1

Table 4.4.4 Top consultants in 2020-21

Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21

Total spend ($ million, GST incl.)

Proportion of 2020-21 total spend (%)

Australian Bureau of Statistics 3.7 10.6

Alphabeta Advisors Pty Limited 2.4 6.9

The Boston Consulting Group Pty Ltd 2.4 6.8

BMF Advertising Pty Ltd 2.0 5.7

Ernst & Young 1.9 5.5

Bendelta Pty Ltd 1.9 5.3

Total of the Largest Shares 14.3 40.9

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Non-consultancy contracts During 2020-21, 471 new reportable non-consultancy contracts were entered into with a total spend of $58.8 million (GST inclusive). In addition, 584 reportable non consultancy contracts were ongoing from a previous period with a total spend of $149.2 million (GST inclusive).

Annual reports contain information about actual spend on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Further information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Summary information on non-consultancy services is set out in Tables 4.4.5 and 4.4.6.

Table 4.4.5: Non-consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Number

Total spend ($ million, GST incl.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 471 58.8

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous 584 149.2

reporting period

Total 1,055 208.0

Table 4.4.6 Top non-consultancy contracts in 2020-21

Organisations receiving a share of reportable non-consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21

Total spend ($ million, GST incl.)

Proportion of 2020-21 total spend (%)

Jones Lang LaSalle (ACT) Pty Ltd 39.8 19.2

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd T/As Universal McCann 22.0 10.6

Gillian Beaumont Recruitment Pty Ltd 19.0 9.1

Hays Specialist Recruitment (Australia) 16.8 8.1

Indue Limited 13.6 6.5

The University of Melbourne 13.4 6.4

Total of the Largest Shares 124.6 59.9

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Australian National Audit Office access clauses All departmental contracts let in the past year required the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

Exempt contracts In 2020-21, no contracts were exempted from reporting on tenders.gov.au

Purchasing Our purchasing activities are consistent with the Secretary’s Instructions and internal procurement guidelines, which are in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules 2020.

Purchasing is made in an accountable and transparent manner, complying with Australian Government policies, and meeting relevant international obligations.

In 2020-21, we exceeded our targets under the Indigenous Procurement Policy by awarding more than three per cent of contracts to Indigenous businesses.

Procurement initiatives to support small business Further information on Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and Small Enterprise participation statistics is available on the Department of Finance’s website. To view SME and Small Enterprise participation statistics, go to finance.gov.au.

We support the use of SMEs through various means including:

■ using standardised contracts for low-risk procurements valued under $200,000

■ using an electronic invoice processing system

■ incorporating Australian Industry Participation Plans in procurement where applicable.

We recognise the importance of ensuring small businesses are paid on time.

The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website. To view the results, go to treasury.gov.au.

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Grants administration We manage programs through effective design, implementation, ongoing monitoring, and evaluation to support achieving intended outcomes for the Australian community.

This is supported by our Grants Services Office which works in partnership with policy areas to support best practice in planning, designing, and selecting grant recipients.

In the 2020-21, financial year, 5,419 grants were administered specific to the department, across 134 programs to a value of $1.01 billion (excluding fee-for-service arrangements).

The Community Grants Hub (the Hub) administers grants for the department, as well as providing shared services grants administration for eight external client agencies.

■ Attorney-General’s Department

■ Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment

■ Department of Education, Skills and Employment

■ Department of Health

■ Department of Home Affairs

■ Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

■ Department of Veterans’ Affairs

■ National Indigenous Australians Agency.

In the 2020-21 financial year, the Hub administered 28,573 funding arrangements across 562 programs, totalling $11 billion (excluding fee-for-service funding arrangements) for these agencies and the department.

Information on grants awarded by the Department of Social Services during 2020-21*is available at grants.gov.au - Australia’s whole-of-government grants information system. Information on grants awarded up to 31 December 2017 is available at https://www.dss.gov.au/grants/grants-funding

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5

Part 5

Financial statements

Financial statements 198

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A1atrallar1 N!lrlfoM/

Audiit Office

Auditor-General for Australia

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Families and Social Services

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Department of Social Services (the Entity) for the year ended 30 June 2021:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2021 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2021 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Secretary and Chief Finance Officer; • Statement of comprehensive income; • Statement of financial position; • Statement of changes in equity; • Cash flow statement; • Administered schedule of comprehensive income; • Administered schedule of assets and liabilities; • Administered reconciliation schedule; • Administered cash flow statement; and • Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, comprising a summary of significant accounting

policies and other explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by me. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Key audit matters

Key audit matters are those matters that, in my professional judgement, were of most significance in my audit of the financial statements of the current period. These matters were addressed in the context of my audit of the financial statements as a whole, and in forming my opinion thereon, and I do not provide a separate opinion on these matters.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue FORREST ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

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Key audit matter

Validity of grants expenses

Refer to Note 2.1B ‘Grants’

I focused on this area as there are a large number of grant programs with differing legislative and policy requirements which make the management of grant processes complex. This has the potential to impact the validity of grant expenses. Further, the Entity has implemented manual compliance processes to manage the risk of invalid grants being made.

For the year ended 30 June 2021 the grant expenses were $2.8 billion.

How the audit addressed the matter

The audit procedures undertaken to address this matter included:

• assessing the design and operating effectiveness of the IT general and application controls

implemented by the Entity to support grant approval by authorised delegates and prevent and detect inaccurate payment processing;

• assessing the design and operating effectiveness of manual controls supporting grants management, including controls related to risk management and compliance processes; and

• examining supporting documentation for a sample of grant agreements to assess the validity of expenditure amounts.

Key audit matter

Accuracy and occurrence of personal benefits expense

Refer to Note 2.1C ‘Personal Benefits’

I focused on this area as the accuracy and occurrence of personal benefits expense is dependent on the correct self-disclosure of personal circumstances by a large number of diverse recipients. The accuracy of personal benefits expense is also reliant on a complex information technology system for the processing of a high volume of payments across numerous personal benefit types with varying conditions for determining payment amount.

The complexity of the personal benefits expense was increased due to the stimulus measures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic where a range of normal payment eligibility requirements were either expanded, relaxed or waived. The additional measures comprised the coronavirus supplement, economic support payments, and a range of related initiatives.

Personal benefits expenses increased by $15.6 billion from the previous year to $144.9 billion for the year 30 June.

How the audit addressed the matter

The audit procedures undertaken to address this matter included:

• assessing the design and operating effectiveness of internal controls in place over the personal benefits payments, focusing on controls for monitoring compliance with requirements to disclose accurate personal information;

• assessing the information technology general controls, specifically access controls to personal circumstances data and controls designed to prevent and detect unauthorised changes to the information technology environment; and

• recalculating a sample of personal benefits payments made to recipients, based on relevant legislation and personal circumstances data held by the Australian Government.

Key audit matter How the audit addressed the matter

Valuation of personal benefits provisions, The audit procedures undertaken to address this matter personal benefits receivables and included: contingent liabilities • evaluating the design and operating effectiveness Refer to Overview, Note 4.3A ‘Personal Benefits of management’s processes to assess whether and Other Provisions’, Note 4.1B ‘Receivables’ and judgements and assumptions used in the estimation Note 7.1 ‘Contingent Asset and Liabilities’ models remain appropriate; I focused on this area as the valuation of the • assessing the work undertaken by the Entity’s

provisions and receivables involve estimation actuary, particularly the assumptions underpinning

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models which require significant judgements and the estimation models involving the personal assumptions including, but not limited to: new circumstances of recipients, doubtful debt budget measures affecting benefit programs percentages, interest rates and the broader timing of payments; personal circumstances of economic environment; and recipients; and the economic environment. The accuracy and completeness of the source data used by the actuary in developing the estimation

• assessing the accuracy and completeness of data used in the estimation models.

of the provisions and receivables is also a key component of the valuation process.

The complexity of these valuations was increased due to uncertainty associated with estimating the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on future cash flow estimates used in the Entity’s valuation models.

I also focused on the appropriate accounting and disclosure of the impacts of the Income Compliance Program in view of the Government’s decision relating to the program which used averaged income data to calculate an individual’s personal benefits debt that was then included in personal benefits receivables. As at 30 June 2021 the provisions totalled $4.1 billion and the receivables totalled $3.4 billion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Secretary of the Department of Social Services is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Secretary is also responsible for such internal control as the Secretary determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Secretary is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Secretary is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

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t ~

• obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the E ntity’s internal control;

• evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whethe r a material uncertainty exists related to events or

conditions that may cast significant doubt on the E ntity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may ca use the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and eve nts in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

From the matters communicated with the Accountable Authority, I determine those matters that were of most significance in the audit of the financial statements of the current period and are therefore the key audit matte rs. I describe these matters in my auditor’s report unless law or regulation precludes public disclosure about the matter or when, in extremely rare circumstances, I determine that a matter should not be communicated in my report because the adverse consequences of doing so would reasonably be expected to outweigh the public interest benefits of such communication.

Australian National Audit Office

Grant Heir

Auditor- General

Canberra

3 September 202 1

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Department of Social Services

Statement by the Secretary and Chief Finance Officer

In our opinion, the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Department of Social Services (the department) will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Ray Griggs AO CSC Andrew Harvey

Secretary Chief Finance Officer

3 September 2021 3 September 2021

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Department of Social Services Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2021

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits Suppliers Depreciation and amortisation Finance costs

Impairment loss on financial instruments Write-down and impairment of other assets Payments for service delivery

Other expenses Total expenses

Notes

1.1A 1.1B 3.2A 1.1C

3.2A

2021 $'000

269,872 158,196 38,746 7,993

-1

166 458

475,432

Own-Source Income Own-source revenue Revenue from contracts with customers Resources received free of charge Rental income Other revenue Total own-source revenue

1.2A 1.2B 1.2C

23,559 54,210 2,540 20

80,329

Gains Gains from sale of assets Other gains Total gains Total own-source income

-

209

209

80,538

Net cost of services (394,894)

Revenue from Government Deficit

384,996

(9,898)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME / (LOSS) Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation reserve Total other comprehensive income / (loss)

5,341

5,341

Total comprehensive loss 5.3 (4,557)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4A for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget.

Original Budget

2020 2021

$'000 $'000

288,486 241,085

146,343 136,280

73,225 42,106

8,487 8,212

41 -

1,083 -

152 -

5,041 -

522,858 427,683

49,598 25,273

1,612 1,470

2,198 1,503

101 -

53,509 28,246

2 -

697 -

699 -

54,208 28,246

(468,650) (399,437)

411,945 379,499

(56,705) (19,938)

(8) -

(8) -

(56,713) (19,938)

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Department of Social Services Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2021

Original Budget

2021 2020 2021

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 6,720 5,334 5,334

Trade and other receivables 3.1A 89,958 85,636 78,723

Total financial assets 96,678 90,970 84,057

Non-Financial Assets

Buildings and leasehold improvements1 3.2A 535,521 581,359 544,198

Property, plant and equipment1 3.2A 1,199 1,485 3,313

Intangibles 3.2A 331 62 884

Prepayments 1,852 1,042 1,042

Total non-financial assets 538,903 583,948 549,437

Total assets 635,581 674,918 633,494

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 3.3A 12,807 20,406 15,754

Other payables 3.3B 10,379 7,255 7,255

Total payables 23,186 27,661 23,009

Interest Bearing Liabilities Leases 3.4A 515,376 548,847 527,682

Provisions Employee provisions 6.1A 91,319 91,691 91,608

Other provisions 273 273 273

Total provisions 91,592 91,964 91,881

Total liabilities 630,154 668,472 642,572

Net assets 5,427 6,446 (9,078)

EQUITY Contributed equity 334,703 331,165 335,579

Asset revaluation reserve 80,946 75,605 75,605

Accumulated deficit (410,222) (400,324) (420,262)

Total equity 5,427 6,446 (9,078)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4A for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget. 1. Right-of-use assets are included in these line items.

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Department of Social Services Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Original Budget 2021

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 331,165 467,376 331,165

Transactions with owners Equity injection - Appropriations - 5,764 -

Departmental capital budget 3,538 2,664 4,414

Restructuring 8.2A - (144,639) -

Total transactions with owners 3,538 (136,211) 4,414

Closing balance as at 30 June 334,703 331,165 335,579

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 75,605 75,613 75,605

Comprehensive income / (loss) Other comprehensive income / (loss) 5,341 (8) -

Total comprehensive income / (loss) 5,341 (8) -

Closing balance as at 30 June 80,946 75,605 75,605

ACCUMULATED DEFICIT Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period (400,324) (379,822) (400,324)

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 - 36,203 -

Adjusted opening balance (400,324) (343,619) (400,324)

Comprehensive loss Deficit for the period (9,898) (56,705) (19,938)

Total comprehensive loss (9,898) (56,705) (19,938)

Closing balance as at 30 June (410,222) (400,324) (420,262)

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from the previous period 6,446 163,167 6,446

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 - 36,203 -

Comprehensive loss for the period (4,557) (56,713) (19,938)

Transactions with owners 3,538 (136,211) 4,414

Closing balance as at 30 June 5,427 6,446 (9,078)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4A for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget.

Accounting Policy

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated and designated as 'equity injections' for a financial year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets are recognised directly in Contributed Equity in that financial year.

Restructuring of Administrative Arrangements

Net assets received from or relinquished to another Australian Government entity under a restructure of administrative arrangements are adjusted at their book value directly against Contributed Equity.

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Department of Social Services Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original Budget

2021 2020 2021

$'000 $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 415,502 469,833 387,063

Rendering of services 28,406 54,716 26,776

GST received 12,872 17,947 651

Other 5,975 11,976 -

Total cash received 462,755 554,472 414,490

Cash used Employees 272,880 292,953 241,168

Suppliers 125,827 158,612 141,791

Interest payments on lease liabilities 7,992 8,484 8,212

Payments for service delivery 166 152 -

Other cash expense - 5,000 500

Section 74 receipts transferred to Official Public Account 34,219 70,578 651

Total cash used 441,084 535,779 392,322

Net cash from operating activities 21,671 18,693 22,168

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment - 3 -

Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 234 1,607 4,414

Purchase of intangibles 285 10,750 -

Total cash used 519 12,357 4,414

Net cash used by investing activities (519) (12,354) (4,414)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations - Equity injections - 6,894 4,414

Appropriations - Departmental capital budget 575 3,576 -

Total cash received 575 10,470 4,414

Cash used Principal payments of lease liabilities 20,341 20,788 22,168

Net cash used by financing activities (19,766) (10,318) (17,754)

Net increase / (decrease) in cash held 1,386 (3,979) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 5,334 9,313 5,334

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6,720 5,334 5,334

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4A for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget.

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I

Department of Social Services Administered schedule of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2021

$'000

Original Budget

2021 2020 2021

Notes $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses

Suppliers 2.1A 126,810 128,156 431,537

Subsidies 85,298 118,229 113,533

Grants 2.1B 2,767,523 2,723,514 2,706,234

Personal benefits 2.1C 144,862,961 129,233,013 150,137,332

Write-down and impairment of other assets 2.1D 320,232 447,102 -

Payments to National Disability Insurance Agency 13,887,818 8,302,651 12,483,796

Fair value loss 80,582 8,302 -

Other expenses1 2.1E 11,341 8,546 143,025

Total expenses 162,142,565 140,969,513 166,015,457

Income Revenue

Non-taxation revenue

Recoveries1 2.2A 270,430 226,408 344,434

Interest 7,691 53,454 82,158

Rendering of services 19,496 17,539 -

Special accounts revenue 14,560 12,091 -

Dividends 2,502 3,775 1,007

Competitive neutrality revenue 11,472 1,998 -

Other revenue 7,320 40,591 43,251

Total non-taxation revenue 470,850

Total revenue 470,850

Gains

- Write back of impairment allowance 58 -

2.2B 97,905 220,612 -

Total gains 97,905 -

Total income 470,850

Net cost of services

Deficit

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE LOSS Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

333,471 355,856

333,471 355,856

Fair value gains

220,670

431,376 576,526

(161,711,189) (140,392,987) (165,544,607)

(161,711,189) (140,392,987) (165,544,607)

(79,646) Revaluations transferred to reserves (1,437,928) -

Total other comprehensive loss (79,646) (1,437,928) -

Total comprehensive loss (161,790,835) (141,830,915) (165,544,607)

ial statements

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4B for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget. 1. Where necessary, the Original Budget information has been reclassified and presented on a consistent basis with the corresponding financial statement item.

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Department of Social Services Administered schedule of assets and liabilities as at 30 June 2021

2021 2020 2021

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 4.1A 19,029 518,528 553,935

Receivables 4.1B 5,162,922 4,706,346 3,551,777

Investments 4.1C 1,093,881 1,173,527 878,813

Total financial assets 6,275,832 6,398,401 4,984,525

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 6,275,832 6,398,401 4,984,525

LIABILITIES Payables

Suppliers 17,458 98,706 98,670

Subsidies 74,070 88,621 86,267

Personal benefits 4.2A 2,374,261 3,886,824 2,558,048

Grants 4.2B 61,919 53,174 53,174

Other payables 4,437 6,000 6,000

Total payables 2,532,145 4,133,325 2,802,159

Provisions

Personal benefits and other provisions 4.3A 4,357,738 4,732,782 4,761,100

Total provisions 4,357,738 4,732,782 4,761,100

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government 6,889,883 8,866,107 7,563,259 Net liabilities (614,051) (2,467,706) (2,578,734)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Refer to Note 8.4B for explanations of major variances to the Original Budget.

Original Budget

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I

Department of Social Services Administered reconciliation schedule for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July (2,467,706) 863,007

Net cost of services Income 431,376 576,526

Expenses Payments to entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities (148,254,747) (132,666,862)

Payments to corporate Commonwealth entities (13,887,818) (8,302,651)

Other comprehensive income Revaluations transferred to reserves (79,646) (1,437,928)

Transfers (to) / from the Australian Government Appropriation transfers from Official Public Account Annual appropriations

Payments to entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities 2,755,234 2,794,019

Payments to National Disability Insurance Agency 1,208,878 1,413,257

Payments to National Disability Insurance Agency for

reimbursement of goods and services 12,767,805 6,968,250

Special appropriations

Payments to individuals and entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities 5.1B 148,116,280 127,336,468

Special accounts Payments to individuals and entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities 5.2 576,464 509,900

Appropriation transfers to Official Public Account

Transfers to Official Public Account (1,829,336) (463,808)

Restructuring (net) 8.2B 727 84,104

Net withholdings of personal benefit overpayments through equity 48,468 (146,048)

Other non-reportable items recognised (30) 4,060

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June (614,051) (2,467,706)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Accounting Policy

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

Revenue collected by the department for use by the Australian Government rather than the department is reported as administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account which is maintained by the Department of Finance. Cash is drawn from the Official Public Account by the department to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of the Australian Government. These transfers to and from the Official Public Account are adjustments to the administered cash held by the department on behalf of the Australian Government and reported as such in the administered cash flow statement and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

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Department of Social Services Administered cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Interest Special accounts GST received Personal benefits recoveries Rendering of services Other Total cash received

Notes

2021 $'000

1,620 15,041 238,710 523,179

18,301 376,392 1,173,243

2020 $'000

2,562 11,694 237,233 699,248

9,595 143,050 1,103,382

Cash used Grants Subsidies Personal benefits Suppliers Payments to National Disability Insurance Agency Other Total cash used Net cash used by operating activities

3,005,067 99,849

147,893,197 139,191 13,976,683 -165,113,987 (163,940,744)

2,932,726 116,120 127,825,558 146,968

8,381,805 8,542

139,411,719 (138,308,337)

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Repayments of advances and loans Total cash received

69,004 69,004

67,252 67,252

Cash used Advances and loans made Total cash used Net cash used by investing activities

223,084 223,084 (154,080)

210,956 210,956 (143,704)

Net decrease in cash held (164,094,824) (138,452,041)

Cash from Official Public Account: Appropriations Total cash from official public account

165,424,661 165,424,661

139,021,894 139,021,894

Cash to Official Public Account: Appropriations Total cash to official public account

(1,829,336) (1,829,336)

(463,808) (463,808)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 518,528 412,483

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 4.1A 19,029 518,528

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Overview......................................................................................................................................................... 11

Financial Performance .......................................................................................................................... 12

Expenses ............................................................................................................................................... 12

Own-Source Revenue and Gains.......................................................................................................... 13

Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government....................................................... 15

Administered Expenses...................................................................................................................... 15

Administered Income.......................................................................................................................... 17

3. Departmental Financial Position.......................................................................................................... 18

Financial Assets..................................................................................................................................... 18

Non-Financial Assets............................................................................................................................. 19

Payables ................................................................................................................................................ 22

Interest Bearing Liabilities ..................................................................................................................... 22

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government........................................................ 23

Administered Financial Assets ........................................................................................................... 23

Administered Payables....................................................................................................................... 26

Administered Other Provisions ........................................................................................................... 27

5. Funding................................................................................................................................................... 28

Appropriations........................................................................................................................................ 28

Administered Special Accounts ............................................................................................................. 35

Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements.................................................................................................. 37

6. People ..................................................................................................................................................... 38

Employee Provisions ............................................................................................................................. 38

Key Management Personnel Remuneration ......................................................................................... 39

Related Party Disclosures ..................................................................................................................... 39

7. Managing Uncertainties ........................................................................................................................ 40

Contingent Assets and Liabilities........................................................................................................... 40

Financial Instruments............................................................................................................................. 41

Administered Financial Instruments ................................................................................................... 43

8. Other Information .................................................................................................................................. 44

Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities........................................................................ 44

Restructuring ......................................................................................................................................... 46

Breach of Section 83 of the Constitution ............................................................................................... 48

Explanations of Major Variances to Budget .......................................................................................... 49

1.

2.

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Overview ...........................................................................................................................................212

1. Financial Performance ..............................................................................................................213

1.1 Expenses ...............................................................................................................................213

1.2 Own-Source Income..............................................................................................................214

2. Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government ..........................................216

2.1 - Administered - Expenses ......................................................................................................216

2.2 - Administered - Income ..........................................................................................................218

3. Departmental Financial Position..............................................................................................219

3.1 Financial Assets.....................................................................................................................219

3.2 Non-Financial Assets.............................................................................................................220

3.3 Payables ................................................................................................................................223

3.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities......................................................................................................223

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government............................................224

-

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets............................................................................................224

-

4.2 Administered - Payables .......................................................................................................227

-

4.3 Administered - Other Provisions ...........................................................................................228

5. Funding.......................................................................................................................................229

5.1 Appropriations........................................................................................................................229

5.2 Administered Special Accounts .............................................................................................236

5.3 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements..................................................................................238

6. People .........................................................................................................................................239

6.1 Employee Provisions .............................................................................................................239

6.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration .........................................................................240

6.3 Related Party Disclosures .....................................................................................................240

7. Managing Uncertainties ............................................................................................................241

7.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities...........................................................................................241

-

7.2 Financial Instruments.............................................................................................................242

7.3 Administered - Financial Instruments....................................................................................244

8. Other Information ......................................................................................................................245

8.1 Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities........................................................245

8.2 Restructuring .........................................................................................................................247

8.3 Breach of Section 83 of the Constitution ...............................................................................249

8.4 Explanations of Major Variances to Budget...........................................................................250

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Overview Objectives of the department

The department is an Australian Government controlled, not-for-profit entity. The purpose of the department is to improve the economic and social wellbeing of individuals and families in Australian communities which we achieve through the implementation of a diverse range of government policies, programs services and payments.

Our purpose reflects four outcomes in which we seek to assist people: Social Security; Families and Communities; Disability and Carers; and Housing and Homelessness.

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements as required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

• the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and • Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities that are reported at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

Taxation

The department is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax and GST.

Reporting of Administered Activities

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the administered schedules and related notes. Except where otherwise stated, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

New Accounting Standards

The department has not identified any new accounting standards that would impact the 2021 financial statements.

Events After the Reporting Period

On 6 August 2021, the department entered into a seven-year lease in Aviation House, which is located in Canberra, and will commence 1 March 2022. The lease liability and right-of-use asset will be recognised in the 2022 financial year.

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1.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

1. Financial Performance Expenses

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 190,668 199,304

Leave and other entitlements 37,379 41,840

Superannuation: Defined contribution plans 19,399 20,617

Defined benefit plans 18,845 23,787

Separation and redundancies 3,581 2,938

Total employee benefits 269,872 288,486

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses are contained in Section 6: People.

Note 1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants and contractors1 65,266 83,253

Volunteer services1 54,179 1,470

IT and communications1 9,928 28,960

Building expenses 7,466 6,645

Legal expenses 4,937 4,731

Training 2,332 3,092

Travel and accommodation 1,533 3,781

Recruitment 984 1,404

Other 8,275 9,260

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 154,900 142,596

Goods supplied 1,713 2,647

Services rendered 153,187 139,949

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 154,900 142,596

Other suppliers Short-term leases 2,105 2,194

Workers' compensation expenses 1,191 1,365

Low value leases - 188

Total other suppliers 3,296 3,747

Total suppliers 158,196 146,343

The department has a short-term lease commitment of $0.605 million as at 30 June 2021 (2020: $1.139 million). 1. As a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order issued in December 2019, corporate IT services and associated assets transferred to Services Australia in February 2020, refer to note 8.2A. Volunteer services relates to IT shared services and audit fees. Prior year IT shared services from February 2020 to June 2020 were not

separately identified by Services Australia as these functions transitioned into their operations.

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The department has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The department recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

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1.2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

1.1 Expenses (continued)

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1C: Finance Costs Interest on lease liabilities 7,992 8,484

Unwinding of discount 1 3

Total finance costs 7,993 8,487

Accounting Policy

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

Own-Source Income Own-Source Revenue

Note 1.2A: Revenue from Contracts with Customers

Rendering of services1 23,559 49,598

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers Type of customer: Australian Government entities (related parties) Non-government entities

22,720 839

23,559

48,938 660

49,598

1. The reduction relates to the transfer of corporate IT services and associated assets to Services Australia in February 2020, refer to note 8.2A.

Accounting Policy

Under the income recognition model the department first determines whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the department applies the general AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the department will consider whether AASB 1058 Income for not-for-profits applies.

Services provided to Australian Government entities through the Community Grants Hub, operate in accordance with partnership agreements that are provided on the basis of a service package. Revenue is recognised as services are delivered over time. Receivables for services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. An allowance is made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Note 1.2B: Resources Received Free of Charge IT services provided by Services Australia2, 3 52,709 -

Remuneration of auditors3 1,470 1,470

Other 31 142

Total resources received free of charge 54,210 1,612

2. Prior year IT shared services from February 2020 to June 2020 were not separately identified by Services Australia as these functions transitioned into their operations. 3. Refer to Volunteer Services note 1.1B Suppliers.

Accounting Policy

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 1.2 Own-Source Income (continued)

Note 1.2C: Rental Income Subleasing right-of-use assets Total rental income

2021 $'000

2,540 2,540

2020 $'000

2,198 2,198

The department, in its capacity as lessor, has one sub-lease arrangement (2020: one arrangement) and fixed memorandum of understanding agreements with Commonwealth agencies in four tenancies (2020: three tenancies).

Maturity analysis of operating lease income receivables: Within one year 2,506 424

One to two years 871 145

Two to three years 901 146

Three to four years 243 147

Four to five years 60 78

More than 5 years 134 193

Total undiscounted lease payments receivable 4,715 1,133

Accounting Policy

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Contributions of Assets at No Cost

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset first qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Australian Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (refer to Note 8.2A).

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the financial year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the department gains control of the appropriation. Appropriations receivable are recognised at nominal amounts (refer to Note 3.1A).

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2.1

I

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

2. Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government Administered - Expenses 2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1A: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Consultants and contractors 55,350 49,225

Research services 22,289 41,757

Advertising, legal and marketing costs 21,250 8,126

Disability employment services 17,486 18,633

Other 10,435 10,415

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 126,810 128,156

Goods supplied 1,474 1,079

Services rendered 125,336 127,077

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 126,810 128,156

Total suppliers 126,810 128,156

Note 2.1B: Grants Public sector: Australian Government entities 426,295 323,164

Local Governments 3,732 5,865

Private sector: Non-profit organisations 1,782,420 1,768,797

External parties 555,076 625,688

Total grants 2,767,523 2,723,514

Accounting Policy

Grants and Subsidies

The department administers grant and subsidy schemes on behalf of the Australian Government. These schemes include grants to local governments, non-government, not-for-profit organisations and other recipients for activities associated with community development and supporting individuals.

Note 2.1C: Personal Benefits Direct: Income Support for Seniors 52,692,102 50,103,637

Working Age Payments 37,577,213 26,680,586

Family Tax Benefit 18,220,890 18,397,991

Income Support for People with Disability 18,391,764 17,781,052

Income Support for Carers 9,820,131 9,374,381

Student Payments 4,582,735 3,567,455

Paid Parental Leave 2,388,981 2,399,420

Allowances and Concessions for Seniors 587,549 378,767

National Redress Scheme 263,747 253,567

Income Support for Vulnerable People 205,032 150,685

Child Payments 100,358 105,601

Other 26,205 37,521

Indirect 6,254 2,350

Total personal benefits 144,862,961 129,233,013

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 2.1 Administered - Expenses (continued) Accounting Policy

Personal Benefits

The department administers personal benefit payments that provide income support, family assistance and other entitlements to individuals on behalf of the Australian Government. Payments to recipients are determined in accordance with provisions under social security law and other legislation, including:

• Social Security (Administration) Act 1999;

• A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999;

• Student Assistance Act 1973;

• Paid Parental Leave Act 2010; and

• National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018.

Payments made under social security law and other legislation are assessed, determined and paid by Services Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs under delegation from the department. The department reports payments made by Services Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs on behalf of the department.

The Social Security (Administration) Act 1999 and the A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999 impose an obligation on recipients to disclose to Services Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs information about financial and personal circumstances that affect entitlement to payment. This is a necessary part of Services Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs administration, which acknowledges that, at the time certain information is required, only the recipient is in a position to provide that information.

Unreported changes in circumstances can lead to incorrect payment, even if no deliberate fraud is intended. Risks associated with relying on voluntary disclosure by recipients are mitigated by a comprehensive portfolio risk management plan, underpinned by compliance strategies, which have been built up over many years. The compliance framework has been designed to meet the requirements of social security legislation.

The compliance framework does not rely solely on information provided by recipients to determine their entitlement. A comprehensive risk management strategy minimises the potential for incorrect payment by subjecting recipients to a variety of review processes. If debts are identified, Services Australia seeks recovery in a lump sum or by instalments. While the risk management strategy is principally directed at minimising debts, the detection of underpayments will also result in an adjustment to their level of entitlement.

Personal benefits recoveries for overpayments made during the year are offset against personal benefit expenses.

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1D: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets Impairment of personal benefits receivable 317,925 447,080

Other 2,307 22

Total write-down and impairment of other assets 320,232 447,102

Note 2.1E: Other Expenses Other special accounts expense 10,434 7,390

Other 907 1,156

Total other expenses 11,341 8,546

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Administered - Income

Revenue

2021 $'000

2020 $'000

Non-Taxation Revenue

Note 2.2A: Recoveries National Redress Scheme

Personal benefits recoveries

237,491

668

197,597

8,789 20,022

226,408

Other Total recoveries

32,271

270,430

Note 2.2B: Fair Value Gains

Loans Total fair value gains

97,905

97,905

220,612

220,612

Accounting Policy

Revenue

All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by the department on behalf of the Australian Government. As such, administered appropriations are not revenues of the individual entity that facilitates distribution or expenditure of the funds as directed.

National Redress Scheme

The department is appropriated to make payments under the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018 and then recovers these payments from the responsible participating institution.

Personal Benefits Recoveries

Personal benefits recoveries mainly relate to fees on the recovery of personal benefit payments.

Interest

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

Competitive neutrality revenue

Hearing Australia provides services on a for-profit basis and is subject to the Australian Government's competitive neutrality policy. Under competitive neutrality arrangements, Hearing Australia is required to make payroll tax and income tax equivalent payments to the Australian Government. These amounts are recognised in the administered financial statements and have been paid or are payable to the official public account.

Dividend revenue

The Australian Government owns 100 per cent of the issued share capital of Hearing Australia. Dividends from Hearing Australia are recognised in the administered financial statements and have been paid or are payable to the official public account.

2.2

I

I

I

--

--

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3.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

3. Departmental Financial Position Financial Assets

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 3.1A: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 2,220 4,285

Appropriations receivables: For ordinary annual appropriation 80,771 77,059

For departmental capital budget 4,387 1,424

For equity injection 1,409 1,409

Total appropriations receivables 86,567 79,892

Other receivables: GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 1,160 1,374

Other 11 85

Total other receivables 1,171 1,459

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 89,958 85,636

Less impairment loss allowance - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 89,958 85,636

During the 2021 financial year, credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2020: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and cash in special accounts.

Financial assets

Trade and other receivables are held for the purpose of collecting contractual cash flows. The cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest that are not provided at below-market interest rates and are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

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3.2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Non-Financial Assets

Note 3.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances

Property, Intangibles Total

plant & equipment

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Buildings and leasehold improvements

As at 1 July 2020

620,630 1,805 895 623,330

(320) (833) (40,424)

Gross book value Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (39,271)

Net book value as at 1 July 2020 581,359 1,485 62 582,906

Additions: By purchase or internally developed 174 60 285 519

By purchase right-of-use 1,467 31 - 1,498

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 5,341 - - 5,341

Depreciation on right-of-use assets (31,369) (189) - (31,558)

Other depreciation and amortisation (6,985) (187) (16) (7,188)

Other movements (2) - - (2)

Re-measurements of right-of-use assets (14,464) - - (14,464)

Disposals: Disposals without proceeds - (1) - (1)

Net book value as at 30 June 2021 535,521 1,199 331 537,051

Net book value as at 30 June 2021 represented by: Gross book value 599,279 1,895 1,180 602,354

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (63,758) (696) (849) (65,303)

Net book value as at 30 June 2021 535,521 1,199 331 537,051

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 491,720 147 - 491,867

In the 2021 financial year: • No leasehold improvements were identified as impaired and written-down (2020: nil); • Property, plant and equipment with a carrying amount of $0.001 million were identified as impaired and written-down (2020: $0.137 million); and • No intangibles were identified as impaired and written-down (2020: $0.946 million).

No property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold within the next 12 months (2020: nil).

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangibles are payable as follows (GST inclusive): Within one year 6,278 69

Total property, plant and equipment and intangible commitments 6,278 69

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

3.2 Non-Financial Assets (continued)

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as otherwise stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Non-financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amount at which these items were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases of less than $2,000, which are expensed in the financial year of acquisition (other than where these assets form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to makegood provisions in office accommodation leases reported by the department where an obligation to restore the property to its original or an agreed condition exists. These costs are included in the value of the department’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the makegood recognised. Leasehold improvement assets have a recognition threshold of $10,000.

The department’s intangibles comprise purchased and internally developed software for internal use. Intangibles are capitalised when their gross values are greater than $50,000 for externally acquired software and $200,000 for internally developed software. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Lease ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for as separate asset classes in the department’s financial information management system. However, the lease ROU assets are included in the same non-financial asset category where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 Leases, the department has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any ROU asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any ROU asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value). Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class by class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity in the asset revaluation reserve except to the extent it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent these amounts reverse a previous revaluation increment for the class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset is restated to the revalued amount.

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I I I I

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

3.2 Non-Financial Assets (continued)

Valuation Processes

The department engaged the services of Jones Lang LaSalle Public Sector Valuations to conduct a materiality assessment of all tangible non-financial assets at 30 June 2021, excluding lease ROU assets. This annual assessment is undertaken to determine whether the carrying amount of the assets is materially different from their fair value. Intangible non-financial assets are carried at cost. Comprehensive valuations are carried out at least once every three years, with the last full detailed revaluation performed at 30 June 2019. Jones Lang LaSalle Public Sector Valuations has provided written assurance to the department that the models developed are in compliance with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement.

The methods used to determine and substantiate the unobservable inputs are derived and evaluated as follows:

• Physical depreciation and obsolescence - assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the cost approach. Under the cost approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and adjusted to take into account physical depreciation and obsolescence. Physical depreciation and obsolescence is determined on the basis of professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration; and

• Leasehold improvement assets - the consumed economic benefit/asset obsolescence deduction is determined on the basis of the associated lease term.

The department did not measure any other non-financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2021.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Intangibles are amortised on a straight-line basis over the anticipated useful life.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset, excluding ROU assets, are based on the following estimated useful lives:

2021 2020

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lesser of 10 years or

lease term

Plant and equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

Artwork 1 to 50 years 1 to 50 years

Intangibles 5 years 2 to 8 years

The change in accounting estimate of the useful life impacts the depreciable useful life and depreciation expense over the current and forward years.

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All non-financial assets are assessed by the department for impairment as at balance date. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the department were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

223 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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3.3

3.4

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Payables

Note 3.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals Total suppliers

2021 $'000

12,807 12,807

2020 $'000

20,406 20,406

During the 2021 financial year, settlement is usually made within 7 days in accordance with Government policy implemented April 2020 to assist the cash flow for Australian businesses (2020: 20 days).

Note 3.3B: Other Payables Salaries and wages 3,944 3,082

Separations and redundancies 1,757 -

Superannuation 750 789

Unearned income 97 88

Other 3,831 3,296

Total other payables 10,379 7,255

Interest Bearing Liabilities

Note 3.4A: Leases Lease liabilities 515,376 548,847

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $29.368 million.

Maturity analysis - contractual undiscounted cash flows Within 1 year 26,430 28,430

Between 1 to 5 years 94,351 107,015

More than 5 years 490,396 517,710

Total leases 611,177 653,155

The department in its capacity as lessee has a lease for its National Office, the Enid Lyons Building which is located in Canberra and accounts for the majority of the lease portfolio. This lease ends in the 2033 financial year and has two further renewal options of five years each.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1B, 1.1C, 1.2C and 3.2.

Accounting Policy

For all contracts entered into, the department considers whether the contract is, or contains a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the re-assessment or modification.

Makegood Provision

The fair value of makegood for leasehold improvements is based on estimated costs per square metre on a site by site basis and is included as a provision for makegood. The value of the provision for a property will depend on the rate and assessed cost of the makegood obligation applied to the premises. The department’s property management advisor has determined that not all property leases have a makegood obligation.

In the 2021 financial year, $0.273 million has been recognised in Other Provisions (2020: $0.273 million).

224 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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4.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government Administered - Financial Assets 2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash at bank 12,655 11,373

Cash in special accounts1 6,374 507,155

Total cash and cash equivalents 19,029 518,528

1. Special account cash balance details are disclosed in Note 5.2.

Note 4.1B: Receivables Personal benefits: Family Tax Benefit 2,410,014 1,990,316

Working Age Payments 1,474,351 2,112,660

Student Payments 340,849 430,664

Income Support for People with Disability 283,811 342,750

Income Support for Seniors 258,870 226,947

Income Support for Carers 229,851 252,613

Other 23,844 19,649

Total personal benefits2 5,021,590 5,375,599

Advances and loans: Student Start-up Loan 653,200 566,500

Advance payments for personal benefits 462,947 396,324

Student Financial Supplement Scheme 447,400 436,900

Pension Loan Scheme 118,995 41,788

Total advances and loans 1,682,542 1,441,512

Other receivables: National Redress Scheme 62,784 144,588

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 18,650 16,781

Rendering of services 10,549 9,341

Other receivables 3,403 1,373

Total other receivables (gross) 95,386 172,083

Total receivables (gross) 6,799,518 6,989,194

Less impairment loss allowance: Personal benefits (1,634,985) (2,281,998)

Other (1,611) (850)

Total impairment loss allowance2 (1,636,596) (2,282,848)

Total receivables (net) 5,162,922 4,706,346

2. During the 2020 financial year, the Australian Government announced that debts determined as part of the Income Compliance Program that were wholly or partially determined on the basis of averaged employment income data from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) will not be recovered, and that payments made against such debts will be refunded.

Personal Benefits Receivable and Personal Benefits Impairment Allowance At 30 June 2021, personal benefit receivable of $0.039 billion of $1.013 billion included in the 30 June 2020 receivable balance is yet to be reduced to zero, with an equal personal benefit impairment allowance.

Personal Benefits Payable At 30 June 2021, $0.721 billion of $0.742 billion included in the 30 June 2020 payable balance (Note 4.2A), has been refunded.

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 4.1 Administered - Financial Assets (continued) Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

Receivables are based on actual debts raised except where noted below.

Personal benefit payments

At any point in time, there are a number of benefit recipients who have received a benefit in excess of their entitlement and owe money to the Commonwealth. The Australian Government Actuary (AGA) has provided advice on the likely level of debt recovery. In providing this advice, the AGA gives consideration to past economic, policy and process changes that have impacted on repayments to date, the pausing of debt recovery activity as a policy response to past natural disasters, and any potential changes that may impact on future repayment prospects. Each of these changes requires separate and collective consideration of the impact of the advice provided.

Family Tax Benefit

At any point in time, there are a number of eligible recipients who have received a benefit in excess of their entitlement and owe money to the Commonwealth. The AGA has provided advice on the likely level of debt recovery, including the estimated impact of COVID-19. The repayment prospects of recipients from the economic impacts of COVID-19 and resultant policy changes is a source of estimation uncertainty in relation to the recovery of the Family Tax Benefit receivable.

The AGA also calculates the impairment allowance associated with the Family Tax Benefit receivable noting there are a number of uncertainties in the estimation process including the impacts of COVID-19 and resultant policy changes. The allowance relies on periodic analysis of longitudinal unit record data to estimate the proportion of the outstanding non-lodger debt, which might be considered receivable, and the doubtful debt associated with each category of debt.

Student Start-up Loan

The Student Start-up Loan is a voluntary loan that is available to full time students in receipt of Youth Allowance, Austudy or ABSTUDY. The scheme commenced on 1 January 2016 with students potentially eligible to take out two loans a year. The loan is only repaid once any Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) have been fully extinguished.

The department engaged the AGA to provide a fair value estimate for the Student Start-up Loan receivable as at 30 June 2021.

The methodology used by the AGA generates individual cash flow profiles for all those who have an outstanding debt at the valuation date. This includes modelling individual cash flows by projecting forward expected future incomes for each individual and their associated compulsory repayment by year. Compulsory repayment thresholds were also projected, considering assumptions as to future CPI growth.

The repayment cash flows were aggregated across all individuals to arrive at total repayments to determine the fair value of the receivable. The net increase of the receivable of $87 million is a result of new debt issued and movements in cash flows due to higher voluntary repayments, offset with a reduction of the debt not expected to be repaid.

Student Financial Supplement Scheme

The Student Financial Supplement Scheme was a voluntary loan scheme for tertiary students to help cover their expenses while they studied. The Student Financial Supplement Scheme closed on 31 December 2003 and no new loans have been issued since this date. Existing Student Financial Supplement Scheme debts are collected through the tax system and voluntary repayments can also be made. Loans repaid through the tax system are only repaid once any Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debts have been fully extinguished.

The department engaged the AGA to provide the fair value estimate of the Student Financial Supplement Scheme receivable as at 30 June 2021.

The model used by the AGA generates individual cash flow profiles for all those who have an outstanding debt at the valuation date. This includes modelling individual cash flows by projecting forward expected future incomes for each individual and their associated compulsory repayment by year. Compulsory repayment thresholds were also projected, considering assumptions as to future Consumer Price Index (CPI) growth. The resultant fair value increase of the receivable of $11 million is largely due to the payments and an increase in the discount rate, offset by better than expected income growth and related assumptions.

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 4.1 Administered - Financial Assets (continued) Pension Loan Scheme

The Pension Loan Scheme is a voluntary reverse equity mortgage that offers older Australians an income stream to supplement their retirement. Older Australians can choose to increase the amount of their fortnightly pension by using their assets as security.

This is the first year that the AGA has been engaged to provide an estimate of this receivable, with prior year assessments being prepared by the department. The AGA have estimated the value of the receivable as the present value of expected future repayments in respect of projected loan balances as at 30 June 2021.

The approach used by the AGA in projecting expected future repayments is to project both the future loan balance and associated property value. On the death of the borrower, the loan is repaid from the sale proceeds and any shortfall is not recovered. The AGA have also projected future voluntary repayments by reference to the level of such repayments received to date. The projected cash flows are discounted at the Commonwealth cost of borrowing for an average term of the repayments of 12.5 years.

The AGA have projected the receivable to be $119 million at 30 June 2021, representing an increase from the prior year of $77 million largely due to a change in discount rate.

The net decrease of the personal benefits impairment loss allowance of $647 million reflects a decrease in the impairment for online compliance debt of $974 million, offset by an increase in the personal benefits doubtful debt provision of $186 million and the Family Tax Benefit of $141 million.

Personal benefits impairment loss allowance

The model used by the AGA projects future repayments to determine the percentage of total debt that should be impaired.

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 4.1C: Investments

National Disability Insurance Agency1 1,002,234 1,088,470

Hearing Australia1 90,252 83,662

Total investments in Commonwealth entities 1,092,486 1,172,132

Other interests:

Unison Housing Limited2 1,395 1,395

Total other interests 1,395 1,395

Total investments 1,093,881 1,173,527

1. The Commonwealth has 100 per cent of the equity interest in the National Disability Insurance Agency and Hearing Australia. 2. The Commonwealth has an interest in a property occupied by Unison Housing Limited located in Melbourne. The principal activity of the entity is the provision of community housing facilities. The Commonwealth owns 31 per cent

of the unimproved market value of the land and its investment in Unison Housing Limited is limited to an equity contribution of grant funding. The Commonwealth’s interest is not expected to be sold or fully realised within the next 12 months. For the 2019 financial year, Unison Housing Limited was revalued independently in accordance with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement.

Accounting Policy

Administered Investments

Administered investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are not consolidated because their consolidation is relevant only at the whole of government level.

Administered investments other than those held for sale are classified as fair value through other comprehensive income and are measured at their fair value as at 30 June 2021. Fair value has been taken to be the Australian Government's proportional interest in the net assets of the entities as at the end of the reporting period.

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4.2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Administered - Payables

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 4.2A: Personal Benefits Direct:

Income Support for Seniors 988,091 980,460

Working Age Payments 461,209 1,646,202

Income Support for People with Disability 358,829 401,565

Family Tax Benefit 260,847 307,334

Income Support for Carers 178,739 279,959

Student Payments 69,415 203,798

Paid Parental Leave 48,634 44,919

National Redress Scheme 2,984 12,992

Other 5,359 9,595

Indirect 154 -

Total personal benefits1 2,374,261 3,886,824

1. Refer to Personal Benefits Receivable and Personal Benefits Impairment Allowance note 4.1B.

Note 4.2B: Grants Private sector: Non-profit organisations 45,145 31,292

Other grants 16,774 21,882

Total grants 61,919 53,174

Settlement of grants payables is made according to the terms and conditions of each grant. Since mid-April 2020, settlement of other payables is usually made within 7 days in accordance with Australian Government policy to assist the cash flow for Australian businesses (2020: 20 days).

Accounting Policy

Administered payables are measured at fair value where possible. The carrying amounts of administered liabilities not measured at fair value are considered to be a reasonable approximation of their fair value.

Grants

Grant liabilities are recognised to the extent that required services have been performed or the eligibility criteria have been satisfied by the grantee, but payments due have not been made. Grant commitments are when the Australian Government enters into an agreement to make grant payments, but services have not yet been performed or criteria satisfied.

228 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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I I

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Administered - Other Provisions

Note 4.3A: Personal Benefits and Other Provisions

Family Tax Pension Claims in National Other1 Total

Benefit Bonus Progress Redress

Scheme Scheme

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Carrying amount as at 1 July 2020 4,312,462 225,000 143,316 37,624 14,380 4,732,782

Provisions made 3,604,639 - 85,296 26,611 - 3,716,546

Provisions expired or settled (3,604,400) (47,700) (141,344) (37,624) (5,122) (3,836,190)

Changes in provision (171,000) (84,400) - - - (255,400)

Closing balance as at 30 June 2021 4,141,701 92,900 87,268 26,611 9,258 4,357,738

1. Single Income Family Supplement and Schoolkids Bonus are disclosed in Other provisions.

Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

During the 2021 financial year, the department engaged the AGA to estimate the following provisions:

Family Tax Benefit

At any point in time, there are eligible recipients, entitled to receive the Family Tax Benefit, who have not yet received their full entitlement from Services Australia. The provision calculates the current financial year and earlier financial years’ liability for claims that have yet to be realised. The methodology considers the likely lodgement profiles associated with reconciliation top-ups, lump sum claims and supplement payments, including new measures.

Pension Bonus Scheme

The Pension Bonus Scheme provides a tax-free lump sum payment to those who continue in employment and defer receiving the Age Pension. The future Pension Bonus Scheme liability relates to those who are currently registered and have not yet received a bonus payment or exited for some other reason.

The AGA make a series of key assumptions about future experience based on historical data, including actual average payments, claim rates and the period over which claims are expected to be made. These factors have been reviewed for the 2021 financial year, based on the behaviour of recipients up to 31 December 2020, and projected over the estimated remaining life of the scheme. The AGA has adopted a long-term bond rate to discount the present value of the provision.

The resultant decrease in the provision of $132 million is mainly attributable to now assuming that claim rates will be more in line with long-term experience, rather than the more conservative position taken previously which reflected significant uncertainty around the impact of COVID-19.

During the 2021 financial year, the department made an estimate for the following provisions:

Claims in progress

At any point in time, there are claims for personal benefits payments that have been submitted and are in the process of being assessed. The liability is calculated using an in-house model, which was reviewed by the AGA in the 2020 financial year. It considers account average payment rates, the proportion of claims expected to be granted and the aging profile of the claims. The claims in progress provision reduced due to the lower than expected effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.

National Redress Scheme

The Commonwealth Government administers the National Redress Scheme and in this capacity makes monetary payments to survivors of child sexual abuse in accordance with the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018. As the National Redress Scheme operates on the basis that the responsible entity pays, the funds paid to the survivor are recovered from the responsible institution.

The provision represents the total monetary payment that is offered to survivors under the scheme that has not been accepted at the reporting date.

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5.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5. Funding Appropriations Note 5.1A: Annual and Unspent Appropriations ('Recove rable GST Exclusive')

Total unspent 30 June 2020

$'000

Amount

appropriated in 2020

-21

Appropriation applied in 2020

-21 1

Total unspent 30 June 2021

$'000

Current year Section 74 appropriation

Receipts

$'000

$'000

Total

appropriation

1

$'000

Current and Prior Years

$'000

Departmental

-Ordinary Annual Services

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2018

-19

3

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

Appropriation Act

(No. 3) 2019

-20

Supply Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

-Capital Budget (DCB)

-Non Operating

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2020

-21

Supply Act (No. 1) 2020

-21

2

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2020

-21

Supply Act (No.1) 2020

-21

-Capital Budget (DCB)

-Non Operating

2

Cash and cash equivalents Total ordinary annual services Departmental

-Other Services

784 43,051 9,182 24,825

1,424

- - - -

5,334

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

150,098

-

229,401

34,219

5,497

-

4,41

4

-

-

-

- - - - -

150,098 2 63,620 5,497 4,414

-

-

(43,051) (9,182) (24,825) (575)

(96,947) (241,497)

- -

1,386

784 - - -

849 53,151 22,123 5,497 4,414 6,720

84,600

389,410

34,219

423,629

(414,691)

93,538

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2019

-20 -Non Operating

-Equity

Injection

1,273

-

-

-

-

1,273

Supply Act (No. 2) 2019

-20

-Non Operating

-Equity Injection

136

-

-

-

-

136

Supply Act (No. 2) 2020

-21

-Equity Injections

4

-

165

-

165

-

165

1,409

165

-

165

-

1,574

Total Departmental

86,009

389,575

34,219

423,794

(414,691)

95,112

1. The variance in the current financial year of $9.103 million ( $423.794 million less $414.691 million ) relates to the movement in cash and appropriation receivable between the current and prior financial year. For additional variance disclosure, refer to Note 8.4A. 2. The Departmental Capital Budget is appropriated through Supply Act (No. 1) 2020- 21, and is not separately identified in the Supply Act. The Departmental Capital Budget includes a quarantine

under section 51 of the PGPA Act of $0.876 million. 3. The departmental ordinary annual services item includes an amount withheld under section 51 of the PGPA Act of $0.784 million which was repealed on 1 July 2021. 4.

The departmental other services item includes a quarantine under section 51 of the PGPA Act of $0.165 million.

230 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5.1 Appropriations (continued) Note 5.1A: Annual and Unspent Appropriations ('Recoverable GST Exclusive') (continued)

Total unspent 30 June 2019 $'000

Amount appropriated in 2019

-20

Appropriation applied in 2019

-20

1

Prior Year Section 75 Transfers

2

$'000

Total unspent 30 June 2020 $'000

Current year Section 75 Section 74 appropriation

Transfers

2

Receipts

$'000

$'000

$'000

Total

appropriation

1

$'000

Current and Prior Years

$'000

Departmental

-Ordinary Annual Services

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018

-19

Appropriation Act (No.

3 ) 2018

-19

3

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018

-19

-Capital Budget (DCB)

-Non

Operating Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2019

-20

Supply Act (No. 1)

2019

-20

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

-Capital Budget (DCB)

-Non

Operating Supply Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

-Capital Budget (DCB)

-Non Operating

Cash and cash equivalents Total ordinary annual services Departmental

-Other Services

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2017

-18

-Non Operating

-Equity Injection

Appropriation Act (No. 6) 2017

-18

-Non Operating

-Equity Injection

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2018

-19

-Non Operating

-Equity

Injection

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2019

-20

-Non Operating

-Equity Injection

Supply Act (No. 2) 2019

-20

-Non Operating

-Equity Injection

69,635 6,076 2,336

- - - - -

9,313

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

250,181

(14,517)

44,797

10,686

-

-

173,014

(7,419)

25,781

9,786

(7,122)

-

7,299

(7,299)

-

-

-

-

- - -

280,461 10,686 191,376 2,664

- -

(59,077) (5,292) (2,336) (237,410) (1,504)

(166,551) (1,240)

-

(3,979)

(10,558)

- - - - - - - -

-

784 -43,051 9,182

24,825 1,424

-

5,334

87,360

450,966

(36,357)

70,578

485,187

(477,389)

(10,558)

84,600

194280 2,065

- -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,325

(1,770)

-

4,520

(3,311)

-

- - -

4,555 1,209

(194) (280) (2,065) (3,282) (1,073)

- - - - -

- - -

1,273 136

2,539

10,845

(5,081)

-

5,764

(6,894)

-

1,409

Total Departmental

89,899

461,811

(41,438)

70,578

490,951

(484,283)

(10,558)

86,009

1. The variance in the current financial year of $6.668 million ($490.951 million less $484.283 million) relates to the movement in cash and appropriation receivable between the current and prior financial year. 2. Due to the transfer of functions with the Department of Home Affairs and Services Australia, the departmental appropriation section 75 transfer of $41.438 million of current year appropriation

included $14.421 million of departmental capital appropriation and $5.081 million of equity appropriation. In addition, $10.558 million of prior year appropriation was transferred. Refer to Note 8.2A.

3. The departmental ordinary annual services item includes an amount withheld under section 51 of the PGPA Act of $0.784 million which was repealed on 1 July 2021.

231 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financ

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5.1 Appropriations (continued) Note 5.1A: Annual and Unspent Appropriations ('Recoverable GST

Exclusive') (continued)

Amount appropriated in 2020

-21

Appropriation

applied

in 2020

-21

1

Total unspent 30 June 2020

Current year appropriation

Section 74 Receipts

Total

appropriation

1

Current and Prior Years

Repealed

appropriatio

n

4

Total

unspent 30 June

2021

Administered

-Ordinary Annual Services

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2017

-18

4

698,882

-

-

-

-

(698,882)

-

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018

-19

1,998,890

-

-

-

(1,898,466)

-

100,424

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2018

-19

90,232

-

-

-

(24)

-

90,208

Supply Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

54,454

-

-

-

(3,527)

-

50,927

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019

-20

97,986

-

-

-

(61,843)

-

36,143

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2019

-20

142,578

-

-

-

(1,341)

-

141,237

Appropriation Act (No. 5) 2019

-20

59,949

-

-

-

(23,127)

-

36,822

Supply Act (No. 1) 2020

-21

-

11,590,108

43

11,590,151

(11,474,994)

-

115,157

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2020

-21

2

-

2,212,192

1,154

2,213,346

(1,648,884)

-

564,462

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2020

-21

-

2,033

-

2,033

-

-

2,033

Advance to the Finance Minister Determination (No.6 of 2020

-2021)

-

159,713

-

159,713

(159,713)

-

-

Supply Act (No.1) 2020

-21

-National Disability Insurance

Scheme Launch Transition Agency

3

-

1,213,828

-

1,213,828

(1,213,828)

-

-

Total Administered

3,142,971

15,177,874

1,197

15,179,071

(16,485,747)

(698,882)

1,137,413

1. The variance in the current financial year of $1,306.676 million ($16,485.747 million less $15,179.071 million) consists of a $1,767.106 million payment from prior year unspent appropriations to the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), $221.222 million for the payment of prior year expense accruals during 2021, offset by $681.652 million that represents unspent available appropriations for administered items. For additional variance disclosure, refer to Note 8.4B.

2. The administered ordinary annual services items includes quarantines under section 51 of the PGPA Act of prior year Administered Items of $175.414 million. 3. The amount applied included $4.950 million that is a portion of the Information, Linkages and Capacity Building program which was drawdown and returned to the Consolidated Revenue

Fund by the department on behalf of the NDIA. 4. 2017-18 Appropriation Acts automatically repealed on 1 July 2020.

232 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5.1 Appropriations (continued) Note 5.1A: Annual and Unspent Appropriations ('Recoverable GST Exclusive') (continued)

Amount appropriated in 2019

-20

Appropriation

applied

In 2019

-20

1

Total unspent 30 June 2019

Current year appropriation

Section 75 Transfers

2

Section

74

Receipts

Total

appropriation

1

Current and Prior

Years

Prior Year Section 75 Transfers

2

Repealed

appropriation

4

Total unspent 30 June 2020

Administered

-Ordinary Annual

Services

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2016

-17

224,555

-

-

-

(224,555)

-

Supply Act (No.1) 2016

-17

178

-

-

-

(178)

-

Appropriation

Act (No.1) 2017

-18 3

727,904

-

-

(29,022)

-

698,882

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2017

-18

11,827

-

-

(11,827)

-

-

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018

-19

2,231,088

-

(219,045)

(13,153)

-

1,998,890

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2018

-19

114,023

-

(13,464)

(10,327)

-

90,232

Supply Act (No. 1) 2019

-20

-

3,767,044

(86,401)

292

3,680,935

(3,626,481)

-

-

54,454

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019

-20

-

5,318,775

-

2,774

5,321,549

(5,223,563)

-

-

97,986

Appropriation Act (No.3)

2019

-20

-

581,900

-

-

581,900

(439,322)

-

-

142,578

Appropriation Act (No. 5) 2019

-20

-

61,900

-

-

61,900

(1,951)

-

-

59,949

Supply Act (No.1) 2019

-20

-

National Disability Insurance Scheme Launch Transition Agency Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019

-20

-

National Disability Insurance Scheme Launch Transition Agency Appropriation Act (No.3) 2019

-20

-

National Disability Insurance Scheme Launch Transition Agency Total Administered

-

581,184

-

-

581,184

(581,184)

-

-

-

-

827,071

-

-

827,071

(827,071)

-

-

-

-

5,002

-

-

5,002

(5,002)

-

-

-

3,309,575

11,142,876

(86,401)

3,066

11,059,541

(10,937,083)

(64,329)

(224,733)

3,142,971

1. The variance in the amount appropriated and the amount applied in the current financial year consists of $232.508 million ($10,937.083 million less $11,059.541 million) relates to the payment of prior year expense accruals during 2020 offset by $354.967 million that represents unspent available appropriations for administered items, and prior year section 75 transfers of $64.329 million.

2. The administered appropriation section 75 transfer includes an amount of $86.401 million of current appropriation which relates to the transfer of functions with the Department of Home Affairs. Refer to Note 8.2B. 3. The administered ordinary annual services items includes quarantines under section 51 of the PGPA Act of prior year Administered Items of $451.746 million.

4. 2016-17 Appropriation Acts automatically repealed on 1 July 2019.

233 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financ

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5.1 Appropriations (continued) Note 5.1B: Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Appropriation applied

2021

2020

Authority

Type

Purpose

$'000

$'000

Unlimited

To enable

the payment of income support payments. Most of the amount relates to

Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, Administered

1, 2

125,911,476 106,241,123

Amount

payments for Age Pension and Disability Support Pension.

A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act

Unlimited

To enable the payment of family income support payments. Most of the amount

19,042,017 18,055,843

1999, Administered

1, 2

Amount

relates to payments for Family Tax Benefit and Schoolkids Bonus.

Unlimited

To enable

payments to working parents to enhance maternal and child health and

Paid Parental Leave Act 2010, Administered

2

2,375,893 2,414,060

Amount

shared caring responsibilities.

Unlimited

To enable payment of student assistance benefits

for Isolated Children and the

Student Assistance Act 1973 - Section 55A (Administered)

2

496,294 420,016

Amount

Aboriginal Study Assistance Scheme.

National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual

Unlimited

An Act to establish the National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child

Sexual Abuse,

290,519 205,307

Abuse Act 2018

Amount

to provide redress for survivors of past institutional sexual abuse. To provide an appropriation where an Act or other

law requires or permits the

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act Refund repayment of an amount received by the Commonwealth and apart from this section 81 119

2013 - Section 77, Administered

there is no specific appropriation for the repayment. An Act to establish the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool payment scheme

Business Services Wage Assessment Tool Payment Scheme Limited for making payments in relation to the use of the Business Services Wage - -

Act 2015 -- Section 99, Administered Amount

Assessment Tool.

Unlimited

An Act to provide for the matching of data in relation to certain assistance and tax and

Data-matching Program (Assistance and Tax) Act 1990 - -

Amount

to amend the Privacy Act 1988.

Social Security and Other Legislation Amendment (Economic

Unlimited

An Act to amend laws in order to provide economic security strategy payments, and

- -

Security Strategy) Act 2008

Amount

for related purposes.

234 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 5.1.

Appropriations (continued)

Note 5.1B: Special Appropriations

('Recoverable GST exclusive') (continued)

Appropriation applied

2021

2020

Authority

Type

Purpose

$'000

$'000

Social Security and Veterans' Entitlements Legislation

Unlimited An Act to amend the law relating to social security and veterans’ affairs, and for other

Amendment (One-off Payments to Increase Assistance for - -

Amount purposes.

Older Australians and Carers and Other Measures) Act 2006 Social Security and Veterans' Affairs Legislation Amendment

Unlimited An Act to amend the law relating to social security and veterans’ affairs, and for other

(One-off Payments and Other 2007 Budget Measures) Act - -

Amount purposes.

2007 Social Security and Veterans' Entitlements Legislation

Unlimited An Act to amend the law relating to social security and veterans’ entitlements, and for

Amendment (One-off Payments and Other Budget Measures) - -

Amount other purposes.

Act 2008 Clean Energy (Household Assistance Amendments) Act

Unlimited

An Act to amend the law relating to social security, family assistance, veterans’

2011 Amount entitlements, military rehabilitation and compensation, farm household support and - -

aged care, and for related purposes.

Household Stimulus Package Act (No.2) 2009

Unlimited

An Act to amend laws in order to provide payments relating to the household stimulus

- -

Amount

package, and for other purposes.

Total special appropriations applied

148,116,280

127,336,468

1.

The Department of Veterans' Affairs spent money from the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the department against the special appropriations for Social Security (Administration) Act 1999;

and A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999, Administered. 2.

The department received PGPA Act section 74 cash receipts from Services Australia for recovery of personal benefit overpayments. These amounts are included against the relevant special

appropriation.

235 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financ

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

5.1 Appropriations (continued)

Note 5.1C: Disclosure by Agent in Relation to Annual and Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Departmental Disclosure by Agent

Attorney-General's Department1 Department of Home Affairs

2020 $'000 $'000

Total receipts 250 426

Total payments (250) (426)

1. The department has access to third party drawing rights for the Courts and Legal Services program. 2. The department has access to third party drawing rights for the Department of Home Affairs annual appropriation for the National Security and Criminal Justice program.

Administered Disclosure by Agent

Attorney-General's Department1 Department of Veterans' Affairs2

Department of Home Affairs3

2021 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total receipts 216,047 16,553 109,315

Total payments (216,047) (16,553) (114,713)

Attorney-General's Department of Veterans' Department of Home Department Affairs Affairs

2020 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total receipts 219,584 15,356 190,495

Total payments (227,149) (15,356) (190,694)

1. The department has access to third party drawing rights for the Attorney-General's Department annual appropriation for the Family Relationship Services, Justice Services and Indigenous Law and Justice programs.

2. ' The department has access to third party drawing rights for the Department of Veterans Affairs annual appropriation for the Veterans' Community Care and Support, Commemorative Activities, Veterans' Counselling and Other Health Services and Assistance and Other Compensation for Veterans and Dependants programs.

3. The department has access to third party drawing rights for the Department of Home Affairs annual appropriation for the National Security and Criminal Justice and Multicultural Affairs and Citizenship programs.

236 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements

5 . 2

Administered Special Accounts

Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account

2

Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special

Account

3

Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021 - s78

PGPA Act

4

National Disability Research Special Account 2016

5

National Disability Research Special Account 2020

6

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Balance brought forward from previous period Increases:

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

501,020

400,407

5,152

397

-

-

983

1,559

-

-

s6 Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012

576,464

509,900

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfer between Special Accounts

-

-

-

-

11,666

-

-

-

781

-

Decreases: Administered Transfer between Special

Accounts

-

-

(11,666)

-

-

-

(781)

-

-

-

Returned to CRF

(594,165)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(21)

-

Contributions

1,411

1,250

11,506

10,444

2,124

-

-

-

-

-

Total increase

s

577,875

511,150

11,506

10,444

13,790

-

-

-

781

-

Available for payments

1,078,895

911,557

16,658

10,841

13,790

-

983

1,559

781

-

Payments made

(484,730)

(410,537)

(4,992)

(5,689)

(7,416)

-

(202)

(576)

(760)

-

Total administered

(1,078,895)

(410,537)

(16,658)

(5,689)

(7,416)

-

(983)

(576)

(781)

-

Total decreases

(1,078,895)

(410,537)

(16,658)

(5,689)

(7,416)

-

(983)

(576)

(781)

-

Total balance carried to the next period

1

-

501,020

-

5,152

6,374

-

-

983

-

-

1. The total balance carried to the next period is represented by cash held in the Official Public Account.

237 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financ

5.2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Administered Special Accounts (continued)

2. Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 80 Establishing Instrument: Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012; section 5 Purpose: To distribute the Commonwealth's contribution of its share of the equal remuneration order pay increases for social and community service sector workers in Commonwealth-funded programs. This account was established on 8 November 2012 in accordance with the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012. This account ceased on the 30 June 2021 in line with the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012. This account is non-interest bearing and the balance is held in the Official Public Account.

3. Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special Account Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 78 Establishing Instrument: PGPA Act Determination (Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021) Purpose: For the disbursement of amounts held on trust or otherwise for the benefit of a person other than the Commonwealth and for services relating to other governments and bodies that are not PGPA Act Agencies. The Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys - Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Special Account Establishment 2010 was repealed on 1 April 2021 and replaced with Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021. This account is non-interest bearing and the balance is held in the Official Public Account. This Special Account consists of the following sub-accounts:

 National Framework  National Campaign - Violence Against Women  National Centre of Excellence

4. Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021 - s78 PGPA Act Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 78 Establishing Instrument: PGPA Act Determination (Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021) Purpose: For the disbursement of amounts held on trust or otherwise for the benefit of a person other than the Commonwealth and for services relating to other governments and bodies that are not PGPA Act Agencies. The Social Services SOETM Special Account 2021 was established on 3 February 2021. It replaced the Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys - Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Special Account Establishment 2010 which was repealed on 1 April 2021. This account is non-interest bearing and the balance is held in the Official Public Account. This Special Account consists of the following sub-accounts:

 National Framework  National Campaign - Violence Against Women  National Centre of Excellence

5. National Disability Research Special Account 2016 Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 78 Establishing Instrument: PGPA Act Determination (National Disability Research Special Account 2016) - Establishment Purpose: For expenditure on projects that relate to the National Disability Research Special Account 2016. The National Disability Research Special Account 2016 ceased on 7 September 2020. This account was superseded by the National Disability Research Special Account 2020 which was established on 19 June 2020. This account is non-interest bearing and the balance is held in the Official Public Account.

6. National Disability Research Special Account 2020 Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 78 Establishing Instrument: PGPA Act Determination (National Disability Research Special Account 2020) Purpose: For expenditure on projects that relate to the National Disability Research Special Account 2020. This account is non-interest bearing and the balance is held in the Official Public Account. The National Disability Research Special Account 2020 ceased on the 30 June 2021.

238 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements 5.3

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Total comprehensive loss - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income (4,557) (56,713) Plus: depreciation/amortisation of assets funded through appropriations (departmental capital budget funding and/or equity injections) 7,188 38,931

Plus: depreciation of right-of-use assets 31,558 34,294

Less: lease principal repayments (20,341) (20,788)

Net Cash Operating Surplus / (Deficit) 13,848 (4,276)

Changes in asset revaluation reserve (5,341) 8

Operating surplus / (deficit) attributable to the department 8,507 (4,268)

From the 2011 financial year, the Australian Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principal repayment amount reflects the cash impact on implementation of AASB 16 Leases, it does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

239 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

5

Part 5 - Financial statements Financ

6.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

6. People Employee Provisions

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 6.1A: Employee Provisions Leave and other entitlements 91,319 91,691

Total employee provisions 91,319 91,691

Accounting Policy

Employee Benefits

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within 12 months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as the net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the department’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

As at 30 June 2021, the liability for long service leave and annual leave expected to be settled beyond 12 months of the balance date has been determined by reference to the work of the AGA. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account employee attrition rates, inflation, increases in salary through promotion and estimated salary increases.

Separation and Redundancy

Provisions are made for employee separation and redundancy benefit payments. The department recognises a provision for separation and redundancies when it has developed a detailed formal plan and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the plan.

Superannuation

Staff of the department are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme, the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme, the Public Sector Superannuation accumulation plan or other superannuation funds.

The Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme and Public Sector Superannuation Scheme are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The Public Sector Superannuation accumulation plan is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and will be settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and disclosure notes.

The department makes employer contributions to each employee’s superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary and are deemed sufficient to meet the current cost to the Australian Government. The department accounts for the contributions as if these payments were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised at 30 June 2021 represents outstanding employer contributions for the financial year.

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6.2

6.3

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those individuals having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the department, directly or indirectly. The department has determined the key management personnel to be the members of the Executive Management Group, which generally comprises the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries. The note includes anyone acting in a key management personnel position who has demonstrated authority and responsibility over planning, directing and controlling the activities of the department, including both departmental and administered funded activities.

Key management personnel remuneration is:

2021 2020

$ $

Short-term employee benefits 2,411,520 2,421,752

Post-employment benefits 395,343 364,041

Other long-term employee benefits 56,693 62,599

Termination benefits - 369,408

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses 2,863,556 3,217,800

The total number of key management personnel (KMP) included in the above table is eight, being three substantive officers who held the position for the full year; three substantive officers who held the position for part of the year and two officers acting in a KMP position for part of the year (2020: eight KMP, being three full year, three part-year and two acting).

The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Cabinet Ministers, Portfolio Ministers, Assistant Ministers and Presiding Officers. The Ministers' remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the department.

Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships

The department is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to this entity are key management personnel (including the Cabinet Ministers, Portfolio Ministers, Assistant Ministers and Presiding Officers).

Transactions with related parties

Given the breadth of Australian Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

One key management personnel has disclosed a relationship with an employee of an entity that the department has provided grants in relation to:

• Volunteer Grants (an outsourced process administered by Volunteering ACT); and • National Disability Insurance Services (managed by a separate statutory agency).

All reported transactions were in the department’s ordinary course of business and conducted under normal terms and conditions.

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

7. Managing Uncertainties Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Departmental Contingencies

As at 30 June 2021, the department has no quantifiable contingent assets or liabilities with a possible likelihood of progression (2020: nil). There are no quantifiable liabilities, unquantifiable or significant remote contingent assets or liabilities (2020: nil).

Administered Contingencies

National Redress Scheme Indemnities

Contingent assets

Balance from previous period Re-measurement

New contingent assets recognised Total contingent assets

Contingent liabilities

Balance from previous period New contingent liabilities recognised

Re-measurement Liability reversed Total contingent liabilities

2021 2020 2021 2020

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

59,690 - - -

28,910 - - -

- 59,690 - -

88,600 59,690 - -

59,690 - - 5,000

- 59,690 - -

(11,391) - - -

- - - (5,000)

48,299 59,690 - -

Quantifiable Contingencies

The National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018 helps people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse from participating institutions gain access to counselling and psychological services, a direct personal response from the responsible institution, and a monetary payment. To facilitate the timely provision of the payment and services to survivors, the department administers the scheme. In this capacity, the department makes the monetary payment to the survivor and then recovers the costs from the institution determined to be responsible for the abuse.

As at 30 June 2021, the department has an administered quantifiable contingent liability of $48.299 million in relation to applications made under the National Redress Scheme that have been referred to an independent decision maker for assessment. The amount is based on the number of applications and the payment values.

As at 30 June 2021, the department has an administered quantifiable contingent asset of $88.600 million in relation to the probable recovery from responsible institutions of monetary payments that may be made to survivors under the National Redress Scheme. The value is based on applications that have been referred to an independent decision maker for assessment and the payment values.

Unquantifiable Contingencies

The department has a compliance policy to identify and seek to recover overpayments. These overpayments are not recognised as receivables until they have undergone review to ensure they are validly recoverable. During the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased recipients and changed controls, this risk of overpayment has increased which may eventuate in an increase in receivables, which is unable to be measured.

During the 2021 financial year, the department was involved in a number of cases before the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. These cases relate to appeals regarding income support payments under the social security legislation. It was not possible to estimate the amounts of any eventual payments that may be required in relation to these claims. Accounting Policy

Contingent Assets and Contingent Liabilities

Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes of disclosure. These items may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of an asset or liability or represent in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when the probability of settlement is greater than remote.

40

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7.2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Financial Instruments

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 7.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Financial assets measured at amortised cost Cash and cash equivalents 6,720 5,334

Trade and other receivables 2,220 4,285

Total financial assets measured at amortised cost 8,940 9,619

Total financial assets 8,940 9,619

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors 12,711 17,436

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 12,711 17,436

Total financial liabilities 12,711 17,436

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

In accordance with AASB 9 Financial Instruments, the entity classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

• financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

• financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and

• financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the department's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition.

Financial assets are recognised when the department becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and are derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

• the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

• the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets either does not meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Financial Instruments (continued) Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on expected credit losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

An asset write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

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Part 5 - Financial statements Financial statements 7.3

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Administered - Financial Instruments

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 7.3A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 19,029 518,528

Financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (designated) Student Start-up Loan 653,200 566,500

Student Financial Supplement Scheme 447,400

Other receivables 1,986 8,744

Total financial assets at amortised cost 21,015 527,272

Investments in Commonwealth entities and other interests 1,093,881 1,173,527

Total financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income 1,093,881 1,173,527

436,900

Pension Loan Scheme 118,995 41,788

Total financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (designated) 1,219,595 1,045,188 Total financial assets 2,334,491 2,745,987

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Suppliers 17,458 98,706

Grants and subsidies 135,989 141,795

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 153,447 240,501

Total financial liabilities 153,447 240,501

Note 7.3B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets

Financial assets at amortised cost Impairment (567) 58

Net (losses) / gains financial assets at amortised cost (567) 58

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (designated) Change in fair value 17,323 212,310

Net gains on financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (designated) 17,323 212,310

16,756 212,368 Net gains on financial assets

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8.1

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

8. Other Information Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities 2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 8.1A: Departmental - Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities Assets expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months Cash and cash equivalents 6,720 5,334

Trade and other receivables 89,958 85,636

Prepayments 1,761 993

Total no more than 12 months 98,439 91,963

More than 12 months Building and leasehold improvements 535,521 581,359

Property, plant and equipment 1,199 1,485

Intangibles 331 62

Prepayments 91 49

Total more than 12 months 537,142 582,955

Total assets 635,581 674,918

Liabilities expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months Suppliers 12,807 20,406

Other payables 10,379 7,255

Leases 18,659 22,583

Employee provisions 33,185 30,723

Total no more than 12 months 75,030 80,967

More than 12 months Leases 496,717 526,264

Employee provisions 58,134 60,968

Other provisions 273 273

Total more than 12 months 555,124 587,505

Total liabilities 630,154 668,472

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 8.1 Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities (continued) 2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Note 8.1B: Administered - Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities Assets expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 19,029 518,528

Receivables 3,991,330 3,698,555

Total no more than 12 months 4,010,359 4,217,083

More than 12 months Receivables 1,171,592 1,007,791

Investments 1,093,881 1,173,527

Total more than 12 months 2,265,473 2,181,318

Total assets 6,275,832 6,398,401

Liabilities expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months Suppliers 17,458 98,706

Subsidies 74,070 88,621

Personal benefits 2,374,261 3,886,824

Grants 61,919 53,174

Other payables 4,437 6,000

Personal benefits and other provisions 4,050,231 4,334,481

Total no more than 12 months 6,582,376 8,467,806

More than 12 months Personal benefits and other provisions 307,507 398,301

Total more than 12 months 307,507 398,301

Total liabilities 6,889,883 8,866,107

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8 .2

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Restructuring

Note 8.2A: Departmental Restructuring

2021 2020

Total1

$'000 $'000

FUNCTIONS ASSUMED Assets recognised Appropriation receivable - 1,313

Total assets recognised - 1,313

Liabilities recognised Suppliers - (1,753)

Employee provisions - (1,448)

Total liabilities recognised - (3,201)

Net assets / (liabilities) recognised - (1,888)

FUNCTIONS RELINQUISHED Assets relinquished Appropriation receivable - (11,871)

Trade and other receivables - (5,519)

Land and buildings - (7,347)

Property, plant and equipment - (19,341)

Intangibles - (110,512)

Prepayments - (11,343)

Total assets relinquished - (165,933)

Liabilities relinquished Suppliers - 468

Employee provisions - 11,571

Lease liabilities - 7,421

Revenue received in advance - 3,722

Total liabilities relinquished - 23,182

Net (assets) / liabilities relinquished - (142,751)

During the 2021 financial year, the department assumed the administrative and policy responsibility of the Information Linkages and Capacity (ILC) Building program from the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA). In addition to the balances reported in the administered restructure (Note 8.2B), the department and the NDIA agreed to a $4.621 million funding transfer for ILC administrative costs, which was appropriated to the department in Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2020-21, refer Note 5.1A.

1. The 2020 comparative is a combination of the following functions:

• The transfer of the Aged Care Gateway Information Technology systems application and development services to the Department of Health as a result of the 21 November 2019 agreement from the Minister for Finance (2020: total assets relinquished $35.278 million, total liabilities relinquished nil);

• The Settlement Services function relinquished by the department to the Department of Home Affairs as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order issued on 29 May 2019 (2020: total assets relinquished $3.578 million, total liabilities relinquished $3.672 million);

• The transfer of corporate IT services and their associated assets to Services Australia as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order issued on 5 December 2019 (2020: total assets relinquished $127.077 million, total liabilities relinquished $19.510 million); and

• The National Redress Scheme function assumed by the department from Services Australia as a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order issued on 5 December 2019 (2020: total assets recognised $1.313 million, total liabilities recognised $3.201 million).

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 8.2 Restructuring (continued)

Note 8.2B: Administered Restructuring

2021 2020

Information Linkages and Capacity Building Program National Disability Insurance Agency1

Total2

$'000 $'000

FUNCTIONS ASSUMED Assets recognised Trade and Other Receivables 727 -

Other investments - 78,989

Total assets recognised 727 78,989

Net assets assumed3 727 78,989

FUNCTIONS RELINQUISHED Assets relinquished Receivables - (1)

Total assets relinquished - (1)

Liabilities relinquished

Suppliers payables - 2,079

Grants payables - 74

Other payables - 2,963

Total liabilities relinquished - 5,116

Net liabilities relinquished - 5,115

1. During the 2021 financial year, the department assumed the administrative and policy responsibility of the Information Linkages and Capacity Building program from the National Disability Insurance Agency. Expenses recognised by the department in the 2021 financial year were $83.282 million while expenses recognised by the losing entity were $27.127 million. Income recognised by the department in the 2021 financial year were $105.852 million while income recognised by the losing entity were $26.983 million. 2. The 2020 comparative is a combination of the Settlement Services function that was relinquished to the

Department of Home Affairs (2020: total assets relinquished $0.001 million, total liabilities relinquished $5.116 million) and the department assumed the net asset value of Hearing Australia from Services Australia (2020: total assets recognised $78.989 million, total liabilities recognised nil). 3. In respect of functions assumed, the net book values of assets and liabilities were transferred to the department for no consideration.

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8.3

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Breach of Section 83 of the Constitution

Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund

Section 83 of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (“the Constitution”) provides that no amount may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund except under an appropriation by law.

In the 2021 financial year, the department identified payments that did not meet the statutory conditions for payment under Section 83, for payments made under the Student Assistance Act 1973, 10 instances of adjustments from administered to departmental appropriation within Appropriation Act (No.1) 2020-21 to the value of $0.006 million, and one payment in respect of long service leave paid without legislative authority under the Long Service Leave (Commonwealth Employees) Act 1976. The value of the payment was $0.016 million.

The identified breaches under the Student Assistance Act 1973 relate to payments of benefits under the ABSTUDY scheme and Assistance for Isolated Children scheme to persons who have not provided their tax file numbers. Payments were made to applicants who had not provided their tax file number as required by section 44A of the Student Assistance Act 1973. The value of these payments was $189.000 million for the 2021 financial year. No debts have been raised.

Amendments to the Student Assistance Act 1973 to address the Section 83 breaches were introduced before Parliament in February 2021, passed both Houses of Parliament on 13 May 2021, and received Royal Assent on 27 May 2021. The Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Student Assistance and Other Measures) Act 2021 amended the Student Assistance Act 1973 to make it more consistent with the social security law in relation to tax file number collection. The amendments to the tax file number provisions (that is, new sections 45 to 47A of the Student Assistance Act 1973) address the Section 83 breaches.

The department has identified some payments under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Jobs and Market Fund that may have occurred without full legislative authority under the Financial Framework (Supplementary Powers) Regulations 1997. The payments relate to the Communications campaign A Life Changing Life, which in addition to providing assistance to grow the workforce that supports the National Disability Insurance Scheme, also included assistance relating to Aged Care and Veterans’ Care. The department is reviewing the matter and will take active steps to address any issues as required.

As disclosed in Note 5.1B Special Appropriations, the department administers a significant volume of special appropriation payments, with the majority of these processed by Services Australia on its behalf. While payments are subject to rigorous review and compliance checking on an ongoing basis, a breach of Section 83 of the Constitution could occur. A debt is raised to recover overpayments to recipients, however not all overpayments will constitute a breach. For the purposes of comprehensive disclosure, all new debts raised for payments under legislation, where it has been assessed that there could be a breach, are disclosed as potential breaches. In the 2021 financial year, the department raised debts to recover overpayments and within this, there may be amounts that relate to potential breaches, as follows: A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999, $1,142.279 million; Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, $648.731 million; Student Assistance Act 1973, $2.480 million; and Paid Parental Leave Act 2010, $0.041 million.

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8.4

Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Explanations of Major Variances to Budget

The following major variance explanations between the Original Budget as presented in the 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements and the 2021 financial statements are presented in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards. The 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements contain the original financial statements’ budget estimates presented to Parliament in respect of the 2021 financial year. The information presented below should be read in the context of the following:

• Variances attributable to factors which would not reasonably have been identifiable at the time of the Budget preparation, such as impairment of assets or impacts of Australian Government bond rate changes have not been included in the explanations;

• Major variances are those deemed relevant to an analysis of the department's performance and are not focused merely on numerical differences between the Budget and actual amounts; • Variances relating to cash flows are a result of the factors explained for net cost of services, assets or liabilities variations. Unless otherwise individually significant, no additional commentary has been included;

and

• The Budget is not audited.

Note 8.4A: Departmental Major Budget Variances for 2021

Explanations of major variances

Total net cost of services was $4.543 million lower than the Budget as a result of: - changes in the department's office accommodation portfolio that have resulted in decreased depreciation on associated right-of-use-assets; and - changes in delivery relating to IT shared services and the transfer of the

National Redress Scheme in to the department has resulted in changes in profile from budget across most categories of expenses.

An increase in supplier expenses and resources received free of charge due to the recognition of the volunteer services provided by Services Australia relating to corporate IT shared services.

Total assets were broadly consistent with the Budget, noting: - lower than expected capital spending as a result of a number of capital projects delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; and - changes in building and leasehold improvements assets due to the adjustments

in lease extension options not known at the time of budget preparation.

Total liabilities were $12.418 million lower than the Budget mainly as a result of a decrease in lease liabilities due to the changes in lease options and variability that surrounds the estimates for the timing of payments to suppliers. Offset by an increase in separations and redundancies payables not known at the time of budget preparation.

A change in the useful life in the leasehold improvement asset class resulted in an increase in the asset revaluation reserve of $5.341 million.

Affected line items

Depreciation and amortisation

Employee benefits Suppliers

Resources received free of charge and Suppliers

Trade and other receivables Non-financial assets

Building and leasehold improvements

Leases Suppliers Other Payables

Equity

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Department of Social Services Notes to and forming part of the financial statements .4 Explanation of Major Variances to Budget (continued) 8

Note 8.4B: Administered Major Budget Variances for 2021

Explanations of major variances

Total administered expenses were $3.873 billion lower than the original budget estimate (Budget) and this variance is mainly due to: - Personal benefit expenses were $5.274 billion less than the Budget, in particular:

o lower than expected demand for unemployment benefits due to the stronger than expected performance seen in the labour market in Australia; and o lower than estimated recipient numbers and lower average payment

rates in Income Support for Seniors due to a combination of higher income and asset values following the recovery of financial markets, and the increasing number of people over pension age remaining in the workface or fully funding their retirement. - National Disability Insurance Scheme expenses were $1.404 billion higher

than the Budget as a result of higher than projected participant numbers and higher average costs per participant, than forecast in the 2021 Budget.

Administered income was $0.039 billion lower than the Budget as a result of lower than expected National Redress Scheme revenue. Offset by changes in fair value gains on loans, reflecting the latest assessment from the Australian Government Actuary.

Administered assets were $1.291 billion higher than the Budget primarily due to an increase in personal benefit receivables, which includes the resumption of debt recovery activities from March 2021. Offset by the cessation of the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account on 30 June 2021 and the return of unspent funds to the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Administered liabilities were $0.673 billion lower than the Budget mainly as a result of: - lower than estimated payable in the JobSeeker payment, as end of year cash outlays remain subdued amid a faster than expected economic recovery; and - lower than estimated provision in Family Tax Benefit, as the latest actuarial

assessment has incorporated the resilient economic conditions and revised down the end of year liability.

Affected line items

Personal benefit expenses

Payments to the National Disability Insurance Scheme

Revenue

Receivables

Cash and cash equivalents

Personal benefit payables

Personal benefits and other provisions

6

Part 6

Appendices

Appendix A Resource statements 254

Appendix B Advertising and market*research 263

Appendix C Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance 268

Appendix D Compliance with the Carer Recognition Act 2010 271

Appendix E Disability reporting 273

Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities 274

Appendix G Glossary of abbreviations and*acronyms 294

Appendix H Compliance index 297

Alphabetical index 305

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

Appendix A

Resource statements Table A-1: Agency resource statement 2020-21

Actual available appropriation for 2020-21

$’000

Payments made 2020-21 $’000

Balance remaining 2020-21 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Ordinary Annual Services1

Departmental appropriation2 508,229 414,691 93,538

Total 508,229 414,691 93,538

Administered expenses

Outcome 1 60,665 28,132

Outcome 2 1,051,533 701,791

Outcome 3 14,978,293 14,428,681

Outcome 4 318,841 113,315

Payments to corporate Commonwealth entities3

1,213,828 1,213,828

Total 17,623,160 16,485,747

Total ordinary annual services A 18,131,389 16,900,438

Other services4

Departmental non-operating

Total 1,574 - 1,574

Equity injections5 1,574 - 1,574

Total other services B 1,574 - 1,574

Total available annual 18,132,963 16,900,438 1,232,525

appropriations and payments

Special appropriations

Social Security (Administration) Act 1999 125,911,476

A New Tax System (Family Assistance) (Administration) Act 1999

19,042,017

Paid Parental Leave Act 2010 2,375,893

Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account Act 2012

-

Student Assistance Act 1973 - Section 55A

496,294

255 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Actual available appropriation for 2020-21

$’000

Payments made 2020-21 $’000

Balance remaining 2020-21 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Business Services Wage Assessment Tool Payment Scheme Act 2015 - Section 99

-

National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Act 2018

290,519

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 - Section 77

81

Total special appropriations C 148,116,280

Special Accounts

Opening balance 507,155

Appropriation receipts6 576,464

Non-appropriation receipts to Special Accounts7

Payments made8

Total special accounts D 1,111,107 1,104,733 6,374

27,488

1,104,733

Total resourcing and payments A+B+C+D 19,244,070 166,121,451

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts and/ or corporate Commonwealth entities through annual appropriations

13,976,683 13,976,683

Total net resourcing and payments for the department9

5,267,387 152,144,768

2020-21 2019-20

Staffing resources (number) 1,989 2,099

1 Supply Act (No. 1) 2020-21, Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2020-21 and Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2020-21. This may also include prior year departmental appropriation, section 74 retained revenue receipts, section 75 transfers and repealed appropriations.

2 This item includes an amount of $3.538 million in 2020-21 for the departmental capital budget. For accounting purposes, this amount has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.

3 ‘Corporate entities’ are corporate Commonwealth entities and Commonwealth companies as defined under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

4 Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2020-21.

5 The equity injections may also include prior year appropriation and repealed appropriations.

6 Appropriation receipts from DSS annual and special appropriations for 2020-21 are included above.

7 This amount includes $12.447 million of transfers between special accounts.

8 Both the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Special Account and the National Disability Research Special Account ceased in 2021. Included in this balance is $594.186 million for return of unspent funds to the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

9 The actual available appropriation for 2020-21 does not include total special appropriations.

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

256 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Table A-2: Expenses and resources for Outcome 1: Social Security Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Program 1.1: Family Tax Benefit

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 18,884,914 18,364,952 519,962

Total for Program 1.1 18,884,914 18,364,952 519,962

Program 1.2: Child Payments

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 101,331 100,454 877

Total for Program 1.2 101,331 100,454 877

Program 1.3: Income Support for Vulnerable People

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 210,828 204,286 6,542

Total for Program 1.3 210,828 204,286 6,542

Program 1.4: Income Support for People in Special Circumstances

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 1,363 1,083 280

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations - - -

Total for Program 1.4 1,363 1,083 280

Program 1.5: Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 23,152 23,236 (84)

Total for Program 1.5 23,152 23,236 (84)

Program 1.6: Income Support for Seniors

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 52,900,635 52,695,743 204,892

Total for Program 1.6 52,900,635 52,695,743 204,892

257 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

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Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Program 1.7: Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 589,969 587,532 2,437

Total for Program 1.7 589,969 587,532 2,437

Program 1.8: Income Support for People with Disability

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 18,372,580 18,397,888 (25,308)

Total for Program 1.8 18,372,580 18,397,888 (25,308)

Program 1.9: Income Support for Carers

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 2,800 1,425 1,375

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations 9,884,775 9,826,457 58,318

Total for Program 1.9 9,887,575 9,827,882 59,693

Program 1.10: Working Age Payments

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 26,275 25,591 684

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations 38,774,066 37,703,382 1,070,684

Total for Program 1.10 38,800,341 37,728,973 1,071,368

Program 1.11: Student Payments

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 4,621,184 4,691,932 (70,748)

Total for Program 1.11 4,621,184 4,691,932 (70,748)

Program 1.12: Program Support for Outcome 1

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 124,681 113,538 11,143

Expenses not requiring appropriation 2,294 10,074 (7,780)

in the Budget year

Total for Program 1.12 126,975 123,612 3,363

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Outcome 1 Totals by appropriation type

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 30,438 28,099 2,339

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations 144,363,434 142,595,862 1,767,572

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 124,681 113,538 11,143

Expenses not requiring appropriation 2,294 10,074 (7,780)

in the Budget year

Total expenses for Outcome 1 144,520,847 142,747,573 1,773,274

a Represents estimated actual expenses for the 2020-21 financial year reported in the 2021-22 Portfolio Budget*Statements.

b Departmental appropriation includes section 74 retained revenue receipts.

259 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table A-3: Expenses and resources for Outcome 2: Families and Communities

6

Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Program 2.1: Families and Communities

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 784,120 697,608 86,512

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations 324,750 271,211 53,539

Special Accounts 14,692 12,408 2,284

Total for Program 2.1 1,123,562 981,227 142,335

Program 2.2: Paid Parental Leave

Administered expenses

Special Appropriations 2,260,710 2,391,288 (130,578)

Total for Program 2.2 2,260,710 2,391,288 (130,578)

Program 2.3: Social and Community Services

Administered expenses

Special Accounts 547,108 488,608 58,500

Total for Program 2.3 547,108 488,608 58,500

Program 2.4: Program Support for Outcome 2

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 204,060 187,775 16,285

Expenses not requiring appropriation 3,795 16,661 (12,866)

in*the Budget year

Total for Program 2.4 207,855 204,436 3,419

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Outcome 2 Totals by appropriation type

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 784,120 697,608 86,512

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations 2,585,460 2,662,499 (77,039)

Special Accounts 561,800 501,016 60,784

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 204,060 187,775 16,285

Expenses not requiring appropriation 3,795 16,661 (12,866)

in*the Budget year

Total expenses for Outcome 2 4,139,235 4,065,559 73,676

a Represents estimated actual expenses for the 2020-21 financial year reported in the 2021-22 Portfolio Budget*Statements.

b Departmental appropriation includes section 74 retained revenue receipts.

261 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table A-4: Expenses and resources for Outcome 3: Disability and Carers

6

Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Program 3.1: Disability Mental Health and Carers

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 1,668,355 1,539,225 129,130

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Special Appropriations - - -

Special Accounts 983 825 158

Total for Program 3.1 1,669,338 1,540,050 129,288

Program 3.2: National Disability Insurance Scheme

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 12,871,639 12,805,589 66,050

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Payments to corporate entities 1,208,878 1,208,878 -

Total for Program 3.2 14,080,517 14,014,467 66,050

Program 3.3: Program Support for Outcome 3

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 124,140 113,538 10,602

Expenses not requiring appropriation in 2,294 10,074 (7,780)

the Budget year

Total for Program 3.3 126,434 123,612 2,822

Outcome 3 Totals by appropriation type

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 14,539,994 14,344,814 195,180

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Payments to corporate entities 1,208,878 1,208,878 -

Special Appropriations - - -

Special Accounts 983 825 158

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 124,140 113,538 10,602

Expenses not requiring appropriation 2,294 10,074 (7,780)

in*the Budget year

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements

Total expenses for Outcome 3 15,876,289 15,678,129 198,160

a Represents estimated actual expenses for the 2020-21 financial year reported in the 2021-22 Portfolio Budget*Statements.

b Departmental appropriation includes section 74 retained revenue receipts.

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6

Table A-5: Expenses and resources for Outcome 4: Housing Part 6 - Appendices Appendix A Resource statements Estimated Actual

actuala Expenses Variation

2020-21 2020-21 2020-21

$’000 $’000 $’000

(a) (b) (a)-(b)

Program 4.1: Housing and Homelessness

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 38,402 20,788 17,614

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Total for Program 4.1 38,402 20,788 17,614

Program 4.2: Affordable Housing

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 113,366 81,161 32,205

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Total for Program 4.2 113,366 81,161 32,205

Program 4.3: Program Support for Outcome 4

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 24,082 21,834 2,248

Expenses not requiring appropriation in 441 1,937 (1,496)

the Budget year

Total for Program 4.3 24,523 23,771 752

Outcome 4 Totals by appropriation type

Administered expenses

Ordinary Annual Services 151,768 101,949 49,819

(Appropriation Act No. 1 and No. 3)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 24,082 21,834 2,248

Expenses not requiring appropriation in 441 1,937 (1,496)

the Budget year

Total expenses for Outcome 4 176,291 125,720 50,571

a Represents estimated actual expenses for the 2020-21 financial year reported in the 2021-22 Portfolio Budget*Statements.

b Departmental appropriation includes section 74 retained revenue receipts.

263 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix B

6

Advertising and market research In 2020-21, the Department of Social Services conducted the following advertising campaigns:

■ Stop it at the Start - the campaign aims to help break the cycle of violence by encouraging adults to reflect on their attitudes and talk with young people about respectful relationships and gender equality. It was jointly funded by the Australian and state and territory governments.

■ Help is Here - the campaign provides information on support services available to anyone affected by domestic and family violence, to help them access the support they need, when they need it.

Further information on the advertising campaigns is available at https://www.dss.gov. au/about-the-department/policies-legislation/certifications and and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website, finance.gov.au.

Tables B-1 to B-4 list payments of $14,300 or more (GST inclusive) to advertising agencies and market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising organisations, as required under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix B Advertising and market*research

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Table B-1 Payments to advertising agencies in 2020-21 Part 6 - Appendices Appendix B Advertising and market*research Advertising agency name Service provided

Amount paid $ GST incl.

33 Creative Pty Ltd Indigenous and creative

communication services - Help is Here campaign

62,418

33 Creative Pty Ltd Indigenous and creative 232,703

communication services - Stop it at the Start campaign, phase 3

33 Creative Pty Ltd Indigenous and creative 32,630

communication services - Care and Support Workforce*campaign

Carbon Media Pty Ltd Videos and resources - 317,306

Disability*Royal Commission

Culture HQ Pty Ltd Culturally and Linguistically 17,867

Diverse communication services - Care and Support Workforce*campaign

Gilimbaa Pty Ltd Indigenous communication 238,300

services - Disability Gateway campaign

Gilimbaa Pty Ltd Translation services - 69,115

Cashless*Debit*Card

Gilimbaa Pty Ltd Indigenous communication 193,512

services - National Redress Scheme

M & C Saatchi Agency Pty Ltd Creative development - Care and 1,029,468

Support Workforce campaign

Marmalade Melbourne Pty Ltd Creative development - 304,467

Disability*Gateway campaign

Marmalade Melbourne Pty Ltd Video production - International 136,204

Day of People with Disability

Marmalade Melbourne Pty Ltd Creative redevelopment - 167,538

Job*Access

Marmalade Melbourne Pty Ltd Graphic design services - 169,835

Disability Gateway campaign

Multicall Pty Ltd Culturally and Linguistically 27,000

Diverse communication services - National Redress Scheme

Nation Creative Pty Ltd Creative development - 165,323

National*Disability Strategy

Nation Creative Pty Ltd Creative development - National 55,000

Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children

265 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

6

Advertising agency name Service provided

Amount paid $ GST incl.

Ogilvy Australia Pty Ltd Culturally and Linguistically

Diverse creative and communication services - Stop it at the Start campaign, phase 3

307,423

Ogilvy Australia Pty Ltd Culturally and Linguistically 241,808

Diverse communication services - Disability Gateway campaign

Publicis Media Australia Pty Ltd Creative development - 725,934

Disability*Gateway campaign

Publicis Media Australia Pty Ltd AUSLAN video production - 20,660

Disability Gateway campaign

The Trustee for the BMF Unit Trust Creative development - Stop it at 2,012,373 the Start campaign, phase 3

Total 6,526,884

Table B-2 Payments to market research and polling organisations in 2020-21

Market research or polling organisation name Service provided

Amount paid $ GST incl.

Australian Survey Research Pty Ltd Social policy research - Data Exchange 100,980

Cultural Perspectives Pty Ltd Social policy research - 102,754

National Redress Scheme

Hall & Partners Pty Ltd Market research - 255,182

Help is Here campaign

Hall & Partners Pty Ltd Market research - Stop it at the 209,097

Start campaign, phase 3

Hall & Partners Pty Ltd Market research - 349,800

Gambling messaging

Hall & Partners Pty Ltd Market research - Disability 177,745

Gateway campaign

Ipsos Public Affairs Pty Ltd Market research - 207,747

Carer Gateway campaign

Kantar Public Australia Pty Ltd Market research - Stop it at the 226,814

Start campaign, phase 3

Kantar Public Australia Pty Ltd Market research - Disability 150,700

Gateway campaign

Roy Morgan Research Ltd Data services - Longitudinal 1,099,155

Study of Indigenous Children

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix B Advertising and market*research

The Social Research Centre Evaluation services - Strong 277,937

and Resilient Communities

The Trustee for Essence Market research - Disability 152,590

Communications Trust Gateway campaign

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix B Advertising and market*research

Market research or polling organisation name Service provided

Amount paid $ GST incl.

Urbis Pty Ltd Social policy research -

Outcome Measurement Initiative 35,840

Urbis Pty Ltd Social policy research - 63,500

Outcome Measurement Initiative

Urbis Pty Ltd Evaluation services - Integrated 103,236

Carer Support Service

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd Evaluation services - 94,580 Technology Trials

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd Evaluation services - DV-alert 237,521

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd Market research - Care and 554,502 Support Workforce campaign

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd Survey - National Redress 31,642 Scheme

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd Survey - National Redress 91,542 Scheme

Whereto Research Based Consulting Pty Ltd

Total

Survey - National Redress Scheme

23,650

4,546,514

Table B-3 Payments to direct mail organisations in 2020-21

Direct mail organisation name Service provided Amount paid $ GST incl.

National Mailing & Marketing Pty Ltd Distribution, warehousing and related services 381,655

Total 381,655

267 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table B-4 Payments to media advertising organisations in 2020-21

6

Media advertising organisation name Service provided

Amount paid $ GST incl.

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - Help is Here campaign 15,075,530

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - Stop it at the Start campaign, 6,450,305 phase 3

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - National Redress Scheme 47,169

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - National Disability Strategy 40,194

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - International Day of People 44,266 with*Disability

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - Cashless Debit Card 70,176

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - National Disability 22,000

Employment*Strategy

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd Advertising - Recruitment 34,106

Total 21,783,746

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix B Advertising and market*research

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Appendix C

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix C Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 requires Commonwealth agencies to report against two core criteria:

■ how the agency accords with and contributes to the principles of ecologically sustainable development

■ the environmental performance of the agency, including the impact of its activities on the natural environment, how these are mitigated and how they will be further mitigated.

How the department accords with and contributes to environmentally sustainable development We do not administer any legislation that has a direct impact on ecologically sustainable development. The principles relating to scientific certainty and biological diversity are generally of limited application to our activities.

Our operations fall into five categories of environmental impact:

■ electricity/gas consumption

■ water use

■ waste generation

■ paper use

■ transportation.

We continue to improve our collection and monitoring of data on energy use, water consumption, and waste management in both our Canberra buildings where the majority of our staff are located. We also assess the effectiveness of current processes through our procurement policy and the Green Lease Schedule to property leases.

Measures taken to minimise the effect of activities on the environment The following tables provide quantitative information on measures taken to minimise the effect of activities on the environment and environmental performance data on our energy and waste production.

269 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table C-1: Energy, waste and water efficiency measures and monitoring mechanisms

6

Measures taken Mechanisms for monitoring and review

Energy

The following departmental offices Conduct annual National Australian Built Environment have Green Lease Schedules in Rating System (NABERS) assessments to ensure energy place: consumption is minimised.

• Centennial Plaza (levels 8 and 9), Sydney • Jacana House (levels 2 and 3), Darwin • Enid Lyons Building, Greenway • Aviation House (levels 5 - 8),

Phillip.

Building Management Committee Continue to conduct Building Management meetings are conducted as Committee*meetings. required under the Green Lease Schedule.

Continue to reduce electricity Careful consideration of fit-out design. through use of efficient lighting solutions, including sensor lighting and fit-out designs that take advantage of natural light.

We participated in Earth Hour 2021. Continue to participate in Earth Hour each year.

Waste

Some initiatives promoted throughout our leased office portfolio include: • digital signage promoting correct Regularly monitor the amount of waste removed from

waste management behaviours Canberra based sites. displayed on monitors through Continue to examine new ways of reducing waste to landfill. tenancies Annual Check-up plus survey to the National Archives

• bin signage updated throughout of*Australia.

Canberra sites to support improved waste management • reducing paper file holdings and physical storage requirements

through the department’s Digitisation program.

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix C Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

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Table C-2: Environmental performance indicators Part 6 - Appendices Appendix C Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance Performance measure Indicator 2020-21 2019-20

Energy efficiency

Total consumption of energy Electricity consumption (kWh) 2,307,762 2,510,556 in*buildings

Total consumption of energy Diesel (L) 1,278 9,855

in*vehicles

E10 (Biofuel) (L) 187 2,848

Unleaded petrol (L) 2,296 9,369

Total vehicle distance travelled Motor vehicle distance travelled (km) 32,018 270,408

Total air travel distance Air travel distance (km) 2,506,912 6,159,048

Waste

Office paper waste production Wastepaper to recycling facilities 133 149

(National) (tonnes)

Commingled recycling Commingled waste to recycling 23 21

(including cardboard but facilities (tonnes) excluding office paper) (Canberra Sites - sole tenant)

Landfill (Canberra Sites - Landfill waste to ACT landfill (tonnes) 52 65

sole tenant)

Note: reduction due to impacts of COVID-19 restrictions

271 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix D

6

Compliance with the Carer Recognition Act The Australian Government recognises the exceptional contribution made by unpaid carers through the Carer Recognition Act 2010. The Carer Recognition Act 2010 includes the Statement for Australia’s Carers that stipulates carers should have the same rights, choices, and opportunities as other Australians.

Subsection 7(1) - Each public service agency is to take all practicable measures to ensure that its employees and agents have an awareness and understanding of the Statement for Australia’s Carers.

We promote staff awareness and understanding of the Carer Recognition Act 2010 through our intranet and other departmental resources.

We inform the general public about the Carer Recognition Act 2010 through our website and Carer Gateway carergateway.gov.au we also fund Carers Australia to coordinate and manage National Carers Week activities each October. These activities raise the awareness of carers and their role, and inform carers about available services and assistance.

Subsection 7(2) - Each public service agency’s internal human resources policies, so far as they may significantly affect an employee’s caring role, are to be developed having due regard to the Statement for Australia’s Carers.

Our human resources policies comply with the principles contained in the Statement for Australia’s Carers. Our Enterprise Agreement includes carer’s leave entitlements.

Staff have access to health and diversity rooms to help manage unforeseen caring responsibilities. Staff can access free counselling arranged through the Employee Assistance Program.

Our intranet also provides employees and managers with information about carers’ entitlements and internal and external resources.

Subsection 8(1) - Each public service care agency is to take all practicable measures to ensure that it, and its employees and agents, take action to reflect the principles of the Statement for Australia’s Carers in developing, implementing, providing or evaluating care supports.

Our standard funding agreement terms and conditions oblige funding recipients to comply with relevant laws, Australian Government policies, codes of ethics, regulations, or industry standards relevant to the activity.

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix D Compliance with the Carer Recognition Act

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix D Compliance with the Carer Recognition Act

Subsection 8(2) - Each public service care agency is to consult carers, or bodies that represent carers, when developing or evaluating care supports.

Carers Australia is the national peak body representing the voice of Australia’s unpaid carers to the Australian Government on matters relating to carer policy and services. We regularly consult Carers Australia for advice on issues impacting unpaid carers and improving carers’ access to and awareness of the Carer Gateway.

In April and May 2021, we commissioned Carers Australia to undertake a national online survey asking carers about their health and wellbeing, and the types of supports they have accessed in their caring role. The findings of this survey will be used by the department when developing or evaluating carer supports including Carer Gateway.

In June 2021, Carers Australia led the first Carer Policy Forum on behalf of the department, bringing together leaders from the community, advocacy and service organisations across different sectors with an interest in carer policy. The Forum serves in an advisory and consultative capacity to the department on carer policy and services.

From April 2020, a national network of Carer Gateway service providers commenced providing access to individually tailored services for all carers. Supports include carer needs assessment, advice and support planning, counselling, peer support, financial support packages assisting carers to access employment, education, respite and transport, and online self-guided coaching.

We regularly consult with Carer Gateway service providers directly and through our state and territory Delivery Network to monitor and discuss matters relating to unpaid carers in their service regions and the delivery of Carer Gateway supports and*services.

We will undertake further consultation with carers and key stakeholders as the implementation and evaluation of Carer Gateway progresses.

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6

Appendix E

Disability reporting The National Disability Strategy is Australia’s overarching framework for disability reform. It acts to ensure the principles underpinning the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are incorporated into Australia’s policies and programs that affect people with disability, their families and carers.

All levels of government continue to be held accountable for the implementation of the strategy through biennial progress reporting. Progress reports can be found at https://www.dss.gov.au/disability-and-carers-supporting-people-with-disability/ resources. Disability reporting is included in the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare publication People with disability in Australia, the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service reports and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at aihw.gov.au and apsc.gov.au

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix E Disability reporting

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate

Commonwealth entities Table F-1 PGPA Rule Section 17AD(da) - Executive Remuneration Information about remuneration for key management personnel

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary

1 $

Bonuses $

Other

benefits and allowances

2 $

Superannuation contributions

3 $

Long service leave

4 $

Other

long-term benefits $ $ $

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 645,564

- 52,771

102,458

17,156

-

- 817,949

Elizabeth

Deputy

381,281 - 28,562 70,299 9,312 - - 489,454

Hefren-Webb

Secretary

Catherine Rule

Deputy

331,737 - 22,099 65,103 9,980 - - 428,919

Secretary

Matthew Flavel

Deputy

317,145 - 24,451 72,138 7,863 - - 421,597

Secretary

5

Adrian Hudson

Deputy

144,012 - 10,969 20,673 3,159 - - 178,813

Secretary

5

Nathan Williamson

Deputy

135,671 - 10,408 23,167 3,347 - - 172,593

Secretary

5

275 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary

1 $

Bonuses $

Other

benefits and allowances

2 $

Superannuation contributions

3 $

Long service leave

4 $

Other

long-term benefits $ $ $

Emily Canning

Acting Deputy Secretary

5

153,281 - 9,818 20,771 3,157 - - 187,027

Shane Bennett

Acting

135,294 - 8,457 20,734 2,719 - - 167,204

Deputy Secretary

5

Total

2,243,985 - 167,535 395,343 56,693 - - 2,863,556

1. Base salary is calculated as total cash salary paid during the financial year, less amounts paid for annual leave and long service leave, with an adjustment for accruals at the beginning and end of the year.

2. Other benefits and allowances comprise annual leave expenses. Annual leave expense is calculated on an accrual basis as annual leave paid and the movement in the annual leave provision.

3. Superannuation is calculated as actual superannuation contributions made during the year, with an adjustment for accruals at the beginning and end of the year.

4. Long service leave is calculated on an accrual basis as long service leave paid and the movement in the long service leave provision.

5. The officer occupied a deputy secretary position for part of the year. The remuneration is the amount calculated for that period.

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

6

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

Table F-2 17AD (da) - Executive Remuneration - Information about remuneration for senior executives

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number of senior executives

Average base salary $

Average bonuses $

Average other benefits and allowances $

Average

superannuation contributions $

Average long service leave

$

Average other

long-term benefits $

Average termination benefits $

Average total remuneration $

$0- $220,000 37 84,035 - 8,919 18,285 1,486 - 12,985 125,710

$220,001- $245,000 11 184,811 - 14,679 33,977 3,091 - - 236,558

$245,001- $270,000 15 196,409 - 16,313 39,840 4,565 - - 257,127

$270,001- $295,000 8 212,822 - 16,496 40,230 9,888 - - 279,436

$295,001- $320,000 2 234,468 - 18,792 49,191 6,376 - - 308,827

$320,001- $345,000 6 253,708 - 20,198 49,180 6,809 - - 329,895

$345,001- $370,000 2 277,275 - 19,560 53,464 7,082 - - 357,381

$370,001- $395,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$395,001- $420,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$420,001- $445,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$445,001- $470,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$470,001- $495,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$495,001- …. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Notes:

• Includes 12 individuals who acted in an SES position continuously for 90 days or more.

• Includes individuals who were promoted to SES positions within the financial year.

• Remuneration has been adjusted for SES on secondment out to exclude the remuneration for the period of secondment.

277 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table F-3 17AD (da) - Executive Remuneration - Information about remuneration for other highly paid staff

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number of other highly paid staff $

Average base salary $

Average bonuses $

Average other

benefits and allowances $

Average

superannuation contributions $

Average long service leave $

Average other

long-term benefits $

Average termination benefits $

Average total remuneration $

$230,001- $245,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$245,001- $270,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$270,001- $295,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$295,001- $320,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$320,001- $345,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$345,001- $370,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$370,001- $395,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$395,001- $420,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$420,001- $445,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$445,001- $470,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$470,001- $495,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$495,001- …. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Table F-4 17AE (1)(aa)(i)-(iii) - Accountable Authority details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period Current Report Period (2020-21)

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Name

Position title/ Position held Date of commencement Date of cessation

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 1/07/2020 19/07/2020

Nathan Williamson Acting Secretary 20/07/2020 22/07/2020

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 23/07/2020 27/09/2020

Nathan Williamson Acting Secretary 28/09/2020 29/09/2020

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 30/09/2020 19/11/2020

Elizabeth Hefren-Webb Acting Secretary 20/11/2020 20/11/2020

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 21/11/2020 26/11/2020

Elizabeth Hefren-Webb Acting Secretary 27/11/2020 27/11/2020

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 28/11/2020 20/12/2020

Elizabeth Hefren-Webb Acting Secretary 21/12/2020 15/01/2021

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 16/01/2021 13/05/2021

Elizabeth Hefren-Webb Acting Secretary 14/05/2021 14/05/2021

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 15/05/2021 26/05/2021

Elizabeth Hefren-Webb Acting Secretary 27/05/2021 28/05/2021

Kathryn Campbell Secretary 29/05/2021 30/06/2021

279 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table F-5 17AG (4)(aa) - Management of Human Resources all Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total

Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

NSW 48 4 52 86 30 116 - - - 168

Qld 21 2 23 60 24 84 - - - 107

SA 18 2 20 50 17 67 - - - 87

Tas 14 0 14 24 15 39 - - - 53

Vic 32 4 36 71 23 94 - - - 130

WA 13 4 17 34 21 55 - - - 72

ACT 484 25 509 957 241 1,198 - - - 1,707

NT 6 0 6 21 2 23 - - - 29

External - - - - - - - - - -

Territories

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

Total 636 41 677 1,303 373 1,676 - - - 2,353

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Table F-6 17AG (4)(aa) - Management of Human Resources all Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

NSW 1 0 1 4 1 5 - - - 6

Qld 0 0 0 6 0 6 - - -

SA 1 0 1 4 1 5 - - -

Tas 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

Vic 0 0 0 3 0 3 - - -

WA 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

ACT 6 4 10 22 8 30 - - -

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

Total 8 4 12 39 10 49 - - -

6

6

0

3

0

40

0

61

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Table F-7 17AG (4)(aa) - Management of Human Resources all Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

NSW 53 3 56 77 27 104 - - - 160

Qld 20 1 21 69 21 90 - - - 111

SA 13 2 15 51 10 61 - - - 76

Tas 12 1 13 22 17 39 - - - 52

Vic 38 6 44 74 27 101 - - - 145

WA 15 4 19 37 18 55 - - - 74

ACT 456 28 484 933 247 1,180 - - - 1,664

NT 5 0 5 28 4 32 - - - 37

External - - - - - - - - - -

Territories

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

Total 612 45 657 1,291 371 1,662 - - - 2,319

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Table F-8 17AG (4)(aa) - Management of Human Resources all Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

NSW 0 0 0 1 0 1 - - - 1

Qld 0 0 0 2 1 3 - - -

SA 4 0 4 4 0 4 - - -

Tas 0 0 0 2 0 2 - - -

Vic 0 0 0 3 0 3 - - -

WA 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

ACT 6 2 8 16 6 22 - - -

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

External - - - - - - - - - -

Territories

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

Total 10 2 12 28 7 35 - - -

3

8

2

3

0

30

0

47

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Table F-9 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iv) Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total

Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 3 0 3 2 0 2 - - - 5

SES 2 10 0 10 7 0 7 - - - 17

SES 1 21 0 21 42 3 45 - - - 66

EL 2 97 1 98 172 18 190 - - - 288

EL 1 172 16 188 357 119 476 - - - 664

APS 6 162 9 171 339 125 464 - - - 635

APS 5 121 11 132 252 84 336 - - - 468

APS 4 18 1 19 74 19 93 - - - 112

APS 3 30 0 30 57 2 59 - - - 89

APS 2 2 1 3 1 1 2 - - - 5

APS 1 0 2 2 0 2 2 - - - 4

Other - - - - - - - - - -

Total 636 41 677 1,303 373 1,676 - - - 2,353

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

Table F-10 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iv) Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 0

SES 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 - - -

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

EL 2 0 2 2 1 1 2 - - -

EL 1 2 2 4 3 1 4 - - -

APS 6 0 0 0 8 1 9 - - -

APS 5 4 0 4 9 3 12 - - -

APS 4 1 0 1 17 3 20 - - -

APS 3 0 0 0 1 1 2 - - -

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

Other - - - - - - - - - -

Total 8 4 12 39 10 49 - - -

1

0

4

8

9

16

21

2

0

0

61

285 Department of Social Services Annual Report 2020-21

Table F-11 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iv) Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 3 0 3 2 0 2 - - - 5

SES 2 11 0 11 5 1 6 - - - 17

SES 1 23 0 23 40 0 40 - - - 63

EL 2 90 1 91 180 20 200 - - - 291

EL 1 172 21 193 344 124 468 - - - 661

APS 6 152 11 163 349 131 480 - - - 643

APS 5 108 9 117 218 62 280 - - - 397

APS 4 27 0 27 88 27 115 - - - 142

APS 3 24 0 24 65 3 68 - - - 92

APS 2 2 1 3 0 1 1 - - - 4

APS 1 0 2 2 0 2 2 - - - 4

Other - - - - - - - - - -

Total 612 45 657 1,291 371 1,662 - - - 2,319

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Table F-12 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iv) Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

EL 2 1 2 3 2 0 2 - - -

EL 1 2 0 2 1 2 3 - - -

APS 6 2 0 2 6 3 9 - - -

APS 5 2 0 2 8 1 9 - - -

APS 4 3 0 3 10 1 11 - - -

APS 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 - - -

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - -

Other - - - - - - - - - -

Total 10 2 12 28 7 35 - - -

0

0

5

5

11

11

14

1

0

0

47

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Table F-13 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iii) Australian Public Service Act Employees by f/t and part-time Status Current Report Period (2020-21)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total Ongoing Full-time Part-time

Total Non-Ongoing

SES 3 5 0 5 0 0 0 5

SES 2 17 0 17 1 0 1 18

SES 1 63 3 66 0 0 0 66

EL 2 269 19 288 1 3 4 292

EL 1 529 135 664 5 3 8 672

APS 6 501 134 635 8 1 9 644

APS 5 374 95 469 13 3 16 485

APS 4 92 20 112 18 3 21 133

APS 3 86 2 88 1 1 2 90

APS 2 3 2 5 0 0 0 5

APS 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 4

Other - - - - - - -

Total 1939 414 2,353 47 14 61 2,414

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Table F-14 17AG (4)(b)(i)-(iii) Australian Public Service Act Employees by f/t and part-time Status Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total Ongoing Full-time Part-time

Total Non-Ongoing

SES 3 5 0 5 0 0 0 5

SES 2 16 1 17 0 0 0 17

SES 1 63 0 63 0 0 0 63

EL 2 270 21 291 3 2 5 296

EL 1 516 145 661 3 2 5 666

APS 6 501 142 643 8 3 11 654

APS 5 326 71 397 10 1 11 408

APS 4 115 27 142 13 1 14 156

APS 3 89 3 92 1 0 1 93

APS 2 2 2 4 0 0 0 4

APS 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 4

Other - - - - - - -

Total 1,903 416 2,319 38 9 47 2,366

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Table F-15 17AG (4)(b)(v) Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Current Report Period (2020-21)

6

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

NSW 168 6 174

Qld 107 6 113

SA 87 6 93

Tas 53 0 53

Vic 130 3 133

WA 72 0 72

ACT 1,707 40 1,747

NT 29 0 29

External Territories - - -

Overseas - - -

Total 2,353 61 2,414

Table F-16 17AG (4)(b)(v) Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total

NSW 160 1 161

Qld 111 3 114

SA 76 8 84

Tas 52 2 54

Vic 145 3 148

WA 74 0 74

ACT 1,664 30 1,694

NT 37 0 37

External Territories - - -

Overseas - - -

Total 2,319 47 2,366

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Table F-17 17AG (4)(b)(vi) Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Report Period (2020-21)

Total

Ongoing 138

Non-Ongoing

Total 138

Table F-18 17AG (4)(b)(vi) Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Previous Report Period (2019-20)

Total

Ongoing 142

Non-Ongoing

Total 143

Table F-19 17AG (4)(c)(i) - Employment Arrangements of SES and Non-SES employees. Australian Public Service Act Employment arrangements Current Report Period (2020-21)

SES Non-SES Total

Department of Social Services Enterprise Agreement 2018 to 2021 - 2,330 2,330

Individual Flexibility Agreements (IFA) - 15 15

Section 24(1) determinations 69 - 69

Total 69 2,345 2,414

Note:

• Excludes the Secretary who is not employed under any of the identified employment arrangements above. Employees acting as SES on 30 June 2021 have been reported as covered by the Department of Social Services Enterprise Agreement 2018 to 2021 (Enterprise Agreement).

• Staff on IFAs are still covered by the Enterprise Agreement

0

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Table F-20 17AG (4)(c)(ii) Australian Public Service Act Employment salary ranges by classification level (Minimum/Maximum) Current Report Period (2020-21)

6

Minimum Salary Maximum Salary

$ $

SES 3 362,600 $468,312*-

SES 2 268,200 305,000

SES 1 201,100 241,900

EL 2 125,028 165,780

EL 1 106,077 140,410

APS 6 85,137 102,442

APS 5 77,728 89,755

APS 4 70,775 76,074

APS 3 62,470 67,781

APS 2 54,055 60,151

APS 1 46,251 51,757

Other - -

Minimum/Maximum range 46,251 468,312

Note:

• The SES Band 3 maximum salary = 65 per cent of the Secretaries classification structure which is Level 2, pay point 3)

Table F-21 17AG (4)(d)(iii)-(iv) Australian Public Service Act Employment Performance Pay by classification level Current Report Period (2020-21)

Number of employees receiving performance

pay

Aggregated (sum total) of all payments made

Average of all payments made

Minimum Payment Made to employees

Maximum Payment made to employees

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 0 0 0 0 0

APS 6 0 0 0 0 0

APS 5 0 0 0 0 0

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

Other 0 0 0 0 0

Total 0 0 0 0 0

Note:

• The Department does not pay any performance pay.

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

Table F-22 PGPA Rule Section 17AG(7)(a)(i)-(iv) - Reportable Consultancy Contracts Expenditure on Reportable Consultancy Contracts Current Report Period (2020-21)

Number Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 67 13,465,738

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 69 21,606,674

Total 136 35,072,412

Table F-23 PGPA Rule Section 17AG(7A)(a)(i)-(iv) - Reportable Non Consultancy Contracts Expenditure on Reportable Non-Consultancy Contracts Current Report Period (2020-21)

Number Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 471 58,777,131

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 584 149,217,284

Total 1,055 207,994,415

PGPA Rule Section 17AGA(2)-(3) - Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

Table F-24 Organisations Receiving a Share of Reportable Consultancy Contract Expenditure Current Report Period (2020-21)

Name of Organisation

Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

Proportion of*2020-21 total spend (%)

Australian Bureau of Statistics (26 331 428 522) 3,726,000 10.6

Alphabeta Advisors Pty Limited (91 603 412 013) 2,416,033

The Boston Consulting Group Pty Ltd (70 007 347 131) 2,382,960

BMF Advertising Pty Ltd (43 533 837 149) 2,012,373

Ernst & Young (75 288 172 749) 1,940,070

Bendelta Pty Ltd (58 105 151 326) 1,872,397

6.9

6.8

5.7

5.5

5.3

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Table F-25 Organisations Receiving a Share of Reportable Non-Consultancy Contract Expenditure Current Report Period (2020-21)

6

Name of Organisation

Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

Proportion of*2020-21 total spend (%)

Jones Lang LaSalle (ACT) Pty Ltd (69 008 585 260) 39,807,213 19.2

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd T/As Universal McCann 22,013,670 10.6

(19 002 966 001)

Gillian Beaumont Recruitment Pty Ltd (58 107 780 683) 18,998,866 9.1

Hays Specialist Recruitment (Australia) (47 001 407 281) 16,769,036 8.1

Indue Limited (97 087 822 464) 13,602,406 6.5

The University of Melbourne (84 002 705 224) 13,363,868 6.4

Table F-26 17AJ (e)-(g) Aids to Access details Current Report Period (2020-21)

Annual report Contact Officer

Branch Manager,

Government and Executive Services Branch, Department of Social Services

Contact Phone Number 1300 653 227

or International +61 2 6146 0001

Contact Email annual.report@dss.gov.au

Entity website (URL) dss.gov.au/annual report

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix F Digital reporting tool data - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

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Appendix G

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix G Glossary of abbreviations and*acronyms

Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms Abbreviations and conventions

AAO Administrative Arrangement Orders

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

AIC Assistance for Isolated Children

AIFS Australian Institute of Family Studies

AFIS Assistance for Isolated Children

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANROWS Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety

ANZSOG Australia and New Zealand School of Government

AO Order of Australia

AP Age Pension

APS Australian Public Service

APSC Australian Public Service Commission

AS/NZS Australian/New Zealand International Standard

ATSICPP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle

BCAP Building Capacity in Australian Parents

CALD Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

CFCA Child Family Community Australia

COAG Council of Australian Governments

COVID-19 Coronavirus disease/ Coronavirus pandemic

CA Carer Allowance

CP Carer Payment

CPA Certified Practising Accountant

CRPD Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

CSC Conspicuous Service Cross

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CSS Child Support Scheme

DES Disability Employment Services

DEX DSS Data Exchange

DOP Double Orphan Pension

DSP Disability Support Pension

DSS Department of Social Services

EL Executive Level

ES Energy Supplement for Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders

FaC Families and Children

FCSI Families and Communities Service Improvement

FTB Family Tax Benefit

FVOCI Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income

FVTPL Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

GST Goods and Services Tax

ICSS Integrated Carer Support Service

IPS Individual Placement and Support

ISO International Standards Organisation

IT Information Technology

JP JobSeeker Payment

LGBTIQ lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer

MP Member of Parliament

NAIDOC National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee

NCAR National Community Awareness Raising

NCAS National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey

NDIA National Disability Insurance Agency

NDIS National Disability Insurance Scheme

NDIS Commission NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission

NHHA National Housing and Homelessness Agreement

NOCS National Office of Child Safety

NRAS National Rental Affordability Scheme

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix G Glossary of abbreviations and*acronyms

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix G Glossary of abbreviations and*acronyms

PAES Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PP Parenting Payment

PPM Post Placement Monitoring

PUSC Payments under Special Circumstances

RA Rent Assistance

RSS Random Sample Survey

RTO Refundable Tax Offsets

SB Special Benefit

SBP Stillborn Baby Payment

SCOREs Standard Client/Community Outcomes Reporting

SDF Sector Development Fund

SEPT Supporting Expecting and Parenting Teens initiative

SES Senior Executive Service

SIH Survey of Income and Housing

SMEs Small and Medium Enterprises

TIA Towards independent Adulthood

TTY Teletypewriter

UA Utilities Allowance

XP Cross Program

XPRA Cross Program Rent Assistance

YA Youth Allowance

Abbreviations and conventions

- Nil

na Not available

N/A Not Applicable

N/P Not Provided

$m $ million

$b $ billion

Note: figures in tables and generally in text have been rounded. Discrepancies in tables between totals and sums of*components are due to rounding.

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Appendix H

Compliance index

List of requirements Below is the table set out in Schedule 2 of the PGPA Rule. Section 17AJ(d) requires this table be included in entities’ annual reports as an aid of access.

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI vi A copy of the letter of transmittal signed Mandatory

and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) ii, iii Table of contents Mandatory

17AJ(b) 305 Alphabetical index Mandatory

17AJ(c) 294-296 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms Mandatory

17AJ(d) 297-304 List of requirements Mandatory

17AJ(e) 293 Details of contact officer Mandatory

17AJ(f) vi Entity’s website address Mandatory

17AJ(g) 293 Electronic address of report Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 1-3 A review by the accountable authority

of*the entity

Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 22 A description of the role and functions of

the entity

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 7-9 A description of the organisational Mandatory

structure of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(iii) iv-v A description of the outcomes and Mandatory

programmes administered by the entity

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix H Compliance index

17AE(1)(a)(iv) 6 A description of the purposes of the entity Mandatory

as included in corporate plan

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix H Compliance index

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(i) 18, 278 Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 18, 278 Position title of the accountable authority Mandatory or each member of the accountable authority

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 278 Period as the accountable authority or Mandatory

member of the accountable authority within the reporting period

17AE(1)(b) 14 An outline of the structure of the portfolio Portfolio

of the entity departments -

mandatory

17AE(2) - Where the outcomes and programs If applicable,

administered by the entity differ from any Mandatory Portfolio Budget Statements, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 17-154 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a) 190-195, A discussion and analysis of the entity’s Mandatory 254-262 financial performance

17AF(1)(b) 254-255 A table summarising the total resources Mandatory and total payments of the entity

17AF(2) - If there may be significant changes in If applicable,

the financial results during or after the Mandatory. previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results

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PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(d) Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) 172 Information on compliance with

section*10 (fraud systems)

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) vi A certification by accountable authority Mandatory

that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared

17AG(2)(b)(ii) vi A certification by accountable authority that Mandatory appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place

17AG(2)(b)(iii) vi A certification by accountable authority Mandatory

that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity

17AG(2)(c) 166-169 An outline of structures and processes Mandatory in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance

17AG(2)(d)-(e) - A statement of significant issues reported If applicable, to Minister under paragraph19(1)(e) of the Mandatory Act that relates to non compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non compliance

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) 166 A direct electronic address of the charter

determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) 167-168 The name of each member of the entity’s Mandatory audit committee

17AG(2A)(c) 167-168 The qualifications, knowledge, skills or Mandatory experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee

17AG(2A)(d) 167-168 Information about the attendance of each Mandatory member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings

17AG(2A)(e) 167-168 The remuneration of each member of the Mandatory entity’s audit committee

Part 6 - Appendices Appendix H Compliance index

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Part 6 - Appendices Appendix H Compliance index

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) 177-180 Information on the most significant

developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) 177-178 Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period

If applicable, Mandatory

If applicable, Mandatory

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) 198-201

17AG(3)(c) 171

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) 182-186 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 279-283 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an Mandatory ongoing and non ongoing basis, including the following: (a) statistics on full time employees (b) statistics on part time employees (c) statistics on gender (d) statistics on staff location

17AG(4)(b) 283-290 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees Mandatory on an ongoing and non ongoing basis; including the following: • Statistics on staffing classification level • Statistics on full time employees • Statistics on part time employees • Statistics on gender • Statistics on staff location • Statistics on employees who identify

as Indigenous

17AG(4)(c) 187, 188 Information on any enterprise Mandatory

agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999

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PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(c)(i) 290 Information on the number of SES

and non SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c)

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 291 The salary ranges available for APS Mandatory

employees by classification level

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 188 A description of non salary benefits Mandatory

provided to employees

17AG(4)(d)(i) 291 Information on the number of employees

at each classification level who received performance pay

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) - Information on aggregate amounts of

performance pay at each classification level

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) - Information on the average amount of If applicable,

performance payment, and range of such Mandatory payments, at each classification level

17AG(4)(d)(iv) - Information on aggregate amount of

performance payments

If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5) - An assessment of effectiveness of assets If applicable,

management where asset management Mandatory is a significant part of the entity’s activities

Purchasing

17AG(6) 194 An assessment of entity performance

against the Commonwealth Procurement*Rules

Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) 192 A summary statement detailing the Mandatory

number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST)

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PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7)(b) 191 A statement that “During [reporting

period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 191 A summary of the policies and Mandatory

procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged

17AG(7)(d) 191 A statement that “Annual reports contain

information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website”

Mandatory

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) 193 A summary statement detailing the Mandatory

number of new reportable non-consultancy contracts entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on such contracts (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting period on those ongoing contracts (inclusive of GST).

17AG(7A)(b) 193 A statement that “Annual reports contain Mandatory information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

17AD(daa) Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AGA 192, 193 Additional information, in accordance

with section 17AGA, about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts.

Mandatory

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PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) - If an entity entered into a contract with a

value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) - If an entity entered into a contract or If applicable,

there is a standing offer with a value Mandatory greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 194 A statement that “[Name of entity]

supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 194 An outline of the ways in which the Mandatory

procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises

17AG(10)(c) 194 If the entity is considered by the If applicable,

Department administered by the Mandatory Finance Minister as material in nature - a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website”

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PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

Financial Statements

17AD(e) 197-251 Inclusion of the annual financial Mandatory

statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) 274-275 Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2 3 of the Rule

Mandatory

17AD(f) Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i) 263 If the entity conducted advertising If applicable,

campaigns, a statement that “During Mandatory [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website”

17AH(1)(a)(ii) - If the entity did not conduct advertising If applicable,

campaigns, a statement to that effect Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) 195 A statement that “Information on grants If applicable,

awarded by [name of entity] during Mandatory [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website]”

17AH(1)(c) 273 Outline of mechanisms of disability Mandatory

reporting, including reference to website for further information

17AH(1)(d) 174 Website reference to where the entity’s Mandatory

Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found

17AH(1)(e) - Correction of material errors in previous If applicable,

annual report Mandatory

17AH(2) 158-163, Information required by other legislation Mandatory 188-189, 268-270, 271-272

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Alphabetical index

A abbreviations and acronyms, 294-296 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples ABSTUDY, 26, 30, 59-62

Closing the Gap targets, 3 employment of, 184-185, 290 Indigenous businesses, 194 longitudinal study of Indigenous children, 2 and provision of NDIS services, 127 wellbeing of Australia’s children, 69, 80 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Workforce

Action Plan, 184 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Workforce Strategy, 184 ABSTUDY, 26, 30, 59-62 access to contractors’ premises, 194 accidents and injuries, 188, 189 accountability see management and

accountability

Accountable Authority, 18, 278 Acknowledgment of Country, i Act of Grace Payments, 41 Administrative Arrangement Orders, 6, 11 advertising agencies, 264-265 advertising and market research, 263-267 advertising campaigns, 263 Advice and Support to Ministers and Assistant

Ministers, key activity, 153-154 Advocacy support for people with disability, 104, 107, 116-118 Affordable Housing Program

National Rental Affordability Scheme, 139, 141, 149-152 Age Pension (AP), 26, 29, 46-47 agency resource statement 2020-21, 254-255 agreements with third parties, 173 Allowances and Concessions for Seniors

Program, 26 Energy Supplement for Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders, 29, 48-50 ANAO see Australian National Audit Office (ANAO)

annual performance statement introduction, 19-20 overview of results, 24-25 performance framework, 21-22 performance measures, 23-24 statement of preparation, 18 see also Disability and Carers performance;

Families and Communities performance; Housing performance; Program Support performance; Social Security performance annual report contact details, inside front cover, 293 apprentices see Student Payments Program APS Code of Conduct, 173 APS Employee Census, 181, 182, 186 APS Employment Principles, 173 APS Values, 7, 173 Assessment Framework, National Redress

Scheme, 159

assessment of income data, 177-178 assets management, 191 Assistance for Isolated Children (AIC), 26, 36-38 Assistant Minister for Children and Families, 11, 14 Assistant Minister for Northern Australia, 11, 14 Assistant Ministers, advice and support to, 154 Assistant Treasurer, 11, 14 assurance activities, 171 Attorney-General’s Department

grants administration for, 195 Audit and Assurance Committee, 166-168, 171 Audit and Assurance Committee Charter, 166 Audit Work Plan 2020-21, 171 Auditor-General’s report, 198-201 audits

Australian National Audit Office, 177 internal audits, 171 Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service, 122, 123

AusTender, 191, 193, 194 Australian Disability Enterprises, 122, 123 Australian Federal Police Operation Ashiba, 173 Australian Government Agencies Privacy Code, 174 Australian Government Crisis Management

Framework, 170 Australian Hearing Services Act 1991, 11, 13 Australian Institute of Family Studies, 11, 13

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Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), 177, 194 Independent Auditor’s Report, 198-201 Australian Privacy Principles (APP), 174 Australian Public Service see APS Australian Taxation Office (ATO)

and income information, 177-178 Austudy, 26, 30, 59-62 autism

Autism@Work program, 185 Helping Children with Autism Program, 122, 123 awards and recognition, 182

B Baker, Nick, 167 Be Connected (Digital Literacy for Older Australians), 86

Better Start for Children with Disability Program, 122, 123 Boosting the Local Care Workforce Program, 127 breaches and complaints, privacy, 176 bullying and harassment, 173 Business Continuity Management Framework, 170 business planning, 170-173, 182

C Campbell, Kathryn, 8, 14 Accountable Authority, 278 see also Secretary

capability development, 182 Carapellucci, Flora, 168 Carer Allowance and Carer Payment, 26, 29, 52-54

Carer Gateway, 113, 271 Carer Recognition Act 2010, compliance with, 271 carers Carer Gateway, 113, 271, 272

Carer Policy Forum, 272 Carers Australia, 271, 272 Income Support for Carers, 26, 29, 52-54 Integrated Carer Support Service, 113, 123 primary carers, Parental Leave Pay, 98 Statement for Australia’s Carers, 271 support for carers, 272 (see also Support for

Carers Activity)

see also Disability Mental Health and Carers Program Cashless Debit Card, 66, 69, 70, 91-93 Product Level Blocking, 2 Census, APS, 181, 182, 186 Chief Finance Officer, 202

Child Payments Program, 26 Assistance for Isolated Children, 26, 36-38 Double Orphan Pension, 26, 36, 38 Stillborn Baby Payment, 29, 36-38

child sexual abuse, institutional see National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Child Support (Assessment) Act 1989, vi Child Support (Registration and Collection) Act

1988, vi

Child Support Scheme (CSS), 26, 29, 33-35 classification of staff, 283-286 Closing the Gap Commonwealth Implementation Plan, 1, 3, 69

Code of Conduct, APS, 173 Code of Conduct, NDIS, 12 Comcare premium rate, 188 committees, governance, 166-169 common law contracts, 188 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, 263 Commonwealth Ombudsman, 177 Commonwealth Procurement Rules 2020, 194 Commonwealth Risk Management Policy, 170 communities see Families and Communities

Program

Community Connectedness see Volunteering and Community Connectedness Activity Community Grants Hub, 195 community housing see Affordable Housing

Program; Housing and Homelessness Program; Rent Assistance Community Support Package, 1 compensation claims, workers’, 188 complaints management, 174, 175, 176 compliance, 171, 172, 177, 271-272 compliance index, 297-304 consultancies, 191-192, 292 Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering, 68 contact details for annual report, inside front cover, 293 Continuity of Support (CoS) arrangements, 122, 123 contractors’ premises, access to, 194 contracts, 193, 194 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, United Nations, 273 Coronavirus Supplement, 1, 27, 28 corporate Commonwealth entity, Hearing Australia, 11, 13 corporate governance, 166-176 Corporate Plan 2020-21, 19, 20, 21, 22, 170

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corruption see fraud control courts and tribunals, 173, 177-178 COVID-19 pandemic and changes to Paid Parental Leave

Scheme, 69

delivery of Emergency Relief and Food Relief, 68 economic impact of, 3, 27 focus for 2020-21, 1 and fraud and compliance awareness

training, 172

impact on workforce of responses to COVID, 181 and new Disability Strategy, 119 Pandemic Action Plan, 170 provision of additional financial support, 28 and Redress Support Services, 162 and SES remuneration, 188 urgent responses required, 24 Crisis Management Framework, 170 culturally and linguistically diverse people, 184

D Dad and Partner Pay, 66, 71, 100-101 Data Improvement Plan, Housing and Homelessness, 140

Debit Card, Cashless, 2, 66, 69, 70, 91-93 A Decade of Data: Findings from the first 10 years of Footprints in Time, a 2020 report, 2

deeming rates, 28 dementia see Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program Department of Agriculture, Water and the

Environment grants administration for, 195 Department of Education, Skills and Employment

grants administration for, 195 Department of Finance, vi, 191 reports on advertising, 263

small enterprise statistics, 194 Department of Health grants administration for, 195

providing staff to, 181 role in implementing NDIS, 132 Department of Home Affairs grants administration for, 195 Department of Social Services (the department)

Accountable Authority, 18, 278 ethical standards, 173 financial management, 190-195, 197-251, 254-262

governance, 166-176 mission statement, 6 organisational structure, 7-9 our people, 10, 181-189 portfolio, 11-14 priorities and values, 7 purposes and outcomes, 6, 7, 22 see also annual performance statement Department of State (under Administrative

Arrangements Orders), 11 Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Digital Transformation Agency transferred to, 11

grants administration for, 195 Department of Veterans’ Affairs grants administration for, 195 Departmental Expenditure, key activity, 153 Deputy Secretaries, 7, 8, 9, 166, 169 Development of the NDIS Market, 104, 108,

127-130

Digital Literacy for Older Australians, 86 digital reporting tool data, 274-293 Digital Transformation Agency, 11 Diploma of Government program, 181 direct mail organisations, 266 disability, people with

Disability Support Pension, 26, 29, 43, 50-51 employment of, 185 payments for carers of, 52-54 programs for children and teenagers, 122, 123 Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse,

Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, 106 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 273 see also Disability Mental Health and Carers

Program; Disability Strategy; NDIS Disability and Carers performance, 104-138 expenses and resources, 261 key achievements, 106

key activity performance, 109-138 key performance results, 107-108 programs and activities, 104 purpose, 104 summary and analysis of performance, 104-105 Programs:

Disability Mental Health and Carers, 104, 113-121 National Disability Insurance Scheme, 104, 122-138 Disability Champion, 185

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Disability Employment Assistance (Australian Disability Enterprises), 122, 123 Disability Employment Services (DES), 104, 105, 106, 107, 109-112 Disability Gateway, 1, 106 Disability Management Service, 109 Disability Mental Health and Carers Program

Advocacy support for people with disability, 104, 107, 116-118 Disability Employment Services, 104, 105, 106, 107, 109-112 Disability Strategy, 3, 104, 105, 106, 107,

119-121, 273

Support for Carers, 104, 106, 107, 113-115 Disability Ministers: Statement of Continued Commitment, 119 disability reporting, 273 disability sector workforce, 1, 106, 127 Disability Strategy, 104, 107, 273 Disability Strategy 2021-2031, 3, 105, 106,

119-121

Disability Support Pension (DSP), 26, 29, 43, 50-51 diverse sexual orientation, 76, 186 diversity and inclusion in the workplace, 183-186 Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021,

183, 184, 185

domestic and family violence, 1, 3, 69, 76, 263 see also Family Safety Activity Domestic Violence Support Package, 1 Double Orphan Pension (DOP), 26, 36-38 DV-alert, 76

E

e-marketplace, NDIS market, 127 ecologically sustainable development, 268-270 Economic Support Payments, 1, 27, 28 effectiveness and efficiency, performance

measures, 23, 24 1800RESPECT, 76 eligible families, Family Tax Benefit, 30 eligible fathers and partners, Dad and Partner

Pay, 100

eligible income support recipients, 91 Emergency Relief Program, 1, 68, 69, 82 Employee Assistance Program, 189, 271 Employee Census, APS, 181, 182, 186 Employee Engagement Action Plan, 181 employees see human resource management; staff employment arrangements, 187-188, 290 employment income reporting, 28

employment principles, 173 Employment Support Service, 109 energy efficiency measures, departmental offices, 268, 269, 270

Energy Supplement for Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders, 26, 29, 48-50 Enterprise Agreement, 187, 188, 271, 290 Enterprise Compliance Framework, 171 Environment Protection and Biodiversity

Conservation Act 1999, 28, 268 environmental performance, 268-270 Equal Remuneration Order, Social, Community

and Disability Services Industry: Fair Work Australia, 102 Escaping Violence Payment (EVP), 3 ethical standards, 173 Ex-Gratia Payments, 41 Executive Agency, 11 Executive Management Group, 166 committees reporting to, 168-169 remuneration, 274-275 exempt contracts, 194 external scrutiny, 177-180

F

Fair Work Act 2009, 187 Fair Work Australia: Social, Community and Disability Services Industry Equal Remuneration Order, 102

Families and Children Activity, 66, 69, 70, 72-75 Families and Children Service Providers, 72 Families and Communities Service Improvement, 72

Families and Communities performance, 66-103 expenses and resources, 259-260 key achievements, 69 key activity performance, 72-103 key performance results, 70-71 programs and activities, 66 purpose, 66 summary and analysis of performance,

67-68

Programs: Families and Communities, 66, 72-97 Paid Parental Leave, 66, 71, 98-101 Social and Community Services, 66, 71,

102-103

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Families and Communities Program Cashless Debit Card, 66, 69, 70, 91-93 Families and Children, 66, 69, 70, 72-75 Family Safety, 66, 70, 76-79 Financial Wellbeing and Capability, 66, 70,

82-85

National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse (see National Redress Scheme) Protecting Australia’s Children, 66, 70,

80-81

Volunteering and Community Connectedness, 66, 70, 86-90 Family Law Act 1975, 11 Family Law System, Joint Select Committee on,

180

Family Safety Activity, 66, 70, 76-79 Family Tax Benefit Program, 26 Child Support Scheme, 29, 33-35 Family Tax Benefit, 29, 30-33

family violence see domestic and family violence fathers and partners, Dad and Partner Pay, 100 Feedback Management System, 174 female employees, 279, 281, 283-286 Financial Counselling, Capability and Resilience,

1, 82

financial management, 190-195, 254-262 financial statements, 197-251 Financial Wellbeing and Capability Activity, 66, 70, 82-85

Flavel, Matt, 8, 168 flexible learning options, 182 Flexible Parental Leave Pay, 2 floods and storms, 24 Food Relief Program, 1, 68, 69, 82 fraud and compliance awareness training, 172 fraud control, 172-173 Fraud Control Plan, 172 freedom of information, 174 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 174 FriendLine - Friends for Good, 86 full-time employees, 287, 288 functions and roles, 22 funding of the department, 190-191

G gambling harm, 68 gender identity, 76 glossary, 294-296 governance, 166-176 Graduate Development Program, 187 grants administration, 195 Griggs, Ray, vi, 3, 18, 202

see also Secretary Growing the NDIS Market and Workforce Strategy, 127 guide to annual report, i Guise, Sarah, 168

H harassment and bullying, 173 Harvey, Andrew, 202 health and safety see work health and safety Health Card Holders, Seniors, 26, 29, 48-50 Hearing and Vision Services for Remote Children

Program, 122

Hearing Australia, 11, 13 Hefren-Webb, Liz, 8 Heir, Grant, 201 Help is Here campaign, 263 Helping Children with Autism Program, 122, 123 homelessness see Housing and Homelessness

Program

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs, 179 household expenses, assistance with, 43-45, 48-49 Housing and Homelessness Program

National Housing and Homelessness Agreement, 139, 140, 141, 142-148 Housing performance, 139-152 expenses and resources, 262

key achievements, 140 key activity performance, 142-152 key performance results, 141 programs and activities, 139 purpose, 139 summary and analysis of performance,

139-140

Programs: Affordable Housing, 139, 141, 149-152 Housing and Homelessness, 139, 140, 141, 142-148 Hudson, Adrian, 9

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human resources management Graduate Development Program, 187 leadership and capability development, 182 overview, 181 and Statement for Australia’s Carers, 271 work health and safety, 188-189 workforce planning, 182 workplace arrangements, 187-188, 290 workplace diversity, 183-186 see also staff

I

Implementation Committee, 169 incidents (accidents and injuries), 188, 189 inclusion in the workplace, 183-186 Income Compliance Program, 177 income data, averaged by ATO, 177-178 Income Management, 2 Income Support for Carers Program, 26

Carer Allowance and Carer Payment, 29, 52-54 Income Support for People in Special Circumstances Program, 26

Payments under Special Circumstances, 29, 41-42 Income Support for People With Disability Program, 26

Disability Support Pension, 29, 50-51 Income Support for Seniors Program, 26 Age Pension, 29, 46-47 Income Support for Vulnerable People Program,

26

Special Benefit, 29, 39-40 Independent Auditor’s Report, 198-201 indeterminate status employees, 279, 281, 283-286 Indigenous businesses, 194 Indigenous Champion, 184 Indigenous children, longitudinal study of, 2 Indigenous employees, 184-185, 290 Indigenous Procurement Policy, 194 Individual Flexibility Arrangements, 187, 290 individuals with injury, disability or a health

condition see Disability Mental Health and Carers Program Indue (Cashless Debit Card service provider), 91 Information Commissioner, Office of (OAIC), 175, 176 Information Publication Scheme (IPS), 174 injuries and accidents, 188, 189

institutional child sexual abuse see National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse,

Royal Commission into, 158 institutions joining Redress Scheme, 160-161 Integrated Carer Support Service (ICSS), 113,

123

internal audit, 171 international standard Risk Management-Guidelines, 170 intersex status employees, 76, 186 investigations for fraud, 173 isolated children, assistance for, 26, 36-38

J

JobAccess website, 109 Jobs and Market Fund, 127 JobSeeker Payment (JP), 26, 27, 28, 29, 55-58 jobseekers and NDIS career opportunities, 127 Joint Select Committee on Australia’s Family Law

System, 180

Joint Select Committee on Implementation of the National Redress Scheme, 180 Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme, 179-180 judicial decisions, 177-178

K Keeping Women Safe in their Homes program, 76 key activities, 22 key activity performance

Disability and Carers, 109-138 Families and Communities, 72-103 Housing, 142-152 Program Support, 154 Social Security, 30-65 knowmore Legal Services, 162 Kruk, Robyn, 2, 162

L

Landry, Hon Michelle, 11, 14 Leaders Resource Menu, 181 leadership and capability development, 181, 182 Legislation Committee, 178-179 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and

queer staff, 186 letter of transmittal, vi linguistically and culturally diverse people, 184 list of requirements, 297-304

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location of employees, 10, 289 Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children, 2 looking forward, 3

M machinery of government changes, 11 Maintenance Action Test, 33 male employees, 279, 281, 283-286 management and accountability, 165-195 Manager of Government Business in the Senate,

vi, 11, 14

Mandatory Training Program, 181, 182 market research and advertising, 263-267 market research organisations, 265-266 McPhee, Ian, 167 media advertising organisations, 267 MensLine Australia’s Changing for Good

program, 76

mental health see Disability Mental Health and Carers Program; work health and safety Mental Health Information line, 181 methodology for achievement of targets, 22 Microsoft Teams, 181 Minister for Families and Social Services, vi, 11,

14, 161, 176

Minister for Government Services, vi, 11, 13, 14 Minister for Homelessness, Social and Community Housing, 11, 14 Minister for Housing, 11, 14 Minister for the National Disability Insurance

Scheme, vi, 11, 14 Minister for Women’s Safety, vi, 11, 14 Ministers, vi, 11, 14 advice and support to, 154 mission statement, 6 Mobility Allowance recipients, 123 Morrison, Jenny, 167 My Aged Care, 113

N NAIDOC Awards, 182 National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service, 122, 123

National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering, 68 National Coordination Group, 68 National Disability Advocacy Program (NDAP), 116 National Disability Insurance Agency see NDIA National Disability Insurance Scheme see NDIS

National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013, 11, 12 2019 review of, 2 National Disability Strategy see Disability

Strategy

National Disability Strategy 2021-2031 see Disability Strategy 2021-2031 National Forum for Protecting Australia’s Children, 80 National Framework for Protecting Australia’s

Children 2009-20, 3, 69 2021-2031, 80 National Housing and Homelessness Agreement

(NHHA), 139, 140, 141, 142-148 National Indigenous Australians Agency grants administration for, 195 National Plan to Reduce Violence against

Women and their Children 2010-22, 76 National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse, 66, 71, 94-97, 180 applications finalised, 161

how the Scheme operates, 159 institutions joining the Scheme, 160-161 key statistics, 162-163 Privacy Impact Assessment, 176 Redress Support Services, 162 Royal Commission into Institutional

Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, 158 Scheme Operator, vi, 158 Second Anniversary Review, 2, 162 support for survivors, 68, 69 National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child

Sexual Abuse Act 2018, vi, 158 National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Rules 2018, 158 National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS),

139, 141, 149-152 NDIA, 11, 12, 106, 116, 132 NDIS, 12, 104, 105, 106, 122-138, 179-180 NDIS Appeals, 116 NDIS Code of Conduct, 12 NDIS Market, 104, 108, 127-130 NDIS National Workforce Plan, 2021-2025, 1,

106, 127

NDIS Participant Plans, 104, 108, 131-138 NDIS Participant Service Guarantee, 2

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NDIS Program Development of the NDIS Market, 104, 108, 127-130 NDIS Participant Plans, 104, 108, 131-138 NDIS Transition (including Commonwealth

Programs), 104, 108, 122-126 NDIS providers see NDIS Market; NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Framework, 106 NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS

Commission), 11, 12 NDIS Transition, 104, 108, 122-126 NDIS workforce, 1, 106, 127 A New Tax System (Family Assistance)

(Administration) Act 1999, vi No Interest Loans, 1 non-consultancy contracts, 193, 292, 293 non-corporate Commonwealth entities, vi non-ongoing employees, 280, 282 non-salary benefits, 188 non-SES employees

Enterprise Agreement, 187, 290 Individual Flexibility Arrangements, 187, 290 notifiable incidents, 189

O objectives, functions and roles, 22 Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC), 175, 176

ongoing employees, 279, 281 Online Wagering, National Consumer Protection Framework for, 68 Operation Ashiba, Australian Federal Police, 173 organisational structure, 7-9 orphans, assistance for, 26, 36-38 our people, 10

see also human resources management; staff out-of-home care, 1, 3, 69 outcomes, 7

Cross Outcome: Program Support Performance (see Program Support performance)

Outcome 1: Social Security Performance (see Social Security performance) Outcome 2: Families and Communities Performance (see Families and

Communities performance) Outcome 3: Disability and Carers Performance (see Disability and

Carers performance)

Outcome 4: Housing (see Housing performance) outcome and program structures, iv-v performance measure target results per

outcomes, 25

purposes and outcomes, 22, 23 outputs, performance measures, 23, 24 Outside School Hours Care for Teenagers with Disability Program, 122 overcrowded housing, 1, 3, 69

P Page, Susan, 167 Paid Parental Leave Program, 69 Dad and Partner Pay, 66, 71, 100-101

Parental Leave Pay, 2, 66, 71, 98-99 palliative care see Support for Carers Activity Pandemic Action Plan, 170 Parenting Payment (PP), 26, 29, 55-58 parliamentary committees, 178-180 parliamentary inquiries, 180 part-time employees, 287, 288 Participant Plans, NDIS, 104, 108, 131-138 Partner Allowance, 43 Partners in Recovery Program, 123 Pay Equity Special Account (SACS), 102 payments to small business, 194 Payments under Special Circumstances (PUSC),

26, 29, 41-42

People and Culture Committee, 168 people in special circumstances see Income Support for People in Special Circumstances Program

people of diverse sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status, 76, 186 people with disability see disability, people with performance framework, 21-22 performance measures, 22, 23-24 performance payments, 187, 291 performance results overview, 24-25 performance statement see annual performance

statement

Personal Helpers and Mentors Program, 123 personal information, dealing with, 174, 176 Policy and Evaluation Committee, 168 polling organisations, 265-266 portfolio

bodies, 11, 12-13, 14 changes to, 11 ministers responsibilities, 14 Portfolio Budget Statement 2020-21, 19, 20, 22

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Pride Network, 186 primary carers, Parental Leave Pay, 98 priorities, 7 privacy, 174-176 Privacy Act 1988, 174 Privacy Code, Australian Government Agencies, 174 Privacy Impact Assessments, 176 private rental market see Affordable Housing

Program; Housing and Homelessness Program; Rent Assistance procurement, 194 Program Support performance advice and support to Ministers and

Assistant Ministers, 154 key performance results, 153 programs, iv-v, 21, 22 Disability and Carers, 104

Families and Communities, 66 Housing, 139 Program Support, 153 Social Security, 26 Protecting Australia’s Children Activity, 66, 70,

80-81

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, vi, 13, 18, 170, 171, 191

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, vi, 21, 166, 172, 173

Public Service Act 1999, 11 purchasing, 194 purposes and outcomes, 6, 21, 22

Q qualitative and quantitative performance measures, 23, 24

R Reconciliation Action Plan 2021-2024, 181, 184 Reconnecting People Assistance Package - Individual Community Care Package, 41

recycling, departmental offices, 270 Redress Scheme see National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse References Committee, 179 Remote Hearing and Vision Services for Children

Program, 122

remuneration Executive remuneration, 274-275 non-SES employees, 187, 290 Secretary, 188, 274 SES employees, 188, 276

Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973, 188 Rent Assistance (RA), 26, 30, 63-65, 140 Rental Affordability Scheme, National (NRAS), 139, 141, 149-152

residential care for younger people see Younger People in Residential Aged Care Strategy 2020-25

Resource Management Guide No. 135 — Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities, vi

resource statements, 254-262 Respite and Carer Support Program, 123 Respite Support for Carers of Young People with Severe or Profound Disability Program,

123

review of year, 1-3 reviews, management-initiated, 171 Reynolds, Hon Linda, vi, 11, 14 risk management, 170-173 ‘robodebt’, 177-178 roles and functions, 22 Royal Commission into Institutional Responses

to Child Sexual Abuse, 158 Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability,

106

Rule, Catherine, 9 rural and remote communities, delivery of NDIS support to, 127 Ruston, Hon Anne, vi, 11, 14

S s 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999, 188, 290 SACS Pay Equity Special Account, 102 Safe Places Emergency Accommodation

program, 76

safety see work health and safety Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988, 188 salary ranges, 291 Secretary, 7, 8

committees reporting to, 166-168 and financial statements, 202 remuneration, 188, 274 review of year, 1-3 Secretary’s Excellence Awards, 182 Senate Standing Committees on Community

Affairs, 178

senior Australians, 86 see also Age Pension; Energy Supplement for Commonwealth Seniors Health Card Holders

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Part 6 - Appendices Alphabetical index

Seniors Connected, 86 Service Charter, 174 Services Australia, 11, 12, 177 and income support payments, 1

providing staff to, 181 SES (Senior Executive Service) employees employment arrangements, 188, 290

remuneration, 188, 276 Set-off payments, 41 sexual abuse of children, institutional see National Redress Scheme for Institutional

Child Sexual Abuse sexual violence responses, national standards for, 76 see also domestic and family violence;

Family Safety Activity

shared services grants administration, 195 Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), 194 Social, Community and Disability Services Industry Equal Remuneration Order: Fair

Work Australia, 102 Social and Community Services Program Social and Community Services Pay Equity Account, 66, 71, 102-103 social housing see Affordable Housing Program;

Housing and Homelessness Program Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, vi Social Security performance, 26-65 expenses and resources, 256-258

key achievements, 28 key activity performance, 30-65 key performance results, 29-30 programs and activities, 26 purpose, 26 summary and analysis of performance,

27-28

Programs: Allowances and Concessions for Seniors, 26, 29, 48-50 Child Payments, 26, 29, 36-38 Family Tax Benefit, 26, 29, 30-35 Income Support for Carers, 26, 29,

52-54

Income Support for People in Special Circumstances, 26, 29, 41-42 Income Support for People With Disability, 26, 29, 50-51 Income Support for Seniors, 26, 29,

46-47

Income Support for Vulnerable People, 26, 29, 39-40 Rent Assistance, 26, 30, 63-65, 140

Student Payments, 26, 30, 59-62 Supplementary Payments and Support for Income Support Recipients, 26, 29, 43-45

Working Age Payments, 26, 29, 55-58 Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Simplifying Income Report and other Measures) Act 2020, 178 Special Benefit (SB), 39-40 special circumstances, people in see Income

Support for People in Special Circumstances Program staff classification, 283-286 diversity and inclusion in the workplace,

183-186

employment arrangements, 187-188, 290 female and male employees, 279, 281 full-time and part-time employees, 279, 281 indeterminate status, 279, 281 Indigenous employees, 290 leadership and capability development, 181,

182

lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer staff, 186 location of employees, 289 non-ongoing employees, 280, 282 ongoing employees, 279, 281 salary ranges, 291 see also remuneration Statement by Secretary and Chief Finance

Officer, 202

Statement for Australia’s Carers, 271 statement of preparation, annual performance statement, 18 Stillborn Baby Payment (SBP), 26, 29, 36-38 Stop it at the Start campaign, 76, 263 storms and floods, 24 strategic and business planning, 170 strategic objectives, 22 Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2021-2024,

181, 184

Strong and Resilient Communities grant, 86 Student Payments Program, 26, 30, 59-62 Sukkar, Hon Michael, 11, 14 Supplementary Payments and Support for

Income Support Recipients Program, 26 Utilities Allowance, 29, 43-45 Support for Carers Activity, 104, 106, 107, 113-115 Support for Day to Day Living program, 123 Support for Trafficked People program, 76

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surge workforces, 181 Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business, 194

T

targets, performance measures, 22 overview of target results, 25 Thin Markets Framework, 127 third parties, 170, 173 Treasury

and survey of payments to small business, 194 tribunals and courts, 173, 177-178 Tristate Vocational Outcomes Pilot Program, 113

U United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 12, 273 unpaid carers see carers Utilities Allowance (UA), 26, 29, 43-45

V

values, 7, 173 Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability: Royal Commission into, 106

violence, domestic and family see domestic and family violence Volunteering and Community Connectedness Activity, 66, 68, 70, 86-90 vulnerable individuals and families, 82

see also Financial Wellbeing and Capability Activity; Income Support for Vulnerable People Program

W Waiver of Debts, 41 waste management, departmental offices, 268, 269, 270

websites advertising campaigns, 263 ANAO audits, 177 Audit and Assurance Committee Charter, 166 AusTender, 191, 193, 194 Australian Institute of Family Studies, 13 Carer Gateway, 271 Commonwealth Ombudsman, 177 Corporate Plan, 170 the department, vi disability reporting, 273 grants information system, 195 Hearing Australia, 13

IPS agency plan, 174 JobAccess, 109 National Disability Insurance Agency, 12 National Redress Scheme, 162 NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission, 12 Privacy Impact Assessments, 176 privacy policy, 174 Service Charter, 174 Services Australia, 12 Treasury, 194 wellbeing

of Australia’s children (see Protecting Australia’s Children Activity) Financial Wellbeing and Capability Activity, 66, 70, 82-85 Widow Allowance, 43 women

financial assistance to escape violent relationship, 3 National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-22,

76

safety of, 69 see also Family Safety Activity Work Based Personal Assistance Program, 122, 123

work health and safety, 187-188 Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 188, 189 Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011, 188 workers’ compensation claims, 188 workforce planning, 182 Workforce Strategy 2019-2022, 182 Working Age Payments Program, 26, 28, 29,

55-58

workplace arrangements, 187-188, 290 workplace diversity, 183-186

Y year ahead, 3 Young Carer Bursary Program, 113 Young Carer Network, 113 Young Carers Respite and Information Services

Program, 123

Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program, 122, 123 Younger People in Residential Aged Care Strategy 2020-25, 2, 106, 131, 132 Youth Allowance (Other), 26, 28, 29, 55-58 Youth Allowance (Student) (YA), 26, 28, 30, 59-62

Part 6 - Appendices Alphabetical index

dss.gov.au

Department of Social Services

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