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Torres Strait Regional Authority—Report for 2019-20


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TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

Annual Report 2019-2020

TSRA 25th Anniversary Design © Torres Strait Printz, Basil Sabatino 2019

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

Annual Report 2019-2020

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

The Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) recognises the Traditional Owners of the land on which we operate. We acknowledge the past and present Elders of all Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area and respect the culture and lore of all Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

The TSRA will always make every effort to respect Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people’s cultural sensitivities when featuring the images or names of people who have recently died. However, please be advised that this Annual Report contains an image of a deceased person and may contain images of persons who have died since this document was prepared for tabling in Parliament in October 2020. We offer our apologies for any distress this may cause.

© Commonwealth of Australia, 2020

ISSN 1324-163X

The TSRA has made all reasonable effort to:

― clearly label material where the copyright is owned by a third party ― ensure that the copyright owner has consented to

the material being presented in this publication.

With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and where

otherwise noted, all material presented in this report is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4) licence. Details of the licence can be found on the Creative Commons Australia website at https://creativecommons.org.au/learn/licences.

This document must be attributed as the Torres Strait Regional Authority Annual Report 2019-2020.

The TSRA’s contact officer for the 2019-2020 Annual Report is Ms Yoshiko Hirakawa, Programme Manager Governance and Leadership. Telephone (07) 4069 0700 or (toll free) 1800 079 093

or email info@tsra.gov.au.

The TSRA Annual Report 2019-2020 is published on the TSRA website at www.tsra.gov.au in the following formats:

― Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) ― Portable Document Format (PDF) ISO 32000-1:2008 ― ePub Electronic Publishing for eBook Readers.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

ii

The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM, MP Minister for Indigenous Australians Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

1 October 2020

Dear Minister

I am pleased to present to you the Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) Annual Report for 2019-2020.

The TSRA’s annual performance statements, financial statements and Auditor-General’s report on the financial statements are included in the Annual Report as required under sections 42, 43 and 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth).

The directors of the TSRA endorsed the Annual Report in a resolution passed at Board meeting number 126 on 21 August 2020.

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (Cth), the TSRA has fully complied with the requirement to prevent, detect and deal with fraud.

The TSRA delivered outcomes as set out in the Torres Strait Development Plan 2019-2022 during the past year and continues to meet the objectives of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029. Through both plans, the TSRA programmes have continued to contribute towards the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and closing the gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians living in the region.

The TSRA looks forward to continuing our good work with you and to working through challenges and building on our successes over the coming year.

Yours sincerely

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM TSRA Chairperson

Torres Strait Regional Authority PO Box 261, Thursday Island, Queensland 4875 Telephone 07 40 690 700

Free Call 1800 079 093 Fax 07 40 691 879 Email info@tsra.gov.au www.tsra.gov.au

iii

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

BOIGU ISLAND

SAIBAI ISLAND

MOA ISLAND

BADU ISLAND

MABUYAGISLAND

IAMA ISLAND

WARRABER ISLAND

PORUMA ISLAND

MASIG ISLAND

ERUB ISLAND

UGAR ISLAND

MER ISLAND

WAIBEN ISLAND

NGARUPAI ISLAND

MURALAG ISLAND

KERIRI (HAMMOND) ISLAND

CAPE YORK PENINSULA

DAUAN ISLAND

ST PAULS

KUBIN

SEISIA

BAMAGA

UMAGICO

INJINOO

NEW MAPOON

MAP OF THE TORRES STRAIT REGION

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

BOIGU ISLAND

SAIBAI ISLAND

MOA ISLAND

BADU ISLAND

MABUYAGISLAND

IAMA ISLAND

WARRABER ISLAND

PORUMA ISLAND

MASIG ISLAND

ERUB ISLAND

UGAR ISLAND

MER ISLAND

WAIBEN ISLAND

NGARUPAI ISLAND

MURALAG ISLAND

KERIRI (HAMMOND) ISLAND

CAPE YORK PENINSULA

DAUAN ISLAND

ST PAULS

KUBIN

SEISIA

BAMAGA

UMAGICO

INJINOO

NEW MAPOON

VISION

EMPOWERING OUR PEOPLE, IN OUR DECISION, IN OUR CULTURE, FOR OUR FUTURE

KALA LAGAW YA

Ngalpun yangu kaaba woeydhay, a ngalpun muruyguw danalgan mabaygal kunakan palayk, wagel goeygoeyika

MERIAM MIR

Buaigiz kelar obaiswerare, merbi mir apuge mena obakedi, muige merbi areribi tonarge, ko merbi keub kerkerem

The Indigenous people of the Torres Strait are a separate race of First Nations peoples who speak two distinct traditional languages and six dialects. Torres Strait Islanders in the eastern islands speak the traditional language of Meriam Mir, which includes the Mer and Erub dialects. The western and central island groups speak Kala Lagaw Ya, which includes the dialects of Kulkalgau Ya, Kalaw Kawau Ya, Kawrareg and Mabuyag. Torres Strait Creole and English are also spoken.

Our vision is expressed in the languages of our region, recognising the importance and diversity of our culture and traditional languages.

Our vision signifies that the heart of our region is our people, with culture an important part of our lives now and into the future. Empowering our people to contribute to and make decisions regarding their future ensures that our culture will remain strong and that the future will be guided by the people who live in the region and understand and promote its unique characteristics.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

vi

HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

MINISTERIAL VISIT

In December 2019, the Board of the Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) was honoured to host a visit from the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM, MP, and the Queensland Minister for Employment and Small Business, Minister for Training and Skills Development and Queensland Government Champion for the Torres Strait, the Hon. Shannon Fentiman MP.

The ministers joined the TSRA Chairperson, Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM, to announce the Wapil initiative. The Wapil initiative will deliver fisheries infrastructure with employment, training and enterprise development, supported by $4.75 million from the Australian Government under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and a further $1.8 million from the Queensland Government under Skilling Queenslanders for Work. The TSRA is working closely with its government and private sector partners to develop up to 120 employment pathways across the region in the fisheries industry.

This was Minister Wyatt’s first visit to the Torres Strait region and the TSRA Board was grateful for the opportunity to meet and discuss some of the key issues for the region, including development of the Indigenous fishing industry, the Indigenous ranger programme, regional governance, and youth suicide prevention.

While on Thursday Island, Minister Wyatt also took time to meet with a group of the region’s emerging leaders - alumni of the TSRA’s leadership programmes - as well as representatives of the Torres Shire Council (TSC) and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC) and other key community stakeholders.

CLIMATE LEADERSHIP

A regional interagency forum was held in September

2019 to consider strategic issues facing the Torres Strait and options that would assist the region

to build resilience and improve delivery against the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029 through adaptive planning.

The TSRA has developed a draft regional resilience framework to help build greater local and regional resilience to the impacts of climate change. The draft framework was informed by discussions with community representatives from Masig and Mer, where a pilot resilient communities initiative has been conducted under the Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021, combined with concepts taken from resilience and adaptation science.

Following a successful trial in Masig and Mer, digital notice boards were deployed to 17 communities. The notice boards are managed by the TSRA in partnership with Community Enterprise Queensland to help ensure timely delivery of information to communities.

High-resolution coastal mapping capabilities were trialled at Iama, Warraber and Poruma. This will form the basis of a monitoring programme to map changes in erosion-prone beach areas to inform coastal works and coastal adaptation planning.

TSRA Chairperson Napau Pedro Stephen AM welcomes Queensland Government Champion for the Torres Strait the Hon. Shannon Fentiman MP and Minister for Indigenous Australians the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM, MP.

The TSRA is working closely with its government and private sector partners to develop up to 120 employment pathways across the region in the fisheries industry.

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HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

ACCESS TO FRESH, HEALTHY FOOD

The TSRA continued to work with Torres Strait individuals, families, schools and communities to expand sustainable horticulture activities leading to greater access to local, affordable and fresh food.

The communities of Boigu, Muralag (Prince of Wales), Poruma, Iama and Warraber worked with TSRA rangers and Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab participants to bring gardening projects to schools and local communities. This included the delivery of educational resources, technical advice, practical demonstrations, and workshops incorporating traditional ecological knowledge.

TSRA support for aquaponics systems, coastal revegetation and the planting of beach shade trees also continued to provide indirect benefits for community health and wellbeing.

BIODIVERSITY PROTECTION

The TSRA coordinates the collection of baseline terrestrial flora and fauna inventories, assessment of ecological conditions, and identification of processes that threaten the terrestrial health and biodiversity of the Torres Strait region.

Biocultural surveys have been conducted for Saibai, Muralag and Warul Kawa, using culturally appropriate

methodologies to monitor and record biodiversity and cultural values across those unique islands. The results of the surveys have been recorded through both technical and community reports, so that data can be used for community-driven biodiversity management and decision-making.

Standard survey procedures for regional and island-based monitoring of seabirds were designed and adopted in 2019-2020. This is a big leap forward in the ongoing development of programmes to record and manage seabirds across the Torres Strait.

Invasive species management has progressed through the TSRA’s collaboration with other agencies through the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Biosecurity Working Group and the Torres Strait Invasive Species Advisory Group. Training in biosecurity fundamentals and biosecurity

rapid response/emergency management has been completed by TSRA rangers and staff members, Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council (NPARC) rangers and other local government agency staff, strengthening on-ground capacity.

DUGONG AND TURTLE MANAGEMENT

A funded partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment has assisted

the TSRA to complete community consultations to review dugong and turtle management plans, as well as to expand mapping and monitoring of critical

habitat areas for those species across the Torres Strait.

Ongoing habitat monitoring of seagrass has also expanded, to include the eastern cluster of islands, where an emerging biodiversity hotspot for Great Barrier Reef green and hawksbill turtles is being explored as a significant area in relation to the Australian Government’s Recovery Plan for Marine Turtles in Australia 2017-2027.

The area between Maizub Kaur (Bramble Cay) and Raine Island in the Great Barrier Reef (where 90 per cent of Great Barrier Reef green turtles are hatched) has long been recognised as an area of significance in the connectivity of turtle habitats. Both

Maizub Kaur and Raine Island are seeing increasing erosion issues, high sand temperatures resulting in feminisation of hatchlings, and other drivers of change.

TSRA ranger Mr George Saveka teaches gardening to Tagai State College students on Thursday Island.

High-resolution coastal mapping capabilities were trialled at Iama, Warraber and Poruma. This will form the basis of a monitoring programme to map changes in erosion-prone beach areas to inform coastal works and coastal adaptation planning.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

viii

Initial temperature data logged on Dauar and Mer

beaches suggests cooler temperatures. A larger

collaborative project to confirm the initial results, led

by Dauar and Mer communities, with researchers,

commenced in 2020 with funding to 2023.

TORRES STRAIT DANCE TEAMS

The Torres Strait Dance Strategy supports local traditional dance teams to gain experience performing professionally on national and international platforms and at key industry events.

Eip Karem Beizam - Meriam Cultural Group embarked on the Meriba Tonar Cultural Tour in Canberra, which saw the group perform at one of the year’s premier Indigenous events, the National NAIDOC Awards. The cultural tour was a partnership of cultural infusion with Canberra-based Torres Strait dance team Kara Buai Dance Troupe. The dancers showcased their proud Meriam culture through dance and interactive workshops at various stakeholder events.

The Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and the Darwin

Aboriginal Art Fair are annual showcases of the

vibrant art and culture of Australia’s First Peoples.

Since 2013, the TSRA has sponsored dance teams to

promote Torres Strait traditional practices through

extraordinary storytelling dance performances at

the events. Muyngu Koekaper Dance Team from

Saibai was one of the showstopper highlights in

Cairns in 2019, entertaining the crowds with high-performance dance moves.

Arpaka Dance Company, from the St Pauls community on Moa, toured to Darwin in 2019 to participate in the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair and the Darwin Festival. A seasoned dance team that has been performing internationally and nationally for more than 15 years, Arpaka once again celebrated its rich oral histories through dance before an enthusiastic and interactive audience from around the world.

Muyngu Koekaper Dance Team performs at the 2019 Cairns Indigenous Art Fair.

Arpaka Dance Company performs at the 2019 Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair.

ix

HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

GAB TITUI CULTURAL CENTRE SHOP

The Gallery Shop at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre had a stellar year in 2019, showing increases in sales, product range and social media presence. The shop’s commitment to offering a wide range of high-quality products and delivering high standards of service, including in the sourcing of products, contributed to the success.

The Gab Titui Cultural Centre’s support for artists includes product development, licensing and promotion, helping to raise the profile of the Torres Strait region’s arts and craft industry.

In 2019, the centre engaged several new artists and suppliers from across the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area, including artists Barry Maitie from Boigu and Supia Bowie from Injinoo, and supplier Conrad Ahwang, owner of the popular Strait Clothing brand.

Regular visits to outer island communities resulted in increased production of Torres Strait Islander arts and crafts for the centre’s excellent supply chain. Preliminary discussions commenced to explore the potential for leading tourism industry stakeholders to commission artworks and distribute them to their national and international audiences.

Social media presence proved to be an effective marketing tool in March 2020, when a single post of a retail product reached 23,000 people, the centre’s highest reach ever.

The point of sale system migrated to a new platform, which proved to be more flexible and secure through initial trials at the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair. The centre’s combined sales at the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair contributed to the $6 million total of the Indigenous arts industry.

Parsa and Coral Trout, by George Gabey, appears on Gab Titui Cultural Centre merchandise, including souvenirs, tea towels and a calendar.

The Gallery Shop at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre had a stellar year in 2019. Gab Titui Cultural Centre artworks are displayed at the 2019 Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

x

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

COVID-19

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the TSRA activated its Business Continuity Plan, including by supporting staff to work remotely and ensuring compliance with guidance from the Department of Health to limit the spread of the virus.

With the support of the TSRA Board, the agency also

undertook an immediate review of programmes and service delivery, implementing the following responses to support the Torres Strait community:

― six-month interest and repayment moratoriums on Business Funding Scheme loans and Home Ownership Programme loans

― fast-tracking of the construction of fisheries infrastructure for island communities where local contractors are available in the community

― funding agreement extensions of up to 12 months for low-risk, essential non-government organisations, supporting them to assist the region’s recovery from the pandemic

― repurposing of the biannual Common Funding Round as a COVID-19 Community Response Initiative directed at supporting organisations that provide essential services to the community or providing additional community support initiatives during and after the pandemic

― closure of the Gab Titui Cultural Centre on 24 March 2020, due to the COVID-19 restrictions, followed by implementation of non-contact shopping on 14 April 2020 and the launch of an online shop on 1 June 2020, to continue to support artists’ incomes

― implementation of an artist support package which was available to the 150 artists registered with the Gab Titui Cultural Centre.

The TSRA participated as an observer at meetings of the Torres Strait Local Disaster Management Group from its establishment on 17 March 2020. On 9 April 2020, the group endorsed the TSRA as a formal member.

REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE

The geography of the Torres Strait area presents and always will present a challenge to the delivery of services and infrastructure. With island communities spread across approximately 44,000 kilometres of sea, the costs of delivering services and infrastructure are significantly higher than in most other parts of Australia. These costs have a major influence on the implementation and timing of programmes, services and projects.

The TSRA plays a key role in ensuring that essential infrastructure is in place for each community. The investment required to construct and maintain essential infrastructure is beyond the resources of the three Torres Strait local regional councils. The TSRA works with all stakeholders to attract the required resources, particularly through its flagship Major Infrastructure Programme.

SEAWALLS

A number of islands within the Torres Strait are low lying or slightly below the extreme water levels that impact the islands. As a result, many communities suffer from tidal inundation during very high tides and storm events.

In order to address this threat, the TSRA and the Queensland Government have commenced Stage 2 of the Torres Strait Seawalls Programme, which will construct barriers against ongoing coastal erosion at Poruma, Warraber, Masig, Boigu and Iama.

The Australian Government committed an additional $20 million of funding for Stage 2 in 2019-2020. This investment will help to protect communities and existing government infrastructure in the region.

TRANSPORT

The high costs of travel and transportation of freight in the Torres Strait continue to impact on economic growth, tourism and the delivery of programmes and services in the region. For example, the delivery of services to the outer Torres Strait islands may not be as timely or effective as service delivery in other Indigenous regions. Therefore, positive initiatives such as subsidised transportation, freight and airfares

are required to mitigate those significant costs.

xi

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The Torres Strait is an island environment, making marine infrastructure essential to transport throughout the region. Much of the wharf infrastructure in the Torres Strait is aging and in need

of large-scale maintenance and/or replacement.

The investment required is beyond the resources of local councils, and the TSRA is continuing to work with all stakeholders to attract the required resources. In 2019-2020, the Australian Government committed $5 million towards marine infrastructure in the region.

WASTE MANAGEMENT

For many years there has been a need to improve the coordination of waste management in the region. The Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area biosecurity restrictions and the high costs of potential solutions make waste management in the region particularly challenging. The development of a Torres Strait regional waste management strategy is now in progress and work undertaken by the TSRA will feed into this strategy.

INTEGRATED SERVICE DELIVERY

The TSRA’s Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) project aims to coordinate the effective delivery of a range of government services to local communities and minimise duplication between agencies. A key challenge to the project is facilitating the engagement of all Commonwealth, state and local government agencies to achieve effective and collaborative delivery of services and infrastructure to Torres Strait communities.

The TSRA hosted the inaugural Regional Interagency Forum on Thursday Island in September

2019, inviting senior officers from relevant government agencies, TSRA portfolio members, and regional mayors and councillors to provide input into the future ISD framework for the region. The TSRA will work in partnership with local government and the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships to deliver the forum annually, to focus on specific priorities that were highlighted at the first meeting.

As a complementary initiative to drive ISD in the region, the TSRA is renegotiating memorandums of agreement with the three local governments in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area: the TSC, TSIRC and NPARC.

CLIMATE CHANGE

The Torres Strait region is on the front line of climate change impacts, particularly in relation to low-lying communities, water security, community health and ecosystem health. Geographic isolation and socioeconomic vulnerability compound the risks that climate change presents to Torres Strait communities’ wellbeing, culture and environment.

The Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021, published by the TSRA in partnership with the TSIRC and the TSC, highlights specific challenges that climate change poses to the region and identifies ways for the region to adapt, build resilience and respond to those challenges.

The Torres Strait Regional Coordination Group, consisting of high-level representatives of the TSRA and the three local governments, was established to drive accountability and strategic assessment for the delivery of cross-regional actions identified in the plan, as well as other matters of strategic regional

significance, and to ensure that there is effective coordination across organisations and agencies.

Significant work is being done with partner agencies to assess and monitor climate impacts on fisheries, marine and terrestrial ecosystems and community health, and a regional coastal adaptation strategy is being developed in collaboration with local councils.

FISHERIES

Commercial fishing is one of the most economically important activities in the Torres Strait region. The TSRA seeks to promote business, employment and wealth creation for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the fishing industry while ensuring that fisheries are managed sustainably.

OWNERSHIP

The TSRA holds fisheries assets (catch allocations and commercial licences) on behalf of all Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the Torres Strait. The Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) is responsible for the management of commercial and traditional fishing in the Torres Strait Protected Zone, and seeks to maximise Traditional Inhabitants’ participation in commercial fishing.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

xii

On behalf of the PZJA, the TSRA has the lead in the development of a roadmap towards 100 per cent ownership of the commercial fisheries by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Traditional Owners. This is being implemented through the Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework project, which was established to ensure that fisheries assets are managed in the Torres Strait for the benefit Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people across the region.

CHALLENGES

Tropical rock lobster (TRL) fishing is among the highest-value economic activities in the Torres Strait region. The current major challenge facing the TRL industry is its reliance on Chinese markets. This has become evident since the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 to be a pandemic, on 11 March 2020. As a result of widespread quarantine, social containment and travel restriction measures, demand has plummeted in China, the prime market for live TRL delivered by air. In the first quarter of 2020, the industry reported a decrease in trade of 50 per cent to 80 per cent.

Climate change is another major challenge for fisheries and the fishing industry. One response, diversification of harvest strategies, was implemented in December 2019 for TRL and bêche-de-mer (sea cucumbers). Developing alternative strategies took years of scientific research and consultation and included augmenting scientific surveys with information from Indigenous fishers to work out sustainable catches.

The implementation of the new strategies followed a greatly reduced total allowable catch for TRL in 2018, when scientific surveys indicated that the TRL resource was being adversely affected by extreme El Niño events and the TRL fishery had to be closed two months early, with substantial economic impacts for the region. Similar tropical marine heatwave events are forecast for 2020.

Markets and climate change impacts look set to be major ongoing challenges in the management of the Torres Strait fisheries by the PZJA to mitigate loss of income, particularly for traditional TRL fishers.

KATTER LEASES

In February 2018, the Supreme Court of Queensland handed down a decision in Wigness v Kingham, President of the Land Court [2018] QSC 20. This was a review of a decision of the Land Court of Queensland.

The Land Court action was brought by parties who had lease entitlements under the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Holding Act 2013 (Qld), known as Katter leases. The parties had applied for grants of Katter leases, but the Minister for Natural Resources and Mines had decided that Native Title was a competing interest and therefore a practical obstacle to the granting of Katter leases.

The Land Court found that this was incorrect and that granting an entitlement to a Katter lease was a ‘pre-existing right-based act’ under section 24IB of the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth). The granting of exclusive possession by such an act extinguishes any Native Title. Therefore, Native Title was not an obstacle and the leases could be granted. The Supreme Court upheld the Land Court’s decision.

There are currently 238 Katter leases and valid entitlements to Katter leases in the Torres Strait. If these entitlements were to be exercised there would be a significant effect on Native Title in the region by its extinguishment for those areas of land.

The Queensland Government has undertaken to provide the TSRA with detailed maps of the Katter lease entitlements in the region.

The Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework project was established to ensure that fisheries assets are managed in the Torres Strait for the benefit Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people across the region.

xiii

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

CONTENTS

Vision vi

Highlights and Achievements vii

Challenges and Opportunities xi

Section One: Strategic Overview 1

Chairperson’s Message 2

Chief Executive Officer’s Message 4

Section Two: Programme Performance 7

Summary of Financial Performance 8

Annual Performance Statements 9

Programme Reports 17

Section Three: Operations 59

Where We Operate 60

What We Do 65

Section Four: Corporate Governance and Accountability 71

Governance Framework 72

Enabling Functions 87

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

xiv

Section Five: Financial Statements 95

Independent Auditor’s Report 96

Contents 98

Certification 99

Primary Financial Statement 100

Overview 104

Notes to the Financial Statements 107

Section Six: Appendices 129

Appendix 1: Human Resources 130

Appendix 2: Grants 134

Appendix 3: Consultants 137

Section Seven: Aids to Access 139

Lists of Requirements 140

List of Abbreviations 143

Index 144

xv

CONTENTS

SECTION ONE: STRATEGIC OVERVIEW

Chairperson’s Message 2

Chief Executive Officer’s Message 4

CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE

UNFORESEEN GLOBAL PANDEMIC

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has profoundly shifted the global environment, which has significantly impacted the economic and cultural

environment of our region. These impacts have seen the lives and livelihoods of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal peoples challenged to considerable lengths.

Our communities, collective at their cornerstone, have not been able to gather for cultural ceremonies, sorry business and community gatherings. Local hospitality businesses have been forced to temporarily close their doors, while essential services have been impacted by the significant disruption to transport and logistics. Due to the decrease of economic activity in Asia, the top exporting location for tropical rock lobster, our local fishermen have worn the financial burden of declining market demands.

Despite these challenges, the pandemic has proved to us what we already knew: we are resilient in our response to change; we are adaptable to changing environments; and, although we have not been able to gather physically, unity in spirit is what collectively binds us.

In these unprecedented times, the Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) Board agreed to reprioritise up to $1 million of appropriated savings to fund the TSRA COVID-19 Community Response Initiative. The purpose of the special grant round was to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 into the region; support communities to expand essential services and infrastructure during the pandemic; and support community recovery efforts.

The TSRA provided financial relief to existing home loan and business loan clients - a six-month moratorium on loan repayments. This opportunity has been positively received. We continue to work closely with clients to manage the ongoing financial impacts of COVID-19.

In response to the dramatic decline in Asia’s economic markets, the TSRA is liaising with Austrade

and the Seafood Trade Advisory Group to explore options for the continued export of live seafood products from the Torres Strait region. Further, the TSRA is working closely with traditional fishers and industry stakeholders to implement an industry recovery plan, and working with regional project partners to fast-track the construction of fisheries infrastructure on the outer islands. This would enable

ongoing employment and quick recovery once travel and export restrictions are lifted.

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

On 1 July 2019, the TSRA celebrated 25 years since establishment. In that time, the TSRA has made significant inroads to deliver programmes and services to the people of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area region. As I reflect on those years, I acknowledge the leaders before me whose hard work has allowed the organisation to come this far.

While most recently we have been occupied with the challenges of COVID-19 we must not forget the fruitful year that was. The TSRA continued to progress its infrastructure priorities, which included Minister for Indigenous Australians the Hon. Ken Wyatt’s announcement of $25 million to assist the region. Since the changeover of ministers, we have continued to advocate for regional governance and greater autonomy in the Torres Strait. We acknowledge that achieving this will take considerable time and resources.

Despite these challenges, the pandemic has proved to us what we already knew: we are resilient in our response to change; we are adaptable to changing environments; and, although we have not been able to gather physically, unity in spirit is what collectively binds us.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

2

In partnership across government and the private sector, through extensive community consultation, we developed the Wapil initiative - meaning ‘many fish’ - to develop informed policy responses aimed at increasing the Indigenous fishing industry economy in the Torres Strait, as a means of reducing unemployment. To finance this initiative, we secured $4.75 million through the Australian Government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy and $1.8 million through the Queensland Government’s Skilling Queenslanders for Work program, to deliver improved fisheries infrastructure to enable fishing activity.

THE YEAR AHEAD

In the face of a global pandemic, the TSRA will need to become more efficient and productive without compromising its efforts to deliver meaningful programmes and services to the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area communities.

The TSRA will continue to focus actively on regional governance and coordination, working alongside our Minister and the National Indigenous Australians Agency. We will continue efforts with our state and local government counterparts to achieve greater autonomy in the Torres Strait. The four-year term of the current TSRA Board membership will come to end in 2020-2021, with elections to take place at the end of 2020.

THANKS

It has been a fruitful and challenging year, and it has made us more resilient than ever before. With 25 years in review, I look forward to another 25 years of making a real impact on the lives and livelihoods of our people and communities.

I acknowledge the significant contributions of my fellow Board members, particularly Mr Donald Banu, who served as Member for Boigu from August 2019 until his death in June 2020. It was my honour and privilege to work beside Mr Banu during his TSRA service. I know his contribution to the Boigu community will not be forgotten and will continue through the generations to come.

I express my gratitude to the newly appointed Chief Executive Officer, Ms Leilani Bin-Juda PSM, and the members of the TSRA Administration for their commitment and dedication to the vision of the TSRA. It has been a pleasure to lead the TSRA during my four-year tenure. Au Esoau, Koeyma Eso.

Napau Pedro Stephen AM Chairperson

SECTION ONE: STRATEGIC OVERVIEW

| CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE

3

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S MESSAGE

PROGRESS THROUGH UNPRECEDENTED TIMES

As described by the TSRA Chairperson, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic occupied most of TSRA core business in 2020.

The TSRA Administration operationalised the Board’s directive to reprioritise up to $1 million towards a COVID-19 Community Response Initiative fund for organisations in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area, to sustain operations essential to the community and provide additional community support during and after the pandemic.

In addition, to provide financial relief, the Economic Development Programme offered existing home loan and business loan clients a six-month moratorium on loan repayments, collectively worth over $325,000 at 30 June 2020. This opportunity was welcomed by our clients.

In support of our local artists in the region, the Culture, Art and Heritage Programme launched the first Gab Titui Cultural Centre online shop during National Reconciliation Week. Our online presence has allowed our artists in the region to reach audiences across Australia and the globe.

I commend the work of the TSRA Administration staff, who through uncertain times have adapted to remote work requirements whilst responding to the COVID-19 challenges from an operational perspective. In the 2020 environment we have had to think and act differently to achieve organisational goals.

I reiterate the Chairperson’s sentiments that we are a resilient people - we are also a resilient organisation, which I am proud to lead. COVID-19 forced us to think outside the box when it comes to business, revealing to us the true potential of our capability.

LOOKING BACK TO LOOK FORWARD

I congratulate the TSRA for celebrating 25 years in 2019. What an incredible achievement.

It has been an honour to be the first Torres Strait Islander woman to substantively hold the position of Chief Executive Officer at the TSRA. I am committed to the equal representation of women in leadership across the region. This year we celebrated International Women’s Day and hosted a presentation by National Gallery of Australia Senior Curator Franchesca Cubillo. It was a successful event and a wonderful opportunity to gain insight into the work of the gallery.

To realise and further harness the capability of the TSRA, we deepened existing partnerships and forged new working relationships with the National Indigenous Australians Agency, Australian Public Service Commission, Australian Border Force, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Australian Fisheries Management Authority. At the local level, the TSRA continues to build on its productive relationships with the Queensland Government and local government, including the Torres Shire Council, Torres Strait Island Regional Council and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council.

Now more than ever before, we must take advantage of our collective regional strength to formulate policy and deliver programmes for the betterment of Torres Strait Islander people and Aboriginal people living in our region.

COVID-19 forced us to think outside the box when it comes to business, revealing to us the true potential of our capability.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

4

OUTLOOK FOR 2020-2021

The challenges of an ever-changing world are imminent. Our island geography and remoteness from mainland Australia present considerable challenge and opportunity. We will proactively engage to enhance regional coordination and delivery of services to improve the lives and livelihoods of our people and communities.

The TSRA will continue to advance organisational reform to modernise operations and service delivery, including to provide active policy advice. We will invest in our workforce and create opportunities for interagency exchanges. We will use innovative technology and resources to improve productivity, explore new economic sources for local and regional growth, and strengthen our working relationships at the local, state and national levels.

In conclusion, I would like to thank our Chairperson, Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM, and the TSRA Board for their leadership and support. I echo the sentiments of the Chairperson in respect to the late Mr Donald Banu. He will be dearly missed by the TSRA family.

I look forward to the future of the TSRA, working with the Board and Administration to produce better outcomes for our people and communities. Koeyma Eso, Au Esoau.

Leilani Bin-Juda PSM Chief Executive Officer

5

SECTION ONE: STRATEGIC OVERVIEW

| CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S MESSAGE

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

Summary of Financial Performance 8

Annual Performance Statements 9

Programme Reports 17

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

A summary of the TSRA’s financial performance for each programme area for 2019-2020 is provided in tables 2-1 and 2-2.

The financial statements in Section 5 provide further

information about the TSRA’s income and expenditure

for the financial year ended 30 June 2020.

APPROPRIATION PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-1: APPROPRIATION PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, BUDGET COMPARED TO ACTUAL, 2019-2020

Programme Budget $’000 Actual $’000 Variance $’000

Economic Development 9,139 7,882 1,257

Fisheries 2,232 2,283 -51

Culture, Art and Heritage 4,159 4,501 -342

Native Title 5,649 5,191 458

Environmental Management 4,667 4,659 8

Governance and Leadership 6,391 6,790 -399

Healthy Communities 2,090 1,933 157

Safe Communities 3,346 3,437 -91

Total 37,673 36,676 997

Note: The total variance represents 2.6 per cent of the total budget.

EXTERNAL FUNDING PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-2: EXTERNAL FUNDING PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, BUDGET COMPARED TO ACTUAL, 2019-2020

Programme Budget $’000 Actual $’000 Variance $’000

Fisheries 0 31 -31

Culture, Art and Heritage 0 100 -100

Environmental Management 11,114 10,440 674

Healthy Communities 3,500 3,500 0

Total 14,614 14,071 543

Note: The total variance represents 3.7 per cent of the total budget.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

8

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The TSRA Board, as the accountable authority of the TSRA, presents the 2019-2020 annual performance statements of the TSRA, as required under section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth). In the Board’s opinion, these annual performance statements accurately reflect the performance of the TSRA and comply with section 39(2) of the Act.

Napau Pedro Stephen AM Chairperson

PURPOSE

The purpose of the TSRA is encapsulated in the agency’s single outcome:

Progress towards Closing the Gap for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait region through development planning, coordination, sustainable resource management, and preservation and promotion of Indigenous culture.

RESULTS AND ANALYSIS

The key performance indicators for the TSRA were set out on page 288 of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Portfolio Budget Statements 2019-2020 and page 21 of the TSRA Corporate Plan 2019-2020.

INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL OWNED COMMERCIALLY VIABLE BUSINESSES

In 2019-2020, three business loans were approved to support Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal businesses (Table 2-3), and business mentoring and support were provided to 13 clients.

Under the Regional Economic Investment Strategy:

― Three Fisheries Business Growth Package applications were received and one was approved.

― Four Tourism Business Growth Package applications were received and one was approved.

― No Arts and Creative Industries Business Growth Package applications were received.

TABLE 2-3: NUMBER AND VALUE OF CONCESSIONAL BUSINESS LOANS, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Loans 5 1 2 5 3 3

Amount $928,213 $20,628 $162,000 $647,151 $598,187 $811,281

INCREASED AVAILABILITY OF APPROVED BUSINESS TRAINING

The You Sabe Business workshops series is a new service replacing the Into Business workshops that the TSRA delivered in partnership with Indigenous Business Australia. The new service is

contextualised to the Torres Strait region and targets

the business incubation stage. It aims to encourage and support the development of business skills and business growth for local Indigenous start-ups.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

| ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

9

Over the next two financial years, the You Sabe Business project will align with training outcomes of the Wapil initiative through the provision of a holistic

package of support that facilitates the sustainability of the fishing industry and reduces unemployment.

As a part of Wapil, up to 90 trainee positions will be made available across the region in the first year, to support entry into the commercial fishing

and seafood processing industries. The You Sabe Business workshops will be customised to provide trainees and fishing entities with industry-specific knowledge and business practices relevant to those industries.

The TSRA conducted three business workshops in 2019-2020 (Table 2-4).

TABLE 2-4: BUSINESS WORKSHOPS PARTICIPATION, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Courses 2 16 18 12 9 3

Participants 17 79 110 113 73 11

INCREASES IN CATCHES BY TORRES STRAIT AND ABORIGINAL FISHERS RELATIVE TO TOTAL ALLOWABLE CATCH, STRENGTHENING CLAIMS FOR INCREASED OWNERSHIP

Implementation of the Torres Strait Fisheries (Quotas for Tropical Rock Lobster (Kaiar)) Management Plan 2018, which commenced in December 2019, has secured access for the Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) sector to an ongoing quota allocation of 66.2 per cent of the total allowable catch.

In the 10 years prior to the plan’s implementation, reported catches in the tropical rock lobster fishery by the TIB sector regularly amounted to a share of around 45 per cent to 50 per cent of the Australian total allowable catch per season. However, in the 2018-2019 season the TIB catch was 52.5 per cent of the Australian total allowable catch (Table 2-5).

Reported catches from the TIB sector in the finfish fishery have been consistently low in recent years (Table 2-6). Reported catches in the bêche-de-mer

fishery (total and relative to the total allowable catch)

decreased between 2018 and 2019 (Table 2-7).

The catch statistics are estimates at time of printing and are likely to be updated in future publications. The best available and up-to-date catch data for Torres Strait fisheries can be obtained from the Fishery Status Reports published each year by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences.

Daily fisher logbook catch reporting for the TIB sector remains voluntary. There are ongoing discussions within the Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) to identify and implement opportunities for better data collection; however, this is likely to be a medium- to long-term outcome and remains a challenge for the PZJA.

TABLE 2-5: TROPICAL ROCK LOBSTER CATCH STATISTICS, 2017-2018 TO 2018-2019

Year 2017-2018 2018-2019

Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) catch (tonnes) 127.00 259.74

TIB Total Allowable Catch (TAC) (tonnes) N/A 327.44

Australian TAC (tonnes) 254.15 494.85

TIB catch share of TIB TAC (%) N/A 79.32

TIB catch share of Australian TAC (%) 49.97 52.49

Note: Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. The tropical rock lobster fishing season is 1 December to 30 September.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

10

TABLE 2-6: FINFISH CATCH STATISTICS, 2017-2018 TO 2019-20

Year 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

CORAL TROUT

Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) catch (tonnes) 4.773 4.249 2.063

Total Allowable Catch (TAC) (tonnes) 134.9 134.9 134.9

TIB catch share of TAC (%) 3.54 3.15 1.53

SPANISH MACKEREL

TIB catch (tonnes) 2.281 6.595 2.026

TAC (tonnes) 132 115 82

TIB catch share of TAC (%) 1.73 5.73 2.47

Note: Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. The finfish fishing season is 1 July to 30 June.

TABLE 2-7: BÊCHE-DE-MER (ALL SPECIES COMBINED) CATCH STATISTICS, 2017 TO 2019

Year 2017 2018 2019

Traditional Inhabitant Boat (TIB) catch (tonnes) 37.7 64.3 34.5

Total Allowable Catch (TAC) (tonnes) 115 110 110

TIB catch share of TAC (%) 32.78 58.45 31.36

Note: Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. The bêche-de-mer fishing season is 1 January to 31 December.

THE PERCENTAGE OWNERSHIP OF TORRES STRAIT COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BY TORRES STRAIT ISLANDERS AND ABORIGINAL PEOPLE IN THE REGION

The TSRA has the lead on behalf of the PZJA in the development of a roadmap towards 100 per cent ownership of the commercial fisheries by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Traditional Owners.

TABLE 2-8: PERCENTAGE OF TORRES STRAIT COMMERCIAL FISHERY OWNERSHIP, 2017-2018 TO 2019-2020

Fishery 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Tropical rock lobster* 66.17 66.17 66.20

Finfish 100 100 100

Bêche-de-mer 100 100 100

Trochus and crab 100 100 100

Prawn 0 0 0

* Provisional allocation under the Torres Strait Fisheries (Quotas for Tropical Rock Lobster (Kaiar)) Management Plan 2018.

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| ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

11

INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF EMERGING AND PROFESSIONALLY ACTIVE ARTISTS AND CULTURAL PRACTITIONERS THAT HAVE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND SUPPORT TO ENSURE COPYRIGHT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

In 2019-2020, the TSRA continued to support the development and promotion of the arts industry in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area. Initiatives offered under the Culture, Art and Heritage Programme included direct support through grant funding and projects, and delivery of initiatives through the Gab Titui Cultural Centre.

The yearly highlights included opportunities for artists and cultural practitioners to take the lead and facilitate art and cultural maintenance workshops, acquire relevant knowledge and experience of marketing and exhibition development, and teach and mentor art and cultural skills to school students, adults and older people.

The TSRA continued to provide partnership support to the three regional art centres: Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh, Ngalmun Lagau Minaral and Erub Erwer Meta. Artists associated with the art centres have increased their skills and experience in producing and marketing their works and have presented exhibitions in national and international institutions.

TABLE 2-9: ACTIVE ARTISTS AND CULTURAL PRACTITIONERS, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Active artists 110 117 151 156 160 262

Cultural practitioners 80 90 85 30 35 106

NUMBER OF NATIVE TITLE CLAIMS SUCCESSFULLY DETERMINED

The Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) in the Torres Strait is operating predominantly in a post-determination environment with 29 Native Title claims successfully determined.

Responses have been provided to all of the Future Acts notices received in 2019-20.

The claims currently being determined within the region are:

― QUD 27/2019 Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim (Part B) ― QUD 9/2019 Warral and Ului ― QUD 26/2019 Kaurareg People #1

― QUD 10/2019 Kaurareg People #2 ― QUD 24/2019 Kaurareg People #3.

TABLE 2-10: KEY NATIVE TITLE REPRESENTATIVE BODY RESULTS, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Active Native Title claims under consideration

2 5 5 5 5 5

Future Acts notices received

85 66 205 260 343 91

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

12

NUMBER OF INDIGENOUS LAND USE AGREEMENTS (ILUA) THAT HAVE COMPENSATION OR OTHER BENEFITS AS PART OF ILUA TERMS

One Indigenous Land Use Agreement was registered with the National Native Title Tribunal in 2019-2020 (Table 2-11).

TABLE 2-11: INDIGENOUS LAND USE AGREEMENTS FINALISED, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Indigenous Land Use Agreements finalised

12 11 7 13 16 1

NUMBER OF ENDORSED COMMUNITY BASED MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR THE NATURAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES OF THE REGION BEING ACTIVELY IMPLEMENTED

Sustainable development is critical to reconciling economic growth, human wellbeing and biodiversity conservation. As the TSRA works to improve social, economic and health outcomes for Torres Strait people, sustaining the Torres Strait’s unique natural and cultural values is critical.

Through its Land and Sea Management Unit, the TSRA aims to support decision-making within

communities through collaborative land use and sea use planning. The TSRA’s approach is transdisciplinary and participatory, integrating traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge and methods.

The number of community-based management plans increased to 58 in 2019-20 (Table 2-12).

TABLE 2-12: COMMUNITY-BASED MANAGEMENT PLANS, 2014-2015 TO 2019-2020

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020

Management plans 32 32 32 37 49 58

Strategic Framework

All community management plans developed by the TSRA are underpinned by the Land and Sea Management Strategy for Torres Strait 2016-2036.

Developed by critical stakeholders and Traditional Owners across the Torres Strait, the strategy provides a framework to support communities to continue to sustainably manage and benefit from their land, sea and cultural resources into the future. It sets out the vision and guiding principles for land and sea management in the region and identifies 16 key values and associated management directions.

An excerpt of the strategy, Management Directions: Land and Sea Management Strategy for Torres Strait 2016-2020, will be reviewed and updated in 2020-2021, in order to report on progress against the guiding principles.

Dugong and Turtle Management

The purpose of dugong and turtle management plans is to empower traditional governance practices with sustainable and adaptive management approaches underpinned by a deep respect for biocultural knowledge of the species. The plans support ongoing traditional uses and practices while ensuring sustainable populations of these marine species across the Torres Strait.

Dugong and turtle management plans have been in place for all outer island communities since 2016. During 2019-2020, a review process was conducted to update community aspirations, legislative requirements, compliance initiatives and the status of species, and to move towards a clear implementation component at the community scale.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

| ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

13

A dugong and turtle management plan and permit system for the Kaiwalagal region has been developed

by Kaurareg Traditional Owners with support from the TSRA. Kaurareg Traditional Owners are working towards endorsing the plan and determining how it can be implemented. The TSRA serves as a resource

for assistance where necessary and when requested.

Biodiversity and Biosecurity

Guided by community priorities, the TSRA has developed a suite of plans to address local and regional partnerships and directives for the management of biodiversity, biosecurity and invasive species.

At a local level, this includes profiles for the management of the habitats and related ecological and cultural resource values of 13 islands, and 18 biosecurity action plans to manage biosecurity threats within each inhabited island community in the Torres Strait. These local plans were developed and are being implemented in close collaboration and consultation with Traditional Owners, Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate (RNTBCs), government partner agencies and other stakeholders. The biosecurity action plans serve as Local Government Area biosecurity management plans for the Torres Shire Council (TSC) and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC).

At a regional level, the Torres Strait Regional Biosecurity Plan 2018-2023 works to manage local biosecurity threats through collaborative efforts of Torres Strait communities, government agencies and other stakeholders represented through the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Biosecurity Working Group and the Torres Strait Invasive Species Advisory Group.

The TSRA continues to work with communities to develop management plans to reduce the impacts of feral animals on natural and cultural resources.

Working on Country

Working on Country (WoC) plans are local, community-based management plans that have been developed by Traditional Owners and community stakeholders in partnership with the TSRA rangers. The plans reflect Traditional Owner aspirations for land and sea country management and guide the work of rangers on the ground over a 10-year timeframe.

WoC plans are in place to guide the work of Indigenous ranger groups in the 14 outer island communities. The TSRA has commenced a rolling update of the plans and aims to have all 14 updated by 2023. The refreshed plan for Masig was finalised early in 2020 and an additional three plan updates, for the islands of Moa, Mer and Erub, will be completed during 2020.

Indigenous Protected Areas

An Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) is an area of Indigenous-owned land and/or sea where Traditional Owners have entered into an agreement (in most cases, with the Australian Government) to promote biodiversity and cultural resource conservation.

The three IPAs in the Torres Strait - Warraberalgal Porumalgal, Ugul Malu Kawal and Kalalagaw (formerly Pulu) - are managed under endorsed IPA Management Plans. The plans have been progressively updated over the past three years; the final update, for Kalalagaw IPA, was completed in June 2020.

Climate Adaptation and Resilience

Local climate adaptation and resilience plans for outer island communities, to align with and complement the Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021, have been in development over several years. These plans are designed to help communities to identify local actions that can be undertaken to prepare for possible climate change impacts and to assist in building greater community strength and resilience.

A dugong and turtle management plan and permit system for the Kaiwalagal region has been developed by Kaurareg Traditional Owners with support from the TSRA. Kaurareg Traditional Owners are working towards endorsing the plan and determining how it can be implemented.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

14

INCREASE THE LEVEL OF ENGAGEMENT OF ELECTED TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL LEADERS IN POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND DECISION-MAKING

Elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders are becoming more engaged in state and Commonwealth policy development and decision-making mechanisms. TSRA Board members and mayors and councillors of the region are also more actively involved in representation on government committees and advisory groups that help shape effective policies for the region.

Indigenous voice co-design process

On 30 October 2019, the Minister for Indigenous Australians announced the commencement of the Indigenous voice co-design process, a mechanism established to develop models to enhance local and regional decision-making and provide a voice to government for Indigenous Australians. The Senior Advisory Group is guiding the co-design process, and provides advice and support to the Minister.

The Minister announced the establishment of the National Co-design Group on 15 January 2020 and the Local and Regional Co-design Group on 4 March 2020. These two groups are tasked to look at ways to create local, regional and national elements of an Indigenous voice.

The elected Torres Strait Islander representatives to the Indigenous voice co-design process are:

― Cr Vonda Malone, TSC Mayor - Senior Advisory Group ― Mr Joseph Elu AO, TSRA Member for Seisia and Portfolio Member for Economic Development -

National Co-design Group ― Mr Getano Lui Jr AM, TSRA Member for Iama and Deputy Chairperson - Local and Regional Co-design Group.

Policy development and decision-making

In addition to her appointment to the Senior Advisory Group, Cr Vonda Malone is Chair of Community Enterprise Queensland, a Queensland Government statutory body with responsibility for providing goods and essential services to Torres Strait, Northern Peninsula Area and mainland Aboriginal communities in remote areas. Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM, TSRA Chairperson, serves as a board member of Community Enterprise Queensland.

Cr Malone also serves as Chairperson of the Torres and Cape Indigenous Councils Alliance and Chairperson and founder of the Torres Health Indigenous Corporation. She is a member of the Northern Australia Indigenous Reference Group, which advises the Australian Government to shape implementation of the northern Australia agenda to ensure that it benefits local Indigenous landowners, communities and businesses, and supports and advises the Ministerial Forum on Northern Development.

In addition to his appointment to the National Co-design Group, Mr Joseph Elu AO serves as Chairperson of Seisia Enterprises Pty Ltd.

Mr Aven S Noah, TSRA Member for Mer, is a member of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Round Table on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics. The round table provides the ABS with grassroots perspectives and advice on tactical and operational components of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander statistics programme. This includes providing advice and guidance around understanding conceptual issues from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.

Mr Horace Baira, TSRA Member for Badu, Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Native Title, serves on the Torres and Cape Hospital and Health Service Board, with additional duties as a member of the Finance and Performance Committee and the Safety and Quality Committee. TSRA Board members and mayors and councillors of the region are more actively involved in representation on government committees and advisory groups that help shape effective policies for the region.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

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15

Mrs Patricia Yusia, TSRA Member for Bamaga and Portfolio Member for Healthy Communities, was elected Mayor of the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council (NPARC) in March 2020. The local government elections held in March 2020 also saw Mr Philemon Mosby from the community of Poruma elected as Mayor of the TSIRC. Mr Mosby also serves as Chair of the Porumalgal (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC, and Chair of the Torres Strait Local Disaster Management Group. Mr John Abednego, TSRA Member for TRAWQ, was re-elected to the TSC.

Engagement with ministers

In December 2019, the TSRA hosted an official visit to the region by the Minister for Indigenous Australians and the Queensland Minister for Employment and Small Business, Minister for Training and Skills Development and Queensland Government Champion for the Torres Strait. The visit facilitated meaningful dialogue between the ministers, local councils and the Traditional Owners of the region.

The TSRA continues to engage with Commonwealth and state ministers, as well as senior government officials, to influence appropriate policy development for the region.

NUMBER OF PBCS THAT ACHIEVE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR OF INDIGENOUS CORPORATIONS (ORIC) COMPLIANCE AS AT 31 DECEMBER EACH YEAR

The majority of RNTBCs in the region have met many, if not all, of the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations compliance requirements.

Two RNTBCs have maintained a level of capacity which has reduced their dependency on grant funding by operating on a fee-for-service cost recovery model. In 2019-2020, those RNTBCs made a commitment to provide support to other RNTBCs in the region as result of the fee-for-service cost recovery model.

INCREASED INVESTMENT INTO NEW AND EXISTING REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURE

The Australian Government and the Queensland Government provided $30 million for the TSRA to undertake the Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 6. This rolling three-year programme (2017-2020) will complete 12 essential health infrastructure projects across the three regional council areas.

The TSRA continued to fund a range of minor infrastructure projects through the three regional councils in 2019-2020.

The TSRA has also secured $40 million in investment from the Australian Government and the Queensland Government to commence Stage 2 of the Torres Strait Seawalls Programme. This important programme ensures that crucial coastal protection work is undertaken for the most endangered islands in the Torres Strait: Boigu, Poruma, Warraber, Iama and Masig.

IMPROVE REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND MARINE INFRASTRUCTURE

Since 2011, the TSRA has delivered infrastructure projects through the Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme, a co-funding initiative of the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads. The TSRA contributes $500,000 annually to the scheme under a memorandum of understanding with the department.

In 2019-2020, the scheme delivered an airstrip security fence replacement on Warraber, pavement repairs on Erub, and the development of a marine access channel dredging study that covers Erub, Masig, Poruma, Saibai and Boigu.

In 2017-2018, the TSRA secured $6 million in infrastructure funding from the Australian Government for the Prince of Wales Island Safe Landing Facility project. The TSRA is working with the TSC to seek development approval for the safe landing facility.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

16

PROGRAMME REPORTS

This section reports on the activities undertaken in 2019-2020 by the TSRA’s eight programmes:

― Economic Development ― Fisheries ― Culture, Art and Heritage ― Native Title

― Environmental Management ― Governance and Leadership ― Healthy Communities ― Safe Communities.

Each programme report provides the following information:

― a statement of the regional goal, programme outcomes and projects and initiatives set out in the Torres Strait Development Plan 2019-2022

― a summary of expenditure ― a summary of performance.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

| PROGRAMME REPORTS

17

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

REGIONAL GOAL

Enhance our region’s wealth, by supporting industry development and increasing employment opportunities for our people equivalent to the wider Australian community.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Increased capability of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region to manage commercially viable businesses.

― Improved access to capital and other opportunities to finance commercially viable businesses.

― Increased number of commercially viable businesses owned and/or operated by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

― Improved wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

― Increased employment and training opportunities.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Economic Development Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following initiatives and activities:

― concessional home loans ― concessional business loans ― business training ― business support services

― TSRA Regional Economic Investment Strategy Phase One Business Development Strategy - provide targeted assistance for the development of commercially viable businesses in three focal industry sectors: Fisheries, Arts and Creative Industries, and Tourism/Visitor Economy.

― TSRA Regional Economic Investment Strategy Phase Two Torres Strait Regional Economic Investment Strategy - identify priorities and strategies to address the Torres Strait region’s economic development enablers, such as transport and communications infrastructure, as outlined in the Regional Economic Investment Strategy.

― employment and training projects.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-13: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

9,139 7,882 1,257

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

18

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Business mentoring and support

Completed/ on schedule The Economic Development Programme provides mentoring and professional business support to eligible applicants who have an existing

business or are ready to start a business.

Thirteen clients were approved for business mentoring and support to assist with organisational capacity building.

Of these 13 clients:

― one client accessed business mentoring and support only ― two clients were referred to claim Business Growth Packages ― one client was referred to the Business Funding Scheme ― nine clients were sponsored to attend conferences for professional

development and to build business networks. Events included the National Indigenous Empowerment Summit and Indigenous Artists Hub training in Cairns.

Business funding

Completed/ on schedule The Business Funding Scheme provides business loans to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the region, at interest rates lower

than commercial bank rates; small business training; and business support and advice.

Three Business Funding Scheme loan applications were received and approved, in the tourism and fishing industries.

Regional Economic Investment Strategy

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Regional Economic Investment Strategy (REIS) continued in 2019-2020. REIS targets three focal industries: Fisheries; Arts and Creative

Industries; and Tourism and the Visitor Economy.

The REIS Business Growth Package provides a combination of low-interest business loans, professional business support and grant funding for eligible applicants.

A total of seven Business Growth Package applications were received in 2019-2020:

― Three Fisheries Business Growth Package applications were received with one approved. ― Four Tourism Business Growth Package applications were received with one approved.

No Arts and Creative Industries Business Growth Package applications were received in this period.

Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project (TSMPP) enhances the skills and capability of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region

to operate commercial vessels and create maritime career pathways in related industries.

The TSMPP currently focuses on equipping TIB licence holders with coxswain licences to meet legislative requirements for commercial fishing. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority exemption for commercial fishing vessels under six metres operating in the region will expire on 30 June 2022 and the TSRA is committed to supporting fishers to obtain the licence before then.

Outer island delivery options were explored and supported. Impacts of COVID-19 delayed the rollout of the new delivery model.

Two TSMPP courses were completed in 2019-2020. Participants undertook training as follows:

― 26 participants commenced and completed the Elements of Shipboard Safety Skill Set course ― 26 participants commenced and completed the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency

― 26 participants commenced and completed the First Aid course ― 26 participants commenced and completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal.

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Activity Flag Status

You Sabe Business workshops

Completed/ on schedule The You Sabe Business workshops aim to assist local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aspiring to start a business, through a

series of three one-day workshops delivered face to face in the region. The workshops’ purpose is to empower aspiring business owners by improving their understanding of business ownership and enabling them to make informed decisions as to whether going into business is right for them.

The delivery model is client focused, offering support from the point of registration for minimum a period of 12 months, with access to a client support officer, an Indigenous mentor and a financial literacy support service.

Twenty-four workshop participants (all graduates of the inaugural You Sabe Business workshop series) were offered tailored support in 2019-20. Of these, three participants accessed business support services and nine received financial literacy support to progress their business concept.

On completion of the 12-month client-focused support, seven of the 24 participants decided to start up a business or stay in business.

The You Sabe Business workshops have been customised to target the business development needs of Wapil participants; however, scheduling was impacted due to COVID-19.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions on travel to the outer islands of the Torres Strait, the Economic Development Programme piloted a virtual You Sabe Business workshop, which commenced on 15 June 2020 and concluded on 26 June 2020.

The virtual workshop was delivered over a total of two hours a day for a period of two weeks by workshop facilitator Brendan Bishop from Indigenous Business Builders. One hour of mentor support post-sessions was provided by Flora Warrior from Saltwater Blue Consultancy.

Three Erub Fisheries Management Association board members and three freezer staff successfully completed the workshop. The Erub Fisheries Management Association, trading as Darnley Deep Seafood, now has a three-year business plan and cashflow projections in place.

Home Ownership Programme

Behind schedule less than three months

The Home Ownership Programme provides home and land loans on freehold land at concessionary interest rates to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait region.

Two home loans were approved in 2019-2020. Complex land tenure arrangements in the Torres Strait continue to make it difficult for loan applicants to provide appropriate security for loans in Deed of Grant in Trust and reserve communities.

Tourism Completed/

on schedule In 2019-2020, the TSRA continued to fund three Tourism Officer positions based in the TSC, TSIRC and NPARC. These positions are dedicated solely to supporting the region’s efforts in enhancing the tourism/visitor economy.

Funding for the Regional Tourism Officer with Tourism Tropical North Queensland (TTNQ) ended in December 2019. TTNQ will continue to support the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area region to increase opportunities and enhance the region’s tourism/visitor economy efforts.

Community Development Programme agreement management

Completed/ on schedule At 30 June 2020, there were 919 CDP job seekers. This represents an increase of 139 job seekers when compared to the total at 30 June 2019.

During 2019-2020, 150 job seekers transitioned into paid employment. The regional employment target was met in each reporting period in 2019-2020.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

20

Activity Flag Status

Growing Our Own Tagai Transitions Maritime project

Completed/ on schedule The Growing Our Own Tagai Transitions Maritime project is funded by the TSRA and delivered in partnership with Tagai State College, TAFE North

Queensland, Northern Peninsula Area State College and the Community Development Programme (CDP) provider, Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab.

This project targets students in years 10, 11 and 12 at Tagai State College and Northern Peninsula Area State College and builds their capability to utilise the region’s commercial maritime resources, and prepares school leavers for a smooth transition from school to work.

In the period from 1 July to 31 December 2019, at Tagai State College:

― four Year 10 students completed the Elements of Shipboard Safety Skill Set course ― 15 Year 11 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal

― 15 Year 11 students completed the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency ― 15 Year 11 students completed the First Aid course ― 14 Year 12 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations -

Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal ― 14 Year 12 students completed the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency ― 14 Year 12 students completed the First Aid course

― 14 Year 12 students completed the Elements of Shipboard Safety Skill Set course ― 12 Year 12 students completed the Australian Maritime Safety Authority mandated practical assessment for Coxswain certificates.

In the period from 1 July to 31 December 2019, at Northern Peninsula Area State College:

― 12 Year 11 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal ― 12 Year 11 students commenced the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency

― 10 Year 11 students completed the First Aid course.

In the period from 1 January to 30 June 2020, at Tagai State College:

― 13 Year 10 students completed the Elements of Shipboard Safety Skill Set course ― 14 Year 11 students commenced the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal

― 13 Year 11 students completed the Elements of Shipboard Safety Skill Set course ― 14 Year 11 students accumulated four days sea time ― 14 Year 11 students commenced task books for Coxswain and Marine

Engine Driver Grade III certificates ― 15 Year 12 students completed the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency ― 15 Year 12 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations -

Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal ― 15 Year 12 students accumulated 14 days sea time ― 15 Year 12 students completed 100 per cent of the task books for Coxswain certificates

― 15 Year 13 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Marine Engine Driver Grade III ― 15 Year 13 students completed the Australian Maritime Safety Authority mandated practical assessment for Coxswain and Marine Engine Driver

Grade III certificates.

In the period from 1 January to 30 June 2020, at Northern Peninsula Area State College:

― seven Year 12 students completed the Certificate II in Maritime Operations - Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal ― 12 Year 12 students commenced the Marine Radio Short-Range Operator Certificate of Proficiency

― 11 Year 12 students completed the First Aid course ― 12 Year 12 students accumulated 17 days sea time ― 12 Year 12 students completed 30 per cent to 50 per cent of task books for Coxswain and Marine Engine Driver Grade III certificates.

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21

Activity Flag Status

Employment and training projects

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA works in partnership with Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab, local shires, Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs), Community Owned Enterprises,

Enterprise Management Group and PDR/SMEC Engineers Pty Ltd to deliver employment and training projects in the region that aim to transition job seekers from the CDP into employment. These projects provide industry-specific training to CDP job seekers while also benefiting the wider community.

In 2019-2020, four projects were undertaken:

― Wongai Multi-Purpose Courts Upgrade ― Ken Brown Oval Extension ― Mer Guesthouse Upgrade ― Thursday Island Cycleway (Stage Three).

WONGAI MULTI-PURPOSE COURTS UPGRADE - THURSDAY ISLAND

Stage One of the Wongai Multi-Purpose Courts Upgrade project was completed in September 2019 and Stage Two was completed in April 2020.

The scope of works included the revitalisation of the basketball, netball and tennis courts; the construction of a toilet block, storeroom and new grandstands; and improvements to the site’s drainage to prevent the site retaining water during the wet season.

Local contractor Rob Clarke Builders was awarded the contract and completed the works using local Indigenous subcontractors from Building and Construction Indigenous Corporation. Seven CDP job seekers obtained a Certificate II in Construction Pathways. Eight CDP job seekers gained full-time employment on Stage One, with seven continuing full-time employment on Stage Two.

KEN BROWN OVAL EXTENSION - THURSDAY ISLAND

The completion of the Ken Brown Oval Extension has resulted in job creation and the obtainment of nationally accredited training for local job seekers through TSRA sponsorship. This project was a partnership between the TSRA, the Queensland Government’s Get Playing Plus programme (Round 2), the TSC, and Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab.

While the project saw the oval extended to meet the requirements for Queensland Rugby League competition matches, the TSRA’s sponsorship focused on completing road-paving capital works and increasing the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in employment.

Seven CDP job seekers completed a Certificate II in Civil Constructions in April 2019 and are now employed full-time by the TSC.

MER GUESTHOUSE UPGRADE

The Mer Guesthouse renovation project commenced in June 2019 and was completed in March 2020.

The project’s scope of works included a renovation of the guesthouse, the inclusion of a meeting room and disability accommodation, repairs to the roof, and works to ensure that the guesthouse meets the current building code and regulations.

Local Indigenous building contractor Paul Ware Constructions was awarded the contract and completed the works. The target for the use of local Indigenous trades, trainees and suppliers was exceeded, with 86 per cent Indigenous participation achieved.

As a result of the project:

― 10 CDP job seekers participated in a combination of paid employment and CDP activity for the duration of the period ― 19 CDP job seekers obtained a White Card ― eight CDP job seekers obtained a Certificate II in Construction Pathways

― one CDP job seeker transitioned into a full-time apprenticeship as a plumber.

THURSDAY ISLAND CYCLEWAY (STAGE THREE)

The Thursday Island Cycleway (Stage Three) commenced in October 2019. This stage will see the construction of a concrete cycleway from Clark Street to the corner of Aubrey Parade and Douglas Street, Thursday Island, and is scheduled for completion by 31 October 2020.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

22

Activity Flag Status

Community Owned Enterprises, in partnership with Mura Gub Industries, successfully commenced eight Work Skills Trainees, all under 20 years of age, via the Queensland Government’s Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative to create employment pathways in the region.

The Thursday Island Cycleway project is multi-phased and is led by the TSC. Project partners include the TSRA, the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads (through the Principal Cycleway Network Plan - Far North Queensland), CDP provider Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab, and Community Owned Enterprises.

FUTURE PROJECTS

The TSRA and project partners are planning to commence an upgrade of the multi-purpose office space on Badu in 2020-2021.

The planned project to construct a concrete road on the Esplanade at Muralag Beach has not commenced, due to unforeseen circumstances, and is on hold until further notice.

MENTORS EMPLOYMENT PROJECT

The TSRA funded three positions for mentors, to provide mentoring to CDP job seekers involved in the Mer Guesthouse Upgrade, the Badu multi-purpose office space upgrade and the Thursday Island Cycleway (Stage Three). Mentor support for the Mer Guesthouse Upgrade and the Thursday Island Cycleway (Stage Three) was completed by 30 June 2020; the Badu multi-purpose office space upgrade is yet to commence.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

An increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in employment

Completed/ on schedule In 2019-2020, 150 CDP job seekers moved from welfare into employment, and 150 job seekers met employment outcome milestones:

― 13-week outcome - 89 CDP jobseekers. ― 26-week outcome - 61 CDP jobseekers.

Job placements were in the following industries:

― administrative and support services - 1 ― construction - 43 ― public administration and safety - 18 ― education and training - 9

― retail trade - 24 ― accommodation and food services - 8 ― agriculture, forestry and fishing - 7 ― health care and social assistance - 6

― transport, postal and warehousing - 7 ― arts and recreation services - 11 ― rental, hiring and real estate services - 1 ― financial and insurance services - 6

― other services - 9.

The overall job placement number has decreased. Slightly fewer job seekers remained in work for a minimum of 26 weeks in 2019-2020 than in 2018-2019.

Increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned commercially viable businesses

Completed/ on schedule In 2019-2020, three business loans were approved to support Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned businesses.

In the same period, business mentoring and support was provided to 13 clients.

Three Fisheries Business Growth Package applications were received, with one approved.

Four Tourism Business Growth Package applications were received, with two approved.

No Arts and Creative Industries Business Growth Package applications were received.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

| PROGRAMME REPORTS

23

Indicator Flag Status

Increased availability of approved business training

Completed/ on schedule In 2019-2020, 90 Work Skills Traineeship positions were approved for the region to support entry into the local commercial fishing industry. The

traineeships include a Certificate I in Business course delivered by TAFE Queensland. The traineeships are six months in duration and funded by the Queensland Government Department of Employment, Small Business and Training via the Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative.

Twenty-four You Sabe Business workshop participants received support to improve their understanding of business ownership, enabling them to make informed decisions as to whether going into business is right for them.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

24

CASE STUDY: PERSEVERANCE LEADS TO HOME OWNERSHIP FOR INDIGENOUS FAMILY

Joseph and Gabrielle Sabatino’s journey to home ownership shows that perseverance pays off.

It is widely known that becoming a homeowner in the Torres Strait region is not easy. The shortage of affordable housing and complexity of land tenure arrangements restrict home ownership, limiting intergenerational wealth creation.

Joseph Sabatino is a Torres Strait Islander from Keriri, while Gabrielle Sabatino is of Aboriginal and European descent and grew up in Tasmania.

In 2017, Joseph completed university and the couple, who were both working, made the decision to look at buying a home. In 2018, they chose to settle in the Torres Strait region, with their young family.

‘Some of the barriers we faced were securing permanent employment, raising a young family, finding a property that was affordable and saving for a deposit amid the high cost of living in the Torres Strait region’, Joseph said.

Joseph and Gabrielle actively monitored the local housing market. ‘We started looking at properties whilst saving for a deposit’, Gabrielle said.

After several negotiations with potential sellers,

they secured their dream home on Ngurapai.

‘Once we moved into our home we felt relief - a sense of achievement. We have now created and secured a future for ourselves and our children’, Gabrielle said.

In areas where it is possible to establish freehold and leasehold land, the TSRA can work with potential homeowners by offering subsidised home loans to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region, through the Home Ownership Programme.

Since the establishment of the TSRA in 1994, the Home Ownership Programme has provided 123 home loans to assist Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the region to purchase a home or freehold land or to undertake renovations.

The overall success of the TSRA Home Ownership Programme has helped 54 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to own their own homes, which has enhanced the wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

TSRA Chairperson Pedro Napau Stephen AM presents the certificate of title for their home to Gabrielle and Joseph Sabatino.

The overall success of the TSRA Home Ownership Programme has helped 54 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to own their own homes, which has enhanced the wealth of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

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FISHERIES

REGIONAL GOAL

Enhance our region’s wealth, by managing and maintaining sustainable fishing industries and increasing employment and economic opportunities for our people.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― A commercially viable fishing industry which is 100 per cent owned by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

― Increased participation in commercial fisheries by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

― Sustainable management of fisheries resources supported by appropriate research.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Fisheries Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake initiatives and activities which contribute to:

― progressing towards 100 per cent ownership of the region’s fisheries ― delivering projects that increase the capacity to participate in commercial fishing activities

― supporting TSRA and community engagement in the PZJA ― managing the lease-out of unused quota in Torres Strait fisheries

― assisting communication with communities on fisheries issues in the region ― supporting research into the sustainability and commercial use of Torres Strait fisheries.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-14: FISHERIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

2,232 2,283 -51

TABLE 2-15: FISHERIES PROGRAMME EXTERNAL FUNDING EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

0 31 -31 ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

26

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Research and extension Completed/ on schedule

The Fisheries Programme’s research and extension projects support the sustainability and commercial use of Torres Strait fisheries.

In 2019-2020, the Fisheries Programme assisted the Spanish Mackerel Biological Samples Project to collect length and age information, by funding workshops on Masig, Erub and Ugar to educate fishers in sample collection.

The programme also provided funding to the Australian Fisheries Management Authority to manage two projects both due to be finalised in 2020-2021:

― Torres Strait Sea Cucumber Stock Status Survey - a field survey to update knowledge on the current stock status of bêche-de-mer species in the Torres Strait

― Measuring Non-commercial Fishing in the Torres Strait - a scoping study to assess options for capturing data on the amount of catches taken from non-commercial (recreational and traditional) fishing in the Torres Strait.

In September 2019, with support from the TSRA in partnership with the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, the Assessing Direct Export Feasibility, Marketing and Branding Opportunities for Torres Strait Fisheries Derived Products (Seafood Export and Branding) project was finalised.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the local fishing industry, the Fisheries Programme developed a recovery action plan to expedite the Seafood Export and Branding project. The project is expected to deliver a plan, in early 2020-2021, that will help fishers to build new branding opportunities and pursue more diverse market options.

Capacity building and training

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA delivers projects that increase the capacity of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region to participate in commercial fishing

activities and the sustainable management of fisheries resources.

Since 2017, the Fisheries Programme has provided 16 weeks of work experience and ongoing mentoring for a fisheries cadet while they complete an undergraduate degree in marine biology at James Cook University.

In February 2020, the TSRA supported two PZJA Traditional Inhabitant members to attend a leadership and fisheries management workshop in Adelaide with participants from across Australia.

The TSRA is also implementing of a new support model for PZJA Traditional Inhabitant members to increase and support their engagement in PZJA decision-making processes, by providing additional analytical support before, during and after PZJA advisory committee meetings.

Finfish quota management Completed/ on schedule

Each year since 2008, the TSRA has leased licences in the finfish fishery to non-Indigenous fishers. The aim of leasing licences to non-Indigenous fishers is to maintain markets until the TIB sector can increase its overall catch and meet market demand.

The Fisheries Programme provides support to the TSRA Board and the Finfish Quota Management Committee to facilitate the leasing process. In 2019-2020, the committee recommended that licences for 74 tonnes of Spanish mackerel, 30 tonnes of coral trout and 5 tonnes of other species be leased out. Those leases generated $169,000 in revenue.

Fisheries Summit

Behind schedule more than three months

The TSRA planned to host a fisheries summit on 28-30 April 2020, to focus on establishing the Indigenous owned and operated fisheries management entity. Agenda items included the selection of company membership, and stakeholder feedback on and approval of the draft five-year business plan.

However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and travel restrictions the summit was postponed until 2020-2021.

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Activity Flag Status

PZJA representation Completed/ on schedule

There are currently 22 PZJA Traditional Inhabitant members from the Torres Strait’s island cluster nations: Kemer Kemer Meriam, Kulkalgal, Maluialgal, Gudamalulgal and Kaiwalagal.

The Fisheries Programme participated in and supported Traditional Inhabitant members’ participation in:

― two Scientific Advisory Committee meetings ― one Tropical Rock Lobster Working Group meeting ― two Tropical Rock Lobster Resource Assessment Group meetings ― one Finfish Working Group meeting

― two Finfish Resource Assessment Group meetings ― one Finfish Harvest Strategy workshop ― two Hand Collectable Working Group meetings ― one Prawn Management Advisory Committee meeting.

Between October 2019 and February 2020, the TSRA supported the 22 members to lead community engagement events on their home islands and throughout their island cluster groups. The members presented fisheries updates and sought input from industry for future meetings. These visits were delivered as part of ongoing support provided to improve the engagement of communities with fisheries governance in the Torres Strait.

Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework

Behind schedule less than three months

In late 2019, the TSRA undertook consultations in all island communities on the proposed model and membership for an Indigenous owned and operated entity to manage fisheries assets currently held by the TSRA. The consultations received strong community support and endorsement. The TSRA Board agreed to progress the establishment of the entity by July 2020.

The TSRA’s Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework Steering Committee guided community consultation on the formation of an independent entity and its draft business plan for 2020-2025. The committee is overseeing corporate and administrative activities to establish the new entity.

Committee members include the TSRA Chairperson, Portfolio Member for Fisheries (Member for Ngurapai and Muralag) and Portfolio Member for Native Title (Member for Badu); two community representatives; and one representative each of Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC and Gur A Baradharaw Kod Torres Strait Land and Sea Corporation.

Fisheries Infrastructure Behind schedule

less than three months

Island cluster consultations and industry-led workshops revealed that communities would benefit significantly if fisheries processing infrastructure and business support were available in remote island locations. Experience showed that success would be achieved through strong and consistent support in the early stages of development and operation, with start-up investment and subsidies from a range of government and non-government partners.

In September 2019, the Wapil initiative, named with a traditional word meaning ‘many fish’, was formed. The TSRA initiative manages infrastructure investment, subsidised employment and training, traineeships, and enterprise development support. It has three key stages of implementation: construction; employment and training; and enterprise development and ongoing advisory support.

Wapil was officially announced in December 2019, with funding support from the Australian Government and the Queensland Government.

COVID-19 travel restrictions delayed construction and training schedules for some island communities during early 2020. However, fish market and processing facility training and MYOB and payroll training of three part-time staff were able to be conducted at the Erub Wapil facility, which opened in March 2020. The first commercial frozen seafood shipment of coral trout, mackerel, barramundi cod and tropical rock lobster was forwarded by sea in April 2020.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

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CASE STUDY: ISLAND CLUSTER CONSULTATION MODEL IMPROVES COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN FISHERIES GOVERNANCE

The TSRA Fisheries Programme supports the Traditional Inhabitant members of PZJA advisory committees and their engagement in the science, community consultation and discussions that underpin commercial fisheries management in the Torres Strait.

The PZJA has seven established advisory committees: the Scientific Advisory Committee, the Tropical Rock Lobster Resource Assessment Group and its working group, the Finfish Resource Assessment Group and its working group, the Hand Collectables Working Group, and the Prawn Management Advisory Committee. Their primary role is to support decision-making by the PZJA.

In 2019-2020, the TSRA Fisheries Programme implemented an enhanced model to support the Traditional Inhabitant members’ engagement in PZJA governance. The model focuses on ensuring that members are supported prior to meetings through briefings, and after meetings through straightforward meeting summaries and improved opportunities to engage with their communities.

The PZJA’s current model for Traditional Inhabitant representation is based on the island clusters of the Kemer Kemer Meriam, Kulkalgal, Maluialgal, Gudamalulgal and Kaiwalagal nations. Between October 2019 and January 2020, PZJA Traditional Inhabitant members led community engagements across their island cluster groups, supported by staff from the TSRA Fisheries Programme.

Representatives from island groups worked together to develop and deliver joint presentations that covered issues across all the commercial fisheries in the Torres Strait. Updates were presented about key activities in the management of each fishery over the previous 12 months, with members leading open discussions about future priorities.

There was strong community and industry engagement in the cluster meetings, which focused on educating the community about how fisheries management decisions are made by the PZJA, and who their local representatives are, as well as seeking community input into key challenges and priorities. The TSRA has a strong commitment to continuing these engagements and developing stronger links with and between communities about the relationship between PZJA decision-making and management of the region’s commercial fisheries.

There was strong community and industry engagement in the cluster meetings, which focused on educating the community about how fisheries management decisions are made by the PZJA, and who their local representatives are, as well as seeking community input into key challenges and priorities.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

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CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE

REGIONAL GOAL

Protect, promote, revitalise, maintain and develop Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal traditions and cultural heritage.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Strong, supported and respected Ailan Kastom.

― Cultural values and protocols are integrated into service planning and management practice.

― The unique cultural heritage and histories of the region are preserved, maintained and promoted.

― An active and sustainable arts and crafts industry.

― The copyright, intellectual property and traditional knowledge of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region are protected.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Culture, Art and Heritage Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following initiatives and activities:

― cultural and language preservation, maintenance, development and promotion ― arts industry development ― gateway/hub for presenting, preserving,

promoting and providing education on Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal culture and arts ― cultural heritage education, preservation and

maintenance (links with the Environmental Management Programme) ― copyright and intellectual property rights policies and initiatives

― cultural values and protocols development projects ― integration of community-based cultural and art activities with community and social services

delivery where appropriate.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-16: CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

4,159 4,501 -342

TABLE 2-17: CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE PROGRAMME EXTERNAL FUNDING EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

0 100 -100 ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

30

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Arts development programme

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA contributed operational support to the Badu, Erub and Moa art centres, enabling the centres to further develop artists’ skills and the

exposure of Torres Strait art and culture in the arts industry. Highlights for the art centres in 2019-2020 included increased presence at industry events and opportunities for exhibitions at national and international institutions.

Arts development initiatives were delivered through the TSRA’s grants and the Gab Titui Cultural Centre’s public programmes, enabling skills development and workshop facilitation opportunities for artists and cultural practitioners.

The TSRA’s partnerships with Arts Queensland, UMI Arts, the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair and TAFE Qld - Tagai Campus guarantee appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal inclusion in arts development initiatives.

Culture, art and heritage grants

Completed/ on schedule Through its biannual Common Funding Round, the TSRA supported 10 grant applications under the Culture, Art and Heritage Programme.

Funded activities included artists’ skills development projects, language and cultural maintenance initiatives, and traditional performing arts participation at events for individuals and groups.

The programme contributed towards two regional events in 2019: the 20th Remote Indigenous Media Festival, hosted by the Torres Strait Islander Media Association; and the Torres Shire Multicultural Festival, hosted by the TSC.

Cultural maintenance programme

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA continues to monitor and promote Ailan Kastom and cultural protocols through funded and/or partnered programmes and initiatives

in communities.

Where appropriate, the TSRA provides guidance on cultural protocols to Australian Government and Queensland Government departments and non-government stakeholders working in the region and involved in Indigenous matters relating to the Torres Strait.

Dance strategy

Completed/ on schedule In 2019, the TSRA partnered with the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair to deliver performances under the Torres Strait

Dance Strategy. Traditional dance groups from the communities of Saibai and St Pauls were supported to perform and participate at these favourably recommended national Indigenous events, furthering their exposure to and engagement with national and international audiences and stakeholders.

The TSRA sponsored the inclusion of traditional performance by Eip Karem Beizam - Meriam Cultural Group, a dance team based on Thursday Island, at the 2019 National NAIDOC Awards in Canberra. This successful sponsorship has created opportunities for Torres Strait dancers to be included in future NAIDOC events.

Arts licensing and intellectual property protection

Completed/ on schedule The Gab Titui Cultural Centre engaged three Indigenous artists under licence agreements for use of their artwork images in publications and on art and

craft products and merchandise developed by the centre, such as mugs, ties, magnets and the annual calendar.

Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award

Completed/ on schedule The presentation of the biennial Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award is recognised as a flagship event for the Gab Titui Cultural Centre and

the TSRA.

The centre was scheduled to open nominations for its 12th award in July 2020. However, due to COVID-19 precautionary measures, the exhibition has been postponed to 2021. The centre continued working with the region’s artists to guarantee submissions of works for the event.

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Activity Flag Status

Gab Titui Cultural Centre - exhibitions/ public programmes

Completed/ on schedule EXHIBITIONS In partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria, Cairns Art Gallery and

the Mer Island community, the Gab Titui Cultural Centre launched the initial tour of the exhibition Black Bamboo Contemporary Furniture Design from Mer, Torres Strait during the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair in July 2019. The exhibition subsequently toured to showcase at the National Gallery of Victoria in February 2020. The Gab Titui Cultural Centre is looking forward to presenting this extraordinary exhibition when it tours home for its final exhibit in 2021.

The national tour of the centre’s cultural maintenance exhibition Evolution: Torres Strait Masks was featured at the Western Australian Museum’s regional Museum of Geraldton and Museum of the Great Southern during the year. The exhibition will continue its tour, visiting its final Western Australian venue at the Fremantle Maritime Museum, during 2020-2021.

The graphic panel display of Evolution: Torres Strait Masks toured through international embassies, featuring at the Papua New Guinea National Museum and Art Gallery, the Australian High Commission Fiji, and the Egyptian Cultural Centre.

PUBLIC PROGRAMMES

The Gab Titui Cultural Centre’s commitment to Torres Strait Islander history and culture underpins many of its public programmes. The programmes achieved outstanding results in 2019-2020, with a busy calendar of events including staple favourites - traditional weaving, lino and screen printing, and jewellery making.

New activities added to the schedule included traditional cooking demonstrations, traditional choral and musical performances, lectures, and cultural presentations. The schedule of events also expanded the range of programmes devised for targeted audiences such as students with disabilities, the elderly, and school-aged children.

Activities and events based at the centre maintained the success of previous years and continued to engage visitors and community members. A programme highlight was the Sai - Fish Traps Community Art Project, which commenced in March 2019, with over 150 people contributing to a single work of art.

The purpose of the project was multidimensional, with a primary focus on educating audiences on the significant role that the sai (fish traps) played in the landmark Mabo Native Title decision. The completion of the project coincided with National Reconciliation Week, culminating in a lecture night discussing the historical context, cultural connections, legend stories and artistic interpretation of the project.

Torres Strait language strategy

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA, in partnership with stakeholders and the Torres Strait Traditional Language Advisory Committee, further developed the initiatives in the

Torres Strait Traditional Languages Plan 2016-2019 and the Torres Strait Languages Charter.

The TSRA supported a wide range of initiatives in recognition of the International Year of Indigenous Languages, celebrated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2019. They included Torres Strait delegations to the Bana Guyurru: Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Forum in Cairns and the PULiiMA Indigenous Language and Technology Conference in Darwin. Local events held to acknowledge the year included Kulkalgaw Choir performances, traditional dancing, artist talks, art workshops and cooking demonstrations in language.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

32

CASE STUDY: COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC PROGRAMMES CONNECT AND COMMUNICATE CULTURE, ARTS AND HERITAGE

The Gab Titui Cultural Centre was created as a symbol of Torres Strait Islander identity, a catalyst for change, a centre for innovation and the keeping place of language, culture and knowledge.

Through the centre’s Community and Public Programmes initiative, the TSRA’s Culture, Arts and Heritage Programme realises the vision of the centre’s founders by connecting and communicating with new audiences across the Torres Strait and around the world.

The word ‘community’ was added to the title of the initiative, formerly known as Public Programmes, to reflect the strong influence that

community has in revitalising and maintaining traditional cultural practices in the region.

When the Gab Titui Cultural Centre was established in 2004, Public Programmes consisted of a small number of scheduled activities. While the centre gained recognition as the premier institution showcasing Torres Strait art and culture, the demand for traditional and educational experiences was worthy of a venue of its stature.

Historically, Public Programmes was associated

with the centre’s exhibitions and commemorative

occasions. It has since expanded its reach to include delivery of activities in the wider Torres Strait communities, cultivating the region’s

performing arts scene and developing resources

for museums, galleries and other cultural institutions both nationally and internationally.

The 2019 Community and Public Programmes calendar comprised nearly 70 events, attended

by more than 2,000 participants, and added countless more visitors to the centre. Art skills workshops, traditional cooking demonstrations,

lectures, cultural presentations and traditional song and dance performances were at the core of the successful schedule. More than 30 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal artists and cultural practitioners were engaged to facilitate the events, sustaining the region’s arts and crafts industry.

The impact of Community and Public Programmes is indisputable, with increased:

― visitation to the Gab Titui Cultural Centre ― revenue from sales of art materials and gifts in the gallery shop ― number of community and public events

― conventional media and social media presence ― requests for educational experiences.

With a strong platform based on access and engagement, Community and Public Programmes will continue to present events offering educational and entertaining experiences well into the future.

Kulkalgaw Choir performs at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre in November 2019.

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NATIVE TITLE

REGIONAL GOAL

Protect, maintain and progress Native Title rights and recognition over the region’s land and sea country.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Traditional Owners receive appropriate compensation from Past Acts, Invalid Acts, Future Acts and Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs).

― Native Title rights are managed, respected and protected.

― Native Title land and sea is accessible for economic and social development.

― Intramural disputes are resolved through appropriate means.

― PBCs understand and meet their responsibilities under the Native Title Act.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Native Title Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to perform the functions of a Native Title Representative Body under the Native Title Act and undertake initiatives which contribute to:

― progressing and successfully negotiating Future Acts and ILUAs with appropriate compensation

― progressing Native Title claims to determination by the Federal Court ― assisting PBCs to build capacity to effectively engage with communities and maintain

compliance with the Native Title Act ― assisting PBCs to settle intramural disputes ― assisting PBCs within the Kulkalgal, Maluyaligal, Gudamaluyligal and Kemer Kemer

Meriam regions to document their traditional economic areas of interest.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-18: NATIVE TITLE PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

5,649 5,191 458

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

34

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Native Title compensation Completed/ on schedule

One ILUA was successfully registered with the National Native Title Tribunal in 2019-20, with a compensation value of approximately $31,000.

Since 2005, 79 ILUAs have been registered. The total value of compensation is approximately $5.715 million.

Land Holding Act (Katter Leases) Completed/ on schedule

A total of 354 Katter lease applications have been received from the region since the introduction of the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (Land Holding) Act 1985 (Qld): 107 perpetual leases were granted, 131 entitlements were recognised and 116 applications were found to be invalid. The entitlements are located in the communities of Badu (8); Boigu (48); Mabuyag (15); Masig (13); Saibai (13); St Pauls (11); Ugar (6); and Warraber (17).

Management of Future Acts and ILUAs

Completed/ on schedule The Native Title Office received 91 Future Acts notices in 2019-2020. Responses have been provided to all 91 of those notices.

Native Title claim Sea Claim Part B (QUD27/2019)

Completed/ on schedule The Native Title Representative Body has been assisting and facilitating the representation of the applicant and Indigenous respondents to

this claim.

A successful Claims Group meeting was conducted in December 2018 to appoint a new applicant to the claim and to reduce the area of the claim. The new applicant is meeting with the applicants of the overlapping claims area to achieve a consent determination.

NTRB legal services

Completed/ on schedule The Native Title Office provides a wide range of legal assistance to the PBCs and Traditional Owners in the region upon request. Table 2-19

provides statistical information on the level of engagement in 2019-2020.

PBC support and capacity building Completed/ on schedule

The Native Title Office provides support to 21 PBCs in the region to ensure that they maintain legislative compliance and can effectively engage with the Traditional Owners in their communities.

The TSRA has memorandums of understanding in place with two high-performing PBCs, agreeing to a range of fee-for-service activities that the PBCs will perform on behalf of the TSRA. Fee-for-service payments by the TSRA offset the PBCs’ operating costs. These PBCs do not receive grant funding.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

Number of reported non-compliance matters involving PBCs

Completed/ on schedule There are no reported non-compliance matters for the region.

Number of DOGITs transferred to PBCs with appropriate support mechanisms

Not started There were no Deed of Grant in Trust transfers in 2019-2020. This activity is initiated by local government with the TSRA providing support to the PBCs as required.

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TABLE 2-19: NATIVE TITLE OFFICE PERFORMANCE STATISTICS, 2018-2019

Facilitation and assistance Number

1. THE CLAIMS EXPERIENCE

Claimant applications

Active claims represented at 30 June 2019 5

Plus claims filed by Native Title Representative Body 0

Less claims determined 0

Less claims dismissed 0

Less claims withdrawn 0

Plus claims briefed to external counsel 0

(+ or -) Other disposition 0

Active claims represented at 30 June 2020 5

Number of active claims registered by National Native Title Tribunal 0

Claims in development 1

Non-claimant applications

Compensation claims 0

2. THE AGREEMENTS EXPERIENCE

Future Acts notices received 91

Responses to Future Acts notices 91

Agreements concluded 0

Agreements in development 0

Indigenous Land Use Agreements concluded and registered 1

Indigenous Land Use Agreements in development 9

Complaints and disputes

Complaints

Received 0

Resolved 0

Pending 0

Disputes relating to Native Title applications 1

Disputes relating to ILUAs, rights of access and other matters 32

Requests for review of decisions not to assist

Requests received 0

Reviews completed 0

Requests for review of decisions to assist

Requests received 0

Requests approved 0

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

36

CASE STUDY: NATIVE TITLE OFFICE ASSISTS COMMUNITIES TO RESOLVE LAND AND SEA DISPUTES

The Native Title Office (NTO) undertakes work under section 203B of the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth), including facilitation and assistance functions and dispute resolution functions, to provide assistance for PBCs and Traditional Owners in respect of intramural and/or intra-island disputes.

In 2019-2020, there was a large demand for the NTO’s assistance with facilitating dispute resolution procedures under RNTBC rules. The NTO is able to assist at the request of PBCs or Traditional Owners. The type of assistance we are able to provide includes raising initial concerns held by PBCs or Traditional Owners and advising the PBCs and Traditional Owners of the requirements and obligations set out in the PBC rules, in order to have land and sea issues or disputes dealt with by the PBC and their Council of Elders.

The NTO is able to provide specific assistance to facilitate dispute resolution, including funding separate legal representatives for disputing parties, liaising with the National Native Title Tribunal to assist with the mediation of disputes, and recording any decisions under customary lore made by the Elders in each community.

The NTO does not act for any disputing party in relation to customary disputes but provides direct assistance to the PBC and Council of Elders under the dispute resolution functions set out in section 203BF of the Native Title Act. We are proud to be able to assist the Traditional Owner communities and, in particular, their PBCs and Elders to exercise their authority and obligations to resolve their own land and sea disputes.

The NTO is pleased to report that it is receiving an increasing number of enquiries in relation to assistance with customary dispute matters. It is expected that drawing on NTO assistance will reduce community disputes and increase opportunities for community harmony and development. In 2019-2020, the NTO assisted with 32 disputes.

Work is also being carried out to assist Traditional Owner communities through the mapping of customary boundaries, which, if done in a way that is responsive to culture and custom, will assist the communities in resolving and avoiding customary disputes in the future.

Work is being carried out to assist Traditional Owner communities through the mapping of customary boundaries, which, if done in a way that is responsive to culture and custom, will assist the communities in resolving and avoiding customary disputes in the future.

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ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

REGIONAL GOAL

Empowering Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to sustainably manage and benefit from their land, sea and cultural resources into the future, in accordance with Ailan Kastom, Aboriginal lore and/or law, and Native Title rights and interests.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Key natural and cultural resources are sustainably managed in line with community priorities and traditional ecological knowledge.

― Appropriate collaborative governance arrangements and partnerships to support sustainable management of the region’s environmental values.

― Greater regional and community-based capacity for the sustainable management of natural and cultural values.

― Improved community sustainability, resilience and ability to adapt to climate change.

― Decision tools to support regional adaptation to climate change.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Environmental Management Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following projects and initiatives. Note that many of the programme’s activities are externally funded, and the availability of external funding and the requirements and/or priorities of funding providers may influence project activities.

Land:

― Biodiversity planning and management ― Invasive species ― Sustainable horticulture ― Environmental education.

Sea:

― Turtle and dugong planning and management ― Marine biodiversity ― Water quality ― State of the environment report card.

People:

― Ranger project ― Indigenous Protected Areas project ― Traditional ecological knowledge project ― Traditional Owner engagement

― Compliance project.

Coasts and climate:

― Climate change adaptation and resilience ― Renewable energy.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-20: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

4,667 4,659 8

TABLE 2-21: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME EXTERNAL FUNDING EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

11,114 10,440 674

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

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PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Invasive species management

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA successfully implements invasive species management through a combination of technical and on-ground support for community-based

monitoring and mitigation of biosecurity threats, and participation in collaborative planning, policy and activities for regional approaches to biosecurity threats and impacts. This includes attendance in, and contributions to, the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Biosecurity Working Group and the Torres Strait Invasive Species Advisory Group.

Funded through the Queensland Government’s Natural Resources Investment Program, significant invasive species management projects deliver outcomes for communities such as:

― controlling and mitigating the spread of cane toad populations in the Torres Strait ― managing feral horses and pigs on Moa ― assessing the impacts of invasive species on natural and cultural systems

on Boigu and Saibai ― eradicating black rats on Warul Kawa.

Invasive species monitoring is regularly undertaken by the TSRA in partnership with regional partners and includes the identification and management of potentially threatening invasive species.

TSRA rangers and other Indigenous workers in the Torres Strait have taken part in biodiversity fundamentals and rapid response training to build capacity in biosecurity work being undertaken across northern Australia.

Sustainable horticulture

Completed/ on schedule The Sustainable Horticulture Project delivers place-based horticultural services, education and resources to Torres Strait communities, supporting

individual, family and community wellbeing through the practice of sustainable food production.

Educational workshops, practical demonstrations, backyard garden support and school visits provide technical information, resources and capacities for communities to build both traditional and contemporary seasonal and sustainable gardens. The project is supported by community Elders who are involved in teaching traditional knowledge of gardening practices.

The project is supporting communities to continue to manage and progress sustainable horticultural through:

― the development of planting guides and fact sheets ― demonstrations and resources promoting sustainable water use ― regional information sharing and competitions ― training and resources for aquaponics systems

― support in trialling various gardening techniques suitable for unique island landscapes.

Marine ecosystem monitoring

Completed/ on schedule Rangers have been trained in seagrass monitoring techniques and are actively carrying out intertidal monitoring in seven communities.

Surveys to measure the extent of coral bleaching were undertaken by the Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University.

Remote weather and marine monitoring stations at three locations across the region continued to be maintained and collect weather and marine data.

Research was conducted to investigate the impacts of Fly River pollution on marine water quality in the Torres Strait, with preliminary results noting that previous concerns appear to have been unwarranted as copper levels are quite low and water quality remains very good. A hydrologist report noted that this was due to the mudflats at the mouth of the Fly River in Papua New Guinea, which absorb and filter a great deal of suspected contaminants.

CSIRO researchers involved with the project visited and reported their findings to communities where the monitoring sites were located.

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Activity Flag Status

Torres Strait Indigenous Ranger Project

Completed/ on schedule In 2019, the TSRA Torres Strait Indigenous Ranger Project marked an important milestone: 10 years of Torres Strait rangers caring for their

traditional homelands and surrounding sea country.

Since the first ranger commenced at Mabuyag in 2009, the number of TSRA rangers has increased to include 60 staff working across 13 outer islands. The size of the TSRA Land and Sea Management Unit has also grown, to ensure that rangers are properly supported to successfully complete their duties to a high standard and in a professional and safe manner at all times.

Funded through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, rangers work closely with Traditional Owners, RNTBCs and key stakeholders across 14 communities on 13 islands, to deliver a suite of natural and cultural management actions against each island’s endorsed WoC plan.

The TSRA is conducting a staged process of updating WoC plans for each community. During 2019-2020, consultations took place with Masigalgal Traditional Owners to finalise the Masig WoC plan. Similarly, on-country workshops were held on Mer, Moa and Erub early in 2020; WoC plans for those islands are now in draft form and will be finalised within coming months.

A highlight of 2019-2020 was the delivery of large projects that showcase the value that a team of rangers can deliver on country. Such projects included restoration of the Dabangay heritage site on Mabuyag and freshwater wells on Masig, and the conduct of multiagency compliance patrols in the Top Western Cluster.

Rangers continue to deliver benefits to communities through a suite of local and regional on-ground activities, including invasive pest and weed control, marine debris management, surveillance and monitoring, dugong and turtle management, cultural site protection, traditional ecological knowledge recording and preservation, and environmental compliance patrols.

Environmental education project

Completed/ on schedule Environmental education is integrated into various projects within the Environmental Management Programme, including the use of traditional

ecological knowledge in ranger activities with schools and the broader communities.

A key educational outcome has been the development of a biosecurity curriculum in regional schools, along with experiential learning opportunities such as student attendance at biosecurity camps with rangers and traditional owners. As a result, young people studying in the Torres Strait now have access to biosecurity information and are building biosecurity knowledge bases.

Traditional ecological knowledge project

Completed/ on schedule The traditional ecological knowledge project supports participating Torres Strait communities to utilise a computer database for the collection,

protection and controlled sharing of traditional knowledge relevant to each community while ensuring adherence to their individually defined cultural protocols.

Twelve Torres Strait outer island communities are utilising the TSRA’s traditional ecological knowledge system. Traditional ecological knowledge training was conducted in three communities in 2019-2020.

The TSRA supported eight communities to develop educational resources that share publicly available traditional knowledge while promoting the revitalisation of Torres Strait languages.

These resources include commonly available traditional knowledge that is used, with RNTBC permission, to guide future ranger work on country and to ensure that ranger work is undertaken in a culturally appropriate way, in the right season, for the effective delivery of land and sea management.

The educational resources developed in 2019-2020 included seasonal calendars and booklets which feature the work of local artists and tell the stories of how Torres Strait Islanders have survived and thrived on the land. The TRSA project team worked with Traditional Owners to finalise a seasonal calendar for Masig and a poster for Mer. Additional resources are under development for Erub, Warraber, Poruma, Boigu, Mabuyag and Saibai.

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Activity Flag Status

Dugong and turtle management

Completed/ on schedule MANAGEMENT PLANS Dugong and turtle management plans have been in place for all outer

island communities since 2016. A community review process to update the plans commenced in 2018-2019 and continued in 2019-2020.

The updated plans aim to build capacity for traditional ways of governance through cultural protocols and management arrangements for traditional hunting allied with the latest research on the state of the species, legislation, and identification of breaches between law, lore and education.

A draft management plan and permitting system for the Kaiwalagal region was developed by Kaurareg Traditional Owners, with support from the TSRA, through a community cultural consultant. Kaurareg Traditional Owners are now working towards endorsing the plan and determining how it can be implemented.

MONITORING AND RESEARCH

The Environmental Management Programme strengthened research, monitoring and reporting works for green turtles and hawksbill turtles to better integrate adaptive management processes and system connectivity (especially with the Great Barrier Reef green turtles and Raine Island).

Annual turtle nesting and hatchling monitoring included:

― conducting nesting and hatchling monitoring surveys at Aukane Islet and Maizab Kaur ― reinstating turtle monitoring and deploying sand temperature loggers at Mer and Dauar

― identifying future tagging and research directives for Warul Kawa in partnership with IPA applicants (relevant RNTBCs), for monitoring to be re-established in late 2020.

A marine indicators science workshop was held in Cairns in October 2020, to align science directives for vital ecological monitoring programmes such as the annual seagrass monitoring and mapping led by the Centre for Tropical Water and Aquatic Ecosystem Research (TropWATER).

The TSRA helped to lead the discussion to develop strategic recovery plans for Torres Strait green turtle and hawksbill turtle species across the Great Barrier Reef.

This resulted in stronger partnerships and monitoring priorities among organisations and researchers with interests in the stocks of green, hawksbill and flatback turtles across the Torres Strait, and re-educated researchers to ensure that all analyses and outcomes are shared with communities.

A plan to integrate Torres Strait marine turtle projects into broader national and international monitoring and management frameworks is underway and will be taken to communities for Traditional Owner input once COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

TropWATER continues to produce posters and report cards and visit communities to present yearly results. With assistance from TropWATER, the TSRA conducted seagrass monitoring at Dungeness Reef and Masig, Naghir, and Mabuyag. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the May 2020 survey of the Torres Strait Dugong Sanctuary has been rescheduled for September 2020.

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Activity Flag Status

Biodiversity planning and management

Completed/ on schedule Biodiversity surveys continue to build on the collection of baseline data and monitoring across the region.

The TSRA, Kaurareg Traditional Owners and expert consultants conducted biodiversity surveys at Irriki (Murulag), Warul Kawa, Saibai and Maizab Kaur. The activities resulted in the collection of terrestrial flora and fauna inventories, assessments of ecological condition, the identification of threats to terrestrial systems and biodiversity, and the development and implementation of culturally appropriate monitoring methodologies to measure change in natural systems.

Survey works further developed data collection tools used by the TSRA that improve the availability of biodiversity and biocultural information and traditional ecological knowledge and streamline data into formats that ranger groups can use in on-ground management.

Outcomes from the survey work included the recording of species not previously recorded by Western science, and, significantly, the use, teaching and recording of traditional ecological knowledge on the cultural significance and traditional use of plants, animals and natural processes. Results have been collated into technical and community reports for the use of Traditional Owners and others who work with them in biodiversity planning.

Strategic biodiversity planning and management was also further informed by research and reporting on indicators for monitoring terrestrial island ecosystem change and a review of Torres Strait terrestrial ecosystem reports and data.

Indigenous Protected Areas project

Completed/ on schedule IPAs in the Torres Strait are protected areas that are established and managed under the cultural authority of Traditional Owners.

During 2019-2020, priority management activities delivered in IPAs by rangers included:

― holding workshops with Traditional Owners on Poruma and Warraber to further develop a plant and animal book for Warraberalgal Porumalgal IPA ― installing data loggers in the central islands to monitor effects of shipping wakes on uninhabited islands

― conducting vessel surveys to progress the rat eradication project on Warul Kawa, a part of Ugul Malu Kawal IPA, and completing a vessel survey of Warraberalgal Porumalgal IPA.

Signage and brochures were developed for IPAs, and rangers consistently monitored the health of the IPA islands and sea country over the course of their work.

Rangers and the TSRA’s IPA Team worked collaboratively with Traditional Owners in the three Torres Strait IPAs to deliver actions against endorsed plans of management for the areas.

The IPA Team worked with Mabuygilgal Traditional Owners from Mabuyag to finalise the update of the management plan for Kalalagaw IPA. The new plan incorporates up-to-date Traditional Owner aspirations for management of the IPA under a traditional cultural framework, a pathway to self-governance and the inclusion of additional islands (Mipa and Woeydhul) within the IPA.

The team also provided advice and support to the communities of Mer, Iama and Masig in developing grant applications for new IPAs for those communities. Due to extensive competition, the applications were unsuccessful. The IPA team continues to work with the communities to fulfil their aspirations of declaring an IPA over their traditional land and sea country.

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Activity Flag Status

Compliance Completed/ on schedule As a component of the national Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers Strategy, the TSRA has established a specialist unit to support environmental

compliance management responsibilities in the Torres Strait. The unit assists individuals and entities undertaking activities in the region to do so in compliance with relevant legislation, policy, agreements (including culturally based plans), the Torres Strait Treaty and licence conditions.

Rangers are central to this effort, and 40 rangers have undertaken nationally recognised compliance training, with a further 20 rangers scheduled to complete the training in 2020-2021. Rangers are undertaking island-specific compliance-focused patrols and surveillance activities and participating in multiagency patrols to protect and preserve the Torres Strait region.

The compliance programme has been extended for 12 months to focus on compliance and training initiatives while strengthening intelligence capacity.

The programme builds on the excellent relationships that the TSRA has developed with partner agencies and is focused on consolidating its position in and support for Australian Government whole-of-government activities and strategies.

Climate change adaptation and resilience

Completed/ on schedule Actions identified in the Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021 continue to be implemented.

Community resilience workshops were held with the Masig and Mer communities and a resilience framework was drafted to guide the development of increased resilience at the local and regional scales.

Sustainability business case options have been developed for Masig as part of the Queensland Government’s Decarbonisation of Great Barrier Reef Islands initiative.

The TSRA is collaborating with Queensland Health to develop and deliver community workshops on climate change and health.

A process is underway to develop a regional waste management strategy.

Improved drone technology has been secured and tested to accurately map changes in key coastal sites.

The TSRA is working with the TSIRC and the TSC to develop a regional coastal adaptation strategy.

Digital noticeboards have been installed in 17 locations across the region in partnership with Community Enterprise Queensland and local stores.

A weather station was installed at Mer to complete the network of six regional TSRA - Australian Institute of Marine Science weather stations.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

Number of actions in the climate change strategy and associated action plans implemented

Completed/ on schedule Local adaptation and resilience plans have been developed for the 14 outer island communities.

Fifty-eight actions identified in the Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021 are in progress or have been completed.

Number of inhabited islands with active food-producing community gardens in place

Completed/ on schedule Fourteen islands in the Torres Strait have active food-producing gardens. They include:

― gardens growing traditional and contemporary crops using a combination of techniques (Boigu, Saibai, Dauan, Warraber) ― community gardens (Ngurapai, Saibai and St Pauls) ― an increasing number of backyard gardens (Badu and Masig).

Gardening activities in the region include:

― experimenting with raised garden beds (Poruma) ― testing and enriching island soils (Warraber) ― companion planting (Iama) ― running community nurseries (Warraber and Ngurapai).

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CASE STUDY: DUGONG AND TURTLE MANAGEMENT PLANS BUILD FUTURES ON TRADITION

Dugong and turtle management plans were created for all of the outer island communities of the Torres Strait in 2016. Driven by the communities in which they were developed, the

plans set objectives, management arrangements

and traditional governance protocols for making use of dugong and turtle resources while ensuring the ongoing conservation of those bioculturally critical species.

Since 2018-2019, with funding support from the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, the TSRA has facilitated a review of

the initial plans. In 2019-2020, this work resulted

in the completion of seven new, community-based priority plans across the island communities of Maluilgal (Near Western Cluster)

and Gadu Maluilgal (Top Western Cluster).

The review process and the new plans are proactively building capacity for Traditional Owners to apply customary land and sea management practices in the sustainable use of wildlife. They also seek to engage with cultural initiatives across traditional and scientific practices to address the challenges of managing biocultural resources sustainably.

The reviews focus on the cultural traditions that govern community aspirations around sustainable use of dugong and turtle resources,

as identified from community consultations guided by cultural consultant Gabriel Bani. The community consultations, and meetings with hunters, have resulted in a great deal of traditional ecological knowledge being shared.

Processes are underway to preserve all knowledge gained through the review process within a TSRA databank. The knowledge will be available to Traditional Owners and stored under strict guidelines. The new plans will provide information on ways to access relevant cultural knowledge that are supported by the Traditional Owners of that knowledge through traditional governance structures.

In addition, the reviews update relevant information on the best available science on the sustainability of the two species, legislative frameworks, and compliance initiatives. They reflect extensive work done by the TSRA to ensure that education and information on both lore and law in regard to dugong and turtle management are up to date. They also recognise and align with regional, state and Commonwealth obligations and objectives for dugong and turtle management.

The final plans are a true reflection of a co-designed species management approach led by traditional knowledge and custodial rights and responsibilities, allowing the Elders in the traditional governance structures to better manage the activities through cultural protocols. Final plans note how the parties in the traditional governance structure will work in collaboration with researchers, rangers, RNTBCs and other stakeholders to manage dugongs and turtles for sustainable use and sustainable futures.

The Traditional Owners of our region have been dependent on, and lived beside, natural marine resources such as dugongs and turtles for thousands of years. The community-based management plans are living documents that allow Traditional Owners to be champions of good cultural practices, and empower communities to work with other critical stakeholders to manage resources sustainably.

A turtle nests at Maizab Kaur. (Photo: Tristan Simpson)

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GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP

REGIONAL GOAL

Effective and transparent self-government, with strong leadership.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Implementation of the National Indigenous Reform Agreement service delivery principles.

― Appropriate Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal participation in decision-making.

― Improved communication, cultural competence and service delivery within a community development framework across governments.

― Strong Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal organisational leadership and governance.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Governance and Leadership Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following projects and initiatives:

― Governance capacity building ― Leadership capacity building ― Integrated Service Delivery coordination ― Community engagement

― Women’s leadership programme ― Youth leadership programme ― Tertiary education assistance ― Support for regional broadcasting.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-22: GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

6,391 6,790 -399

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PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Community consultation and engagement

Behind schedule less than three months

During 2019-2020, community engagement visits were undertaken at Saibai, Iama, St Pauls, Boigu, Erub, Ngurapai and Muralag (single event), Port Kennedy, TRAWQ, Poruma and Kubin by the Chairperson, the acting Chief Executive Officer, programme managers and support staff.

Integrated Service Delivery coordination

Not started (activity restructured)

The TSRA held the inaugural Regional Interagency Forum in September 2019, to engage senior officers from local, state and Commonwealth agencies in guiding the future Integrated Service Delivery framework for the region.

The forum was structured around the core themes of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029, and participants were asked to identify issues, gaps and existing governance structures for each theme and to reflect on progress to date. During the forum, TSRA Board members requested that the TSRA refocus community booklets to project plans outlining the delivery of priority community infrastructure needs.

Following on from the inaugural event, the TSRA plans to host a Torres Strait regional health and wellbeing forum during 2020-2021. This forum will aim to identify service gaps and outline a framework for a more collaborative, holistic approach to culturally appropriate primary and secondary health care in the Torres Strait region.

Media and communications support

Completed/ on schedule This is a contracted activity delivered through Zakazukha Marketing Communications.

Internal and external audit support

Completed/ on schedule The external and internal audit programmes were completed. Reports tracking the status of audit recommendations were provided at four

Audit Committee meetings.

Assistance with Tertiary Education Scheme

Completed/ on schedule Twelve Torres Strait residents were supported in 2019-2020 to undertake bachelor’s degrees at a mainland campus.

Chief Executive Officer, Board and Chairperson support

Completed/ on schedule Three Executive Committee meetings, three Audit Committee meetings, three Board meetings and five special out-of-session Board meetings

were conducted in 2019-2020.

The Governance and Leadership Programme provides executive support for the office of the TSRA Chairperson and the Chief Executive Officer.

Board, internal and external committee secretariat support

Completed/ on schedule In addition to providing secretariat services to the TSRA Board, the Governance and Leadership Programme provides secretariat support

to the Executive Committee, Audit Committee, Programme Steering Committee and Regional Governance Committee, and support for TSRA representation in the PZJA.

Indigenous leadership

Completed/ on schedule The Australian Rural Leadership Program (ARLP) and Training Rural Australians in Leadership (TRAIL) are delivered in partnership with the

Australian Rural Leadership Foundation (ARLF).

During 2019-2020, the TSRA supported one new Torres Strait participant in the ARLP, and one ongoing participant who will complete the programme in 2020.

The TSRA supported three successful applicants for TRAIL in 2020. However, the programme was postponed until 2020-2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The TSRA has supported the following TRAIL participants:

― 2015-2016 - one male ― 2016-2017 - two males and one female ― 2017-2018 - one male ― 2018-2019 - one male and four females

― 2019-2020 - one male and two females.

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Activity Flag Status

Support to regional broadcasting

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Islander Media Association met its targets for broadcasting hours and local content during 2019-2020.

However, only two of the eight outer island stations were operational at 30 June 2020. Travel restrictions have delayed travel for technicians, but three more stations should be operational by December 2020. Additional resourcing may be required for the re-establishment of the remaining three outer island stations.

Women’s leadership and youth leadership

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Young Leaders Program and the Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Program are delivered in partnership with the ARLF.

Seven participants (four female and three male) were supported in the Torres Strait Young Leaders Program and nine women were supported to undertake the Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Program.

Common Funding Round Completed/ on schedule

The Governance and Leadership Programme has responsibility for delivery of the TSRA’s biannual Common Funding Round.

The programme is also responsible for the grant management database and the TSRA’s Grant Procedures Manual.

Due to the restrictions on community activities associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, the first Common Funding Round for 2020 was replaced with the TSRA COVID-19 Community Response Initiative to support organisations to deliver community services during the pandemic.

Agency plans and reporting Completed/ on schedule

The Governance and Leadership Programme ensured that the TSRA effectively met its planning and reporting obligations in 2019-2020. This included delivering the:

― Annual Report ― Quarterly Report to the Minister for Indigenous Australians ― Torres Strait Development Plan ― Corporate Plan.

The TSRA also delivers ad hoc reports to the Australian Parliament as a body of the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal women participating in leadership roles in the region

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Program is delivered in partnership with the ARLF.

The 2012 baseline was six participants. Since 2015-2016, the TSRA has supported participants including:

― 2015-2016 - seven participants ― 2016-2017 - 10 participants ― 2017-2018 - 10 participants ― 2018-2019 - eight participants

― 2019-2020 - nine participants.

Increase in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal youth (aged 18-25) who participate in leadership development activities

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Young Leaders Program is delivered in partnership with the ARLF.

The TSRA has supported Torres Strait Young Leaders Program participants including:

― 2015-2016 - two males and four females ― 2016-2017 - three males and three females ― 2017-2018 - two males and five females ― 2018-2019 - three males and five females

― 2019-2020 - three males and four females.

SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

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47

CASE STUDY: INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY EVENT CELEBRATES WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP

The TSRA hosted its inaugural International

Women’s Day event at the Gab Titui Cultural

Centre on 9 March 2020. The event, led

by graduates of the Torres Strait Women’s

Leadership Program, was attended by senior

officers from government and non-government

organisations based on Thursday Island.

The event showcased the leadership and career opportunities available to Torres Strait Islander women and highlighted the contributions that women make to their communities and workplaces every day.

The TSRA invited Franchesca Cubillo, Senior

Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Art at the National Gallery of Australia, as

keynote speaker, to share her personal story

and leadership journey. Ms Cubillo identifies

as a Yanuwa, Larrakia, Bardi and Wardaman

woman and has written and presented

extensively on subjects such as the repatriation

of Australian Indigenous ancestral remains,

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and

culture, and museology and curatorship.

Ms Cubillo reiterated the importance of Indigenous women undertaking leadership training and development to ensure that their voices are heard and they can make an effective contribution to decision-making in their communities. She enjoyed hearing about the Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Program from course graduates and seeing them put the skills they had developed during

the programme into use at the International

Women’s Day event.

Nicole Assan, a graduate of the Torres Strait

Women’s Leadership Program and a proud

Gudang Yadhaykenu woman from the region

stretching from the east coast to the tip of

Cape York, was master of ceremonies for the

event. Mrs Assan spoke of the impact that

the programme has had on her life and the

direction of her career. She noted that she now

has the confidence to speak to large audiences

and is looking to further her studies, something

she did not think she could manage before

participating in the programme.

The Torres Strait Women’s Leadership

Program, delivered by the ARLF, challenges

participants to transform their self-awareness

and to build their understanding of

governance structures and contemporary

leadership practice.

Since 2014, 49 women from 15 islands

within the Torres Strait region (including the

Northern Peninsula Area of Cape York) have

successfully completed the programme.

Many are now elected representatives,

senior government officials or local business

owners. With a steadily increasing number

of graduates from the Women’s Leadership

Program, an ongoing challenge for the TSRA is

to effectively engage these leaders in shaping

the future development of the Torres Strait.

In consultation with the programme graduates

and the ARLF, the TSRA is exploring options

to support an effective and independent

alumni network. While the alumni themselves

will continue to guide this initiative, it is

anticipated that a new biannual forum will

foster opportunities for ongoing individual

leadership development and mechanisms

to utilise the expertise of the alumni to guide

policy initiatives for our region.

The alumni have also highlighted the need

for a support network to not only engage

programme graduates but also guide others

who are considering applying to undertake

the programme, preparing them for the

challenges it will present to maximise their

personal development.

Ms Franchesca Cubillo, Senior Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at the National Gallery of Australia, delivers the keynote address at the Gab Titui Cultural Centre.

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HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

REGIONAL GOAL

Enhance both healthy communities and our living environment.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Monitor and secure whole-of-government investment in infrastructure to support healthy homes and healthy living environments (including waste management).

― Monitor the delivery of primary and public healthcare services to ensure that they are based on regional needs and community priorities.

― Improve access to affordable fresh and healthy foods.

― Support initiatives which encourage more active and healthy communities.

― Affordable home ownership available across the region.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Healthy Communities Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following projects and initiatives:

― monitor and contribute to health policy and programme delivery in the region ― monitor the rollout of and contribute funding to the delivery of essential services and

infrastructure to support healthy living environments ― support and monitor health education initiatives, including initiatives on physical

education, nutrition, obesity, diabetes, motivation, substance abuse, and sport and recreation activities ― monitor and advocate for healthy and

affordable food options for the region ― fund sport and recreation activities and minor infrastructure.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-23: HEALTHY COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

2,090 1,933 157

TABLE 2-24: HEALTHY COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME EXTERNAL FUNDING EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

3,500 3,500 0

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49

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

Seawalls Completed/

on schedule In 2019-2020, the Australian Government committed an additional $20 million of funding for Stage 2 of the Torres Strait Seawalls Programme.

The programme now has a total budget of $40 million and will increase coastal protection for low-lying Torres Strait communities at Boigu, Poruma, Warraber, Iama and Masig.

Stage 2 has commenced. It will be rolled out as a joint initiative between the TSRA and the Queensland Government and will conclude in 2022.

Major infrastructure projects

Behind schedule more than three months

The TSRA continued to roll out the Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 6, a $30 million jointly funded Australian Government and Queensland Government programme.

The full Stage 6 programme was scheduled for completion by June 2020. However, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the completion of several projects to November 2020.

Regional water operations and support

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA supported the TSIRC to complete the Sustainable Water and Wastewater Management Project. This project will support best practice

water management for the region to address chronic water shortages experienced in many of the Torres Strait island communities.

Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA continued to work with the TSIRC to identify infrastructure and non-infrastructure solutions to allow for all-tide safe access to the Ugar

community. During 2019-2020, a dredged channel option was endorsed as a viable option. The Ugar flight subsidy remained operational.

The TSRA funded a range of minor infrastructure projects. Over the past four years, the three regional councils (TSC, TSIRC and NPARC) have been allocated funding for 30 projects.

Projects allocated funding in 2019-2020 included the construction of footpaths and sports field and community lighting. The projects were completed in June 2020.

Healthy fresh food and horticulture

Completed/ on schedule The Healthy Communities Programme provided grant funding to community organisations to support market garden activities.

The Environmental Management Programme’s Mekem Garden Sustainable Horticulture Project delivered food garden initiatives and workshops. Communities on 14 islands - including Boigu, Saibai, Dauan, Warraber, Ngurapai, St Pauls, Badu, Masig, Poruma and Iama - have been involved in the development of community and backyard garden projects which promote the growing of fresh foods in Torres Strait communities.

The Healthy Communities Programme complemented those activities with visits to run grant information sessions for the community.

Sport and recreation activities (grant funding)

Completed/ on schedule The Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association continued to administer sports subsidy funding on behalf of the TSRA throughout the

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area region.

The association provided 78 sport and recreation grants to encourage participation in a range of sporting and recreational activities, including sporting events at the state and national levels, and to fund five major local sporting carnival events.

Waste and landfill projects

Behind schedule more than three months

The Healthy Communities Programme continued to work with key stakeholders in local and state government and Australian Government agencies to find solutions to address waste management issues in the region.

In 2019-2020, the Major Infrastructure Programme supported a sewage pond upgrade and the construction of a new regional waste facility for the Northern Peninsula Area. The impact of the COVID-19 epidemic has delayed these projects, but they are on track to be completed in 2020.

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Activity Flag Status

Horn Island affordable housing project

Not started This joint project with the TSC aimed to provide additional options for affordable home ownership in the region. The TSRA’s planned contribution to the project is to construct a 24-lot subdivision on Ngurapai (Horn Island).

Due to ongoing delays because of Native Title issues, there has been an increase in costs, for which the TSC is seeking additional funding from the Queensland Government.

Health promotion and community education projects

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA provides operational funding to the Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association. In 2019-2020, the association provided

support to sporting events in the region and worked closely with event organisers and stakeholders, such as Queensland Health, to deliver health and nutrition education initiatives.

The TSRA also influences policy for health programmes across all tiers of government, through participation in the:

― Torres Strait Cross Border Health Issues Committee ― National Health Leadership Forum ― Department of Health: Implementation Plan Advisory Group ― Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children Steering Committee

― James Cook University Torres Strait Island Health Sciences Consultative Committee ― Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Partnership meetings.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

Increased participation by community members in structured sport, recreation and other healthy activities

Behind schedule more than three months

Five major local sporting events were supported and 78 sports subsidy grants for sporting and recreational activities were approved.

COVID-19 impacts have affected the delivery of the sporting events, although sports subsidies are committed for delivery later in 2020.

Increased inclusion of the Torres Strait in state and federal funding initiatives relating to investment in housing and affordable home ownership

Not started The TSRA has contributed funding to a project to complete a subdivision on Ngurapai (Horn Island). Issues with Native Title previously delayed this project.

Construction was set to commence in 2019-2020 but did not proceed due to insufficient funds. The TSC is seeking additional funding from the Queensland Government.

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CASE STUDY: MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMME FUNDS UPGRADE AND REFURBISHMENT ON BOIGU

Established in 1998, the Major Infrastructure Programme is a jointly funded initiative of the Australian Government and the Queensland Government, with the TSRA as the funding administrator. The programme provides sustainable environmental health infrastructure, with a focus on water and wastewater infrastructure.

The geographic location of the Torres Strait presents several challenges when delivering services and infrastructure. The 20 inhabited island communities are spread across approximately 44,000 kilometres of sea, and the costs of delivering services and infrastructure are significantly higher than in most other parts of Australia. Those costs can have a major influence on the implementation and timing of project delivery.

The Major Infrastructure Programme model provides an opportunity for infrastructure projects to be implemented over a three-year cycle. This flexibility enables the programme to reduce costs and align project rollouts with other infrastructure projects delivered in the region.

The TSRA maintains a strong partnership with the Queensland Government and regional councils to undertake projects that improve the core health infrastructure and wellbeing of Indigenous people across the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area region.

The Boigu Island Pump Station Refurbishment and Sewage Treatment Plant Upgrade project was considered a priority project by the TSIRC and was subsequently funded by the TSRA and the Queensland Government through Stage 6 of the Major Infrastructure Programme.

Despite impacting factors, the project reached practical completion stage on 21 February 2020. The project took two years to complete, at a cost of $2.4 million.

As well as providing new infrastructure and improved waste disposal services that will extend the life span of existing TSIRC assets and improve health outcomes for the Boigu community, the project created opportunities for employment and skills transfer to develop the Indigenous engineering skills sector for the Torres Strait.

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SAFE COMMUNITIES

REGIONAL GOAL

Safe, healthy, respectful and progressive communities, based on cultural and Ailan Kastom and Aboriginal traditions.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

― Effective community and social services support.

― Families and individuals are safe in home and community.

― Public areas are safe and accessible for community members.

― Communities have access to appropriate transport infrastructure.

PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

The Safe Communities Programme has a mandate from the TSRA Board to undertake the following projects and activities:

― support the delivery of non-mainstream social services, including community capacity building for ongoing, funded non-government organisations

― participate in interagency and Integrated Service Delivery meetings and/or forums to monitor issues, including the progress of social services to address community and domestic safety issues

― contribute to shaping planning and service delivery in the region ― support safe and accessible community infrastructure and land and sea communication

systems.

EXPENDITURE

TABLE 2-25: SAFE COMMUNITIES PROGRAMME EXPENDITURE, 2019-2020

Budget $’000

Actual $’000

Variance $’000

3,346 3,437 -91

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53

PERFORMANCE

Activity Flag Status

School attendance and learning initiatives (grants)

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA provided a grant to Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc. to purchase a 14-seater bus to provide safe and secure transport for secondary school

students to and from school, medical centres and community, cultural and sporting events.

Community safety partnerships

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA has a range of key partnerships related to community safety, with relevant local, state and Australian Government agencies. The TSRA is a

member of the Torres Strait Child and Family Committee, the Local Level Alliance and the Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme.

Community safety projects (grants)

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA is an active member of the Torres Strait Marine Safety Program, which oversees the delivery of a range of initiatives including boat safety

training, provision of safety drop bags and children’s life jackets, and school-based maritime safety education.

Law enforcement partnerships

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA provides funding support for the delivery of legal services for residents in the region. The service is provided by the Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd.

In 2019-2020, 1,071 cases relating to duty lawyer, criminal, family and civil casework were supported, and 1,167 cases were supported for advice and minor assistance.

The Community Legal Education Officer role continues to assist clients to understand the legal process.

Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA works with the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads, through a memorandum of understanding, to deliver the

Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme.

In 2019-2020, through the scheme, the TSRA contributed funding to three projects in the TSIRC area, which delivered airport road improvements at Erub, an airstrip fence replacement at Warraber, and a regional marine access channel dredging study.

Social services delivered by non-government organisations - Port Kennedy Association and Mura Kosker Sorority

Completed/ on schedule Core operational and social service support funding was provided to the Port Kennedy Association and the Mura Kosker Sorority to continue to

deliver important community social support services.

With this support, the organisations deliver programmes such as child and family support services, after-school and holiday care programmes, and domestic and family violence counselling. Both organisations act as auspicing bodies for individuals and unincorporated bodies that apply for community grants.

The Port Kennedy Association currently employs 15 Indigenous staff and the Mura Kosker Sorority currently employs 26 Indigenous staff, in roles including administrators, counsellors, outreach workers and programme coordinators and managers. The Mura Kosker Sorority’s funding also helps to support wellbeing officers on the outer islands.

Coordination of infrastructure planning

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA works closely with the three local government councils and the Queensland Department of Local Government, Racing and Multicultural

Affairs to coordinate and deliver jointly funded projects in the region.

In 2019-2020, the TSRA continued to support the Community Minor Infrastructure Fund. The fourth round of the fund provided joint funding for three projects that improved community safety in the NPARC area, through the improvement of footpaths in the Bamaga community and sports field lighting in the Seisia and Bamaga communities.

The TSRA is also a member of two local council technical working groups which facilitate information sharing on regional infrastructure planning and coordination.

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Activity Flag Status

Community capacity building (grants)

Completed/ on schedule Three grants were provided to community organisations to encourage capacity building and to improve the delivery of services in communities.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd also delivers capacity-building workshops to communities in relation to social justice matters.

Social and economic engagement partnerships

Behind schedule less than three months

In 2019-2020, the TSRA worked with key partners to improve social and economic community engagement. The Safe Communities Programme contributed to Integrated Service Delivery forums as well as interagency social service forums.

Social services delivered by non-government organisations (grants)

Completed/ on schedule The capacity-building implementation project built governance and administrative capacity in the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy

Association, which improved the delivery of social support services in the Torres Strait region.

The Port Kennedy Association received grant funding to continue its community after-school care programme in 2019-2020.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMME SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Indicator Flag Status

All Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people employed in the TSRA-supported social services sector in the region have appropriate accreditation

Completed/ on schedule The TSRA provides the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy Association with an annual operational budget that includes

appropriations for training and accreditation.

Indigenous employees of those organisations have appropriate accreditation to effectively perform their duties within the social services sector. These include certificates in aged care and disability services, children’s services, community services, accounting, and business administration.

AII TSRA-funded service delivery organisations in the region provide quality services and operate in accordance with relevant standards

Completed/ on schedule Social support services are effectively delivered in the region by the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy Association. The

services are operated in accordance with relevant standards under the Associations Incorporation Act 1981 (Qld) and within the TSRA’s funding guidelines.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd delivers legal services in the region in accordance with relevant standards and guidelines.

Reduction in service referrals, response timeframes and waiting lists for social service providers

Completed/ on schedule The programmes delivered by the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy Association include child safety services, child and

family services, disability services, respite services and services for older people.

The number of service referrals varies depending on clients’ individual circumstances. All responses to clients and waiting lists are managed in line with the service standards of those organisations.

Increased participation in TSRA-supported community events by residents and TSRA-funded service organisations

Completed/ on schedule The number of residents and TSRA-funded organisations participating in various community events continued to grow,

increasing from 500 in 2018-2019 to 600 in 2019-2020.

Community events coordinated by the Mura Kosker Sorority and the Port Kennedy Association include events related to International Women’s Day, Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month, Seniors Week, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day, and Child Protection Week.

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CASE STUDY: NEW BUS PROVIDES SAFE, RELIABLE TRANSPORT FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

In 2019-2020, the TSRA provided a grant to Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc. (TSKM) to purchase a new, 14-seater bus.

TSKM provides accommodation on Thursday Island for approximately 65 outer island secondary students who attend the Tagai State College Secondary Campus. It is important that these young people are provided with educational opportunities equivalent to those available on mainland Australia.

In partnership with Tagai State College and other local organisations, TSKM supports students to achieve the best possible outcomes in education, through cultural and traditional knowledge support, and successful transitions from school to work, through developing positive career paths.

The new bus provides the students with the practical support they need to attend school and be actively involved in the community after school hours. TSKM is now providing improved, safe, and more reliable transport to school activities, visits to medical centres, and community activities and cultural and sporting events.

The blessing of the new bus was conducted by Fr Simeon Noah on 14 November 2019 and was attended by TSKM’s board members, staff and students, and TSRA staff.

TSKM is now providing improved, safe, and more reliable transport to school activities, visits to medical centres, and community activities and cultural and sporting events.

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SECTION TWO: PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

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57

SECTION THREE: OPERATIONS

Where We Operate 60

What We Do 65

WHERE WE OPERATE

GEOGRAPHY

The Torres Strait is part of Australia’s north-eastern state, Queensland. The area is approximately 150 kilometres wide at its narrowest point and is situated between the tip of Cape York Peninsula and Papua New Guinea.

The Torres Strait links the Coral Sea in the east to the Arafura Sea in the west. The two main navigation passages are the Prince of Wales Channel, north of Keriri (Hammond Island), and the Endeavour Strait, between Cape York and Muralag (Prince of Wales Island).

The picturesque region consists of over 270 islands and reefs with a variety of topographies, ecosystems and formations. Several islands close to the Papua New Guinea coastline are low lying and are regularly inundated by sea water. Many of the western islands are hilly and steep. The central islands are predominantly coral cays and the islands in the east are volcanic.

LOGISTICS

The TSRA delivers services across the entire Torres Strait region, including 17 inhabited islands and the communities of Bamaga and Seisia in the Northern Peninsula Area of mainland Australia.

The TSRA relies on air and sea links and limited phone and internet communications for the delivery of its services. Most travel within the region is restricted to small watercraft, helicopters and light aircraft.

The main gateway to the Torres Strait is the airport located on Ngurapai (Horn Island), a 20-minute ferry ride from Thursday Island (Waiben) where the administrative hubs of the Australian Government, Queensland Government, TSC and TSIRC are located.

The bulk of goods and materials required by the region are shipped by container vessel from Cairns and redistributed by barge from transhipment points on Thursday Island and Ngurapai.

CULTURE

The Torres Strait region is predominantly inhabited by Torres Strait Islanders and Kaurareg Aboriginal people. In 2016, the year of the most recent ABS census, the total population of the region was 9,548, of whom 7,784 were Torres Strait Islander or Aboriginal people.

The Torres Strait’s unique Ailan Kastom (island custom) is a central part of life in the region. Ailan Kastom is kept alive through the arts, rituals and performances, and the preservation of languages and traditional knowledge, which are passed from one generation to the next. Cultural values are strongly intertwined with traditional ancestral ties and respect for the waterways, land and sea and the resources that they provide.

HISTORY

The Torres Strait is named after Spanish explorer Luis Vaez de Torres, who sailed through the area in 1606. Queensland Government administration of the Torres Strait was established on Thursday Island in 1877, following the arrival of missionaries on Cape York Peninsula. Early settlers were involved in pearling, bêche-de-mer collection, and mining.

FIGURE 3-1: THE TORRES STRAIT

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

AUSTRALIA

Arufura Sea

Coral Sea

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NATIVE TITLE

Torres Strait Islander people first achieved recognition of their land rights in 1992 following the High Court’s landmark Mabo decision, which granted the Meriam people Native Title rights over Mer (Murray Island). It was the first time that Native Title had been recognised under the common law of Australia. It set a precedent for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people throughout Australia to assert their Native Title rights through the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth).

Native Title has been granted for 13 inhabited islands and most of the uninhabited islands in the Torres Strait region. In addition, the Kaurareg Aboriginal people have achieved recognition of their Native Title rights over seven inner islands: Ngurapai (Horn Island), Muralag (Prince of Wales Island), Zuna (Entrance Island), Yeta (Port Lihou Island), Mipa (Turtle Island), Tarilag (Packe Island) and Damaralag.

In total, 22 Native Title determinations have been made in the Torres Strait. No new determinations were made in 2019-2020. Native Title claims are being pursued over two land claims and three sea claims.

REGIONAL STATISTICS

The TSRA uses the latest data available from the ABS to benchmark the progress of the TSRA’s programmes. The data used in this section was taken from the ABS QuickStats website and was current at 30 June 2020.

The figures are for the Torres Strait and the two communities in the Northern Peninsula Area (Bamaga and Seisia) which are included in the TSRA’s area of responsibility.

POPULATION

Population changes that occurred between the ABS censuses of 2011 and 2016 are shown in tables 3-1 to 3-4.

In 2016, the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal population of the Torres Shire Local Government Area represented 68.6 per cent of the total population. For the TSIRC Local Government Area, the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal population represented 91.8 per cent of the total population. This shows a slight increase in the proportion of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in those two areas compared to 2011.

The Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal population represented 74.4 per cent of the total population in Seisia and 82.4 per cent in Bamaga in 2016.

TABLE 3-1: TOTAL POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Total)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

3,256 3,610 4,248 4,514 1,046 1,164 203 260 8,753 9,548

TABLE 3-2: TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Total)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

2,063 2,482 3,856 4,144 845 957 135 201 6,899 7,784

SECTION THREE: OPERATIONS

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61

On average, the gender balance changed only slightly between 2011 and 2016, showing a total increase of 1.2 per cent in the proportion of males.

The population age across the region also remained more or less consistent between 2011 and

2016, except in Seisia, where the statistics show a 19.4 per cent decrease in the average age. The age profile in Seisia is believed to be skewed by the number of non-resident visitors in the community at the time of the 2011 Census.

TABLE 3-3: GENDER BALANCE OF THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Gender

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government

Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Average)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

Male (%) 49.8 49.5 51.3 50.8 49.4 47.9 49.1 51.1 49.5 50.1

Female (%) 50.2 50.5 48.7 49.2 50.6 52.1 50.9 48.9 50.5 49.9

TABLE 3-4: AVERAGE AGE OF POPULATION OF THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Average)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

28 28 23 24 23 24 31 25 23 25

EMPLOYMENT

Table 3-5 shows that people in full-time work made up more than half of those eligible for employment in both 2011 and 2016.

TABLE 3-5: EMPLOYMENT IN THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Employment Type

Torres Strait Bamaga Seisia

Region (Total)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

Full time 1,039 915 277 311 76 65 1,392 1,291

Part time 837 547 84 93 17 12 938 652

Away from work 226 159 14 20 6 3 246 182

Unemployed 173 287 29 42 0 15 202 344

Total 2,275 1,908 404 466 99 95 2,778 2,469

Note: The figures for the Torres Strait relate only to Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people, while the figures for Bamaga and Seisia include Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.

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EDUCATION

The number of Torres Strait residents undertaking some form of education in 2016 was 3,641. The education categories are shown in Table 3-6.

The Tagai State College average school attendance rate in 2016, across years 1 to 12, was 89 per cent. This is slightly below the whole-of-Queensland average attendance rate of 90 per cent.

TABLE 3-6: EDUCATION IN THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Education Level

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government

Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Total)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

Pre-school 68 85 91 89 14 25 0 3 173 202

Primary 333 378 780 783 175 198 22 29 1,310 1,388

Secondary 253 318 176 221 89 92 8 20 526 651

Technical or further

43 59 97 72 24 19 3 5 167 155

University 71 74 25 20 10 11 3 4 109 109

Other 11 8 47 17 7 11 0 6 65 42

Not stated 504 594 247 412 54 60 17 28 822 1,094

Total 1,283 1,516 1,463 1,614 373 416 53 95 3,172 3,641

INCOME

The 2016 Census data indicates an improvement in the average household incomes of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people. This is reflected in Table 3-7.

The Queensland averages for household weekly income were $660 in 2011 and $1,402 in 2016. The Australian averages for the same periods were $662 and $1,438.

TABLE 3-7: MEDIAN WEALTH IN THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016 ($/WEEK)

Income Type

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government

Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Average)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

Personal 682 740 314 373 577 568 506 592 411 484

Household 1,579 1,837 849 929 1,117 1,402 785 1,261 971 1,357

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HOUSING TENURE

The 2016 Census reported that there were 2,267 dwellings in the region; the tenure arrangements are shown in Table 3-8.

The figures indicate that the number of houses owned in the region decreased between 2011 and

2016, while the number of properties being rented increased. Complex land tenure arrangements in the region and a lack of freehold land and long-tenure leasehold land remain challenges to increasing home ownership.

TABLE 3-8: TENURE OF PRIVATE DWELLINGS IN THE TORRES STRAIT INCLUDING BAMAGA AND SEISIA, 2011 AND 2016

Tenure Type

Torres Shire Local Government Area

Torres Strait Island Regional Council Local Government

Area Bamaga Seisia

Region (Total)

2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016

Owned 65 76 49 31 0 3 5 5 119 115

Mortgaged 48 35 0 0 0 0 4 0 52 35

Rented 632 646 856 907 245 273 53 59 1,786 1,885

Other 17 6 9 18 3 0 0 0 29 24

Not stated 53 147 28 33 8 18 0 10 89 208

Total 815 910 942 989 256 294 62 74 2,075 2,267

HEALTH

A synthesis of data from the ABS Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey 2012-2013 shows:

― Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people were more than three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have diabetes.

― Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people were twice as likely as non-Indigenous people to have signs of chronic kidney disease.

― Obesity rates for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal females and males were higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in every age group.

― Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people’s rates of heart disease were significantly higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in all age groups from 15 years to 54 years.

The mortality rates for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal males in the 35-44 age group were over four times higher than rates for non-Indigenous males. The mortality rates for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal females in the 25-29 age group and the 35-39 age group were five times higher than rates for non-Indigenous females.

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WHAT WE DO

ROLE

The TSRA is the leading Commonwealth representative body for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait, including two communities (Bamaga and Seisia) in the Northern Peninsula Area. It was established on 1 July 1994 under the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Act 1989 (Cth), and is currently enabled by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth).

The TSRA also performs separate functions under the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) as the NTRB for the Torres Strait region. In 2018-2019, the former Minister for Indigenous Affairs renewed the TSRA’s NTRB status until 30 June 2021.

PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Under section 142D of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the TSRA is required to formulate the Torres Strait Development Plan, to improve the economic, social and cultural status of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the region.

The Torres Strait Development Plan 2019-2022 details the TSRA’s eight programmes and how they contribute to regional outcomes, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Closing the Gap strategy, the Australian Government Indigenous Advancement Strategy and the United Nations Articles on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Regional outcomes are defined in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029. The Regional Plan was developed by the TSRA, TSC, TSIRC and NPARC, in consultation with Torres Strait communities, and captures community challenges, priorities and aspirations.

The TSRA is a corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth), which requires the TSRA to develop a corporate plan each year. The TSRA’s Corporate Plan, which sets out its programme activities and performance measures for the financial year, flows directly from the Regional Plan and the Torres Strait Development Plan (Figure 3-2).

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FIGURE 3-2: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY INTEGRATED PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Inputs

Inputs into the Regional Plan and other plans. A number of inputs need to be fed into and be part of community and leader consultations. These inputs, when considered and discussed with community and leaders, produce vital information to incorporate into the Regional Plan and subsequent lower level plans made by the various organisations involved in service delivery in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Integrated Plans

Integrated plans that incorporate all levels of Integrated Service Delivery for the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area.

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan

Council Corporate Plans

Outline the individual vision and strategies for the Torres Shire Council, Torres Strait Island Regional Council and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council covering a four-year period, with a strategic and operational outlook.

Council Operational Plans

Detailed operational plans addressing infrastructure, transport and other matters.

Specific Purpose Service Delivery Plans/ Projects

Specific plans and projects that are identified and developed on an as-required basis. These plans will be managed by the appropriate agency that has the specific service delivery responsibility.

Community Consultations

Prescribed Bodies Corporate

Community Vision Documents

Australian Government and Queensland Government Policies

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FIGURE 3-2: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY INTEGRATED PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Strategic Direction - Australian Government and Queensland Government policies

Regional Vision and Goals - Determined by elected representatives based on community consultations

Integrated Service Delivery Framework - Informs how the Regional Plan is to be delivered, defines the roles and responsibilities of contributing agencies, and outlines the monitoring and reporting functions.

TSRA Programme Plans

Detailed plans outlining the management of programmes.

Torres Strait Development Plan 2019-2022 Outlines TSRA programmes contributing to the Regional Plan, Indigenous Advancement Strategy and COAG Building Blocks for Closing the Gap.

TSRA Corporate Plan Sets out the objectives and strategies the TSRA intends to pursue in achieving its purposes each year, with a four-year outlook.

Integrated Service Delivery Action Plan Sets out an agreement between communities, the TSRA and government service delivery agencies on action, priority and timing for the delivery of new services and infrastructure.

Agency Plans

Individual plans developed by agencies for delivering services in the region.

Integrated Service Delivery Mechanisms

Integrated Service Delivery mechanisms in the form of agreements that commit to a framework outlining and establishing governance arrangements.

Regional Plan Community Booklets

Provide regular reporting to communities and other stakeholders on progress made towards delivering the Regional Plan.

Communities

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LEGISLATED FUNCTIONS AND POWERS

The functions of the TSRA, as defined in section 142A(1) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), are:

(a) to recognise and maintain the special and unique Ailan Kastom of Torres Strait Islanders living in the Torres Strait area;

(b) to formulate and implement programmes for Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(c) to monitor the effectiveness of programmes for Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area, including programmes conducted by other bodies;

(d) to develop policy proposals to meet national, State and regional needs and priorities of Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area;

(e) to assist, advise and co-operate with Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal communities, organisations and individuals at national, State, Territory and regional levels;

(f) to advise the Minister on:

(i) matters relating to Torres Strait Islander affairs, and Aboriginal affairs, in the Torres Strait area, including the administration of legislation;

(ii) the co-ordination of the activities of other Commonwealth bodies that affect Torres Strait Islanders, or Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area; (g) when requested by the Minister, to provide

information or advice to the Minister on any matter specified by the Minister; (h) to take such reasonable action as it considers necessary to protect Torres Strait Islander and

Aboriginal cultural material and information relating to the Torres Strait area if the material or information is considered sacred or otherwise significant by Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons; (i) at the request of, or with the agreement of,

the Australian Bureau of Statistics but not otherwise, to collect and publish statistical information relating to Torres Strait Islanders, and Aboriginal persons, living in the Torres Strait area; (j) such other functions as are conferred on the

TSRA by this Act or any other Act;

(k) such other functions as are expressly conferred on the TSRA by a law of a State or of an internal Territory and in respect of which there is in force written approval by the Minister under section 142B;

(l) to undertake such research as is necessary to enable the TSRA to perform any of its other functions;

(m) to do anything else that is incidental or conducive to the performance of any of the preceding functions.

The powers of the TSRA are outlined in section 142C of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), which states:

(1) The TSRA has power to do all things that are necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of its functions.

(2) The powers of the TSRA include, but are not limited to, the following powers:

(a) to accept gifts, grants, bequests and devises made to it; (b) to act as trustee of money and other property vested in it on trust; (c) to negotiate and co-operate with other

Commonwealth bodies and with State, Territory and local government bodies; (d) to enter into an agreement for making a grant or loan under section 142GA to the

State of Queensland or an authority of that State (including a local government body); (e) to enter into an agreement (other than an agreement referred to in paragraph (d)) with

a State or a Territory.

(3) Despite anything in this Act, any money or other property held by the TSRA on trust must be dealt with in accordance with the powers and duties of the TSRA as trustee.

(4) The powers of the TSRA may be exercised in or out of Australia.

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GOVERNMENT POLICY FRAMEWORK

Closing the Gap is a commitment by the Australian Government and state and territory governments to improve the lives of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Australians and, in particular, to provide a better future for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal children.

A national, integrated Closing the Gap strategy has been agreed by COAG, the peak intergovernmental forum in Australia. COAG brings together the Prime Minister, state premiers, territory chief ministers and the President of the Australian Local Government Association.

Closing the Gap is linked to a wider reform of Commonwealth-state financial relations. COAG’s national agreements and partnerships, in areas such as education, housing and health, are focused on overcoming Indigenous disadvantage.

The TSRA’s programme structure is based on the

Building Blocks that COAG has endorsed for Closing

the Gap: Early Childhood, Schooling, Health,

Economic Participation, Healthy Homes, Safe

Communities and Governance and Leadership.

In 2014-2015, the Australian Government introduced the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, with the objective of achieving real results in the key priority areas of getting children to school, getting adults into work, and building safer communities.

The TSRA has aligned its programme outcomes to the streams of the Australian Government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy while continuing to deliver against the COAG targets:

― to close the life expectancy gap within a generation ― to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade

― to ensure access to early childhood education for all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities within five years

― to halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for children within a decade

― to halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 (or equivalent) attainment rates by 2020 ― to halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous

Australians within a decade.

INTEGRATED SERVICE DELIVERY

A key element of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029 is its focus on integrated planning, development and service delivery. The TSRA’s Integrated Service Delivery project aims to coordinate the effective delivery of a range of government services to local communities and minimise duplication between agencies.

The project has identified and documented over 1,600 gaps in service delivery across 20 communities. The TSRA has published a series of booklets detailing service gaps in each community, which are available from the TSRA’s website.

The TSRA Board has requested that local, state and Commonwealth government agencies refocus on relationships to build stronger partnerships for the delivery of services in the Torres Strait.

In September 2019, the TSRA hosted the inaugural Regional Interagency Forum, inviting senior officers from relevant government agencies, TSRA portfolio members and regional mayors and councillors to provide input into the future Integrated Service Delivery framework for the region.

The interagency forum will be held annually by the TSRA in collaboration with the three regional local government agencies and the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships.

The TSRA Board has requested that local, state and Commonwealth government agencies refocus on relationships to build stronger partnerships for the delivery of services in the Torres Strait.

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SECTION FOUR: CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Governance Framework 72

Enabling Functions 87

GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

The TSRA’s governance framework (Figure 4-1) provides a system of direction and controls, enabling regional outcomes to be achieved through organisational goals and objectives. The framework allows risks and issues to be escalated to the appropriate level.

The resolution of risks and issues occurs through formal project management structures, programme structures, the TSRA Programme Steering Committee, the TSRA Audit Committee and the TSRA Board.

FIGURE 4-1: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

Minister for Indigenous Australians

Australian Government

Parliamentary Committees

State, Territory and Local Governments

Finance

Human Resources

Information Technology

Property Management

Prescribed Bodies Corporate

Indigenous Representative Bodies

Indigenous People in the Torres Strait Region

Indigenous Corporations

Economic Development

Fisheries

Culture, Art and Heritage

Native Title

Environmental Management

Governance and Leadership

Healthy Communities

Safe Communities

Audit Committee

Chief Executive Officer

Stakeholders

Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) Board

Programme Delivery Corporate Support

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RESPONSIBLE MINISTER

The Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM, MP, is the Minister responsible for the TSRA.

Throughout the reporting period the TSRA provided ministerial minutes and briefings to the Minister, including quarterly reports detailing the TSRA’s operations and service delivery.

MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS

Under section 142E of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the Minister has powers of direction in relation to the TSRA. Section 142E of the Act states:

(1) The TSRA must perform its functions and exercise its powers in accordance with any general written directions given to it by the Minister.

(2) The Minister must not give directions about the content of any advice, information or recommendation that may be given by the TSRA to a Minister, Department of State or authority of the Commonwealth.

(3) The Minister must not give directions about the content of any advice, information or recommendation that may be given by the TSRA to:

(a) a Minister of a State or Territory; or (b) a Department of a State or Territory; or (c) an authority of a State or Territory; except for the purpose of protecting the

confidentiality of information given to the TSRA by the Commonwealth or an authority of the Commonwealth.

(4) Subject to subsection (5), the Minister must cause a copy of a direction to be laid before each House of the Parliament within 15 sitting days of that House after that direction was given.

(5) The rule in subsection (4) does not apply if the laying of a copy of a direction before each House of the Parliament would result in the disclosure of a matter in a manner that would be inconsistent with the views or sensitivities of Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons.

The TSRA did not receive any formal directions from the Minister during the reporting period.

STATEMENT OF EXPECTATIONS AND STATEMENT OF INTENT

In 2016, the former Minister for Indigenous Affairs provided a Statement of Expectations to the TSRA concerning the operation and performance of the TSRA. In response, the TSRA provided a Statement of Intent to the Minister.

MINISTERIAL APPOINTMENTS

The Minister for Indigenous Australians made five Acting TSRA Chief Executive Officer appointments under section 144L(a) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) during 2019-2020.

Ms Mary Bani, Mr Christopher De Mamiel and Ms Kerry Vizcarra-Dixon were appointed as the Acting Chief Executive Officer of the TSRA for the periods outlined in Table 4-1.

TABLE 4-1: ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER APPOINTMENTS, 2019-2020

Appointed Duration

Ms Mary Bani 12 June 2019 -

23 July 2019

Mr Christopher De Mamiel 24 July 2019 - 31 July 2019

Ms Mary Bani 1 August 2019 -

8 December 2019

Ms Kerry Vizcarra-Dixon 9 December 2019 - 22 January 2020

Ms Mary Bani 23 January 2020 -

30 January 2020

TSRA BOARD

The TSRA Board is an elected representative body which participates in scheduled quarterly meetings and issue-specific out-of-session meetings.

The primary functions of the Board are to:

― set out the TSRA’s vision for the Torres Strait ― oversee the TSRA’s strategic objectives and direction ― approve programme mandates

― review the TSRA’s performance, objectives and outcomes ― manage strategic risk and regional stakeholder relations.

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The Chairperson and Executive Committee members are elected by the Board at their first meeting following the TSRA elections. The Executive Committee members are the Deputy Chairperson, the Alternate Deputy Chairperson and portfolio members who represent each programme.

The Chairperson is a full-time Principal Executive Officer, while other Board members are part-time officials. All Board members are remunerated in accordance with determinations of the Remuneration Tribunal for full-time and part-time officials.

TSRA Board members are officials under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) and are classified as non-executive directors. The Board is the accountable authority for the TSRA.

BOARD ELECTIONS

The TSRA Board consists of 20 members elected under Division 5 of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth).

Each member represents one of 20 wards defined in Part 1 of the Torres Strait Regional Authority Election Rules 2017 (Cth). The wards align with the communities of Badu, Bamaga, Boigu, Dauan, Erub, Hammond, lama, Kubin, Mabuyag, Masig, Mer, Ngurapai and Muralag, Port Kennedy, Poruma, Seisia, Saibai, St Pauls, TRAWQ (Tamwoy, Rose Hill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine), Ugar, and Warraber.

The most recent Board elections were held in July 2016. Elections for Board office holders were held at the first meeting of the new Board, in September 2016.

Section 142Y of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) states that TSRA elections must be held every four years. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Minister for Indigenous Australians exercised his power under section 142S of the Act to postpone the election due to occur in mid-2020. The election is now scheduled to occur in late 2020.

MEMBERSHIP CHANGES WITHIN THE REPORTING PERIOD

Two casual vacancies arose on the Board as the result of the resignations of:

― Mr Jerry D Stephen Jr, Member for Ugar, Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Fisheries, in May 2019

― Mr Eric Peter, Member for Boigu, Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Portfolio Member for Native Title, in June 2019.

In accordance with Part 6 of the Torres Strait Regional Authority Election Rules 2017 (Cth), a casual vacancy may be filled by means of a recount of votes cast for candidates who were unsuccessful in the election. If no unsuccessful candidates exist or consent to act if elected, the vacancy may be filled by a by-election.

Mr Jerry D Stephen Jr was elected unopposed in 2016. Upon acceptance of his resignation, on 24 July 2019, the Minister fixed a by-election date for Ugar Ward for 12 October 2019. Mr David Stuart, the Australian Electoral Commission Returning Officer, declared Mr Rocky Stephen to be the elected member for the Ugar ward on 13 October 2019, upon the completion of counting.

Mr Donald Banu, the unsuccessful candidate for the Boigu ward in the 2016 election, declared an interest in filling the position vacated by Mr Eric Peter. In accordance with rule 126(2) of the Torres Strait Regional Authority Election Rules 2017 (Cth), a recount of votes was undertaken. Mr David Stuart declared Mr Banu to be the elected member for the Boigu ward on 30 August 2019.

OFFICE HOLDER ELECTIONS WITHIN THE REPORTING PERIOD

Following the resignations of Mr Jerry D Stephen Jr, Deputy Chairperson, and Mr Eric Peter, Alternate Deputy Chairperson, the TSRA Administration engaged the Australian Electoral Commission to undertake officeholder elections in line with the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Election of Officeholders) Regulations 2019 (Cth).

Mr David Stuart, the Australian Electoral Commission Returning Officer, attended TSRA Board meeting number 117 on 4 September 2019. Following a formal nomination and ballot process, Mr Getano Lui Jr AM, Member for Iama, was declared the new Deputy Chairperson, and Mr Horace Baira, Member for Badu, was declared the new Alternate Deputy Chairperson.

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PROFILES OF TSRA BOARD MEMBERS IN 2019-2020

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM

CHAIRPERSON MEMBER FOR PORT KENNEDY PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP REGIONAL GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE MEMBER

Mr Stephen has over 30 years of extensive executive leadership and management experience with Australian Government and state and local government agencies and community organisations. He is a former Mayor of the TSC and served the community for 20 years in that role. Mr Stephen is an ordained minister of religion.

Mr Stephen is a member of Community Enterprise Queensland (formerly known as the Islanders Board of Industry and Service) and the Port Kennedy Association.

The keys issues of concern for Mr Stephen are housing,

unemployment, health, domestic violence, and substance abuse. He aims to address these through programmes which improve health care practices and

the wellbeing of families and support ways for families

to access affordable housing. He will advocate for increasing the wealth of our region through developing

local industries and jobs, and for supporting community organisations with service delivery.

During his term, Mr Stephen would like to provide strong leadership that promotes honesty, loyalty and outstanding customer service. He would like to establish a single regional governance authority in the

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area, to provide

effective and efficient governance with a model of hope and security in line with social and economic independence for people living in the Torres Strait.

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM

DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON MEMBER FOR IAMA REGIONAL GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE CHAIR

Mr Lui is Councillor for Iama on the TSIRC. He was previously a

Councillor and Chairperson of the lama Community Council, Chairperson of the Island Coordinating Council and Chairman of the Islanders Board of Industry and Service. Mr Lui was the TSRA Board’s first Chairperson.

Mr Lui was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 1994. He is a Justice of the Peace (magistrates court).

Mr Lui was involved in the ratification of the Torres Strait Treaty between Australia and Papua New Guinea. He is currently Co-chairperson of the Traditional Inhabitants Meeting at the Australia-Papua New Guinea bilateral meetings.

Mr Lui is concerned about the socioeconomic and cultural wellbeing of his people. Advocating for regional governance with the aim of regional autonomy that will grant full self-determination to the people of Zenadth Kes is a priority for him.

Mr Horace Baira

ALTERNATE DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON MEMBER FOR BADU PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR NATIVE TITLE AUDIT COMMITTEE MEMBER

Mr Baira is a member of the Torres and Cape Hospital and Health Service Board, and a former Councillor for Badu Island on the TSIRC.

Mr Baira has experience in environmental health; community management; rural and remote operations; and small business management. His key issues of concern are the effectiveness of Integrated Service Delivery between stakeholders in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area region and the allocation of resources towards community and economic development.

Mr Baira has a strong commitment to developing and improving policies and programmes for the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area communities, working towards a safe and healthy region with a strong economy while conserving Ailan Kastom and the region’s pristine environment.

Mrs Patricia Yusia

MEMBER FOR BAMAGA PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

Mrs Yusia has over 30 years of experience as a director of

non-government organisations and 25 years of experience in the health sector.

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In May 2020, Mrs Yusia was elected Mayor of the NPARC. She currently serves as a director of local community organisations, including Bamagau Kazil Torres Strait Islanders Corporation, Apunipima Cape York Health Council and Northern Peninsula Area Family and Community Services. She is also a member of the Mura Badulgal (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation Board.

Mrs Yusia aims to improve Indigenous leadership, community partnerships, and social and cultural determinants which affect the Torres Strait lifestyle. She will lobby for more funding for organisations which empower community groups to be sustainable, believing it is important to encourage communities to work together for a brighter, healthy future for their children and future generations.

Mr Joel Gaidan

MEMBER FOR DAUAN

Mr Gaidan is a former Councillor for Dauan on the TSIRC and was employed by the council as an environmental health worker. He

also worked for the Department of Immigration in a police liaison role on Dauan. He is in the process of completing a Diploma of Environmental Health.

Mr Gaidan’s key areas of concern for his community include addressing the shortage of housing and improving infrastructure. This includes upgrading and maintaining the water supply and rubbish dump, sealing roads, and addressing the mobile telephone blackspot on Dauan.

Mr Gaidan’s main priorities for his time on the Board are obtaining helicopter subsidies and a community hall for the community of Dauan.

IN MEMORY

Mr Donald Banu

MEMBER FOR BOIGU

Prior to the publication of this Annual Report, the TSRA lost one of its Board Members, with the passing of Mr Donald Banu, Member for Boigu, in June 2020.

Mr Banu served for three terms as TSRA Member for Boigu, during 2004-2008, 2008-2012 and 2019-2020. In his first and second terms, Mr Banu also served as the TSRA Portfolio Member for Native Title. His contribution was instrumental in the Native

Title determinations for several island communities, and later the Torres Strait Sea Claims.

A key focus area for Mr Banu was capacity building for PBCs to allow Torres Strait Islanders to benefit from opportunities such as land lease agreements.

Mr Banu was a strong advocate for action to address the issue of coastal erosion in his community of Boigu, across all levels of government, culminating in the Torres Strait Seawalls Programme.

Mr Banu was involved in the project to repatriate Indigenous human remains and sacred objects to Torres Strait communities. He was instrumental in negotiating an agreement with the United Kingdom’s Natural History Museum for the return of ancestral remains to the Torres Strait. Mr Banu was involved in this project during 2010-2011 and during that time 138 sets of ancestral remains were repatriated to Australia from overseas.

In his own time, Mr Banu undertook an active role in his community and the wider Torres Strait to help young people achieve career paths in the Australian Navy and other Australian Defence Force services.

Mr Banu will be sadly missed by the TSRA, the Boigu community and the wider Torres Strait community.

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Mr Jimmy Gela

MEMBER FOR ERUB

Mr Gela is Chairperson of Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation RNTBC,

Deputy Chair of Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC, a director of Gur A Baradharaw Kod Corporation and a director of Ged Erub Trading Homeland Enterprise (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation.

Mr Gela is interested in maintaining and preserving our cultural knowledge and traditional practices for the benefit of future generations, and training and upskilling locals to obtain professional qualifications, particularly in trades, business management and administration, health, and education.

Mr Gela would like to see Torres Strait Island Police Support Officers given the opportunity to receive training in compliance with the qualities of Queensland Police Service officers, to make them more effective in enforcing the law within the community.

He would also like to see all tiers of government maintain working relationships with Native Title holders that support the betterment and growth of people and community, acknowledging our cultural laws and values.

Mr Seriako Dorante

MEMBER FOR HAMMOND

Mr Dorante has previously served as Deputy Chairperson of the Hammond Island Council. He holds a Certificate IV in

Frontline Management and a Certificate IV in Local Government Administration.

In 2020, Mr Dorante was elected as Councillor for Kirirri on the TSIRC.

Mr Dorante’s key issues of concern are Native Title, housing, employment, health and wellbeing. He believes that the promotion of the TSRA must happen in all our communities, to encourage communities to support their elected members so that regional issues can be addressed properly through better consultation processes involving all relevant stakeholders and government bodies.

Mr Dorante will advocate to improve the lifestyles and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in the region.

Mr David Bosun

MEMBER FOR KUBIN

Mr Bosun is a former Councillor for Kubin Community on the TSIRC. He is also a director of Ngalmun Lagau Minaral Arts

Torres Strait Islander Corporation.

Mr Bosun holds an Associate Diploma in Journalism and Communication, a Diploma in Leadership and Management, a Certificate IV in Visual Arts and a Certificate IV in Business Management. He would like to see vast improvements made in the Torres Strait region’s economy through sustainable tourism ventures and the promotion of arts and culture.

Mr Bosun emphasises a grassroots approach to training, employment and economic development that enables communities to become empowered, self-sufficient and independent.

Mr Cygnet Repu

MEMBER FOR MABUYAG PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR CULTURE, ART AND HERITAGE

Mr Repu is Chairperson of the Goemulgaw Kod, a local cultural organisation on

Mabuyag. He is also Chairperson of the Torres Strait Traditional Language Advisory Committee. He is an experienced culturalist who has presented overseas and is passionate about acquiring other skills.

Mr Repu has received various awards during his 20-year service with Biosecurity Australia and will draw on that experience during his term. His key issues of concern for the Torres Strait are housing, children’s welfare, cultural hunger, community unity, travel and transport.

Mr Repu believes that our region is different, and through his portfolio will connect the Torres Strait’s parent brand while respecting local cultural practices. Employee engagement, productivity, leadership and employer branding in the region must acknowledge that each location is unique.

Mr Joel Gaidan

MEMBER FOR DAUAN

Mr Gaidan is a former Councillor for Dauan on the TSIRC and was employed by the council as an environmental health worker. He

also worked for the Department of Immigration in a police liaison role on Dauan. He is in the process of completing a Diploma of Environmental Health.

Mr Gaidan’s key areas of concern for his community include addressing the shortage of housing and improving infrastructure. This includes upgrading and maintaining the water supply and rubbish dump, sealing roads, and addressing the mobile telephone blackspot on Dauan.

Mr Gaidan’s main priorities for his time on the Board are obtaining helicopter subsidies and a community hall for the community of Dauan.

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He will engage the support of the community, believing that what is best for the Torres Strait should be identified by its people, and that minimising the effects of cultural challenges depends on identifying their impacts and gaining skills to effectively overcome them.

Ms Hilda Mosby

MEMBER FOR MASIG PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Ms Mosby has more than 20 years of experience in the

Australian Public Service and was employed as Senior Housing Officer for the TSIRC. In 2020, Ms Mosby was elected as Councillor for Masig on the TSIRC.

Community involvement has been a paramount focus for Ms Mosby, who is an active member of committees dealing with education, health, justice, fisheries and Native Title in her community of Masig.

Of key concern to Ms Mosby is the impact of coastal erosion on low-lying Torres Strait communities, including her own community. She will advocate for an integrated approach to address coastal erosion issues by the relevant Australian Government and Queensland Government agencies.

Ms Mosby is passionate about the preservation of Torres Strait culture through language, music and art. She will continue to advocate for the best outcomes for the cultural wellbeing of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people in the region.

Mr Aven S Noah

MEMBER FOR MER

Mr Noah believes that traditional land and sea rights are paramount to controlling resources which will form the

foundation of the region’s economic independence. Mr Noah is passionate about greater autonomy for the Torres Strait, supporting and contributing to the region’s goal of achieving ‘home rule’ and establishing ‘Ailanesia’.

In 2020, Mr Noah was elected as Councillor for Mer on the TSIRC. He is a member of the Round Table on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics; the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, ABS; and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Group, Ipsos Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Unit.

Mr Noah has extensive experience in media and communications and is keen to see the development of their use, including the uptake of new technologies, across the region.

Mr Noah manages Native Title at Mer Gedkem Le (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation and is also a member of the Indigenous Reference Group of the National Museum of Australia.

Mr Yen Loban

MEMBER FOR NGURAPAI AND MURALAG PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR FISHERIES AUDIT COMMITTEE MEMBER

Mr Loban is a former Deputy

Mayor of the TSC. His primary concerns are the lack of basic service infrastructure on Muralag, and the low level of support provided to the ongoing development of Ngurapai and the outer islands.

Mr Loban will work to ensure that the communities of Ngurapai and Muralag are healthy and safe. He would like to see these communities receive the same services as other communities across the Torres Strait. He hopes to influence TSRA programmes to focus on equity in the provision of services that benefit all communities in the region.

He would also like to see an improvement in access to health services and education.

Mr Frank Fauid

MEMBER FOR PORUMA

Mr Fauid is the Central Islands Representative on the Torres Strait Islander Media Association Board and a member of

Porumalgal (Torres Strait Islanders) Corporation. He is currently employed by the Australian Border Force on Poruma.

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Mr Fauid is a pastor of the Australian Christian Churches (Assemblies of God) and became a justice of the peace in 2019. He has a Certificate III in Micro Business Operations.

Mr Fauid’s key concern is the issue of coastal erosion affecting Poruma and other low-lying communities. He is also concerned about the condition of some of the infrastructure in his community, particularly the basketball court, which is needed to encourage regular exercise.

Mr Fauid would like to see an art centre established on Poruma, the Poruma Island Resort reopened and the fishing industry restarted to connect the community to the wider economy. His other concerns are the lack of jobs in the communities, and the need to improve the health and wellbeing of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the region.

Mr Fauid will work with the relevant government ministers and stakeholders to address these issues to get the best outcomes for his community and the wider region.

Ms Chelsea Aniba

MEMBER FOR SAIBAI PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR SAFE COMMUNITIES

Ms Aniba has qualifications in radio broadcasting, business administration, social housing,

Indigenous justice studies and governance.

She has eight years of experience in radio broadcasting and is a member of the Torres Strait Islander Media Association Committee of Management. She is also a director of the Saibai Community Development Corporation and works closely with non-government organisations in tackling domestic violence, juvenile justice and mental health issues in communities.

Ms Aniba’s two primary concerns are coastal erosion and rising sea levels; and the insufficient supply of social housing. She advocates for the construction of seawalls for affected Torres Strait communities and the rollout of the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.

Ms Aniba is also concerned about creating employment and economic development opportunities for local families in small businesses; helping to keep, restore and revitalise culture; and strengthening RNTBCs to enable them to progress Native Title issues.

Mr Joseph Elu AO

MEMBER FOR SEISIA PORTFOLIO MEMBER FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Mr Elu is a former Councillor for Seisia on the NPARC, and has 21 years of experience

as Chairman of the Seisia Island Council. He is Chairperson of Seisia Enterprises Pty Ltd and Seisia Community Torres Strait Islander Corporation.

Mr Elu is Deputy Chairperson and a member of the Audit and Risk Committee of the Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation. He was Chairperson of Indigenous Business Australia (formerly known as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commercial Development Corporation) for 12 years.

Mr Elu was awarded the Centenary Medal in 2001 and received an honorary Doctorate of Economics from Queensland University of Technology in 2002. In 2008, he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia and awarded the NAIDOC Lifetime Achievement Award.

Mr Elu is an influential leader in Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal affairs and Indigenous economic development. He has assisted Indigenous people throughout Australia to develop sustainable economic enterprises.

Mr John Paiwan

MEMBER FOR ST PAULS AUDIT COMMITTEE MEMBER

Mr Paiwan has 12 years of experience in local government as an employee of the TSIRC.

He holds a Diploma of Leadership and Management and a Certificate IV in Occupational Health and Safety.

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Mr Paiwan’s key concerns are upgrading key infrastructure in communities, such as water services and electricity supply; continuing support for the delivery of affordable home ownership for local people in the region; continuing support for the training and employment of local people; and supporting small business and economic development in the region.

He aims to achieve his goals by working in partnership with the TSIRC, other stakeholders, service providers and local organisations in the region to address and support community concerns.

Mr John Abednego

MEMBER FOR TRAWQ REGIONAL GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE MEMBER

Mr Abednego is a Councillor on the TSC, a member of the Parents and Citizens Association

of the Tagai State College Secondary Campus, and President of the TRAWQ Indigenous Corporation. He also plays a role in the Anglican Church.

Mr Abednego has a Diploma of Counselling and 25 years of experience in community, organisation and board development; policies and procedures; and government systems. During his career he has been involved in mediation and counselling, court referrals, and social justice interagency networking.

Mr Abednego’s key concerns are lack of funding, inappropriate policies, and the fact that traditional culture and the mainstream are not equal partners. To address those concerns he aims to seek outside funding, have dedicated positions for cultural people, and ensure that cultural people are involved in developing culturally appropriate policies with meaningful outcomes.

Mr Abednego aims to achieve effective processes that deliver meaningful outcomes in the community.

Mr Rocky Stephen

MEMBER FOR UGAR

Mr Stephen was elected on 13 October 2019, to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of Mr Jerry D Stephen Jr.

Mr Stephen joins the TSRA Board as a returning member, having previously served on the board for two consecutive terms from 2000 to 2008. He was the youngest serving member. Mr Stephen is glad to be back and looks forward to working closely with the members of the TSRA Board in addressing the issues of his community and the region.

In 2020, Mr Stephen was re-elected as Councillor for Ugar on the TSIRC. Mr Stephen is also a Traditional Inhabitant member of the PZJA, representing the Kemer Kemer Meriam nation, and is a member of the PZJA Scientific Advisory Committee and Finfish Resource Assessment Group.

Mr Stephen brings a wealth of experience in serving the community, including his involvement in a number of community boards and committees.

Mr Willie Lui

MEMBER FOR WARRABER

Mr Lui is a former Councillor for Warraber on the TSIRC. He holds a Certificate IV in Finance and is a qualified carpenter.

The key areas of concern for Mr Lui are the high cost of living, lack of employment opportunities, and Native Title issues.

He will work to see those concerns addressed through effective implementation of the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029 and the Torres Strait Development Plan.

Mr Lui would also like to see improvements made in health and wellbeing and access to affordable housing across the region during his term.

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BOARD MEETINGS

The Chairperson is required to convene at least four TSRA Board meetings each year under section 144E of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth). If it is considered necessary, the Chairperson may convene special meetings of the Board to enable the TSRA to carry out its functions.

During 2019-2020, the TSRA Board held eight meetings as detailed in Table 4-2. Attendance at those meetings is outlined in Table 4-3.

TABLE 4-2: BOARD MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES, 2019-2020

Meeting Number Date Apologies Absent

116

Special Meeting (in camera)

7 August 2019 Mr Seriako Dorante

Ms Hilda Mosby

Mr David Bosun

Nil

117 4-6 September 2019 Mr Jimmy Gela

Mr Aven S Noah (Day 2 and Day 3)

Mr David Bosun (Day 3)

Nil

118

Special Meeting (in camera)

21 November 2019 Mr Jimmy Gela

Mr Seriako Dorante

Ms Chelsea Aniba

Mr Joseph Elu AO

Ms Hilda Mosby

Nil

119 4-6 December 2019 Mrs Patricia Yusia Nil

120

Special Meeting

14 February 2020 Mr Jimmy Gela

Ms Chelsea Aniba

Mr Joseph Elu AO

Ms Hilda Mosby

Mrs Patricia Yusia

Mr Joel Gaidan

Mr Cygnet Repu

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM

Nil

121

Special Meeting

25 March 2020 Nil Nil

122 1-3 April 2020 Mr Getano Lui Jr AM (Day 1)

Ms Chelsea Aniba (Day 1)

Ms Hilda Mosby (Day 2)

Nil

123

Special Meeting

15 April 2020 Mr Joseph Elu AO

Mr Joel Gaidan

Nil

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TABLE 4-3: BOARD MEETING ATTENDANCE, 2019-2020

Member

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM 8 of 8

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM 6 of 8

Mr Horace Baira 7 of 8

Mrs Patricia Yusia 6 of 8

Mr Donald Banu 7 of 8

Mr Joel Gaidan 6 of 8

Mr Jimmy Gela 5 of 8

Mr Seriako Dorante 6 of 8

Mr David Bosun 6 of 8

Mr Cygnet Repu 7 of 8

Ms Hilda Mosby 3.5 of 8

Mr Aven S Noah 7.5 of 8

Mr Yen Loban 7 of 8

Mr Frank Fauid 7 of 8

Ms Chelsea Aniba 6.5 of 8

Mr Joseph Elu AO 5 of 8

Mr John Paiwan 7 of 8

Mr John Abednego 7 of 8

Mr Rocky Stephen 5 of 8

Mr Willie Lui 7 of 8

BOARD CHARTER

The second edition of the TSRA Board Charter was adopted in 2016. The charter brings together all the resources that Board members require to enable them to exercise their powers and responsibilities.

The TSRA Board Charter is based on ethical standards and good governance and contains key documents such as the Board Member’s Code of Conduct, the TSRA’s Charter of Representation, Performance and Accountability, and the terms of reference relating to Board committees.

BOARD MEMBER INDUCTION

Following the TSRA Board elections in 2016, an induction programme was undertaken by all newly elected Board members. The programme was based on key governance roles, Board functions and processes, and Board members’ matters.

The TSRA Governance and Leadership Team delivered

an induction programme for the two members who joined the Board during the reporting period:

― Mr Donald Banu, who was elected Member for Boigu on 30 August 2019, was inducted on 2-3 September 2019

― Mr Rocky Stephen, who was elected Member for Ugar on 12 October 2019, was inducted on 21 November 2019.

BOARD TRAINING AND EDUCATION

On 3 December 2019, as part of the 2019-2020 Internal Audit programme, conflict of interest training

was provided to members of the Audit Committee and other Board members who wished to attend. The training was delivered by the TSRA’s Internal Auditor, Mr Chris King, Director of Pilot Partners.

Board members are eligible to apply for the TSRA’s leadership capacity building programmes. Individual qualifications are stated in the members’ profiles in this section of the Annual Report.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

The TSRA Board formed an Executive Committee at its meeting in September 2016, to assist the Chairperson to carry out his functions. The portfolio structure of the Executive Committee is aligned to the TSRA’s eight programmes.

Executive Committee meetings are held quarterly, immediately prior to each regular TSRA Board meeting. The TSRA Chairperson may call for additional Executive Committee meetings should they be required.

The Executive Committee’s objectives are to:

― ensure that policies and future directives are made in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) and other relevant legislation

― advocate for improved outcomes in the Torres Strait region ― represent the views of the TSRA on internal and external committees

― assist the TSRA Chairperson to communicate to Torres Strait communities government policies and TSRA decisions and achievements as they relate to the Executive Committee’s portfolio responsibilities.

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MEMBERSHIP

The 2019-2020 Executive Committee members and

their portfolio responsibilities are shown in Table 4-4.

TABLE 4-4: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP, 2019-2020

Member Role

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM Chairperson Portfolio Member for

Governance and Leadership

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM

Deputy Chairperson

Mr Horace Baira Alternate Deputy Chairperson

Portfolio Member for Native Title

Mrs Patricia Yusia Portfolio Member for Healthy Communities

Mr Cygnet Repu Portfolio Member for Culture, Art and Heritage

Ms Hilda Mosby Portfolio Member for Environmental Management

Mr Yen Loban Portfolio Member for Fisheries

Ms Chelsea Aniba Portfolio Member for Safe Communities

Mr Joseph Elu AO Portfolio Member for Economic Development

MEETINGS

In 2019-2020, the TSRA Executive Committee met four times, as shown in Table 4-5. Attendance at Executive Committee meetings is shown in Table 4-6.

TABLE 4-5: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES, 2019-2020

Meeting Number Date Apologies Absent

117 2 September

2020

Nil Nil

119 2 December

2020

Nil Nil

122 30 March

2020

Nil Nil

Note: Executive Committee meetings are held immediately prior to regular Board meetings. The number of each Executive Committee meeting aligns with the number of the corresponding Board meeting.

TABLE 4-6: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING ATTENDANCE, 2019-2020

Dates

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM 3 of 3

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM 3 of 3

Mr Horace Baira 3 of 3

Mr Joseph Elu AO 3 of 3

Ms Chelsea Aniba 3 of 3

Ms Hilda Mosby 3 of 3

Mr Cygnet Repu 3 of 3

Mrs Patricia Yusia 3 of 3

ADVISORY COMMITTEES

Advisory committees are those committees established under section 142M of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth).

The TSRA currently has three advisory committees: the Audit Committee, the Finfish Quota Management Committee (FQMC) and the Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework Steering Committee (FROF Steering Committee).

AUDIT COMMITTEE

The TSRA is required to have an Audit Committee under section 45 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth).

The TSRA Board is responsible for appointing the Audit Committee to provide independent advice and assistance to the TSRA Board on the risk control and compliance frameworks as well as the TSRA’s external accountability responsibilities. The Audit Committee consists of four members.

The Chairperson of the Audit Committee is an independent member, Mr Adrian Kelly from management firm Charterpoint Pty Ltd. The Chairperson of the Audit Committee provides technical expertise and experience, and advice on best practice accounting and auditing standards in the public sector. The Chairperson can request special meetings of the Audit Committee if considered necessary.

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The membership of the Audit Committee was endorsed by the incoming TSRA Board at its inaugural

meeting in September 2016. The current TSRA Audit Committee Charter can be found online at www.tsra.gov.au/_ _data/assets/pdf_file/0020/ 26408/TSRA-Audit-Committee-Charter-March-2020.pdf.

Membership

The membership of the Audit Committee during 2019-2020 is shown in Table 4-7.

Meetings

The Audit Committee met three times in 2019-2020, as shown in Table 4-8. Attendance at Audit Committee meetings is shown in Table 4-9.

TABLE 4-7: AUDIT COMMITTEE MEMBERS, 2019-2020

Member and Role Qualifications, Knowledge, Skills or Experience

Remuneration (Exclusive of Travel)

Mr Adrian Kelly (Charterpoint Pty Ltd)

Chairperson and Independent Member

Mr Kelly is a chartered accountant and registered company auditor with over 30 years of experience in the provision of assurance and specialist advisory services. His experience includes providing tailored assurance, risk management and governance services to his clients, and identifying opportunities to deliver improvements in governance and financial and reporting systems.

Mr Kelly is also the Audit and Risk Committee Chair for the Self Storage Association of Australasia and is a past Chair of the Board of the ACT and South East NSW Aero-Medical Service Ltd.

$26,750

Mr Horace Baira

Member for Badu

Mr Baira holds the Native Title Portfolio on the TSRA Board and is a member of the Torres and Cape Hospital and Health Service Board, and a former Councillor for Badu Island on the Torres Strait Island Regional Council.

He has experience in environmental health; community management; rural and remote operations; and small business management.

$1,506(1)

Mr Yen Loban

Member for Ngurapai and Muralag

Mr Loban holds the Fisheries Portfolio on the TSRA Board and is also a former Deputy Mayor of the Torres Shire Council. $1,506(1)

Mr John Paiwan

Member for St Pauls

(Rotational Member from 1 October 2019)(2)

Mr Paiwan has 12 years of experience in local government as an employee of the Torres Strait Island Regional Council.

He holds a Diploma of Leadership and Management and a Certificate IV in Occupational Health and Safety.

$1,506(1)

(1) TSRA Board Members on the Audit Committee are paid daily sitting fees as per the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Part-time Public Office) Determination.

(2) Refer to page 7 of the TSRA Audit Committee Charter for details relating to the appointment of the Rotational Member.

TABLE 4-8: AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES, 2019-2020

Dates Apologies

3 September 2019 Nil

3 December 2019 Nil

31 March 2020 Nil

TABLE 4-9: AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETING ATTENDANCE, 2019-2020

Member

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr Adrian Kelly 3 of 3

Mr Horace Baira 3 of 3

Mr Yen Loban 3 of 3

Mr John Paiwan 3 of 3

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FINFISH QUOTA MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

The FQMC was established by the Board in 2007 to provide advice on leasing arrangements in the Torres Strait finfish fishery, following the transfer of the fishery to 100 per cent ownership by Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Traditional Owners.

The terms of reference for the FQMC set out the membership to be the four TSRA Board members from the finfish communities (Erub, Masig, Mer and Ugar), an independent TSRA Board member as Chairperson, and one community fisher representative from each of the finfish communities.

The current Chairperson (the Member for Ngurapai and Muralag) and community fisher representatives have been appointed members of the FQMC for the term of the sitting TSRA Board. Membership of the committee expires on the date on which the Australian Electoral Commission issues a notice of election for the TSRA.

Membership

Membership of the FQMC during 2019-2020 is shown in Table 4-10.

TABLE 4-10: FINFISH QUOTA MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE MEMBERS, 2019-2020

Name Role

Mr Yen Loban Chairperson

TSRA Member for Ngurapai and Muralag and Portfolio Member for Fisheries

Mr Rocky Stephen TSRA Member for Ugar

Mr Daniel Stephen Ugar community fisher representative

Mr Aven S Noah TSRA Member for Mer

Mr John Tabo Jr Mer community fisher representative

Ms Hilda Mosby TSRA Member for Masig

Mr John Morris Masig community fisher representative

Mr Jimmy Gela TSRA Member for Erub

Mr Daniel Sailor Erub community fisher representative

Meetings

The FQMC met once in 2019-2020, as shown in Table 4-11. Attendance at FQMC meetings is shown in Table 4-12.

TABLE 4-11: FINFISH QUOTA MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES, 2019-2020

Dates Apologies

3 March 2020 Ms Hilda Mosby, TSRA Member for Masig

TABLE 4-12: FINFISH QUOTA MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE MEETING ATTENDANCE, 2019-2020

Member

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr Yen Loban 1 of 1

Mr Rocky Stephen 1 of 1

Mr Daniel Stephen 1 of 1

Mr Aven S Noah 1 of 1

Mr John Tabo Jr 1 of 1

Ms Hilda Mosby 0 of 1

Mr John Morris 1 of 1

Mr Jimmy Gela 1 of 1

Mr Daniel Sailor 1 of 1

FISHERIES REGIONAL OWNERSHIP FRAMEWORK STEERING COMMITTEE

The FROF Steering Committee was first appointed by the Board in 2018-2019 as an informal committee to work on the Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework project. It was established as a formal advisory committee to the Board on 20 November 2018.

The terms of reference for the FROF Steering Committee set out the membership to be TSRA Board members and community members appointed by the TSRA Chairperson.

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The current committee Chairperson (the Member for Ngurapai and Muralag) and TSRA Board, community and Native Title representatives have been appointed members of the FROF Steering Committee for the term of the sitting TSRA Board. Membership of the committee expires on the date on which the Australian Electoral Commission issues a notice of election for the TSRA.

Membership

The membership of the FROF Steering Committee during 2019-2020 is shown in Table 4-13.

TABLE 4-13: FISHERIES REGIONAL OWNERSHIP FRAMEWORK STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS, 2019-2020

Name Role

Mr Yen Loban Chairperson

TSRA Member for Ngurapai and Muralag and Portfolio Member for Fisheries

Mr Horace Baira TSRA Member for Badu and Portfolio Member for Native Title

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM TSRA Chairperson and Portfolio Member

for Governance and Leadership

Mr Kenny Bedford Community representative

Mr Frank Loban Community representative

Mr Maluwap Nona, Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC

Native Title representative

Mr Ned David, Gur A Baradharaw Kod Torres Strait Sea and Land Council

Native Title representative

Meetings

The FROF Steering Committee met nine times in 2019-20, as shown in Table 4-14. Attendance at FROF Steering Committee meetings is shown in Table 4-15.

TABLE 4-14: FISHERIES REGIONAL OWNERSHIP FRAMEWORK STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING DATES AND APOLOGIES, 2019-2020

Dates Apologies

17-19 July 2019 Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM

Mr Kenny Bedford

14-16 October 2019 Mr Yen Loban

18-19 November 2019 Mr Kenny Bedford

17-18 December 2019 Mr Horace Baira Mr Maluwap Nona

13 February 2020

Mr Kenny Bedford

Mr Ned David

9 April 2020 Mr Horace Baira

14 May 2020 Mr Maluwap Nona

27 May 2020 Mr Maluwap Nona

25 June 2020 Mr Maluwap Nona

TABLE 4-15: FISHERIES REGIONAL OWNERSHIP FRAMEWORK STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING ATTENDANCE, 2019-2020

Member

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr Yen Loban 8 of 9

Mr Horace Baira 7 of 9

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen AM 8 of 9

Mr Kenny Bedford 6 of 9

Mr Frank Loban 9 of 9

Mr Maluwap Nona, Malu Lamar (Torres Strait Islander) Corporation RNTBC

5 of 9

Mr Ned David, Gur A Baradharaw Kod Torres Strait Sea and Land Council

8 of 9

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ENABLING FUNCTIONS

The Chief Executive Officer is appointed by the Minister for Indigenous Australians and is responsible

for the TSRA’s administration and staffing.

The TSRA’s organisational structure provides a clear

line of accountability to the Board and the Minister through the Chief Executive Officer (Figure 4-2).

FIGURE 4-2: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

Programme Manager Governance and

Leadership

Programme Manager Economic Development

Programme Manager Fisheries

Chief Financial Officer and Manager Corporate

Services

Minister for Indigenous Australians

Torres Strait Regional Authority

Chairperson

Chief Executive Officer

Programme Manager Healthy and Safe Communities

Programme Manager Native Title

Programme Manager Culture, Art and Heritage

Programme Manager Environmental Management

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PROGRAMME STEERING COMMITTEE

The TSRA has in place a Programme Steering Committee (PSC) to monitor the performance of its programmes and operations.

The TSRA’s programmes manage projects and ongoing activities contributing to the outcomes outlined in the Torres Strait Development Plan and the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029. The PSC considers programme resources and ensures that strategies and operational activities align with the TSRA’s overall outcomes.

The PSC consists of the TSRA’s Chief Executive Officer, programme managers and Chief Financial Officer. The PSC meets on a quarterly basis and as required to consider specific project risks and issues.

RISK MANAGEMENT

The TSRA has standardised its processes for the identification, documentation and management of risks and issues. All TSRA projects and managed activities include risk assessments as part of the planning and approval process.

The TSRA’s risk management system is based on the better practice principles and processes outlined in ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management - Guidelines.

Figure 4-3 illustrates the continuous, systematic process that the TSRA uses to maintain risk within an acceptable level.

The system is:

― dynamic - by being responsive to change and assisting corporate learning and continuous improvement

― systematic - by being rigorous, transparent and explicit and taking into account stakeholder perspectives

― integrated and embedded - in so far as practicable, by reviewing established management planning, decision-making and reporting processes.

RISK IDENTIFICATION

Risk identification involves identifying the issues that are likely to negatively impact the achievement of the goals of the TSRA. This includes political and strategic risks, programme delivery risks and operational support risks.

Risks are identified via:

― an annual risk management workshop attended by the TSRA’s administration (top-down approach)

― completion of individual risk assessments at the programme/project level (bottom-up approach)

― audits and assessments conducted through internal and external audit functions.

RISK ASSESSMENT

Risk assessment includes the process of determining the likelihood of a risk occurring and the consequence or impact of the risk.

Risk identification

Risk assessment

Risk mitigation Risk monitoring

Risk reporting

FIGURE 4-3: TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS

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RISK APPETITE

The TSRA is a custodian of the Australian Government’s investment in the future prosperity of the Torres Strait region. Therefore, the TSRA seeks to balance its risk position between:

― investment in activities that may drive substantial growth in the region ― the need to remain a stable organisation with the capacity to continue to work for the

community into the future.

The TSRA’s risk appetite is necessarily around the middle of the risk-taking spectrum. Depending on the results from year to year and community needs, the TSRA may choose to increase or decrease its appetite for higher risk activities.

The TSRA:

― accepts a higher risk appetite when approving a new system or process that offers greater processing capacity and efficiencies

― accepts a moderate risk appetite for programme outcomes that are aimed at contributing to the regional goals

― accepts a low risk appetite for significant breaches of security or unauthorised access to confidential records

― accepts a very low risk appetite for risks that would result in physical or mental harm to staff and the environment.

RISK MITIGATION

Risk mitigation (or risk reduction) involves developing actions or plans to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. All mitigation steps are assigned an owner and timeframe.

RISK MONITORING

All TSRA employees are expected to identify and manage risks within their span of control.

The members of the TSRA’s Management Group are responsible for:

― incorporating suitable risk management activities into business planning (via completion of a risk assessment at the programme or project level)

― ensuring that the risk management processes are implemented ― ensuring that risk mitigation actions are followed.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

The TSRA has a property portfolio which includes office accommodation at three sites on Thursday Island; the Gab Titui Cultural Centre; and residential staff accommodation, consisting of 57 houses and apartments.

The TSRA also owns and maintains the historic Green Hill Fort, which is listed on the Commonwealth Heritage List.

In addition, the TSRA has a fleet of vehicles and vessels, most of which are located on outer island communities in the Torres Strait as part of the Indigenous ranger programme.

MAINTENANCE

Schedules for the regular maintenance of property and assets are in place and the work is contracted out to appropriate tradespeople. Ongoing repairs and maintenance are carried out in a way that meets the TSRA’s obligations to environmental sustainability, meets government procurement guidelines and supports Indigenous and local businesses.

TSRA-owned properties are maintained in line with our five-year maintenance plan, which aims to reduce the cost of reactive property maintenance through planned, targeted property maintenance practices, ensuring that the properties are safe, sustainable, well maintained and fit for purpose.

CAPITAL WORKS

In 2019-2020, the TSRA continued a capital works project with funding of $2.989 million from the Australian Government Public Service Modernisation Fund.

This project is to construct a commercial building on Thursday Island. To meet a mandatory Indigenous participation rate, 90 per cent of all work hours will be carried out by Indigenous tradespeople and labourers. The project will be completed in 2020-2021.

The new facility will provide increased environmental

sustainability and an improved working environment

for TSRA staff. The building will be a showcase of sustainable design in remote areas, incorporating solar technology, sustainable water use and other environmental design technologies.

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HUMAN RESOURCES

The TSRA’s employees are located at TSRA facilities on Thursday Island and throughout the island communities of the Torres Strait region. A small office in Cairns is used to increase the TSRA’s capacity to attract people with skills and experience not available in the Torres Strait.

The TSRA has a workforce strategy that complements the Torres Strait Development Plan and sets the strategic direction for supporting and developing the TSRA’s workforce.

STAFFING PROFILE

For information on the TSRA’s staffing profile in 2019-2020, see Appendix 1.

WORKPLACE AGREEMENT

TSRA staff operate under the TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2017. The terms and conditions of employment are set out in the agreement. The TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2017 came into effect from 6 June 2017.

The salary ranges for staff covered under the agreement range from $43,604 for an Australian Public Service level 1 staff member to $138,118 for an Executive Level 2 staff member.

The TSRA has updated the TSRA Enterprise Agreement and is seeking a determination from the Australian Public Service Commission rather than entering into a bargaining process with TSRA officers. The determination is expected to be approved by mid-September 2020.

PAYROLL AND LEAVE RECORDS

The human resources and payroll company Frontier Software Pty Ltd provides payroll software to the TSRA to facilitate in-house payroll and leave arrangements.

LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

The TSRA’s employees attended internal and external learning and development courses during 2019-2020. This included programme and project management training, career development training, cultural awareness training, fraud awareness training, relevant university studies and various other courses.

As part of their induction, all new TSRA employees complete the Australian Public Service Commission’s online induction programme. In addition, all TSRA employees who are required to travel in helicopters as part of their role complete helicopter underwater escape training.

The TSRA Performance Development Programme informs the learning and development required by staff and supports them in achieving the best outcomes possible for them as TSRA employees and as people.

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

The TSRA fulfilled its responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth) in 2019-2020.

No notifications arising from undertakings by the TSRA were made to Comcare under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth) during the year.

There were no investigations conducted during the year relating to undertakings carried out by the TSRA and there were no notices given to the TSRA during the year under the Comcare legislation.

The TSRA has a work health and safety management system and trained employees who undertake duties as first-aid officers, fire wardens and health and safety representatives. Health and safety representatives and safety committees work cooperatively to improve the TSRA’s work health and safety policy and operational matters. Workers are informed of current issues and receive work health and safety information.

The TSRA has a rehabilitation management system in accordance with Comcare requirements. The rehabilitation management system includes an active early intervention and injury management strategy. A healthy lifestyle reimbursement of up to $200 per year is available to employees.

The TSRA also has a bullying and harassment policy in place and two trained harassment contact officers are available to provide employee support. The TSRA offers support for workers through an employee assistance programme delivered by an external provider.

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WORKPLACE DIVERSITY

The TSRA is committed to supporting a culture of equity, inclusion and diversity, and to ensuring that the TSRA workforce is representative of the broader community. The TSRA upholds the Australian Public Service Values and strives to provide a workplace that is free from discrimination and recognises the diversity of the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal communities that it serves.

All TSRA staff receive up-to-date information on developments in human resources, including developments in equal employment opportunity, harassment-free workplaces and workplace diversity. Employees can also access publications from the Australian Public Service Commission and related agencies.

WORKPLACE CONSULTATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

The TSRA fosters and promotes workplace consultation through regular management, programme area and staff meetings. In addition, the TSRA conducts regular meetings with staff representatives on the Workplace Consultative Committee. As appropriate, management consults with employees on major workplace changes, the development of guidelines and policies applying to employment conditions, and the development and implementation of the enterprise agreement.

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) requires Australian Government organisations to report annually on their environmental performance and contribution to ecologically sustainable development.

The TSRA’s environmental policy outlines the agency’s

commitment to minimising the environmental impact of its operations. The TSRA does this by:

― using energy-efficient office machinery and computer monitors ― using low-wattage lights throughout the TSRA offices

― reducing paper use by centralising printers and making double-sided printing the default ― using office paper that is carbon neutral, is recycled and/or has an environmental

sustainability rating.

The TSRA also contributes to ecological sustainability in the Torres Strait region by:

― employing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as trainees, rangers and ranger supervisors

― partnering with Tagai State College in the Horticulture in Schools Programme ― providing technical assistance to improve food production in the Torres Strait through the

Sustainable Horticulture Project ― improving invasive species control, including by

supporting management strategies for invasive fish, cane toads, and feral dogs impacting on green turtle nesting sites, and developing a regional pest management strategy ― producing biodiversity profiles, fauna surveys

and fire management plans for all inhabited Torres Strait islands ― working with communities for the sustainable management of turtles and dugongs

― developing and implementing actions to build sustainability and resilience across the region through planning for climate change impacts

― monitoring environmental change across the region.

ACCOUNTABILITY

EXTERNAL SCRUTINY

During 2019-2020, the TSRA, as a corporate Commonwealth entity, was accountable to the Parliament of Australia through the responsible Minister and the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio.

The Auditor-General is the TSRA’s external auditor. The audit of the TSRA’s financial statements is conducted in accordance with an audit strategy agreed to by the Auditor-General and the TSRA. The 2019-2020 audit was conducted in September 2020. A copy of the independent auditor’s report, including the auditor’s opinion, is provided as part of the financial statements in Section 5 of this report.

The TSRA was not affected by judicial decisions or reviews by outside bodies in 2019-2020. The Australian Information Commissioner did not issue a report on the TSRA under section 30 of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) and no personal privacy complaints were made against the TSRA in 2019-2020.

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FRAUD CONTROL

The TSRA has implemented a fraud control framework in accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth). No incidents of fraud were detected in 2019-2020.

INTERNAL AUDIT

The TSRA’s Audit Committee is assisted in the internal audit function by an external contractor, Charterpoint Pty Ltd. Charterpoint is responsible for implementing the TSRA’s internal audit programme, which aims to provide assurance that key risks are being managed effectively and efficiently, including assurance that the TSRA complies with regulatory requirements and policies.

COMPLIANCE REPORT

In accordance with section 19 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth), the TSRA provided the Finance Minister and the Minister for Indigenous Australians with a letter from the TSRA directors advising that the TSRA:

Has complied with the provisions and requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act); and the PGPA Rules as amended from time to time.

INDEMNITIES AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS FOR OFFICERS

The TSRA indemnifies current and former directors and staff members against liability or costs incurred in connection with any claim brought against them as a result of, or in connection with, their appointment to any office or position in the TSRA.

The TSRA holds directors’ and officers’ liability insurance cover through Comcover, the Australian Government’s self-managed fund. The TSRA has an annual insurance renewal process, and reviewed its insurance coverage in 2019-2020 to ensure that it remained appropriate for its operations.

No indemnity-related claims were made during the year, and the TSRA is not aware of any circumstances likely to lead to such claims being made.

The cost of directors’ and officers’ liability insurance for 2019-2020 was $5,161.

DIRECTORS’ INTERESTS POLICY

In accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth) and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (Cth), the TSRA Board has a policy and process to manage all direct and indirect conflicts of interest, including a register of all directors’ pecuniary interests and a requirement that directors make a formal declaration of their interests at each TSRA Board meeting. The declarations are recorded in the minutes of the meeting.

The pecuniary interest process applies to all committees of the TSRA.

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

The TSRA has in place a Charter of Representation, Performance and Accountability that sets out the roles and responsibilities of the Board and the Administration. The TSRA Board has delegated responsibility to the Administration, through its Chief Executive Officer, to ensure that funding decisions are made in line with the policies, priorities and general guidelines determined by the Board.

As part of the TSRA Board’s governance framework, each Board member is required to complete a Notice of Personal and Financial Interests to the Minister. There is also a requirement for related party disclosure questionnaires to be completed to declare any financial transactions between the TSRA and a Board member and/or members of the Board member’s family. Members’ related party disclosure questionnaires are available to enable members to declare any changes in their circumstances.

A Register of Pecuniary Interests that is maintained and included in each Board meeting’s briefing package also assists the Chairperson and other Board members to manage any conflicts of interest that may arise.

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EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

In accordance with section 17BE(ta) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (Cth), the TSRA reports on executive remuneration as described in Schedule C of the Rule.

The TSRA has determined that its key management personnel consist of the TSRA Board members (including the TSRA Chairperson) and the Chief Executive Officer, as set out under Note 3.2 in the TSRA Financial Statements for the period ended 30 June 2020.

The TSRA had one highly paid staff member and no senior executives in 2019-2020. The reduction from two senior executives reported in the previous period to nil in the current period resulted from a retirement and a combination of leave and reassignment of duties.

Details of executive remuneration are set out in Section 5 and Appendix 1 of this Annual Report.

OTHER REPORTABLE MATTERS

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

Entities subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme. A plan showing what information the TSRA publishes in accordance with the requirement is available on the TSRA’s website at www.tsra.gov.au/information-publication-scheme2.

GRANTS AND CONSULTANCIES

In accordance with the requirements of section 144ZB

of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), this annual report includes details of grants made by the TSRA (see Appendix 2) and consultants

engaged by the TSRA (see Appendix 3) in 2019-2020.

DISCLOSURE OF SACRED MATTERS

In accordance with section 144ZB(4) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth), this Annual Report does not disclose any matters known to the TSRA to be held sacred by Torres Strait Islander or Aboriginal people.

ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH

The TSRA advertises all ongoing vacancies and non-ongoing vacancies of more than 12 months using the APSjobs website and other selected national advertising. The TSRA uses the Australian Government’s preferred supplier, Dentsu Mitchell Media Australia Pty Ltd, to advertise tenders and recruitment notices.

The TSRA also uses Far North Queensland region-based print media for advertising job vacancies, publishing media releases and tenders, and distributing the TSRA Community Newsletter, in line with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

The TSRA did not conduct any advertising campaigns or make payments to market research, polling, direct mail or media advertising organisations in 2019-2020.

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SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Independent Auditor’s Report 96

Contents 98

Certification 99

Primary Financial Statement 100

Overview 104

Notes to the Financial Statements 107

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Indigenous Australians

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Torres Strait Regional Authority (‘the Entity’) for the year ended 30 June 2020:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2020 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Accountable Authority, Chief Executive and Chief Finance Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to the financial statements.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Chair and the Directors are responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Chair and the Directors are also responsible for such internal control as the Chair and the Directors determine are necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Chair and the Directors are responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Chair and the Directors are also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

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Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

• obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates

and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude

that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Lorena Skipper

Executive Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

8 September 2020

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

97

Certification

Primary financial statement Statement of Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Cash Flow Statement

Overview

Notes to the financial statements: 1. Financial Performance 1.1 Expenses 1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

2. Financial Position 2.1 Financial Assets 2.2 Non-Financial Assets 2.3 Payables 2.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities

3. People and Relationships 3.1 Employee Provisions 3.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 3.3 Related Party Disclosures

4. Managing Uncertainties 4.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 4.2 Financial Instruments 4.3 Fair Value Measurement

5. Other Information 5.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities 5.2 Assets Held in Trust 5.3 Budget Variances Commentary

CONTENTS

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SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

99

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

for the period ended 30 June 2020

2020 2019 Original Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 1.1A 18,718 19,282 19,111

Suppliers 1.1B 16,664 17,444 15,371

Grants 1.1C 13,432 15,394 12,588

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 1,758 1,773 1,145

Finance costs 1.1D 154 79 150

Impairment Loss on Financial Instruments 1.1E 21 150 -

Total expenses 50,747 54,122 48,365

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 599 624 505

Interest 1.2B 652 1,126 1,065

Other income 1.2C 15,082 13,400 10,898

Total own-source revenue 16,333 15,150 12,468

Gains Reversal of write-downs and impairment 1.2D 131 114 -

Total gains 131 114 -

Total own-source income 16,464 15,264 12,468

Net cost of services 34,283 38,858 35,897

Revenue from Government 1.2E 35,897 35,883 35,897

Surplus/(Deficit) on continuing operations 1,614 (2,975) -

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation surplus 519 2,610 -

Total other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Total comprehensive income/(loss) 2,133 (365) -

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Statement of Comprehensive Income

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as at 30 June 2020

2020 2019 Original Budget

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 3,848 2,976 2,479

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 5,533 4,924 4,197

Other investments 2.1C 26,591 29,978 22,724

Total financial assets 35,972 37,878 29,400

Non-financial assets1 Land and buildings 2.2A 56,622 53,223 58,268

Plant and equipment 2.2A 1,315 1,062 1,491

Heritage and cultural 2.2A 77 77 77

Other non-financial assets 2.2B 89 364 -

Total non-financial assets 58,103 54,726 59,836

Total assets 94,075 92,604 89,236

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 2.3A 1,533 2,495 1,407

Grants 2.3B - 147 741

Other payables 2.3C 256 147 136

Total payables 1,789 2,789 2,284

Interest bearing liabilities Leases 2.4A 418 - -

Total interest bearing liabilities 418 - -

Provisions Employee provisions 3.1A 4,511 4,591 4,503

Total provisions 4,511 4,591 4,503

Total liabilities 6,718 7,380 6,787

Net assets 87,357 85,224 82,449

EQUITY Contributed equity 3,021 3,021 3,021

Reserves 18,096 17,577 14,967

Retained surplus 66,240 64,626 64,461

Total equity 87,357 85,224 82,449

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Statement of Financial Position TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

1. Right-of-use assets are included in the following line items: Land and buildings.

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2020 2019 Original Budget

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 3,021 1,032 3,021

Adjusted opening balance 3,021 1,032 3,021

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection - Appropriations - 1,989 -

Total transactions with owners - 1,989 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 3,021 3,021 3,021

RETAINED EARNINGS Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 64,626 67,601 64,461

Adjusted opening balance 64,626 67,601 64,461

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period 1,614 (2,975) -

Total comprehensive income 1,614 (2,975) -

Closing balance as at 30 June 66,240 64,626 64,461

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 17,577 14,967 14,967

Adjusted opening balance 17,577 14,967 14,967

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Total other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 18,096 17,577 14,967

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 85,224 83,600 82,449

Adjusted opening balance 85,224 83,600 82,449

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period 1,614 (2,975) -

Other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Total comprehensive income 2,133 (365) -

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection - Appropriations - 1,989 -

Total transactions with owners - 1,989 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 87,357 85,224 82,449

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Statement of Changes In Equity TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

Accounting Policy Equity Injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

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2020 2019 Original Budget

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 3,021 1,032 3,021

Adjusted opening balance 3,021 1,032 3,021

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection - Appropriations - 1,989 -

Total transactions with owners - 1,989 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 3,021 3,021 3,021

RETAINED EARNINGS Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 64,626 67,601 64,461

Adjusted opening balance 64,626 67,601 64,461

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period 1,614 (2,975) -

Total comprehensive income 1,614 (2,975) -

Closing balance as at 30 June 66,240 64,626 64,461

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 17,577 14,967 14,967

Adjusted opening balance 17,577 14,967 14,967

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Total other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 18,096 17,577 14,967

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 85,224 83,600 82,449

Adjusted opening balance 85,224 83,600 82,449

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period 1,614 (2,975) -

Other comprehensive income 519 2,610 -

Total comprehensive income 2,133 (365) -

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection - Appropriations - 1,989 -

Total transactions with owners - 1,989 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 87,357 85,224 82,449

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Statement of Changes In Equity TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

Accounting Policy Equity Injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

2020 2019

Original Budget

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from government 35,897 35,883 35,897

Sale of goods and rendering of services 15,768 14,172 11,403

Interest 614 1,091 915

GST received 2,868 2,236 -

Total cash received 55,147 53,382 48,215

Cash used Employees 18,688 19,183 19,111

Suppliers 19,223 18,357 15,371

Interest payments on lease liabilities 6 - -

Loan payments 24 28 -

Grants 14,348 17,231 12,588

Total cash used 52,289 54,799 47,070

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 2,858 (1,417) 1,145

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from loan repayments 772 311 -

Proceeds from sales of investments 3,387 4,796 4,326

Total cash received 4,159 5,107 4,326

Cash used Loan payments 1,736 594 -

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 4,320 4,500 5,471

Total cash used 6,056 5,094 5,471

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities (1,897) 13 (1,145)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed Equity - 1,989 -

Total cash received - 1,989 -

Cash used Principal payments of lease liabilities 89 - -

Total cash used 89 - -

Net cash from/(used by) financing activities (89) 1,989 -

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held 872 585 -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 2,976 2,391 2,479

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2.1A 3,848 2,976 2,479

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Cash Flow Statement

for the period ended 30 June 2020

TORRES STRAIT REGIONAL AUTHORITY

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Standard/ Interpretation

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not‐for‐Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income of Not‐For‐Profit Entities

AASB 16 - Leases

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the TSRA’s financial statements.

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 .

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

New Accounting Standards

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions and adjustment to financial statements

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes . The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019. This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not‐For‐Profit Entities

Overview

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Standard/ Interpretation

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not‐for‐Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income of Not‐For‐Profit Entities

AASB 16 - Leases

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the TSRA’s financial statements.

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 .

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

New Accounting Standards

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions and adjustment to financial statements

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes . The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019. This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not‐For‐Profit Entities

Overview

The TSRA adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The TSRA elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard. The Entity applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117: • Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics;

• Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right‐of‐use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-of-use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date; • Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application; and • Applied the exemption not to recognise right‐of‐use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, the TSRA previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the TSRA recognises right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the TSRA has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the TSRA recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of land and buildings, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the TSRA's incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. The TSRA's incremental borrowing rate is the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied for land was 1.99% and for buildings was 0.34%.

The TSRA adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the TSRA shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the TSRA applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the TSRA shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

In relation to AASB 15, the TSRA elected to apply the new standard to all new and uncompleted contracts from the date of initial application. The TSRA is required to aggregate the effect of all of the contract modifications that occur before the date of initial application.

In terms of AASB 1058, the TSRA is required to recognise volunteer services at fair value if those services would have been purchased if not provided voluntarily, and the fair value of those services can be measured reliably. There was no impact from adopting AASB 15 and AASB 1058 as at 1 July 2019.

Application of AASB 16 Leases

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

105

Departmental 1 July 2019

$512,523

-$448,456

-$64,067

Retained earnings $Nil

1 July 2019

$438,096 -$28,292

$117,389

$527,193

-$78,737

$448,456

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the TSRA.

Events After the Reporting Period

Lease liabilities

Prepayments

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity's 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019 Less: GST

Undiscounted lease payments Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019

Plus: effect of extension options reasonably certain to be exercised

Impact on transition On transition to AASB 16, the TSRA recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment

The right-of-use assets were measured as follows:

a) Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments. b) Land: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments.

The TSRA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Taxation

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

106

Departmental 1 July 2019

$512,523

-$448,456

-$64,067

Retained earnings $Nil

1 July 2019

$438,096 -$28,292

$117,389

$527,193

-$78,737

$448,456

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the TSRA.

Events After the Reporting Period

Lease liabilities

Prepayments

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity's 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019 Less: GST

Undiscounted lease payments Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019

Plus: effect of extension options reasonably certain to be exercised

Impact on transition On transition to AASB 16, the TSRA recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment

The right-of-use assets were measured as follows:

a) Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments. b) Land: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments.

The TSRA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Taxation

1.1 Expenses

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

1.1A: Employee benefits Wages and salaries 14,544 14,545

Superannuation Defined contribution plans 1,594 1,584

Defined benefit plans 446 524

Leave and other entitlements 2,134 2,629

Total employee benefits 18,718 19,282

1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Consultants and professional fees 6,825 6,409

Travel 2,929 3,977

Repairs and maintenance 603 698

Other staff costs 542 321

Office running costs 1,705 1,322

Property costs 415 242

Transport, freight and storage 539 767

Media, advertising and public relations 202 336

Licences 6 9

Other 1,830 2,127

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 15,596 16,208

Goods supplied 829 1,045

Services rendered 14,767 15,163

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 15,596 16,208

Other suppliers Operating lease rentals1 - 1,124

Short-term leases 992 -

Workers compensation expenses 76 112

Total other suppliers 1,068 1,236

Total suppliers 16,664 17,444

1. The TSRA has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117. The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1B, 1.1D, 2.2 and 2.4A.

Accounting Policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses are contained in the People and Relationships section.

Financial Performance This section analyses the financial performance of the Torres Strait Regional Authority for the year ended 2020.

Accounting Policy Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets The TSRA has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The TSRA recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

107

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

1.1C: Grants Public sector: Australian Government entities (related parties) - 329

State and Territory governments 2,740 1,634

Local governments 3,775 3,602

Private sector: Non-profit organisations 5,467 4,310

For-profit organisations 1,450 5,519

Total grants 13,432 15,394

1.1D: Finance costs Write down of loans to net present value 148 79

Interest on lease liabilities1 6 -

Total finance costs 154 79

1.1E: Impairment Loss on Financial Instruments Impairment on loans 14 22

Impairment on trade and other receivables 7 128

Total write-down and impairment of assets 21 150

1. The TSRA has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Accounting Policy All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

108

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Own-Source Revenue 1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers Sale of goods 177 248

Rendering of services 422 376

Total revenue from contracts with customers 599 624

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Type of customer: Non-government entities 599 624

599 624

1.2B: Interest Loans 161 209

Deposits 491 917

Total interest 652 1,126

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

1.2C: Other income Rent 11 -

Return of grant funding 175 -

Other Government contributions 14,896 13,400

Total other revenue 15,082 13,400

Accounting Policy Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has transferred to the buyer. As required by AASB15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers, the TSRA determines whether a contract is in scope of AASB 15 by the following criteria:

a) An enforceable contract must exist, b) There must be sufficiently specific performance obligations in the contract to enable the TSRA to determine when they have been satisifed, and; c) There must not be a significant donation component in the contract. If these three criteria are met, the transaction price will be split between significantly specific performance obligations and recognised as revenue as those obligations are completed. If any of these three criteria are not met, the TSRA refers to AASB 1058 Income of not-for-profit Entites to recognise the revenue as follows:

a) For transfers to enable the TSRA to acquire or construct a non financial asset, revenue is recognised as the non financial asset is acquired or constructed, otherwise; b) the transfer is accounted for as revenue when it is received.

The principal activity from which the TSRA generates its revenue is the delivery of State and Commonwealth Government funded projects in the Torres Strait that benefit Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait. All of these contracts for 2018-19 have been determined to have insufficiently specific performance obligations to attach the transaction price to, and therefore there are no adjustments as at 1 July 2019. One grant received in 2019-20 for $41K was assessed to be a transfer to acquire a non-financial asset and, as such, has been recognised as a future obligation under contract liabilities as at 30 June 2020.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the TSRA expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer

Accounting Policy Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method .

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

109

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Gains

1.2D: Reversal of write-downs and impairment Reversal of losses from remeasuring loans 130 78

Reversal of impairment losses 1 36

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 131 114

1.2E: Revenue from Government Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Corporate Commonwealth entity payments 35,897 35,883

Total revenue from Government 35,897 35,883

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to this entity) is recognised as Revenue from Government by the corporate Commonwealth entity unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

110

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Gains

1.2D: Reversal of write-downs and impairment Reversal of losses from remeasuring loans 130 78

Reversal of impairment losses 1 36

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 131 114

1.2E: Revenue from Government Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Corporate Commonwealth entity payments 35,897 35,883

Total revenue from Government 35,897 35,883

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to this entity) is recognised as Revenue from Government by the corporate Commonwealth entity unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

2.1 Financial Assets

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.1A: Cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 3,081 2,602

Cash on hand or on deposit - TSRA Housing Fund 767 374

Total cash and cash equivalents 3,848 2,976

2.1B: Trade and other receivables Goods and services receivables Goods and services 181 214

Total goods and services receivables 181 214

The TSRA has no contract assets as at 30 June 2020.

Other receivables GST receivable from the Australian Tax Office 1,057 1,389

Loans 4,707 3,699

Interest 5 16

Other 42 47

Total other receivables 5,811 5,151

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 5,992 5,365

Less impairment loss allowance Loans (314) (300)

Goods and services (145) (141)

Total impairment loss allowance (459) (441)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 5,533 4,924

Credit terms are net 30 days (2019: 30 days).

Accounting Policy Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes: a) cash on hand; b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily

convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value; and

Financial Position This section analyses the Torres Strait Regional Authority's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (ATSI Act) requires that funds available under the TSRA Housing Fund, including interest earnings, are to be used exclusively for housing loans. Consequently, income earned on the TSRA Housing Fund is not available for operational expenses but is directed back into new loans.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

111

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Concessional loans - nominal value 4,909 3,908

Less: unexpired discount (202) (209)

Concessional loans - (gross) 4,707 3,699

Less: impairment allowance (314) (300)

Concessional loans - carrying value 4,393 3,399

2.1C: Other investments Term deposits 16,604 19,613

Term deposits - TSRA Housing Fund 9,987 10,365

Total other investments 26,591 29,978

TSRA holds a portfolio of concessional loans that are provided for business development and home ownership programs. The values of these loans as at 30 June are as follows:

Accounting Policy Financial Assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Accounting Judgements and Estimates The initial fair value of concessional loans is taken to be the present value of all future cash receipts, discounted using the prevailing market rate of interest for instruments of a similar structure (currency, term, type of interest rate, credit risk). Subsequently the value of the loan is derived by applying the amortised cost using the effective interest method, with the initial market rate as the effective rate, and anticipated cash flows based on contracted repayment terms, resulting in the amortisation of the discount over the anticipated life of the loan.

2.2 Non-Financial Assets 2.2A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and intangibles

Land

Buildings

Total land & buildings

Heritage and

cultural

1

Other plant & equipment

Total

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

As at 1 July 2019 Gross book value

11,805

41,433

53,238

77

4,979

58,294

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (15) (15) - (3,917) (3,932)

Total as at 1 July 2019 11,805 41,418 53,223 77 1,062

54,362

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16 258 254 512 - -

512

Adjusted Total as at 1 July 2019 12,063 41,672 53,735 77 1,062

54,874

Additions Purchase 3 3,582 3,585 - 735

4,320

Right-of-use assets - 59 59 - -

59

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - 519 519 - -

519

Depreciation

-

(1,169)

(1,169)

-

(482)

(1,651)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets

(9)

(98)

(107)

-

-

(107)

Total as at 30 June 2020

12,057

44,565

56,622

77

1,315

58,014

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by Gross book value

12,066

44,663

56,729

77

5,714

62,520

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment

(9)

(98)

(107)

-

(4,399)

(4,506)

Total as at 30 June 2020

12,057

44,565

56,622

77

1,315

58,014

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets

249

215

464

-

-

464

No other property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months. No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment. 1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class. Contractual commitments for the purchase of property, plant and equipment The TSRA has a current contractual commitment of $64,630 for the construction of a new building at 56 Douglas Street, Thursday Island. (2019: $3,021,722). Revaluations of non‐financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 4.3. On 30 June 2020, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

112

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Concessional loans - nominal value 4,909 3,908

Less: unexpired discount (202) (209)

Concessional loans - (gross) 4,707 3,699

Less: impairment allowance (314) (300)

Concessional loans - carrying value 4,393 3,399

2.1C: Other investments Term deposits 16,604 19,613

Term deposits - TSRA Housing Fund 9,987 10,365

Total other investments 26,591 29,978

TSRA holds a portfolio of concessional loans that are provided for business development and home ownership programs. The values of these loans as at 30 June are as follows:

Accounting Policy Financial Assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Accounting Judgements and Estimates The initial fair value of concessional loans is taken to be the present value of all future cash receipts, discounted using the prevailing market rate of interest for instruments of a similar structure (currency, term, type of interest rate, credit risk). Subsequently the value of the loan is derived by applying the amortised cost using the effective interest method, with the initial market rate as the effective rate, and anticipated cash flows based on contracted repayment terms, resulting in the amortisation of the discount over the anticipated life of the loan.

2.2 Non-Financial Assets 2.2A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and intangibles

Land

Buildings

Total land & buildings

Heritage and

cultural

1

Other plant & equipment

Total

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

As at 1 July 2019 Gross book value

11,805

41,433

53,238

77

4,979

58,294

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (15) (15) - (3,917) (3,932)

Total as at 1 July 2019 11,805 41,418 53,223 77 1,062

54,362

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16 258 254 512 - -

512

Adjusted Total as at 1 July 2019 12,063 41,672 53,735 77 1,062

54,874

Additions Purchase 3 3,582 3,585 - 735

4,320

Right-of-use assets - 59 59 - -

59

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - 519 519 - -

519

Depreciation

-

(1,169)

(1,169)

-

(482)

(1,651)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets

(9)

(98)

(107)

-

-

(107)

Total as at 30 June 2020

12,057

44,565

56,622

77

1,315

58,014

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by Gross book value

12,066

44,663

56,729

77

5,714

62,520

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment

(9)

(98)

(107)

-

(4,399)

(4,506)

Total as at 30 June 2020

12,057

44,565

56,622

77

1,315

58,014

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets

249

215

464

-

-

464

No other property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months. No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment. 1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class. Contractual commitments for the purchase of property, plant and equipment The TSRA has a current contractual commitment of $64,630 for the construction of a new building at 56 Douglas Street, Thursday Island. (2019: $3,021,722). Revaluations of non‐financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 4.3. On 30 June 2020, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

113

Accounting Policy Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the TSRA has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

Revaluations Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous

revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the entity using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

All heritage and cultural assets have indefinite useful lives and are not depreciated.

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the entity were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Buildings on freehold land

Leasehold improvements

Plant and equipment

2020

17 to 45 years

Lease term

3 to 8 years

2019

17 to 45 years

Lease term

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

114

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.2B: Other non-financial assets Prepayments 89 364

Total other non-financial assets 89 364

Accounting Policy (continued)

Heritage and Cultural Assets The TSRA has a limited collection of 23 (2019: 23) distinct Cultural and Heritage assets with an aggregated fair value of $77,000 (2019: $77,000). Cultural assets are comprised of artworks, carvings, and traditional headdresses. Heritage assets consist of models of 2 (2019: 2) sailing vessels and a brass Pearl Diver’s helmet (2019: 1) each of which has historical significance to the region. The assets are on display at the TSRA’s main office and the Gab Titui Cultural Centre. The conservation and preservation of TSRA’s heritage and cultural assets is achieved by a variety and combination of means

including: the provision of education and awareness programs; asset management planning; professional training and development; research; and the provision of appropriate storage and display environments.

Accounting Judgements and Estimates The fair value of land has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by an independent valuer. The fair value of buildings has been taken to be the depreciated current replacement cost. In some instances, the TSRA's buildings are purpose-built and may in fact realise more or less in the market.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

115

2.3 Payables

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 1,492 2,495

Contract liabilities 41 -

Total suppliers 1,533 2,495

2.3B: Grants Private sector: Non-profit organisations - 147

Total grants - 147

2.3C: Other payables Salaries and wages 227 130

Superannuation 29 17

Total other payables 256 147

2.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.4A: Leases

Right of Use Asset Operating Leases1 418 -

Total leases 418 -

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2020 was $1,087,771.

1. The Entity has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Accounting Policy Refer Overview section for accounting policy on leases.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

116

2.3 Payables

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 1,492 2,495

Contract liabilities 41 -

Total suppliers 1,533 2,495

2.3B: Grants Private sector: Non-profit organisations - 147

Total grants - 147

2.3C: Other payables Salaries and wages 227 130

Superannuation 29 17

Total other payables 256 147

2.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

2.4A: Leases

Right of Use Asset Operating Leases1 418 -

Total leases 418 -

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2020 was $1,087,771.

1. The Entity has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Accounting Policy Refer Overview section for accounting policy on leases.

3.1 Employee Provisions

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

3.1A: Employee provisions Long service leave 2,623 2,753

Annual leave 1,787 1,737

Personal leave 101 101

Total employee provisions 4,511 4,591

Accounting policy Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave, personal leave and long service leave. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the TSRA's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation. Superannuation The TSRA's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme. The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes. The TSRA makes employer contributions to the employees' defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

People and Relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

117

3.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Short-term employee benefits 782 918

Post-employment benefits 70 79

Other long-term employee benefits 83 73

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 935 1,070

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are 22 (2019: 23)

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. The entity has determined the key management personnel to be the Board Members including the Chairperson and the Chief Executive Officer. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the entity.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

118

3.3 Related Party Disclosures

2020 2019

Loans to Related Parties $ $

Loans to directors and close family members outstanding as at year-end 375,747 39,291

Loans to directors and close family members during the year 371,623 -

Loan repayments by directors and close family members during the year 15,233 9,350

Loans to director-related entities outstanding as at year-end 59,236 140,442

Loans to director-related entities during the year - 47,000

Loan repayments by director-related entities during the year 93,189 54,764

Interest revenue included in net cost of services from loans to directors/director-related entities 15,053 12,937

2020 2019

TSRA Director's Name and Relationship with Grantee Grantee $ $

J Elu - Councillor for Seisia, P Yusia - Mayor Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council 5,500 23,600

Torres Shire Council 135,587 1,556,185

Torres Strait Island Regional Council 133,945 203,412

D Bosun - Director Ngalmun Lagau Minaral (TSI) Corporation 175,000 75,000

J Abednego - President TRAWQ Indigenous Corporation 36,700 79,373

Torres Strait Islander Media Association 881,913 530,000

H Baira- Vice Chairperson Mura Badulagal (TSI) Corporation - 240,000

J Gela - Chairperson, R Pilot - Director Erubam Le PBC 12,100 17,500

F Fauid - Chairperson Porumalgal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC - 61,000

P Yusia - Director NPA Family & Community Services 232,800 -

2020 2019

Government Entity Purpose of Grant $ $

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Torres Strait Indigenous Ranger Program - 8,992,446

Indigenous Protected Areas - 213,143

Ranger Capacity Building - 551,000

National Landcare Program 600,000 600,000

Department of Communications and the Arts Evolution: Torres Strait Masks - 158,457

National Indigenous Australians Agency Indigenous Protected Areas 216,127 -

National Indigenous Australians Agency Torres Strait Indigenous Ranger Program 9,118,340 -

National Indigenous Australians Agency Ranger Capacity Building 548,000 -

National Indigenous Australians Agency Major Infrastructure and Other Projects - Seawalls 3,500,000 -

Indigenous Language Centre 420,000 -

Grants to Related Parties

J Abednego - Councillor, Y Loban - Deputy Mayor G Lui - Deputy Mayor, D Bosun, S Dorante, A Noah, H Mosby, R Stephen - Councillors

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Other Transactions with Related Parties

F Fauid - Director, J Gela - Director

Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Loans to Related Parties Loans were made to the following directors and director -related entities. They were approved under normal terms and conditions applying to the TSRA's loan schemes. The directors involved took no part in the relevant decisions of the board.

The table below outlines the loan holder/s and the TSRA director with whom a related party connection exists.

Loan Holder: Seisia Community Torres Strait Islander Corporation - Joseph Elu - TSRA Board Member - Seisia Community Torres Strait Islander Corporation Chairperson Loan Holder: Alice Loban - Yen Loban - TSRA Board Member - Close family member of Alice Loban Loan Holder: Loban Marine

- Yen Loban - TSRA Board Member - Loban Marine Owner Loan Holder: Patrick Loban - Yen Loban - TSRA Board Member - Close family member of Patrick Loban

Grants were made to the following Director-related entities. They were approved under normal terms and conditions applying to t he TSRA's grant programs. The Directors involved took no part in the grant application approval processes.

Related party relationships The TSRA is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to this entity are Key Management Personnel including the Portfolio Minister, Chairperson, Chief Executive Officer and Directors, and other Australian Government entities .

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as o rdinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separate ly disclosed in this note. There are no related party transactions with the Portfolio Minister, the Chief Executive Officer or their close family members. The following transactions with Director related parties occurred during the financial year:

Grant receipts were received from the following Australian Government Entities by the TSRA during 2019 -20.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

119

4.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019 2020 2019

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Contingent liabilities Balance from previous period 116 116 116 116

Total contingent liabilities 116 116 116 116

Quantifiable Contingencies

The above table contains $116,000 of contingent liabilities disclosed in respect to a bank guarantee in favour of the Torres Shire Council (2019: $116,000) The table contains no contingent assets. (2019: $0).

At 30 June 2020, the TSRA had no unquantifiable contingencies. (2019: $0)

Unquantifiable Contingencies

Total Bank Guarantees

Managing Uncertainties

Accounting Policy Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in th e notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in res pect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

This section analyses how the TSRA manages financial risks within its operating environment.

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

120

4.2 Financial Instruments

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

4.2A: Categories of financial instruments Financial assets at amortised cost Term deposits 26,591 29,978

Cash and cash equivalents 3,848 2,976

Trade and other receivables 83 136

Loan receivables 4,393 3,399

Total financial assets at amortised cost 34,915 36,489

Total financial assets 34,915 36,489

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors 1,492 2,495

Grant liabilities - 147

Contract Liabilities 41 -

1,533 2,642

Total financial liabilities 1,533 2,642

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Accounting Policy Financial assets The entity classifies its financial assets in the following categories: (a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss; (b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and (c) financial assets measured at amortised cost. The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria: 1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and 2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write -off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial liabilities Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

6B 6A 6B 9A 9B 8A 10B 13

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

121

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

4.2B: Net gains or losses on financial assets Financial assets at amortised cost Interest revenue - Term deposits 491 917

Interest revenue - Loans 161 209

Reversal of impairment losses 1 36

Reversal of losses from remeasuring loan 130 78

Write down of loans to net present value (148) (79)

Loans and receivables provided for as impaired (21) (150)

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets at amortised cost 614 1,011

614 1,011

4.2C: Net gains or losses on financial liabilities

There are no gains or losses on financial liabilities for the year ended 30 June 2020 (2019: $Nil)

Net gains on financial assets

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

122

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Non-financial assets

Land 11,808 11,805

Buildings 44,350 41,418

Heritage and cultural 77 77

Total non-financial assets 56,235 53,300

The remaining assets and liabilities reported by the TSRA are not measured at fair value in the Statement of Financial Position.

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

4.3 Fair Value Measurement

4.3A: Fair value measurement

Accounting Policy The fair value of land has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by an independent valuer. T he fair value of buildings has been taken to be the depreciated current replacement cost. In some instances, the TSRA's buildings ar e purpose-built and may in fact realise more or less in the market.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

123

5.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

5.1A: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 32,214 35,347

More than 12 months 61,861 57,257

Total assets 94,075 92,604

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 4,029 4,776

More than 12 months 2,689 2,604

Total liabilities 6,718 7,380

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

124

5.2 Assets held in trust

5.2A: Assets held in trust

2020 2019

$’000 $’000

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund Monetary assets As at 1 July 47,354 48,165

Receipts 25,213 13,496

Payments (19,793) (14,307)

Total as at 30 June 52,774 47,354

Finfish Trust Account Monetary assets As at 1 July 1,865 1,704

Receipts 183 161

Total as at 30 June 2,048 1,865

Tropical Rock Lobster Trust Account Monetary assets As at 1 July 64 -

Receipts - 64

Total as at 30 June 64 64

Monetary assets

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund

On 17 October 1998, the Queensland State Government and the TSRA entered into a Major Infrastructure Program (MIP) Funding Agreement under which $15 million for major infrastructure projects was provided by the State over three years with matching funds from the Commonwealth. The co -funding arrangement between the State and TSRA has continued over the years as set out in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between TSRA and the State. On 14 April 2014, a variation to the MOU was signed to expand the trust fund to include not only MIP projects, but also the Seawalls project and Other Projects. A further variation was executed on 22 May 2017 to reflect changes to the scope of and budget for the Seawalls Project and the introduction of the Major Infrastructure Programme Stage 6 . On 4 June 2019, a further variation was executed to reflect the addition of Seawalls Program Stage 2.

The recipients/ beneficiaries of infrastructure projects developed under the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund are the Torres Strait Island Regional Council (TSIRC), Torres Shire Council (TSC) and the Northern Peninsular Area Regional Council (NPARC).

TSRA’s role in the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund is set out in the Memorandum of Understanding between the State and TSRA. TSRA has a fiduciary duty in respect of the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund funds and in the development of Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund projects but not as the owner of any assets under construction or on completion. This is evidenced by the fact that no future economic benefit or returns will flow to TSRA as a result of its involvement with the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund. For financial statement preparation purposes, TSRA does not consolidate the Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust Fund funds into its financial statements as TSRA is of the opinion that it does not have control of the Fund.

Finfish Trust Account

Torres Strait Islanders own 100 per cent of the Finfish fishery. Finfish quota that is not used by Traditional Inhabitant fishers is leased to Non-Traditional fishers. Leasing revenue is held in trust by the TSRA and disbursed to the beneficiaries for the benefit of the fishery. For example, capacity building activities to increase the number of Torres Strait Islanders fishing in an economical and environmentally sustainable way in the fishery.

Tropical Rock Lobster Trust Account

Torres Strait Islanders own 66.17 per cent of the Tropical Rock Lobster (TRL) fishery through licencing conditions imposed for the 2019 season. There are no plans to lease any of this quota for the next 2 years following a TSRA Board decision. The TRL Management Plan was implemented on 1st of December 2019.

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

125

5.3 Budget Variances Commentary

Explanation of major budget variances Affected line items (and Statement)

The budgeted Other Government contributions revenue and suppliers and grants expenses include revenue and expenditure on funding agreements that had been executed at the time the budget was prepared. During the financial year, after the budget was prepared, additional funding of $4.2m was received. Additional suppliers and grants expenditure of $2.14m was tied in to increased funding received. As the TSRA is the leading Commonwealth representative body for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people living in the Torres Strait, the TSRA is often approached by other government agencies to deliver programmes on an adhoc basis throughout the year. In recent years it has become common practice for the TSRA to enter into additional funding agreements with other agencies after the date that the budget is formally finalised.

Other Government contributions Suppliers and Grants (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

The budget reflects the depreciation funding received as part of the annual budget and is substantially less than the actual depreciation expense. Depreciation (Statement of Comprehensive Income)

The variances of $1.37m in cash, $3.87m in investments and -$1.73m in non-financial assets are due to timing differences for payments across financial years mainly due to major capital works projects and the receipt of additional funding.

Cash and cash equivalents, Other investments, Non-Financial assets (Statement of Financial Position)

The below table provides commentary for significant variances between the TSRA's original budget estimates, as published in the 2019-20. Portfolio Budget Statements, and the actual expenditure and net asset position for the year.

The annual stocktake and revaluation of assets, including impairments of property, has caused an increase in the asset revaluation reserve of $3.129m that was not budgeted for.

Changes in asset revaluation surplus (Statement of Comprehensive Income -Other Comprehensive Income)

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

126

SECTION FIVE: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

127

SECTION SIX: APPENDICES

Appendix 1: Human Resources 130

Appendix 2: Grants 134

Appendix 3: Consultants 137

APPENDIX 1: HUMAN RESOURCES

TABLE A1-1: ALL ONGOING EMPLOYEES CURRENT REPORT PERIOD (2019-2020)

Location

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL

Qld 14 - 14 38 1 39 - - - 53

Total 14 - 14 38 1 39 - - - 53

TABLE A1-2: ALL NON-ONGOING EMPLOYEES CURRENT REPORT PERIOD (2019-2020)

Location

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL

Qld 53 3 56 38 7 45 - - - 101

Total 53 3 56 38 7 45 - - - 101

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

130

TABLE A1-3 ALL ONGOING EMPLOYEES PREVIOUS REPORT PERIOD (2018-2019)

Location

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL

Qld 15 - 15 36 - 36 - - - 51

Total 15 - 15 36 - 36 - - - 51

TABLE A1-4: ALL NON-ONGOING EMPLOYEES PREVIOUS REPORT PERIOD (2018-2019)

Location

Male Female Indeterminate

Total

FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL FULL TIME

PART TIME TOTAL

Qld 59 2 61 51 3 54 - - - 115

Total 59 2 61 51 3 54 - - - 115

SECTION SIX: APPENDICES

| APPENDIX 1: HUMAN RESOURCES

131

TABLE A1-5: INFORMATION ABOUT REMUNERATION FOR KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL, 2019-2020

Short-term Benefits ($)

Post-employment Benefits ($) Other Long-term Benefits ($)

Termination Benefits ($)

Total

Remuneration ($)

NAME POSITION TITLE BASE

SALARY BONUSES OTHER

BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS LONG SERVICE LEAVE

OTHER LONG-TERM BENEFITS

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen Chairperson and Member for Port Kennedy 311,827 - - 21,003 8,572 - - 341,402

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM Deputy Chairperson and Member for Iama 24,625 - - 2,339 - - - 26,965

Mr Horace Baira Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Member for Badu 27,599 - - 2,622 - - - 30,221

Mrs Patricia Yusia Member for Bamaga 7,530 - - 715 - - - 8,245

Mr Donald Banu Member for Boigu 11,646 - - 1,106 - - - 12,753

Mr Joel Gaidan Member for Dauan 6,827 - - 649 - - - 7,476

Mr Jimmy Gela Member for Erub 7,831 - - 744 - - - 8,575

Mr Seriako Dorante Member for Hammond 4,618 - - 439 - - - 5,057

Mr David Bosun Member for Kubin 7,028 - - 668 - - - 7,696

Mr Cygnet Repu Member for Mabuyag 18,775 - - 1,784 - - - 20,558

Ms Hilda Mosby Member for Masig 17,068 - - 1,621 - - - 18,689

Mr Aven S Noah Member for Mer 11,245 - - 1,068 - - - 12,313

Mr Yen Loban Member for Ngarupai and Muralag 37,213 - - 3,535 - - - 40,748

Mr Frank Fauid Member for Poruma 8,132 - - 773 - - - 8,905

Ms Chelsea Aniba Member for Saibai 17,827 - - 1,694 - - - 19,521

Mr Joseph Elu AO Member for Seisia 7,731 - - 734 - - - 8,465

Mr John Paiwan Member for St Pauls 12,137 - - 1,153 - - - 13,291

Mr John Abednego Member for TRAWQ 12,851 - - 1,221 - - - 14,072

Mr Rocky Stephen Member for Ugar 8,434 - - 801 - - - 9,235

Mr Willie Lui Member for Warraber 9,036 - - 858 - - - 9,894

Ms Leilani Bin-Juda PSM Chief Executive Officer 114,392 - - 9,065 5,255 - - 128,712

Ms Mary Bani Acting Chief Executive Officer 154,168 - 7,265 14,972 5,458 - - 181,863

TABLE A1-6: INFORMATION ABOUT REMUNERATION FOR OTHER HIGHLY PAID STAFF, 2019-2020

Total Remuneration Bands

Short-term Benefits ($)

Post-employment Benefits ($) Other Long-term Benefits ($)

Termination Benefits ($)

Total

Remuneration ($)

NUMBER OF OTHER HIGHLY PAID STAFF

AVERAGE BASE SALARY

AVERAGE BONUSES AVERAGE OTHER BENEFITS AND

ALLOWANCES

AVERAGE

SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS

AVERAGE LONG SERVICE LEAVE AVERAGE OTHER LONG-TERM

BENEFITS

AVERAGE TERMINATION BENEFITS

AVERAGE TOTAL REMUNERATION

270,001-295,000 1 174,015 - 20,606 72,429 6,554 - - 273,604

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

132

TABLE A1-5: INFORMATION ABOUT REMUNERATION FOR KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL, 2019-2020

Short-term Benefits ($)

Post-employment Benefits ($) Other Long-term Benefits ($)

Termination Benefits ($)

Total

Remuneration ($)

NAME POSITION TITLE BASE

SALARY BONUSES OTHER

BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS LONG SERVICE LEAVE

OTHER LONG-TERM BENEFITS

Mr Napau Pedro Stephen Chairperson and Member for Port Kennedy 311,827 - - 21,003 8,572 - - 341,402

Mr Getano Lui Jr AM Deputy Chairperson and Member for Iama 24,625 - - 2,339 - - - 26,965

Mr Horace Baira Alternate Deputy Chairperson and Member for Badu 27,599 - - 2,622 - - - 30,221

Mrs Patricia Yusia Member for Bamaga 7,530 - - 715 - - - 8,245

Mr Donald Banu Member for Boigu 11,646 - - 1,106 - - - 12,753

Mr Joel Gaidan Member for Dauan 6,827 - - 649 - - - 7,476

Mr Jimmy Gela Member for Erub 7,831 - - 744 - - - 8,575

Mr Seriako Dorante Member for Hammond 4,618 - - 439 - - - 5,057

Mr David Bosun Member for Kubin 7,028 - - 668 - - - 7,696

Mr Cygnet Repu Member for Mabuyag 18,775 - - 1,784 - - - 20,558

Ms Hilda Mosby Member for Masig 17,068 - - 1,621 - - - 18,689

Mr Aven S Noah Member for Mer 11,245 - - 1,068 - - - 12,313

Mr Yen Loban Member for Ngarupai and Muralag 37,213 - - 3,535 - - - 40,748

Mr Frank Fauid Member for Poruma 8,132 - - 773 - - - 8,905

Ms Chelsea Aniba Member for Saibai 17,827 - - 1,694 - - - 19,521

Mr Joseph Elu AO Member for Seisia 7,731 - - 734 - - - 8,465

Mr John Paiwan Member for St Pauls 12,137 - - 1,153 - - - 13,291

Mr John Abednego Member for TRAWQ 12,851 - - 1,221 - - - 14,072

Mr Rocky Stephen Member for Ugar 8,434 - - 801 - - - 9,235

Mr Willie Lui Member for Warraber 9,036 - - 858 - - - 9,894

Ms Leilani Bin-Juda PSM Chief Executive Officer 114,392 - - 9,065 5,255 - - 128,712

Ms Mary Bani Acting Chief Executive Officer 154,168 - 7,265 14,972 5,458 - - 181,863

TABLE A1-6: INFORMATION ABOUT REMUNERATION FOR OTHER HIGHLY PAID STAFF, 2019-2020

Total Remuneration Bands

Short-term Benefits ($)

Post-employment Benefits ($) Other Long-term Benefits ($)

Termination Benefits ($)

Total

Remuneration ($)

NUMBER OF OTHER HIGHLY PAID STAFF

AVERAGE BASE SALARY

AVERAGE BONUSES AVERAGE OTHER BENEFITS AND

ALLOWANCES

AVERAGE

SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS

AVERAGE LONG SERVICE LEAVE AVERAGE OTHER LONG-TERM

BENEFITS

AVERAGE TERMINATION BENEFITS

AVERAGE TOTAL REMUNERATION

270,001-295,000 1 174,015 - 20,606 72,429 6,554 - - 273,604

SECTION SIX: APPENDICES

| APPENDIX 1: HUMAN RESOURCES

133

APPENDIX 2: GRANTS

TABLE A2-1: DETAILS OF GRANTS, 2019-2020

Grant Recipient

Recipient Category Activity Amount ($)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd C Legal services 915,000

Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh Admin C Art centre operational funding 100,000

Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh Admin C COVID-19 Community Initiatives Grant 50,000

Bamaga Enterprises Ltd D Business Growth Package 846,926

Basako Fishing D Business Growth Package 29,512

Community Owned Enterprises C Capture Erub stories 25,000

Community Owned Enterprises C Torres Strait Railway histories Elders

meeting

16,316

Department of Transport and Main Roads A Transport Infrastructure

Development Scheme

500,000

Erub Erwer Meta TSI Corporation C Art centre operational funding 100,000

Erub Erwer Meta TSI Corporation C COVID-19 Community Initiatives

Grant

50,000

Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (TSI) Corporation RNTBC

C Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 12,100

James Mills D Business Growth Package 131,478

Kaurareg Native Title Aboriginal Corporation RNTBC C Prescribed Body Corporate support funding

25,700

Mabuygiw Garkaziw Kupay TSI Corporation C Mabuyag traditional boundary project

20,864

Mabuygiw Garkaziw Kupay TSI Corporation C Mabuyag traditional plant and animal information book

25,000

Many Rivers Microfinance Ltd D Microenterprise development and

community economic development support

300,000

Masigalgal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC

C Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 38,600

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc. C COVID-19 Community Initiatives

Grant

150,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc. C COVID-19 Community Initiatives

Grant

500,000

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc. C Mura Kosker Sorority Torres Strait

Writers Group

37,110

Mura Kosker Sorority Inc. C Operational funding 515,000

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

134

Grant Recipient

Recipient Category Activity Amount ($)

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral TSI Corporation

C Digital media, etching and jewellery making 25,000

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral TSI Corporation

C Art centre operational funding 100,000

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral TSI Corporation

C COVID-19 Community Initiatives Grant 50,000

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council B Northern Peninsula Area Health and Wellbeing Expo

5,500

NPA Family and Community Services

C COVID-19 Community Initiatives Grant 232,800

Port Kennedy Association C Operational funding and after

school care

610,379

Porumalgal (TSI) Corporation RNTBC

C Prescribed Body Corporate support funding 44,000

RaW Fitness D Fitness programs 28,444

Shane Lui D Business Growth Package 114,000

TAFE Queensland A Delivery of Torres Strait Maritime

Pathways Project

2,000,000

Thursday Island Primary Parents and Citizens Association A Start Strong Club 12,568

Tagai State College A Growing Our Own Tagai Transition

Maritime Project - Northern Peninsula Area State College

227,273

Torres Shire Council B 2019 Torres Shire Multicultural

Festival

25,000

Torres Shire Council B Ken Brown Oval Extension mentor

component

5,702

Torres Shire Council B COVID-19 Community Initiatives

Grant

104,885

Torres Strait Island Regional Council

B Kulkalgaw Choir trip to Cairns

Indigenous Art Fair

25,000

Torres Strait Island Regional Council

B Strait Smiles - oral health messages 8,945

Torres Strait Island Regional Council

B COVID-19 Community Initiatives Grant 100,000

Torres Strait Islander Media Association

C Operational funding 881,913

Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc. C Purchase of bus 55,836

Torres Strait Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust B Torres Strait Seawalls Programme Stage 2

3,500,000

Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association C Operational funding 746,000

Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association C Four Winds Games Coordinator 50,000

SECTION SIX: APPENDICES

| APPENDIX 2: GRANTS

135

Grant Recipient

Recipient Category Activity Amount ($)

TRAWQ Indigenous Corporation C Purchase of office furniture and

equipment

8,000

TRAWQ Indigenous Corporation C Rental of additional office space 28,700

Ugar Ged Kem Le Zeuber Er Kep Le (TSI) Corporation RNTBC C Prescribed Body Corporate support funding

32,400

Ugar Community Disaster Management Group

C COVID-19 Community Initiatives Grant 21,235

TOTAL 13,432,186

Recipient Categories

A State and Territory Governments

B Local Governments

C Private Sector Non-profit Organisations

D Private Sector For-profit Organisations ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

136

APPENDIX 3: CONSULTANTS

TABLE A3-1: DETAILS OF CONSULTANTS, 2019-2020

Name Amount ($) Purpose

Selection Process

Justification Code

Asset Advance Valuers 26,450 Asset valuation Direct

sourcing

B

Charterpoint 42,652 Independent Chair of the Audit

Committee

Open tender A

Honey & Fox 20,000 Fisheries recovery action plan Direct

sourcing

A

James Cook University 342,499 Seagrass monitoring and survey Direct sourcing

B

Keogh Bay People 104,503 Fisheries framework Select tender A

Pilot Partners 225,828 Internal audit services Open tender A

University of Wollongong 24,000 Fisheries quota review Direct

sourcing

A

Total 785,932

Note: All consultants engaged under section 144T of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) were engaged using the standard terms and conditions for the engagement of consultants by the TSRA as set out in the instrument referred to in section 144T(3) of the Act.

For the purposes of reporting, engagement of a ‘consultant’ is defined as the engagement of temporary services that involve the development of an intellectual output that assists with decision-making, where the intellectual output represents the independent view of the service provider. The independent intellectual output must be the majority element of the contract in terms of relative value or importance.

Justification Code

A Need for specialised or professional skills

B Need for independent research or assessment

SECTION SIX: APPENDICES

| APPENDIX 3: CONSULTANTS

137

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

Lists of Requirements 140

List of Abbreviations 143

Index 144

LISTS OF REQUIREMENTS

This Annual Report is prepared in accordance with section 144ZB of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 (Cth) and all other sections; section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth); and section 17BE of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (Cth).

As a corporate Commonwealth entity, the TSRA is also required to prepare an annual report in accordance with the requirements of other legislation, namely the Commonwealth Electoral

Act 1918 (Cth), the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) and the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth).

The tables below detail the reporting requirements and provide the locations of the relevant information within this Annual Report.

Any enquiries relating to the TSRA’s compliance with reporting requirements can be directed to the TSRA by phone on (07) 4069 0700 or (toll free) 1800 079 093, or by email to info@tsra.gov.au.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS OF THE PUBLIC GOVERNANCE, PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY RULE 2014 (CTH)

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report (Page) Description Requirement

17BE(a) 65 Details of the legislation establishing the body Mandatory

17BE(b)(i) 68 A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set

out in legislation

Mandatory

17BE(b)(ii) 9 The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s

corporate plan for the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(c) 73 The names of the persons holding the position of

responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers

Mandatory

17BE(d) 73 Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or

instrument during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(e) None to report Any government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act If applicable, mandatory

17BE(f) None to report Particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or (b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of

the Act

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(g) 9-16 Annual performance statements in accordance with

paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule Mandatory

17BE(h), 17BE(i)

None to report A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j) 73-82 Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(k) 87 Outline of the organisational structure of the entity

(including any subsidiaries of the entity)

Mandatory

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

140

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report (Page) Description Requirement

17BE(ka) 130-131 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender; (d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17BE(l) 60, 89, 90 Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity Mandatory

17BE(m) 72-86, 88-89,

91-93

Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period Mandatory

17BE(n), 17BE(o)

92, 119 For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(p) None to report Any significant activities and changes that affected the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(q) Not applicable Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(r) 91 Particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or (b) a Parliamentary Committee; or (c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or (d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(s) Not applicable An explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(t) 92 Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting

period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs)

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(taa) 83-84 The following information about the audit committee for the entity:

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee; (b) the name of each member of the audit committee; (c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of

each member of the audit committee; (d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee; (e) the remuneration of each member of the audit

committee

Mandatory

17BE(ta) 93, 132-133 Information about executive remuneration Mandatory

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| LISTS OF REQUIREMENTS

141

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS OF THE ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER ACT 2005 (CTH)

ATSI Act Reference Page of Report Description

144ZB(2)(a) 73 Details of any directions given by the Minister under section 142E

144ZB(2)(b) 137 Details of any consultants engaged under section 144T

144ZB(3) 134-136 If a grant was made by the TSRA during a financial year to an individual or body:

(a) the name of the individual or body (b) the amount and purpose of the grant

144ZB(4) 93 The TSRA must not disclose in any annual report any matters known

to the TSRA to be held sacred by Torres Strait Islanders or Aboriginal persons

144ZB(5) 137 If an annual report gives details of a consultant engaged under

section 144T, details of any significant differences between the terms and conditions on which that consultant was engaged and the standard terms and conditions for the engagement of consultants by the TSRA as set out in the instrument referred to in subsection 144T(3)

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS OF OTHER LEGISLATION

Legislative Reference Page of Report Description

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Cth), section 311A 93 Details of advertising and market research,

including advertising campaigns

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth), section 516A 91 Details of ecologically sustainable

development and environmental performance

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth), Schedule 2,Part 4 90 Details of work health and safety initiatives

and outcomes

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

142

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviation Meaning

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

Ailan Kastom island custom

ARLF Australian Rural Leadership Foundation

ARLP Australian Rural Leadership Program

CDP Community Development Programme

COAG Council of Australian Governments

CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

FQMC Finfish Quota Management Committee

FROF Steering Committee Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework Steering Committee

ILUA Indigenous Land Use Agreement

IPA Indigenous Protected Area

ISD Integrated Service Delivery

NPARC Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council

NTO Native Title Office

NTRB Native Title Representative Body

PBCs Prescribed Bodies Corporate

PSC Programme Steering Committee

PZJA Protected Zone Joint Authority

REIS Regional Economic Investment Strategy

RNTBCs Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate

TIB Traditional Inhabitant Boat

TRAIL Training Rural Australians in Leadership

TRAWQ Tamwoy, Rose Hill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine

TRL tropical rock lobster

TropWATER Centre for Tropical Water and Aquatic Ecosystem Research

TSC Torres Shire Council

TSIRC Torres Strait Island Regional Council

TSKM Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc.

TSMPP Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project

TSRA Torres Strait Regional Authority

TTNQ Tourism Tropical North Queensland

WoC Working on Country

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

143

INDEX

A abbreviations, 143

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005, 65, 74

advisory committees under, 83-86

disclosure of sacred matters, 68, 93

functions and powers under, 68

requirements under, 65, 68, 73, 81, 93, 140

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Act 1989, 65

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Holding Act 2013 (Qld), xiii

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd, 54, 55

Aborigines and Torres Strait Islander (Land Holding) Act 1985 (Qld), 35

accountability, 91-93

accountable authority, Board as, 9, 74

advertising and market research, 93

advisory committees

PZJA, 27, 28, 29

TSRA, 83-86

affordable housing project, Horn Island, 51

age, of Torres Strait region population, 62

Ailan Kastom, 30, 31, 38, 53, 60, 68

analysis of performance against key performance indicators, 9-16

annual performance statements, 9-16; see also programme performance reports

appropriation programme expenditure, 8, 18, 26, 30, 34, 38, 45, 49, 53; see also external funding expenditure; financial statements

Arpaka Dance Team, ix

art centres, regional, support for, 12, 31

artists, support for, x, xi, 12, 30-32; see also Gab Titui Cultural Centre; Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award

Arts and Creative Industries Business Growth Package, 9, 19, 23

Arts Queensland, partnership with, 31

asset management, 89

Assistance with Tertiary Education Scheme, 46

Associations Incorporation Act 1981 (Qld), 55

Audit Committee, 46, 72, 83-84, 92

Charter, 84

members and remuneration, 84

Auditor-General, 91; see also Australian National Audit Office, independent auditor’s report

Aukane Islet, turtle nest monitoring, 41

Austrade, 2

Australian Border Force, 4

Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, 10

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 61

Australian Electoral Commission, 74, 85, 86

Australian Fisheries Management Authority, 4, 27

Australian Government Public Service Modernisation Fund, 89

Australian Information Commissioner, 91

Australian Institute of Marine Science, 43

Australian Maritime Safety Authority, 19, 21

Australian National Audit Office, independent auditor’s report, 96-97

Australian Public Service Commission, 4, 90, 91

Australian Rural Leadership Foundation, 46, 47, 48

Australian Rural Leadership Program, 46

B Badhulgaw Kuthinaw Mudh art centre, 12; see also regional art centres, support for

Badu Island, 23, 31, 43, 50

Katter leases, 35

Bamaga, 54, 60, 61

bêche-de-mer fisheries, 27

catch statistics, 10, 11

sustainable management, xiii

traditional ownership of, 11

biocultural surveys, viii, 42

biodiversity planning and management, viii, 14, 38, 42, 91; see also Environmental Management Programme

biosecurity, regional, xii, 14, 39, 40

biosecurity action plans, 14

Black Bamboo Contemporary Furniture Design from Mer, Torres Strait (exhibition), 32

Board

as accountable authority, 9, 74

functions, 73-74

meetings and attendance, 46, 81-82

members, 75-80

training and education, 82

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

144

Board Charter, 82

Board Code of Conduct, 82

Boigu Island, viii, 39, 40, 43, 52

Katter leases, 35

seawall project, xi, 16, 50

Boigu Island Pump Station Refurbishment and Sewage Treatment Plant Upgrade project, 52

bullying and harassment policy, 91

Business Continuity Plan

activation in response to COVID-19, xi

Business Funding Scheme loans, 19

moratorium on repayments, xi, 2, 4

see also business loans

Business Growth Packages, applications, 9, 19, 23

business loans, 18

applications and approvals, 9

moratorium on repayments, xi, 2, 4

business support services, 9, 18, 19; see also You Sabe Business workshops

business training, 9-10, 18, 24

C Cairns Art Gallery, 32

Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, ix, x, 31, 32

cane toad management initiatives, 39, 91

Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers Strategy, 43

capital works projects, 89

case studies

Community and public programmes connect and communicate culture, arts and heritage, 33

Community engagement with fisheries governance, 29

Dugong and turtle management plans, 44

Home Ownership Programme, 25

International Women’s Day event, 48

Major Infrastructure Programme projects on Boigu, 52

Native Title Office, 37

New bus for safe, reliable transport for college students, 56

catch data (fisheries), 10-11

Centre for Tropical Water and Ecosystem Research, 41

Chairperson’s message, 2-3

challenges and opportunities, xi-xiii

Champion for the Torres Strait (Qld), vii, 16

Charter of Representation, Performance and Accountability, 92

Chief Executive Officer

message from, 4-5

role and responsibilities, 87

climate change adaptation and resilience, vii, xii, 14, 38, 43, 91

Closing the Gap, progress towards, 65, 69; see also Integrated Service Delivery

coastal mapping, high-resolution, vii, 43

coastal protection measures, xi, 16, 50

Code of Conduct, Board, 82

Comcare, 91

Comcover, 92

Common Funding Round, 31, 47

repurposing during pandemic, xi, 47

see also COVID-19 Community Response Initiative

Commonwealth Heritage List, 89

Commonwealth Procurement Rules, 93

community booklets, 46, 67, 69

community capacity building grants, 55

Community Development Programme, 21

job seeker placements under, 20, 22-23

community engagement activities, 45, 46

Community Enterprise Queensland, vii, 15, 43

community gardens, food production, viii, 43, 50; see also sustainable horticulture activities

Community Legal Education Officer, 54

Community Minor Infrastructure Fund, 54; see also minor infrastructure project funding

Community Owned Enterprises, 22, 23

community safety grants, 54

community safety partnerships, 54

community-based management plans, development of, 13-14

complaints and disputes, Native Title and ILUAs, 36

compliance report, 92

conflicts of interest, declaration of, 92

Construction Pathways, 22

consultants, 137

coral reefs, conservation and management, 39, 43

coral trout fishery

catch statistics, 11

licence leases, 27

corporate Commonwealth entity, TSRA as, 65, 91

corporate governance and accountability, 71-93

Council of Australian Governments, Closing the Gap strategy, 65, 69

COVID-19 Community Response Initiative, xi, 2, 4, 47

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| INDEX

145

COVID-19 pandemic

impact on Board elections, 74

impact on communities, 2, 4, 47

impact on infrastructure projects, 50

impact on service delivery, 19, 20, 27, 28, 41, 46, 47, 51

TSRA response, xi, 2, 4, 47

CSIRO, 39

cultural maintenance initiatives; see Ailan Kastom; Culture, Art and Heritage Programme

cultural practitioners, support for, 12, 30-32; see also artists, support for

culture, art and heritage grants, 31

Culture, Art and Heritage Programme, 4, 12

case study, 33

expenditure, 8, 30

performance report, 30-32

cycleway, Thursday Island, 22-23

D Damaralag, Native Title rights, 61

dance strategy, ix, 31

Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, ix, x, 31

Dauan Island, 43, 50

Decarbonisation of Great Barrier Reef Islands initiative, 43

Deed of Grant in Trust, 20, 35

Dentsu Mitchell Media Australia Pty Ltd, 93

Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, viii, 44

Department of Foreign Affairs, 4

digital noticeboards, installation of, vii, 43

disclosure of sacred matters, 68, 93

dispute resolution procedures, Native Title, 37

domestic and family violence prevention measures, 54, 55

dugong management plans, viii, 13-14, 38, 91

case study, 44

Dungeness Reef, seagrass monitoring, 41

E ecological knowledge, sharing of, 38, 40, 42

ecologically sustainable development measures, TSRA, 91

Economic Development Programme

case study, 25

expenditure, 8, 18

performance report, 18-24

education statistics, Torres Strait region, 63

Eip Karem Beizam - Meriam Cultural Group, ix, 31

elections, TSRA Board, 74

employee assistance programme, 91

employment and training projects, 18, 22; see also Community Development Programme

employment statistics, Torres Strait region, 62

enabling functions, TSRA, 87-93

enabling legislation, 65, 68

energy conservation measures, TSRA, 91

enterprise agreement, 90

Entrance Island (Zuna), 61

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 91, 140

environmental education project, 40

environmental health infrastructure investment, 16, 52

Environmental Management Programme

case study, 44

expenditure, 8, 38

performance report, 38-43

environmental performance report, 91

Erub dialect, vi

Erub Erwer Meta art centre, 12; see also regional art centres, support for

Erub Fisheries Management Association, 20

Erub Island, 16, 27, 28, 54

regional art centre, 12, 31

working on country plans, 14, 40

ethical standards, Board, 82

Evolution: Torres Strait Masks (exhibition), 32

Executive Committee, 46, 74, 82-83

meetings and attendance, 83

export of fisheries products, feasibility study, 2, 27

external audit programme, 46

external funding expenditure, 8, 26, 30, 38, 49; see also appropriation programme expenditure; financial statements

external scrutiny, 91

F female staff, TSRA, 130-131

feral animals management, 14, 39, 91; see also invasive species management

Finance Minister, 92

financial performance summary, 8; see also financial statements

financial statements, 96-126

certification, 99

independent auditor’s report, 96-97

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

146

finfish fisheries

catch statistics, 10, 11

licence leases, 27

quota management, 27 (see also Finfish Quota Management Committee)

traditional ownership of, 11, 85

Finfish Quota Management Committee, 27, 85

Finfish Resource Assessment Group, 28, 29

fisheries

capacity development, vii, xiii, 3, 10, 26, 27 (see also Wapil initiative)

catch statistics, 10-11

impact of climate change on, xiii

impact of COVID-19 on, xiii, 2, 27, 28

infrastructure development, vii, xi, 2, 28

sustainable development measures, xiii, 26

traditional ownership of, xii-xiii, 11, 26, 85

see also finfish fisheries; Fisheries Programme; tropical rock lobster fisheries

Fisheries Business Growth Package, 9, 19, 23

fisheries infrastructure facilities, vii, xi, 2, 28

Fisheries Programme

case study, 29

expenditure, 8, 26

performance report, 26-28

Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework, xiii, 28

Fisheries Regional Ownership Framework Steering Committee, 28, 85-86

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, 27

fisheries roadmap, development of, xiii, 11

fisheries summit, postponement of, 27

Fishery Status Reports (ABARES), 10

Fly River pollution, impacts on Torres Strait, 39

fraud control, 92

Freedom of Information Act 1982, 93

Frontier Software Pty Ltd, 90

full-time staff, TSRA, 131-132

functions, TSRA, 68

Future Acts notices, 12

G Gab Titui Cultural Centre, x, 12, 31, 89

closure due to COVID-19, xi

online shop, launch of, xi, 4

Gab Titui Indigenous Art Award, 31

Gadu Maluigal (Top Western Cluster), 44

gender

of Torres Strait region population, 62

of TSRA staff, 130-131

geography and logistics, Torres Strait region, 60

Governance and Leadership Programme

case study, 48

expenditure, 8, 45

performance report, 45-47

governance framework, 72-86

grant management system, 47

grants, 54, 93, 134-136

Green Hill Fort, 89

Growing Our Own Tagai Transitions Maritime project, 21

H habitat monitoring, viii, 39, 41

Hand Collectables Working Group, 28, 29

health, of Torres Strait Islands population, 64

Healthy Communities Programme

case study, 52

expenditure, 8, 49

performance report, 49-51

highlights and achievements, vii-x

history, of Torres Strait region, 60

home loans, 18, 20

moratorium on repayments, xi, 2, 4

Home Ownership Programme, 20

case study, 25

moratorium on repayments, xi, 2, 4

Horn Island, 51, 61; see also Ngarupai, Native Title rights

Horticulture in Schools Programme, 91; see also sustainable horticulture activities

housing tenure, Torres Strait region, 64

human resources, 90-91

I Iama Island, vii, 42

gardens, viii, 43, 50

seawall project, xi, 16, 50

income statistics, Torres Strait region, 63

indemnities and liability insurance, 92

Indigenous Advancement Strategy, vii, 3, 40, 65, 69

Indigenous Business Australia, 9

Indigenous Land Use Agreements, 13, 34, 35

Indigenous Protected Area Management Plans, 14, 42

Indigenous Protected Areas, 14, 38, 42

Indigenous ranger programme, vii, 40; see also rangers, TSRA

Indigenous voice co-design process, 15

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| INDEX

147

induction programme, Board, 82

insurance premium, 92

integrated planning framework, 66-67

Integrated Service Delivery, xii, 45, 46, 55, 67

Closing the Gap targets as framework for, 69

intellectual property protection, artists and cultural practitioners, 12, 30, 31

internal audit programme, 46, 92

international engagement, ix, 12, 31, 32, 33

International Women’s Day event, 48, 55

International Year of Indigenous Languages, 32

Into Business workshops, replacement of, 9; see also You Sabe Business workshops

invasive species management, viii, 14, 38, 39, 91; see also biosecurity, regional

J James Cook University, 39

job seeker placements under Community Development Programme, 20, 22-23

judicial decisions and reviews, 91

K Kaiwalagal region dugong and turtle management plan, 14, 41

Kala Lagaw Ya, traditional language, vi

Kalalagaw Indigenous Protected Area, 14, 42

Kalaw Kawaw Ya, dialect, vi

Katter leases, xiii, 35

Kaurareg People Native Title claims, 12, 61

Kaurareg Traditional Owners, development of dugong and turtle management plan, 14, 41

Kawrareg, dialect, vi

Ken Brown Oval extension, 22

key management personnel, remuneration, 93, 118, 132-133

key performance indicators, results against, 9-16; see also performance indicators, programme specific

Kulkalgau Ya, dialect, vi

L Land and Sea Management Strategy for Torres Strait 2016-2036, 13

Land Court of Queensland, xiii

land tenure arrangements, 20, 25, 64; see also Deed of Grant in Trust; Katter leases

leadership capacity development, 45, 46, 47, 48; see also Australian Rural Leadership Foundation

learning and development, staff, 90

legal services, funding support for, 54, 55

letter of transmittal, iii

liability insurance, 92

lists of requirements, 140-142

Local and Regional Co-design Group, establishment of, 15

Local Level Alliance, 54

M Mabo decision, 61

Mabuyag, dialect, vi

Mabuyag Island, 40, 41, 42

Katter leases, 35

Mabuygilgal Traditional Owners, 42

Maizab Kaur, turtle nest monitoring, 41

Major Infrastructure and Other Projects Trust, 50

Major Infrastructure Programme, 16, 50

case study, 52

male staff, TSRA, 130-131

Maluilgal (Near Western Cluster), 44

marine access channel dredging study, 16, 54

marine ecosystem monitoring, 39

marine infrastructure, xi-xii, 16

maritime career training courses, 19, 21

Masig Island, 41, 42, 43

Katter leases, 35

seawall project, xi, 16, 50

working on country plans, 14, 40

Masigalgal land and sea country plan, updating, 40

masks exhibition, 32

Measuring Non-commercial Fishing in the Torres Strait, 27

media and communications support, 46

Mekem Garden Sustainable Horticulture Project, 50; see also sustainable horticulture activities

memorandum of understanding

with Prescribed Bodies Corporate, 35

with Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, 16, 54

memorandums of agreement, xii

mentors employment project, 23

Mer dialect, vi

Mer Guesthouse Upgrade, 22, 23

Mer Island, vii, ix, 22, 23, 41, 42, 43

transfer to the Meriam people, 61

working on country plans, 14, 40

Meriam Mir, traditional language, vi

Meriba Ged Ngalpun Mab, viii, 21, 22, 23

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

148

Meriba Tonar Cultural Tour, ix

Minister for Employment and Small Business (Qld), vii, 16

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, 65; see also Minister for Indigenous Australians

Minister for Indigenous Australians, vii, 3, 15, 16, 73, 74, 92

Minister for Natural Resources and Mines, xiii

Minister for Training and Skills Development (Qld), vii, 16

ministerial appointments, 73

ministerial briefings, 73

ministerial directions, 73

ministerial visit, vii, 16

minor infrastructure project funding, 16, 49, 50, 54

Mipa (Turtle Island), 42, 61

Moa Island, 31, 39

working on country plans, 14, 40

Mura Koska Sorority, funding support for, 54, 55

Muralag (Prince of Wales Island), viii

Native Title rights, 61

Murray Island (Mer), 61; see also Mer Island

Muyngu Koekaper Dance Team, ix

N NAIDOC Awards, National, ix, 31

National Co-design Group, establishment of, 15

National Gallery of Australia, 4, 48

National Gallery of Victoria, 32

National Indigenous Australians Agency, 3, 4

National Indigenous Reform Agreement, 45

National NAIDOC Awards, ix, 31

National Native Title Tribunal, 13, 35, 36, 37

Native Title Act 1993, xiii, 37, 61, 65

Native Title claims, 12, 34, 35, 61

Native Title compensation, 34, 35, 36

Native Title Office, 35, 37

performance statistics, 36

Native Title Programme

case study, 37

expenditure, 8, 34

performance report, 34-36

Native Title Representative Body, 12, 35, 36

TSRA appointment as, 34, 65

Ngalmun Lagau Minaral art centre, 12; see also regional art centres, support for

Ngarupai, Native Title rights, 61; see also Horn Island

non-Indigenous fishers, lease of licences to, 27

non-ongoing staff, TSRA, 130, 131

Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council, viii, 4, 20, 65

infrastructure projects funding, 50, 54

memorandum of agreement with, xii

Northern Peninsula Area State College, 21

Notice of Personal and Financial Interests, 92

O Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations, 16

official visits, vii, 16

ongoing staff, TSRA, 130, 131

operations, report on, 60-69

opportunities and challenges, xi-xiii

organisational structure, 87

outlook for 2020-2021, 5

P pandemic, response to; see COVID-19 pandemic

part-time staff, TSRA, 131-132

Pathways projects, 19, 22

payroll services, 90

pecuniary interests, declaration of, 92

Performance Development Programme, 90

performance indicators, programme specific, 23- 24, 35, 43, 47, 50, 55; see also key performance indicators, results against

performance reports, programme, 17-55

pest management strategy, 91; see also invasive species management

planning and reporting requirements, 47

planning framework, 65-67

policy development and decision-making, Indigenous engagement in, 15-16

population statistics, Torres Strait region, 60, 61-64

Port Kennedy Association, funding support for, 54, 55

Port Lihou Island (Yeta), 61

Poruma Island, vii, viii, 40, 42, 43, 50

seawall project, xi, 16, 50

powers, TSRA, 68

Prawn Management Advisory Committee, 28, 29

Prescribed Bodies Corporate, 16, 22, 35, 37

compliance results, 35

Prime Minister and Cabinet Portfolio, 47, 91

Prince of Wales Island, 16, 61

Prince of Wales Island Safe Landing Facility project, 16

Privacy Act 1988, 91

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| INDEX

149

programme expenditure, 8, 18, 26, 30, 34, 38, 45, 49, 53; see also financial statements

programme outcomes, 18, 26, 30, 34, 38, 45, 49, 53

programme performance reports, 17-55

Programme Steering Committee, 46, 72, 88

property management, 89

Protected Zone Joint Authority, xii-xiii, 10, 26, 27, 46

Traditional Inhabitant members participation, 27, 28

case study, 29

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, 92, 140

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 65, 74, 83, 92

reporting requirements, 9, 92, 140

public programmes, Gab Titui Cultural Centre, 32

case study, 33

Public Service Modernisation Fund, 89

Pulu Islet Indigenous Protected Area; see Kalalagaw Indigenous Protected Area

purpose, TSRA, 9

Q Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Forum, 32

Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, xii, 69

Queensland Department of Employment, Small Business and Training, 24

Queensland Department of Local Government, Racing and Multicultural Affairs, 54

Queensland Department of Natural Resources Investment Program, 39

Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, 16, 22, 54

Queensland Government Champion for the Torres Strait (Qld), vii, 16

Queensland Health, 51

R radio stations, Indigenous, 45, 47

rangers, TSRA, viii, 40, 43, 91

rat eradication program, Warul Kawa, 39, 42

Recovery Plan for Marine Turtles in Australia 2017-2027, viii

regional art centres, support for, 12, 31

regional broadcasting, support for, 47

Regional Economic Investment Strategy, 9, 18, 19

Regional Governance Committee, 46

Regional Interagency Forum, xii, 46, 69

regional issues and challenges, xi-xiii

Regional Tourism Officer positions, funding for, 20

Register of Pecuniary Interests, 92

Registered Native Title Bodies Corporate, 14, 16, 37

rehabilitation management system, 91

related party transactions, 92

Remote Indigenous Media Festival, 31

remuneration

Audit Committee, 84

key management personnel, 92, 118, 132-133

senior executives, 132-133

responsible minister, 73; see also Minister for Indigenous Australians

risk management, 72, 88-89

role, TSRA, 65

S Safe Communities Programme

case study, 56

expenditure, 8, 53

performance report, 53-55

Sai — Fish Traps Community Art Project, 32

Saibai Island, viii, 16, 39, 40, 42, 43, 50

Katter leases, 35

salary ranges, staff, 90

school attendance initiatives, 54, 56

Sea Claim (Part B), 12, 35

Seafood Export and Branding project, 27

Seafood Trade Advisory Group, 2

seagrass meadows, conservation and management, ix, 39, 41

seasonal calendars, development of, 40

seawalls, construction of, xi, 16, 50

secretariat support, provision of, 46

Seisia community, 54, 60, 61

Senior Advisory Group, 15

service delivery; see Integrated Service Delivery

Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative, vii, 3, 23, 24

Spanish Mackerel Biological Samples Project, 27

Spanish mackerel fishery, 27

catch statistics, 11

licence leases, 27

sport and recreation activities and facilities, 50, 51

St Pauls, Moa Island, Katter leases, 35

staff statistics, 90, 130-133

state of the environment reporting, 38

Statement of Expectations, 73

Statement of Intent, 73

Supreme Court of Queensland, xiii

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

150

sustainable horticulture activities, viii, 38, 39, 43, 50, 91; see also community gardens, food production

Sustainable Water and Wastewater Management Project, 50

T TAFE North Queensland, 21, 31

Tagai State College, 21, 56, 63, 91

Tarilag (Packe Island), Native Title rights, 61

tertiary education assistance, 45, 46

Thursday Island, 22-23, 89

TSRA properties on, 89

Thursday Island Cycleway (Stage Three), 22-23

Torres Shire Council, vii, 4, 16, 20, 65

biosecurity strategy, 14

climate resilience activities, 43

infrastructure project funding, 50, 54

memorandum of agreement with, xii

Torres Shire Multicultural Festival, 31

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Biosecurity Working Group, viii, 14, 39

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area Regional Plan 2009-2029, vii, 46, 65, 88

Torres Strait Child and Family Committee, 54

Torres Strait Dance Strategy, ix, 31

Torres Strait Development Plan 2019-2022, 65, 67

Torres Strait Dugong Sanctuary survey, 41

Torres Strait Fisheries (Quotas for Tropical Rock Lobster (Kaiar)) Management Plan 2018, 10

Torres Strait Invasive Species Advisory Group, viii, 14, 39

Torres Strait Island Regional Council, vii, 4, 20, 65

biosecurity strategy, 14

climate resilience activities, 43

infrastructure projects funding, 50, 54

memorandum of agreement with, xii

Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people employment opportunities; see employment and training projects

Torres Strait Islanders Media Association, 31, 47

Torres Strait Kaziw Meta Inc., grant for school bus, 54

case study, 56

Torres Strait Local Disaster Management Group, xi

Torres Strait Marine Safety Programme, 54

Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project, 19

Torres Strait masks exhibition, 32

Torres Strait Regional Adaptation and Resilience Plan 2016-2021, vii, xii, 14, 43

Torres Strait Regional Authority, establishment of, 65

Torres Strait Regional Authority (Election of Officeholders) Regulations 2019, 74

Torres Strait Regional Authority Election Rules 2017, 74

Torres Strait Regional Biosecurity Plan 2018-2023, 14

Torres Strait Regional Coordination Group, xii

Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim (Part B), 12, 35

Torres Strait Sea Cucumber Stock Status Survey, 27

Torres Strait Seawalls Programme, xi, 16, 50

Torres Strait Traditional Language Advisory Committee, 32

Torres Strait Traditional Languages Charter, 32

Torres Strait Traditional Languages Plan 2016-2019, 32

Torres Strait Treaty, 43

Torres Strait Women’s Leadership Program, 47, 48

Torres Strait Young Leaders Program, 47

Torres Strait Youth and Recreational Sporting Association, 50, 51

Tourism Business Growth Package, 9, 19, 23

tourism industry, 20; see also Tourism Business Growth Package

Tourism Tropical North Queensland, 20

traditional ecological knowledge project, 38, 40, 42; see also traditional knowledge, transfer of

Traditional Inhabitant Boat sector, 10

Traditional Inhabitants, ownership of region’s fisheries, xii-xiii, 11, 26, 85

traditional knowledge, transfer of, 31, 42; see also Ailan Kastom; Culture, Art and Heritage Programme

traditional languages, revitalisation of, 30, 32, 40

training and development, TSRA staff, 90

Training Rural Australians in Leadership programme, 46

transmittal letter, iii

transport and freight costs, as challenge to programme delivery, xi-xii

Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme, 16, 54

tropical rock lobster fisheries, 10, 28, 29

catch statistics, 10

impact of COVID-19 on market, xiii, 2

traditional ownership of, 11

Tropical Rock Lobster Resource Assessment Group, 28, 29

TropWATER, 41

TSRA Community Newsletter, 93

TSRA Corporate Plan, 9, 47, 65, 67

TSRA Enterprise Agreement 2017, 90

turtle management plans, viii-ix, 13-14, 38, 41, 91

case study, 44

SECTION SEVEN: AIDS TO ACCESS

| INDEX

151

U Ugar Island, 50

Katter Leases, 35

Ugul Malu Kawal Indigenous Protected Area, 14, 42

UMI Arts, 31

V vision, vi

W Wapil initiative, vii, 3, 10, 20, 28

Warraber Island, viii, 16, 40, 42, 43, 50, 54

Katter leases, 35

seawall project, xi, 16, 50

Warraberalgal Porumalgal Indigenous Protected Area, 14, 42

Warral and Ului Native Title claim, 12

Warul Kawa Indigenous Protected Area, 42

waste management, xii, 43, 50

wastewater management, 50, 52

water management, 38, 50

weed management; see invasive species management

Wigness v Kingham, President of the Land Court [2018] QSC 20, xiii

women’s leadership programmes, 45, 47, 48

Wongai Multi-Purpose Courts Upgrade project, 22

work health and safety, 91

Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 91, 140

Work Skills Trainees, 23, 24

working from home arrangements, xi

Working on Country plans, 14, 40

workplace agreement, 90

Workplace Consultative Committee, 91

workplace diversity, 92

Y year ahead, 3, 5

Yeta, Native Title rights, 61

You Sabe Business workshops, 9-10, 20, 24

impact of COVID-19 on, 20

youth leadership programme, 47

Z Zakazukha Marketing Communications, 46

Zuna (Entrance Island), Native Title rights, 61

ANNUAL REPORT 2019-2020

152