Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Australian Institute of Family Studies—Report for 2019-20


Download PDF Download PDF

ANNUAL REPORT 2019/20

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2019/20

Discovering what works for families

Visit us online aifs.gov.au

Photo credits

Front cover: © GettyImages/AleksandarNakic

Back cover: © GettyImages/Evgen_Prozhyrko

© GettyImages/jarenwicklund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 1

© GettyImages/martinedoucet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 3

© GettyImages/lisegagne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 11

© GettyImages/SolStock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 15

© GettyImages/mixetto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 16

© GettyImages/g-stockstudio . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 37

© GettyImages/Peter Carruthers . . . . . . . . . . . p 39

© GettyImages/andresr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 41

© GettyImages/AJ_Watt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 43

© GettyImages/Maryna Andriichenko . . . . . . p 45

© GettyImages/Neil Bussey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 47

© GettyImages/AleksandarNakic . . . . . . . . . . . p 52

© GettyImages/MonicaNinker . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 65

© GettyImages/Vladimir Vladimirov . . . . . . . p 103

© GettyImages/franckreporter . . . . . . . . . . . . p 123

Annual report 2019/20

Australian Institute of Family Studies

Contact officer for Annual Report: Deputy Director (Corporate Services) Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone (0 3) 9214 7888 Facsimile (0 3) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au

Annual reports are available at: aifs.gov.au/annual-reports

© Commonwealth of Australia 2020

With the exception of AIFS branding, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, content provided by third parties, and any material protected by a trademark, all textual material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (CC BY 4.0). You may copy, distribute and build upon this work for commercial and non-commercial purposes; however, you must attribute the Commonwealth of Australia as the copyright holder of the work. Content that is copyrighted by a third party is subject to the licensing arrangements of the original owner.

Designed by Lisa Carroll Edited by Katharine Day Indexed by Neil Conning & Associates Printed by CanPrint

ISSN 7726-9870

ii

Level 4 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone ( 03) 9214 7888 Facsimile ( 03) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au ABN 6 4 001 053 079

14 September 2020 Senator The Hon Anne Ruston MP Minister for Families and Social Services Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

It is with pleasure that I present to you the fortieth Annual Report of the Australian Institute of Family Studies, for presentation to Parliament in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

This report has been prepared pursuant to the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.

The report relates to the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.

Ms Anne Hollonds Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies

iii

Who we are and what we do

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) is a statutory agency of the Australian Government that conducts, facilitates and communicates research about issues affecting families in Australia.

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report iv

Contents One - Director’s review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Research highlights 2019/20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Communicating our research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Finances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Outlook for 2020/21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Two - Agency overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Role and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Organisational structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Outcome and program structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Three - Report on performance . . . . . . . . . 15

Performance statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

How we measure and demonstrate performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Performance framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

AIFS’ performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Performance against 2019/20 strategic initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Impact case studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Organisational case studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Report on performance - financial activities . . .50

Balance sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Four - Management and accountability . 53

Corporate governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

Senior executive members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Senior management groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Corporate and statutory reporting . . . . . . . . . . . .56

Risk management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

Ethical standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58

External scrutiny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58

Management of human resources . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Assets management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

Commissioning bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Australian National Audit Office access clauses 64

Exempt contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Procurement initiatives to support small business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Five - Financial statements . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Six - Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

Appendix A: Other mandatory information . . .104

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2019/20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108

Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . . .115

Appendix E: List of requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117

Seven - Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

v

List of tables

Table 3.1: Key reporting questions for case studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Table 3.2: Output performance 2019/20 . . . . . . 24

Table 3.3: Results from staff survey on COVID-19 transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Table 3.4: Outcomes performance 2019/20. . . .27

Table 3.5: Impact performance 2019/20 . . . . . . 29

Table 3.6: Pillar 1 initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Table 3.7: Pillar 2 initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Table 3.8: Pillar 3 initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Table 3.9: Pillar 4 initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Table 3.10: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2019/20, and budgeted expenses, 2020/21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

Table 4.3: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Table 4.5: Expenditure on consultancy contracts over 2017/18 to 2019/20 (incl. GST) . 63

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2019/20 . .106

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2019/20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . . . . .115

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

List of figures

Figure 2.1: AIFS organisational structure as at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Figure 3.1: AIFS’ Strategic Framework . . . . . . . . .17

Figure 3.2: AIFS’ Theory of Change . . . . . . . . . . .19

Figure 3.3: AIFS performance framework: program logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Figure 3.4: AIFS’ Strategic Directions and 2019/20 Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report vi

© GettyImages/jarenwicklund

One —

Director’s review

Director’s review 1

Director’s review

In 2019/20 Australian families faced multiple challenges with the combined impacts of drought, bushfires over the summer and then the COVID-19 pandemic. These crises have placed major strains on family life, relationships and livelihoods.

Families have had to adapt to these external disruptions in order to supervise children doing remote learning while working from home; care for vulnerable family members during lockdown; support family members who have lost income, and cope with significant financial pressures and uncertainty.

Individuals look to their families for support every day and even more so during times of crisis. In these tumultuous times, families need a voice to convey their experiences and needs to the policy makers, practitioners and advocates who make decisions that affect families’ lives. More than ever, evidence based on ‘what works for families’ is necessary to ensure decisions are made that support families to do their job well.

Throughout this year, which has been defined by the pandemic, AIFS has demonstrated resilience, flexibility and innovation. Despite the challenges of being located in Melbourne and working from home for long periods during the successive lockdowns, the staff at AIFS have been incredibly productive. They have shown great agility in adapting projects to respond to COVID-19, assessing new opportunities and committing to uninterrupted delivery of a substantial program of work.

Anne Hollonds Director

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 2

© GettyImages/martinedoucet

Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19

The Families in Australia Survey is AIFS’ own comprehensive survey that explores the current contexts of family life in Australia. Its scope is every person in every type of family. The current focus of the survey is to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of Australian families.

We ran the first wave of data collection in May-June 2020, when all states were in various stages of lockdown. There were 7,306 respondents. We plan to run a number of waves of the survey in 2020/21 to paint a picture of

how people are coping with and adjusting to the coronavirus pandemic, one of the greatest health, social and economic challenges in the last century. It will also document how families fare after the pandemic emergency and when we move into the recovery phase.

We are sharing the insights drawn from the Families in Australia Survey with the general public and with non-government and government agencies, to help them develop the supports that families need.

Research highlights 2019/20

During the past year we worked on 31 projects and continued to extend our expertise and experience to make a significant contribution to practice and policy development in a wide range of family wellbeing areas.

31

3 Director’s review

Australian Gambling Research Centre

Globally, gambling has expanded at a rapid pace, and related harms are an increasing concern. The Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) undertakes policy-relevant research that enhances understanding of the nature and extent of gambling participation and related harms, and advances knowledge of the ways to prevent and reduce harm among at-risk populations, their families and communities.

Recent restrictions related to the global COVID-19 pandemic led to changes in the availability of gambling in Australia, with land-b ased gambling (‘pokies’ or electronic gambling machine/EGM) venues temporarily closed and major sporting codes (national and international) suspended. The AGRC has responded to the changing gambling environment and conducted several significant research projects in the past year, including:

ƒ the Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Survey, which seeks to improve understanding of the types of products people gambled on before and during the COVID-19 restrictions, and how people’s gambling participation, alcohol consumption and health and wellbeing changed with the restrictions in place.

ƒ the National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering in Australia: Baseline Study, which examines uptake and perceived usefulness of consumer protection measures for online wagering and was commissioned by the Department of Social Services (DSS) as part of a larger four-phase evaluation of the National Consumer Protection Framework.

ƒ the Pints, Punts 'n' Peers Study, which is a national study exploring the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among young Australians.

ƒ the Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence against Women study, which is a national study investigating the nature of the relationship between gambling and domestic violence, funded by Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety.

Child Care Package Evaluation

The Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) introduced the Child Care Package on 2 July 2018. In December 2017, AIFS was commissioned by the Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) to lead an evaluation of the Child Care Package, with consortium partners the Centre for Social Research and Methods at the Australian National University; the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales; and the Social Research Centre.

In 2019/20, the evaluation consortium undertook several data collection activities with families, services and other stakeholders. We also devoted considerable resources to obtaining and beginning work on the DESE’s administrative data, which are critical to the evaluation reporting. Evaluation activities were disrupted by the bushfires in the summer of 2019/20, and then were further disrupted with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. These disruptions affected data collections, such that most planned 2020 data collections were not conducted. The COVID-related disruptions, of course, also affected the DESE, AIFS and consortium partners, and together with the significant impacts of COVID-19 on families and the Early Childhood Education and Care sector, have meant considerable changes to the evaluation. As a result the final rounds of data collection will no longer proceed, and the evaluation will focus on the Child Care Package up until the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. A draft interim report was prepared and provided to the DESE in June 2019, drawing on some of the data collected and analysis completed at this time, and plans are underway for the completion of the evaluation, including final reporting, in early 2021.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 4

Knowledge Translation and Impact (KTI) Lab

AIFS is committed to ensuring that the research we produce is relevant to those working in policy and practice to best influence positive outcomes for children and families. The KTI Lab builds and supports the capability of our researchers to create and communicate knowledge. The KTI Lab also delivers capability-building projects that help policy makers and service providers to make the best use of evidence. In 2020, the KTI Lab co-hosted Canadian research impact specialist Dr David Phipps to share his insights with a range of research, policy and practice audiences in a capability-b uilding effort known as Mobilising Melbourne.

Child Family Community Australia (CFCA)

The Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange, funded by the Department of Social Services (DSS), synthesises and translates knowledge to provide resources, publications and support for child, family and community welfare professionals. CFCA is a key part of AIFS’ Knowledge Translation and Impact team’s work in building the sector’s capacity and capability for evidence-informed decision making.

In 2019/20, CFCA focused on enhancing and innovating its products to respond to the sector after conducting a review to better understand the needs of users. The project has adapted again throughout COVID-19 by prioritising relevant topics and the way we translate and communicate knowledge.

Nearly 23,000 subscribers now receive the fortnightly CFCA News, a 39% increase on 2018/19; with record rates of engagement, particularly during COVID-19. CFCA produced 27 publications and resources this financial year, and its website received over 3.4 million page views. The CFCA webinar program also provided professional development to large numbers of sector professionals (over 14,700 participants across 13 webinars; a 23% increase on 2018/19), with significant increases in attendance rates during COVID-19. Continuous impact measurement has indicated that CFCA content has contributed to improved knowledge of the latest research and increased use of evidence in policy and practice by its users.

Emerging Minds: National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

AIFS is a partner of the National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health (NWC), which assists professionals and organisations who work with children and families to enhance their skills to identify, assess and support children at risk of mental health difficulties. Activities in 2019/20 include the production of monthly syntheses of recent child mental health research; 17 short articles covering a variety of child mental health issues, and a range of practitioner resources including practice papers for the child and family welfare sector. We also played an important leadership role in the evaluation of the National Workforce Centre, contributing to the design, data collection and analysis of components of the evaluation.

Families and Children Expert Panel

The Expert Panel Project aims to help Families and Children (FaC) Activity service providers to better articulate the evidence underpinning their programs and to build program monitoring and evaluation into their routine.

Activities in 2019/20 included:

ƒ continuing to work with Communities for Children Facilitating Partner service providers to assess programs in relation to the evidence-b ased criteria

ƒ providing direct support to FaC Activity service providers in relation to program planning activities

ƒ redesigning the evaluation and outcomes measurement workshop content for wider publication on the Expert Panel website, and the publication of two instructional videos: A guided tour through: program logic models and A guided tour through: measuring outcomes

ƒ working with the Centre for Evidence and Implementation (CEI) to deliver three workshops focusing on program implementation and the development of a complementary video resource

ƒ continued implementation of the ‘Building effective partnerships between non-I ndigenous FaC providers and Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations (ACCOs)’ project, in partnership with SNAICC

ƒ completion of Phase 2 of the Evaluation of the Expert Panel Project.

Director’s review 5

Family law research

Family law continues to be a key research area for the Institute. Key projects the team have worked on in 2019/20 include:

ƒ the Elder Abuse Prevalence Study - commissioned by the Attorney General’s Department (AGD) - more information in Research Highlights

ƒ the Evaluation of the Small Claims Property Pilot (a new court-based model for small value family law property matters that is being trialled in four Federal Circuit Court Registries) - commissioned by the AGD

ƒ the Lawyer-assisted Property Mediation: Legal Aid Commission Trial commissioned by the AGD - more information in Research Highlights.

ƒ examination of the family law enforcement regime - collaboration with Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS).

The research team also continues to be engaged in research activities for the Singapore Ministry of Family and Social Development aimed at understanding trends of co-parenting in Singapore, and engages in stakeholder engagement activities in the family law sector. In addition to making a submission and giving evidence to the Joint Select Committee on Australia’s Family Law System, members of the family law team have participated in activities with key stakeholders in the family law sector, including participating in the Family Law Forums hosted by the AGD following the completion of the Australian Law Reform Commission’s review of the family law system.

Data Linkage and Integration Authority (DLIA)

The Institute is an accredited Commonwealth Integrating Authority, authorised to undertake high-r isk data linkage projects involving Commonwealth data for statistical and research purposes. The Data Linkage and Integration Authority (DLIA) team is able to negotiate and arrange access to a rich array of administrative and other data sources. This linking of datasets provides valuable new information for research and policy making in a secure, privacy-preserving manner.

A highlight of 2019 was AIFS receiving a direct invitation to present at the 6th International Conference of Crime Observation and Criminal Analysis in Brussels, Belgium. A representative from the AIFS DLIA team attended the conference in November and presented on the emerging landscape of access to data and information in Australia. The presentation focused on AIFS’ role in linking government agencies’ datasets for research and evaluation, and bridging the gaps between academia and data custodians in data linkage projects in Australia.

Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies

We have continued to build significant expertise in longitudinal research by conducting, leading and collaborating with several large-scale longitudinal research studies. As leaders in this field, the Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies (LLS) team is often sought out on a national and international level to advise and/or collaborate on longitudinal research projects. Some of the advisory roles LLS holds include:

ƒ Member of National Research Advisory Group on National Children’s Digital Health Collaborative

ƒ Advisory role on Australian Youth Development Index Expert Panel

ƒ International Coordinator for Growing Ups Around the World

ƒ Member of International Advisory Group for EuroCohort

ƒ Invited by GESIS Panel (Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany) to be Co-Investigators on the ‘PARI Panel - A longitudinal and multi perspective survey infrastructure on the psychology of refugee integration’ (PARI = Psychological Antecedents of Refugee Integration).

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC)

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) follows the development of 10,000 children and their families in urban and rural areas and continues to provide insights into the paths Australian children and their families take through life. Data are collected from two cohorts every two years.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 6

The first cohort of 5,000 children was aged 0-1 (B cohort) year in 2003-04, and the second cohort of 5,000 children was aged 4-5 years in 2003-04 (K cohort).

Key activities in 2019 involved the testing and finalisation of survey instrument and fieldwork procedures for Wave 9 data collection for both B and K cohorts. As face-to-face interviews were about to commence in March 2020, they were immediately halted due to health and safety concerns surrounding COVID-19. In response, the Growing Up in Australia team redesigned the Wave 9 survey instrument and developed Wave 9C. While continuing to ask questions that track participants’ development and wellbeing and, ensuring the longitudinal nature of the study remains intact, Wave 9C will focus on the impacts of COVID-19 and recent natural disasters. A 30-minute online survey called Wave 9C1 will be administered to young people and parents from both B and K cohorts, from early October to early December 2020. A follow-up online survey called Wave 9C2 is planned for early 2021.

Wave 8 data will be released in September- October 2020.

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health is the first national longitudinal study in Australia focusing exclusively on male health and wellbeing. The study aims to fill the gaps in knowledge about male health and wellbeing across the life course and to contribute to the development of health programs and policies targeted to the special health needs of men and boys.

Key Ten to Men activities in 2019/20 included the pilot phase of Wave 3 data collection, where testing of survey instruments and fieldwork procedures and pre-wave contact activities took place. In March 2020, due to the health and safety concerns around COVID-19, planning for the face-to-face interview component of Wave 3 data collection (due to commence in May 2020) was halted. The project team quickly re-evaluated and worked to revise the survey content and methodology to enable contactless interviewing. Some new content surrounding the impacts of COVID-19 and recent effects of natural disasters, such as bushfires and floods,

were incorporated into the revised survey. The Wave 3 fieldwork will comprise an online survey phase, a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) phase, and a paper survey mailout. The online survey went live at the end of July 2020 with data collection concluding in December 2020.

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA)

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA) is a long-term research project examining how humanitarian migrants settle into a new life in Australia. Close to 2,400 individuals and families living in communities around Australia and who have been granted permanent humanitarian visas are taking part in the study.

BNLA Wave 5 data were released in late 2019 and, along with the first four waves of data, are available to approved researchers from government, academic institutions and non-p rofit organisations.

Director’s review 7

Communicating our research

Expanding the reach of our research findings to a wider range of audiences, including policy makers, practitioners, other researchers and the general public has again been a key focus for AIFS.

Communicating our research is a key AIFS function. We do this through releasing research publications, both in short and long form, through our information exchange services, such as CFCA, by researchers presenting at conferences and events, and in our webinars. The Institute’s research is widely reported in the media and promoted through our websites, newsletters and social media.

Events

A major part of our knowledge translation activities is to host events, including online webinars and our biennial conference. A significant amount of planning was undertaken to host our 16th AIFS Conference scheduled for 9-12 June 2020. This unfortunately had to be postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. New dates for the conference have been secured for 15-18 June 2021 at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC) and the team will continue to plan for the event in 2020/21. Pleasingly, the vast majority of our 2020 speakers and sponsors have confirmed their participation in the 2021 event. Our revised theme is: Remaking Australia: What is a good life for families?

While we weren’t able to host the conference, we hosted a series of online webinars as part of a Families in Focus series instead. Five webinars were conducted in June 2020 and featured speakers who were originally scheduled for plenary sessions at the 2020 Conference. We also hosted a webinar on early findings from the Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 on 2 July 2020. The webinars were a great success, attracting almost 2,000 attendees from across the country, with 91% of participants rating the quality of the webinars as ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’.

Our regular webinar series for CFCA, Emerging Minds and the Families and Children Expert Panel has also continued to be hugely popular, with more than 14,000 participants tuning in throughout the year. With more and more people getting comfortable with online webinar content as a result of working from home more often, we plan on expanding our webinar program in 2020/21.

Publications

We continued to publish high quality research into the wellbeing of Australian families, with 57 papers produced, and more than 3.4 million publications viewed or downloaded from our websites. We also produced a host of short articles, news pieces, infographics, fact sheets, social media posts and practice resources. In the past year, publishing highlights included reports on:

ƒ Child wellbeing after parental separation

ƒ Use of health services among children at risk of social-emotional problems: Opportunities for early intervention

ƒ Children’s social-emotional wellbeing: The role of parenting, parents’ mental health and health behaviours

ƒ Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018

ƒ National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering: Baseline study

ƒ Parenting arrangements after separation

ƒ Elder Abuse National Research Project: Strengthening the evidence base

ƒ Child Care Package Evaluation: Early monitoring report.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 8

Finances

In the 2019/20 financial year, AIFS operated with $4,452,000 of government appropriation and $10,068,526 of other revenue (primarily from contracted research), as detailed in the 'Financial statements' (page 65). The Institute incurred a budget deficit of $1,488,329. This deficit is primarily due to depreciation and amortisation expenses, the impacts of COVID-19 and the adverse impact of movements in employee provisions due to discount factors.

Without depreciation and amortisation of $920,930, AIFS would have reported a deficit of $567,399.

We have received approval to run an operating deficit of $590,000 due to the impact of COVID-19 and employee provisions.

Director’s review 9

Outlook for 2020/21

The coronavirus pandemic has given AIFS the impetus to ask how we could be even more of a trusted voice for families.

The pandemic has amplified our strengths and weaknesses, and the challenges we face in our operating environment. As well as delivering on our research commitments to our commissioning bodies, the seven major priorities for the year ahead are:

ƒ Finalising our Strategic Plan 2021-2026: Development of the strategic roadmap for 2021-26 is a key priority to ensure AIFS continues to be a national evidence-informed voice on the factors affecting families in a rapidly changing world.

ƒ Considering the best format for the AIFS Conference in June 2021 (rescheduled from June 2020 because of the pandemic)

ƒ Implementing multiple waves of the new Families in Australia Survey: for insights and analysis about how families are coping with and adjusting to the COVID-19 pandemic

ƒ Expanding the innovative Knowledge Translation and Impact Lab: to help policy makers and service providers bridge the gap between knowledge and practice

ƒ Redeveloping our website: to make evidence easier to find and easier to apply in practice

ƒ Improving our online working environment: by rolling out Windows 10 and Microsoft 365, and transitioning our manual, paper-based processes to an online workflow system

ƒ Implementing the Doing My Best Work performance development program for our staff.

To enable us to achieve our priorities, we'll continue to draw on our capabilities to experiment creatively, test new ideas and adapt to face our changing environment. A key change this year will be welcoming a new Director at AIFS, as I am leaving to take up the role of National Children’s Commissioner in November 2020. I have been privileged to be a part of AIFS’ journey for the past five years. I have confidence that the new Director has strong foundations to take AIFS to its next phase to become a strong voice for families. They will be blessed with productive collaborations with our partners and stakeholders, and an incredibly talented and committed team at AIFS to deliver on the priorities in our plan.

Anne Hollonds Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies 14 September 2020

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 10

© GettyImages/lisegagne

Two —

Agency overview

Agency overview 11

Agency overview

AIFS is a Melbourne based statutory agency of the Australian Government, established in February 1980 under the Australian Family Law Act 1975.

A non-corporate entity, AIFS is an agency within the Department of Social Services (DSS) portfolio. We also have close links with the Attorney General’s Department (AGD), the Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE), the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Department of

Defence, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA), the Department of Health (DoH) and other Australian Government portfolios, their departments and agencies. Our staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. At 30 June 2020, 93 people were employed at the Institute, excluding the Director.

Role and functions

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting the welfare of Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, researchers and the broader community. We evaluate policies and programs, and we provide advice to inform the design and implementation of policy and services.

The Institute’s What Works for Families Research Framework (Families Framework), highlighted in the AIFS Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23, guides our research agenda including commissioned projects. The Framework outlines four key research areas:

ƒ Life stages and transitions

ƒ Family relationships

ƒ Social and economic participation

ƒ Challenges for families.

We communicate our research findings to make evidence accessible and useful for decision makers, practitioners and the general public. We do this through our research publications, conferences, websites, information exchanges, information services, presentations, seminars and webinars, representation and through mass media.

The AIFS Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23 outlines our roles and functions for this annual reporting period. The four strategic priorities outlined in the plan are:

ƒ Create knowledge

ƒ Communicate for impact

ƒ Collaborate and connect

ƒ Activate organisational sustainability.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 12

Organisational structure

The Director is responsible for providing the overall leadership of the Institute and is supported by two Deputy Directors: the Deputy Director Research and Deputy Director Corporate Services (see Figure 2.1). This group works together to lead a team of managers responsible for the day-to-day work of AIFS in meeting our strategic objectives.

The Deputy Director Research is responsible for our research program, which includes a wide range of research, evaluation and dissemination projects focusing on policy and practice relevant issues affecting families in Australia.

The Deputy Director Corporate Services is responsible for the management of services to support our research activities, including human,

financial and physical resources, information management and communications technology, communication services and corporate governance.

Research managers oversee teams of research staff who work on a range of commissioned and internally initiated projects. During the reporting period this included two information exchanges - the Australian Gambling Research Centre and the Child Family Community Australia information exchange - and five longitudinal studies.

The Corporate Services area supports our research activities by providing administrative and specialist functions such as library, publishing, finance, information management and technology, communications, human resources and business capability services.

Figure 2.1: AIFS' organisational structure as at 30 June 2020

Kelly Hand Deputy Director (Research)

Dr Michael Alexander Deputy Director (Corporate Services)

John Stamoulis Chief Financial O*cer

Dr Antonia Quadara Strategy and Business Development Manager

Ian Boor Information Management and Technology Manager

Glen White Business Capability Services Manager

Dr Galina Daraganova Executive Manager Large Scale and Longitudinal Studies

Dr Stewart Muir Senior Research Fellow Family, Policy and Practice

Dr Nerida Joss Executive Manager KTILab

Dr Rebecca Jenkinson Manager Australian Gambling Research Centre

Dr Rae Kaspiew Executive Manager Family Law and Family Violence

Tracey Young Executive Manager Communications

Stephanie Purcell Executive Manager Human Resources

Anne Hollonds Director

Agency overview 13

Outcome and program structure

In this reporting period, we operated within the Australian Government’s outcome and output framework published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019-20 (PBS) and the AIFS Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23. The Institute has a single planned outcome: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

All our activities have been directed to achieving this outcome. Key performance criteria, detailed in the 'Report on performance' section (page 15), measure the Institute’s core outputs and deliverables. The Institute’s management accountability performance is described in the 'Management and accountability' section (page 53), and its finances in the 'Financial statements' section (page 65).

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 14

© GettyImages/SolStock

Three —

Report on performance

Report on performance 15

© GettyImages/mixetto

Report on performance

Performance statement

We have a single planned outcome:

Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

As detailed in our Strategic Directions 2016-21, four key pillars lay the foundation to achieve this outcome:

ƒ Knowledge creation: Conducting high quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding the wellbeing of Australian families

ƒ Knowledge communication: Increasing the effectiveness of communications to foster greater understanding about factors that affect families

ƒ Collaboration: Expanding the national knowledge base of factors affecting families through collaborative partnerships

ƒ Organisational activation: Building organisational capability to achieve research and communication objectives.

Our work in these pillars is guided by:

ƒ AIFS’ Families Framework, which describes how we think about families and what supports them

ƒ a theory of change that describes our impact pathway (i.e. how what we do leads to improvements for children and families)

ƒ a performance measurement framework that maps to, and shows AIFS performance along, this impact pathway

ƒ organisational values that underpin the ethos of the organisation, how we do our work and what we expect of each other to achieve our purpose

ƒ a revised risk governance framework more closely aligned to the nature of the work we do.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 16

This integrated strategy framework is shown in Figure 3.1.

Figure 3.1: AIFS’ Strategic Framework

Families Framework

Strategic Initiatives

Operations

Theory of Change

Strategic Direction pillars and goals

How we understand families and what supports them

How our work achieves impact

Priority projects to achieve our goals each year

Our purpose, core business and long-term goals

Our projects, outputs, processes and capabilities

PERFORMANCE AND REPORTING

GOVERNANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

AIFS VALUES

Report on performance 17

How we measure and demonstrate performance

In 2018/19, AIFS undertook a mid-point review of our Strategic Directions. The review resulted in:

ƒ an explicit articulation or 'theory' of our impact pathway; that is, mapping how what we do and produce leads to positive outcomes for children and families (impact)

and connected to this

ƒ a revised performance framework that better demonstrates the outcomes and impacts we achieve.

The revised framework considers not only quantifiable activities and outputs but also:

ƒ what outcomes these activities and outputs have resulted in

ƒ how these have benefited our key stakeholders

ƒ the impact these benefits generate for children and families.

This is the first year of reporting against this revised framework and represents a significant development in our commitment to continuous improvement in performance measurement. We describe our theory of change and performance framework below.

AIFS’ impact pathway

Performance measurement needs to tell a meaningful story about whether - and how well - an organisation is achieving its intended outcomes and impact. This requires having not only clear links between activities, outputs and outcomes but also an underlying theory or rationale about why and how activities and outputs lead to the desired outcomes.

As part of the Strategic Directions mid-p oint review, and reflecting good practice in performance measurement, we developed our own theory of change. Based on our current state, we examined:

ƒ the pathways between our activities and positive outcomes for children, families and community

ƒ who we primarily create and communicate research for, and the benefits they receive

ƒ how beneficiaries use our work, and how we expect this use to foster positive outcomes for children and families

ƒ expected outcomes and impacts along this pathway.

Our current impact pathway is premised on the following links:

By conducting and communicating research, and bringing policy and practice actors together to engage with this knowledge, AIFS provides:

ƒ access to high quality, timely and relevant research, information and resources

ƒ deeper understanding into the trends, issues and challenges facing families

ƒ capacity building across policy and practice communities to strengthen research use and evaluation practice.

Policy makers use our research and resources to enact systemic change through policy development and implementation. Service providers use our research to develop their workforce, deliver direct action, and enhance their programs and practices for children and families.

Consequently, as a result of accessing and using research and building evaluation capability, governments and services are more able to design policies, legislation, programs and practices that meet the needs of families.

The resulting theory of change is shown in Figure 3.2 (page 19).

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 18

Figure 3.2: AIFS’ Theory of Change

GOALS: OUR LONG-TERM AIMS

PURPOSE: WHY WE EXIST

To create and communicate knowledge that accelerates positive outcomes for children and families

BENEFICIARIES: WHO BENEFITS FROM OUR WORK?

BENEFITS: THE VALUE AIFS PROVIDES

PILLARS: WHAT WE DO

IMPACT ON BENEFICIARIES Governments and services use AIFS’ research to design e*ective policies and programs for children and families

IMPACT ON FAMILIES

Laws, policies, systems, services and practices support the wellbeing of children and families

• Better understanding of issues • Potential policy solutions to consider • Enhanced capacity to use research • Trusted research partner

Policy makers and Government

Service Sector

Limited influence Indirect influence Direct influence

• Access to relevant research •€Evidence to support service development •€Evaluation capacity building

Strategic directions

1. National research leadership

2. Leading source of relevant, timely and accessible knowledge and resources 3. Influence national conversations and action on child and family wellbeing 4. Sustainability as an independent research institute

PILLAR 01

CREATE KNOWLEDGE

PILLAR 02

COMMUNICATE KNOWLEDGE

PILLAR 03

CONNECT & COLLABORATE

PILLAR 04

ACTIVATE

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Theory of Change/impact pathways

Report on performance 19

Performance framework

Improving life outcomes for children and families is a complex social and policy issue involving diverse actors and stakeholders. Additionally, translating ‘knowing’ into ‘doing’ is a long-term endeavour involving multiple pathways. Drawing a causal link between research and impact is therefore challenging; our ability to influence outcomes becomes less direct the further along the impact pathway we focus.

While the ultimate impacts of our work are about policies, legislation, programs and practices that improve outcomes for children and families, it is not possible to measure how directly we have enabled that impact.

Our performance framework focuses on AIFS’ direct and indirect spheres of influence.

Direct influence refers to those things AIFS can directly control or manage such as:

ƒ Inputs: resources, staff and assets

ƒ Activities: what we do on a day-to-day basis

ƒ Outputs: the products, resources and organisational practices produced as a consequence of these activities.

Indirect influence refers to the results, outcomes and impacts that should occur as a consequence of our work:

ƒ Outcomes: the results we wish to see as a consequence of our activities and outputs, namely: our research is sought out by our stakeholders; our research is seen as relevant by our stakeholders; and our organisational capabilities support our research activities.

ƒ Impact: to the consequences of stakeholders seeking out and valuing our work, namely: better understanding among stakeholders of issues affecting families; improved capacity to use research; and deeper insights about what works in policy and practice to support families.

We use a program logic model to link inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes and impacts against our strategic goals and impact pathway. Both quantitative and qualitative data are used to monitor and measure performance. Qualitative data are drawn from stakeholder feedback and from case studies. Figure 3.3 (page 21) provides a high-level representation of AIFS’ Performance Framework.

Unlike previous years, we no longer set year-on-y ear targets for outputs. Small increases or decreases in output numbers (e.g. number of projects) are not particularly meaningful on their own. Instead we report on the previous year and the current year, and where necessary provide a narrative to explain any significant differences.

However, we consider targets for metrics related to outcome and impact measures to be meaningful to our theory of change. Increases in subscribers, webinar attendees or downloads provide information about AIFS' reach; increases in stakeholder access to, and use of, our research helps the development of policies and practices that support families. Year-on-year targets should be informed by previous trend data and represent feasible stretch targets. Data from the years 2019/20 and 2020/21 will be used to baseline and establish appropriate target increments for 2021/22 and 2022/23.

In addition to these improvements in performance measurement, we have also introduced research impact and organisational case studies that provide detailed information about what impacts were achieved and how this occurred. Six case studies are included in this Performance Statement. Table 3.1 (page 22) outlines the key questions the case studies report on.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 20

Figure 3.3: AIFS performance framework: program logic

Performance indicator

Inputs

Action measures

AIFS’ impact pathway

Results measures

Resources and infrastructure

Sta*: skills, experience, qualifications

Revenue: commissioned, appropriations, other

Capital and technical assets: IMT, data lab

Research and evaluation projects Research and resources dissemination Outreach and stakeholder engagement Research and evaluation capacity building Organisational management and capability development

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families Access to high quality research and information Platforms for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration Practices and processes that ensure sustainability

Better understanding about issues facing families Improved capacity to use research to inform policy and service design Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise End users find AIFS’ research and resources relevant Organisational capability enables AIFS to achieve impact

Number and types of activities

Number and types of outputs and products

Access and reach of research and resources

Research uptake and use

Outcomes

What we do (activities)

What we produce (outputs)

Impacts for policy and practice communities

What we measure

PILLARS & GOALS Create knowledge, Communicate knowledge, Connect & collaborate, Activate

Report on performance 21

Table 3.1: Key reporting questions for case studies

Research impact case studies

Project description

What was the issue or problem to be addressed?

What was the broader context?

Project aims

What does it aim to do? What are the research questions?

Who does it involve?

Project significance

What were the results/findings/outcomes?

How does/did the project help to address this issue or problem?

Who benefits from this research and how?

What are the next steps to increase its utility or reach?

Case studies

Elder Abuse research program

Families in Australia (COVID-19) Survey

CFCA Scoping Study

Families in Focus webinar series

Organisational capability case studies

What was the situation? What was the problem/issue to be addressed?

What did we do to address the issue? What were the aims or desired outcomes?

What’s been the result? What’s been achieved and what’s been the benefit?

What are the next steps? What will AIFS do to maintain or keep building on the achievements?

Case studies

Pivot to COVID-19 work arrangements

Transforming culture at AIFS

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 22

AIFS’ performance

This section provides an overall assessment of the Institute’s performance in terms of outputs, outcomes and impact.

AIFS outputs

A key function of the Institute is to undertake and communicate research on the issues affecting families to improve the understanding of policy makers, service providers and the broader community. We do this by providing:

ƒ robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families

ƒ access to high quality research and information

ƒ platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration

ƒ practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability.

Table 3.2 (page 24) details AIFS outputs against these domains for 2019/20. Output measures for the previous year are provided for comparison.

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families. AIFS is a leading national provider of research and evaluation into the factors that impact on wellbeing, and what interventions can improve outcomes for families. In 2019/20, researchers were working on a total of 31 research projects. Of these, 27 were commissioned projects. This is a positive reflection of our value, relevance and competitiveness as a research agency.

Compared to 2018/19, there are fewer unique agencies we have been commissioned by (21 in 2018/19 compared to 14 in 2019/20).

Factors that may have influenced this metric include:

ƒ fewer agencies seeking research and evaluation services relevant to AIFS’ work

ƒ a range of shorter-term commissions being finalised in 2019/20 while several long-term projects commissioned in previous years continued. This may have resulted in fewer commissioning agencies overall.

Access to high-quality research and information. In addition to undertaking research, the Institute is also committed to making this research accessible to a range of stakeholders. We do this through the production of publications, resources and webinars. The number of publications and products released this year remained relatively steady at 58. Given the travel and face-to-face restrictions associated with COVID-19, and the cancellation of a number of conferences that we were due to present at (including our own), AIFS’ researchers nevertheless maintained a high number of external presentations (57 compared to 68 in 18/19). These are a key mechanism for sharing and communicating our research to diverse audiences.

Complementing this external communication of AIFS’ research, we also delivered 18 webinars over the reporting period, up from 14 in 2018/19. This includes six webinars in the Families in Focus series, showcasing five presentations by selected keynote speakers originally scheduled to speak at the 2020 Conference, which has been postponed due to COVID-19. The Families in Focus case study provides more information about the value this series provided stakeholders.

Platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration. AIFS not only produces research but also aims to bring policy, practice and research communities together in conversation about the factors impacting families and what works to support them. We do this through the AIFS conference and other cross-sector events, collaborative partnerships, and through advisory group participation.

Partnerships and collaborations are important mechanisms to foster and leverage cross-sector expertise and skills. AIFS’ partnerships include Memoranda of Understanding, formal project consortia and less formal collaborations. In 2019/20 AIFS held 24 such partnerships, similar to 2018/19.

Participation in advisory groups is another key mechanism through which cross-sector dialogue occurs. We have not reported on this in previous years but think it is helpful to start doing so. In 2019/20 AIFS was represented on 38 advisory groups convened by other organisations.

Report on performance 23

Practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability. Strengthening AIFS’ internal practices, processes, staff capability and organisational culture underpin our overall performance and is a key area of organisational investment. This measure is focused on how AIFS invests in the capability and wellbeing of its people. We do this through learning and development training, wellbeing sessions and comprehensive inductions for incoming staff.

There were 12 face-to-face Learning and Development programs delivered. Some of these programs consisted of two days training, such as the Plain English Writing Skills program. Seven wellbeing sessions were held and nine new starter induction training packages were delivered (one additional module included in 2019/20 for all new starters, Privacy training).

Table 3.2: Output performance 2019/20

Measure and metric 2018/19 2019/20

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families

Total number of projects (total) 33 31

Number of commissioned 29 27

Number of commissioning bodies 21 14

Access to high-quality research and information

Number of publications and products released 66 57

Number of external presentations 68 55

Number of AIFS webinars 14 18

Platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration

Number of AIFS events 5 1a

Number of event attendees 1,237 70a

Number of partnerships 33 24

Number of advisory group representation N/A 38

Practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability

Learning and Development sessions 7 17

Wellbeing sessions 9 7

Number of APS new starter induction training 8 9

Note: a AIFS cancelled multiple events in 2019/20 due to COVID-19 and postponed the AIFS 2020 Conference until 2021 .

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 24

Outcomes

Outcomes are what we anticipate as a consequence of our activities and outputs: that our research is sought out by our stakeholders; our research is seen as relevant by our stakeholders; and our organisational capabilities support our research activities.

Table 3.3 (page 26) provides detail of outcome metrics across three measures:

ƒ end users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise

ƒ end users and stakeholders find AIFS’ research and resources relevant to their work

ƒ we maintain the organisational capability that enables us to achieve impact.

These are discussed in turn.

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise. To demonstrate this measure, we consider a range of metrics that tell us about reach (number of e-News subscribers); end users actively seeking out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise (seeking out publications, attending webinars, and access by media); and frequency of engagement with AIFS’ research and resources.

The number of e-News subscribers increased by 20%, with the majority of these being CFCA News subscribers followed by AIFS News subscribers. The intended target for 2020/21 is set at equal to or greater than 2019/20. At the end of 2020/21, we will review the data from the previous two years to help determine future targets.

The number of webinar attendees increased from 8,930 in 2018/19 to 11,447 in 2019/20, an increase of 28%. This is likely the result of the increase in the number of webinars delivered, the Families in Focus webinar program, and the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in a largely online setting for information sharing. Results from the stakeholder feedback survey show that 63% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that AIFS webinars were relevant and targeted to their work. Qualitative feedback indicated that end users find the webinars informative and helpful to their work.

While the number of AIFS’ publications accessed in 2019/20 appears to suggest a 19% reduction compared to 2018/19, this is not the case. The decrease is the result of efforts to improve user experience. Prior to 2019/20, most AIFS publications spanned more than one webpage; a user had to click through multiple pages to read a publication. In 2019/20, we converted publications from a multi-page to a single-page format, making it easier to read publications online. The resulting decline in page views is due to that conversion, not to fewer publications being viewed.

On media engagement with AIFS’ research, we have elected to report on both media citations, as well as direct approaches for comment (e.g. media interviews). The intention is to provide greater detail about how media engage with our research, with requests for comment suggesting more active engagement. Compared to 2018/19, the results for the current reporting period are somewhat lower. This is attributed to fewer research reports being released, which are often accompanied by media releases.

In this year’s stakeholder survey, respondents were asked how frequently they engaged with our research and resources (daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, other). Over three-quarters of respondents (77%) reported seeking out AIFS’ research and resources on at least a monthly basis. A third of these stated that they did so on a daily basis, indicating a high frequency of engagement.

End users and stakeholders find AIFS’ research and resources relevant to their work. This measure aims to track (and improve) AIFS’ performance in ensuring products are:

ƒ easy to find

ƒ accessible and relevant to end users’ work

ƒ useful to end users in their work.

The results from the 2019/20 survey are consistent with those of the previous year. Almost 80% of respondents agreed with the statement that ‘It is easy to locate the

Report on performance 25

information, research or resources I am looking for on AIFS websites.’ In addition, 86% of respondents agreed that ‘AIFS’ publications and resources are written in plain, accessible language.’

Compared to 2018/19, a higher proportion of respondents stated that they had used AIFS’ research and resources in the last 12 months (86% in 2019/20 compared to 74% in the previous year). Respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the following products were useful and relevant to their work:

ƒ AIFS website: 85%

ƒ In-depth reports: 83%

ƒ Research summaries: 90%

ƒ Fact sheets: 90%

ƒ E-News: 80%.

Together, these results indicate that AIFS is performing well in our key functions of producing and communicating research, and in making this research easy to find, accessible and relevant to our key stakeholders.

Organisational capability enables AIFS to achieve impact. This measure tracks our performance in building organisational capability to achieve research and communication objectives. We use the results from the APS Employee Census on staff engagement, staff wellbeing and innovation as our key metric. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the employee census has been postponed until October 2020. We are, therefore, unable to report on this metric.

We did, however, run two surveys with staff to understand the impacts that COVID-19 working from home arrangements were having, how effectively AIFS supported the transition to remote working and what tools and ideas would help staff to feel connected and productive. Key results from these surveys are reported in Table 3.3.

Table 3.3: Results from staff survey on COVID-19 transition

Positive rating

26 Mar- 1 April 11-19 May

How well has AIFS supported your transition to home-based work? 93% 98%

Satisfaction with communication provided by AIFS 97% 92%

Satisfaction with IT/ Technology support

89% 94%

Satisfaction with support from manager (satisfied/ very satisfied) Not asked 84%

As described in the performance statement against the strategic initiatives and in the case studies on the Pivot to COVID-19 and the Families in Focus webinar series, the Institute, in 2019/20, ably demonstrated the organisational capability required to ensure we can deliver high quality, impactful research.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 26

Table 3.4: Outcomes performance 2019/20

Measure and metric

Previous Actual Targets

18/19 19/20 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise

Number of e-News subscribers 24,137 28,982 ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Accessing publications (number of page views) 4.2M 3.4Ma ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Number of webinar attendees 8,930 11,447 ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Number of media citations 4,255 3,661 ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Number of media comments

Not

reported

107 ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Stakeholder feedback survey

Frequency of engagement - minimum monthly (new question) N/A 78% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Measure and metric

Prev Target Actual Targets

18/19 19/20 19/20 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise

Stakeholder feedback survey

Relevance

AIFS’ resources are easy to find 80% ≥80% 79% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

AIFS’ resources are accessible & easy to understand 89% ≥89% 86% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Whether used AIFS’ resources 74% ≥74% 86% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Case study 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Organisational capability enables AIFS to achieve impact

APS employee census scoresb

Staff engagement 77% ≥75% N/A ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Staff wellbeing 78% ≥75% N/A ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Innovation 72% ≥70% N/A c ≥18/19 TBD TBD TBD

Case study 0 1 2 1 1 1 1

Notes: a Prior to 2019/20, most AIFS publications spanned more than one webpage . To read a publication a user had to click through multiple pages . In 2019/20, to improve the user experience, publications were converted from a multi page to a single-page format . The resulting decline in page views is due to that conversion, not to fewer publications being viewed . b The APS Census is held in May each year . Due to COVID-19 it has been postponed to October, hence there are no data available for the 2019/20 actuals . c Innovation will not be asked in the next Employee Census .

Report on performance 27

Impacts

Impacts are what occur as a consequence of end users and stakeholders seeking out and using our research and resources. The identified consequences are:

ƒ better understanding among stakeholders of issues affecting families

ƒ improved capacity to use research

ƒ deeper insights about what works in policy and practice to support families.

Two sources are used to demonstrate AIFS’ impact: data from the Stakeholder Feedback Survey and the impact case studies (page 38).

Based on the survey results, there has been a significant increase across all metrics.

Better understanding among stakeholders about issues facing Australian families. Stakeholder responses indicate that a very high proportion (95%) agreed or strongly agreed that AIFS’ resources had helped them to know what was occurring in their field of work or expand their knowledge base.

Improved capacity of stakeholders to use research to inform policy and service design. Respondents to the survey indicated that AIFS’ research and resources had improved their capacity to use evidence to inform policy and service design:

ƒ 84% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that they incorporated AIFS’ resources into their work practice

ƒ 85% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that AIFS’ resources were used to help make evidence-based decisions.

Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families. We want AIFS’ research and resources to provide policy and service sectors with greater insight and understanding about how different policy and program decisions might impact on children and families. Stakeholder survey respondents were asked about the extent to which they agreed with the following: ‘AIFS’ resources are used to debate and discuss different options for action’ . Eighty-four per cent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with this statement.

The case studies provide greater detail about how AIFS’ research achieves these impacts.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 28

Table 3.5: Impact performance 2019/20

Measure and metric

Prev Target Actual Targets

18/19 19/20 19/20 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24

Better understanding among stakeholders about issues facing Australian families

Stakeholder feedback survey

AIFS’ resources expand my knowledge 72% ≥70% 95% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Impact case studies 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Improved capacity of stakeholders to use research to inform policy and service design

Stakeholder feedback survey

AIFS’ resources are incorporated into work practice 58% ≥55% 84% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

AIFS’ resources are used to make evidence-based decisions 60% ≥60% 85% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Impact case studies 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families

Stakeholder feedback survey

AIFS’ resources are used to debate and discuss different options for action 60% ≥60% 84% ≥19/20 TBD TBD TBD

Impact case studies 0 1 2 1 1 1 1

Report on performance 29

Performance against 2019/20 strategic initiatives

Four pillars organise the work we undertake to achieve our outcome. We:

ƒ create knowledge by generating high quality, impartial research relating to the wellbeing of families in Australia

ƒ communicate knowledge by disseminating research and resources through multiple channels to target audiences

ƒ connect and collaborate with policy, practice and research communities to strengthen capability and enable evidence-informed action that improves outcomes for children, families and their communities

ƒ activate our future sustainability by building an organisational culture of excellence, impact and effective operations and governance.

AIFS’ Strategic Directions set out four long-t erm goals in each of these pillars to be achieved in a five -y ear time frame. At the outset of each financial year, we identify shorter-term, priority initiatives designed to help achieve these goals. See Figure 3.4 (page 31) for the Strategic Directions and Initiatives implemented over 2019/20.

In 2019/20 we identified three key areas of strategic focus and corresponding initiatives:

1. Strengthen AIFS' ability to do impactful research and to report on our work in ways that better demonstrate our impact:

ƒ develop and implement an AIFS Knowledge Translation and Impact (KTI) Blueprint for adaptation across the organisation

ƒ develop and implement KTI strategies at research program and project levels

ƒ deliver capacity-building training to staff

ƒ plan and deliver the AIFS 2020 Conference.

2. Transition significant change initiatives from the previous year to business as usual:

ƒ transition TechOne shared finance services as the AIFS’ system for project budgeting and management accounting.

3. Plan for AIFS' future capability requirements to ensure we continue to create knowledge and communicate with impact:

ƒ review and refine AIFS' recruitment strategy

ƒ design and implement Learning and Development program

ƒ develop an Implementation Strategy for the upgrade of our website's content management system

ƒ upgrade AIFS Data Management Strategy for future capability requirements.

Through the project discovery and business case stages, we refine the scope and purpose of these initiatives. This can mean some alteration to the initiatives as they were originally envisaged. In addition, in the last six months of 2019/20 AIFS, like many other agencies, experienced significant disruption to our operations in the wake of both the summer bushfires and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maintaining operational effectiveness and project delivery in this context required considerable organisational effort as we pivoted to:

ƒ finding new ways of working collaboratively with colleagues, funders and project partners in a remote working landscape

ƒ maintaining, and indeed strengthening, our workplace culture in the absence of physically being at work

ƒ continuing to deliver high quality products and projects to funders

ƒ meeting the emerging needs of our end users and stakeholders as they too shifted their practice.

As detailed in our organisational case study on the Pivot to COVID-19, we have maintained, and in some cases strengthened, our organisational performance.

To ensure initiatives remain aligned to our higher-level goals while also being responsive to our changed internal and external operating environments, specific initiatives have been revised (but do not diverge significantly from the intended focus). See Figure 3.4 (page 31) for a description of these revised initiatives.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 30

Figure 3.4: AIFS’ Strategic Directions and 2019/20 Initiatives

OUR PURPOSE

To create and communicate knowledge that accelerates positive outcomes for children, families and their communities

PILLAR 01 PILLAR 02 PILLAR 03

CREATE

Research and advice in the design, implementation and evaluation of policy and practice

Resources and education for policy, practice, research and the public

Bringing policy makers, service providers and researchers together

COMMUNICATE COLLABORATE

PILLAR 04

ACTIVATE

Nurturing a culture of excellence, collegiality, courage, curiosity and humour. Sustainability as an independent Institute.

We are operationally e*cient and financially sustainable. We maintain a sustainable program of incoming research that enables AIFS to achieve our purpose. We are an organisation of choice for people who want to make a di*erence.

AIFS is recognised as the premier research organisation investigating factors a*ecting the wellbeing of children and families.

Government and non-government sectors engage us to undertake research and provide advice that informs policy, practice and program development.

AIFS is the leading source of accessible, timely and relevant resources to support the work of policy and practice and to inform the broader community.

Our resources are used to inform national discussions about family and wellbeing.

AIFS are recognised thought leaders in accelerating positive outcomes for families and communities.

We influence national conversations about family and wellbeing.

KTI Lab concept development and structure

Plan and deliver AIFS 2020 Conference.

Develop an Implementation Strategy for the upgrade of AIFS’ content management system.

Implement Knowledge Translation and Impact (KTI) strategies at the Research Program and Project level

Develop a collaborative relationship with La Trobe University.

Review of Performance and Development program Review and refine AIFS’ recruitment strategy Transition to TechOne shared finance services to business as usual practice Upgrade AIFS Data Management Strategy for future capability requirements

GOALS

19/20

initiatives

GOALS

19/20

initiatives

Report on performance 31

Pillar 1: Create knowledge

A key function of the Institute is to create knowledge and contribute to the broader evidence base on the factors affecting families. In 2019/20, we undertook 31 research and evaluation projects. The strategic initiatives under Pillar 1 aimed to enhance the impact of this research for the policy and practice communities we serve. Three key initiatives were implemented:

ƒ development of Knowledge Translation and Impact (KTI) strategies at the Research and Program levels

ƒ development of collaborative research relationships with La Trobe University

ƒ instigation of the Families in Australia Survey program.

The implementation of KTI strategies at the research program level was identified as a key initiative at the outset of 2019/20. This initiative aimed to cascade KTI learnings developed through CFCA to the research work of the Institute overall.

In addition to this, we commenced discussions with La Trobe University as part of a longer-t erm

strategy to harness shared interests and complementary strengths in the areas of family wellbeing, and to maximise the data assets of each institution. By the end of 2019/20, plans were in place to hold a round table on potential research and funding opportunities, with a particular focus on the impact of COVID-19 on families. This will form the basis of collaborations in 2020/21 and beyond.

Finally, as the implications of COVID-19 on the Australian economy and daily life started to become apparent in February and March, the Institute rapidly pivoted to the question of how Australian families were faring. We developed an online survey to capture, in real time, the challenges families of all kinds were experiencing. Plans are now in place for subsequent waves of data collection (see the case study on the Families in Australia Survey).

Table 3.6 highlights progress against the initiatives in Pillar 1 of our Strategic Directions relating to creating knowledge in our Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Table 3.6: Pillar 1 initiatives

Initiative Purpose Desired outcomes Achievements

Implement KTI strategies at the Research and Program levels

ƒ Integrate KTI principles into research projects

ƒ Build researcher capabilities in KTI concepts and methods

ƒ Clear understanding of how projects achieve impact

ƒ Implement strategies to achieve this

ƒ Demonstrate AIFS’ leadership in impactful research

ƒ Developed impact strategies and narratives for each research stream

ƒ Showcased impact narratives to broader organisation

Develop collaborative relationships with La Trobe University

ƒ Identify and explore key areas of mutual interest

ƒ Leverage shared data, skills and capabilities

ƒ Identified avenues of collaborative research and funding opportunities

ƒ Collaboration working group established

ƒ Working group met four times August-June 2020

ƒ Plans for a research round table in place by end June

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 32

Initiative Purpose Desired outcomes Achievements

Instigate Families in Australia Survey (COVID-19)

ƒ Understand the diverse impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families and how they adjusted

ƒ Giving families a platform to share their experiences of the pandemic

ƒ Provide insights about families experiences of the pandemic and what was negatively and positively impact on their wellbeing for policy makers and practitioners

ƒ Document the lived experience of the pandemic for families, providing context for future research around longer term outcomes and impacts

ƒ Survey developed and launched between May and June

ƒ Preliminary analysis completed

ƒ Webinar to share preliminary findings confirmed

Pillar 2: Communicate for impact

A second key function of the Institute is to share and communicate research to our stakeholders in policy and practice communities, and to the general community, with the aim of providing accessible, relevant and timely high quality information. We use our capabilities in strategic communication and knowledge translation to:

ƒ publish accessible research reports and resources

ƒ produce webinars as a key platform to share research and practice evidence with stakeholders across Australia

ƒ deliver AIFS’ biennial conference and other events.

Two priority initiatives were identified for delivery in 2019/20:

ƒ the AIFS 2020 Conference

ƒ an implementation strategy for the upgrade of our content management system.

The purpose of the AIFS Conference - which was to also coincide with AIFS’ 40th Anniversary - was to share knowledge and build cross-sector capability to accelerate positive change in family policy and service systems.

In January 2020, we were on track to deliver this. However, as the restrictions resulting from COVID-19 impacted Australia, it became clear that hosting the AIFS conference in June 2020 would not be possible. Rather than lose the planning already invested, and still wanting to have a platform for knowledge sharing, we have explored the option of shifting the conference to June 2021, and in its place ran a Families in Focus webinar series with selected keynote speakers. The webinars delved into key family safety and wellbeing issues impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. Five webinars were held in June.

Table 3.7 (page 34) highlights progress against our actions for Pillar 2 of our Strategic Directions, relating to communicating for impact in our Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Report on performance 33

Table 3.7: Pillar 2 initiatives

Initiative Purpose Desired outcomes Achievements

Families in Focus webinar series (replaced AIFS Conference 2020)

ƒ Make some of the conference content available to our stakeholders

ƒ Conference speakers contextualised their keynote topic in relation to COVID-19

ƒ Access to knowledge for policy makers, practitioners and researchers

ƒ Capacity building

ƒ Inform national discussions about family wellbeing

ƒ Six webinars attracted over 1,974 participants

ƒ 91% of participants rated the quality of the webinars as ‘very good or excellent’

ƒ 78% of participants said the webinars added to their knowledge base (webinars either ‘met’ or ‘exceeded’ their expectations)

Strategy for the upgrade of our websites’ content management system (CMS)

ƒ Develop a business case and roadmap for the migration of our websites to a new CMS

ƒ Develop a plan for ongoing hosting, support and management of our websites

ƒ Our online content is accessible and easy to find.

ƒ Our online content meets our users’ needs.

ƒ Our CMS supports our websites securely and effectively.

ƒ Management of our websites is secure and financially sustainable

ƒ Approached market to determine requirements for a new CMS, hosting and support

ƒ Successfully determined CMS, hosting and support requirements

Pillar 3: Collaborate and connect

In addition to creating and communicating knowledge, the Institute also aims to:

ƒ bring policy makers, service providers and researchers together in dialogue to share knowledge, insight and new directions on the issues facing families and what works to support them

ƒ support stakeholders in policy and practice in their work.

Strategic initiatives for 2019/20 focused on strengthening our ability to support stakeholders close the evidence to practice gap.

Based on the Project Discovery and Business Case testing stages, we chose to integrate several smaller, related initiatives into one: a Knowledge Translation and Impact Lab that will work across the Institute. The Lab aims to build the capability of AIFS’ research teams to create and communicate knowledge to accelerate positive outcomes for families. It will also test innovative ideas about how to better translate our knowledge.

Table 3.8 (page 35) highlights progress against our actions for Pillar 3 of our Strategic Directions relating to collaboration in our Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 34

Table 3.8: Pillar 3 initiatives

Initiative Purpose Desired outcomes Achievements

KTI Lab ƒ Build internal capability

to translate research for maximum impact with our stakeholders

ƒ Innovate and test research engagement strategies

ƒ External capability building of sectors/ organisations KTI skills

ƒ Increased knowledge, skills and confidence of staff in KTI

ƒ KTI is an organisation-wide capability

ƒ AIFS’ profile as leaders in KTI is increased

ƒ Development of a KTI Blueprint

ƒ Creation of resources to improve the skills of AIFS’ staff

ƒ Coaching and advice provided to researchers on applying KT strategies to projects for impact

Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability

Pillar 4 is focused on ensuring that our organisational practices, processes, capabilities and culture are calibrated to support our work and sustainability as an independent research institute. The goals under this pillar are that:

ƒ We are operationally efficient and financially sustainable.

ƒ We maintain a sustainable program of incoming research that enables AIFS to achieve our purpose.

ƒ We are an organisation of choice for people who want to make a difference.

Since the commencement of AIFS’ Strategic Directions in 2016, significant initiatives have been implemented with the aim of achieving these goals, namely:

ƒ the co-design of AIFS Values by staff

ƒ the co-design of our new work premises

ƒ continuous improvement in our IMT capabilities to support flexible and remote working

ƒ continuous improvement in general business processes to maximise efficiency.

The positive impact of these efforts have been demonstrated in our APS census results each year. In 2019/20, we further built on these successes by:

ƒ reviewing our performance and development program

ƒ reviewing AIFS' recruitment strategy

ƒ transitioning TechOne shared finance services to business as usual practice

ƒ commencing work on AIFS' Data Management Strategy for future capability requirements.

These has been implemented against the backdrop of shifting the entire agency to remote working.

Table 3.9 (page 36) highlights progress against our objectives and actions for Pillar 4 of our Strategic Directions relating to activation in our Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Report on performance 35

Table 3.9: Pillar 4 initiatives

Initiative Purpose Desired outcomes Achievements

Within Enterprise Agreement framework redesign performance and development program

To develop a program that:

ƒ staff engage with and find meaningful

ƒ uses performance and development program as a vehicle to strengthen people management

ƒ Better compliance

ƒ More useful agreements

ƒ Better understanding of development needs

ƒ Better recognition/reward as part of process

ƒ Better articulation with values, behaviours, wellbeing

ƒ Closer links to Strategic Directions

ƒ Better ‘management’ conversations

ƒ Co-design conducted and tested with a broad cross-section of staff

ƒ Unique program developed with launch in early 2020/21

Recruitment process review

ƒ Strengthen the process

ƒ Update our brand to applicant

ƒ Modern and culture-appropriate process

ƒ Good staffing decisions

ƒ Implementation strategy developed

Data Management Strategy ƒ Implement a clear, agreed approach to managing

data assets by developing set standards and tools in handling the creation, storage, management and processing of all data assets

ƒ Strengthened capability as a data-driven organisation

ƒ Strengthen AIFS’ position as trusted leaders in governing and managing data assets

ƒ An integrated, seamless and user-friendly data environment to support effective management of AIFS’ functions

ƒ Data Governance working group established and are progressing this work

ƒ Delays due to COVID-19 mean this will be finalised in 2020/21

TechOne to BAU ƒ To streamline business processes more efficiently ƒ Having a single source of truth regarding financial

information for current and future years

ƒ When no longer require Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources (DISER) implementation support

ƒ All major transition issues have been resolved, including additional training for Finance staff and updated documentation

ƒ System improvements including greater reporting capability will be progressed as BAU activities

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 36

© GettyImages/g-stockstudio

Report on performance 37

Impact case studies

Elder Abuse Research Program 9 End users find AIFS’ research relevant to their work

9 Better understanding among stakeholders of the issues facing families

The issue to be addressed

There has been an increased focus on the problems of family violence and child abuse, and growing recognition that similar problems face our elderly citizens. However, there has been limited investigation into elder abuse. There is no clear understanding of the extent of elder abuse in Australia or the frameworks and responses available to address it.

Elder abuse is an important policy concern for the Attorney-General’s Department (AGD), who are working to address these knowledge gaps.

The research program

In 2015/16 we were asked by the AGD to scope the current issues, frameworks and responses to elder abuse in Australia. This piece of work helped to inform the Terms of Reference for the Australian Law Reform Commission’s (ALRC) inquiry into Commonwealth laws and legal frameworks, and how they might better protect older people from misuse or abuse as well as safeguard their autonomy. The inquiry recommended undertaking a national prevalence study on the nature and extent of elder abuse in Australia.

AIFS, leading a consortium of key organisations, was engaged to complete the groundwork for this study, developing the definitions and measures that would form the basis of the research: Elder Abuse National Research: Strengthening the Evidence Base - Stage One. This was done in consultation with relevant organisations and communities.

AIFS was then commissioned to lead the prevalence study into elder abuse. The National Prevalence Study is the first large-scale effort

to assess the nature and extent of elder abuse among those in the Australian population aged 65 and over. AIFS ran two surveys:

• a survey of 7,000 people aged 65 and over who are living in the community (i.e. those who are not in residential aged care settings) to examine experiences of elder abuse

• a survey of 3,400 people aged 18-64 years focused on the knowledge of elder abuse, attitudes to older people and the extent to which participants in the survey provide assistance to older people.

Data collection has now been completed.

Benefits and impacts

As mentioned above, the 2015/16 scoping report helped inform the ALRC inquiry’s Terms of Reference.

In addition, stakeholders have told us that the report has been extremely useful to them. It provides an accessible snapshot of the state of evidence at this time. We understand that the report is being used to communicate the size of the problem, the characteristics of perpetrators and the factors involved. The report also helps to communicate why the prevalence study is important.

The impact of the prevalence study, while not yet fully realised, will be significant. While various types of studies have been undertaken internationally, ours is a larger sample than most - in terms of older people AND in the general community component. The two-pronged approach is unique - investigating both prevalence and understanding. It will provide nuanced insight into the extent and dynamics of elder abuse as well as community

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 38

© GettyImages/Peter Carruthers

understandings of this abuse. Understanding community attitudes is critical to informing prevention strategies.

People over 60 will be the ultimate beneficiaries of the evidence generated through this research. The evidence will help to better identify elder abuse, identify ways to support victims and identify paths to prevention. Those delivering services and supporting people in the 60+ age bracket are also major beneficiaries of this research. With a better understanding of elder abuse, these providers will be better equipped to identify it in the course of their work.

Next steps

A report will be released to stakeholders and AIFS will work with them to help them to understand the issue and the impacts/ implications for their activities. The report could also help to inform new policy in this area.

Report on performance 39

Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 The Families in Australia Survey is our flagship survey series. The first survey in the series was Life during COVID-1 9.

9 End users find AIFS’ research relevant to their work

9 Improved capacity of stakeholders to use research to inform policy and service design

The issue to be addressed

This survey was the result of long reflection about how we (AIFS) engage with families. AIFS undertakes so much research and has so much data but we haven’t had a direct mechanism to hear from families outside the terms of specific research projects. We needed to refocus our efforts to align with the key concerns of our main stakeholders: Australian families.

Conversations on how best to directly engage with families were happening pre-COVID-19 but the pandemic provided the impetus to translate these conversations into action.

The research

The Life during COVID-1 9 survey ran from 1 May to 9 June 2020 and had 7,306 participants. Our aim was to understand how Australian families coped with the COVID-19 pandemic. It asked families how they had:

• adjusted to the pandemic, and the restrictions and programs that were put in place

• experienced the social and economic impacts of the pandemic

• supported each other, even when they didn't, or couldn't, live together

• protected their physical and mental health.

We wanted to capture what family life looked like at this time and how families were looking after each other across households and generations.

The survey provides a more global review of family experience than our other surveys. It was open to any person over 18, living in Australia. We wanted to use this survey as a platform to

promote our message that ‘YOU’ define what constitutes a family. We can’t pick that up from our other research projects. Data threads can be brought together but it’s not a direct insight.

Although a different kind of survey, it is still rigorous. The size of responses gives us opportunities to use the data differently than in our other studies.

We often look at the more extraordinary aspects of life (the stressful aspects). This survey provides insights into the everyday rhythms of life, and that brings important information to the conversation.

Benefits and impacts

These data provide multiple perspectives of people and families beyond the anecdotal. The rapid process gives us a sense of the now (in contrast to our longitudinal studies and the slow data release through these processes).

This survey has contributed to documenting the experience of people in the first wave of the pandemic. AIFS has released a series of quick short reports to get the findings out and into current conversations about the pandemic. In future we will release more in-depth papers.

AIFS is currently the key user. Our collection and use of these data will inform our conversations with governments and communities. We see this survey as a foundation for our connection with families. Helping families to tell us what their experiences and priorities are. How are families faring in their main activities (raising kids, caring, etc.)? And we want to keep listening to families to get a dynamic view of their experience.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 40

© GettyImages/andresr

Next steps

This survey gave us contemporary information on pertinent issues. If we continue to engage with the right people and groups, and learn from the data we’re collecting, we can remain current and identify emerging issues alongside our longer-term insights.

AIFS is committed to investing in this project for the next 12 months, which will include two more waves. We’re planning to transition the project from its beginnings, with a strong COVID-19 focus, to a more general measure of family experiences. We want to provide valuable and rigorous work but also a timely voice.

Report on performance 41

Scoping for future capacity-building activities 9 End users find AIFS’ research relevant to their work

9 Improved capability and capacity of stakeholders and audience to use research to inform policy and service design

The issue to be addressed

We identified that AIFS, through a review of the CFCA and Expert Panel projects, was reaching a significant number of professionals in the child, family and welfare sector but not maximising the potential of this reach. The question then was, could we do more in how we delivered these projects to have greater impact on our stakeholders and audience?

Knowledge translation requires insight into the needs of end users and how they will use evidence in their decision making and practice. We wanted to create a platform that provided a value proposition for the end user, by combining the production of research with the capacity-bu ilding function for evidence-informed decision making.

The research

The aim of the scoping study was to:

• understand how our stakeholders and audience are using AIFS’ research and resources in their practice

• identify how our research and resources could improve users’ evidence-based decision making.

The study used human-centred design, to allow us to put the user at the centre of the service to understand their issues and experiences. We asked our users: What value do you put on evidence and how do you see that evidence being used in your work?

Benefits and impacts

This work enabled us to better understand the sector; and equipped us to better engage with our stakeholders. It has taught us to be cautious of making assumptions about the needs and preferred solutions for how our stakeholders and audiences engage with our research and products - we cannot design a service purely from the inside out. It has also improved our relationship with our funder, the Department of Social Services, to create a shared vision for these projects.

Next steps

The learnings from this work have been used to inform our approach of knowledge translation at AIFS. As a project team, we put a spotlight on each of our products and examined how they could be improved. From this, we developed a work plan to innovate these services using the insights from this study, especially in response to changes required during COVID-19.

We have:

• upgraded and innovated the content and design of our products (webinars, publications and newsletter)

• improved our impact metrics and the way we collect them to obtain ongoing insight about the needs of our (approx. 27,000 subscriber) audience

• created a new consultation and reporting mechanism focused on impact and continuous improvement.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 42

© GettyImages/AJ_Watt

Report on performance 43

Families in Focus webinar series: June 2020 9 Platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration

9 End users seek out AIFS research, resources and expertise

What was the situation?

The AIFS 2020 Conference was scheduled to take place between 9 and 12 June 2020. It regularly attracts more than 500 delegates. The biennial conference brings together the collective expertise of policy makers, researchers, and service providers across a range of sectors to connect them to the latest knowledge and insights about families. The coronavirus pandemic hit three months prior to the conference, and the subsequent ban on mass gatherings meant that the conference was postponed until June 2021.

What did we do to respond?

At very short notice we staged a series of webinars across the month of June. The rationale for the series was to invite high profile presenters who would have been presenting at the AIFS conference. Each presenter was invited to participate in a webinar on the topic they had nominated but to contextualise it in relation to COVID-19.

This enabled us to deliver on our promise of providing access to research and expertise, for the benefit of people who work in the interests of families, across a variety of sectors and professions.

What’s been the result? What’s been achieved and what’s been the benefit?

Six webinars were held in the series, free of charge. Five of the webinars took place in June 2020, with the final webinar scheduled on 2 July 2020.

• The six webinars attracted a total of 1,974 participants

• 91% of participants rated the quality of the webinars as ‘very good or excellent’.

• 78% of participants said the webinars added to their knowledge base (webinars either ‘met’ or ‘exceeded’ their expectations).

10 June: What will it take for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to live vibrant, joyful lives?

Presenter: Richard Weston, CEO, SNAICC - National Voice for our Children

‘Richard spoke the truth regarding some of our issues. I especially liked that he pointed out that our Indigenous Australians can come up with our own initiatives to assist our mob, rather than having to follow what other countries like NZ have done.’

16 June: Progressing New Zealand’s Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy in a COVID-19 context

Presenter: Maree Brown, Director Child Wellbeing Unit, New Zealand Department of the Prime Minister & Cabinet

‘It's wonderful to see such a holistic, child-and-youth-centred wellbeing strategy developed and endorsed at the system level, to help enhance wellbeing for children and young people across the country.’

23 June: How young people are experiencing the social and economic impacts of COVID-19

Panel: Katherine Ellis, CEO YACVic with youth members of YACVic Annika McCaffrey and Fadak Alfayadh

‘Well convened; good pace; practical ideas and policy discussed; excellent.’

25 June: COVID-19 and its impact on the family violence legal and service system

Presenter: Angela Lynch AM, Chief Executive Officer, Women’s Legal Aid

‘Very informative, I will be downloading the slides of the presentation and sharing with work colleagues.’

30 June: A new early childhood system for Australia

Presenter: Jay Weatherill, CEO, Thrive by Five, Minderoo Foundation

‘This was fantastic and I think we need to have continual updates and ways to get seriously involved.’

2 July: Findings from the Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19

Presenter: Kelly Hand, Deputy Director (Research), AIFS

‘Thank you for a fantastic webinar and presentation of findings that have helped me to crystallise what families may be experiencing during this difficult time.’

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 44

© GettyImages/Neil Bussey

What are the next steps? What will AIFS do to maintain or keep building on the achievements?

Considerable uncertainty remains about what the pandemic will mean for travel and gatherings over the next year, and what this may mean for our rescheduled conference. This webinar series has allowed us to test a different delivery method from our traditional face-to-face conference format. It may lead to us implementing a ‘virtual’ option for our conference to expand access to our content, or supplementing smaller face-t o-f ace events with virtual events to allow us to provide platforms for sharing knowledge in a COVID-safe manner.

Report on performance 45

Organisational case studies

Pivot to COVID-19: The agency-wide transition to remote working 9 An organisational culture that enables AIFS to achieve impact

What was the situation?

Like many organisations, the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020 had AIFS’ leadership and business continuity planning committee assessing the prospect of and planning for remote working arrangements. Foremost in our minds was the wellbeing of staff and continuity of our work.

This happened rapidly. The time from recognising the need to act to actual implementation was around 7-10 days. Social distancing was directed on 3 March. By 17 March staff were advised to remain at home. Since then, AIFS’ operations have continued from remote locations.

In the lead up to the transition, there were a number of things we needed to balance, in particular the balance between preparation and taking action, and not overreacting. The accelerated pace of events meant limited time to brief individual managers. Directives had to be clear and communicated well.

Since then, the specific issues we’ve faced have shifted over time. The initial focus was logistic - can we actually do this? Then, consideration turned to what has been impacted? Next, we focused on how staff were managing to conduct their work - did they have the equipment they needed; support they required from managers; clear and frequent communication? At all times staff wellbeing underpinned our approach. In this new environment, with new demands and expectations, how were our staff actually coping?

What did we do to respond?

The key actions taken included, in order:

• ensuring and testing all staff contact details and remote access to our IT systems

• cancelling non-essential travel

• preparing staff to be able to work from home at short notice

• requiring physical distancing in the office

• mandating all staff other than critical operations work from home

• introducing daily Executive meetings to monitor the situation

• creating detailed guidance for working from home

• introducing ongoing COVID-related communications, check ins, manager forums and other mechanisms to ensure clear, consistent communication and information sharing.

AIFS Business Continuity Plan enabled us to act quickly and confidently. It is a comprehensive plan and we conduct regular scenario testing. While we hadn’t specifically tested for a global pandemic, we had run two scenarios in the previous 12 months of our office space not being available, so we knew what actions to take. All of our IT systems and communications arrangements had previously been tested, including the automated notification system. Our normal channels of communication remain functional but, had they not been available, we would have had the Plan to fall back on.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 46

© GettyImages/Maryna Andriichenko

What’s been the result? What’s been achieved and what’s been the benefit?

The transition to working remotely has been relatively smooth and productivity levels remain high. We have managed the logistics around conducting our research and meeting contractual obligations; we even initiated and implemented our own research with the COVID-19 survey. Since the pandemic started to impact AIFS’ working environment, we have:

• successfully transitioned our work environment to 100% working from home

• increased the frequency of Executive meetings and expanded the size of the Executive team to include the HR Manager and CFO

• increased the frequency of communications with staff.

One activity we did do differently was to include key management in Executive decision making. This is a reflection of our value system and of the investment we have made in nurturing our organisational culture. Our change management practice is a shared responsibility and this experience is reflective of that.

What are the next steps? What will AIFS do to maintain or keep building on the achievements?

We have learned as a collective to embrace this new world. We know that going forward we can facilitate safe and productive work in a remote capacity. We can see how we might balance our work and personal lives differently and we recognise that working from home will be a normal everyday thing for AIFS. We are making the most of this experience and viewing it as a positive change management exercise.

We have shown we are able to transition and maintain productivity at home and meet our commitments.

Report on performance 47

Transforming culture at AIFS 9 An organisational culture that enables AIFS to achieve impact

What was the situation?

We had to transform our culture and the way we work in order to achieve our strategic objectives. The problems we were trying to solve included:

• financial problems, which had led to sudden and unexpected staff cuts in mid-2015

• declining value of research contracts and increasing competition for work

• poor staff morale as demonstrated by our APS Employee Census results in 2015 and 2016

• distrust and lack of confidence in management

• poor management skills and practices

• a lack of collaboration between teams meaning the strengths across the Institute weren’t being readily harnessed

• a ‘gap’ between the researchers and the corporate staff often described as ‘us and them’

• our premises were costing us too much money.

Negative elements of the culture were constraining creativity and innovation, as well as hampering efforts to improve organisational sustainability. A new strategic plan had been developed in 2016, but we needed a transformation in culture and capabilities to implement the new strategy.

The strengths of the organisation included its longstanding reputation for research excellence and earlier experiences of collegiality among staff when the Institute was smaller in size. It was agreed by senior managers that a new approach was required in order to build on these strengths to fulfil the potential of the Institute to achieve its organisational purpose.

What did we do to respond?

We engaged our own staff in co-design processes to create values and behaviours reflecting the culture we aspired to. We also used these principles to involve staff in the design of our new premises. We saw an opportunity for the premises to embody our values. We used a skilled external facilitator at key points in the process. The project was divided into three components:

1. Defining our values and behaviours

• We conducted a staff survey and three initial co-design workshops with staff using creative activities to draw out input from staff.

• A cross-functional team workshop was held to review major themes from the survey and co-d esign and articulate a clear and concise set of core values.

• A graphic artist recorded the conversations and insights from the workshops, culminating in the final artwork for our values.

• An interactive launch event was held to ‘reveal’ the values and discuss putting the values into action.

2. Co-designing our new workplace

We asked staff about their current experiences of working in the existing AIFS premises. We also ran a couple of exercises to create a vision for our workplace. We asked staff to envision what their typical day could look like in the new office. Another exercise asked staff to unleash their imaginations and come up with a ‘wish list’ for the new office.

Staff worked in cross-functional groups to create prototypes of their vision using a variety of craft materials such as plasticine, cardboard, pipe-c leaners, etc. The models were displayed in a ‘gallery’ for all staff to browse for the next couple of months.

These workshops helped identify common themes and perspectives, which were compiled into a report to formally brief our interior design agency and project team. Flexible work zones, collaboration, connection, wellbeing, breaking down internal silos and ‘bringing nature inside’ were major themes.

A whole-of-Institute meeting was held at which the facilitator shared from the co-design workshops: ‘this is what we heard you say’. The interior designer explained the fit-out plan: ‘this is what we created from your ideas’.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 48

3. Change management and communication

We established ‘AIFS Explorer’, a fortnightly e-news bulletin, centralising all communication about the move, organisational culture and change initiatives. Prior to this, internal communication was sporadic and not centrally managed.

We developed a calendar of events leading up to the move: a series of clean-up days followed by pizza lunches; progress pictures of the fit -o ut; site visits; and orientation walks to help familiarise staff with the new location.

We created an online collaboration space where we posted answers to staff questions and key documents so staff could keep up-to-date with developments. We also set up a ‘Relocation Working Group’ with representation across all teams to ensure the flow of information between staff and the project Steering Committee.

A celebration was held one month after moving in to acknowledge the cross-team collaboration and hard work of all staff in the relocation

What’s been the result? What’s been achieved and what’s been the benefit?

Operational improvements

• The average research contract duration has increased 32.5% in the period 2016 to 2018.

• The average size of contracts in dollar terms has increased by 42.2% over the same period.

• Our move to new premises in February 2018 achieved an annual leasing cost reduction of 21.5%.

• No Comcare claims (after a poor history of these) despite some challenging workplace issues needing to be addressed.

Improvement in APS Employee Census results 2018

• In 2018, AIFS was ranked in the top 10 of 100 organisations in the APS for wellbeing, engagement and innovation; 6th for Wellbeing; 8th for Engagement; and 10th for Innovation.

• In 2019, although the rankings dropped slightly, the overall scores against these measures were almost identical.

• In other positive signs from our Census data, staff perceptions of our senior executive leaders are high - 73% say their SES effectively leads and manages change (up 23 points from 2017) and 66% say communication between SES and other employees is effective (up by 29 points).

• Ninety per cent of staff now say internal communication is regular (up by 47 points).

• Our change management has improved significantly - 71% of staff say they are consulted about change at work (up by 28 points) and 68% of staff say change is managed well (up by 39 points).

Finalist in the IPAA Public Sector Innovation awards

• AIFS was a finalist in the Culture and Capability category of the IPAA Public Sector Innovation Awards in 2019.

What are the next steps? What will AIFS do to maintain or keep building on the achievements?

An ongoing challenge is that shaping the culture through our values and behaviour never ends. We need to consistently reflect on our behaviour and actions through the filter of our values and have the courage to challenge each other if we slip into old patterns of thinking and acting.

One of our values is ‘honest and respectful conversations’. Staff have said they appreciate that being able to have difficult conversations is essential - but that they sometimes lack the confidence and skills in this area. We are implementing development programs for staff and managers to build this capability. We are also refreshing our performance development and review system - so that there is a stronger connection between the individual, the manager, our organisational purpose and the values that underpin it.

One of our ongoing challenges is balancing our dependency on contract funding with promoting a culture where taking risks is permissible, and being clear about what level of risk is acceptable. Our appetite for risk and the processes for managing risk are maturing. This helps to facilitate a culture where people feel supported to take risks and empowered to innovate.

Report on performance 49

Report on performance - financial activities

Operating results

In accordance with the Australian Government net cash appropriation arrangements, AIFS incurred a deficit of $1,488,329. This deficit is primarily due to depreciation and amortisation expenses, the impacts of COVID-19 and the adverse impact of movements in employee provisions due to discount factors.

Without depreciation and amortisation of $920,930, AIFS would have reported a deficit of $567,399.

AIFS has received approval to run an operating deficit of $590,000 due to the impact of COVID-19 and employee provisions.

See Table 3.10 (page 51) for a summary of budgeted and actual expenses for 2019/20.

Operating revenue

The total operating revenue was $14,520,526 and consisted of the following:

ƒ government appropriations of $4,452,000

ƒ sale of goods and rendering of services of $9,984,711

ƒ other revenue of $83,815.

Operating expenses

Total operating expenses were $16,008,855 and consisted of:

ƒ employee benefits of $10,240,264

ƒ supplier expenses of $4,843,262

ƒ depreciation and amortisation of $920,930

ƒ loss on sale of assets of $4,399.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 50

Table 3.10: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2019/20, and budgeted expenses, 2020/21

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget 2019/20 $’000

Actual 2019/20 $’000

Variation (column 2 - column 1) $’000

Budget 2020/21 $’000

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 15,396 15,055 341 15,588

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 564 954 (390) 601

Total for Program 1.1 15,960 16,009 (49) 16,189

Outcome 1 totals by appropriation type

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 15,396 15,055 341 15,588

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 564 954 (390) 601

Total expenses for Outcome 1 15,960 16,009 (49) 16,189

2019/20 2019/20 2019/20 2020/21

Average staffing level 1 82 84 (2) 82

Note: 1 . T he headcount and average staffing level are not the same measure . The headcount is the total number of employees at 30 June 2020 . The average staffing level is an average over the financial year .

Balance sheet

Net asset position

The net asset position at 30 June 2020 was $1,485,609 (2019: $2,254,938).

Total assets

Total assets at 30 June 2020 were $15,651,889 (2019: $13,251,596). Financial assets declined by $1,702,119 mainly due to improved payment terms by trade debtors. Non-financial assets have increased by $4,102,413 primarily due to the introduction of AASB 16, which has resulted in recognition of right of use assets (leases) for the first time.

Total liabilities

Total liabilities at 30 June 2020 were $14,166,280 (2019: $10,996,658). Liabilities increased by $3,169,622, which was primarily due to the introduction of AASB 16 resulting in the addition of the right of use liability (leases) for the first time.

Report on performance 51

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 52

Four —

Management and accountability

Management and accountability 53

Management and accountability

Management accountability is achieved with the support of the Corporate Services area of the Institute.

Corporate Services provides a range of enabling functions to assist us to meet our goals, through the ongoing improvement and application of financial, administrative, human resources, communications and information management and technology policies and practices.

Accountability is met through our internal management committee, advisory and governance committees, staff and management committees, including the Senior Leadership Group, robust reporting processes, internal and external audits, the Business Continuity Plan and policies and guidelines under the Protective Security Policy Framework.

Corporate governance

We operate under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). The corporate focus throughout 2019/20 was the effective maintenance of high standards of governance, accountability and reporting in order to fulfil all PGPA requirements and build organisational capacity to achieve our research and communication objectives. This corporate oversight is conducted through senior management committees (detailed below).

The Family Law Act 1975 sets out our role, functions and governance arrangements. During 2019/20, the responsible minister for AIFS was Senator the Hon Anne Ruston.

Fraud control

During the financial year 2019/20, no fraud was identified. The next fraud risk assessment is scheduled to be conducted in 2020/21.

Annual Report 2019/20 Fraud Control Certification

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I, Anne Hollonds, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies, hereby certify that I am satisfied that the Institute has:

ƒ undertaken a fraud risk assessment and updated the fraud control plan

ƒ put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and reporting mechanisms that meet the specific needs of the Institute

ƒ taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the Institute.

Anne Hollonds, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies 07 September 2020

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 54

Senior executive members

Ms Anne Hollonds is the Director of the Institute reporting to the Minister for Families and Social Services. Two Deputy Directors assist the Director in leading and managing AIFS. Dr Michael Alexander has been the Deputy Director (Corporate Services) since January 2016. Ms Kelly Hand has been the Deputy Director (Research) since February 2017.

Senior management groups

The Director has overall responsibility for the leadership and management of the Institute. A number of groups are in place to support this function.

Executive Group

The Executive Group leads and coordinates all aspects of the research and corporate functions of the Institute. It comprises the Director and the two Deputy Directors.

Senior Leadership Group

The Senior Leadership Group comprises the Executive and Senior Managers from the corporate and research areas. The group is a strategic leadership forum providing advice to the Director and Deputy Directors.

Governance committees and advisory groups

We support sound management of our accountability and ethical and legislative responsibilities through the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, and the Human Research Ethics Committee. We also have numerous research advisory groups providing advice on the research projects.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee

The Risk Assessment and Audit Committee reports to the Director and plays a key role in our corporate governance. It helps ensure effective and efficient use of resources by reviewing the performance and operations of internal controls and performance management systems. It

approves our internal audit program and advises the Director on risk, fraud, compliance and performance. It also provides assurance to the Director on preparing and reviewing financial statements. An external member chairs the committee. Membership includes the two Deputy Directors and three independent members external to the Institute.

The committee met four times during 2019/20, addressing a range of issues including the review of budgets. Dennis Mihelyi attended four meetings; Matthew Zappulla attended three meetings; Heather Hausler attended four meetings; Michael Alexander attended four meetings; and Kelly Hand attended two meetings.

Dennis Mihelyi is the only paid committee member. He received $3,314 in 2019/20.

The charter determining the function of the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee is available at: aifs.gov.au/risk-assessment-and-audit-committee

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee members, 2019/20

ƒ Dennis Mihelyi (Chair), Chief Financial Officer, Australian Building and Construction Commission

ƒ Brian Scammell (Member), Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Group, Productivity Commission (September 2019, then retired)

ƒ Heather Hausler (Member), General Manager, Corporate Operations Transport Certification Australia (December 2019, March and June 2020)

ƒ Matthew Zappulla (Member), Technical Director, Auditing and Assurance Standards Board

ƒ Kelly Hand (Member), Deputy Director (Research), AIFS

ƒ Dr Michael Alexander (Member), Deputy Director (Corporate Services), AIFS

ƒ Anne Hollonds (Observer), Director, AIFS

ƒ Malcolm Williamson (Observer), Chief Financial Officer, AIFS (September 2019, December 2019 and March 2020)

ƒ John Stamoulis (Observer), Chief Financial Officer, AIFS (June 2020)

Management and accountability 55

Human Research Ethics Committee

The role of our Human Research Ethics Committee is to ensure the ethical standards outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and elaborated in our ethics statement, Ethical Issues in the Research Process (1996), are met in all research projects undertaken by us.

In particular, the committee must ensure projects meet the three key principles of: respect for persons, beneficence and justice, as set down in the National Statement. The committee is registered with the Australian Health Ethics Committee, a subcommittee of the National Health and Medical Research Council.

The Ethics Committee meets to consider new project proposals, receive brief oral and written reports on ongoing projects, consider any complaints or problems that may have arisen regarding ethical issues in our research, and review the complaints procedures, as required.

The committee met five times in 2019/20 and undertook expedited considerations on six occasions, assessing 20 ethics applications for new, revised or extended research projects. The committee has an expedited review process in place for projects that need approval between meetings of the committee.

Members of the Ethics Committee are appointed for three-year terms, with the exception of one member who has sought an extension of their appointment for a shorter term.

Human Research Ethics Committee members, 2019/20

ƒ Dr Duncan Ironmonger AM (Chair), BCom, MCom (Melb.); PhD (Cambridge); Department of Economics, University of Melbourne

ƒ Dr Richard Ingleby, MA, DPhil (Oxford); LLM (Cambridge); Visiting Professor, North China University of Technology

ƒ Ms Lorraine Parsons, BA (La Trobe); BSW (La Trobe); Grad. Cert. Management (Curtin)

ƒ Rev. John Lamont, BA (La Trobe); BTheol (United Faculty of Theology, Ormond College)

ƒ Dr Sarah Wise, BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Melb.); Good Childhood Fellow, Social Work, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne/Berry Street

ƒ Victoria Triggs, BA (Melb.), Grad. Dip. Ed. Admin. (Melb.), Williamson Fellow (Leadership Victoria), Grad. Dip. Australian Institute of Company Directors

ƒ Karena Jessup, BA (UTas), BTeach (Hons) (UTas), PhD (UTas), Senior Manager, Survey Research, The Australian Institute of Family Studies

ƒ Ms Carol Soloff , BSc (Hons) Australian National University

AIFS Expert Advisory Committee

The title and terms of reference of the old ‘Advisory Council’ were reviewed in October 2017. The future of this group is under consideration.

Corporate and statutory reporting

During 2019/20 we continued to refine and strengthen our planning processes in order to make our reporting outputs more robust, including ongoing improvements to our budget development and review and monitoring processes. These initiatives continue to bring together a range of corporate and communications priorities, and have contributed to robust compliance standards and reporting performance against outcomes.

In August 2019 we published our fifth Corporate (Agency) Plan for 2019/20 to 2022/23, as required under the PGPA Act. We spent much of 2019/20 implementing the plan’s strategic priorities.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 56

Risk management

In 2019/20 we completed our first full year using the new risk reporting template developed in 2018/19, with all the risks on the risk register undergoing a thorough, scheduled review by the risk owner. After review, these risks were considered by the Senior Leadership Group, then reviewed by our Risk Assessment and Audit Committee.

This practical approach to risk was highly successful, with a number of risks being significantly updated, renewed or removed entirely based on the current risk environment. As at June 2020, there are a number of risks that have a higher risk rating and/or an increased level of treatment in response to the pandemic that has been affecting the risk environment since early March.

We progressed our Risk Management Framework, including engaging with Comcover to assist us in the process, and reaching out to other Commonwealth agencies that had recently revised their frameworks, to get best practice advice.

Improvements in our ability to manage and mitigate our risks will continue, with the recent procurement of a risk and compliance solution that will assist in the standardisation of our risk approach, and centralised management and reporting.

Internal audit

During 2019/20, four reviews were undertaken by the internal auditors, namely reviews of Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plans, Procurement and Payment Practices, Contract Management and Revenue Recognition and AIFS compliance to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and related legislation. All reviews confirmed that AIFS have maintained, in all material respects, effective control procedures.

During 2019/20 AIFS engaged BDO East Coast Partnership to provide internal audit services.

Business continuity

Following a major review and update of the Business Continuity Plan (BCP) last year, we conducted several scenario tests this year to identify and rectify any gaps in our planning and ensure our readiness in the event of an incident.

We also undertook a modernisation of our access to the BCP, moving from a paper-based approach using BCP binders issued to each staff member to a secure cloud -b ased solution, tailored to be accessible on mobile devices (mobile phones), so the BCP is readily available anytime, anywhere.

An internal audit of our BCP and readiness was undertaken that recommended minor changes to our business continuity planning. These changes are being enacted over the coming year.

Protective Security Policy Framework

October 2019 was the first reporting period for the new Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF). Our results were in line with the majority of Australian Government agencies, indicating a solid implementation of the core and supporting requirements. All staff completed mandatory security awareness training in February 2020, and all security cleared staff completed an annual security check in September 2019. Our path to greater security maturity is informed by our Security Work Plan and is well underway.

Privacy

The Privacy Team progressed its rollout of infrastructure to enable a culture in AIFS that respects privacy to build stakeholders’ trust and confidence.

Some of the achievements include:

ƒ data breach response plan enabling AIFS to identify, contain, escalate, assess and respond to data breaches on time to mitigate and remediate potential harm to affected individuals.

Management and accountability 57

ƒ privacy management policy to ensure active privacy management practices at AIFS when dealing with personal information

ƒ data confidentialisation and disclosure control policy to mitigate the risk of identifying any individual or information about an individual in data held, used or disclosed by the Institute

ƒ data de-identification framework to plan, implement and review data confidentialisation and statistical disclosure controls in a transparent and accountable fashion

ƒ the celebration of ‘Privacy Awareness Week’, which included annual privacy training by all staff to promote privacy awareness

ƒ drafting Privacy Impact Assessments for significant projects

ƒ draft framework to record all personal information holdings to provide a unified view of how personal information is handled, managed and the risks associated.

We were not subject to any privacy or Freedom of Information decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner in 2019/20.

Ethical standards

We continue to take actions designed to integrate the APS Values into the organisational culture and the day-to-day work of all employees. The obligations of employees to uphold the APS Values and abide by the APS Code of Conduct are:

ƒ promoted in staff induction and training

ƒ applied to human resource management processes, including individual performance plans

ƒ reflected in human resource policies and procedures, which are made available to all employees on our intranet.

External scrutiny

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) performs an annual statutory audit of our financial statements. In addition, an independent contractor conducts a program of internal audit reviews (BDO East Coast Partnership). The outcomes of all audits are presented to the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee and plans developed for the implementation of recommendations and the ongoing monitoring of resultant actions for improved processes.

In 2019/20, we were not subject to reports by the Auditor-General, parliamentary committees or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

We do not have statutory administrative decision-making powers and were not subject to any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals in 2019/20.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 58

Management of human resources

Employee skills and qualifications

We are fortunate to have employees with a great diversity of skills, knowledge and experience. This ranges from research knowledge in multiple disciplines - including social science, psychology, family law, child and adolescent development, criminology, demography, economics, statistics and survey design - to management skills such as commercial contract negotiation, project management, financial and human resource management, information technology and

communications. This diversity of knowledge and expertise exemplifies one of the benefits of working in a small organisation. These skills are known and, as such, can be used across a number of facets of our operations.

Figures 4.1 and 4.2 show, respectively, the highest qualifications gained by our employees overall and by those employed in the research area.

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2020

Year 10 1.1%

Doctorate 24.5%

Masters 24.5%

Postgraduate diploma 10.6%

Bachelor degree including honours 29.8%

Undergraduate diploma or equivalent 2.1%

Associate diploma or equivalent 4.3%

Year 12 3.2%

Note: All sta*: includes Director, excludes casuals.

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2020

Doctorate 35%

Masters 30%

Postgraduate diploma 5%

Bachelor degree including honours 30%

Note: All research sta*: includes Director, excludes casuals.

Workforce planning

In 2019/20, we continued to develop our capacity to plan and respond to changing workforce needs. Building capacity and other workforce issues, including increasing the diversity of our workforce, will continue to be an area of focus in 2020/21.

Learning and development

The primary focus of learning and development activities is to ensure that we have the organisational capability to meet operational objectives, both now and in the future.

During the year, staff development covered a range of topics including written communication, leadership, research and analysis tools, compliance topics, interpersonal skills and

Management and accountability 59

wellbeing. The effectiveness of the training provided was evaluated after each course and in the performance reviews conducted between managers and individuals.

We also continue to provide professional development opportunities for employees via professional memberships, and attendance at conferences and webinars, many of which have moved to online or remote formats during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recruitment

Our recruitment in 2019/20 focused on specialist research positions, as well as key positions in knowledge translation and a new Chief Financial Officer. Our vacancies were advertised via online channels including the APS Jobs site and our social media pages.

Staff engagement, participation and development

We recognise the vital contribution our people make to the achievement of our purpose and the importance of staff being engaged with their work, participating in the workplace, and developing professionally.

Our comprehensive induction program for new staff and our ongoing activities that embed the AIFS Values and Behaviours ensure our workforce has a strong foundation.

In the second half of 2019/20 we relied on our strong culture of innovation, engagement and wellbeing to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our leaders and staff swiftly responded to the challenges of remote working through new flexibilities, peer support and increased use of video and collaboration technologies.

AIFS Values

In 2019/20 we worked to embed our AIFS Values and Behaviours, which along with the APS Values, help to shape our culture and guide us towards achieving our purpose. AIFS’ five values and behaviours are:

Champions of our work and each other

We want everyone’s boat to rise: We take collective pride in each other’s work and success.

Excellence for impact

We are committed to producing excellent work that makes a difference for families.

Fearless and curious explorers

We value experimentation, creativity and ongoing learnings.

Honest and respectful conversations

We are authentic and have meaningful conversations including the tough ones.

Seeing the lighter side

We value collegiality, humour and fun.

Workplace Relations Committee

The Workplace Relations Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss matters relating to the Enterprise Agreement as well as the workplace in general. The committee comprises management and employee representatives. The Committee’s work in 2019/20 focused on staff consultation relating to the provision of salary increases by a Determination made by the Director under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 as an alternative to enterprise bargaining, with the nominal expiry of the Australian Institute of Family Studies Enterprise Agreement 2017 being in June 2020. The 2020 salary increase of 2% was subsequently affected by the Government’s decision to defer salary increases for Commonwealth employees by six months and will now take effect in December 2020.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 60

Health and Safety Committee

The Health and Safety Committee was established to represent staff and facilitate consultation and discussion between management and employees regarding health and safety matters in the workplace. Committee meetings are held at least quarterly and provide an effective forum for staff to raise particular health and safety issues as well as the planning and promotion of health and safety practices and principles in the workplace.

Statistics on staffing

As at 30 June 2020, there were 93 staff - 22 males and 71 females - employed at the Institute under the Public Service Act 1999, excluding the Director and employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/ intermittent (casual) basis.

Tables 4.1 and 4.2 present profiles of our staff by gender and type of employment at 30 June 2020 and 30 June 2019 respectively. As Table 4.1 indicates, at 30 June 2020 we had 35% of staff in ongoing positions and 65% of staff in non-ongoing positions. Table 4.3 describes staff by classification level, gender and type of employment as at 30 June 2020.

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2020

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Totals

Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

Male 6 0 10 6 22

Female 14 12 21 24 71

Total number 20 12 31 30 93

% of all staff 22 13 33 32 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2019

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Totals

Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

Male 8 0 10 4 22

Female 14 11 32 25 82

Total number 22 11 42 29 104

% of all staff 21 11 40 28 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Management and accountability 61

Table 4.3: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2020

Classification

AIFS classification

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Total

% of all staff Male Female Male Female

SES Band 1 SES Band 1 1 1 0 0 2 2

Executive Level 2 AIFS EL2 2 10 2 4 18 29

Executive Level 1 AIFS EL1 2 4 7 11 24 26

APS6 AIFS Band 5-6 1 8 2 17 28 30

APS5 AIFS Band 5-6 0 2 3 8 13 14

APS4 AIFS Band 3-4 0 1 2 4 7 8

APS3 AIFS Band 3-4 0 0 0 1 1 1

APS2 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS1 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 6 26 16 45 93 100

% of all staff 6 28 17 48 100

Note: E ighteen employees on higher duties were counted at the higher duties level . Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Staff location

As at 30 June 2020 100% of AIFS' ongoing and non-o ngoing employees were located in Victoria, the same as at 30 June 2019.

Employees who identify as Indigenous

As at 30 June 2020 we had 0 ongoing or non-ongoing employees who identified as Indigenous, the same as at 30 June 2019.

Individual and collective agreements

Details of the number of staff covered by our Enterprise Agreement or a Section 24(1) determination at 30 June 2020 are shown in Table 4.4.

Performance pay

0 employees were eligible for performance pay in 2019/20.

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2020

Type of agreement SES Non-SES

Enterprise Agreement 0 91

Section 24(1) determination 2 0

Note: T he two SES employees on Section 24(1) determinations are also covered by the Enterprise Agreement at their substantive level . The number of staff excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 62

Assets management

We maintain a detailed and effective assets register. Assets management is not a significant aspect of our strategic business.

Purchasing

All purchasing is carried out in line with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Accountable Authority’s Instructions and Financial Guidelines, and in keeping with the core principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical conduct. Templates covering all aspects of purchasing and approval have been developed and are used consistently.

All procurements in excess of $10,000 are reported in AusTender, and contracts in excess of $100,000 are included in Senate Order 192 reporting.

Consultants

Our core business, to conduct research and communicate the findings, can require the use of consultant expertise. Consultants are generally engaged when particular specialist expertise is necessary and sufficiently skilled expertise is not immediately available in-house, or independent advice is required.

The services provided by new and continuing consultants in the reporting period included website content governance services, the review and audit of financial activities, human resources and business process analyses, as well as media relations services.

Processes for the engagement of consultants were consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Financial Guidelines. As with all procurement, the priority in the engagement of consultants is to obtain value for money. Competitive processes are used for the selection of consultants, and the Accountable Authority’s Instructions contained guidelines for the approval of expenditure.

Consistent with the policy of including trend data in annual reports, expenditure on consultancy contracts over the three most recent financial years is listed in Table 4.5.

Table 4.5: Expenditure on consultancy contracts over 2017/18 to 2019/20 (incl. GST)

Financial year

Consultancy contract expenditure $

2017/18 366,279

2018/19 232,790

2019/20 274,137

During 2019/20, seven new consultancy contracts were entered into (including those to the value of less than $10,000), involving total actual expenditure of $163,289.41 (incl. GST). In addition, three ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the year, involving total actual expenditure of $110,847.50 (incl. GST). Expenditure for the year totalled $274,136.91 (incl. GST).

The Annual Report contains information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies over $10,000 is available on the AusTender website: www.tenders.gov.au

Management and accountability 63

Commissioning bodies

During the 2019/20 financial year, the following organisations commissioned projects from the Institute:

ƒ Attorney-General’s Department

ƒ Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Ltd

ƒ Australian Bureau of Statistics

ƒ Central Queensland University

ƒ Department of Education, Northern Territory

ƒ Department of Education, Skills and Employment

ƒ Department of Health

ƒ Department of Social Services

ƒ Department of Veterans’ Affairs

ƒ Monash University

ƒ National Centre for Vocational Education Research

ƒ National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

ƒ Parenting Research Centre

ƒ Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

Our contract templates contain standard clauses to provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises. All contracts let during the reporting period contained these standard clauses.

Exempt contracts

We have not entered into any contracts or standing offers above the reporting threshold value of $10,000 that have been exempted from publication in AusTender.

Procurement initiatives to support small business

AIFS supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Our procurement practices support small and medium enterprises (SMEs) by using the following:

ƒ the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low risk procurements valued under $200,000

ƒ Australian Industry Participation Plans in whole-of-government procurement where applicable

ƒ the Small Business Engagement Principles (outlined in the government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda), such as communicating in clear, simple language and presenting information in an accessible format

ƒ electronic systems or other processes used to facilitate on-time payment performance, including the use of payment cards.

Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website: www.finance.gov.au/procurement/ statistics-on-commonwealth-purchasing-contracts/

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 64

© GettyImages/MonicaNinker

Five —

Financial statements

Financial statements 65

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 66

Financial statements 67

Statement by the Director and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2020 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Institute of Family Studies will be able to pay it's debts as and when they fall due.

Anne Hollonds J ohn Stamoulis

Director C hief Financial Officer

07 September 2020 0 7 September 2020

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 68

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2020

Notes

2020 $

2019 $

Original

Budget 2020 $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 3A 10,240,264 9,823,638 10,816,000

Suppliers 3B 4,734,857 4,214,481 4,612,000

Depreciation and amortisation 6A 920,930 448,535 532,000

Finance costs 3C 108,405 3,628

Losses from asset sales 4,399 11,777 -

Total expenses 16,008,855 14,502,059 15,960,000

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 4A 9,984,711 9,601,719 10,862,000

Royalties 34,516 30,092 44,000

Other revenue 4B 33,916 44,113 38,000

Total own-source revenue 10,053,143 9,675,924 10,944,000

Gains

Gains from sale of assets 15,383 8,747 32,000

Total gains 15,383 8,747 32,000

Total own-source income 10,068,526 9,684,671 10,976,000

Net cost of services (5,940,329) (4,817,387) (4,984,000)

Revenue from Government 4C 4,452,000 4,412,000 4,452,000

Deficit before income tax on continuing operations (1,488,329) (405,387) (532,000)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus - 82,210 -

Total other comprehensive income - 82,210 -

Total comprehensive loss (1,488,329) (323,176) (532,000)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 69

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2020

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2019/20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2019/20 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

Employee benefits are lower than budget as the Average Service Level (ASL) was lower than anticipated due to delays in commencement of project research in 2019/20, this is partly impacted by COVID-19. There were also several unfilled budget positions during the year.

Employee benefits

The Institute completed additional field work in 2019/20, mainly data collection and travel. Suppliers

Depreciation is higher due to the introduction of the Australian Accounting Standards Board Standard - Leases (AASB 16) from 1 July 2019. Initial application of AASB 16 resulted in recognition of $4.8 million right-of-use leasehold improvement asset.

Depreciation and amortisation

The majority of the Institute's revenue is earned from commissioned research and/or evaluation projects. The Institute's estimated revenue as published in the 2018/19 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on anticipated new contracts.

The total value of research contracts the Institute was able to deliver milestones on during 2019/20, was impacted by COVID-19.

Revenue from contracts with customers

Lower revenue was earned from cost recovery activities and support of administrative activities. Other revenue

Valuation of non-financial assets was undertaken at the end 2018/19 and resulted in an asset revaluation surplus of $82,210 for prior year. No valuation was undertaken in 2019/20.

Changes in asset revaluation surplus

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 70

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2020

Notes 2020

$

2019 $

Original

Budget 2020 $

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 5A 1,359,941 1,660,720 258,000

Trade and other receivables 5B 7,133,395 8,534,735 7,004,000

Total financial assets 8,493,336 10,195,455 7,262,000

Non-financial assets 1

Leasehold improvements 6A 5,937,035 1,834,567 1,516,000

Plant and equipment 6A 841,899 880,080 685,000

Intangibles 6A 28,000 42,000 35,000

Other non-financial assets 6B 351,619 299,493 359,000

Total non-financial assets 7,158,553 3,056,140 2,595,000

Total assets 15,651,889 13,251,596 9,857,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Unearned income 7A 6,080,933 7,327,257 4,078,000

Supplier payables 7B 573,746 207,069 363,000

Other payables 7C 347,427 877,304 1,183,000

Total payables 7,002,106 8,411,630 5,624,000

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 7D 4,427,000 - -

Total interest bearing liabilities 4,427,000 - -

Provisions

Employee provisions 8A 2,367,474 2,234,732 2,472,000

Other provisions 8B 369,700 350,296 -

Total provisions 2,737,174 2,585,028 2,472,000

Total liabilities 14,166,280 10,996,658 8,096,000

Net assets 1,485,609 2,254,938 1,761,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity 4,551,511 4,362,511 4,624,000

Reserves 296,630 296,630 214,000

Accumulated deficit (3,362,532) (2,404,203) (3,077,000)

Total equity 1,485,609 2,254,938 1,761,000

1 . R ight-of-use assets are included in the following line item: Leasehold improvements

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 71

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2020

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2019/20 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2019/20 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The Institute received $1,217,873.31 of section 74 receipts at the end of June 2020 which were unable to be returned to the Official Public Account (OPA) during the 2019/20 financial year and were not factored into the PBS estimate of Cash at Bank Account.

Cash and cash equivalents

Value of leasehold improvements and plant and equipment increased due to the initial recognition of a $4.8 million right-of-use leasehold improvement asset, upon introduction of AASB 16.

Plant and equipment

Unearned revenue represents cash receipts received in advance for work yet to be performed. The Institute's estimated revenue as published in the 2019/20 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on historical trends. The balance of unearned income at 30 June is difficult to estimate and can vary from year to year as it is impacted by the timing of payments received for contracted research projects and the timing of deliverables of those projects as these may not necessarily fall in the same financial year. Timing of payments and project deliverables are also subject to change after the publication of the PBS.

Unearned income

Supplier payable increased at year end with the large field work accrual in 2019/20. Supplier payables

Other payable reduced as a result of the introduction of AASB 16 with the write back of the lease incentive liability. Other payables

Interest bearing liabilities increased with the introduction of AASB 16. Interest bearing liabilities

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 72

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2020

Notes

2020 $

2019 $

Original

Budget 2020 $

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 4,362,511 4,173,511 4,435,000

Adjusted opening balance 4,362,511 4,173,511 4,435,000

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget 189,000 189,000 189,000

Equity injection - - -

Total transactions with owners 189,000 189,000 189,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 4,551,511 4,362,511 4,624,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (2,404,203) (1,998,816) (2,545,000)

Adjusted on initial application of AASB 16 530,000 - -

Adjusted opening balance (1,874,203) (1,998,816) (2,545,000)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (1,488,329) (405,387) (532,000)

Total comprehensive income (1,488,329) (405,387) (532,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June (3,362,532) (2,404,203) (3,077,000)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Balance carried forward from previous period 296,630 214,420 214,000

Adjusted opening balance 296,630 214,420 214,000

Comprehensive income

Changes in asset revaluation surplus - 82,210 -

Total comprehensive income - 82,210 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 296,630 296,630 214,000

TOTAL EQUITY 1,485,609 2,254,938 1,761,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 73

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2020

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2019/20 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2019/20 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The result for the year was an increase deficit due to revenue for contract research being lower than anticipated. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic some research milestones were not achieved resulting in lower revenue recognition, whilst expenditure was still incurred.

Deficit for the period

With the introduction of AASB 16 initial treatment resulted in write back of the balance of the Leasehold incentive to retained earnings. Retained earnings

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 74

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2020

Notes

2020 $

2019 $

Original

Budget 2020 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 16,152,322 15,125,709 4,102,000

Sale of goods and rendering of services 11,071,290 13,192,860 10,914,000

GST received 407,205 426,722 73,000

Other 33,000 33,000 -

Total cash received 27,663,817 28,778,291 15,089,000

Cash used

Employee benefits (10,207,347) (9,926,172) (10,454,000)

Suppliers (4,727,562) (4,555,009) (4,580,000)

Interest payments on lease liabilities (89,000) - -

GST paid (967,829) (1,068,491) (12,000)

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA (11,456,220) (12,566,560) -

Total cash used (27,447,958) (28,116,232) (15,046,000)

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 215,859 662,059 43,000

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (131,616) (444,577) (189,000)

Total cash used (131,616) (444,577) (189,000)

Net cash used by investing activities (131,616) (444,577) (189,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity 31,978 425,792 189,000

Total cash received 31,978 425,792 189,000

Cash used

Principal payments of lease liability (417,000) - -

Total cash used (417,000) - -

Net cash from financing activities (385,022) 425,792 189,000

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held (300,779) 643,274 43,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,660,720 1,017,446 215,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 1,359,941 1,660,720 258,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 75

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2020

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2019/20 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2019/20 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The presentation of the Cash Flow Statement in the PBS does not require entities to account for the return of Section 74 receipts to the OPA and the redrawing of these funds from the relevant Appropriation Item. Subsequently, the Cash Flow Statement presented in the 2019/20 Financial Statements identifies significantly higher amounts of 'Cash received' and 'Cash used' than in the PBS.

Appropriation, Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA

The majority of the Institute’s revenue is earned from commissioned research and/or evaluation projects. The Institute’s estimated revenue as published in the 2019/20 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on historical trends.

During 2019/20 the total value of revenue received for research and evaluation the Institute was commissioned to deliver was more than historical averages, resulting in a higher value of unearned income carried forward to future periods.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

Employee numbers were below budgeted as new projects took time to engage new employees, resulting in reduced employee benefits. Employee benefits

The Institute has deferred all capital expenditure except for $131,616 which was drawn down from the Departmental Capital Budget of $189,000.

Purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 76

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Note 1: O verview and summary of significant accounting policies 78

Note 2: E vents after the reporting period 81

Note 3: Expenses 82

Note 4: O wn-source income 84

Note 5: F inancial assets 86

Note 6: N on-financial assets 87

Note 7: P ayables and interest bearing liabilities 90

Note 8: Provisions 91

Note 9: Appropriations 92

Note 10: Net cash appropriation arrangements 94

Note 11: K ey Management Personnel remuneration 95

Note 12: R elated party disclosures 96

Note 13: C ontingent assets and liabilities 96

Note 14: F inancial instruments 97

Note 15: F air value measurements 100

Note 16: A ggregate assets and liabilities 102

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 77

Note 1: O verview and summary of significant accounting policies

1.1 B asis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

b) A ustralian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar unless otherwise specified.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.2 S ignificant accounting judgements and estimates

Refer to Note 15 for explanation of assumptions used in estimating the fair value of assets.

The liability for long service leave has been estimated using present value techniques in accordance with the short hand method in accordance with section 24 of the FRR. This takes into account expected salary growth, attrition and future discounting using Commonwealth bond rates.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.3 N ew Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

New standards, amendments to standards and interpretations that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) prior to the signoff date and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a future material impact on the Institute's financial statements.

The standards that were issued prior to the sign-o ff date and adopted for the first time in the current reporting period are:

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers, ASSB 16-8 and AASB 1058 became effective on 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue. The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

Under the new income recognition model the Entity shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the Entity applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions

78

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The Entity adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

The details of the changes in accounting policies are detailed in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

The initial adoption of these standards had no financial impact.

AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 16 Leases

The Entity adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information

presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The Entity elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard. The Entity applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117:

ƒ Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics;

ƒ Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right-of-use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-o f-use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date;

ƒ Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application; and

ƒ Applied the exemption not to recognise right-o f-use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, the Entity previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the Entity recognises right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the Entity has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the

Note 1: Overview and summary of significant accounting policies continued

79

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 1: Overview and summary of significant accounting policies continued

value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the Entity recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of office space, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the Entity’s incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. The Entity’s incremental borrowing rate is the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied was 2.06%.

Impact on transition

On transition to AASB 16, the Entity recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

Departmental 1 July 2019

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment $4,844,000

Lease liabilities $4,844,000

Lease incentive - fit out $530,000

Retained earnings $530,000

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity's 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

1 July 2019

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019

$7,132,731

Less: outgoings $1,865,174

Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application $423,557

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019 $4,844,000

1.4 T axation

The Institute is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

a) w here the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

b) f or receivables and payables.

80

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 2: E vents after the reporting period

The Director and Accountable Authority has provided notice of resignation.

81

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 3: E xpenses

2020 $

2019 $

Note 3A: Employee benefits

Salaries and wages 7,419,932 6,969,087

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 1,110,662 961,865

Defined benefit plans 267,977 469,403

Leave and other entitlements 1,309,150 1,323,112

Other employee benefits 132,543 100,172

Total employee benefits 10,240,264 9,823,638

Note 3B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 2,513,460 1,265,564

Contractors 1,449,992 1,320,483

Travel 266,784 357,328

IT Services 356,838 253,036

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 4,587,074 3,196,411

Goods supplied 48,580 72,345

Services rendered 4,538,494 3,124,066

Total goods supplied 4,587,074 3,196,411

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals1 - 637,798

Workers compensation expenses 147,783 383,899

Total other suppliers 147,783 1,021,697

Total suppliers 4,734,857 4,218,110

Note 3C: Finance costs

Interest on lease liabilities 89,000 -

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 19,405 3,628

Total finance costs 108,405 3,628

1. The Entity has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.3 and 6A.

82

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy: Employee benefits

Superannuation

The majority of the staff of the Institute are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance and Deregulations administered schedules and notes.

The Institute makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The Institute accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June each year represents pro-rata outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Refer also to note 8 for accounting policy with respect to leave provisions.

Accounting Policy: Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The Institute has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The entity recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Institute has no such leases.

Note 3: Expenses continued

83

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 4: O wn-source income

2020 $

2019 $

Own-source revenue

Note 4A: Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods 11 24,567

Revenue from contracts with customers 9,984,700 9,577,152

Total revenue from contracts with customers 9,984,711 9,601,719

Own sourced income for AIFS is derived from research activities recognised over time.

Type of customer:

Australian Government entities (related parties) 8,956,747 7,446,884

State and Territory Governments 723,616 1,096,158

Non-government entities 304,348 1,058,677

Total 9,984,711 9,601,719

Note 4B: Other revenue

Cost recovery 916 11,113

ANAO audit services received free of charge 33,000 33,000

Total other revenue 33,916 44,113

Note 4C: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 4,452,000 4,412,000

Total revenue from Government 4,452,000 4,412,000

Accounting Policy: Revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers

The Institute receives contract revenue by conducting high-quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding families in Australia for various stakeholders. The key stakeholders comprise mainly other Commonwealth agencies, State Government agencies as well as non-government entities.

Revenue from rendering of contract services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts over time and is measured at the reporting date. AIFS Revenue policies relating to when a contract is in scope of AASB 15 and if the performance obligations are required by an enforceable contract and they are sufficiently specific to enable the Entity to determine when they have been satisfied.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to either:

a) s ervices performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed; or

b) t he proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction; or

c) m ilestones achieved against provision in the contract.

84

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy: Revenue (continued)

Copyright royalty revenue for the use of the Institute’s publications and bibliographic databases is recognised on an accrual basis. The Institute has no control over the amount of royalties and a provisional amount is accrued based on historical receipts.

Cost recovery which relates mainly to Comcare receipts and sponsorships of travel expenses is recognised on an accrual basis.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30-day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the Institute gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Resources received free of charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Accounting Policy: Gains

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements. The Institute did not receive any contribution of assets in 2019/20 or 2018/19.

Sale of assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Note 4: Own-source income continued

85

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 5: F inancial assets

2020 $

2019 $

Note 5A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,359,941 1,660,720

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,359,941 1,660,720

Note 5B: Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables in connection with

Goods and services 504,947 1,813,868

Other receivables 21,141 26,481

Total goods and services receivables 526,088 1,840,349

Appropriation receivable

Appropriation receivable (existing programs) 6,607,307 6,694,386

Total trade and other receivables 7,133,395 8,534,735

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for receivables .

Accounting Policy: Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes:

a) c ash on hand; and

b) d emand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

86

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 6: N on-financial assets

Note 6A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment and intangibles

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment and intangibles for 2020

Leasehold improvements $

Plant and equipment $

Computer software $

Total $

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value 1,863,367 880,080 42,000 2,785,447

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (28,800) - - (28,800)

Total as at 1 July 2019 1,834,567 880,080 42,000 2,756,647

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16 4,844,000 4,844,000

Adjusted Total as at 1 July 2019 6,678,567 880,080 42,000 7,600,647

Additions

Purchase 17,128 59,929 - 77,057

Purchase - ICT equipment/WIP - 54,559 - 54,559

Provision for make good - - -

Depreciation and amortisation (204,507) (153,829) (14,000) (372,336)

Depreciation and amortisation on right-o f-u se assets (548,594) - - (548,594)

Transfer (1,160) 1,160 -

Other movements -

Accumulated depreciation on disposals 581 - 581

Disposals (4,980) - (4,980)

Total as at 30 June 2020 5,937,035 841,899 28,000 6,806,934

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by

Gross book value 6,690,136 995,728 42,000 7,727,864

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (753,101) (153,829) (14,000) (920,930)

Total as at 30 June 2020 5,937,035 841,899 28,000 6,806,934

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 4,295,406 4,295,406

Note: No plant and equipment, leasehold improvements and computer software are expected to be sold within the next 12 months .

Accounting Policy: Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

87

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy: Leasehold improvements, plant and equipment

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000 and for leasehold improvements and computer software for purchases costing less than $10,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by AIFS where there exists an obligation to restore property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for 'make good' recognised.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by the Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the entity has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class Fair value measurement

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment Market selling price

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) were carried at fair value. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Note 6: Non-financial assets continued

88

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy: Leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (continued)

Depreciation

Depreciable leasehold improvements, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Institute using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future, reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2020 2019

Leasehold improvements 10 years 10 years

Plant and equipment 3 to 15 years 3 to 15 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. As no indicators of impairment were identified. It was determined that there was no impairment.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Institute were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Accounting Policy: Intangibles

The Institute’s intangibles comprise commercially purchased software and are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $10,000 which are expensed on acquisition. Intangibles are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Institute’s software are 3 to 5 years (2018/19: 3 to 5 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2020.

2020 $

2019 $

Note 6B: Prepayments

Prepayments 351,619 299,493

Total other non-financial assets 351,619 299,493

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for prepayments .

Note 6: Non-financial assets continued

89

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 7: P ayables and interest bearing liabilities

2020 $

2019 $

Note 7A: Unearned income

Unearned income advanced 6,080,933 7,327,257

Total unearned income 6,080,933 7,327,257

Note 7B: Suppliers

Suppliers in connection with

Trade creditors and accruals 573,746 207,069

Total suppliers 573,746 207,069

Suppliers are expected to be settled in no more than 12 months. Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 7C: Other payables

Salaries and wages 129,321 70,544

Superannuation 20,629 10,732

Lease incentive1 - 530,000

GST payable 194,319 267,577

Other 3,160 (1,549)

Total other payables 347,427 877,304

Other payables to be settled

No more than 12 months 347,427 407,304

More than 12 months - 470,000

Total other payables 347,427 877,304

Note 7D: Interest bearing liability

Leases1 4,427,000 -

Total interest bearing liability 4,427,000 -

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2020 was $509,715.

1. The Entity has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Unearned income are commissioned research revenue payments received but cannot be recognised as revenue because the tasks or deliverables are not completed at the time payments were received.

The Institute classifies its financial liabilities as ‘other financial liabilities’. This comprises suppliers and other payables that are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

90

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 8: P rovisions

2020 $

2019 $

Note 8A: Employee provisions

Leave 2,367,474 2,234,732

Total employee provisions 2,367,474 2,234,732

Employee leave provisions expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 733,417 726,804

More than 12 months 1,634,057 1,507,928

Total employee provisions 2,367,474 2,234,732

No liability existed for separation and redundancy in 2020.

$ $

Note 8B: Other provisions

Provision for make good

As at 1 July 2019 350,295 240,000

Additional provision made - 106,667

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 19,405 3,628

Total other provisions 369,700 350,295

The Institute currently has an agreement for leasing of premises which has provisions requiring the Institute to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The Institute has made a provision to reflect present value of this obligation.

Accounting Policy: Employee provisions

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits ) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the Institute is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Institute’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by the use of the Department of Finance’s shorthand method using the Standard Commonwealth sector probability profile. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

91

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 9: A ppropriations

Note 9A: Annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual appropriations for 2020

Annual

appropriation1 $

Adjustments to appropriation2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2020 (current and prior years)

$

Variance3 $

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 4,452,000 11,456,220 15,908,220 16,152,322 (244,102)

Capital budget4 189,000 - 189,000 31,978 157,022

Equity injections - - - - -

Total departmental 4,641,000 11,456,220 16,097,220 16,184,300 (87,080)

Notes: 1 . I n 2019/20, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . I n 2019/20, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . T he variance is attributable to the change in the balance of unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2020

(see note 9B) . This is due to delays in revenue being recognised on contracted research and timing of capital expenditure . 4 . D epartmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1, 3, 5) . They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts .

Annual appropriations for 2019

Annual

appropriation1 $

Adjustments to appropriation2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2019 (current and prior years)

$

Variance3 $

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 4,412,000 12,566,560 16,978,560 15,125,709 1,852,851

Capital budget4 189,000 - 189,000 425,792 (236,792)

Equity injections - - - - -

Total departmental 4,601,000 12,566,560 17,167,560 15,551,501 1,616,059

Notes: 1 . I n 2018/19, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . I n 2018/19, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . T he variance is attributable to the change in the balance of Unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2018 and 30 June 2019

(see note 9B) .

4 . D epartmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1 ,3,5) . They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts .

92

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 9B: Unspent annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

2020 $

2019 $

Departmental

Appropriation Act 1 2018/19 - 6,694,386

Appropriation Act 1 2018/19 cash at bank - 1,660,720

Appropriation Act 1 2019/20 6,607,307 -

Appropriation Act 1 2019/20 cash at bank 1,359,941 -

Total departmental 7,967,248 8,355,106

Accounting Policy: Transactions with the Government as owner

Equity injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other distributions to owners

The FRR require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless in the nature of a dividend. There was no distribution to owners in 2019/20 or 2018/19.

Note 9: Appropriations continued

93

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 10: N et cash appropriation arrangements

2020 $

2019 $

Total comprehensive income (loss) less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations (984,399) 125,359

Plus: depreciation right-of-use assets (548,594) -

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations (372,336) (448,535)

Less: Principal repayment - leased assets 417,000 -

Total comprehensive income (loss) - as per Statement of Comprehensive Income (1,488,329) (323,176)

From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principle repayment amount reflects the cash impact on implementation of AASB 16 Leases, it does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

94

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 11: K ey Management Personnel remuneration

During the reporting period ended 30 June 2020, the Institute had three executives who meet the definition of Key Management Personnel (KMP). KMP are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of AIFS directly or indirectly. AIFS determined the KMP to be the Director, Deputy Director Corporate, and Deputy Director Research. Their names and length of terms as KMP are summarised below:

Name Position Term as KMP

Anne Hollonds1 Director Full year

Michael Alexander Deputy Director Full year

Kelly Hand Deputy Director Full year

2020 $

2019 $

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 683,548 671,059

Other benefits and allowances 59,266 40,534

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 112,710 105,559

Other long-term employee benefits

Long service leave 19,602 18,987

Total Key Management Personnel remuneration expenses 875,126 836,139

KMP remuneration was prepared on an accrual basis. The total number of KMP that are included in the above table is three (2019: Three).

The above KMP remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Institute.

Note: 1 . T he Director and Accountable Authority has provided notice of resignation .

95

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 12: Re lated party disclosures

Related party relationships

The Institute is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties of the Institute include but are not limited to:

ƒ KMP as outlined in Note 11;

ƒ Close family members of KMP outlined in Note 11; and

ƒ Organisations controlled by these KMP and their close family members.

Related parties to the Institute also included the Portfolio Minister, Cabinet Ministers and other Australian Government entities.

Transaction with related parties

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by the entity, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Note 13: C ontingent assets and liabilities

The Institute had no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingent assets or liabilities as at 30 June 2020 (2019: nil).

96

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 14: F inancial instruments

Note 14A: Categories of financial instruments

2020 $

2019 $

Financial Assets under AASB 139

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,359,941 1,660,720

Goods and services 504,947 1,813,868

Other receivables 21,141 26,481

Total financial assets at amortised cost 1,886,030 3,501,069

Total financial assets 1,886,030 3,501,069

The net fair values of cash and cash equivalents and trade receivables approximates their carrying amounts.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors and accruals 573,746 207,069

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 573,746 207,069

Total financial liabilities 573,746 207,069

The net fair value of trade creditors and accruals approximates their carrying amounts.

Accounting Policy: Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the entity classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) fi nancial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) fi nancial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and

c) fi nancial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial assets at amortised cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

97

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy: Financial assets (continued)

Effective interest method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial asset either doesn't meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-m onth expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Note 14: Financial instruments continued

98

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 14B: Net gain or losses on financial assets/financial liabilities

There was no gain or losses from financial assets - loans and receivables - at amortised cost in the financial year ended 30 June 2020 (2019: nil).

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities and financial assets

Financial liabilities and financial assets that are not contractual (such as GST, created as a result of statutory requirements imposed by governments) are not financial instruments.

Receivables Receivables consist of contractual receivables, such as accounts payable and accruals.

Payables Payables consist of contractual payables, such as accounts payable and accruals.

Note 14: Financial instruments continued

99

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 15: F air value measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The remaining assets and liabilities disclosed in the statement of financial position do not apply the fair value hierarchy.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Accounting Policy

The Institute engaged the service of the Jones Lang Lasalle (JLL) to conduct a detailed external valuation of all non-financial assets at 30 June 2019 and has relied upon those outcomes to establish carrying amounts. An annual assessment is undertaken to determine whether the carrying amount of the assets is materially different from the fair value. Comprehensive valuations carried out at least once every three years. JLL has provided written assurance to the AIFS that the models developed are in compliance with AASB 13.

The methods utilised to determine and substantiate the unobservable inputs are derived and evaluated as follows:

Physical Depreciation and Obsolescence - assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach. Under the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take in physical depreciation and obsolescence. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration. For all Leasehold Improvement assets, the consumed economic benefit/asset obsolescence deduction is determined based on the term of the associated lease.

AIFS' policy is to recognise transfers into and transfers out of fair value hierarchy levels as at the end of the reporting period.

100

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Fair value measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2020 $

2019 $ Valuation technique(s) and inputs used

Non-financial assets 2 Plant and equipment1 - - Market Approach: This approach seeks to estimate the

current value of an asset with reference to recent market transactions involving identical or comparable assets.

Inputs: Prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving plant and equipment assets were considered.

Plant and equipment1 841,899 880,080 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current prices for substitute assets. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the assets under consideration.

Leasehold improvements1 1,641,629 1,834,567 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current costs per square metre of floor area relevant to the location of the asset. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on the term of the associated lease.

Total non-financial assets 2,483,528 2,714,647

Notes: 1 . N o non-financial assets were measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2020 (2019: nil) . 2 . A IFS’ assets are held for operational purposes and not held for the purposes of deriving a profit . The current use of all non-financial assets is considered their highest and best use .

3 . T here were no transfers between Levels 1 and 2 for recurring fair value measurements during the year .

Note 15: Fair value measurements continued

101

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 16: A ggregate assets and liabilities

2020 $

2019 $

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 9,765,886 10,943,483

More than 12 months 5,886,003 2,308,112

Total assets 15,651,889 13,251,595

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 9,554,398 8,707,354

More than 12 months 4,611,882 2,289,304

Total liabilities 14,166,280 10,996,658

102

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

© GettyImages/Vladimir Vladimirov

Six —

Appendices

Appendices 103

Appendix A: Other mandatory information

Work health and safety

We are committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, and meeting our responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. See 'Management and accountability' (page 54) for our workplace health and safety policies, processes and performance.

Advertising and market research

No payments of $14,000 or greater (inclusive of GST) were made for the purposes of advertising and market research expenditure, as described in section 321A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

We are committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

The HWT Tower in which we are located has a 4.5 star NABERS energy rating. Lighting throughout our office is sensitive to movement, meaning it will automatically turn off after a set period of no activity and only turn back on when movement is detected to reduce energy usage on unnecessary lighting. We’ve installed block-o ut blinds on all north and west facing windows to reduce our electricity consumption in the warmer months.

Our transition to a mobile workforce means our staff all use laptops, which consume less power than their desktop counterparts. All our office equipment and appliances either have aggressive standby timers or are low power to begin with.

Adverse effects due to transport (causing emissions to the air and use of resources) continue to be mostly due to domestic airline flights. While as a small agency we are not a major user of flights, this has been dramatically reduced in 2019/20 due to COVID-19. The proximity of our office to train and tram networks enables the majority of staff to take public transport to and from the office. Our webinars continue to be

very popular and regularly replace face-to-face seminar presentations, extending their reach and reducing the need for people to travel to the Institute to hear them. Our state-o f-t he-a rt video-c onferencing equipment means reduced travel for both staff and key stakeholders as it is now very easy to participate in meetings from our office and will be a stronger feature of our working arrangements into the future.

Paper consumption (use of natural resources) is minimised by using recycled paper and ensuring that the office printers default to black and white, double-sided printing. Two new Konica Minolta printers were installed in February 2019 providing updated technology, reduced consumption of resources during use and more granular reporting of print usage.

Paper use in 2019/20 (number of printer/copier impressions) decreased by 22.87% compared to the previous year. While this continues the decreased usage reported over the previous three years, it’s important to note that due to COVID-19, staff were working from home for the last quarter of this financial year. It’s estimated that without COVID-19, our usage would be down 4.2% over last financial year.

Our transition to digital working in line with the Australian Government's digital transition and digital continuity 2020 policies is continuing.

Waste generation is reduced by the separation of paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and organic waste at waste stations throughout the tenancy.

Disability reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007/08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available from the Commission’s website (see apsc.gov.au). Since 2010/11, departments and agencies have not been required to report on these functions.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 104

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by a new National Disability Strategy 2010-20, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with a disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level, two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with a disability are faring.

Information Publication Scheme

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements.

Although no new requests were received in 2019/20, a decision made in 2017/18 was reviewed and upheld by the Office of Australian Information Commissioner.

Contact details

FOI Contact Officer Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006

Telephone ( 03) 9214 7888 Facsimile ( 03) 9214 7839 Email aifs-foi@aifs.gov.au

Appendices 105

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2019/20

Actual available appropriation for 2019/20 $ (a)

Payments made 2019/20 $ (b)

Balance remaining 2019/20 $ (a) - (b)

Ordinary annual services1

Departmental appropriation2 24,452,327 16,485,079 7,967,248

Total 24,452,327 16,485,079 7,967,248

Total ordinary annual services A 24,452,327 16,485,079 7,967,248

Other services3

Departmental non-operating

Equity injections4

Total

Total other services B

Total available annual appropriations and payments

Special appropriations

Total special appropriations C

Special accounts5

Total special accounts D

Total resourcing and payments A+B+C+D 24,452,327 16,485,079 7,967,248

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts through annual appropriations

Total net resourcing and payments for AIFS 24,452,327 16,485,079 7,967,248

Notes: 1 . A ppropriation Act (No . 1) 2019/20 and Appropriation Act (No . 2) 2019/20 (and Appropriation Act (No . 5) 2019/20 if necessary) . This may also include prior year departmental appropriation and Section 74 Retained Revenue Receipts . 2 . I ncludes an amount of $0 . 1 89 million in 2019/20 for the Departmental Capital Budget . For accounting purposes this amount has been

designated as ‘contributions by owners’ . 3 . A ppropriation Act (No . 2) 2019/20 and Appropriation Act (No . 4) 2019/20 (and Appropriation Act (No . 6) 2019/20 if necessary) . 4 . I ncludes appropriation equity provided through Appropriation Bill (No . 2 ) 2019/20 . 5 . D oes not include ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM) .

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 106

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2019/20

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget1 2019/20 $’000

Actual expenses 2019/20 $’000 (b)

Variation 2019/20

$’000 (a) - (b)

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation2 15,396 15,055 341

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year

564 954 (390)

Total for Program 1.1 15,960 16,009 (49)

2019/20 2019/20 2019/20

Average staffing level (number) 82 84 (2)

Notes: 1 . F ull year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2019-20 Budget at Additional Estimates . 2 . D epartmental Appropriation combines Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Acts Nos . 1, 3 and 5) and Retained Revenue Receipts under section 74 of the PGPA Act 2013 .

Appendices 107

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2019/20

The following are the research publications, presentations and other outputs prepared by AIFS staff during 2019/20.

Publications

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2019). Annual report 2018/19. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2019). Corporate Plan 2019/20 to 2022/23. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2019). Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2018. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2019). Parenting arrangements after separation: Evidence summary. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). Child wellbeing after parental separation (AIFS Research Summary). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bandara, D., Edwards, B., Mohal, J., & Daraganova, G. (2019). Consent to data linkage in a child cohort study, Growing up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (CSRM Working Paper No. 7). Canberra: ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods.

Bandara, D., Howell, L., Silbert, M., Mohal, J., Garrard, B., & Daraganova, G. (2019). Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health - Data user guide (Version 3.0). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J., Bray, J. R., Carroll, M., Hand, K., Gray, M., Katz, I. et al. (2019). Child Care Package evaluation: Early monitoring report. Report on baseline, early monitoring and emerging issues. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Broadley, K., & Paterson, N. (2020). Client violence towards workers in the child, family and community welfare sector (CFCA Paper No. 54). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carson, R. (2020). Children and young people participating in research (CFCA short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

El-Murr, A. (2019). Managing resistance to gender equality for policy and practice (CFCA short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Evans-Whipp, T., & Gasser, C. (2019). Adolescents’ resilience. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 107-118). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Evans-Whipp, T., & Gasser, C. (2019). Are children and adolescents getting enough sleep? In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 29-46). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Evans-Whipp, T., & Gasser, C. (2019). Teens with at least one close friend can better cope with stress than those without. The Conversation.

Gasser, C., & Evans-Whipp, T. (2019). Here to help: How young people contribute to their community. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 121-132). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Gasser, C., Evans-Whipp, T., & Terhaag. S. (2019). The physical health of Australian children. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 9-28). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Goldsworthy, K., & Muir, S. (2019). Timely decision making and outcomes for children in out-o f-h ome care: A quick scoping review. Canberra: DSS.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 108

Hall, T., Price-Robertson, R., & Awram, R. (2020). Engaging with parents when there are child protection concerns: Key considerations. Adelaide, SA: Emerging Minds.

Heyes, N. (2019). Child safe organisations: Information for organisations on how to keep children safe (CFCA short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Hing, N., Russell, A., Thomas, A., & Jenkinson, R. (2019). Hey, big spender: An ecological momentary assessment of sports and race betting expenditure by gambler characteristics. Journal of Gambling Issues, 42, 42-61.

Howell, L., Bandara, D., Mohal, J., Andalón, M., Silbert, M., Garrard, B. et al. (2019). Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health - Data issues paper. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Jenkinson, R., Khokhar, T., Tajin, R., Jatkar, U., & Deblaquiere, J. (2019). National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering: Baseline study. Final report. Canberra: Department of Social Services.

Johnson, S. (2020). Responding to the coronavirus pandemic: Conducting a needs assessment in a time of rapid change (Expert Panel short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Kaspiew, R. (2020). To fix the family law system, we need to ask parents what really works. The Conversation.

Kaspiew, R., Carson, R., Dow, B., Qu, L., Hand, K., Roopani, D. et al. (2019). Elder abuse national research - strengthening the evidence base: Research definition background paper . Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Kerdo, E. (2020). Responding to the coronavirus pandemic: Documentation tips for monitoring and evaluation. (Expert Panel short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Kerdo, E. (2019). Tips for commissioning an external evaluation. (Expert Panel short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

King, T. L., Shields, M., Sojo, V., Daraganova. G., Currier, D., O’Neil, A. et al. (2020). Expressions of masculinity and associations with suicidal ideation among young males. BMC Psychiatry, 20, 228.

McLean, S. (2019). Therapeutic residential care services in Australia: A description of current service characteristics (CFCA Paper No. 50). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Price-Robertson, R., Kirkwood, D., Dean, A., Hall, T., Paterson, N., & Broadley, K. (2020). Working together to keep children and families safe: Strategies for developing collaborative competence (CFCA Paper No. 53). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L. (2019). Working Together to Care for Kids: A survey of foster and relative/kinship carers (CFCA short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L., & Weston, R. (2020). Financial journeys of Australian parents after separation: Transitions into and out of poverty. Australian Journal of Social Issues, Advance online publication. doi. org/10.1002/ajs4.115

Quadara, A. (2019). Child sexual abuse prevention strategies for population-level change: Challenges and future directions. In B. Lonne, D. Scott, D. Higgins, & T. Herrenkohl (Eds.), Re-v isioning public health approaches for protecting children (pp. 145-163). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Quadara, A., El-Murr, A., Douglas, W., & Muir, S. (2019). Process evaluation of the Third Action Plan 2016-19: Final report. Canberra: Department of Social Services.

Quadara, A., O’Brien, W., Ball, O., Douglas, W., & Vu, L. (2020). Good practice in delivering and evaluating interventions for young people with harmful sexual behaviours (ANROWS Research Report No 8). Sydney: ANROWS.

Rioseco, P., Warren, D., & Daraganova. G. (2020). Children’s social-e motional wellbeing: The role of parenting, parents’ mental health and health behaviours. Working paper. Melbourne:

Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Rioseco, P., Warren, D., & Daraganova. G. (2020). Social-e motional wellbeing from childhood to early adolescence: The benefits of supporting parents. Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Roopani, D. (2020). Powers of attorney and financial abuse of older Australians . (CFCA short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Appendices 109

Salveron, M., Paterson, N., & Price-Robertson (2020). Engaging with parents who have children in out-o f-h ome care: Key considerations. Adelaide, SA: Emerging Minds.

Slewa-Younan, S., Rioseco, P., Guajardo, M.G.U., & Mond, J. (2019). Predictors of professional help-seeking for emotional problems in Afghan and Iraqi refugees in Australia: Findings from the Building a New Life in Australia database. BMC Public Health, 19, 1485.

Smart, J. (2019). Identifying evaluation questions. (Expert Panel short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, J. (2020). Making the most out of evaluation: Nine principles to maximise the use of your evaluation. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, J. (2020). Planning an evaluation: Step by step. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, J. (2020). Responding to the coronavirus pandemic: Assessing rapid service changes. (Expert Panel short article). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Vassallo, S. (2019). Risky driving among Australian teens. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 57-68). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Vassallo, S., & Swami, N. (2019). Tweens and teens: What do they worry about? In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 131-140). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Warren, D., Andalón, M., & Gasser, C. (2019). Shop or save: How teens manage their money. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 81-94). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., Quinn, B., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Health service use among children at risk of social-e motional problems: Opportunities for early intervention. Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Warren, D., Quinn, B., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Use of health services among children at risk of social-e motional problems: Opportunities for early intervention. Working paper. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., & Swami, N. (2019). Teenagers and sex. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 47-56). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., & Yu, M. (2019). Gambling activity among teenagers and their parents. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 69-80). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Whitehouse, G., Baird, M., & Baxter, J. A. (2019). Australia country note. In A. Koslowski (Ed.), International review of leave policies and research 2019 (pp. 61-70). London: International Network on Leave Policies and Related Research.

Yu, M., & Warren, D. (2019). Shaping futures: School subject choice and enrolment in STEM. In G. Daraganova & N. Joss (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2018 (pp. 95-108). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Updated CFCA resource sheets

Australian legal definitions: When is a child in need of protection? (December 2019)

Child protection and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (January 2020)

LGBTIQA+ communities: Glossary of common terms (November 2019)

Mandatory reporting of child abuse and neglect (June 2020)

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 110

Events and webinars

Families in Focus webinar series

Richard Weston, SNAICC. What will it take for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to live vibrant, joyful lives?, 10 June 2020.

Maree Brown, New Zealand Dept. of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Progressing New Zealand’s Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy in a COVID-1 9 context, 16 June 2020.

Katherine Ellis, YacVic; Annika McCaffrey, & Fadak Alfayadh. How young people are experiencing the social and economic impacts of COVID-1 9, 23 June 2020.

Angela Lynch, Women’s Legal Service Qld. COVID-1 9 and its impact on the family violence legal and service system, 25 June 2020.

Jay Weatherill, Thrive by Five and Former Premier of South Australia. A new early childhood development system for Australia, 30 June 2020.

CFCA webinar series

Stewart Muir, AIFS; Jade Purtell, & Lou Limoges. Young people’s experiences of leaving care and their support needs: Recent research and promising practices, 24 July 2019.

Adam Dean, AIFS; Megan Frost, Relationships Australia NSW. Responding to elder abuse: Rights, safety and participation, 28 August 2019.

Derek McCormack, Parenting Research Centre; Lesley Taylor, NAPCAN. Putting children first: Changing how we communicate with parents to improve children’s outcomes, 11 September 2019.

David MacKenzie, University of South Australia; Sandy Meessen, Barwon Child Youth and Family. Intervening early to prevent youth homelessness: Lessons from the Geelong Project, 30 October 2019.

Nicole Paterson, AIFS; Toni Cash, Queensland Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women; Chloe Warrell, BEROS-Community Living Association. Collaborative practice in child and family welfare: Building practitioners’ competence, 18 March 2020.

Rae Kaspiew, AIFS; Emma Rogers, Jackie Wruck, Queensland Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women. Sadie’s story: Helping women affected by domestic and family violence navigate a fragmented system, 1 April 2020.

Philip Mendes & Jacinta Waugh, Monash University. Preparing young people to leave care during COVID-1 9, 27 May 2020.

CFCA-Emerging Minds webinar series

Bill Wilson, Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority; Dana Shen, DS Consulting; Ruth Tulloch, Uniting Communities. Supporting the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children through a collaborative community approach, 9 July 2019.

Nicola Palfrey, Australian Child and Adolescent Trauma, Grief and Loss Network; Michelle Roberts. Supporting children after natural and human-i nduced disasters, 7 August 2019.

Gill Munro, Emerging Minds; Lisa Hofman, Jarrah House; Yinka Olaitan, & Sarah Kendrick. Working with parents affected by alcohol and other drug use: Considering the needs of children in practice, 16 October 2019.

Sarah Seekamp, University of South Australia; Ben Rogers, National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health. Parent-child play: A mental health promotion strategy for all children, 4 December 2019.

Pam Rycroft, The Bouverie Centre; Dan Moss, Emerging Minds. What is child-f ocused supervision in adult-f ocused services and how does it work?, 26 February 2020.

Liz Gordon, Queensland Program of Assistance to Survivors of Torture and Trauma; Julio Alejo, Community Access and Service SA. Cultural considerations to support children from migrant and refugee backgrounds, 13 May 2020.

Ten to Men webinar series

Brendan Quinn, Dinusha Bandara, Michelle Silbert, & Leanne Howell, AIFS. Introducing the Ten to Men study, 4 November 2019.

Brendan Quinn, Dinusha Bandara, Michelle Silbert, & Leanne Howell, AIFS. Using the data from Ten to Men, November 2019.

Appendices 111

Presentations

Bandara, D., & Daraganova. G. (2019, July). Ten to Men: Cohort profile, sampling methods, and cohort reconciliation. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

Bandara, D., & Daraganova, G. (2019, November). Indigenous data: AIFS. Paper presented to the Indigenous Data Governance Working Group, Shepparton, Vic.

Baxter, J. (2019, September). The experiences of services and families in transitioning to the new package. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Kensington, NSW.

Baxter, J. (2019, November). Why don’t dads take parental leave? Paper presented at the Raising the Bar event, Melbourne.

Bradshaw, P., Warren, D., & Vosnaki, K. (2019, September). Comparing adolescent risky behaviour in Scotland and Australia: Preliminary findings from harmonised analysis of two ‘Growing Up’ studies. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies Conference, Potsdam, Germany.

Carroll, M. (2019, September). Patterns of child care use and child care supply, before and since the Child Care Package. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Kensington, NSW.

Carson, R. (2019, July). ‘Give children a bigger voice, more of the time’ - Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the Brotherhood of St Laurence Workshop on Engaging the Voice of the Child, Fitzroy, Vic.

Carson, R. (2019, August). National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study. Paper presented to the Research and Data Priorities Working Group, Attorney-General’s Department, Online.

Carson, R. (2019, October). Elder Abuse National Research - Strengthening the evidence base: The foundation for the Australian prevalence study. Paper presented to the Eastern Elder Abuse Network, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2019, November). Family law reform. Paper presented at the Victorian Women Lawyers Panel Discussion, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2019, November). ‘Give children a bigger voice, more of the time’ - Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Project. Paper presented at the ‘Voice of the Child in Family Law, Featuring Tommy’ event, Victorian Family Law Pathways Network, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2020, June). ‘Give children a bigger voice, more of the time’ - Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the Albury Wodonga Family Law Pathways Network Conference, Wodonga, Vic.

Daraganova. G. (2019, December). Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. Paper presented to the Australian Government Department of Health, Canberra.

Daraganova, G. (2020, January). Consent and linkage in longitudinal studies. Paper presented at the CLOSER UK Conference: Preparing for the future II: International Approaches to Challenges Facing the Longitudinal Population Studies, London, UK.

Daraganova, G. (2020, June). Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. Paper presented at the Men’s Health Research Symposium, Online.

Daraganova, G., & Bandara. D. (2019, July). LSAC linkage and consent. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

Daraganova, G., & Jessup, K. (2019, July). Surveying children and young people: Experiences from 21st century population cohort studies. Workshop presented at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies, University College London Institute of Education, London, UK.

Daraganova, G., Jessup, K., Bandara. D., & Renda, J. (2019, July). Tackling attrition in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

De Maio, J., Rioseco, P., & Daraganova, G. (2019, July). Methodological innovations to collect data from a complex population. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

Dean, A. (2019, November). Elder abuse: Key issues and emerging evidence. Paper presented at the Australian Association of Social Workers Conference, Adelaide.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 112

Dean, A. (2019, November). Elder abuse: Key issues and emerging evidence. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services (FRSA) Conference, Lovedale, NSW.

El-Murr, A. (2019, November). Not just a buzzword - Breaking down intersectionality. Paper presented at the 4th Annual Domestic and Family Violence Conference ‘Research to Action’, Sydney.

El-Murr, A. (2019, December). Sexually abusive behaviours exhibited by young people. Paper presented at the Adolescent Family Violence Workshop, Melbourne.

Hand, K. (2019, September). An overview of the Child Care Package and the evaluation approach. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Kensington, NSW.

Hollonds, A. (2019, November). Grandparents who are primary carers of grandchildren. Paper presented at the Asian Family Conference, Singapore.

Hollonds, A. (2019, November). How do we build better policies for vulnerable children? Paper presented at the OECD Conference on Child Well-being, ‘Building Resilience in Vulnerable Children’, Paris, France.

Hollonds, A. (2020, March). What more must we do in national policy terms to make Australia a nation in which all children grow up safe and well? Paper presented at the National Coalition on Child Safety and Wellbeing Annual Meeting, Melbourne.

Hunter, C., Carlow, M., & Boadle, J. (2019, November). Bridging the know-d o gap: Knowledge to action. Workshop presented in Adelaide.

Jenkinson, R. (2019, October). Weighing up the odds: Young men, sports and betting. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation ‘Knowledge in Action’ Workshop, Bendigo, Vic.

Jenkinson, R. (2019, November). Young men and sports betting. Paper presented at the ‘Reducing the Risk: Understanding the Complexity of Gambling Within Professional and Community Sport’ Symposium, AFL Players’ Association Annual Conference, Parkville, Vic.

Jenkinson, R., Khokhar, T., Tajin, R., & Jatkar, U. (2019, November). National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering: Baseline Study. Paper presented to the National Framework Governance Committee, Canberra.

Jenkinson, R., Khokhar, T., Tajin, R., & Sakata, K. (2019, November). Pints ’n’ punts: Exploring the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among young Australians. Paper presented at the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs Conference, Hobart.

Jessup, K., & Daraganova, G. (2019, July). The life course of the study: Growing Up in Australia. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

Mohal, J., Bandara, D., & Daraganova, G. (2019, November). Access to information and data in Australia. Paper presented to the International Conference on Crime Observation and Criminal Analysis, Brussels, Belgium.

Mohal, J., Renda, J., Gasser, C., Clifford, S., & Lange, K. (2019, July). LSAC Data Users Workshop. Workshop presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne.

Moore, S. (2019, December). Evidence in program design and planning. Paper presented at the SPEN (State Parent Education Network) Meeting.

Muir, S. (2019, August). Expert Panel Activities 2019. Paper presented to the Communities for Children Working Group Forum.

Muir, S., Heidenreich, A., & Charman, W. (2019, September). Inside, outside, all around: Three perspectives on evaluation capacity building. Paper presented at the Australian Evaluation Conference, Sydney.

Price-Robertson, R. (2020, March). Diagnosis in children’s mental health. Paper presented to the Language of Child Mental Health Seminar Series, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne.

Price-Robertson, R., Kirkwood, D., Dean, A., Hall, T., & Paterson, N. (2019, November). Collaborative competence: What does it look like in child and family welfare? Paper presented at the Australian Association of Social Workers Conference, Adelaide.

Qu, L. (2019, November). Parenting and family relationship dynamics after separation: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of Separated Families. Paper presented at the Asian Family Conference, Singapore.

Appendices 113

Qu, L. (2019, November). Post-s eparation parenting disputes and pathways to the courts. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services (FRSA) Conference, Lovedale, NSW.

Qu, L. (2019, November). The 2006 Family Law Reforms in Australia: Methodology, findings and learnings. Paper presented to the Ministry of Social and Family Development, Singapore.

Qu, L., Gray, M., Stanton, D., & Weston, R. (2019, September). Relationship breakdown and subjective wellbeing: A comparative cross-c ountry analysis. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Kensington, NSW.

Quinn, B., Warren, D., Robinson, E., Hayes, L., Wade, C., Daraganova, G., & Rioseco, P. (2019, September). Medicare Benefit Schedule (MBS) service engagement among a prospective cohort of children with symptoms of poor psychological adjustment: Trends, gaps and unmet need. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Sydney.

Rioseco, P., Daraganova, G., & De Maio, J. (2019, July). Participation and non-r esponse: Insights from a large scale longitudinal study of recently arrived humanitarian migrants. Paper presented at the European Survey Research Association 8th Biennial Conference, Zagreb, Croatia.

Rioseco, P., Terhaag, S., & Daraganova, G. (2019, July). Self-r ated health and post-tr aumatic stress disorder among refugee couples: Findings from the Building a New Life in Australia study. Paper presented at the 20th International Mental Health Conference, Gold Coast.

Rogers, C. (2019, September). Insights about experiences of the Child Care Package for families and services. Paper presented at the Australian Social Policy Conference, Kensington, NSW.

Sakata, K., Tajin, R., Khokhar, T., & Jenkinson, R. (2020, March). Gambling harms, at-r isk alcohol use and smoking in Australia. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Lunchtime Learning Series, Melbourne.

Tajin, R., Sakata, K., Khokhar, T., & Jenkinson, R. (2020, March). Gambling participation and related harm among Victorian adults: Findings from HILDA 2015 survey. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Lunchtime Learning Series, Melbourne.

Van Hooff, M., Lawrence-Wood, E., & Daraganova, G. (2019, November). Combat, transition, first responders and families: The Australian context. Paper presented at the Global Alliance Conference on Post-traumatic Stress, Adelaide.

Warren, D. (2019, September). Children’s housing experiences: Insights from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies Conference, Potsdam, Germany.

Warren, D., & Daraganova, G. (2019, September). Eating behaviours and attitudes of Australian adolescents. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies Conference, Potsdam, Germany.

Warren, D., Vassallo, S., & Daraganova, G. (2019, September). Adolescent delinquent behaviour: Are predictors different for girls and boys? Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies Conference, Potsdam, Germany.

Submissions

The Institute prepares submissions to inquiries and responds to requests for consultation. Such activity is an indication of the Institute’s involvement in the policy and research process.

In 2019/20, the Institute made the following submissions:

ƒ Submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs Inquiry into Age Verification for Online Wagering and Online Pornography (October 2019)

ƒ Submission to the Joint Select Committee on Australia’s Family Law System (January 2020)

ƒ Submission to the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health (January 2020)

ƒ Submission to the Australian Banking Association Consultation Paper on the Use of Credit Cards for Gambling Transactions (March 2020)

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 114

Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations

Acronym or abbreviation Description

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ACCOs Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations

AGD Attorney-G eneral’s Department

AGRC Australian Gambling Research Centre

AIFS Australian Institute of Family Studies

ALRC Australian Law Reform Commission

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANROWS Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety

APS Australian Public Service

ASL Average Service Level

BCP Business Continuity Plan

BNLA Building a New Life in Australia

CATI Computer Assisted Telephone Interview

CEI Centre for Evidence and Implementation

CFCA Child Family Community Australia

CFO Chief Financial Officer

CMS Content management system

COVID-19 Coronavirus

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

DCB Departmental Capital Budget

DESE Department of Education, Skills and Employment

DISER Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources

DLIA Data Linkage and Integration Authority

DoH Department of Health

DSS Department of Social Services

DVA Department of Veterans’ Affairs

EL Executive Level

FaC Families and Children

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

FRR Financial Reporting Rule

FVOCI Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income

Continued on next page

Appendices 115

Acronym or abbreviation Description

FVTPL Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

GST Goods and Services Tax

HILDA The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey

HR Human resources

HWT Herald and Weekly Times

IPAA Institute of Public Administration Australia

IPS Information Publication Scheme

JLL Jones, Lang, La Salle

KMP Key Management Personnel

KT Knowledge Translation

KTI Knowledge Translation and Impact

LLS Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies

LSAC Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

MCEC Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

MP Member of Parliament

NABERS National Australian Built Environment Rating System

NFP Not-for-profit

NWC National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

OPA Official Public Account

PARI Psychological Antecedents of Refugee Integration

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PSPF Protective Security Policy Framework

PSS Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

QFCC Queensland Family and Child Commission

ROU Right of Use

SES Senior Executive Service

SME Small and medium enterprises

SNAICC Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care

SOETM Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts

SPPI Solely payments of principal and interest

UK United Kingdom

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 116

Appendix E: List of requirements

The Annual Report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit. This index refers to mandatory and suggested reporting items.

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI iii A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by

accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) v Table of contents Mandatory

17AJ(b) 123 Alphabetical index Mandatory

17AJ(c) 115 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms Mandatory

17AJ(d) 117 List of requirements Mandatory

17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer Mandatory

17AJ(f) ii Entity’s website address Mandatory

17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 2 A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 12 A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 13 A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) 14 A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) iv A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) 13 Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 13 Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 117

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 13 Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period. Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the performance of the entity

Annual performance statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 16 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule. Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on financial performance

17AF(1)(a) 50 A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) 51 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(d) Management and accountability

Corporate governance

17AG(2)(a) 54 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) 54 A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) 54 A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) 54 A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) 54 An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 118

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(2)(d)-(e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, mandatory

Audit committee

17AG(2A)(a) 55 A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) 55 The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) 55 The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(d) 55 Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) 55 The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

External scrutiny

17AG(3) 58 Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny. Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. If applicable, mandatory

Management of human resources

17AG(4)(a) 59 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 61-62 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-on going basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees

(b) statistics on part-time employees

(c) statistics on gender

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 119

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(b) 61-62 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-on going basis; including the following:

ƒ statistics on staffing classification level

ƒ statistics on full-time employees

ƒ statistics on part-time employees

ƒ statistics on gender

ƒ statistics on staff location

ƒ statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) 62 Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) 62 Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc. identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c). Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 62 The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 62 A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, mandatory

Assets management

17AG(5) N/A An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities. If applicable, mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) 63 An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) 63 A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 120

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7)(b) 63 A statement that ‘During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]’.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 63 A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) 63 A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 64 A statement that ‘[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 64 An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature - a statement that ‘[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

Financial statements

17AD(e) 65 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 121

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

Executive remuneration

17AD(da) 95 Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule Mandatory

17AD(f) Other mandatory information

17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that ‘During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) 104 If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that ‘Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].’

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(c) 104

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) 105 Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2) 104 Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

Note: N/A = not applicable

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 122

© GettyImages/franckreporter

Seven —

Index

Index 123

accountability, 53-64 advertising and market research, 104 advisory groups, 55 agency overview, 11-14 agency resource statements, 106-7 agreements, individual and collective, 62 assets management, 63 assets, total, 51 Auditor’s Report, 66-7 Australian Gambling Research Centre, 4, 13 Australian National Audit Office access clauses, 64

balance sheet, 51, 71-2 budgeted expenses, 51, 107 Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA), 7

business continuity, 57 Business Continuity Plan, 46, 54, 57

capacity-building, 42 case studies impact, 22, 38-45 organisational, 46-9

cash flow statement, 75-6 CFCA-Emerging Minds webinar series, 5, 111 CFCA resource sheets, 110 CFCA webinar series, 111 change, theory of, 19 Child Care Package Evaluation, 4, 8 Child Family Community Australia (CFCA), 5, 1, 40 collaboration, 16, 23-4, 34-5 collective agreements, 62 commissioning bodies, 64 committees, 54-8, 60-1 communicating research, 8 conferences, 6, 8, 10-12, 23, 30, 33-4, 44-5, 60 consultants, 63 contact details, ii, 105 contracts, exempt, 64 corporate and statutory reporting, 56 corporate governance, 54 Corporate Plan, 12, 14, 32-5 Corporate Services, 13, 54 COVID-19 pandemic, 2-5, 7-10, 22-7, 30, 32-4, 36,

40-2, 44-7, 50, 60, 104 culture, 48

Data Linkage and Integration Authority, 6 Data Management Strategy, 30-1, 35-6

deliverables, 14 direct influence, 20 Director’s review, 1-10 disability reporting, 104-5

ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, 104 Elder Abuse Prevalence Study, 6 Elder Abuse Research Program, 22, 38-9 Emerging Minds, 5, 8, 111 employee skills and qualifications, 59 employees see management of human resources employment agreements, 62 environmental performance, 104 ethical standards, 58 Evaluation of the Small Claims Property Pilot, 6 events, 8, 111 Executive Group, 55 exempt contracts, 64 expenses, 50-1, 107 Expert Advisory Committee, 56 external scrutiny, 58

Families and Children Expert Panel, 5, 8 Families Framework, 12, 16-17 Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-1 9, 3, 40

Families in Focus webinar series, 44, 111 Family Law Act 1975, 12, 54 family law research, 6 finances, 9 financial activities, report on performance, 50-1 financial statements, 65-102 fraud control, 54 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 105

Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Survey, 4 goals, 21, 31 governance committees, 54-5 governance, corporate, 54 Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of

Australian Children (LSAC), 6-8

health and safety, 7, 61, 104 Health and Safety Committee, 61 Human Research Ethics Committee, 56 human resources, management of, 59-62 impact, 33-4 impact case studies, 22, 38-45

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 124

impact pathway, 18 impact performance, 29 Independent Auditor’s Report, 66-7 individual and collective agreements, 62 Information Publication Scheme, 105 initiatives, strategic, 31-6 internal audit, 57

key management personnel, 95 key performance criteria, 14 key reporting questions, 22 key research areas, 12 knowledge creation, 16 Knowledge Translation and Impact (KTI) Lab, 5

Lawyer-assisted Property Mediation: Legal Aid Commission Trial, 6 learning and development, 12, 24, 30, 59-60 liabilities, total, 51 lifecourse studies, 6-7 list of requirements, 117-22 longitudinal and lifecourse studies, 6-7 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), 6-8

management and accountability, 53-64 management of human resources, 59-62 management, assets, 63 mandatory and suggested reporting items, 117-122 mandatory information, 104-5 market research, 104 media engagement, 12, 25, 27, 63

National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering, 4, 8 net asset position, 51 notes to and forming part of the financial

statements, 77-102

operating expenses, 50 operating results, 50 operating revenue, 50 organisational

capability, 22, 26-7 case studies, 46-9 structure, 13 sustainability, 35-6 Outcome 1, 51, 107 outcome and program structure, 14 outcomes, 25

outcomes, performance, 27 outlook for 2020/21, 10 output performance, 24 outputs, 23 overview, agency, 11-14

partnerships, 23 performance, output, 24 performance, report on, 15-51 performance against AIFS strategic initiatives, 30-6 performance criteria, 14 performance framework, 20-1 performance statement, 16 Pillars 1-4, 21, 31-6 Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers Study, 4 Pivot to COVID-19: The agency-wide transition to

remote working, 46 presentations, 112-14 privacy, 57-8 procurement initiatives to support small business, 64 Program 1.1, 51, 107 Program Logic, 21 program structure, 14 Protective Security Policy Framework, 57 Public Governance Performance and Accountability

Act 2013, 68 Public Service Act 1999, 12, 60-1 publications, 8, 108-10 purchasing, 63

qualifications, 59

recruitment, 60 Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence against Women, 4 report on performance, 15-51 reporting, corporate and statutory, 56 requirements, list of, 117-22 research

areas, key, 12 communicating, 8, 18 directions, performance against, 8, 18, 23, 26 highlights, 3-7 impact case studies, 22 projects, 3-4, 6, 23, 40, 55-6 reports, 25, 33 resource statements, agency 106-7 results, operating, 50 revenue, operating, 50 Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, 55

Index 125

risk management, 57-8 role and functions, iv, 12

security, 57 seminars, 12, 104 senior executive members, 55 Senior Leadership Group, 55 senior management groups, 55-6 skills and qualifications, 59 small business procurement initiatives, 64 social media, 8, 60 staff engagement, participation and development, 60 staff survey on COVID-19 transition, 26 staffing overview, 61-2 staffing see management of human resources stakeholder feedback surveys, 27, 29 Statement by the Director and Chief Financial

Officer, 68 statement of changes in equity, 73-4 statement of comprehensive income, 69-70 statement of financial position, 71-2 statutory reporting, 56 Strategic Directions, 56 Strategic Framework, 17 strategic goals, 20 strategic impact, 29 strategic initiatives, 30-6 Strategic Plan 2020-2026, 10 strategic priorities, 12, 56 submissions, 114

Tech One to BAU, 36 Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 7 Ten to Men webinar series, 111 Theory of Change, 19 total assets, 51 total liabilities, 51

values and behaviours, 48-9, 60

webinars, 5, 7-8, 12, 23-5, 27, 33-4, 44, 60, 104 websites, 5, 8, 10, 12, 26, 30, 63, 105 What Works for Families Research Framework, 12, 16-17

Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 61, 104 work health and safety, 7, 104 workforce planning, 59 Workplace Relations Committee, 60

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 126

Photo credits

Front cover: © GettyImages/AleksandarNakic

Back cover: © GettyImages/Evgen_Prozhyrko

© GettyImages/jarenwicklund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 1

© GettyImages/martinedoucet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 3

© GettyImages/lisegagne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 11

© GettyImages/SolStock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 15

© GettyImages/mixetto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 16

© GettyImages/g-stockstudio . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 37

© GettyImages/Peter Carruthers . . . . . . . . . . . p 39

© GettyImages/andresr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 41

© GettyImages/AJ_Watt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 43

© GettyImages/Maryna Andriichenko . . . . . . p 45

© GettyImages/Neil Bussey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 47

© GettyImages/AleksandarNakic . . . . . . . . . . . p 52

© GettyImages/MonicaNinker . . . . . . . . . . . . . p 65

© GettyImages/Vladimir Vladimirov . . . . . . . p 103

© GettyImages/franckreporter . . . . . . . . . . . . p 123

ANNUAL REPORT 2019/20

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2019/20

Discovering what works for families

Visit us online aifs.gov.au