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Bureau of Meteorology—Report for 2019-20


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ANNUAL REPORT 2019*20

CONNECT WITH US

BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 2019*20

www.bom.gov.au

Trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services for Australia-all day, every day.

The Bureau’s work supports a wide variety of sectors, enabling a safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia.

Further information For more information concerning this report contact:

Manager, Planning and Reporting Bureau of Meteorology 700 Collins Street, Docklands, Victoria 3008 GPO Box 1289, Melbourne, Victoria 3001

Tel: (03) 9669 4000 Fax: (03) 9669 4699 Email: publications@bom.gov.au

Other information and contact details are available on the Bureau of Meteorology website www.bom.gov.au

This report is available electronically at www.bom.gov.au/annualreport

ISSN: 1037-3608

© Commonwealth of Australia 2020

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced without prior written permission from the Bureau of Meteorology. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Design and Production Manager, Communications, Enterprise Services Group, Bureau of Meteorology, GPO Box 1289, Melbourne, Victoria 3001. Information regarding reproduction of material from the Bureau website can be found at www.bom.gov.au/other/copyright.shtml.

Design: Bureau of Meteorology Design and Production

200215-1

Our vision To be an organisation of global standing, that is highly valued by the community for our pivotal role in enabling a safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia.

Our mission To provide trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services for Australia—all day, every day.

Our strategy Our Strategy is focused on four pillars of success:

IMPACT AND VALUE

Products and services that benefit the Australian community and drive competitive advantage for businesses and industries.

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Outstanding people, science, systems and infrastructure, working together for maximum simplicity, productivity and agility.

INSIGHT AND INNOVATION

Deep understanding, creative thinking and enduring partnerships that generate novel solutions

for our customers and our organisation.

THE BUREAU WAY

One enterprise, that is safe and diverse, where our people grow and are empowered to excel, and where our customers come first, trust us and consider that we are a pleasure to work with.

Annual Report 2019-20 Letter of transmittal 1

Letter of transmittal

The Hon Sussan Ley MP Minister for the Environment

Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

As the accountable authority for the Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau), I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for 2019-20. The report details our ongoing efforts

to provide trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services for Australia—all day, every day. The report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013 which requires that you present the report to the Parliament.

In accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I certify that the Bureau has a fraud risk assessment and fraud control plan, and has in place appropriate fraud prevention,

detection and investigation procedures for dealing with, recording and reporting fraud, and that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the Bureau.

Yours sincerely

Dr Andrew Johnson FTSE FAICD CEO and Director of Meteorology

25 September 2020

Office of the CEO and Director of Meteorology Bureau of Meteorology GPO Box 413, Brisbane QLD 4001 Australia

Annual Report 2019-20 Contents 2

Contents Introduction and Summaries 3

The Bureau at a glance 3

Community Impacts 5

2019-20 Snapshot 7

National weather event summary 9

Section 1 - Overview 15

Review by the CEO and Director of Meteorology 15

Agency overview 20

Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 24

Section 3 - Group performance 38

National Forecast Services 38

Business Solutions 54

Data and Digital 64

Science and Innovation 78

Strategy and Performance 88

Corporate Services 93

Recognition of performance 99

Section 4 - Organisational Management 104

Bureau of Meteorology Organisational Chart 104

Corporate governance 106

Corporate responsibility 118

People management 133

Financial resource management 150

Section 5 - Financial Statements 156

Section 6 - Appendices 199

Glossary 199

List of Requirements 202

Index 206

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 3

Introduction and Summaries The Bureau at a glance Our purpose

Our purpose is defined by our mission:

To provide trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services for Australia—all day, every day.

To achieve our purpose—across the domains of weather, water, climate and oceans—we:

• monitor and report on current conditions;

• provide forecasts, warnings and long-term outlooks;

• analyse and explain trends;

• foster greater public understanding and use of the information we provide; and

• continue to extend our understanding of, and ability to forecast, Australian conditions.

Our vision

Our vision is:

To be an organisation of global standing, that is highly valued by the community for our pivotal role in enabling a safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia.

Our strategy

Our strategy is focused on four pillars of success:

IMPACT AND VALUE —Products and services that benefit the Australian community and drive competitive advantage for businesses and industries.

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE—Outstanding people, science, systems and infrastructure, working

together for maximum simplicity, productivity and agility.

INSIGHT AND INNOVATION—Deep understanding, creative thinking and enduring partnerships that

generate novel solutions for our customers and our organisation.

THE BUREAU WAY—One enterprise, that is safe and diverse, where our people grow and are empowered

to excel, and where our customers come first, trust us and consider that we are a pleasure to work with.

Authority

The Bureau operates under the authority of the Meteorology Act 1955 and the Water Act 2007. The Bureau

is an Executive Agency under the Public Service Act 1999, and a non-corporate entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The Meteorology Act 1955 requires the Bureau to

fulfil Australia’s international obligations under the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and related international treaties and agreements.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 4

Portfolio and Ministers

The Bureau operates within the Agriculture, Water and the Environment Portfolio reporting to the Minister

for the Environment, the Hon Sussan Ley MP. On water-related matters, the Bureau reports to the Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia, the Hon Keith Pitt MP.

Funding basis

The Bureau receives the majority of its funding from the Australian Government ($263.3 million in 2019-20). Additional revenue ($74.9 million in 2019-20) was derived from other sources, including the sale

of goods and services. More information is provided in the Financial resource management chapter and in the Environment and Energy Portfolio Budget Statements 2019-20.

Under the Portfolio Budget Statements, the Bureau is responsible to the Australian Government for Program 1.1 - Bureau of Meteorology, and for delivering the following outcome:

Informed safety, security and economic decisions by governments, industry, and the community through

the provision of information, forecasts, services and research relating to weather, climate and water.

Our staff

As at 30 June 2020, the Bureau had 1399 ongoing and 194 non-ongoing staff, as well as 236 paid and over 4600 volunteer observers who help maintain Australia’s climate record. More information can be found

in the People management chapter.

Bureau staff are located across Australia, on remote islands and in Antarctica. The Bureau’s administrative

and operational headquarters are in Melbourne. We observe and forecast from the Antarctic to north of the

equator, and from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific. More information on the location of our staff and services is provided in the Agency overview.

Our values

The values that guide our behaviours are:

• safety;

• customer focus;

• passion and tenacity;

• responsibility;

• humility; and

• integrity.

More information on the Bureau’s values can be found in the Agency overview.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 5

Community Impacts The Bureau is entirely focused on providing products and services that benefit the Australian community and drive competitive advantage for businesses and industries. Here are some of the ways the Bureau

contributes to a safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia.

Our Severe Weather Warnings

• alert Australians to protect themselves and their property from severe weather such as tropical

cyclones, thunderstorms and damaging winds;

• warn communities to prepare for and respond to the effects of flooding, including making timely

evacuations; and

• support the emergency services in carrying out effective emergency and disaster preparation,

response and recovery.

Our Fire Weather Warnings

• alert the community to weather conditions conducive to the spread of dangerous bushfires;

• help State and Territory fire agencies in predicting fire conditions and making decisions about total

fire ban days; and

• ·allow emergency services to pre-position personnel and equipment to minimise fire damage.

Our Marine and Ocean Services

• support safety at sea and inform search and rescue operations;

• support business operations in offshore oil and gas, fishing and aquaculture industries; and

• help fishers, boaters and water sports enthusiasts to stay safe and plan their trips on the water.

Our Aviation and Defence Forecasts and Warnings

• facilitate safe and efficient aviation sector operations;

• inform flight planning and fuel load decisions;

• provide alerts on hazardous weather and atmospheric conditions such as volcanic ash; and

• support Australia’s defence operations in Australia and overseas by delivering specialised

forecasting and advisory services.

Our UV and Heatwave Forecasts

• help Australians avoid dangerous UV exposure, to protect against skin cancer;

• help protect vulnerable Australians against heat exhaustion and heatstroke; and

• alert health authorities to periods of heightened demand, to allow for implementation of heatwave

management plans.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 6

Our Climate Maps and Information

• help Australians understand the nation’s climate patterns, climate trends and variations, and

climate-related risks;

• report on rainfall deficiencies and support drought assistance programs;

• support insurance claims processes; and

• support the development of climate-appropriate infrastructure.

Our Water and Environmental Information Services

• underpin water planning, water use and efficiency and water allocations;

• guide investment in and maintenance of water infrastructure, and aid decision-making in water

supply and irrigation activities; and

• support the management of ecosystems.

Our Seasonal Climate Outlooks

• help farmers make decisions about crop planting, fertiliser application, stock management, fodder

and water restocking strategies;

• allow emergency managers to prepare the community ahead of bushfire and tropical cyclone

seasons; and

• help retailers and tourist operators to tailor their activities to seasonal variations.

Our Extreme, Temperature, Sunlight and Wind Forecasts

• allow energy market operators to forecast power demand, particularly during heatwave conditions;

• support the renewable energy sector by informing site selection, production potential and energy

output estimates from solar, wind and hydropower installations; and

• support activities in the construction and transport industries.

Our Everyday Weather Forecasts

• help Australians to plan their sporting and outdoor activities;

• help individuals and families to organise their daily commute; and

• help tourism operators and event managers to optimise their activities and events, and to prepare

contingencies when required.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 7

2019-20 Snapshot

Eye on the environment What we delivered

63 weather surveillance radars

30 field offices

701 automatic weather stations

~6300 rainfall stations

13 wind profilers

38 upper air balloon stations

13 solar observatories and terrestrial radiation monitors

32 wave buoys

45 sea level stations

33 satellites operated by international partners

5400+ hydrological monitoring stations

operated by the Bureau and its partners

4600+ volunteer observers

703 000+ public forecast services

107 000+ marine safety broadcasts

17 000+ weather and ocean warnings

1700+ flood watches and warnings

32 000 fire weather forecasts and warnings

2+ million aviation forecast products

216 critical event briefings to the Australian Government Crisis Coordination Centre

500 000+ climate graphs and charts

172 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles

published

250+ climate briefings

210 locations in the seasonal streamflow forecasts service

The reach of our services Our service highlights

over 85% of website visitors returned the

following month

860 000+ Facebook followers

618 000+ Twitter followers

26 000+ subscribers to the Bureau’s YouTube

channel

489 million BOM Weather app sessions

51% increase in Climate Data Online

downloads

14 000+ responses to media enquires

~97% of the population covered by a Bureau radar

~92% of the population within 20 km of a

Bureau automatic weather station

11 bilateral agreements with overseas counterparts

$74.9 million in own source income

92.8% of routine forecast products delivered on

schedule

98.9% uptime of automatic weather stations

98.0% uptime of real-time radars

97.9% uptime of wind profilers

99.8% uptime of internet services

99.9% uptime of the Australis supercomputer

Top 5 performance of ACCESS in global forecasting models

16 minutes average time from earthquake to

tsunami bulletin

+54 Net Promoter Score for community customers

+61 Net Promoter Score for emergency

management customers and partners

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 8

How we performed The Bureau’s performance is measured against 19 success measures. For each measure, a critical assessment determines whether the Bureau’s performance met expectations, partially met expectations or

did not meet expectations. For more details see the Annual Performance Statement.

Impact and value

The financial and social value we deliver to government, industry and the Australian community. Performance met expectations

The levels of satisfaction and trust our customers and partners have in us and the way we interact with them. Performance met expectations

Our reputation among our customers and partners, and within the Australian community. Performance met expectations

The level of uptake of our services by new customers and the return rate from existing customers. Performance met expectations

The conversion rate from ideas to opportunities to customer outcomes. Performance met expectations

Operational excellence

Our delivery to customer requirements. Performance met expectations

Internationally benchmarked levels of capacity utilisation, product and service performance, system reliability, resilience and speed to market. Performance met expectations

Our delivery to budget. Performance met expectations

Independent verification of the quality of our services. Performance met expectations

The levels of workforce skill and competency benchmarked with our peers and against accepted international standards. Performance met expectations

Insight and innovation

The depth, breadth and quality of our external partnerships and collaborations. Performance met expectations

Our innovation maturity is reflected in our strategy, culture, processes and systems. Performance did not meet expectations

The quality of our scientific publications, benchmarked internationally. Performance met expectations

The speed of delivery from concept to prototype and from prototype to customer acceptance. Performance partially met expectations

Feedback from staff, customers and partners on our capacity to innovate. Performance partially met expectations

The Bureau Way

Our performance benchmarked internationally against work health, safety and environment best practice. Performance partially met expectations

Feedback from staff and customers on the alignment of our stated intent with our actual behaviours and actions, especially those of our senior leaders.

Performance met expectations

A diverse and inclusive workforce, benchmarked against the community. Performance partially met expectations

The number and outcomes of collaborative and whole-of-enterprise activities. Performance met expectations

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 9

National weather event summary

JULY

6-9: Fog persisted across Tasmania due to a high-pressure system over the southern Tasman

Sea.

10: Strong to gale force winds, heavy showers and thunderstorms in South Australia resulted in

power outages in the Mount Lofty Ranges. A tree fell on a house and car in Strathalbyn and a

caravan was blown off the road near Callington. A tornado was reported near Lucindale.

10-12: Tasmania experienced several days of

strong and gusty winds which resulted in widespread power outages, damaged roofs and

downed trees across the north of the State. Snow fell in Tasmania’s highlands down to 300 m, while

wind gusts reached 150 km/h on Hogan Island.

12-14: 40 to 50 cm of snow fell across alpine

areas in Victoria.

AUGUST

7-8: Southeast Australia experienced damaging

winds, squally showers, and storms. In South Australia storms brought localised flooding to the

Adelaide Hills, with power blackouts affecting thousands of properties. Emergency services in

Victoria and New South Wales received more

than 800 calls for assistance. Heavy snow fell in elevated areas.

16-17: The lower west and southwest coasts of Western Australia experienced severe wind gusts

and snow fell on Bluff Knoll in the Stirling Range.

19: Heavy fog blanketed much of Greater Brisbane, with low-lying cloud spreading as far

west as the Lockyer Valley and Scenic Rim in Queensland.

21-23: In Queensland, bushfires burned at Bribie Island, Noosa Heads and Dunwich in North

Stradbroke Island.

29: A tornado at Harvey in southwestern Western Australia damaged five homes.

SEPTEMBER

1-10: Severe frost damaged crops in southwest Western Australia, with some low minimum

temperature records set for September, including

−5.5 °C at Salmon Gums Research Station.

6: Thunderstorms over the northeast of Victoria

spawned a tornado at Peechelba, resulting in property damage and death of about a dozen

cattle.

11: 70 fires burning in Queensland scorched

more than 33 000 ha and destroyed 17 homes at

Peregian Beach, the Scenic Rim, Applethorpe, Stanthorpe and Biboohra (Mareeba).

9-12: More than 50 fires were active in New South Wales, with five fires burning out of control

at Drake near Tenterfield, Ebor near Armidale and Shark Creek in the Clarence Valley. After a

reprieve on the 11th, winds strengthened during

the 12th, expanding the fire fronts.

16: Snow fell overnight in most parts of Canberra,

with 5-8 cm also falling at Goulburn.

17-18: Frost caused crop damage across

southeastern South Australia and parts of western Victoria.

20: Severe winds were reported around

Melbourne, with an A380 aircraft forced to make an emergency landing at Avalon Airport due to

strong wind shear.

OCTOBER

1: Severe thunderstorms brought heavy rainfall to the Sunshine Coast. Caboolture had falls of

around 100 mm in two hours.

8: A house was destroyed by fire at Thornton in

Queensland. Other fires were burning at Grandchester, The Ridge, Mount Sylvia, Mount

Morgan and Childers, but all were under control

by the 9th.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 10

10: Having burned more than 78 000 ha since early September, the Long Gully Road fire at

Drake in New South Wales resulted in two fatalities at Coongbar.

17: In New South Wales, 44 homes were

destroyed by the Busbys Flat fire, 19 in the Drake fire and another lost at the Purgatory Creek fire at

Jackadgery, west of Grafton. One hundred and fifty-three outbuildings and seven other facilities

were destroyed.

Bushfire at Busbys Flat.

17: Severe thunderstorms developed from the

Central Highlands, the Darling Downs and South East Coast districts of Queensland. Strong winds

brought down trees in the Lockyer Valley and power outages affected around 20 000 homes.

24: Several fires burned across South Australia,

including one at Wongulla where several firefighters were injured.

NOVEMBER

9-15: Numerous bushfires were burning across

eastern Queensland during November, with 15 homes lost at Cobraball (near Yeppoon) and

one lost at Cooroibah (near Noosa).

11: A statewide total fire ban and State of Emergency was declared across New South

Wales due to extreme and catastrophic bushfire conditions. The Greater Sydney and Hunter

Valley regions saw the first forecast catastrophic conditions for those areas since the rating was

introduced.

12: A fire at Port Lincoln, on South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula, burned about 5000 ha and

damaged at least 11 properties.

12: Poor air quality and reduced visibility was a

feature in Greater Sydney during the month, with

smoke from bushfires and dust resulting in many days of air quality alerts being issued.

17: Severe thunderstorms over southeast Queensland brought large hail around 4-6 cm in

diameter to the Sunshine Coast region.

21: Lightning strikes and hot, gusty winds

resulted in more than 60 fires across Victoria,

with large fires in East Gippsland, at Rochester, and at Mount Glasgow north of Ballarat. A Code

Red fire danger was declared for the Mallee and Northern Country. Strong winds blew debris into

powerlines, leaving thousands of Victorians without power, and caused a dust storm at

Mildura.

26: Major storms saw strong winds across New South Wales, causing widespread damage and

major power outages. The State Emergency Service (SES) received over 2000 calls for

assistance.

DECEMBER

11: Severe storms over Brisbane delivered

record daily rainfall for December, with more than 120 mm falling in two hours leading to flash

flooding in the metropolitan region.

13: Severe storms over southeast Queensland

produced giant hail 8-10 cm in diameter at Wolvi

and Wilsons Pocket near Gympie, and 11.5 cm hail at Goomboorian.

17-20: A severe to extreme heatwave in South Australia set records tumbling. Nullarbor

recorded a maximum of 49.9 °C on the 19th; the State’s hottest December temperature and the

fourth hottest ever recorded in Australia. Adelaide

also had its hottest December day with 44.8 °C, exceeding the previous record from 1904.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 11

20-31: Significant fires across South Australia included the Cudlee Creek fire, northeast of

Adelaide, that burned 23 200 ha, causing one fatality and the loss of 87 homes. Fires on

Kangaroo Island burned almost half the island,

including both farmland and wilderness areas. The fires resulted in two fatalities, and the loss of

89 houses and 296 other structures. Tens of thousands of livestock and countless native

animals were killed. The fire was declared safe in February following heavy rain and thunderstorms.

The aftermath of the Cudlee Creek fire.

23: Widespread areas of smoke extended across

eastern and southern Victoria from fires burning in New South Wales, Gippsland and southwest

Victoria, and persisted over several days.

31: Accumulated Forest Fire Danger Index

values were the highest on record for December over areas of southeastern Australia and

Tasmania, including regions of significant fire

activity in southern New South Wales, East Gippsland, and South Australia. By the end of

December, more than 5 million ha had been burned across Australia since the start of July,

including 3.6 million in New South Wales, half a million in Victoria, 250 000 in Queensland, and

more than 60 000 in South Australia. At least

18 lives had been lost, and more than 1600 homes had been destroyed.

JANUARY

1-2: Extreme heat affected much of Greater

Sydney, with temperatures reaching 46.8 °C at Richmond on the 1st.

4: Canberra Airport reached 44.0 °C -- the highest temperature ever recorded in the

Australian Capital Territory (ACT), exceeding the previous record from 1939.

6-10: Tropical cyclone Blake briefly crossed over

the Dampier Peninsula on the 6th, before moving back to water and making landfall a second time

east of Wallal Downs on the 7th. Blake moved through the east Pilbara and Western Australian

interior bringing heavy rainfall and flooding, causing extensive road closures.

7-10: Heavy rain resulted in major flooding in the

Hawkesbury-Nepean and Georges rivers, and local flooding and coastal erosion were seen in

some parts of Sydney. Observatory Hill recorded 391.6 mm of rain in four days.

11-17: From a tropical low that formed in the Arafura Sea and tracked westwards across the

Top End, Tropical cyclone Claudia formed off

Western Australia’s Kimberly coast and was upgraded to a severe tropical cyclone on the 12th

as it moved further out to sea. The system generated locally heavy rainfall across the

western Top End.

13-15: Smoke haze from bushfires extended

across most of Victoria, including Melbourne. The

State recorded the worst air quality in the world on the 14th, as smoke from fires in East

Gippsland spread. Extensive smoke from bushfires persisted in regions across New South

Wales and the ACT.

19: Severe thunderstorms developed over central and eastern Victoria, bringing heavy rainfall and

giant hail, up to 5.5 cm in diameter at Glen Iris in Melbourne’s southeast.

20: One of the most severe hailstorms recorded in the ACT was felt in Canberra, with hail of

4-6 cm in diameter falling across the city causing

extensive damage to buildings and motor vehicles.

20-22: Widespread rainfall helped reduce the number of uncontained bushfires in Victoria’s

east. Bushfires burned more than 1.5 million ha across Victoria during January.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 12

27-31: A large fire burned in Namadgi National Park south of Canberra, spanning over

80 000 ha. A State of Emergency was declared for the ACT for the first time since the 2003

bushfires.

31: Raised dust fell as dirty brown rain over southern Victoria. High temperatures and

humidity fuelled thunderstorms over the southwest, generating strong winds that knocked

over several electricity transmission towers near Colac.

31: A localised severe thunderstorm impacted

Port Lincoln in South Australia, resulting in significant flash flooding.

FEBRUARY

1: Heavy and intense thunderstorms moved

across South Australia. Widespread rainfall totals of 50 mm or more were recorded in central and

northern regions, leading to flash flooding in

some areas.

1-2: Extreme heat affected many parts of New

South Wales, with numerous February record- high maximum and minimum temperatures. The

minimum temperature of 34.7 °C at Condobolin was a February record for the State.

1-15: Heavy rainfall caused flooding on

numerous rivers in Queensland and eastern New South Wales. Significant flood levels were

recorded in in the Georgina/Eyre, Logan/Albert, Condamine/Balonne and Warrego catchments in

Queensland, and on the Orara, Hawkesbury- Nepean and Georges rivers in New South Wales.

6-10: Tropical cyclone Damien developed to the

northwest of Broome, moving west-southwest then south towards the Pilbara coast, intensifying

to a severe Category 3 system on the 7th. Damien made landfall over the Karratha and

Dampier regions on the 8th, before weakening

and moving inland through the Pilbara, east Gascoyne and northern Goldfields districts.

12: Severe thunderstorms brought heavy and intense rainfall to Queensland’s southeast coast

leading to swift water rescues, inundation of

homes, and roads cut. 125 mm fell over two hours at Coolum and 30 nursing home residents

were evacuated.

13: After widespread rain in New South Wales, all

fires were declared under control.

13: After impacts in Vanuatu and New Caledonia, ex-tropical cyclone Uesi approached Lord Howe

Island with strong winds damaging buildings and boats. Large waves were recorded from

southeast Queensland and down the New South Wales coast.

23-25: Tropical cyclone Esther formed over the

Gulf of Carpentaria and made landfall between Mornington Island, and the Northern Territory and

Queensland border on the 24th. The system weakened to an ex-tropical cyclone as it moved

slowly west across the Northern Territory delivering widespread rainfall. Stopping near the

Kimberley coast in Western Australia, the system

reversed its track and moved eastwards across the Northern Territory again at the end of the

month.

23-24: An extensive dust-storm swept across the

interior of the Northern Territory reducing visibility to less than 200 m in many locations.

24-27: Tropical cyclone Ferdinand formed to the

northwest of Western Australia and slowly tracked to the southwest. The system had no

impact on the Australian continent.

23-29: Heavy rainfall produced very significant

river levels in Queensland; the highest recorded

since 2012. Major flooding was recorded across the Balonne River catchment including at St

George and Dirranbandi, and in the Bulloo River at Bollon and Quilpie.

27: Severe storms developed over the southeast, producing heavy rainfall around the Sunshine

and Gold coasts. 76 mm was recorded in one

hour at Coomera Shores.

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 13

MARCH

1-9: The remnants of ex-tropical cyclone Esther

brought widespread heavy rainfall and flooding to many parts of the country. March daily rainfall

records were broken at several stations in the

Kimberley and Northern Territory. Significant flooding in western Queensland kept some

properties isolated for weeks and major transport routes disrupted. Flash flooding caused

disruptions to parts of Victoria’s train network, with the SES receiving more than 300 calls for

assistance. Melbourne’s wettest March day since

1929 was recorded on the 5th.

5-7: Severe thunderstorms developed in western, central and eastern parts of

Queensland, with heavy and intense rainfall recorded at several locations.

15: Severe tropical cyclone Gretel developed in

the Coral Sea and tracked southeast towards New Caledonia and away from the Australian

coast.

APRIL

4: Tropical cyclone Harold developed in the northern Coral Sea and tracked south-southeast

into the central Coral Sea. The system had no

impact on the Australian continent.

5: Heavy rainfall and strong winds in Victoria

resulted in flooded roads, fallen trees and damage to buildings; the SES responded to more

than 400 calls for help. Strong winds were observed across Tasmania with a gust of

146 km/h recorded at Hogan Island.

2-11: Temperatures were persistently warm across Western Australia, with Perth reaching a

new April record maximum of 39.5 °C on the 11th. Argyle Aerodrome had a new Australian

April minimum temperature record with 31.1 °C

on the 2nd.

11: Strong squally winds followed the passage of

a cold front across Victoria, with gusts of 131 km/h reported at Wilsons Promontory. The

SES received more than 450 calls, mostly for fallen trees.

19: A severe thunderstorm impacted Central

Queensland, and in a rare event for April, giant hail of 5-12.5 cm in diameter was observed

causing property damage in Rockhampton and Yeppoon.

30: A vigorous cold front brought strong winds and a drop in temperature, with significant

snowfall over the alpine regions of Victoria and

New South Wales. Mount Buller reported 10-15 cm of snow. Some sites had their coldest

April day on record.

MAY

1-2: Strong winds combined with low pressure produced a storm surge which led to minor

coastal flooding in low-lying areas of Melbourne

and at Lakes Entrance.

20: A strong cold front brought a band of

thunderstorms with lightning and winds in excess of 100 km/h to southern central Victoria. Areas

west of Geelong were hardest hit, where more

than 100 houses were severely damaged, including from a tornado.

21-23: A cold spell saw numerous low maximum temperature records set across the northern and

central districts of Queensland. The 23rd was the coldest Queensland May day on record

(16.97 °C) since records began in 1910.

24-25: A large and complex weather system impacted western parts of Western Australia, with

strong winds through the Central West district whipping up large amounts of dust, blanketing

many towns and reducing visibility below 500 m

Annual Report 2019-20 Introduction and Summaries 14

in Geraldton. At least 62 000 homes were without power across the State. Higher than normal tides

were experienced in most locations around the west coast, leading to coastal inundation and

significant beach erosion.

A footpath in Shoalwater, south of Perth, collapses due to the wild weather.

24-26: A deep low pressure system in the

Tasman Sea off the Illawarra and Sydney coasts brought damaging surf conditions with some

coastal inundation around Newcastle.

JUNE

1-2: Heavy snow was recorded in the Victorian

Alps in the first two days of winter; Mount Hotham had more than 10 cm of fresh snow.

7: A large waterspout formed off the New South Wales coast between Wallabi Point and Diamond

Beach near Taree.

17: A strong cold front moved over the west coast and southwest Western Australia and resulted in

damaging wind gusts, higher than normal tides and damaging surf conditions.

22-24: Heavy rain in southeast Tasmania produced three-day rainfall totals that were more

than double the June average in many parts.

27-29: A series of cold fronts produced strong wind gusts and heavy rainfall over coastal parts

of the Lower West and South West forecast districts of Western Australia causing property

damage and power outages.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 15

Section 1 - Overview Review by the CEO and Director of Meteorology

Dr Andrew Johnson, FTSE FAICD

I am very pleased to present the Bureau’s achievements in 2019-20. In what has been a very challenging

year for our nation, the Bureau has again delivered on our mission of providing trusted, reliable and

responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services for Australia—all day, every day.

We have completed the third year of our Strategy 2017-2022. The Strategy is firmly focused on driving a

step change in the impact and value we create for the Australian community. We remain on track to materially contribute to an increase in Australia’s economic prosperity, public safety, national security,

environmental health and community well-being.

During 2019-20, we continued with four major transformation activities that are translating our strategic

intent into action. We completed the Aviation Meteorological Services Transformation Program on

schedule, on budget and on scope. This Program has delivered a more flexible, responsive and cost- effective service to Australia’s aviation industry.

Implementation of the Public Services Transformation Program is proceeding to plan, with the design and implementation on 1 July 2020 of a new operational structure and concept of operations. The

transformation will continue for the next two years and will bring about a fundamental change to the way we work, enabling a single ‘one Bureau’ national operation, underpinned by excellent science and technology

that delivers the outstanding products and services wherever the weather and community need us to be.

We completed the third year of a five-year program known as ROBUST which is ensuring the security, stability and resilience of our information and communication technology (ICT) systems and observing

networks. The implementation of the Business Systems Transformation Program also commenced during the second half of 2019. The Program will uplift and streamline our Finance and Human Resources

systems and processes over the next two years.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 16

Many parts of Australia were affected by severe weather throughout the year. The thoughts of all Bureau staff are with those communities who have been adversely affected by the weather over the last

12 months.

The year 2019 was both the warmest and driest on record for Australia since consistent national

temperature records began in 1910 and surpassed the previous record in 2013. The onset of a strong

positive Indian Ocean Dipole and the breakdown in the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex in spring set the scene for costly and damaging drought and fire impacts across much of Australia. Leading into the

2019-20 bushfire season, much of Australia had experienced the worst drought on record (since 1900), with markedly low river flows, dry soil and vegetation across eastern Australia. The record warm and dry

year was one of the key factors that influenced the fire conditions in large parts of the country over the summer. Extreme heatwaves impacted much of the country towards the end of December with reports of

increased ambulance call outs, and on 18 December 2019 Australia saw its hottest, nationally averaged

day on record.

Beginning in late winter, severe bushfires occurred in several States that lasted throughout spring and

summer. In addition to the tragic loss of life, property and wildlife, smoke from bushfires impacted millions of people, particularly in Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne. The Bureau mobilised its national resources to

help ensure the safety of communities across Australia who were seriously impacted by extreme fire conditions during December and January. I am immensely proud of the efforts of so many in the Bureau

who worked tirelessly to support governments, industry and the wider community during this time of

national emergency.

In other events, several strong cold fronts during August brought damaging winds to the southeast.

Regrettably, a woman was killed when a branch struck her car in Victoria’s Dandenong Ranges, and another woman was killed by a falling tree in Parkville, Melbourne. A further cold outbreak during early

September affected the southeast, with a tornado reported in Victoria. Power was cut through parts of Sydney, and a storm may have contributed to the downing of a helicopter off the Newcastle coast, with

five people onboard. A severe thunderstorm outbreak in southeast Queensland produced giant hail and

heavy rainfall impacted heavily populated areas. Hail of up to 13 cm in diameter was reported and up to 29,000 homes were without power.

In January, Canberra was impacted by a severe hailstorm which caused widespread damage to cars, roofs and solar panels. More than 2000 calls for assistance were made to emergency services. Melbourne was

also impacted by severe thunderstorms in late January. Insurance claims for these events exceeded

$500 million. Multiple, consecutive days of heavy rainfall in February brought widespread flooding to southeast Queensland and eastern New South Wales. Sydney recorded its wettest four-day period since

1990, with 392 mm recorded; 835 mm was recorded at Tweed Heads over a 10-day period. This year also saw seven named cyclones, with three - Damien, Esther and Blake - making landfall and bringing

extremely heavy rainfall and large areas of flooding to Western Australia.

An update to the BOM Weather app was launched in June, helping to ensure that the Bureau is not only

keeping pace with the changing needs of our customers, but also enabling greater reach into Australian

communities. The Bureau expanded its social media presence and continued its regular weekly agricultural forecast on the ABC television's Landline. We updated our weather webpage in August and sea surface

temperature charts in October and introduced more climate outlooks, more often. We also had an increasing number of followers on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn and our blog which

continued to be effective for promoting public-safety campaigns on the risks and impact of severe weather.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 17

A new weather radar was commissioned at Rainbow in north-western Victoria in March and positive progress was made in the ongoing preparations for new radar facilities in northwest and southern

Queensland, western New South Wales, and Mildura in Victoria. The Bureau also upgraded the existing Esperance radar in Western Australia, which now features Doppler wind and real-time rain information for

the first time, enhancing the Bureau’s ability to monitor storm severity, fine-tune warnings during severe

weather events and enable meteorologists to observe wind better than ever before.

We continued to strengthen our relationships with key partners. In December, a senior delegation from the

UK Met Office visited the Bureau to discuss further opportunities for collaboration in the areas of services, science, systems, people and project management, on top of our long-standing relationship. This followed

a visit by the Korean Meteorological Administration in November which focused on observation metrology and instrumentation. We also deepened engagement with the national security sector, including through

the establishment of the National Security Meteorology Five Eyes Community of Practice to exchange

information regarding national security issues. The Bureau is also serving as a delivery partner for the Australian Antarctic Division’s Davis Aerodrome Project.

New relationships were formed, and existing relationships deepened, with a number of industry customers. Collaborative testing of trial weather alert products was enabled through relationships with leading

agricultural organisations such as Southern Farming Systems, MacKilllop Farm Management Group and NSW Local Land Services. We also worked with Powerlink and the Clean Energy Regulator on initiatives

that will help the electricity industry to adapt to higher levels of renewable energy in the national electricity

grid.

Our aviation meteorological services offering expanded to include new routes for major resources

businesses, improving their access to worksites. We concluded an agreement with the Government of Timor Leste to maintain observing equipment and Dili Airport to support quality-assured Terminal

Aerodrome Forecasts.

In the water domain we developed in partnership with Sydney Water a meteorological and soil moisture

warning system that helps to target maintenance and remediation of pipe infrastructure. Our collaboration

with Australian Bureau of Statistics has reduced the regulatory burden placed on water authorities by streamlining reporting requirements. We also commenced work on a Near Real-Time Water Reporting

Portal that will significantly improve the timeliness and spatial resolution of water accounting in the Murray- Darling Basin.

Our relationship with Defence has continued to deepen at all levels. The Bureau is now supporting strategic

decision-makers in key national security departments via a quarterly global seasonal outlook which identifies the potential impacts of adverse weather and climate on food security, refugee migration or

conflict events. This information supports decision-makers to take appropriate interventions or be cued to national security concerns much earlier. The Bureau also worked with Defence aviation bases to institute

weather alerts and related operating procedures that protect valuable aircraft and equipment and ensure the safety of personnel from ‘on tarmac’ events like hail and lightning strikes.

In April, we published our new Research and Development Plan which sets the direction for our investment

in research and development over the next decade. We strengthened our relationship with the UK Met Office and other international partners. In June, our Chief Scientist and Group Executive of Science and

Innovation, Dr Gilbert Brunet, was appointed as the inaugural Chair of a new Scientific Advisory Panel for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The Scientific Advisory Panel comprises 15 eminent

international experts. It will act as a think tank, guiding the WMO on matters of weather, water and climate science and research, with a focus on bringing research and operations specialists together.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 18

In line with the nation and the world, the Bureau has spent much of the second half of this year anticipating and responding to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our focus has always remained on ensuring our

critical services continue to be delivered to the Australian community and that our staff are safe and well. Bureau staff were seconded to Services Australia to assist in its response to the unprecedented demand in

claims driven by the adverse impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. There has been an extraordinary

response from all staff across the Bureau to mobilise during this time of crisis and to manage their own personal challenges while at the same time delivering on our essential national mission. These demands

have been especially acute for our teams based in Victoria and I would like to acknowledge with deep thanks their patience, persistence and resilience.

It remains a great privilege to lead an organisation that delivers critical services to our communities, governments and industries when it matters most. Throughout 2019-20, I have regularly received positive

and constructive feedback from a wide range of our customers, partners and stakeholders, not only on the

quality of our services and advice and the dedication and professionalism of our staff, but also our new service delivery methods, technologies and channels. This feedback will enable us to continually improve

what we do. While the year ahead will undoubtedly present us with many challenges, we will re-dedicate our very considerable capabilities in the service of Australia.

Financial results The Bureau reported an operating surplus of $32.1 million, excluding depreciation for 2019-20, against a

budgeted operating surplus of $6.6 million. This surplus is largely due to external revenue used for capital assets and additional funding received from Government. After including depreciation, the operating result

was a deficit of $84.9 million in 2019-20, compared to a deficit of $82.1 million in 2018-19. This deficit was

expected, as the Bureau—like all Australian Government agencies—is not funded for depreciation, but instead receives a separate asset capital injection. After the impact of the asset revaluation, the Bureau

recorded a total comprehensive loss of $26.0 million.

Total revenue for 2019-20 was $338.2 million, of which $263.3 million was funded as appropriation from

Government, and $74.9 million was related to own-source income and gains, primarily from the sales of goods and rendering of services and other income. Operating expenditure for 2019-20 was $423.1 million,

primarily made up of employee costs (42 per cent), supplier costs (29 per cent) and asset-related operating

costs which included depreciation and amortisation (28 per cent).

The Bureau manages a significant portfolio of non-financial assets with a written down value of

$848.6 million, of which 86 per cent is identified as land and buildings, plant and equipment, and computer software. As part of our ongoing asset investment and replacement program, $203.7 million was invested

in asset acquisition and construction in 2019-20, predominantly to support the delivery of customer services. Funding for capital investment was mostly provided by Government through departmental capital

and equity-based funding. Other investments made by the Bureau were primarily funded from own-source

revenue.

Outlook 2020-21 In 2020-21, we will continue to deliver our Strategy 2017-2022 and seek to drive a profound positive shift

in the impact and value the Bureau provides for Australia, as we meet our customers’ increasing demands

for personalised and customised delivery of weather, water, climate and oceans information to support their decision-making.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 19

We will focus on the delivery of our major transformation programs for our public services and our underpinning business systems, and will continue to improve the security, stability and resilience of our ICT

and observing systems to support reliable, ongoing operations. We will also continue our efforts to increase the efficient use of our resources, and investment in the skills and capabilities of our staff, to both enable

the implementation of our Strategy and provide our people with satisfying and worthwhile careers.

In response to the ongoing disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic, we will continue to ensure workplace health and safety risks are monitored and managed and that critical resources are available to maintain

operations and essential service delivery to Australian communities.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 20

Agency overview

Role and functions The Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau) is Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency,

providing a wide range of products and services to support informed decision-making by governments, emergency services, industry and the community.

The Bureau’s products and services include a range of observations, forecasts, warnings, analyses and advice covering Australia’s atmosphere, water, ocean and space environments. Its expertise and services

assist Australians to manage and live within their natural environment.

The Bureau is one of the few organisations in Australia that touches the lives of all Australians every day. Since 1908, the Bureau has proudly provided an extraordinary array of products and services that have

contributed to economic prosperity, public safety and community well-being. The knowledge of, and insights into, Australia we have gained over this period are unique and irreplaceable. For more information

on how the Bureau meets its obligations to the Australian community see the Corporate responsibility chapter.

Authority The Bureau operates under the authority of the Meteorology Act 1955 and the Water Act 2007, which

together provide the legal basis for its activities. The Bureau must also fulfil Australia’s international obligations under the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and related

international meteorological treaties and agreements.

The Bureau is an Executive Agency under the Public Service Act 1999 and a non-corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

Under the Public Service Act, the Director of Meteorology has the powers and responsibilities of an agency head.

As at 30 June, the Director of Meteorology reported to the Minister for the Environment, the Hon Sussan Ley MP, on all general matters and to the Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia, the Hon

Keith Pitt MP, on water-related matters.

The Bureau is an Executive Agency in the Agriculture, Water and the Environment Portfolio. At 30 June, the Bureau reported to the Minister for the Environment generally, and to the Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia on water-related matters.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 21

Location The Bureau’s services span the Australian region encompassing the mainland, Tasmania and Australia’s offshore islands and territories (including the Australian Antarctic Territory), and the surrounding oceans

and seas (including the Indian, Pacific and Southern oceans). For some Bureau services the span is even greater. For example, the Bureau’s Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre is responsible for an area that includes

the volcanically active regions of Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the southern Philippines. As a partner

in the Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre, the Bureau provides threat information to National Tsunami Warning centres of other Indian Ocean countries.

Bureau staff are located across Australia, on remote islands and in Antarctica. The Bureau’s Victorian Office in Docklands, Melbourne, is a centre for administrative and operational activity, and provides overall

national strategic planning, management and coordination of the Bureau’s services.

The location of Bureau State and Territory offices, field offices and other staffed observing facilities as at 30 June.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 22

Organisational structure For 2019-20, the Bureau was structured into six Groups. For more detail on the governance of the Bureau and an organisational chart, see the Corporate governance chapter.

Staff As at 30 June, the Bureau employed 1399 ongoing and 194 non-ongoing staff. Many staff work around the

clock to provide surveillance, forecast and warning services 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Detailed information on the Bureau’s staff and the management of human resources is provided in the People

management chapter.

Values In delivering products and services to its customers, Bureau staff individually and collectively uphold the Australian Public Service Values of impartiality, commitment to service, accountability, respectfulness and

ethical conduct. These values guide our behaviours and how we treat our customers, our partners and

each other. The following Bureau-specific values and behaviours determine what is important and bind us together as an organisation and as colleagues.

Safety

We are committed to actively improving the health and well-being of our people, and strive for zero harm.

Customer focus

We listen to our customers, understand their needs and are invested in their success. We strive to provide

them with an outstanding experience. We are a pleasure to work with and can be relied upon to deliver.

Passion and tenacity

We are proud of our heritage, who we are, what we do and where we are headed. We deliver in times of

crisis. Our deep commitment to our nation’s well-being drives our success.

Responsibility

We understand and accept our responsibilities. We learn from success and failure. We hold each other to account for our actions and results.

Humility

We are humble in our dealings with each other and our customers. We help each other and operate as one enterprise.

Integrity

Our integrity is founded on trust, honesty and reliability.

Customers, partners and stakeholders The Bureau works with a broad range of customers, partners and stakeholders across all sections of the

community, and provides special services to an extensive range of federal, State and local government departments and agencies. These services support emergency management (including prevention,

preparedness and response), agriculture, aviation, land and marine transport, energy and resources

operations, climate policy, water management, defence and foreign affairs.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 1 - Overview 23

The Bureau’s weather, climate and water information supports business decisions across all manner of activities—from planting to harvesting, excavation to construction, and operational planning. Sector-specific

applications of the Bureau’s products and services are essential, and benefit all Australians.

Every day, millions of Australians use the Bureau’s information to help make decisions about activities that

are affected by the weather, and in emergency situations, the Bureau’s services enable individuals,

families, businesses and communities to make informed decisions about evacuating or preparing themselves for potential or imminent danger.

The national and international meteorological and scientific community is another vital partner, as cooperation through sharing global weather observations and research efforts is an essential and integral

part of the Bureau’s operations.

Other Bureau stakeholders include government ministers and the Parliament, the Australian science

community, the media, staff and suppliers.

For information on engagement and outreach activities refer to the Corporate responsibility chapter.

The Bureau's primary stakeholders

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 24

Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement Introductory statement I, Andrew Johnson, as the accountable authority of the Bureau of Meteorology present the Bureau’s

2019-20 Annual Performance Statement as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013. In my opinion, the Bureau’s Annual Performance Statement accurately reflects the Bureau’s performance in achieving its purpose for the year ended 30 June 2020 and

complies with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Dr Andrew Johnson CEO and Director of Meteorology

25 September 2020

Performance framework The Bureau operates within the enhanced Commonwealth performance framework in accordance with the

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The Act requires each Commonwealth agency to produce a corporate plan at the beginning of the cycle

that sets out its purpose, strategies for achieving its purpose and how success will be measured. The Bureau’s purpose, as defined by its mission, is to provide trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water,

climate and ocean services for Australia—all day, every day. The Bureau’s Corporate Plan 2019-20 is

available online at www.bom.gov.au/inside/Bureau-of-Meteorology-Corporate-Plan-2019-20.pdf

At the end of the reporting cycle, agencies are required to produce an annual performance statement and

provide an assessment of the extent to they have succeeded in achieving their purpose. The Bureau’s performance is measured using the 19 success measures outlined in its Corporate Plan 2019-20.

This section reports on the Bureau’s results for 2019-20 against the purpose and performance criteria published in the Bureau of Meteorology Corporate Plan 2019-20 and the Portfolio Budget Statements

2019-20 for the Environment and Energy Portfolio.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 25

Analysis of performance against agency purpose For 2019-20, the Bureau performed strongly against the performance indicators identified in its corporate

plan, as detailed in the performance results. The Bureau’s performance met expectations against 14 measures, partially met expectations against four measures, and did not meet expectations for one

measure, indicating that the Bureau has been largely successful in delivering its priorities and planned achievements for the year, in line with its purpose.

The Bureau’s performance results were achieved in the context of an intensely dynamic operating

environment, which is likely to continue for 2020-21 and the outlook period (2021-22 to 2023-24) as the Bureau drives a profound positive shift in the impact and value it has for Australia. Important factors

affecting the Bureau’s performance include:

• our customers’ increasing desire for personalised and customised delivery of weather, water, climate

and ocean information to support their planning and decision-making;

• increasing customer expectations for highly visual services provided via mobile devices;

• the increasing volume and sophistication of cybersecurity threats;

• exponential increases in data volumes and opportunities created by advances in science and

technology—including through partner agencies in other countries;

• greater scrutiny of the Bureau’s processes and data streams;

• changes in Australia’s climate, including more frequent and more intense weather extremes that

place greater pressure on the environment and those that work on the land;

• increased community risk from extreme weather as the population increases, urban settlement

patterns continue to concentrate in coastal areas, and public and private infrastructure expands;

• anticipating and responding to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure the continued

delivery of critical services to the Australian community and to ensure the safety and well-being of

our staff; and

• a challenging budget position requiring greater operational efficiency, and growth and diversification

in external revenue sources.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 26

Significant change initiatives that affected the Bureau’s performance in 2019-20 included:

• continuing delivery of the Strategy 2017-2022;

• completing the Aviation Meteorological Services Transformation Program to deliver a more flexible,

responsive and cost-effective service to Australia’s aviation industry;

• continuing implementation of the Public Services Transformation Program to deliver a new

climatological, hydrological and meteorological service by 2022;

• continuing implementation of the ROBUST Program to improve information and communication

technology (ICT) systems and observations systems by raising the security, stability and resilience of the operational network infrastructure;

• commencing implementation of the Business Systems Transformation Program to uplift and

streamline finance and human resources systems and processes over the next two years; and

• enhancing many of our products and services such as the BOM Weather app to meet the changing

needs of our customers.

Performance results The Bureau’s performance in 2019-20 against the 19 strategic success measures (SSMs) outlined in its Strategy 2017-2022 is shown below.

Impact and Value Products and services that benefit the Australian community and drive competitive advantage for

businesses and industries.

SSM1: The financial and social value we deliver to Government, industry and the Australian community. Performance met expectations

The Bureau provided customers with information, including forecasts and warnings, to help protect life and property through hazard preparedness and response during severe weather events, such as bushfires, tropical cyclones, floods and heatwaves.

The Australian agriculture sector is worth more than $60 billion annually and the Bureau’s information and services help Australian farmers to manage and adapt to weather and climate variability.

The Bureau’s aviation meteorological service contributed an estimated benefit of $34 million to the aviation sector in 2019-20, which saw significantly reduced flight activity due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The resilience and quality of the service was maintained through the final year of the Aviation Meteorological Services Transformation Program.

The Bureau’s services to Australia’s land and maritime transport sectors in 2019-20 enabled road users to make safer driving choices, helped to reduce road congestion, and ensured the Australian Antarctic Division avoided days of lost service for the Aurora Australis operating in the Southern Ocean.

The Bureau contributed to the delivery of an estimated $500 million of economic value in the resources sector in 2019-20 by providing specialised services to help mitigate the impacts of severe weather on the sector’s operations.

The Bureau continued to provide specialised meteorological, oceanographic and space weather forecasting and advisory services to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and energy sectors for operations in Australia and overseas. Our forecasting supported strategic and tactical decisions made by ADF planners during the 2019-20 bushfires and the daily safety of ADF aircraft conducting training and operations.

Australia’s water sector is worth more than $20 billion annually, and the Bureau’s services, information and insight play a key role in mitigating risk and increasing productivity in the sector.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 27

SSM2: The levels of satisfaction and trust our customers and partners have in us and the way we interact with them. Performance met expectations

The Bureau’s general community survey found that: 79 per cent of customers found information from the Bureau relevant to their location; 65 per cent found their recent experience helped them do what they needed to do; and 92 per cent would use the Bureau source again.

The Bureau’s partner and emergency management survey found that 75 per cent of customers were satisfied with the Bureau’s services, rating their experience 8, 9 or 10 out of 10.

Positive feedback was received through the Hazards Services Forum, the Bureau’s key consultative mechanism with its emergency management partners, including on the progress, implementation and delivery of the majority of actions identified in the Intergovernmental Agreement on the provision of the Bureau’s hazard services.

Positive feedback was received from aviation customers on the Bureau’s products and services, particularly on the extension of aerodrome forecast hours and implementation of an advanced smoke forecasting model.

Positive qualitative feedback was received on the quality of Bureau products and services from senior strategically focused stakeholders in the Defence and national security sectors.

More than 2000 customers attended webinars on water, climate and drought-related issues, with an average of 93 per cent customer satisfaction.

SSM3: Our reputation among our customers and partners, and within the Australian community. Performance met expectations

Net promoter scores recorded in the Bureau’s customer surveys during 2019-20 were:

· +52 for general community customers; and

· +61 for partner and emergency management customers.

On the NPS Global benchmark scale, 60 and above is considered exceptional customer service.

More than 70,000 stories featuring the Bureau were published during 2019-20.

SSM4: The level of uptake of our services by new customers and the return rate from existing customers. Performance met expectations

The Bureau’s customer surveys found 24 per cent of general community customers and 67 per cent of partner and emergency management customers nominated a Bureau source as their most used source for accessing forecasts or warnings.

Bureau website customer sessions grew by 2.5 per cent from 643.6 million in 2018-19 to 659.9 million in 2019-20. In 2019-20, 84.3 per cent of the Bureau’s website sessions were from returning customers, compared with 85.9 per cent the previous year.

The number of customers using the BOM Weather app grew by 15.4 per cent from 3.4 million in 2018-19 to 3.9 million in 2019-20. BOM Weather app customer sessions grew by 40.5 per cent from 348.4 million in 2018-19 to 489.6 million in 2019-20.

Usage of the Bureau’s top four water information products--Water Storages, Water Restrictions, Design Rainfalls and Groundwater Explorer--increased by 95 per cent in 2019-20.

100 per cent of the Bureau’s research project portfolio comprised of returning customers.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 28

SSM5: The conversion rate from ideas to opportunities to customer outcomes. Performance met expectations

In 2019-20, 12 research projects were successfully delivered, including observation-driven reanalysis of Australian weather, ocean modelling, seasonal prediction modelling, characterisation of synoptic weather features, localised weather forecasts and nowcasts, and air quality modelling.

Operational Excellence Outstanding people, science, systems, infrastructure and partnerships working together for maximum simplicity, productivity and agility

SSM6: Our delivery to customer requirements. Performance met expectations

The aggregate customer survey scores (averaging scores for customer preference, experience, impact and reputation) in 2019-20 were: 57 per cent for general community customers (unchanged from 57 per cent in 2018-19); and 70 per cent for partner and emergency management customers (a decrease from 77 per cent in 2018-19).

The Bureau’s routine forecast products were issued on-time on 92.8 per cent of occasions.

Tropical cyclone services were delivered as required to meet service standards to emergency services partners for seven tropical cyclone events, three of which made landfall on the Australian mainland coastline.

The Bureau issued 1813 flood watches and warnings, with a timeliness of 91 per cent, below the target of 97 per cent by 2022.

93 per cent of marine gale warnings issued for capital city local waters met accuracy standards. Warnings for all nine large wave events met target accuracy standards.

100 per cent of tsunami bulletins were issued within the target of under 30 minutes, with an average response time of 16 minutes from earthquake to tsunami bulletin issuance.

Positive feedback was received from emergency services partners, the 2020 Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements and the South Australian Independent Review of the 2019-20 bushfires, for the Bureau’s delivery of services during the 2019-20 severe weather season.

SSM7: Internationally benchmarked levels of capacity utilisation, product and service performance, system reliability, resilience and speed to market.

Performance met expectations

The Bureau’s website uptime was 99.8 per cent, which met the target of 99.8 per cent.

Average system uptime on the Bureau’s Australis supercomputer was 99.96 per cent, compared to 99.91 per cent in 2018-19. Average capacity utilisation for the Bureau’s Australis supercomputer was 49 per cent, compared to 33 per cent in 2018-19.

An assessment of the Bureau’s cyber security capability against the National Institute of Standards and Technology Cyber Security Framework indicated maturity remains at a lower level as people, processes and technology are uplifted under the ROBUST Program.

The Bureau maintained its level of digital information management maturity against the National Archives of Australia annual survey, with a score of 3.2 out of 5.

The level of compliance for all observational networks and instruments was generally satisfactory, except for the upper air network, which did not comply with frequency, height and spatial resolution requirements set by the WMO.

The number of private automatic weather stations (AWSs) reporting to the Weather Observations Website in Australia grew by around 45 per cent from 300 in 2018-19 to approximately 550 in 2019-20.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 29

Real-time radar uptime was 98.0 per cent, which exceeded the target of 95 per cent.

AWS uptime was 98.9 per cent, which exceeded the target of 95 per cent.

Wind-profiler uptime was 97.9 per cent, which exceeded the target of 95 per cent.

Sea level network availability was 89.0 per cent, below the target of 95 per cent. Reduced availability was primarily due to the failure of three sites in the South Pacific and the inability to travel to return to service due to COVID-19.

Tsunami network uptime was 99.8 per cent, which exceeded the target of 95 per cent.

Satellite availability was 75.2 per cent, below the target of 95 per cent. Reduced availability was primarily due to two ground stations that provide back-up data services for international partners being offline, with the rest of the network achieving better than 95 per cent availability for the year.

Space weather network (ionosonde) availability was 92.1 per cent, below target of 95 per cent. One site experienced a major failure and was replaced.

Incident recovery times were generally within service level agreements. Mean-time to recovery for two Priority 1 incidents was 124 minutes (within the target of 240 minutes) and for 49 Priority 2 incidents was 362 minutes (within the target of 480 minutes).

An internal audit of the Bureau’s risk management processes verified compliance with the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy.

There was ongoing activation of incident management teams for the extensive bushfires across eastern Australia, simultaneously with tropical cyclones and followed by floods. Post event review management activities were completed for major events. Incident and crisis management teams remain active for COVID-19.

Assurance mapping was not completed as planned due to the readiness of target groups; however, controls assurance was undertaken on key business risks.

The Bureau maintained its certification of compliance for all existing quality management systems and the Defence Weather and Tsunami Warning Services achieved certification of compliance to ISO 9001.

The National Association of Testing Authorities reconfirmed the Bureau’s ISO 17025 pressure accreditation, while the Bureau’s application for ISO 17025 temperature accreditation experienced external delays and remains in progress. The ISO 9001 initial audit of the Bureau’s AWS network remains on track.

SSM8: Our delivery to budget. Performance met expectations

The Bureau reported an operating surplus of $32.1 million, excluding depreciation for 2019-20, against a budgeted operating surplus of $6.6 million. This surplus is largely due to external revenue used for capital assets and additional funding received from Government.

SSM9: Independent verification of the quality of our services. Performance met expectations

Five-day forecasts of mean sea level pressure and upper level temperature, height and winds made from the Bureau’s ACCESS-G model during 2019-20 improved by an average of 9 per cent over forecasts made during 2018-19 as measured using the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Basic Systems exchanged scores.

70 per cent of flood forecast lead times met service level specification targets, which met the target of 70 per cent.

81 per cent of flood forecast peak height predictions met service level specification targets, which exceeded the target of 70 per cent.

89.6 per cent of one-day maximum temperature forecasts were within 2 °C of the observed temperature, compared to 89.2 per cent in 2018-19.

Forecast rainfall range values provided a good indication of observed rainfall based on statistical performance metrics.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 30

Seasonal climate outlooks achieved better forecast skill results than climatology. The average hit rate of aggregate seasonal forecast skill for rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature was 71 per cent, which exceeded the target of 55 per cent.

Seasonal streamflow forecasts were reliable and exceeded the target 80 per cent benchmark of continuous ranked probability scores.

SSM10: The levels of workforce skill and competency benchmarked with our peers and against accepted international standards.

Performance met expectations

Of the Bureau’s 235 operational meteorological forecasters, 234 had meteorological qualifications that met or exceeded the international standard, as defined by the WMO. The following qualifications were held:

· 96 aviation forecasting;

· 127 fire weather forecasting;

· 127 severe thunderstorm forecasting; and

· 41 tropical cyclone forecasting with 24 as lead forecasters.

Bureau staff undertook more than 6100 online courses, including modules on financial delegations, workstation ergonomics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness, emergency evacuation procedures and ICT security. Specialist technical in-service training was also provided to over 880 participants.

Insight and Innovation Deep understanding and creative thinking that generates novel solutions for our customers and our organisation.

SSM11: The depth, breadth and quality of our external partnerships and collaborations. Performance met expectations

The Bureau worked in close partnership with a range of intergovernmental organisations, national meteorological and hydrological services, academic and research organisations, Australian, State and Territory Government agencies, peak industry groups and multilateral partners throughout 2019-20 to deliver impact and value for its customers.

84 per cent of publications were co-authored with external partners.

SSM12: Our innovation maturity is reflected in our strategy, culture, processes and systems. Performance did not meet expectations

The Bureau’s innovation framework was developed during 2019-20 and will be implemented in 2020-21 to build the Bureau’s innovation maturity.

SSM13: The quality of our scientific publications, benchmarked internationally. Performance met expectations

38 per cent of 2019-20 publications were published in A or A* journals based on the Excellence in Research for Australia quality ranking which considers quality, acceptance rate and editorial board compositions.

An average of 1.6 articles was published per Science to Services Program staff member.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 31

SSM14: The speed of delivery from concept to prototype and from prototype to customer acceptance. Performance partially met expectations

81 per cent of Bureau projects delivered outcomes to schedule, compared with 77 per cent in 2019-20.

71 weather and climate forecast model enhancements were deployed to the Bureau’s operational supercomputer in 2019-20.

SSM15: Feedback from staff, customers and partners on our capacity to innovate. Performance partially met expectations

An organisational culture survey measuring the Bureau's effectiveness in teamwork and leadership found that the Bureau's staff attitude towards team-work practices and outcomes in innovation was 66 compared to 64 in 2018-19, compared to other Australian organisations.

The Bureau Way One enterprise, that is safe and diverse, where our people grow and are empowered to excel, and where

our customers come first, trust us and consider that we are a pleasure to work with.

SSM16: Our performance benchmarked internationally against work health, safety and environment best practice. Performance partially met expectations

The Bureau was compliant with all relevant environmental legislation and targets in 2019-20. No material non-compliances with legislative, government policy and mandatory governance requirements were reported.

The average time taken to register work health and safety incidents was 3.7 days, which did not meet the target of less than three days, but an improvement from 5.7 days in 2018-19.

The Bureau’s lost time injury frequency rate was 2.9, compared to 9.09 in 2018-19 and below the industry benchmark for public administration of 4.9.

The Bureau’s medically treated injury frequency rate was 3.3, compared to 1.24 in 2018-19.

Hazard reports as a percentage of work health and safety incidents reported was 55 per cent, compared with 43 per cent in 2018-19.

The Bureau’s overall security maturity was assessed as 'ad hoc' against the Protective Security Policy Framework core requirements. An internal audit of the Bureau’s protective security was rated unsatisfactory.

SSM17: Feedback from staff and customers on the alignment of our stated intent with our actual behaviours and actions, especially those of our senior leaders.

Performance met expectations

An organisational culture survey measured the Bureau’s effectiveness in team work and leadership, compared to other Australian organisations. The survey found that:

· the Bureau’s team climate indicator was 66.8, compared with 64.9 in 2018-19;

· the organisational focus indicator was 52.5, compared with 46.6 in 2018-19; and

· the leadership indicator was 75.6, compared with 75.0 in 2018-19.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 32

SSM18: A diverse and inclusive workforce, benchmarked against the community. Performance partially met expectations

Female staff comprised 28 per cent of the Bureau’s Senior Executive Service positions, compared to 30 per cent in 2018-19, and below the target of 40 per cent by 2023. Female staff comprised 39 per cent of Executive Level 2 Upper positions, compared to 34 per cent in 2018-19, and below the target of 40 per cent by 2023.

Female staff held 25.6 per cent of the Bureau’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) job roles, compared with 25.1 per cent in 2018-19, and below the target of 30 per cent.

Female staff comprised 33.6 per cent of the Bureau’s workforce, compared with 32.7 per cent in 2018-19, and below the target of 50 per cent by 2023.

Indigenous Australian staff comprised 1.4 per cent of the Bureau’s workforce, unchanged from 2018-19 and below the target of 2.7 per cent.

People identifying with a disability comprised 2.5 per cent of the Bureau’s workforce, compared to 2.6 per cent in 2018-19.

Staff with a language other than English remained unchanged at 25.2 per cent.

SSM19: The number and outcomes of collaborative and whole- of-enterprise activities. Performance met expectations

The Bureau’s ROBUST and Public Services Transformation programs engaged across the enterprise to ensure alignment with strategic objectives in designing and implementing solutions for future service delivery and systems and infrastructure resilience. Enterprise collaboration was structured through a range of targeted reference groups and forums.

73 per cent of Bureau projects involved cross-enterprise teams, compared to 63 per cent in 2018-19.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 33

Upholding capability As described in its Corporate Plan 2019-20, the Bureau has a responsibility to maintain a complex and wide-ranging field of capabilities to ensure it meets its purpose. To this end, the Bureau has been

implementing the 21 strategic actions identified in its Strategy 2017-2022 and progressing capability developments across five broad themes: strategy, people, relationships and geographical footprint,

infrastructure and technology, and asset management and financial sustainability.

Delivery of strategic actions As indicated in the table below, five strategic actions were in continuous improvement, implementation was

continuing on a further 15, and one was in the planning phase as at 30 June 2020. The creation of an enterprise innovation framework under action 3.1 progressed more slowly than expected in 2019-20 and

will be implemented in 2020-21.

Enterprise strategic actions Planned delivery Status at 30 June

^ = Implementation

o = Continuous improvement

2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

Impact and value

1.1 Focus on key customers in priority sectors, understand their needs and expectations and deepen and broaden our relationships with them.

o o o o Implementation

is continuing

1.2 Establish our market positioning, business models, and product and service offerings in priority sectors.

o o o o Implementation

is continuing

1.3 Amplify our outreach to the Parliament, public sector, industry and the community as Australia’s most authoritative and trusted source of weather, water, climate and ocean information.

o o o o Continuous

improvement of implemented actions

1.4 Build skills, systems and culture across the enterprise to operate in a business-like way, delivering an outstanding customer experience.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

1.5 Measure and monitor the quality, impact and value of our products and services, and drive a culture of continuous improvement.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

Operational excellence

2.1 Enable empowered and high-performing teams with skills and knowledge to meet customers’ needs.

o o o o Implementation

is continuing

2.2 Use standardised enterprise systems and processes that allow us to more rapidly respond to customer requirements and deliver value for money.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

2.3 Adopt a single set of enterprise information and technology standards and platforms that ensure scalability and which enable end-to-end product and service lifecycle management.

^ ^ o o Implementation

is continuing

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 34

2.4 Have governance arrangements that ensure teams and individuals are accountable, open, collaborative and responsive.

o o o o Continuous

improvement of implemented actions

2.5 Develop resilient systems and processes that support sustained delivery of products and services to our customers.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

Insight and innovation

3.1 Create and action a whole-of- enterprise innovation framework to guide future investment, culture and practice.

^ o o o Planning is

continuing

3.2 Continuously scan and evaluate our external environment, building and applying knowledge on emerging trends, competitor activity and market disruptions.

o o o o Continuous

improvement of implemented actions

3.3 Grow the organisation’s capabilities in co- design and agile methodologies. o o o o Implementation

is continuing

3.4 Ensure a whole-of-enterprise approach for national and international partnerships and collaborations.

o o o o Implementation

is continuing

3.5 Enhance the pipeline of STEM talent into the Bureau. o o o o Continuous

improvement of implemented actions

3.6 Invest in a portfolio of high-risk/high-reward initiatives that deliver transformative impact and value for our customers.

^ ^ o o Implementation

is continuing

The Bureau Way

4.1 Actively pursue a high level of safety and environmental sustainability performance, with a special focus on mental health and physical well- being.

^ ^ o o Implementation

is continuing

4.2 Transparently manage the organisation, aligning strategy, structure, capability, culture and investment for customer impact and value.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

4.3 Systematically manage performance to ensure all staff can see how their individual role contributes to the collective delivery of our Strategy.

o o o o Continuous

improvement of implemented actions

4.4 Build a workforce for the future with skills in leadership, collaboration and personal resilience. Affirm behaviours that are consistent with our values.

o o o o Implementation

is continuing

4.5 Implement a whole-of- enterprise diversity and inclusion plan that enables gender equity and diversity at all levels in the organisation.

^ o o o Implementation

is continuing

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 35

Achievements in capability development The sections below identify the Bureau’s achievements in capability development during the year across the five themes identified in the Strategy 2017-2022 and the 2019-20 Corporate Plan.

Strategy

Capability aim: To develop an enterprise-wide strategic foresight capability and deliver a step change in planning, change management, performance management and risk, resilience and business continuity across the Bureau.

To enhance its strategic capability, the Bureau has:

• matured a strategic foresight or ‘futures strategy’ capability to support the organisation in navigating changes in its operating environment;

• released a new 10-year Research and Development Plan 2020-2030, outlining its vision for research and development that reflects customer needs and ways to meet them;

• continued to implement a standard approach to enterprise transformation using a recognised change methodology program as a foundation;

• documented key business risks in its enterprise risk management system and provided regular risk reports to the Security, Risk and Business Continuity Committee and Executive Team; and

• matured its resilience framework to provide an enterprise approach to managing incidents and crises and supporting business continuity.

Relationships and geographical footprint

Capability aim: To strengthen our customer engagement and understanding about the decisions our customers make that depend upon weather, climate, ocean and water insights. This will enable the Bureau to deliver improved and differentiated offerings, with the aim that government and industry customers increasingly value the Bureau as a trusted partner, delivering measurable impact and value every day.

To enhance its relationships and geographical footprint, the Bureau has:

• continued to embed staff in and undertake reverse placements with partner and customer organisations;

• strengthened relationships with key partners, including the UK Met Office, the Murray-Darling Basin Authority and deepened relationships with a number of industry customers, including leading agricultural and energy organisations;

• deepened engagement with the National Security sector, including through the establishment of the National Security Meteorology Five Eyes Community of Practice to exchange information regarding national security issues securely at an international level;

• served as a delivery partner for the Australian Antarctic Division’s Davis Aerodrome Project;

• continued to support international initiatives through participation in bodies such as the WMO and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, ongoing contributions to WMO data- sharing, and the continuation of the second phase of the Climate and Oceans Support Program for the Pacific (COSPPac2).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 36

People

Capability aim: To ensure our teams have the skills and knowledge required to meet customer needs by delivering outcomes on enterprise culture, leadership and team development, workforce planning, staff attraction and retention, training and organisational learning. The Bureau will also continue to develop and implement a comprehensive approach to diversity and inclusion, and to enhance the pipeline for STEM graduates.

To maintain and enhance its people capability, the Bureau has:

• continued to uplift its customer engagement, and product development and management capability through staff training programs;

• continued to support the development of a leadership and cultural transformation through a series of Strategy-in-Action workshops and a 360-degree leadership assessment program of its leaders;

• matured its Business Partnership Model to support the delivery of all corporate services and delivered an overarching enterprise workforce plan and capability development plan; and

• strengthened its workforce and culture through diversity, inclusion and STEM initiatives, including participation in the Australian Network on Disability Access and Inclusion Index, launching the Multicultural Access and Equity Action Plan 2019-2022 and the Accessibility Action Plan 2019-2022, and the continuation of its STEM Ambassador Program.

Infrastructure and technology

Capability aim: To provide effective end-to-end management of data and systems, and to develop core skills and capabilities, critical for ensuring customer needs are met effectively and securely through seamless delivery, from collection to provision.

To maintain and enhance its infrastructure capability, the Bureau has:

• delivered a new radar at Rainbow in Victoria’s Wimmera Southern Mallee region, upgraded the existing Esperance radar in Western Australia, installed new automatic meteorological balloon launching systems at Woodstock (Townsville), Charleville, Geraldton, Esperance and Moree, and upgraded other observing systems to increase the resilience, reliability and sustainability of its observing network;

• completed the second phase of its Willis Island Remediation Project to undertake station works to ensure staff safety and enable more resilient and efficient observations collection;

• relocated Brisbane-based Observing Operations staff to a new purpose-built facility with improved infrastructure and capability to perform remote monitoring;

• uplifted its data capability, including through the establishment of a Data Governance Office and the launch of Data 2022 and Beyond, the Bureau’s vision, priorities and implementation roadmap to respond effectively to the rapidly evolving data landscape.

• continued to uplift its cyber security maturity, including through the release of its Cyber Security Roadmap 2025 and Cyber Security Delivery Plan 2023, strengthening cyber security governance processes and improving cyber security awareness;

• upgraded the Bureau’s Australis supercomputer to provide a more secure platform for its operations and future service delivery;

• decommissioned its oldest data centre, the Central Computing Facility, and completed over 50 infrastructure, system and server upgrades to enable the Bureau’s critical systems to continue providing resilient and stable support for forecast systems and applications;

• uplifted its service management capability to assist in enhancing technology incident and change management processes; and

• ensured its modelling capability will meet future service needs by implementing several enhancements to its Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) modelling capabilities throughout the year.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 2 - Annual Performance Statement 37

Asset management and financial sustainability

Capability aim: To ensure the Bureau meets its fiduciary responsibilities and that its teams are supported with business insight and analysis to achieve financial sustainability. It also aims to deliver efficient whole-of-enterprise procurement services and effective management of the Bureau’s property footprint.

To enhance its asset management and financial sustainability capability, the Bureau has:

• developed a strategic asset management plan and financial model and prepared supporting detailed asset management plans for each of its observing networks;

• continued to mature its governance, and improved management of contracts and the use of operational asset and sustainment agreements to provide greater stability in the cost and availability of critical supplies;

• continued to mature its enterprise financial management reporting to include broader program outcomes, issue identification and financial tracking against the Bureau’s 10-year financial plan; and

• continued to mature its charging unit to support various costing and pricing activities and released a revised charging and costing procedure.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 38

Section 3 - Group performance National Forecast Services Goal: Leverage our knowledge and insight to contribute to zero lives lost through natural hazards

and increase social and economic benefits by $1 billion to all Australians by 2022.

The National Forecast Services Group focuses on the delivery of weather, climate, water and ocean (including marine) services to enhance value and impact for the general public and emergency services

customers. It also develops and delivers the Bureau’s core meteorological, climatological, hydrological, oceanographic and front-line communication expertise across all sectors, and supports Business Solutions

Group in achieving its stated outcomes.

The Group’s services span the breadth of Australia, its territories and oceans and are delivered in a tiered

approach with national context typically derived centrally and tailored locally.

For 2019-20, the Group consisted of four Programs with the following responsibilities:

Community Forecasts National services to the general public including climate services, oceans services and water forecast services

National policy, planning and quality management for weather, climate, oceans and marine services

Understanding community needs

Public Safety Services for flood, thunderstorms, severe weather, fire, cyclones, tsunami and drought

Multi-hazard warning system

Emergency services sector liaison

National Operations Day-to-day service delivery

Consistent integrated national forecast service

Operation through the National Operations Centre and State and Territory- based forecasting centres

Community Outreach Engagement with the Australian community

State media and issues management

Marketing and campaigns

Public education

Social media and video

Media and graphic design

Customer service centre

Throughout 2019-20, the National Forecast Services Group focused on the delivery of three outcomes that

support the delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of these outcomes is discussed below.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 39

Outcome 1: A systematic and enduring capability to strengthen partnerships and understand customer needs, which we will translate into improved services. Achieving the outcome

Hazards Services Forum strengthening emergency management relationships

The Bureau of Meteorology Hazards Services Forum Task Team met twice this year to progress the standardisation of Bureau services with actions endorsed out of session by the Senior Officers. Notably,

the Forum has agreed to progress seven actions relating to potential fire behaviour under the Australian

Fire Danger Rating System (AFDRS) project (see highlight below), and to close an action relating to the already consistent severe weather services to the Australian Government Crisis Coordination Centre. The

Forum, co-chaired by Emergency Management Australia and comprised of representatives from national, State and Territory emergency services, consistently demonstrates the productive and close working

relationship between the Bureau and our partners in this important sector.

Applying customer feedback to improve boating and marine services

In response to feedback from key marine safety partners in Tasmania, and following endorsement through

the Hazard Services Forum, the Bureau standardised the wind warnings issued for major lakes in Tasmania. This will improve clarity for the boating community without losing the detailed, localised forecast

information on which lake users rely.

Following consultation with its marine safety partners, the Bureau improved the wording of the standard

safety phrase included in all marine forecasts and warnings. The improvement aims to help boaters understand that wind gusts and wave heights may be more extreme than the averages listed in the

forecast. Marine users are advised to be prepared for maximum waves twice the forecast height and wind

gusts 40 per cent stronger than the forecast, stronger still in squalls and thunderstorms.

Improving shared understanding of thunderstorm asthma

The Bureau continued to work closely with the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services and

other partners to better understand the phenomena known as thunderstorm asthma. Verification of results from an early warning system pilot, has shown the system is making significant contributions to the

academic, technical, and practical understanding of thunderstorm asthma. The pilot has been renewed for

the 2020 pollen season.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 40

Understanding flood information needs across Australia

Bureau hydrologists worked side by side with staff from the Western Australian Department of Fire and

Emergency Services (DFES) staff in the State Operations Centre to better understand and support flood management requirements. A Bureau senior hydrologist worked alongside DFES staff in the lead up and

throughout the State's 2019-20 wet season which included flooding associated with tropical cyclones

Damien, Esther and Blake. The Bureau also assisted DFES through education, insights and the development of a statewide flood intelligence project, in partnership with all relevant State water agencies.

Bureau staff with their DFES colleagues in the Western Australian State Operations Centre.

In Queensland, the collaborative development of a new communications protocol for the Paradise Dam is

providing enhanced community safety and emergency response to flooding in the lower Burnett River

catchment. The protocol outlines a new phased approach to operational communication that was tested in exercises in late 2019 by teams from the Bureau and its emergency response partners, and then further

practised in operations in February.

Under its multi-year flood supplementary services delivery project, the Bureau continued to work with the

Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, Victorian councils, catchment management authorities, the Victorian State Emergency Service and local communities, to deliver an

excellent flood warning service and community education program for at-risk communities across Victoria.

In February, the Bureau hosted Victoria's Catchment Management Authorities Flood Plain Management Forum focusing on the Bureau's weather and flood services and the Total Flood Warning System in

Victoria. Attendees welcomed the opportunity to interact with Bureau experts and gain better insight into flood warning operations.

Improving flood services through a national approach

In August, the Australia-New Zealand Emergency Management Committee (ANZEMC) endorsed the

National Framework for Flood Warning Infrastructure and the Flood Warning Infrastructure Standard

developed by the National Flood Warning Infrastructure Working Group, chaired by the Bureau. The Framework provides guidance for future flood warning infrastructure planning and investment, based on

jurisdictional analyses of their flood warning infrastructure.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 41

Continuing tsunami partnerships

In March, the Bureau and Geoscience Australia renewed the five-year strategic agreement to operate the

Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre (JATWC) that provides around-the-clock earthquake and tsunami detection, early warning, and advisory services for Australia and the Indian Ocean.

Australian Tropical Cyclone Advisory Group

A new advisory body was formed in December to support tropical cyclone Hazard Management Agencies across northern Australia and the Bureau in mitigating the hazards caused by tropical cyclones. The

Australian Tropical Cyclone Advisory Group provides a forum to share learning and to coordinate public education, tropical cyclone services and tropical cyclone warning processes across relevant agencies, the

Bureau and emergency broadcasters.

Highlights and significant events

Participating in the Royal Commission to improve emergency response

A Royal Commission into Australia's National Natural Disaster Arrangements was established following Australia's devastating 'Black Summer' bushfires. As a key agency supporting Australia's emergency

response and recovery, the Bureau provided evidence to the Commissioners regarding climate drivers and context, and technical and operational contributions to emergency management.

As the opening witness to the Commission, the Bureau provided a comprehensive high-level summary of the climate drivers behind the conditions leading up to 'Black Summer', demonstrating the importance of

climate conditions in determining bushfire potential and the significant impacts of the Bureau's climate

work.

Number of days that Australian area-averaged mean temperatures were in the warmest 1 per cent of records.

On day six, the Bureau outlined its role in resilience-building, mitigation activities, communication, and real- time support for the Bureau's emergency management partners. The Commissioners were particularly interested in the Bureau's work to make hazard services nationally consistent and its operational role

during peak events. The Bureau highlighted its integral role before, during, and after emergencies, and the

Bureau's agility and commitment to its partners and the community.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 42

Since the devastating 2019-20 warm season, the Bureau has also made significant contributions to the Independent Review into South Australia's 2019-20 Bushfire Season, the New South Wales Independent

Bushfire Inquiry, the Victorian Inspector General of Emergency Management Inquiry, the Senate Committee Inquiry into Lessons to be learned in relation the Australian bushfire season 2019-20 and

numerous coronial inquest processes. The Bureau has identified opportunities to further strengthen

Australia's national response to natural hazards and improve community outcomes. The outcomes and recommendations of the Royal Commission are due in August 2020, with other inquiries and reviews to

follow.

An ensemble flood forecasting pilot for the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley

The Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley has a long history of widespread and disastrous flooding and poses the highest unmitigated flood risk in Australia due to its unique geography and large population. There is a

heavy reliance on the road network for vehicle-based evacuation; however, many critical roads are cut off

before flooding reaches populated areas. Traditional flood forecasts based on observed rainfall and upstream water levels may not provide the lead time needed to evacuate the people impacted by a large

flood.

To meet this challenge, and give the emergency services the warning lead time they need, the Bureau

developed an ensemble flood forecasting capability in partnership with its partners and stakeholders. By harnessing the expertise of the Bureau's experienced flood forecasters with highly skilled emergency

responders, new co-designed products have been developed, including extended lead time flood forecasts

based on a blend of real-time radar observations with numerical weather prediction model outputs. New ways of displaying flood forecasts were also developed for the New South Wales SES to interpret the

information to take effective action.

Training and flood simulation exercises for the pilot service were conducted with emergency management

partners to enable the new service to be integrated into decision-making processes and operations.

A map showing sites in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley that support flood warning activities including official forecast locations (light blue), information locations (dark blue) and data locations (yellow).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 43

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• building customer engagement and communication competencies for staff in decision support roles;

• establishing new risk and resilience services and a decision support presence; and

• enhancing community recognition of the Bureau's role as a trusted source of weather, water and

climate information.

Outcome 2: A service of global standing, built on world-class science and technology, national expertise and local insight. Achieving the outcome

Increasing access to flood warning data

The Bureau commenced a new Flood Data System in June, providing customers and partners with access

to 15-minute updates of rain and river gauge data for each State, Territory or for the nation. The system allows users to incorporate the data directly into their systems allowing for more optimal solutions to their

needs and improved flood intelligence to better manage the impacts associated with rain, river flows and

flooding.

Uplifting the climate watch for the nation

The Bureau's Climate Service monitors Australia's climate and produces forecasts of expected conditions

in the weeks and months ahead. In the past year there has been a continuing uplift of the Bureau's underpinning climate data and modelling capability, including substantial updates to climate (long-range)

forecasts and continued refinement of services. Building on the new ACCESS-S model, multi-week forecasts were introduced in August, while the frequency of forecast updates for monthly and seasonal

outlooks was increased to once per week. These changes resulted in a large increase in the public uptake

of climate forecasts, increasing by more than 300 per cent. These services were particularly welcome during the past year that has seen some of the most extreme climatic conditions on the last century,

including Australia's hottest and driest year on record, and record fire danger in eastern states.

Implementing a national forecast production system

The Bureau's primary weather forecast production system—the Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE)—was initially developed at a regional scale for each State and Territory regional forecasting centre. As part of the

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 44

Bureau's Public Services Transformation Program, GFE is being transformed to enable the forecasting of a range of weather elements nationally for the first time. The new Gridded Operational Consensus Forecast

(GOCF) supports public weather forecasts that will be more accurate, timely and simpler to produce and enable earlier delivery of guidance to the Bureau's meteorologists via the GFE. The GOCF produces best- practice gridded basic guidance for weather parameters such as temperature, rainfall, dew point, mean

sea-level pressure, wind speed and wind direction over Australia. It uses statistical post-processing and machine learning techniques to correct biases in, add detail to, and combine numerical weather prediction

(NWP) outputs from the Bureau's ACCESS models and international global NWP models. The GOCF will enable forecasters to focus on activities that make best use of their knowledge, skills and insights. The

national GFE functionality will be increased during 2020-21.

The national GFE displaying forecast wind speed and direction and 24-hour rainfall amount.

Establishing an improved Fire Danger Rating System for Australia

The Australian Fire Danger Rating System (AFDRS) project is focused on developing and implementing a

national fire danger rating system to better describe the overall fire danger and risk to firefighters, land managers, government, utilities, businesses and the community. Over the past 12 months, the Bureau has

been involved in extensive consultation with key stakeholders around product development and has

commenced sections of the system build. The AFDRS will include a set of longer-term seasonal products that will help emergency services plan for the months ahead and ensure the provision of a seamless

service encompassing weather and climate timescales.

Delivering better insights on sea surface temperatures

The Bureau's operational ocean forecast model OceanMAPS was upgraded in May. The new version uses the surface-forcing generated by the Bureau's latest ACCESS numerical weather prediction model suite

and includes a more advanced formulation of surface fluxes and an updated data assimilation system.

Verification results indicate that these enhancements resulted in an 8-10 per cent improvement in forecast skill relative to the current operational system for sea surface temperature fields.

The Bureau's operational daily regional and global sea surface temperature analyses were upgraded in November and April respectively to ingest new data streams from NOAA-20 and Suomi-NPP satellites.

These analyses provide boundary conditions for several ACCESS models covering the global and regional domains, and are used by systems for tropical cyclone and seasonal prediction. The upgraded global

product is now one of the most accurate operational near real-time sea surface temperature analysis

systems worldwide.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 45

Reducing illness and lives lost from heatwave

In collaboration with the Department of Health, Geoscience Australia, the Australian Bureau of Statistics,

the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, the Bureau led the Reducing Illness and Lives lost from Heatwaves project seeking to identify

Australians most at risk from heatwave.

The project involves linking together several large Commonwealth datasets to identify key heatwave risks to Australians to potentially guide future government investment. The project also evaluates future

heatwave impacts using climate change scenarios from the Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) UNHaRMED project. It is the first to map vulnerability against Excess Heat Factor

(EHF), the scale used to define heatwave intensity by the Bureau and many Australian States and Territories.

This project is an important step towards the Bureau's broader implementation of impact-based forecast

and warning services. The Bureau is also co-chair of the National Heatwave Working Group (NHWG) which is developing a National Heatwave Warning Framework.

A Pacific-first for tsunami warning services

The Bureau's Tsunami Warning Services (TWS) deliver tsunami warnings nationally within Australia (via

the Australian Tsunami Warning System) and tsunami advisory information internationally to Indian Ocean countries. The Bureau's TWS became the first in the Pacific region to achieve certification and compliance

with ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management Standard.

The Bureau supports NASA's Lucy mission

The Bureau’s Northern Territory office was delighted to host a visit from NASA scientists in October. The

mission involved setting up 14 NASA telescopes along the Stuart Highway to observe a stellar occultation. The star was predicted to be shadowed by a 50 km wide Trojan asteroid for just 6 seconds just after 11 pm

on the night of 4 November, with predicted cloud cover being a critical factor in mission success. Although cloud cover prevented mission success, new relationships were forged, and the mission’s science leader

thanked the Bureau for its support.

A certificate of appreciation presented to the Bureau.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 46

Highlights and significant events

Predicting worsening drought and fire danger in 2019-20

Spring and early summer 2019-20 brought unprecedented climate conditions to much of Australia. Following poor rainfall during 2017 and 2018 in many areas, the onset of a strong positive Indian Ocean

Dipole and the breakdown in the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex in spring, set the scene for costly and

damaging drought and fire impacts across much of Australia. The Polar Vortex is a pattern of strong westerly winds over the Southern Ocean which gives rise to the so-called 'roaring forties' to Australia's

south. During spring, this normal pattern broke down and westerly winds spread much further north than usual to affect much of Australia, leading to dangerous fire danger and heatwaves affecting many parts.

The seasonal outlook for rainfall (left) and maximum temperature (right) provided to emergency managers and the public in August 2019.

The climate outlooks during spring into early summer showed substantially increased chances of below average rainfall and above average temperatures, and these outlooks were a key input into fire weather

forecasts issued by Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC). The Bureau's

insights and modelling allowed more frequent information updates to be provided to agencies, and to enhance the information available to our customers. As the season progressed and demands for

information grew, the Bureau stood up a new weekly National Hazard Outlook service to integrate recent climate conditions with weekly and seasonal forecasts, which was provided to emergency managers across

Australia.

The Bureau sets new benchmark for cyclone forecast accuracy

Severe tropical cyclone Damien inflicted the most intense conditions on Dampier and Karratha since

tropical cyclone Orson in 1989. The Karratha automatic weather station (AWS) recorded sustained winds of 144 km/h and a maximum wind gust of 194 km/h, indicating the impact was towards the top end of a

Category 3 cyclone. The Dampier weather radar sustained significant damage due to the event.

During the cyclone, the forecasts issued by the Perth Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre exhibited

extraordinary track accuracy due to a combination of improved models, notably the new ACCESS-G3 model, the robust forecast process and the highly skilled forecasting team. The accuracy of forecasts three

days out were particularly accurate compared to historical forecasts. This was despite Damien developing

quickly after moving offshore, the system changing track abruptly towards the coast and intensifying as it neared the coast.

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The consistent forecast and messaging over subsequent days provided both industry and the public ample warning time to make their preparations. The feedback given from industry and emergency services on the

forecasts for this event were overwhelmingly positive.

The track map for severe tropical cyclone Damien tweeted by the Bureau.

Managing operations to deliver critical decision support

Throughout the year, the Bureau's national approach to resilient operations has ensured the community is

provided a reliable and responsive weather service.

As the makings of tropical cyclone Claudia began to lash the Top End in January, the Darwin office turned

its focus to customer decision support activities while Tropical Cyclone Warning centres in Queensland and

Western Australia focused expertise into providing accurate and timely tropical cyclone advices. This approach meant that local meteorologists were able to work side-by-side with Northern Territory

emergency services to provide briefings and offer critical decision advice to the team based at the Territory Emergency Operations Centre.

Meteorologists Bradley Wood (left) and Dean Sgarbossa (right) monitor thunderstorms forming across the Northern Territory late last year as part of the 2019-20 Operational Resilience Project.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 48

Later that month, while much of the focus was on New South Wales during the unprecedented bushfire season, a major fire was closing in on the southwest suburbs of Canberra. To assist the ACT Emergency

Services Agency in its response, Incident Weather Forecasts for the fire were prepared by fire weather experts around the country, while rolling weather updates were provided to ABC Radio Canberra by

Bureau experts in the Sydney and Perth offices. When the fire was threatening to break containment, the

Bureau took advantage of a relatively quiet season in Tasmania to deploy a staff member from the Hobart Office to Canberra to provide in-person briefings and support for tactical decision-making.

In mid-May, storms impacted the whole coast of the Western Australia, from Exmouth to Albany and eastwards to Kalgoorlie. The event brought winds in excess of 130 km/hr, dust storms, severe fire weather

conditions, heavy rainfall, storm surges and significant wave heights of 8 metres or more. Despite the tropical cyclone season officially ending almost three weeks earlier, warnings had to be issued for the

Cocos Keeling Islands as well as offshore oil and gas rigs on the North West Shelf, and the Tropical

Cyclone Warning Centre (TCWC) was quickly reactivated with help from the teams in Darwin and Brisbane.

Many warnings, Facebook posts, YouTube videos, tweets, TV interviews, media conferences and extra

radio crosses followed, to provide the public with the information they needed to prepare and stay up to date with what was happening. All this occurred while most of the office was working from home and, while

some forecasters did come into the office, others worked from home using new online tools to improve communication and to share and access information. These examples highlight the Bureau's increasing

capacity to bring resources from around the country to where they are most needed, no matter where and

when severe weather events arise.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• implementing the new climatological, hydrological and meteorological services model being

established through the Public Services Transformation Program;

• informing future impact-based hazard warning services through a risk model using community

vulnerability, exposure and hazard data; and

• developing a Roadmap for implementing nationally consistent impact-based warnings.

Outcome 3: Highly valued services for customers and partners through our technology, science, people and communication expertise. Achieving the outcome

Delivering customer-focused weather service enhancements

A major update to the popular BOM Weather app was launched in June. New features include hourly

forecasts for the next 72 hours, pan and zoom radar, weather forecasts and warnings that move with the

current location, UV forecasts and fire danger ratings all presented in a fresh new design. More than 6000 customers provided input into the trial version prior to release. For more information see the Data and

Digital Group performance chapter.

This followed the release of a new mobile weather webpage (weather.bom.gov.au) in July 2019, accessible

to anyone with a desktop computer, tablet, or smartphone. The development of the webpage paved the way for the decommissioning of the old mobile website, and the series of enhancements included in the

app update, including the new radar viewer.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 49

Preparing the community for severe weather

The Bureau continued its community awareness campaign encouraging members of the public to prepare

for severe weather. The 'Know Your Weather. Know Your Risk' campaign was distributed through social media and emergency services partners from October to April. New educational videos released after

severe weather events also helped to explain the science behind these weather occurrences.

Throughout September, the Bureau provided detailed medium- and long-term weather and climate

information as part of the Annual Preparedness Briefings chaired by Emergency Management Australia.

Additionally, the Bureau provided more than 100 presentations relevant to bushfire risk to every State and Territory across Australia between 1 April and 30 November. These included briefs to all levels of

government and presentations to fire agencies, their Commissioners and the Chief Officers Strategic Committee of the Australian Fire and Emergency services Authority Council (AFAC), chaired by the

Department of Home Affairs and Emergency Management Australia.

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Providing better information on flash flooding potential

More detail has been added to the Bureau’s severe thunderstorm and severe weather warning service

through a new threshold for intense rainfall that is expected to exceed the 2 per cent Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) rate. These intense rainfall conditions represent a threat to the community, particularly

with respect to dangerous and life-threatening flash flooding. This information is now being added to

relevant warning products to draw people's attention to the most dangerous weather hazards.

Providing flood scenario outlooks for better flood preparation

An operational trial of a new national flood scenarios outlook product was undertaken during the year. The product indicates the likely magnitude and timing of flooding based on two different rainfall scenarios,

allowing the emergency services to make plans and contingency arrangements based on different probable outcomes. The product focuses on the seven days ahead and complements the Bureau’s existing flood

watch service. The flood scenarios outlooks were issued in five States and Territories during the

operational trial period to support event planning and preparedness, and feedback from the emergency services has been positive. The next step is to implement the product fully into the Bureau's operational

flood product suite.

2019-20 tropical cyclone season

There were seven tropical cyclones in the Australian region during the 2019-20 tropical cyclone season, which is significantly below the long-term average. There are usually between 9 and 13 tropical cyclones in

the Australian region each season. Of the seven tropical cyclones, three reached Category 3 intensity

(severe tropical cyclone) while in the Australian region, and three crossed the coast as tropical cyclones (cyclones Blake, Esther and Damien). Damien was the only severe tropical cyclone to make landfall.

The seven cyclones in the Australian region during 2019-20.

Expanding tidal prediction services for Queensland

Tidal prediction services for approximately 60 new coastal locations and secondary ports in Queensland are being delivered by the Bureau under a new three-year contract with Maritime Safety Queensland. The

first milestone of the project included the provision of tidal predictions for the 2021 Blue Book publications and was delivered to the client in June.

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Embedded meteorologists assisting in fuel reduction burns

Under a trial arrangement with the Western Australian Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and

Attractions, a Bureau meteorologist was embedded within the State's Parks and Wildlife Service for between September and December to help with fuel reduction burns. The role of the meteorologist was to

optimise the use of meteorological information for strategic and tactical decision-making. Specialised

products and guidance were developed to address service gaps and detailed briefings were routinely provided to enhance the information provided.

The access to a dedicated meteorologist was widely valued by the Department and resulted in the Parks and Wildlife Service gaining a better understanding of weather patterns, potential smoke impacts and

improved planning for prescribed burning.

Highlights and significant events

Deploying the expertise of the Bureau during Black Summer

From early spring, many parts of the country experienced prolonged and devastating bushfires. Leading into the 2019-20 bushfire season, much of Australia had experienced the worst drought on record (since

1900), with markedly low river flows, dry soils and vegetation across eastern Australia. From July, the first bushfires had developed in northeast New South Wales, and during early spring the fires were burning

across southeast Queensland. Widespread fires continued to burn into 2020.

From October, new fires developed throughout central and southern New South Wales. During November,

the severe thunderstorm and heatwave season commenced in southeastern Australia, further worsening

the situation. Along with impacts to health and infrastructure, excessive heat during these events increased the fire danger, while lightning strikes started new fires.

During the first half of summer many new fires started in New South Wales, Victoria and the ACT, many merging to form large complexes that affected vast areas. Fires also developed in South Australia, with

devastating impacts on Kangaroo Island. Smoke from these fires caused hazardous air pollution levels in Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne over several weeks, having significant widespread impacts on public

health. The fires peaked in late December and early January with the loss of much property and lives.

Record high temperatures were widespread, including Australia's hottest day, week and month on record, and the highest temperature ever recorded in Canberra (44.0 °C) and the Sydney Basin (Penrith 48.9 °C).

Throughout the season, Bureau staff worked alongside emergency services and other sectors to provide forecasts, warnings, briefings and weather intelligence to inform decision-making. The Bureau worked with

its partners in the media to ensure the community was aware of the expected impacts of these hazards,

and the appropriate preparations to take.

The Bureau was also supported by international volunteers and services: the US National Weather Service

seconded nine fire weather specialist meteorologists to the Bureau, while the Korean and Japanese meteorological agencies made additional satellite data available.

The full expertise of the Bureau was deployed, with meteorologists, climatologists, technicians, communication specialists and other Bureau capabilities working in close cooperation with Australian and

State Government agencies, fire authorities, local councils, the Australian Defence Force, national, state

and local media, and industry.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 52

Fire ground surrounding Cape Borda Lighthouse and AWS, Kangaroo Island. Taken from aircraft on 10 January 2020. Provided courtesy CFS, South Australia.

Not all floods are bad news; Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre floods

We often associate floods with destruction and devastation—but for the Channel Country, flooding brings

life to the outback, helping vegetation and wildlife flourish.

Following the Queensland floods from January to March this year, floodwaters travelled almost 1000 km, before reaching Australia's largest lake, Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre in South Australia. At its peak, the lake

reached around 80 per cent capacity, an event not seen since 2011. Interest was high with the Bureau fielding many enquiries from the public and media. For a short period, the lake became a tourist mecca.

Responding to this surge of interest, the Bureau worked cooperatively with media partner Channel 7 to visit the lake and take footage to develop an educational Bureau video of the spectacular event. The Bureau

also generated blogs and many tweets as the waters made their journey, then gathered in the lake. Special

Water Focus reports also described the event to stakeholders in the water industry. A rare event to which the Bureau responded and delivered key information and resources to the community.

An abundance of water in Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre.

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Public Services Transformation Program—strengthening our services

As part of its commitment to provide an outstanding service for the Australian community, the Bureau

commenced the Public Services Transformation Program to improve public services that deliver maximum impact and value for the Australian community. This Program, due for completion in 2022, will see a

fundamental change in how the Bureau works, and it supports its partners and the community to make

decisions that better protect lives and property.

In 2019-20, the Program:

• transitioned to a new operations approach for weather, water, climate and ocean services. These

changes are the first step towards creating a more responsive and resilient organisation, with the

ability to more flexibly deploy our capabilities wherever the weather and the community need us to be;

• developed a new framework for impact-based forecasting and warnings that will guide the Bureau to

develop easier to understand forecasts and warnings, based on what the weather will do rather than

what the weather will be, which will enable better protection of people's lives, properties and livelihoods; and

• uplifted technology capability that means we can now prepare and issue forecasts for any location

from any office, creating a more resilient and responsive enterprise.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• establishing National Production Services centres to lead the Bureau's 24-hour weather watch; and

• advancing the automation of routine forecast production without impacting customer requirements.

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Business Solutions Goal: A Bureau delivering $1 billion in added economic impact and value for Australia.

The Business Solutions Group leads the Bureau in improving customer engagement and business systems

to deliver an outstanding experience for its customers. The Group has an enterprise-wide focus on improving the Bureau’s customer-facing skills, systems and processes to promote customer interactions

that are more responsive and business-like. It also leads the enterprise in customer engagement across

focus sectors, namely: agriculture; aviation, land and maritime transport; energy and resources; national security; and water. By strengthening the Bureau’s relationships and service offerings, the Group aims to

ensure that customers value the Bureau as an essential business partner, delivering measurable impact and value every day.

As at 30 June 2020, the Group consisted of five Programs with the following responsibilities:

Agriculture

Deepening the Bureau's relationships

Developing a deep understanding of the sector and its needs

Delivering responsive, coordinated, world-class services

Aviation, Land and Maritime Transport

Energy and Resources

National Security

Water

Throughout 2019-20, the Business Solutions Group focused on the delivery of three outcomes that support

the delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of these outcomes is discussed below.

Outcome 1: A Bureau that deeply understands our customers. Achieving the outcome

Deepening engagement with national security sector

Deep and trusted relationships with the national security sector enabled rapid integration of Bureau support

to Operation Bushfire Assist (see highlight below) and uptake of the Bureau's new Global Seasonal Outlook, which provides insights into emerging global weather and climate risks to support security

planning and decision-making. The Bureau provided the outlook and associated briefing each quarter to key Government decision-makers in the Departments of Defence, Home Affairs, Prime Minister and

Cabinet and Foreign Affairs and Trade. The Bureau also initiated a first-of-its-kind National Security

Meteorology Five Eyes Community of Practice to exchange information regarding national security issues securely at an international level.

Increasing engagement with the water sector

The Bureau established a single point of contact (water@bom.gov.au) to engage with its water customers,

to support the application of Bureau data and analysis for decision-making. This engagement with water modellers, water operators, water planners and water-dependent businesses enhanced the Bureau's

understanding of customer needs and will help to shape future offerings to the sector.

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In May, the Bureau ran a webinar on the impact of recent rain on water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin that had 644 attendees from Federal and State Government agencies, water utilities, local

governments, banks and financial advisors, and a wide range of water-dependent businesses. The webinar was very well received with a 97 per cent satisfaction rate from attendees. The increasing attendance and

strong return rate highlighted the value that these professionals derive from the Bureau's analysis and

expertise.

Providing high-value, real-time and tailored services to energy and resources customers

The Energy and Resources Program continued to embed specialist decision-support meteorologists with

some of its key customers to help them make critical weather-related business decisions. Embedded meteorologists were placed with the Australian Energy Market Operator and Woodside Energy Limited,

informing business-critical decisions such as balancing supply and demand across the energy grid, or deciding when it is safe to continue offshore oil and gas operations when there is a potential for tropical

cyclones in the region.

Helping farmers adapt to climate variability and drought

The Bureau, in collaboration with FarmLink and CSIRO, supported the Australian Government's drought

assistance package by creating Regional Weather and Climate Guides that make it easier for locals to understand weather and climate trends in their areas.

Fifty-six guides covering all of Australia’s Natural Resource Management regions were released in October and can be accessed on the National Farmers' Federation FarmHub, the Bureau’s website, and the

Managing Climate Variability’s ‘Climate Kelpie’ website.

The guides provide farmers with information that helps to improve decision-making as they manage and adapt to weather and climate variability.

Highlights and significant events

Refining smoke forecasts during Black Summer

The bushfires during the 2019-20 summer had significant impacts on the aviation sector for which a low point during this period was undoubtedly the loss of the C-130 large air tanker and its three aircrew during

aerial firefighting operations north-east of Cooma in New South Wales in late January.

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Over the summer, vast volumes of bushfire smoke regularly blanketed Australia’s eastern seaboard, having a detrimental impact on busy air lanes and the health and safety of ground crew at airports. Smoke at times

drastically reduced visibility at Sydney and Canberra airports, significantly reducing airport capacity. At cruising altitudes, pyrocumulonimbus clouds rose above areas with intense fires, requiring course

alterations to avoid dangerous turbulence and disrupting carefully plotted landing schedules.

Conversations with the Bureau's aviation customers quickly highlighted that improvements to the coding of areas of smoke in aviation forecasts would help the sector. The Bureau discussed possible approaches

with its international network and decided to add an element to aviation forecasts: Vertical visibility. Vertical visibility is applied when there is no distinct boundary of the smoke layer to be determined and the

obscuration by smoke is all the way to the ground. New procedures, training and guidance were prepared and delivered to the Bureau’s aviation specialists and published across the Australian aviation sector to

pilots, airlines and aerodrome operators. Within a few weeks this new nationally consistent approach had

been implemented, communicated and was delivering value.

In late February, the Bureau facilitated a workshop with representatives from across the aviation sector on

the impacts of the bushfires, focusing on smoke. The move to introduce vertical visibility was praised by the sector, particularly the quality of the communication that accompanied the change. Insights from the

workshop will contribute to more tailored and relevant service provision during future bushfire episodes. The Bureau demonstrated the possibilities offered by air quality models which had been developed with

support of fire agencies and show promise for forecasting the movement of atmospheric smoke and the

visibility within these layers.

Satellite imagery showing immense coverage of bushfire smoke.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• deepening our understanding of customer activities, risks and opportunities; and

• strengthening strategic partnerships with peak bodies and senior levels of government to catalyse

enhanced impact.

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Outcome 2: Customers engage with a business-like Bureau to increase their productivity and reduce risk. Achieving the outcome

Transforming aviation services

The Aviation Meteorological Services Transformation Program was successfully completed in July with the establishment of operational forecasting centres in Brisbane and Melbourne, forecaster training and

technology upgrades. This has established the foundation to deliver continuous quality improvement and

service resilience, as well as increased flexibility and responsiveness in a safe and efficient operating environment. All forecasts for northern Australia are produced in Brisbane while southern Australian

forecasts are delivered from Melbourne. Hazardous weather advisories for phenomena such as tropical cyclones and volcanic ash are produced in Melbourne.

Enhancing the Bureau's National Security Operating Model

The National Security Program has continued to professionalise all facets of the program throughout the

year and maintained its agreed levels of support to our customers during the COVID-19 shutdowns. The

Defence Weather Services Team achieved ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management certification, which will be expanded to Space Weather Services and the National Security Program in 2020-21. Using lessons

learned during Operation Bushfire Assist, a re-evaluation of the provision of services to Headquarters Joint Operations Command was undertaken. The Bureau entered into a consortium agreement with the

Australia-Canada-France-Japan syndicate for the provision of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) space weather advisories.

Using data to manage Australia's water resources

The Bureau compiles and delivers comprehensive information about water resources across Australia as part of its responsibilities under the Water Act 2007. In 2019-20, the Bureau supported a range of

customer initiatives, including the development of real-time catchment and marine forecast models for the Great Barrier Reef, and the validation of models estimating lake levels from satellites using Australia's

storage level data with Brown University in the United States. The Bureau worked closely with WaterNSW to better understand the climate and weather drivers relevant to Sydney's water supply and inform supply

augmentation planning.

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The Bureau also worked with the Murray-Darling Basin Authority to assess climatic trends and better understand climate risk in the Murray-Darling Basin, and with the Commonwealth Environmental Water

Holder to manage a significant inflow event in the northern Murray-Darling Basin that led to the first filling of Narran Lakes in seven years.

The Narran Lakes in New South Wales filled for the first time in seven years, on 3 March (top) and 19 March 2020 (bottom).

New approaches to high-accuracy wave forecasting for the resource sector

An urgent customer request to improve wave forecasting in a challenging situation led to implementation of a novel, world-leading approach in partnership with the University of Western Australia. The customer's

shipping activities are very sensitive to sea state, such that a variance of 0.2 metre in wave height may mean the difference between bringing a ship in for loading or not. A machine-learning algorithm was used

to correct a high-resolution wave model, increasing skill at the location by up to 35 per cent. This approach

enabled the customer to make improved decisions leading to more than $50 million of additional economic value.

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Ultra-high accuracy temperature forecasts for LNG operations

Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) plants are highly susceptible to temperature changes, particularly when

temperatures exceed 40 °C or there are dramatic fluctuations, so accurate observations and forecasts are critical for successful operations. Using simple bias-correction factors, the Bureau improved localised

hourly temperature forecasts for an LNG customer by approximately 22 per cent, leading to better

operational planning, safety and gas supply forecasting. A correction based on modelled wind direction and investigation of individual site data were also explored. The initial results from a machine-learning approach

showed that the tailored forecasts of the plant's maximum temperature were an improvement of around 36 per cent compared to the official Bureau forecast for the wider region.

The Bureau leads the way on agricultural insurance

Increased weather, climate and water variability is driving increased volatility in farm cash income and other

measures of financial performance. Weather-based 'parametric' or index-based insurance products can

stabilise farm income volatility and create opportunities to increase profitability. These products are currently significantly underutilised by producers and agribusinesses and innovation by insurers has been

constrained by the quality and availability of on-farm weather observation data.

In collaboration with CSIRO's Data61, the Bureau launched the Trusted Private Automatic Weather

Stations project (TPAWS) to address these issues. The TPAWS project alerts stakeholders when on-farm observations are likely to be inaccurate, ensuring data-driven rural services, such as insurance, are derived

from consistently high-quality data. The Agriculture Program is at the forefront of the Bureau’s customer

engagement and is helping to shape and refine the delivery of services to their customers. This project was the result of close engagement and collaboration across the Bureau, the Department of Agriculture, Water

and the Environment and the sector over the 2019-20 period.

Highlights and significant events

The islanding of South Australia, and a little bit of Victoria

When a convective downburst struck a major transmission line in Australia's electricity system in late

January, the Bureau's flexibility and customer focus played a significant role in helping keep the lights on.

Extreme heat and humidity led to thunderstorms that created severe convective downbursts across parts of Victoria. One of these downbursts generated winds that damaged electricity transmission infrastructure

near Cressy, in regional Victoria. Within a second, South Australia and much of southwestern Victoria was cut off from the national grid, effectively 'islanding' this huge area from the remainder of the National

Electricity Market. The outage put unprecedented pressure on South Australia's electricity generation,

potentially costing the industry and businesses many millions of dollars.

The frequent, in-depth forecasting services provided by the Bureau to the Australian Energy Market

Operator (AEMO) were a vital support for controlling the balance of generation and demand in the transmission network. The specialist service delivered forecasts of expected cloud cover over the Adelaide

metropolitan area, where rooftop solar can contribute substantially to meeting daytime energy demand. Wind forecasts were also important given the large number of wind farms through the area.

Forecasts of thunderstorms, rainfall and wind also enabled staff from AusNet Services, the Victorian

transmission network owner and operator, to safely and effectively restore the connection in February.

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Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• uplifting customer-facing skills, systems, and processes to better meet customer needs; and

• developing and adopting systems and processes that ensure efficient prioritisation of Bureau

investments.

Outcome 3: A Bureau creating $1 billion in added economic value for Australia. Achieving the outcome

Piloting the Buntine Highway Early Warning System

During the northern wet season, travellers can be stranded between tributaries of the Victoria River from

monsoonal rainfall inundating highway crossings, sometimes requiring helicopter rescues to bring people to

safety.

During the 2019-20 wet season, the Bureau successfully tested the Buntine Highway Early Warning

System for the Northern Territory Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics. The system provides at least 24-hours' notice of conditions which may lead to inundation of road crossings on a remote

334-kilometre stretch of the Buntine Highway between the Victoria Highway and Kalkarindji.

A new impact-based rain and river flow for the Cooper Basin

During the year, Bureau hydrologists engaged closely with oil and gas producer Santos to understand how

rain and river flow impacted its oil and gas operations in Queensland's Cooper Basin. The Bureau developed an impact-based service in close consultation with Santos, and following extensive rainfall in

Queensland, the first flow service was initiated in mid-February, with weekly updates until mid-June. Even though the flooding resulted in significant impact to Santos' drill sites and operations areas, feedback on

the service was overwhelmingly positive as the service helped them to better understand the impacts of rainfall events. The service reports were also provided to external stakeholders, such as landholders, who

also gave positive feedback on the service.

Drought leads to spike in demand for water information

2019 was Australia's hottest and driest year on record, which saw a significant increase in the use of the

Bureau's water information products, particularly Water Storages and Water Restrictions. Overall, water information products were used 780 000 times, a 40 per cent increase in usage compared to the previous

year. The centralisation of Australia's water information significantly reduces transactions costs in decision- making for customers, who range from federal policy agencies through to small businesses and individuals.

Applying space weather modelling for energy security

A new Space Weather Model for electricity grid and cathodic pipeline protection from geomagnetically induced currents has been operationalised, providing electricity distribution and pipeline industries greater

prediction of the impacts of geomagnetic storm effects.

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Electricity infrastructure, vulnerable to geomagnetic currents from space weather.

Climate and extreme weather initiative kicks early goals for the electricity sector

Under the Electricity Sector Climate Information (ESCI) project, the Australian Government is providing

$6.1 million over three years from 2018-19 to improve climate and extreme weather information for the electricity sector. The project, undertaken with AEMO and CSIRO, is designed to improve the reliability and

resilience of the National Electricity Market to the risks from climate change and extreme weather.

The project is on-track to deliver future climate information at a fine spatial and temporal scale for specific

climate variables, such as temperature and wind, that can be used to improve long-term climate risk planning for electricity infrastructure.

Highlights and significant events

Supporting Operation Bushfire Assist

The Bureau provided critical support to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) during Operation Bushfire

Assist 2020, epitomising the Bureau's commitment to the safety of the Australian community. Evacuation operations conducted by sea and by air were directly informed by the Bureau's meteorologists and

services.

When the Emergency Warning was issued for the east of Victoria, the Bureau's Senior Defence

Meteorologist at RAAF Base East Sale and operational meteorologists in Melbourne were there to assist

the ADF response. Up to 50 pilots and crew were briefed daily by Bureau meteorologists, focusing on keeping the ADF aviators flying safely in unprecedented conditions with massive smoke plumes, volatile

winds and raging fires generating their own storms. Commander of the ADF Rotary Wing Aviation Task Force, responsible for evacuating residents during the bushfire season, specifically commended the

Bureau's efforts.

The Bureau's ocean forecasts were also used in real time for planning, preparation, and evacuation of

residents from the fire-affected areas. Oceanographic systems were used by Navy officers to generate

high-resolution ocean and wave forecasts for the coast covering Mallacoota and Eden. Data on surface currents were provided to HMAS Choules and Adelaide.

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The Defence Meteorological Support Unit at Headquarters Joint Operation Command in Canberra provided decision support to operations planning. These staff were critical in supporting decisions made by ADF

response across multiple States and Territories. Upon request, the team prepared and supplied a tailored briefing pack and geospatial datasets with burn area overlays that were used extensively in planning the

response activities.

HMAS Choules' embarked MRH-90 Maritime Support Helicopter, HAT-TRICK, re-joins the ship as they both continue to support Operation Bushfire Assist.

Supporting Australian interests in Antarctica

Knowing what the weather is doing in Antarctica can be a matter of life and death, and the ongoing role the Bureau has played since the very first Australian expeditions are central to its mission.

During 2019-20, the Bureau partnered with the Australian Antarctic Division to support the development of

an aerodrome at Davis Station that will be accessible all year round. This will significantly increase Australia's capability and capacity for Antarctic science, support the safety of expeditioners and strengthen

Australia's commitment to the Antarctic Treaty. The Bureau contribution will include increased atmospheric monitoring, modellings of the weather conditions, advice on sea ice conditions and assessments of hazards

to aviation operations.

Over the coming years this project will provide investment required to uplift the delivery of services

supporting safe and efficient transport by air and sea to one of the most remote locations on Earth.

During the year, the Bureau also developed a new weather service capability to support a proof of concept flight for a RAAF C-130J Hercules aircraft into Wilkins Runway near Casey Station, despite delays in the

Antarctic aviation program due to above average temperatures impacting runway conditions.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 63

A ski-equipped Basler BT-67 aircraft landing on the existing runway at Davis Station.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• advancing Australia’s foreign policy, security, international development assistance and science

goals in the Asia-Pacific, Southern Ocean and Antarctica; and

• promoting greater use of the Bureau's data, knowledge, insight and wisdom by Australia's water,

energy, resources, aviation, transport and agriculture industries.

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Data and Digital Goal: Data, technology and digital services enabling the delivery of an outstanding customer experience.

The Data and Digital Group, partnering with other Bureau Groups, provides a platform to develop and deliver enterprise services and technologies underpinning the Bureau’s delivery to its customers.

The Group consolidates all information and communication technology (ICT) and observation technology,

software development and digital and data management. It is instrumental in ensuring the Bureau’s effectiveness, innovation, security and sustainability in meeting customer needs through seamless delivery,

from data collection to provisioning. The Group is critical for framing the future of the Bureau, delivering new architecture and capability, and ensuring the Bureau is secure.

For 2019-20, the Group consisted of seven Programs with the following responsibilities:

Planning and Architecture Technology policies and standards

DDG planning uplift

Demand and pipeline management

Observing Systems and Operations Operation of the observing network

Observations delivery

Maintenance and sustainment of the network

Data Data governance, advice and standards

Data management specialised services

Data requirements and quality

Managing data partnerships

Data services

Digital Channels and Customer Experience Design Customer research and user experience design User design and prototyping

Digital development

Customer analytics

Digital planning

Application Services Delivery of ICT applications and platforms

Digital services

Testing and quality assurance

Service and Infrastructure Management Reliable ICT operations

High-performance computing

ICT support services

Cyber Security Cyber awareness

Assurance and governance

Cyber security operations

Throughout 2019-20, the Data and Digital Group focused on the delivery of four outcomes that support the

delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of these outcomes is discussed below.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 3 - Group performance 65

Outcome 1: A globally benchmarked data and digital capability informed by deep customer insight and understanding. Achieving the outcome

Progressing the Digital Roadmap

The Bureau continued to uplift its digital channels in line with its Digital Roadmap to ensure customers receive a positive experience through modern, intuitive, engaging and innovative digital channels.

A highpoint for the year was the market launch of the next generation BOM Weather app (see highlight

below) which was built through the Bureau's customer-centred design process. Through the Digital Roadmap the Bureau will continue to implement a world-class Digital Channels Operating model that will

ensure we deliver superior and consistent experiences across our digital service and products.

Uplifting the Bureau's data capability

The Bureau undertook several major activities during 2019-20 to maintain trusted, reliable and responsive

data as the foundation to everything it does, and to ensure it can respond effectively to the rapidly evolving data landscape.

In November, the Bureau established the Data Governance Office and launched Data 2022 and Beyond. The Data Governance Office is the central point for all the Bureau's data management guidance and

advice, and Data 2022 and Beyond outlines the Bureau's vision, priorities and implementation roadmap to ensure support for the transformation in operations, products and services being driven by the Bureau’s

Strategy 2017-2022.

In May, the Data Integrity Advisory and Assurance Committee, an external committee of independent experts, completed its annual review of the integrity of Bureau's data. The Committee had high praise for

Data 2022 and Beyond and the Data Governance framework.

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The five transformative themes of Data 2022 and Beyond

Quality and accreditation of the Bureau's observing systems

In November, the Bureau underwent its first surveillance audit following ISO 17025 accreditation for

atmospheric pressure calibration in early 2018. The Bureau exited the audit successfully without findings, which also confirmed compliance to the latest release of the standard. The Bureau also continued its

pursuit of ISO 17025 accreditation for temperature calibration, working closely with the accrediting body, the National Association of Testing Authorities, to provide additional information to support the application,

with the aim to reach a successful conclusion in 2020-21.

The Bureau is developing and implementing a Quality Management System for the management and

operation of its automatic weather station (AWS) observing network and the data it generates. In 2019-20,

adoption and application of the quality management concepts, tools and practices was completed. Work will continue in 2020-21 across other operational areas towards achieving ISO 9001 certification.

Applying satellite imagery to bushfire management

After the devastating 2019-20 bushfires, the Australian Space Agency led the establishment of the Bushfire Earth Observation Taskforce to determine how satellite data could be better used for bushfire

management for the next fire season and beyond. Several satellite and fire weather experts from the Bureau worked closely with the Australian Space Agency, Geoscience Australia, and CSIRO, as well as

state emergency and fire agencies to develop recommendations and actions.

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The Taskforce identified several opportunities to further improve this capability, including Australian involvement in satellite missions that would help assure Australia’s access to this critical data while also

improving fire, vegetation, water and weather monitoring.

Highlights and significant events

Launching the new BOM Weather app

An update to the BOM Weather app (v3.0) was launched in June. More than three million people access the BOM Weather app every year, making it the Bureau's second most-used digital channel. The upgrade

helped to ensure Bureau is keeping pace with the changing needs to customers and can reach even more members of the Australian community. New features of the app include:

• better access to people with a vision impairment when used in conjunction with the 'accessibility'

functions on mobile phones and tablets;

• optimisation for small screens;

• weather alerts automatically based on the user's location, even on the move;

• upgraded dynamic pan and zoom radar that includes a user-location marker and the ability to

navigate around Australia;

• wind speeds in km/h and knots;

• four-day sun protection information and UV; and

• 'weather mood' background (for example, sunny or rainy) and night-time mode.

Tenth Asia-Oceania Meteorological Satellite Users' Conference

The tenth Asia-Oceania Meteorological Satellite Users’ Conference was hosted by the Bureau in

Melbourne in December. The conference comprised three separate events:

• a two-day training event focused on the application of satellite data for thunderstorms, tropical

cyclones and nowcasting;

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• a three-day conference plenary attended by 132 participants from 28 countries plus the World

Meteorological Organization (WMO); and

• a joint meeting of the WMO Regional Associations two and five (RA-II and RA-V) focused on satellite

data utilisation in the Asia-Oceania region, including discussion on further collaboration opportunities between the Bureau, the Korean Meteorological Agency and the Japanese Meteorological Agency

(JMA).

The Bureau sponsored the attendance of nine participants from small island nations and developing countries, and a further seven were sponsored by JMA.

These events are important for maintaining strategic partnerships with satellite providers and satellite data users. More than 90 per cent of the observations assimilated into the Bureau's numerical weather

prediction systems are from satellites, providing the foundation for all the services delivered by the Bureau, including services to defence, aviation, agriculture and the general public.

Conference delegates from day one of the three-day plenary.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• assessing the Bureau's future observations needs over the next 5 to 10 years; and

• implementing the Bureau's Data Stewardship model and developing an enterprise approach to data

analytics.

Outcome 2: Secure, stable, resilient, accessible and responsive services all day, every day. Achieving the outcome

Uplifting the Bureau's Service Management

Implementation of the Bureau's Service Management Uplift initiative continued during the year. The Bureau

recruited four subject matter experts to assist in enhancing technology incident and change management processes. These processes are essential in any technology environment, but become increasingly

important where transformation is occurring. The uplift has been undertaken in collaboration with the

ROBUST Program to ensure processes and procedures support the new operating environments and has resulted in improved handling of major incidents and the minimisation of impact or outage time.

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Strengthening asset management planning

The Bureau strengthened its asset management capability through the development and publication of a

Strategic Asset Management Plan and financial model, and preparation of supporting detailed asset management plans for each observing network. Detailed user requirements for an Enterprise Asset

Management System to manage the Bureau's observing assets were established, and an approach to

market was presented in August. The new system will replace many of the functions performed by the current database but will uplift capability in assignment and scheduling, recording and analysing asset

performance, and reporting on performance.

Extending the life of the Bureau's critical systems

To enable the Bureau's critical systems to continue providing resilient and stable support for forecast systems and applications, the Category 1 Asset Life Extension Project (Cat1 Project) delivered 12 work

packages, completing over 50 infrastructure, system and server upgrades and countless application

configurations. The project provided the foundational capability for the Scalable and National Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE), enhancements to the Tsunami Decision Support Tool (DST) and significant

Australian Integrated Forecast System (AIFS) infrastructure upgrades. These enhancements improve the intra-operability of the Bureau’s forecasting capability while ensuring the systems remain secure and data

and service integrity is maintained.

Uplifting the measurement standards

The Standards and Metrology Laboratory Uplift Project was developed in response to a recommendation

from a 2017 Automatic Weather Station Review to introduce environmental testing for the Bureau's AWS equipment as part of regular calibration work, and to seek accreditation to the ISO 17025 standard.

During the year, the Standards and Metrology Team successfully completed the design and build of a new electrical calibration capability that will allow the system to be commissioned in late 2020. The system

supports calibration of analogue to digital conversion for measurement of voltage, current, resistance and frequency signals. The new system can test four AWSs simultaneously over a period of 24 hours.

The build of a new relative humidity calibration system is underway, with acceptance testing to begin early

in 2020-21. The preliminary design of new pressure and rainfall calibration capabilities is also well advanced. Once complete, the Bureau will apply to the National Association of Testing Authorities to

expand its ISO 17025 accreditation to include these fields.

Maintaining the Bureau's commitment to the National Environmental Information Infrastructure

The Bureau continued to lead the cross-government collaboration to deliver the National Environmental

Information Infrastructure (NEII) and manage the platform. The NEII platform provides access to Environmental Web Data Services, Vocabularies and an Environmental Monitoring Sites Register, all of

which improve the accessibility and reusability of environmental data for all Australians. During 2019-20, the NEII Team added over 21 web data services, increased its metadata catalogue by over 60 entries and

logged 12 new environmental monitoring networks. Other improvements to the platform included the addition of an analytics dashboard, secure access for data contributors and additional statistical usage

information. NEII was also showcased at the Group on Earth Observations Week Conference and the Data

Integration Partnership for Australia presentation, both held in Canberra in November and December, respectively.

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Highlights and significant events

Consolidation of the Central Computing Facility

The Bureau's oldest data centre, the Central Computing Facility (CCF), was fully decommissioned in June after almost 46 years of service. The CCF was first commissioned in the Bureau's former Melbourne Office

in Lonsdale Street in 1974 and relocated to the Bureau's current Melbourne Office in Docklands in 2004.

The decommissioning has enhanced the Bureau's resilience by retiring end-of-life equipment, removing vulnerable systems and migrating to modern architectures.

Over two years, the Bureau's data centre equipment was consolidated from three sites to two by retiring, migrating and transforming 189 IT assets dispersed across 46 systems. The work was undertaken by more

than 120 project, applications, networking, platforms, data centre and procurement specialists, supported by system owners and business representatives to ensure negligible disruption to the Bureau's operations.

Systems affected include core parts of the Bureau's network that served offices and sites across Oceania,

communication links to external partners, including to aviation, education and science sectors as well as to national meteorological services in Asia, the Pacific and Europe. The project also quadrupled the Bureau's

link capacity to Singapore and improved services with Meteorological Service Singapore.

Nathan Mudge and Darren Spencer transferring the old racks for recycling.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• developing service improvement and sustainability plans for each observing network to meet service

level commitments and manage risk;

• preparing for a supercomputer replacement in 2021-22 with improved capacity, performance,

service management and job scheduling; and

• reviewing the Bureau's website content, including content decommissioning, to ensure customers

have the most up-to-date, accurate and relevant information.

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Outcome 3: Delivery of end-to-end solutions that optimise performance and efficiency in every process. Achieving the outcome

Ensuring a sustainable weather watch on Willis Island

2019-20 saw the completion of the second phase of the Bureau's Willis Island Remediation Project. A team of 20 tradespeople descended on the island for a three-week period in May to undertake station

works to ensure staff safety and enable more resilient and efficient observations collection in this cyclone- prone region. The team remodelled the meteorological office space, creating multi-purpose rooms, an amenities room and a dedicated first-aid room, and carried out refurbishments of the outside deck area.

The team also installed high-quality bird screening to protect the space from wildlife and an air-conditioning system to help manage the damaging effects of high humidity, such as growth of mould on internal walls

and surfaces.

Aerial photo showing the supply and accommodation vessels offshore and workers on Willis Island.

Queensland's second Observing Operations Hub goes live in Brisbane

In August, the Bureau's Brisbane-based Observing Operations staff relocated from their Eagle Farm site to a new purpose-built facility in Virginia.

Staff moved an estimated 80 pallets of observation infrastructure, also bringing historic observations equipment uncovered during the packing process, that will go on display at the new hub.

The new hub has dedicated mechanical and electrical workshops, office and warehouse space, a

conference room, video wall and high-quality amenities. It provides staff with improved infrastructure and capability to perform remote monitoring and more effectively and efficiently sustain the Bureau's

observation network in southern Queensland.

Establishment of the hubs within the National Observing Operations Program is part of realising the

Bureau's Observing Systems Strategy, with work underway for the final planned purpose-built facilities in Hobart, Perth and Sydney.

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New automated meteorological balloon launching systems

New automated meteorological balloon launching systems (AMBLS) were installed at Woodstock

(Townsville), Charleville, Geraldton, Esperance and Moree during the year. The new AMBLS hold 60 radiosondes compared to the previous 24 and provide the flexibility to increase the number of balloon

flights, or launch adaptive flights, remotely from the Observing Operations Hub as required.

The AMBLS make a significant contribution to the sustainability of the Bureau’s upper air observing program and will replace a combination of manual processes at staffed locations and ageing technology at

operational upper air sites. The installations are part of a rollout schedule where a total of 24 AMBLS will be installed by 30 June 2022.

The new AMBLS at Moree.

Providing ICT support during COVID-19

As the Bureau moved swiftly to a ‘work from home’ capability in March, the logistical effort to ensure

appropriate ICT equipment, remote access capability and support was enormous. In excess of 1000 requests were handled in a matter of two weeks, with support teams providing help and assistance as

the Bureau changed its standard work environment to remote use versus the Office 365 suite. Online meetings grew exponentially through the first couple of weeks, and secure connections for other

applications required a rapid introduction of new technology, piloted and introduced in a matter of weeks

rather than months.

Mid-term upgrade for the Australis supercomputer

High-performance computing (HPC) is the core enabler and principle capability underpinning all the Bureau’s operations, and a project to strengthen this capability through a scheduled mid-term upgrade has

been a vital to meet the future demands of next generation numerical models that will provide improved detail and accuracy.

In April, the Bureau received Australis II, a 4.0 petaflop Cray XC50 and CS500 system that will deliver

double the computing power and storage, and improved capability for more frequent running of enhanced prediction models. The upgrade is a significant milestone in achieving a more secure supercomputing

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platform for the Bureau's operations and future service delivery including through the Public Services Transformation Program.

The project successfully navigated the COVID-19 crisis which added complexity to the physical delivery, installation and commissioning of the machine. The system will be commissioned during 2020-21 and will

take over production work from the existing Australis system.

Enhancing the radar network

Working in partnership with State Governments, the Bureau upgraded the existing Esperance radar in Western Australia and delivered a new radar at Rainbow in Victoria's Wimmera Southern Mallee region

(see highlight below). The Esperance radar features Doppler wind and real-time rain information for the first time, enhancing the Bureau’s ability to monitor storm severity, fine-tune warnings during severe weather

events and enable meteorologists to observe wind better than ever before.

In May, the Minister for Environment, the Hon Sussan Ley MP, announced the site for the new Mildura

radar. The current Mildura radar is the second oldest of the Bureau's more than 60 radars and has been

operating from its present location at the town's airport since 1989. The new radar will be built roughly 45 kilometres west of Mildura, in Cullulleraine, and will deliver improved coverage and weather information

to the surrounding regions.

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Highlights and significant events

Sustainable improvements to rural radar coverage

At the end of March, the Bureau delivered a new radar at Rainbow to fill a gap in its observing network in western Victoria's Wimmera Southern Mallee region. A 20 kW solar photovoltaic system was also installed

to help offset the radar's power costs and to reduce the Bureau's carbon footprint.

The state-of-the-art instrument can detect rain intensity, hail, bushfire plumes, and wind velocity, assisting with flood and severe weather warnings, emergency services management and general weather

forecasting for the community.

Data available through the radar helps local growers to make informed choices about harvesting, tillage

and the use of chemicals and fertilisers, enabling more effective crop-spraying and fertiliser application, avoiding wastage and reducing financial risk for farmers. The radar will also benefit the aviation, defence,

construction, resources and energy, and tourism sectors more broadly.

Jointly funded by the Victorian and Federal Governments, the radar was delivered ahead of schedule and under budget, with support from the Wimmera Development Association. As part of the rollout, community

engagement events were held with Bureau and Rainbow P-12 College used the opportunity for STEM education for its students.

The Rainbow radar, powered by a 20 kW solar photovoltaic power system.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• constructing and commissioning radars in the Brewarrina and Hillston regions in western NSW and

the Upper Burdekin region in northwest Queensland;

• commissioning the Australis II supercomputer;

• releasing a new web portal to receive and ingest priority water datasets; and

• building and commissioning fit-for-purpose observing hub facilities in Hobart and Perth.

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Outcome 4: Sustained operational excellence during and after the ROBUST transformation. Achieving the outcome

AARNet membership boosts Bureau research

Australia's Academic and Research Network (AARNet) interconnects the Australian research and education sector though an ultra-high-speed network that was built to meet the needs of data-intensive

research, like the Bureau's numerical weather prediction systems that provide daily forecasts, and climate

change research.

During 2019-20, teams from across the Bureau worked with AARNet to access the National Computational

Infrastructure's (NCI) supercomputer, which plays a vital role in the Bureau's research. The team also reviewed the security controls in place for accessing NCI to ensure they remained fit-for-purpose.

The AARNet membership will help to foster further collaboration with the research communities and facilitate the transport and sharing of large datasets and research.

Updated operating model

The Group updated its operating model during the year, moving from a functional to a service-based model better aligned with the outcomes of ROBUST, the Public Services Transformation Program and the

Bureau's strategic focus. The service-based approach enhances the Group's capabilities in the Plan, Build and Run model that will drive better performance across its Programs.

Highlights and significant events

ROBUST delivers new AMBLS

The Brisbane hub team will be spending less time in the air, thanks to a new Automatic Meteorological

Balloon Launching System (AMBLS) operating in outback Queensland. Previously, a team member would fly into Charleville every fortnight to load the weather balloons and radiosondes. The new AMBLS now

provides the team with the flexibility to reload every seven to eight weeks. The technology is more advanced with increased reliability, remote support is more user-friendly and allows the Bureau's technical

officers to work in a more efficient manner. The Bureau is now better able to deliver an improved operational service, especially during severe weather.

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Brisbane's Upper Air Lead Warren Zhou monitoring the AMBLS balloon software; Charleville’s first scheduled sounding.

The Bureau's current fleet of meteorological balloon launching systems is ageing, and during the next few years the ROBUST Program will replace more that reach the end of their lives. The ROBUST installations

are managed through an integrated schedule with the Observing Systems and Operations Program, contributing to a more sustainable observing network.

Uplifting cyber security in the Bureau

During 2019-20, the Cyber Security Program undertook a range of activities to drive security maturity uplift within the Bureau. The Cyber Security Roadmap 2025 was released to set the direction for improvements

to the Bureau's cyber security capabilities along with the Cyber Security Delivery Plan 2023 to outline the key initiatives to implement the Bureau's cyber security strategy.

Cyber security governance processes were strengthened through the establishment of a Cyber Security Sub-Committee, reporting to the existing Security Business Risk and Resilience Committees, and a cyber

security assurance function was established. Several cyber security policies were developed and released

for staff consultation and mandatory online cyber security training courses were developed and piloted, with a full rollout planned for late 2020.

The Bureau undertook an assessment of its cyber security maturity against international best practice, the US National Science and Technology Institute Cyber Security Framework, with results showing an

improvement in the maturity of the Bureau's cyber security risk management. Improvements were also made to the Bureau's security posture in line with the Australian Signals Directorate's Essential 8, including

the rollout of multi-factor authentication, implementation of a next-generation email filtering platform, and

improved privileged access management.

In November, the 'Stop.Think.Protect.Connect. Cyber Security' awareness campaign led several activities,

including a cyber security simulation exercise with the Bureau's senior leaders and the release of the regular 'Cyber News Bites' newsletter, which provides news stories, tips, technical issues and advice.

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A graphic from the 'Stop.Think.Protect.Connect' awareness campaign.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 4 include:

• hosting the next generation numerical prediction applications for environmental, weather and climate

forecast services on the Australis system; and

• uplifting the Bureau's digital channels, including the BETA launch of the new Bureau website.

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Science and Innovation Goal: A customer- and partner-focused Group that is scientific, innovative, diverse and inclusive.

The Science and Innovation Group harnesses Earth science undertaken by an increasingly diverse and

inclusive workforce to provide innovative systems and services that deliver great impact and value for the Bureau’s customers and partners. These systems and services are enhanced by mutually beneficial

national and international relationships that allow the Bureau and our partners to achieve more together

than they can alone.

At 30 June 2020, the Group consisted of three Programs with the following responsibilities:

Global and National Science Relationships Enhancing our world-class science and innovation outcomes through high-value international and national relationships.

Whole-of-enterprise coordination of collaborations.

Enhance our influence in national and global forums.

Research Research and development to support the Bureau's

scientific systems, and customers and partners.

Research to Operations Transfer of the Bureau's operational prediction systems

from research to operations.

Throughout 2019-20, the Science and Innovation Group focused on the delivery of three outcomes that support the delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of

these outcomes is discussed below.

Outcome 1: An adaptive weather, climate and water knowledge agenda informed by deep customer and partner insight and understanding. Achieving the outcome

Creating a new vision for research and development

In April, the Bureau released a new ten-year Research and Development Plan 2020-2030 outlining its vision for research and development that reflects customer needs and ways to meet them. The Plan

highlights four objectives focused on delivering targeted improvements to underpinning numerical prediction capabilities and to forecast delivery and services based on identified needs, to deliver more

accurate, timely, and tailored insights over the next decade. The plan will help the Bureau implement its

Strategy and deliver world-class services for all Australians.

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The new ten-year Research and Development Plan 2020-2030.

Establishing an Antarctic prediction system

A scoping study was completed to document the requirements of an Antarctic prediction system to support the delivery of enhanced forecast services for the high southern latitudes. This system will provide

forecasts for safe and effective aviation, shipping and other operations within the Antarctic region.

Strengthening international and national partner relationships

The Bureau continued to uplift its strategic relationships with priority international and national partners

through an enterprise-wide partnership framework including the identification of partnership stewards, the development of principles for international representation and governance management tools to support

the measurement and tracking of partnership health over time. The realignment of international relations functions to the Office of the CEO in 2020-21 will also enhance the Bureau’s role in the World

Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC).

Climate Processes Team Leader Dr Matthew Wheeler was appointed as an expert member of the newly

formed WMO Research Board and the WMO research representative on the WMO-IOC Joint Collaborative Board, which now oversees all collaboration between meteorological and oceanographic activities in the

UN system.

Developing an enterprise innovation framework

The Bureau progressed development of its enterprise innovation framework, which aims to strengthen and enhance the organisation's innovative capacity. The framework will enable the Bureau to best support the

development of deep understanding, creative thinking and enduring partnerships and generate novel

solutions for its customers and organisation. Implementation of the framework will begin in the second half of 2020.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• implementing systems to deliver more frequent high-resolution predictions;

• developing customer-focused products across different timescales; and

• implementing the Bureau's enterprise innovation framework.

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Outcome 2: A scientific capability of global standing and connectivity, excelling in a collaborative, innovative, diverse and inclusive workplace. Achieving the outcome

Improving how the Bureau transfers research into operations

During the year, the Bureau consolidated the functions associated with the operationalisation of its numerical environmental and weather prediction services into a new Research to Operations Program. The

establishment of this dedicated Program will improve the efficiency of applying the Bureau's research and

development advancements into better products and services that ultimately enhance the impact and value delivered to the Australian community.

The Program's first operationalisation of a major Bureau numerical and environmental weather prediction system was for a new system of tropical cyclone prediction. This also involved decommissioning the

superseded system of tropical cyclone prediction after a period of side-by-side running to confirm the new system was operating as expected.

Improving guidance post-processing

A large fraction of the value of numerical weather prediction model output is only realised when the ‘raw’ model output is processed to reduce errors and derive more useful quantities for end-users. The

implementation of the new Aurora computing platform in August enabled the Bureau to make a significant upgrade to its gridded guidance post-processing. The resulting quality improvements enable greater

automation of routine functions so that operational meteorologists can devote more effort to high-impact and customer-decision support tasks.

In collaboration with the UK Met Office, the Bureau commenced work on implementing a replacement post- processing system known as IMPROVER. This system will provide probabilistic guidance for basic weather variables based on Bureau state-of-the-art high-resolution rapid update weather models and international

models.

Showcasing the Bureau’s scientific capabilities and achievements

The Bureau held its annual R&D workshop in November, focusing on recent scientific advances that have improved weather, water, ocean and climate services. Involving 225 participants from 48 organisations, the

event provided an opportunity for the Bureau to engage and collaborate with its partners, customers and

other stakeholders. A total of 76 presentations and six in-depth workshops showcased how the Bureau and partners can provide the Australian community with improved services and improved decision-making

abilities, resulting in greater impact and value.

Weather, climate and water research for improved insight and understanding

The Bureau continued to undertake weather, climate and water research to discover insights and build on

its understanding to improve services to its customers and create shared value with its partners. In particular, the Bureau:

• continued to participate in the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Earth System and

Climate Change Hub, supporting world-leading, customer-focused research in collaboration with

CSIRO and universities;

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• developed a new dataset of 'application ready' data to serve the hydrological community as it moves

towards seamless services, from past climate records through weather and climate forecasts to

projections; and

• continued its partnership with the Victorian Government to deliver the Victorian Water and Climate

Initiative. The Initiative is highlighting shifts in Australia's extreme hourly precipitation and the

contribution of atmospheric greenhouse gas increases to the cool-season rainfall decline in

southeast Australia since the start of the Millennium Drought.

Welcoming interns for mutual benefit

In February, the Bureau's Research Program hosted five-week internships for three students from Monash University and The University of Melbourne with backgrounds in meteorology, mathematics and statistics,

software engineering and biomedical science. The students were enthusiastic about exploring questions of relevance to the Bureau and participated in product and service improvement projects, including on rainfall

guidance and fire weather forecasts. The students engaged with Bureau staff with various backgrounds

and career experiences to learn what had helped them find meaningful, interesting and motivating work.

University internships have mutual benefits for the Bureau and supporting universities. It helps develop

innovative thinking, bring in new ideas and thinking, and facilitate knowledge transfer of Bureau data, service concepts and research. Some previous interns have gone on to work for the Bureau, while others

have noted that their internship experience helped them in a STEM career.

Highlights and significant events

Developing fire danger information on timescales from weeks to decades

Bureau researchers developed new capabilities for bushfire weather prediction that are consistent across different timescales. These include multi-week to seasonal predictions developed for the first time for

Australia (in collaboration with the Country Fire Authority and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning in Victoria and the Bushfires and Natural Hazards CRC), as well as future climate projections

throughout this century. A novel calibration method was developed to make these data consistent with observations-based fire weather data back to 1950 (available from

http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/climate_averages/ffdi/index.jsp).

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The new suite of seamless products was used extensively during the devastating 2019-20 summer fires, including in long-range predictions provided to State and Territory fire agencies. The climate projections

were used to help understand why the observed conditions were so severe compared to historical records. Future projections can also be used for long-term planning activities for bushfires and other hazards

(including cyclones, thunderstorms and east coast lows); for example, as part of research summaries

provided to the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council (AFAC) and partner agencies for input to their climate adaptation applications.

Maps of daily Forest Fire Danger Index (FFDI) are shown using an observations-based data set for three individual days from January 2020 on which extremely dangerous fire events occurred, as well as using the FFDI projections data set for the ACCESS1-0 global climate model to show three individual days from January 2050 for the future simulated climate. These days were selected to highlight a future simulated extreme event for comparison with some of the extreme conditions experienced during the 2019-20 summer.

Using new observations from the Timor Sea to improve weather and climate prediction

Bureau scientists led a voyage of the RV Investigator to the Timor Sea during October to December as part

of the international Years of the Maritime Continent project. The aim of the voyage was to take measurements of the atmosphere and ocean in regions where global weather and climate prediction

models have shown large errors. This information will then be used to target model development to reduce

errors and improve forecast performance. The voyage involved scientists from other institutions and countries, all coming together to make the best possible use of the ship time awarded by the Marine

National Facility.

Of particular interest for the Bureau were observations relating to atmospheric waves, the development and

movement of storms, the diurnal cycle, and atmosphere-ocean transfers of heat, momentum and moisture. Radiosonde launches were made at least twice per day, and sometimes up to eight times per day, and

storms were tracked by the dual-polarised Doppler meteorological radar. Work is continuing to quality- control the measurements taken during the voyage to ensure they are suitable for detailed studies of the processes that cause the model errors.

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Left: Dr Matthew Wheeler launches a radiosonde from the rear deck of the RV Investigator in the Timor Sea. A radiosonde provides measurements of temperature, humidity, and winds as a function of height through the depth of the troposphere and into the stratosphere, usually reaching 20 km altitude. Right: The Investigator's conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) rosette is lowered into the Timor Sea. This instrument measured salinity, temperature, pressure, and any number of other seawater properties to depths of up to 2500 m during the voyage.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• increasing the availability of satellite-derived inputs to numerical prediction systems;

• developing coupled ensemble data assimilation for numerical weather prediction and water models;

and

• progressing development of seamless weather and climate forecasting processes, and near

seamless national water prediction.

Outcome 3: Sustained deployment of excellent science and innovation outcomes in systems and services, delivering greater impact and value for customers. Achieving the outcome

Supporting the Bureau's transformation through improved modelling

The Bureau continued to enhance its operational weather prediction models during 2019-20. A new system for tropical cyclone prediction was introduced, providing major improvements in the accuracy of the

extreme wind speed predictions for these devastating phenomena.

A new suite of high-resolution systems was approved for deployment, including the Bureau's first high- resolution ensemble weather prediction system to provide information about the forecast uncertainty, as

well as the mostly likely outcome. This information is in high demand by many users such as emergency services, transport and the energy sector. These high-resolution systems are made possible by the

computing power available from the Bureau's supercomputer Australis.

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In June, the operational ACCESS-G3 global model suite was updated to include extra observational sources, compiled to improve the resilience of the observing systems and inclusion of newer satellites with

better-performing instruments. These changes generated four to six-hour improvements in forecast skill across several measures, equivalent to two to three years' worth of system development.

Climate model improvements through field campaigns in cold places

With support from the National Environmental Science Program and the Australian Antarctic Partnership Program, the Bureau gained significant understanding of the physical processes involved in aerosol-cloud- radiation-precipitation interactions over the Southern Ocean. The inaccurate representation of these processes in the Bureau's ACCESS climate model results in strong biases in the surface radiation budget

that have far-reaching impacts on the ability to predict several aspects of the Australian climate of the future. Evaluating satellite products over this region to allow for them to be used quantitatively for process

studies, and further characterising the underlying causes of the shortwave radiation bias in ACCESS using

our observations.

Improved volcanic ash predictions for the aviation industry

The world's first volcanic ash ensemble forecasting system that produces probabilistic forecasts of volcanic ash became operational in June. Developed by the Bureau over several years, the Dispersion Ensemble

Prediction System will help the Bureau's Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) provide improved information to the aviation industry on where an ash cloud is likely to form based on real-time conditions

when an eruption occurs. Once a volcanic eruption has been identified, the new system takes around

10 minutes to produce a probabilistic forecast before sending this critical information to the VAAC forecasting desk and on to the aviation industry. Previous models were deterministic, meaning one single

answer was provided; however, small errors in wind direction or speed meant that there could be significant deviations in the position of the ash cloud relative to that which was predicted. The new forecasts will

improve the volcanic ash advisories issued by the VAAC and enable the aviation industry to better manage risk.

Developing better numerical prediction systems for the marine environment

The Bureau’s global ocean modelling system OceanMAPS was upgraded in May to incorporate new physics and to utilise atmospheric forcing from the Bureau's ACCESS-G3 model. The upgraded version

has demonstrated performance improvements, particularly for sea surface temperature predictions. The national storm surge system was updated to incorporate an ensemble wave model that will provide better

storm surge forecasts for coastal communities and the emergency services during severe storm and

cyclone events.

Advances in long-range prediction

In September, the first ever multi-week forecasts of the Australian climate were made available to the public. Research and development focused on expanding the set of available forecasts to include forecasts

of temperature and rainfall extremes on both multi-week and seasonal timescales. This included undertaking research to understand the predictability of forecasting extremes, model strengths and

weaknesses, and to generate a large set of prototype forecast products for trial by the agricultural sector,

as part of the Rural R&D for Profit Program's 'Forewarned is Forearmed' project and the Northern Australia Climate Program (NACP).

Forecasts of the northern wet season onset and the Madden-Julian Oscillation were made operational, in part funded by NACP. The Bureau also produced a series of training videos to support its multi-week and

seasonal prediction experimental products for the 'Climate Mates' group of farmers as part of the NACP

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project. A post-processing component was also added to the forecast suite to support the generation of prototype and operational forecast products.

In conjunction with the Energy Sector Climate Initiative, the Bureau ran high-resolution climate simulations for the remainder of the century to better understand the impact of a changing climate on Australia's

coastal regions. This work supplements the high-resolution analysis of the current climate—Bureau of

Meteorology Atmospheric high-resolution Regional Reanalysis for Australia (BARRA) —that was completed last year.

To test the validity of using the ACCESS-S2 model for longer-term forecasts, the Bureau has been running the model using historical observations from the last 38 years. This process, known as hindcasting, is

useful because it tests the model performance using real observational data where the outcome is known. For the first time a limited trial set of ACCESS-S2 hindcasts were produced that forecast out to five years

into the future. Initial results showed the potential for useful forecasts out to 18 months, but further work is

required to assess the benefits of longer-term multi-year forecasts.

Highlights and significant events

Developing new tools to track the rapid intensification of agricultural drought

As part of the Northern Australia Climate Project, the Bureau has been working on tools that can help

identify and potentially predict the rapid intensification of agricultural droughts. An example of this intensification occurred in eastern Australia during late 2019, when the existing dry conditions rapidly

worsened due to a combination of very low rainfall, high temperatures and sometimes stronger winds. The

Evaporative Stress Index (ESI), which is based on the ratio between actual and potential evapotranspiration, has been applied and studied in Australia for the first time to capture these aspects of

drought that are important for vegetation.

In times of worsening drought, potential evapotranspiration far exceeds the actual evapotranspiration,

meaning that rapid and strong decreases in the ESI can be used to indicate a 'flash drought'. Such changes in the ESI were observed over eastern Australia from mid-October 2019 to mid-January 2020.

Work is continuing on using the ACCESS-S model to predict these changes in the ESI for valuable input to

the Bureau's agricultural customers.

The Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) on 15 October 2019 (left) declined rapidly in eastern Australia to its value on 10 January 2020 (right), indicating a rapid development of agricultural drought conditions.

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Real-time trial of the pyrocumulonimbus firepower threshold

Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) are deep fire-generated clouds which often heighten the volatility of existing

fires by generating unpredictable wind gusts and lightning that may ignite new fires. The atmospheric favourability for the formation of pyroCb can be predicted by estimating the theoretical minimum firepower

(fire intensity) required for these clouds to form, termed the pyrocumulonimbus firepower threshold (PFT).

The Bureau developed a PFT 'flag'—the ratio of the PFT to a modified fire danger index—to identify a set of conditions that support both intense fires and deep moist plume growth. Forecasts of the PFT, PFT flag

and their main ingredients were generated in a real-time trial for fire-weather forecasters and fire-behaviour analysts during the southern Australian fire season.

The trial was a great success, with some indication of pyroCb threat identified for almost all cases, and the PFT forecast products were strongly endorsed by users. The trial highlighted several broader issues with

the understanding and definition of pyroCb, and the forecasting challenges associated with the

phenomenon. The trial also identified opportunities for further development, many of which will be addressed in an upcoming project sponsored by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.

Left: A Himawari-8 satellite image of eastern Victoria and southeast New South Wales on 30 December 2019, the most active pyroconvection day of the 2019-20 fire season. Right: The PFT-flag forecast at the corresponding time, providing warning of the threat of deep pyroconvection. Fires initiating deep pyroconvection are marked with stars.

Next generation of hail analysis and nowcasting services

Hailstorms continue to have significant impacts on Australia’s economy, as demonstrated by events such the Canberra hailstorm in January. Early warnings remain one of the most effective ways to minimise

hailstorm impacts, and the Bureau's Radar Science and Nowcasting Team embarked on a new project to modernise the hail analysis and nowcasting techniques used by forecasters. The HailTrack technique

(developed in collaboration with the University of Queensland) was at the core of this project, which utilises the Bureau’s new polarimetric and Doppler radars to deliver a physically based approach for predicting hail

impact. This approach provides increased lead-time for hail predictions and more accurate spatial mapping

of hail impacts.

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Validation of two hail estimation techniques (unfilled grid) against insurance claims (coloured grid) for the 27 November 2014 Brisbane hailstorm. The conventional technique is shown in panel (a) and the HailTrack technique is shown in panel (b). Adapted from Brook et al. 2020.

In collaboration Insurance Australia Group (IAG), gridded insurance loss datasets were analysed for a

2018 Sydney hailstorm event to quantify the skill of different radar techniques, and a machine-learning approach produced a short-term forecast of hail. Insurance data at the postcode level for other recent

events were also used to quantify the skill of radar products and directly estimate losses from those events.

Work was also completed to support the next version of Monash University's WeatheX app, which gathers hail reports from the public, drone mapping of hailstone swaths, and in-situ probe measurements of

hailstone trajectories. An initiative with IAG’s partner hail repair business, Smart Repairs, also began to utilise the data collected by their drive-through 3D scanner for quantifying hail size and concentration.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• upgrading seasonal, ocean and wave predictions;

• undertaking experimental numerical weather and ocean prediction; and

• undertaking high-resolution water and water resources modelling.

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Strategy and Performance Goal: A responsive, accountable and high-performing Bureau delivering greater impact and value for Australia.

The Strategy and Performance Group is responsible for identifying growth opportunities, monitoring long- term trends and outlooks, gathering competitive intelligence and driving cross-program strategic initiatives.

It is driving improvement in strategy, planning, change management, enduring project management

capability, performance management, risk, resilience and business continuity in the Bureau.

The Group leads the organisation’s efforts in aligning strategy, structure, capability, culture and investment.

It provides the frameworks and tools to ensure systematic management of performance across the Bureau, ensuring appropriate governance arrangements to help achieve the Bureau’s goals. The Enterprise

Portfolio Management Office (EPMO) provides whole-of-enterprise coordination and guidance across project and program management and supports effective investment decision-making.

The Group supports more effective management of risk and security by strengthening risk assessment,

business continuity, internal audit, and physical and protective security capabilities. The Group works in partnership across the Bureau to facilitate and support governance and security arrangements that are

necessary to achieve the Bureau’s mission and comply with federal legislative requirements and best practice.

For 2019-20, the Group consisted of two Programs with the following responsibilities:

Strategy, Planning and Performance Strategy and strategic foresight

Change management and business transformation

Planning and performance measurement

Program and project management

Risk and Resilience Risk management

Organisational resilience

Physical and protective security

Quality assurance

Throughout 2019-20, the Strategy and Performance Group focused on the delivery of three outcomes that

support the delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of these outcomes is discussed below.

Outcome 1: Whole-of-enterprise navigation of global and national trends and shocks. Achieving the outcome

Delivering the Bureau’s Strategy

Implementing the Bureau's Strategy 2017-2022 is the primary focus for the organisation. The Strategy is

translated into action through an Annual Corporate Plan rolling four-year Group and Program plans, which

explicitly align investment and transformation initiatives to the Strategy. To monitor strategy execution, half- yearly progress reports were provided to the Executive Team. Strategy-in-Action workshops for the

Bureau's Leadership Team play an important role in building leadership capability and cohesion in delivery of the Strategy.

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Monitoring developments in the Bureau's operating environment

The Bureau has embedded its strategic foresight or ‘futures strategy’ capability, to support the organisation

in navigating changes in our operating environment. The capability includes regular environmental scanning and inquiries into matters of strategic importance to:

• identify trends, risks, and opportunities in the external operating environment;

• analyse what these changes mean for the Bureau; and

• explore how the Bureau can best respond to these changes.

Keeping abreast of business risks

Understanding the Bureau’s risks and their potential consequences is a critical component of strategic and

operational decision-making, especially identifying new risks as they emerge. The Bureau’s business risks were documented in an enterprise-wide risk management system with risk reports provided to the Security,

Risk and Business Continuity Committee monthly, and the Executive Team and Audit Committee on a quarterly basis.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• identifying and analysing new and emerging business risks;

• undertaking regular strategic foresight workshops with the Executive Team; and

• monitoring progress in delivering the Bureau’s Strategy 2017-2022.

Outcome 2: A resilient Bureau well positioned for the future. Achieving the outcome

Planning for success

Group plans and Program plans were updated in 2019-20, outlining the activities and initiatives the enterprise will deliver to achieve the Bureau’s Strategy 2017-2022. Increased focus was given to

articulating the interlocks and dependencies across Groups, particularly given the significant transformation

activities underway.

An independent view of Bureau performance

In November, an independent panel of four experts completed a review of the Business Solutions Group, providing the Bureau and its stakeholders with assurance that its activities are appropriate, effective,

efficient and achieving progress towards agreed strategic outcomes. The Group accepted the review’s 12 recommendations and improved its opportunity assessment process, approach to strategic partnerships

and workforce planning.

Improving performance reporting

The Bureau refined its suite of regular performance reports to the Executive Team, enhancing focus and

visibility on technology, forecasts and warnings and customer services. The Bureau undertook biannual assessments of its delivery against the Strategy and its 19 Strategic Success Measures. The Annual

Report 2018-19 met the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and received a gold award at the Australasian Reporting Awards.

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Embedding a resilience framework

The Bureau has an enterprise approach to managing incidents and crises and is updating its approach to

business continuity across all business areas. Over 130 employees have received initial training in the Bureau’s incident management process with scenario-based training delivered to State and Territory offices

towards a national target level of competency.

Implementing the Bureau process model

The Bureau made significant progress in documenting 560 business processes and establishing a

business process management competency to support ongoing management and improvement of processes. This work provided a structured foundation for collaboration and design to support enterprise

transformation initiatives.

Uplifting enterprise security

Protective security maturity improved with new procedures. The security culture was enhanced through

awareness briefings, upgrades of observation infrastructure and office refurbishments and transition to the Government's new information classification system. An internal audit of the protective security function

was undertaken with recommendations to be implemented in 2020-21.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• implementing the Bureau's process model for effective project and program delivery; and

• facilitating independent reviews of two Groups' activities to ensure they are appropriate, effective and

efficient.

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Outcome 3: Superior performance through excellence in program and project design, and execution. Achieving the outcome

Maintaining and extending quality management

The Bureau's quality management systems were maintained and expanded, providing assurance for customers and stakeholders that the Bureau's accredited business processes continue to meet

international standards under ISO 9001. Assurance has been determined via external certification audits

for the five certified quality management systems, including the new certification of Defence Weather Services and the Tsunami Warning Service.

Implementing the Bureau delivery model

The Bureau integrated its technology delivery model with its project framework to create a single

enterprise-wide delivery model for all initiatives. The model incorporates the Bureau's transformation framework and new benefits framework and helps to identify the activities, documentation and processes

required to successfully deliver an initiative. All projects must now have defined benefits to inform

investment decision-making and to measure success.

Providing insightful project reporting

Enterprise project reporting was augmented with dynamic dashboards and automated integration with financial data. All projects must report monthly progress to senior managers, with objective evidence to

ensure projects and initiatives deliver outcomes within schedule. Quarterly portfolio-level reports provide the Executive Team with visibility of the overall portfolio health, trends, risks and issues requiring action.

Uplifting change management capability

The Bureau approach to transformation continued to mature, with focus on:

• governance using frameworks, tools and consistent approaches that are integrated into enterprise

models and work programs;

• capability development through training, coaching and sponsorship briefings, 360-degree leadership

assessments and promoting an aligned culture;

• monitoring and reporting through the quarterly Bureau integrated transformation schedule and

change impact reporting; and

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• engagement through a community of practice, transformation leads network, communication and

Strategy-in-Action workshops for Bureau leaders.

The Bureau relied upon its change and incident management capability throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to support its people and equip its leaders to manage the changing workplace dynamic.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• providing online change management training modules to all staff; and

• developing quality management system certification for space weather services and automatic

weather stations.

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Corporate Services Goal: Excellent, trusted and proactive corporate services enabling the Bureau to increase the value for our customers and impact we have for Australia.

The Corporate Services Group is responsible for providing shared enterprise-enabling services so the Bureau can achieve its strategic objectives.

The Group is driven to transform corporate service delivery by modernising its systems and processes, so

they are user-friendly while meeting compliance requirements. The Group delivers specialist analysis and authoritative strategic advice to inform organisational decisions. It also provides quality assurance controls

through key corporate functions such as financial management, workplace safety and well-being, legal services, workforce planning and capability development, and reputation management.

For 2019-20, the Group consisted of six Programs with the following responsibilities:

Finance Enterprise-wide financial services

Procurement

Finance policy

Facilities management

Government Relations and Corporate Communication Parliamentary and government relations Media relations and public affairs

Internal engagement

Organisational Development Employee relations and payroll

Training, leadership and team development

Workforce planning, diversity and inclusion

Recruitment and staff retention

Legal and Commercial Legal services

Commercial contracts and intellectual property

Compliance

Privacy and freedom of information

Health, Safety and Environment Safe work practices

Staff mental and physical well-being

Environmental sustainability

Compensation, rehabilitation and return to work

Customer Relationships Customer skills and engagement capabilities

Customer relationship management system

Product management capability

Throughout 2019-20, the Corporate Services Group focused on the delivery of three outcomes that

support the delivery of the Bureau’s Strategy and purpose. The Group’s achievement in delivering each of these outcomes is discussed below.

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Outcome 1: We created trusted partnership with our customers and stakeholders to design systems and services to meet the Bureau's needs. Achieving the outcome

Partnering with Comcare on workplace health and safety

The Bureau partnered with the Australian Government’s health and safety and injury regulator Comcare to proactively support participation and productivity through healthy and safe workplaces and minimise the

impact of harm. Comcare worked with the Bureau to undertake workplace inspections including the remote

space weather network site on Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

Building and managing customer relationships

Two critical capabilities were developed that are essential for effective customer service. The first was detailed process mapping for the customer engagement process, from initial market research through to

opportunity management. The second was a foundation and intermediate staff training course on customer engagement, based on role requirements. The Bureau also progressed development of its Customer

Relationship Management (CRM) system which will collect, analyse and manage customer interactions in a

systematic way.

Building a finance strategy to support future investment

The Bureau developed a long-term financial strategy to align with the Bureau’s strategic objectives and future investment. The Bureau also enhanced its budgeting framework and financial forecasting tools and

developed an activity-based costing model in line with the Australian Government's charging framework.

Creating efficiencies through Business Systems Transformation

The Bureau continued work on its two-year program to uplift and streamline finance and human resource

systems and processes as it implements new business systems and transitions to whole-of-Australian- Government-shared services arrangements. Work modules to transform travel and expense management,

activity-based costing and organisational charting were completed, with modules on recruitment, staff rostering and resource planning still in progress.

In addition, new delegations and authorisations were implemented, combining financial, organisational development and freedom of information delegations into one instrument to streamline decision-making

and improve consistency.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 1 include:

• uplifting intellectual property management and strategic contract management; and

• implementing the Bureau's purchasing card and new travel procedure.

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Outcome 2: Build excellent services, frameworks and skills and capabilities that enable the Bureau Way. Achieving the outcome

Training up the next generation of Bureau meteorologists

The Bureau had seven staff complete the Graduate Diploma in Meteorology Course in October. Four of the graduate meteorologists will work in the Bureau's Brisbane office and three in Melbourne. The course also

included participants from the Royal Australian Navy and from Fiji, Hong Kong and Singapore. The

Graduate Diploma, which is delivered through the Bureau of Meteorology Training Centre, is a nationally accredited qualification which takes eight months to complete.

Building and maintaining a well-equipped workforce

A sustainable workforce plan and workforce planning toolkit were developed during the year to facilitate

effective workforce profiling and analysis as the first step of the Bureau's workforce planning cycle. This plan and toolkit are assisting work areas to better understand their workforce supply and capabilities in the

context of organisational objectives, and to prepare to respond to emerging challenges quickly and more

strategically.

Over 400 staff participated in the Management Fundamentals learning program, to improve capability in

leading virtual teams and finance fundamentals. An additional 700 staff used the 'Just In Time' self-learning library to enhance skills in topics such as customer service, project management and well-being. A

Managing Underperformance toolkit was also drafted to provide step-by-step guidance to managers working to address performance concerns.

Diversity in action

The Bureau undertook a wide range of initiatives to help build a workplace where all staff feel included and empowered. The Bureau participated in the Australian Network on Disability Access and Inclusion Index

and launched its Multicultural Access and Equity Plan 2019-22 in July and its Accessibility Action Plan 2019-22 in November. Events held throughout the year to raise awareness, recognise and celebrate

diversity included:

• NAIDOC Week and the launch of the Masig and Ngoorabul season calendars on the Bureau's

Indigenous Weather Knowledge website in July;

• the Indigenous Australian Government Development Program graduation ceremony in November;

and

• International Women's Day in March.

The Bureau's support for the whole-of-enterprise diversity and inclusion enabled the Public Safety Program

to take on an intern through the Australian Network on Disability. The internship provides opportunities for talented university students and helps cultivate an inclusive and diverse workplace culture. The intern

supported the Bureau's development of automated warning capability for fast-responding rivers and has become a full-time Bureau employee and operational flood forecaster.

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Building frameworks to support internal and external engagement

The Bureau developed a framework for parliamentary engagement that will be implemented in 2020-21.

The framework focuses on mechanisms to proactively identify and action opportunities in relation to parliamentary inquiries, events and outreach mechanisms. Steps were taken to implement the

Parliamentary Document Management System within the Bureau, as part of a workflow and process improvement initiative.

Work to develop a National Media Framework commenced with a view to reaching the Australian

community and industry sectors through proactive media relations and strategic national media partnerships.

A framework for internal engagement was developed and implemented, to better guide and support engagement activity across the Bureau. The framework focuses on four key programs of work including:

delivering priority enterprise-wide communications; supporting transformation and change management; fostering enterprise-wide improvement; and improving the way the team works. A review of the Internal

Communications operating model also commenced. Steps were taken to uplift the Bureau Leader’s

Communication portal, to help support our Senior Leadership Team with delivery of key messages and the rollout of initiatives across the organisation.

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Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 2 include:

• integrating enabling functions as the new Enterprise Services Group is formed; and

• implementing an enterprise-wide workforce capability framework.

Outcome 3: Build an excellent corporate services function to enable sound stewardship of our organisation. Achieving the outcome

Ensuring strong and effective legal compliance

The Legal Services Team assisted the organisation with over 350 distinct matters, including complex

employment matters, collaboration arrangements, research agreements, procurement and corporate real estate. The team also provided support for the Bureau's participation in a range of inquiries related to the

2019-20 bushfire season.

Providing high-quality oversight of meteorology for aviation

During the height of the summer bushfires, the Meteorological Authority Office reviewed and adapted its procedures to support operations at aerodromes affected by smoke. The office also contributed to

Australian civil and defence aviation safety initiatives, continued to support development initiatives for

aviation meteorological services in the Pacific, and achieved recertification of compliance with the ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management Standard.

Maintaining a strong safety culture

The Bureau's work health safety and environment policies and procedures were updated and consolidated

in line with the Bureau’s policy and procedure governance framework. Significant reviews were made to the overseas travel and contractor management policies in response to the Bureau's Safety Risk Profile

assessment.

A mental health uplift program was provided to 400 Bureau managers to improve recognition and understanding of mental health challenges. Manager-led safety team talks were developed focusing on

sharing lessons learned from manual handling, electrical safety, emergency response, bicycle commuting, bushfires and first aid.

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Taking care of our people while delivering for Australia

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the Bureau's priorities was to look after the health and safety

of its people, while continuing to provide our essential services and products to our customers. This was

achieved by:

• supporting flexible work arrangements and providing staff with equipment to work from home safely;

• uplifting ICT connectivity and security to ensure resilient operations; and

• actively promoting an active staff health and well-being monitoring program.

Next steps

Key activities to be delivered in 2020-21 to help achieve Outcome 3 include:

• strengthening multi-year financial planning and investment decision processes;

• implementing frameworks, guidance, tools and templates for Customer Engagement and Product

Management; and

• strengthening strategic property management capability.

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Recognition of performance Throughout 2019-20, the Bureau continued to recognise the excellent work of individual staff, volunteers and teams who are contributing to the trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean

services provided for all Australians.

Australia Day Achievement Medallions

Australia Day Achievement Medallions are awarded under the auspices of the Australia Day Council to

promote good citizenship and achievement and acknowledge employees that have made a significant contribution to the nation.

In presenting the 2020 medallions, CEO and Director of Meteorology Dr Andrew Johnson said that all three recipients had made a profound contribution to the Bureau. The medallions were presented to:

• Andrea Peace for her fundamental role in establishing, building and refining the Bureau's video

capability as a critical and integral part of the Bureau's engagement with the Australian community;

• Dr Eun-Pa for her dedication to expanding the field of meteorological science which has seen the

delivery of key innovations to the Bureau's seasonal forecasting services; and

• Dr Gary Dietachmayer for his contributions to the Bureau and the Australian public, in particular for

leading the development of the ACCESS global, regional and high-resolution modelling systems.

Australia Day Medallion recipients (from left) Andrea Peace, Dr Gary Dietachmayer and Dr Eun-Pa Lim with CEO and Director of Meteorology, Dr Andrew Johnson.

Bureau Excellence Awards

In August, the Bureau recognised and celebrated the extraordinary service and performance of recipients

of its 2019 Bureau Excellence Awards. CEO and Director of Meteorology, Dr Andrew Johnson announced this year’s award recipients, and congratulated them on all their achievements.

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2019 award Recipient(s)

Director's Choice Brendan McMahon was recognised for his outstanding delivery of impact and value to the Bureau’s national security customers and to the people of the Northern Territory, particularly through his trusted and highly valued relationships with the RAAF's squadron at Tindal.

Director's Choice As one of Australia's leading scientists in bushfire meteorology, Dr Mika Peace was recognised for her delivery of exceptional impact and value to emergency management customers and to the people of Queensland during the catastrophic fires of November 2018.

Operational Excellence Michelle Wickham was recognised for her exceptional leadership and commitment in the delivery of commercial support to the ROBUST Program. Michelle is leading the delivery of the largest and most complex suite of strategic procurements undertaken by the Bureau.

Operational Excellence The Bureau's Concur Team was recognised for its demonstrated excellence in the delivery of the Concur initiative. The implementation of Concur has delivered significant benefits and process improvements for the Bureau, reducing 45 per cent of red tape issues identified by Bureau staff.

Impact and Value The National Fire Danger Rating Prototype Project Team (Evan Morgan, Paul Fox- Hughes, Sam Sauvage, Simon Louis and Nathan Faggian) was recognised for its significant contribution to the safety of the Australian community through the development of an improved National Fire Danger Rating System.

Insight and Innovation The Marine Standards Laboratory was recognised for its outstanding innovation in development of world-class sea-level monitoring systems. This involved designing, building and testing a calibration rig to ensure that new, radar-based sensors deliver the world-class sea-level monitoring.

The Bureau Way Ben Van Doorn was recognised for his outstanding commitment to the Bureau's whole-of-enterprise performance, building trust and respect every day through his support and assistance to Groups and Programs and his desire to help achieve positive outcomes.

The Bureau Way Maggie Harvey was recognised for her outstanding personal contribution towards the successful relocation of the Brisbane office, going considerably above and beyond the call of duty and exemplifying all the attributes of the Bureau Way including resilience, leadership and adaptability.

Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society—Christopher Taylor Award

Dr Robert Taggart, a Senior Meteorologist at the New South Wales Forecasting Centre, won the

2019 Christopher Taylor Award, a biennial award for operational forecasting and related investigations. Dr Taggart developed new climatological guidance for forecasting fog frequency, duration, onset and

clearance times, including displays that are used by operational meteorologists to make forecast decisions for fog, a major aviation safety hazard.

Inaugural Pacific Meteorological Council Awards

Current and former Bureau staff received five awards at the Pacific Meteorological Council held in Apia,

Samoa in August:

• the Bureau received an Award of Recognition for outstanding services to the development of

meteorological services in the Pacific region through project support and technical staff development;

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• Dr Lynda Chambers received an Innovation and Research Contribution Award for outstanding

research in the area of Traditional Knowledge;

• Dr Scott Power received an Innovation and Research Contribution Award in the area of Climate

Change and Climate Variability; and

• Mr Ram Krishna and Mr Neil Plummer received Lifetime Awards.

Simon McGree (left) receiving the Pacific Meteorological Council Award.

Victorian Water Research Innovation Award

The Victorian Climate Initiative, a partnership between Victoria's Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, the Bureau and CSIRO, won the Australian Water Association’s Research Innovation Award.

Research undertaken through the Victorian Climate Initiative has helped Victoria’s water corporations to

plan for a changing climate and provided world-class practical advice for incorporating climate change into long-term planning.

Integrated Water Accounts win award

The Bureau has won the Australian Water Association ACT Program Innovation Award, for its work in

creating the Integrated Water Accounts for the Canberra Region alongside the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The Bureau and the ABS created a 'one-stop shop' for water accounts information for the Canberra region,

by consolidating and integrating various data sources into one complete product.

Each organisation produces annual national water accounts for differing but complementary purposes, the

Bureau reporting on the volume of water available in the environment and how it is traded, extracted and managed, while the ABS focuses on the interactions between users within the economy and the

environment.

Volunteer Rainfall Observer Excellence Awards

Manual rainfall observations are collected from across Australian and transmitted to the Bureau by around

5000 volunteers who form an integral part of the Bureau's composite observations systems. The Bureau recognises the dedicated and sustained commitment of its long-serving volunteer rainfall observers by

presenting them with excellence awards for 50 and 100 years of service.

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In 2019-20, 13 families across Victoria were presented with 100-year Family Rainfall Excellence Awards:

• the Staples family at Oak Lea for providing rainfall observations at Rainbow since 1898;

• the Kane family for providing rainfall observations at Barraport North since 1912;

• the Hughes family for providing rainfall observations at Little River since 1906;

• the Molesworth family for providing rainfall observations at Ballark since 1889;

• the Heir family for providing rainfall observations at Clear Lake since 1903;

• the Nicholson family of Valley View for providing rainfall observations at Morrl since 1902;

• the Hanns family of Marston Downs for providing rainfall observations at Sea Lake since 1905;

• the Stephenson family of Yendalock for providing rainfall observations at Sea Lake since 1905;

• the Ferrier family for providing rainfall observations at Marlbed since 1908;

• the O'Keefe family for providing rainfall observations at Boorhaman since 1908;

• the Kranz family of Ailsa for providing rainfall observations at Warracknabeal since 1897;

• the Lloyd family for providing rainfall observations at Irymple since 1908;

• the English family for providing rainfall observations at Kerang since 1880.

Bill Hughes stands in front of his two rain gauges holding his award; manual on the left and the tipping bucket rain gauge on the right.

Five 50-year Individual Rainfall Excellence Awards were also presented in Victoria to:

• Jana Millear for providing rainfall observations at Moyston since 1957;

• Ian Watson for providing rainfall observations at Nyah since 1957;

• Raymond Jennings for providing rainfall observations at Gellibrand River since 1961;

• Hans Abbetmeyer for providing rainfall observations at Walpa since 1962; and

• Sandy Cameron for providing rainfall observations at Dellicknora since 1963.

In South Australia one award was presented to Max Ricks for 65 years of rainfall observations from his Cherry Gardens property presented by the Governor of South Australia and Patron of Volunteers, His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le at Government House.

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World Meteorological Day—Long Service Awards

The Bureau recognised 26 staff members for their 30 years of service to the organisation in March, as part

of World Meteorological Day celebrations.

Australasian Reporting Awards

The Bureau received a Gold Award for its 2018-19 Annual Report at the 2020 Australasian Reporting

Awards in June.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 104

Section 4 - Organisational Management Bureau of Meteorology Organisational Chart As at 30 June 2020

Position Name

CEO and Director of Meteorology Andrew Johnson

Program Director, Public Services Transformation Kirsten Garwood

Program Director, ROBUST Alistair Legge

Group Executive, National Forecast Services Piero Chessa

General Manager, Community Forecasts Peter Stone

General Manager, Community Outreach David Perry

General Manager, National Operations Todd Smith

General Manager, Public Safety Shoni Maguire

Group Executive, Business Solutions Peter Stone

General Manager, Agriculture Alister Hawksford and Luke Shelley

General Manager, Aviation, Land and Maritime Transport Brett Anderson

General Manager, Energy and Resources Kate Vinot

General Manager, National Security Stephen Alexander

General Manager, Water Matt Coulton

Group Executive, Data and Digital Nichole Brinsmead

General Manager, Application Services Karen Conradi

General Manager, Cyber Security Mary Kelaher

General Manager, Data Boris Kelly-Gerreyn

General Manager, Digital Channels and Customer Experience Design Ben Di-Lorenzo

General Manager, Observing Systems and Operations Bryan Hodge

General Manager, Planning and Architecture Cameron Smith

General Manager, Service and Infrastructure Management Mike Webb

Group Executive, Science and Innovation Gilbert Brunet

General Manager, Global and National Science Relationships Jas Chambers

General Manager, Research Bertrand Timbal

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 105

General Manager, Research to Operations Robert Argent

Group Executive, Strategy and Performance Group Graham Hawke

General Manager, Strategy, Planning and Performance Bronwyn Ray

General Manager, Risk and Resilience Helen Foster

Group Executive, Corporate Services Group Paula Goodwin

General Manager, Customer Relationships Kate Dalton

General Manager, Finance Pranay Lodhiya

General Manager, Communications Emma Liepa

General Manager, Health, Safety and Environment Steve Bagaric

General Manager, Legal and Commercial Astrid Heward

General Manager, Organisational Development Simone Keenan

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 106

Corporate governance

Corporate governance framework The Bureau’s corporate governance framework provides a sound basis for decision-making, defines

mechanisms for accountability and stewardship, and supports the Bureau’s strategic direction and leadership.

The framework is based on:

• the legislative foundation provided by the Meteorology Act 1955, the Water Act 2007, the Public

Service Act 1999, and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act);

• a clearly defined executive and management structure;

• a comprehensive planning, performance and reporting framework;

• various mechanisms for stakeholder input and review;

• detailed financial and asset management policies, procedures and guidelines;

• thorough risk management and fraud control strategies; and

• an Audit Committee and internal audit function to provide independent advice and assurance on the

Bureau’s activities.

Accountable Authority The Bureau's Accountable Authority during the report period 2019-20 was as follows:

Name Position title/Position held Period as the Accountable Authority

or member within the reporting period

Date of

Commencement Date of cessation

Andrew Johnson Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology 1 July 2019 30 June 2020

Executive and management structure As 30 June, the Bureau comprised:

• the Executive Team (CEO and Director of Meteorology, six Group Executives, the Public Services

Transformation Program Director and the ROBUST Program Director);

• six Groups, further broken down into 28 Programs, who are collectively responsible for delivering the

Bureau’s Strategy 2017-2022;

• the Public Services Transformation Program and the ROBUST Program;

• the National Operations Centre;

• seven State and Territory Offices, located in the State capital cities and Darwin; and

• 32 field observing offices across Australia, the offshore islands, and Antarctic Territory, as well as

other specialist facilities.

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In addition to the general Group and Program structure, several specialist roles are attached to senior positions, including:

• Chief Customer Officer, performed by the Group Executive, Business Solutions;

• Chief Operating Officer, performed by the Group Executive, Corporate Services;

• Chief Information and Technology Officer, performed by the Group Executive, Data and Digital;

• Chief Scientist, performed by the Group Executive, Science and Innovation;

• Chief Strategy Officer, performed by the Group Executive, Strategy and Performance;

• Chief Financial Officer, performed by the General Manager, Finance; and

• General Counsel, performed by the General Manager, Legal and Commercial.

The Executive The Bureau’s Executive Team (the Executive) comprises the CEO and Director of Meteorology (Director),

six Group Executives, the Public Services Transformation Program Director and the ROBUST Program Director. The role of the Executive is to consider and promulgate decisions on program, policy, financial

and people management issues across the Bureau and to provide leadership under the authority of the

Director as the Accountable Authority for the agency (under the PGPA Act). The Executive has responsibility for setting the Bureau’s strategic policies and priorities and for optimising the use of its

resources.

Dr Andrew Johnson

Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology

Dr Johnson was appointed Director and CEO of the Bureau of

Meteorology in September 2016. He joined the Bureau from Johnson & Associates Consulting, a firm he founded to provide environmental

and agricultural knowledge services nationally and internationally. For nearly a decade Dr Johnson was a member of the CSIRO Executive

Team where he led the organisation’s water, land, atmospheric, marine, biodiversity and urban research. Dr Johnson is a Non- Executive Director of the Planet Ark Environmental Foundation, a

Councillor of the Queensland Futures Institute and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Australian Agricultural Company.

Dr Johnson has a PhD from the University of Queensland and a master’s from the Kennedy School at Harvard University. Dr Johnson

is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technical Sciences and Engineering and Australian Institute of Company Directors. Dr

Johnson is also Australia’s permanent representative to the World

Meteorological Organization (WMO) in Geneva.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 108

Mr Piero Chessa

Group Executive, National Forecast Services

Piero joined the Bureau in March 2020 after spending 13 years at The Boeing Company, where he held senior positions in Operations and Data

Science activities. A physicist, Piero moved from theoretical physics to

atmospheric dynamics and accepted the challenge to build a Regional Meteorological Service in Italy. He then moved to the European Centre

for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts in the United Kingdom as a Senior Scientist. Piero combines a strong domain competence and an

established experience in Public Services, with a deep and varied knowledge of Operations in multinational corporations.

Dr Peter Stone

Chief Customer Officer and Group Executive, Business Solutions

Peter joined the Bureau in July 2017. Peter’s work history has included a

range of roles in farm management, food industry consulting, grain marketing, science management and corporate governance. For much of

the last 10 years, Peter’s work has focused on establishing partnerships

that seek solutions to the management of contested resources, such as land and water in northern Australia, coal seam gas and the Great Barrier

Reef.

Ms Nichole Brinsmead

Chief Information and Technology Officer and Group Executive, Data and Digital

Nichole commenced with the Bureau in February 2018 as Group Executive Data and Digital, and Chief Information and Technology

Officer. In this position Nichole is accountable for delivering the data,

infrastructure and systems to underpin the Bureau's operations, from measurement and collection through to production and delivery. Nichole

has had over 20 years' experience in a diverse range of roles across several business and technology domains in the financial services, higher

education, professional services, emergency services and government sectors. This has included senior roles at PwC, ANZ, and RMIT where

she has had very significant leadership and management responsibilities

in operational, solution delivery and engagement environments. Nichole is the Bureau’s Gender Equality Champion.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 109

Dr Gilbert Brunet

Chief Scientist and Group Executive, Science and Innovation

Gilbert joined the Bureau in December 2018 after 12 years as Director of the Meteorological Research Division (MRD) of Environment and Climate

Change Canada. Gilbert is recognised as an expert in weather and

climate dynamics with a PhD in meteorology from McGill University. From 2012-15, Gilbert was seconded to the UK Met Office as the Director

Weather Science. Gilbert has also previously led the Numerical Prediction Research Section of Environment and Climate Change Canada. Gilbert is

currently Chair of the WMO Scientific Advisory Panel, and Chair of the UK Met Office’s Scientific Advisory Committee. Gilbert previously chaired the

Scientific Steering Committee of the WMO Research Program. Gilbert is

the Bureau’s Accessibility Champion.

Mr Graham Hawke

Chief Strategy Officer and Group Executive, Strategy and Performance

Graham joined the Bureau in 2013 as the Executive responsible for the Bureau’s climate, water, research and environment functions. Graham

has over 20 years of senior management experience in government and

the private sector including in transport, rural water and global professional services. Graham currently serves on advisory boards to

Melbourne University and Water Research Australia. Graham holds a Master of Engineering Science, is a Fellow of Engineers Australia and a

Chartered Engineer. Graham also holds a Master of Business Administration, is a graduate member of the Australian Institute of

Company Directors and a professional member of the Australian

Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. Graham is the Bureau’s Indigenous Champion.

Ms Paula Goodwin

Chief Operating Officer and Group Executive, Corporate Services

Paula joined the Bureau in March 2020 and is responsible for

Organisational Development, Finance, Health, Safety and Environment, Government Relations, Corporate Communication, Legal and

Commercial, and Customer Relationships. Paula has experience in leading corporate teams and supporting organisations through strategic

and organisational transformations. She has previously worked with the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and its

predecessor the Department of Environment and Energy, as well as the

Department of Immigration and Border Protection, the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service and the Australian Crime

Commission. Paula is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Human

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 110

Resources, and has a Masters in National Security Policy from the Australian National University, as well as a Masters in Human Resource

Management, a Graduate Certificate Employment Relations, and Bachelor Arts Information Management and Human Resource

Management from the University of Canberra.

Ms Kirsten Garwood

Public Services Transformation Program Director

Kirsten joined the Bureau in October 2017. Kirsten is responsible for

leading the Bureau's enterprise-wide initiative to design and deliver a new climatological, hydrological and meteorological services model.

Prior to joining the Australian Public Service (APS), Kirsten spent

25 years within the information, communications and technology sector in technical, service delivery, customer leadership and senior leadership

roles, serving both the private and public sectors, and working closely with the national security and social services sectors since 2011.

Kirsten has an MBA from the Australian Graduate School of Management and a Bachelor of Science (Hons) from the University of

New South Wales.

Mr Alistair Legge

ROBUST Program Director

Alistair joined the Bureau in September 2017 to direct the ROBUST Program. Prior to joining the Bureau, Alistair was Chief Information

Officer and General Manager Customers for United Energy and

Multinet Gas. Alistair is an experienced technology and organisational change leader and has held customer, market, innovation and revenue- focused executive leadership roles across gas and electricity utilities, telecommunications providers and the entertainment industry, together

with senior management consulting roles. Alistair has a Bachelor of

Engineering and a Master of International Business from the University of Melbourne, and an MBA from the Australian Graduate School of

Management.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 111

Committees The Bureau Executive is the highest-level decision-making body within the organisation. Executive meetings are chaired by the Director and held once per month.

The Executive is supported by three sub-committees: the Investment Committee; the Major Transactions Committee; and the Security, Risk and Business Continuity Committee. The Bureau’s Audit Committee

provides independent assurance on the Bureau’s risks, controls and compliance, and is convened by the

CEO.

In addition to the subcommittees, the Bureau’s senior managers meet monthly to discuss key issues and

progress. These Senior Leadership Team meetings involve the Director, Group Executives and General Managers

Partnerships The Bureau partners with Australian Government agencies to manage the delivery of common outcomes.

At 30 June, these partnership arrangements include:

• a strategic partnering agreement for the provision of meteorological and oceanographic services to

support the Department of Defence;

• memorandums of understanding with a range of Defence stakeholders, including: the Navy, Army

and Air Force; Headquarters Joint Operations Command; Defence Estate and Infrastructure Group; and the Defence Science and Technology Group;

• a memorandum of understanding and agency agreement with Airservices;

• a memorandum of understanding with the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment;

• a memorandum of understanding with the Australian Antarctic Division;

• a collaborative relationship understanding with CSIRO;

• a collaborative head agreement with Geosciences Australia;

• a strategic partnership with the ABC; and

• a strategic partnership agreement with the Australian Energy Market Operator.

The Audit Committee The Director of Meteorology convenes the Bureau of Meteorology’s Audit Committee in compliance with

section 45 of the PGPA Act. The Audit Committee is governed by its charter (www.bom.gov.au/inside/corp_documents.shtml), which requires the committee to review and provide

independent assurance on the appropriateness of the Bureau’s financial reporting, performance reporting,

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 112

system of risk oversight and management and system of internal control in accordance with section 17 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA rule).

The Audit Committee comprises four independent members who bring a wealth of experience to their role. Throughout 2019-20, the committee was chaired by Mr Andrew Dix.

The Audit Committee held 4 meetings in 2019-20. The Audit Committee considered the Strategic Internal

Audit Plan 2018-2022, internal audit reports and adopted a new internal audit protocol and processes.

Audit Committee membership and meeting attendance

Member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant) Number of meetings

attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Andrew Dix Andrew was appointed as the first Independent Chair of the Bureau’s Audit Committee in 2015. He holds other board and audit committee roles, including at Swinburne University of Technology, Services Australia, Anglicare Victoria, Western Leisure Services Pty Ltd, and Victorian Farmers Federation. Prior to his non-executive career, Andrew spent 35 years in influential roles at Price Waterhouse followed by Telstra. Andrew is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants, a professional member of the institute of Internal auditors, and a Graduate Member of the Institute of Company Directors.

4 /4 28 000

Daniel McCabe

Daniel is currently the Chief Information Officer and Head of the Information Technology Division at the Australian Department of Health, where he oversees modernisation of the information and communication technology (ICT) environment through initiatives such as My Aged Care and the Enterprise Data Warehouse. He has also acted as Chief Operating Officer for the Department’s corporate and enabling areas. Daniel has held senior influential roles in the Department of Immigration and Border Protection and the Department of Defence, where he has led substantial ICT modernisation and change initiatives.

4 /4 $Nil

Mark Tucker

Mark is a former APS Deputy Secretary. He worked in the portfolios of Agriculture, the Environment, Communication and the Arts, and Prime Minister and Cabinet. Mark has been involved in most of Australia’s natural resource management priorities over the past 30 years, providing policy advice to governments and implementing significant funding programs and legislation. He has a Bachelor of Science (Hons) majoring in marine zoology, and early in his career conducted research in Antarctic coastal marine ecosystems.

4 /4 $27 032

Paula Allen Paula has over 25 years’ experience across services, finance, technology, governance and strategy for business, government and international organisations. Paula is a Fellow Chartered Accountant, Chartered Financial Analyst, a Graduate Member of the AICD as well as holding their Advanced Diploma in Mastering the Boardroom. She has studied more broadly including across leadership, new technology, big data and ethics. She is a member of the Professional Conduct Committee for Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand and maintains various private clients.

4 /4 $20 000

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 113

Corporate planning and evaluation The Bureau’s Strategy 2017-2022 charts the Bureau’s course over five years, outlining strategic objectives, actions and success measures.

The Corporate Plan 2019-20 was published on the Bureau’s website in August. Prepared in accordance with requirements of the PGPA Act, the Plan set out the Bureau’s priorities, planned achievements and

success measures for 2019-20 and the outlook to 2022-23.

Operational planning within the Bureau is undertaken on a Group and Program basis. The evaluation of performance against plans is an important component of the annual planning cycle. Progress against the

Bureau’s success measures is regularly monitored through reports to the Bureau Executive. Overall performance against the success measures for 2019-20 is presented in the Annual Performance

Statement.

Enterprise risk management approach The Bureau’s enterprise risk management framework is closely aligned to the Strategy 2017-2022 to enable:

• a greater understanding of how the management of risks and opportunities within the Strategy will

drive success;

• identification and assessment of the risks inherent within the Strategy through Group and Program

plans, and where emerging and disruptive risks may affect the delivery of strategic actions;

• dynamic and constructive risk conversations between members of the Senior Leadership Team;

• monitoring of risks relating to culture; and

• monitoring of the alignment of strategy, risk controls, compliance and people.

The framework is founded on a robust governance, control and reporting system that depends on:

• leadership—communicating the risk message with a consistent tone;

• integrating risk into day-to-day business—identifying where risk needs to be managed within an

activity; and

• understanding the Bureau’s appetite for risk—providing training, relevant to roles and

responsibilities, on how to take the right risks.

With the introduction of the new framework and methodology, all Bureau risks have been reviewed. Risks associated with achieving the Bureau’s strategic actions were identified including risks shared across

Groups and Programs as well as any emerging risks. Collectively, these are referred to as key business risks, and are outlined in the table below.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 114

Risks and impacts Risk mitigation processes Change in risk

level during the year

Failure or damage to instruments and equipment, or obsolete inventory, impacting service delivery, customer confidence and reputation

Asset and inventory management policies and procedures

Equipment calibration and quality assurance procedures

Field Inspection and Meteorological Manuals

Instrument checking, testing and maintenance schedules and logs

Same

Major projects and programs fail to deliver their objectives, impacting the delivery of customer benefits

Project management training and education and tools to ensure adoption

Implement the Bureau Delivery Model to support all project types and confirm business processes

Monitoring of and early escalation of risks and issues that impact schedule, quality and cost

Up

Failure to attract, engage and retain workforce capability now and into the future in order to deliver the Bureau's Strategy

Commencement of good faith negotiations for an enterprise agreement six months prior to expiry of current agreement

Investment in talent attraction and retention activities and investigation of new pathways for future staff

Workforce plans in place with accompanying capability and learning and development frameworks to support training and certification for career and succession planning opportunities

Same

A significant overspend impacts the Bureau's budget, financial standing and reputation

A robust budgeting framework and process based on long-term financial sustainability

Delegations, underpinned by Commonwealth Procurement Rules, Accountable Authority

Regular program and project monitoring and reporting of budget and expenses

Same

Failure to sustain a safe and positive workplace culture leading to breaches of the Code of Conduct and incivility impacting the ability to deliver on the Bureau's strategy

Improved people management capability through Management Essentials training for all managers

Mandated training in Code of Conduct and Employment Obligations.

Socialisation and education of workforce in relation to new and revised Policies and Procedures relevant to employee conduct and behaviour expectations

Same

A Bureau worker is infected with COVID-19 Active case management COVID-19 Response Plan Fact Sheets

Ongoing advice - hygiene, social distancing, travel to office, notification protocols

Up

Resilience The Bureau is committed to its role in enabling a safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia, and has established mechanisms to ensure it can continue to thrive in a rapidly changing environment. Enhancing

the Bureau’s adaptive capacity and its ability to manage transformation requires many components that assist in increasing resilience.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 115

Throughout 2019-20, the Bureau has been building its resilience framework to anticipate and adapt to disruptive events and incidents, and to continue operating where uncertainty affects strategic objectives.

The framework uses a risk-based approach, and a common terminology and structure to avoid confusion during the management of disruptive events. It incorporates crisis management, incident control, business

continuity, IT disaster recovery, security risk management and communications. A robust Business

Resilience Framework will support the Strategy through ensuring continuity of service for important Bureau activities as well as establishing an effective and efficient means to return disrupted services to operation.

Responding and adapting to COVID-19

The national response to the COVID-19 pandemic had a significant effect on the Bureau's workforce.

Working together, the Bureau responded to the fast-moving changes brought by the crisis and remained 'open for business' and delivering impact and value for Australia.

During the final weeks of March, teams began facilitating Bureau staff working from home, packing and

dispatching kits across Australia, and assisting with the relocation of in-office staff. These logistical activities were conducted in a very short period by committed staff.

Between March and May, 1192 staff or 77 per cent of the Bureau worked from home, ensuring their safety and the delivery of essential services to the Australian community.

In June, Bureau staff outside Victoria began to return to workplaces, which was also a large and complex undertaking. The Bureau worked hard to ensure that all its offices were COVID-19 safe and phased the

return of staff to the workplace to enable consideration of circumstances in different States and Territories

and in different functional areas of the Bureau.

The disruption of COVID-19 led to a rapid adaptation of the Bureau's ways of working, which challenged

the Bureau to be innovative in its operations. There was a significant uplift in the Bureau's IT, connectivity, and security to ensure resilient operations during flexible work arrangements.

In April, the Bureau operated a Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre remotely for the first time as severe tropical cyclone Harold, a large and powerful Category 5 tropical cyclone, formed in the Pacific and started

tracking towards Vanuatu. In mid-May, one of the deepest lows Western Australia has formed, just as the

COVID-19 travel restrictions were being eased in the State, providing a stern test for the Bureau's resilience.

The Bureau also worked closely with other Australian government agencies to continue to provide support and capacity for critical Government functions during the COVID-19 crisis. In April, nine Bureau staff were

seconded to Services Australia to assist in its response to the unprecedented demand in claims driven by

the adverse impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 116

Fraud control In 2019-20, the Bureau of Meteorology did not identify any significant issues or incidents of fraud. The Bureau’s Fraud Control Plan, last updated in 2019 and published on the Bureau’s intranet, provides the

basis for its fraud prevention, detection and investigation activities in compliance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework and section 10 of the PGPA Rule. The Bureau conducts fraud risk assessments

annually as part of its overall risk management framework.

The Bureau uses various strategies and mechanisms to prevent fraud which include:

• an Audit Committee to provide independent assurance to the Director about a range of matters

including fraud control and developing and implementing an internal audit plan;

• preparing a fraud risk assessment that is reviewed annually;

• providing a dedicated Fraud Liaison Officer as a central referral point on fraud-related matters, and a

Fraud Control Officer to assess allegations of potential incidences;

• ensuring every employee completes online induction training modules before accessing the Bureau’s

internal data systems; modules include the Fraud Control Framework, Accountable and Ethical Decision-Making, ICT Security and APS Values, Code of Conduct and Employment Principles;

• assigning financial delegations to positions, requiring co-authorisation of spending and assurance

that the amount is allocated in the approved budget;

• maintaining an up-to-date fraud risk register as an integral part of the Bureau’s fraud control

mechanism within the risk management framework;

• participating in Commonwealth fraud activities including Fraud Forums and recognised training; and

• developing a new Framework and Control Plan with the Attorney-General's Department

Commonwealth Fraud Prevention Centre to undertake a Fraud Capability Assessment.

The Bureau has several mechanisms in place to detect any incidents of potential fraud, including:

• the Bureau’s internal auditors undertaking historical financial ledger audits to identify and report any

concerns in transactional behaviour by employees or contractors;

• scrutinising a vendor master listing and ledger, and verifying listed or disclosed business

registrations with the Australian Taxation Office and the Australian Securities and Investment Commission;

• commissioning an independent consultant to provide data-mining analysis to highlight outliers and

further investigate each item of concern;

• the Australian National Audit Office auditing the Bureau’s financial statements;

• encouraging employees to report suspected fraud to their direct supervisor or to the Fraud Liaison

Officer or Fraud Control Officer;

• a new travel and expense solution with inbuilt audit capability;

• quality assurance of sample transactions conducted monthly; and

• regular reporting and analysis for breaches of compliance and patterns.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 117

Where the Bureau determines that an allegation of potentially fraudulent activity needs to be investigated, it will:

• seek the advice of the Fraud Liaison Officer and Fraud Control Officer;

• follow the Australian Government Investigations Standards 2011 for all fraud investigation activities;

• investigate the allegation using an internal (or outsourced) investigation officer or through referral of

serious or complex fraud matters to the Australian Federal Police; and

• maintain a fraud register for the purposes of registering incidents of possible fraud. All known

incidents are investigated and any material matters, as diagnosed by the Fraud Control Officer, are formerly reported to the Bureau’s Audit Committee.

External scrutiny The following matters were dealt with in 2019-20, with the Bureau providing submissions and evidence to

the:

• Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements which was established in response

to the extreme bushfire season of 2019-20 which resulted in loss of life, property and wildlife and

environmental destruction;

• New South Wales Bushfire Inquiry into the causes of, preparation for and response to the 2019-20

bushfires to provide input ahead of the next bushfire season;

• South Australian Government's Independent Review into South Australia’s 2019-20 bushfire

season, with a focus on the Kangaroo Island and Cudlee Creek bushfires. The review looked into

South Australia’s preparedness for dealing with significant bushfire activity and what can be done to

mitigate the impact of bushfires on communities into the future. The review's final report was released in June; and

• Australian Parliament's Senate Inquiry into Lessons to be learned in relation to preparation, planning,

response and recovery efforts following the 2019-20 Australian bushfire season.

The Bureau also provided input to a range of other jurisdictional inquiries into the 2019-20 summer bushfires.

Freedom of information Entities subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). Part II of the FOI Act requires each agency to

display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements. The information provided by the Bureau in response to the IPS is available at

www.bom.gov.au/foi/ips.shtml

In 2019-20, the Bureau received 22 requests under FOI and carried over 1 request from 2018-19. Of these, 22 were completed by 30 June 2020 and 1 remained in progress.

Corrections An error in the reporting of APS Act employees has been identified in the 2018-19 Annual Report. The

number of part-time ongoing employees for 2018-19 should have been 172, not 171 as reported (page 135).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 118

Corporate responsibility

Responsibility to the Australian community Inherent in its vision and mission, the Bureau has a responsibility to the Australian community to support a

safe, prosperous, secure and healthy Australia. The Bureau’s focus is on providing trusted, reliable and responsive weather, water, climate and ocean services that benefit the Australian community and drive

competitive advantage for business and industry.

The Bureau is accountable to the Australian Government for fulfilling its legislative mandate with the

resources invested in it, but is ultimately answerable to the Australian community. Under the Meteorology

Act 1955, the Bureau performs its functions largely in the public interest as well as for sectors such as defence, shipping and aviation, and in support of primary production, industry, trade and commerce.

Throughout 2019-20, the Bureau continued to provide the warnings, forecasts, information and advice on which Australians depend—providing round-the-clock services to support informed decision-making by

governments, emergency services, industry and the community. These services are becoming even more important as Australians become increasingly vulnerable to a range of severe weather events, due to

changes in population, settlement patterns and the growth of infrastructure.

The Bureau’s services are particularly crucial when conditions are extreme. The organisation has upheld its duty to assist Australians to better manage the impacts of their natural environment, including drought,

floods, fires, storms, tsunamis and tropical cyclones. The Bureau’s warnings and advice to the emergency services support essential decision-making when people and property are under threat.

In fulfilling its duties, the Bureau remains committed to:

• providing the best possible information about Australia’s weather, climate, water, oceans and space

weather;

• providing timely information to allow planning and response to impending critical events;

• presenting information clearly, using plain English and easy-to-understand graphics, and making it

accessible to vulnerable communities;

• meeting increasing user expectations by incorporating relevant advances in science and technology,

and enhancing its products and services in line with community needs;

• identifying any limitations in its products and services, and providing information regarding the

source, reliability, completeness and currency of any data supplied; and

• notifying users of service changes and interruptions at the earliest opportunity.

National outreach Throughout 2019-20, Bureau outreach was largely undertaken through the seven State and Territory

offices (covering the five mainland States, the Northern Territory, and Tasmania and Antarctica). Each office was responsible for the day-to-day delivery of forecast and warning services to their respective

communities, working in tandem with State and local governments and emergency service agencies as part of the emergency management and disaster mitigation networks in their respective jurisdiction. In

some jurisdictions, the Bureau has embedded forecasters within emergency management centres to

provide personal interaction and quick access to the Bureau’s expertise and specialisation in severe weather.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 119

State and Territory offices also worked closely with the media to ensure that communication with the general public is effective and that warnings are broadcast widely. Staff interact with a broad range of

stakeholders and users, and provide a focal point for the delivery of services to local industry and government customers, supporting the Bureau’s sectoral leaders in providing high-quality solutions.

Because Australia’s climate varies greatly throughout the States and Territories (see table below) and can

differ significantly from one year to the next, the value of weather and climate information is enhanced by local experts who have the knowledge and relationships to help users interpret information effectively.

State/Territory Meteorology

Queensland The meteorology of Queensland extends from the deep tropics through to temperate and arid regimes, and encompasses coastal waters that include the Great Barrier Reef, the Torres Strait Islands and the eastern Gulf of Carpentaria. The large and dispersed population is vulnerable to risks posed by tropical cyclones, flooding, severe thunderstorms and bushfires. The State’s strong agricultural sector grapples with droughts and other broadscale impacts of climate.

New South Wales The diversity of New South Wales’ weather and climate reflects its many landscapes; from the highest alpine areas in Australia to some of the country’s most productive agricultural areas. New South Wales is often affected by heatwaves, drought, bushfires, intense coastal storm systems, severe thunderstorms and hailstorms. Weather on the coastal strip is influenced by the steep coastal escarpment and ranges, which accentuate heavy rains and bring major flooding to coastal rivers.

Victoria Victoria is renowned for its very changeable and challenging weather events. These include heatwaves, extreme fire weather, and the effects of bushfire smoke in summer; damaging winds from winter storms; and rain, severe thunderstorms, and floods in all seasons. Victoria is also vulnerable to thunderstorm asthma events, when the right weather conditions and fine grass pollen can combine to cause acute asthma episodes.

Tasmania Tasmania’s location in the path of the ‘roaring forties’ westerly wind belt brings heavy and reliable rain to the western half of the island and much warmer and drier conditions to the sheltered east coast. Snow can fall any time of year in the highlands, but summer heatwaves and windy weather fronts bring dangerous fire conditions to the east and south.

South Australia The climatic and hazardous weather conditions of greatest concern to South Australia include bushfires, thunderstorms with local hail and flooding, drought, gales and periods of extreme heat.

Western Australia Western Australia is susceptible to a wide range of severe weather events all year round. The warmer months are characterised by heavy rain, tropical lows and cyclones in the north, and extreme heat and bushfires in the south. During the cooler months, bushfires occur in the north while cold fronts with destructive winds and heavy rain are common in the south.

Northern Territory The Top End of Australia has a tropical climate characterised by a wet season from October to April and a dry season from May to September. At different times of the year, parts of the Northern Territory experience severe thunderstorms, wildfires and widespread flooding. All coastal areas are subject to tropical cyclone landfall.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 120

Helping the community respond to extreme weather in New South Wales

With a season of catastrophic weather, drought, dust storms, cyclones, hailstorms and severe floods, the

past year has been notable in New South Wales for its variety and extremity of weather, as well as for the dedication of Bureau staff and the strong and effective working relationships with response agencies and

communities.

An exceptionally warm and dry winter with 95 per cent of the State in drought set the scene for extreme weather to follow. Spring and the first half of summer were marked by heat, fires, smoke, reduced air

quality and windstorms. The tone shifted during the second half of summer to severe storms, floods and tropical cyclones.

The breadth of weather experienced across New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory included:

• fires and smoke which had devastating impacts on life and property up and down the coast and

ranges;

• wind and hailstorms, with storms in Sydney in October leaving some areas without power for days;

• a devastating hailstorm across Canberra in January that caused an estimated $500 million in

damage;

• widespread flooding following rain in February as the Hawkesbury and Georges rivers saw the

largest floods in a generation; and

• destructive winds on Lord Howe Island in February from tropical cyclone Uesi with a 154 km/h gust

recorded.

Above, a storm approaches Narrabri, New South Wales. Below, retardant is dropped on the Green Wattle Creek fire (photo courtesy of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service).

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Public education and social engagement Helping Australians understand and use its products and services is one of the Bureau’s core responsibilities under the Meteorology Act. The goal is to give Australians timely weather, water, climate

and ocean information, education and updates across a range of channels, particularly when conditions put lives and property in danger.

The early onset of the severe weather season during 2019-20 led to increased communications activity.

The Bureau responded to over 14 000 media enquiries, issued more than 600 media releases and published over 10 000 posts, videos, and Instagram stories. Special resources and support was given to

Indigenous media outlets to assist them in communicating severe weather events.

Meteorologist Diana Eadie speaks to the media.

Australia's Black Summer stretched many elements of the Bureau's operations, including its public

information capacity. During the fires, State and Territory Media teams increased the reach and engagement of public safety messaging including through more than 100 media conferences, 130 video

and audio news releases, 5000 interviews and media responses, and continuous social media posts. The delivery of the continuous weather narrative across multiple channels ensured that the communities were

continually updated on the very latest conditions.

Throughout the year, the Bureau's social media channels proved especially effective for promoting public- safety campaigns on the risks and impact of severe weather, and improving access to science through the

AskBOM community engagement posts. The opportunity for community members to engage directly with Bureau experts through webinars was well received, as was the use of more creative formats to tell the

weather narrative on Instagram and Facebook.

The Bureau also supported the community in understanding and responding to weather and related

phenomena, including through its Weather Connect customer service centre and information emails to subscribers.

The Bureau had an increasing number of followers on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn

and its blog. Instagram, which the Bureau has been active on since February 2017, continued to attract interest, with the audience base doubling in 2019-20 driven by beautiful imagery and explanations of

weather science.

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Weather forecast for major sporting events

The Victorian State Office provided critical information in support of major events across the State, most notably in January as two senior meteorologists worked on-site throughout the Australian Open tennis

tournament. The expert weather information provided helped officials make critical decisions about stadium

roof closures and player and public safety as smoke from an active fire season frequently threatened the event.

The Victorian office has also been proactive in delivering briefings for other major events such as the AFL

Grand Final and the Spring Racing Carnival. These initiatives are aimed at developing new relationships with some of Australia's major sporting bodies and local authorities managing health and safety in large

crowds.

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Meteorologist Kevin Parkyn provides the weather forecast ahead of the Boxing Day Test in Melbourne.

Stakeholder participation and feedback Third-party participation in the Bureau’s policy formulation and service provision is facilitated through:

• the Australia-New Zealand Emergency Management Committee and its working subcommittees

(Community Outcomes and Recovery; and Mitigation and Risk) and related groups including the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group; the National Flood Risk Advisory Group; the Australian Tropical

Cyclone Advisory Group; and the National Heatwave Working Group;

• AFAC (the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council);

• the Bureau of Meteorology Hazards Services Forum;

• the Jurisdictional Reference Group on Water Information;

• State and Territory consultative committees for flood, marine, agriculture and climate;

• consultative meetings with private meteorological service providers, the aviation industry and

Defence;

• State, Territory and local government emergency management and disaster mitigation committees;

and

• Australia's agricultural research and development corporations, regional farming groups, natural

resource management organisations, major agribusiness, State and Territory Governments, and

representative bodies such as the National Farmers’ Federation.

The Bureau uses a range of surveys and feedback mechanisms to ensure its products and services meet the growing needs of its customers. In 2019-20, the Bureau monitored and evaluated feedback from general community and emergency management customers and partners, focusing on the four

performance areas of preference, experience, impact and reputation.

Four community surveys were undertaken in September, December, March and June, helping to identify

areas for improvement and inform service development. Overall performance was largely consistent across

the year and with the previous year's results. Brand reputation and experience were highly rated, while there remain opportunities to increase the Bureau’s nomination as the preferred source for weather

forecasts and warnings. The surveys found that almost all users say the Bureau’s forecast services

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(98 per cent) or warning services (97 per cent) are at least meeting their needs or better, but only 61 per cent of customers were aware of Bureau warnings and took precautions or actions as a result.

A survey of emergency management customers and partners was undertaken in May. Performance remained strong overall, although results were somewhat lower than the previous year, most likely due to

differences in sample composition. The survey found that 80 per cent of customers and partners who used

the Bureau's services in the past month said that service helped them do what they needed to do to a 'great' or 'very great' extent, compared with 83 per cent the previous year.

The Bureau uses the net promoter score index (ranging from -100 to +100) as a way of gauging the willingness of its customers to recommend products or services to others. In 2019−20, the Bureau

achieved an average net promoter score of +54 from community customers and +61 from emergency management customers and partners. These results indicate a high level of satisfaction and customer

loyalty. More survey results are included in the performance section of the Annual Report.

The Bureau also conducted an online survey on the use of weather information for snow-based activities for the duration of the 2019 snow season. The survey received an enthusiastic response with 763 surveys

completed, many and with rich details from participants, highlighting the passion this customer group has for the weather. One of the findings was a strong desire to include Tasmanian weather information in the

Bureau's 'alpine' section of the website, which has been implemented following the survey. Many of the other ideas and suggestions will drive improvements to snow services in as the Bureau builds its new

Bureau website.

The Bureau regularly invites feedback, including suggestions and complaints from its customers. A total of 6375 messages were logged through the Bureau’s website feedback facility, of which 469 were classified

as criticism and 80 messages were classified as praise. All feedback was directed to the appropriate area for response and resolution.

The Bureau’s online research community now has 6585 registered testers—up from 6157 in June 2019.

BOMIdeas hosts online surveys and activities that allow these registered testers and other customers to

provide feedback on potential service enhancements.

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International engagement International cooperation is an essential and integral part of the Bureau’s operations. Through reciprocal relationships and knowledge-sharing with countries and agencies around the globe the Bureau leverages

scientific expertise and technological and operational developments, and collects and exchanges information critical for monitoring and predicting the state of the atmosphere and hydrosphere.

The Bureau is deeply engaged in international activities that provide direct and indirect benefits to the

organisation and to the broader Australian and international community. Through these activities, the Bureau continues to build its profile and reputation, foster goodwill with key partners and strengthen its

skills, capabilities and knowledge base.

In 2019-20, the Bureau made important contributions to the activities of the World Meteorological

Organization (WMO) and has maintained strong representation in key positions that help ensure Australia’s interests are considered in policy development and decision-making. It also met its obligations under

international treaties and agreements including the provision of aeronautical meteorological services on

behalf of Australia as the designated authority under the International Civil Aviation Organization. As Australia's representative to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s

(UNESCO) Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), the Bureau continued to engage with and represent the interests of Australian marine science stakeholders.

The Bureau has formal bilateral agreements with 11 overseas agencies and actively cooperates across a wide range of subject areas with countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, China, Japan,

South Korea and Indonesia. These collaborations focus on mutual and complementary fields of technical

and scientific expertise.

Australian aid-funded capacity development programs represent a significant component of the Bureau’s

international activities and the Bureau has a long history of supporting counterpart meteorological and hydrological services in the Pacific. These engagements strengthen organisational capabilities and skills

and contribute to broader whole-of-government objectives. An important part of this work is the Bureau’s involvement in the Australian Government-funded Climate and Ocean Support Program in the Pacific—a

foundational climate information services sub-program of the Australia Pacific Climate Partnership. Other

aid-funded activities have included capacity building work with Papua New Guinea, Tonga and Samoa.

Supporting a resilient Pacific-providing climate information for community action

The Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific Phase 2 (COSPPac2) operates across 14 Pacific Island countries and involves adding to the long-term Pacific sea level data record; archiving and managing

meteorological data and producing sector-specific information; seasonal climate and ocean monitoring and

prediction services; and communications, training and capacity development. COSPPac2 is supporting Pacific Island stakeholders to use climate, ocean, and sea level information to strengthen climate and

disaster resilience.

A highlight of 2019-20 was supporting Pacific national meteorological services to produce monthly national

Early Action Rainfall (EAR) Watch bulletins to better communicate seasonal outlooks to climate-vulnerable communities. National EAR Watches are now produced monthly in eight countries, (Cook Islands, Fiji,

Kiribati, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu), providing information to help

governments and communities respond to periods of prolonged dry or wet conditions.

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Building on the success of COSPPac, the Green Climate Fund-sponsored Vanuatu Climate Information Services Resilient Development Program has been improving the currency and functionality of climate data

records for Vanuatu. Climate Information Services are being strengthened for target end-users with the development of new impact-based seasonal forecasts .

In partnership with the WMO and the Papua New Guinea National Weather Service, the Bureau is

contributing to a Weather and Climate Early Warning System for Papua New Guinea to increase its capacity for generating effective, impact-based, multi-hazard warnings to protect lives, livelihoods and

assets.

Diversity and inclusion The Bureau strives to be the model of an inclusive culture where diversity of thought and background is valued to provide better outcomes for staff, customers and the community. Success is based on creating

an inclusive environment where people feel respected and valued, share a sense of fairness and of belonging, and are encouraged to make a unique and meaningful contribution.

The Bureau values the diversity of its staff, respecting differences that include—but are not limited to—

gender, ethnicity, religion, age, ability or disability, sexual orientation, language, skills, experience, education, industry sector and thinking approaches.

The Bureau brings its commitment to life by:

• developing and promoting an equitable, respectful and inclusive workplace culture where staff are

engaged, are valued for their uniqueness and feel like they belong;

• bringing together people with different backgrounds and ways of thinking, which helps to drive better

decision-making, innovation and overall performance;

• ensuring recruitment from the broadest talent pool that reflects the Bureau’s customers and

communities with which it works; and

• supporting the use of flexible work arrangements at all levels to enable staff to balance their personal

and professional commitments.

Disability reporting The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 is Australia’s overarching framework for disability reform. It

acts to ensure the principles underpinning the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are incorporated into Australia’s policies and programs that affect people with disability, their

families and carers.

All levels of government will continue to be held accountable for the implementation of the strategy through

biennial progress reporting to the Council of Australian Governments. Progress reports can be found at

www.dss.gov.au. Disability reporting is included in the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service reports and the Australian Public Service (APS) Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at

www.apsc.gov.au

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Ethical standards The Bureau supports a safe, inclusive and respectful work culture that reflects the diversity of the community it services. It operates within the context of Australia being a signatory to the seven key human

rights treaties, with human rights being protected and promoted through domestic legislation, policies, practices and independent bodies. The Bureau undertakes a range of activities to meet this commitment,

including:

• promoting APS Values, Code of Conduct and Employment Principles, and awareness of workplace

discrimination and Closing the Gap, through communication with staff, training, and induction

packages for new employees;

• endorsing the Public Interest Disclosure Framework, through communication with staff, training and

supporting policy documents;

• providing an online training course entitled Accountable and Ethical Decision Making;

• delivering shared culture workshops and information sessions for managers covering the APS

employment framework and key messages from the publication Respect: Promoting a culture free from harassment and bullying in the APS;

• providing employees with access to information on ethical standards via the intranet, and also

through the APS Commission’s website;

• issuing APS Code of Conduct guidelines for Bureau staff, and providing guidance and policies with

respect to duty of care, making public comment and the performance of outside work/ employment;

• initiating disciplinary processes, including counselling and investigations when allegations relating to

breaches of the APS Code of Conduct were reported;

• making available a review-of-action process, as provided for in section 33 of the Public Service Act

1999, to aggrieved employees; and

• initiating investigation processes into disclosures received under the Public Interest Disclosure Act

2013.

Supporting sustainable development The Bureau recognises the opportunity and privilege it has to support sustainable development in Australia

and beyond, contributing to prosperous, fair, healthy and sustainable communities. Both in the way it

conducts its operations, and in the vast array of products and services it provides for the community, the Bureau’s work supports Australia’s commitment to the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable

Development, and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Throughout 2019-20, the work of the Bureau has contributed to 15 of the 17 goals (all except SGD 1 and 16).

Goal Bureau contribution

2. Zero hunger • help graziers and horticulturalists determine optimum crops, timing around planting and harvesting, fertilisation and chemical spraying

• help meat and livestock farmers control stocking rates, and pre-empt health issues in livestock

• alert farmers to conditions such as frost, hail, storms and floods

• support irrigation and water restocking strategies

• support government drought assistance programs

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Goal Bureau contribution

3. Good health and well-being • help Australians protect themselves from cyclones, floods, severe storms and bushfires • support authorities in making evacuation decisions to get people at risk to safety

• help Australians avoid dangerous ultraviolet (UV) exposure, to protect against skin cancer

• help protect vulnerable Australians against heat exhaustion and extreme cold

• alert health authorities to periods of heightened demand

• help Australians plan their sporting and outdoor activities

• support management of biohazards, airborne allergens and diseases

4. Quality education • provide quality education in meteorology including capacity building in neighbouring countries

• help the community understand Australia’s weather, ocean and climate-related risks

• contribute to the global knowledge base in the meteorological sciences and contribute to cutting-edge developments

• promote ongoing learning and development for Bureau staff

5. Gender equality • promote gender equality through implementation of the Gender Equality Action Plan

• provide family-friendly working conditions including flexible working options for all staff

• provide training and development to managers on inclusive leadership and unconscious bias

6. Clean water and sanitation • help governments and water authorities in planning and water management • aid decision-making in water supply and the management of water allocations and rights

• support dam management and the protection of water and sanitation infrastructure, particularly during severe weather events

• inform the design of new water infrastructure

7. Affordable and clean energy • enable the Australian energy market to forecast power demand, particularly during heat and cold extremes

• support renewable energy generation by informing production potential and energy output estimates

• support operations and efficiency in Australia’s offshore oil and gas industry

• support improved planning and mitigation of disrupted electricity supply due to severe weather events

• invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects within the Bureau's property portfolio

8. Decent work and economic growth • provide economic benefits in the order of 11.6:1 (for every dollar spent by the Bureau on delivering services, there is a return of $11.60 to the Australian economy)

• support economic growth in key sectors (see Goal 9)

• provide good employment opportunities for Bureau staff

9. Industry, innovation and infrastructure • support safe and efficient air travel in Australian airspace, inform routing and fuel load decisions and help protect aircraft from volcanic ash

• help businesses manage the impact of weather on their operations and minimise disruption from severe weather events

• provide valuable information to the financial and insurance services sector

• support the construction of climate-appropriate infrastructure and help protect infrastructure from weather and climate-related events

• provide information products as a basis for innovation and value-adding by industry

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Goal Bureau contribution

10. Reduced inequalities

• provide consistent, comprehensive services for all Australians, including in rural and remote areas

• promote Australian Indigenous culture through the Indigenous Weather Knowledge website and support reconciliation through the Reconciliation Action Plan

• implement initiatives that promote Diversity and Inclusion

• support capacity building and development of Pacific Island nations to manage severe weather impacts and mitigate climate change

• assist Pacific and Indian Ocean countries prepare for and respond to tsunamis

11. Sustainable cities and communities • support the emergency services in carrying out effective emergency and disaster preparation, response and recovery

• warn communities to prepare for hazardous weather events, to protect housing and community infrastructure, and to make timely evacuations

• allow emergency services to pre-position personnel and equipment to minimise infrastructure damage and to restore essential services following an emergency

• help communities to organise their activities and daily commute

• support management of public and private green spaces

12. Responsible consumption and production

• implement a Bureau environmental framework to minimise the effect of operations on the environment

• support responsible purchasing policies, efficient use of natural resources, and the management of chemicals and wastes through their lifecycle

13. Climate action • help Australians understand the nation’s climate patterns, trends and variations in climate, and climate-related risks

• provide climate research, modelling and forecasting to support policy decisions and mitigation strategies

• help Pacific Island nations measure and respond to climate change impacts

14. Life below water • support marine management including sustainable fishing and aquaculture

• support safety at sea and inform search and rescue operations

• support response to ocean environmental incidents (such as oil spills)

• implement changes to the Bureau's balloon program to reduce the likelihood of ingestion by marine birds and turtles

15. Life on land • support the management of ecosystems

• support bushfire mitigation including controlled burns

• institute ecological protection measures for Bureau operations at environmentally sensitive sites

17. Partnerships for the goals • contribute to the activities of the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, and the International Civil

Aviation Organization

• collaborate with 11 overseas agencies through bilateral agreements

• partner with local, regional, State and Territory and national emergency management authorities

The Bureau also supports the principles of ecological sustainable development as outlined in the

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The broad range of Bureau products, services and advice empower stakeholders to make informed decisions on matters of ecosystem and

biodiversity conservation, both now and for the future.

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Environmental sustainability The Bureau is committed to environmentally sustainable practices and the management of impacts from its activities, with the pursuit of a high level of environmental sustainability an aspect of the Bureau’s Strategy.

The Bureau’s approach to environmental management is based on the principles of addressing the whole- of-life impact of the property portfolio, managing the unique challenges associated with operations, and

efficient use of resources including carbon emission reduction.

Achieving a sustainable estate

The Bureau's operations are diverse, encompassing land, water, atmosphere and oceans across Australia

and its external territories. 2019-20 saw a focus on protecting sensitive marine environs, with multiple permits sought and achieved for operations in marine parks and an uplift in biosecurity controls to prevent

the spread of invasive plant species when visiting Bureau infrastructure on islands. Site-specific environmental management plans were also developed for project works at sites with known environmental

sensitivities, ranging from building works at Willis Island in the Coral Sea, to automatic weather station

relocations at mainland airports.

Resource demand

Organisational demand on natural resource comes in many forms at the Bureau, from general office activities to waste generation, equipment and instrument use through to the transport of goods. The Bureau

aims to incorporate sustainability into procurement practices to avoid unnecessary consumption and minimise the environmental impact of goods and services over whole-of-life.

Key highlights for the Bureau in 2019-20 were:

• working with building owners at the Collins Street Office to introduce or improve the introduction of

multiple new recycling streams, including stationery;

• following the success of the Laverton solar pilot, which generated 36 MWh or nearly 30 per cent of

annual power usage, the installation of solar power generation systems was extended to the new Rainbow radar; and

• the Melbourne Collins Street Office received a six-star NABERS energy rating, reflecting energy

efficiency measures such as LED fittings with integrated motion and dimming sensors throughout the tenancy.

Reducing operational impact

Weather balloons are a critical component of the Bureau's observational program but have the potential to

cause adverse effects as plastics and other materials enter the environment. In its attempts to address

these issues, the Bureau made two major breakthroughs in 2019-20, leading to changes in its upper air operations that reduce the environment impact of atmospheric monitoring

Following a trial in 2018-19 and based on advice from leading marine researchers, the use of marine life- friendly, blue balloons became operational at three Bureau sites and are now being deployed around the

country. In February, the Bureau commenced the use of biodegradable parachutes that are used to slow the descent of the burst balloon at some sites. The new parachutes are made of polybutylene succinate, a

biodegradable polymer resin that breaks down into water and carbon dioxide.

The Bureau remains committed to addressing the impact of its operations, and will continue to work with suppliers into the future to actively improve environmental outcomes associated with observational

practices.

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Environmental performance

Indicator 2018-19 2019-20 Change

Energy use

Total purchased electricity (kWh) 14 246 700 15 768 500 +11%

Purchased electricity consumption offices (kWh) 2933 350 2565 800 -13%

Purchased electricity consumption data centres (kWh) 6917 100 8737 100 +26%

Purchased electricity consumption other sites (kWh) 4396 300 4465 600 +2%

Scope 2 emissions from electricity use (tonnes CO2 equivalent) 12 410 13 846 +12%

Vehicle fleet *

Total number of fleet vehicles 75 79 +5%

Total distance travelled (km) 954 686 919 594 -4%

Total fuel purchased (kL) 96.3 96.5 0%

Average consumption of fleet vehicles (L/100km) 10.46 10.38 -1%

Emissions from leased vehicle fleet (tonnes CO2 equivalent) 255 257 +1%

Air travel

Total number of flights 10 197 7082 -31%

Total distance travelled (km) 15 559 219 10 565 813 -32%

Emissions from air travel (tonnes CO2 equivalent) 3122 1998 -36%

Resource efficiency

Planet-friendly stationery purchased 34% 31% -3%

* the vehicle fleet data is for the Fringe Benefit Tax year period, 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020

Note: Some values are estimated due to incomplete billing cycles at time of publication.

Heritage The Bureau has a demonstrated commitment to record and preserve significant parts of its own history in

delivering meteorological services to Australia. The heritage values associated with sites owned or controlled by the Bureau is quite broad. Some sites have long-term associations with weather and

meteorology, some sites are places of first use of significant technology such as radar, while others were key to major meteorological events.

The Bureau's heritage strategy is based on Commonwealth heritage management principles, and

establishes processes for the identification and assessment of heritage values of sites owned or controlled by the Bureau. In keeping with this strategy, heritage considerations are incorporated into the due diligence

associated at site works. This includes at Giles Weather Station, where heritage conservation is incorporated into the operation and maintenance of the original buildings from 1956.

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Giles Weather Station, established as part of Australia's involvement with post-WWII British rocket and nuclear testing.

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People management

Effectiveness in managing and developing employees Attracting and retaining talent was a key organisational goal in 2019-20. The Bureau's newly developed

sustainable workforce plan and workforce planning toolkit have assisted its work areas to better understand their workforce supply and capabilities in the context of achieving organisational objectives. Performance

management and development also remains critical to the Bureau’s strategic objectives. Participation rates for the miPDS performance development scheme continue to be high, with 99 per cent of employees

having an agreement in place at the end of June.

The Bureau's second Organisational Culture Survey was held in August to examine the issues and behaviours that contribute to workplace satisfaction and performance. The findings provide an insight to

culture at both an organisational and team level and identified areas for focus and improvement consistent with executing the Bureau’s Strategy 2017-2022. More than 130 team reports were generated from the

survey. Leaders conducted two workshops with their teams to explore the survey’s findings and developed a team action plan to support and drive cultural change. The 2020 Australian Public Service (APS)

Employee Census has been postponed until October with results expected in January 2021.

Workforce snapshot

2018-19 2019-20 Difference

Number of staff employed 1608 1593 -15

Total employee expenditure $186.693 million $177.728 million -$8.965 million

The diversity of our workforce

Women (% of the total workforce) 32.7 34.2 1.5

People with a disability* (% of the total workforce) 2.6 2.4 -0.2

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (% of the total workforce) 1.4 1.4 0

Staff with English as a second language (% of the total workforce) 16.6 16.4 -0.2

Staff with English and another language (% of the total workforce) 8.6 8.8 0.2

Staff health and well-being

Work health and safety incident reports 488 447 -41

Number of Health and Safety Representatives 41 30 -11

Training and education

Staff undertaking support studies (% of the total workforce) 2.2 1.75 -0.45

* Note that disability is a voluntary disclosure. Some employees choose not to disclose disabilities.

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Strategy-in-Action workshops were held in September, December, March, and June for the Bureau's extended leadership cohort. The workshops have played an important role in building leadership capability

and cohesion, shared learning and experiences, and culture and momentum around implementation and delivery of the strategy. Each workshop is focused on putting the strategy into action and deliberate

outcomes are sought from each session, with repeating themes around customer, leadership and culture,

and transformation. Feedback surveys are conducted with participants to inform future agendas and drive continuous improvement for each workshop.

The Bureau’s employee turnover rate was 15.4 per cent in 2019-20, which was 3 per cent higher than in 2018-19. Attracting and retaining high-calibre science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM)

graduates continued to be a priority and was achieved through the Australian Government’s Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Entry Level Programs, the Graduate Meteorology Program,

university forums, internships and work experience programs.

Training and development In 2019-20, the Bureau of Meteorology Training Centre continued to facilitate learning programs to support

organisational capability and licensing and compliance requirements. The Graduate Diploma in Meteorology course—the initial training program for meteorologists—saw 15 students graduate in 2019

(including 7 Bureau staff) and a further 19 commence the 2020 program (including 15 Bureau staff).

Continued development of online material provided Bureau staff with greater access to training opportunities, particularly for those located in regional and remote locations. Staff undertook more than

6100 online courses, with modules from the 'Just-In-Time' learning library, financial delegations, workstation ergonomics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness, emergency evacuation

procedures and ICT security being particularly prominent. Specialist technical in-service training was also

provided, using online modules with remote supervision for over 880 participants.

Despite the challenges posed by COVID-19 social distancing requirements, the Bureau's Introduction to

Meteorology course was delivered to 255 participants, comprising 165 external customers and 90 internal stakeholders. Contextualised training was provided for several strategic partners, including Southern Rural

Water, the Australian Energy Market Operator, the Murray-Darling Basin Authority and the South Australian Department of Environment and Water. A significant development for the year was delivery of the course

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online via virtual classroom infrastructure, meeting demand for external customers who had planned to attend face-to-face courses, as well as attracting customers beyond the capital cities for whom the course

was previously inaccessible.

In support of the Bureau's Observing System Strategy, training was delivered to more than 70 staff on

automatic weather station (AWS) operational support, AWS site inspection, remote stations observations

and maintenance, aerodrome weather observer and radar maintenance.

The National Meteorological Library's collection was updated with 480 books, reports and conference

proceedings, and 719 Bureau staff publication records were added to the Bureau Abstracts database. The Library continued to strengthen its archival of historical material through the ongoing acquisition and

maintenance of the Rare Books Collection and continuing development of the digital repository to ensure the Bureau's valuable and unique meteorological historical and research material was preserved. The

library also increased efforts to improve the accessibility of its collection through the National Libraries

Australia catalogue accessed through the Trove service. A total of 724 new library holdings of books, reports and journal holdings were added to the National Australian database and more than 1100 records

were updated.

Work health and safety The Bureau is committed to ensuring the health and well-being of its staff and strives to reach zero harm through a positive culture and by embedding health, safety and well-being practices in all activities.

An added challenge for 2019-20 has been to ensure staff safety and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Health Safety and Environment Program provided dedicated support to the Bureaus

COVID-19 Critical Incident Management Team (CMT) and COVID-19 Incident Management Teams (IMTs)

throughout the period, ensuring critical health and safety support was available during a range of initiatives including implementation of flexible work arrangements, staff health and well-being monitoring programs,

hygiene practices and health scenario planning.

Highlights from 2019-20 included:

• completion of Incident Cause Analysis Method Lead Investigator training by health and safety staff to

strengthen incident investigation skills with a clear focus on better defining corrective and

preventative measures across the Bureau;

• development of manager-led Safety Team Talks to share key learnings identified following safety

incidents, including those associated with manual handling, electrical safety, emergency response,

bicycle commuting, bushfires and first aid;

• delivery of a mental health uplift program to people leaders across the Bureau to improve recognition

of the signs of mental health, what to say and do and how to support a team member who may be struggling; a skill particularly significant due to the mental health challenges posed by the COVID-19

pandemic;

• completion of a detailed review on the management of contractors and development of an uplift

program to ensure that all contractors undertaking work on behalf of the Bureau do so safely;

• implementation of an improved International Travel Safety program to ensures staff travelling

internationally have up-to-date information, risk assessments, check in processes and access to emergency services while overseas; and

• delivery of an influenza vaccination program across the Bureau.

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Lead WHS indicators Lag WHS indicators

WHS Statement of Commitment (policy) was reviewed and approved by the Bureau.

WHS criteria were included in all procurement documents and contracts.

As at 30 June, 16 Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) and 14 Deputy HSRs represented 28 work groups.

An improved level of participation by the Senior Leadership Team has seen safety conversations grow to ~150 conversations per month.

Bureau Executive provided with monthly comprehensive WHS briefs.

Comcare was notified of three dangerous occurrences under section 38 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth). No action from the regulator.

Proactive reporting culture maintained, with 447 HSE incident/hazard reports lodged, compared with 488 in 2018-19.

The preventative reporting of hazards improved by 27 per cent, with hazards representing 55 per cent of all reports recorded, compared to 43 per cent in 2018-19.

There was an improvement in timeliness of incident/hazard reports, with the average report lodged in 3.7 days, compared to 5.7 days in 2018-19.

The Bureau’s lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) of 2.90 has improved year on year and is favourable when compared to the Comcare industry rate for 'Public Administration' at an LTIFR of 4.9.

10 workers’ compensation claims were accepted (0.6 claims per 100 staff).

1 lost-time compensation claim was accepted with 9 of the claims for medical treatment expenses only.

Vehicle accident rate of 13 per 100 vehicles (down from 18 in 2018-19), driver at fault as a percentage of claims: 37.5 per cent (down from 59 per cent in 2018-19).

Consultation

The Bureau recognises that staff engagement and participation improve decision-making for health and safety matters, and helps reduce work-related incidents, injuries and illness. The Bureau has formal health

and safety consultative arrangements and circulates all WHS procedures to staff for consultation prior to

finalisation.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 137

Rehabilitation and compensation

In 2019-20, 15 compensation claims were lodged with Comcare of which 10 were accepted, 3 were

denied, 1 was non-compliant and 1 withdrawn. Of the accepted claims, 3 were musculoskeletal, and 1 psychological. The staff member with an accepted lost time injury was supported through the return to

work process. The Bureau achieved a return to work rate of 75 per cent in the 2019-20 year.

The Bureau's claim frequency rate continues to remain under the average rate for APS agencies. The Bureau's Comcare premium rate for 2019-20 of 0.25 per cent was also below the overall scheme premium

rate of 0.85 per cent.

The Compensation and Rehabilitation Employee Services (CARES) team continued to see positive return

to work outcomes for compensable claims through the engagement of effective rehabilitation providers, dedicated managers, CARES team support and the positive approach of injured staff. A proactive, early- intervention approach for injured or ill employees resulted in minimal lost time for non-compensable

matters. This involved managers and supervisors establishing immediate supportive contact with employees who required further assistance. The CARES team worked with all parties to support the return

to work process in a collaborative way.

Employment arrangements As at 30 June, the Bureau had 1399 ongoing and 193 non-ongoing staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999. These figures include 24 Senior Executive Service (SES) and equivalent staff but exclude the

Head of Agency. With the exception of the SES and the Head of Agency, all staff are covered under the Bureau of Meteorology Enterprise Agreement (EA). The salary bands under the EA and non-salary benefits

are outlined below. There were 45 staff with individual flexibility agreements pursuant to the EA, providing

allowances and flexibility in working arrangements.

Australian Public Service Act employment arrangements—current report period (2019-20)

Employment arrangement SES Non-SES Total

Bureau of Meteorology Enterprise Agreement 2018 0 1568 1568

SES (and equivalent) Employment Contracts 24 0 24

Total 24 1568 1592

Note: Includes staff on leave without pay and excludes the Head of Agency.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 138

Non-salary benefits

Non-salary benefits for employees include:

• flexible working arrangements, such as flex-time, executive-level time off in lieu, part-time and home- based work;

• assistance to employees who are in, have left, or are preparing to leave situations which are affected

by family and domestic violence;

• provision for leave, including recreation leave, long service leave, personal/carer’s leave,

compassionate leave, war service, sick leave, pregnancy leave, maternity leave, adoption leave,

supporting partner leave, study leave, employee-funded extra leave, ceremonial leave, defence

leave, jury service leave, purchased leave and community leave (with and without pay);

• study assistance and relocation support;

• access to an employee assistance program;

• access to the flexible remuneration packaging scheme;

• provision of business-related equipment; and

• career guidance and development services.

Salary ranges by classification level

Classification Minimum salary Maximum salary

SES 3 N/A N/A

SES 2 $240 308 $268 183

SES 1 $199 339 $218 781

EL 2 $116 564 $179 785*

EL 1 $95 800 $107 909

APS 6 $78 686 $89 463

APS 5 $71 357 $77 769

APS 4 $64 010 $70 194

APS 3 $57 105 $66 834

APS 2 $51 529 $56 584

APS 1 $26 777^ $49 661

Other $55 240 $55 240

Minimum/maximum range $26 777 $268 183

* Includes Research Officers ^ Includes Cadet and Trainee staff

Executive remuneration

The payment of salary and administration of conditions for the Head of Agency is derived from the relevant Remuneration Tribunal determination. The Bureau has an SES remuneration framework that applies to the

SES (and equivalent) staff. At 30 June there were 24 common law contracts for SES (and equivalent) staff. These contracts also provided for non-salary benefits, such as business equipment (home computing

facilities and mobile phone) and airline club membership. The Bureau has zero staff on Australian Workplace Agreements and is not subject to any determinations under subsection 24(3) of the Public

Service Act.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 139

Information about remuneration for key management personnel

The Bureau’s key management personnel include the CEO as its Accountable Authority, and members of the Bureau Executive who report directly to the CEO. Remuneration information for key management personnel is provided below.

Key management personnel Short-term benefits Post-employment

benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses Other benefits

and allowances Superannuation contributions

Long service leave Other long- term

benefits

Andrew Johnson CEO/Director $443 549 - $28 619 $64 802 $13 106 - - $550 077

Alistair Legge ROBUST Program Director $273 902 - $41 627 $46 600 $8303 - - $370 432

Gilbert Brunet Chief Scientist $273 176 - $35 768 $46 413 $8122 - - $363 480

Graham Hawke Chief Strategy Officer $271 090 - $6387 $41 753 $8846 - - $328 076

Kirsten Garwood PST Program Director $274 040 - $47 421 $48 095 $8289 - - $377 845

Nichole Brinsmead

Chief Information Officer $273 067 - $51 855 $48 286 $8234 - - $381 433

Paula Goodwin Chief Operating Officer (part-year) $66 404 - $17 164 $10 679 $17 701 - - $111 948

Peter Stone Group Executive $226 833 - $94 133 $56 530 $13 935 - - $391 431

Piero Chessa Group Executive (part-year) $81 067 - $25 269 $14 429 $2015 - - $122 780

Jennifer Gale Chief Operating Officer (part-year) $157 792 - $37 876 $26 586 $4683 - $68 428 $295 364

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 140

Information about remuneration for senior executives

The average total remuneration of senior executives, excluding key management personnel, during the reporting period is provided below.

Total remuneration bands Short-term benefits Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration

Number of

senior executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuati on contributions

Average long service leave Average other long-term

benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0 - $220 000 10 $62 523 - $16 782 $12 048 $8592 - $55 141 $110 234

$220 001 - $245 000 2 $151 440 - $43 075 $28 922 $4609 - - $228 046

$245 001 - $270 000 7 $189 908 - $25 827 $34 376 $9992 - - $260 103

$270 001 - $295 000 2 $210 385 - $19 487 $40 357 $11 229 - - $281 459

$295 001 - $320 000 1 $105 039 - $10 145 $23 777 $4245 - $163 669 $306 875

$320 001 - $345 000 - - - - - - - - -

$345 001 - $370 000 1 $94 588 - $2 739 $21 416 - - $228 246 $346 989

$370 001 - $395 000 - - - - - - - - -

$395 001 - $420 000 - - - - - - - - -

$420 001 - $445 000 1 $91 615 - $16 147 $19 007 $4517 - $305 964 $437 250

$445 001 - $470 000 1 $2056 - $16 029 $1874 - - $431 592 $451 550

$470 001 - $495 000 - - - - - - - - -

$495 001 - … - - - - - - - - -

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 141

Information about remuneration for other highly paid staff

Remuneration of staff who are neither key management personnel nor senior executives, and whose total remuneration exceeds the threshold amount for the

reporting period ($220 000) is also provided below.

Total remuneration bands Short-term benefits Post-

employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration

Number of

other highly paid staff

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuati on contributions

Average long service leave Average other long-term

benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$220 001 - $245 000 12 $153 382 - $35 139 $30 828 $6208 - $100 673 $233 947

$245 001 - $270 000 6 $135 095 - $82 942 $31 414 $6888 - - $256 340

$270 001 - $295 000 4 $110 505 - $87 246 $28 886 $3579 - $171 239 $273 026

$295 001 - $320 000 - - - - - - - - -

$320 001 - $345 000 - - - - - - - - -

$345 001 - $370 000 1 $41 221 - $24 006 $9 876 $2660 - $273 490 $351 254

$370 001 - $395 000 - - - - - - - - -

$395 001 - $420 000 - - - - - - - - -

$420 001 - $445 000 1 $95 919 - $7 453 $34 422 $4383 - $292 219 $434 396

$445 001 - $470 000 - - - - - - - - -

$470 001 - $495 000 - - - - - - - - -

$495 001 - … 1 $114 674 - $64 389 $33 121 $7658 - $331 793 $551 635

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 142

Performance Pay (Australian Public Service Act Employees)

No employees received performance pay during 2019-20.

Workforce profile (staffing statistics) All statistics are as at 30 June unless otherwise stated.

External Territories include Australian Antarctic Territory, Norfolk Island and Cocos Islands. Macquarie Island is included in Tasmania, Willis Island in Queensland and Lord Howe Island in New South Wales.

All ongoing employees—current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

NSW 69 7 76 22 9 31 0 0 0 107

Qld 107 4 111 31 6 37 0 0 0 148

SA 42 0 42 13 3 16 0 0 0 58

Tas 39 3 42 12 8 20 0 0 0 62

Vic 482 34 516 242 66 308 0 0 0 824

WA 56 5 61 11 8 19 0 0 0 80

ACT 39 5 44 24 10 34 0 0 0 78

NT 28 0 28 9 0 9 0 0 0 37

External Territories

3 0 3 2 0 2 0 0 0 5

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 865 58 923 366 110 476 0 0 0 1399

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 143

All non-ongoing employees—current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

NSW 2 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Qld 7 2 9 3 1 4 0 0 0 13

SA 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Tas 4 0 4 2 0 2 0 0 0 6

Vic 72 23 95 55 6 61 0 0 0 156

WA 3 0 3 2 0 2 0 0 0 5

ACT 4 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

NT 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

External Territories

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 95 30 125 62 7 69 0 0 0 194

All ongoing employees—previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

NSW 73 6 79 29 12 41 0 0 0 120

Qld 100 2 102 30 6 36 0 0 0 138

SA 49 0 49 15 5 20 0 0 0 69

Tas 36 4 40 11 6 17 0 0 0 57

Vic 481 38 519 223 63 286 0 0 0 805

WA 59 8 67 20 6 26 0 0 0 93

ACT 40 5 45 31 10 41 0 0 0 86

NT 39 0 39 10 1 11 0 0 0 50

External Territories

7 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 884 63 947 369 109 478 0 0 0 1425

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 144

All non-ongoing employees—previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

NSW 3 2 5 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

Qld 3 3 6 2 1 3 0 0 0 9

SA 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Tas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Vic 78 18 96 42 11 53 0 0 0 149

WA 6 0 6 1 0 1 0 0 0 7

ACT 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

External Territories

3 1 4 3 0 3 0 0 0 7

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 97 25 122 48 13 61 0 0 0 183

Australian Public Service Act Ongoing employees—current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 4 0 4 3 0 3 0 0 0 7

SES 1 12 0 12 3 0 3 0 0 0 15

EL 2 134 7 141 68 13 81 0 0 0 222

EL 1 277 22 299 98 47 145 0 0 0 444

APS 6 269 20 289 108 34 142 0 0 0 431

APS 5 95 6 101 31 5 36 0 0 0 137

APS 4 14 0 14 31 5 36 0 0 0 50

APS 3 47 2 49 17 5 22 0 0 0 71

APS 2 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 3

APS 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 0 0 0 5

Other 10 0 10 4 0 4 0 0 0 14

Total 865 58 923 366 110 476 0 0 0 1399

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 145

Australian Public Service Act Non-ongoing employees—current report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

EL 2 10 6 16 8 0 8 0 0 0 24

EL 1 39 11 50 21 0 21 0 0 0 71

APS 6 22 12 34 13 3 16 0 0 0 50

APS 5 6 1 7 9 0 9 0 0 0 16

APS 4 5 0 5 5 1 6 0 0 0 11

APS 3 11 0 11 5 3 8 0 0 0 19

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 94 30 124 62 7 69 0 0 0 193

Australian Public Service Act Ongoing employees—previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 3 0 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 6

SES 1 13 0 13 2 0 2 0 0 0 15

EL 2 138 6 144 59 14 73 0 0 0 217

EL 1 293 27 320 94 39 133 0 0 0 453

APS 6 263 24 287 99 40 139 0 0 0 426

APS 5 103 4 107 44 4 48 0 0 0 155

APS 4 19 0 19 40 2 42 0 0 0 61

APS 3 43 2 45 20 9 29 0 0 0 74

APS 2 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 3

APS 1 5 0 5 2 1 3 0 0 0 8

Other 3 0 3 4 0 4 0 0 0 7

TOTAL 884 63 947 369 109 478 0 0 0 1425

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 146

Australian Public Service Act Non-ongoing employees—previous report period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total Full-

time

Part- time

Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SES 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

EL 2 13 7 20 6 1 7 0 0 0 27

EL 1 37 6 43 20 3 23 0 0 0 66

APS 6 31 8 39 7 4 11 0 0 0 50

APS 5 2 1 3 2 2 4 0 0 0 7

APS 4 4 0 4 4 1 5 0 0 0 9

APS 3 8 2 10 8 2 10 0 0 0 20

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 96 25 121 48 13 61 0 0 0 182

Australian Public Service Act Employees, Full-time and Part-time Status—current report period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total

Ongoing

Full-time Part-time Total Non- ongoing Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 7 0 7 1 0 1 8

SES 1 15 0 15 1 0 1 16

EL 2 202 20 222 18 6 24 246

EL 1 375 69 444 60 11 71 515

APS 6 377 54 431 35 15 50 481

APS 5 126 11 137 15 1 16 153

APS 4 45 5 50 10 1 11 61

APS 3 64 7 71 16 3 19 90

APS 2 3 0 3 0 0 0 3

APS 1 3 2 5 0 0 0 5

Other 14 0 14 0 0 0 14

Total 1231 168 1399 156 37 193 1592

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 147

Australian Public Service Act Employees, Full-time and Part-time Status—previous report period (2018-19)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total

Ongoing

Full-time Part-time Total Non- ongoing Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 6 0 6 1 0 1 7

SES 1 15 0 15 1 0 1 16

EL 2 197 20 217 19 8 27 244

EL 1 387 66 453 57 9 66 519

APS 6 362 64 426 38 12 50 476

APS 5 147 8 155 4 3 7 162

APS 4 59 2 61 8 1 9 70

APS 3 63 11 74 16 4 20 94

APS 2 3 0 3 0 0 0 3

APS 1 7 1 8 0 1 1 9

Other 7 0 7 0 0 0 7

Total 1253 172 1425 144 38 182 1607

Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location—current report period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 107 4 111

Qld 148 12 160

SA 58 2 60

Tas 62 6 68

Vic 824 156 980

WA 80 5 85

ACT 78 5 83

NT 37 2 39

External Territories 5 1 6

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 1399 193 1592

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 148

Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location—previous report period (2018-19)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 120 6 126

Qld 138 8 146

SA 69 2 71

Tas 57 0 57

Vic 805 149 954

WA 93 7 100

ACT 86 3 89

NT 50 0 50

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 7 7 14

Total 1425 182 1607

Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment—current report period (2019-20)

Total

Ongoing 20

Non-ongoing 3

Total 23

Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment—previous report period (2018-19)

Total

Ongoing 21

Non-ongoing 2

Total 23

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 149

All employees by office location and occupational stream—current report period (2019-20)

HOA SES ASO PO TO GSO ITO RS TR Total

NSW 0 0 7 68 30 0 6 0 0 111

Qld 1 1 17 83 53 0 6 0 0 161

SA 0 0 6 29 23 0 2 0 0 60

Tas 0 1 6 27 30 0 3 1 0 68

Vic 0 22 246 358 83 0 196 61 14 980

WA 0 1 8 41 33 0 2 0 0 85

ACT 0 4 20 45 2 0 12 0 0 83

NT 0 0 2 16 20 0 1 0 0 39

External territories 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 6

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 1 29 312 668 279 0 228 62 14 1593

HOA: Head of Agency; SES: Senior Executive Service; ASO: Administrative Service Officer; PO: Professional Officer; TO: Technical Officer; GSO: General Service

Officer; ITO: Information Technology Officer; RS: Research Scientist; TR: Trainee.

All employees age profile—current report period (2019-20)

16-20 21-25 26-30 31-35 36-40 41-45 46-50 51-55 56-60 61-65 66-70 >71

Female 0 15 32 80 99 97 74 65 59 16 8 0

Male 0 19 44 118 137 153 176 166 146 68 16 5

Indeterminate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 0 34 76 198 236 250 250 231 205 84 24 5

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 150

Financial resource management

Financial performance The Bureau reported an operating surplus of $32.1 million, excluding depreciation for 2019-20, against a

budgeted operating surplus of $6.6 million. This surplus is largely due to external revenue used for capital assets and additional funding received from Government. After including depreciation, the operating result

was a deficit of $84.9 million in 2019-20, compared to a deficit of $82.1 million in 2018-19. The Bureau’s operating results show deficits as its depreciation and amortisation expenditure is shown in its operating

statements, while its departmental capital budget for asset replacement is treated as an equity contribution

and is shown in its balance sheet.

After the impact of the asset revaluation, the Bureau recorded a total comprehensive loss of $26.0 million.

Revenue

Total revenue for the Bureau for 2019-20 was $338.2 million. This is an increase of $13.3 million compared

to the 2018-19 year.

The Bureau’s Australian Government appropriation was $263.3 million in 2019-20, which was $31.6 million

higher than the 2018-19 year.

Changes in appropriation funding are largely associated with:

• funding associated with the 2017-18 Budget measure—Improved Security and Resilience;

• funding associated with the 2018-19 Budget measure—Improved Security and Resilience—

Tranche 2;

• funding associated with the 2019-20 Coronavirus Economic Response Package and;

• increased funding for economic parameter adjustments offset by efficiency dividends.

The Australian Government appropriation contributed 78 per cent of the Bureau’s total operating revenue.

The remaining funds were derived from ‘own-source income’ and ‘other income’ totalling $74.9 million—a decrease of $18.3 million compared to the 2018-19 year.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 151

Expenditure

The Bureau’s operating expenditure for 2019-20 was $423.1 million—an increase of $16.2 million

(4 per cent) compared with the 2018-19 year. This increase was due to higher depreciation and amortisation expenditure offset by lower employee and supplier expenses compared to the 2018-19 year.

Employee costs represented 42 per cent of the Bureau’s total costs.

Supplier costs were $122.8 million (29 per cent of total expenses), and included:

• observations consumables;

• lease costs associated with premises and other goods and services;

• costs associated with service delivery; and

• communication, software and other information technology (IT) costs.

Depreciation and amortisation was $117.0 million (28 per cent of total expenses).

Significant non-compliance

During 2019-20 there were no significant non-compliant breaches of the finance law under section 19(1)(e)

of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 152

Total resources

Actual Available

appropriation— current year (a)

Payments made (b)

Balance remaining (a)- (b)

$'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental

Annual appropriations—ordinary annual services 469 188 387 626 81 562

Annual appropriations—other services—non- operating 205 411 131 108 74 303

Total departmental annual appropriations 674 599 518 734 155 865

Departmental special appropriations - - -

Total special appropriations - - -

Special accounts - - -

Total special accounts - - -

less departmental appropriations drawn from annual/special appropriations and credited to special accounts

- - -

Total departmental resourcing (A) 674 599 518 734 155 865

Administered

Annual appropriations—ordinary annual services - - -

Annual appropriations—other services—non- operating

- - -

Annual appropriations—other services—specific payments to States, ACT, NT and local government

- - -

Annual appropriations—other services—new administered expenses,

- - -

Total administered annual appropriations - - -

Administered special appropriations - - -

Total administered special appropriations - - -

Special accounts - - -

Total special accounts receipts - - -

less administered appropriations drawn from annual/special appropriations and credited to special accounts

- - -

less payments to corporate entities from annual/special appropriations

- - -

Total administered resourcing (B) - - -

Total resourcing and payments for entity X (A + B)

674 599

518 734

155 865

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 153

Asset management The Bureau managed an asset base valued at $1033.636 million. Of this, $848.556 million related to

fixed and intangible assets.

Asset Amount ($m)

Land and buildings 90.686

Land and buildings ROU 117.843

Plant and equipment 460.568

Plant and equipment ROU 0.734

Intangible assets 178.725

Total 848.556

The new leases standard AASB 16 requires the companies to bring the majority of operating leases

on-balance sheet. Property and equipment leases previously recognised off-balance sheet were accounted for as a right-of-use (ROU) assets and has resulted in increase of fixed assets.

The Bureau’s asset investment and replacement program was monitored throughout the year at the Program level, and via monthly Executive meetings, to ensure optimal delivery and use of available

resources.

A revaluation of Bureau assets undertaken by an external provider was completed and applied to the

Asset register in June 2020, resulting in an asset uplift of $58.905 million.

During 2019-20, the Bureau invested $203.690 million in asset acquisition and construction to

support its service delivery to Australia, including:

• implementing the Australian Integrated Forecast System (AIFS) upgrade, the new weather app,

the Optimised Forecast Process (OFP), a national situational awareness tool, user experience

design and platform implementation;

• upgrading observing systems such as automatic weather stations, balloon sites across multiple

locations, wind profiler upgrades, radar upgrades, uplifting infrastructure at data centres and

the Australis II supercomputer mid-life upgrade; and

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 154

• facility construction, refurbishment and consolidation of the Sydney and Hobart Offices, and

refurbishment of levels 5, 6 and 11 at the Melbourne Office.

Procurement Value for money is the core principle underpinning all procurement. The Bureau’s Accountable Authority Instructions provide internal control of procurement within the agency, and are aligned with

the PGPA Act, the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and broader Australian Government policy.

No contracts of $100 000 or more (inclusive of GST) were let during 2019-20 that did not provide for

the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

For details of standard clauses that provide the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) with access

to contractors’ information, refer to: https://www.finance.gov.au/procurement/clausebank

No contracts in excess of $10 000 (inclusive of GST) or standing offers were exempted by the accountable authority from being published on AusTender on the basis that they would disclose

exempt matters under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

Information on procurements expected to be undertaken in 2020-21 is in Bureau’s annual

procurement plan, available from the AusTender website (www.tenders.gov.au).

Procurement initiatives to support small business and Indigenous-owned businesses

The Bureau supports small business participation in the Australian Government procurement market.

Small-to-medium enterprises and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance website at:

https://www.finance.gov.au/government/procurement/statistics-australian-government-procurement- contracts-

The Bureau recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the

Treasury’s website (www.treasury.gov.au).

Bureau support for small business includes using the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low-risk procurements valued under $1 000 000.

The Bureau supports the goals of the Australian Government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy and achieved its Indigenous procurement target for 2019-20. More information is available on the

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s website (www.pmc.gov.au).

Consultants

The selection and engagement of consultants was conducted in accordance with the PGPA Act,

Commonwealth Procurement Rules and internal policy and procedures.

During 2019-20, 24 new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of

$2 569 332. In addition, five ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $762 507.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 4 - Organisational Management 155

Number and expenditure on consultants—current report period (2019-20)

Total

No. of new contracts entered into during the period 24

Total actual expenditure during the period on new contracts (inc. $GST) $2569 332

No. of ongoing contracts engaging consultants that were entered into during a previous period 5

Total actual expenditure during the period on ongoing contracts (inc. $GST) $762 507

The main categories of purpose for which consultants were engaged were legal services, audit

services, management advisory services and management support services.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies.

Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website (www.tenders.gov.au).

Advertising and market research

Under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the Bureau is required to disclose

payments of advertising and market research.

Advertising and market research over the reporting threshold of $14 000 (GST inclusive) were

undertaken to the value of $30 256 and $61 684 respectively, in 2019-20. Details are provided below.

The Bureau did not undertake any polling, direct mail or advertising campaigns during 2019-20.

Advertising and market research expenditure—current report period (2019-20)

Organisation Purpose Expenditure ($, GST inclusive)

Media advertising organisations

Universal McCann Pty Ltd Recruitment advertising $30 256

Market research organisations

Ernst & Young t/as EY Sweeney $61 684

Total $91 940

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 156

Section 5 - Financial Statements Contents Page

Certification 158

Primary financial statements 161

Statement of Comprehensive Income 161

Statement of Financial Position 162

Statement of Changes in Equity 164

Cash Flow Statement 166

Administered Schedules of Comprehensive Income 167

Administered Schedules of Assets and Liabilities 168

Administered Reconciliation Schedule 169

Administered Cash Flow Statement 170

Notes to the financial statements 171

Overview 171

Financial Performance 175

1.1 Expenses 175

1.2 Own-Source Revenue 175

Financial Position 177

2.1 Financial Assets 180

2.2 Non-Financial Assets 180

2.3 Payables 185

2.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities 185

2.5 Provisions for Restorations 186

Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government 187

3.1 Administered - Financial Assets 187

3.2 Administered - Financial Liabilities 187

Funding 188

4.1 Appropriations 188

4.2 Special Accounts 189

People and Relationships 190

5.1 Employee Provisions 190

5.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 191

5.3 Related Party Disclosures 191

Managing Uncertainties 192

6.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 192

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 157

6.2 Financial Instruments 193

6.3 Administered - Financial Instruments 194

Other Information 195

7.1 Budget Variances Commentary 195

7.2 Assets Held in Trust 197

7.3 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities 197

7.4 Fair Value Measurement 198

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 158

Certification

Independent Auditor's Report To the Minister for the Environment

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Bureau of Meteorology (‘the Entity’) for the year ended 30 June 2020:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2020 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer;

• Statement of Comprehensive Income;

• Statement of Financial Position;

• Statement of Changes in Equity;

• Cash Flow Statement;

• Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income;

• Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities;

• Administered Reconciliation Schedule;

• Administered Cash Flow Statement; and

• Notes to the financial statements, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other

explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) ( (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence

I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced

Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology is also responsible for such internal control as the Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Chief Executive Officer and Director of Meteorology is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Chief Executive

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 159

Officer and Director of Meteorology is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the

aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or

error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

• obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that

are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control;

• evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting

estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;

• conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of

accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern.

If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and

• evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a

manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Jodi George Executive Director Delegate of the Auditor-General Canberra 31 August 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 160

STATEMENT BY THE ACCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2020 comply with

subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Bureau of Meteorology will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

28 August 2020 28 August 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 161

Primary financial statements

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2020 Original

2020 2019 Budget 2020

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 1.1A 177,714 186,693 175,240

Suppliers 1.1B 122,823 123,110 131,880

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 117,029 93,696 97,813

Finance costs 1.1C 1,517 224 -

Impairment loss on financial instruments 1.1D 42 43 -

Write-down and impairment of other assets 1.1E 491 174 1

Foreign exchange losses 88 205 -

Loss from sale of assets 583 374 -

Contributions to WMO and IOC1 2,862 2,425 2,084

Total expenses 423,149 406,944 407,018

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 74,054 88,576 77,373

Other revenue 1.2B 271 392 -

Total own-source revenue 74,325 88,968 77,373

Gains

Reversal of impairment of other assets 1.2C - 4,143 -

Gains from sale of assets - - 91

Foreign exchange gains 607 86 -

Total gains 607 4,229 91

Total own-source income 74,932 93,197 77,464

Net cost of services (348,217) (313,747) (329,554)

Revenue from Government 1.2D 263,269 231,658 238,359

Deficit (84,948) (82,089) (91,195)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 2.2A 58,905 - -

Total other comprehensive income 58,905 - -

Total comprehensive loss (26,043) (82,089) (91,195)

1. Contributions to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Inter-Governmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC).

The budget variances commentary is contained in the Other Information section (note 7.1). The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 162

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2020 2020 2019 Original

Budget 2020

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 948 813 722

Trade and other receivables 2.1A 164,752 178,511 158,385

Accrued revenues 2,296 3,622 4,652

Total financial assets 167,996 182,946 163,759

Non-Financial Assets1

Land 2.2A 12,229 11,795 -

Buildings 2.2A 196,300 78,182 83,057

Plant and equipment 2.2A 461,302 349,076 461,071

Computer software 2.2A 178,722 130,064 104,404

Other intangibles 2.2A 3 6 -

Heritage and cultural 2.2A - 1,212 -

Inventories 2.2B 5,381 5,825 6,635

Prepayments 9,155 10,337 8,587

Total non-financial assets 863,092 586,497 663,754

Assets held for sale 2,548 4,073 5,737

Total assets 1,033,636 773,516 833,250

LIABILITIES

Payables2

Suppliers 2.3A 88,338 80,541 29,235

Other payables and liabilities 2.3B 6,532 10,724 54,141

Total payables 94,870 91,265 83,376

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 2.4A 123,755 - -

Total interest bearing liabilities 123,755 - -

Provisions

Employee provisions 5.1A 63,279 68,917 66,666

Provisions for restoration 2.5 25,141 24,555 24,105

Total provisions 88,420 93,472 90,771

Total liabilities 307,045 184,737 174,147

Net assets 726,591 588,779 659,103

EQUITY

Contributed equity 1,086,180 923,315 1,097,447

Reserves 334,049 275,144 275,144

Accumulated deficit (693,638) (609,680) (713,488)

Total equity 726,591 588,779 659,103

1. Right-of-use assets are included in the following line items: Land, Buildings, Plant and Equipment. 2. Comparative information reflects the reclassification of deferred revenue balance now accounted for as contract liabilities.

The budget variances commentary is contained in the Other Information section (note 7.1). The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 163

Accounting Policy Cash and cash equivalents

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalent includes cash on hand or on deposit.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 164

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020 2019 Original

Budget 2020

$'000 $'000 $'000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 923,315 790,361 934,353

Adjusted opening balance 923,315 790,361 934,353

Transactions with owners

Distributions to owners

Returns of capital

Return of equity appropriations (52) (38) -

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - appropriations 128,355 92,297 128,356

Departmental capital budget 34,562 40,695 34,738

Total transactions with owners 162,865 132,954 163,094

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,086,180 923,315 1,097,447

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (609,680) (525,396) (619,356)

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 4,257 - -

Adjusted opening balance (605,423) (525,396) (619,356

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (84,948) (82,089) (91,195)

Total comprehensive income (84,948) (82,089) (91,195)

Transactions with owners

Contributions to owners

Other (3,267) (2,195) (2,937)

Total transactions with owners (3,267) (2,195) (2,937)

Closing balance as at 30 June (693,638) (609,680) (713,488)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 275,144 275,144 275,144

Adjusted opening balance 275,144 275,144 275,144

Comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income 58,905 - -

Total comprehensive income 58,905 - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 334,049 275,144 275,144

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 165

2020 2019 Original

Budget 2020

$'000 $'000 $'000

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 588,779 540,109 590,141

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 4,257 - -

Adjusted opening balance 593,036 540,109 590,141

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (84,948) (82,089) (91,195)

Other comprehensive income 58,905 - -

Total comprehensive income (26,043) (82,089) (91,195)

Transactions with owners

Distributions to owners

Returns of capital

Return of equity appropriations (52) (38) -

Other (3,267) (2,195) (2,937)

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - appropriations 128,355 92,297 128,356

Departmental capital budget 34,562 40,695 34,738

Total transactions with owners 159,598 130,759 160,157

Closing balance as at 30 June 726,591 588,779 659,103

The budget variances commentary is contained in the Other Information section (note 7.1). The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy Equity Injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs), are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year. Other Distributions to Owners Distributions to owners are debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend. The return of funds to the Commonwealth relating to the proceeds of Bureau of Meteorology houses are debited to

contributed equity.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 166

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020 2019 Original Budget

2020

$'000 $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 352,414 350,934 314,609

Sales of goods and rendering of services 84,011 109,741 77,372

GST received 28,323 16,301 -

Total cash received 464,748 476,976 391,981

Cash used

Employees (186,071) (187,728) (174,490)

Suppliers (158,100) (155,275) (131,880)

Interest payments on lease liabilities (1,375) - -

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA (79,652) (104,611) (79,937)

GST paid (6,161) (6,076) -

Other (3,267) (2,195) (2,084)

Total cash used (434,626) (455,885) (388,391)

Net cash from operating activities 30,122 21,091 3,590

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 2.2A 3,280 2,263 2,845

Total cash received 3,280 2,263 2,845

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment and intangibles 2.2A

(185,126)

(105,550)

169,529

Total cash used (185,126) (105,550) 169,529

Net cash used by investing activities (181,846) (103,287) (166,684)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Departmental capital budget 34,562 40,695 -

Contributed equity 131,108 41,592 163,094

Total cash received 165,670 82,287 163,094

Cash used

Principal payments of lease liabilities (13,811) - -

Total cash used (13,811) - -

Net cash from financing activities 151,859 82,287 163,094

Net increase in cash held 135 91 -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period

813

722

722

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period

948

813

722

The budget variances commentary is contained in the Other Information section (note 7.1). The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 167

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020 2019

$'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Other expenses - (780)

Total expenses - (780)

Income

Revenue

Non-taxation revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers - 328

Total revenue - 328

Net contribution by services - (452)

Deficit - (452)

Total comprehensive loss - (452)

Budget Variance Commentary

The original budget for 2020 has not been disclosed in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income as no items were published in the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Further advertising will not be done on the Bureau of Meteorology's website and therefore it is expected that no

amounts will be disclosed in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income from 2019-20 financial year.

Accounting Policy

All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by the Bureau of Meteorology on

behalf of the Australian Government. As such, administered appropriations are not revenues of the individual entity that oversees distribution or expenditure of the funds as directed.

Revenue is generated from advertising on the Bureau of Meteorology’s website. Administered advertising revenue is recognised when advertisements are displayed. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period.

Impairment allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 168

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES as at 30 June 2020 2020 2019

Notes $'000 $'000

ASSETS

Financial Assets

Trade and other receivables 3.1A - 123

Total assets administered on behalf of Government - 123

LIABILITIES

Payables

Trade and other payables 3.2A 366 478

GST payable - 11

Total liabilities administered on behalf of government 366 489

Net liabilities (366) (366)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variance Commentary

The original budget for 2020 has not been disclosed in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income as

no items were published in the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 169

ADMINISTERED RECONCILIATION SCHEDULE for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July (366) 86

Net cost of services

Payments to entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities

- (452)

Transfers (to)/from the Australian Government

Appropriation transfers to Official Public Account

Transfers to Official Public Account - -

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June (366) (366)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy

Administered Cash Transfers to and from Official Public Account

Revenue collected by the Bureau of Meteorology for use by the Government rather than the Bureau of Meteorology is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the Bureau of Meteorology on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the

schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 170

ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020 2019

$'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering of services 112 296

GST received 11 6

Total cash received 123 302

Cash used

Suppliers (112) (302)

GST paid (11) -

Total cash paid (123) (302)

Net cash from operating activities - -

Cash to Official Public Account

Cash transfers to Official Public Account - -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period

-

-

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period

-

-

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 171

Notes to the Financial Statements

Overview Objectives of the Entity

The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of the Bureau of Meteorology is to provide a wide range of products and services relating to weather, climate and water to support informed decision-making by governments, emergency services, industry and the community.

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

New Accounting Standards

All new standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date are applicable to the current reporting period. AASB 15 and AASB 1058 did not have a material effect on the Bureau of Meteorology’s financial statements. AASB 16 did not have a material effect on the Statement of Comprehensive Income, however, this resulted in a material increase in both asset and liability values in the Statement of Financial Position.

Standard/ Interpretation Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions1, and adjustment to financial statements

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting

Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes. The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 172

AASB 16 Leases AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease,

Interpretation 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

The Bureau of Meteorology adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the Bureau of Meteorology shall first determine whether an enforceable

agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the Bureau of Meteorology applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the Bureau of Meteorology shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

In relation to AASB 15, the Bureau of Meteorology elected to apply the new standard to all new and uncompleted contracts from the date of initial application. The Bureau of Meteorology is required to aggregate the effect of all of the contract modifications that occur before the date of initial application.

In terms of AASB 1058, the Bureau of Meteorology is required to recognise volunteer services at fair value if those

services would have been purchased if not provided voluntarily, and the fair value of those services can be measured reliably. The Bureau of Meteorology’s revenue recognition practices under the previous accounting standards align with that of AASB 15 and AASB 1058. Regarding material revenue streams relating to Section 74 revenue, the expenses incurred for delivering the products and services is expected to provide the best measure of progress towards satisfaction of the performance obligation, which is consistent with existing revenue recognition practices.

There is no impact to the financial statement as a result of the adoption of AASB 15 and AASB 1058.

Application of AASB 16 Leases

The Bureau of Meteorology adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative

effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The Bureau of Meteorology elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 173

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard. The Bureau of Meteorology applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117: Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics; Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right-of-use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-of-use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date; Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application; and

Applied the exemption not to recognise right-of-use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, the Bureau of Meteorology previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the Bureau of Meteorology recognises right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the Bureau of Meteorology has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the Bureau of Meteorology recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of office space, heavy equipment and automobiles, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the Bureau of Meteorology’s incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. The Bureau of Meteorology’s incremental borrowing rate is the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied was 1.06%.

The right-of-use assets were measured as follows: a) Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments. b) All other leases: the carrying value that would have resulted from AASB 16 being applied from the commencement

date of the leases, subject to the practical expedients noted above.

Impact on transition

On transition to AASB 16, the Bureau of Meteorology recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

1 July 2019

$'000

Departmental

Right-of-use assets 119,751

Lease liabilities 119,750

Retained earnings 1

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 174

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the Bureau of Meteorology's 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

1 July 2019

$'000

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019 82,708

Less: short-term leases not recognised under AASB 16 (200)

Less: low value leases not recognised under AASB 16 (72)

Plus: effect of extension options reasonably certain to be exercised 56,200

Plus/(Less): CPI and lease variations (2,006)

Undiscounted lease payments 136,630

Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application (16,880) Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019 119,750

Taxation

The Bureau of Meteorology is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Reporting of Administered activities

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the administered schedules and related notes.

Except where otherwise stated, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Events After the Reporting Period

Departmental

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the Bureau of Meteorology. Furthermore, based on current assessment of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are no significant subsequent events to report, however, this will be continuously monitored.

Administered

There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the Bureau of Meteorology.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 175

Financial Performance This section analyses the financial performance of the Bureau of Meteorology for the year ended 2020.

1.1 Expenses

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.1A: Employee Benefits

Wages and salaries 125,615 125,397

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 15,970 15,057

Defined benefit plans 13,209 14,283

Leave and other entitlements 12,926 23,713

Separation and redundancies 9,136 7,749

Other 858 494

Total employee benefits 177,714 186,693

Accounting Policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and Relationships section

(note 5.1).

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.1B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 17,407 16,762

Contractors 32,723 20,695

Communication and consumables running the observing network 20,342 23,278

Communication and IT related consumables - other 24,439 22,716

Property operating expenses 7,274 6,154

Other 7,157 5,810

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 109,342 95,415

Goods supplied 8,769 7,918

Services rendered 100,573 87,497

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 109,342 95,415

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals1 12,790 27,132

Workers compensation expenses 383 563

Short-term leases 202 -

Low value leases 106 -

Total other suppliers 13,481 27,695

Total suppliers 122,823 123,110

1. The Bureau of Meteorology has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1C, 2.2A and 2.4A.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 176

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The Bureau of Meteorology has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The Bureau of Meteorology recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over

the lease term.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.1C: Finance Costs

Unwinding of discount 142 224

Interest on lease liabilities 1,375 -

Total finance costs 1,517 224

1.1D: Impairment Loss on Financial Instruments

Impairment on trade and other receivables 9 1

Increase/(Decrease) in expected credit loss 33 42

Total impairment on financial instruments 42 43

1.1E: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets

Impairment of inventories 491 174

Total write-down and impairment of other assets 491 174

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 177

1.2 Own-Source Revenue

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.2A: Revenue from Contracts with Customers

Sale of goods 1,271 1,251

Rendering of services 72,783 87,325

Total revenue from contracts with customers 74,054 88,576

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Major product / service line:

Aviation weather services 30,878

Defence weather services 7,531

Consultative services 23,430

Research 8,032

Other revenue 4,183

74,054

Accounting Policy

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

A contract is in scope of AASB 15 when it has commercial substance whereby it is probable that the Bureau will collect the consideration to which it will be entitled based on the existing relationship with and knowledge of customer’s ability

and intention to pay the consideration. Contracts with the Bureau are usually in the form of formal memorandum of understanding, agreements, work order or purchase order.

The Bureau is required to determine at each contract’s inception whether it satisfies the performance obligation over time or satisfies the performance obligation at a point in time. The satisfaction of a performance obligation over time is dependent on the following factors:

● The customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits provided by the Bureau’s performance as the

entity performs the service;

● The Bureau’s performance creates or enhances an asset that the customer controls as the asset is created or

enhanced; or

● The work performed by the Bureau does not create an asset with an alternate use to the Bureau and the Bureau has

an enforceable right to payment for work completed to date.

The following is a description of principal activities from which the Bureau of Meteorology generates its revenue:

1. Aviation weather services - Relates to the provision of meteorological services in support of Civil Aviation, the costs for which is recovered through a levy charged pursuant to the Meteorology Act 1955. Revenue generated from levy charges falls under the scope of AASB 1058. The Bureau recognises the revenue when the service has been delivered.

2. Defence weather services - Recognition is contingent on the terms of the individual contract. Due to the nature of the services, the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits as the services are delivered and therefore revenue is recognised over time in line with the term of the contract as per AASB 15.

3. Consultative services - Recognition is contingent on the terms of the individual contract. Due to the nature of the

services, the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits as the services are delivered and therefore

revenue is recognised over time in line with the term of the contract as per AASB 15.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 178

Accounting Policy (Continued)

4. Research - Research income relates to the performance of research related activities. These activities are usually performed in accordance with an agreement outlining desired outputs and outcomes and therefore recognition is

contingent on the conditions of the applicable contract. In accordance with AASB 15, revenue is either recognised over time and in line with the performance obligations as set out in the contract, or recognised upon satisfactory completion of the specifically identifiable performance obligations.

5. Calendar sales - Revenue recognised on sale of calendars are recognised at a point in time basis when the sale occurs in accordance with AASB 15.

6. Data extraction consumables and special data processing - Relates to information to customers provided upon request. Revenue is recognised at a point in time basis when the sale occurs in accordance with AASB 15.

7. Offshore mining - This relates to the provision of tropical cyclone and offshore-specific wind and wave forecasts to

facilitate the smooth and safe operation of off-shore rigs. As access to these services is provided on a subscription basis and the benefits are transferred as the service is delivered, revenue is recognised over time in accordance with AASB 15.

8. Sale of houses - Relates to the Bureau’s sale of houses originally used to house staff in remote locations. Revenue is recognised at a point in time basis when the sale is completed in accordance with AASB 15.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the Entity expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any

impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made

when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.2B: Other Revenue

Resources received free of charge

Remuneration of auditors 110 110

Inventory received free of charge1 138 108

Insurance refunds 12 166

Other 11 8

Total other revenue 271 392

1. Bathythermographs gifted from the Department of Defence.

Accounting Policy

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on

their nature.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 179

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.2C: Reversals of Impairment of Other Assets

Impairment of property, plant and equipment - 317

Impairment of intangibles - 3,826

Impairment of inventories - -

Total reversals of impairment of other assets - 4,143

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

1.2D: Revenue from Government

Appropriations - Departmental 263,269 231,658

Total revenue from Government 263,269 231,658

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the Bureau of Meteorology gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised

only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

1.2E: Unsatisfied Obligations The Bureau of Meteorology expects to recognise as income any liability for unsatisfied obligations associated with revenue from contracts with customers according to the terms or milestones as set out in the contracts. Majority of the

Bureau of Meteorology’s revenue will be recognised in line with the delivery of products or outputs with the customers.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 180

Financial Position This section analyses the Bureau of Meteorology’s assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships

section.

2.1 Financial Assets

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

2.1A: Trade and Other Receivables

Goods and services receivables

Goods and services - 10,609

Contract assets 9,964 -

Total goods and services receivables 9,964 10,609

The contract assets are associated with any transfers of goods or services relating to Section 74 revenue to a customer before the customer pays consideration or before payment is due when a contract is performed.

Refer Note 2.3A for information relating to contract liabilities.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Appropriation receivables

Appropriation receivable 77,928 87,420

Equity injection 74,252 77,056

Total appropriation receivables 152,180 164,476

Other receivables

Statutory receivables 2,687 3,472

Total other receivables 2,687 3,472

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 164,831 178,557

Less impairment loss allowance (79) (46)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 164,752 178,511

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2019: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates,

are classified as subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 181

2.2 Non-Financial Assets

2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles for 2020 Land Buildings Plant and

equipment

Computer software 1

Other

intangibles Heritage and cultural

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value 11,795 92,295 504,353 283,331 50 1,212 893,036

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation - (14,113) (155,277) (151,391) (44) - (320,825)

Accumulated impairment - - - (1,876) - - (1,876)

Total as at 1 July 2019 11,795 78,182 349,076 130,064 6 1,212 570,335

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16 1,880 117,329 542 - - - 119,751

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2019 13,675 195,511 349,618 130,064 6 1,212 690,086

Additions

Purchased 175 122,180 65,072 - - 187,427

Internally developed - - - 16,263 - - 16,263

Right-of-use assets 57 14,593 596 - - - 15,246

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income2 (50) 7,731 51,224 - - - 58,905

Depreciation and amortisation (497) (20,333) (67,577) (28,619) (3) - (117,029)

Transfers of assets between classes3 (956) (1,377) 5,270 (4,058) - (1,212) (2,333)

Disposals

Other - - (9) - - - (9)

Total as at 30 June 2020 12,229 196,300 461,302 178,722 3 - 848,556

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by

Gross book value 12,726 216,181 548,896 360,608 50 - 1,138,461

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (497) (19,881) (87,594) (180,010) (47) - (288,029)

Accumulated impairment - - - (1,876) - - (1,876)

Total as at 30 June 2020 12,229 196,300 461,302 178,722 3 - 848,556

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 1,440 116,404 734 - - - 118,578

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 182

Asset balances in the above table includes assets under construction. 1. The carrying amount of computer software included $12.689 million of purchased software and $166.033 million of internally developed software (2019: $16.531 million and $113.533 million, respectively). 2. A revaluation was undertaken for the three asset classes during the 2019-20 financial year. Refer to accounting policy note for further details. 3. The balance in the transfers of assets between classes is due to transfer of land and buildings classes to assets held for sale class.

Contractual commitments for the acquisitions of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets The Bureau of Meteorology has commitments for the purchases of the following property, plant and equipment: - High Performance Computing; - Radar Sustain and Modernisation; - Public Services Transformation; and - Improved security and resilience for ICT systems

Accounting Policy

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the Bureau of Meteorology where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the Bureau of Meteorology's leasehold improvements and relevant assets with a corresponding liability recognised as a provision for ‘make good’ (Note 2.5).

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the Bureau of Meteorology has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of

Government financial statements.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, land, buildings, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 183

independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets. Currently revaluations are done on a class basis every three years.

The Bureau of Meteorology undertook a revaluation of three of its asset classes (land, buildings, and property, plant and equipment) during the 2019-20 financial year. The entity engaged the services of a qualified valuer (James Munroe from AON Risk Services Australia Limited) for the purpose of the revaluation in accordance with AASB 116. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the

surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date was eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Bureau of Meteorology using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2020 2019

Buildings on freehold land 5 to 52 Years 5 to 52 Years

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Property, plant and equipment 2 to 50 Years 2 to 50 Years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of either the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All asset classes were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows and the asset would be replaced if the Bureau of Meteorology were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

The Bureau of Meteorology's intangibles comprise software licences, purchased software, and internally developed software. The software is carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Bureau of Meteorology's software is predominately 3 to 5 years other than the Services System software which has a useful life of 20 years (2019: 3-5 years and 20 years, respectively).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 184

Heritage and Cultural Assets

During the 2020 financial year, the Bureau of Meteorology undertook a valuation of its library collection, consisting of both heritage class of assets and Property, Plant and Equipment. On initial recognition in 2018, the heritage assets were non-depreciating, however, this has been updated for a useful life of 30 years retrospectively from the recognition date to reflect the library's default useful life. These assets are included within Property, Plant and Equipment and depreciated on a straight-line basis over its useful life.

Assets not recognised

Historical meteorological data has not been recognised as an asset due to difficulties in the application of control criteria.

For historical meteorological data to be recognised as an asset the following criteria need to be met: · the weather data must generate future economic benefits; · the cost of collecting and maintaining the data can be reliably measured; · the data can be separately identifiable as an asset; and · the Bureau of Meteorology maintains control of the data.

The Bureau of Meteorology provides meteorological data to the public at no cost. From this point the Bureau of Meteorology has no control over and cannot regulate the information. Based on the above criterion, control of the asset

is not met. For this reason the Bureau of Meteorology does not recognise historical meteorological data as an asset.

Accounting Judgements and Estimates

The fair value of land and buildings and property, plant and equipment has been taken to be the market value of similar

assets as determined by an independent valuer.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

2.2B: Inventories

Inventories held for distribution 7,137 7,119

less Provisions for obsolescence (1,756) (1,294)

Total inventories 5,381 5,825

During 2020 $4.598 million of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense (2019: $4.598 million).

Accounting Policy

Inventories held for distribution are valued at cost; costs have been assigned to inventory quantities on hand at balance date using the average cost basis, adjusted for any loss of service potential.

The Bureau of Meteorology’s inventory holding consists of Publications held for sale and items utilised in the installation of sites, or the repair/maintenance of its equipment.

The inventory is held to ensure that repairs/maintenance can be made at short notice to keep the operational equipment in service. The range of inventory held consists of items which can be utilised across a significant part of the operational network and as such is not limited to a specific piece of equipment. When items of inventory are sold or utilised to make repairs/maintenance to equipment, the carrying amount of the items are recognised as an expense.

Items held for the purposes of major spare parts or as stand-by equipment are classified in the Bureau of Meteorology’s accounts and records as Property, Plant and Equipment in accordance with AASB 116, consistent with

the Bureau of Meteorology Asset Management Policy.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 185

2.3 Payables

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

2.3A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 43,031 26,571

Operating lease rentals - 42

Contract liabilities1 45,307 53,928

Total suppliers 88,338 80,541

Settlement was usually made within 30 days. All supplier payables are expected to be settled within 12 months.

The contract liabilities are associated with Bureau’s obligation to transfer goods or services to a customer for which the entity has received consideration from the customer relating to Section 74 revenue.

Refer Note 2.1A for information relating to contract assets.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

2.3B: Other Payables

Wages and salaries 2,586 1,340

Superannuation 446 233

Separation and redundancies 3,500 4,800

Lease incentive2 - 663

Accounting for leases2 - 3,688

Total other payables 6,532 10,724

1 Comparative information represents the deferred revenue balance in 2018-19.

2 The Bureau of Meteorology has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Refer Note 5.1 for accounting policy information relating to separation and redundancies.

Accounting Policy

Financial Liabilities

The Bureau of Meteorology classifies its financial liabilities which includes supplier and other payables as 'other financial liabilities'. Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Supplier and other

payables are derecognised upon payment.

2.4 Interest Bearing Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

2.4A: Leases

Lease liabilities1

Land 1,459 -

Buildings 121,565 -

Plant and equipment 731 -

Total leases 123,755 -

1. The Bureau of Meteorology has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2020 was $13.811 million.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 186

Accounting Policy

Refer Overview section for accounting policy on leases.

2.5 Provisions for Restorations

Provisions for restorations

$'000

As at 1 July 2019 24,555

Additional provisions made 444

Amounts used -

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 142

Total as at 30 June 2020 25,141

The Bureau of Meteorology has four hundred and thirty seven agreements (2019: four hundred and thirty seven) for the leasing and licensing of premises and land which have provisions requiring the Bureau of Meteorology to restore the premises and land to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The Bureau of Meteorology has made a provision to reflect the present value of these obligations.

Accounting Judgements and Estimates

Make Good

A provision for restoration obligation (make good) is recognised if, as a result of a past event, the Bureau of Meteorology has a present obligation (legal or constructive) that can be estimated reliably and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Make good provisions are measured at the best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the present obligation at reporting date, including the risks and uncertainties specific to the liabilities.

Make good provisions are discounted to present value when the time value of money is material.

Provisions are reviewed annually and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 187

Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred. The Bureau of Meteorology does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the

accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

3.1 Administered - Financial Assets

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 3.1A: Trade and Other Receivables

Goods and services receivables - 123

Total goods and services receivables - 123

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2019: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Where receivables are not subject to concessional treatment, they are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Gains and losses due to impairment, derecognition and amortisation are recognised through profit and

loss.

3.2 Administered - Financial Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 3.2A: Trade and Other Payables

Advertising payable 26 26

Sundry payables 340 452

Total trade and other payables 366 478

Accounting Policy

The Bureau of Meteorology classifies its financial liabilities which includes supplier and other payables as 'other

financial liabilities'. Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 188

Funding This section identifies the Bureau of Meteorology’s funding structure.

4.1 Appropriations

4.1A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Annual Appropriations for 2020

Annual

Appropriations Adjustments to Appropriations 1

Total

Appropriations Appropriation applied in 2020 (current and

prior years)

Variance2

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental

Ordinary Annual services

263,269 79,652 342,921 (353,064) (10,143)

Capital Budget3 34,562 - 34,562 (34,562) -

Other services - - - - -

Equity injections 128,355 - 128,355 (131,108) (2,753)

Total departmental 426,186 79,652 505,838 (518,734) (12,896)

1. The adjustments to appropriation is for the PGPA Act Section 74 Receipts.

2. The variance disclosed is made up of the movement in cash, appropriation receivable, GST receivable and return of equity appropriations.

3. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

Annual Appropriations for 2019

Annual

Appropriations 1

Adjustments to Appropriations2

Total

Appropriations Appropriation applied in 2019 (current and

prior years)

Variance3

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental

Ordinary Annual services

231,658 104,611 336,269 (349,341) (13,072)

Capital Budget4 40,695 - 40,695 (40,695) -

Other services

Equity injections 135,334 - 135,334 (41,592) 93,742

Total departmental 407,687 104,611 512,298 (431,628) 80,670

1. Under Section 51 of the PGPA Act, the Finance Minister has permanently withheld the Bureau of Meteorology's equity appropriation by $11,000,000 and $32,037,000 for the reallocation between years.

2. The adjustments to appropriation is for the PGPA Act Section 74 Receipts.

3. The variance is made up of the movement in cash, appropriation receivable, GST receivable, section 51 withholding and return of equity appropriations.

4. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 189

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

4.1B: Unspent Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Departmental

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018-19 - 87,572

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2019-20 68,255 -

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2016-171 - 38

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2017-182 52 19,420

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2018-19 48,433 100,673

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2019-20 25,819 -

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2018-19 - 661

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2019-20 120 -

Appropriation Act (No.5) 2019-20 10,500 -

Total departmental 153,179 208,364

1. Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2016-17 was repealed on 1 July 2019.

2. Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2017-18 will be repealed on 1 July 2020.

4.2 Special Accounts

Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys - Bureau of Meteorology Special Account 1

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Balance brought forward from previous period 725 576

Increases 1,923 1,092

Available for payments 2,648 1,668

Decreases (1,700) (943)

Total Departmental 948 725

Total balance carried to the next period 948 725

Balance represented by:

Cash held in entity bank accounts - -

Cash held in the Official Public Account 948 725

Total balance carried to the next period 948 725

1. Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, section 78.

Establishing Instrument: Financial Management and Accountability Determination 2008/06.

Purpose: To enable the Bureau of Meteorology to hold and expend amounts on behalf of persons or entities other than the Commonwealth.

Total balance to be carried to the next period is the value of cash held in special account of $947,826 (2019: $724,832).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 190

People and Relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

5.1 Employee Provisions

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

5.1A: Employee Provisions

Leave 63,181 68,741

Other 98 176

Total employee provisions 63,279 68,917

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for 'short-term employee benefits' (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability. Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any), out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the Bureau of Meteorology is estimated to be equal or less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time leave is taken, including the Bureau of Meteorology's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. The liabilities for annual leave and long service leave have been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2020. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

The actuarial assessment provides estimates on two valuation bases. There was a change in the accounting estimate for the Bureau's leave liabilities to the basis which is reflective of the probabilistic element of staff actual leave balances at the Bureau. The change in accounting estimate reflects a more realistic approach and comparative to the actual balance.

Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The Bureau of Meteorology recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations. Refer Note 2.3B for further details.

Superannuation

Staff of the Bureau of Meteorology are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) and other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance's administered schedules and notes.

The Bureau of Meteorology makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The Bureau of Meteorology accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2020 represents outstanding contributions.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 191

5.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the Bureau of Meteorology, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise)

of the Bureau of Meteorology. The Bureau of Meteorology has determined the key management personnel to be the Director of Meteorology/Chief Executive Officer and Group Executives. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Short-term employee benefits 2,727 2,767

Post-employment benefits 404 408

Other long-term employee benefits 93 31

Termination benefits 68 248

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 3,292 3,454

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are 10 individuals (2019: 8 individuals).

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Bureau of Meteorology.

5.3 Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships:

The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the Bureau of Meteorology are Key Management Personnel including close family members of key management personnel, entities controlled by key management personnel, the Portfolio Minister and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Significant transactions with related parties can include:

● the payments of grants or loans;

● purchases of goods and services;

● asset purchases, sales, transfers or leases;

● debts forgiven; and

● guarantees.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by the Bureau of Meteorology, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 192

Managing Uncertainties This section analyses how the Bureau of Meteorology manages financial risks within its operating environment.

6.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Contingent assets

Balance from previous period 358 424

New contingent assets recognised 49 358

Re-measurement - -

Assets realised (382) (424)

Total contingent assets 25 358

Quantifiable Contingencies

The Bureau of Meteorology has a number of claims with Comcover in respect of property and motor vehicle damage.

Claims to the value of $49,000 (2019: $358,000) have been lodged with Comcover for assessment. Property claims relate to radar failure caused by cyclone, and motor vehicle claims consisted of damages caused by either collision or hail.

The estimate is based on information provided by Bureau staff to the Comcover assessor.

The Bureau of Meteorology had no quantifiable contingent liabilities in 2019-20 (2019: Nil).

Unquantifiable Contingencies

The Bureau of Meteorology has an unquantifiable contingency that may give rise to a liability in the future in relation to past accommodation arrangements. This is currently under investigation and the quantum is indeterminable at this point in time.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are

disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

The Bureau of Meteorology does not have any administered contingent liabilities or assets to report (2019: Nil).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 193

6.2 Financial Instruments

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

6.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial Assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents 995 813

Trade receivables 9,885 10,563

Total financial assets at amortised cost 10,880 11,376

Total financial assets 10,880 11,376

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Supplier payables 6,241 8,619

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 6,241 8,619

Total financial liabilities 6,241 8,619

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the Bureau of Meteorology classifies its financial assets in the following categories: a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and c) financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at

amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to

lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures

the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount

of the financial asset.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 194

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

6.2B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

Impairment (9) (1)

Net losses on financial assets at amortised cost (9) (1)

Net losses on financial assets (9) (1)

6.2C: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Liabilities

There are no gains or losses from financial liabilities not at fair value through the profit or loss in the year ending 2020 (2019: Nil).

6.3 Administered - Financial Instruments

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Note 6.3A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial assets at amortised cost

Goods and services receivable - 123

Total financial assets at amortised cost - 123

Total financial assets - 123

The Bureau of Meteorology does not have any Administered Financial Liabilities for 2020 (2019: Nil).

Note 6.3B: Net Gains and Losses on Financial Assets

There are no gains or losses from financial assets not at fair value through the profit or loss in the year ending 2020 (2019: Nil).

Note 6.3C: Net Gains and Losses on Financial Liabilities

There are no gains or losses from financial liabilities not at fair value through the profit or loss in the year ending 2020 (2019: Nil).

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 195

Other Information 7.1 Budget Variances Commentary

The variance explanations below relate to the movements between budgeted information for the Bureau of Meteorology published in the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and actual amounts presented in the Bureau

of Meteorology's financial statements.

As a guide, variances are considered to be 'major' based on the following criteria:

• the variance between budget and actual is greater than 10%; and;

• the variance between budget and actual is greater than 2% of the relevant category (Income, Expense and

Equity totals); or;

• an item below this threshold but is considered important for the reader's understanding or is relevant to an

assessment of the discharge of accountability and to an analysis of performance of the Bureau of Meteorology.

An explanation for a major variance may not be provided where the item is considered immaterial in the overall context of the financial statements.

Statement of Comprehensive Income for Bureau of Meteorology

Suppliers

Factors contributing to the variance in Supplier expense includes the introduction of the new AASB 16 standard which

realigned some lease expenditure to the balance sheet, contractors related to specialist project work and expenditure related to projects from external revenue generating activities.

Depreciation and amortisation expense

The variance relates to the impact of the new AASB 16 standard which introduced depreciation expense for balance sheet leases and the impact of the Bureau asset revaluation which resulted in an increase in the value of the Bureau asset base by $58mil with subsequent impact on depreciation expenditure for the year. The impact of these items was unknown at the time of the Budget build in March 2019, the impact of the increase in depreciation associated with the AASB 16 standard was included in the PAES Budget update completed later in the 2019-20 financial year.

Finance cost unwinding of discount

Item now includes impact of interest on lease liabilities associated with AASB 16 standard.

Contributions to WMO and IOC

Bureau contributions to the WMO have over the past few years been impacted by a higher contribution rate applied to the Australian Government subscription and the impact of the movement in Swiss Franc exchange rate. Additional funding was provided by Government in the PAES Budget update.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

Reduced revenue from the Aviation sector resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic occurring from March, offset by an increase in the number and value of non-Aviation externally generated project activities.

Revenue from Government

Funding from Government during the year including during the PAES Budget update for a New Policy Proposal (NPP) related to the Disaster Preparedness Initiative and as part of the Government response to the COVID-19 pandemic occurring from March in support of Bureau activities relating to the Aviation sector.

Statement of Financial Position for Bureau of Meteorology

Trade and other receivables

Carry over of unspent Appropriated funding related to Bill 5 Aviation sector support to be spent in the 2020-21 financial year and usage of cash for purchase of assets in support of the Bureau asset program.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 196

Non-financial assets

Overall the non-financial asset variance is 31% higher than Budget. The variance reflects the AASB 16 standard with ROU asset values recognised under non-financial asset for the first time and the impact of the Bureau revaluation of its asset base completed late in the financial year. This contributed to the respective increase of $119mil in ROU assets and $59mil in revaluations. The impact of the AASB 16 standard was included in the Bureau Budget later in the financial year as part of the PAES Budget update.

Suppliers

Variances associated with the timing of payments to vendors.

Interest bearing liabilities

This reflects the recognition of Lease Liabilities as part of the introduction of the AASB 16 standard. Budget adjustments were made as part of the PAES Budget update completed later in the financial year.

Reserves

Variance relates to the asset revaluation completed late in the financial year.

Cash Flow Statement for Bureau of Meteorology

Appropriations

Additional funding from Government (Bill 5), increase in expenditure associated with external generated project activities, staff separations including redundancies and additional asset purchases.

Employees

Due to payments for staff entitlements and restructuring costs associated with staff separations from the Bureau during the 2019-20 financial year.

Suppliers

Large number of vendor payments early in the financial year and other supplier costs accrued during the 2018-19 year and additional expense associated with the increase in externally generated project activity.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

Receipts received associated with an increase in externally generated activities for current and future (yet to commence) Section 74 projects.

Purchase of property, plant and equipment and intangibles

Variance reflects increased asset spend funded through externally generated revenues and purchase of assets through cash reserves.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 197

7.2 Assets Held in Trust

To enable the Bureau of Meteorology to hold and expend amounts on behalf of persons or entities other than the

Commonwealth.

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys

Bureau of Meteorology Special Account

As at 1 July 725 576

Receipts 1,923 1,092

Payments (1,700) (943)

Total as at 30 June 948 725

7.3 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

7.3A: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 182,532 199,108

More than 12 months 851,104 574,408

Total assets 1,033,636 773,516

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 170,782 154,338

More than 12 months 136,263 30,399

Total liabilities 307,045 184,737

Note 7.3B: Administered - Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months - 123

More than 12 months - -

Total assets - 123

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 366 489

More than 12 months - -

Total liabilities 366 489

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 5 - Financial Statements 198

7.4 Fair Value Measurement

7.4A Fair value measurement

Fair value measurements at the

end of the reporting period

2020 2019

$'000 $'000

Non-financial assets

Land 10,790 11,795

Buildings 79,896 78,182

Plant and equipment 315,137 271,768

Accounting Policy

The Bureau of Meteorology procured valuation services from AON Services Pty Ltd (AON). The Bureau of Meteorology tests the procedures of the valuation model at least once every twelve months. AON provided written assurance to the

Bureau of Meteorology that the valuation model(s) developed comply with AASB 13.

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 199

Section 6 - Appendices Glossary A

AAD Australian Antarctic Division

AAGE Australian Association of

Graduate Employers

ABC Australian Broadcasting

Corporation

ACCESS Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator

ACCESS-Fire a fire prediction version of ACCESS

ACCESS-S a seasonal prediction version of ACCESS

ACT Australian Capital Territory

ADF Australian Defence Force

AEMO The Australian Energy Market

Operator

AEST Australian Eastern Standard

Time

AFAC National Council for Fire and

Emergency Services

AMBLS Automated meteorological balloon launching systems

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

APEC Asia-Pacific Economic

Cooperation

API Application Programming

Interface

APS Australian Public Service

APSC Australian Public Service

Commission

ASO Administrative Service Officer

AWRA Australian Water Resources Assessment

Australis the Bureau's supercomputer

AWS Automatic Weather Station

B

BARRA Bureau of Meteorology

atmospheric high-resolution regional reanalysis for Australia

BOM Bureau of Meteorology

BOMIdeas Bureau's online research community BMTC Bureau of Meteorology Training Centre

C

CARES Compensation and

Rehabilitation Employee Services

CEO Chief Executive Officer

cm Centimetre

CO2 Carbon Dioxide

CORE Online training to engage staff

and improve cultural awareness

COSPPac2 Climate and Oceans Support Program for the Pacific CPA Certified Practising Accountant

CRM Customer relationship

management

CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation

Scheme

Cth Commonwealth

D

DCB Departmental Capital Budget

DMSU Defence Meteorological Support Unit

E

EA Enterprise Agreement

EPMO Enterprise Project Management Office

ESCI Electricity Sector Climate

Information

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 200

F

FAICD Fellow of the Australian Institute

of Company Directors

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FLARE Flash Flood Advisory Resource FMA Floodplain Management

Australia

FOI Freedom of Information

FOI Act Freedom of information Act

1982

FRR Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015

FTSE Fellow of the Australian

Academy of Technological Services and Engineering

G

GPS Global Positioning System

GSO General Service Officer

GST Goods and Services Tax

H

Ha Hectares

HF High Frequency

HOA Head of Agency

HPC High performance computing

HR Human Resources

HRS Hydrologic Reference Station

HS&E Health, Safety and Environment

HSR Health and Safety

Representative

I

IAGDP Indigenous Australian

Government Development Program

ICAO International Civil Aviation

Organization

ICT Information and Communication

Technology

IDAHOBIT International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Interphobia and Transphobia

IMO International Maritime

Organization

IOC Intergovernmental

Oceanographic Commission (of UNESCO)

IOTWMS Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System

IPS Information Publication Scheme

ISO International Organization of

Standardization

IT Information technology

ITO Information Technology Officer

ITIL Informational Technology

Infrastructure Library

IWK Indigenous Weather Knowledge

J

JATWC Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre JWGFVR Joint Working Group on Verification on Forecast

Research

K

kl kilolitre

km kilometre

KPI Key Performance Indicator

kWh kilowatt hour

L

LGBTIQ+ People who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or otherwise sexually or gender diverse

LIS NASA land information system

M

MBA Master of Business

Administration

METAREA geographical sea regions for coordinating the transmission of meteorological information

miPDS Employee Performance

Development Scheme

MOU Memorandum of Understanding

N

NAIDOC National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee

NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NATA National Association of Testing

Authorities, Australia

NFWIWG National Flood Warning Infrastructure Working Group NMHS National Meteorological and

Hydrological Services

NOAA National Oceanic and

Atmospheric Administration

NPS Net Promoter Score

NSW New South Wales

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 201

NSW OEH NSW Office of Environment and Heritage NT Northern Territory

NWP Numerical Weather Prediction

NZ New Zealand

O

OceanMAPS Ocean Modelling, Analysis, and Prediction System OPA Official Public Account

OSO Observing Systems and

Operations

OSS Observing System Strategy

P

PAES Portfolio Additional Estimates

Statements

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PGPA Rule Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

PhD Doctor of Philosophy

PO Professional Officer

PSPF Protective Security Policy

Framework

PSS Public Sector Superannuation

Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

Q

Qld Queensland

R

R&D research and development

RAAF Royal Australian Air Force

Rainfields 3 a tool that provides real-time quality-controlled rainfall estimates and forecasts

RPV6 Research Plan 6

ROBUST A program to increase resilience of critical business functions RS Research Scientist

S

SA South Australia

SafetyNET Inmarsat satellite service SAROM South Australian regional ocean model

SES State Emergency Service

SES Senior Executive Service

SIA Strategy in Action

SDG Sustainable Development Goal

SSM Strategic Success Measure

STEM Science Technology,

Engineering and Mathematics

T

Tas Tasmania

TAOCCC Trial Automation of Observations at Cairns, Canberra and Coolangatta

TC tropical cyclone

TO Technical Officer

TR Trainee

TSP Tsunami Service Provider

U

UK United Kingdom

UM Unified Model

UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

US United States of America

UV Ultraviolet

V

Vic Victoria

W

WA Western Australia

WHS Work Health and Safety

WHSMS Work Health and Safety Management System WIRADA Water Information Research and Development Alliance WMO World Meteorological

Organization

WWMIWS Worldwide Met-Ocean Information and Warning Service

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 202

List of Requirements This list of requirements is provided in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, section 17AJ: Aids to access.

N/A denotes that the requirement was not applicable to the Bureau during 2018-19. IBC refers to inside back cover.

PGPA Rule Reference Requirement Description Page

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI Mandatory Letter of transmittal 1

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) Mandatory Table of contents. 2

17AJ(b) Mandatory Alphabetical index. 206

17AJ(c) Mandatory Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. 199

17AJ(d) Mandatory List of requirements. 203

17AJ(e) Mandatory Details of contact officer. IBC

17AJ(f) Mandatory Entity's website address. IBC

17AJ(g) Mandatory Electronic address of report. IBC

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) Mandatory A review by the accountable authority of the entity. 15

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) Mandatory Role and functions 20

17AE(1)(a)(ii) Mandatory Organisational structure 104, 106

17AE(1)(a)(iii) Mandatory Outcome and program administered 4

17AE(1)(a)(iv) Mandatory Purposes as included in corporate plan. 4

17AE(1)(aa)(i) Mandatory Name of the accountable authority 106

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) Mandatory Position of the accountable authority 106

17AE(1)(aa)(iii )

Mandatory Period as the accountable authority within the reporting period. 106

17AE(1)(b) Portfolio departments - mandatory

An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. N/A

17AE(2) If applicable,

Mandatory

Where the outcomes and programs administered differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period.

N/A

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F

Mandatory Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

24

17AD(c)(ii) Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a) Mandatory A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. 150

17AF(1)(b) Mandatory A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. 152

17AF(2) If applicable,

Mandatory.

Significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period. N/A

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 203

PGPA Rule Reference Requirement Description Page

17AD(d) Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) Mandatory Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). 116

17AG(2)(b)(i) Mandatory A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

1

17AG(2)(b)(ii) Mandatory A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

1

17AG(2)(b)(iii) Mandatory A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

1

17AG(2)(c) Mandatory An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

106-117

17AG(2)(d) - (e) If applicable, Mandatory

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non- compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

N/A

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) Mandatory A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee. 111

17AG(2A)(b) Mandatory The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. 112

17AG(2A)(c) Mandatory The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee. 112

17AG(2A)(d) Mandatory Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings. 112

17AG(2A)(e) Mandatory The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee. 112

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) Mandatory Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity's response to the scrutiny. 117

17AG(3)(a) If applicable, Mandatory Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information

Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

117

17AG(3)(b) If applicable, Mandatory Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of

the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

N/A

17AG(3)(c) If applicable, Mandatory Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period.

N/A

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) Mandatory An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. 133

17AG(4)(aa) Mandatory Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following: (a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender; (d) statistics on staff location.

142-149

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 204

PGPA Rule Reference Requirement Description Page

17AG(4)(b) Mandatory Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following: Statistics on staffing classification level; Statistics on full-time employees; Statistics on part-time employees; Statistics on gender; Statistics on staff location; Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

142-149

17AG(4)(c) Mandatory Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

137

17AG(4)(c)(i) Mandatory Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

137

17AG(4)(c)(ii) Mandatory The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. 138

17AG(4)(c)(iii) Mandatory A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. 138

17AG(4)(d)(i) If applicable, Mandatory Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay.

142

17AG(4)(d)(ii) If applicable, Mandatory Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level.

142

17AG(4)(d)(iii) If applicable, Mandatory Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each

classification level.

142

17AG(4)(d)(iv) If applicable, Mandatory Information on aggregate amount of performance payments.

142

Assets Management

17AG(5) If applicable,

Mandatory

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

153

Purchasing

17AG(6) Mandatory An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules 154

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) Mandatory A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

154-155

17AG(7)(b) Mandatory Summary statement regarding the engagement of consultants in the format specified at paragraph 17AG (7)(b) of the PGPA Rule

154-155

17AG(7)(c) Mandatory A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

154-155

17AG(7)(d) Mandatory Statement regarding actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies in the format specified at paragraph 17AG (7)(d) of the PGPA rule

154-155

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 205

PGPA Rule Reference Requirement Description Page

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) If applicable,

Mandatory

If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

154

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) If applicable,

Mandatory

Statement regarding contracts or standing offers with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) that have been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act

154

Small business

17AG(10)(a) Mandatory Summary statement detailing procurement initiatives supporting small business using the text specified at paragraph 17AG (10)(a) of the PGPA Rule.

154

17AG(10)(b) Mandatory An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. 154

17AG(10)(c) If applicable, Mandatory Summary statement regarding timely payments to small businesses (including reference to the Australian

Government survey) using the text specified at paragraph 17AG (10)(c) of the PGPA Rule

154

Financial Statements

17AD(e) Mandatory Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. 156-198

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) Mandatory Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule. 138-141

17AD(f) Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i) If applicable, Mandatory Statement in relation to advertising campaigns conducted as specified at paragraph 17AH (1)(a)(i) of the PGPA rule

N/A

17AH(1)(a)(ii) If applicable, Mandatory If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

155

17AH(1)(b) If applicable, Mandatory Statement providing information on grants awarded for the reporting period, as specified at paragraph 17AH

(1)(b) of the PGPA Rule

N/A

17AH(1)(c) Mandatory Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. 126

17AH(1)(d) Mandatory Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

117

17AH(1)(e) If applicable, mandatory Correction of material errors in previous annual report. 117

17AH(2) Mandatory Information required by other legislation. 130-131

Annual Report 2019-20 Section 6 - Appendices 206

Index A Accessibility Action Plan, 36, 95 advertising and market research, 155 agency overview, 20 Annual Performance Statement, 24 APS Values, Code of Conduct and Employment Principles, 127 Audit Committee, 111,112 AusTender, 154-55

B BOM Weather app, 7, 16, 26-27, 48, 65, 67, 153 business continuity, 35, 88-90, 111, 115

C Comcare, 94, 136-37 consultants, 154-55, 175, 204 corrections, 117 corporate governance, 106-117 corporate responsibility, 118-132

D disability reporting, 126 diversity (reporting), 127, 133

E Emergency Management Australia, 39-40 energy use, 131 Enterprise Agreement, 114, 137 environmental sustainability, 130-32 Executive Team, 106-110

F

financial resource management, 150-55 financial statements, 156-198 notes to, 171-198 fraud control, 1, 106, 116-17

G Gender Equality Action Plan, 128 glossary, 199-201 greenhouse emissions, 130, 131

H Heritage (reporting), 131-32

I

Independent Auditor's Report, 158-59 international engagement, 125-26

J

Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre, 41

L

letter of transmittal, 1 LGBTIQ+ Action Plan, location, 21

M Ministers, 4 Multicultural Access and Equity Plan, 36, 95

O organisation structure, 104-06 organisational management, 104 Outlook 2020-21, 18-19

P people management, 133-49 performance pay, 142 procurement, 154-55 purpose, 3

Q quality management, 29, 45, 57, 66, 91-92, 97

R Reconciliation Action Plan, 129 remuneration, staff, 138-41, 190-91 risk management, 113-16

S social media, 16, 49, 121-22 stakeholders, 22-23, 123-24

T

training and development, 134-35 tropical cyclone season, 50

U United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, 79, 125, 129

V values, 4, 22, 34

W weather event summary, 9, 10-14 work health and safety, 31, 135-37 World Meteorological Organization (WMO), 3 17, 20, 28-30, 35, 68, 79, 107, 109, 125-26, 161, 195

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Further information For more information concerning this report contact:

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Tel: (03) 9669 4000 Fax: (03) 9669 4699 Email: publications@bom.gov.au

Other information and contact details are available on the Bureau of Meteorology website www.bom.gov.au

This report is available electronically at www.bom.gov.au/annualreport

ISSN: 1037-3608

© Commonwealth of Australia 2020

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Design: Bureau of Meteorology Design and Production

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