Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Executive Director of Township Leasing—Report for 2018-19


Download PDF Download PDF

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING Annual Report 2018-2019

Image: Hands

Executive Director of Township Leasing Annual Report 2018-19

© Commonwealth of Australia 2019

ISSN: 1836 4470

ISBN: 978 1 921647 598

With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and where otherwise noted, all material presented on this site is provided under a Creative Commons license

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/licence.

The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode.

The document must be attributed as the Executive Director of Township Leasing Annual Report 2018-19.

Third party copyright for publications

This Department has made all reasonable efforts to:

• Clearly label material where the copyright is owned by a third party, and

• Ensure that the copyright owner has consented to this material being presented in this publication.

Contact officer

Executive Director of Township Leasing GPO Box 3671 Darwin NT 0801 1800 152 259 townshipleasing@otl.gov.au www.otl.gov.au

Images

© The Executive Director of Township Leasing

The Honourable Ken Wyatt AM MP Minister for Indigenous Australians Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

I am pleased to present to you the Annual Report of the Executive Director of Township Leasing for the financial year 2018-19, for your presentation to Parliament in accordance with subsection 20R(1) of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976.

Yours faithfully

Pennie Weedon Executive Director of Township Leasing

4

Image: Goal posts at Mutitjulu

Contents3 Executive Director Of Township Leasing - Year In Review 2018-1999 `13 13About The Executive Director Of Township LeasingRespect For Traditional Aboriginal Culture Consultative Forums New Lease Negotiations1515 `16 17Operational Highlights 2018-2019 Tiwi IslandsWurankuwu Township Lease Pirlangimpi Township Lease - Consultative Outcomes Milikapiti Township Lease - Progress Towards Rent Repayment1919 `20 20 21New Investment On The Tiwi IslandsWurrumiyanga Ferry Pontoon And Visitors Centre Pirlangimpi Self-Dialysis Renal Unit Pirlangimpi School Additional Classroom Major Upgrade To Wurrumiyanga Airport2323 `24 25 25Operational Highlights 2018-19 Groote EylandtNew Angurugu Police Station Complete Angurugu Waste Management - Transfer Station And Short-Term Car Disposal Areas Groote Archipelago Local Decision Making Agreement Anindilyakwa Land Council - Community Housing And Recreational Developments2727 `27 28 28Operational Highlights 2018-19 MutitjuluEstablishing The Mutitjulu Consultative Forum New Public Housing Resolving Essential Servicing Capacity And Supply Supporting The Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation29 29 `30 31Major Projects MutitjuluMutitjulu Community Laundry Mutitjulu Visitors Accommodation Mutitjulu Community Business Centre And Adult Education Centre3333 `33 34 34 34 34 35 36Report Of The Executive Director Of Township Leasing: Year Ended 30 June 2019Office Of Township Leasing Administrative Arrangements Township Leases Held By The Executive Director 2018-19 Section 19 Leases Held By The Executive Director 2018-19 Section 19 Housing Leases Australian Government (Commonwealth) Asset Leases Alice Springs Living Areas Held By The Executive Director 2018-19 Services Provided By Other Bodies37 Expenditure Statement39 Table A Communities Covered By Township Leases Held By The Executive Director Of Township Leasing In 2018-1940 Table B Housing Leases Held By The Executive Director Of Township Leasing In 2018-1941 Table C Commonwealth Asset Leases Administered By The Executive Director Of Township Leasing Or Office Of Township Leasing 2018-1946 Table D Alice Springs Living Areas (Town Camps) Subleases Held By The Executive Director Of Township Leasing In 2018-19484849MapsMap of the Nothern Territory Map of the Alice Springs Region

Image: Animal and bird tracks

I am pleased to present the Executive Director of Township Leasing Annual Report 2018-19, my first report since being permanently appointed to the role. I am honoured to lead the Office of the Executive Director of Township Leasing and to continue the work I commenced with the Office of Township Leasing over ten years ago. It gives me great pleasure to work with Traditional Owners on their country and through the local Consultative Forums to help achieve their aspirations to manage and enhance their communities and local enterprises.

2018-19 has been a busy time for my Office as we continue working with the well-established township leases on the Tiwi Islands and Groote Eylandt, while consolidating the newer leases over Mutitjulu and Pirlangimpi, and participating in the discussions towards a township lease for Jabiru.

Since the signing of the township leases for Mutitjulu and Pirlangimpi in 2017, the work and output of my Office has increased significantly. The additional commitment to supporting negotiations for the proposed Jabiru Township Lease has meant that the 2018-19 reporting period has been both busy and rewarding. The role of my Office in negotiations is to provide technical and procedural advice regarding how the terms and conditions of the proposed lease will operate once it comes into effect. The Mirrar Traditional Owners of Jabiru have a strong vision for the future of their community and I look forward to working with them to realise their aspirations.

The principal role of the Executive Director is to hold township leases over entire remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory on behalf of the Commonwealth Government. Township leases provide certainty of tenure to occupiers of Aboriginal land, in return for the payment of economic rent to the Traditional Owners. In reality the role is quite broad, and inherent in each Headlease are obligations to work with and support the aspirations of Traditional Aboriginal landowners in the management and development of their communities. Through the collection of a fair rate of rent from all occupiers of the townships, the Executive Director enables the flow of wealth back to landowners. This wealth enables economic development opportunities which benefit the community and grow local enterprise.

It has been gratifying to see one of the key original intentions of township leasing come to

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING - Year in review 2018-19

3

fruition with the recouping of the advance payments of rent, first for Wurrumiyanga in 2017 and in this reporting period for Groote Eylandt. The Township Lease for Angurugu, Umbakumba and Milyakburra was signed in December 2008 and the advance payment was fully repaid several years before anticipated. The return of rent will see an economic return for Traditional Owners, which can now be directed to benefit the community and fund opportunities for business development.

I am generally pleased with the progress and successes of the current township lease communities. However due to its small size and limited access to funding for housing and other services, it has been difficult to progress social and economic outcomes for the community of Wurankuwu (Ranku) on the Tiwi Islands. Road accessibility, housing management and aging infrastructure remain critical issues for Ranku. In order to accomplish the aims of the township lease and to achieve the ambitions of the Wulirankuwu Traditional Owners to be able to reside in Ranku all year round, I have established a Ranku Working Group. The Group is comprised of

Commonwealth, Northern Territory, Land Council, Local Government and Traditional Owner representatives that coordinate to focus on these pertinent issues. Throughout this reporting period there has been some significant progress, and the commitment of the Catholic Education Office to keeping the Ranku school open is deeply appreciated. I have commissioned a coordinated study of the service and infrastructure needs of Ranku in order to clarify the investment required to address the identified areas of need. I look forward to the continued commitment of all agencies to restoring Ranku to a flourishing community.

It is pleasing to see some progress in the Alice Springs Living Areas, or Town Camps, where I hold the interest on behalf of the Commonwealth. In the 2018-19 reporting period, the Northern Territory Government released its review into all Northern Territory town camps. The review recommends that the Northern Territory review and amend the Special Purposes Leases Act, so that subdivision is possible in the Alice Springs Town Camps. I am obliged to implement the government objectives of home ownership and economic development in the town

Image:

Mutitjulu Consultative Forum

4

camps where possible. However, without the option for subdivision, it is not possible to realise either of these aims. I am encouraged that the Northern Territory has adopted the recommendation to conduct a statutory review into the Special Purposes Leases Act. I will continue to advocate for resources and policies to support improved opportunities for Alice Springs Town Camp residents. I am hopeful that the recent commitment by the Northern Territory Government to a Local Decision Making Agreement may lead to a focus on legislative changes and support the aspirations of town camp residents for establishment of a Community Housing model.

I welcome the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s announcement of an independent review into the outcomes of township leasing as part of the Northern Australia White Paper strategy, and I look forward to participating in the review. I understand that at the time of preparing this report the Department had drafted terms of reference for the review and were seeking tenders for an independent evaluator. I believe the review will be a timely opportunity to highlight the achievements of township leasing and will identify ways to improve the model and the continued work with land councils to increase opportunities in new communities.

Since the inception of township leasing I have worked closely with the two previous Executive Directors to establish the Office of Township Leasing, to design the operational and procedural framework, and to develop the relationships required to operate an efficient and respected enterprise. As outlined above, the

Office has expanded to meet the increased workload and may need to further develop in implementing the Jabiru Township Lease once signed. During my term as Executive Director I will formalise a Strategic Plan for the Office of Township Leasing which will set the strategic direction and priority areas for the Office. This process has commenced with a workshop held in February 2019 and will be completed in the next reporting period.

The supply and standard of housing in remote communities has been for many years, and remains, a topical issue. One of the primary aims of township leasing is to enable community and economic development. To this end I have held discussions with a range of stakeholders during and prior to this reporting period, to explore improvement and expansion options for housing in the township lease communities

As the Executive Director, I hold leases over remote public housing in 47 communities in the Northern Territory on behalf of the Commonwealth. I am not directly involved in housing service delivery or funding negotiations with the Northern Territory Government, though I do provide input on technical issues regarding the tenure arrangements. In my view, housing leases are essential to enable governments to provide certainty of funding and reliable service delivery for public housing. Traditional Owners also recognise that housing leases keep governments committed to maintaining and investing in public housing. For these reasons I was pleased when the National Partnership for Remote Housing, confirming the $550 million commitment by the Commonwealth

5

for the Northern Territory until 2023, was signed by both governments.

In early 2016, the Office of Township Leasing convened a series of workshops with Traditional Owners and stakeholders to discuss possible community housing options in the township lease communities, as reported in the 2015-16 Annual Report. Since then I have been involved in further discussions, each with an individual perspective, towards community housing models and providers. In Alice Springs, Tangentyere Council Aboriginal Corporation is working with my Office and the Northern Territory Government towards developing a community housing model which would incorporate membership of the fifteen Town Camp Housing Associations.

On Groote Eylandt, the Anindilyakwa Land Council is progressing towards community housing management with the Northern Territory Government through the Local Decision Making Agreement signed with the Northern Territory Chief Minister. The Anindilyakwa Housing Aboriginal Corporation has

been established and is working towards building capacity to take over management of public housing service delivery for the Groote Eylandt communities. On the Tiwi Islands, discussions to date have been focussed on the Tiwi Land Council’s participation on the Joint Steering Committee for the National Partnership Agreement for remote housing.

I look forward to being involved in housing discussions for these communities into the future and contributing to developing options for community housing provider models as they progress.

While there have been no new home ownership subleases granted during this reporting period, I am aware that there is substantial interest in some sectors of the township lease communities. One of the defining moments that led me to reassess some of my perceptions of the government’s land reform agenda in the mid 2000s was talking to the late Mr Walter Kerinaiua. He spoke of aspirations for equality of opportunity for Traditional Owners to use their own land for investment and, notably,

Image:

Executive Director and Mr Donald Fraser, Mutitjulu Consultative Forum

6

for individual home ownership. The greatest take up of home ownership to date has been in his community of Wurrumiyanga, with 16 individual home ownership leases in place. While home ownership on Aboriginal land in the Northern Territory has been slow to develop, I know that there is still a fair degree of interest on the Tiwi Islands and in other township lease communities. For those prospective home owners, the land tenure aspect of achieving home ownership is the easy part.

During my term as Executive Director I intend to work with both the Northern Territory and Commonwealth Governments and with Indigenous Business Australia to refocus on home ownership policy and to reduce the complexity of its implementation to ensure that the opportunity can be taken up by those who aspire to own their own home. I have also had exploratory discussions with external providers who are interested in making home ownership achievable for Traditional Owners and residents of remote communities and are developing innovative options including affordable housing developments.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the Honourable Ken Wyatt AM MP on his appointment as Minister for Indigenous Australians, and to acknowledge the significance of his being the first Aboriginal man in this role. I thank Minister Wyatt for the time he has already taken to meet with me to discuss matters relating to township leasing and I look forward to working closely with him to help accomplish the aspirations of Traditional Owners.

I would also like to acknowledge the support my Office has received from his predecessor, the Minister of Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion over several years. One of the highlights of his term was jointly hosting the ceremony in Wurrumiyanga in 2017 to celebrate the handover of the first rent payment to Mantiyupwi Traditional Owners, following repayment of the original advance payment. I wish him well in his retirement.

Finally, I am grateful to all staff of the Office of Township Leasing whose outstanding commitment, professional approach and depth of experience enables us to deliver the priorities and achievements detailed in this report.

Pennie Weedon Executive Director of Township Leasing

Pennie Weedon Executive Director of Township Leasing

7

8

In August 2018, Ms Pennie Weedon was appointed to the position of the Executive Director of Township Leasing for a period of three years. Ms Weedon had been acting in the role following the retirement of the former Executive Director, Mr Greg Roche.

Ms Weedon is an Aboriginal woman of Wagaman descent and the first Indigenous woman to hold statutory responsibilities for land tenure and administration in the Northern Territory. Ms Weedon has had a long career in the Commonwealth public sector. She is the founding Director of the Office of the Executive Director of Township Leasing (the Office) and was fundamental in the establishment of the Office in 2008.

RESPECT FOR TRADITIONAL ABORIGINAL CULTURE The Executive Director of Township Leasing and the Office of Township Leasing respect the spiritual and custodial relationship that Aboriginal Traditional Owners have with their lands and waters, and their responsibility to maintain and protect sites of significance. Aboriginal people have a deep spiritual connection to their traditional land, and every aspect of their lives connects to it. Life and law originate from and are governed by the land, bringing a sense of identity and belonging.

The Northern Territory Aboriginal Sacred Sites Act and the Land Rights Act protect sacred sites in the Northern Territory. Each township lease also includes provisions for the protection of sacred sites. The Office of Township Leasing engages the Northern Territory Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority to identify all sites of significance within the boundaries of each township lease and issue an Authority Certificate. In addition to Authority Certificates, in the Central Land Council region, the Executive Director obtains sacred site clearances from the Central Land Council, including housing precinct leases in remote communities, and within the town of Mutitjulu.

The Executive Director supports traditional and community decision-making processes by working closely with Consultative Forums and in partnership with the Land Councils.

ABOUT TOWNSHIP LEASING

About the EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING

9

A township lease is a voluntary agreement negotiated between the Commonwealth and Traditional Owners, represented by their respective Land Council and Land Trust. A township lease aims to formalise all current and future land tenure arrangements by registered sublease or licence agreements. Current township lease terms range from eighty to ninety-nine years.

On the signing of a township lease, all land tenure arrangements within the township boundary become the responsibility of the Executive Director to administer, including negotiating subleases and the collection of rent. The Executive Director will also honour any existing formal lease arrangements. Township leases require the Executive Director to enter into lease arrangements applying sound commercial principles. Subleases provide security of tenure to occupiers of land in return for the payment of economic rent to Traditional Owners for the use of their land. One of the main benefits of a township lease is that the Executive Director may grant long term tenure comparatively quickly compared with other forms of leasehold interests on Aboriginal land.

Most township leases include an advance rent payment made to the Traditional Owners from the Aboriginal Benefits Account. The purpose of the payment is to provide funds for Traditional Owners to invest in economic and community development. To date, Traditional Owners have invested in a wide variety of projects including new business enterprises, community infrastructure and housing, which have expanded their commercial organisations, created local jobs and economic activity.

COMMUNITY LAND ENTITY LEASE The Land Rights Act sets out that a township lease is held by a ‘Lease Entity’, and establishes the position of the Executive Director of Township Leasing as a lease entity. A Community Land Entity Lease is a different model of township lease in which a Traditional Owner ‘Entity’ may hold and administer the lease instead of the Executive Director. A Traditional Owner Entity must be an Aboriginal Corporation established under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 1999 and structured for that purpose.

A perceived advantage of the Community Land Entity Lease over Township Leases held by the Executive Director is that it addresses community concerns that a Township Lease leads to Traditional Owners losing control over their land. The township lease over the community of Gunyangara in northeast Arnhem Land is an example of Community Land Entity Lease.

There are however a number of possible models and options for township leasing. Mutitjulu and Pirlangimpi are examples of ‘transitionary’ township leases which include provisions for the Executive Director to establish and administer the township lease and over time transfer the lease to a Traditional Owner Land Entity if and when they are ready. The transfer of the lease to the Land Entity must receive endorsement from the relevant land council and approval of the Minister for Indigenous Australians.

10

11 11

Image: Mutitijulu Waterhole

12

CONSULTATIVE FORUMS Each township lease establishes a Consultative Forum of Traditional Owners, the primary means in which the Executive Director engages and consults with landowners and the community. The composition of the Consultative Forum is set out in each township lease, and operation of the Consultative Forum varies from community to community.

The role of the Consultative Forum is to provide advice to the Executive Director on matters relating to land and the administration of the township lease. The Executive Director pays close attention to the views of Consultative Forum members, who play an essential role in keeping the community informed about land use decisions.

Each of the township leases includes a five-year review mechanism to enable Consultative Forum members and the Executive Director to review the township lease terms and conditions, ensuring they reflect current community values and to improve operation of the lease. Any change to the township lease must be agreed to by the relevant land council Executive and the Minister for Indigenous Australians, and be formalised by a Deed of Amendment.

NEW LEASE NEGOTIATIONS Throughout 2018-19, the Executive Director and representatives of the Office of Township Leasing continued to attend meetings to discuss a proposed future township lease at Jabiru. The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has been the lead agency for the lease negotiations with the Mirrar Traditional Owners, represented by the Northern Land Council.

Jabiru is located within Kakadu National Park and was established in 1982 as a closed town to provide services to the uranium mining industry. The current Kakadu township mining lease will expire in 2021, coinciding with the closure of the Ranger uranium mine.

The Executive Director of Township Leasing has attended the s19A lease negotiation discussions and primary stakeholder group meetings. The Executive Director has provided procedural advice, taking into consideration the Jabiru Masterplan and post mining at Jabiru, for how the proposed terms and conditions of a draft lease would function once operational.

Image:

Wurrumiyanga beach

13

Image: Wurankuwu School

14

OPERATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS 2018-19

Tiwi Islands WURANKUWU TOWNSHIP LEASE The Milikapiti and Wurankuwu Township Lease, signed in 2011, encompasses the township of Milikapiti on Melville Island and the small community of Wurankuwu (Ranku) on Bathurst Island. Ranku is located approximately 60 kilometres from Wurrumiyanga and is classified as a Homeland (or outstation) by the Northern Territory Government.

The Northern Territory Government funds housing, municipal and essential services in homelands through its Homelands Program. This is a lower level of funding than is allocated for public housing and infrastructure in the larger locations defined as Remote Communities. Thus, economic development and investment in housing and service infrastructure at Ranku is made problematic.

The Executive Director understands the strong attachment that Ranku Traditional Owners have with their community and knows that they have long been wanting to re-establish occupancy all year round, an aim that is supported by the Tiwi Land Council. The Catholic Education Office has been instrumental in enabling some families to return to Ranku through their continued support and commitment to keeping the school open.

In order to support Ranku Traditional Owners and to meet the obligations of the township lease to enable development, the Executive Director has established a Ranku Working Group to coordinate service delivery and investment in Ranku. The Working Group includes the Commonwealth and Northern Territory governments and the Tiwi Islands Regional Council, the Tiwi Land Council, Catholic Education Office and Traditional Owner representatives. It aims to coordinate a central point to focus on improved services, living conditions and facilitate the return of families.

The Executive Director has secured funding to undertake an infrastructure assessment with the objective of identifying the suitability of essential services and requirements for all year-round community access and occupancy. Road accessibility, housing management and ageing infrastructure remain the most critical issues for Ranku, and the infrastructure assessment will enable the Working Group to quantify the areas in need and the cost to remediate.

15

PIRLANGIMPI TOWNSHIP LEASE - CONSULTATIVE FORUM OUTCOMES The Pirlangimpi Township Lease was signed in June 2017 and included $2 million

advance payment of rent and $2 million economic development investment fund. At the request of the Directors of Munupi Aboriginal Corporation and Munupi Pty Ltd, the Executive Director engaged a consultant to work with the Directors to develop a Business and Strategic Plan that could support investment of the combined $4 million in funds from the Commonwealth Government into economic and community development.

The Pirlangimpi Consultative Forum supported the decision for the Munupi Directors to engage directly with the consultants to develop their Business and Strategic Plan. Future aspirations of the Traditional Owners and community residents were captured during a community consultation process and continues to do so through the Munupi Directors. The Business and Strategic Plan will define Munupi family objectives, identify future commercial and tourism opportunities, and prepare a road map over the next two to five years for the $4 million economic development investment into Pirlangimpi.

Since execution of the township lease, the Office of Township Leasing has carried out a due diligence process to establish the pre-existing rights of all occupiers and to negotiate formal access rights through subleases. Throughout this reporting period approximately 90% of existing occupiers have entered into long term sublease arrangements and the Office of Township Leasing has collected in excess of $200,000 in rent on behalf of Traditional Owners toward the repayment of the $2 million advance payment.

Image:

Pirlangimpi Consultative Forum

16

MILIKAPITI TOWNSHIP LEASE - PROGRESS TOWARDS RENT REPAYMENT When the Wulirankuwu Traditional Owners signed the Milikapiti Township Lease on 22 November 2011, they received an advance rental payment of $1.76 million to establish trusts with their local business organisations to facilitate investment back into their own community. Through the collection of sublease rent, Milikapiti has since paid back $1.56 million of the advance payment. A significant milestone is expected in the coming financial year that will see the full advance payment recouped and the Wulirankuwu Trust will begin to see all rent collected for Milikapiti returned directly to the Trust, within nine years of commencement of the lease.

The Executive Director will continue to work with Wulirankuwu Traditional Owners to achieve their aspirations for economic investment opportunities in the community.

Image:

Milikapiti serviced land for development

The Executive Director has met several times with the Consultative Forum to confirm the tenure arrangements and to discuss new economic development applications from governments and other businesses. The Consultative Forum members have supported a number of proposals including an upgrade of the Munupi Arts Centre, demountable staff accommodation for the Tiwi Islands Training and Education Board, a new bore and the development of a 24-lot subdivision. The Commonwealth Government has funded the subdivision which will support future housing and other economic development opportunities in Pirlangimpi. The Northern Territory Government has carriage of the project which is expected to commence early in 2020.

17

Image: Nguiu-Ullintjinni Assocation Shop

18

NEW INVESTMENT ON THE Tiwi Islands WURRUMIYANGA FERRY PONTOON AND VISITORS CENTRE Following lengthy negotiations, the Executive Director of Township Leasing was pleased to grant a sublease to Mantiyupwi Pty Ltd in the 2018-19 reporting period. The sublease supports the construction and operation of a new pontoon and associated visitor centre at Wurrumiyanga on Bathurst Island. The pontoon will provide enhanced docking facilities for the daily Sealink ferry service, improving access to Bathurst Island for both local residents and visiting tourists. The Visitors Centre will provide amenity for people arriving and leaving the island with shade, public toilets facilities, a kiosk and information for visitors. Construction of the pontoon and Visitors Centre began in June 2019 and is expected to be operational by early 2020.

The Executive Director and a number of key stakeholders worked cooperatively to resolve the complex tenure for this development which extended to both sides of the Aspley Strait. Negotiations covered the subleased area within the township lease boundary, an area of Crown Lease in the Aspley Strait administered by the Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics, and a parcel of land near Paru on Melville Island under the jurisdiction of the Tiwi Land Council.

The investment in the Wurrumiyanga Pontoon and Visitors Centre and the awarding of the contract to build and construct to local company Tiwi Enterprises Ltd, is evidence of what is achievable with a collective approach through the township leasing model.

‘The Visitors Centre will provide amenity for people arriving and leaving the island with shade, public toilets facilities, a kiosk and information for visitors’.

19

PIRLANGIMPI SELF-DIALYSIS RENAL UNIT In April 2018, the Executive Director approved an application from the Northern Territory Department of Health to install a new ‘Renal Ready’ renal dialysis unit on the grounds of the existing health clinic at Pirlangimpi. The renal dialysis unit allows people in need of dialysis to administer self-dialysis in their own community, which means Pirlangimpi residents can remain on Country to receive treatment. The dialysis unit has capacity for four stations and opened in May 2019.

PIRLANGIMPI SCHOOL ADDITIONAL CLASSROOM The Northern Territory Department of Education applied in February 2018 to construct a new classroom at the Pirlangimpi school. The multi-purpose classroom has improved facilities and better caters to student numbers to support the Families as First Teachers (FaFT) program. The room was complete in October 2018 and officially opened in November 2018.

Image:

Pirlangimpi New Classroom

Image:

Munupi Arts Annual General Meeting

20

21

MAJOR UPGRADE TO WURRUMIYANGA AIRPORT Connectivity and reliable accessibility are vital for every community but especially so for remote towns and communities across Australia, which rely on good transport links to survive and thrive.

This need was recognised by the Australian and Northern Territory governments who jointly invested $9 million to resurface and extend the existing airstrip in Wurrumiyanga in 2018-19. The Wurrumiyanga airstrip is the largest airstrip on the Tiwi Islands, servicing approximately 2000 people. The upgrade and lengthening of the runway will help make Bathurst Island more accessible, opening up further opportunities for tourism and industry, and guaranteeing reliable transport connections for residents and emergency services.

Caption: Pirlangimpi Rental unit

Image: Wurrumiyanga Airport Upgrades - Opening Ceremon

Image:

Wurrumiyanga Airport Upgrades - Opening Ceremon

21

Image: Angurugu Water Tanks

22

Caption: Pirlangimpi Rental unit Image:

New

Angurugu Police Station

OPERATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS 2018-19 Groote Eylandt NEW ANGURUGU POLICE STATION COMPLETE An overnight police post was installed in Angurugu in 2008, senior Anindilyakwa leaders, including the Land Council and the Chairman, had for some years been calling for a permanent police presence in Angurugu.

In November 2015, a serious violent disturbances galvanised community and government efforts to address community safety issues in Angurugu. The new $14.5 million Angurugu Police Station has been funded by contributions of $10 million from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet for Indigenous Advancement Strategy, $1.5 million from the Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment National Partnership and $3 million from the Anindilyakwa Land Council.

On 8 November 2016, the Northern Territory Government applied to the Executive Director to construct a new permanent police station on Lot 391 Angurugu. Following discussions with the Angurugu Consultative Forum, the Executive Director gave consent for the police station development and granted tenure in the form of a sublease to NT Police, Fire and Emergency Services.

The Executive Director also consented to relocate the existing pre-school from Lot 391 to a new purpose-built facility on the Angurugu school grounds.

A realignment of the front boundary of the lot resulted in the increased overall area and in a new identifier and survey plan; the new police station is now located on new Lot 651 Angurugu. The building was completed in this reporting period and a formal opening is planned for November 2019. It is expected that the station will increase the police presence to seven days a week, and residents will have access to other services including driver’s licences and court information.

23

24

ANGURUGU WASTE MANAGEMENT - TRANSFER STATION AND SHORT-TERM CAR DISPOSAL AREAS Identifying the need to manage the large number of abandoned vehicles in and around Angurugu, the East Arnhem Regional Council (EARC) contacted the Executive Director to access an area in the town to temporarily relocate old car bodies and other abandoned vehicles and machinery. The aim was to stockpile the vehicles in a safe place away from the community centre. From here, the vehicles will be crushed and removed from Groote Eylandt.

The Executive Director supported the project and through the Angurugu Consultative Forum, identified an area south of the Market Garden as a suitable location. The Angurugu Community has welcomed the idea and community members have begun relocating their old white goods, such as washing machines and fridges, to the site.

EARC put forward a second proposal as part of their waste management strategy to construct a Waste Transfer Station in Angurugu. The Transfer Station will allow residents to dump hard rubbish locally rather than having to transport it to the dry tip on the Rowell Highway towards Alyangula, and is aimed at alleviating irregular dumping around the perimeter of the town. The Transfer Station will provide designated recycling and disposal bins, and Council will transfer the materials regularly to the dry tip.

The Angurugu Consultative Forum supported the proposal and decided on an appropriate area for the Waste Transfer Station in an undeveloped site away from the residential area.

Image:

Angurugu short-term car disposal area

24

25

GROOTE ARCHIPELAGO LOCAL DECISION MAKING AGREEMENT On 15 November 2018, the Northern Territory Government signed the Groote Archipelago Local Decision Making Agreement with the Anindilyakwa Land Council (ALC) to progress local decision making on priority transition areas as identified by the Land Council.

Local Decision Making is a Northern Territory Government policy initiative which is being implemented primarily by the Department of the Chief Minister. The Agreement identifies short, medium and long-term priorities for transition to regional and local control, and sets out timeframes and processes to settle detailed implementation plans for each service transition.

Part of the Agreement provides a platform to transition to community control agreed service delivery areas that are the responsibility of the Northern Territory Government.

To date, the primary focus has been on developing a community housing model. The Land Council has been negotiating with the Northern Territory Government regarding contractual and funding arrangements towards the future transition of management and potential ownership of public housing assets.

The ALC has also established the Anindilyakwa Housing Aboriginal Corporation to manage community housing and is working towards obtaining status as a Community Housing Association.

The Executive Director has been involved in the discussions regarding the future community housing association and will continue to support the aspirations of Traditional Owners through the transfer of tenure.

ANINDILYAKWA LAND COUNCIL - COMMUNITY HOUSING AND RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS The ALC has continued to implement the recommendations of its Housing Master Plan by negotiating for a community housing system as outlined above and by allocating significant funding towards building community housing in Angurugu and Umbakumba. To that end the Executive Director has granted approvals for the Land Council to create several multiple-lot subdivisions in both Angurugu and Umbakumba. These proposals will significantly benefit each community and provide a variety of employment and training opportunities. The Executive Director and the respective community Consultative Forum members have collectively considered and support the projects.

In Angurugu, a subdivision to create an additional five housing lots is almost complete, with the construction contract being awarded to local organisation, Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises Aboriginal Corporation. The eleven-lot subdivision near the Angurugu market garden is expected to commence in 2020. The major project will also include the creation of a new road and park area, installation of services and construction of new houses.

In Umbakumba, a subdivision to create four new lots has progressed to the final approval stage with construction of new houses expected to commence in 2020. A second, larger housing project is scheduled for Umbakumba with the ALC proposing the development of a 30-lot subdivision in what is known the Southern Growth Area.

This development is anticipated to cover an area of 6.8 hectares and include the construction of new roads and services for up to 40 new dwellings.

The ALC has also committed substantial funding for a number of developments aimed to enhance community amenity, including shade shelters, BMX tracks, a community sports hub in Angurugu, music recording and performance facilities, and men’s sheds.

25

Image: Mutitjulu oval

26

OPERATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS 2018-19 Mutitjulu ESTABLISHING THE MUTITJULU CONSULTATIVE FORUM

In Mutitjulu, the signing of the Township Lease in March 2017 and establishment of the Consultative Forum has provided a voice for Anangu Traditional Owners and Mutitjulu community members. Allowing them to realise their visions and support future economic development opportunities on their land. Traditional Owners and residents now have greater control over decisions about land use in their township through the Consultative Forum mechanism.

The Mutitjulu Consultative Forum has considered numerous developments, including the numbers and configuration of new public housing, applications for staff housing, a workers’ camp and community laundry facilities. Additionally, a connecting footpath in the town’s central area, extending the boundary of the Mutitjulu cemetery, the sustainable supply of essential services, and an accommodation complex for visiting Traditional Owners. Members are also considering other matters such as the review of the operation of the permit system.

The Executive Director strengthened the authority and decision-making capacity of the Consultative Forum members by establishing key practices. These include inducting a Consultative Forum member as Co-Chairperson with the Executive Director for each formal meeting, providing a written briefing to all Members, inviting external parties to attend only as required, and embedding formal Rules for Meetings of the Consultative Forum.

NEW PUBLIC HOUSING As part of the township lease negotiations, the Commonwealth committed $10 million for public housing works for Mutitjulu. An additional $2.6 million had been allocated to Mutitjulu under the National Partnership Agreement for Remote Indigenous Housing. The Northern Territory Government has also committed to build and manage public housing in the community and entered into an underlease to formalise those arrangements.

The first tranche of public housing works was completed in September 2018, which involved demolishing and rebuilding four houses and upgrading three others. The second tranche of works, underway at the time of reporting will replace two mud brick houses and upgrade the 26 remaining public houses.

The third tranche of works, to build 11 new 3-bedroom houses, is scheduled to commence in 2020.

27

RESOLVING ESSENTIAL SERVICING CAPACITY AND SUPPLY Management of essential services (power, water and sewerage) in Mutitjulu is the responsibility of Parks Australia under the Park Management Plan, and this is reflected in the Township Lease.

The Executive Director continues to engage with key stakeholders through the Mutitjulu Essential Services Working Group to guide assessment of infrastructure capacity, future expansion, and requirements to transfer management to relevant government agencies.

To ensure current capacity and future demand is quantified appropriately, allowing for town expansion, the Executive Director has commissioned an infrastructure assessment study, anticipated to be completed by mid 2020.

SUPPORTING THE MUTITJULU COMMUNITY ABORIGINAL CORPORATION To support the Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation’s future capacity and to assist Board members to achieve the community’s aspirations, the Executive Director engaged a consultant to assist with development of a strategic plan. The Strategic Plan will enable the Corporation to focus on its organisational priorities, administrative, financial and governance structures, and community objectives. The Corporation’s Directors have a strong vision for future commercial and tourism opportunities in Mutitjulu.

The Mutitjulu Consultative Forum supported a number of the Corporation’s proposals throughout this reporting period including the purchase of a housing contractors’ camp to be run as commercial accommodation.

Image:

Mutitjulu Community Pool

28

MAJOR PROJECTS

Mutitjulu MUTITJULU COMMUNITY LAUNDRY The Executive Director has supported the Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation through the Consultative Forum to progress with economic and community developments that will benefit the residents of Mutitjulu. One such initiative has been the installation of a community laundry. With funding from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation procured a transportable building and converted the premises into a laundry equipped with seven heavy-duty washing machines and dryers, sinks and bench space. This initiative has been welcomed by the community, as it provides a place for washing clothes and larger items such as blankets, in turn improving hygiene and health outcomes.

29

MUTITJULU VISITORS ACCOMMODATION The first tranche of public housing works in Mutitjulu commenced in early 2018 and was awarded to Alice Springs construction company Patrick Homes. Patrick Homes established a contractor’s camp to provide accommodation for its workers during the time of the building program, as an alternative to securing costly accommodation in Yulara.

The Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation negotiated the purchase of the contractor’s camp once the building works were complete and now operates the facility of 16 single bed en suite rooms as commercial accommodation.

Since opening the accommodation has had high occupancy rates and the Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation is considering options for additional commercial accommodation.

Image:

Mutitjulu Carnival

30

MUTITJULU COMMUNITY BUSINESS CENTRE AND ADULT EDUCATION CENTRE As part of the township lease negotiations, the Commonwealth committed $2 million for the construction of a Community Business Centre in Mutitjulu. The Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation has been funded to oversee the project. Ekistica has been contracted as project managers for the design and construction of the Business Centre, working alongside a Steering Committee comprised of Traditional Owners, Government stakeholders and the Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation. In early 2019 the Mutitjulu Consultative Forum confirmed support for the Business Centre to be located on a large land parcel at the entrance of Mutitjulu, adjacent to the existing Adult Education Centre Building.

Early floorplan designs incorporate multiple office spaces and a large boardroom as well as kitchen and washing facilities. The Mutitjulu Community Aboriginal Corporation will manage the Business Centre which will provide an economic return through short and long-term leasing of office space and meeting room facilities to visiting organisations, enabling the delivery of their services to community.

The Steering Committee is also considering possible options for the existing Adult Education Centre, which is in a state of disrepair. The old building is built of locally made mud bricks which have deteriorated over time. Community members would like to repair and re-purpose the building if possible. Funding committed from the Central Land Council’s Community Development Fund may enable the necessary repairs and repurposing of the building.

31

Image: Wurrumiyanga Ferry Pontoon Construction

32

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING:

Year ended 30 JUNE 2019 Subsection 20R(1) of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 provides that the Executive Director must act as soon as practicable following the end of each financial year to prepare and give to the Minister for presentation to the Parliament a report on the operations of the Executive Director for the year.

The position of the Executive Director of Township Leasing is established pursuant to section 20B of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 (the Land Rights Act). The position is an independent statutory office holder that sits within the portfolio responsibility of the Minister for Indigenous Australians.

The Executive Director holds and administers leases on behalf of the Commonwealth in the Northern Territory. The Executive Director cannot own freehold title land and does not negotiate leases on behalf of the Commonwealth. The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has been responsible for conducting such negotiations during this reporting period. On 28 September 2018, the Commonwealth Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon. Nigel Scullion, appointed Ms Pennie Weedon to the position of Executive Director for a term of three years.

OFFICE OF TOWNSHIP LEASING The Office of Township Leasing is the administrative office of the Executive Director. Its primary role is to work alongside the local Consultative Forums and administer the township leasing on behalf of the Executive Director.

ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS In 2018-19, the Executive Director operated from offices in Darwin. The Office of Township Leasing is located in Darwin city and at the end of the reporting period consisted of three Directors and ten other staff.

Office of Township Leasing staff are Commonwealth public servants engaged under the Public Service Act 1999 and employed by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. During this reporting period The Office is subject to separate budget provisions to the Department and is funded by an appropriation, approved by the Minister, from the Aboriginals Benefit Account.

33

TOWNSHIP LEASES HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 2018-19 Section 19A of the Land Rights Act allows Aboriginal land trusts to grant a township lease over a community on Aboriginal Land to the Executive Director. All current township leases have been signed under section 19A of the Land Rights Act, except the township sublease covering Mutitjulu which is under signed pursuant to section 20CA.

In the year under review, the Executive Director held five township leases covering eight communities. See Table A for details.

SECTION 19 LEASES HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 2018-19 Under section 19(3) of the Land Rights Act (s19) an Aboriginal land trust may grant an estate or interest in land to the Commonwealth for any public purpose.

The Executive Director, with the approval of the Minister for Indigenous Australians, enters into s19 leases over community housing and other government assets on behalf of the Commonwealth. See Table A for further details.

SECTION 19 HOUSING LEASES It is current government policy that any significant Commonwealth investment in assets located on Aboriginal Land must be secured by a long-term tenure arrangement such as a lease.

In the Northern Territory, Section 19 Housing leases are held either directly by the Northern Territory Government or by the Executive Director on behalf of the Commonwealth. Unlike a township lease, a Housing lease only covers the lots within a community used for public housing.

The Executive Director does not provide tenancy management services to communities. Where the Executive Director holds the Housing leases, the Executive Director subleases the community housing to the Northern Territory Government. This allows Territory Housing access to maintain and build new houses and enter into tenancy agreements with occupants. The Northern Territory Government consults with the community through Local Housing Reference Groups. See Table B for further details.

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT (COMMONWEALTH) ASSET LEASES The Executive Director has direct management of Australian Government assets leases located in the Central Land Council and Northern Land Council Regions. The Office of Township Leasing however, has agreed to manage several other leases in the Northern Land Council Region on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Department of Education and Training. The arrangement simplifies the administration of leases and helps to ensure that these assets are maintained.

In 2018-19 the Executive Director administered Commonwealth Asset leases that secured assets such as early childhood centres, safe houses, Government Engagement Coordinator complexes, offices and residential accommodation. See Table C for further details.

34

ALICE SPRINGS LIVING AREAS HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 2018-19 The Alice Springs Living Areas (also referred to as the Alice Springs Town Camps) are small communities situated in and around Alice Springs. A separate Housing Association holds a lease over each Town Camp. These leases have been issued either under the Special Purposes Leases Act (NT) or the Crown Lands Act (NT).

The Executive Director, on behalf of the Australian Government, entered into subleases for forty years in 2010 with the fifteen Housing Associations over seventeen Alice Springs Town Camps. The Executive Director simultaneously granted an under-lease in the form of a Housing Management Agreement to the Northern Territory Government.

Housing Management Agreements are underlease arrangements between the Executive Director and the Northern Territory Government, applicable for all Alice Springs Town Camps. Under these agreements, the Northern Territory Government assumes responsibility for all areas located within the town camp boundary and captures all infrastructure, including housing, open spaces, roads, parks and community centres. The current Housing Management Agreements commenced on 1 July 2018 for a term of five years. Refer to Table D for further details.

Image:

Milikapit Government Egagement Coordinator Complex

35

SERVICES PROVIDED BY OTHER BODIES In 2018-19 the Executive Director engaged service providers and contractors (both government and non-government) for:

Cadastral surveys

An audited trust account

Migration of data to new property management software

Repairs and maintenance

Consultative Forum support

Recruitment services

During the year under review the Executive Director also engaged the following consultants:

• Elton Consulting

• Tanyah Nasir Consulting

• TBF Consulting

Office of Township Leasing website support

Alice Springs Towns Camp housing association administration

Business planning (planning day)

Development and implementation of ICT Solution

Strategic and Business Planning services

36

37

EXPENDITURE StatementUnder subsection 64(4A) of the Land Rights Act, fund the activities of the Executive Director from the Aboriginals Benefit Account. Full financial details of the Aboriginals Benefit Account are in the financial statements of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, submitted to the Minister under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999, and to the Finance Minister under section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The statements are subject to scrutiny through the Senate Estimates Committee process. Details of expenditure and revenue arising from the activities of the Executive Director of Township Leasing for the year ended 30 June 2019 provided below.Table A Communities covered by Township Leases held by the Executive Director of Township Leasing in 2018-19Table B Housing Leases held by the Executive Director of Township Leasing in 2018-19Table C Commonwealth Asset Leases Administered by the Executive Director of Township Leasing or Office of Township Leasing 2018-19Table D Alice Springs Living Areas (Town Camps) subleases held by the Executive Director of Township Leasing in 2018-19 37

Image: Pirlangimpi Beach

38

Community Location Date of Execution Term

1

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu) Bathurst Island 30 August 2007 99 years

2 Angurugu Groote Eylandt 4 December 2008 80 years

3 Umbakumba Groote Eylandt 4 December 2008 80 years

4 Milyakburra Bickerton Island 4 December 2008 80 years

5

Milikapiti (Snake Bay) Melville Island 22 November

2011

99 years

6

Wurankuwu (Ranku)

Bathurst Island 22 November 2011 99 years

7 Mutitjulu Central Australia 16 March 2017 67 years

8

Pirlangimpi (Garden Point) Melville Island 26 June 2017 99 years

Total 8

Table A COMMUNITIES COVERED BY TOWNSHIP LEASES HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING IN 2018-19

39

Community Region Executed NT sublease date of effect Tenure

1 Lajamanu CLC 29.6.2011 29.06.2011* Aboriginal Land

2 Hermannsburg CLC 29.6.2011 29.06.2011* Aboriginal Land

3 Yuendumu CLC 11.4.2013 11.04.2013* Aboriginal Land

4 Areyonga CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

5 Kaltukatjara CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

6 Kintore CLC 30.5.2013 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

7 Mt Liebig CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

8 Nturiya CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

9 Papunya CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

10 Pmara Jutunta CLC 23.10.2012 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

11 Willowra CLC 30.5.2013 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

12 Ali Curung CLC 1.7.2013 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

13 Nyirripi CLC 1.7.2013 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

14 Ampilatawatja CLC 18.7.2013 01.07.2018 Aboriginal Land

15 Imanpa CLC 25.9.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

16 Wutunugurra CLC 25.9.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

17 Imangara CLC 25.9.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

18 Wilora CLC 8.11.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

19 Tara CLC 8.11.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

20 Titjikala CLC 8.11.2013 01.07.2018 CLA

21 Alpurrurulam CLC 30.04.2014 01.07.2018 CLA

22 Atitjere CLC 18.7.2014 01.07.2018 CLA

23 Laramba CLC 18.7.2014 01.07.2018 CLA

24 Santa Teresa CLC 21.9.2015 01.07.2018 CLA

25 Engawala CLC 17.06.2016 01.07.2018 CLA

26 Binjari NLC 08.03.2017 01.07.2018 CLA

Total: 26

Table B HOUSING LEASES HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING IN 2018-19

*Note that housing subleases for these communities were under preparation at the time of writing. When executed it is anticipated the date of effect for these subleases will be 1 July 2018.

40

Government Engagement Coordinator (GEC) Complexes (22)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

1 Ali Curung 248 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

2 Ali Curung 249 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

3 Areyonga 48 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

4 Atitjere 80 CLC 10.08.2015 CLA

5 Haasts Bluff 75 CLC 12.03.2014 Aboriginal Land

6 Lajamanu 420 CLC 01.05.2013 Aboriginal Land

7 Hermannsburg 55 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

8 Hermannsburg 192 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

9 Kaltukatjara 96 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

10 Papunya 262 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

11 Yuelamu 86 CLC 25.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

12 Willowra 136 CLC 03.05.2013 Aboriginal Land

13 Willowra 4 CLC 03.05.2013 Aboriginal Land

14 Mt. Liebig 43 CLC 29.10.2014 Aboriginal Land

15 Engawala 67 CLC 17.06.2015 Aboriginal Land

16 Imanpa 91 CLC 17.06.2015 CLA

17 Yuendumu 633 CLC 10.08.2015 Aboriginal Land

18 Kintore 156 CLC 07.05.2016 Aboriginal Land

Table C COMMONWEALTH ASSET LEASES ADMINISTERED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING OR OFFICE OF TOWNSHIP LEASING 2018-19 41

19 Santa Teresa 321 CLC 07.05.2016 Aboriginal Land

20 Alpurrurulum 169 CLC 20.01.2017 CLA

21 Gapuwiyak 159 NLC 01.05.2018 Aboriginal Land

22 Yirrkala 265 NLC Aboriginal Land

Safe Houses (2)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

23 Hermannsburg 228 CLC 15.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

24 Lajamanu 246 CLC 01.05.2013 Aboriginal Land

Child Care Centres (15)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

25 Yuelamu 98 CLC 03.05.2013 Aboriginal Land

26 Lajamanu 322 CLC 23.07.2012 Aboriginal Land

27 Santa Teresa 335 CLC 06.08.2013 Aboriginal Land

28 Areyonga 83 CLC 05.07.2013 Aboriginal Land

29 Kintore 128 CLC 05.07.2013 Aboriginal Land

30 Atitjere 335 CLC 18.07.2013 CLA

31 Haasts Bluff 81 CLC 05.07.2013 Aboriginal Land

32 Kaltukatjara 237 CLC 30.07.2014 Aboriginal Land

33 Mount Liebig 22 CLC 01.07.2015 Aboriginal Land

Table C (continued) COMMONWEALTH ASSET LEASES ADMINISTERED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING OR OFFICE OF TOWNSHIP LEASING 2018-19 42

Government Engagement Coordinator (GEC) Complexes (20)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

34 Nyirripi 54 CLC 16.09.2015 Aboriginal Land

35 Titjikala 13 CLC 07.05.2016 CLA

36 Laramba 93 CLC 02.06.2016 Aboriginal Land

37 Yarralin 116 NLC 25.11.2017 CLA

38 Robinson River 33 NLC 23.03.2018 Aboriginal Land

39 Ali Curung 80 CLC 14.06.2018 Aboriginal Land

Image:

School Visit, Wurankuwu, Pennie Weedon, Executive Director of Township Leasing

43

Table C (continued) COMMONWEALTH ASSET LEASES ADMINISTERED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING OR OFFICE OF TOWNSHIP LEASING 2018-19Government Engagement Coordinator (GEC) Complexes (20)Community Lot Region Executed Tenure40 Bulman 81 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land41 Galiwinku 321 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land42 Gapuwiyak 171 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land43 Maningrida 700 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land44 Milingimbi 235 NLC 16.08.2012 Aboriginal Land45 Minjilang 229 NLC 16.08.2012 Aboriginal Land46 Ngukurr 409 NLC 16.08.2012 Aboriginal Land47 Ramingining 259 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land48 Ramingining 260 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land49 Warruwi 89 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land50 Peppimenarti 54 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land51 Minyerri 92 NLC 01.07.2013 Aboriginal Land52 Palumpa 105 NLC 16.08.2012 Aboriginal Land53 Beswick 183 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land54 Belyuen 305 NLC 27.07.2012 Aboriginal Land55 Wadeye 586 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land56 Wadeye 608 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land57 Robinson River 87 NLC 01.07.2013 Aboriginal Land58 Robinson River 89 NLC 01.07.2013 Aboriginal Land59 Yirrkala 243 NLC 01.07.2013 Aboriginal Land 44

Safe Houses (5)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

60 Maningrida 717 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

61 Ngukurr 424 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

62 Ramingining 265 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

63 Wugularr 188 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

64 Peppimenarti 25 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

Child Care Centres (10)

Community Lot Region Executed Tenure

65 Peppimenarti 91 NLC 18.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

66 Wadeye 650 NLC 18.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

67 Wadeye 375 NLC 18.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

68 Warruwi 48 NLC 21.10.2014 Aboriginal Land

69 Minjilang

223, 224 adj

NLC 17.8.2012 Aboriginal Land

70 Manyallaluk 28 NLC 17.08.2012 Aboriginal Land

71 Emu Point 14adj NLC 01.07.2013 Aboriginal Land

72 Jilkminggan 82 NLC 13.02.2014 CLA

73 Aputula 7 CLC 05.07.2012 CLA

74 Wugularr 193 NLC 15.09.2016 Aboriginal Land

Image:

Mutitjulu Oval Scoreboard

45

Housing Association Town Camp Tenure

1

Mpwetyerre Aboriginal Corporation Abbotts Camp Special Purpose lease

2 Ilparpa Aboriginal Corporation Ilparpa Special Purpose lease

3 Karnte Aboriginal Corporation Karnte Crown lease

4

Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation and Hoppys Camp Hoppys Special Purpose lease

5

Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation Charles Creek Special Purpose lease

6

Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation Kunoth Special Purpose lease

7

Akngwertnarre Association Incorporated Morris Soak Special Purpose lease

8

Anthepe Housing Association Incorporated Drive In Special Purpose lease

9

Aper Alwerrknge Association Incorporated and Palmers Camp Palmers Special Purpose lease

10

Ewyenper-Atwatye Association Incorporated Hidden Valley Special Purpose lease

11

Ilperle Tyathe Association Incorporated Warlpiri Special Purpose lease

12

Ilyperenye Association Incorporated

Old Timers Special Purpose lease

13

Inarlenge Community Incorporated

Little Sisters Crown lease

14 Mount Nancy Mount Nancy Special Purpose lease

15 Basso’s Farm Basso Special Purpose lease

16 Larapinta Valley Larapinta Special Purpose lease

17

Nyewente Association Incorporated Trucking Yards Special Purpose lease

Total 17

Table D ALICE SPRINGS LIVING AREAS (TOWN CAMPS) SUBLEASES HELD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TOWNSHIP LEASING IN 2018-19 46

Image: Wurrumiyanga Consultative Forum

47

Maps

Milikapiti (Snake Bay)

Umbakumba

Milyakburra

Angurugu

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

DARWIN

JABIRU

KATHERINE

DALY WATERS

TENNANT CREEK

ALICE SPRINGS

YULARA

ALYANGULA ~100 km

N

Wurankuwu (Ranku)

Lajamanu

TIWI ISLANDS

GROOTE EYLANDT ARCHIPELAGO

Wutunugurra

Wilora

Nyirripi

Imangara

Ali Curung

Kaltukatjara

Hermannsburg

Ampilatawatja

Pmata Jutunta

Tara

Titjikala

Papunya

Kintore

Alpurrurulam

Nturiya

Areyonga

Imanpa

Yuendumu

Mount Liebig

Willowra

Legend

MAJOR TOWN

Highway Sealed

Highway Unsealed

Housing Leases

Township Leases

Pirlangimpi (Garden Point)

Binjari

Mutitjulu

Atitjere Laramba

Santa Teresa

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018 Executive Director of Township Leasing 34

Image:

Map of the Northern Territory

48

~1000 m

N

BASSO'S FARM MT NANCY ILPERLE TYATHE (Walpiri Camp)

NYEWENTE (Trucking Yards)

YARRENYTY ARLTERE (Larapinta Valley )

AKNGWERTNARRE (Morris Soak)

INARLENGE (Little Sisters)

ANTHEPE (Drive in)

KARNTE

APER ALWERRKNGE (Palmers Camp)

ANTHELK-EWLPAYE (Charles Creek)

EWYENPER ATWATYE (Hidden Valley )

ANTHELK-EWLPAYE (Kunoth)

LHENPE ARTNWE (Hoppy's Camp)

MPWETYERRE (Abbots Camp)

ILYPERENYE (Old Timers)

ILPARPA (Walpiri)

Table D Alice Springs Living Areas (Town Camps) subleases held by the Executive Director of Township Leasing in 2017-18

Araluen

Braitling Larapinta

Flynn

Ilparpa

Arumbera

Connellan

Ross

Mount Johns

Undoolya

Ciccone

Gillen

Sadadeen

East Side

Dessert Springs

Alice Springs

The Gap

Housing Association Town Camp Tenure

1 Mpwetyerre Aboriginal Corporation Abbotts Camp Special Purpose lease

2 Ilparpa Aboriginal Corporation Ilparpa Special Purpose lease

3 Karnte Aboriginal Corporation Karnte Crown lease

4

Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation and Hoppys Camp Hoppys Special Purpose lease

5 Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation Charles Creek Special Purpose lease

6 Anthelk-Ewlpaye Aboriginal Corporation Kunoth Special Purpose lease

7 Akngwertnarre Association Incorporated Morris Soak Special Purpose lease

8 Anthepe Housing Association Incorporated Drive In Special Purpose lease

9

Aper Alwerrknge Association Incorporated and Palmers Camp Palmers Special Purpose lease

10 Ewyenper-Atwatye Association Incorporated Hidden Valley Special Purpose lease

11 Ilperle Tyathe Association Incorporated Warlpiri Special Purpose lease

12 Ilyperenye Association Incorporated Old Timers Special Purpose lease

13 Inarlenge Community Incorporated Little Sisters Crown lease

14 Mount Nancy Mount Nancy Special Purpose lease

15 Basso’s Farm Basso Special Purpose lease

16 Larapinta Valley Larapinta Special Purpose lease

17 Nyewente Association Incorporated Trucking Yards Special Purpose lease

Total 17

Executive Director of Township Leasing ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018 35 Image: Map of the Alice Spings Region

49