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National Library of Australia—Report for 2013-14


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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y

O F A U S T R A L I A

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y

O F A U S T R A L I A

Published by the National Library of Australia Parkes Place Canberra ACT 2600 T 02 6262 1111 F 02 6257 1703 National Relay Service 133 677 nla.gov.au/policy/annual.html

ABN 28 346 858 075

© National Library of Australia 2014

National Library of Australia Annual report / National Library of Australia.-8th (1967/68)- Canberra: NLA, 1968--v.; 25 cm. Annual.

Continues: National Library of Australia. Council. Annual report of the Council = ISSN 0069-0082.

Report year ends 30 June.

ISSN 0313-1971 = Annual report-National Library of Australia. 1. National Library of Australia-Periodicals.

027.594

Prepared by the Executive and Public Programs Division Printed by Union Offset

Cover image: Nicolaes Visscher (1618-1679) Orbis terrarum nova et accuratissima tabula 1658 (Amsterdam: J. Jansson, 1658) nla.map-rm4641

Canberra ACT 2600 T +61 2 6262 1111 F +61 2 6257 1703 Hearing or speech impaired-call us via the National Relay Service on 133 677 nla.gov.au ABN 28 346 858 075

8 August 2014

Senator the Hon. George Brandis QC Attorney-General Minister for the Arts Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

National Library of Australia Annual Report 2013-2014

The Council of the National Library of Australia has pleasure in submitting to you, for presentation to each House of Parliament, its annual report covering the period 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014.

The report is submitted to you in accordance with section 9 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011.

The report has been prepared in conformity with the requirements set out under Clause 1 of Schedule 1 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act and with select regard to the Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports, approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999 and made available by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet on 29 May 2014.

We commend the Annual Report to you.

Yours sincerely

Mr Ryan Stokes Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Chair of Council Director General

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION 1 Chair’s Report 3

Director General’s Review 6

Summary of Financial Performance 12

CORPORATE OVERVIEW 19 Role 21

Legislation 21

Organisation 21

Corporate Governance 23

Public Accountability 28

Corporate Management 34

Information Technology 47

REPORT OF OPERATIONS 53 Outcome and Strategies 55

Strategic Direction One: Collect and Preserve Australia’s Documentary Heritage 56

Strategic Direction Two: Make the Library’s Collections and Services Accessible to All Australians 61

Strategic Direction Three: Deliver National Leadership 66

Strategic Direction Four: Achieve Organisational Excellence 71

Cross-agency Key Performance Indicators 73

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 77 Audited Financial Statements 79

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 vii vi

APPENDICES 129 Appendix A: The Council of the National Library of Australia and Its Committees 131

Appendix B: National Library of Australia Foundation Board 137

Appendix C: National Library of Australia Committees 138

Appendix D: Principal Supporting Policies and Documents 140

Appendix E: Consultancy Services 142

Appendix F: Staffing Overview 143

Appendix G: Gifts, Grants and Sponsorships 147

Appendix H: National Library of Australia Fund 149

Appendix I: Notable Acquisitions 157

GLOSSARY AND INDICES 161 Glossary 163

Shortened Forms 164

Compliance Index 165

Index 166

Figures

1.1 Income, 2013-14 and 2012-13 12

1.2 Expenses, 2013-14 and 2012-13 13

1.3 Total Assets, 2013-14 and 2012-13 15

1.4 Total Liabilities, 2013-14 and 2012-13 16

1.5 Net Cash Flow, 2013-14 and 2012-13 17

2.1 Organisational and Senior Management Structure, 30 June 2014 22

2.2 Corporate Governance Structure, 2013-14 23

2.3 Energy Consumption, 2010-2014 43

2.4 Paper Consumption, 2010-2014 43

2.5 Ten-year Growth in Digital Collection Storage 48

2.6 Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2014 48

2.7 Use of Web Services, 2000-01 to 2013-14 49

3.1 Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained 59

3.2 Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed 60

3.3 Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users 65

3.4 Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services 69

3.5 Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies 70

Tables

2.1 Compliments Received, 2013-14 31

2.2 Complaints Received, 2013-14 32

2.3 Library Expenditure, 2013-14 33

2.4 Salary Ranges below SES Level and Number of Employees, 30 June 2014 36

2.5 Reporting Requirements under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 30 June 2014 39

2.6 Premiums for Injuries Suffered, 2011-15 (as a percentage of wages and salaries) 40

2.7 Availability of Ten Key Service Areas, 2013-14 50

3.1 Develop, Store and Maintain the National Collection—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14 59

3.2 National Collection—Storage (%) 60

3.3 National Collection—Processing (%) 60

3.4 Provide Access to the National Collection and Other Documentary Resources— Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14 65

3.5 Collection Access—Service Charter (%) 65

3.6 Provide and Support Collaborative Projects and Services—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14 69

3.7 Collaborative Services—Percentage of Specified Service Standards and Timeframes Met (%) 70

3.8 Summary of Results against the Cross-Agency Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14 73

3.9 Cross-Cultural Agency Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14 74

E.1 Consultancy Services Engaged, 2013-14 142

F.1 Staff Distribution by Division, 30 June 2014 143

F.2 Ongoing and Non-ongoing Full-time and Part-time Staff by Classification and Gender, 30 June 2014 144

F.3 Staff by Equal Employment Opportunity Group and APS Classification, 30 June 2014 145

F.4 Training Days, 2013-14 146

INTRODUCTION

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

INTRODUCTION 3

CHAIR’S REPORT

Nicolaes Visscher (1618-1679) Orbis terrarum nova et accuratissima tabula (detail) 1658 (Amsterdam: J. Jansson, 1658) nla.map-rm4641

It is my pleasure to report that over 2013-14 the National Library has continued to broaden its reach and to build and preserve its collection innovatively and successfully. The Library’s significant achievements are set out in this report.

For some years now, the Library has been at the forefront of research and action by collecting institutions around the world to meet the collecting, access and preservation challenges presented by the dynamic digital environment in which we operate. The Library is part-way through an ambitious and challenging project to replace existing digital infrastructure to provide the required capability and capacity to efficiently collect digital content, digitise paper and other analogue collections, preserve digital material, and deliver digital content.

This project is core to the Library’s ability to protect and deliver digital collections and to meet collecting and access obligations into the future. Using a mix of commercial products, open-source software and in-house development, in January the Library released a system to support the end-to-end digitisation, management, preservation and delivery of published books and journals held in its collections. Given the centrality of the project to the Library’s work and success, and its complexity, the Library Council takes a close interest in its progress and governance.

On the access front three things stand out as highlights of the year: the extraordinary success of the exhibition, Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia; the continuing growth and success of Trove; and the careful planning, design work and preparation for the integration of the Petherick, Maps, and Pictures and Manuscripts Reading Rooms, and the integration of the Newspapers and Microforms and Main Reading Rooms.

Mapping Our World brought together spectacular maps from international collections and those from the Library and other public and private Australian collections to tell the story of European mapping of Australia, from early notions of a vast southern land to Matthew Flinders’ published map of 1814. With 118,264 visitors to the exhibition, from around Australia and abroad, it has broken previous attendance records and ranks as the most popular exhibition in the Library’s long exhibiting history. The exhibition was made possible only by the generous support of lenders: the Australian and ACT Governments; the exhibition’s Principal Partner, Shell; its Major Partners, Australian Capital Equity, Esri Australia, Planet Wheeler, Channel Seven and Crowne Plaza Canberra; its Airline Partners, Etihad and Virgin Australia; and its Accommodation Partner, Toga Hotels.

INTRODUCTION NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 5 4

The Council has taken a keen interest in the Public Management Reform Agenda and in the proposals for corporate planning for entities such as the Library. The Library’s existing Strategic Directions will serve it well for another year. In June, the Council initiated the process to develop strategic directions for 2015-2019 in preparation for the implementation of the new corporate planning arrangements on 1 July 2015.

I would like to acknowledge the contribution of my fellow Council members: the Hon. Mary Delahunty, Mr John M. Green, Dr Nicholas Gruen, Mr Chris Hayes MP, Ms Jane Hemstritch, Dr Nonja Peters, Professor Janice Reid, Senator Zed Seselja and Ms Deborah Thomas. The Council farewelled the Hon. Dick Adams, Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM and Senator Gary Humphries in 2013, and thanked all three for their work on Council.

On behalf of Council I would like to acknowledge and extend our appreciation to the Library’s Corporate Management Group led by Director General Anne-Marie Schwirtlich, and to all Library staff. Through their collective efforts and passionate dedication to the Library we are able to achieve our goals. We thank them for their efforts.

Ryan Stokes

Use of Trove, the Library’s free, online national delivery and discovery service, continued to grow, as did its content. In June 2013, Trove had an average of more than 60,000 visits a day; by June 2014 the figure had grown to 66,000. More than 24 million visits to Trove, from Australia and the world, were recorded for the year—an increase of 16 per cent over the previous year— with visitors completing more than 93 million searches. The number of unique visitors rose to 15 million—an increase of 25 per cent over last year. 

The Library conducted the first major evaluation of customer satisfaction with Trove and was heartened by the results, with the overwhelming majority of users (84 per cent) rating Trove as ‘excellent’ or ‘very good’, a further 14 per cent rating it ‘good’, and a total of 98 per cent of Trove users happy with their experience. The Library is particularly pleased that the evaluation showed Trove’s reach extending to Australians in regional, rural and remote areas, with many respondents thanking the Library for this new form of easy access to Australian documentary heritage.

Consistent with the master plan for the Library’s building, design work for the expansion of the Main Reading Room on the ground floor and relocation of the Petherick, Maps, and Pictures and Manuscripts Reading Rooms to a new space on the first floor of the building was completed. This work will also ensure that significant portions of three levels of the building will be upgraded to meet building codes, work health and safety requirements and government standards for the comfort of individuals, the protection of the collection and building heritage values. Following receipt of the Minister’s approval to proceed, work commenced in May.

The Library’s work on building, managing and preserving the collection continued. The Library gave priority to working with the Attorney-General’s Department on preparations to amend the Copyright Act 1968 (Copyright Act) to provide for the legal deposit of electronic resources. The Library is eager to see legislative change achieved in 2014-15 to ensure that the national collection of material published in Australia is comprehensive and best able to serve future research and study needs.

In March, the Library released, in proof-of-concept form, a new web archive service—the Australian Government Web Archive. The archive preserves Commonwealth government websites and online publications, with collecting beginning in 2011. The service complements the Library’s long-established PANDORA archive which makes available, by permission, a range of web material published by individuals and organisations and selected government websites prior to 2011. Development work on the website will continue, particularly to bring it under the Library’s single discovery service, Trove.

With its Audit Committee, the Library Council has taken particular interest in matters concerning the valuation of the Library’s collection and the impact valuation requirements and processes have on the work and resources of the Library. The Council is grateful to the Australian National Audit Office for its assistance in resolving these issues.

INTRODUCTION NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 7 6

year was collecting websites relating to the September 2013 federal election, resulting in more than 500 websites collected, including those of candidates, lobby and interest groups, and registered political parties, and media, commentary, social media and video sites. In addition, many of the websites of outgoing ministers and sites relating to discontinuing programs, including the website of the Climate Institute of Australia, were collected.

Despite the acceleration of digital publishing, for the foreseeable future the Library will be collecting both paper-based and digital material, and 2013-14 has seen remarkable additions to the national collection, some of which are highlighted in Appendix I.

Over the course of the year, the Library completed an analysis of its newspaper holdings against its Collection Development Policy and the Australian Newspaper Plan, an agreement with all state and territory libraries concerning newspaper preservation. The Library collects and preserves print copies of national titles, such as The Australian and Australian Financial Review, and, with the ACT Heritage Library, all ACT papers including suburban weeklies. The Library also collects and preserves print copies of capital city dailies, ethnic newspapers and subject-based newspapers such as The Queensland Graingrower. To ensure that the Library is able to support the research needs of most onsite researchers, it also collects and retains significant regional papers Australia wide; higher use newspaper titles (those used more than ten times over the past seven years); as well as copies of newspapers from nearby areas such as Braidwood, Cooma, Goulburn, Queanbeyan and Yass. Initially, the Library collects these titles in print but does not retain the print copy once a microfilm copy has been acquired. Local and community newspapers outside the ACT—that is, those which are not regional in their coverage— have not been considered collecting priorities since 1990 and have been out of the Library’s collecting scope since 1999. The Library commenced repatriating copies of selected local print newspapers outside the scope of its Collection Development Policy to the state and territory libraries in whose jurisdictions they were published to ensure that the collections of record are comprehensive.

One benefit of the Library’s long-standing collaboration with state and territory library partners on newspaper collecting has been the highly successful Australian Newspaper Digitisation Program funded jointly by the Library and contributing partners. This year the largest number of newspaper pages was digitised since the program began in 2007, with 3.6 million pages added to Trove. The Digital Excellence Program at the State Library of NSW was a major contributor to this result. By the end of the year, over 13 million pages were accessible. Trove newspapers is by far the largest collection of digitised newspapers in the world and this content continues to drive usage of Trove, with over 24 million visits recorded in the period.

As the Chair has reported, use of Trove, which assists people to access content held by the Library and collecting institutions across Australia, rose steadily and users continue to express great satisfaction with it. In May and June 2013, the Library conducted an online survey to

DIRECTOR GENERAL’S REVIEW

The Library has made notable progress in advancing its Strategic Directions for 2012-14, which focus on developing the national collection, promoting access and engaging audiences, collaboration and leadership, and achieving organisational excellence.

The Library shapes its strategic thinking with reference to its broader context. Over the course of the reporting year, the Library has monitored developments in the policy environment, trends in use and information-seeking behaviour, and changes in the digital domain. Three developments have been of particular interest. The Minister has articulated six principles by which he will shape policy for the Arts, namely excellence, integrity, artistic freedom, self-confidence, sustainability and accessibility. The Library believes that it is well positioned to contribute to these principles. The second development was the tabling of the Australian Law Reform Commission’s report on Copyright and the Digital Economy. The Library welcomes the Commission’s recommendation that a ‘fair use’ exception replace many of the existing ‘purpose-based’ exceptions in the Copyright Act. Finally, the Library has taken account of the Public Management Reform Agenda and followed keenly the proposed changes to the financial accountability, corporate planning and online security frameworks, all of which will have an impact on the Library.

Responding to the dominance of the digital in the information world, the Library is developing more robust workflows and systems to enable it to collect, preserve, digitise and provide access to an increasing number of online resources. In January, Stage 1 of the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement (DLIR) project was completed. This enables the digitisation, management and delivery of published books and journals in the Library’s collections and will support the bit-level preservation of the Library’s digital collections. Stage 2 of the project commenced in February and when concluded will support the digital appraisal, management and delivery of manuscripts and pictures and develop prototypes for web archiving and preservation. The DLIR project is innovative, complex and significant and a mid-point review of the project will commence early in 2014-15.

The legislative environment does not support the Library’s collecting work in the digital domain. As the Chair has noted, the Library is eager to see amendments to the Copyright Act which will extend the legal deposit provisions to ensure that material published in digital form can be preserved by the Library. To prepare for this vital amendment to the Copyright Act, Library staff have worked on Regulation Impact Statements and assessed the cost of the compliance obligations for publishers. The Library stands ready to work closely with the Attorney-General’s Department and publishers to ensure the smooth implementation of these new arrangements.

In the absence of legal deposit for electronic material, the Library seeks permission to collect and preserve, in the PANDORA archive, a selection of web-based publications. A focus for the

INTRODUCTION NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 9 8

acclaim. Audience evaluation by Environmetrics revealed that 98 per cent of visitors gave the content the top ratings, approximately half of the audience came from outside Canberra/ Queanbeyan and the economic benefit to the ACT economy was nearly $25,000,000.

December 2013 brought to a close the Library’s significant contribution to the ACT Government’s Centenary of Canberra program. In the second half of the calendar year, the Library was able, with the generous assistance of many donors, to complete the digitisation of issues of The Canberra Times dating from 1955 to 1995. This is a lasting legacy for the Centenary year, ensuring that Canberra’s history is readily available to future generations.

The Friends of the National Library of Australia continued to promote the Library through a diverse program of events and activities for its 2,000 members. These included the 2013 Kenneth Myer Lecture, delivered in August by Professor Julian Disney AO on ‘Media Standards in an Internet World’. The Executive Committee of the Friends also approved two very handsome contributions to the Library. The Friends will fund a project to digitise first-hand accounts of the Federation of Australia. The Friends will also fund, for four years commencing in 2014-15, an annual Friends of the National Library Creative Arts Fellowship. This fellowship has long been imagined and will open the collection in new ways.

Highlights of the Library’s own busy events program included the Kenneth Binns Lecture delivered in August by Australian author Murray Bail; the Seymour Biography Lecture, ‘The Informed Imagination’, delivered in September by Dr Drusilla Modjeska; and the extraordinarily successful education and public programming in association with the record-breaking exhibition, Mapping Our World.

It was a pleasure for the Library to work with the many generous lenders to, and sponsors of, Mapping Our World. The inclusion of Fra Mauro’s Map of the World was made possible by the willingness of the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana to lend it and the support of Kerry Stokes AC, Noel Dan AM and Adrienne Dan, Nigel Peck AM and Patricia Peck, and Douglas and Belinda Snedden.

The Library’s two appeals for donations, the End of Year Appeal launched in December 2013 and the Tax Time Appeal launched in May 2014, were most successful. The End of Year Appeal sought financial donations to assist with the preservation of Joan Blaeu’s rare map Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus (Eastern or Asian Archipelago) dating to 1663, and donations received were double the target. The 2014 Tax Time Appeal was launched in May and will support the preservation and digitisation of the Library’s rare medieval manuscripts, as well as access programs for the Treasures Gallery. The target for this appeal was also well exceeded.

Collaboration with institutions in Australia and overseas is a hallmark of the Library’s culture. The Library has continued its efforts to achieve Reimagining Libraries, the vision of National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA). Library staff have led and contributed actively to NSLA groups, working on a range of strategic priorities to improve and harmonise public access to collections and services. During the year, issues on which groups collaborated included the preservation of digital heritage, the implications and challenges of digital collecting, and the accessibility of large pictures and map collections—all with the aim of benefiting library users for generations to come.

evaluate Trove customer satisfaction. This gathered demographic information about Trove users and about why and how they use Trove; asked about the value they place on the service and how they would like to see Trove develop. Analysis of the data was completed this year. It is most gratifying that Trove users are very satisfied and are proportionally representative of state and territory, and metropolitan, regional and rural, populations.

In order to maintain Trove’s usability, the Library continued to redevelop the Trove newspapers service over the second half of the reporting year. Originally designed to handle 4 million newspaper pages, Trove is now delivering access to 13 million pages, requiring a major platform upgrade to deliver higher performance and to position the service for expected content growth in newspapers over the next several years. In addition, the implementation of Trove 6.1 in May 2014 saw some long-awaited improvements to the newspapers interface, including the ability to group newspaper titles by state. The Library is now focusing on upgrading the entire newspapers interface in an environment in which almost 25 per cent of Trove visits are via mobile devices.

Other notable growth in Trove content included: transcripts of ABC Radio National shows, which increased more than 1,000 per cent, from 19,667 to over 200,000 items (Radio National content will appear in Trove hours after first broadcast following a new approach to harvesting the historic content); increased exposure of unique local collections, such as a collection of postcards from Ashfield Library; and all 18,002 images of the Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection, donated to the Library by Fairfax Media in December 2012, and whose preservation, cataloguing and digitisation was funded by the Australian Government’s National Cultural Heritage Account.

The Library works with purpose and skill in the digital domain but its importance as a physical venue cannot be underestimated. It remains a place to consult the overwhelming majority of the collection that is in paper form (or is in digital form that, for reasons of licensing or other agreements, must be consulted onsite), as well as to enjoy exhibitions and participate in events and learning programs. The Library takes great pride in the services provided in its landmark building.

The Chair has reported on progress on the project to integrate reading rooms and to create spaces that support learning and knowledge creation and efficient workflows for researchers and staff. The project will enable the modernisation and improvement of facilities and services and will ensure that the aesthetic and heritage values of the building are enhanced. Following completion of schematic and detailed design work early in the year, the tender process for the associated building works was conducted, with Manteena Pty Ltd appointed as head construction contractor. The project is scheduled for completion in early 2016.

The Library’s two galleries continued to be strong attractions. The Treasures Gallery drew an interested audience to its regularly refreshed content, offering visitors an extraordinary range of viewing. The Library’s Exhibition Gallery saw three well-received and very different shows: City of Trees, which was commissioned by the Centenary of Canberra from British artist Jyll Bradley; the Library’s hugely successful international exhibition, Mapping Our World; and Luminous World: Contemporary Art from the Wesfarmers Collection.

Russell Crowe launched Mapping Our World in November before a record crowd. As the Chair has noted, the exhibition drew a record number of visitors and received public and critical

INTRODUCTION NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 11 10

2014. The Library was re-accredited as an ACTSmart Business site and has achieved significant reductions (from 44 per cent in 2010 to 24 per cent in 2014) in waste to landfill.

This report provides me with a welcome opportunity to thank the Library Council, volunteers, Friends, members of the Foundation Board, donors and partners. The generosity with which they contribute their time, energy, goodwill and expertise to the Library is inspiring.

It is with gratitude that I also note the counsel received from colleagues in the department, which was, as always, immensely useful.

Each year I say that the Library is conscious of the significant challenges it faces. The year ahead is no different as the Library seeks to manage a doubling of the efficiency dividend while endeavouring to maintain the investment in technology and systems development to support digital library services, to identify a cost-effective solution to long-term storage needs and to manage continuing pressure on its budget. Financial constraints will require the Library to reduce its collecting and cataloguing work; to reduce its opening hours for reading rooms; to suspend the Harold White Fellowships; to cease its e-publishing and curtail its trade publishing program.

As part of the 2014-15 Budget measures, five corporate back-office functions at the Library will be consolidated with those of six other Canberra collecting institutions and delivered by the Attorney-General’s Department’s Shared Services Centre. The five functions are payroll, accounts, records management, information and communications technology corporate systems support, and common goods and services purchasing. The Library will transition to this consolidated service by 30 June 2016. Over the next two years, with departmental colleagues, the Library will work to ensure that affected staff are best placed and that the quality and scope of services provided under the new arrangements strongly support the Library’s business and accountability needs.

Nonetheless, the Library will advance its strategic directions. To ensure that Australians can access, enjoy and learn from a national collection that documents Australian life and society, the Library will progress its work on the DLIR project; continue to press and to prepare for the extension of legal deposit to electronic materials; continue work to develop a sustainable business model for Trove; manage the construction of a specialist integrated reading room and the expansion of the Main Reading Room; mark the centenary of the First World War with an exhibition drawn from the Library’s collections; maintain its digitisation program; continue to assess options for a new Integrated Library Management System (ILMS); and prepare a new corporate plan for 2015-2019.

Library staff take pride in advancing the institution’s role in supporting learning, scholarship, curiosity and cultural life. They pursue vital long-term goals with industry, innovation and intelligence, conscious of the extraordinary legacy of which they are stewards. The pages ahead tell the story.

Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Libraries Australia is a membership-based collaboration which meets the collection management needs of more than 1,200 member libraries. The redevelopment of its search service was a priority for the year and the new service will be released to members in July 2014. This redevelopment will deliver improved capacity and performance, together with a refreshed and more usable online interface.

The Library continued to collaborate with members of the Australian diplomatic community. In particular, the embassies of the United States of America, France and Italy made significant contributions to the Library’s public programs. The Library also hosted visits by delegations from a number of embassies, including the United States of America and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

A senior delegation from the National Library of China, led by Mr Sun Yigang, Assistant Director of that library, was welcomed in December. The visit furthered the collaboration which will bring to the National Library of Australia a major exhibition of the treasures of the National Library of China.

In February, the Library hosted the Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania, welcoming 24 participants from 18 countries and regions. India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan and Vietnam participated, as did several countries in Oceania. The conference focused on library initiatives and activities in the region and also enabled a day of discussion between international colleagues and colleagues from NSLA about collaborative collecting initiatives, copyright, digital preservation and digital collecting.

As it enters its twentieth year, the Community Heritage Grants program continues to be an important source of support for community groups. The program is managed by the Library on behalf of funding partners, including the Attorney-General’s Department Ministry for the Arts; the National Archives of Australia; the National Film and Sound Archive; and the National Museum of Australia. Grants of up to $15,000 are awarded to libraries, archives, museums, genealogical and historical societies and multicultural and Indigenous groups. In 2013, 125 applications were received for Community Heritage Grants. Of these, 78 organisations received grants averaging $5,400. Awardees received their grants from Mr Roger Wilkins AO, Secretary of the Attorney-General’s Department, on 29 October. The 2014 grant round closed on 2 May and received 134 applications.

Planning for, and building the capability of, the Library’s workforce continues to be a corporate focus. The production of the Library Leadership Development Resource Kit and launch of the Library’s Indigenous Employment Strategy were both proud and significant moments. Arrangements affecting recruitment have had an impact on the Library’s ability to manage staffing levels smoothly in the second half of the operating year.

The Library continues to reduce its energy consumption and improve its environmental management. Energy consumption for air-conditioning in the two large offsite repositories was significantly reduced last year and, this year, trials in the stack areas of the main building yielded promising results. Stage 2 of the project to improve the efficiency and performance of lighting in the Foyer and Main Reading Room was commenced and is due for completion in

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The major variations between financial years relate to an increase in government revenue ($0.566 million), which is the net effect of efficiency dividends, parameter adjustments and previous budget measures, and increases in the sales of goods and services ($1.507 million), largely due to increases in revenue received from corporate sponsorship ($0.649 million), Library shop ($0.752 million) and publications ($0.210 million), much of which related to the Mapping Our World exhibition. The reduction in interest revenue (-$0.379 million) is largely the result of a decline in deposit interest rates to approximately 3.7 per cent during 2013-14, compared with rates of above 4 per cent during 2012-13. The increase in the category, All other income, ($0.510 million) is primarily a result of increased grant revenue ($0.380 million) mainly for the Mapping Our World exhibition; increased donations ($0.264 million), including to support the preservation of the Joan Blaeu map and to fund an exhibitions curator position; and a reduction (-$0.125 million) in resources received free of charge.

EXPENSES The total expenses of $77.542 million for 2013-14 were $0.365 million above budget and $2.287 million more than 2012-13.

Figure 1.2 shows a comparison of expenditure across items against budgets for 2013-14 and 2012-13.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2013-14 and 2012-13

$0m 12.5 25.0 37.5 $10m 62.5 75.0 87.5 $100m

Total

Other

Depreciation and amortisation

Suppliers

Employees

38.476

40.349

39.066

16.652

16.233

15.389

20.309

19.980

20.074

2.105

0.615

0.726

77.542

77.177

75.255

Actual 2013-14 Budget 2013-14 Actual 2012-13

$1m

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

OPERATING OUTCOME During 2013-14, income, including revenue from government, amounted to $67.904 million and expenses were $77.542 million, resulting in a deficit of $9.638 million. From an income-statement perspective, the Library does not receive appropriation funding for depreciation of the national collection (totalling $12.431 million), which forms part of operating expenses. Government funding for the purchase of collection material is provided through an equity injection totalling $9.861 million.

INCOME The total income of $67.904 million for 2013-14 was $2.755 million above budget and $2.204 million more than 2012-13.

Figure 1.1 shows a comparison of income across items against budgets for 2013-14 and 2012-13.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2013-14 and 2012-13

$1m 12.5 25.0 37.5 $10m 62.5 75.0 87.5 $100m

Total

All other income

Interest

Sales of goods and services

Revenue from government

50.218

50.218

49.652

11.676

10.204

10.169

2.052

1.600

2.431

3.958

3.127

3.448

67.904

65.149

65.700

Actual 2013-14 Budget 2013-14 Actual 2012-13

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

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TOTAL ASSETS Figure 1.3 shows that the total value of the Library’s assets increased by $40.417 million to $1,840.727 million in 2013-14.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2013-14 and 2012-13

$1m $10m $100m $1,000m $10,000m

Actual 30 June 2014 Actual 30 June 2013

Total

Plant and equipment

Intangibles—software

Inventories and other

Financial assets

57.139

55.611

2.752

3.905

1,534.707

1,515.236

13.239

13.953

1,840.727

1,800.310

Land and buildings

The National Collection

6.291

5.318

226.599

206.287

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

The increase in non-financial assets ($38.889 million) was largely the result of the revaluation of the Library’s collections, land and buildings (a net increment of $41.425 million) and the net difference between current-year assets acquisitions, disposals and current-year depreciation expenses (-$1.383 million). In addition, there was a decrease in the value of inventories (-$1.224 million) and an increase in the value of prepaid supplier expenses ($0.071 million). The increase in financial assets ($1.528 million) relates primarily to an increase in investments ($2.543 million) and cash at bank ($0.251 million), offset by decreases against other financial assets (-$0.800 million) and receivables (-$0.466 million).

There was a decrease in employee expenses (-$0.590 million) compared to 2012-13. The majority of this variation relates to a decline in leave expenses (-$0.884 million), largely due to a favourable movement in the discount rate, which is used to calculate the present value of the long service leave liability.

Supplier expenses were higher ($1.263 million) than 2012-13, largely due to increases in the cost of goods sold ($0.520 million), exhibitions freight ($0.344 million) and promotion of library services ($0.409 million), all of which relate to the Mapping Our World exhibition.

The increase in other expenses ($1.379 million) was primarily due to increased write-downs ($1.224 million), most of which were the result of revised procedures following a review of Library trade publications by an independent consultant. Also contributing to the variation in other expenses was a loss from asset sales ($0.238 million) due to revised timing arrangements for the replacement of some information technology equipment.

EQUITY The Library’s total equity increased by $41.648 million to $1,823.861 million in 2013-14. The net increase was a result of an equity injection for collection acquisitions ($9.861 million), a net revaluation increment ($41.425 million) following the revaluation of the Library’s collection, land and buildings, and the net operating result (-$9.638 million) for 2013-14.

INTRODUCTION NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 17 16

CASH FLOW In 2013-14, there was a minor increase in the Library’s cash balance, which increased by $0.251 million to $5.857 million as at 30 June 2014.

Figure 1.5 shows a comparison of cash flow items for 2013-14 and 2012-13.

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2013-14 and 2012-13

Net operating Net investing Net financing Total

-$20m

-$15m

-$10m

-$5m

$0m

$5m

-$25m

$15m

$10m

Actual 2013-14 Actual 2012-13

11.524 9.450

-21.134 -19.119

9.861 9.832 0.251 0.163

The increase in net cash from operating activities ($2.074 million) reflects the comments under ‘Income’ and ‘Expenses’. The increase in net cash used by investing activities ($2.015 million) primarily reflects the net movement of funds from investments to cash at bank between years ($2.691 million) and a decrease in the purchase of property, plant, equipment and intangibles (-$0.781 million). There was a minor increase in net cash from financing activities between financial years ($0.029 million) as a result of the Library’s equity injection, provided by government to fund collection acquisitions, being slightly increased.

TOTAL LIABILITIES As Figure 1.4 shows, the Library’s total liabilities decreased by $1.231 million from last financial year to $16.866 million.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2013-14 and 2012-13

$1m $10m $100m

Actual 30 June 2014 Actual 30 June 2013

Total

Provisions

11.833

12.744

5.033

5.353

Payables

16.866

18.097

The changes in liabilities relate to decreases in supplier payables (-$0.250 million), employee provisions (-$0.923 million), which relate mostly to the favourable movement in the discount rate used to calculate the present value of the long service leave liability, and other payables (-$0.096 million) offset by increases in grants payable ($0.026 million) and other provisions ($0.012 million).

CORPORATE OVERVIEW

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

CORPORATE OVERVIEW 21

Claes Jansz. Visscher (c. 1586-1652) Nova totius terrarum orbis geographica ac hydrographica tabula (detail) 1652 in De zee-atlas ofte water-waereld ... by Hendrick Doncker (Amsterdam: Hendrick Doncker, 1659) Petherick Collection nla.map-ra10-s12

ROLE The functions of the Library are set out in section 6 of the National Library Act 1960. They are:

a. to maintain and develop a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia and the Australian people;

b. to make library material in the national collection available to such persons and institutions, and in such manner and subject to such conditions, as the Council determines with a view to the most advantageous use of that collection in the national interest;

c. to make available such other services in relation to library matters and library material (including bibliographical services) as the Council thinks fit, and, in particular, services for the purposes of:

• the library of the Parliament

• the authorities of the Commonwealth

• the Territories

• the Agencies (within the meaning of the Public Service Act 1999);

d. to cooperate in library matters (including the advancement of library science) with authorities or persons, whether in Australia or elsewhere, concerned with library matters.

The Library is one of many agencies within the Attorney-General and Minister for the Arts portfolio with responsibilities for collecting Australian cultural heritage materials and making them available to the Australian public. The former Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government and Minister for the Arts, the Hon. Tony Burke MP, had responsibility for the Library until September 2013. His successor, appointed Minister for the Arts on 18 September 2013, is Senator the Hon. George Brandis QC. The affairs of the Library are conducted by the Library Council, with the Director General as executive officer.

LEGISLATION The Library was established by the National Library Act 1960, which defines the Library’s role, corporate governance and financial management framework. As a Commonwealth statutory authority, the Library is subject to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) which provides the reporting and accountability framework. From 1 July 2014, the Library will be subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

ORGANISATION The Library’s senior management structure comprises the Director General and six Assistant Directors General.

Figure 2.1 shows the Library’s organisational and senior management structure.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 23 22

Figure 2.1: Organisational and Senior Management Structure, 30 June 2014

Access and Digital Services Australian Collections

Management Digitisation and Photography Overseas Collections Management Preservation Services

Collections Management

Resource

Sharing

Information Technology

Executive and Public Programs

Corporate Services

DIRECTOR GENERAL Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Australian Collections and Reader Services Ms Margy Burn

Assistant

Director General Collection Delivery

and Storage Maps Oral History and

Folklore Pictures and Manuscripts Reader Services

Ms Amelia McKenzie

Assistant

Director General

Dr Marie-Louise Ayres

Assistant

Director General Collaborative Services Database Services

Ms Cathy Pilgrim

Assistant

Director General

Collection Access Collection Infrastructure IT Services Web Publishing Mr Mark Corbould

Assistant

Director General

Mr Gerry Linehan

Assistant

Director General

Communications and Marketing, Community Programs and Performance Management Community Outreach Executive Support Exhibitions Publications and Production Sales and Promotion

Accountability and Reform Building and

Security Services Contracts and

Legal Support Finance Human Resources

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Figure 2.2 shows the principal elements of the Library’s corporate governance structure.

Figure 2.2: Corporate Governance Structure, 2013-14

AUDIT COMMITTEE

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

COMMONWEALTH AUTHORITIES AND COMPANIES ACT 1997

Reporting and accountability legislation

Roles and responsibilities set out by the CAC Act

REPORTING OBLIGATIONS Set out by the CAC Act

PORTFOLIO BUDGET STATEMENT Approved budget and

performance targets

Deliverables and key performance indicators

Performance measures against stakeholder, customer, financial, process and

learning and growth perspectives

NATIONAL LIBRARY ACT 1960 Enabling legislation

Established by the National Library Act 1960

ACCOUNTABILITY TO PARLIAMENT Annual Report

ACCOUNTABILITY TO GOVERNMENT Through CAC Act reporting

requirements

BALANCED SCORECARD Translates strategic directions into operational initiatives

and processes

DIRECTIONS FOR THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Strategic Directions

2012-14

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF

AUSTRALIA

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 25 24

COUNCIL The National Library Act provides that a council shall conduct the affairs of the Library. The Council has 12 members, including the Director General, one senator elected by the Senate and one member of the House of Representatives elected by the House.

At 30 June 2014, there was one vacancy on Council. Appendix A lists Council members and their attendance at Council meetings.

In 2013-14, in addition to general administrative, compliance and financial matters, Council considered a range of matters, including:

• integration of the Library’s reading rooms;

• the DLIR project;

• the 2014-15 Budget;

• the Trove evaluation survey;

• the Library’s contribution to the Anzac Centenary Program;

• the Information Technology Strategic Plan 2013-2016;

• collection storage;

• use of the Trust Funds;

• new acquisitions;

• strategic workforce planning;

• work health and safety;

• environmental management;

• the activities of the Library’s Foundation Board;

• significant factors affecting the development of the Australian collections;

• national infrastructure for libraries and the Library’s leadership role;

• Council’s evaluation of its performance;

• the implications of the PGPA Act;

• strategic directions.

Council has two advisory committees: the Audit Committee and the Corporate Governance Committee.

AUDIT COMMITTEE The role of the Audit Committee is to:

a. support the Library and Council members in complying with their obligations under the CAC Act;

b. provide a forum for communication among Council members, senior managers and internal and external auditors;

c. ensure there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library, and review policies relating to internal controls and risk management.

The Audit Committee comprises a minimum of three non-executive Council members. Council may appoint external members to the Audit Committee. The Chair of Council and Director General also attend meetings. Details of Audit Committee members and meeting attendance can be found at Appendix A.

In 2013-14, the Audit Committee considered a range of matters, including:

• financial statements for 2012-13;

• Library trust account disbursements;

• internal assessment of the Audit Committee’s performance;

• review of the Audit Committee’s role and charter;

• the internal audit schedule;

• the Australian National Audit Office’s 2013-14 financial statement audit strategy;

• the compliance report (required under the CAC Act);

• the Internal Audit Plan 2014-15;

• internal audits of:

- procurement and purchasing

- workforce planning

- IT security

- sales and promotion, and the Bookshop’s annual stocktake

- management of social media

- digital collection management

- digitisation for other libraries;

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 27 26

• Australian National Audit Office reports and recommendations;

• discussion papers on the Commonwealth Financial Accountability Review, including the PGPA Act and Public Management Reform Agenda;

• valuation of the collection;

• reports on legal services, compliance, fraud and ethics, risk management and business continuity, insurance, whistleblower and related complaints, contract management and training, probity and purchasing thresholds.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE The role of the Corporate Governance Committee is to:

a. evaluate Council’s effectiveness in its corporate governance role;

b. evaluate the Director General’s performance and remuneration;

c. oversee the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

The Corporate Governance Committee comprises three non-executive Council members (the Chair, the Deputy Chair and the Chair of the Audit Committee) and has the authority to co-opt other non-executive Council members.

Appendix A lists the Corporate Governance Committee members. In February 2014, the Corporate Governance Committee met to consider the results of the 2013 Council Self-Evaluation Survey and, in June 2014, it met to discuss the Director General’s performance.

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT GROUP The Corporate Management Group (CMG), consisting of the Director General and the six Senior Executive Service (SES) staff, provides strategic and operational leadership for the Library. In particular, it monitors the achievement of objectives and strategies, oversees budget matters, develops policy, coordinates activities across the organisation and oversees a range of operational issues. CMG meets weekly.

A number of cross-organisational committees advise CMG in areas such as workforce planning, asset management, building works, emergency planning, collection development and management, events and education, exhibitions, and publications.

CORPORATE PLANNING FRAMEWORK The Balanced Scorecard continues to be the Library’s principal planning support system, facilitating the integration of strategic, operational and budget planning. Since its introduction in 2000-01, the Balanced Scorecard has proved to be a successful performance management tool accepted by staff and other stakeholders. All scorecard achievements, initiatives and targets are reviewed regularly as part of strategic management planning and monitoring processes.

RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK The Library’s Risk Management Framework continues to provide effective tools for identifying, evaluating and responding to risks that may affect the collection, core business functions and resources, staff and visitors and/or strategic decision-making.

The Library’s Risk Management Register, which is subject to annual review, is central to this framework. The register lists risks to the Library, as well as risk-reduction strategies. These strategies are managed through established procedures and plans, such as the Collection Disaster Plan, the IT Disaster Recovery Plan, the Business Contingency Plan for Critical Building Systems, and the Business Continuity Framework.

Risk management within the Library is overseen by the Library’s Emergency Planning Committee, which is chaired by the Assistant Director General, Corporate Services, and includes SES staff representing all business areas. The committee provides a clear control structure to identify, monitor, respond to and mitigate risks that may affect the Library.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 29 28

PUBLIC ACCOUNTABILITY

OMBUDSMAN During 2013-14, the Commonwealth Ombudsman did not advise referral of any issues relating to the Library.

PRIVACY The Library introduced a new Privacy Policy in response to the amendments to the Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Act) which came into effect on 12 March 2014. The Library provided training to staff in the new amendments and audited functions to ensure compliance with the amendments.

The Library made two submissions to the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner’s public consultation on the draft guidelines for the new Australian Privacy Principles. The Library responded to one request for access to information under the Privacy Act in 2013-14.

PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE The public interest disclosure legislation took effect on 15 January 2014.  From that date until 30 June 2014 no public interest disclosures were lodged with the Library.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION The Library finalised three requests, including a subsequent appeal, under the  Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act). Partial access was granted in respect of the requests.

Agencies subject to the FOI Act are required to publish information as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement of the FOI Act has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with IPS requirements. The Library complies with IPS requirements, and a link to the scheme is provided on the Library’s website.

INDEMNITIES AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS Premiums under the Library’s insurance coverage with Comcover encompass general liability, directors’ and officers’ indemnity, property loss, damage or destruction, business interruption and consequential loss, motor vehicles, personal accidents and official overseas travel. The Library’s insurance premium attracted a 9.3 per cent discount as a result of its performance measured by Comcover’s Risk Management Benchmarking Survey. Under the terms of the insurance schedule of cover, the Library may not disclose its insurance premium price.

The Library participated in the Insurance and Risk Management Corporate Insurance Forum of cultural agencies, which holds regular meetings with Comcover to discuss insurance issues.

EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL AUDIT The Library’s Audit Committee met three times to consider external and internal audit reports.

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE REPORTS

During 2013-14, the Library implemented the Auditor-General recommendations contained in the following Australian National Audit Office reports:

• Control of Credit Card Use (No. 35, 2012-13);

• Agencies Implementation of Performance Audit Recommendations (No. 53, 2012-13).

INTERNAL AUDIT REPORTS

The Audit Committee considered a number of internal audit reports, see pages 25-26.

PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES AND GOVERNMENT INQUIRIES The Library made a submission in response to the Discussion Paper arising from the Australian Law Reform Commission’s inquiry into copyright and the digital economy.

MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS Under section 48A of the CAC Act, the Minister for Finance and Deregulation (Finance Minister) may make a General Policy Order specifying an Australian Government general policy applicable to the Library, provided the Finance Minister is satisfied that the Minister for the Arts has consulted the Library on the application of the policy. No General Policy Orders applying to the Library are in place.

LEGAL ACTION A claim was lodged in the ACT Supreme Court in 2003 on behalf of Wagdy Hanna and Associates Pty Ltd, seeking damages for an alleged disclosure of information in respect of a 1996 tender process for one of the Library’s offsite storage facilities. The court proceedings were held in December 2008, with Justice Richard Refshauge reserving his decision. In August 2012, the court found in favour of the Library. The outcome is under appeal by Wagdy Hanna and Associates Pty Ltd at the Court of Appeal of the ACT. The Court of Appeal conducted hearings into the appeal in February 2014.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 31 30

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND EQUITY The Library serves a culturally and socially diverse community and aims to make its collection accessible to all. The Library’s collection includes material in over 300 languages. Its programs and services are developed with an emphasis on public accessibility, and adhere to the principles outlined in the Australian Government’s Charter of Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Community. The Library is conscientiously implementing the charter, and seeks to provide all Australians with the opportunity to access documentary resources of national significance. In particular, during 2013-14, the Library:

• provided an introductory program to international students of English as an additional language or dialect;

• provided exhibition and education tours for adults and young people with special needs, and senior citizens groups;

• supported community projects, including National Reconciliation Week, the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, National Simultaneous Storytime, Children’s Book Week, National Volunteer Week, and Libraries and Information Week;

• supported the development of youth arts activities through events and education programs;

• conducted oral history interviews with thalidomide survivors regarding their experiences living with the severe and ongoing effects of this drug, with Vietnamese veterans who migrated to Australia after the war, and with Indigenous elders for the Centenary of Canberra oral history project;

• supplied gratis photographs from the Library’s collections for various Aboriginal history research projects, including for Arrernte families who were part of the Little Flower/Santa Teresa Mission;

• hosted a group of senior Indigenous artists from Kalkarindji (Gurindji) in the Northern Territory to view and listen to special collection material relating to the Wave Hill walk-off;

• continued to offer a range of assistive technologies in the reading rooms to help people with sight, hearing or mobility impairments to access services and collections;

• provided an ongoing customer service training program for front-of-house staff and volunteers, including training in mental health awareness;

• reviewed online accessibility in relation to event podcasts and promotional videos to ensure transcripts are available;

• established a formal Memorandum of Understanding with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies enabling Link-Up staff to receive regular training about Library resources and services.

SERVICE CHARTER The Library’s Service Charter sets out its commitment to users, the standards of service that users can expect, and the mechanisms for providing feedback or making a complaint.

Revised in 2011-12, the Service Charter is available online (nla.gov.au/service-charter) and as a print publication.

During 2013-14, the Service Charter standards were met as follows:

• 98 per cent of general reference inquiries were answered within timeframes (target 90 per cent);

• 94 per cent of collection items were delivered within timeframes (target 90 per cent);

• the Library’s website was available 24 hours a day for 100 per cent of the time (target 99.5 per cent).

The Library welcomes feedback and suggestions for service improvements. Feedback forms are placed throughout the Library and on the website (nla.gov.au/feedback). During the financial year, 186 formal compliments and 72 formal complaints were received from users, as indicated in Tables 2.1 and 2.2 respectively.

Table 2.1: Compliments Received, 2013-14

Subject Number Nature

Information and online services to individuals

176

• Quality, professionalism, responsiveness and dedication of staff • Quality and speed of response to inquiries and delivery of collection material • Quality of reproduction services • Quality of website • Trove

Public Programs activities

9

• Quality of tours and support for educational visits • Quality of events program • Quality of publications • Quality of galleries and exhibitions • Quality of volunteer-led tours

Facilities and support

1

• Quality of food services • Quality of support for events

Total 186

In addition, several hundred informal compliments were received from visitors for the Mapping Our World exhibition and from users of the Library’s Trove, Copies Direct and reading room services.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 33 32

Table 2.2: Complaints Received, 2013-14

Subject Number Nature

The collection 3

• Cataloguing information for collection material • Online access to collection material

Information and online services to individuals

42

• Use of mobile phones by Library users • Wireless connectivity problems and slow response times • Access to e-resources • Use of new scanners • Delays, misunderstandings and perceived lack

of assistance relating to requesting/receiving and discharging material • Reader registration processing • Copying and inter-library lending fees and delays in delivery

Public Programs activities

8 • Content and display of exhibitions

Facilities and support

19

• Car-parking availability • Restrictions in reading rooms • Cloaking arrangements

Total 72  

The Library provided explanations and/or apologies in response to all complaints, and undertook remedial action to address them as appropriate. Complaints relating to car parking were referred to the National Capital Authority as the responsible body.

CONSULTANCY SERVICES The Library entered into 21 new consultancy contracts during 2013-14 involving total actual expenditure of $163,446 (inclusive of GST). Appendix E lists the new consultancies with an individual value of $10,000 or more. There were also 12 ongoing consultancy contracts that were active during the same period, involving total actual expenditure of $900,523, bringing the total level of expenditure on consultancy contracts in 2013-14 to $1,063,969.

ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH Advertising and market research in excess of $12,400 for non-recruitment and non-tender services amounted to $78,578 (inclusive of GST).

Table 2.3 summarises expenditure by the Library in 2013-14.

Table 2.3: Library Expenditure, 2013-14

Business Activity Value ($)

Adcorp Media advertising in The Canberra Times 40,270

Environmetrics

Evaluation research of the Mapping Our World exhibition 12,441

iSENTIA Media monitoring services 25,867

Total 78,578

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 35 34

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

The Library’s corporate management activities aim to maximise service to clients by realising the full potential of staff and other available resources. Major activities during the financial year focused on implementing the Leadership Capability Model, Strategic Workforce Plan, Strategic Building Master Plan, and Work Health and Safety and Environmental Management Systems, and preparations for the PGPA Act that takes effect on 1 July 2014. Through participation in the Corporate Management Forum and related subcommittees, the Library also played a part in corporate management across other collecting and portfolio agencies, displaying a supportive, collaborative and cooperative working style to other organisations.

PEOPLE MANAGEMENT The current Strategic Workforce Plan is the first in a series of plans with a medium- to long-term focus on change and the digital environment, career sustainability and building internal capability. During the reporting period, a number of initiatives were undertaken to meet these identified workforce planning objectives and the Library’s strategic goal of organisational excellence.

By way of example, a Library-wide reflective leadership forum for executive level staff was developed and implemented. The forum consisted of three separate groups which were each allocated an organisationally relevant topic to investigate over an extended period. This initiative used both the content and the process of the leadership forum to develop the skills and knowledge of senior staff.

Another significant piece of work was the development of a bespoke Leadership Capability Model which includes capabilities considered fundamental to effective and successful leadership at the Library. A supporting kit has been developed with a range of self-assessment and management tools to establish capability gaps and development opportunities. The model has been used to drive a modular approach to leadership training with ‘Four Pillar’ workshops delivered in the reporting period.

Mentoring has been reinvigorated with a new program and supporting framework developed. Ten pairs completed the mentoring program in 2013, with a further nine pairs commencing in 2014. Participants in the 2013 cycle were very positive about their experience and reported that the program was valuable to themselves as individuals and to the Library as an institution.

The Library also created a cross-divisional working group to focus specifically on Workforce Planning Priority Area 2: building responsiveness to change and to new and emerging digital opportunities. This working group completed extensive internal and external research and made a series of recommendations about how to enhance the digital confidence of Library staff. These initiatives are now in the implementation phase.

An Indigenous Employment Strategy was also developed and launched. The strategy includes three sub-plans that each detail a range of operational initiatives that the Library will undertake over six years to create an attractive and supportive employment environment for Indigenous Australians.

STAFF ENGAGEMENT

The Consultative Committee is a mechanism to explore issues of relevance to both staff and management. Staff representatives were specifically invited to engage with the review of the Performance Management Framework undertaken at the beginning of 2014. It is expected that changes to the framework will be implemented next financial year.

Additionally, in October 2013, staff were surveyed to solicit their thoughts prior to the next round of enterprise bargaining. Preparations for a new Enterprise Agreement included offering briefings for staff on bargaining processes in February 2014.

An Enterprise Agreement communication strategy was endorsed by CMG. To support open communication on the bargaining process, staff have been invited to contribute their ideas through multiple channels such as the Consultative Committee, branch meetings, a dedicated webpage and email options.

In March 2014, the Government published its public sector workplace bargaining policy, which requires that agencies demonstrate both the affordability and productivity of any changes to a proposed Enterprise Agreement to fund improvements to salaries and conditions. The Library is committed to providing fair and sustainable remuneration for its staff within the context of the Government’s bargaining policy.

REMUNERATION

In accordance with the Australian Government’s regime for Principal Executive Officers, Council determines the Director General’s remuneration.

At 30 June 2014, terms and conditions of employment for SES staff, such as non-salary benefits including access to motor vehicles (or payment in lieu) and mobile phones, continued under common law contract.

At 30 June 2014, nine non-SES staff had enhanced benefits through Individual Flexibility Arrangements.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 37 36

Table 2.4 shows the salary ranges for classifications below SES level and the number of employees at each level.

Table 2.4: Salary Ranges below SES Level and Number of Employees, 30 June 2014

Classification Salary Range ($) Employees (no.)

EL 2 117,622-144,037 28

EL 1 95,467-120,198 75

APS 6 76,173-86,114 84

APS 5 67,489-71,940 72

APS 4 60,648-68,340 84

Graduate 55,216-65,486 1

APS 3 55,216-59,640 64

APS 2 47,685-54,065 33

APS 1 41,491-45,859 0

Cadet 14,189-41,491 1

All ongoing and long-term non-ongoing staff were required to participate in the Performance Management Framework, with pay-point progression subject to achieving a satisfactory rating.

FRAUD RISK ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL

The Library is committed to the prevention of fraud, and works to minimise the risk of fraud in the workplace.

The Library is required to examine and update its Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan every two years; this review was completed in 2013-14. In accordance with the Library’s Fraud Management Policy, staff must be aware of their responsibilities in relation to fraud against the Commonwealth. Fraud awareness training is required to be undertaken by all Library staff and, during 2013-14, training sessions were made available through an online program to new staff and to staff who had not attended such training in the past four years.

Fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures are in place. These, along with the Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan, meet the Library’s needs and comply with Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

ETHICAL STANDARDS

The Library promotes and endorses the ethical behaviour of its employees by informing staff of their responsibilities. In July 2013, the Library launched a new mandatory online training module on fraud and ethics which includes details of APS employee responsibilities as well as ethical

scenarios and examples of workplace fraud. All new staff are required to complete the module on commencement and existing staff will complete the program at regular intervals.

The Public Service Act 1999 was amended with effect from 1 July 2013 and the Library delivered information sessions to all staff on the new APS values. Awareness of APS Values and the APS Code of Conduct is also achieved through:

• regular review and feedback under the Library’s Performance Management Framework;

• provision of information about the Australian Public Service Commission’s Ethics Advisory Service;

• support of policies and procedures, such as the fraud awareness policies and the new Public Interest Disclosure procedure;

• clearly identified channels and support networks through which employees can raise matters of concern.

Staff were advised of new Public Interest Disclosure provisions that took effect in January 2014 by means of briefing sessions and tailored training for the delegates and authorised officers appointed under the new legislation.

DISABILITY STRATEGY

The Library remains committed to the principles of the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, and will improve access for people with disability to employment, programs, services and facilities.

The Library’s Disability Framework integrates disability access into existing strategic and business planning processes. The principal elements of the framework include:

• providing access to information and services;

• providing access to employment;

• purchasing accessible services;

• recognising people with disability as consumers of services;

• consulting people with disability about their needs.

These elements provide the platform for continuing developments in reader and visitor services, collections management, and building and security services.

During the year, the Library invited the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Network on Disability, Suzanne Colbert AM, to address the Disability Contact Officers Committee.

In its two major projects—Reading Room Integration and DLIR—the Library is ensuring that the needs of people with disabilities are being met. For example, the design for the new reading rooms complies with current code requirements.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 39 38

WORKPLACE DIVERSITY

At 30 June 2014, 68 per cent of staff were female, and 23 per cent of staff identified as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background, 1.8 per cent identified as Indigenous (up from 1.4 per cent last year) and 5.3 per cent identified as having a disability (down from 6 per cent last year). Appendix F includes a more detailed breakdown of workplace diversity figures.

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

The Library’s leadership and commitment to work health and safety continues to be demonstrated with bi-monthly and annual reports to Council and CMG.

The Library is committed to developing a Rehabilitation Management System and a formalised health and wellbeing program. Initial planning was undertaken, with implementation of both of these projects determined as a focus for the forthcoming year.

Further to the chemical storage and handling review, undertaken during 2013, the Library has developed an action plan to implement the resulting recommendations.

Training courses in work health and safety offered during the year included:

• Senior First Aid Certificate;

• Mental Health First Aid Training;

• Reframe and Refocus: Building Resilience;

• Assertiveness in Action;

• Manual Handling.

Seminars on work health and safety topics included:

• Food Choices—What the Labels Tell Us;

• Boost Your Energy;

• Meal Planning and Healthy Eating on a Budget;

• Gender Identity;

• Trauma;

• Headaches and Migraines;

• Stroke and Stroke Prevention;

• Information for Carers;

• Getting to Know Anxiety;

• Body Stressing.

Employee assistance program topics included:

• Manager’s Hotline;

• Managing Stress;

• Adapting to Change;

• Motivation and Morale in Teams;

• How to Beat Fatigue;

• Work Life Balance.

The offer of in-house influenza vaccination was taken up by 173 staff, and 134 staff elected to participate in a health assessment.

The Library’s work health and safety statistics are presented in Table 2.5.

Table 2.5: Reporting Requirements under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 30 June 2014

Section Issue Outcome

Section 38 occurrences Notification of notifiable incidents There were no notifications

Section 39 directions Directions to preserve incident sites No directions were issued

Section 95 notices Issue of provisional improvement notices No notices were issued

Section 70 notices Obligations of person conducting business or undertaking to health and safety representatives

No notices were issued

Section 191 notices Issue of improvement notices No notices were issued

Section 195 notices Issue of prohibition notices No notices were issued

Section 200 notices Issue of non-disturbance notices No notices were issued

Part 10 investigations Investigations addressing non-compliance with notices There were no

investigations

During 2013-14, there were no new injury cases that resulted in claims being accepted for workers’ compensation.  There was one claim for workers’ compensation accepted by Comcare which had been lodged in the previous year. The Library’s premium rates for injuries over the past three years are shown in Table 2.6.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 41 40

Table 2.6: Premiums for Injuries Suffered, 2011-15 (as a percentage of wages and salaries)

Premium Rates 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Latest premium rates for the Library* 0.56* 0.38 0.73* 0.95

Premium rates for all agencies combined (for comparison) 1.41 1.77 1.81 2.12

Library premium rates as a percentage of all agencies (%) 39.72 21.47 40.33 44.81

* Including as amended retrospectively by Comcare.

ASSET MANAGEMENT

COLLECTION ASSET

The collection is the Library’s major asset, on which many of its services are based. The total value of the collection is $1.535 billion. An annual stocktake and revaluation is undertaken using sampling methodologies.

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, AND SOFTWARE

The Asset Management Committee oversees the Library’s Strategic Asset Management Plan and coordinates operational asset acquisition programs. It also develops and monitors a four-year forward asset acquisition program for strategic planning purposes and an asset disposal program for items reaching the end of their working life. Major asset acquisitions in 2013-14 included the purchase of IT equipment and infrastructure, and shelving.

The total value of plant and equipment at 30 June 2014 was $13.239 million.

The total value of software at 30 June 2014 was $6.291 million.

LAND AND BUILDINGS

The total value of the Library’s land and buildings at 30 June 2014 was assessed at $226.599 million, including the main building in Parkes and the repository in Hume. Management of the Library’s facilities is overseen by the Building Works Coordinating Committee, which meets quarterly. A 15-year Long-Term Strategic Building Management Plan is used to set directions for building works, and incorporates an annual maintenance plan and a five-year capital works program, which are reviewed each year by Council. The Long-Term Strategic Building Management Plan ensures that building works are consistent with the long-term direction of the Library and underpins Library facility planning and budgeting. The plan was last reviewed and updated during 2011-12.

In 2013-14, the Library completed planning and design for the Reading Room Integration project. This project is a major component of the Library’s 2008 Strategic Building Master Plan and the 2013 Conservation Management Plan. It will complete the refurbishment of the prominent public areas of the Library with works being undertaken on Levels 2, 1, Ground

and Lower Ground 1. The project will improve and modernise the public spaces to make them fit for a twenty-first-century national library, and it builds on the expansion of the galleries in 2012 and associated changes to the Main Reading Room.

Outcomes for the project include the integration of the Pictures and Manuscripts, Maps and Petherick Reading Rooms on the first floor and the integration of the Main and Newspapers and Microforms Reading Rooms on the ground floor. The Asian Collections Reading Room will remain unchanged. As well as improving reader services, the project will improve sustainability, upgrade building services such as fire systems and air-conditioning plant, and meet compliance requirements for buildings and fit-out mandated in the Building Code. The project is expected to be completed by early 2016.

During the year, a range of capital expenditure building projects was undertaken, including:

• the design of new energy-efficient lighting and control systems for the heritage-listed Main Reading Room and foyer;

• the refurbishment of the Executive and Public Programs office area to provide flexible staff accommodation and meet government standards;

• the upgrade of the Fire Control Panel to improve early fire detection;

• the installation of energy efficient lighting and controls to service areas;

• the installation of an equipment lift to storage areas on Lower Ground 2 (LG2);

• the replacement of motorised shelving to increase storage capacity and improve efficiency.

Consultation and design work has commenced on a number of other major projects, including:

• the refurbishment of external windows and the marble façade of the main building;

• the refurbishment of staff change-room facilities on LG2;

• the design of an entry door for large objects;

• the master planning for refurbishment of services areas on LG2;

• the strategic review of air-conditioning systems.

HERITAGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

The National Library of Australia and its surrounds are included on the Commonwealth Heritage List and the Library is committed to the conservation of the heritage values of the building. This includes consulting with recognised heritage specialists before undertaking building works in sensitive areas. In 2013-14, the Library conducted further consultation with heritage specialists in relation to the plans for the Reading Room Integration project and the replacement of lighting in the Main Reading Room and foyer.

During the year, the National Capital Authority transferred ownership to the Library of the ‘Robb panels’. These seven bronze artworks were fixed to the exterior of the building above the windows to the Main Reading Room during the original construction in 1968. The Library arranged for the artworks to be professionally cleaned and restored after the transfer.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 43 42

The Library completed the annual audit of its heritage furniture collection. A number of heritage furniture items have been identified for refurbishment and reuse in the new Special Collections Reading Room.

SECURITY AND BUSINESS CONTINUITY

The Library’s Emergency Planning Committee oversees protective security and business continuity planning. This committee comprises senior staff with responsibility for critical areas, including corporate communications, and the security of staff, the collection, visitors, buildings and other assets.

In 2013-14, the Library completed an update of the Business Continuity Framework. This framework incorporates detailed planning strategies for collection disasters, storage, IT recovery, and critical building systems recovery.

During the year, the Library’s emergency management and business continuity planning systems were thoroughly tested. The Library also implemented new procedures for managing critical incidents on weekends when staff numbers are limited.

ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

The Library is committed to improving environmental performance across all areas of operations. An Environmental Policy and Environmental Action Plan guide the Library’s work. The Environmental Management System helps to set, implement and review objectives and targets.

The Library’s Environment Management Committee meets quarterly to coordinate sustainability efforts and achieve sustainability targets. Reports on environmental performance are provided annually to Council.

The Library incorporates sustainable development principles into major projects. For example, the Reading Room Integration project design specifies the use of energy-efficient lighting and controls, efficiencies in air-conditioning, use of sustainable building materials where possible and water-saving initiatives.

In comparison with the previous year, the Library has reduced gas consumption by 4 per cent to 4,191,085 MJ and electricity consumption by 4 per cent to 5,838,419 kWh. Water consumption has had to be estimated over the past two years, due to a faulty water meter, and therefore reliable usage figures are not available. 

Compared to 2012-13, waste to landfill decreased by 2 per cent from 45,573 kg to 44,469 kg in 2013-14. Waste to landfill was 24 per cent of total waste in 2013-14 compared to 32 per cent in the previous year. Major variations can be attributed to an increase in metal recycling from the compactus shelving replacement and an increase in organic and paper recycling.

In 2010-11, the Library developed three-year targets for reductions in energy and water usage. June 2013-14 marks the end of the reporting period and these targets have been met, with the exception of water usage where reliable figures are not available. Electricity consumption and gas consumption have reduced by 15 per cent and 26 per cent respectively over the three-year period as illustrated in Figure 2.3.

Figure 2.3: Energy Consumption, 2010-2014

0

Electricity Target

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

1,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

7,000,000

Electricity (kWh)

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Gas Target

4,000,000

5,000,000

6,000,000

Achieved

Gas (MJ)

While no target was set for a reduction in paper consumption in 2013-14, it has reduced by 42 per cent over the three-year period, as illustrated in Figure 2.4.

Figure 2.4: Paper Consumption, 2010-2014

0 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

0

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,500,000

3,000,000

1,500,000

500,000

Number of pages

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 45 44

The Environment Management Committee has set new targets for the next 3 years and broadened the targets to include waste to landfill.

During 2013-14, the Library continued to improve waste management practices, and reduced its energy consumption and carbon footprint by:

• achieving re-accreditation with the ACTSmart Office Recycling program, a best-practice program on managing waste;

• commencing recycling of halogen light globes;

• installing energy-efficient lighting and controls to service areas;

• commencing a project to install energy-efficient lighting in the Main Reading Room and Foyer;

• conducting further trials of reducing run times of air-conditioning in collection storage areas where this can be achieved without impacting adversely on the preservation of collections.

The overall results compared to 2013-14 are also due to the full-year effect of initiatives implemented the previous year.

PURCHASING

The Library maintained a focus on cost-effective contract management and procurement practices consistent with Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Procurement and contract templates were reviewed to ensure they continue to meet government good practice and are simple and straightforward to use.

Large purchasing activities for the year included construction for the Reading Room Integration project and new change rooms; replacement lighting for the Main Reading Room; and IT acquisitions, shelving and digitisation services for newspapers.

There were no contracts of $100,000 or more that did not provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

COOPERATION ON CORPORATE MANAGEMENT ISSUES The Corporate Management Forum consists of senior executives from agencies in the Arts portfolio and a small number of non-portfolio agencies. The forum considers a range of corporate issues including human resource management, financial management, procurement, risk, IT and facilities management, with a view to achieving economies of scale, sharing experiences and encouraging better practice.

The forum met four times during 2013-14 and matters considered included:

• the PGPA Act and related issues;

• paid parking in the Parliamentary Zone;

• records management;

• the 2013-14 and 2014-15 Budgets and related initiatives;

• work health and safety;

• capital planning and funding;

• energy management;

• risk management and insurance;

• enterprise bargaining;

• performance indicators and reporting;

• shared services.

GRANTS During the reporting period, the Library operated nine grant programs.

COMMUNITY HERITAGE GRANTS

The Library awarded 78 grants of up to $15,000 to assist community organisations to preserve and manage nationally significant cultural heritage collections. Financial support and assistance for this grants program was received from the Attorney-General’s Department Ministry for the Arts; the National Archives of Australia; the National Film and Sound Archive; and the National Museum of Australia.

HAROLD WHITE FELLOWSHIPS

The Library funded seven fellowships for established writers and researchers to spend up to six months at the Library researching collection material in their areas of expertise. Fellowships were awarded to Dr Penelope Allison, Dr Peter Griggs, Dr Deborah Jordan, Dr Catherine Kelly and Professor John Williams. Honorary Fellowships were awarded to Associate Professor Ann Elias and Associate Professor Paul Sharrad.

JAPAN FELLOWSHIPS

Awarded to established scholars and writers to spend up to six months at the Library researching Japanese collection material, the fellowships are funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust. One fellowship was awarded to Dr Emiko Okayama and one Honorary Fellowship was awarded to Professor Rikki Kersten.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 47 46

JAPAN STUDY GRANTS

Funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust, these grants support scholars in Japanese studies who live outside Canberra to undertake research using the Library’s Japanese and western languages collections for up to four weeks. Grants were awarded to Mr Alexander Brown, Ms Prue Holstein, Dr Shigeru Sato, Mr Ross Tunney and Mr Martin Veres.

NATIONAL FOLK FELLOWSHIP

With assistance from the National Folk Festival, the Library funded a four-week residency for Jan Wositzky to research original manuscripts and sound recordings of W.E. (Bill) Harney, and to prepare and develop a performance which premiered at the Festival.

NORMAN MCCANN SUMMER SCHOLARSHIPS

Funded by Mrs Pat McCann, the Library awarded three six-week scholarships to young Australian postgraduate students Mr Edward Cavanagh, Ms Lucy Davies and Ms Kate Laing to undertake research on topics in Australian history or literature.

SEYMOUR SUMMER SCHOLARSHIP

Funded by Dr John and Dr Heather Seymour, this six-week scholarship supports research, preferably in biography, by a young Australian postgraduate student. The scholarship was awarded to Ms Ashley Barnwell.

KENNETH BINNS TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP

Funded by Mrs Alison Sanchez, the fellowship supports travel for professional development by Library staff in the early stages of their career. The 2014 fellowship was awarded to Ms Elizabeth Caplice.

FRIENDS OF THE NATIONAL LIBRARY TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP

Funded by the Friends of the National Library of Australia, the fellowship provides a significant professional development opportunity for a Library staff member. The 2014 fellowship was awarded to Ms Kate Ross.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Information technology (IT) is used to facilitate and support the development of new online services and ongoing infrastructure, and to ensure that these services are cost effective, reliable and responsive.

In recent years, the Library has developed and improved the Library’s Trove service, which supports discovery and use of collections held by Australian libraries and collecting institutions. The Library has also commenced a major project to replace systems used to build, preserve and deliver digital collections. IT and communication infrastructure is provided in-house.

DIGITAL LIBRARY INFRASTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT PROJECT Core infrastructure and capability to sustain and develop the Library’s digital collections and associated services is fundamental to the Library’s future. The Library faces critical issues in its ability to manage and maintain access to its born-digital and digitised collections, and its ability to support new types of collection materials over time. Our digital library infrastructure is inadequate for maintaining what we have now; it limits our capacity to develop the collection and meet client service needs, including through ways of collecting and increased digital access to our non-digital collections.

The DLIR project is a multi-year project to replace the Library’s existing digital library systems used to support digital collecting, digitisation, and delivery of digital content. It will also provide systems to support the active management and preservation of the Library’s digital collections. The project will deliver systems and a scalable infrastructure capable of supporting enhanced activities should additional funding be provided.

Central to the project approach was an open market procurement activity to purchase pre-existing software or services to deliver the software, supplemented by in-house development activities to implement components that cannot be purchased. In 2012-13, the project moved from planning and procurement to its implementation phase with the purchase of a digitisation workflow management system and a digital preservation repository system.

During 2013-14, the first of four implementation stages of the DLIR project was completed. Achievements for this period include:

• deployment of the DocWorks digitisation workflow system, for content and structure analysis of books and journals;

• development and deployment of a new collection management system (CMS), providing support for digitisation of books and journals;

• development and deployment of a new digital library content repository;

• commencement of the second implementation phase, which enhances new digital library systems to support the Pictures and Manuscripts Collections.

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INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES During 2013-14, the Library’s digital collection increased in size by 30 per cent (728 terabytes), and now exceeds 3 petabytes of storage (see Figure 2.5). Digitisation of Australian newspapers and collecting of Australian web content accounted for 75 per cent of this storage growth. Figure 2.6 shows the allocation of storage by collection material type.

Figure 2.5: Ten-year Growth in Digital Collection Storage

June 04

Dec 04

June 05

Dec 05

June 06

Dec 06

June 07

Dec 07

June 08

Dec 08

June 09

Dec 09

June 10

Dec 10

June 11

Dec 11

June 12

Dec 12

0

500

1,000

1,500

Storage size (terabytes)

June 13

Dec 13

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

June 14

Figure 2.6: Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2014

Newspapers 58.7%

Website archive 28.5%

Maps 0.5%

Manuscripts 3.7% Sheet music 0.6%

Oral History 4.3%

Pictures 3.0%

Others 1.6%

The Library also supports substantial infrastructure to enable the discovery of, and access to, its own and other collections. Figure 2.7 shows the trend in raw transaction load on the Library’s web services since 2000-01. Following what appears to be a spike in 2012-13 due to the behaviour of major internet search engines, growth has returned to trend in 2013-14. Raw transaction load continues to be driven by the use of Trove, especially its digitised Australian newspapers.

Figure 2.7: Use of Web Services, 2000-01 to 2013-14

2010-11

2009-10

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

2000-01

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Webservers usage (billions of requests)

2011-12

Trove

Catalogue

Digital collections

Web archive

Libraries Australia

NLA Web

2012-13

2013-14

In 2013-14, the Library migrated its intranet into the Drupal content management system, which involved updating the design and reviewing the information architecture to allow for more efficient access to everyday work tools.

Reliable IT infrastructure is essential to the Library’s digital storage and access services. Table 2.7 shows the average availability of ten key service areas. The target availability of 99.5 per cent was exceeded for all service areas. This is a considerable improvement on the outcome for the previous year. Significant time and effort was put into restructuring aspects of the Library’s IT infrastructure to reduce single points of failure, enhance storage capacity and take advantage of the benefits of server virtualisation.

CORPORATE OVERVIEW NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 51 50

Table 2.7: Availability of Ten Key Service Areas, 2013-14

Service Availability (%)

Network 99.90

File and print 100

Email 99.90

Website 100

Integrated Library Management System 99.90

Digital Library 99.60

Corporate systems 100

Document supply 100

Libraries Australia 99.60

Trove 99.80

High-profile online services—namely Trove and Libraries Australia—which include user interaction and access by web bots from search engines such as Baidu and Google continued to be a source of substantial traffic. This has been managed by improved bandwidth controls. In 2013-14, the Library continued enhancements to search functions for Trove newspapers and Libraries Australia, which involved updates to the software and hardware infrastructure supporting these services. These improvements will provide the capacity and scalability needed to support current and future demands.

As part of its Strategic Asset Management program, the Library continued to replace and upgrade IT infrastructure, including:

• installation of an additional 324 terabytes of storage to allow for growth in newspaper and web archives;

• utilisation of a de-duplication backup system to achieve significant efficiencies in data backup. The de-duplication technology provides for 37 terabytes of actual storage that would otherwise consume 710 terabytes of disk space;

• a full refresh of the Library’s fleet of printers and copiers and the introduction of ‘follow-me’ printing that allows employees to print from any network printer and has resulted in a significant reduction in the number of printers and paper consumption, reducing energy use and asset replacement expenditure;

• a doubling in the number of systems managed as virtual servers to 280. This includes the extension of the server cluster to support digital library systems;

• enhancement of the Library’s IT Disaster Recovery capability through shared storage and a multi-node, highly available virtualisation cluster.

In response to the expected application to the Library of the Government’s Protective Security Policy Framework and Information Security Manual, the Library:

• released three updated IT security policies;

• conducted staff IT security awareness seminars and continued to update the IT security website.

The Library continued improving IT services and operations by:

• enhancing the capability of Libraries Australia, the ILMS, Copies Direct and other systems to meet the cataloguing standard, Resource Description and Access (RDA);

• further developing Trove;

• introducing a new Drupal-based platform for support documentation to assist members of the public, content partners, researchers and developers to use the Library’s online services. The new Trove Help Centre, made available in May 2014, is the first content on the new platform, with other services to follow in 2014-2015.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

REPORT OF OPERATIONS 55

Oronce Fine (1494-1555) Nova, et integra universi orbis descriptio (detail) 1890 (Paris: Phototype Bertland 9 Rue Cadet, 1890) Petherick Collection nla.map-rm2932

OUTCOME AND STRATEGIES

Performance reporting in this chapter is based on the Library’s outcome and four strategies set out in the Portfolio Budget Statement 2013-14. The Library has one outcome:

Enhanced learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society by providing access to a national collection of library material.

In 2013-14, the Library achieved this outcome through its focus on four strategic directions:

• collect and preserve Australia’s documentary heritage;

• make the Library’s collections and services accessible to all Australians;

• deliver national leadership;

• achieve organisational excellence.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 57 56

STRATEGIC DIRECTION ONE

COLLECT AND PRESERVE AUSTRALIA’S DOCUMENTARY HERITAGE

The Library collects Australian printed publications under the legal deposit section of the Copyright Act, as well as selected materials in other formats, including oral histories, manuscripts, pictures, maps and e-publications. The Library also harvests and archives a snapshot of the Australian internet domain (.au).

In 2013-14, the Library undertook to:

• document Australia’s cultural, intellectual and social life by collecting, storing and preserving Australian print and digital publishing, personal papers, pictures, maps and oral histories;

• inform Australians about their region and their place in the world through the Library’s Asian and other overseas collections.

MAJOR INITIATIVES

Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement Project

Stage 1 of the DLIR project was completed in January 2014 and Stage 2 commenced in February. Stage 1 saw the implementation of the digitisation workflow component of the digital library core system, a new delivery interface for digitised books and journals, and implementation of the DocWorks system as the optical character recognition and content analysis software. Digitisation of books and journals began in early 2014 using the new system and by the end of the financial year, nearly 500 books, pamphlets and journals had been digitised.

Stage 1 of the DLIR implementation also covered digital preservation requirements. During the year, the Library procured a digital preservation management system, Preservica (formerly known as Safety Deposit Box), which operated in test mode in readiness for production mode in 2014-15.

Legal Deposit for Electronic Publications

The Library worked with colleagues in the Ministry for the Arts and Attorney-General’s Department in the preparation of a Regulation Impact Statement on a proposed legal deposit scheme for electronic publications. Discussion was held on the content of the proposed legislation and its regulatory impact on publishers.

Move to Digital Collecting

In 2013-14, the Library transferred more than 200 overseas print serial titles to digital subscriptions, building on the strategic move from print to digital collecting that commenced with the introduction of overseas e-books in 2012-13. The overseas e-book collection continued to grow and now comprises more than 1,550 titles, all of which are available for offsite access by registered Library users. Usage has increased steadily, with an average of more than 160 logins per month, of which almost 60 per cent are offsite via remote access. This change provided improved access particularly for users based outside Canberra.

The Library released the Australian Government Web Archive in March 2014. The archive enables searching and online access to Commonwealth government website content collected by the Library through annual harvests since 2011. It was a timely development as government publishing has substantially migrated online, with a 25 per cent decline in print monographs deposited. The harvesting of content via the Australian Government Web Archive was authorised by a whole-of-government agreement in 2010. The archive will provide access to this content until the later stages of the DLIR project, which will provide integrated discovery and delivery through Trove.

The development of the capacity to manage the acquisition and description of born-digital personal records progressed, with the successful transfer of digital collections of former Senator Bob Brown, historian Rupert Gerritsen and photographer Francis Reiss, and the development of associated policies, workflows and procedures. Digital manuscript systems are being trialled to ensure the continued accessibility and authenticity of digital records transferred to the Manuscripts Collection.

The ongoing shift from collecting film and paper-based photographs to digital photography continues, with 64 per cent of photographic acquisitions in 2013-14 being digital.

Nearly all of the Oral History and Folklore Collection recordings are born-digital. Taking advantage of this, the Library has been developing systems and technologies which allow the automated or semi-automated ingest of digital audio collection materials and associated descriptive information, leading to improved processing efficiencies. Over the last ten years, the Library has more than doubled its acquisition of audio recordings to more than 1,900 hours in 2013-14, of which 903 hours were acquired by semi-automated ingest.

ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTS

The Australian publishing community’s uptake of digital publishing has increased significantly over the last two years. The Library continued to receive offers from publishers to voluntarily deposit e-books, with over 100 offers this year. Further evidence was an increase in applications for Cataloguing-in-Publication records for e-books or dual-format publications, up from 4 per cent two years ago to over 25 per cent this year.

The Library collected some 14,000 Australian print books during the year. A third were from government publishers and the remainder were acquired through the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act. Half of the legal deposit books acquired were published by the largest 20 commercial publishers, and the other half by individuals, micro-publishers and organisations.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 59 58

Large commercial publishers have moved rapidly into digital publishing in the last two years, with most large publishers now having digital imprints and publishing digital-only books in Australia. Australia’s highest volume publisher is the romantic fiction imprint Harlequin, which has a strong imprint exclusively publishing Australian authors in digital form. The amount of digital material deposited on physical media continues to decrease, representing the decline of physical media in digital publishing, where online services and direct-to-device distribution is replacing publishing on DVD or CD.

Should legislation for a revised legal deposit framework be passed in the coming year, the Library will work closely with publishers to communicate the proposed changes and prepare for the beginning of a new era in the operation of legal deposit in Australia.

The Library became the second national library worldwide to have its policy decisions on RDA, the new international cataloguing rules, published in the RDA online toolkit. With the new standard now widely adopted in the English-speaking world, the Library will continue to advocate for the redevelopment of the Machine-Readable Catalogue (MARC) format, so that the intent of the new rules can be fully realised. This will make library catalogue records easier to produce, improve the user searching experience and enable library data to be shared in an open data environment.

In a year marked by the success of the Library’s Mapping Our World exhibition, it was pleasing to obtain donor funding to support two significant map preservation projects. With funding donated through a special appeal, a conservator was engaged to work on a collection of nineteenth-century atlases and maps of Australasia produced by the cartographer Frederick Proeschel (1809-1870). The works were extensively treated, including surface cleaning, fibre analysis, removal of varnish and repair to binding structures.

The second project focused on the Library’s landmark acquisition in 2012-13 of Joan Blaeu’s Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus, a 1663 wall chart in its original unrestored state. Preservation staff carried out basic stabilisation to allow for its display in Mapping Our World, but additional treatment work is required to ensure the map’s long-term preservation. Following the successful appeal, the next step is to undertake a complete assessment of the map, including historical research and scientific examination to make treatment recommendations.

The Library acquired many interesting and significant materials during the year. A selection of notable acquisitions is listed in Appendix I.

PERFORMANCE

Data on the Library’s performance against deliverables and key performance indicators relating to storing, maintaining and cataloguing its collection is provided in the following tables (Tables 3.1 to 3.3) and figures (Figures 3.1 and 3.2).

Table 3.1: Develop, Store and Maintain the National Collection—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14

Measure Target Achieved

Deliverables 

Collection items stored and maintained (no.) 6,544,000 6,582,833

Items catalogued or indexed (no.) 54,200 50,398

Key performance indicators

National collection—percentage of collection processing standards met (%) 95 91.70

National collection—percentage of specified storage standards met (%) 95 97.30

Figure 3.1: Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained

Target Achieved

2016-17 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

1,750,000

3,500,000

5,250,000

7,000,000

The target was met.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 61 60

Table 3.2: National Collection—Storage (%)

Achieved Achieved Target Target

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

95.30 95 94 97.30 95 95 95 95

The target was met.

Figure 3.2: Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed

0

Target Achieved

2016-17 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

0

25,000

50,000

75,000

100,000

The target was not met. Over recent years, acquisition numbers have trended downwards as fewer Australian print publications are produced and acquired and the Library implements its planned reduction of overseas collecting.

Table 3.3: National Collection—Processing (%)

Achieved Achieved Target Target

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

91.30 95 94 91.70 95 95 95 95

The target was not met. Increased staff movements and the resulting need for more refresher and other training has impacted on processing standards.

STRATEGIC DIRECTION TWO

MAKE THE LIBRARY’S COLLECTIONS AND SERVICES ACCESSIBLE TO ALL AUSTRALIANS

The Library provides access to its collections for all Australians through services to users in the main building and nationally through online information services. Its reference and collection delivery services are provided to onsite users, and to those outside Canberra, via online services and the digitisation of selected collection resources. The Library also delivers a diverse annual program of exhibitions and events.

In 2013-14, the Library undertook to:

• harness new and emerging opportunities in the digital environment—including the National Broadband Network with its reach to regional and remote communities;

• support research and lifelong learning for all Australians by maximising online access to the Library’s collections and services.

MAJOR INITIATIVES

Digitisation

The books and journals digitisation program entered a new phase in 2013-14 with the implementation of new systems and workflows. This built capacity for the Library to provide digitised books and journals in a contemporary interface. While only a small number of titles were available at the end of the financial year, books and journals content will grow over time, albeit at a more modest rate than digitised newspapers.

The newspaper digitisation partnership with the State Library of New South Wales continued this year with a further 3.6 million pages of newspapers digitised.

In May, the digitisation of the Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection was completed. The archive was a gift from Fairfax Media and the cleaning, re-housing, cataloguing and digitisation of the 18,002 items in the collection commenced in December 2012. All items are now accessible via the Library’s catalogue and Trove, as well as the Fairfax syndication website.

Reading Room Integration

Following extensive consultation with stakeholders and user groups, a detailed design for integrated reading rooms was completed in July 2013. Reader Services staff began the planning process to develop and prepare for new service models and access to collections in order to maintain the excellent services expected by onsite users. The Library anticipates maintaining normal operations throughout construction, with minimal disruption to users and visitors.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 63 62

ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTS

Manuscripts Collection Management

The project to review and improve workflows associated with the development and management of the Manuscripts Collection continued. An online acquisition portal was developed with associated webpages that provide a better experience for donors and greater efficiency for staff managing offers of Manuscripts Collection material. Procedures to manage incoming material were reviewed, ensuring acquisition and registration of new collections is efficient and timely.

Online Access to Special Collections

The Library continued its focus on increasing the discoverability of and online access to special collections.

In December, catalogued pictures and manuscripts collections became available for online requesting with the implementation of e-callslips. This innovation means that all Library collection materials with a record in the online catalogue can be requested for use onsite from anywhere and at any time. To improve access to maps published in series, digitised graphical indices were created which identify the individual sheets held by the Library. This work has been completed for 1,200 maps series, enabling many thousands of individual sheets to be requested via e-callslips.

Fifteen per cent of the Oral History and Folklore Collection (6,896 hours of recordings) is now delivered as full online audio from the Library’s website, Trove and other online aggregators, accompanied by time-pointed summaries and transcripts to assist navigation and discovery, where these exist.

Trove

Trove is now the primary means by which Australians discover and access the Library’s collection, and is a gateway to the collections of contributing Australian galleries, libraries, archives and museums. Newspaper digitisation continues to drive Trove’s content growth. However, strong growth has also been achieved for most resource types, especially archived websites, pictures, music and sound. More than 54 ABC Radio National programs, from Bush Telegraph to the Science Show, are available through Trove.

Small regional museum collections from across Australia were added to Trove, for example those from the Tweed River Regional Museum and the Berrima District Historical & Family History Society. Specialty collections are also represented, with the Harry Daly Museum (from the Australian Society of Anaesthetists) and the Gold Museum of Ballarat added this year. Trove’s new content extends to corporate collections, such as those from the Grape and Wine Research Development Corporation and Australian Pork, and legal collections, including two Australian open access legal journals and a historic run of the Australian Government Solicitor’s Legal Opinions.

Trove’s value to the Australian community was affirmed by a formal evaluation of user satisfaction. The study by Gundabluey Research confirmed that Trove has a truly national reach with usage generally proportional to Australian population by state, and by metropolitan,

regional or rural place of residence. In addition to quantitative information, more than 200 pages of verbatim comments were captured. Those living in rural and regional areas commented that their sense of community identity was strengthened. Comments were also received on the way in which Trove has transformed the research landscape, making it cheaper and easier, opening up new content and enabling new methods of research. The survey has provided a rich seam of information for planning future development.

Work underway in 2013-14 will go a long way towards meeting system improvement needs identified by respondents. A major project to redevelop the Trove newspapers infrastructure was completed, providing much needed capacity and performance improvements, and some search interface updates. A new Drupal-based Trove Help Centre was also introduced.

Trove now has more than 131,000 registered users and averages 66,000 visitors each day, with much higher peaks (243,246 unique visitors on one day in May) when Trove content is posted by users on large social media sites. Trove users also enhance the service, contributing more than 50,000 lists and close to three million tags to date. Text correction by Trove’s digital volunteers has been valued at $22 million or more than 340 work years since Trove’s launch in November 2009.

Information and Research Services

The Ask a Librarian and Copies Direct services continue to be widely appreciated, particularly in regional Australia. Approximately 30 per cent of the use of both services consistently comes from people living outside the capital cities. In the words of our users: ‘Wow! The response to my enquiry was incredibly helpful and prompt. I’m very thankful for the assistance via email, especially as I am not based in Canberra’ and ‘Thank you so much for your efficient and easy to use online service. I have just updated my expired card, and the process was astonishingly easy and quick. The online services are wonderful and tremendously helpful to me’.

The Library continues to find ways to reach new audiences and encourage use of its information and research services by leveraging digital platforms. Ask a Librarian inquiries are now invited through social media channels. The inquiry service also has a presence within the Australian Wikipedia community through links to Ask a Librarian on every Australian-related article in the encyclopaedia. Work to create an Ask a Librarian presence within Trove, in collaboration with state and territory libraries, also continues.

Online Engagement

In 2013-14, the Library redeveloped its blogs (nla.gov.au/blogs) to better showcase the expertise of staff and the richness of the collection. Seven new blogs were created—Behind the Scenes, Trove, Exhibitions, Treasures, Web Archiving, Preservation and Fringe Publishing. Blogging output has increased fourfold with many more parts of the organisation able to tell their own stories and directly engage with the public.

The Library’s main Twitter account, @nlagovau, is now the seventh most followed account in the APS with over 20,219 followers, up from 14th position in June 2013 when comparative records began, making it the most followed national arts-related account. The Library’s Twitter presence was expanded beyond the existing @nlagovau, @TroveAustralia and @LibrariesAust accounts

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 65 64

to include @NLAPandora (web archiving) and @NLAjakarta (Indonesian office). The Library’s Facebook account now has 9,439 Likes. Seven new themes were added to the Library’s Flickr Commons account in 2013-14. These included images on topics such as seasonal and lifestyle themes, as well as images of significant collection items such as the Enemark panoramas and the Library’s Underground Australia book. The total number of Library images now available is 634, and the account receives around 2,000 visits per day.

The Treasure Explorer education website (treasure-explorer.nla.gov.au) continued to promote the Library’s collection by providing online activities and educational material for students, and resources and lesson plans for teachers. The site, which allows students and teachers to contribute socially and engage with Australian history, is also the portal for material featured in the Treasures Gallery. Treasure Explorer attracted 38,578 unique visitors during the reporting period.

Publications and Exhibitions

The Library published 20 new books promoting the collection, which were sold through more than 1,550 outlets in Australia and New Zealand and also online. Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia, published to accompany the Mapping Our World exhibition, was reprinted twice within the first three months of release, with over 12,000 copies sold. The Big Book of Australian History by Peter Macinnis was selected as an Eve Pownall Notable Book in the 2014 Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards. Both An Eye for Nature: The Life and Art of William T. Cooper by Penny Olsen and The Australian Women’s Weekly Fashion: The First 50 Years by Deborah Thomas with Kirstie Clements sold over 75 per cent of the initial print run within the first four months of release.

The Mapping Our World exhibition achieved success in the Museums Australia Multimedia and Publication Design Awards 2014, winning the exhibition branding section and sharing the exhibition poster award. Mapping Our World attracted 118,264 visitors and was the most successful exhibition ever held by the Library. The Treasures Gallery, the Library’s permanent display of collection highlights, also continued to be popular with the public, with a 39 per cent increase in visitor numbers compared with last year.

PERFORMANCE

Performance data relating to access to the collection and service to users is provided as follows:

• Table 3.4 shows deliverables and key performance indicators relating to access to the national collection and other documentary resources during 2013-14;

• Figure 3.3 compares delivery of physical collection items to users against targets over the past four years;

• Table 3.5 compares performance against the Service Charter over the same four-year period.

Table 3.4: Provide Access to the National Collection and Other Documentary Resources— Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14

Measure Target Achieved

Deliverables 

Physical collection items delivered to users (no.) 175,000 178,432

Key performance indicators Collection access —percentage of specified Service Charter standards met (%)

100 100

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

0.0

Target Achieved

2016-17 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

0

75,000

150,000

225,000

300,000

The target was exceeded, largely due to the increased use of maps by onsite users. 

Table 3.5: Collection Access—Service Charter (%)

Achieved Achieved Target Target

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

100 100 99 100 100 100 100 100

The Service Charter standards were met.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 67 66

STRATEGIC DIRECTION THREE

DELIVER NATIONAL LEADERSHIP

The Library delivers national leadership by providing a range of IT services to Australian libraries and collecting institutions, and by leading and participating in activities that make Australia’s cultural collections and information resources more readily available to the Australian public and international communities.

In 2013-14, the Library undertook to:

• provide national infrastructure to underpin efficient and effective library services across the country, and to support Australian libraries in the twenty-first-century digital world;

• share knowledge and innovation experiences with the Australian and international cultural sectors and collaborate to respond to new challenges and opportunities.

MAJOR INITIATIVES

Libraries Australia

The Australian National Bibliographic Database is Australia’s largest single bibliographic resource and lies at the heart of the Libraries Australia service suite. The database represents the holdings of more than 1,200 Australian libraries from all states and sectors and reached a milestone of 25 million records in January 2014. This achievement represents 32 years of leadership by the Library, and fruitful national collaboration.

Use of the Libraries Australia service continues to grow. Work on a major redevelopment of the Libraries Australia search service was completed and made available to members in July 2014. This service is used by 1,200 Australian libraries to support their cataloguing and collection management workflows. The redevelopment included the replacement of the underlying software to deliver improved performance, capacity to support large-scale data quality improvement projects, and a more usable and efficient interface.

Additional software innovations were completed, including automatic record duplication detection and removal (previously a manual task), and the capacity for Library staff to perform large-scale quality checks and changes that previously required assistance from third-party programmers. The Libraries Australia Document Delivery service also benefitted from a system upgrade to improve functionality and performance for members.

Another benefit to libraries participating in the Libraries Australia service is the global exposure of their collections via WorldCat, the world’s largest aggregator of bibliographic records, and Trove, which combines bibliographic records with digital and full-text resources including Australian newspapers.

Trove

As the centenary of the First World War approaches, the value of the Trove application programming interface (API) in making Australian collection data available in re-usable forms has been realised through a number of projects undertaken by third parties across Australia and the world. The War Herald website displays each day’s war-related news from a century ago, drawing in content through the Trove API. On a much larger scale, Europeana has redeveloped its portal to First World War resources and now includes a federated search across collections from Europe, America, New Zealand and Australia, using the APIs of Europeana, Digital Public Library of America, DigitalNZ and Trove. This is an excellent example of the role played by aggregators such as Trove in offering the world an entry point to Australian collections.

The Library has taken a leadership role in showcasing the possibilities afforded by API access to large cultural datasets. After several years of advocacy and direct outreach to library audiences at workshops and conferences, Australian libraries are beginning to experiment with making their content available through multiple interfaces and developers continue to develop experimental interfaces to Trove content. These innovative uses of the Trove API are now featured in an application gallery as part of the new Trove Help Centre. Among them are TroveNewsBot, which was nominated for the 2014 Digital Humanities Awards, and Paper Miner, an experimental maps-based interface to Trove content developed by the Smart Services Cooperative Research Centre. Serendip-o-matic, a new tool for the exploration of cultural collections around the world, includes content sourced from Trove.

Trove continues to provide aggregated access to Australian research material and access was improved this year with one new repository added. Harvesting of this content has also been improved, and records are now tagged with Australian Research Council and National Health and Medical Research Council research identifiers where appropriate. This enables easier discovery of publicly funded research, and opens up new possibilities for exposing open access resources. For example, ePress open access books from the University of Technology, Sydney, can now be found in Trove and two new open access journals have recently been added.

National and State Libraries Australasia

The Library continues to work collaboratively on a range of projects aimed at transforming and aligning services offered by national, state and territory libraries so that the needs of Australians for access to library services in the digital age can be better met.

The Library is leading the NSLA Digital Preservation Group, which will drive digital capability development over the next decade or more. During the year, the group developed a joint statement on digital preservation, defined a matrix outlining the most important components of digital preservation systems, and developed a model for a technical registry and format library for NSLA libraries.

The Library is leading the NSLA Storage Management Group, which shares best practice in library storage through work such as developing a costing tool, standards, policy and practice. The Library also co-led projects on managing and providing access to very large collections of pictures and maps.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 69 68

International Relations

From March 2014, Trove staff participated in regular teleconferences with content aggregator counterparts at Europeana, Digital Public Library of America and DigitalNZ. These meetings offer a significant opportunity to share knowledge and expertise, and learn from the experiences of Trove’s peer services on topics as diverse as business models, service impact assessment, managing rights, harvesting and metadata.

Throughout the year, Library staff engaged in 88 initiatives to strengthen ties with other countries. These ranged from formal visits by ambassadors, politicians and senior colleagues from other cultural institutions to participation in conference programs as speakers, presenters or panel members, providing advice and sharing knowledge and expertise across a range of Library services, initiatives and activities. The Library also hosted visits by international colleagues and undertook visits to other international libraries and cultural institutions.

ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTS

This was the first year in which cloud-related changes impacted on the Library’s role as a metadata aggregator.

Traditionally, individual libraries and other cultural organisations have installed and run a dedicated ILMS or CMS, and managed their own data storage, backup and security. Cloud-based systems have changed this paradigm, with systems and data managed by third parties and customers using web-based interfaces to interact.

The effects of these changes are apparent in both the Libraries Australia and Trove environments. Two cloud-based ILMS are in use by Libraries Australia members: one for large research libraries, and the other for small- to medium-sized libraries. While fewer than 40 of the 1,200 members have implemented cloud-based systems to date, considerable effort has been required to manage the significantly different data flows from these systems. The change has required investment of staff time and expertise, and processes are not yet fine-tuned, but the Library is nevertheless confident that the advent of these systems will, in time, improve the coverage and currency of Libraries Australia data.

At least one cloud-based CMS, with capacity to share museum and gallery data using standards-based protocols, is now in use in Australia, resulting in a steady stream of small- and medium-sized museums and historical societies adding their collections to Trove.

PERFORMANCE

The following tables and figures show performance data relating to the Library’s goals for collaborative projects and services.

Table 3.6 shows deliverables and key performance indicators in relation to providing and supporting collaborative projects and services in 2013-14.

Table 3.6: Provide and Support Collaborative Projects and Services— Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14

Measure Target Achieved

Deliverables 

Agencies subscribing to key collaborative services (no.) 1,441 1,425

Records and items contributed by subscribing agencies (no. in millions) 44.06 29.87

Key performance indicators Collaborative services standards and timeframes (%)

97 99

Figure 3.4 depicts the changes over the last four years in the number of agencies subscribing to key collaborative services.

Figure 3.4: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

0.0

Target Achieved

2016-17 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

0

750

1,500

2,250

3,000

The target was not met, due to the closure or amalgamation of an increasing number of state and Commonwealth government libraries during the year.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 71 70

A comparison over the past four years of the number of records contributed by subscribing agencies is provided in Figure 3.5.

Figure 3.5: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

STRATEGIC DIRECTION FOUR

ACHIEVE ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE

The Library aspires to develop the full potential of its staff to achieve the Library’s vision; integrate social and environmental goals into its governance and business operations; diversify its funding sources to support the need to deliver collections and services to all Australians; and maximise returns on government and private sector investment by managing financial resources effectively.

In 2013-14, the Library undertook to provide its staff with:

• a work environment that promotes career development, work-life balance, and work health and safety;

• the opportunity to participate in, and contribute to, sound governance arrangements and effective financial management.

ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTS

Strategic Workforce Plan

In 2013-14, activity focused on three priorities aimed at building staff capability, responding to change and developing digital competency and confidence in staff. The internal mentoring program was successfully reinvigorated, a diversity work experience program was developed, and a reflective senior leadership forum was established to assist with career sustainability and to help deliver major strategic initiatives and projects across the Library. The implementation of the Library Leadership Development Resource Kit and the launch of the Library’s Indigenous Employment Strategy were both proud and significant achievements. The introduction of the Interim Arrangements for Recruitment to the Australian Public Service has impacted the Library’s ability to manage staffing levels smoothly in 2014.

Work Health and Safety Management

The Library prioritised improving workplace health and safety. As well as implementing stronger governance regimes linked to the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, there was a focus on training and awareness of issues including work-life balance, stress management and resilience, risk management, dealing with hazardous substances, working with contractors and first aid. The Library consolidated its work health and safety systems and processes.

The target was not met. The anticipated number of newspaper articles contributed to Trove was not achieved. During the year, one of the subscribing agencies scaled back its newspaper digitisation activity to meet adjusted priorities.

Table 3.7 shows performance against the standards and timeframes for collaborative services.

Table 3.7: Collaborative Services—Percentage of Specified Service Standards and Timeframes Met (%)

Achieved Achieved Target Target

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

96.60 98 98 99 97 97 97 97

The target was met.

0

Target Achieved

2016-17 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

0

10,000,000

20,000,000

30,000,000

50,000,000

40,000,000

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 73 72

Environmental Management

In 2010-11, the Library set three-year targets for a reduction in electricity (-10 per cent), gas (-10 per cent) and water (-10 per cent) consumption. As a result of initiatives implemented, the Library achieved all of its targets except for water consumption. Electricity consumption was reduced by 15 per cent and gas consumption was reduced by 26 per cent. Water consumption was not able to be accurately measured due to a faulty ActewAGL water meter. While no target was set for a reduction in paper consumption in 2013-14, usage has decreased by 42 per cent since 2010-11.

The Library also commenced measuring waste to landfill over the period and has set new targets for the next three years for a reduction in electricity, gas, water and paper consumption, and waste to landfill. The major focus over the period will be to review climate control parameters for the collections and factor the required changes into the scheduled building plant and equipment upgrades over the period.  

Personal Giving, Philanthropic and Business Partnerships

In 2013-14, 26 per cent of Library revenue came from non-appropriation sources, including 1.2 per cent from personal giving and philanthropic partnerships.

Assisted by the Chair of Council and the Library’s Foundation Board, the Library raised $1.5 million in cash donations and sponsorship, and $2.42 million in in-kind support. A major priority was to raise funds and secure in-kind support for the international exhibition, Mapping Our World. In total, $4.8 million was realised in cash donations, sponsorship and in-kind support for the exhibition.

The Library has continued to develop stronger relationships with its donor communities, raising a combined total of $355,707 through its 2013 End of Year and 2014 Tax Time Appeals. These funds will support the preservation of Joan Blaeu’s map, Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus, preservation and digitisation of the Library’s small but significant collection of medieval manuscripts, and access programs for the Treasures Gallery. The Library’s repeat donors have increased from 355 to 375 and the number of Patrons (financial donors who have given $1,000 or more) has increased from 170 to 204.

The Library also entered into fee-for-service partnerships with various state libraries to digitise collections, mostly newspapers. The value of the work undertaken in 2013-14 was $3.22 million.

Governance Arrangements

The Library has continued its sound governance practices. These include strategic plans and policies to manage the collection, workforce, buildings and other plant and equipment. No compliance issues were identified with respect to the CAC Act and no issues of significance were identified through external audit programs. The internal audit program confirmed two issues of significance which related to cost attribution of digitisation projects and the strategy for ingesting new digital content into the collection. Both issues are being addressed. Regular reporting was provided to Council and Government on major projects, and additional reports and processes were set in train to manage identified budget risks.

Individual performance management cycles were aligned to the financial year, to achieve better integration of performance and management with Government performance targets.

In consultation with the Australian National Audit Office and the Department of Finance, the Library continued improving the regime for valuing the collection asset. The Library developed cost-effective strategies which provide assurance to Council and Government of the collection asset’s value and ensure disclosures in the Financial Statements meet the requirements of the new accounting standard, AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement.

The Library prepared for the 1 July 2014 implementation of the PGPA Act. The Council, Audit Committee members and Library employees were provided with briefings, information and training. Policies, procedures and delegations were updated where necessary.

As part of the 2014-15 Budget, the Government announced a new savings measure to consolidate the back-office functions of various Canberra-based collecting institutions including the Library. The functions include accounts processing, payroll and records management. A future focus will be to ensure that the new arrangements meet the business needs of the Library.

CROSS-AGENCY KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Table 3.8: Summary of Results against the Cross-Agency Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14

Indicator Result

Visitor interactions Fully met

Participation in public and school programs Not met

Quantity of school learning programs delivered Not met

Visitor satisfaction Fully met

Expenditure mix Partially met

Collection management and access Not met

The indicators where the targets were not met reflect the impact of increased staff movements and delays in replacing staff, particularly in the latter half of the reporting year.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 75 74

Table 3.9: Cross-Cultural Agency Key Performance Indicators, 2013-14

Key Performance Indicators 1 Target Actual

2014-15 Forward Estimates

2015-16 Forward Estimates

2016-17 Forward Estimates

Visitor interactions

Total number of visits to the organisation 939,000 1,276,552 888,000 960,000 915,000

Total number of visits to the organisation’s website in millions

34 46.60 36 38 41

Total number of onsite visits by students as part of an organised educational group

12,000 10,419 12,000 12,000 12,000

Participation in public and school programs

Number of people participating in public programs

415 528 415 395 395

Number of students participating in school programs 48,000 48,997 48,000 48,000 48,000

Quantity of school learning programs delivered

Number of organised programs delivered onsite

225 236 225 225 225

Number of program packages available online

4 4 4 4 4

Number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs

200 184 200 200 200

Visitor satisfaction

% of visitors that were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit 90 98 90 90 90

Key Performance Indicators 1 Target Actual

2014-15 Forward Estimates

2015-16 Forward Estimates

2016-17 Forward Estimates

Expenditure mix

Expenditure on collection development (as a % of total expenditure) 32 30.20 30 30.70 31.70

Expenditure on other capital items (as a % of total expenditure) 9.80 8.30 13.70 11.30 8.20

Other expenditure (i.e. non-collection development)

Labour costs (as a % of total expenditure) 25.50 26.50 24.10 24.60 25.30

Other expenses (as a % of total expenditure) 32.70 35 32.10 33.50 34.80

Collection management and access

Number of acquisitions (made in the reporting period) 57,000 61,864 54,000 54,000 54,000

Total number of objects accessioned (in the reporting period) 47,000 43,793 47,000 47,000 47,000

% of the total collection available to the public 92 92.40 92 92 92

% of the total collection available to the public online 4.10 3.95 4.60 5.10 5.60

% of the total collection digitised 3.40 3.62 3.60 3.90 4.10

1 The national arts and cultural agencies are progressively implementing a range of cross-agency key performance indicators from 2012-13 to 2014-15 to facilitate standardised reporting to enable aggregation of data across the agencies.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 79

AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Independent Auditor’s Report 80

Statement by Council, Director General and Chief Financial Officer 82

Statement of Comprehensive Income 83

Statement of Financial Position 84

Statement of Changes in Equity (Consolidated) 85

Statement of Changes in Equity (NLA) 85

Cash Flow Statement 86

Schedule of Commitments 87

Schedule of Contingencies 88

Notes to the Financial Statements 89

Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) Insulae Moluccae … (detail) in Iohn Hvighen van Linschoten: His Discours of Voyages into ye Easte & West Indies, Divided into Foure Bookes by Jan Huygen van Linschoten (London: Printed … by Iohn Wolfe, 1598) Petherick Collection nla.cat-vn6186729

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 81 80

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 83 82 2

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2014

Notes 2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 3A 38,476 39,066 38,476 39,066

Suppliers 3B 16,652 15,389 16,578 15,322

Grants 3C 529 607 477 554

Depreciation and amortisation 3D 20,309 20,074 20,309 20,074

Write-down and impairment of assets 3E 1,313 89 1,176 88

Losses from asset sales 3F 238 - 238 -

Other expenses 3G 25 30 25 30

77,542 75,255 77,279 75,134

Own-Source Income

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 11,676 10,169 12,077 10,160

Interest 4B 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Royalties 4C 203 199 162 198

Other revenue 4D 3,744 3,236 2,945 2,741

17,675 16,035 16,957 15,222

Gains Gain from sale of assets 4E - 9 - 9

Other gains 4F 11 4 11 4

Total gains 11 13 11 13

Total own-source income 17,686 16,048 16,968 15,235

Net cost of services 59,856 59,207 60,311 59,899

Revenue from Government 4G 50,218 49,652 50,218 49,652

Deficit (9,638) (9,555) (10,093) (10,247)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 41,425 5,405 41,425 5,405

Total comprehensive income (loss) 31,787 (4,150) 31,332 (4,842)

Consolidated NLA

Own-source revenue

Total own-source revenue

Total expenses

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1

Statement by Council, Director-General and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, as amended.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the National Library of Australia and the consolidated entity will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Council of the National Library of Australia.

Signed ……………………..…. Signed ……………………..…. Signed ……………………..….

R. Stokes Chair

A. Schwirtlich Director-General

G. Linehan Chief Financial Officer

August 2014 August 2014 August 2014

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 85 84 4

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Statement of Changes in Equity (Consolidated) for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 1,401,894 1,411,449 320,217 314,812 60,102 50,270 1,782,213 1,776,531

Adjusted opening balance 1,401,894 1,411,449 320,217 314,812 60,102 50,270 1,782,213 1,776,531

Comprehensive income Deficit for the period (9,638) (9,555) - - - - (9,638) (9,555)

Other comprehensive income - - 41,425 5,405 - - 41,425 5,405

Total comprehensive income (9,638) (9,555) 41,425 5,405 - - 31,787 (4,150)

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners

Equity injection - - - - 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Total transactions with owners - - - - 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,392,256 1,401,894 361,642 320,217 69,963 60,102 1,823,861 1,782,213

Retained earnings Total equity

Contributed equity / capital

Asset revaluation surplus

Statement of Changes in Equity (NLA) for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 1,394,516 1,404,763 320,217 314,812 60,102 50,270 1,774,835 1,769,845

Adjusted opening balance 1,394,516 1,404,763 320,217 314,812 60,102 50,270 1,774,835 1,769,845

Comprehensive income Deficit for the period (10,093) (10,247) (10,093) (10,247)

Other comprehensive income - - 41,425 5,405 - - 41,425 5,405

Total comprehensive income (10,093) (10,247) 41,425 5,405 - - 31,332 (4,842)

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners

Equity injection - - - - 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Total transactions with owners - - - - 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,384,423 1,394,516 361,642 320,217 69,963 60,102 1,816,028 1,774,835

Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus Contributed equity /

capital Total equity

The above statements should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

3

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2014

Notes 2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

ASSETS

Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 6A 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Trade and other receivables 6B 1,829 2,295 1,727 2,191

Other investments 6C 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Other financial assets 6D 471 1,271 469 1,283

Total financial assets 57,139 55,611 49,320 48,403

Non-Financial Assets Land and buildings 7A, C 226,599 206,287 226,599 206,287

National Collection, property, plant and equipment 7B, C 1,509,953 1,497,273 1,509,953 1,497,273

Intangibles 7D, E 44,284 37,234 44,284 37,234

Inventories 7F 1,183 2,407 1,155 2,236

Other non-financial assets 7G 1,569 1,498 1,569 1,498

Total non-financial assets 1,783,588 1,744,699 1,783,560 1,744,528

Total assets 1,840,727 1,800,310 1,832,880 1,792,931

LIABILITIES

Payables Suppliers 8A 3,494 3,744 3,495 3,747

Grants 8B 46 20 31 16

Other payables 8C 1,493 1,589 1,493 1,589

Total payables 5,033 5,353 5,019 5,352

Provisions Employee provisions 9A 11,751 12,674 11,751 12,674

Other provisions 9B 82 70 82 70

Total provisions 11,833 12,744 11,833 12,744

Total liabilities 16,866 18,097 16,852 18,096

Net assets 1,823,861 1,782,213 1,816,028 1,774,835

EQUITY Contributed equity 69,963 60,102 69,963 60,102

Reserves 361,642 320,217 361,642 320,217

Retained surplus 1,392,256 1,401,894 1,384,423 1,394,516

Total equity 1,823,861 1,782,213 1,816,028 1,774,835

Consolidated NLA

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 87 86 6

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Schedule of Commitments as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013 2014 2013

BY TYPE $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Commitments receivable Net GST recoverable on commitments 352 - 352 -

Other 1 7,546 11,720 7,546 11,720

Total commitments receivable 7,898 11,720 7,898 11,720

Commitments payable Capital commitments Buildings 1,167 1,408 1,167 1,408

Property, plant and equipment 76 35 76 35

Intangibles 500 450 500 450

Collections 2 315 201 315 201

Total capital commitments 2,058 2,094 2,058 2,094

Other commitments Operating leases 3 4,120 220 4,120 220

Other 4 5,199 3,738 5,199 3,738

Net GST payable on commitments - 511 - 511

Total other commitments 9,319 4,469 9,319 4,469

Total commitments payable 11,377 6,563 11,377 6,563

Net commitments by type 3,479 (5,157) 3,479 (5,157)

BY MATURITY Commitments receivable Within 1 year 4,085 4,124 4,085 4,124

Between 1 to 5 years 3,813 7,596 3,813 7,596

Total commitments receivable 7,898 11,720 7,898 11,720

Commitments payable Capital commitments Within 1 year 2,036 2,094 2,036 2,094

Between 1 to 5 years 22 - 22 -

Total capital commitments 2,058 2,094 2,058 2,094

Operating lease commitments Within 1 year 846 132 846 132

Between 1 to 5 years 3,274 88 3,274 88

Total operating lease 4,120 220 4,120 220

Other commitments Within 1 year 2,419 1,850 2,419 1,850

Between 1 to 5 years 2,380 1,899 2,380 1,899

More than 5 years 400 500 400 500

Total other commitments 5,199 4,249 5,199 4,249

Total commitments payable 11,377 6,563 11,377 6,563

Net commitments by maturity 3,479 (5,157) 3,479 (5,157)

Consolidated NLA

NB: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. 1 Other commitments receivable include a contract for service with the State Library of NSW to undertake digitisation of library material; an agreement with the Attorney General’s Department to support the Community Heritage Grants program; and amounts receivable in future years from a catering contract with an external supplier in relation to the cafes within the Library. 2

Collection commitments represent contracts for the purchase of collection items. 3

Operating leases included are effectively non-cancellable and comprise: an exhibition workshop which expires in November 2015; a lease of a warehouse for housing of the Library collection which expires in May 2019; a lease of office space within the Australian Embassy in Jakarta; and agreements for the provision of motor vehicles. 4

Other commitments primarily consist of the provision of computer services, security, legal services, cleaning, and building maintenance.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

5

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2014

Notes 2014 2013 2014 2013

OPERATING ACTIVITIES $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Cash received Receipts from Government 50,218 49,652 50,218 49,652

Sales of goods and rendering of services 14,318 10,510 14,718 10,501

Interest 1,896 2,294 1,618 1,951

Net GST received 938 1,412 938 1,412

Other 2,211 1,401 1,372 911

Cash received on behalf of others 275 203 275 203

Total cash received 69,856 65,472 69,139 64,630

Cash used Employees (39,303) (38,554) (39,303) (38,554)

Suppliers (18,531) (16,850) (18,453) (16,788)

Other (498) (618) (458) (549)

Total cash used (58,332) (56,022) (58,214) (55,891)

Net cash from operating activities 10 11,524 9,450 10,925 8,739

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 85 190 85 190

Investments 28,135 26,037 28,121 25,832

Total cash received 28,220 26,227 28,206 26,022

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment (10,301) (11,067) (10,301) (11,067)

Purchase of intangibles (8,375) (8,390) (8,375) (8,390)

Investments (30,678) (25,889) (29,876) (25,341)

Total cash used (49,354) (45,346) (48,552) (44,798)

Net cash used by investing activities (21,134) (19,119) (20,346) (18,776)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed equity 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Total cash received 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Net cash from (used by) financing activities 9,861 9,832 9,861 9,832

Net increase (decrease) in cash held 251 163 440 (205)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 5,606 5,443 4,810 5,015

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Consolidated NLA

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 89 88

8

Table of Contents - Notes to the Financial Statements

Note

Description Page Number

1 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 9

2 Events After the Reporting Period 17

3 Expenses 18

4 Own Source Income 21

5 Fair Value Measurements 22

6 Financial Assets 26

7 Non-Financial Assets 28

8 Payables 34

9 Provisions 35

10 Cash Flow Reconciliation 36

11 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 37

12 Remuneration of Council Members 37

13 Related Party Disclosures 38

14 Senior Executive Remuneration 38

15 Remuneration of Auditors 40

16 Financial Instruments 40

17 Financial Assets Reconciliation 42

18 Compensation and Debt Relief 42

19 Trust Money Controlled by the Library 42

20 Reporting of Outcomes 45

21 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 45

7

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA Schedule of Contingencies as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Contingent assets Claims for damages or costs - - - -

Total contingent assets - - - -

Contingent liabilities Claims for damages or costs 1,318 1,318 1,318 1,318

Total contingent liabilities 1,318 1,318 1,318 1,318

Net contingent assets (liabilities) (1,318) (1,318) (1,318) (1,318)

Consolidated NLA

Details of each class of contingent liabilities and contingent assets listed above are disclosed in Note 11: Contingent Liabilities and Assets, along with information on significant contingencies that cannot be quantified.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

8

Table of Contents - Notes to the Financial Statements

Note

Description Page Number

1 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 9

2 Events After the Reporting Period 17

3 Expenses 18

4 Own Source Income 21

5 Fair Value Measurements 22

6 Financial Assets 26

7 Non-Financial Assets 28

8 Payables 34

9 Provisions 35

10 Cash Flow Reconciliation 36

11 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 37

12 Remuneration of Council Members 37

13 Related Party Disclosures 38

14 Senior Executive Remuneration 38

15 Remuneration of Auditors 40

16 Financial Instruments 40

17 Financial Assets Reconciliation 42

18 Compensation and Debt Relief 42

19 Trust Money Controlled by the Library 42

20 Reporting of Outcomes 45

21 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 45

90

98

99

102

103

107

109

115

116

117

118

118

119

119

121

121

123

123

123

126

126

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 91 90

10

1.4 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

Other than the valuation of the National Collection and employee provisions no accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

Fair value of the National Collection

The NLA obtains independent valuation annually of the National Collection. At the end of each reporting period the NLA updates the assessment of fair value for the National Collection based on the advice of the most recent independent valuation.

Due to the extent and diversity of the National Collection, a valuation of an appropriate sample is considered to be the only practicable means of providing a reliable valuation. Consequently the valuation methodology involves a stratified random sampling of the collections. The statistical sampling methodology was developed by the University of Western Australia, Statistical Consulting Group. The aim of the stratification was to group items that are similar in nature; the way in which they are stored; and approximate value.

The valuation methods adopted for the collection are by market based evidence if a market exists for items in the collection or, in the absence of market based evidence, depreciated replacement cost if the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Those collections for which market based evidence was adopted included: rare books; rare maps; atlases and globes; the general collection; music scores; and ephemera. Market based evidence was sought from a range of sources including dealers in antiquarian material, book sellers, specialist dealers and relevant sales databases. Actual acquisition costs over the past two years for the general collection and the music collection were used to provide a guide as to the purchase price for items. Depreciated replacement cost methodology was adopted for collections including aerial photographs; modern map sheets and microform because of the absence of market based evidence. The cost of items in the collection where no available market evidence was available was achieved by assessing costs from the providers and suppliers of such material. Note 5 provides information on the valuation techniques and inputs used to value the National Collection.

Employee Provisions

The NLA relies on a methodology developed by the Australian Government Actuary to estimate the present value of a provision for annual and long service leave. The methodology for estimating the present value of the long service leave uses probability factors for NLA employees reaching unconditional entitlement and a discount factor which provides for both interest effects and salary increases, both in terms of promotional salary advancement and salary inflation.

1.5 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. Of the new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board that are applicable to the current reporting period, none have had a material financial impact on the NLA.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

Of the new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board that are applicable to future reporting periods, other than AASB 1055 Budgetary reporting being introduced from 1 July 2014, which will require additional disclosures, none will have a material financial impact on the NLA. The requirements and likely impact of AASB 1055 Budgetary reporting is disclosed in the following table.

9

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1.1 Objective of the National Library of Australia

The National Library of Australia (NLA) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of the NLA is to ensure Australians have access to a national collection of library material to enhance learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society.

The NLA is structured to meet a single outcome:

Outcome 1: Enhanced learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society by providing access to a national collection of library material.

The continued existence of the NLA in its present form and with its present program is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by the Parliament for the NLA’s administration and programs.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: • Finance Minister’s Orders (FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and • Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The NLA and Consolidated financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are prepared in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the NLA and Consolidated statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the NLA and Consolidated statement of comprehensive income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.3 Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements are those of the economic entity, comprising the NLA (parent entity) and the Library’s Trust Accounts. Details of the Trust Accounts may be found at Note 19. The accounts of the Library’s Trust Accounts are prepared for the period 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014 using accounting policies consistent with those of the NLA. The effects of transactions and balances between entities are eliminated in full.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 93 92

12

1.7 Gains

Other Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition and they were not received in the course of the ordinary activities of the NLA, or from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of non-current assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.8 Transactions with the Government as Owner

Equity Injections

Amounts that are designated as equity injections for a year are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Restructuring of Administrative Arrangements

Net assets received from or relinquished to another Australian Government agency or authority under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are adjusted at their book value directly against contributed entity.

Other Distributions to Owners

The FMOs require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend.

1.9 Employee Benefits

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within 12 months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave, as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in the future years by employees of the NLA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the NLA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

11

Accounting Standard

Summary of changes Possible impact

AASB 1055 Budgetary Reporting

From 1 July 2014 requires reporting of budgetary information by not-for-profit entities within the General Government Sector. In particular original budget presented to Parliament; variance of actuals from budget; and explanations of significant variances.

No financial impact, however additional disclosures will be required.

1.6 Revenue

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

• the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer; • the NLA retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods; • the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and • it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the

NLA.

Revenue from the sale of goods is reported on a net sale basis, which is calculated by deducting from gross sales the amount of actual product return received and where material an amount estimated for anticipated products returns.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

• the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and • the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the NLA.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances for impairment are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration received in the course of the ordinary activities of the NLA are recognised as revenue at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition unless received from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements (refer note 1.8).

Revenue from Government

Funding received or receivable from the Attorney-General’s Department (appropriated to the Department as a CAC Act body payment item for payment to the National Library) is recognised as Revenue from Government, unless they are in the nature of an equity injection. Grants received from Government entities are included in Other Revenue, Note 4D.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 95 94 14

1.14 Financial Assets

AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement requires financial assets to be classified in the following categories:

• at fair value through profit or loss; • held-to-maturity investments; • available-for-sale financial assets; and • loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. The NLA currently only holds financial assets that are classified as loans and receivables. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset (or financial liability) and of allocating interest income (or expense) over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts (or cash payments) over the expected life of the financial asset (or financial liability), or where appropriate a shorter period. Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets at fair value through profit or loss.

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as `loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account and the loss is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

1.15 Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities `at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon `trade date’.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis (refer to Note 1.14).

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that goods or services have been received and irrespective of having been invoiced.

1.16 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position, but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset, or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the

13

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The NLA recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Superannuation

Employees of the NLA are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or a superannuation fund compliant with the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 nominated by the employee. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme. The liability for the defined benefit schemes is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The NLA makes employer contributions to the CSS, PSS and PSSap superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. Employer contributions to superannuation funds nominated by the employee are made at the same rate as those of the PSSap. The NLA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

1.10 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Where an asset is acquired by means of a finance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount. The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.11 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.12 Fair Value Measurement

It is the NLA’s policy to recognise transfers into and out of the fair value hierarchy levels as at the end of the reporting period.

1.13 Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 97 96

16

Depreciation and amortisation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2014 2013

Building and building improvements 10 to 200 years 10 to 200 years

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Plant and equipment 1 to 25 years 1 to 25 years

National Collection - tangible 50 to 825 years 50 to 825 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2014. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment is made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows and the asset would be replaced if the NLA were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

The Library’s collection assets consist of a comprehensive range of materials relating to the history and culture of Australia and of selected overseas publications. The collections have been developed over the years since 1901 when the Library was established as the Commonwealth Parliamentary Library. The National Library Act 1960 provides the Library with a mandate to build a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of Library material relating to Australia and the Australian people. Australian materials collected include print publications in the form of books, maps, sheet music, and ephemeral materials like posters and leaflets; and unpublished materials such as manuscripts, pictures and oral history and folklore recordings. The overseas collection of publications provides a strong base to support research especially in the fields of South East and East Asia studies and the social sciences and the humanities. The Australian and overseas print collections are augmented by extensive microform holdings and digital resources (refer to note 1.19).

The NLA’s curatorial policy can be accessed from http://www.nla.gov.au/policy/cdp/ and the preservation policies may be accessed from http://www.nla.gov.au/policy/prespol.html.

1.19 Intangibles

The Library’s intangibles comprise purchased software and internally developed software for internal use and heritage and cultural assets forming part of the National Collection in the form of digitised collections, archived web pages, oral history collections and digital photographs. The threshold for the recognition of software assets is $2,000 (GST exclusive). The purchase of intangible library material regardless of the amount, other than serials, is capitalised as part of the National Collection, which is a cultural and heritage asset.

Software assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment loss. As at 30 June 2014 intangible heritage and cultural assets are held at cost.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Library’s software ranges between 2 and 15 years (2012-13: 2 to 15 years). The intangible Library collections are not amortised as their useful lives have been determined as indefinite.

15

amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable, but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

1.17 Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s

accounts immediately prior to restructuring.

1.18 National Collection, Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,500 (GST exclusive), which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). The purchase of library material regardless of the amount, other than serials, is capitalised as part of the National Collection, which is a heritage and cultural asset.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment and the National Collection are carried at fair values less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. It is the NLA’s policy to seek valuation advice annually to confirm all valuations remain current.

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation and Amortisation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment are written-off to the estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the NLA, using in all cases the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation/amortisation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 99 98 18

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 3: Expenses

Note 3A - Employee Benefits

Wages and salaries 29,255 29,092 29,255 29,092

Superannuation Defined contribution plans 2,089 1,894 2,089 1,894

Defined benefit plans 4,073 4,153 4,073 4,153

Leave and other entitlements 2,860 3,744 2,860 3,744

Separation and redundancies 30 - 30 -

Other employee benefits 169 183 169 183

Total employee benefits 38,476 39,066 38,476 39,066

Note 3B - Suppliers

Goods and Services supplied or rendered Access to external databases and records 325 278 325 278

Building services 3,618 3,514 3,618 3,514

Collection preservation 131 178 131 178

Communications 238 261 238 261

Computer services and supplies 1,290 1,119 1,290 1,119

Contractors and consultants 1,789 1,951 1,781 1,949

Cost of goods sold 1,334 814 1,327 811

Freight and postage 768 329 768 329

Insurance 502 356 502 356

Magazine and newspaper subscriptions 2,451 2,672 2,451 2,672

Non asset furniture and equipment 198 282 198 282

Non asset software 9 61 9 61

Other 421 519 421 521

Promotion of Library services 985 576 933 535

Promotional publications 163 168 162 168

Stationary, printing and office machine consumables and repairs 450 541 450 541

Training 445 379 445 379

Travel and subsistence 469 469 463 446

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 15,586 14,467 15,512 14,400

17

The useful lives of these collections are reviewed annually to determine whether events and circumstances continue to support an indefinite useful life assessment for that collection.

All intangible assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2014.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

The description of the National Collection and references to curatorial and preservation policies are disclosed in note 1.18.

1.20 Inventories

Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Inventories held for distribution are valued at cost, adjusted for any loss of service potential.

Costs incurred in bringing each item of inventory to its present location and condition are assigned as follows:

• stores - purchase cost on a first-in-first-out basis; and • finished goods and work-in-progress - cost of direct materials and labour plus attributable costs that are capable of being allocated on a reasonable basis.

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost as at the date of acquisition.

1.21 Taxation

The NLA is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and the goods and services tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

• where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and • for receivables and payables.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

There are no events after the reporting date that will materially affect the financial statements.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 101 100 20

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 3E - Write-Down and Impairment of Assets

Asset write-downs and impairment from Write-down - Inventory 1,254 62 1,117 61

Bad and doubtful debts expense - Receivables for goods and services 1 1 1 1

Write-offs - Plant and equipment 58 25 58 25

Write-offs - Intangibles - Software - 1 - 1

Total write-down and impairment of assets 1,313 89 1,176 88

Note 3F - Losses from Asset Sales

Property, plant and equipment: Proceeds from sale (85) - (85) -

Carrying value of assets sold 323 - 323 -

Total losses from asset sales 238 - 238 -

Note 3G - Other Expenses

Fringe Benefit Tax (Non-remuneration) 25 30 25 30

Total other expenses 25 30 25 30

Note 3H - Operating Expenditure for Heritage and Cultural assets†

Operating expenditure 17,529 18,394 17,529 18,394

Total operating expenditure for heritage and cultural assets 17,529 18,394 17,529 18,394

†Operating expenditure for heritage and cultural assets is contained within the Statement of Comprehensive Income, however it is not disclosed as a separate item. It is merely a different representation of expenditure already reported in Note 3A to 3G relating to heritage and cultural assets.

19

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 3B - Suppliers (cont)

Goods supplied in connection with External parties 3,906 3,894 3,894 3,890

Total goods supplied 3,906 3,894 3,894 3,890

Services rendered in connection with Related parties 729 1,190 729 1,190

External parties 10,951 9,383 10,889 9,320

Total Services rendered 11,680 10,573 11,618 10,510

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 15,586 14,467 15,512 14,400

Other suppliers Operating lease rentals - external External parties Minimum lease payments 803 787 803 787

Workers compensation expenses 263 135 263 135

Total other supplier 1,066 922 1,066 922

Total supplier 16,652 15,389 16,578 15,322

Note 3C - Grants

Private sector Non-profit organisations 428 498 428 498

Individuals 101 109 49 56

Total grants 529 607 477 554

Grants to non-profit organisations support Australian community organisations to preserve significant documentary heritage collections. Grants to individuals are provided to scholars and writers to work on materials held in the National Collection.

Note 3D - Depreciation and Amortisation

Depreciation Plant and equipment 2,582 2,552 2,582 2,552

Heritage and cultural assets 12,431 12,359 12,431 12,359

Buildings 3,980 3,849 3,980 3,849

Total depreciation 18,993 18,760 18,993 18,760

Amortisation Leasehold improvements 5 2 5 2

Intangibles 1,311 1,312 1,311 1,312

Total amortisation 1,316 1,314 1,316 1,314

Total depreciation and amortisation 20,309 20,074 20,309 20,074

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 103 102

22

Grantor Purpose and conditions of the grant

Amount

National Archives of Australia Funds were provided to be used for the 2014 Community Heritage Grants Program to assist in meeting both the

costs of the grants and the administration of the program.

$20,000

National Film and Sound Archive Funds were provided to be used for the 2014 Community Heritage Grants Program to assist in meeting both the

costs of the grants and the administration of the program.

$20,000

National Museum of Australia Funds were provided to be used for the 2014 Community Heritage Grants Program to assist in meeting both the

costs of the grants and the administration of the program.

$20,000

Grants recognised as income in a previous reporting period and where the associated conditions were discharged in 2013-14 financial year total $967,038 (2012-13: $1,144,083).

The Library also receives donations to its Trust Funds which are detailed at Note 19.

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Gains

Note 4E - Gains from the Sale of Assets

Property, plant and equipment Proceeds from sale - 190 - 190

Carrying value of assets sold - (181) - (181)

Net gain from sale of assets - 9 - 9

Note 4F - Other Gains

Sale of plant and equipment under the capitalisation threshold - proceeds 11 4 11 4

Total other gains 11 4 11 4

Note 4G - Revenue from Government

Attorney-General's Department CAC Act body payment item 37,666 - 37,666 -

Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport CAC Act body payment item 12,552 49,652 12,552 49,652

Total revenue from Government 50,218 49,652 50,218 49,652

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets that measured at fair value.

The different levels of fair value are identified below:

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Input other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

21

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 4: Own Source Income

Own Source Revenue

Note 4A - Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

Sale of goods in connection with Related parties 5 3 5 3

External parties 2,360 1,401 2,353 1,394

Total sale of goods 2,365 1,404 2,358 1,397

Rendering of services in connection with Related parties 390 401 390 401

External parties 8,921 8,364 9,329 8,362

Total rendering of services 9,311 8,765 9,719 8,763

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 11,676 10,169 12,077 10,160

Note 4B - Interest

Deposits 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Total interest 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Note 4C - Royalties

Other 203 199 162 198

Total royalties 203 199 162 198

Note 4D - Other Revenue

Resources received free of charge - Collection material 1,653 1,778 1,653 1,778

Grants and other non-reciprocal payments 1,233 853 1,233 853

Donations 823 559 - -

Other revenue 35 46 59 110

Total other revenue 3,744 3,236 2,945 2,741

During 2013-14 the Library received the following grants totalling $616,000 where the expenditure is specifically for a future financial year:

Grantor Purpose and conditions of the grant

Amount

A.C.T. Government To research and conduct oral history interviews. $5,000

Attorney-General’s Department Funds were provided to be used for the 2014 Community Heritage Grants Program. To assist in meeting both the

costs of the grants and the administration of the program.

$528,000

Australian Broadcasting Commission To conduct oral history interviews. $15,000

Australian Paralympic Committee To conduct up to 12 oral history interviews. $8,000

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 105 104

24

Note 5C - Valuation Technique and Inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurement

Level 2 and 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities in 2014 Category (Level 2 or Level 3) Fair Value Valuation

technique(s)1 Inputs used Range (weighted average)2

$'000

Non-financial assets Land - Industrial 3 1,000 Market

comparables Sales prices of comparable land $100 - $165 psm

($100 psm)

Land - Parliamentary Triangle 3 14,100 Market

comparables Sales prices of comparable land $650 - $1,100 psm

($875 psm)

Buildings - Industrial / Warehouse 3 7,310 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Consumed economic benefit/ obsolescence of the asset

1% to 10% per year

(5% per year)

Buildings - Work in progress 2 2,975 Cost Consumed

economic benefit/ obsolescence of the asset

Buildings - National Library 3 201,190 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Consumed economic benefit/ obsolescence of the asset

1% to 10% per year

(5% per year)

Leasehold improvements 3 24 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Consumed economic benefit/ obsolescence of the asset

0% to 50% per year

Heritage and cultural 3 440,279 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Replacement Cost (price per item)

-4.7% to 9.1%

Heritage and cultural 3 913,566 Market Approach

(statistical model)

Statistically verified random sample

0.3% - 26.0% (10.3%) Statistically selected sample

Heritage and cultural 2 142,869 Market Approach Adjusted market

transactions

Other property, plant and equipment 2 5,379 Market Approach Sales

comparison

Other property, plant and equipment 3 7,860 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Replacement Cost Not available

1. There has been no change to the valuation techniques during 2013-14. 2. Significant unobservable inputs only. Not applicable for assets and liabilities in the level 2 category.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes

The NLA engages professional independent valuers with appropriate skills and experience to value its assets. For the 30 June 2014 valuation the NLA engaged the following valuers:

• Land, building and leasehold improvements: Herron Todd White (Canberra) Pty Ltd

23

Note 5A - Fair Value Measurement

Fair value measurement at the end of the reporting period by hierarchy for assets and liabilities in 2014

Fair value Level 1 inputs Level 2 inputs Level 3 inputs $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Non-financial assets Land 15,100 - - 15,100

Buildings 211,475 - 2,975 208,500

Leasehold improvements 24 - - 24

Heritage and cultural 1,496,714 - 142,869 1,353,845

Other property, plant and equipment 13,239 - 5,379 7,860

Total non-financial assets 1,736,552 - 151,223 1,585,329

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 1,736,552 - 151,223 1,585,329

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

The NLA did not measure any non-financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2014.

Fair value measurements - highest and best use differs from current use for non-financial assets (NFAs)

The NLA’s assets are held for the purposes of maintaining and disseminating Australia’s cultural heritage and are not held for the purposes of deriving a profit. The current use of the NLA’s assets are considered to be their highest and best use.

Note 5B - Level 1 and Level 2 Transfers for Recurring Fair Value Measurements

There have been no transfers between levels 1 and 2 of the valuation hierarchy during the year. The NLA’s policy for determining when transfers are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 107 106 26

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 6: Financial Assets

Note 6A - Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Total cash and cash equivalents 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Note 6B - Trade and Other Receivables

Goods and services receivables in connection with Related parties 17 6 17 6

External parties 553 1,449 553 1,449

Total goods and services receivables 570 1,455 570 1,455

Other receivables GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office 365 150 366 150

Interest 836 681 733 577

Other 60 11 60 11

Total other receivables 1,261 842 1,159 738

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,831 2,297 1,729 2,193

Less impairment allowance Goods and services (2) (2) (2) (2)

Total impairment allowance (2) (2) (2) (2)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1,829 2,295 1,727 2,191

Note 6B - Trade and Other Receivables (cont)

Trade and other receivables (net) expected to be recovered No more than 12 months 1,829 2,295 1,727 2,191

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1,829 2,295 1,727 2,191

Trade and other receivables (gross) aged as follows Not overdue 1,373 2,070 1,271 1,966

Overdue by 0 to 30 days 357 136 357 136

31 to 60 days 99 84 99 84

61 to 90 days 1 1 1 1

More than 90 days 1 6 1 6

458 227 458 227

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,831 2,297 1,729 2,193

25

• Tangible heritage and cultural assets (i.e. National Collection): Australian Valuation Solutions Pty Ltd • Other property, plant and equipment: Pickles Valuation Services were engaged to confirm that current values did not materially differ to fair value.

The NLA relies on the valuation models provided by the valuers and it is the NLA’s policy to seek valuation advice annually to confirm that all valuations remain current. All contracted valuers are required to provide written assurance that the valuation models used are in compliance with AASB 13.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

The significant unobservable input used in fair value measurement of the NLA’s land is the selection of land with similar utility and adjustments for the restrictions on use of the land.

The significant unobservable input used in fair value measurement of the NLA’s buildings, leasehold improvements and plant and equipment is the estimated consumed economic benefit, which is based on the expected useful lives and any adjustment for obsolescence. Significant increases (decreases) in expected useful lives would result in significant higher (lower) fair value measurement and significant increases (decreases) in adjustments for obsolescence would result in significant lower (higher) fair value measurement.

For heritage and cultural material valued using the depreciated cost technique the significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the National Collection relate to the consumed economic benefit / asset obsolescence (accumulated depreciation). A significant increase (decrease) in this input would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement. Collection material valued using the depreciated cost technique include: general collection, music scores, general and prompt ephemera, modern maps, aerial photographs and microforms.

The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the NLA’s statistically verified National Collection assets relate to the size of the samples and professional judgment applied to the valued assets. The smaller (larger) the sample the higher (lower) the relative standard error (RSE).

Note 5D - Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Land Buildings Leasehold

Improvements

Heritage and

cultural

Other

Property, Plant &

equipment

Total

2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance 15,935 187,305 29 1,337,197 9,360 1,549,826

Total gains/(losses) recognised in the net cost of service 1

- (3,980) (5) (12,133) (1,179) (17,297)

Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income (835) 21,791 - 23,437 - 44,393

Additions - 3,384 - 5,344 - 8,728

Disposals - - - - (321) (321)

Closing balance 15,100 208,500 24 1,353,845 7,860 1,585,329

Non-financial assets

Notes 1. These losses are presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income under depreciation. The NLA’s policy for determining when transfers are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 109 108 28

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

7A - Land and Buildings

Land Fair value 15,100 15,935 15,100 15,935

Buildings Work in progress 2,975 3,017 2,975 3,017

Fair value 208,500 187,306 208,500 187,306

Total buildings and land 226,575 206,258 226,575 206,258

Leasehold improvements Fair value 24 29 24 29

Total leasehold improvements 24 29 24 29

Total land and buildings 226,599 206,287 226,599 206,287

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings. The National Library building ($201,190,000) and land ($14,100,000) upon which it stands is a special purpose building, which may not be disposed of without prior Ministerial approval. No land or buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

7B - National Collection, Property, Plant and Equipment

Heritage and cultural Fair Value - National collection 1,496,714 1,495,679 1,496,714 1,495,679

Accumulated depreciation - (12,359) - (12,359)

Total heritage and cultural 1,496,714 1,483,320 1,496,714 1,483,320

Other property, plant and equipment Fair value 15,772 13,953 15,772 13,953

Accumulated depreciation (2,533) - (2,533) -

Total other property, plant and equipment 13,239 13,953 13,239 13,953

Total property, plant and equipment 1,509,953 1,497,273 1,509,953 1,497,273

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy at Note 1. The effective date for all revaluations was 30 June 2014. The revaluation for the land and buildings was conducted by independent valuers from Herron Todd White and the revaluations for the National Collection was undertaken by independent valuers from Australian Valuation Solutions.

A revaluation increment of $21,791,000 for buildings (2012-13: increment of $5,261,000); a revaluation decrement for land of $835,000 (2012-13: $0); leasehold improvements were found to be at fair value (2012-13: increment of $7,000); and a revaluation increment of $20,469,000 for heritage and cultural assets were passed to the asset revaluation reserve by class and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment.

No land and buildings or heritage and cultural material is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months, however immaterial amounts of plant and equipment are expected to be disposed as they reach their planned disposal date during the next 12 months.

27

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

The impairment allowance is aged as follows

Overdue by 31 to 60 days - - - -

61 to 90 days 1 1 1 1

More than 90 days 1 1 1 1

Total impairment allowance 2 2 2 2

Credit terms are net 30 days (2013: 30 days)

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance Account (consolidated)

Movements in relation to 2014 Goods and

services $’000

Other receivables $’000

Total $’000

Opening balance (2) - (2)

Amounts written off (1) - (1)

Amounts recovered and reversed - - -

Increases recognised in net surplus 1 - 1

Closing balance (2) - (2)

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance Account (consolidated)

Movements in relation to 2013 Goods and

services $’000

Other receivables $’000

Total $’000

Opening balance (2) - (2)

Amounts written off (1) - (1)

Amounts recovered and reversed - - -

Increases recognised in net surplus 1 - 1

Closing balance (2) - (2)

Note 6C - Other Investments

Fixed term deposit with bank 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Total other investments 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Other investments are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Total other investments 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Note 6D - Other Financial Assets

Accrued revenues 471 1,271 469 1,283

Total other financial assets 471 1,271 469 1,283

All other financial assets are expected to be recovered in less than 12 months.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 111 110

30

Note 7C (con’d): Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2012-13) (Consolidated only, as this is the same as the parent entity)

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 15,935 186,010 201,945 1,490,100 17,417 1,709,462 Accumulated depreciation / amortisation - - - - (4,128) (4,128) Net book value 1 July 2012 15,935 186,010 201,945 1,490,100 13,289 1,705,334 Additions By purchase or internally developed - 2,925 2,925 4,694 3,380 10,999 By donation/gift/at no cost - - - 885 - 885

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income

- 5,268 5,268 - 137 5,405

Depreciation / amortisation expense - (3,851) (3,851) (12,359) (2,552) (18,762) Capitalised depreciation - - - - (95) (95) Disposals Other - - - - (206) (206)

Net book value 30 June 2013 15,935 190,352 206,287 1,483,320 13,953 1,703,560 Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by Gross book value 15,935 190,352 206,287 1,495,679 13,953 1,715,919 Accumulated depreciation / amortisation - - - (12,359) - (12,359) Net book value 30 June 2013 15,935 190,352 206,287 1,483,320 13,953 1,703,560

Other property, plant and

equipment

Heritage and cultural

Total

Land

Buildings

Total land and

buildings

Capitalised depreciation: Where the use of a non-current asset contributes towards the development of a new non-current asset, the associated depreciation expense is capitalised and forms part of the carrying amount of the new asset. In such situations the capitalised depreciation is excluded from the depreciation charge recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

29

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2013-14) (Consolidated only, as this is the same as the parent entity)

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 15,935 190,352 206,287 1,495,679 13,953 1,715,919 Accumulated depreciation / amortisation - - - (12,359) - (12,359) Net book value 1 July 2013 15,935 190,352 206,287 1,483,320 13,953 1,703,560 Additions By purchase or internally developed - 3,341 3,341 4,609 2,326 10,276 By donation/gift/at no cost - - - 747 - 747

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income

(835) 21,791 20,956 20,469 - 41,425

Depreciation / amortisation expense - (3,985) (3,985) (12,431) (2,582) (18,998) Capitalised depreciation - - - - (77) (77) Disposals Other - - - - (381) (381)

Net book value 30 June 2014 15,100 211,499 226,599 1,496,714 13,239 1,736,552 Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by Gross book value 15,100 211,499 226,599 1,496,714 15,772 1,739,085 Accumulated depreciation / amortisation - - - - (2,533) (2,533) Net book value 30 June 2014 15,100 211,499 226,599 1,496,714 13,239 1,736,552

Total

Buildings

Other property,

plant and equipment

Land

Total land and buildings

Heritage and cultural

Capitalised depreciation: Where the use of a non-current asset contributes towards the development of a new non-current asset, the associated depreciation expense is capitalised and forms part of the carrying amount of the new asset. In such situations the capitalised depreciation is excluded from the depreciation charge recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 113 112

32

Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2013-14) (Consolidated only, as this is the same as the parent entity)

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 6,483 8,244 31,916 46,643 Accumulated amortisation (3,197) (6,212) - (9,409) Net book value 1 July 2013 3,286 2,032 31,916 37,234 Additions By purchase or internally developed 1,729 569 6,077 8,375

Amortisation (845) (466) - (1,311) Capitalised amortisation - (14) - (14) Disposals Other - - - -

Net book value 30 June 2014 4,170 2,121 37,993 44,284 Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by Gross book value 8,212 8,416 37,993 54,621 Accumulated amortisation (4,042) (6,295) - (10,337) Net book value 30 June 2014 4,170 2,121 37,993 44,284

Total

Heritage and cultural

Computer software - purchased

Computer software - internally

developed

Capitalised amortisation: Where the use of a non-current asset contributes towards the development of a new non-current asset, the associated amortisation expense is capitalised and forms part of the carrying amount of the new asset. In such situations the capitalised amortisation is excluded from the amortisation charge recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

31

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 7D - Intangibles

Computer software Internally developed - in progress 1,711 1,051 1,711 1,051

Internally developed - in use 6,501 5,432 6,501 5,432

Purchased 8,416 8,244 8,416 8,244

Accumulated amortisation (10,337) (9,409) (10,337) (9,409)

Total computer software 6,291 5,318 6,291 5,318

Other intangibles Heritage and cultural - National Collection 37,993 31,916 37,993 31,916

Total other intangibles 37,993 31,916 37,993 31,916

Total Intangibles 44,284 37,234 44,284 37,234

No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.

No material intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 115 114 34

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 7F - Inventories

Inventories held for sale Work in progress 285 338 285 338

Finished goods 851 2,023 823 1,852

Total inventories held for sale 1,136 2,361 1,108 2,190

Inventories held for distribution Work in progress 5 15 5 15

Finished goods 42 31 42 31

Total inventories held for distribution 47 46 47 46

Total inventories 1,183 2,407 1,155 2,236

Inventories are categorised as follows

No more than 12 months 566 1,083 546 1,047

More than 12 months 617 1,324 609 1,189

Total inventories 1,183 2,407 1,155 2,236

During 2013-14 $1,334,000 (2012-13: $814,000) of inventory held for sale was recognised as an expense upon sale and $163,000 (2012-13: $168,000) of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense upon use. The value of inventory held at fair value less cost to sell is $442,000 (2012-13: $297,000).

Note 7G - Other Non-Financial Assets

Prepayments 1,569 1,498 1,569 1,498

Total other non-financial assets 1,569 1,498 1,569 1,498

Total other non-financial assets are expected to be recovered in No more than 12 months 1,453 1,459 1,453 1,459

More than 12 months 116 39 116 39

Total other non-financial assets 1,569 1,498 1,569 1,498

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

Note 8: Payables

Note 8A - Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 3,490 3,744 3,491 3,747

Operating lease rentals 4 - 4 -

Total suppliers 3,494 3,744 3,495 3,747

All supplier payables are current and settlement is usually made net 30 days.

33

Note 7E: (Cont’d) Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2012-13) (Consolidated only, as this is the same as the parent entity)

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 5,400 7,163 26,070 38,633 Accumulated amortisation (2,789) (5,672) - (8,461) Net book value 1 July 2012 2,611 1,491 26,070 30,172 Additions By purchase or internally developed 1,419 1,125 5,846 8,390

Amortisation expense (744) (568) - (1,312) Capitalised amortisation - (15) - (15) Disposals Other - (1) - (1)

Net book value 30 June 2013 3,286 2,032 31,916 37,234 Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by Gross book value 6,483 8,244 31,916 46,643 Accumulated amortisation (3,197) (6,212) - (9,409) Net book value 30 June 2013 3,286 2,032 31,916 37,234

Heritage and Cultural

Computer software - purchased

Computer software - internally developed

Total

Capitalised amortisation: Where the use of a non-current asset contributes towards the development of a new non-current asset, the associated amortisation expense is capitalised and forms part of the carrying amount of the new asset. In such situations the capitalised amortisation is excluded from the amortisation charge recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 117 116 36

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per statement of financial position to the cash flow statement

Report cash and cash equivalents as per Cash flow statement 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Statement of financial position 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Discrepancy - - - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from (used by) operating activities

Net cost of services (59,856) (59,207) (60,311) (59,899)

Revenue from Government 50,218 49,652 50,218 49,652

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation / amortisation 20,309 20,074 20,309 20,074

Loss/(Gain) on disposal of assets 296 17 296 17

Resources received free of charge - goods (1,653) (1,778) (1,653) (1,778)

Notional expenditure 1,022 1,071 1,022 1,071

Changes in assets / liabilities Assets (Increase) / decrease in net receivables 1,266 (1,230) 1,278 (1,268)

(Increase) / decrease in inventories 1,224 (300) 1,081 (300)

(Increase) / decrease in prepayments (71) 235 (71) 235

Liabilities Increase / (decrease) in prepayments received (241) 241 (241) 241

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions (923) 395 (923) 395

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables (250) 154 (252) 157

Increase in other payables 145 67 145 67

Increase / (decrease) in grant payables 26 (11) 15 5

Increase in other provisions 12 70 12 70

Net cash from / (used by) operating activities 11,524 9,450 10,925 8,739

Non-cash financing and investing activities

National Collection material received free of charge 722 817 722 817

Total Non-Cash Financing and Investing 722 817 722 817

35

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Suppliers in connection with Related parties 58 86 58 86

External parties 3,436 3,658 3,437 3,661

Total suppliers 3,494 3,744 3,495 3,747

Note 8B - Grants

Private sector: Individuals 46 20 31 16

Total grants 46 20 31 16

All grants payables are current. The grant liability is recognised because grant recipients have met the conditions of the grants but are yet to be paid.

Note 8C - Other Payables

Wages and salaries 1,072 982 1,072 982

Superannuation 187 168 187 168

Separations and redundancies 30 - 30 -

Prepayments received/unearned income 198 439 198 439

Other 6 - 6 -

Total other payables 1,493 1,589 1,493 1,589

All other payables are expected to be settled within the next 12 months.

Note 9: Provisions

Note 9A - Employee Provisions

Leave 11,751 12,674 11,751 12,674

Total employee provisions 11,751 12,674 11,751 12,674

Employee provisions expected to be settled No more than 12 months 3,072 3,735 3,072 3,735

More than 12 months 8,679 8,939 8,679 8,939

Total employee provisions 11,751 12,674 11,751 12,674

Note 9B - Other Provisions

Provision for sales returns 82 70 82 70

Total other provisions 82 70 82 70

Other provisions are expected to be settled within the next 12 months.

Provision for sales returns Total

$'000 $'000

As at 1 July 2014 70 70

Additional provisions made 89 89

Amounts used (77) (77)

Amounts reversed - -

Total asset as at 30 June 2014 82 82

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 119 118

38

Note 13: Related Party Disclosures

Transactions with Council members or Council member related entities

Other than identified in the following table no members of the Council have, since the end of the previous financial year, received or become entitled to receive a benefit (other than a benefit included in the aggregate amount of remuneration received or due and receivable by Council members shown in the financial statements) by reason of a contract made by the Library with the Council member or an entity in which she/he has a substantial financial interest. The Library does not make any loans to members of Council or their related entities.

Contracts with Council Members

Name Description Amount

R. Stokes Contract with Australian Capital Equity, for which Mr Stokes has an interest for the purchase of publications. $16,000 GST Inc

Controlled Entities - Library Trust Accounts

The Library provides administrative support services to the Library’s trust accounts during the year free of charge. The activities funded by the trust accounts support the functions of the Library.

Note 14: Senior Executive Remuneration

Note 14A - Senior Executive Remuneration Expenses for the Reporting Period

2014 2013 2014 2013

$ $ $ $

Short-term employee benefits Salary 956,055 968,818 956,055 968,818

Performance bonuses 45,813 44,739 45,813 44,739

Motor vehicle and other allowances 170,727 173,031 170,727 173,031 Total short-term employee benefits 1,172,595 1,186,588 1,172,595 1,186,588

Post-employment benefits Superannuation 194,955 193,982 194,955 193,982

Total post-employment benefits 194,955 193,982 194,955 193,982

Other long-term employer benefits Annual leave accrued 65,920 85,549 65,920 85,549

Long-service leave 5,326 41,336 5,326 41,336

Total other long-term benefits 71,246 126,885 71,246 126,885

Termination benefits - - - -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 1,438,796 1,507,455 1,438,796 1,507,455

Consolidated NLA

1. Note 14A was prepared on an accrual basis and therefore the performance bonus disclosed above differs from the cash ‘Bonus paid’ in Note 14B. 2. Note 14A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where remuneration expensed was less than $195,000.

37

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Contingent assets Balance from previous period - - - - - 2 - 2

Assets recognised - - - - - (2) - (2)

Total contingent assets - - - - - - - -

Contingent liabilities Balance from previous period - - - - 1,318 - 1,318 -

New - - - - - 1,318 - 1,318

Re-measurement - - - - - - - -

Total contingent liabilities - - - - 1,318 1,318 1,318 1,318

Net contingent assets (liabilities) (1,318) (1,318)

Total Guarantees Indemnities

Claims for damages or costs

Quantifiable Contingencies

As disclosed in the 2012-13 financial statements the Library had received a claim for damages for $1,318,014 and interest from an unsuccessful tenderer. The Library denied liability and defended the claim and a judgement in favour of the Library was made on 3 August 2012. The claimant subsequently lodged an appeal, judgement is pending and consequently a contingent liability for $1,318,014 has been recognised as at 30 June 2014.

Unquantifiable Contingencies

The claim for damages from the unsuccessful tenderer also includes a claim for interest on the damages being sought, however if the claim is successful the interest rate used to calculate the payment would be determined by the Court.

Significant Remote Contingencies

The Library had no significant remote contingencies.

Note 12: Remuneration of Council Members

The number of Council members of the Library included in these figures are shown below in the relevant remuneration bands:

2014 2013

$0 - $29,999 12 12

$30,000 to $59,999 1 1

Total 13 13

Total remuneration received or due and receivable by the Council members of the Library

$174,053

$112,128

Parliamentary members of Council do not receive any remuneration from the Library for their service on Council. The above disclosure excludes the Director-General, who is an executive member of the Council and whose remuneration is disclosed in Note 14. These payments are determined by the Remuneration Tribunal and paid in accordance with Sections 13 and 17A of the National Library Act 1960.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 121 120

40

Note 14C - Other Highly Paid Staff

During the reporting period there were no employees (2012-13: 0 employees) excluding senior executive staff and the Director-General whose total reportable remuneration exceeded $195,000 where total reportable remuneration was calculated as specified in Note 14B.

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 15: Remuneration of Auditors

The fair value of services received

Financial statement audit services 76 76 76 76

Total fair value of services received 76 76 76 76

No other services were provided by the Auditor-General.

Note 16: Financial Instruments

Note 16A - Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial Assets Loans and receivables: Cash on hand or deposit 5,857 5,606 5,250 4,810

Receivables for goods and services 568 1,453 568 1,453

Interest receivable 836 681 733 577

Fixed Term Deposit with Bank 48,982 46,439 41,874 40,119

Accrued revenue 471 1,271 469 1,283

Total loans and receivables 56,714 55,450 48,894 48,242

Total financial assets 56,714 55,450 48,894 48,242

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Supplier payables 3,494 3,744 3,495 3,747

Grants payable 46 20 31 16

Other 6 - 6 -

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 3,546 3,764 3,532 3,763

Total financial liabilities 3,546 3,764 3,532 3,763

Note 16B - Net Gains and Losses from Financial Assets

Loans and receivables Interest revenue 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Net gain loans and receivables 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Net gain on financial assets 2,052 2,431 1,773 2,123

Note 16C - Fair values of financial instruments

The net fair value of each class of the Library’s financial assets and liabilities equal the carrying amount for both current and preceding reporting periods.

39

Note 14B - Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

2014

Average annual reportable remuneration1 Substantive Senior

Executives Reportable salary2 Contributed

superannuation3 Reportable allowances4 Bonus Paid5 Total

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 2 119,290 10,668 - - 129,958

$195,000 to $224,999 4 185,246 29,383 - - 214,629

$225,000 to $254,999 1 193,144 35,050 - - 228,194

$345,000 to $374,999 1 270,050 42,372 - 44,739 357,161

Total 8

2013

Average annual reportable remuneration1

Substantive Senior Executives1 Reportable

salary2

Contributed superannuation3 Reportable allowances4 Bonus Paid5 Total

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 2 97,420 15,321 - - 112,741

$195,000 to $224,999 5 184,292 30,765 - - 215,057

$345,000 to $374,999 1 264,950 40,158 - 41,367 346,475

Total 8

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which

are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits); and salary sacrificed benefits. Senior executives are not in receipt of exempt foreign employment income paid by the Library. 3. The 'contributed superannuation' amount is the average cost to the Library for the provision of

superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. 'Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries. 5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that

reportable remuneration band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the Library during the financial year. Other than the Director-General no senior executives are eligible to be paid a bonus.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 123 122

42

Note 16E - Liquidity risk

The Library’s financial liabilities are payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that the Library will encounter difficulties in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to government funding and mechanisms available to the Library and internal policies and procedures that have been put into place to ensure that there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities in 2014 On demand Within 1 year between 1 to between 2 to more than Total

2 years 5 years 5 years

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors - 3,494 - - - 3,494

Grants payable - 46 - - - 46

Other payables - 6 - - - 6

Total - 3,546 - - - 3,546

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities in 2013 On demand Within 1 year between 1 to between 2 to more than Total

2 years 5 years 5 years

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors - 3,744 - - - 3,744

Grants payable - 20 - - - 20

Total - 3,764 - - - 3,764

Note 16F - Market risk

The Library holds basic financial instruments that do not expose it to certain market risks. The Library is exposed to minimal ‘currency risk’ and is not exposed to ‘other price risk’ or ‘interest rate risk’.

Note 17: Financial Assets Reconciliation

Notes

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total financial assets as per statement of financial position 57,139 55,611 49,320 48,403

Less: non-financial instrument components Other receivables 6B 425 161 426 161

Total non-financial instrument components Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 56,714 55,450 48,894 48,242

Consolidated NLA

Note 18: Compensation and Debt Relief

The Library has not made (2012-13: Nil) or provided for any provisions in relation to compensation and debt relief, including either act of grace payments; waivers of debt owed to the Library; payments made under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration; payments approved under ex-gratia programs or payments made under special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999.

Note 19: Trust Money Controlled by the Library

The Library operates a number of trust funds to account for donations and income from the application of donated funds. These funds operate under formal trust arrangements; are only able to be used in accordance with the terms of trusts, which are for the purposes of the Library; and these moneys are also recognised in the primary financial statements. The following is a brief comment on each fund currently in operation:

41

Financial assets

The net fair values of cash, deposits on call, interest bearing deposits and non-interest-bearing monetary financial assets approximate their carrying amounts. None of the classes of financial assets are readily traded on organised markets in standardised form.

Financial liabilities

The net fair values for trade creditors and grant liabilities, which are short term in nature, are approximated by their carrying amounts. None of the classes of financial liabilities are readily traded on organised markets in standardised form.

Note 16D - Credit risk

The Library is exposed to minimal credit risk as the majority of loans and receivables are cash. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade receivables and accrued revenue (2013-14: $1,042,000 and 2012-13: $2,726,000). The Library has assessed the risk of default on payment and has allocated $2,000 in 2013-14 (2012-13: $2,000) to an impairment account.

The Library manages its credit risks by limiting the provision to credit to qualifying organisations. In addition, the Library has policies and procedures in place to guide and monitor the recovery of overdue debt.

The Library holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

Credit quality of financial assets (consolidated only) not past due or individually determined as impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Past due or impaired

Past due or impaired

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Cash and cash equivalents 5,857 5,606 - -

Receivables for goods and services 112 1,228 458 227

Interest receivable 836 681 - -

Fixed term deposit with bank 48,982 46,439 - -

Accrued revenue 471 1,271 - -

Total 56,258 55,225 458 227

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired in 2014

0 to 30 days 31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days 90+ days Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables for goods and services 357 99 1 1 458

Total 357 99 1 1 458

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired in 2013

0 to 30

days

31 to 60 days 61 to 90 days

90+ days Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables for goods and services 136 84 1 6 227

Total 136 84 1 6 227

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 125 124

44

2014

$’000 2013

$’000

(f) The H.S. Williams Trust is a bequest from the late Harold S. Williams for the maintenance of and addition to the H.S. Williams collection.

Balance carried forward from previous year 330 296

Receipts during the year 58 68

Interest received 11 13

Available for payments 399 377

Payments made (26) (47)

Balance carried forward to next year 373 330

(g) The Dame Mary Gilmore Trust is a bequest from the late Dame Mary Gilmore for the maintenance, preservation and protection of the Dame Mary Gilmore diaries.

Balance carried forward from previous year 17 16

Receipts during the year - -

Interest received 1 1

Available for payments 18 17

Payments made - -

Balance carried forward to next year 18 17

(h) The Nora Heysen Trust Account is a specific bequest from the late Nora Heysen for the provision of scholarships for the study of aspects of the art of Hans Heysen or his contribution to the artistic culture of Australia; or to further the study of the art of Hans Heysen; or to promote and perpetuate the standing of Hans Heysen.

Balance carried forward from previous year 227 214

Receipts during the year 2 3

Interest received 9 11

Available for payments 238 228

Payments made - (1)

Balance carried forward to next year 238 227

(i) The Ray Mathew and Eva Kollsman Trust is a bequest from the late Eva Kollsman to encourage Australian writers to work on or with the National Collection; for the acquisition and indexing of the works and papers of Australian writers as part of the National Collection; or to promote Australian writing through publications, exhibitions and public events.

Balance carried forward from previous year 1,240 1,196

Receipts during the year 9 -

Interest received 48 65

Available for payments 1,297 1,261

Payments made (56) (21)

Balance carried forward to next year 1,241 1,240

43

2014

$’000 2013

$’000

(a) The Morris West Trust Fund was funded by the author Morris West. The fund is used for the publication of material owned by the Library.

Balance carried forward from previous year 489 460

Receipts during the year 5 4

Interest received 20 25

Available for payments 514 489

Payments made - -

Balance carried forward to next year 514 489

(b) The General Trust Fund comprises donations received for general purposes or where no purpose is specified by the donor.

Balance carried forward from previous year 3,405 2,868

Receipts during the year 804 451

Interest received 133 155

Available for payments 4,342 3,474

Payments made (449) (69)

Balance carried forward to next year 3,893 3,405

(c) The Kenneth Baillieu Myer Trust is a bequest from the late Kenneth Baillieu Myer for the purposes of the Kenneth Myer Annual Oration as held by the Library and for such other purpose as may be considered appropriate by the Director-General.

Balance carried forward from previous year 25 23

Receipts during the year 3 8

Interest received 1 1

Available for payments 29 32

Payments made (5) (7)

Balance carried forward to next year 24 25

(d) The E.A. & V.I. Crome Trust is a bequest by the late E.A. Crome for the maintenance of and addition to the E.A. & V.I. Crome collection.

Balance carried forward from previous year 85 82

Receipts during the year - -

Interest received 4 3

Available for payments 89 85

Payments made - -

Balance carried forward to next year 89 85

(e) The Acquisition Trust Fund comprises donations received specifically for the acquisition of library material.

Balance carried forward from previous year 1,298 1,247

Receipts during the year - 49

Interest received 52 69

Available for payments 1,350 1,365

Payments made (25) (67)

Balance carried forward to next year 1,325 1,298

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 126

45

Note 20: Reporting of Outcomes

The Library is structured to meet one outcome:

Outcome 1: Australians have access to a national collection of library material to enhance learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society.

Note 20A - Net Cost of Outcome Delivery (Consolidated)

2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Expenses 77,542 75,255 77,542 75,255

Own Source Income 17,686 16,048 17,686 16,048

Net cost of outcome delivery 59,856 59,207 59,856 59,207

Outcome 1 Total

Consolidated NLA

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Note 21: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

Total comprehensive income less depreciation / amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations (1) 44,218 8,209 43,763 7,517

Plus : depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 12,431 12,359 12,431 12,359

Total comprehensive income (loss) - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 31,787 (4,150) 31,332 (4,842)

Notes (1) From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements and in respect of the Library as a collection institution, revenue appropriations for depreciation expenses for the National Collection were ceased. The Library instead receives a separate Collection Development Acquisition Budget provided through an equity appropriation to fund additions to the National Collection.

APPENDICES

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

APPENDICES 131

Jan Jansson (1588-1664) Mar di India (detail) in De zee-atlas ofte water-waereld ... by Hendrick Doncker (Amsterdam: Hendrick Doncker, 1659) Petherick Collection nla.map-ra10-s45

APPENDIX A

THE COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA AND ITS COMMITTEES

COUNCIL

Chair

Mr Ryan Stokes BCom (Curtin) Non-executive member, New South Wales Chief Executive Officer, Australian Capital Equity Chief Operating Officer, Seven Group Holdings Pty Ltd Director, Seven West Media Pty Ltd Director, WesTrac Pty Ltd Director, Iron Ore Holdings Pty Ltd Council Member, Australian Strategic Policy Institute Council Member, Prime Ministerial Advisory Council on

Veterans’ Mental Health Appointed on 1 July 2012 for a three-year term until 30 June 2015 Attended six of six meetings

Deputy Chair

Ms Deborah Thomas Dip Fine Art (Monash/Caulfield), MAICD Non-executive member, New South Wales Director, Media, Public Affairs and Brand Development, Bauer Media Pty Ltd

Executive Director Post/ACP Magazines JV, Bangkok, Thailand Board Member, ANZAC Centenary Advisory Board Non-executive Director, Royal Hospital for Women Foundation Non-executive Director, Ardent Leisure Non-executive Director, Youth Off The Streets Councillor, Woollahra Council, New South Wales Reappointed on 11 April 2013 for a third three-year term

until 10 April 2016 Elected as Deputy Chair on 7 June 2013 Attended six of six meetings

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 133 132

Members

Dr Nicholas Gruen BA (Hons), PhD (ANU), LLB (Hons) (Melbourne) Non-executive member, Victoria Chief Executive Officer, Lateral Economics Chairman, Innovation Australia Chairman, Australian Centre for Social Innovation Chairman, Open Knowledge Foundation (Australia) Chairman, Deakin University Arts Participation Incubator Patron, Australian Digital Alliance Appointed on 11 April 2013 for a three-year term until 10 April 2016 Attended six of six meetings

Mr Chris Hayes MP, Dip Labour Relations and Law (Sydney) Non-executive member, New South Wales Federal Member for Fowler Elected by the House of Representatives on 26 May 2014

for a three-year term until 25 May 2017 Attended one of one eligible meeting

Ms Jane Hemstritch BSc (Hons) (London), FCA, FAICD Non-executive member, Victoria Non-executive Director, Lend Lease Group Chair, Victorian Opera Non-executive Director, Santos Ltd Non-executive Director, Tabcorp Holdings Ltd Non-executive Director, Commonwealth Bank of Australia Reappointed on 25 July 2013 for a second three-year term

until 24 July 2016 Attended six of six meetings

Senator Gary Humphries BA, LLB (ANU) Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory Former Senator for the Australian Capital Territory Elected by the Senate on 1 July 2011 for a three-year term

until 30 June 2014 Senate term ended on 6 September 2013; Council resignation effective from that date Attended one of one eligible meeting

The Hon. Dick Adams  Non-executive member, Tasmania Former Federal Member for Lyons Elected by the House of Representatives on 13 May 2011

for a three-year term until 12 May 2014 House of Representatives term ended on 6 September 2013; Council resignation effective from that date Attended one of one eligible meeting

Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM, BEc (ANU), MBA (Canberra) Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory Former Secretary, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport

Appointed on 27 November 2012 for a three-year term until 26 November 2015 Resigned from Council with effect from 3 October 2013 Attended one of one eligible meeting

The Hon. Mary Delahunty BA (Hons) (La Trobe), MAICD Non-executive member, Victoria Executive Director, Luminosity Australia Pty Ltd Deputy Chair, McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park Director, Centre for Advancing Journalism, University of Melbourne Appointed on 11 April 2013 for a three-year term until 10 April 2016 Attended six of six meetings

Mr John M. Green BJuris LLB (UNSW) Non-executive member, New South Wales Company director, writer and publisher Director, QBE Insurance Director, WorleyParsons Australian Government Takeovers Panel Board Member, Centre for Independent Studies Appointed on 25 July 2013 for a three-year term until 24 July 2016 Attended three of six meetings; leave of absence granted for

two meetings

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 135 134

Dr Nonja Peters BA (Hons), PhD (WA) Non-executive member, Western Australia Director, History of Migration Experience Centre, Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University

Vice Chair, Advisory Committee, Western Australian Maritime Museum Member, WA Advisory Committee, National Archives of Australia Member, Friends of Battye Library Committee Vice Chair, Associated Netherlands Societies of Western Australia Reappointed on 25 July 2013 for a second three-year term

until 24 July 2016 Attended five of six meetings

Professor Janice Reid AM, FASSA, BSc (Adelaide), MA (Hawaii), MA, PhD (Stanford) Non-executive member, New South Wales Former Vice-Chancellor, University of Western Sydney Member, Advisory Board, St Vincent’s and Mater Hospitals (NSW) Australian representative, Council of the University of the South Pacific Vice-Chair, International Talloires Network of Universities Appointed on 14 June 2012 for a three-year term until 13 June 2015 Attended six of six meetings

Senator Zed Seselja BA, LLB, Grad Dip Legal Practice (ANU), Grad Cert Public Administration (Canberra) Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory Senator for the Australian Capital Territory Elected by the Senate on 11 December 2013 for a three-year term

until 10 December 2016 Attended two of three eligible meetings

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich BA (Hons) (Macquarie), Dip Information Management (NSW) Director General and executive member, Australian Capital Territory Appointed on 9 February 2011 for a five-year term until 8 February 2016 Attended six of six meetings

Meetings

Council met on:

AUDIT COMMITTEE

• 2 August 2013; • 4 October 2013; • 6 December 2013;

• 7 February 2014; • 4 April 2014; • 6 June 2014.

Chair

Ms Jane Hemstritch Non-executive member of Council Attended two of three meetings

Members

Mr John M. Green Non-executive member of Council Appointed to the Committee on 1 January 2014

Attended one of one meeting

Ms Deborah Thomas Non-executive member of Council Attended three of three meetings

Mr Geoff Knuckey External member Attended three of three meetings

Other Council members attended meetings as follows:

• Mr Ryan Stokes (three); • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich (three); • The Hon. Dick Adams MP (one); • The Hon. Mary Delahunty (two); • Dr Nonja Peters (three); • Professor Janice Reid (three).

Terms of Reference

The Audit Committee’s terms of reference are to:

a. on behalf of the members of the Council of the Library, oversee compliance by the Library and Council with obligations under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997;

b. provide a forum for communication between the members of Council, senior managers of the Library and the Library’s internal and external auditors;

c. ensure that there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library and to consider the adequacy, efficiency and effectiveness of the internal control system and risk management framework; and to oversee compliance by the Library with those systems and procedures;

d. consider the appropriateness of the Library’s accounting policies;

e. consider the annual financial report of the Library and to recommend its adoption to Council.

Meetings

The Audit Committee met on:

• 2 August 2013; • 6 December 2013; • 4 April 2014.

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 137 136

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Chair

Ms Deborah Thomas Non-executive member of Council Attended two of two meetings

Members

The Hon. Mary Delahunty Non-executive member of Council Attended two of two meetings

Ms Jane Hemstritch Non-executive member of Council Attended two of two meetings

Mr Ryan Stokes Non-executive member of Council Attended two of two meetings

Terms of Reference

The Corporate Governance Committee’s terms of reference are to:

a. evaluate the effectiveness of Council in its role in corporate governance;

b. evaluate the performance and remuneration of the Director General;

c. oversee the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

Meetings

The Corporate Governance Committee met on:

• 7 February 2014; • 6 June 2014.

APPENDIX B

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA FOUNDATION BOARD

Chair

Mr Kevin McCann AM

Members

The Lady Ebury

Ms Lorraine Elliott AM

Ms Julia King AM

Ms Kathryn Favelle (from 11 September 2013) National Library of Australia

Mr Brand Hoff AM (from 11 September 2013)

Ms Cathy Pilgrim National Library of Australia

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich National Library of Australia

Mr Douglas Snedden 

Ms Deborah Thomas Council of the National Library of Australia

Secretariat

Development Office National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The National Library of Australia Foundation Board’s terms of reference are to:

a. provide advice on Library fundraising targets;

b. provide assistance and advice on major fundraising campaigns, events and associated activities;

c. assist in obtaining funds from a variety of sources, including the business and philanthropic sectors;

d. encourage individual members to personally contribute or actively secure amounts required for nominated Library fundraising appeals.

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 139 138

APPENDIX C

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA COMMITTEES

Three committees provide advice to the Library:

• Libraries Australia Advisory Committee;

• Fellowships Advisory Committee;

• Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee.

LIBRARIES AUSTRALIA ADVISORY COMMITTEE

FELLOWSHIPS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair

Mr Geoff Strempel  Public Library Services (South Australia)

Members

Dr Craig Anderson RMIT University

Ms Liz Burke  Murdoch University

Dr Alex Byrne  State Library of New South Wales

Mr Peter Conlon  Queanbeyan City Library

Ms Amelia McKenzie  National Library of Australia

Mr Ben O’Carroll  State Library of Queensland

Ms Ann Ritchie Barwon Health

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich National Library of Australia

Ms Rosa Serratore National Meteorological Library

Ms JoAnne Sparks  Macquarie University

Secretariat

Resource Sharing Division National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Libraries Australia Advisory Committee provides advice on strategic and policy issues affecting the delivery of the Libraries Australia service, the broad direction of service development, and changes occurring in the library community that are likely to affect services.

Chair

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich National Library of Australia

Members

Emeritus Professor Graeme Clarke AO, FSA, FAHA Australian Academy of the Humanities

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM, FAHA  Australian Society of Authors

Emeritus Professor Rod Home AM, FAHA  Australian Academy of Science

Professor Purnendra Jain Asian Studies Association of Australia

Professor Pat Jalland FASSA  Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

Professor Joyce Kirk  Australian Library and Information Association

Professor Julie Marcus  Independent Scholars Association of Australia

Secretariat

Australian Collections and Reader Services Division National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Fellowships Advisory Committee makes recommendations on the award and administration of fellowships and scholarships.

COMMUNITY HERITAGE GRANTS STEERING COMMITTEE

Chair

Ms Cathy Pilgrim  National Library of Australia

Members

Ms Vicki Humphrey  National Museum of Australia

Ms Meg Labrum  National Film and Sound Archive

Mr Stuart Ray  Attorney-General’s Department

Ms Rosemary Turner  National Library of Australia

Ms Helen Walker  National Archives of Australia

Secretariat

Executive and Public Programs Division National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee provides advice and direction on matters associated with the Community Heritage Grants program, including policy and administration. It also facilitates the exchange of information about the program between the Library and funding partners.

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 141 140

APPENDIX D

PRINCIPAL SUPPORTING POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS

Information about the Library’s functions, objectives, policies and activities can be found in the documents listed below. Most policy documents are available on the Library’s website.

Corporate Services

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy (2013) Enterprise Agreement (2011-2014) Environmental Management System (2013) Fraud Control Plan (2012-2013) Protective Security Policy and Procedures

(2013)

User Charging Policy (2011) Visitor Access to, and Use of, Medications and Other Personal Medical Equipment in the Library (2013)

Public Programs

Donor Recognition Policy (2013) Events Policy (2013) Exhibitions Loans Policy (2011) Exhibitions Policy (2013) Learning Policy (2014) Policy on Bequests (2012) Publications Policy (2012) Volunteer Program Policy (2014)

Legislation

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 National Library Act 1960 National Library Regulations 1994 Portfolio Budget Statement Public Service Act 1999

Strategic and Operational

Balanced Scorecard 15-Year Long-Term Strategic Building Management Plan (2012) Business Continuity Framework (2012) Disability Framework (2011) IT Strategic Plan (2013-2016) IT Security Framework Risk Management Register (2013) Social Media Policy (2012) Strategic Directions (2012-2014) Strategic Workforce Plan (2012-2014) Resource Sharing Strategic Plan (2012-2015)

Collection

Collection Development Policy: Australian Collecting (2008) Collection Development Policy: Overseas, Asian and Pacific Collecting (2013) Collection Digitisation Policy (2012)

Cataloguing

Cataloguing Authority Control Policy (2011) Cataloguing Policy (2011)

E-resources

Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Policy (2011)

Preservation

Collection Disaster Plan (2012) Digital Preservation Policy (2012) Policy on Participation in Cooperative Microfilming Projects with Other 

Institutions (2010) Policy on Preservation Copying of Collection Materials (2007) Preservation Policy (2009)

Service Charter

Policy on Handling Complaints and Other User Feedback (2011) Service Charter (2011)

Reader Services

Code of Conduct for Readers and Visitors (2011) Information and Research Services Policy (2011)

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 143 142

APPENDIX E

CONSULTANCY SERVICES

The following table shows new consultancy services with an individual value of $10,000 or more that were engaged in 2013-14, the nature of the consultancy, its value or estimated value, the selection process, and justification of the decision to use the consultancy.

The following are justifications for decisions to undertake consultancies: A: Skills currently unavailable within organisation; B: Need for specialised or professional skills.

Table E.1: Consultancy Services Engaged, 2013-14

Consultant Purpose

Contract Price* ($)

Selection process Justification

Ashurst Australia

Review documentation for Reading Room Integration construction tender

$27,000

Direct Sourcing

B

Australian Valuation Solutions Pty Ltd Value the Library’s National Collection

$31,350

Direct Sourcing

B

Clayton Utz General legal advice $21,691

Direct Sourcing

B

Effective People

Review Building and Security Services Branch and Divisional Support Unit

$19,228

Direct Sourcing

B

GHD Pty Ltd

Review the Library’s exterior marble fascia $36,275 Select

Tender

B

Icelab Pty Ltd

Develop Trove API dashboards and widgets $10,692

Direct Sourcing

A

The Squad Pty Ltd

Develop online visual design and identity branding for the Library’s website

$19,949

Select Tender

B

Total (7) $166,185

*Values are GST inclusive.

APPENDIX F

STAFFING OVERVIEW

With the exception of the Director General, all Library staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. Conditions of employment for staff below the SES level are contained in the Library’s Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014. Some staff received enhanced benefits through an Individual Flexibility Arrangement.

At 30 June 2014, the Library had 402 full-time and part-time ongoing staff, 23 full-time and part-time non-ongoing staff and 24 casual staff. Refer to Table F.1 for more details. The average full-time equivalent staffing for 2013-14 was 424, compared to 437 in 2012-13.

Staff Distribution

Table F.1: Staff Distribution by Division, 30 June 2014

Division

Ongoing Non-ongoing June

2014 Total

June 2013 Total

Full- time

Part- time Full- time

Part- time Casual

Collections Management 114 25 3 2 9 153 169

Australian Collections and Reader Services 86 23 3 0 6 118 137

Resource Sharing 22 5 1 0 0 28 29

Information Technology 39 4 3 1 0 47 48

Executive and Public Programs

34 10 5 4 8 61 59

Corporate Services 35 5 0 1 1 42 44

Total 330 72 15 8 24 449 486

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 145 144

Staff Classification

Table F.2: Ongoing and Non-ongoing Full-time and Part-time Staff by Classification and Gender, 30 June 2014

Classification

Ongoing Non-ongoing June

2014 Total

June 2013 Total

Full-time

Part- time

Full- time

Part- time

Casual

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

Statutory office holder

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SES Band 1 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 2 4

EL 2 15 11 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 12 11 13

EL 1 29 31 1 8 2 1 0 1 2 0 34 41 39 37

APS 6 20 42 4 14 1 1 1 1 0 0 26 58 22 62

APS 5 20 33 1 11 1 1 0 0 0 5 22 50 23 56

APS 4 14 49 1 13 0 1 0 1 4 1 19 65 20 76

Graduate 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

APS 3 12 34 2 7 0 4 0 1 0 4 14 50 18 57

APS 2 3 10 2 5 2 0 1 2 3 5 11 22 12 31

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Cadet 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

Total 116 214 12 60 6 9 2 6 9 15 145 304 147 339

Grand total 330 72 15 8 24 449 486

Note: Table is based on paid employees. Employees on long-term leave for more than 12 weeks are not included.

SES Staff Movements

Ms Jasmine Cameron, Assistant Director General, Executive and Public Programs, retired on 3 July 2013. Ms Cathy Pilgrim was subsequently promoted to Assistant Director General, Executive and Public Programs, on 22 August 2013.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Table F.3: Staff by Equal Employment Opportunity Group and APS Classification, 30 June 2014

Classification Male Female Total Indigenous peoples

People with disability

Culturally and linguistically diverse

background

Statutory office holder 0 1 1 0 0 1

SES Band 1 2 4 6 0 1 0

EL 2 16 12 28 0 1 4

EL 1 34 41 75 0 2 11

APS 6 26 58 84 1 6 12

APS 5 22 50 72 1 2 18

APS 4 19 65 84 2 5 22

Graduate 1 0 1 1 0 0

APS 3 14 50 64 2 7 22

APS 2 11 22 33 0 0 15

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Cadet 0 1 0 1 0 0

Total 145 304 449 8 24 105

Note: Data for equal employment opportunity groups is based on information supplied voluntarily by staff.

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 147 146

Staff Training

An annual Staff Training Calendar is developed in consultation with all areas of the Library and includes priorities identified through the Strategic Workforce Plan, division business plans, and individual staff performance development plans. The calendar recognises the 70:20:10 developmental model  (70 per cent on-the-job experience, 20 per cent coaching and 10 per cent facilitated learning) that has wide application in the APS.

In this reporting period, the Library developed a Leadership Capability Model and a supporting guide for staff to assist in identifying specific development needs and provide options to fulfil these needs. The model focuses on three key career points: new to role, sustaining performance at level and aspiring to a new role. Four specifically designed workshops were delivered to staff.

Senior leaders from government and industry were invited to give presentations to staff. The Library also implemented a reflective leadership forum for three groups of executive level staff, who were allocated a specific topic to investigate as active learning over an extended period.

Development opportunities for staff included internal and external programs, seminars, workshops, on-the-job training and placements. Training opportunities covered technical skills such as cataloguing, digital publications and preservation, as well as capability development such as oral communication, procurement, writing, and strategic planning. Diversity training undertaken included Indigenous cultural awareness. The Library has also developed a comprehensive plan to improve the digital confidence of staff.

The total training and development expenditure, excluding staff time, was $438,353. The number of training days undertaken by staff is set out in Table F.4.

Table F.4: Training Days, 2013-14

Classification Male Female Total

SES 8 45 53

EL 1-2 145 249 394

APS 5-6 88 341 429

APS 1-4 56 350 406

Total 297 985 1282

APPENDIX G

GIFTS, GRANTS AND SPONSORSHIPS

Ms Susan Allen

Ms Robyn Archer AO CdOAL

Belvoir Street Theatre

Mr Peter Bradley

Ms Lily Brett

The Casey family / Marian McGowan

The Castles family

Ms Jill Causer

Ms Shelley Cohney

Mr Roger Dargie

Ms Sara Dowse

Ms Claire Dunne OAM

Ms Helen Evans

Ms Samantha Flanagan

Dr Paul Fox

Ms Andrea Goldsmith

Professor Virginia Hooker

Dr Jamie Kassler and Dr Michael Kassler

Mr Chris McCullough

Ms Esther Missingham

Professor John Mulvaney

National Central Library Taiwan

Ms Ann Nugent

The Estate of Professor Judith Robinson-Valery

Ms Diane Romney

Dr Robyn Rowland AO

Ms Louise Saxton

Dr Mike Smith AM

Mr Robert Southey

Professor Frank Stilwell

Ms Jane Sullivan

Mr John Ulm

Uniting Church in Australia Frontier Services

Mrs Vera Werder

GRANTS

Attorney-General’s Department (Community Heritage Grants)

Australia China Council (Oral History Project)

Australian Broadcasting Corporation (Oral History Project)

Australian Government International Exhibitions Insurance Program (Exhibitions)

Australian Paralympic Committee (Oral History Project)

City of Melbourne (Oral History Project)

Copyright Agency Ltd Cultural Fund (Writing the Australian Landscape)

Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House (Oral History Project)

SUBSTANTIAL COLLECTION MATERIAL DONATIONS

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 149 148

SPONSORSHIPS

Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia

Australian Capital Equity Pty Ltd

Australian Capital Tourism

Crowne Plaza Canberra

Esri Australia

Etihad Airways

Seven Network

Shell

Toga Hotels

Virgin Australia

National Library Partners

The Brassey of Canberra (Accommodation)

Eden Road Wines

Forrest Hotel and Apartments (Accommodation)

Realm Precinct (Accommodation)

In-kind Sponsors

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group

Bauer Media Group

The Charlotte Smith Collection

Mr Donald Beggs

Embassy of Italy

FASHFEST

Jenny Oates & Associates

Seven Network

Vitek Vodka Pty Ltd

Wesfarmers Ltd

ZAIJA

BEQUESTS

The Estate of Mr Harold S. Williams

Friends of the National Library of Australia (Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship)

Mrs Pat McCann (Norman McCann Summer Scholarship)

Mrs Alison Sanchez (Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship / Kenneth Binns Lecture)

Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO (Seymour Summer Scholarship / Seymour Biography Lecture)

National Archives of Australia (Community Heritage Grants)

National Collecting Institutions Touring and Outreach Program (Exhibitions)

National Film and Sound Archive (Community Heritage Grants)

National Folk Festival (National Folk Fellowship)

National Museum of Australia (Community Heritage Grants)

FELLOWSHIPS AND PUBLIC PROGRAMS

APPENDIX H

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA FUND

The National Library of Australia Fund helps the Library to manage, develop, preserve, digitise and deliver its documentary heritage collections to the widest possible audience, both online and onsite.

This year, specific campaigns have included  The Canberra Times digitisation project, the Joan Blaeu wall map preservation project, and support for the Mapping Our World exhibition.

From 2013-14, National Library of Australia Fund donors are acknowledged at the following gift levels:

• Principal Patron: gifts of $1,000,000 and above;

• Platinum Patron: gifts of $250,000 and above;

• Gold Patron: gifts of $100,000 and above;

• Silver Patron: gifts of $25,000 and above;

• Bronze Patron: gifts of $10,000 and above;

• Patron: gifts of $1,000 and above;

• Donor: gifts up to $1,000.

The Library gratefully acknowledges the generosity and support of Patrons and donors.

Listed below are Patrons who have given to the fund since its inception in 2009 and donors who have given during 2013-14. (An asterisk beside a name in the lists below indicates Patrons who donated during 2013-14.)

PRINCIPAL PATRONS

Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation

PLATINUM PATRONS

Mrs Pat McCann

Ms Simone Vinall*

GOLD PATRONS

Planet Wheeler Foundation*

Mrs Alison Sanchez*

Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO*

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 151 150

SILVER PATRONS

Associate Professor Noel Dan AM and Mrs Adrienne Dan*

Friends of the National Library of Australia*

Dr Ron Houghton DFC and the late Mrs Nanette Houghton*

Macquarie Group Foundation Limited*

Mr Kevin McCann AM and Mrs Deidre McCann*

Minerals Council of Australia

Origin Foundation*

Mr Nigel Peck AM and Mrs Patricia Peck

Mr Dick Smith AO*

Mr Doug Snedden and Ms Belinda Snedden*

Mr Ryan Stokes*

In memory of the late Ms Della Keren Thomas*

Wesfarmers Limited

Mr Stephen Yorke*

One supporter donated anonymously at this level.

BRONZE PATRONS

Mr Jim Bain AM and Mrs Janette Bain

Mrs Alison J. Bloomfield*

Dr Diana Carroll

Ms Christine Courtenay AM and the late Mr Bryce Courtenay AM

Mr John Fairfax AO and Mrs Libby Fairfax

Mr Tim Fairfax AC

Mr James Ferguson

Sir James Gobbo AC CVO*

Ms Catherine Hope Gordon*

Ms Jane Hemstritch*

Liberty Financial

Ms Marjorie Lindenmayer*

The late Dame Elisabeth Murdoch AC DBE

Mrs Maria Myers AO

Ms Meg Paul*

Mr Jack Ritch and Mrs Diana Ritch*

Mrs Margaret Ross AM*

Mrs Josephine Shanks and Professor Robert Shanks*

Mr Robin V.F. Smith*

Dr Fiona Powell

Mr A.G.D. White OAM and Mrs Sally White OAM*

Three supporters donated anonymously at this level.

FOUNDING PATRONS

Dr Marion Amies*

Mrs P. Bischoff OAM*

Mrs Josephine Calaby*

Dr R.L. Cope PSM*

The late Mr Victor Crittenden OAM

Ms Lauraine Diggins

The Lady Ebury*

Mr Andrew Freeman*

Ms J.L. Fullerton AO*

Griffith 8 Book Group

Mrs Claudia Hyles*

Dr Joyce Kirk and Dr Terry Kirk*

Dr Jan Lyall PSM

Mrs Vacharin McFadden*

Mr Peter McGovern AM*

Mrs Glennis Moss and the late Dr Kenneth Moss AM

Mrs Libby Oliver and Mr John Oliver*

Mrs P. P. Pickering

Emeritus Professor Alan Robson AO and Mrs Gwenda Robson*

Miss Kay Rodda*

Rotru Investments Pty Ltd for Mrs Eve Mahlab AO and Mr Frank Mahlab

Mr William Thorn and Mrs Angela Thorn

Mr John Ulm and Mrs Valda Ulm*

Ms Lucille Warth*

Three supporters donated anonymously at this level.

PATRONS

Ake Ake Fund

Mrs Sue Andrew*

Ms Joanna Baevski*

Mr Sam Bartone

Mrs Jennifer Batrouney SC

The Hon. Justice Annabelle Bennett AO and Dr David Bennett AC QC

Ms Baiba Berzins*

Professor Geoffrey Blainey AC

Dr Ruth Bright AM and Dr Desmond Bright*

Mr Charles Bright and Mrs Primrose Bright

Dr Elizabeth Brouwer*

Emeritus Professor Mairead Browne and Dr David Browne*

Dr Geoffrey Cains

Dr Edmund Capon AM OBE and Mrs Joanna Capon OAM

Emeritus Professor David Carment AM*

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM FAHA*

Mrs Gloria Cumming

Mr Charles P. Curran AC and Mrs Eva Curran

Ms Perri Cutten and Mr Jo Daniell*

Mrs Rowena Danziger AM and Mr Ken Coles AM*

Dr Michelle Deaker*

The Hon. Mary Delahunty*

Dr Annie Duncan and Mr Peter Duncan*

The Hon. R.J. Ellicott QC*

Dr Suzanne Falkiner

Mrs Maureen Fisher*

Lt Col (Ret’d) M.A. Fletcher JP*

Mr Denis Foot and Ms Dianne Redwood*

Ms Christine Goode PSM*

Ms Grazia Gunn and Professor Emeritus Ian Donaldson FAHA FBA FRSE

Professor Margaret Harris*

Mr Peter Henderson AC and Mrs Heather Henderson*

Mr Robert Hill-Ling AO and Mrs Rosemary Hill-Ling OAM

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 153 152

Mrs Rosanna Hindmarsh OAM*

Dr J.S. Kerr AM*

Mr Lou Klepac OAM and Mrs Brenda Klepac

KPMG

Leighton Holdings Limited

Mr Frank Lewincamp and Ms Barbara Lewincamp*

Dr Frederick Lilley and Mrs Penelope Lilley*

The Linnaeus Estate*

Mr Brian Long and Ms Cathy Long*

Emeritus Professor Campbell Macknight

Ms Janet Manuell SC

Ms Kathleen Marshall*

Mr Julian Martyn and Ms Linda Sproul*

Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE GBM*

Dr Thomas Mautner*

Mrs Janet McDonald AO and Mr Donald McDonald AC

The late Capt. Paul J. McKay

Ms Fiona McLeod SC

Mr Ronald McLeod AM

Mr Simon McMillan*

Mr Baillieu Myer AC and Mrs Sarah Myer*

Ms Jane Needham SC

Professor Colin Nettelbeck FAHA and Mrs Carol Nettelbeck*

Ms Marion Newman*

Professor Brian O’Keeffe AO*

Dr Melissa A. Perry QC

Ms Cathy Pilgrim and Mr Steven Anderson*

Mr Chester Porter QC*

Professor Janice Reid AM FASSA*

The Hon. Margaret Reid AO*

Dr Craig J. Reynolds FAHA*

Mrs E. Richardson OAM

Mr Geoffrey Robinson and Ms Julie Burdis*

Dr Maxine Rochester*

Professor Emerita Jill Roe AO*

Professor Michael Roe

The Rome Family*

Ms Christine Ronalds AM SC

Mr Alan Rose AO and Mrs Helen Rose*

The Reverend G.T. Shaw and Mrs J.D. Shaw

Mr Stephen Shelmerdine and Mrs Kate Shelmerdine

Mr Tony Shepherd AO*

In memory of the late Mr Edmund Simon*

Mrs Mary Simpson

Mrs Helene L. Stead

Mr Arnold Thomas*

Ms Deborah Thomas*

Mr Robert Thomas AM*

Ms Lisa Turner

The late Mr Gerald Walsh MA*

Mr Norman Wheatley and Mrs Joy Wheatley*

Dr Peter White*

Dr Malcolm Wood*

Dr Michael W. Young

Six supporters donated anonymously at this level.

DONORS 2013-14

Mrs Heather Abbott and Mr Christopher Abbott

Ms Joan Adler

In memory of the late Mr John Alback

Dr Cynthia Allen

Mr Robert Allmark

Ms Cynthia Anderson

Professor Warwick Anderson AM

Mr Bruce Andrews

Dr Graeme Aplin

Mr Tim Ash and Mrs Meredith Ash

Asia Bookroom

Mrs Margaret Astbury

Ms Dionne Avard

Mr William D. Bachman

Professor Peter Bailey AM

Mr C. Ballantyne

Mrs Sandra Barbato

Dr Glen Barclay and Dr Caroline Turner AM

Mr John Barlow

Sister Margaret Barry

Mr W.R. Baxter

Ms Wendy E. Benson

Ms Virginia Berger

Mr U.N. Bhati

Miss Judith Bibo

Mr Terry Bibo

Dr David Biles OAM and Mrs Julia Biles OAM

Mrs Chris Birrell

Mr Craig Boaden

Ms Emily Booker

Dr P. Boorman and Mrs M. Boorman

Mr Luke Bosher and Ms Kate Phillips

Mr Warwick Bradney

Mrs Mary E. Brennan

Dr Edward Brentnall and Mrs Hazel Brentnall

Mr A. Brims and Mrs M. Brims

Mr H.M. Brown and Ms J.E. Brown

Mrs Margaret Brown

Mr William Brown

Bundanoon History Group

Mr David Burke OAM

Dr Geoffrey Burkhardt FACE

Professor Harvey Butcher and Dr Phillipa Butcher

Ms Frances Callinan

Ms Dorothy Cameron

Ms June Cameron

Ms Judith Campbell and Mr Brian Campbell

Canberra Calligraphy Society

Mr Matt Carkeet

Dr John Carmody

Mrs Marguerite Castello

Mrs Lexie Cawley

Mr Ray Chugg

Ms N. Clarke

Mr Lindsay Cleland

Miss Winsome Collingridge

Mr Greg Cornwell AM

Mr Michael Coulthard and Miss Jan Tucker

Mr Peter Cousens

Mrs Margaret Cowburn

Professor Robert Cribb

Mr B.R. Crisp

Mr Bill Crowle and Ms Mary Crowle

Mrs Fay Cull

Ms Debra Cunningham

Lady Geraldine Currie

Ms Elise Huntington Daniel

Mr Brian Davidson

Brigadier Phillip Davies AM

Mrs Elizabeth Davis and Mr Walter Davis

Mr Nigel D’Cruz

Mr B.G. Dexter

Mr Norman Dickins

Dr Michael Scott Donald

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 155 154

Mr M.H. Dowsett

Ms Melanie Drake

Miss Robyn A. Duncan

Ms Sue Dyer and Mr Steve Dyer

Ms Heather Dyne

Mrs R. Eastway

Dr Neville Exon

Ms Meegan Ferguson and Mr Chris Ferguson

Ms Anne Fernandez

Dr Juliet Flesch

Ms Lynn Fletcher

Mr Michael Flynn

Dr Marg Folkard

Mr Frank Ford and Ms Olwen Ford

Mr W.L. Ford

Ms Judith Forster

Dr L.E. Foster

Ms Margaret Frey

Friends of the Barossa Library

Mr Terence Gibbons

Mrs Kay Gibson

Dr Joan Godfrey OBE

Mr Anthony Godfrey-Smith

Mr Ian Gollings AM and Mrs Shirley Gollings OAM

Mr Mark Gregory

Mrs Alexandra Grimwade

Ms Linda Groom

Dr Pamela Gutman

Justice Roger Gyles AO

Dr Terry Haig

Mr Alan Hall

Mrs Isobel Hamilton

Mrs Aileen Hancock

Mr Warren Harding and Mrs Elizabeth Harding

Mr Eric Harley

Dr Steven Harper and Dr Jocelyn Harper

Mr Powell Heuer and Ms Denise Krause

Dr Peter Heysen

Dr Marian Hill

Mr Kim Hoekman

Professor Stephanie Hollis

Mr David Hope and Ms Jennifer Remete

Ms Diana Howlett

Ms Debra Huntley

Dr Anthea Hyslop

Mr Michael Ilchef

Dr Robert Irwin and Mrs Valerie Irwin

Dr Ian Jobling

Mr David M.H. John

Dr J.V. Johnson CSC AAM

Mr John Jones

Mr Paul Jones

Dr Garry Joslin

Ms Meryl Joyce

Mrs Eunice Jukes

Mrs Lena Karmel

Ms Antonia Kasunic and Mr Nicholas Craft

Mr Edward Kearney

Ms Mary Keep

Mrs Sheila Kellock

Ms Joan Kennedy

Mr David Kennemore

Ms Judith M. Kennett

Mr Richard Kenyon

Dr Ruth Kerr OAM

Mr Gordon Kerry

Professor Wallace Kirsop

Mrs A.J. Kitchin

Mrs Karleen Klaiber

Mr Nicholas Korner

Dame Leonie Kramer AC OBE

Ms Angela Kueter-Luks

Mrs Ann Lancaster

Ms Anne Latreille

Dr Diana Leeder

Ms Julia Legge

Associate Professor Susan Lever

Ms B.P. Lewis

Mr Trevor Lewis

Mr Douglas Lithgow

Mr Seth Lockwood

Mrs Barbara Long

Miss J.M. Long

Mr Stephen Loosley

Mr Michael Lynch and Ms Liz Lynch

Mrs R. Lyne

Mr Rod Mackenzie

Mr John Maffey OAM

Mr John B. Malone

Ms D’Nay Manning

Mr Robert B. Mark JP

Mr John Marlay and Mrs Judy Marlay

Ms Glenda Martinick

Mrs M.J. Mashford

Dr Robyn Mason

Mrs Mieke Masselos and Mr Theodore Masselos

Ms Rebecca Maxwell

Professor Jane McCredie AM

Mr Alan McDermid and Mrs Carol McDermid

Mr David McDonald

Miss Janet McDonald

Mr Michael McDonald and Mrs Jane McDonald

Dr Peter McDonald

Mr Alan McGuiness

Dr D.F. McMichael AM

Dr Betty Meehan FAHA

Ms Rachel Miller

Mrs M.B. Mitchell and Mr A.F. Mitchell

Dr Ann Moffatt

Dr Marjorie Moffatt

Dr Louise Moran

Mrs Helena Morrison and Mr Don Morrison

Mrs Mary Moss

Dr Satyanshu Mukherjee

Emeritus Professor D.J. Mulvaney

Mrs Barbara Mummery

Dr Doug Munro

Mr Paul Munro

Mr John Myrtle and Mrs Bronwyn Myrtle

Mr Claude Neumann

Ms Jennifer O’Brien and Mr Michael O’Brien

Mr Robert K. O’Connor QC

Mr Justin Odell

The Hon. Justice (Ret’d) Barry O’Keefe AM and Mrs Jeanette O’Keefe

Ms Jennifer O’Neill

Mr Terence O’Neill

Dr Jacqueline Orsborne

Dr Nina Natividad Pangahas

Dr Margaret Park

Dame Judith Parker AM and Mr George Parker

Mr J.W. de B Persse

Dr Nonja Peters

Mrs Susan Pettersson

Ms M.E. Phillips

Pixel Perfect Prolab

Mrs Winsome Plumb

Mr Tony Powell AO

Mr Graeme Powell and Ms Tini O’Brien

Mrs Anne Prins

Ms Olwen Pryke and Mr Andrew Harpham

Mr Bruce Putland

Mr J. Quaid

Dr Neil Radford

Mr John Rapley

Mr Michael Reed AM and Mrs Ann Reed

Ms Dorothy Rhodes

Mrs Elizabeth Riley and Professor G. Riley

Mr Mark Riley and Mrs Margaret Riley

Mrs Patricia Roberts

Mrs Jill Robertson and Mr John Robertson

Dr James S. Robinson

Mr Gregory Rogan

Mr Trevor Rook

Mr William Rutledge and Mrs Julia Rutledge

Mr Stephen Ryan and Mrs Mary Ryan

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 157 156

APPENDIX I

NOTABLE ACQUISITIONS

Australian and Overseas Publications

Some of the highlights of the Library’s range of publications acquired during the year are:

• a beautifully bound copy of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of George Barrington, Now under Sentence of Transportation…, a rare 1790 penny chapbook about the life of notorious pickpocket and famous convict George Barrington. This pamphlet was published after Barrington was sentenced in September 1790 and before he was transported on 2 February 1791;

• a rare copy of the musical score, Dr Leichardt’s March: For the Piano, which celebrates the return of the explorer Ludwig Leichhardt from his 1846 expedition and was composed by his friend, Stephen Hale Marsh (1805-1888), an accomplished musician and harpist and an important figure in the Australian music scene of this period;

• ephemera and websites relating to the 2013 Federal election and the 2014 Western Australia Senate election. The Library’s collection of this material was extraordinarily successful, surpassing all previous elections. With the aid of a very effective mass media and social media campaign, the Library received political ephemera for 727 House of Representatives candidates, 119 Senate candidates, and over 50 lobby groups. The Library also archived over 550 election-based websites, including the websites of political parties, interest groups and media and social network sites, which are available through the Library’s PANDORA archive;

• two new databases purchased for perpetual access: a fourth module of the Nineteenth Century Collections Online database, Women—Transnational Networks (adding to the three modules already acquired), and the Chatham House Online Archive, 1920-2008;

• Records of the Worshipful Company of Stationers 1554-1923 on microfilm. This collection provides access to all the existing records from the archive of the Worshipful Company of Stationers, the guild for the printing and publishing industry in England, from 1554 to 1923. It is the most important source for the history of the English book trade and provides a unique insight into the day-to-day workings of the printing and publishing world.

Pictures

Outstanding acquisitions into the Pictures Collection include:

• two watercolours by Donald Friend, Self Portrait in a Carved Mirror and The Dead, Labuan 1945, which complement the Library’s extensive holdings of his diaries;

• a large bronze portrait medallion of William Charles Wentworth made in 1854 by Thomas Woolner;

Mr Manfred Salamon and Mrs Linda Salamon

Ms Mary I. Scholes

Mrs Jane Scott and Mr Bill Scott

Mr Mark Scott and Mrs Caroline Scott

Mr Bill Semple

Mr Robin Sharry

Mr Wayne Sheridan

Dr Kerry Smith

Ms Wendy Smith

Mrs Penny Sohier

Mrs Gwyneth Sparrow

The Hon. James Spiegelman AC

Mr Dan Sprod OAM

Mrs Aileen Sproule

Mr Peter Spyropoulos and Mrs Maria Spyropoulos

Miss Patricia Staunton

Associate Professor Bruce Steele AM

Mr Paul Strasser

Dr Jennifer Strauss AM

Dr Nicole Sully

Ms Susan Sutton

In memory of the late Mrs Jessie Taylor

Dr Jan Tent

Mrs Rhonda Thiele

Mr Vince Townsend

Mrs Geraldine Triffitt

Mr Richard Tulip

Ms J.M. Twomey

Reverend Dr Max Vodola

Ms Jennifer Wardell

Mr David Waring and Mrs Beverley Waring

Mr Michael Wasson

Ms Jill Waterhouse

Mr Phillip Watts

Ms Alexandra Wedutenko

Ms Joyce P. West

Ms Rosalie Whalen

Mrs Barbara R. White

Ms Helen White

Ms Wendy Whitham

WIC Words Discussion Group

Mr D. Wickens

Mrs P. Wicksteed

Dr I.S. and H. Wilkey

Ms Jan Wilkinson

Ms Helen Williams AO

The Reverend Robert Willson

Mr Bruno Yvanovich

99 supporters donated anonymously at this level.

APPENDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 159 158

• rare albumen print carte de visite photographs by Johnstone and Co. of explorers Robert O’Hara Burke and William John Wills, taken in 1860, prior to their ill-fated expedition;

• two watercolours on vellum of an Australian Cassowary and Rawnsley’s Bowerbird by Henry Constantine Richter, the illustrator and lithographer renowned for his work with John Gould;

• two photograph albums compiled by a German merchant navy officer documenting his internment in camps at Enoggera and Liverpool during the First World War;

• twenty black and white exhibition prints of Australian soldiers in Vietnam by Tim Page capturing battle scenes, operational conditions and interactions with the Vietnamese people.

Manuscipts

Noteworthy manuscript acquisitions include:

• the delivery book for Maidstone gaol, 1788-1795, which records details of prisoners, including 14 female convicts transported to Botany Bay in the Second Fleet on the Lady Juliana;

• the 1852 journal of Alexander Barnett describing his travel to Australia and work on the Major’s Creek goldfields in NSW;

• a substantial addition to the records of Belvoir Street Theatre, 1988-2006;

• a beautifully illustrated journal of tailor Joseph Pettingell, who emigrated from London to Hobart with his family on the Thomas Laurie in 1834;

• a signed original manuscript copy of Capriccietto for Little Bells by Australian composer Dulcie Holland, dated 1934;

• a collection of material from rower William Dixon relating to the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games;

• letters written to his family by Errol Flynn, dating from his childhood to his death in 1959;

• the personal papers of poet Dorothy Porter, author Andrea Goldsmith, publisher Sophie Cunningham, diplomat Stephen Brady CVO and actor director Noel Tovey;

• email correspondence between photographers Francis Reiss and Jeff Carter successfully transferred from MacMail.

Maps

The following acquisitions will enhance the Library’s Maps Collection:

• an 1838 edition of The London Atlas of Universal Geography Exhibiting the Physical & Political Divisions of the Various Countries of the World … published by John Arrowsmith and including 53 colour maps and additional plates not held in other editions;

• a colourful example of carto-marketing, Betts’s Portable Terrestrial Globe, an expandable ‘umbrella’-frame world globe from c. 1920;

• some 1,000 maps of Myanmar from 2000, the latest large-scale publicly available mapping of the nation;

• a highly detailed, very rare six-sheet marine chart, A New Chart of the China Sea and East India Archipelago, produced in 1823 by J.W. Norie & Co., showing the East Indies and China Sea with the Malay Peninsula, New Guinea and northern parts of Australia;

• Map of London’s Underground Railways, a New Design for an Old Map, the first edition of Harry Beck’s famous and influential simplified design;

• A Colonial and Missionary Church Map of the World, printed for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, London, 1842, showing ‘Christian, heathen and Mahometan countries, English possessions and churches’;

• A rare reduced form of a map of the Pacific Ocean, Carta Terza Generale del Asia by Robert Dudley, produced in the 1660s and intended for an atlas which was never published.

Oral History

Noteworthy oral histories added to the collection include:

• new collaborative projects, such as the History of Australian Geoscience with Geoscience Australia, which interviews individuals active in industry, research and exploration from the 1960s. The History of ABC Rural Broadcasting in Australia has begun with interviews with former Rural Department Director, Graham White, and Countrywide presenter and producer Neil Inall;

• interviews with notable Australians, including former parliamentarians Paul Everingham, Jo Vallentine, Rosemary Crowley, Gerry Hand and Race Mathews; aerospace engineer Professor Brian O’Keefe AO; maxillofacial surgeon Dr John De Burgh Norman; environmentalist Philip Toyne; actor Angela Punch McGregor; businessman Harold Mitchell; theologian Professor James Haire; astronomer Professor John Norris; and submariner Vice Admiral Ian MacDougall;

• social history interviews recorded with six people born in the early 1960s to mothers who had taken thalidomide and, with funding from the Centenary of Canberra, Canberrans, including Indigenous elder Matilda House, vintner Ken Helm, architect Enrico Taglietti and Joan Waldren, a member of the longstanding Cusacks family business;

• the oral history component of several Australian Research Council funded grants, of which the Library is a partner, including The History of Australian Press Photography and ongoing projects, Trailblazing Women and the Law, Australian Gay and Lesbian Life Stories and Australian Generations, a large-scale social history project researching intergenerational dynamics and the impact of social change on experience and attitudes;

• the only known recording of Indigenous opera singer Lorna Beulah (1928-2012) performing at a Presbyterian gathering in Forbes, NSW, in the mid-1960s;

• eleven interviews recorded for the Vietnamese Veterans in Australia project, which documents the war experiences of veterans who served with the Vietnamese army, and now live in Australia.

GLOSSARY AND INDICES

N A T I O N A L L I B R A R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

GLOSSARY AND INDICES 163

Pieter Goos (c. 1616-1675) Oost Indien (detail) (Amsterdam: Pieter Goos, c. 1690) nla.map-rm2215

GLOSSARY

Term Definition

Balanced Scorecard A strategic management tool

bots

Software applications that run automatic tasks over the internet at very high speed. Also known as web robots

Libraries Australia

A service providing information about items held by Australian libraries, used by Australian libraries for automated cataloguing and inter-lending; see librariesaustralia.nla.gov.au

logarithmic scale

A scale of measurement in which equal distances on the scale represent equal ratios of increase; for example, with logarithmic scale to the base of 10, the numbers 10, 100 and 1,000 are shown as equal distances on the graph

outcomes

The results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Australian Government on the Australian community

PANDORA

Australian web archive established by the Library in 1996;  see pandora.nla.gov.au

performance

The proficiency of an agency or authority in acquiring resources economically and using those resources efficiently and effectively in achieving planned outcomes

performance targets Quantifiable performance levels or changes in level to be attained by a specific date

petabyte 1,000 terabytes

quality

Relates to the characteristics by which customers or stakeholders judge an organisation, product or service

Reimagining Libraries

An initiative of National and State Libraries Australasia, in which the Library is working with the state and territory libraries and the National Library of New Zealand to transform its library services to better meet user needs in the digital age

terabyte 1,000 gigabytes

Trove

A national discovery service implemented by the Library in November 2009, providing a single point of access to a wide range of traditional and digital content from Australian collections and global information sources

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 165 164

SHORTENED FORMS

Abbreviation Definition

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABC Australian Broadcasting Corporation

APS Australian Public Service

CAC Act Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997

CMG Corporate Management Group

CMS Collection Management System

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

DLIR Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project

EFTPOS Electronic Funds Transfer at Point of Sale

ERA Electronic Resources Australia

FMOs Finance Minister’s Orders

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

GST goods and services tax

ICT information and communication technologies

ILMS Integrated Library Management System

IPS Information Publication Scheme

IT information technology

LG2 Lower Ground 2

NLA National Library of Australia

NSLA National and State Libraries Australasia

OCR optical character recognition

PC personal computer

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PSS Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

RDA Resource Description and Access

SES Senior Executive Service

COMPLIANCE INDEX This report complies with the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 issued by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation on 22 September 2011.

Requirement Page

Enabling legislation 21

Responsible Minister 21

Ministerial directions 28

Other statutory requirements: • Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 • Work Health and Safety Act 2011

42-44 38-40

Information about directors 131-134

Organisational structure 22

Statement on governance 23-27

Key activities and changes affecting the authority 6-11

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies 28-29

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers 29

While not required of statutory authorities, this report also selectively complies with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Requirements for Annual Reports approved on 29 May 2014 by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Requirement Page

Asset management 40-44

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 36

Consultants 32, 142

Financial statements 79-127

Freedom of information 29

Grant programs 45-46

Purchasing 44

Work Health and Safety 38-40

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 167 166

INDEX

abbreviations 164 ABC Radio National show transcripts 8, 62 access see collection access accessions 75 acquisitions 75

e-books 57 Manuscripts Collection 158 Maps Collection 158-9 notable 157-9 Oral History 159 Pictures Collection 157-8 ACT Government 3, 102 ACT Heritage Library 7 ACT newspapers, collecting 7 ACTSmart Business site, Library as 11 ACTSmart Office Recycling program 44 Adams, The Hon. Dick 5, 132, 135 Adcorp Australia Ltd 33 advertising and market research 33 air-conditioning 10, 41, 42 Allison, Dr Penelope 45 Anderson, Dr Craig 138 Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus wall map

(1663) (Blaeu) 58, 72, 149 Ashfield Library postcard collection 8 Asia-Pacific region, Library hosts conference of

national libraries 10 Asian Collections Reading Room 41 Ask a Librarian enquiry service 63 asset management 40-4 Asset Management Committee 40 assets, total 15 Assistant Directors General 22, 27, 145 assistive technology in reading rooms 30 Attorney-General’s Department Ministry for the Arts

4, 6, 10, 11, 21, 45, 56, 103, 147, 156 audio recordings 57 Audit Committee 4, 23, 25-6, 28, 37, 40, 73,

135-6, 138-9 Auditor-General 44 Auditor’s report, independent 80-1

Australia China Council 147 The Australian 7 Australian Broadcasting Corporation 102, 147 Australian Capital Equity 3 Australian Capital Tourism 148 Australian digital collecting 57 Australian Financial Review 7 Australian Gay and Lesbian Life Stories 159 Australian Generations 159 Australian Government International Exhibitions

Insurance Program 147 Australian Government Solicitor’s Legal Opinions 62 Australian Government Web Archive 4, 57 Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander Studies 30 Australian Law Reform Commission’s report on Copyright and the Digital Economy 6, 28 Australian National Audit Office 4, 25, 28, 73, 80-1 Australian National Bibliographic Database 66 Australian Network on Disability 37 Australian Newspaper Digitisation Program 7 Australian Newspaper Plan 7 Australian newspapers

accessed through Trove 7, 62, 63 Collection Development Policy 7 digital storage requirements 48 digitisation 7, 48, 61 Australian Paralympic Committee 102, 147 Australian Pork 62 Australian Public Service Commission, Ethics

Advisory Service 37 Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct 37 Australian Research Council 67 The Australian Women’s Weekly Fashion:

The First 50 Years (Thomas and Clements) 64 Ayres, Dr Marie-Louise 22

Bail, Murray 9 Bain, Janette 150 Bain, Jim 150

balance sheet 84 Balanced Scorecard 23, 27 Barnett, Alexander, journal and work on Major’s Creek goldfields 158

Barnwell, Ashley 46 Barrington, George 157 Beauchamp, Glenys 5, 132 Belvoir Street Theatre records 158 bequests 148 Berrima District Historical & Family History Society

62

Betts’s Portable Terrestrial Globe 158 Beulah, Lorna (Indigenous opera singer) 159 Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana 9 The Big Book of Australian History (Macinnis) 64 Blaeu, Joan, Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus

wall map (1663) 58, 72, 149 blogs 63 Bloomfield, Alison J. 150 Bradley, Jyll 8 Brady, Stephen, personal papers 158 Brandis, Senator the Hon. George 21 The Brassey of Canberra 148 Brown, Alexander 46 Brown, Bob, born-digital personal records 57 building redevelopment and design projects 40-1 Building Works Coordination Committee 41 buildings and land 40-1 Burke, Liz 138 Burke, Robert O’Hara (albumen print photograph)

158

Burke, The Hon. Tony 21 Burn, Margy 22 Business Contingency Plan for Critical Building Systems 27

Business Continuity Framework 27, 42 Byrne, Dr Alex 138

Cameron, Jasmine 145 The Canberra Times advertising in 33 digitisation 9, 149

Canberra-based collecting institutions, consolidation of back-office functions 11, 73 capital expenditure 41, 75 Caplice, Elizabeth 46 Carroll, Diana 150 Carta Terza Generale del Asia (1660s), map of the

Pacific Ocean (Robert Dudley) 159

Carter, Jeff (photographer), email correspondence 158 cash flow 17 cash flow statement 86 Cataloguing-in-Publication, e-books 57 cataloguing/indexing, collection items 59, 60 cataloguing policies 58, 140 cataloguing standard, based on RDA 51, 58 Cavanagh, Edward 46 Centenary of Canberra 8, 9, 30, 159 Chair’s report 3-5 Channel Seven 3 Charter of Public Service in a Culturally Diverse

Community 30 Chatham House Online Archive, 1920-2008 157 chemical storage and handling 38 Children’s Book Week 30 City of Melbourne 147 City of Trees (exhibition) 8 Clarke, Emeritus Prof. Graeme 139 Clarke, Dr Patricia 139 Clements, Kirstie 64 Climate Institute of Australia website 7 cloud-based ILMS and CMS systems 68 Colbert, Suzanne 37 collaborating nationally and internationally 4, 9-10,

66-70 agencies subscribing to collaborative services 69 collaborative services standards and

timeframes 69, 70 embassies of USA, France and Italy 10 international relations 67, 68 Libraries Australia 10, 66 newspaper collecting 7 with non-library organisations to add resources

to Trove 62 NSLA 10, 68 records/items contributed by subscribing

agencies 69, 70 Trove role 67 visits from embassies of USA and Netherlands

10

collecting and preserving Australia’s documentary heritage 4, 7, 56-60 issues and developments 57-8 major initiatives 56-7

performance 59-60

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 169 168

collecting program, overseas 57, 60 collection access 30, 61, 75 availability of ten key service areas 49-50 issues and developments 62-4

major initiatives 61 percentage of collection available 75 performance 64-5 regional and remote communities 63 Service Charter 64, 65 collection asset, valuation 40, 73 collection development expenditure 75 Collection Development Policy 7, 140 Collection Digitisation Policy 140 Collection Disaster Plan 27 collection items

catalogued/indexed 59, 60 number of physical items delivered to users 65 preservation treatment 58 processing 59, 60 storage and maintenance 59-60 see also accessions; acquisitions collection management 10, 62, 75

workflow 62, 66 collection policies 56-7, 140 collections

digital see digital collections substantial material donations 147 A Colonial and Missionary Church Map of the World (1842) 159 Comcover

insurance coverage 29 insurance premium rate 29 Risk Management Benchmarking Survey 29 commercial publishers digital publishing 58 provision of print publications 57 committees, NLA 4, 23, 24, 25-6, 28, 37, 40, 42, 43, 73, 135-6, 138-9 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) 21, 23, 25, 28, 72, 140 Commonwealth Financial Accountability Review 26 Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 36 Commonwealth Heritage List 41 Commonwealth Ombudsman 29 Commonwealth Procurement Rules 44 Community Heritage Grants Program 10, 45, 102, 103, 147, 148 Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee 139

complaints received 32 compliance index 165 compliments received 31 Conference of Directors of National Libraries in

Asia and Oceania, Library hosts 10 Conlon, Peter 138 Conservation Management Plan 40 consultancy services 32, 142 Consultative Committee 35 contract management and procurement practices

44

Copies Direct service 31, 51, 63 Copyright Act 1968 4, 6, 56 see also legal deposit Copyright Agency Ltd Cultural Fund 147 Copyright and the Digital Economy (Australian Law

Reform Commission report) 6, 28 Corbould, Mark 22 corporate governance 23-7 structure 23 Corporate Governance Committee 23, 26, 136 corporate management 34-46

cooperation on 44-5 Corporate Management Forum 34, 44-5 Corporate Management Group (CMG) 5, 26, 35 corporate overview 19-51 Corporate Planning Framework 27 corporate services policy and documents 141 Council 3, 21, 23 Council members 5, 24, 25, 26, 131-4

remuneration 118 Courtenay, the late Bryce 150 Courtenay, Christine 150 cross-agency key performance indicators 73-5 Crowley, Rosemary, oral history interview 159 Crowne Plaza Canberra 3 Cunningham, Sophie, personal papers 158

Dan, Adrienne 9, 150 Dan, A/Prof. Noel 9, 150 Davies, Lucy 46 De Burgh Norman, John, oral history interview 159 Delahunty, The Hon. Mary 5, 132, 135, 136 Department of Finance 73 digital collecting 7, 9, 10, 47, 57 digital collections 3, 48

born-digital personal records 57 growth in storage 48 storage by material 48

Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement (DLIR) project 6, 11, 37, 47, 56 digital preservation 10, 56, 72 digital preservation management system 47, 56 Digital Public Library of America 67, 68 digital publications

from commercial publishers 58, 68 legal deposit 4, 6, 11, 56, 57, 58 DigitalNZ 67, 68 digitisation 3, 48, 56, 61 Australian newspapers 9, 48, 61, 62, 72, 149 books 56, 61 Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection 8, 61 Federation of Australia, first-hand accounts 9 fee-for-service partnerships with state libraries

72

journals 56, 61 medieval manuscripts 9, 72 percentage of collection digitised 75 Director General 5, 22, 24, 25, 26 Director General’s review 6-11 Disability Contact Officers Committee 37 Disability Framework 37 disability strategy 37 Disney, Prof. Julian 9 Dixon, William, 1936 Berlin Olympic Games rower material 158 DocWorks 47, 56 donations, grants and sponsorships 8, 9, 45-6, 72, 102-3, 147-8, 149-56 Dr Leichardt’s March: For the Piano (musical score) (Marsh) 157 Drupal content management system 49, 51

e-books Australian 57 Cataloguing-in-Publication 57 and legal deposit 57 overseas acquisition 57

e-callslips 62 e-resources policy 141 Ebury, The Lady 137 Eden Road Wines 148 education 30, 64, 74 electricity consumption 42, 43, 72 electronic publications, legal deposit for 4, 6, 11,

56, 57, 58 Elias, A/Prof. Ann 45 Elliott, Lorraine 137

Emergency Planning Committee 27, 42 End of Year Appeal 9, 72 Enemark panoramas 64 energy consumption/efficiency 10, 42-3, 44, 72 Enterprise Agreement (EA) 35, 143 Environment Management Committee 42, 44 Environmental Action Plan (EAP) 42 environmental management 10, 42, 43-4 Environmental Management System (EMS) 34, 42 Environmental Policy 42 Environmetrics 9, 33 equal employment opportunity 145 equity 14 equity statements 85 Esri Australia 3 ethical standards 36-7 Etihad Airways 3 Europeana 67, 68 events program 9, 148 Everingham, Paul, oral history interview 159 Executive and Public Programs office area,

refurbishment 41 Exhibition Gallery 8 exhibitions 3, 8, 14, 31, 33, 58, 64, 72, 147, 148,

149

expenses 13-14, 75 external audit 28, 72, 80-1 An Eye for Nature: The Life and Art of William T. Cooper (Olsen) 64

Facebook 64 Fairfax, John 150 Fairfax, Libby 150 Fairfax, Tim 150 Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection, digitisation

8, 61 Fairfax Media 8 Favelle, Kathryn 137 Federal election 2013 ephemera and websites

7, 157 Federation of Australia, first-hand accounts, digitisation 9 fellowships 9, 45, 46, 139, 148 Fellowships Advisory Committee 139 Ferguson, James 150 financial performance summary 12-17 financial statements 77-88

notes to 89-126

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 171 170

Fine, Oronce, Nova, et integra universi orbis descriptio 54 Fire Control Panel 41 First World War resources, access to international

11, 67 Flickr Commons 64 Flynn, Errol, letters to his family 158 Forrest Hotel and Apartments 148 Foundation Board 11, 73, 137 Foyer refurbishment 10, 41, 44 Fra Mauro Map of the World 9 fraud awareness training 36 Fraud Management Policy 36 Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan 36 Freedom of Information 29 Friend, Donald

The Dead Labuan (watercolour) 157 Self Portrait in a Carved Mirror (watercolour) 157 Friends of the National Library of Australia 9, 46, 148 Friends of the National Library Creative Arts Fellowship 9 Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship 46, 148 fundraising 9, 72, 137, 149-56

gas consumption 42, 43, 72 General Policy Orders 28 Geoscience Australia 159 German merchant navy officer First World War

internment camp photograph albums 158 Gerritsen, Rupert, born-digital personal records 57 gifts, grants and sponsorships 8, 45-6, 102-3,

147-8, 149-56 glossary 163 Gobbo, Sir James 150 Gold Museum of Ballarat 62 Goldsmith, Andrea, personal papers 158 Goos, Pieter, Oost Indien 162 Gordon, Catherine Hope 150 governance arrangements 72-3 government inquiries 28 grants/grant programs 8, 45-6, 102-3, 147-8 Grape and Wine Research Development

Corporation 62 Green, John M. 5, 132, 135 Griggs, Dr Peter 45

Gruen, Dr Nicholas 5, 133 Gundabluey Research 62-3

Haire, Prof. James, oral history interview 159 Hand, Gerry, oral history interview 159 Harlequin digital-only books 58 Harney, W.E. (Bill) 46 Harold S. Williams Trust 45, 46 Harold White Fellowships 11, 45 Harry Daly Museum (from the Australian Society of

Anaesthetists) 62 Hayes, Chris 5, 133 Helm, Ken, social history interview 159 Hemstritch, Jane 5, 133, 135, 136, 150 heritage furniture 42 Heritage Management Strategy 41-2 History of ABC Rural Broadcasting in Australia 159 History of Australian Geoscience 159 The History of Australian Press Photography 159 Hoff, Brand 137 Holland, Dulcie, signed original manuscript of

Capriccietto for Little Bells 158 Holstein, Prue 46 Home, Emeritus Prof. Rod 139 Houghton, the late Nanette 150 Houghton, Dr Ron 150 House, Matilda, social history interview 159 Humphrey, Vicki 139 Humphries, Senator Gary 5, 133

Inall, Neil, oral history interview 159 income 12-13 income statement 83 indemnities 29 independent auditor’s report 80-1 Indigenous Employment Strategy 10, 35, 71 Indigenous groups

community photographs supplied to 30 oral history interviews for Centenary of Canberra project 30 view material related to Wave Hill walk-off 30 Indigenous Literacy Foundation 30 Individual Flexibility Arrangements 35, 143 influenza vaccinations 39 information and research services 63 Information Publication Scheme (IPS) 29 Information Security Manual 50

information technology 47-51 equipment 40, 50 infrastructure and services 8, 48-51, 63 reliability 49-50 see also Digital Library Infrastructure

Replacement project innovation 62, 66 Insurance and Risk Management Corporate Insurance Forum 29 insurance coverage premium 29 Integrated Library Management System (ILMS)

11, 51, 68 Interim Arrangements for Recruitment to the Australian Public Service 10, 71 internal audit 25, 28, 72 Internal Audit Plan, 2014-15 25 international relations 68 iSENTIA 33 IT Disaster Recovery Plan 27, 50

Jain, Prof. Purnendra 139 Jalland, Prof. Pat 139 Jansson, Jan, Mar di India 130 Japan Fellowships 45 Japan Study Grants 46 Jordan, Dr Deborah 45 journals, digitisation 56, 61

Kelly, Dr Catherine 45 Kenneth Binns Lecture 9, 148 Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship 46, 148 Kenneth Myer Lecture 9 Kersten, Prof. Rikki 45 King, Julia 137 Kirk, Prof. Joyce 139 Knuckey, Geoff 135

Labrum, Meg 139 Laing, Kate 46 land and buildings 40-1 Leadership Capability Model 34, 71, 146 leadership forum 10, 34, 71 legal action 28 legal deposit

e-books 57 for electronic publications 4, 6, 11, 56, 57, 58 Regulation Impact Statement for electronic publications 56 legal journals, open access 62

legislation 21, 140 liabilities, total 16 Liberty Financial 150 Libraries and Information Week 30 Libraries Australia 10, 50, 51, 66

benefits for libraries participating in 66 Document Delivery service 66 Search Service 10, 66 use of cloud-based systems 68 Libraries Australia Advisory Committee 138 Library Leadership Development Resource Kit 10,

34, 71 The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of George Barrington Now under Sentence of

Transportation... (1790) 157 lighting 10, 41, 42, 44 Lindenmayer, Marjorie 150 Linehan, Gerry 22 The London Atlas of Universal Geography

Exhibiting the Physical & Political Divisions of the Various Countries of the World (1838 edition) (John Arrowsmith) 158 Long-Term Strategic Building Management Plan 40 Luminous World: Contemporary Art from the Wesfarmers Collection (exhibition) 8

McCann, Deidre 150 McCann, Kevin 137, 150 McCann, Pat 46, 148, 149 MacDougall, Vice Admiral Ian, oral history interview

159

McGregor, Angela Punch, oral history interview 159 Macinnis, Peter, The Big Book of Australian History 64 McKenzie, Amelia 22, 138 Macquarie Group Foundation Limited 150 Maidstone gaol, 1788-1795 delivery book 158 Main Reading Room 11, 41

integration with Newspapers and Microforms Reading Room 3, 4, 8, 41 lighting upgrade 10, 41, 44 making the Library’s collections and services

accessible to all Australians 61-5 Manteena Pty Ltd 8 Manuscripts Collection digital records transferred to 57

management 62 noteworthy acquisitions 158

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 173 172

Map of London’s Underground Railways, a New Design for an Old Map, first edition (Henry Beck) 159

Map of the World (Fra Mauro) 9 Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia (book) 64 Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia

(exhibition) 3, 8-9, 14, 31, 33, 58, 64, 72, 148, 149 attendance records 3, 8 economic benefit of 9

launch 8 partners and lenders 3, 9 wins award 64 Maps Collection acquisitions 158-9 online access 62 preservation projects 58 Maps Reading Room 3, 4, 41 MARC format, redevelopment 58 Marcus, Prof. Julie 139 Marsh, Stephen Hale, Dr Leichardt’s March: For the Piano (musical score) 157 Matthews, Race, oral history interview 159 medieval manuscripts, preservation and digitisation 9, 72 mentoring program 34, 71 Minerals Council of Australia 150 Minister for the Arts 6, 21, 28 Minister for Finance and Deregulation 28, 165 Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government 21 ministerial directions 28 Mitchell, Harold, oral history interview 159 Modjeska, Dr Drusilla 9 Murdoch, the late Dame Elisabeth 150 Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House 147 museum collections, accessible through Trove 62 Myanmar maps 158 Myers, Maria 150

National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA) 67 collaboration 9, 67 Digital Preservation Group 67 management and access to large picture and

map collections 67 Reimagining Libraries 9 Storage Management Group 67

National Archives of Australia 10, 45, 103, 148 National Broadband Network 61 National Capital Authority 32, 41 National Collecting Institutions Touring and

Outreach Program 148 National Cultural Heritage Account grant 8 National Disability Strategy 37 National Film and Sound Archive 10, 45, 103, 148 National Folk Fellowship 46 National Folk Festival 46, 148 National Health and Medical Research Council 67 national leadership 66

issues and developments 68 major initiatives 66-8 performance 69-70 National Library Act 1960 21, 23, 140 National Library of Australia committees 4, 23, 24, 25-6, 28, 37, 40, 42, 43,

73, 135-6, 138-9 corporate governance 23-7 Council 3, 21, 23 Council meetings 134 Council members 5, 24, 25, 26, 131-4 financial constraints 11 Foundation Board 11, 72, 137 objectives 90 organisational and senior management

structure 21-2 role 21 Service Charter 31-2, 64, 65, 140 National Library of Australia Fund 149-56 National Library of China 10 National Library Regulations (1994) 140 National Museum of Australia 10, 45, 103, 148 National Reconciliation Week 30 National Simultaneous Storytime 30 National Volunteer Week 30 net cash flow 17 A New Chart of the China Sea and East India

Archipelago (1823) (marine sheet) 159 New South Wales newspapers, digitisation 61 newspapers accessed through Trove 62, 63

analysis of holdings 7 collection policy 7 digital storage requirements 48 digitisation 7, 9, 61, 72, 149 on Trove 6, 7, 50, 63

Newspapers and Microforms Reading Room, integration into Main Reading Room 3, 4, 8, 41 Nineteenth Century Collections Online database modules 157 non-collection capital expenditure 75 non-collection development labour costs 75 non-English speaking community, introductory

program 30 Norman McCann Summer Scholarships 46, 148 Norris, Prof. John, oral history interview 159

O’Carroll, Ben 138 office accommodation, refurbishment 41 Office of the Australian Information Commissioner 29

Okayama, Dr Emiko 45 O’Keefe, Brian, oral history interview 159 Olsen, Penny, An Eye for Nature: The Life and Art of William T. Cooper 64

Ombudsman 29 online access to special collections 62 online databases, 19th Century 157 online engagement 63-4 online visits 4, 7, 49, 62, 63, 74 operating outcome 12 Oral History and Folklore Collection

born-digital records 57 grants received 102, 147 interviews 30, 159 online access 62 organisational and senior management structure

22-3 organisational excellence 71 issues and developments 71-3 Origin Foundation 150 outcome and strategies 55, 90

strategic directions 55-75 overseas collecting program move to digital collecting 57

planned reduction 60

Page, Tim, Vietnam War black and white exhibition prints 158 PANDORA archive 4, 6, 7, 64, 157 paper consumption 43, 72 parliamentary committees 28 partnerships 3, 7, 72 patrons and donors 72, 149-56

Paul, Meg 150 Peck, Nigel 9, 150 Peck, Patricia 9, 150 people with disabilities 37

services for 30 people management see staff Performance Management Framework 35, 36 Peters, Dr Nonja 5, 134, 135 Petherick Reading Room 3, 4, 41 Pettingell, Joseph, journal 158 philanthropy see donations, grants and

sponsorships photographs digital acquisitions 57 Indigenous communities 30

Indigenous experience 30 Pictures Collection, outstanding acquisitions 157-8 Pictures and Manuscripts Reading Room,

integration with Maps and Petherick reading rooms 3, 4, 8, 41 Pilgrim, Cathy 21, 137, 139, 145 Plancius, Petrus, Insulae Moluccae... 78 Planet Wheeler Foundation 3, 149 plant and equipment 40, 72 podcasts, online access 30 policies and documents 140-1 Porter, Dorothy, personal papers 158 Portfolio Budget Statement 2013-14 23, 55, 140 postcard collection 8 Powell, Fiona 150 preservation management system, digital 47, 56 preservation policies 140 preservation projects

donations to 72 Frederick Proeschel’s atlases and maps 58 Joan Blaeu’s Archipelagus Orientalis sive Asiaticus 58 Preservica 56

print publications 7 from commercial publishers 57 overseas, transfer to digital subscriptions 57 received through legal deposit 57

Privacy Act 1988 29 Privacy Policy 29 procurement practices 44 Proeschel, Frederick, atlases and maps 58 Protective Security Policy Framework 51

GLOSSARY AND INDICES NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 175 174

public accountability 28-33 public car parking 32 public education programs and tours 30, 74 Public Governance, Performance and

Accountability Act 2013 21, 34, 73 Public Interest Disclosure 29, 37 Public Management Reform Agenda 5, 6, 26 public programs policies 141 Public Service Act 1999 37, 140, 143, 165 publications 64

notable acquisitions 157 popularity and sales 64 purchasing 44

The Queensland Graingrower 7

Ray, Stuart 139 reader services policy and documents 140 Reading Room Integration project 3, 4, 8, 37, 40, 41, 42, 44, 61

Realm Precinct 148 Records of the Worshipful Company of Stationers 1554-1923 (microfilm) 157 recycling 42, 44 Rehabilitation Management System 38 Reid, Prof. Janice 5, 134, 135 Reimagining Libraries 9 Reiss, Francis (photographer)

born-digital personal records 57 email correspondence 158 remuneration 35-6 Council Members 118

highly paid staff 121 Senior Executives 35, 119-20 report of operations 53-75 research services 63 Resource Description and Access (RDA) 51, 58 Richter, Henry Constantine, bird watercolours 158 Risk Management Framework 27 Risk Management Register 27 Ritch, Diana 150 Ritch, Jack 150 Ritchie, Ann 138 ‘Robb panels’ (bronze artworks attached to the building) 41 Ross, Kate 46

Sanchez, Alison 46, 148, 149 Sato, Dr Shigeru 46 scholarships 46 school programs

participation in 74 quality of school learning programs delivered 74 Schwirtlich, Anne-Marie 5, 6-11, 22, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139 security and business continuity 42 senior citizens groups 30 Senior Executives 26 remuneration 36, 119-20 staff movements 145 Serratore, Rosa 138 Service Charter 31-2, 64, 65, 140 Seselja, Senator Zed 5, 134 Seymour, Dr Heather 46, 148, 149 Seymour, Dr John 46, 148, 149 Seymour Biography Lecture 9, 148 Seymour Summer Scholarships 46, 148 Shanks, Josephine 150 Shanks, Prof. Robert 150 Sharrad, A/Prof. Paul 45 Shell 3 Smart Services Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney 67 Smith, Dick 150 Smith, Robin V.F. 150 Snedden, Belinda 9, 150 Snedden, Douglas 9, 137, 150 social history interviews 159 social justice and equity 30 social media, use of 63-4 software 47, 50, 56, 66 valuation 40 Sparks, JoAnne 138 special collections, online access 62 Special Collections Reading Room 42 sponsorships 13, 72, 148 staff 34-40, 71, 143-6 classification 36, 144 disability strategy 37 distribution by division 143 engagement 35 Enterprise Agreement 35, 143 equal employment opportunity 145 from culturally and linguistically diverse

backgrounds 38

Individual Flexibility Arrangements 35, 143 remuneration 35-6, 121 Strategic Workforce Plan 34, 71, 146 training 29, 30, 36, 71, 146 work health and safety 34, 38-40, 71 workforce planning 10, 34, 35, 71, 146 workplace diversity 38 see also Senior Executives State Library of New South Wales 7, 61 statement of changes in equity (consolidated) 85 statement of changes in equity (NLA) 85 statement of comprehensive income 83 statement of financial position 84 Stokes, Kerry 9 Stokes, Ryan 3-5, 131, 135, 136, 150 strategic and operational policies and documents

140

Strategic Asset Management Plan 40, 50 Strategic Building Master Plan 34, 40 Strategic Directions 2012-14 5, 6, 11, 23 strategic directions

achieving organisational excellence 71-3 collecting and preserving Australia’s documentary heritage 56-60 delivering national leadership 66-70 making the Library’s collections and services

accessible to all Australians 61-5 Strategic Workforce Plan 34, 71, 146 Strempel, Geoff 138 Sun, Yigang 10

Taglietti, Enrico, social history interview 159 Tax Time Appeal 9, 72 thalidomide survivors, oral history interviews 30, 159

Thomas, Deborah 5, 131, 135, 136, 137 and Clements, Kirstie, The Australian Women’s Weekly Fashion: The First 50 Years 64

Thomas, the late Della Keren, in memory of 150 Toga Hotels 3 total assets 15 total liabilities 16 Tovey, Noel, personal papers 158 Toyne, Philip, oral history interview 159 Trailblazing Women and the Law 159 training 29, 30, 36, 71, 146 Treasure Explorer education website 64 Treasures Gallery 8, 64, 72

Trove 3, 5, 48, 50, 51, 57, 62-3 access to ABC Radio National transcripts 8, 62 access to Ashfield Library postcard collection 8 access to Australian research material 67 access to Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection

8, 61 access to Oral History and Folklore Collection 62 adds corporate and legal collections 62 adds small regional museum collections 62 API access to international First World War

resources 11, 67 compliments 31 growth in usage 4, 7, 62, 63 international relations 67, 68 leadership role 67 registered users 63 text correction by digital volunteers 63 use of cloud-based systems 68 user satisfaction study 4, 7-8, 62-3 Trove Help Centre 51, 67 Trove Newspapers 50

access 7, 62, 63 growth 7, 62 interface redevelopment 8, 63 Tunney, Ross 46 Turner, Rosemary 139 Tweed River Regional Museum 62 Twitter 63-4

Underground Australia 64 University of Technology, Sydney 67

Vallentine, Jo, oral history interview 159 Veres, Martin 46 Vietnamese veterans in Australia, oral history project 30, 159

Vinall, Simone 149 Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation 149 Virgin Australia 3 visitor satisfaction 9, 33, 74 visits

online 4, 7, 49, 62, 63, 74 to the Library 74 Visscher, Claes Jansz, Nova totius terrarum orbis geographica ac hydrographica tabula 20 Visscher, Nicolaes, Orbis terrarum nova et

accuratissima tabula 2 volunteers 11, 30, 63

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014 176

Wagdy Hanna and Associates Pty Ltd 28 Waldren, Joan, social history interview 159 Walker, Helen 139 War Herald website 67 waste management 42, 44, 72 water consumption 42, 72 web archiving 4, 6, 7, 64, 157 web harvesting 57, 67 web services, usage 4, 7, 49, 62, 63, 74 Wentworth, William Charles (bronze portrait

medallion) 157 Wesfarmers Limited 150 Western Australian Senate election 2014

ephemera and websites 157 White, A.G.D. 150 White, Graham, oral history interview 159 White, Sally 150 Wilkins, Roger 10 Williams, Prof. John 45 Wills, William John (albumen print photograph)

158

Women—Transnational Networks (19th Century online database) 157 Woolner, Thomas, bronze portrait medallion of William Charles Wentworth 157 work health and safety 34, 38-40, 71

employee assistance programs 39 injury cases 139 premiums for injuries suffered 40 training courses and seminars 38 Work Health and Safety Act 2011 71

reporting requirements 39 workforce planning 10, 34, 35, 71, 146 workplace diversity 38 Worshipful Company of Stationers, records,

1554-1923 (microfilm) 157 Wositzky, Jan 46 Writing the Australian Landscape 147

Yorke, Stephen 150 youth arts activities 30

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA