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Australian Film, Television and Radio School—Report for 2013-14


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AUSTRALIAN FILM TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHOOL

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

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AUSTRALIAN FILM, TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHOOL

Building 130, The Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park NSW 2021 PO Box 2286, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Tel: 1300 131 461 Tel + 61 (0)2 9805 6611 Fax + 61 (0)2 9887 1030 www.aftrs.edu.au

© Australian Film, Television and Radio School 2014 Published by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School ISSN 0819-2316 The text in this Annual Report is released subject to a Creative Commons BY- NC- ND licence, except for the text of the independent auditor’s report. This means, in summary, that you may reproduce, transmit and otherwise use AFTRS’ text, so long as you do not do so for commercial purposes and do not change it. You must also attribute the text you use as extracted from the Australian Film, Television and Radio School’s Annual Report. For more details about this licence, see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_GB. This licence is in addition to any fair dealing or other rights you may have under the Copyright Act 1968. You are not permitted to reproduce, transmit or otherwise use any still photographs included in this Annual Report, without first obtaining AFTRS’ written permission. The report is available at the AFTRS website http://www.aftrs.edu.au

Cover: Still from AFTRS award-winning student film, All Gods Creatures

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AUSTRALIAN FILM, TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHOOL

Building 130, The Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park NSW 2021 PO Box 2286, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Tel: 1300 131 461 Tel + 61 (0)2 9805 6611 Fax + 61 (0)2 9887 1030 www.aftrs.edu.au

© Australian Film, Television and Radio School 2014 Published by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School ISSN 0819-2316 The text in this Annual Report is released subject to a Creative Commons BY- NC- ND licence, except for the text of the independent auditor’s report. This means, in summary, that you may reproduce, transmit and otherwise use AFTRS’ text, so long as you do not do so for commercial purposes and do not change it. You must also attribute the text you use as extracted from the Australian Film, Television and Radio School’s Annual Report. For more details about this licence, see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_GB. This licence is in addition to any fair dealing or other rights you may have under the Copyright Act 1968. You are not permitted to reproduce, transmit or otherwise use any still photographs included in this Annual Report, without first obtaining AFTRS’ written permission. The report is available at the AFTRS website http://www.aftrs.edu.au

Cover: Still from AFTRS award-winning student film, All Gods Creatures

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LETTER FROM THE CHAIR

29 August 2014

Senator the Hon George Brandis QC Minister for the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister It is with great pleasure that I present the Annual Report for the Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) for the financial year ended 30 June 2014.

The Annual Report 2013-14 has been prepared in line with Section 9 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011. The report was adopted by resolution of the Council of AFTRS on August 29 2014.

The School has had another successful year and acknowledges the ongoing support and assistance of the Minister for the Arts, his office and the Ministry for the Arts. Yours sincerely

Yours sincerely

Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA Chair of Council

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CONTENTS Chair’s Introduction 4

CEO’s Perspective 8

Vision and Purpose 14

Portfolio Budget Statements and Key Performance Indicators 2013-14 15

Strategic Direction 18

Educate and Create 19

Engagement and Participation 33

Leadership, Collaboration and Support 36

Performance and Accountability 42

Corporate Governance 46

Council 48

Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee 51 Academic Board 52

Future Review Committee 52

Future Review and Research Committee 52

Executive 53

Statutory Reports 56

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) 57

Staffing Establishment and Appointments 57

Industrial Relations 62

Work Health and Safety 62

Staff Training and Development 63

Freedom of Information 64

Privacy 65

Judicial Decisions and Reviews by Outside Bodies 65 Ministerial Directions 65

Fraud Control 65

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers 66

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 66

Appendices Enabling Legislation 68

Financial Resource Summary 69

AFTRS Graduates 2013 72

Supporter Awards to Students 75

Public Program 77

Industry Events 83

Guest Lecturers 87

Financial Statements 90

Index 126

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CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION

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CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION When the Australian Film, Television and Radio School was established as the nation’s elite education and training body in 1972, it was the beginning of a remarkable period. Over the following decades Australian film, television and radio grew and flourished, bringing Australian stories to life for audiences at home and abroad.

AFTRS graduates have been central to this development. As leaders, visionaries, creative professionals and technical experts they have put their stamp on the nation, and the world.

Today AFTRS is internationally recognised as one of the best film schools in the world. Its graduates are renowned for their creativity and entrepreneurship, and as important and valuable contributors across all aspects of an increasingly global industry.

Forty years on the media industry is very different. It will continue to change in the coming years as the new imperatives of the digital era disrupt traditional business models, methods of production and relationships with audiences. This is an uncertain and challenging time, but it is also one of huge opportunity, especially for AFTRS, its graduates and students.

Screens are more important than ever. There are more of them and they come in many different sizes with different capacities and requirements. The digital era is above all a screen-based age, and while this presents real challenges for many sections of the media industry it also presents previously unimagined opportunities. There are countless new ways to communicate, to tell stories and to reach and interact with audiences.

One thing is certain: the need for talented and creative people to produce the content that will fill these screens is greater than ever.

The skills that will be needed to do this include many of those that have traditionally been taught at AFTRS, but go further.

Over the past two years AFTRS has been actively considering how it needs to change to truly be a school for the 21st century. Strategic planning sessions considered what the future may be like, and the skills, attributes and knowledge graduates will need to thrive in this exciting, rapidly changing sector.

Council has actively engaged with the strategic vision developed by the Chief Executive, Sandra Levy, to regenerate AFTRS and redesign the teaching programs to better meet these needs. It has been an intense project, but an exciting and stimulating one. Sandra has engaged with staff and the industry to produce a new model of teaching, a model that emphasises practical skills, technical knowledge, cultural understanding and an adaptive, entrepreneurial spirit. This is the important first step in ensuring that the School remains central to the sectors it serves for the next 40 years.

As this Annual Report is the last to be to be published under Sandra Levy’s leadership, it is timely to acknowledge her achievements and vision for the future of the School, as well as her success in crafting that future while continuing to deliver extensive award and short courses at the highest possible levels.

CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION

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Over the past year, Sandra Levy has worked closely with staff, teams from industry and educational specialists to develop new curricula. Commencing in February 2015 AFTRS will offer a three-year Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree. This award course will provide students with a broad-based screen education and equip them with the practical and conceptual skills needed to work on different platforms, enriched by a creative and global perspective.

The Specialist Program will offer diplomas and advanced diplomas in key areas, including Radio. The Specialist Program is targeted at those who need to reskill, or to extend existing skills in industry specialisations. These courses will provide sub-degree qualifications and, while entry will continue to be based upon merit-selection, the program will enable greater access to industry based training and education opportunities through flexible delivery.

During her seven-year term, Sandra Levy has increased access to education and training opportunities for the best merit-selected students. This year was no exception. AFTRS is justly proud of its 2013 Graduation; 246 students graduated from 20 different courses, including the first intake of the Masters of Screen Arts and Business, who are likely to become the next generation of industry leaders. Many graduates receive generous internships and awards from industry, demonstrating its recognition of the standard of AFTRS training and the ability of its students to make an immediate contribution.

Through revitalised and sustainable Open Program short courses, opportunities have been extended to the screen and radio industries as well as a wide range of participants from education, (including school children), corporations, and Indigenous communities. In 2013-14, the Open Program demonstrated its outreach capacity by training more than 5,000 people across Australia, with a further 3,200 participants attending corporate training programs. Through outstanding management and marketing, the program delivers increased revenue that is re-invested in the School’s education and training activities. This year, for the first time, the Open Program contributed a profit to the School’s budget, which delivered a break-even result.

Under Sandra Levy’s leadership AFTRS has become much more than a globally recognised national film school; it has become a truly national cultural institution, and one that supports industry, collaborates with arts and educational institutions, and welcomes everyone who is interested in participating in the cultural life of screen and radio. The distinctive Public Program of screenings, discussions, and debate with media content makers creates an environment where innovative content and creative businesses can not only develop, but thrive. These initiatives, coupled with the Australian journal of screen arts and business, LUMINA, and the Creative Fellowship, that supports recipients to research and create experimental screen content, demonstrate the breadth of AFTRS’ role. The broader screen and radio industry is enlivened by such cultural activity and engagement which allows considered reflection of the past and bold imagination of possible futures.

External recognition of creative excellence was again pleasing this year as AFTRS student films were selected for both nationally and internationally acclaimed festivals, and many were additionally acknowledged through the receipt of prestigious awards. At the Australian Directors Guild awards, an AFTRS’ 2012 graduate, Melissa Anastasi, won the Best Student Film, and four other student films were also nominated.

The 2010 AFTRS Creative Fellow, Lynette Wallworth, was invited to screen her work Coral: Rekindling Venus during the 2014 World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China.

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Jane Campion, who graduated from the School in 1983 was appointed President of the Jury at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival - one of the most prestigious international appointments in the film industry. These are just a few notable examples of AFTRS’ influence and impact.

These achievements represent the outcomes of collaborative effort, and on behalf of the Council, I thank the Executive team and staff of AFTRS for their ongoing contribution and commitment to delivering the best in teaching and learning opportunities for students and industry.

Alongside these impressive achievements, the School’s corporate governance processes consistently meet high standards. On behalf of Council, I thank the Academic Board for its expert contribution to the development of the 2015 curricula. In particular Chair Professor Robyn Ewing, appointed from Council in September 2013 and independent members, Dr Graham Hendry and Mr Graham Forsyth. The School is grateful for the contribution of the outgoing Chair of Academic Board, Professor Cathryn McConaghy.

In terms of the overseeing of financial, audit and risk management systems, Council is appreciative of the expertise and dedication of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee. Special thanks to Mr Paul Apps, independent member, and Mr Andrew Mason, who was appointed Chair of the FARM Committee in July 2013 and whose Council term was extended for a further three years. Thanks are also due to Mr Peter Duncan, Deputy Chair of Council, and outgoing Chair of the FARM Committee.

I would also like to express my appreciation to all members of Council for their collegiality, generosity and considered input into this year's Council deliberations including former members Mr Tom Burstall, staff-elected member Ms Sally Browning and student-elected member Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith (Master of Screen Arts 2013) whose terms were completed in 2013.

At the beginning of the last year of her term as CEO of AFTRS, Sandra Levy was awarded an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in the General Division of the 2014 Queen’s Birthday Honours for distinguished service to the arts as a film and television director and producer and through her strategic leadership and educational roles. This honour is very well deserved, and on behalf of Council and the AFTRS community I congratulate Sandra on this acknowledgement of her career excellence and outstanding contribution.

I would like to commend the Minister for the Arts, the Hon. George Brandis QC for his support of the School and the industry. The Government’s support of, and ongoing commitment to the Australian Film, Television & Radio School, as a cultural and educational institution, is vital to the ongoing success, innovation and sustainability of the Australian media industry, as well as its impact at home and abroad.

Yours sincerely

Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA Chair of Council

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CEO’S PERSPECTIVE

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CEO’S PERSPECTIVE As I begin the final 12 months of my contract, this Annual Report will be my seventh and last as Chief Executive Officer of AFTRS. It has been a period of intense change and innovation in the output of the School, and in the educational, cultural and industry landscape in which the School resides. The School has responded well to the challenges and opportunities presented.

There is much to acknowledge and recognise in the many and considerable achievements of the School since I began as CEO. From moving into the purpose-designed, state-of-the-art campus in May 2008 where celebrations included Baz Luhrmann receiving an AFTRS honorary degree from Hugh Jackman at a special industry event; the unveiling of the significant commissioned public art work Tjamu Tjamu by Indigenous artist Mr Jackie Kurltjunyintja Giles Tjapaltjarri, in August 2009, and the hundreds that gathered to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the School along with 40 years of alumni in September 2012.

The School is an elite Australian cultural and educational institution, spanning both the creative and business aspects of the screen arts and broadcasting sector, a sector that continues to experience high levels of structural change and creative transformation as it moves into the 21st century.

AFTRS offers a diverse curriculum across a number of different levels, and has markedly increased opportunities to access education and training. Not only does the School offer diversity and access, but excellence, in 2014 The Hollywood Reporter rated AFTRS in the top 15 international film schools in the world, the only Australian film school to be included on the list.

To be situated at the intersection of culture, industry and education is a dynamic position that has been maintained through the regular review and refinement of the School’s key output — the Award course program.

My first few years at AFTRS saw the establishment of a revised Award course program which offered the opportunity to access study at AFTRS with education and training at three levels: Beginner, Intermediate or Advanced. The introduction of a one-year Foundation Diploma in 2009, at the Beginner level, invigorated the School, as a younger demographic of undergraduate students were challenged to explore the creative possibilities of a career in the screen arts and broadcast sectors, through conceptual learning, as well as through practice-based collaborative production.

Other students have completed a post-graduate certificate or diploma from a range of industry specialisations, including Cinematography, Design, Directing, Editing, Producing, Radio Broadcasting, Screen Business, Screen Music, Screenwriting and Sound, and have had considerable success in their post-AFTRS careers. The 2013 graduation saw 193 students graduating from 20 different postgraduate courses, along with 53 students from the undergraduate Foundation Year Diploma.

The move to Moore Park and the new educational strategy has enabled wider access to AFTRS education and training as evidenced by a doubling of graduate numbers since 2008.

The force of industry change has brought with it a challenge for the School: to change in order to remain ahead both of student expectations and industry needs, and to ensure AFTRS’ position as the pre-eminent film school in Australia. Rather than try to

CEO’S PERSPECTIVE

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keep pace with technological change, the strategy has been to build on the Foundation Diploma’s innovative cross-disciplinary design and conceptual focus and combine it with the School’s practice-based, collaborative model to introduce a three-year Bachelor of Arts (Screen) on offer from 2015. This will produce graduates who are steeped in storytelling and in the history of their art form, as well as being able to demonstrate collaborative skills, critical thinking and ethical practice. One of the many reasons to pursue this model is that the creative output of the Foundation Diploma and the response from industry to its graduates has been very strong — as evidenced by the opportunities offered by industry to those graduates, notably the Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program for 12 student internships this year, as well as the Shine Australia Intern Program.

As the architect of the new BA (Screen), I have had the pleasure of leading a creative and collaborative development process that has brought together teams of AFTRS teachers, industry contributors and educational specialists to develop and design the BA (Screen) curriculum. We have been overwhelmed with the positive response from prospective students at this year’s Information Day and Courses & Careers expos and fairs.

Hand-in-hand with the development of the BA (Screen) has been the revision of the industry-focused, specialist courses at the lower educational level of diplomas and advanced diplomas. These courses will be offered part-time, many online, and will be flexibly designed to ensure national access and the widest diversity of reach.

The School’s short course program prides itself on being highly responsive to industry needs. It too has transformed since 2007 when it operated offices in most States and provided industry courses with varying success and impact. In 2011, rebadged as the Open Program, operations were centralised to the Sydney campus while courses continue to be delivered in capital cities and in regional or remote Australia from one administrative centre.

In 2013-14, the Open Program trained more than 5,000 students in the short course program, an increase of almost 200%, compared to 2008-09, with an additional 3,300 attending tailored corporate courses, including the Radio School for Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink. The Open Program continues to deliver an excellent standard and range of short courses and extends the AFTRS brand by providing a hands-on entry point for award course applicants. In 2014, 26% of award course applicants had completed an Open Program course, an increase from 23% in 2013.

The creative and cultural contribution of Indigenous filmmakers and broadcasters is highly valued by the School. In 2009, AFTRS initiated a fully subsidised Indigenous program through which tailored training workshops were delivered across the country providing access to the skills, knowledge and inspiration to facilitate Indigenous Australians to tell their own stories.

The Indigenous Program engages with Indigenous communities and partners and with a broad range of organisations and government agencies to provide and deliver training. In 2013-14 partners included Screen Queensland, UMI Arts, Foxtel, Screenworks Northern Rivers and the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence enabling the delivery of workshops to 204 participants, including an acting workshop, Facing the Machine, that provided 14 Indigenous stage actors with screen acting skills and experience.

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In the last four years, the Indigenous Program has run 70 short courses and trained over 860 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in specially designed courses. It has also provided 283 subsidies for Indigenous Australians to attend existing Open Program courses.

While the contribution and participation of industry professionals is embedded in the Award and Open Program courses, AFTRS itself forms part of the cultural sector, and engages actively with its industry development role.

Since the physical relocation of the School to Moore Park in May 2008, industry engagement and interaction has been a prime focus. When the School is not using its facilities, they are available free-of-charge for industry and content development activities. Since the re-location, almost 700 industry activities have been hosted at AFTRS. The Public Program, launched in the same year has also been a resounding success. The weekly Friday on My Mind forum has become established as an industry institution where professionals share insights about their creative practice with students, staff and the wider industry.

In 2012, this forum was extended to Melbourne and curated and hosted locally with the support of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. This series has also proved enormously popular, and provided a focus for creative discussion and debate within the Victorian community. Since 2008, combined Sydney and Melbourne attendance of Friday on My Mind reached nearly 17,000 across a total of 260 sessions.

TV Talks, a sister act to Friday on My Mind, was launched in Sydney in 2012, and provides a monthly opportunity for the television industry to discuss current issues in a similar fashion. These sessions allow for the important function of networking and ideas interchange between industry professionals, network executives and television production companies. This year more than 800 people attended over 10 sessions.

The School also takes an active role in Australian cultural life outside the boundaries of its campus. This year sessions were hosted at a number of key events including the Adelaide Film Festival, the Australian International Documentary Conference (held in Adelaide), the Melbourne International Film Festival, the Sydney Film Festival, and the Sydney Writer’s Festival.

Internationally, the School has partnered with New York University's Tisch School of the Arts and the Ecole nationale supérieure Louis-Lumière in Paris to provide their students with exchange opportunities. It has also provided the China-based Shanghai Media Group with a series of tailored media courses at the AFTRS campus. AFTRS is a member of CILECT (the International Association of over 160 audio-visual educational institutions), and this year, the Director of Screen and I attended the annual conference in Buenos Aires, to discuss the impact of the digital age in the teaching curricula of film schools.

Student films have been selected for film festivals and special events around the world. Since the proliferation of short film production, and much easier access to filmmaking technology, festivals are far more competitive and a selection for screening is highly prized. This year I have been heartened by the international success of AFTRS student films, including the selection of five short films to screen at the Palm Springs International ShortFest and individual works in San Francisco’s Frameline, the Nashville Film Festival and the Busan International Film Festival, Korea. In terms of award highlights, How the Light Gets In won the Documentary Short Category at the Heartland Festival (USA), and All God’s Creatures won Best Narrative at BeFilm, Underground Film Festival in New York.

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On the national front, it was pleasing to see 11 films selected for the St Kilda Film Festival, an Academy Award® qualifying event, and the film Stuffed nominated at the Sydney Film Festival’s Dendy Awards for Best Short Film and Best Short Screenplay as well as the Rouben Mamoulian Award for Best Director. This year, for the first time, all four nominations for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards were AFTRS student films. The winning film By This River, directed by 2012 graduate Melissa Anastasi, has also been selected for screening into a number of local and international festivals. In 2013-14, 33 student films have screened at 31 festivals both nationally and internationally.

In 2014, Melissa Anastasi was also one of two successful recipients of an AFTRS Creative Fellowship—the first time an alumni has been selected for this prestigious award. The second recipient of the Fellowship this year is director Amiel Courtin-Wilson. I introduced the Creative Fellowship in 2009 in order to advance the work of original and creative voices in the industry, and provide a unique opportunity to research and create a piece of innovative screen art. The completed work is presented to the School community in a workshop, as a learning opportunity for students and staff. I look forward to the creative and research output of their explorations again in 2014.

Of the many milestones to recognise during these years, the establishment of the Australian journal of screen arts and business, LUMINA, is one of which I am immensely proud. Twelve issues of the journal have been published, with the latest Television, Going, Going… Where? looking at the current and future state of the broadcasting sector. Previous LUMINA issues have highlighted Indigenous filmmaking, Documentary filmmaking, Genre, Collaboration, and the 40 th anniversary of the School. LUMINA’s contribution to screen scholarship was recognised with an international Independent Publisher Book Award in 2011 with a Silver Medal for Best Regional Non-Fiction.

In 2013, in the inaugural national review of higher education introduced by the Commonwealth Government, AFTRS was one of the first ten organisations to be reviewed to ensure it met the newly-defined Threshold Standards. On completion of the review, the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) approved and confirmed the School’s self-accreditation status for the maximum period of seven years, demonstrating confidence in the School’s management and its standards of education, governance and compliance. TEQSA also congratulated AFTRS on its Curriculum Review Handbook, noting it as “an exemplary document”.

AFTRS is in a strong position. It produces creative, entrepreneurial, and collaborative screen and radio practitioners. It supports industry to develop and grow, and to contribute to its ongoing education and training. It has well-developed educational acumen which is demonstrated by its diverse, conceptual and practice-based curriculum, high quality education specialists and teaching professionals, and a confirmed self-accreditation status under TEQSA. Meanwhile it is developing an innovative, new curriculum to meet the cultural and educational demands of the 21st century and spending public money wisely by balancing its budget and creating additional revenue through targeted outreach activities.

It is a key cultural, educational and screen arts and broadcast industry asset for all Australians to be proud of.

I thank all who have supported the School this year—the students, the staff, the industry contributors, Council and Committee members—and over the past seven years, with particular thanks to Chairs Peter Ivany AM, and Michael Smellie. Professor Julianne Schulz AM FAHA was appointed Chair in October 2012. She has been a

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significant contributor to the current strategy of new courses and new thinking for the School, as well as a considerable personal support to me as CEO. I thank her for her enthusiasm and vision for the School.

It is vital that the important role AFTRS plays continues to be recognised as a key element in the success and ongoing evolution of the Australian screen arts and broadcast sector, and in the development of rigorous and creative screen education. To the Minister for the Arts, the Hon. George Brandis QC I thank you for your interest in, and commitment to, this unique educational and cultural institution.

Sandra Levy, AO Chief Executive Officer

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THE AUSTRALIAN FILM, TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHOOL The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) is a federal statutory authority established by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 and its functions are described in Appendix 1 (Enabling Legislation).

VISION STATEMENT AFTRS exists to enrich the screen arts and broadcast culture through education, training, research and the dissemination of ideas.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES AFTRS encourages:

Creativity By providing opportunities for the exploration of artistic expression, ideas, innovation and risk taking.

Enterprise By fostering career sustainability, collaboration and resourcefulness.

AFTRS activities are conducted in the spirit of:

Excellence Aspiring to the highest standards of creative excellence.

Diversity Nurturing and valuing difference and originality.

Respect Encouraging mutual respect in all collaborations.

THE SCHOOL’S PURPOSE

The School provides higher education and training in the screen arts and broadcast industries. AFTRS conducts research relevant to industry and disseminates ideas to stimulate conversation about the screen arts, creative practice and broadcast activity. It reaches out to regional and Indigenous Australia, and to new markets to deliver short courses, tailored training, workshops and other screen arts and broadcast activities. It partners with cultural institutions and makes a unique contribution to joint activities with them through its creative expertise and educational reputation. It collaborates with industry to deliver relevant education and experience and it shares its facilities, services and resources with industry organisations, associations and individuals for their activities and events.

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PORTFOLIO BUDGET STATEMENTS AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2013-14 OUTCOME 1 Support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast culture in Australia including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training and research.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUTCOME 1 Program 1.1: Delivery of specialist education to meet the diverse creative needs of students and the skill requirements of industry by means of Award course activities and through its Open Program.

DELIVERABLES

2013-14

Budget Target

2013-14

AFTRS Actuals

Award courses offered 25 23

Open Program courses 250 289

Forums for industry practitioners to share their expertise

40 73

Use of School facilities by Industry for events and activities

100 75

Regular consultations on skill requirements of industry nationally

Annually Annually

PROGRAM 1.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIS) Performance of the program is measured through the applications and enrolments of students in the Award courses; the number of eligible students successfully completing their course of study; and paid enrolments across the full range of Open Program activities.

Performance measures shared with other cultural agencies include: attendance at events, activities and Open Days; visits to the AFTRS website and page views.

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KPIs 2013-14

Budget Target

2013-14

AFTRS Actuals

Visitor interactions:

Number of visits to the organisation's website 100,000 243,148

Number of page views on the organisation's website

750,000 807,961

Number of attendances at AFTRS' events, activities and Open Days

7,000 9,412

Share of funding by source:

Operational funding from government (as a % of total funds) 73.2% 69.2%

Capital funding from government (as a % of total funds)

6.5% 8.3%

Other income (i) (as a % of total funds)

20.3% 22.5%

(ii) (as a % of government funding excl. lease)

31% 36.0%

Expenditure mix:

Expenditure on programs/projects (as a % of total expenditure)

83.5% 82.3%

Expenditure on capital items (as a % of total expenditure)

6.5% 8.3%

Expenditure on other labour costs (as a % of total expenditure)

7.5% 7.5%

Other expenses (as a % of total expenditure)

2.5% 1.8%

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AFTRS specific KPIs:

Number of new student applications (with creative portfolios)

600 672

Number of new and ongoing student enrolments

300 2631

Percentage of eligible completions 90% 94%

Number of student completions 270 2462

Number of Open Program enrolments 4,750 5,0233

1 AFTRS has a merit selection process. Offers are made to students on the basis of their creative portfolio. In 2014, 303 offers were made, with 277 to new students, in addition to the School’s 26 ongoing students. The differential is accounted for by students who decline offers or withdrew from the course of study for personal or other reasons by the census date of 31 March 2014.

2 Variations between target and actual numbers reflects the aggregate number of students who are either continuing students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma of Screen Business or Master of Arts Screen Business which are run over two years; three students who are completing the Master of Arts Research; and students who have not completed their course study due to withdrawal from the course or leave of absence.

3 Does not include tailored courses delivered to approximately 3,300 participants. Note the 2012-13 Annual Report figure of 6,252 included 1,091 tailored course participants.

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STRATEGIC DIRECTION The functions that are laid out in the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 provide the framework for the AFTRS Corporate Plan which is the source of strategies, activities and achievements for the last year.

EDUCATE AND CREATE

AFTRS will continue to provide an outstanding education in screen arts and broadcasting through practice-oriented learning that is distinctive for: its quality, its focus on creativity and its delivery through innovative methods.

ENGAGEMENT AND PARTICIPATION

AFTRS will reach out to cultural organisations and institutions and across regions, new markets and communities to engage, contribute and share its specialist knowledge, training and education.

LEADERSHIP, COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT

AFTRS will continue to collaborate with industry across a full range of education, research and training activities and assist industry to meet its skills requirements, as well as support its activities and events.

PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

AFTRS will manage and optimise the use of its resources by encouraging a productive and accountable environment.

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EDUCATE AND CREATE AFTRS will continue to provide an outstanding education in screen arts and broadcasting through practice-oriented learning that is distinctive for its quality, focus on creativity and delivery through innovative methods.

AFTRS is recognised as a world leader in educating and training creative individuals across a range of disciplines. It remains the only Australian institution to be included in the list of the top fifteen international film schools, compiled by The Hollywood Reporter in 2014.

AFTRS provides many opportunities for individuals to pursue lifelong learning and professional development in the screen arts and broadcast industries, including merit-selected Award course programs and non-award short courses and training through the Open Program.

AWARD COURSE PROGRAM

The AFTRS Award course program provides collaborative and practice-oriented teaching and learning. The education experience is distinctive. This is due to the professional and educational expertise of teaching staff and its technical resources and links with industry. As a result it develops creativity, capacity for problem solving, critical thinking and enquiry in its students.

Central to the School’s philosophy is the development of conceptual thinking coupled with applied practice. Students engage in all aspects of the experiential learning cycle: learning concepts; planning and preparing for practical projects; experimenting in many aspects of practice and then reflecting, interpreting and making connections.

The current AFTRS Award course program was established in 2009 and consists of three levels: undergraduate, postgraduate specialisation and masters level education.

Undergraduate

• Foundation Diploma - fundamentals in specialist areas delivered in a manner that allows students to combine work and study

Postgraduate

• Graduate Certificates: fundamentals in specialist areas of screen arts delivered to allow students to combine work and study • Graduate Diplomas: professional creative practice in screen arts and broadcasting specialisations

Masters

• Master of Screen Arts: masters level combining course work and research for screen arts practitioners • Master of Screen Arts and Business: leadership for executives and entrepreneurs in screen arts and business

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FOUNDATION DIPLOMA: INTRODUCTION TO CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

The Foundation Diploma is a one-year generalist course in screen arts designed to develop curiosity, creativity, imagination, and general cinematic and interactive storytelling skills. Teaching is conducted through a series of practical and ideas-based workshop cycles and is accompanied by grounding in professional practice, which provides students the opportunity to make projects, individually or with fellow students.

The Foundation Diploma comprises nine workshops: 1. Character, Performance and Script 2. Creating Experiences 3. Observation and Research 4. Story and Audience 5. Designing Worlds 6. Emotional Noise 7. Image 8. Juxtaposition and Rhythm 9. Professional Practice

All students undertaking the Foundation Diploma in 2013 successfully graduated in December and twelve students were accepted into the Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program.

These twelve graduates undertook three-month paid internships with the following subscription channels and platforms: Foxtel, FOX SPORTS, BBC Worldwide, Disney Channel, Aurora Community Channel, SBS Subscription TV, Discovery Networks, TVSN & Expo Channel, Nickelodeon and ASTRA itself. Since the commencement of the ASTRA Graduate Program in 2011, 41 Foundation Diploma graduates have received internships and twenty-six have accepted ongoing employment.

The aim of the ASTRA Graduate Program is to provide opportunities for the most creative, skilled and motivated students to be exposed to, and trained in, the subscription television sector. Now in its fourth year, the Program continues to provide a great opportunity for students to enter the industry.

Foundation graduates, Nicky D’Arcy and Jacob Abi-Arrange participated in the ASTRA 2011 and 2012 programs respectively. Both have subsequently secured full-time positions as producers with FOX SPORTS Australia. Nick D’Arcy has since accepted a senior Promotions Producer role at Channel Nine and 2013 graduate Bianca Benussi secured a full-time position in Programming and Scheduling with the Walt Disney Company, Australia.

Since graduating in 2011, Rachel Argall has accrued eight producing credits and in 2014 won Best Australian Animation at the WOW Film Festival for Iron Hands which she wrote, produced, animated and directed.

2011 graduates, Aragorn Fenton and Nicholas Lever, secured full-time producer and VFX roles, respectively with The Precinct Studios and have produced music videos for artists such as Jessica Mauboy, Ricki Lee, and Flume.

Foundation 2010 graduates Brooke Horne, Holly Bennett and Laura Nagy, have had ongoing assistant director roles on international studio films such as T he Great Gatsby, Wolverine and Unbroken and on the Australian television drama Redfern Now. Laura is currently working as an assistant director on the feature film Gods of Egypt and Brooke was the Assistant Director on I am Emmanuelle.

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Since graduating in 2009, Erin Good and Taylor Litton-Strain have enjoyed success with a string of nominations and awards for their films including Abbie which screened in eight festivals locally and in USA, and won four awards. The film was acquired by Qantas for inflight entertainment and screened at the Australian Museum as part of Jurassic Lounge. This year Erin’s latest AFTRS student film The Wonderful gained Official Selection into the Montreal World Film Festival 2014 and LA Shorts Fest 2014. It was also nominated for an Australian Director's Guild Award. In 2013 Erin and Taylor’s film My Mother Her Daughter was nominated for an Australian Production Design Guild Award and won the Australian Cinematographer's Society Silver Award.

In October 2013, Shine Australia launched a six-month paid Graduate Program offered exclusively to AFTRS Foundation Diploma graduates. Foundation Diploma graduate Luke Davis was granted an internship and worked across a range of departments, including post-production, Shine 360 (Shine's brand management and licensing arm), development, casting and publicity, as well as productions such as The Voice and The Bachelor. The program has been a great success and will continue in 2014.

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE: FUNDAMENTALS IN SPECIALIST SKILLS

The Graduate Certificate program is designed for those who wish to develop skills in an area of specialisation and, due to work or other commitments, prefer to study part-time. Students collaborate with their peers through cross-disciplinary exercises.

The Graduate Certificates offered in 2014 were:

• Graduate Certificate in Cinematography Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Costume Design * • Graduate Certificate in Directing Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Documentary Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Editing Drama * • Graduate Certificate in Screen Culture * • Graduate Certificate in Screen Music • Graduate Certificate in Screenwriting Fundamentals

(* These courses did not proceed in 2014 due to a lack of appropriately qualified applicants.)

GRADUATE DIPLOMA: INTENSIVE PROFESSIONAL CREATIVE PRACTICE

The Graduate Diploma program is aimed at experienced industry practitioners who show promise in a specialist discipline. The training provided is through a conceptual and intensive practice-oriented program and aims to develop, challenge and extend students’ existing skills. The principles of storytelling, skills development, collaboration and screen business characterise the Graduate Diploma courses.

The Graduate Diploma includes a series of exercises and workshops that increase cross-disciplinary work, and encourage greater experimentation and risk-taking.

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The Graduate Diplomas offered in 2014 were:

• Graduate Diploma in Cinematography • Graduate Diploma in Directing • Graduate Diploma in Documentary • Graduate Diploma in Editing • Graduate Diploma in Producing • Graduate Diploma in Production Design • Graduate Diploma in Radio • Graduate Diploma in Screen Business • Graduate Diploma in Screen Music • Graduate Diploma in Sound - Post Production • Graduate Diploma in Sound - Location Recording * • Graduate Diploma in Screenwriting

(*This course did not proceed in 2014 due to a lack of appropriately qualified applicants.)

RADIO

In 2013 AFTRS offered a Graduate Diploma in Radio for the first time. This one-year, full-time course is highly practical and intensive, and prepares students to work in both the commercial and public broadcasting sectors by covering all key aspects of radio broadcasting.

The course focuses on the development of each student’s ability to create and deliver compelling, innovative content for radio and, increasingly, other digital platforms.

The course is structured around a series of four pop-up radio stations that are managed by the students. Towards the end of the year, all students participate in an internship program with radio stations in regional and capital city markets. This program provides a significant pathway into employment for radio graduates. Most students who graduated in 2013, with the Graduate Diploma in Radio, are employed in the commercial and public broadcasting sectors across Australia, including Wagga Wagga, Alice Springs, Bega, Kalgoorlie, Darwin, Gold Coast, Port Pirie and Sydney.

MASTER'S PROGRAMS: LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION

The courses at Masters level represent the pinnacle of the School’s offerings. They are aimed at the most creative initiators and originators and provide the opportunity for advanced exploration and learning in both creative practice and related conceptual thinking.

Master of Screen Arts (MSA)

Students selected for the course have an opportunity to apply a high level of autonomy, innovative thinking, imaginative ingenuity and expert judgement in the development and realisation of a project, whilst refining their specialist, theoretical and conceptual skills through course work and practical exercises. Students are challenged to take risks in their ideas and approach, and to achieve a high level of creative excellence.

Students may specialise in directing (drama or documentary), screenwriting, producing, production design, cinematography, sound design, screen music, editing or animation. Alternatively they may choose to work across disciplines such as writing and directing, or directing and cinematography.

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Master of Screen Arts and Business (MSAB)

The MSAB has three core objectives. It aims to recognise the new generation of leaders who have demonstrated their talent and established a solid footing in the media and screen content industries. It also aims to teach them high-level skills in leadership, management, finance and persuasion and address gaps in their knowledge base not adequately covered in their prior training or work experience. Finally, it provides a hub to network with peers and with mentors in leadership positions.

The course equips students to fully participate in the financial aspects of any project; developing the expertise to scrutinise a financial proposition and reconstruct it, understand financial modelling and communicate financial information to stakeholders. It also provides opportunities to develop connections with industry leaders, policy makers and fellow students. Such connections may form the basis of a lifelong professional network.

ACADEMIC BOARD

In October 2013, Council member and Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts, Robyn Ewing from the University of Sydney, was appointed Chair of the Academic Board. She joining higher education specialists, Dr Graham Hendry, (Senior Lecturer, Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney) and Mr Graham Forsyth, (Associate Dean, Academic, University of NSW Art and Design) Other members of the Board are the CEO, the Director of Education and the Head of Policy and Governance at AFTRS.

The Academic Board provides robust and arm’s-length review of Award course education activities relating to curriculum development and student progress. The Academic Board endorsed the list of 2013 graduands for approval by Council; and approved the structure, graduate attributes, course aims, subject aims and descriptors for the forthcoming Bachelor of Arts (Screen), and the courses and subject learning outcomes for the new Specialist Program courses to be introduced in 2015.

The Academic Board met four times in 2013-14.

TEACHING DIVISIONS

The Screen Division, headed by the Director of Screen and supported by the Deputy Director, Course Convenors and Heads of Department, continued to deliver the Foundation Diploma, Graduate Diplomas, Graduate Certificates, the Master of Screen Arts and the Master of Screen Arts and Business. In 2014, the Screen Division worked closely with the Education Division and the CEO to develop the new Bachelor of Arts (Screen) curriculum for implementation in 2015.

The Specialist Division was established in November 2013 to develop a program of narrowly focused, skills based, specialist courses in Film, Radio, Design, Editing, Factual, Music, Producing and Screenwriting. Courses will be offered in Semester 1 of 2015 at three levels: Introductory, Diploma and Advanced Diploma.

In November 2013, the Radio Division was merged with the Specialist Division. As a result the Specialist Division delivered the Graduate Diploma in Radio in 2014.

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EDUCATION DIVISION

The Education Division is responsible for the quality assurance of academic processes, including the development and review of curriculum; the professional development of teachers; the management of student administration and the provision of student academic and welfare support.It also ensures that all education activities meet the regulatory and compliance requirements of the tertiary education sector, including reporting of institutional data.

The Education Division has been engaged in the development of the new School curriculum of a Bachelor of Arts (Screen) and the courses offered in the Specialist Program. The BA (Screen) involved extensive research, consultation and discussion in subject development committees, comprising the CEO, industry contributors, AFTRS academic staff and education specialists. This has ensured a scholarly and robust approach to the BA (Screen) curriculum design, underpinned by the School’s highly specialist screen expertise and knowledge, and evidenced in the high standard of course documentation.

The inclusion of both internal staff and external industry members in this consultative approach also underpins the development of the Specialist Program, which will deliver specialist skills and training at the sub-degree level in 2015. Some of these courses— diplomas and advanced diplomas—are designed to be delivered fully or partially online to ensure wide access for student participation around the country.

The design of the new curriculum meets the requirements of the Australian Qualifications Framework and the Threshold Standards of the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011.

The Education Division is responsible for professional development of teachers, and for providing academic and pastoral support to students. These two aspects of support are important factors in enabling students to meet their learning outcomes and to ensure the School delivers a quality education experience. Professional development activities for teachers have focused on assessment from moderation to late submissions; student academic support including giving feedback; adopting a new academic referencing system (APA 6th Edition); and student academic literacy and resources.

EDUCATIONAL COMPLIANCE

The Education Division is responsible for ensuring the School’s core business of teaching and learning complies with all relevant legislation, guidelines and regulations in respect of higher education. This includes compliance with the Higher Education Support Act 2003, the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011, and the Australian Qualifications Framework. AFTRS complied with all reporting requirements to the Department of Education, providing Student Data enrolments, Student and Course Completions, FEE-HELP estimates, Student Data Submissions and Course and Campus Data. It also completed all required verification activities and reported all relevant data through the Provider Information Request to TEQSA.

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STUDENT CENTRE The Student Centre is responsible for the administration of all student-related matters, including applications, enrolment, and graduation.The Student Centre coordinates support services for students, including academic and welfare support; provides information and advice to prospective applicants and current students, and administers the Student Management System. It is also responsible for the integrity and security of academic transcripts and testamurs.

APPLICATIONS, ENROLMENTS AND COMPLETIONS

The allocation of places in Award courses is competitive and based on merit selection. Applicants must complete the published application tasks and meet the selection criteria for consideration of their application to be offered a place in that course.

Applications for entry to the 2014 academic year opened on 1 September 2013 and closed on 1 November 2013, following an extensive period of recruitment activities, including Open Days, attendance at Education & Career Expos (in several states) and the distribution of a promotional publication inserted in national newspapers and street press. Each year the School also advertises in specialist industry publications, websites, on social media and in e-newsletters in order to reach the widest pool of potential applicants.

On September 7 and 8 2013, 1,350 people attended AFTRS Open Days. Potential applicants to the School were able to obtain relevant information about the courses they were interested in applying for, as well as an overview of the School and its facilities.

APPLICATION, ENROLMENT & COMPLETION DATA

COURSE (LEVEL) 2014 ACADEMIC YEAR

Applications (with Creative Portfolios)

Enrolments

Foundation Diploma 147 46

Graduate Certificate 203 59

Graduate Diploma 259 110

Masters 63 22

Total new - 237

Total continuing - 26

TOTAL 672 263

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GRADUATION 2013

The 2013 Graduation ceremony was held on-site at the Entertainment Quarter; one of the largest events of its kind hosted by the School. It was attended by 600 family and friends of the graduating students. The Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, Minister for Communications and Member for Wentworth, delivered the keynote address on behalf of the Senator, the Hon. George Brandis QC, Minister for the Arts (For a list of 2013 graduates, see Appendix 3.)

The honorary degree of a Master of Arts, Film and Television was awarded to the director, Phillip Noyce. He was a student in 1973, the inaugural year of AFTRS, and graduated the following year. His career as a director commenced with the feature film Backroads (1977), followed by Newsfront (1978) which won Australian Film Institute awards for Best Film, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. His continued exemplary contribution to local and international cinema include the features Dead Calm (1989); Patriot Games (1992); Clear and Present Danger (1994); The Quiet American (2002) and Salt (2010).

Phillip’s Rabbit-Proof Fence about the journey of three Aboriginal girls who run away from a white mission and walk the 1500 miles home, achieved great acclaim and won the AFI Award for Best Film in 2002. In 2011, Phillip directed and executive produced the ABC (US) pilot Revenge, followed by Americana in 2012.

He joins a select group of eminent Australian film and television practitioners including Darren Dale, John Edwards, Dr George Miller, Baz Luhrmann, Jan Chapman and John Doyle, to be awarded the AFTRS honorary degree.

Over the weekend of December 7 and 8, 2013 the graduate showcase program screened 84 films from the following course levels: 24 Foundation Diploma; 37 Graduate Diploma; 15 Graduate Certificate, and eight from the Master of Screen Arts. Student films were also available for viewing online via a password protected viewing portal— providing industry members and others with the opportunity to view student work, at their convenience.

GRADUATE ACHIEVEMENTS

Graduates of the School continue to make a significant mark in national and international arenas. In 2014, Jane Campion was the Jury President at the Cannes Film Festival and her mini-series, Top of the Lake was nominated for two Emmy Awards: Outstanding Direction for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special, and Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special. The latter nomination was shared with graduate Gerard Lee (1982, Scriptwriting Extension). Top of the Lake also won Best Tele-feature or Miniseries at the 2014 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards (AACTA), and episode five won Best Cinematography and Best Sound In Television.

AFTRS supports its students by profiling and promoting their films to national and international film awards and festivals and pursuing other public screening opportunities.

This year, 33 recent AFTRS student films were selected for screening at 31 festivals, a total of 69 screenings. Highlights include 11 films selected for competition at the St Kilda Film Festival in Melbourne and five selected for competition at the Palm Springs International Shortfest in the USA. Details of student film awards and screenings are listed on the following pages:

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• Melissa Anastasi (Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) won Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards for her film By This River , which was also screened at the BUFF Film Festival 2014 (Malmo, Sweden), the Buster International Film Festival for Children (Denmark), Flickerfest and St Kilda Film Festival.

• Philip Charles (Graduate Diploma in Cinematography 2012) won a Bronze Award for Depths at the 2013 Australian Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Siobhan Costigan’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) documentary short, How the Light Gets In was selected as one of five winners (from 1,500 entries from 80 countries) at the 2013 Heartland Film Festival (an Academy-Award qualifying festival) in the Documentary Short category. Her film, Freak was also accepted into the St Kilda Film Festival.

• Bonnie Elliot (Cinematography 2006) won the Miller Australia Award for Best Cinematography in an Australian Short Film at Flickerfest for Perception.

• Lucy Gaffy (Master of Screen Arts 2012) was nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards for The Fence, which was also screened in the World Cinema section of the Busan International Film Festival in Korea, at Flickerfest 2014, and the Human Rights Arts & Film Festival in Melbourne.

• Ross Giardina (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2009) won a Bronze Award for Gödel, Incomplete at the Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards (Fictional Drama Shorts category).

• Erin Good’s (Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) film The Wonderful was nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards.

• Maziar Lahooti (Master of Screen Arts 2012) won the award for Best Direction - Short Form for Heaven at the 2013 WA Screen Awards. The film also received the award for Best Performance by an Actor for Wayne Davis.

• Lucas Li’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) film Horrie was highly commended in the category of Best Short Documentary Film at Flickerfest.

• Jack McAvoy (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2012) was awarded a Silver Award for All God’s Creatures at the 2013 Australian Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Brendon McDonall (Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) has collected several awards for All God’s Creatures including: Best Narrative at BeFilm, Underground Film Festival in New York, Best Short Film and Best Director at Mardi Gras Festival in Sydney and Best Film at West End Film Festival, Brisbane. All God’s Creatures was selected for screening at Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA, Flickerfest, Melbourne Queer Film Festival, Nashville Film Festival and St.Kilda Film Festival. His film Chicom also screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Laura Murray (Graduate Diploma Production Design 2012) won the AFTRS Award for Student Design for Spirit Harbour at the 2013 Australian Production Design Guild Awards.

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• Miranda Nation (Graduate Diploma in Directing [Fiction & Non-Fiction] 2010) and Lyn Norfor (Graduate Diploma in Screen Business 2010) were nominated for Best Short Fiction Film for Perception at 2014 AACTA. The film also screened at Clermont-Ferrand 36th International Short Film Festival, France 2014.

• Goldie Soetianto (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2013) won a Gold Award for her work on Jackey, Jackey, and a Silver Award for her work on Eric in the student category at the Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Joseph Twist (2010 Graduate Certificate Screen Music) won the Professional Development Award from the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) allowing him to spend the year studying in New York.

• Caitlin Yeo (2003 Graduate Diploma in Screen Composition) won Best Music for a Feature Film at the Australasian Performing Rights Association/Australian Guild of Screen Composers Screen Music Awards, and Best Music at the Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards for The Rocket.

• Warwick Young’s (Master of Screen Arts 2013) Stuffed was nominated at the Dendy Awards (Sydney Film Festival) for Best Short Film, the Rouben Mamoulian Award for Best Director and Best Short Screenplay Award. It was also nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards.

• Breathe (Vincent Lamberti, Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2012) was selected for the Student Etudes Competition at Camerimage, an International Film Festival in Poland. It also screened at the St.Kilda Film Festival, Melbourne.

• Clan (Larissa Behrendt, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) was selected for Frameline, San Francisco USA.

• Corinna (Hollie Fifer, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) screened at the Antenna Documentary Festival in Sydney.

• Embrace (George-Alex Nagle, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) screened at the Sydney Film Festival 2014.

• Eric (Andrew Lee, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) was selected for screening at Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA

• The Fort (D’arcy Foley-Dawson, Graduate Diploma Directing, 2012) screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Fruit (Madeleine Parker, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) was accepted into Maryland Film Festival, USA and St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Gödel, Incomplete (Martha Goddard, Master of Screen Arts 2012, Lisa Hoppe, Master of Screen Arts 2012) screened at CineGlobe Geneva, Cinequest USA, Worldfest in Housten USA and at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• I Am Emmanuel (Genevieve Clay-Smith, Master of Screen Arts 2013) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA

• Into The Streets (Logan Mucha, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) was accepted into St.Kilda Film Festival

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• Kit (Adam Rosenberg, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) screened at the Antenna Documentary Festival in Sydney.

• Like Breathing (Liz Cooper, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA.

• The Misfortune of Others (Mat Govoni, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• The Orchard (Laura Scrivano, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) screened at the St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Switch on the Night (Alejandra Canales, Master of Arts Documentary 2006) was invited to screen at the 1001 Documentary Festival in Turkey.

• Kharisma directed by Shannon Murphy ( Graduate Diploma Directing, 2012) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest USA.

AFTRS alumni were also recognised by government agencies in funding and support decision:

• Screen Australia has financed development for Hollie Fifer’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) feature documentary, The Opposition (originally developed at AFTRS).

• Liz McCarthy’s (2012 Diploma Documentary) project Boom (developed at AFTRS) was selected by Thomas Mai’s (Screen Australia financed) documentary financing initiative to become one of the largest crowd source campaigns in Australia.

• Sophie Weisner (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) received development funding from the ABC for her documentary Call Me Dad.

NON-AWARD COURSES

AFTRS targets both new and traditional markets for education and training in screen arts and broadcasting through the design and delivery of short courses. All courses are taught by industry professionals and take place at AFTRS campus in Sydney or at partner venues across the country. Courses range from general interest and introductory workshops to intensive master classes for industry professionals.

AFTRS works directly with industry professionals and organisations to ensure that its short courses are up to date and relevant to industry practice. It partners with industry guilds and bodies to provide targeted programs and is increasing its online offerings to be able to extend its reach. In 2013-14, 289 non-award courses were run for 5,023 participants. Additionally courses were designed and delivered for nine industry organisations.

AFTRS has also developed business opportunities by providing tailored programs to corporate and government clients. This activity is gaining momentum.

AFTRS delivered a tailored Radio School program of 650 sessions for Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink for over 3,200 participants.

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Non-award Courses Target Actual

Total number of non-award courses

250 289

Total number of non-award enrolments

4,750 5,023

Non-award courses by program unit

Number of Courses Number of Enrolments

Industry Program 77 1,280

National Program 14 335

Television Unit 99 1,052

Schools 60 1,704

Children’s 39 652

Industry and National Programs

AFTRS delivers quality short course training to both emerging and established industry professionals. The Industry Program continues to grow and offer training for all levels of professionals wanting to stay current, learn new skills and hear from industry experts.

Industry Program courses cover radio, film, emerging platforms, and all discipline areas including editing and cinematography. Highlights this year include Finding Animation, featuring key creators from Pixar, and Developing a Television Series with Ellen Sandler, both run in Sydney and Melbourne, as well as Masterclass in Narrative Comedy with Tim Ferguson. Additionally, Summer and Winter Schools were run during Award course holiday periods.

The School works with state film agencies to provide training specifically for industry practitioners in their state. During the reporting period the School worked with the South Australian Film Corporation to run a screen business program over a nine-month period. Other popular courses nationally were television writing, feature film screenwriting, introductory producing, as well as a Marketing Boot Camp run in Grafton, NSW.

Television Unit

The TV Unit develops and delivers a range of short courses to meet the needs of the non-fiction television production sector. Courses range from entry-level introductory courses through to technical and specialist operational offerings. The TV Unit is now well-established as the ‘go to’ place for factual TV training and fosters excellent relationships with broadcasters and production companies. It provides quality courses that attract both repeat and new clients to AFTRS. Improvements and innovations made to course offerings ensure that AFTRS training is at the forefront of the ever-changing television industry.

The Unit has continued its dialogue with broadcasters, major production companies and independent practitioners through regular meetings and through the monthly TV

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Industry event, TV Talks. This year, ten TV Talks sessions were run and attracted 839 attendees.

Many new courses were introduced this year, including Creating and Producing TV Formats, and Legal Essentials. In addition, the Unit hosted a Branded Content seminar in October 2013. The TV Unit invites specialist content makers to run one-off seminars to ensure the currency of its educational offerings.

As well as running the regular program of short courses, the TV Unit also devised and delivered tailored training for the China-based company Shanghai Media Group, in factual TV production and post-production for 24 of their employees.

Schools and Children Program This year, the Schools and Children Program significantly increased participation in school holiday programs and school groups visiting throughout the year. Courses are designed to be delivered either at AFTRS or offsite at primary and secondary schools. Feedback for the program continues to be very positive with increasing repeat bookings. Additional courses have been developed and delivered over the past year in response to requests from regular participants wanting to further advance their skills.

The Schools’ Advisory Committee continue to provide expert advice on course offerings, curriculum content, the framework for the primary and secondary schools program, school holiday programs, and programs for teachers.

INDIGENOUS PROGRAM

The Indigenous Program educates the next generation of Indigenous storytellers through film, television, digital media and radio courses. This can be through workshops specially developed for specific Indigenous communities or through subsidies for Indigenous students in existing Open Program short courses.

Indigenous workshops are subsidised and supported by AFTRS as part of its commitment to providing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to develop skills in screen arts and broadcasting. In 2013-14, a total of 204 Indigenous participants attended seventeen Indigenous Program workshops with an additional 93 Indigenous students receiving subsidies to attend existing Open short courses.

The programs for Indigenous communities included workshops in digital storytelling, claymation, writing television series, scriptwriting, acting for screen, lighting, interviewing, and editing skills. These were held in Wellington (NSW), Port Lincoln (SA), Wagga Wagga (NSW), Roebourne (WA), Darwin (NT), Thursday Island (Torres Strait), Lismore (NSW) and Hermannsburg (NT). Three-day radio workshops on announcing, presenting and radio packaging were held in Townsville (QLD) and Roebourne (WA).

AFTRS engaged with strategic partners to deliver tailored courses for diverse communities. In June 2014, partnerships with Screen Queensland in Brisbane and Cairns, as well as UMI Arts in Cairns, delivered introductory screenwriting courses. In August 2013, AFTRS worked with Foxtel and Screenworks Northern Rivers to deliver a writing television series workshop for emerging writers, led by John Bell (series writer Gods of Wheat Street). In Sydney, AFTRS worked with the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence to conduct digital storytelling workshops for young adults.

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In December 2013, the Indigenous Program delivered an Acting for Television workshop to facilitate Indigenous stage actors to transition to screen acting roles. 'Facing the Machine' was facilitated by Redfern Now director Adrian Wills and actor Andrew MacFarlane, with masterclasses conducted by actors David Field and Claudia Karvan. Fourteen actors attended the workshop and learnt many aspects of acting for television, which culminated in filming and screening scenes from Underbelly, Six Feet Under, Redfern Now and Breaking Bad.

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ENGAGEMENT AND PARTICIPATION AFTRS will reach out to cultural organisations and institutions, the regions, new markets and communities to engage, contribute and share its specialist knowledge, training and education.

AFTRS continues to strengthen connections and forge new programs and partnerships across the cultural and industry sectors of screen arts and broadcasting in order to provide opportunities for students and the general public to engage with leading creative and entrepreneurial practitioners and screen content.

CULTURAL AND INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

The School has developed unique partnerships to further its objectives, and create new educational opportunities for its Award students and strengthen industry engagement. Each year, strategic partners are engaged to provide assistance in the provision of non Award courses:

• Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) - The ASTRA Graduate Program is a partnership established in 2010 where ASTRA offers three-month internships to selected Foundation Diploma graduates with subscription television channels. This year, ASTRA offered internships to 12 graduates.

• National Institute of Dramatic Arts (NIDA) - an educational partnership where AFTRS Graduate Diploma students work closely with NIDA acting and design students in annual collaborative workshops.

• Screen Australia - AFTRS has partnered with Screen Australia on a range of initiatives, including the producer’s placement scheme. Through the Talent Escalator Program, Helen Burak (2013 Graduate Diploma in Producing) completed an internship with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group in Los Angeles.

• Commercial Radio Australia (CRA) - AFTRS partners with CRA to deliver to a three-day residential conference on site. The School also provides two online courses for the commercial radio sector.

• Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) - AFTRS partners with ACMI to deliver 32 sessions of Friday on My Mind in Melbourne.

• South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC) partnered with the Open Program to deliver a screen business program for industry practitioners over a nine-month period.

• The Indigenous Program engaged partners Screen Queensland, UMI Arts (QLD), Foxtel, Screenworks Northern Rivers and the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence to assist in the delivery of tailored screenwriting and digital storytelling courses for Indigenous participants.

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FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

Through a program of strategic and cultural alliances, AFTRS curates and presents discussions on many areas of screen arts and broadcast production. These public events increase AFTRS engagement in broader cultural activities and promote awareness and appreciation of Australian screen arts and broadcasting.

In October 2013, the CEO was invited by the Governor of South Australia to attend the opening night of the Adelaide Film Festival and the premiere of the feature film Tracks . AFTRS sponsored a well-attended event with the film’s key creatives, producer Emile Sherman and director John Curran. Robyn Davidson, and photographer Rick Smolan were interviewed by Margaret Pomeranz.

In 2014, at the Sydney Writer’s Festival, AFTRS hosted a session titled 'Adapt or Die: Small Start, Global Finish' with guest writers Hannah Kent and Graeme Simsion, and producer Ian Collie. In 2014, a Friday On My Mind session was again run in partnership with the Sydney Film Festival (SFF). Hosted at the Festival Hub by AFTRS Head of Documentary, Rachel Landers, Indian director and screenwriter Pan Nalin discussed his documentary, Faith Connections. AFTRS also ran two other sessions at the SFF: Giles Hardie moderated 'Action, Romance, Silliness: The Good, the Bad, the Cringeworthy', a session on genre movies with guests Matilda Brown, Dave Wade and Chris Taylor; and Iranian-American filmmaker, Desiree Akhavan was in conversation with Dee Jefferson, about her first feature Appropriate Behavior, which she wrote, directed and starred in.

In 2013-14 AFTRS partnered with or supported the following professional and cultural organisations:

• Antenna Documentary Film Festival • Australian Centre for the Moving Image • Australian Directors Guild • Australian Cinematographers Society • Australian International Documentary Conference • Australian Production Design Guild • Australian Screen Sound Guild • Australian Writers' Guild • Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association • Australian Teachers of Media • Byron Bay Writers’ Festival • Colourfest Film Festival • Commercial Radio Australia • Foxtel • Human Rights Arts and Film Festival • Melbourne International Film Festival • Melbourne Writers’ Festival • National Centre for Indigenous Excellence • National Film and Sound Archive • National Institute of Dramatic Art • Persian Film Festival • Screen Australia • Screen Queensland • Screen Music Awards • Screenworks Northern Rivers • South Australian Film Corporation • St. Kilda Film Festival • Sydney Film Festival

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• Sydney Writers’ Festival • UMI Arts (QLD) • WOW (World of Women’s) Film Festival

PUBLIC PROGRAM

The Public Program at AFTRS provides a diverse collection of events open to students, staff, industry and the general public that provide a free opportunity to engage and participate in the cultural life of the screen and broadcast sector.

Friday on My Mind continues to successfully draw audiences keen to learn from the unique perspectives and insights of creative practitioners involved in many aspects of film, television and digital media production.

Running for its seventh year in Sydney, and the third year in Melbourne, sessions continued weekly with the support of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. In 2013-14, Friday on My Mind had an attendance of 3,129 across 50 sessions.

AFTRS records and publishes transcripts of Friday on My Mind sessions in its journal, LUMINA, which is accessible as a hard copy journal,a free ebook from the iTunes store, or as seperate articles on the AFTRS website.

Continuing to prove popular and relevant is the monthly TV Talks program, launched in 2012 .TV Talks is an opportunity for industry professionals to discuss industry-relevant issues and provide a networking opportunity. This year ten sessions were hosted focusing on issues from ratings and multi-channelling, to the specifics of developing comedy and factual content for the small screen. Leading television professionals from commercial, public sector, and subscription TV networks as well as many production companies spoke at these sessions and over 830 individuals attended these events, many visiting AFTRS for the first time.

In 2013, AFTRS partnered with the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) to program classic cinema screenings. Reel Sundays was a twelve-week season of classic films screened in the AFTRS Theatre, made possible through accessing the NFSA’s non-theatrical Lending Collection. The season ran from September 15 to December 1, 2013.

For more details, see Public Program: Appendix 5.

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LEADERSHIP, COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT

AFTRS will continue to collaborate with industry across the range of education, research and training activities and assist industry to meet its skills requirements, and to support its activities and events

AFTRS demonstrates leadership in the cultural and industry sector by engaging, collaborating and supporting a range of activities and events as well as by creating an industry hub where practitioners and professionals, along with students, staff and alumni, can network, create and develop projects. AFTRS also provides valuable resources for the sector’s artistic and educational endeavours through the publication of a screen journal, the Jerzy Toeplitz Library and access to its Moore Park campus.

LUMINA

LUMINA, now in its sixth year of publication, is AFTRS’ screen arts and business journal, the only publication of its kind in Australia. LUMINA contributes to the diversity and complexity of the Australian screen and broadcast industries by commissioning and publishing challenging discourse on significant issues.

In November 2013 AFTRS published edition 12: Television. Going, Going…Where? This issue of LUMINA presents interviews and reflections from the television industry's leading thinkers and practitioners on the future of television, including its challenges, threats and opportunities.

Co-edited by Denise Eriksen and Sandra Levy, contributors include Adam Turner, Ross Coulthart, Bruce Meagher, Rick Ellis and Dario Russo.

CREATIVE FELLOWSHIP

Now in its fifth year, the AFTRS Creative Fellowship continues to reward daring and adventurous creative practice. Creative Fellows enjoy a special relationship with the School, with AFTRS providing support for their projects whenever resources are available. The Creative Fellows give back to the School in the presentation of their final work, and through a report on what they have learned during the creative process.

In 2014, 68 creative professionals applied for a Fellowship. These applications were reviewed by the selection panel in May. Applicants were asked to submit a proposal that met the brief, “adventurous in its aims, bold in its ambition, and innovative in its execution”. The panel found the standard of applicants to be very high and awarded two Creative Fellowships of $50,000 to emerging filmmakers: • Amiel Courtin-Wilson for Aether, a docu-drama short film about the legendary avant-

garde pianist, Cecil Taylor • Melissa Anastasi for Sleepwalking, a short film which, through the story of a boy and his parents in an isolated landscape, explores questions about the world as we perceive it, and the world that exists beyond our perception.

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RESEARCH

Through its research activities, AFTRS undertakes scholarly work and industry analysis to progress topical issues of importance to the screen arts and broadcasting sector.

In 2013-14, AFTRS commissioned and published the following occasional papers:

• The Case for Creating an Australian Copyright Registry by Professor Michael Fraser and Head of Screen Business, David Court, and

• Beyond The Great Wall: Pathways to Australia / China Co-Productions written by Mario Andreacchio and edited by David Court.

In 2013-14, AFTRS staff delivered the following papers:

• Do Your Students Have a Clue? The Alternate Reality Game as Pedagogical Tool by Catherine Gleeson, Convenor Foundation Diploma and Marty Murphy, Lecturer Foundation Diploma, presented at the Australian Screen Production Education & Research Association Conference;

• The Academic Video Essay by Matthew Campora, Screen Studies Lecturer presented at the Australian Screen Production Education & Research Association Conference;

• Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines by guest Sound Lecturer, Andrew Belletty, presented at the UNSW Postgraduate Research Conference;

• Love, Death, Film and Music, presented by Head of Screen Music, Martin Armiger at the Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film (University for Television and Film) as part of the Berlin Transmediale Festival; and later at the artist academy, Takt Projektraum as part of their workshop program, and

• Engage or Perish: Talk Radio’s Future, presented by Director of Radio, Mark Collier at the RadioAsia Conference in Hanoi.

LIBRARY

The Library is one of the most comprehensive screen arts and broadcast sector resources in Australia. It services staff and students as well as members of the industry and general public for study and research purposes.

The Library continues to evolve into a flexible and multi-platform discovery centre and to assist the School’s educational and research needs across Award and Open Program courses. Comprising six areas, the 2014-2017 strategy is formulated to address the information needs of AFTRS' diverse community through addressing Relevance and Responsiveness; Empowerment and Information Literacy; Capability and Resourcing; Screen and Broadcast Sector’s Information Requirements; Technology and Innovation; and Marketing and Current Awareness.

Subscriptions to information provider Informit, which harvests Australian publications, and the aggregator Ebscohost that comprises a suite of international databases and publications, considerably expanded the Library collection. These licences, together with the streaming of over 300 films and documentaries through the service providers

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Kanopy and Beamafilm, support and enhance the academic and scholarly standing of AFTRS at the same time allowing Library patrons to access these resources remotely. As part of its Information Literacy focus, the Library initiated the roll-out of the bibliographic management software Mendeley, to enhance academic rigour at AFTRS.

This year, the Library initiated a marketing campaign to increase its membership base from the screen and broadcast sector, and the decision was made to offer this membership to the sector free of charge. As a result of these initiatives, the Library has 466 active industry members.

In 2013-14, the Library was visited 23,000 times; 44,340 items were borrowed, 331 eBooks were lent, and 183 hours of streaming vieos were screened. Thirteen seperate Libguides (subject specific e-resources), were produced, ranging in subject from the Story of Film to Sound. These resources have been well-received.

INDUSTRY HUB AND INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

AFTRS is a creative hub for the screen arts and broadcasting sector, and continued to host a significant number of events, screenings, forums and meetings this year. AFTRS policy encourages industry engagement by making its facilities available for industry activities and events free of charge, when they are not being used for educational purposes.

Industry guilds and societies, industry associations, AFTRS graduates, cultural organisations, government agencies, filmmakers, production companies and education organisations use the School’s facilities for meetings, screenings, casting sessions, conferences, master classes, workshops and equipment testing. The presence of industry in this way creates a professional environment that benefits all who work, study or visit AFTRS. (For details, see Industry Events: Appendix 6).

This environment within AFTRS is enhanced by the visit of local and international guest visitors. In 2013, screenwriter, playwright and director, David Mamet visited the School to speak to staff and students about his creative practice, ideas and storytelling. It was a wonderful opportunity for the cohort to have a conversation with such an eminent and powerful storyteller.

AFTRS employs screen arts and broadcast practitioners as teachers and lecturers for award and short courses. The teaching staff draws on their own professional experience, networks and connections with industry to ensure the currency of the courses, and to guide the development and activities of the School.

AFTRS creative campus environment also attracts leading industry members to lecture as guests in Award courses across all disciplines and in Open Program short courses. (For details, see Guest Lecturers: Appendix 7.)

Events were held at AFTRS to launch staff work; Screen Studies Lecturer, Matthew Campora’s book Subjective Realist Cinema: From Expressionism to Inception; the Occasional Paper, The Case for Creating an Australian Copyright Registry co-written by Head of Screen Business, David Court and Professor Michael Fraser, and the AFTRS commissioned White Paper: Beyond the Great Wall - Pathways to Australia-China Co-Productions by Mario Andreacchio.

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Industry Guilds and Associations

AFTRS maintains a close relationship with the relevant screen and broadcasting industry guilds, societies, and associations, and in 2013-14, staff attended the following events and award nights:

• Australian Cinematographers Society Awards: Cinematography Lecturer, Erika Addis presented the ‘Best Student Cinematography Award.’

• Australian Writers’ Guild Awards: Head of Screenwriting (Industry), Ross Grayson Bell presented the ‘Monte Miller Award for Short and Long-form Screenplays’; and Documentary Lecturer, Randall Wood was a selection panel member for Documentary Award categories.

• Australian Production Design Guild Awards: Master Screen Arts Convenor, Sarah Stollman presented the ‘AFTRS Award for Student Design.

• Australian Screen Sound Guild Awards: Head of Sound, Chris McKeith presented the award for ‘Best Sound in a Short Film’.

• South Australian Screen Awards: Head of Sound, Chris McKeith was a selection panel mentor for Sound Design.

• WOW Film Festival: Head of Producing, Andrena Finlay presented the award for ‘Best Student Film’.

The Radio Division once again held its annual seminar at AFTRS, an event that brings together more than 20 leading broadcast industry practitioners to explore issues and share work experience with the Graduate Radio Diploma students and participants in the online Commercial Radio Programming course.

DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC EVENTS

A number of activities were held that were focused around specific disciplines offered by the School. Some of these were co-hosted with industry guilds and organisations, and attended by current students, staff, industry members and potential AFTRS applicants.

• A Conversation with Roger Deakins BSC ASC, hosted by the Australian Cinematography Society and Head of Cinematography, Kim Batterham;

• Seven Doc Talks, a series of master classes hosted by Head of Documentary, Rachel Landers featuring directors, Eva Orner and Ian Darling as part of the Antenna International Documentary Festival;

• SoundByte series: Recording Ensemble Music and the Score; Sounds of Lifestyle and Reality TV; and Capturing the Sounds of Asia;

• Glories of the Score III: a Screen Music evening highlighting the music of graduates Kyls Burtland, Robert Clark, Pru Montin and Flynn Wheeler, and including a special performance by Fox Force Five;

• Sound Design, a seminar presented by Head of Sound, Chris McKeith at the Real Film Festival, Newcastle;

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• The Invisible Cut: a seminar held in conjunction with the Film Circle Critics of Australia and the Australian Screen Editor’s Guild. Head of Editing, Mark Warner hosted a panel of editors Suresh Ayyer, Katrina Baker, Roland Gallois, Lindi Harrison, Denise Haslem and Nick Meyers;

• Writing sessions delivered by Allen Palmer, Screenwriting Lecturer, titled How to Write Better Scenes, Transcendent Storytelling: What Elevates The Great Above The Good and The Character-Driven Hero's Journey;

• Finding Your Creative Voice: a creativity lab run by Nell Greenwood, A/Head of Screenwriting for potential Master of Screen Arts applicants;

• Storyworlds: Talk With Directors: hosted by Acting Head of Directing, Robert Klenner and Head of Screen Design, Igor Nay and with guests Warwick Thornton, Melinda Doring and David Caesar;

• The Magnificent Seven for Successful Producing: panel session including producers Al Clark, Helen Bowden, Jodi Matterson and Kristy Stark;

• World premiere of the TV pilot, Deadbeat Dads, introduced by Neil Peplow, Director of Screen, and Ross Grayson Bell, Head of Screenwriting (Industry), jointly hosted by MTV and AFTRS.

INTERNSHIPS, ATTACHMENTS AND EXCHANGE

AFTRS facilitates a range of diverse opportunities for students and graduates to apply for internships, attachments and seek direct work experience. In 2013-14, the School continued to develop current schemes and initiated new partnerships to extend opportunities for AFTRS’ students and graduates.

• New York University (NYU) Tisch School of the Arts: AFTRS continued its ongoing partnership with NYU that enabled a select group of NYU students to participate in the Foundation Diploma. In 2014, the fourth group of NYU students participated in the subject, Emotional Noise as well as a cultural engagement workshop.

• Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA): ASTRA continued to offer opportunities for graduates of the Foundation Diploma to apply for a three-month internship in the subscription television sector. Twelve graduates were successful in gaining an internship with a subscription television channel or platform.

• Shine Australia: In 2013, AFTRS launched a partnership with Shine Australia that provided the opportunity for Foundation Diploma graduates to apply for a six-month paid internship to gain experience across a range of departments within the company, including post-production, Shine 360 (brand management and licensing), development, casting and publicity, as well as to work on shows in production.

• Screen Australia Escalator Program: in partnership with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group, this program provides an AFTRS graduate with the opportunity to work in Los Angeles on a three-month paid internship.

• Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis-Lumière: AFTRS has a student exchange program that operates on an annual basis. In 2014, Cinematography student, Fanny Mazoyer joined the Master of Screen Arts for one semester.

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• Radio Internships: as part of the Graduate Diploma of Radio, all students complete internships prior to graduation at public, commercial or community radio stations.

• Scholarships and Awards: AFTRS has a range of awards and scholarships available for graduating students, made possible through a variety of philanthropic support including the Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent, European Union Travelling Scholarships, the A.V. Myer Indigenous Awards, the Kenneth B. Myer Award for Exceptional Talent, the Kenneth B. Myer Award for Project Development and the Shark Island Institute Documentary Award.

• AFTRS industry networks continue to provide placements for students. In 2013-14, AFTRS students had placements on the feature films Unbroken, Gods of Egypt and Wolverine.

CILECT

AFTRS is a member of CILECT (Centre International de Liaison des Ecoles de Cinéma et de Télévision) the association of the world’s major film and television schools. CILECT represents 159 specialist film schools from sixty countries, and membership is by invitation only.

In September 2013, the CEO and Director of Screen attended the annual CILECT Conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The Impact of the Digital Age in CILECT Schools’ Teaching Curricula was the Conference theme, and of particular note was the session investigating Producing/Commercialisation/Distributing/Marketing Curricula: New Formats. Dr Karen Pearlman, Head of Screen Studies presented a paper: Shaping the Film Edit: Editing, Technology and Curriculum Invited Guest.

AFTRS is also a member of CILECT’s Asia-Pacific Association (CAPA) which includes 32 film schools from 12 countries. Members are from film schools in China, India, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand. At the CAPA Conference in 2013, guest sound lecturer Andrew Belletty presented a paper: Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines.

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PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

AFTRS will manage and optimise the use of its resources by encouraging a productive and accountable environment. AFTRS manages its finances and facilities to maximise benefits for students, staff and industry and ensure the maintenance of a safe and productive work environment and the efficient and effective use of public resources.

ENHANCING WORK METHODS AND ENVIRONMENT

During the reporting period a number of reviews and measures have been implemented with the aim of simplifying process, ensuring compliance, and supporting the new educational offering to be available from 2015. A full review of policy documents is underway to ensure currency and to increase accessibility to information and policy decisions. Closely associated with this process has been a review of documentation to ensure compliance with new and amended legislation such as the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013, the Privacy Act 1988, the Fair Work Act 2009, and the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy.

The staffing structure necessary to support the 2015 course offerings has been reviewed and the new structure is in the process of being implemented. In addition, a number of changes have been made to the building including the creation of new and larger teaching spaces for the anticipated student cohort; the relocation of the Student Centre to provide easier access for potential applicants and students; the relocation of parts of Central Services to be closer to staff; and the expansion of the technical store to enable ease of access by students. The most appropriate resources for the new educational environment have been considered and resulted in, for example, the purchase of new furniture that can be used more flexibly, and a greater concentration of online resources for students.

CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT

During the period the School conducted a tender and contracted for the provision of electricity for the building from July 2014 onwards. The new contract will deliver a reduction in the electricity rate for year one of 16.8% and year two of 14.3%, compared to that contracted in 2013-2014. A two-year proposal was accepted which provides competitive pricing and budget assurance.

A closed tender was held, following wide research of the local radio industry, to upgrade the school's radio studios. The old consoles required replacement as it was no longer possible to source parts, maintenance or support services. The new consoles resolve this risk and represent a significant step forward in capability and flexibility through the use of new, advanced technologies.

In order to ensure the best use of resources, AFTRS also accesses a number of whole-of-government procurement arrangements including travel and stationery, that have delivered cost effective outcomes.

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WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

Following the introduction of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, a detailed gap analysis to ensure AFTRS complied with all legislative responsibilities was completed. During the reporting period, an audit was undertaken by the internal auditors and the School was found to comply with the legislative requirements.

A number of policies and procedures were developed or reviewed, risk assessment and mitigation processes were expanded, the online incident reporting system was enhanced, and compliance-related staff training was completed. Established systems such as the School’s Health and Safety Committee continue to ensure appropriate dissemination of information and to ensure workers remain current in their knowledge and expertise.

WORKPLACE CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION

The Chief Executive Officer held all school meetings on key strategic topics, regularly attended Divisional meetings, and issued newsletters to inform staff of current events and provide updates on key issues. The topic of workplace culture has become a standing agenda item for the Executive and considerable work completed on behaviours to reflect AFTRS values. An external anonymous ‘whistleblower’ service remains available to staff, although no reports were lodged in the reporting period.

CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

A comprehensive and consultative review of the AFTRS website resulted in the launch of a new website in March 2014. The new site is a more interactive, online space, which improves student recruitment processes, assists with external communication, and makes the entire AFTRS short film library and Alumni Project Database available.

A new intranet is being implemented, co-ordinated with the review of the School’s policy and procedural documentation. The new system will be user-focused and provide accurate, up-to-date information and internal communication across the School.

A new Client Relationship Management system has been implemented to streamline the management of short courses and provide a platform to manage ongoing contact with past and future students. The system is in place for short courses and for the recruitment phase of Award courses. Further expansion of the system is planned, which will include general marketing activities.

LIBRARY SERVICES

The key objectives of the structural review of Library Services—strategic engagement across AFTRS, curriculum integration, accessibility and digitisation—have progressed well this year, and the Library is on track to support the new educational offering in 2015. Together with opening up further access to the industry, subscriptions to international databases, publications and video streaming of screen material have effected significant advances which will support the research and academic activities of students, staff and industry. The Library initiated and managed the roll-out of, and training associated with, the bibliographic management software Mendeley, to enhance academic rigour.

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PRODUCTION RESOURCES AND VIDEO POST

AFTRS remains at the forefront of contemporary digital techniques and their implementation through its planned design and installation of new equipment and facilities. This year new grading suites were installed that considerably increased technical quality and significantly reduced grading costs. Production Resources and Video Post kept pace with both the quantity and digital demands of student productions, with Video Post also providing staff and technical resources to Open Program short courses.

Eighty-five student productions were supported this year, including high production value short films and experimental projects. On 7 and 8 December 2013, the graduating projects of 2013 were screened at the School’s theatre and studios.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Council

Under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 (the Act), the School is governed by a Council responsible to the Federal Parliament through the Minister for the Arts. The Hon Tony Burke MP was Minister for the Arts to 17 September 2013. The Hon. George Brandis QC MP commenced as Minister for the Arts on 18 September 2013.

Responsibilities and duties

The Council is responsible for strategic direction, organisational development, succession planning and resource allocation, including budget control and risk. The Council ensures that policies on key issues are in place and are appropriate and that risks facing AFTRS are identified, assessed and properly managed.

Composition

There are nine members of the Council, specified under the Act: • three members appointed by the Governor-General; • three members appointed from convocation by the Council; • the Chief Executive Officer, ex officio; • one staff member elected by staff each year and • one student member elected by students each year.

Members represent the interests of the School and the screen arts and broadcasting sector contributing expertise in a range of areas, including education, law, film and television production, commercial activities and management.

The Governor-General appoints the Chair. The Council elects the Deputy Chair. These positions may not be held by ex officio, staff or student members.

Members appointed by the Governor-General, and those appointed from Convocation, hold office for a term of up to three years. The staff member holds office for one year and ceases to be a member of Council if they cease to be a staff member of the School. The student member holds office for one year and ceases to be a member of Council if they cease to be a student of the School.

The maximum appointment period is two terms. Casual vacancies for elected positions may be filled, with the approval of the Minister, until the current term for that position expires.

Council members are non-executive directors with the exception of the Chief Executive Officer who is an executive director.

The Chief Executive Officer oversees the operations and activities of AFTRS, and manages affairs according to general policy approved by the Council.

On appointment, members receive a Corporate Governance Handbook as part of their induction. The Handbook sets out their responsibilities and duties as members of Council.

All members are asked to declare any conflict of interest at the beginning of each Council meeting. This process is recorded in the Council minutes and a conflict of interest register.

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COUNCIL MEMBERS As at 30 June 2014, Council members were:

Appointed by the Governor-General Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA BA UQ PhD Sydney, GCM, AGSM: Chair Term: 29 October 2012-28 October 2015

Professor Robyn Ewing BEd (Hons), PhD Sydney Term: 25 October 2012-24 October 2015

One vacancy

Ex Officio Ms Sandra Levy AO, BA DipEd Sydney, Hon D Litt Macq Chief Executive Officer, AFTRS

Appointed from Convocation Mr Peter Duncan BA LLB Sydney, BA (Film and Television) AFTRS: Deputy Chair Term: reappointed from 28 November 2011-27 November 2014

Mr Andrew Mason Term: reappointed from 14 February 2014-13 February 2017

Mr Darren Dale, BA Communications (Journalism) UTS, Hon MSA AFTRS Term: 5 April 2012-4 April 2015

Staff-Elected Member Dr Matthew Campora PhD UQ, Lecturer, Screen Studies, AFTRS Term: 25 February 2014-24 February 2015

Student-Elected Member Ms Jessica Tuckwell Enrolled Graduate Certificate (Screenwriting), AFTRS BA Sydney, Grad Dip Dramatic Art (Directing) NIDA. Term: 25 February 2014-8 November 2014

Immediate past members (2013-2014) Mr Tom Burstall BA Dramatic Arts Production NIDA Term: 10 March 2011-9 March 2014

Ms Sally Browning BA (Media Arts) RMIT: Staff-elected member Manager, Administration and Budgets, Screen Division, AFTRS Term: 25 February 2013-24 February 2014

Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith: Student-elected member BA Communications UTS, MSA, AFTRS Term: 27 February 2013-8 November 2013 (extended to 6 December 2013).

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Key: √ Present ~ via telephone or Skype X Absent / Meeting prior to appointment - Term completed

Council Members 2013-2014

5 Jul 2013

30 Aug 2013 25 Oct 2013

6 Dec 2013 21 Feb 2014

16 May 2014

Prof Julianne Schultz Chair √ √ √ √ √ √

Ms Sandra Levy CEO

√ √ √ √ √ √

Mr Peter Duncan Deputy Chair X ~ ~ X X √

Mr Tom Burstall ~ ~ ~ √ √ -

Mr Andrew Mason √ √ √ X √ X

Mr Darren Dale ~ √ √ √ X √

Prof Robyn Ewing X √ √ √ √ √

Ms Sally Browning X √ √ √ √ -

Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith X √ √ X - -

Ms Jessica Tuckwell / / / / / √

Dr Matthew Campora / / / / / √

AFTRS COUNCIL MEMBERS ATTENDANCE JULY 2013 - JUNE 2014

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Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee The establishment of an audit committee is a requirement under Section 32 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act). The main objective of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee is to assist Council to discharge its responsibilities relating to:

• financial reporting • performance reporting • systems of risk oversight; and • systems of internal control.

The Committee held four meetings in 2013-2014.

Responsibilities and duties The FARM Committee considers any matters relating to financial affairs and risk management that it determines is desirable. It also examines any other matters referred by the Council.

The duties of the FARM Committee relate to:

• the scope and nature of external audit and any issues arising from audit; • the examination of the Annual Report before submitting to Council; • the process for identifying major risks to which AFTRS is exposed and verifying that internal control systems are adequate and functioning effectively;

• the consideration of the internal audit program; • the review of all significant transactions that do not form part of normal AFTRS business and • the evaluation of AFTRS exposure to fraud.

Composition The FARM Committee consists of five members that include Council members and up to two Independent members as may be determined from Council from time to time.

In accordance with the CAC Act and the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Regulations 1997, the Chair of the Committee must be a person other than the Chair of Council or the Chief Executive Officer. The Chair of the Committee shall be appointed by Council from members of Council or an external appointee (Independent member). The Council appoints members for an initial period of two years, after which appointments may be subject to annual rotation.

FARM Committee Members at 30 June 2014 Mr Andrew Mason: Chair

Mr Paul Apps (Audit and Control Advisor, International Monetary Fund; Former Head of Audit, Reserve Bank of Australia)

Mr Darren Dale

Ms Sandra Levy AO

The Director, Corporate and Production Services and the Head of Financial Services have a standing invitation to attend FARM Committee meetings. The internal and external auditors are also in attendance at meetings.

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FARM Committee Members’ Attendance 2013-2014

FARM Members 2013-2014 5 Jul 2013 23 Aug 2013 25 Oct 2013 21 Feb 2014

Mr Andrew Mason Chair

√ √ √ √

Mr Paul Apps (Independent member)

√ √ √ √

Ms Sandra Levy AO

√ √ √ √

Mr Darren Dale

~ √ √ ~

Key: √ Present

~ via telephone or Skype

X Absent

/ Meeting prior to appointment

Academic Board The Academic Board is an ad-hoc sub-committee of the Council and met four times in the 2013-2014 year.

The functions of the Academic Board are to:

• make recommendations to Council relating to the approval of new curricula. • make recommendations to Council relating to major changes to courses of study. • approve curriculum and ensure it is designed to meet the highest standards of the higher education sector.

• review policies, rules, guidelines and procedures related to the admission, enrolment, assessment and progress of students in approved courses of study. • make recommendations to the CEO relating to academic matters in the School. • report on any issues referred to it by Council or the CEO. • make recommendations to Council regarding the conferring of degrees, or any

other award, following successful completion of any approved course of study conducted by the School. • make recommendations to Council regarding the conferral of the honorary degree.

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Composition The Academic Board consists of the Independent Chair, a higher education specialist with a PhD at professorial level; two or more Independent members, with higher education expertise; the CEO, the Director of Education, and the Head of Policy & Governance.

Academic Board Members at 30 June 2014 Professor Robyn Ewing BEd (Hons), PhD Sydney: Chair Professor, Teacher Education and the Arts, University of Sydney Mr Graham Forsyth BA (Hons) Sydney Associate Dean (Academic) UNSW Art & Design Dr Graham Hendry BA(Hons), PhD UOW, Grad Dip Ed Studies (Higher Ed) Sydney Senior Lecturer, Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney. Ms Sandra Levy AO, BA DipEd Sydney, Hon D Litt Macq CEO AFTRS Ms Francine Finnane BA (Communications) UTS Director of Education, AFTRS Ms Kylie Burke BA (Film & Television) AFTRS, Head of Policy & Governance, AFTRS

Future Review Committee The Future Review Committee comprises the CEO (Chair), Director of Screen, Convenor Foundation Diploma, Convenor Graduate Certificate, Convenor Graduate Diploma, Convenor Master of Screen Arts, and the Director of Education.

The main functions of the Future Review Committee are to initiate and provide strategic leadership on the educational aims and objectives of the School,including the:

• aims and objectives of award courses; • admission and selection processes; • effectiveness of award courses in meeting aims and objectives; • research strategy and activities; • review of academic related policy for referral to the Academic Board as required; • impact of new technologies on future planning for the School, and • award course offerings for the next academic year.

The Future Review Committee meets as required and decisions are reported through Executive minutes.

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Executive Team The Chief Executive Officer oversees the operations and activities of AFTRS, and manages the School according to general policy approved by the Council. The CEO leads the Executive which is made up of the Directors of the School’s Divisions and the Deputy Director, Screen. The Directors manage the key strategic and operational activities and report to the CEO.

Chief Executive Officer Ms Sandra Levy, AO

Executive at 30 June 2014 Director, Corporate and Production Services - Ms Ann Browne Director, Screen - Mr Neil Peplow (to 24 April 2014)* Deputy Director, Screen - Ms Sarah Stollman Director, Specialist Programs - Mr Martin Brown (from 4 November 2013) Director, Education - Ms Francine Finnane Director, Radio - Mr Mark Collier (to 5 January 2014)** Director, Open Program - Ms Liz Hughes Director, Technology and Infrastructure - Mr Tim Sadler.

* vacant, pending new appointment ** position subsequently abolished and responsibilities transferred to Director, Specialist Programs.

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SPECIALIST PROGRAMS

OPEN PROGRAM

SCREEN

Foundation Diploma Graduate Certificate Graduate Diploma Master of Screen Arts Master of Screen Arts & Business

Industry Television Schools & Youth Indigenous

Tailored

Marketing & Promotion Publicity

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

EDUCATION

Learning and Teaching Education Reporting/compliance Student Centre

Radio

Specialist Program Development

TECHNOLOGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Production Technology ICT & Services

CORPORATE AND PRODUCTION SERVICES

Financial Services Human Resources Property Services Business Affairs Policy and Governance

Sales and Distribution Jerzy Toeplitz Library Production Resources Video-Post

AFTRS COUNCIL

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STATUTORY REPORTS

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STATUTORY REPORTS

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO - WORKPLACE DIVERSITY)

There have been no complaints received by staff members this financial year.

Staff input continues to be sought through anonymous new employee and staff exit surveys. There is an external, anonymous Whistleblowing hotline service that has not received any reports during this period. In addition, special email addresses are advertised for Authorised Officers appointed under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013 provisions who may receive complaints.

STAFFING, ESTABLISHMENT AND APPOINTMENTS

AFTRS staff selection processes are based on merit selection. Representation of women at AFTRS has remained stable at 53% of staff.

The senior executive team was restructured at the beginning of 2014; however, overall numbers remained unchanged. Representation of women at the senior management level has increased from 57% to 62%, slightly increased at the head of department level from 55% to 60% (the same rate as the previous year), remained static for lecturer positions, and increased slightly in technical roles from 8% to 13%.

As at 30 June 2014 there were 118 staff at AFTRS, twelve of whom worked part time (no change from last year). Staff from non-English speaking backgrounds occupied 21 positions (to the head of department level), two were occupied by people identifying as having a disability, and one member of staff identified as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Of the 39 appointments made by AFTRS during the year, 26 were women and eight indicated they were from a non-English speaking background. All equity-related policies are available on the intranet.

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2012-13 2013-14

Male Full time

Male Part time

Female Full time

Female Part time Total

Male Full time

Male Part time

Female Full time

Female Part time Total

New South Wales

a) PEO 1 1 1 1

b) SES 3 4 7 3 4 7

c) Below SES 48 6 54 5 113 45 4 50 6 105

d) Temporary 1 1 2 3 1 1 5

Victoria

Below SES 1 1

Total 52 6 60 6 124 51 5 55 7 118

Staff are employed at AFTRS under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973. The majority of staff are covered by the AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011. Three staff members have Individual Flexibility Arrangements or Individual Variable Remuneration. SES equivalent staff are employed on a contract basis. The holder of the Principal Executive Office is covered by a performance appraisal scheme which allows for an annual performance related payment.

COMPARISON TABLES 2012-13 & 2013-14 STAFFING INFORMATION

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2012-13 2013-14

Male Female Total NESB Male Female Total NESB

*Senior Management 3 5 8 3 5 8

Management/Heads of Department 13 16 29 5 11 16 27 5

Teaching 11 6 17 2 11 7 18 1

Teaching/Training Support 1 9 10 1 7 7 3

Administration 10 25 35 8 11 22 33 6

Technical 13 1 14 5 13 2 15 5

Production 5 4 9 5 3 8

Support 2 2 1 2 2 1

Total 58 66 124 22 56 62 118 21

*Includes one PEO

BREAKDOWN OF AFTRS STAFF BY GENDER, LEVEL & NESB

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2012-13 2013-14

Salary Band NESB ATSI PWD Women NESB ATSI PWD Women

To $45,619 1 1

$45,620 - $59,934 1 3 1 5

$59,935 - $63,814 2 12 4 11

$63,815 - $85,245 7 16 6 15

$63,815 - $85,245 5 1 14 4 1 12

$97,065 - $119,2956 7 1 12 5 1 10

Over $119,295 9 1 9

Total 22 1 2 66 21 1 2 62

The table above shows the representation of the four EEO target groups (Non-English Speaking Background, Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, People with a Disability, and Women) in the AFTRS staff. The data is drawn from information provided voluntarily.

REPRESENTATION OF EEO TARGET GROUPS WITHIN SALARY BANDS

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Work and Private Commitments

AFTRS retains a flexible policy in relation to accommodating private commitments, which includes part-time work, job sharing, home-based work, flexible working hours, personal leave (that can also be used for religious/cultural observances) recreation leave at half pay and leave without pay. In addition, AFTRS allows individual flexibility arrangements based on genuine agreement.

Staff Training And Development

Internal training during 2013-14 continued to offer employees basic administration, general and technology skills. In addition, training was undertaken in information management; communication skills; copyright; risk assessment in child related matters, including mandatory reporting; research skills; financial matters, including fraud awareness; online course development; health and safety; leadership, and general management. Staff also participated in general training undertaken in partnership with other cultural agencies based in New South Wales.

Teaching staff were offered opportunities to upgrade their skills in areas including student management, online learning and discipline-specific training. A number of staff across the School accessed professional development leave or were granted leave without pay to enhance their industry-based skills.

Staff attended conferences in areas including: screen producing; documentary; radio; screen production education; online and blended learning; library and records management; accounting; copyright; work health and safety; production technology; marketing, and information technology. Conferences were attended both overseas and in Australia.

In 2013-14 AFTRS provided study assistance to staff undertaking external studies in fields such as public policy; creative writing; media communications; carpentry, and a range of education-related qualifications. The qualifications ranged from certificates to doctorates.

Programs addressing the training and development needs of staff as identified by management and staff through the ongoing performance management scheme, continued to be implemented. Compliance related information and training was also provided.

Cost of Staff Training

Value of staff time involved in training:

• 103 days internal training $48,276

• 78 days external training $36,222

• 103 days attending conferences $57,549

• 27 days approved professional development leave $7,448 • 105 days approved study leave $40,510

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Direct expenditure staff training:

• Internal training $8,714

• External training $20,961

• Conferences $31,700

• Related travel $56,056

Total cost of staff training $307,436

Average expenditure per staff member $2,605

The average expenditure per staff member is an increase of 11% on the 2012-13 figure (which had been a 9% decrease on the previous year).

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

AFTRS continued its commitment to involving staff in decision-making processes. The primary expression of this being inclusion of a staff-elected member on the governing Council. Staff representatives have input through a range of Committees, including the Health and Safety Committee. Staff input is also provided through regular departmental and divisional meetings—and when seeking input about change, anonymous methods of providing comments have been made available.

Information is available to staff primarily through email, noticeboards, the AFTRS intranet and website, CEO and staff newsletters and at all school meetings.

The Modern Award and Agreement Making

Minimum staff terms and conditions of employment are currently established by the AFTRS Award 2000, an Enterprise Award. Under the provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009, organisations whose staff were covered by an Enterprise Award were required to lodge an application with the Fair Work Commission by the end of 2013 to modernise that award or minimum staff terms and conditions would be established by the most suitable industry based modern award. AFTRS lodged an application to modernise the award in December 2013 and it is expected the matter will be determined during the 2014-15 financial year.

The AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011 nominally expired in February 2014, however the provisions will continue to apply until the Agreement is either terminated or replaced. AFTRS is in the process of obtaining approvals in accordance with the recently released Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy to finalise the employer bargaining position.

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY (WHS)

AFTRS continues to identify and promote best practice WHS management and is committed to the reduction of workplace related accidents, illnesses and injuries. AFTRS is committed to the implementation of, and adherence to, all relevant government WHS policy and legislation.

During this period several policies and procedures were developed or reviewed including the following.

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• Online Incident Reporting System - review to reduce false reports. • Risk Management documents and processes. • High Risk Activities (non-production) - list of activities and approval process finalised.

• Working on Roof Risk Assessment. • Emergency Services Route to AFTRS reviewed. • Workplace Bullying Policy reviewed.

An ongoing program of review continued, including: induction of students and contractors; risk assessment processes; ergonomic assessments; identification and review of high risk activities, and workplace inspections. Measures were taken to address identified risks including the installation of a duress alarm and hospital grade flooring in the First Aid Room. An audit of compliance with the legislation was also completed by the Internal Auditors and AFTRS was found to comply, receiving a rating of 4.

The School has retained membership of the Cultural Institutions Health and Safety network and joined the Commonwealth Safety Managers Forum.

Consultation

Staff are regularly consulted on health and safety related issues by their managers or specialist staff. In addition, the Health and Safety Committee, the key consultative body, held four meetings during this period. Workers are encouraged to communicate concerns either directly to the Committee or through their representatives, and are welcome to attend meetings.

Workers are represented on the Committee by Health and Safety Representatives from specific work groups within the School. Health and Safety Representatives have undergone training as required by statute before they can exercise their full functions. A member of the AFTRS Executive attends Committee meetings and reports directly to the Executive.

Minutes of the meetings and other health and safety information is made available to workers on noticeboards, via email, and on the School intranet.

Training Undertaken included:

• Due Diligence for Officers. • Attendance at Commonwealth Safety Managers Forum. • WHS Awareness and Risk Management. • Ergonomic workplace assessment. • First Aid and Recertification. • Emergency Warden. • Dealing with Customer Aggression. • Understanding Mental Health. • Induction/Orientation for staff and contractors. • Construction Induction Training (“White card” staff and students) • Production Safety (new students). • Elevating Work Platform—Scissor Lift • Various licences/tickets.

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Personnel

As part of our commitment to health and safety, AFTRS currently has the following trained personnel: • Six Health and Safety Representatives and Deputies. • 25 Senior First Aid Officers. • 34 Emergency Wardens. • Five Rehabilitation Case Managers.

Incident Reports

During the reporting period there were 26 incidents reported (a reduction of 43% on the previous year). None were reportable and all are closed.

There was one compensation claim lodged during the reporting period (decision pending). No remedial action was required as a result of the incident.

DISABILITY REPORTING MECHANISMS

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, departments and agencies have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports will be made available in late 2014, on www.dss.gov.au in late 2014.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

AFTRS is subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and, under Part II of the FOI Act, is required to publish a broad range of information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). AFTRS displays a plan on its website that shows what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements. This information includes details of AFTRS’ structure, functions, appointments, annual reports, consultation arrangements and FOI officer.

AFTRS also publishes information resulting from FOI access requests, information to which AFTRS routinely gives access in response to FOI access requests, and information routinely provided to Parliament. AFTRS’ website provides details of the information published in accordance with the IPS requirements at: www.aftrs.edu.au/ about/governance/foi/information-publication-scheme

Formal requests may also be made for information about AFTRS and its operations under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. These requests are referred to AFTRS’ FOI officer. One request was received and finalised by AFTRS during the reporting period.

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PRIVACY

AFTRS has five broad categories of personnel information: personnel records; contractor records; student records; volunteer records; and mailing lists.

AFTRS continued to comply with its obligations under the Privacy Act 1988 in relation to the collection, use, disclosure, integrity, and access to and correction of, personal information. AFTRS also continued to take relevant Privacy Commissioner Guidelines into account in dealing with personal information.

No complaints under the Privacy Act 1988 were received by AFTRS during the reporting period.

MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS AND GOVERNMENT POLICIES

Ministerial directions may be issued under certain provisions of the School’s enabling Act or under other Commonwealth legislation. No ministerial directions that applied to the School were issued under the enabling or other Commonwealth legislation during the reporting period.

No General Policy Orders under Section 48A of the CAC Act applied to the School during the reporting period.

JUDICIAL DECISIONS AND REVIEWS BY OUTSIDE BODIES

There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that have had, or may have, a significant effect on the operations of AFTRS. No reports about AFTRS were made by the Auditor General (other than a report on the financial statements), a Parliamentary Committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

FRAUD CONTROL

AFTRS maintained its Fraud Control Policy and continued to implement its 2012-14 Fraud Control Plan. The Policy and Plan reflected the fraud risk assessment prepared by AFTRS’ internal auditors and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011.

AFTRS progressively undertook actions to enhance its fraud control measures, including refresher training for staff, and these actions were reported to meetings of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee. AFTRS also participated in the annual Fraud Against the Commonwealth Survey, administered by the Australian Institute of Criminology.

The CEO is satisfied that AFTRS has appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet AFTRS’ specific needs and that she has taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud at AFTRS.

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INDEMNITIES AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS FOR OFFICERS

AFTRS paid an insurance premium for liability cover to Comcover, which, incorporated specific cover to indemnify the Council members and Officers for any claim made against them while acting in their capacity as office holders.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

AFTRS continues to identify aspects of its operations that impact on the environment. The School is committed to developing a continual improvement process to control its environmental impacts in relation to energy, water and waste management.

Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD)

The AFTRS program of environmental activities aims for:

• reporting systems that identify energy efficiency opportunities; • low-landfill output due to recycling programs; • lower water usage through preventative maintenance programs; continued, environmentally friendly disposal of all obsolete computer

and production equipment, and • increased awareness of AFTRS commitment to sustainability by briefing all new staff and students during induction.

Environmental Performance Reporting

(As per Commonwealth reporting requirements guideline under Section 516A of The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

See table on page 67.

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Activity Alignment with ESD

Principles

Advancement of ESD Principles

Managing contracts

Tenders and contracts for potential suppliers contain environmental evaluation and conditions.

Procurement decisions and contracting integrates long-term environmental aims.

Environmental Management Plan implementation

Review and modify environmental policies and management plans. Provides the basis of our environmental management

program.

Maintain initiatives from plan. Provides a plan and target for initiatives and energy use.

Theme Steps taken to reduce effect Measures to review and

improve reducing the effect

Energy efficiency

AFTRS has the following initiatives in place to reduce energy consumption: • Switchable lighting so unused

areas can be switched off. • Signage to inform staff and students to switch off lights

and equipment. • Motion sensors for lighting and mechanical services

to reduce over running in unused areas. • Routine maintenance of the air-conditioning systems to

ensure they run efficiently and as designed.

Collection and review of consumption data manually on site and periodical energy audits.

Waste AFTRS continues to implement

recycling programs that separate waste at source and aims to reduce waste by providing crockery, utensils and kitchen areas and reducing waste to landfill by encouraging recycling.

Ensuring engagement with staff on environmental matters and maintaining the program.

Water AFTRS makes use of water

efficient devices including showerheads, dual flush toilets, water-saving washers on taps and low water usage dishwashers.

Monitoring water consumption and encouraging efficient use.

Overall there has been an increase in energy and water usage and generation of waste. This increase has been

minimal in proportion to the significantly increased use of AFTRS facilities by staff, students and industry.

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APPENDIX 1

ENABLING LEGISLATION The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) was established by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 (the Act). It is the leading institution for education and training in Australia’s screen arts and broadcast industries. AFTRS’ functions as laid out in section 5(1) of the Act are:

(a) to provide advanced education and training by way of the development of the knowledge and skills required, in connection with the production of programs; (b) to conduct and encourage research in connection with the production of programs; (c) to conduct such seminars and courses of education or training for persons

engaged, or to be engaged, directly or indirectly, in connection with the production of programs as are approved by the Council; (d) to co-operate and make arrangements with other institutions and persons for purposes in connection with the production of programs or the provision of

education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a); (e) for purposes in connection with the production of programs or the provision of education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a), to provide facilities

for, and to offer the services of the staff of the School to, such other institutions or persons as are approved by the Council; (f) to make grants of financial assistance to persons to enable or assist those persons to receive education or undergo training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a); (g) to award such degrees, diplomas and certificates in relation to the passing of

examinations or otherwise in relation to the education and training provided by the School as are specified in a determination under section 6A; and (h) to do anything incidental or conducive to the performance of the foregoing functions.

Section 5(2) provides that the School: shall exercise its functions with a view to enabling and encouraging the production of programs of a high degree of creativeness and of high technical and artistic standards.

A number of regulations and other legislative instruments have been made under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 since the Act commenced. As a Commonwealth statutory authority, AFTRS also operated under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

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APPENDIX 2

FINANCIAL RESOURCE SUMMARY

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

In the 2013-14 financial year AFTRS generated a small surplus that rounded to a break even result.

The Parliamentary Appropriation for AFTRS in 2013-14 was $24,429K. Total revenue was $31,515K with ‘Own sourced revenue’ of $7,091K providing the balance through Award course and Open Program short course fees, interest, and the sale of AFTRS training products less a $5K loss on sale of assets. Total ‘Own sourced revenue’ exceeded last year’s by $1,465K or 26%. .

Revenue from ‘Sale of goods & rendering of services’ increased by $1,507K or 28%, largely as a result of the expansion of the range and number of Open Program short courses. Interest received declined by $42K compared to the previous year, due to the lower interest rates on offer during the financial year.

Expenses at $31,515K were $1,484K or 4.9% higher than the previous year mainly as a consequence of the additional variable expenses flowing from running more Open Program short courses than expected.

In accordance with our five-year capital expenditure plan, depreciation exceeded our capital expenditure for the year.

AFTRS’ financial statements for 2013-14 were prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and the Finance Minister’s Orders for the reporting period ending 30th June 2014. The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) issued an unqualified audit opinion on the financial statements and notes on 29 August 2014.

EXTERNAL AUDIT

The ANAO carried out an interim review of AFTRS’ operations in the reporting period.

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INTERNAL AUDIT

Deloitte Australia provides an independent internal audit service to the School. Internal Audit is administratively responsible to the Director, Corporate and Production Services and is accountable to the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee. Representatives from the internal auditors attend FARM meetings together with a representative of the ANAO.

Internal Audit submits an annual audit plan and regular quarterly operational plans to FARM. Audits conducted during 2013-2014 were:

• Workplace Health and Safety; • Recruitment and Payroll, and • Course Award and Graduation.

RISK MANAGEMENT

AFTRS participated in Comcover’s 2014 Risk Management Benchmarking Survey. Consequently the School was awarded a benchmarking discount of 6.24% on the cost of its 2014-15 insurance premium.

CLAIMS AND LOSSES

There were no major losses during the year ending 30 June 2014.

PURCHASING

The purchasing functions and procedures of AFTRS, and the standard terms of accounts payment, are consistent with, or guided by, the Commonwealth Procurement Guidelines. Through the Administrative Orders, AFTRS Council delegates certain powers and functions, including purchasing levels, to occupants of specific AFTRS management positions. This is subject to the limits prescribed under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 and the Council-approved policies, programs and procedures of AFTRS.

To the best of the School’s knowledge, all properly rendered invoices were paid within the agreed trading terms. AFTRS participates in some whole-of-government contracts where appropriate, including the Travel Services contract, and contracts for the provision of stationary and office supplies. Information technology equipment and general goods purchases utilised both state and federal contracts (where appropriate). The School buys capital items in accordance with the annual capital program.

COMPETITIVE TENDERING AND EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

AFTRS procurement policy requires purchases over $100,000 to be obtained through formal processes that may involve either public or selected tender (RFQ/RFP/RFT) and could include an expression of interest phase. Purchases greater than $400,000 require public tender, which may also include an expression of interest process.

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In general, consideration is given to the following factors to determine the method of approach to market:

• urgency of the requirement; • limited number of known potential suppliers; • competitiveness of the marketplace; • a supplier’s prior knowledge or experience with a particular activity that other

suppliers could not build up unless extensive additional costs and time delays were incurred, and • compatibility with existing equipment.

In 2013-14 AFTRS sought written quotes and/or tenders for the following services (over $100,000):

• Provision of electricity to building, and • Radio studio consoles.

CONSULTANCY SERVICES

AFTRS engages consultants with specialist skills to help with defined projects. During the year, AFTRS entered into seven specialist consultancies, involving expenditure of $65K. A total of two consultancies had a value exceeding $15K.

Consultant Project

Odgers Berndtson International Senior Executive Search AARNET Pty Ltd Enterprise Network Audit and Design

In addition, the School engaged other consultants to provide regular, ongoing services.

CONTRACTORS

Each year AFTRS engages a range of independent contractors; most are industry practitioners who support its core activities of teaching and learning. See note 2B in the Financial Accounts.

PROPERTY USE

AFTRS headquarters are located at the Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park, Sydney NSW—in the heart of Sydney’s screen precinct. The building (12964m2) features specialist screen and radio teaching, and production facilities. The cost of leasing, car parking and outgoings for 2013-14 totalled $4,490K.

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APPENDIX 3

AFTRS GRADUATES 2013

FOUNDATION DIPLOMA Alexandra Adoncello Marra Aghajani Benjamin Alexis Sebastian Antoniou Jack Atherton Elizabeth Bennett Bianca Benussi Philip Boatswain Nicola Brown Christopher Brun Thomas Celius Nicola Chadwick Murray Clapham Jack Colquhoun Emma Cummings Stephanie Davidson Luke Davis Chloe de Brito Giovanni De Santolo Rowan Devereux Jake Donaldson Gavin Drumm Noel Franco Ari Friedgut Alexander Gastrell Rachel Giddens Alexandra Grose Jacob Hanrahan Joel Humphries Poppy Hunter Ian Knighton Benjamin Levin Alexander Monaghan Caleb Mountjoy Liam Moy Thomas Muir Courtney Mulvay Sam Natale Danielle Payne

Peter Richardson Benjamin Ryan Lisa Ryan Matthew Sanasi Lachlan Campbell-Serventy Ryan Simpson Jasmeen Singh Nathaniel Smith Jack Stodart Luke Sullivan Oscar Ward Chanelle Whitty Luke Williams Ho Ming Wong

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN CINEMATOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS

Richard Dobson Christopher Elder Nicholas Forster Oliver Fuller Jarryd Hall Jordan-Rhys Moses Jenkins Simon Knox Thomas Mangan Timothy Oxford Alexander Serafini Chelsea Thistlewaite Davi Soesilo

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DIRECTING FUNDAMENTALS

Harriet Archibald Luke Danbsy-Scott Scout Darling-Blair Samuel Faull Keun Sang Lee Matisse Purinton-Miller Nicholas Snelling Michael Wannenmacher Patrick Byrnes Daniel Cohn Michael Condon Emily Garrett Kyle Hedrick Malina Mackiewicz Jonathan Weir Michael Witt Daniel Youd

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COSTUME DESIGN Liesl Mann Clare McCutcheon Zora Milevski Mathew Pal Rebecca Romans Olivia Simpson

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DOCUMENTARY FUNDAMENTALS

Thomas Anlezark Sally Corry Christopher Darwin Kerry Mcguire James Millynn Brendan Palmer Kelly Perry Brendan Toole

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDITING DRAMA Wayne Blair Jenna Bowden Christian Cicchini Glen Cox Brian Dyer Belinda Felix Trent Mitchell Alison Myers Andrew Willmott

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN PRODUCING Ian Browning Jeffrey McDonald

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREEN CULTURE Anne Breslin Barbara Cooper Caroline Fonda Ravinder Kambhoj Jenna Schofield

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREEN MUSIC Sabine Brix John Kilbey Jarrah McCleary Jodi Phillis Timothy Schnur Rocco Tozzi Eugene Ward

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREENWRITING FUNDAMENTALS

Scott Anderson Rachel Argall Amal Awad Hannah Bent Jo-Anne Brechin D'Arcy Foley-Dawson Mathew Govoni Claire Harris Melissa Heris Damien Higginbotham Angela Lyos Sophie Morris Madeleine Parker Laura Scrivano Madeleine Searle Blake Shuttleworth Benn Sutton Natalie van den Dungen

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN CINEMATOGRAPHY Matthew Bedford Cara Bowerman Ella-Marie Gibbins Alexander Glucina Dane Howell Thomas Jefferson Kent Lock Goldie Soetianto Lucas Tomoana Adric Watson

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GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DIRECTING Elizabeth Cooper Erin Good Payam Kokab Andrew Lee John-Paul McElwee Nicholas McRobbie Shannon Murphy George Alexander Nagle Jack Naylor-Hampson Peter Skinner

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DOCUMENTARY Cassandra Charlton Laura Clarke Siobhan Costigan Ehsan Knopf Larissa Lavarch Lucas Li Amy Blue Lucine Lauren Ross

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN EDITING Stewart Arnott Courtney Bowden Michael Drake Varinya Eammano Amanda Eyley Bonnie Fan Florence Holmes Angus Macpherson

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PRODUCING Charles Billeh Helen Burak Debora Cravero Julia Kelly Stacey Kwijas Chloe Lawrence-Hartcher Sabrina Organo

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREEN BUSINESS James Carr Jason Critelli Erica Drew Jamie Engel Bruno Reis-Liporoni Timothy Maddocks

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PRODUCTION DESIGN Sally Addinsall Belle Blamey Grace Brown Ruby Mathers Emma McEwen Teresa Meoli Amanda Safranko Rebecca Sheedy Eve Waugh

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN RADIO Deborah Bauer Ashleigh Blucher Zachariah Carman Simon Coore Julian Daw Harry Dodshon Gabrielle Fitzgerald Charlotte Meldrum-Hanna Alice Moldovan Christopher Nairn Caitlin Nienaber Holly Spillane Samuel Stove Michele Weekes James Weir Michael Whittington Shad Wicker Timothy Wong-See

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREEN MUSIC Freya Berkhout Tiernan Cross Joel Geist Grace Huie Robbins Joshua McHugh Edward McPhie Benjamin Romalis Matthew Rudduck

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREENWRITING Huna-Nangaua Amweero Jacob Holmes-Brown Neale Irwin Joshua Magee Christopher Marchand Sarah-Jane McAllan Kim McCreanor Adam Roper

MASTER OF SCREEN ARTS Cyrus Bezyan Jeremy Cassar Genevieve Clay-Smith Jessica Craig-Piper Anita Jankovic Charlotte McConaghy James Raue Christopher Squadrito Warwick Young

MASTER OF SCREEN ARTS & BUSINESS John Beohm Xiao Han Drummond David Gurney Susan Maslin Andrew McKay Elizabeth Norris Margaret Tillson Benjamin Whimpey

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APPENDIX 4

SUPPORTER AWARDS TO STUDENTS FOXTEL AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL NEW TALENT

The Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent was presented by the Advisor to the Office of the CEO, Foxtel, Malcolm Smith and awarded to Chris Squadrito.

KENNETH B. MYER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL TALENT The Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Exceptional Talent was presented by the Director of Screen, Neil Peplow, and awarded to Andrew Lee and Freya Berkhout.

KENNETH B. MYER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FOR PROJECT DEVELOPMENT The Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Project Development was presented by the Director of Screen, Neil Peplow and awarded to Genevieve Clay-Smith.

A. V. MYER INDIGENOUS AWARDS FOR EXCEPTIONAL TALENT

A. V. Myer Indigenous Awards were presented by Council member, Darren Dale, on behalf of Andrew Myer and awarded to Dena Curtis and Bjorn Stewart.

SHARK ISLAND INSTITUTE DOCUMENTARY AWARD

The Shark Island Institute Documentary Award was presented by Shark Island’s Malinda Wink, on behalf of Ian Darling from the Shark Island Production Company, and awarded to Blue Lucine.

THE EUROPEAN UNION FILM AWARDS

The Delegation of the European Union Film Award, in cooperation with the Embassy of Spain, was presented by the NSW Consul-General, Mr Alvaro Iranzo and awarded to Warwick Young who received return flights, accommodation and an invitation to the Festival of Valladolid—Seminci in Spain.

The Delegation of the European Union Film Award, in cooperation with the Embassy of the Republic of Croatia, was presented by the NSW Consul, Ms Sandra Štetić and awarded to Laura Clarke who received return flights, accommodation and an invitation to the Zagreb Film Festival in Croatia.

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SCREEN AUSTRALIA’S TALENT ESCALATOR PROGRAM

Screen Australia’s Talent Escalator program, which includes an internship with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group in Los Angeles, was presented by Screen Australia’s Charlotte Seymour and awarded to Helen Burak.

SHINE AUSTRALIA INTERN PROGRAM

The inaugural Shine Australia Intern Program was presented by Shine Australia CEO, Mark Fennessy and awarded to Luke Davis.

ASTRA GRADUATE PROGRAM

The successful recipients of the 2014 ASTRA program, designed to provide graduates of the 2013 Foundation Diploma with experience working at subscription television organisations, were Oscar Ward, Jack Atherton, Jack Stodart, Jake Donaldson, Jasmeen Singh, Murray Clapham, Phillip Boatswain, Bianca Benussi, Rachel Giddens, Danielle Payne, Joel Humphries and Alex Monaghan.

THE SELWYN SPEIGHT AWARD FOR RADIO REPORTING

The Selwyn Speight Award was presented by the Director of Radio, Mark Collier to Samuel Stove. The award encourages the pursuit of excellence in, and the proper practice of, radio reporting. It is awarded to a Graduate Diploma Radio student who wishes to pursue a career in current affairs journalism.

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APPENDIX 5

PUBLIC PROGRAM: 2013-14 FRIDAY ON MY MIND

MELBOURNE

'Most Outstanding Actress' Friday, July 5 2013

Guest: Kat Stewart

Tactics that Scored Big at the Box Office Friday, July 12 2013

Guest: Clayton Jacobson

Rocking out with Renegades Friday, July 19 201

Guest: Joe & Ken Connor

Realising Ideas Friday, August 16 2013

Guest: Fremantle Media's Creative Director, Jason Stephens

Screenwriting & Hollywood Show Running Friday, August 23 2013 Guest: David Hannam

The Ins & Outs of Self Distribution - I am Eleven Friday, August 30 2013 Guest: Genevieve Bailey

Connecting Locals with Internationals Friday, September 6 2013 Guest: Debra Richards

Marketing for Box Office Success Friday, September 13 2013

Guest: Phil Oneile

The Nuts & Bolts of Cinema Exhibition in Australia Friday, September 20 2013 Guest: Ross Entwistle

Producing Australia's Best TV Dramas Friday, September 27 2013 Guest: Imogen Banks

Patrick - Stylishly & Gothically Rebooted Friday, October 4 2013

Guests: Mark Hartley and Justin King

The Secrets of Writing Relationships Friday, October 11 2013

Guest: Judi McCrossin

Fallout Friday, October 18 2013

Guest: Lawrence Johnston

The Actor's Director Friday, October 25 2013

Guest: Daina Reid

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Creative Producing in Australia Friday, November 1, 2013

Guest: Richard Keddie

Dressing Up The Story Friday, February 21 2014

Guest: Tim Chappel

Evolve or Perish: The Delights and Challenges of Running a Production Company Friday, February 28 2014

Guests: Tony Wright and George Adams

The Alchemy of Music and Image Friday, March 7 2014

Guest: Natasha Pincus

Passion and Versatility Equals Longevity Friday, March 14 2014 Guest: David Parker

Balancing Story and Digital Effects Friday, March 21 2014

Guest: Scott Zero

The Art of the Cast Friday, March 28 2014

Guest: Jane Norris

The Business of Composing Friday, April 4, 2014

Guest: David Hirschfelder

Offbeat & Rocking the Television Comedy Boat… Friday, April 11 2014 Guests: Robyn Butler & Wayne Hope

Producing Television Drama and Documentary that Engages with Australian History Friday, May 2 2014

Guest: Andrew Wiseman

Creative Producing Friday, May 9 2014

Guest: Robyn Kershaw

Acting Craft, Quality, Longevity and Life Friday, May 16 2014

Guest: Nadine Garner

Distinctly Australian Animation Friday, May 23 2014

Guest: Peter Viska

Location, Location, Location Friday, May 30 2014

Guest: Greg Noakes

LOL Friday, June 6 2014

Guest: Magda Szubanski

Art, Film and Love Songs Friday, June 13 2014

Guest: Rhys Graham

Producing Big Ideas on Small Budgets Friday, June 20 2014

Guest: Liz Kearney

Bending the Genres Friday, June 27 2014

Guest: Amiel Courtin-Wilson

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SYDNEY

The Devils Playground - Recast & Remade Friday, July 5 2013

Guest: Simon Burke

Stories of Me - Unapologetically Personal Friday, September 6 2013 Guest: Ian Darling and Paul Kelly

Deadbeat Dads: the ticket to ride Friday, October 4 2013

Guests: Ben Matthews, Shelley McLaren, Kent Pearson and Drew Michel

Australia's First Lady of Film Friday, November 1 2013

Guest: Gillian Armstrong

Gods of Egypt Friday, March 14 2014

Guest: Alex Proyas

The Astonishing Aim High in Creation! Friday, March 21 2014

Guest: Anna Broinowski

Animal Logic crafting ‘brick-by-brick’ the animated blockbuster: The Lego Movie Friday, March 28 2014 Guests: Amber Naismith, David Burrows, David Williams and Miles Green

The Filmmaker Behind the Exceptional & Award Winning 52 Tuesdays Friday, April 4 2014

Guest: Sophie Hyde

Hunting for the Australian Industry Drop Bear: A Career in Screen Comedy Friday, April 11 2014

Guest: Josh Lawson

War is Hell (to Film) Friday, May 2 2014

Guest: Alister Grierson

An Epic Story of Survival. Once My Mother: Friday, May 9 2014

Guest: Sophia Turkiewicz

Strictly Writing: Craig Pearce Friday, May 16 2014

Guest: Craig Pearce

So you think you can run the Sydney Film Festival? Friday, May 23 2014 Guest: Nashen Moodley

Plonk! Goes the Funding Model Friday, May 30 2014

Guests: Nathan Earl, Glen Condie, Chris Taylor, Joshua Tyler

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Touch: Meeting the Cate Blanchett challenge to Bring Strong Australian Female Stories to our Screens Friday, June 6 2014 Guest: Christopher Houghton

Sydney Film Festival ‘Pop Up’ Edition Friday, June 13 2014

Guest: Pan Nalin

Breaking All the Rules: Around the Block Friday, June 20 2014

Guest: Su Armstrong

The Last Impresario Friday, June 27 2014

Guests: Gracie Otto and Nicole O'Donohue

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TV TALKS TV Talks - an opportunity to watch, listen and laugh with a panel of engaging TV industry people talking about TV 'stuff', complemented by networking afterwards!

Waking Up Early Adam Boland: Director of Morning TV, TEN Network Neil Breen: Executive Producer, Today and Weekend Today Tuesday, July 2 2013 Michael Pell: Executive Producer, Sunrise and Weekend Sunrise

They’re from the Network Phil Craig: Head of Factual ABC TV Debbie Byrne: Executive Producer, Network Seven Tuesday, August 6 2013 Richard Huddlestone: EP ABC 1&2, Entertainment and Development

Shine a Light Tuesday, September 3 2013

Carl Fennessy: joint CEO, Shine Australia

Funny Business Rick Kalowski: Head of Comedy, ABC TV Paul Leadon: Head of Comedy, Network Ten Tuesday, October 1 2013 Phil Lloyd: writer, actor and creator of Australian television comedy

The Multi Channel World Ross Crowley: Director of Programming, Foxtel Monica Forlano: Head of Program Scheduling, Network Ten Stuart Menzies: Controller, ABC 2 Tuesday, November 12 2013

Hamish Turner: Director of Digital Content, Nine Network

Is Development Hell? Elliot Spencer: Head of Creative Services & Development, Shine Australia Caroline Spencer: Director of Development, FremantleMedia John Gregory: CEO, Freehand TV Tuesday, February 4 2014

Hilary Innes: Director of Entertainment and Development, ITV Studios

Publicity Blues? Neil Shoebridge: Director of Corporate and Public Communications, Network Ten Heidi Virtue: Publicity & Events Consultant, FOXTEL Tuesday, March 4 2014 Lesna Thomas: Former Head of Publicity, ABC TV

But did it Rate? Doug Peiffer: Chief Executive Officer, OzTAM Russel Howcroft: Executive General Manager, Network TEN Tuesday, April 1 2014 Tim Clucas: Television Executive

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You're Kidding Deirdre Brennan: Head of Children’s ABC TV Hugh Baldwin: Director Television & Digital Content, Nickelodeon Tuesday, May 6 2014

Andy Ryan: co-Head of Drama, Nine Network Niki Hamilton: Supervising Producer, Children’s TV, Network Seven

Diversify or Die? Alan Erson: General Manager and Head of Factual, Essential Media Chris Oliver-Taylor: Managing Director, Tuesday, June 3 2014

Matchbox Pictures Michael Cordell: Creative Director, CJZ

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APPENDIX 6

INDUSTRY EVENTS AT AFTRS JULY 2013 TO JUNE 2014

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting meeting Tuesday, July 2

Independent Filmmakers: meeting Tuesday, July 2

Media Stockade: Work in progress screening The Surgery Ship Tuesday, July 9

National Film & Sound Archive: Heath Ledger Young Artists Wednesday, July10 Oral History Project

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: Wednesday, July10

Talk/ presentation/panel discussion /Q&A

Jad Haber (AFTRS Graduate): Auditions for independent Wednesday, July10 July10self-funded short film

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Tuesday, July 16

Foxtel (Showtime): Screening latest release feature Monday, July 22

Australian Screen Sound Guild: Location recording Tuesday, July 23 sub-committee meeting

Motion Picture Company: Test screening feature film In Cold Light Wednesday, July 24

OZDOX: committee meeting Tuesday, August 6

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Certificate Screenwriting meeting Tuesday, August 6

Australian Theatre for Young People: Call-back meeting Wednesday, August 7

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Tuesday, August 13

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: screening and Q&A Wednesday, August 14

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Tuesday, August 20

Change Focus Media: Screening and Q&A Once My Mother Tuesday, August 20

Australian Production Design Guild: Tuesday, August 27

Annual General Meeting and Committee Meeting

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: Screening and Q&A Wednesday, September 18

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Thursday September 19

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National Film & Sound Archive: Comparison footage test of 35mm & DCP Newsfront Tuesday September 24

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Tuesday, October 1

Graduate Certificate Screenwriting meeting

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rehearsals, Hey Joe Tuesday, October 29

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Wednesday, October 30

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rehearsals, Hey Joe Thursday, October 31

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Wednesday, October 9

Australian Screen Editors Guild: Part screening,The Turning Thursday, October 10

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting Tuesday, November 5 meeting

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rough-cut screening, Hey Joe Sunday, November 10

ABC TV Factual: Short film preview screening, Wednesday November 13 Opening Shots

AFTRS Graduate: Documentary film preview screening Tuesday, 19 Nov Man from Coxs River

Actors Equity (Equity Foundation): Casting Hothouse Friday, November 22- Sunday, November 24

AFI/AACTA: Awards preview screening, Inside Llewyn Davis Tuesday, November 26

NYU Tisch: Class after AFTRS campus tour Wednesday, November 27

AFTRS 2011 Graduate: Independent film project Wednesday, November 27 rehearsals

AFTRS 2013 Graduates: Independent film project, Friday, November 29 make-up & camera tests

AFTRS Graduates: Interview panel AFTRS 2013 project Tuesday, December 3

AFTRS Graduates 2013: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting Tuesday, December 3 meeting

Independent short film preview screening: Pocket Money Thursday, December 12

Australian Screen Sound Guild: Annual General Meeting Saturday, December 14

World of Women’s Cinema: WOW Film Festival judging Tuesday, December 17

Australian Guild of Screen Composers: meeting Tuesday, December 17

Film Critics Circle: Annual General Meeting Thursday, January 30

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Foxtel: Feature film screening, Labor Day Monday, February 3

Screen NSW: Aurora Mentorship Workshop Thursday, February 6

Bower Bird Films: Rough cut screening, Tuesday, February 11

Love Marriage in Kabul

OZDOX (with ADG): The Social Impact Producer Wednesday, February 12

Sydney Symphony Orchestra: workshops Thursday, February 13

SSS Production: Investor/test screening, Absolution Tuesday, February 25

NSW Emerging Filmmakers Funded project short film Wednesday, February 26 The Tender Dark

Feature film rough-cut screening: Infini Monday, March 3

Foxtel: Feature film screening, The Monuments Men Monday, March 3

Centennial Parklands: meeting Wednesday, March 5

Woman in Film & Television: WOW Festival Screening Sunday, March 9

OZDOX (with ADG): The Social Impact Producer Tuesday, March 11

Unboxed Media & NITV: screening, The Tipping Points Wednesday, March 12 Mar

Shark Island Productions: Talk Tuesday, March 18

Feature film rough-cut screening: Terminus Wednesday, March 19

Feature film postproduction meeting: Skin Deep Saturday, March 29

Colonial First State: Entertainment Quarter meeting Monday, March 31

New Thought Productions: Feature film screening, Concealed Monday, March 31

Aboriginal Disability Network: Short film screening, Living My Way Monday, April 7

OZDOX (with ADG): Immersive Documentary Tuesday, April 8

Feature film script reading: Psychoanalysis Thursday, April 17

Project development: WOW award recipients Wednesday, May 7

Fine cut screening: Crushed Monday, May 12

OZDOX (with ADG) Wed 14 May

Colonial First State: Entertainment Quarter meeting Thursday, May 15

Australian Screen Directors Authorship Collecting Society Wednesday, May 21 (ASDACS): meeting

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The Trophy Thief: production meeting Saturday, May 24

Shark Island Productions & Documentary Australia: Tuesday, May 27 Good Pitch Australia event with screening

AFTRS Graduate films selected for ABC TV: Friday, June 6

Freshblood screening

Screening: Prank Wednesday, June 25

Australian Screen Directors Authorship Collecting Friday, June 27

Society (ASDACS): meeting

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APPENDIX 7

GUEST LECTURERS The AFTRS campus environment attracts industry members to lecture as guests in Award and Open Program courses across all disciplines and specialisations.

In 2013-14, Award Course guest lecturers included:

• Graduate Certificate: Melissa Anastasi, Curtis Fernandez, Lawrence Horne, Jocelyn Moorhouse, Danny Long, Raena Lea-Shannon, Cate Shortland, Mark Seton, Sylvia Wilczynski, Jamie Hediger, Michael Pickells, Michael Philips, Mark Stewart-Pearson, Yoomin Lee, Paul Nichola, Peter James, Ruth Cullen, Amin Palangi, Bamdad Erfanian Yeganeh, Tony Krawitz, Evelyn Saunders, Marten Dean, Danny Lachevre, Ester Harding, Carolyn Johnson, Pieter de Vries, Annamaria Talas, Max Bourke, Rebecca Barry, Peter Dasent, Geir Gunnarsson and Caitlin Yeo.

• Graduate Diploma: Kriv Stenders, Louise Fox, Seph McKenna, Tim Ferguson, Alex Williams, Simon Wood, Alan Flower, Robert Connelly, Mary Finsterer, Paul Healy, Peter Tonagh, Andrew Maiden, Duane Hatherly, Emma Snowden, David Booth, Melinda Doring, David Booth, Beverly Dunn, William Zappa, Ana Kokkinos, Sophie Hyde, Melissa Bruder, Megan Wedge, Peter Dasent, Antony Partos, Guy Gross, Stephen Rae, Caitlin Yeo, Simeon Bryan, Peter James, Steve Arnold, Chris Godfrey, Garry Phillips, Paul Nichola, Andrew Belletty, Wes Chew, Les Fiddess, Mark Franken, Luke Mynott, Martin Oswin, Jenny Ward, Will Ward, Heather Ogilvie, Amy Noble, Anni Browning, Peter Castaldi, Phil Hunt, Brendan McNamara, Lucy Cooper, Tracey Mair, Emma Snowden, Peter Tonagh, Ross Crowley, Kymn Niblock, Penny Win, Duane Hatherly, Leah Cooper and Josie Mason-Campbell.

• Master of Screen Arts: Ian Watson, Jessica Hobbs, Shirley Barrett, Lynette Wallworth, Miranda Harcourt, Galvin Scott Davis, Danny Lachevre, Jonathan Teplitzky, Cate Shortland and Charmian Gradwell.

• Screen Business: Paul McCarthy, Deb Verhoeven, Bob Campbell, John Borghetti, Kim Dalton, Jock Given, Mike Lynskey, Ashok Jacob, Helen O'Neil, Scott Dinsdale, Bob Connolly, Eva Cox, Rick Ellis, Kim Williams, Graeme Mason, John Frey, Grant Blackley, Cathryn McConaghy, John Doumani, Mark Kenny, Jenny Morawska, Meredith Edwards and Andrew Leigh MP.

• Radio: Alan Jones, Merrick Watts, Richard Kingsmill, Brendan Jones, Amanda Keller, Paul Murray, Sam Cavanagh, Tom Ivey and Angela Catterns.

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In 2013-14, AFTRS Open guest lecturers included:

• AFTRS Open Course Lecturers: Aaron Kirby, Adrian Wills, Alexa Wyatt, Alice Tynan, Andrew Gordon, Andy Day, Anna Tow, Anne Brooksbank, Babette Buster, Carly Wallace, Carol Cameron, Caroline Spencer, Claire Phillips, Clarissa House-Watson, Colm McNaughton, Damian Del Borrello, Dave King, David Forsyth, David Summons, David Whealy, Denise Eriksen, Devris Hasan, Dylan Blowen, Elissa Down, Ella Manning, Ellen Sandler, Ellery Ryan, Gaby Brown, Gareth Tillson, Genevieve Ginty , Glenn Fraser, Greg Fitzgerald, Greg Woodland, Jack McGrath, James Smith, Janine Cooper, Jason van Genderen, Jennifer Wilson, Jessica Campanaro, Jessica Hobbs, Jill Hewitt, Johannes Muljana, John Bisset, , John Gregory, John Harvey, Jon Bell, Jonathan Ogilvie, Julie Money, Jutta Goetze, Kate McLoughlin, Kimberley Duband, Kris Mrksa , Kristie Boerst, Lesley Holden, Lewis Morley, Linda Aronson, Lorelle Adamson, Louis Irving, Lucy Gaffy, Margaret Harvey, Maria Tran, Marie Patane, Mark Rogers, Mark Stewart-Pearson, Martha Goddard, Martin Corben , Martin Sacks, Matt Enfield, Matt McGowen, Matthew Luhn, Melanie Alexander, Melanie Withnall, Melissa Femia, Michael Philips, Miguel Zaragoza, Mike Bridges, Mikey Trotter, Monica Davidson, Nadia Townsend, Nathan Marsh, Paul Hawker, Rebecca Edwards, Rene Hernandez, Rob Macdonald, Rob Neil, Robin Hughes, Rodney Whitham, Roger Lanser, Rowan Woods, Sandra Alexander, Sarah Eddowes, Sophie Wiesner, Steve McDonald, Steve Vidler, Suzanne Mackay, Tait Brady, Thomas Heymann, Tim Chappel, Tim Ferguson, Tim Green, Tom Zubrycki, Tracey Spicer, Trent Bartfeld, Vicki Madden, Walter McIntosh, Warren Eagles.

• AFTRS Open Guest Lecturers: Annamaria Talas, Tasma Asmar, Sean Cook, Leesa Kahn, Blake Ayshford, Scott Lovelock, Chris Gordon, Michael Kalesniko, Frank Rodi, Jamie Hunt & Ross Turley, Dave Cole, Sonja Simec , Dr Nick Herd, Anni Browning, John Martin, Chris Harris, Nick Cole, Dave McEwan, Michael Bridges, Anna Steel, Colleen Clarke, Lianne Lee, Micha Hewson, Peter Newman, Adrian Brant, Josie Mason-Campbell, Edwina Waddy, Callum Metcalfe, Ben Ulm, Rob Wallace, Sue Smith, Bevan Lee, Karina Holden, Pieter De vries, Sue Clothier, Lile Judickas, Dione Gilmour, Tracey Hoddinett, Karren Gail, David Witt, Justine Gillmer, Chris Rose, Adrian Swift, Andrew Mulready, Jason Franklin, Angela Rapley, Michael Byers, Aaron Quirk, Rick Spence, Phil Craig, John Godfrey, Brendon Moo.

• AFTRS Open Program Guest Lecturers (Tailored training): Tony Shannon, Rob Duckworth, Carla Bignasca, Christopher North, Nikki Stevens, Frank Wang, Theresa Miller, Lisa Sweeney, John Pearson, Rob Duckworth, Theresa Miller, Nick Bennett, Christopher North, Carla Bignasca, John Pearson, Sophie Onikul.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

91

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

92 92

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STATEMENT BY COUNCIL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, as amended.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Film Television and Radio School will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Council.

Prof. Julianne Schultz Chair 29 August 2014

Sandra Levy Director 29 August 2014

Ann Browne Chief Financial Officer 29 August 2014

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NOTES 2014 2013

$000 $000

EXPENSES

Employee benefits 2A 17,572 17,223

Suppliers 2B 12,153 11,026

Depreciation and amortisation 2C 1,750 1,788

Write-down and impairment of assets 2D 40 (6)

TOTAL EXPENSES 31,515 30,031

Less:

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 3A 6,879 5,372

Interest 3B 212 254

Total own-source revenue 7,091 5,626

Gains

Net gains/(losses) from sale of assets 2E (5) (4)

TOTAL OWN-SOURCE INCOME 7,086 5,622

Net cost of services 24,429 24,409

Revenue from government 3C 24,429 24,411

Surplus - 2

Other comprehensive income - -

Total comprehensive income - 2

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME For The Year Ended 30 June 2014

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NOTES 2014 2013

$000 $000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 4A 7,318 6,893

Trade and other receivables 4B 1,694 1,594

Total financial assets 9,012 8,487

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 5A, B, C 8,404 9,107

Intangibles 5D 633 543

Other non-financial assets 5F 305 266

Total non-financial assets 9,342 9,916

TOTAL ASSETS 18,354 18,403

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 6 952 951

Other payables 7 4,033 4,137

Total payables 4,985 5,088

Provisions

Employees 8 2,532 2,478

Total Provisions 2,532 2,478

TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,517 7,566

NET ASSETS 10,837 10,837

EQUITY

Retained surplus 10,837 10,837

TOTAL ENTITY 10,837 10,837

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

AS AT 30 JUNE 2014

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Retained Earnings TOTAL EQUITY

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

Opening balance 10,837 10,835 10,837 10,835

Comprehensive income

Surplus for the period - 2 - 2

Closing balance as at 30 June 10,837 10,837 10,837 10,837

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

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NOTES 2014

$000

2013 $000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Receipts from Government 24,429 24,411

Sales of goods and rendering of services 6,769 5,368

Interest 200 253

Net GST received 1,046 1,094

Other 192 37

Total cash received 32,636 31,163

Cash used

Employees 18,696 18,294

Suppliers 12,067 10,912

Total cash used 30,763 29,206

Net cash from operating activities 9 1,873 1,957

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 55 53

Purchase of plant, equipment and intangibles (1,503) (1,659)

Net cash used by investing activities (1,448) (1,606)

Net increase / (decrease) in cash held 425 351

Cash at the beginning of the reporting period 6,893 6,542

Cash at the end of the reporting period 7,318 6,893

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CASH FLOW STATEMENT

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

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SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS

AS AT 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $000 2013

$000

BY TYPE

Commitments receivable

Net GST recoverable on commitments 4,087 4,555

Total commitments receivable 4,087 4,555

Commitments payable

Capital commitments Leasehold improvements 6 8

Total capital commitments 6 8

Other commitments

Operating leases1 44,433 49,487

Other commitments2 520 612

Total other commitments payable 44,953 50,099

Net commitments payable by type 40,872 45,552

BY MATURITY

Commitments receivable

Net GST recoverable on commitments

Within 1 year 498 499

Between 1 to 5 years 1,896 1,892

More than 5 years 1,693 2,164

Total commitments receivable 4,087 4,555

Commitments payable

Operating lease commitments

Within 1 year 5,151 5,147

Between 1 to 5 years 20,663 20,534

More than 5 years 18,619 23,806

Total operating leases commitments 44,433 49,487

Capital commitments

Within 1 year 6 8

Total capital commitments 6 8

Other commitments

Within 1 year 322 333

Between 1 to 5 years 198 279

Total other commitments 520 612

Total commitments payable 44,959 50,107

Net commitments payable by maturity 40,872 45,552

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NB: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. 1 Operating leases included are non-cancellable and comprise of leases for office accommodation, motor vehicles, and office equipment.

2 Other commitments primarily comprise of contracts for security and cleaning services.

The previous schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENCIES

As At 30 June 2014

There is no event since financial year end to the date of this report which has the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of AFTRS. (2013 Nil)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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INDEX TO THE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE DESCRIPTION

1 Summary of significant accounting policies

2 Expenses and asset disposals

3 Income

4 Financial assets

5 Non-financial assets

6 Suppliers

7 Other payables

8 Provisions

9 Cash flow reconciliation

10 Contingent liabilities and assets

11 Remuneration of council members

12 Council-related party disclosures

13 Senior executives remuneration

14 Remuneration of auditors

15 Fair value measurements

16 Financial instruments

17 Assets held in trust

18 Reporting of outcomes

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1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Objective of AFTRS AFTRS is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of AFTRS is to provide advanced education and training to advance the skills and knowledge of talented individuals to meet the evolving needs of Australia’s screen and broadcast industries.

It is structured to meet one outcome: To support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast industry culture in Australia including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training and research.

The continued existence of AFTRS in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for AFTRS' administration and programs.

1.2 Basis of preparation of the financial statements The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: a) Finance Minister’s Orders (or FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian

Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statement has been prepared on an accrual basis and is in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statement is presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financil position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to AFTRS or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, revenues and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when, and only when, the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

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1.3 Significant accounting judgements and estimates No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

1.4 Changes in Australian Accounting Standards Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standards requirements AASB13 (Fair Value Measurement) has been adopted in the current period without last year comparatives. No new accounting standards, amendments to standards and interpretations issued by the Australian accounting standards Board that are applicable in the current period have had a material financial effect on AFTRS. No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements New standards, amendments to standards, and interpretations that are applicable to future periods are regularly issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board. It is estimated that adopting these pronouncements, when effective, will have no material impact on future reporting periods.

1.5 Revenue Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyers; b) AFTRS retains no managerial involvement nor effective control over the goods; c) the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and d) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to

AFTRS.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised proportionately over the lives of the contracts and is recognised when: a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to AFTRS.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectibility of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectibility of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue, all from short term bank deposits, is recognised on an accrual basis at applicable interest rates.

Revenues from Government Funding appropriated to AFTRS as a CAC Act body payment for Departmental outputs for the year are recognised as Revenue from Government.

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1.6 Gains Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Employee benefits Liabilities for short-term employee benefits (as defined in AASB 119) and termination benefits due within twelve months of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefit liabilities are measured at the present value of estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provisions for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as it is non-vesting and the average sick leave to be taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined internally as at 30 June. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases.

Separation and Redundancy Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. AFTRS recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and where appropriate has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Superannuation Most staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap). Staff who are not members of these schemes are covered by other superannuation schemes of their choice.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

AFTRS makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost of the superannuation entitlements. These are accounted for as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

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The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions accrued to that date.

1.8 Leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. AFTRS has no finance leases.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.9 Cash Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include: a) cash on hand; b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

1.10 Financial assets AFTRS has only one class of financial assets (other than cash detailed above), being trade receivables and other receivables. They are with fixed or determinable payments and not quoted in an active market, with maturities of less than 12 months after the reporting date.

1.11 Impairment of financial assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. No impairments are reported.

Receivables are recognised at the amounts due. Impairment adjustment is made when collection of the receivable or part thereof is judged to be unlikely.

1.12 Payables Trade creditors and accruals are recognised at their amortised amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received.

1.13 Contingent assets and liabilities Contingent assets and liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to their existence or situation where the amount cannot be reliably measured. They are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote or probable but not virtually certain.

1.14 Acquisition of assets Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

1.15 Leasehold improvements, plant & equipment Asset recognition threshold Purchases of fixed assets are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for items costing less than $2,000 which are expensed in the year of

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acquisition (other than where they are parts of a group and have to be acquired as such and exceed that amount in total).

Revaluations Fixed assets are carried at fair value, measured at depreciated replacement cost, revalued with sufficient frequency by internal staff with appropriate technical knowledge such that the carrying amount of each asset is not materially different, at reporting date, from its fair value. A revaluation review was carried out in June 2013, covering all fixed assets except for motor vehicles. No revaluation adjustments were considered necessary. This has been reviewed and approved by the Council of AFTRS.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount.

Depreciation and amortisation Depreciable plant, equipment and motor vehicles are written-off over their estimated useful lives to AFTRS using, in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation/amortisation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2014 2013

Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

Motor vehicles 7 years 7 years

Intangibles 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

Leashold improvements lease terms lease terms

107

Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment as at 30 June. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is its depreciated replacement cost.

1.16 Intangibles These comprise of externally developed software for internal use and are carried at cost. Modification costs are included where appropriate.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis. All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

1.17 Taxation AFTRS is exempt from all forms of taxation except for fringe benefits tax (FBT) and the goods and services tax (GST).

Receivables and payables stated are inclusive of GST where applicable. Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except where the GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office.

1.18 Foreign currency Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the exchange rate at the date of settlement. Associated currency gains and losses on foreign currency receivables and payables at balance date are not material.

1.19 Events After the Balance Sheet Date There is no event since financial year end to the date of this report which has the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of AFTRS.

1.20 Comparative figures Comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation in these financial statements where required.

1.21 Rounding Amounts have been rounded to the nearest $1,000 except in relation to the following: > Remuneration of council members; > Remuneration of officers (other than council members); and > Remuneration of auditors.

108

2014

$000

2013

$000

2. EXPENSES 2A. Employee expenses

Wages and salaries 13,730 13,216

Superannuation

Defined benefit plans 534 528

Defined contribution plans 1,641 1,539

Leave and other benefits 1,661 1,693

Separation and redundancy 6 247

Total employee expenses 17,572 17,223

2B. Suppliers

Goods & services

Consultants 170 280

Contractors 878 689

Stationery 290 255

Repairs & maintenance 2,236 1,397

Utilities 645 637

Building services 325 306

Travel

352 402

Marketing 908 784

Others 1,463 1,469

Total goods & services 7,267 6,219

Goods & services are made up of:

Provision of goods by external entities 3,222 3,051

Rendering of services by federal government entities 233 154

Rendering of services by external entities 3,812 3,014

Total goods & services 7,267 6,219

Other supplier expenses

Operating lease rentals to external entities 4,579 4,505

Workers compensation premiums to federal government entities 307 302

Total other supplier expenses 4,886 4,807

Total supplier expenses 12,153 11,026

109

2C. Depreciation and amortisation

2014

$000

2013

$000

Depreciation Leasehold improvements 541 495

Plant and equipment 977 1,146

Motor vehicles 9 20

Total depreciation 1,527 1,661

Amortisation Computer software 223 127

Total amortisation 223 127

Total depreciation and amortisation 1,750 1,788

2D. Writedown of assets Impairment of receivable / (allowance written back) 20 (6)

Fixed assets written off 20 -

40 (6)

2E. Gains & losses from asset disposals Equipment

Proceeds from disposal 11 -

Carrying value of assets sold (5) -

Gains from disposal of equipment 6 -

Motor vehicles Proceeds from disposal 39 48

Carrying value of assets sold (50) (52)

Loss from disposal of motor vehicles 11 4

Total proceeds from disposal 50 48

Total carrying value of assets sold (55) (52)

Total net losses from disposals of assets (5) (4)

110

2014

$000

2013

$000

3. OWN-SOURCE INCOME

3A. Sale of goods and rendering of services

Sale of goods

Federal government entities 4 10

External entities 16 5

20 15

Rendering of services

Federal government entities 27 4

External entities 6,832 5,353

6,859 5,357

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 6,879 5,372

3B. Interest

Interest on deposits 212 254

3C. Revenue from Government

Attorney General Department CAC Act body payment item 24,429 24,411

111

2014 $000

2013 $000

4. FINANCIAL ASSETS

4A. Cash

Cash at bank 7,315 6,890

Cash on hand 3 3

Total cash 7,318 6,893

4B. Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables from

Related entities 1,254 1,343

External entities 195 6

Total receivables for goods and services 1,449 1,349

Other receivables

Student debtors 122 86

Interest receivable 18 6

GST receivable 120 149

Other receivable 5 4

Total other receivables 265 245

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,714 1,594

Less : Impairment allowance for other receivables (20) -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1,694 1,594

All receivables are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Trade and other receivables (gross) are aged as follows

Not overdue 1,714 1,594

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,714 1,594

Impairment allowance is aged as follows :

Overdue by :

Less than 30 days (20) -

Total impairment allowance (20) -

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance for goods and services receivables

Opening balance - (6)

Amounts written off -

Amounts recovered and reversed 6

Increase/(Decrease) recognised in net cost of services (20) -

Closing balance (20) -

112

2014

$000

2013

$000

5. NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

5A. Leasehold improvements

Fair value 7,007 6,848

Accumulated depreciation (2,442) (1,901)

Total leasehold improvements 4,565 4,947

5B. Plant and Equipment

Fair value 13,622 16,022

Accumulated depreciation (9,806) (11,944)

Total plant & equipment 3,816 4,078

5C. Motor vehicles

At valuation 169 239

Accumulated depreciation (146) (157)

Total motor vehicles 23 82

Total infrastructure, equipment & vehicles 8,404 9,107

5D. Intangibles (Computer software purchased)

At cost 1,593 1,313

Accumulated amortisation (960) (770)

Total intangibles 633 543

No indicators of impairment were found for above non-financial assets. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the policy in note 1.

113

5E. Analysis of Leasehold Improvements, Plant, Equipment & Intangibles

Leasehold improvements Equipment Motor

vehicles

Intangibles (Software purchased)

TOTAL

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances (2013-14)

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 6,848 16,022 239 1,313 24,422

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (1,901) (11,944) (157) (770) (14,772)

Net book value 1 July 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

Additions by purchase 159 741 - 312 1,212

Transfer - (12) - 12 -

Depreciation / amortisation expense (541) (977) (9) (223) (1,750)

Disposals

Written off - (9) - (11) (20)

Other disposals - (5) (50) - (55)

Net movements during the year (382) (262) (59) 90 (613)

Net book value 30 June 2014 4,565 3,816 23 633 9,037

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by

Gross book value 7,007 13,622 169 1,593 22,391

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (2,442) (9,806) (146) (960) (13,354)

4,565 3,816 23 633 9,037

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances (2012-13)

As at 1 July 2012

Gross book value 6,365 15,351 283 1,008 23,007

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (1,406) (10,857) (164) (643) (13,070)

Net book value 1 July 2012 4,959 4,494 119 365 9,937

Additions by purchase 489 724 35 305 1,553

Transfer (6) 6 - - -

Depreciation / amortisation expense (495) (1,146) (20) (127) (1,788)

Disposals -

Written off -

- - - -

Other disposals - - (52) - (52)

Net movements during the year (12) (416) (37) 178 (287)

Net book value 30 June 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by

Gross book value 6,848 16,022 239 1,313 24,422

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation

(1,901) (11,944) (157) (770) (14,772)

Netbook value 30 June 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

114

2014 $000

2013 $000

5F. Other non-financial assets

Prepayments 305 266

All prepayments are expected to be recovered within 12 months

6. SUPPLIERS

Trade creditors and accruals - external entities 926 903

Trade creditors and accruals - related entities 22 43

Operating lease rentals - external entities 4 5

952 951

All supplier payables are current. Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

7. OTHER PAYABLES

Deferred income 1,825 1,817

Accruals and sundry payables 2 2

Lease incentive 1,587 1,772

Salaries, wages, and superannuation 619 546

4,033 4,137

All other payables are current.

8. PROVISIONS

Annual leave 1,011 951

Long service leave 1,521 1,442

Redundancy - 85

Aggregate employee provisions 2,532 2,478

Employee provisions expected to be settled in

No more than 12 months 1,157 1,247

More than 12 months 1,375 1,231

2,532 2,478

115

2014 $000

2013 $000

9. CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION Reconciliation of cash per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statement Cash as per cash flow statement 7,318 6,893

Cash as per statement of financial position 7,318 6,893

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities Net cost of services - 2

Adjustment for non-cash items Depreciation & amortisation 1,750 1,788

Write-down of assets 20 -

Losses (gains) on disposal of assets 5 4

Increase / (decrease) in doubtful debt provision 20 (6)

Lease incentive liability discharged (185) (185)

Changes in assets and liabilities (Increase) / decrease in receivables (120) 16

(Increase) / decrease in other assets (39) (7)

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions 54 63

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables 163 212

Increase / (decrease) in other payables 205 70

Net cash from operating activities 1,873 1,957

10. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND ASSETS AFTRS is not aware of the existence of any potential claim which might impact on its financial affairs.

11. REMUNERATION OF COUNCIL MEMBERS The number of AFTRS Council members are shown below in the relevant remuneration bands less than $29,999 5 8

$30,000 - $59,999 3 1

Total number of AFTRS council members 8 9

$ $

Total remuneration received or due and receivable by AFTRS Council members 187,887 166,341

The Council of AFTRS consists of the Director of the School as well as staff and student representatives and persons independent of the School. The Director and staff representative receive no additional remuneration for these duties and are hence excluded from above figures. Commencing in 2013, under advice from the Remuneration Tribunal, the student representative became entitled to a remuneration.

12. COUNCIL RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

There was no other related party transaction nor benefit during 2013-14 and 2012-13.

116

2014 $

2013 $

13. SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

13A. Senior Executive Remuneration Expenses for the Reporting Period

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary 1,196,743 1,135,188

Performance bonus 45,675 25,753

Other (fringe benefits) 162,482 133,090

Total short-term employee benefits 1,404,900 1,294,031

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 147,485 130,225

Total post-employment benefits 147,485 130,225

Other long-term employee benefits

Annual leave accrued 92,281 88,042

Long-service leave 20,467 19,109

Total other long-term employee benefits 112,748 107,151

Termination benefits - -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 1,665,133 1,531,407

Notes: 1. Note 13A is prepared on an accrual basis (therefore the performance bonus expenses disclosed above may differ from the cash 'Bonus paid' in Note 13B). 2.Note 13A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed as a senior executive was less than $195,000

117

Substantive senior executives Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³ Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

Average annual reportable remuneration¹ No. $ $ $ $ $

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2014 Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 2 110,268 12,058 - - 122,326

$195,000 to $224,999 4 192,196 24,586 - - 216,782

$255,000 to $284,999 1 242,025 17,057 - - 259,082

$345,000 to $374,999 1 303,862 32,083 - 14,675 350,620

Total number of substantive senior executives 8

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2013

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 3 97,357 12,344 - - 109,701

$195,000 to $224,999 4 184,666 20,626 - - 205,292

$255,000 to $284,999 1 239,143 19,116 - - 258,259

$285,000 to $314,999 1 249,582 28,604 - 4,753 282,939

Total number of substantive senior executives 9

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. Reportable salary includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ for tax purposes); c) exempt foreign employment income; and d) reportable employer superannuation contributions. 3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to AFTRS for the provision of superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable

remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on individuals’ payment summaries. 5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. It may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving AFTRS during the financial year. Bonuses salary sacrificed are included in reportable salaries.

13B. Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

118

13C. Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Other Highly Paid Staff during the Reporting Period

Average annual reportable remuneration¹ Other highly paid staff Reportable

salary²

Contributed superannuation³ Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total

reportable remuneration

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2014

Total number of other highly paid staff - - - - - -

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2013

Total number of other highly paid staff - - - - - -

119

2014 $

2013 $

14. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

Remuneration (net of GST) to the Australian National Audit Office for auditing financial statements for the reporting periods 45,000 43,000

No other services were provided by the Australian National Audit Office during the reporting periods.

120

15. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability .

15A. Recurring fair value measurements ($000)

Fair value measurements for assets and liabilities at the end of the current reporting period by hierarchy

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

Fair value Level 1 inputs

Level 2 inputs

Level 3 inputs

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 8,404 8,404

Total non-financial assets subject to regular fair value assessment 8,404 - - 8,404

The highest and best use of all non-financial assets are the same as their current use.

15B. Level 1 and Level 2 transfers for recurring fair value measurements

There were no inter-level transfers during the year

15C. Reconciliation from opening balances to closing balances for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements ($000)

Leasehold improvements Equipment Motor

vehicles

Total

Opening balance 4,947 4,078 82 9,107

Transfers into Level 3 - - - -

Transfers out of Level 3 - - - -

Reclassification - (12) - (12)

Total gains or losses for the period

Depreciation (541) (991) (59) (1,591)

Included in other comprehensive income

- - - -

Purchases, issues, sales and settlements

Purchases 159 741 - 900

Issues - - - -

Sales - - - -

Settlements - - - -

Closing balance 4,565 3,816 23 8,404

121

15D. Valuation technique and inputs for Level 3 fair value measurements Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities at the end of the current reporting period

Fair value $000

Valuation technique

1

Significant unobservable inputs Range

2

Sensitivity of fair value measurement to changes in significant unobservable inputs

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 4,565

Depreciated replacement cost Original cost is adjusted with an inflation factor (determined from quotations on significant items) to compensate for currency fluctuations and cost variations, less accumulated depreciation to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of assets

10 - 15 years (weighted average 7.9%)

Significant unobservable inputs used are obsolescence and inflation

Inflation factor 2.5%

Significant variations in any of those inputs in isolation could result in a significantly lower or higher fair value measurement.

Equipment 3,816

Depreciated replacement cost Current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation on such cost to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of assets

3 - 10

years (weighted average 14.3%)

Significant unobservable input used is obsolescence, any substantial variations could result in a significantly lower or higher fair value measurement.

Motor vehicles 23

Depreciated replacement cost Current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation on such cost to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit

7 years (14.3%)

Due to the minor value of this asset class, any variations in value are deemed immaterial

1 No change in valuation technique occurred during the period. 2 Significant unobservable inputs only.

Valuation Process Fixed assets are carried at fair value, measured at depreciated replacement cost, revalued by internal staff with appropriate technical knowledge such that the carrying amount of each asset is not materially different, at reporting date, from its fair value. No revaluation adjustments were considered necessary. This has been reviewed and approved by the Council of AFTRS.

122

Floating Interest Rate

Fixed Interest Rate Maturing in 1 Year or Less

Non-Interest Bearing

Total

Notes

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

Financial Assets

Loans and receivables

Cash at bank 4A 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 - - 7,315 6,890

Cash on hand 4A - - - - 3 3 3 3

Receivables for goods and services 4B* - - - - 1,449 1,349 1,449 1,349

Other receivables 4B* - - - - 145 96 145 96

Total 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 1,597 1,448 8,912 8,338

Carrying amount of financial assets 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 1,597 1,448 8,912 8,338

Total Assets 18,354 18,403

Payables

At amortised cost:

Trade creditors 6 - - - - 952 951 952 951

Other payables 7 - - - - 1,827 1,819 1,827 1,819

Carrying amount of financial liabilities

- - - - 2,779 2,770 2,779 2,770

Total Liabilities 7,517 7,566

16. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (a) Categories of financial assets and liabilities

* After excluding GST and impairment allowance

123

(b) Net fair values of financial assets & liabilities Financial assets The net fair values of cash, deposits on call and non-interest bearing monetary financial assets approximate their carrying amounts.

Financial liabilities The net fair values of trade creditors, all of which are short term in nature, approximate their carrying amounts.

(c) Net income from financial assets / liabilities

Note

3B

2014 $000

2013 $000

Interest income from bank deposits 212 254

Net income from financial assets and liabilities 212 254

(d) Fee income and expense There was no fee income or expense arising from financial instruments in the year ending 30 June 2014

(e) Credit risk exposures AFTRS has no past due nor impaired financial assets. Exposure to credit risk is minimal as the majority of financial assets are receivable from the Australian Government and bank deposits where potential of default is unlikely. Other receivables consists of student fees and trade receivable with adequate provision for foreseeable uncollectibility. The maximum exposure to such minor assets is their total values (2014: $1,551,000; 2013: $1,435,000)

(f) Liquidity risk AFTRS' liabilities are mostly trade payables and provisions for employees benefits. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the probability that AFTRS will encounter difficulty in meeting its financial obligations which is highly unlikely due to appropriations funding, internal policies and procedures in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

(g) Market risk exposures Market risks include those from interest rate, currency and other price risks which might cause the fair value of future cash flows to fluctuate because of changes in market prices. AFTRS' exposures to currency and other price risks are minimal. Basic bank deposits held are subject to the usual interest rate risk associated with short term investments with floating rates.

124

17. ASSETS HELD IN TRUST Purpose - Monies provided by Kenneth & Andrew Myer to fund study activities including annual Indigenous scholarship and advancement of the role of the creative producer.

The trust is administered by Merlyn Asset Management Pty Ltd at the discretion of the AFTRS Council.

2014 $000

2013 $000

Trust funds managed by AFTRS

Fund opening balance 1,600 1,324

Distribution received 59 67

Interest 1 1

Increase / (decrease) in value of investment 207 263

Imputation refund received 26 25

Scholarships (80) (80)

Fund closing balance 1,813 1,600

Represented by :

Cash management fund 47 41

Equities fund 1,766 1,559

Total funds managed by Merlyn Asset Management Pty Ltd 1,813 1,600

125

18. REPORTING OF OUTCOMES AFTRS is structured for the delivery of one outcome which is detailed in section 1.1 of this note. 18B. Net cost of outcome delivery

Outcome 1

2014 $000

2013 $000

Expenses 31,520 30,035

Income from non government sector

Activities subject to cost recovery (6,879) (5,372)

Other

Interest (212) (254)

Other revenue - -

Total (7,091) (5,626)

Net cost 24,429 24,409

18C. Major classes of expenses, income, assets, and liabilities by outcome

Operating expenses

Employee benefits 17,572 17,223

Suppliers 12,153 11,026

Depreciation and amortisation 1,750 1,788

Write-down and impairment of assets 45 (2)

Total operating expenses 31,520 30,035

Funded by :

Revenue from government 24,429 24,411

Sale of goods and rendering of services 6,879 5,372

Interest 212 254

Other revenue - -

Total operating revenues 31,520 30,037

Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 7,318 6,893

Trade and other receivables 1,694 1,594

Property, plant and equipment 8,404 9,107

Intangibles 633 543

Other non-financial assets 305 266

TOTAL ASSETS 18,354 18,403

Liabilities

Payables 4,985 5,088

Provisions 2,532 2,478

TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,517 7,566

126

INDEX A

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, 11, 31, 57 Academic Board, 23, 51-2 The Academic Video Essay, 37 Adelaide Film Festival, 11, 34 administrative tribunals, 65 AFTRS Award 2000, 62 AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011, 62 All God's Creatures, 11, 27 alumni, 12, 29 applications, 17, 25, 36 appointments. see Academic Board; staff APS Statistical Bulletin, 64 Asia-Pacific Association (CAPA), 41 associations (industry), 39-40 ASTRA. see Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association Auditor-General, 65 Australian Centre of Moving Image (ACMI), 33 Australian Cinematographers Society Awards, 39 Australian Directors Guild Awards, 12, 27, 28 Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973, 14, 18, 47, 68 Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy, 42, 62 Australian International Documentary Conference, 11, 34 Australian Journal of Screen Arts and Business. see LUMINA Australian Production Design Guild Awards, 39 Australian Screen Sound Guild Awards, 39 Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program, 10, 20, 33, 40 Australian Writers’ Guild Awards, 39 A.V. Myer Indigenous Award, 41 award course program, 19 awards (events), 39 awards (students), 41, 75-6

B

BA (Screen), 10, 23, 24 Beyond The Great Wall: Pathways to Australia / China Co-Productions, 37, 39 Busan International Film Festival, 11, 27 By This River, 12, 27

C

The case for creating an Australian Copyright Registry, 37, 38 certificate courses. see graduate certificates Chair introduction, 5-7 letter to Minister, 2

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), 53, 65

127

children's courses, 30 CILECT (Centre International de Liaison des Ecoles de Cinéma et de Télévision), 11, 41 Client Relationship Management system, 43 Comcover, 66, 70 Commercial Radio Australia (CRA), 33 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, 50, 65, 68 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Regulations 1997, 50 Commonwealth Disability Strategy, 64 Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011, 65 communication (workplace), 43 complaints, 57 completions, 25 compliance, 42 conferences, 61 content management systems, 43contractors, 71 contracts, 42, 70 Coral: Rekindling Venus, 6 Corporate Governance Handbook, 47 Corporate Plan, 18 Council, 47-52 courses. see also award course program; graduate certificates; graduate diplomas; masters program; Open Program; short courses new, 10, 24 short, 10-11, 14, 19, 29, 30, 31, 38, 43, 44 Creating and Producing TV Formats and Legal Essentials, 31 Creative Fellowship, 6, 12, 36-7 curriculum, 12, 24

D

Developing a Television Series, 30 diploma courses. see graduate diplomas discipline specific events, 39-40 Do Your Students Have a Clue? The Alternate Reality Game as Pedagogical Tool, 37, 41

E

Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis-Lumière, 11, 41 ecologically sustainable development, 66 Education Division, 23, 24 employment awards and agreements, 62 Engage or Perish: Talk Radio’s Future, 37 enrolments, 17, 25, 30

Enterprise Award, 62 Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 66 environmental performance reporting, 66-7 environmental protection and biodiversity conservation, 66

equal employment opportunity (EEO), 57 establishment act, 14, 18, 47, 68 European Union Travelling Scholarship, 41 events, 34, 39-40. see also Friday on My Mind executive team, 53, 57

128

F

Facing the Machine, 10, 32 Fair Work Act 2009, 42, 62 festivals, 34-5 Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee, 50-1, 65, 70 financial performance, 69-71 Finding Animation, 30 Foundation Diploma, 9, 10, 19, 20, 25, 33, 40 graduates, 20-1, 26, 72, 76 Foxtel, 10, 20, 31, 34 Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent, 41 Frameline, 11, 28 fraud control, 65 freedom of information, 64 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 64 Friday on My Mind, 11, 33, 34, 35, 77-80 Future Review Committee, 52

G

General Policy Orders, 65 Gods of Egypt, 20, 41 Governor-General, 47 graduate achievements, 20-1, 26-9

graduate certificates, 19 graduate diplomas, 19, 20 Graduate Diploma in Radio, 22, 23, 39, 41 graduate screening program, 2013, 26 graduates 2013, 72-4 graduation 2013, 26 The Great Gatsby, 20 guest lectures, 87-8 guiding principles, 14 guilds, 39-40

H

Health and Safety Committee, 43, 62, 63 Heartland Festival (USA), 11 Higher Education Support Act 2003, 24 The Hollywood Reporter, 9, 19

How the Light Gets In, 11, 27

I

incident reports, 64 indemnities, 66 Indigenous Program, 10, 11, 31-2, 34 industrial relations, 62 industry engagement, 38 events, 39, 83-6 guilds and associations, 39-40 short courses, 30

129

Industry Program, 30 Information Publication Scheme, 64 insurance premiums, 66, 70 internships, 40 Iron Hands, 20

J

Journal of Screen Arts and Business. see LUMINA judicial decisions, 65

K

Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Exceptional Talent, 41 Kenneth B Myer Award for Project Development, 41 key performance indicators (KPIs) program 1.1, 15-17

L

lecturers, guest, 87-8 legislation (enabling), 14, 18, 47, 68 library services, 37-8, 43 Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines, 37, 41Love, Death, Film and Music, 37 LUMINA, 6, 12, 35, 36

M

Master of Screen Arts and Business (MSAB), 6, 19, 23 Master of Screen Arts (MSA), 19, 22, 26 graduates, 74 lecturers, 87 masters program, 19, 22-3, 26 Ministerial directions, 65

N

Nashville Film Festival, 11, 27 National Centre for Indigenous Excellence, 10, 31, 34 National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, 64 National Film and Sound Archives (NFSA), 35

National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA), 33 National Program, 30 New York University, Tisch School of Arts, 11, 40 non-award courses, 29-30

O

occupational health and safety (OH & S). see work health and safety (WHS) Open Program, 6, 10, 11, 15, 19, 31, 37, 38, 44 organisation chart, 54

130

P

Palm Springs International Shortfest, 11, 26, 27, 28, 29 part-time courses. see graduate certificates partnerships, 33-4 portfolio budget statements key performance indicators, 15-17 outcome 1, 15 post-graduate program. see graduate certificates; graduate diplomas privacy, 65 Privacy Act 1988, 42, 65 procurement, 42, 70-1 Producing/Commercialisation/Distributing/Marketing Curricula: New Formats, 41 production resources, 44 Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013, 42 Public Program, 35, 77-80 purpose, 14

Q

quality assurance. see Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA)

R

radio Graduate Diploma in Radio, 22, 23, 39, 41 Radio Internships, 41 Reel Sunday, 35 research, 37 Rouben Mamoulian Award, 12, 28

S

scholarships, 41 Schools and Children Program, 31 Screen Australia, 29, 33

Talent Escalator program, 40, 76 Screen Division, 23 Screen Queensland, 10, 31, 34, 35 Screenworks Northern Rivers, 10, 31, 34, 35 Shanghai Media Group, 11, 31 Shaping the Film Edit: Editing, Technology and Curriculum Invited Guest, 41 Shark Island Foundation Documentary Prize, 41 Shine Australia, 10, 21, 40, 76 short courses, 10-11, 14, 19, 29, 30, 31, 38, 43, 44 Sleepwalking, 37 South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC), 30, 33, 35 Specialist Division, 23 St Kilda Film Festival, 12, 26, 35 staff appointments, 57 consultation, 63 merit selection, 57 profile, 58-60 review of structure, 42

131

training and development, 61-2, 63-4 women, 57 State of the Service Report (APS), 64 strategic direction, 18 Student Centre, 25, 42 Sydney Film Festival, 11, 12, 28, 34, 35 Sydney Writers’ Festival, 11, 34

T

teaching divisions, 23 Television Unit, 30 Tertiary Education Quality Standards Act 2011, 24 Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA), 12 Tisch School of Arts (NYU), 11, 40

Torres Strait Islanders. see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders training and development, staff, 61-2, 63-4 TV Talks, 81-2

U

UMI Arts, 10, 31, 34, 35 Unbroken, 20, 41 undergraduate courses, 19 Underground Film Festival, NYC, 11, 27

V

video-post, 44 vision, 14

W

website, 16, 43 whistleblower service, 43 Wolverine, 20, 41 work and private commitments, 61 work health and safety (WHS), 43, 62-3 Work Health and Safety (WHS) Act 2011, 43 workplace culture, 43 workplace diversity, 57

WOW Film Festival, 39

132

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LETTER FROM THE CHAIR

29 August 2014

Senator the Hon George Brandis QC Minister for the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister It is with great pleasure that I present the Annual Report for the Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) for the financial year ended 30 June 2014.

The Annual Report 2013-14 has been prepared in line with Section 9 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011. The report was adopted by resolution of the Council of AFTRS on August 29 2014.

The School has had another successful year and acknowledges the ongoing support and assistance of the Minister for the Arts, his office and the Ministry for the Arts. Yours sincerely

Yours sincerely

Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA Chair of Council

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CONTENTS Chair’s Introduction 4

CEO’s Perspective 8

Vision and Purpose 14

Portfolio Budget Statements and Key Performance Indicators 2013-14 15

Strategic Direction 18

Educate and Create 19

Engagement and Participation 33

Leadership, Collaboration and Support 36

Performance and Accountability 42

Corporate Governance 46

Council 48

Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee 51 Academic Board 52

Future Review Committee 52

Future Review and Research Committee 52

Executive 53

Statutory Reports 56

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) 57

Staffing Establishment and Appointments 57

Industrial Relations 62

Work Health and Safety 62

Staff Training and Development 63

Freedom of Information 64

Privacy 65

Judicial Decisions and Reviews by Outside Bodies 65 Ministerial Directions 65

Fraud Control 65

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers 66

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 66

Appendices Enabling Legislation 68

Financial Resource Summary 69

AFTRS Graduates 2013 72

Supporter Awards to Students 75

Public Program 77

Industry Events 83

Guest Lecturers 87

Financial Statements 90

Index 126

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CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION

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CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION When the Australian Film, Television and Radio School was established as the nation’s elite education and training body in 1972, it was the beginning of a remarkable period. Over the following decades Australian film, television and radio grew and flourished, bringing Australian stories to life for audiences at home and abroad.

AFTRS graduates have been central to this development. As leaders, visionaries, creative professionals and technical experts they have put their stamp on the nation, and the world.

Today AFTRS is internationally recognised as one of the best film schools in the world. Its graduates are renowned for their creativity and entrepreneurship, and as important and valuable contributors across all aspects of an increasingly global industry.

Forty years on the media industry is very different. It will continue to change in the coming years as the new imperatives of the digital era disrupt traditional business models, methods of production and relationships with audiences. This is an uncertain and challenging time, but it is also one of huge opportunity, especially for AFTRS, its graduates and students.

Screens are more important than ever. There are more of them and they come in many different sizes with different capacities and requirements. The digital era is above all a screen-based age, and while this presents real challenges for many sections of the media industry it also presents previously unimagined opportunities. There are countless new ways to communicate, to tell stories and to reach and interact with audiences.

One thing is certain: the need for talented and creative people to produce the content that will fill these screens is greater than ever.

The skills that will be needed to do this include many of those that have traditionally been taught at AFTRS, but go further.

Over the past two years AFTRS has been actively considering how it needs to change to truly be a school for the 21st century. Strategic planning sessions considered what the future may be like, and the skills, attributes and knowledge graduates will need to thrive in this exciting, rapidly changing sector.

Council has actively engaged with the strategic vision developed by the Chief Executive, Sandra Levy, to regenerate AFTRS and redesign the teaching programs to better meet these needs. It has been an intense project, but an exciting and stimulating one. Sandra has engaged with staff and the industry to produce a new model of teaching, a model that emphasises practical skills, technical knowledge, cultural understanding and an adaptive, entrepreneurial spirit. This is the important first step in ensuring that the School remains central to the sectors it serves for the next 40 years.

As this Annual Report is the last to be to be published under Sandra Levy’s leadership, it is timely to acknowledge her achievements and vision for the future of the School, as well as her success in crafting that future while continuing to deliver extensive award and short courses at the highest possible levels.

CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION

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Over the past year, Sandra Levy has worked closely with staff, teams from industry and educational specialists to develop new curricula. Commencing in February 2015 AFTRS will offer a three-year Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree. This award course will provide students with a broad-based screen education and equip them with the practical and conceptual skills needed to work on different platforms, enriched by a creative and global perspective.

The Specialist Program will offer diplomas and advanced diplomas in key areas, including Radio. The Specialist Program is targeted at those who need to reskill, or to extend existing skills in industry specialisations. These courses will provide sub-degree qualifications and, while entry will continue to be based upon merit-selection, the program will enable greater access to industry based training and education opportunities through flexible delivery.

During her seven-year term, Sandra Levy has increased access to education and training opportunities for the best merit-selected students. This year was no exception. AFTRS is justly proud of its 2013 Graduation; 246 students graduated from 20 different courses, including the first intake of the Masters of Screen Arts and Business, who are likely to become the next generation of industry leaders. Many graduates receive generous internships and awards from industry, demonstrating its recognition of the standard of AFTRS training and the ability of its students to make an immediate contribution.

Through revitalised and sustainable Open Program short courses, opportunities have been extended to the screen and radio industries as well as a wide range of participants from education, (including school children), corporations, and Indigenous communities. In 2013-14, the Open Program demonstrated its outreach capacity by training more than 5,000 people across Australia, with a further 3,200 participants attending corporate training programs. Through outstanding management and marketing, the program delivers increased revenue that is re-invested in the School’s education and training activities. This year, for the first time, the Open Program contributed a profit to the School’s budget, which delivered a break-even result.

Under Sandra Levy’s leadership AFTRS has become much more than a globally recognised national film school; it has become a truly national cultural institution, and one that supports industry, collaborates with arts and educational institutions, and welcomes everyone who is interested in participating in the cultural life of screen and radio. The distinctive Public Program of screenings, discussions, and debate with media content makers creates an environment where innovative content and creative businesses can not only develop, but thrive. These initiatives, coupled with the Australian journal of screen arts and business, LUMINA, and the Creative Fellowship, that supports recipients to research and create experimental screen content, demonstrate the breadth of AFTRS’ role. The broader screen and radio industry is enlivened by such cultural activity and engagement which allows considered reflection of the past and bold imagination of possible futures.

External recognition of creative excellence was again pleasing this year as AFTRS student films were selected for both nationally and internationally acclaimed festivals, and many were additionally acknowledged through the receipt of prestigious awards. At the Australian Directors Guild awards, an AFTRS’ 2012 graduate, Melissa Anastasi, won the Best Student Film, and four other student films were also nominated.

The 2010 AFTRS Creative Fellow, Lynette Wallworth, was invited to screen her work Coral: Rekindling Venus during the 2014 World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China.

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Jane Campion, who graduated from the School in 1983 was appointed President of the Jury at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival - one of the most prestigious international appointments in the film industry. These are just a few notable examples of AFTRS’ influence and impact.

These achievements represent the outcomes of collaborative effort, and on behalf of the Council, I thank the Executive team and staff of AFTRS for their ongoing contribution and commitment to delivering the best in teaching and learning opportunities for students and industry.

Alongside these impressive achievements, the School’s corporate governance processes consistently meet high standards. On behalf of Council, I thank the Academic Board for its expert contribution to the development of the 2015 curricula. In particular Chair Professor Robyn Ewing, appointed from Council in September 2013 and independent members, Dr Graham Hendry and Mr Graham Forsyth. The School is grateful for the contribution of the outgoing Chair of Academic Board, Professor Cathryn McConaghy.

In terms of the overseeing of financial, audit and risk management systems, Council is appreciative of the expertise and dedication of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee. Special thanks to Mr Paul Apps, independent member, and Mr Andrew Mason, who was appointed Chair of the FARM Committee in July 2013 and whose Council term was extended for a further three years. Thanks are also due to Mr Peter Duncan, Deputy Chair of Council, and outgoing Chair of the FARM Committee.

I would also like to express my appreciation to all members of Council for their collegiality, generosity and considered input into this year's Council deliberations including former members Mr Tom Burstall, staff-elected member Ms Sally Browning and student-elected member Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith (Master of Screen Arts 2013) whose terms were completed in 2013.

At the beginning of the last year of her term as CEO of AFTRS, Sandra Levy was awarded an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in the General Division of the 2014 Queen’s Birthday Honours for distinguished service to the arts as a film and television director and producer and through her strategic leadership and educational roles. This honour is very well deserved, and on behalf of Council and the AFTRS community I congratulate Sandra on this acknowledgement of her career excellence and outstanding contribution.

I would like to commend the Minister for the Arts, the Hon. George Brandis QC for his support of the School and the industry. The Government’s support of, and ongoing commitment to the Australian Film, Television & Radio School, as a cultural and educational institution, is vital to the ongoing success, innovation and sustainability of the Australian media industry, as well as its impact at home and abroad.

Yours sincerely

Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA Chair of Council

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CEO’S PERSPECTIVE

9

CEO’S PERSPECTIVE As I begin the final 12 months of my contract, this Annual Report will be my seventh and last as Chief Executive Officer of AFTRS. It has been a period of intense change and innovation in the output of the School, and in the educational, cultural and industry landscape in which the School resides. The School has responded well to the challenges and opportunities presented.

There is much to acknowledge and recognise in the many and considerable achievements of the School since I began as CEO. From moving into the purpose-designed, state-of-the-art campus in May 2008 where celebrations included Baz Luhrmann receiving an AFTRS honorary degree from Hugh Jackman at a special industry event; the unveiling of the significant commissioned public art work Tjamu Tjamu by Indigenous artist Mr Jackie Kurltjunyintja Giles Tjapaltjarri, in August 2009, and the hundreds that gathered to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the School along with 40 years of alumni in September 2012.

The School is an elite Australian cultural and educational institution, spanning both the creative and business aspects of the screen arts and broadcasting sector, a sector that continues to experience high levels of structural change and creative transformation as it moves into the 21st century.

AFTRS offers a diverse curriculum across a number of different levels, and has markedly increased opportunities to access education and training. Not only does the School offer diversity and access, but excellence, in 2014 The Hollywood Reporter rated AFTRS in the top 15 international film schools in the world, the only Australian film school to be included on the list.

To be situated at the intersection of culture, industry and education is a dynamic position that has been maintained through the regular review and refinement of the School’s key output — the Award course program.

My first few years at AFTRS saw the establishment of a revised Award course program which offered the opportunity to access study at AFTRS with education and training at three levels: Beginner, Intermediate or Advanced. The introduction of a one-year Foundation Diploma in 2009, at the Beginner level, invigorated the School, as a younger demographic of undergraduate students were challenged to explore the creative possibilities of a career in the screen arts and broadcast sectors, through conceptual learning, as well as through practice-based collaborative production.

Other students have completed a post-graduate certificate or diploma from a range of industry specialisations, including Cinematography, Design, Directing, Editing, Producing, Radio Broadcasting, Screen Business, Screen Music, Screenwriting and Sound, and have had considerable success in their post-AFTRS careers. The 2013 graduation saw 193 students graduating from 20 different postgraduate courses, along with 53 students from the undergraduate Foundation Year Diploma.

The move to Moore Park and the new educational strategy has enabled wider access to AFTRS education and training as evidenced by a doubling of graduate numbers since 2008.

The force of industry change has brought with it a challenge for the School: to change in order to remain ahead both of student expectations and industry needs, and to ensure AFTRS’ position as the pre-eminent film school in Australia. Rather than try to

CEO’S PERSPECTIVE

10

keep pace with technological change, the strategy has been to build on the Foundation Diploma’s innovative cross-disciplinary design and conceptual focus and combine it with the School’s practice-based, collaborative model to introduce a three-year Bachelor of Arts (Screen) on offer from 2015. This will produce graduates who are steeped in storytelling and in the history of their art form, as well as being able to demonstrate collaborative skills, critical thinking and ethical practice. One of the many reasons to pursue this model is that the creative output of the Foundation Diploma and the response from industry to its graduates has been very strong — as evidenced by the opportunities offered by industry to those graduates, notably the Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program for 12 student internships this year, as well as the Shine Australia Intern Program.

As the architect of the new BA (Screen), I have had the pleasure of leading a creative and collaborative development process that has brought together teams of AFTRS teachers, industry contributors and educational specialists to develop and design the BA (Screen) curriculum. We have been overwhelmed with the positive response from prospective students at this year’s Information Day and Courses & Careers expos and fairs.

Hand-in-hand with the development of the BA (Screen) has been the revision of the industry-focused, specialist courses at the lower educational level of diplomas and advanced diplomas. These courses will be offered part-time, many online, and will be flexibly designed to ensure national access and the widest diversity of reach.

The School’s short course program prides itself on being highly responsive to industry needs. It too has transformed since 2007 when it operated offices in most States and provided industry courses with varying success and impact. In 2011, rebadged as the Open Program, operations were centralised to the Sydney campus while courses continue to be delivered in capital cities and in regional or remote Australia from one administrative centre.

In 2013-14, the Open Program trained more than 5,000 students in the short course program, an increase of almost 200%, compared to 2008-09, with an additional 3,300 attending tailored corporate courses, including the Radio School for Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink. The Open Program continues to deliver an excellent standard and range of short courses and extends the AFTRS brand by providing a hands-on entry point for award course applicants. In 2014, 26% of award course applicants had completed an Open Program course, an increase from 23% in 2013.

The creative and cultural contribution of Indigenous filmmakers and broadcasters is highly valued by the School. In 2009, AFTRS initiated a fully subsidised Indigenous program through which tailored training workshops were delivered across the country providing access to the skills, knowledge and inspiration to facilitate Indigenous Australians to tell their own stories.

The Indigenous Program engages with Indigenous communities and partners and with a broad range of organisations and government agencies to provide and deliver training. In 2013-14 partners included Screen Queensland, UMI Arts, Foxtel, Screenworks Northern Rivers and the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence enabling the delivery of workshops to 204 participants, including an acting workshop, Facing the Machine, that provided 14 Indigenous stage actors with screen acting skills and experience.

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In the last four years, the Indigenous Program has run 70 short courses and trained over 860 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in specially designed courses. It has also provided 283 subsidies for Indigenous Australians to attend existing Open Program courses.

While the contribution and participation of industry professionals is embedded in the Award and Open Program courses, AFTRS itself forms part of the cultural sector, and engages actively with its industry development role.

Since the physical relocation of the School to Moore Park in May 2008, industry engagement and interaction has been a prime focus. When the School is not using its facilities, they are available free-of-charge for industry and content development activities. Since the re-location, almost 700 industry activities have been hosted at AFTRS. The Public Program, launched in the same year has also been a resounding success. The weekly Friday on My Mind forum has become established as an industry institution where professionals share insights about their creative practice with students, staff and the wider industry.

In 2012, this forum was extended to Melbourne and curated and hosted locally with the support of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. This series has also proved enormously popular, and provided a focus for creative discussion and debate within the Victorian community. Since 2008, combined Sydney and Melbourne attendance of Friday on My Mind reached nearly 17,000 across a total of 260 sessions.

TV Talks, a sister act to Friday on My Mind, was launched in Sydney in 2012, and provides a monthly opportunity for the television industry to discuss current issues in a similar fashion. These sessions allow for the important function of networking and ideas interchange between industry professionals, network executives and television production companies. This year more than 800 people attended over 10 sessions.

The School also takes an active role in Australian cultural life outside the boundaries of its campus. This year sessions were hosted at a number of key events including the Adelaide Film Festival, the Australian International Documentary Conference (held in Adelaide), the Melbourne International Film Festival, the Sydney Film Festival, and the Sydney Writer’s Festival.

Internationally, the School has partnered with New York University's Tisch School of the Arts and the Ecole nationale supérieure Louis-Lumière in Paris to provide their students with exchange opportunities. It has also provided the China-based Shanghai Media Group with a series of tailored media courses at the AFTRS campus. AFTRS is a member of CILECT (the International Association of over 160 audio-visual educational institutions), and this year, the Director of Screen and I attended the annual conference in Buenos Aires, to discuss the impact of the digital age in the teaching curricula of film schools.

Student films have been selected for film festivals and special events around the world. Since the proliferation of short film production, and much easier access to filmmaking technology, festivals are far more competitive and a selection for screening is highly prized. This year I have been heartened by the international success of AFTRS student films, including the selection of five short films to screen at the Palm Springs International ShortFest and individual works in San Francisco’s Frameline, the Nashville Film Festival and the Busan International Film Festival, Korea. In terms of award highlights, How the Light Gets In won the Documentary Short Category at the Heartland Festival (USA), and All God’s Creatures won Best Narrative at BeFilm, Underground Film Festival in New York.

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On the national front, it was pleasing to see 11 films selected for the St Kilda Film Festival, an Academy Award® qualifying event, and the film Stuffed nominated at the Sydney Film Festival’s Dendy Awards for Best Short Film and Best Short Screenplay as well as the Rouben Mamoulian Award for Best Director. This year, for the first time, all four nominations for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards were AFTRS student films. The winning film By This River, directed by 2012 graduate Melissa Anastasi, has also been selected for screening into a number of local and international festivals. In 2013-14, 33 student films have screened at 31 festivals both nationally and internationally.

In 2014, Melissa Anastasi was also one of two successful recipients of an AFTRS Creative Fellowship—the first time an alumni has been selected for this prestigious award. The second recipient of the Fellowship this year is director Amiel Courtin-Wilson. I introduced the Creative Fellowship in 2009 in order to advance the work of original and creative voices in the industry, and provide a unique opportunity to research and create a piece of innovative screen art. The completed work is presented to the School community in a workshop, as a learning opportunity for students and staff. I look forward to the creative and research output of their explorations again in 2014.

Of the many milestones to recognise during these years, the establishment of the Australian journal of screen arts and business, LUMINA, is one of which I am immensely proud. Twelve issues of the journal have been published, with the latest Television, Going, Going… Where? looking at the current and future state of the broadcasting sector. Previous LUMINA issues have highlighted Indigenous filmmaking, Documentary filmmaking, Genre, Collaboration, and the 40 th anniversary of the School. LUMINA’s contribution to screen scholarship was recognised with an international Independent Publisher Book Award in 2011 with a Silver Medal for Best Regional Non-Fiction.

In 2013, in the inaugural national review of higher education introduced by the Commonwealth Government, AFTRS was one of the first ten organisations to be reviewed to ensure it met the newly-defined Threshold Standards. On completion of the review, the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) approved and confirmed the School’s self-accreditation status for the maximum period of seven years, demonstrating confidence in the School’s management and its standards of education, governance and compliance. TEQSA also congratulated AFTRS on its Curriculum Review Handbook, noting it as “an exemplary document”.

AFTRS is in a strong position. It produces creative, entrepreneurial, and collaborative screen and radio practitioners. It supports industry to develop and grow, and to contribute to its ongoing education and training. It has well-developed educational acumen which is demonstrated by its diverse, conceptual and practice-based curriculum, high quality education specialists and teaching professionals, and a confirmed self-accreditation status under TEQSA. Meanwhile it is developing an innovative, new curriculum to meet the cultural and educational demands of the 21st century and spending public money wisely by balancing its budget and creating additional revenue through targeted outreach activities.

It is a key cultural, educational and screen arts and broadcast industry asset for all Australians to be proud of.

I thank all who have supported the School this year—the students, the staff, the industry contributors, Council and Committee members—and over the past seven years, with particular thanks to Chairs Peter Ivany AM, and Michael Smellie. Professor Julianne Schulz AM FAHA was appointed Chair in October 2012. She has been a

13

significant contributor to the current strategy of new courses and new thinking for the School, as well as a considerable personal support to me as CEO. I thank her for her enthusiasm and vision for the School.

It is vital that the important role AFTRS plays continues to be recognised as a key element in the success and ongoing evolution of the Australian screen arts and broadcast sector, and in the development of rigorous and creative screen education. To the Minister for the Arts, the Hon. George Brandis QC I thank you for your interest in, and commitment to, this unique educational and cultural institution.

Sandra Levy, AO Chief Executive Officer

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THE AUSTRALIAN FILM, TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHOOL The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) is a federal statutory authority established by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 and its functions are described in Appendix 1 (Enabling Legislation).

VISION STATEMENT AFTRS exists to enrich the screen arts and broadcast culture through education, training, research and the dissemination of ideas.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES AFTRS encourages:

Creativity By providing opportunities for the exploration of artistic expression, ideas, innovation and risk taking.

Enterprise By fostering career sustainability, collaboration and resourcefulness.

AFTRS activities are conducted in the spirit of:

Excellence Aspiring to the highest standards of creative excellence.

Diversity Nurturing and valuing difference and originality.

Respect Encouraging mutual respect in all collaborations.

THE SCHOOL’S PURPOSE

The School provides higher education and training in the screen arts and broadcast industries. AFTRS conducts research relevant to industry and disseminates ideas to stimulate conversation about the screen arts, creative practice and broadcast activity. It reaches out to regional and Indigenous Australia, and to new markets to deliver short courses, tailored training, workshops and other screen arts and broadcast activities. It partners with cultural institutions and makes a unique contribution to joint activities with them through its creative expertise and educational reputation. It collaborates with industry to deliver relevant education and experience and it shares its facilities, services and resources with industry organisations, associations and individuals for their activities and events.

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PORTFOLIO BUDGET STATEMENTS AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2013-14 OUTCOME 1 Support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast culture in Australia including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training and research.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUTCOME 1 Program 1.1: Delivery of specialist education to meet the diverse creative needs of students and the skill requirements of industry by means of Award course activities and through its Open Program.

DELIVERABLES

2013-14

Budget Target

2013-14

AFTRS Actuals

Award courses offered 25 23

Open Program courses 250 289

Forums for industry practitioners to share their expertise

40 73

Use of School facilities by Industry for events and activities

100 75

Regular consultations on skill requirements of industry nationally

Annually Annually

PROGRAM 1.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIS) Performance of the program is measured through the applications and enrolments of students in the Award courses; the number of eligible students successfully completing their course of study; and paid enrolments across the full range of Open Program activities.

Performance measures shared with other cultural agencies include: attendance at events, activities and Open Days; visits to the AFTRS website and page views.

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KPIs 2013-14

Budget Target

2013-14

AFTRS Actuals

Visitor interactions:

Number of visits to the organisation's website 100,000 243,148

Number of page views on the organisation's website

750,000 807,961

Number of attendances at AFTRS' events, activities and Open Days

7,000 9,412

Share of funding by source:

Operational funding from government (as a % of total funds) 73.2% 69.2%

Capital funding from government (as a % of total funds)

6.5% 8.3%

Other income (i) (as a % of total funds)

20.3% 22.5%

(ii) (as a % of government funding excl. lease)

31% 36.0%

Expenditure mix:

Expenditure on programs/projects (as a % of total expenditure)

83.5% 82.3%

Expenditure on capital items (as a % of total expenditure)

6.5% 8.3%

Expenditure on other labour costs (as a % of total expenditure)

7.5% 7.5%

Other expenses (as a % of total expenditure)

2.5% 1.8%

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AFTRS specific KPIs:

Number of new student applications (with creative portfolios)

600 672

Number of new and ongoing student enrolments

300 2631

Percentage of eligible completions 90% 94%

Number of student completions 270 2462

Number of Open Program enrolments 4,750 5,0233

1 AFTRS has a merit selection process. Offers are made to students on the basis of their creative portfolio. In 2014, 303 offers were made, with 277 to new students, in addition to the School’s 26 ongoing students. The differential is accounted for by students who decline offers or withdrew from the course of study for personal or other reasons by the census date of 31 March 2014.

2 Variations between target and actual numbers reflects the aggregate number of students who are either continuing students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma of Screen Business or Master of Arts Screen Business which are run over two years; three students who are completing the Master of Arts Research; and students who have not completed their course study due to withdrawal from the course or leave of absence.

3 Does not include tailored courses delivered to approximately 3,300 participants. Note the 2012-13 Annual Report figure of 6,252 included 1,091 tailored course participants.

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STRATEGIC DIRECTION The functions that are laid out in the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 provide the framework for the AFTRS Corporate Plan which is the source of strategies, activities and achievements for the last year.

EDUCATE AND CREATE

AFTRS will continue to provide an outstanding education in screen arts and broadcasting through practice-oriented learning that is distinctive for: its quality, its focus on creativity and its delivery through innovative methods.

ENGAGEMENT AND PARTICIPATION

AFTRS will reach out to cultural organisations and institutions and across regions, new markets and communities to engage, contribute and share its specialist knowledge, training and education.

LEADERSHIP, COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT

AFTRS will continue to collaborate with industry across a full range of education, research and training activities and assist industry to meet its skills requirements, as well as support its activities and events.

PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

AFTRS will manage and optimise the use of its resources by encouraging a productive and accountable environment.

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EDUCATE AND CREATE AFTRS will continue to provide an outstanding education in screen arts and broadcasting through practice-oriented learning that is distinctive for its quality, focus on creativity and delivery through innovative methods.

AFTRS is recognised as a world leader in educating and training creative individuals across a range of disciplines. It remains the only Australian institution to be included in the list of the top fifteen international film schools, compiled by The Hollywood Reporter in 2014.

AFTRS provides many opportunities for individuals to pursue lifelong learning and professional development in the screen arts and broadcast industries, including merit-selected Award course programs and non-award short courses and training through the Open Program.

AWARD COURSE PROGRAM

The AFTRS Award course program provides collaborative and practice-oriented teaching and learning. The education experience is distinctive. This is due to the professional and educational expertise of teaching staff and its technical resources and links with industry. As a result it develops creativity, capacity for problem solving, critical thinking and enquiry in its students.

Central to the School’s philosophy is the development of conceptual thinking coupled with applied practice. Students engage in all aspects of the experiential learning cycle: learning concepts; planning and preparing for practical projects; experimenting in many aspects of practice and then reflecting, interpreting and making connections.

The current AFTRS Award course program was established in 2009 and consists of three levels: undergraduate, postgraduate specialisation and masters level education.

Undergraduate

• Foundation Diploma - fundamentals in specialist areas delivered in a manner that allows students to combine work and study

Postgraduate

• Graduate Certificates: fundamentals in specialist areas of screen arts delivered to allow students to combine work and study • Graduate Diplomas: professional creative practice in screen arts and broadcasting specialisations

Masters

• Master of Screen Arts: masters level combining course work and research for screen arts practitioners • Master of Screen Arts and Business: leadership for executives and entrepreneurs in screen arts and business

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FOUNDATION DIPLOMA: INTRODUCTION TO CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

The Foundation Diploma is a one-year generalist course in screen arts designed to develop curiosity, creativity, imagination, and general cinematic and interactive storytelling skills. Teaching is conducted through a series of practical and ideas-based workshop cycles and is accompanied by grounding in professional practice, which provides students the opportunity to make projects, individually or with fellow students.

The Foundation Diploma comprises nine workshops: 1. Character, Performance and Script 2. Creating Experiences 3. Observation and Research 4. Story and Audience 5. Designing Worlds 6. Emotional Noise 7. Image 8. Juxtaposition and Rhythm 9. Professional Practice

All students undertaking the Foundation Diploma in 2013 successfully graduated in December and twelve students were accepted into the Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program.

These twelve graduates undertook three-month paid internships with the following subscription channels and platforms: Foxtel, FOX SPORTS, BBC Worldwide, Disney Channel, Aurora Community Channel, SBS Subscription TV, Discovery Networks, TVSN & Expo Channel, Nickelodeon and ASTRA itself. Since the commencement of the ASTRA Graduate Program in 2011, 41 Foundation Diploma graduates have received internships and twenty-six have accepted ongoing employment.

The aim of the ASTRA Graduate Program is to provide opportunities for the most creative, skilled and motivated students to be exposed to, and trained in, the subscription television sector. Now in its fourth year, the Program continues to provide a great opportunity for students to enter the industry.

Foundation graduates, Nicky D’Arcy and Jacob Abi-Arrange participated in the ASTRA 2011 and 2012 programs respectively. Both have subsequently secured full-time positions as producers with FOX SPORTS Australia. Nick D’Arcy has since accepted a senior Promotions Producer role at Channel Nine and 2013 graduate Bianca Benussi secured a full-time position in Programming and Scheduling with the Walt Disney Company, Australia.

Since graduating in 2011, Rachel Argall has accrued eight producing credits and in 2014 won Best Australian Animation at the WOW Film Festival for Iron Hands which she wrote, produced, animated and directed.

2011 graduates, Aragorn Fenton and Nicholas Lever, secured full-time producer and VFX roles, respectively with The Precinct Studios and have produced music videos for artists such as Jessica Mauboy, Ricki Lee, and Flume.

Foundation 2010 graduates Brooke Horne, Holly Bennett and Laura Nagy, have had ongoing assistant director roles on international studio films such as T he Great Gatsby, Wolverine and Unbroken and on the Australian television drama Redfern Now. Laura is currently working as an assistant director on the feature film Gods of Egypt and Brooke was the Assistant Director on I am Emmanuelle.

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Since graduating in 2009, Erin Good and Taylor Litton-Strain have enjoyed success with a string of nominations and awards for their films including Abbie which screened in eight festivals locally and in USA, and won four awards. The film was acquired by Qantas for inflight entertainment and screened at the Australian Museum as part of Jurassic Lounge. This year Erin’s latest AFTRS student film The Wonderful gained Official Selection into the Montreal World Film Festival 2014 and LA Shorts Fest 2014. It was also nominated for an Australian Director's Guild Award. In 2013 Erin and Taylor’s film My Mother Her Daughter was nominated for an Australian Production Design Guild Award and won the Australian Cinematographer's Society Silver Award.

In October 2013, Shine Australia launched a six-month paid Graduate Program offered exclusively to AFTRS Foundation Diploma graduates. Foundation Diploma graduate Luke Davis was granted an internship and worked across a range of departments, including post-production, Shine 360 (Shine's brand management and licensing arm), development, casting and publicity, as well as productions such as The Voice and The Bachelor. The program has been a great success and will continue in 2014.

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE: FUNDAMENTALS IN SPECIALIST SKILLS

The Graduate Certificate program is designed for those who wish to develop skills in an area of specialisation and, due to work or other commitments, prefer to study part-time. Students collaborate with their peers through cross-disciplinary exercises.

The Graduate Certificates offered in 2014 were:

• Graduate Certificate in Cinematography Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Costume Design * • Graduate Certificate in Directing Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Documentary Fundamentals • Graduate Certificate in Editing Drama * • Graduate Certificate in Screen Culture * • Graduate Certificate in Screen Music • Graduate Certificate in Screenwriting Fundamentals

(* These courses did not proceed in 2014 due to a lack of appropriately qualified applicants.)

GRADUATE DIPLOMA: INTENSIVE PROFESSIONAL CREATIVE PRACTICE

The Graduate Diploma program is aimed at experienced industry practitioners who show promise in a specialist discipline. The training provided is through a conceptual and intensive practice-oriented program and aims to develop, challenge and extend students’ existing skills. The principles of storytelling, skills development, collaboration and screen business characterise the Graduate Diploma courses.

The Graduate Diploma includes a series of exercises and workshops that increase cross-disciplinary work, and encourage greater experimentation and risk-taking.

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The Graduate Diplomas offered in 2014 were:

• Graduate Diploma in Cinematography • Graduate Diploma in Directing • Graduate Diploma in Documentary • Graduate Diploma in Editing • Graduate Diploma in Producing • Graduate Diploma in Production Design • Graduate Diploma in Radio • Graduate Diploma in Screen Business • Graduate Diploma in Screen Music • Graduate Diploma in Sound - Post Production • Graduate Diploma in Sound - Location Recording * • Graduate Diploma in Screenwriting

(*This course did not proceed in 2014 due to a lack of appropriately qualified applicants.)

RADIO

In 2013 AFTRS offered a Graduate Diploma in Radio for the first time. This one-year, full-time course is highly practical and intensive, and prepares students to work in both the commercial and public broadcasting sectors by covering all key aspects of radio broadcasting.

The course focuses on the development of each student’s ability to create and deliver compelling, innovative content for radio and, increasingly, other digital platforms.

The course is structured around a series of four pop-up radio stations that are managed by the students. Towards the end of the year, all students participate in an internship program with radio stations in regional and capital city markets. This program provides a significant pathway into employment for radio graduates. Most students who graduated in 2013, with the Graduate Diploma in Radio, are employed in the commercial and public broadcasting sectors across Australia, including Wagga Wagga, Alice Springs, Bega, Kalgoorlie, Darwin, Gold Coast, Port Pirie and Sydney.

MASTER'S PROGRAMS: LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION

The courses at Masters level represent the pinnacle of the School’s offerings. They are aimed at the most creative initiators and originators and provide the opportunity for advanced exploration and learning in both creative practice and related conceptual thinking.

Master of Screen Arts (MSA)

Students selected for the course have an opportunity to apply a high level of autonomy, innovative thinking, imaginative ingenuity and expert judgement in the development and realisation of a project, whilst refining their specialist, theoretical and conceptual skills through course work and practical exercises. Students are challenged to take risks in their ideas and approach, and to achieve a high level of creative excellence.

Students may specialise in directing (drama or documentary), screenwriting, producing, production design, cinematography, sound design, screen music, editing or animation. Alternatively they may choose to work across disciplines such as writing and directing, or directing and cinematography.

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Master of Screen Arts and Business (MSAB)

The MSAB has three core objectives. It aims to recognise the new generation of leaders who have demonstrated their talent and established a solid footing in the media and screen content industries. It also aims to teach them high-level skills in leadership, management, finance and persuasion and address gaps in their knowledge base not adequately covered in their prior training or work experience. Finally, it provides a hub to network with peers and with mentors in leadership positions.

The course equips students to fully participate in the financial aspects of any project; developing the expertise to scrutinise a financial proposition and reconstruct it, understand financial modelling and communicate financial information to stakeholders. It also provides opportunities to develop connections with industry leaders, policy makers and fellow students. Such connections may form the basis of a lifelong professional network.

ACADEMIC BOARD

In October 2013, Council member and Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts, Robyn Ewing from the University of Sydney, was appointed Chair of the Academic Board. She joining higher education specialists, Dr Graham Hendry, (Senior Lecturer, Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney) and Mr Graham Forsyth, (Associate Dean, Academic, University of NSW Art and Design) Other members of the Board are the CEO, the Director of Education and the Head of Policy and Governance at AFTRS.

The Academic Board provides robust and arm’s-length review of Award course education activities relating to curriculum development and student progress. The Academic Board endorsed the list of 2013 graduands for approval by Council; and approved the structure, graduate attributes, course aims, subject aims and descriptors for the forthcoming Bachelor of Arts (Screen), and the courses and subject learning outcomes for the new Specialist Program courses to be introduced in 2015.

The Academic Board met four times in 2013-14.

TEACHING DIVISIONS

The Screen Division, headed by the Director of Screen and supported by the Deputy Director, Course Convenors and Heads of Department, continued to deliver the Foundation Diploma, Graduate Diplomas, Graduate Certificates, the Master of Screen Arts and the Master of Screen Arts and Business. In 2014, the Screen Division worked closely with the Education Division and the CEO to develop the new Bachelor of Arts (Screen) curriculum for implementation in 2015.

The Specialist Division was established in November 2013 to develop a program of narrowly focused, skills based, specialist courses in Film, Radio, Design, Editing, Factual, Music, Producing and Screenwriting. Courses will be offered in Semester 1 of 2015 at three levels: Introductory, Diploma and Advanced Diploma.

In November 2013, the Radio Division was merged with the Specialist Division. As a result the Specialist Division delivered the Graduate Diploma in Radio in 2014.

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EDUCATION DIVISION

The Education Division is responsible for the quality assurance of academic processes, including the development and review of curriculum; the professional development of teachers; the management of student administration and the provision of student academic and welfare support.It also ensures that all education activities meet the regulatory and compliance requirements of the tertiary education sector, including reporting of institutional data.

The Education Division has been engaged in the development of the new School curriculum of a Bachelor of Arts (Screen) and the courses offered in the Specialist Program. The BA (Screen) involved extensive research, consultation and discussion in subject development committees, comprising the CEO, industry contributors, AFTRS academic staff and education specialists. This has ensured a scholarly and robust approach to the BA (Screen) curriculum design, underpinned by the School’s highly specialist screen expertise and knowledge, and evidenced in the high standard of course documentation.

The inclusion of both internal staff and external industry members in this consultative approach also underpins the development of the Specialist Program, which will deliver specialist skills and training at the sub-degree level in 2015. Some of these courses— diplomas and advanced diplomas—are designed to be delivered fully or partially online to ensure wide access for student participation around the country.

The design of the new curriculum meets the requirements of the Australian Qualifications Framework and the Threshold Standards of the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011.

The Education Division is responsible for professional development of teachers, and for providing academic and pastoral support to students. These two aspects of support are important factors in enabling students to meet their learning outcomes and to ensure the School delivers a quality education experience. Professional development activities for teachers have focused on assessment from moderation to late submissions; student academic support including giving feedback; adopting a new academic referencing system (APA 6th Edition); and student academic literacy and resources.

EDUCATIONAL COMPLIANCE

The Education Division is responsible for ensuring the School’s core business of teaching and learning complies with all relevant legislation, guidelines and regulations in respect of higher education. This includes compliance with the Higher Education Support Act 2003, the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011, and the Australian Qualifications Framework. AFTRS complied with all reporting requirements to the Department of Education, providing Student Data enrolments, Student and Course Completions, FEE-HELP estimates, Student Data Submissions and Course and Campus Data. It also completed all required verification activities and reported all relevant data through the Provider Information Request to TEQSA.

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STUDENT CENTRE The Student Centre is responsible for the administration of all student-related matters, including applications, enrolment, and graduation.The Student Centre coordinates support services for students, including academic and welfare support; provides information and advice to prospective applicants and current students, and administers the Student Management System. It is also responsible for the integrity and security of academic transcripts and testamurs.

APPLICATIONS, ENROLMENTS AND COMPLETIONS

The allocation of places in Award courses is competitive and based on merit selection. Applicants must complete the published application tasks and meet the selection criteria for consideration of their application to be offered a place in that course.

Applications for entry to the 2014 academic year opened on 1 September 2013 and closed on 1 November 2013, following an extensive period of recruitment activities, including Open Days, attendance at Education & Career Expos (in several states) and the distribution of a promotional publication inserted in national newspapers and street press. Each year the School also advertises in specialist industry publications, websites, on social media and in e-newsletters in order to reach the widest pool of potential applicants.

On September 7 and 8 2013, 1,350 people attended AFTRS Open Days. Potential applicants to the School were able to obtain relevant information about the courses they were interested in applying for, as well as an overview of the School and its facilities.

APPLICATION, ENROLMENT & COMPLETION DATA

COURSE (LEVEL) 2014 ACADEMIC YEAR

Applications (with Creative Portfolios)

Enrolments

Foundation Diploma 147 46

Graduate Certificate 203 59

Graduate Diploma 259 110

Masters 63 22

Total new - 237

Total continuing - 26

TOTAL 672 263

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GRADUATION 2013

The 2013 Graduation ceremony was held on-site at the Entertainment Quarter; one of the largest events of its kind hosted by the School. It was attended by 600 family and friends of the graduating students. The Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, Minister for Communications and Member for Wentworth, delivered the keynote address on behalf of the Senator, the Hon. George Brandis QC, Minister for the Arts (For a list of 2013 graduates, see Appendix 3.)

The honorary degree of a Master of Arts, Film and Television was awarded to the director, Phillip Noyce. He was a student in 1973, the inaugural year of AFTRS, and graduated the following year. His career as a director commenced with the feature film Backroads (1977), followed by Newsfront (1978) which won Australian Film Institute awards for Best Film, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. His continued exemplary contribution to local and international cinema include the features Dead Calm (1989); Patriot Games (1992); Clear and Present Danger (1994); The Quiet American (2002) and Salt (2010).

Phillip’s Rabbit-Proof Fence about the journey of three Aboriginal girls who run away from a white mission and walk the 1500 miles home, achieved great acclaim and won the AFI Award for Best Film in 2002. In 2011, Phillip directed and executive produced the ABC (US) pilot Revenge, followed by Americana in 2012.

He joins a select group of eminent Australian film and television practitioners including Darren Dale, John Edwards, Dr George Miller, Baz Luhrmann, Jan Chapman and John Doyle, to be awarded the AFTRS honorary degree.

Over the weekend of December 7 and 8, 2013 the graduate showcase program screened 84 films from the following course levels: 24 Foundation Diploma; 37 Graduate Diploma; 15 Graduate Certificate, and eight from the Master of Screen Arts. Student films were also available for viewing online via a password protected viewing portal— providing industry members and others with the opportunity to view student work, at their convenience.

GRADUATE ACHIEVEMENTS

Graduates of the School continue to make a significant mark in national and international arenas. In 2014, Jane Campion was the Jury President at the Cannes Film Festival and her mini-series, Top of the Lake was nominated for two Emmy Awards: Outstanding Direction for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special, and Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special. The latter nomination was shared with graduate Gerard Lee (1982, Scriptwriting Extension). Top of the Lake also won Best Tele-feature or Miniseries at the 2014 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards (AACTA), and episode five won Best Cinematography and Best Sound In Television.

AFTRS supports its students by profiling and promoting their films to national and international film awards and festivals and pursuing other public screening opportunities.

This year, 33 recent AFTRS student films were selected for screening at 31 festivals, a total of 69 screenings. Highlights include 11 films selected for competition at the St Kilda Film Festival in Melbourne and five selected for competition at the Palm Springs International Shortfest in the USA. Details of student film awards and screenings are listed on the following pages:

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• Melissa Anastasi (Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) won Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards for her film By This River , which was also screened at the BUFF Film Festival 2014 (Malmo, Sweden), the Buster International Film Festival for Children (Denmark), Flickerfest and St Kilda Film Festival.

• Philip Charles (Graduate Diploma in Cinematography 2012) won a Bronze Award for Depths at the 2013 Australian Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Siobhan Costigan’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) documentary short, How the Light Gets In was selected as one of five winners (from 1,500 entries from 80 countries) at the 2013 Heartland Film Festival (an Academy-Award qualifying festival) in the Documentary Short category. Her film, Freak was also accepted into the St Kilda Film Festival.

• Bonnie Elliot (Cinematography 2006) won the Miller Australia Award for Best Cinematography in an Australian Short Film at Flickerfest for Perception.

• Lucy Gaffy (Master of Screen Arts 2012) was nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards for The Fence, which was also screened in the World Cinema section of the Busan International Film Festival in Korea, at Flickerfest 2014, and the Human Rights Arts & Film Festival in Melbourne.

• Ross Giardina (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2009) won a Bronze Award for Gödel, Incomplete at the Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards (Fictional Drama Shorts category).

• Erin Good’s (Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) film The Wonderful was nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards.

• Maziar Lahooti (Master of Screen Arts 2012) won the award for Best Direction - Short Form for Heaven at the 2013 WA Screen Awards. The film also received the award for Best Performance by an Actor for Wayne Davis.

• Lucas Li’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) film Horrie was highly commended in the category of Best Short Documentary Film at Flickerfest.

• Jack McAvoy (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2012) was awarded a Silver Award for All God’s Creatures at the 2013 Australian Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Brendon McDonall (Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) has collected several awards for All God’s Creatures including: Best Narrative at BeFilm, Underground Film Festival in New York, Best Short Film and Best Director at Mardi Gras Festival in Sydney and Best Film at West End Film Festival, Brisbane. All God’s Creatures was selected for screening at Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA, Flickerfest, Melbourne Queer Film Festival, Nashville Film Festival and St.Kilda Film Festival. His film Chicom also screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Laura Murray (Graduate Diploma Production Design 2012) won the AFTRS Award for Student Design for Spirit Harbour at the 2013 Australian Production Design Guild Awards.

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• Miranda Nation (Graduate Diploma in Directing [Fiction & Non-Fiction] 2010) and Lyn Norfor (Graduate Diploma in Screen Business 2010) were nominated for Best Short Fiction Film for Perception at 2014 AACTA. The film also screened at Clermont-Ferrand 36th International Short Film Festival, France 2014.

• Goldie Soetianto (Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2013) won a Gold Award for her work on Jackey, Jackey, and a Silver Award for her work on Eric in the student category at the Cinematography Society NSW/ACT Awards.

• Joseph Twist (2010 Graduate Certificate Screen Music) won the Professional Development Award from the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) allowing him to spend the year studying in New York.

• Caitlin Yeo (2003 Graduate Diploma in Screen Composition) won Best Music for a Feature Film at the Australasian Performing Rights Association/Australian Guild of Screen Composers Screen Music Awards, and Best Music at the Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards for The Rocket.

• Warwick Young’s (Master of Screen Arts 2013) Stuffed was nominated at the Dendy Awards (Sydney Film Festival) for Best Short Film, the Rouben Mamoulian Award for Best Director and Best Short Screenplay Award. It was also nominated for Best Student Film at the Australian Directors Guild Awards.

• Breathe (Vincent Lamberti, Graduate Diploma Cinematography 2012) was selected for the Student Etudes Competition at Camerimage, an International Film Festival in Poland. It also screened at the St.Kilda Film Festival, Melbourne.

• Clan (Larissa Behrendt, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2013) was selected for Frameline, San Francisco USA.

• Corinna (Hollie Fifer, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) screened at the Antenna Documentary Festival in Sydney.

• Embrace (George-Alex Nagle, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) screened at the Sydney Film Festival 2014.

• Eric (Andrew Lee, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) was selected for screening at Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA

• The Fort (D’arcy Foley-Dawson, Graduate Diploma Directing, 2012) screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Fruit (Madeleine Parker, Graduate Diploma Directing 2013) was accepted into Maryland Film Festival, USA and St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Gödel, Incomplete (Martha Goddard, Master of Screen Arts 2012, Lisa Hoppe, Master of Screen Arts 2012) screened at CineGlobe Geneva, Cinequest USA, Worldfest in Housten USA and at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• I Am Emmanuel (Genevieve Clay-Smith, Master of Screen Arts 2013) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA

• Into The Streets (Logan Mucha, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) was accepted into St.Kilda Film Festival

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• Kit (Adam Rosenberg, Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) screened at the Antenna Documentary Festival in Sydney.

• Like Breathing (Liz Cooper, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest, USA.

• The Misfortune of Others (Mat Govoni, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) screened at St.Kilda Film Festival.

• The Orchard (Laura Scrivano, Graduate Diploma Directing 2012) screened at the St.Kilda Film Festival.

• Switch on the Night (Alejandra Canales, Master of Arts Documentary 2006) was invited to screen at the 1001 Documentary Festival in Turkey.

• Kharisma directed by Shannon Murphy ( Graduate Diploma Directing, 2012) was selected for Palm Springs International Shortfest USA.

AFTRS alumni were also recognised by government agencies in funding and support decision:

• Screen Australia has financed development for Hollie Fifer’s (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) feature documentary, The Opposition (originally developed at AFTRS).

• Liz McCarthy’s (2012 Diploma Documentary) project Boom (developed at AFTRS) was selected by Thomas Mai’s (Screen Australia financed) documentary financing initiative to become one of the largest crowd source campaigns in Australia.

• Sophie Weisner (Graduate Diploma Documentary 2012) received development funding from the ABC for her documentary Call Me Dad.

NON-AWARD COURSES

AFTRS targets both new and traditional markets for education and training in screen arts and broadcasting through the design and delivery of short courses. All courses are taught by industry professionals and take place at AFTRS campus in Sydney or at partner venues across the country. Courses range from general interest and introductory workshops to intensive master classes for industry professionals.

AFTRS works directly with industry professionals and organisations to ensure that its short courses are up to date and relevant to industry practice. It partners with industry guilds and bodies to provide targeted programs and is increasing its online offerings to be able to extend its reach. In 2013-14, 289 non-award courses were run for 5,023 participants. Additionally courses were designed and delivered for nine industry organisations.

AFTRS has also developed business opportunities by providing tailored programs to corporate and government clients. This activity is gaining momentum.

AFTRS delivered a tailored Radio School program of 650 sessions for Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink for over 3,200 participants.

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Non-award Courses Target Actual

Total number of non-award courses

250 289

Total number of non-award enrolments

4,750 5,023

Non-award courses by program unit

Number of Courses Number of Enrolments

Industry Program 77 1,280

National Program 14 335

Television Unit 99 1,052

Schools 60 1,704

Children’s 39 652

Industry and National Programs

AFTRS delivers quality short course training to both emerging and established industry professionals. The Industry Program continues to grow and offer training for all levels of professionals wanting to stay current, learn new skills and hear from industry experts.

Industry Program courses cover radio, film, emerging platforms, and all discipline areas including editing and cinematography. Highlights this year include Finding Animation, featuring key creators from Pixar, and Developing a Television Series with Ellen Sandler, both run in Sydney and Melbourne, as well as Masterclass in Narrative Comedy with Tim Ferguson. Additionally, Summer and Winter Schools were run during Award course holiday periods.

The School works with state film agencies to provide training specifically for industry practitioners in their state. During the reporting period the School worked with the South Australian Film Corporation to run a screen business program over a nine-month period. Other popular courses nationally were television writing, feature film screenwriting, introductory producing, as well as a Marketing Boot Camp run in Grafton, NSW.

Television Unit

The TV Unit develops and delivers a range of short courses to meet the needs of the non-fiction television production sector. Courses range from entry-level introductory courses through to technical and specialist operational offerings. The TV Unit is now well-established as the ‘go to’ place for factual TV training and fosters excellent relationships with broadcasters and production companies. It provides quality courses that attract both repeat and new clients to AFTRS. Improvements and innovations made to course offerings ensure that AFTRS training is at the forefront of the ever-changing television industry.

The Unit has continued its dialogue with broadcasters, major production companies and independent practitioners through regular meetings and through the monthly TV

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Industry event, TV Talks. This year, ten TV Talks sessions were run and attracted 839 attendees.

Many new courses were introduced this year, including Creating and Producing TV Formats, and Legal Essentials. In addition, the Unit hosted a Branded Content seminar in October 2013. The TV Unit invites specialist content makers to run one-off seminars to ensure the currency of its educational offerings.

As well as running the regular program of short courses, the TV Unit also devised and delivered tailored training for the China-based company Shanghai Media Group, in factual TV production and post-production for 24 of their employees.

Schools and Children Program This year, the Schools and Children Program significantly increased participation in school holiday programs and school groups visiting throughout the year. Courses are designed to be delivered either at AFTRS or offsite at primary and secondary schools. Feedback for the program continues to be very positive with increasing repeat bookings. Additional courses have been developed and delivered over the past year in response to requests from regular participants wanting to further advance their skills.

The Schools’ Advisory Committee continue to provide expert advice on course offerings, curriculum content, the framework for the primary and secondary schools program, school holiday programs, and programs for teachers.

INDIGENOUS PROGRAM

The Indigenous Program educates the next generation of Indigenous storytellers through film, television, digital media and radio courses. This can be through workshops specially developed for specific Indigenous communities or through subsidies for Indigenous students in existing Open Program short courses.

Indigenous workshops are subsidised and supported by AFTRS as part of its commitment to providing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to develop skills in screen arts and broadcasting. In 2013-14, a total of 204 Indigenous participants attended seventeen Indigenous Program workshops with an additional 93 Indigenous students receiving subsidies to attend existing Open short courses.

The programs for Indigenous communities included workshops in digital storytelling, claymation, writing television series, scriptwriting, acting for screen, lighting, interviewing, and editing skills. These were held in Wellington (NSW), Port Lincoln (SA), Wagga Wagga (NSW), Roebourne (WA), Darwin (NT), Thursday Island (Torres Strait), Lismore (NSW) and Hermannsburg (NT). Three-day radio workshops on announcing, presenting and radio packaging were held in Townsville (QLD) and Roebourne (WA).

AFTRS engaged with strategic partners to deliver tailored courses for diverse communities. In June 2014, partnerships with Screen Queensland in Brisbane and Cairns, as well as UMI Arts in Cairns, delivered introductory screenwriting courses. In August 2013, AFTRS worked with Foxtel and Screenworks Northern Rivers to deliver a writing television series workshop for emerging writers, led by John Bell (series writer Gods of Wheat Street). In Sydney, AFTRS worked with the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence to conduct digital storytelling workshops for young adults.

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In December 2013, the Indigenous Program delivered an Acting for Television workshop to facilitate Indigenous stage actors to transition to screen acting roles. 'Facing the Machine' was facilitated by Redfern Now director Adrian Wills and actor Andrew MacFarlane, with masterclasses conducted by actors David Field and Claudia Karvan. Fourteen actors attended the workshop and learnt many aspects of acting for television, which culminated in filming and screening scenes from Underbelly, Six Feet Under, Redfern Now and Breaking Bad.

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ENGAGEMENT AND PARTICIPATION AFTRS will reach out to cultural organisations and institutions, the regions, new markets and communities to engage, contribute and share its specialist knowledge, training and education.

AFTRS continues to strengthen connections and forge new programs and partnerships across the cultural and industry sectors of screen arts and broadcasting in order to provide opportunities for students and the general public to engage with leading creative and entrepreneurial practitioners and screen content.

CULTURAL AND INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

The School has developed unique partnerships to further its objectives, and create new educational opportunities for its Award students and strengthen industry engagement. Each year, strategic partners are engaged to provide assistance in the provision of non Award courses:

• Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) - The ASTRA Graduate Program is a partnership established in 2010 where ASTRA offers three-month internships to selected Foundation Diploma graduates with subscription television channels. This year, ASTRA offered internships to 12 graduates.

• National Institute of Dramatic Arts (NIDA) - an educational partnership where AFTRS Graduate Diploma students work closely with NIDA acting and design students in annual collaborative workshops.

• Screen Australia - AFTRS has partnered with Screen Australia on a range of initiatives, including the producer’s placement scheme. Through the Talent Escalator Program, Helen Burak (2013 Graduate Diploma in Producing) completed an internship with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group in Los Angeles.

• Commercial Radio Australia (CRA) - AFTRS partners with CRA to deliver to a three-day residential conference on site. The School also provides two online courses for the commercial radio sector.

• Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) - AFTRS partners with ACMI to deliver 32 sessions of Friday on My Mind in Melbourne.

• South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC) partnered with the Open Program to deliver a screen business program for industry practitioners over a nine-month period.

• The Indigenous Program engaged partners Screen Queensland, UMI Arts (QLD), Foxtel, Screenworks Northern Rivers and the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence to assist in the delivery of tailored screenwriting and digital storytelling courses for Indigenous participants.

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FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

Through a program of strategic and cultural alliances, AFTRS curates and presents discussions on many areas of screen arts and broadcast production. These public events increase AFTRS engagement in broader cultural activities and promote awareness and appreciation of Australian screen arts and broadcasting.

In October 2013, the CEO was invited by the Governor of South Australia to attend the opening night of the Adelaide Film Festival and the premiere of the feature film Tracks . AFTRS sponsored a well-attended event with the film’s key creatives, producer Emile Sherman and director John Curran. Robyn Davidson, and photographer Rick Smolan were interviewed by Margaret Pomeranz.

In 2014, at the Sydney Writer’s Festival, AFTRS hosted a session titled 'Adapt or Die: Small Start, Global Finish' with guest writers Hannah Kent and Graeme Simsion, and producer Ian Collie. In 2014, a Friday On My Mind session was again run in partnership with the Sydney Film Festival (SFF). Hosted at the Festival Hub by AFTRS Head of Documentary, Rachel Landers, Indian director and screenwriter Pan Nalin discussed his documentary, Faith Connections. AFTRS also ran two other sessions at the SFF: Giles Hardie moderated 'Action, Romance, Silliness: The Good, the Bad, the Cringeworthy', a session on genre movies with guests Matilda Brown, Dave Wade and Chris Taylor; and Iranian-American filmmaker, Desiree Akhavan was in conversation with Dee Jefferson, about her first feature Appropriate Behavior, which she wrote, directed and starred in.

In 2013-14 AFTRS partnered with or supported the following professional and cultural organisations:

• Antenna Documentary Film Festival • Australian Centre for the Moving Image • Australian Directors Guild • Australian Cinematographers Society • Australian International Documentary Conference • Australian Production Design Guild • Australian Screen Sound Guild • Australian Writers' Guild • Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association • Australian Teachers of Media • Byron Bay Writers’ Festival • Colourfest Film Festival • Commercial Radio Australia • Foxtel • Human Rights Arts and Film Festival • Melbourne International Film Festival • Melbourne Writers’ Festival • National Centre for Indigenous Excellence • National Film and Sound Archive • National Institute of Dramatic Art • Persian Film Festival • Screen Australia • Screen Queensland • Screen Music Awards • Screenworks Northern Rivers • South Australian Film Corporation • St. Kilda Film Festival • Sydney Film Festival

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• Sydney Writers’ Festival • UMI Arts (QLD) • WOW (World of Women’s) Film Festival

PUBLIC PROGRAM

The Public Program at AFTRS provides a diverse collection of events open to students, staff, industry and the general public that provide a free opportunity to engage and participate in the cultural life of the screen and broadcast sector.

Friday on My Mind continues to successfully draw audiences keen to learn from the unique perspectives and insights of creative practitioners involved in many aspects of film, television and digital media production.

Running for its seventh year in Sydney, and the third year in Melbourne, sessions continued weekly with the support of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. In 2013-14, Friday on My Mind had an attendance of 3,129 across 50 sessions.

AFTRS records and publishes transcripts of Friday on My Mind sessions in its journal, LUMINA, which is accessible as a hard copy journal,a free ebook from the iTunes store, or as seperate articles on the AFTRS website.

Continuing to prove popular and relevant is the monthly TV Talks program, launched in 2012 .TV Talks is an opportunity for industry professionals to discuss industry-relevant issues and provide a networking opportunity. This year ten sessions were hosted focusing on issues from ratings and multi-channelling, to the specifics of developing comedy and factual content for the small screen. Leading television professionals from commercial, public sector, and subscription TV networks as well as many production companies spoke at these sessions and over 830 individuals attended these events, many visiting AFTRS for the first time.

In 2013, AFTRS partnered with the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) to program classic cinema screenings. Reel Sundays was a twelve-week season of classic films screened in the AFTRS Theatre, made possible through accessing the NFSA’s non-theatrical Lending Collection. The season ran from September 15 to December 1, 2013.

For more details, see Public Program: Appendix 5.

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LEADERSHIP, COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT

AFTRS will continue to collaborate with industry across the range of education, research and training activities and assist industry to meet its skills requirements, and to support its activities and events

AFTRS demonstrates leadership in the cultural and industry sector by engaging, collaborating and supporting a range of activities and events as well as by creating an industry hub where practitioners and professionals, along with students, staff and alumni, can network, create and develop projects. AFTRS also provides valuable resources for the sector’s artistic and educational endeavours through the publication of a screen journal, the Jerzy Toeplitz Library and access to its Moore Park campus.

LUMINA

LUMINA, now in its sixth year of publication, is AFTRS’ screen arts and business journal, the only publication of its kind in Australia. LUMINA contributes to the diversity and complexity of the Australian screen and broadcast industries by commissioning and publishing challenging discourse on significant issues.

In November 2013 AFTRS published edition 12: Television. Going, Going…Where? This issue of LUMINA presents interviews and reflections from the television industry's leading thinkers and practitioners on the future of television, including its challenges, threats and opportunities.

Co-edited by Denise Eriksen and Sandra Levy, contributors include Adam Turner, Ross Coulthart, Bruce Meagher, Rick Ellis and Dario Russo.

CREATIVE FELLOWSHIP

Now in its fifth year, the AFTRS Creative Fellowship continues to reward daring and adventurous creative practice. Creative Fellows enjoy a special relationship with the School, with AFTRS providing support for their projects whenever resources are available. The Creative Fellows give back to the School in the presentation of their final work, and through a report on what they have learned during the creative process.

In 2014, 68 creative professionals applied for a Fellowship. These applications were reviewed by the selection panel in May. Applicants were asked to submit a proposal that met the brief, “adventurous in its aims, bold in its ambition, and innovative in its execution”. The panel found the standard of applicants to be very high and awarded two Creative Fellowships of $50,000 to emerging filmmakers: • Amiel Courtin-Wilson for Aether, a docu-drama short film about the legendary avant-

garde pianist, Cecil Taylor • Melissa Anastasi for Sleepwalking, a short film which, through the story of a boy and his parents in an isolated landscape, explores questions about the world as we perceive it, and the world that exists beyond our perception.

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RESEARCH

Through its research activities, AFTRS undertakes scholarly work and industry analysis to progress topical issues of importance to the screen arts and broadcasting sector.

In 2013-14, AFTRS commissioned and published the following occasional papers:

• The Case for Creating an Australian Copyright Registry by Professor Michael Fraser and Head of Screen Business, David Court, and

• Beyond The Great Wall: Pathways to Australia / China Co-Productions written by Mario Andreacchio and edited by David Court.

In 2013-14, AFTRS staff delivered the following papers:

• Do Your Students Have a Clue? The Alternate Reality Game as Pedagogical Tool by Catherine Gleeson, Convenor Foundation Diploma and Marty Murphy, Lecturer Foundation Diploma, presented at the Australian Screen Production Education & Research Association Conference;

• The Academic Video Essay by Matthew Campora, Screen Studies Lecturer presented at the Australian Screen Production Education & Research Association Conference;

• Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines by guest Sound Lecturer, Andrew Belletty, presented at the UNSW Postgraduate Research Conference;

• Love, Death, Film and Music, presented by Head of Screen Music, Martin Armiger at the Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film (University for Television and Film) as part of the Berlin Transmediale Festival; and later at the artist academy, Takt Projektraum as part of their workshop program, and

• Engage or Perish: Talk Radio’s Future, presented by Director of Radio, Mark Collier at the RadioAsia Conference in Hanoi.

LIBRARY

The Library is one of the most comprehensive screen arts and broadcast sector resources in Australia. It services staff and students as well as members of the industry and general public for study and research purposes.

The Library continues to evolve into a flexible and multi-platform discovery centre and to assist the School’s educational and research needs across Award and Open Program courses. Comprising six areas, the 2014-2017 strategy is formulated to address the information needs of AFTRS' diverse community through addressing Relevance and Responsiveness; Empowerment and Information Literacy; Capability and Resourcing; Screen and Broadcast Sector’s Information Requirements; Technology and Innovation; and Marketing and Current Awareness.

Subscriptions to information provider Informit, which harvests Australian publications, and the aggregator Ebscohost that comprises a suite of international databases and publications, considerably expanded the Library collection. These licences, together with the streaming of over 300 films and documentaries through the service providers

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Kanopy and Beamafilm, support and enhance the academic and scholarly standing of AFTRS at the same time allowing Library patrons to access these resources remotely. As part of its Information Literacy focus, the Library initiated the roll-out of the bibliographic management software Mendeley, to enhance academic rigour at AFTRS.

This year, the Library initiated a marketing campaign to increase its membership base from the screen and broadcast sector, and the decision was made to offer this membership to the sector free of charge. As a result of these initiatives, the Library has 466 active industry members.

In 2013-14, the Library was visited 23,000 times; 44,340 items were borrowed, 331 eBooks were lent, and 183 hours of streaming vieos were screened. Thirteen seperate Libguides (subject specific e-resources), were produced, ranging in subject from the Story of Film to Sound. These resources have been well-received.

INDUSTRY HUB AND INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

AFTRS is a creative hub for the screen arts and broadcasting sector, and continued to host a significant number of events, screenings, forums and meetings this year. AFTRS policy encourages industry engagement by making its facilities available for industry activities and events free of charge, when they are not being used for educational purposes.

Industry guilds and societies, industry associations, AFTRS graduates, cultural organisations, government agencies, filmmakers, production companies and education organisations use the School’s facilities for meetings, screenings, casting sessions, conferences, master classes, workshops and equipment testing. The presence of industry in this way creates a professional environment that benefits all who work, study or visit AFTRS. (For details, see Industry Events: Appendix 6).

This environment within AFTRS is enhanced by the visit of local and international guest visitors. In 2013, screenwriter, playwright and director, David Mamet visited the School to speak to staff and students about his creative practice, ideas and storytelling. It was a wonderful opportunity for the cohort to have a conversation with such an eminent and powerful storyteller.

AFTRS employs screen arts and broadcast practitioners as teachers and lecturers for award and short courses. The teaching staff draws on their own professional experience, networks and connections with industry to ensure the currency of the courses, and to guide the development and activities of the School.

AFTRS creative campus environment also attracts leading industry members to lecture as guests in Award courses across all disciplines and in Open Program short courses. (For details, see Guest Lecturers: Appendix 7.)

Events were held at AFTRS to launch staff work; Screen Studies Lecturer, Matthew Campora’s book Subjective Realist Cinema: From Expressionism to Inception; the Occasional Paper, The Case for Creating an Australian Copyright Registry co-written by Head of Screen Business, David Court and Professor Michael Fraser, and the AFTRS commissioned White Paper: Beyond the Great Wall - Pathways to Australia-China Co-Productions by Mario Andreacchio.

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Industry Guilds and Associations

AFTRS maintains a close relationship with the relevant screen and broadcasting industry guilds, societies, and associations, and in 2013-14, staff attended the following events and award nights:

• Australian Cinematographers Society Awards: Cinematography Lecturer, Erika Addis presented the ‘Best Student Cinematography Award.’

• Australian Writers’ Guild Awards: Head of Screenwriting (Industry), Ross Grayson Bell presented the ‘Monte Miller Award for Short and Long-form Screenplays’; and Documentary Lecturer, Randall Wood was a selection panel member for Documentary Award categories.

• Australian Production Design Guild Awards: Master Screen Arts Convenor, Sarah Stollman presented the ‘AFTRS Award for Student Design.

• Australian Screen Sound Guild Awards: Head of Sound, Chris McKeith presented the award for ‘Best Sound in a Short Film’.

• South Australian Screen Awards: Head of Sound, Chris McKeith was a selection panel mentor for Sound Design.

• WOW Film Festival: Head of Producing, Andrena Finlay presented the award for ‘Best Student Film’.

The Radio Division once again held its annual seminar at AFTRS, an event that brings together more than 20 leading broadcast industry practitioners to explore issues and share work experience with the Graduate Radio Diploma students and participants in the online Commercial Radio Programming course.

DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC EVENTS

A number of activities were held that were focused around specific disciplines offered by the School. Some of these were co-hosted with industry guilds and organisations, and attended by current students, staff, industry members and potential AFTRS applicants.

• A Conversation with Roger Deakins BSC ASC, hosted by the Australian Cinematography Society and Head of Cinematography, Kim Batterham;

• Seven Doc Talks, a series of master classes hosted by Head of Documentary, Rachel Landers featuring directors, Eva Orner and Ian Darling as part of the Antenna International Documentary Festival;

• SoundByte series: Recording Ensemble Music and the Score; Sounds of Lifestyle and Reality TV; and Capturing the Sounds of Asia;

• Glories of the Score III: a Screen Music evening highlighting the music of graduates Kyls Burtland, Robert Clark, Pru Montin and Flynn Wheeler, and including a special performance by Fox Force Five;

• Sound Design, a seminar presented by Head of Sound, Chris McKeith at the Real Film Festival, Newcastle;

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• The Invisible Cut: a seminar held in conjunction with the Film Circle Critics of Australia and the Australian Screen Editor’s Guild. Head of Editing, Mark Warner hosted a panel of editors Suresh Ayyer, Katrina Baker, Roland Gallois, Lindi Harrison, Denise Haslem and Nick Meyers;

• Writing sessions delivered by Allen Palmer, Screenwriting Lecturer, titled How to Write Better Scenes, Transcendent Storytelling: What Elevates The Great Above The Good and The Character-Driven Hero's Journey;

• Finding Your Creative Voice: a creativity lab run by Nell Greenwood, A/Head of Screenwriting for potential Master of Screen Arts applicants;

• Storyworlds: Talk With Directors: hosted by Acting Head of Directing, Robert Klenner and Head of Screen Design, Igor Nay and with guests Warwick Thornton, Melinda Doring and David Caesar;

• The Magnificent Seven for Successful Producing: panel session including producers Al Clark, Helen Bowden, Jodi Matterson and Kristy Stark;

• World premiere of the TV pilot, Deadbeat Dads, introduced by Neil Peplow, Director of Screen, and Ross Grayson Bell, Head of Screenwriting (Industry), jointly hosted by MTV and AFTRS.

INTERNSHIPS, ATTACHMENTS AND EXCHANGE

AFTRS facilitates a range of diverse opportunities for students and graduates to apply for internships, attachments and seek direct work experience. In 2013-14, the School continued to develop current schemes and initiated new partnerships to extend opportunities for AFTRS’ students and graduates.

• New York University (NYU) Tisch School of the Arts: AFTRS continued its ongoing partnership with NYU that enabled a select group of NYU students to participate in the Foundation Diploma. In 2014, the fourth group of NYU students participated in the subject, Emotional Noise as well as a cultural engagement workshop.

• Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA): ASTRA continued to offer opportunities for graduates of the Foundation Diploma to apply for a three-month internship in the subscription television sector. Twelve graduates were successful in gaining an internship with a subscription television channel or platform.

• Shine Australia: In 2013, AFTRS launched a partnership with Shine Australia that provided the opportunity for Foundation Diploma graduates to apply for a six-month paid internship to gain experience across a range of departments within the company, including post-production, Shine 360 (brand management and licensing), development, casting and publicity, as well as to work on shows in production.

• Screen Australia Escalator Program: in partnership with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group, this program provides an AFTRS graduate with the opportunity to work in Los Angeles on a three-month paid internship.

• Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis-Lumière: AFTRS has a student exchange program that operates on an annual basis. In 2014, Cinematography student, Fanny Mazoyer joined the Master of Screen Arts for one semester.

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• Radio Internships: as part of the Graduate Diploma of Radio, all students complete internships prior to graduation at public, commercial or community radio stations.

• Scholarships and Awards: AFTRS has a range of awards and scholarships available for graduating students, made possible through a variety of philanthropic support including the Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent, European Union Travelling Scholarships, the A.V. Myer Indigenous Awards, the Kenneth B. Myer Award for Exceptional Talent, the Kenneth B. Myer Award for Project Development and the Shark Island Institute Documentary Award.

• AFTRS industry networks continue to provide placements for students. In 2013-14, AFTRS students had placements on the feature films Unbroken, Gods of Egypt and Wolverine.

CILECT

AFTRS is a member of CILECT (Centre International de Liaison des Ecoles de Cinéma et de Télévision) the association of the world’s major film and television schools. CILECT represents 159 specialist film schools from sixty countries, and membership is by invitation only.

In September 2013, the CEO and Director of Screen attended the annual CILECT Conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The Impact of the Digital Age in CILECT Schools’ Teaching Curricula was the Conference theme, and of particular note was the session investigating Producing/Commercialisation/Distributing/Marketing Curricula: New Formats. Dr Karen Pearlman, Head of Screen Studies presented a paper: Shaping the Film Edit: Editing, Technology and Curriculum Invited Guest.

AFTRS is also a member of CILECT’s Asia-Pacific Association (CAPA) which includes 32 film schools from 12 countries. Members are from film schools in China, India, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand. At the CAPA Conference in 2013, guest sound lecturer Andrew Belletty presented a paper: Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines.

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PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

AFTRS will manage and optimise the use of its resources by encouraging a productive and accountable environment. AFTRS manages its finances and facilities to maximise benefits for students, staff and industry and ensure the maintenance of a safe and productive work environment and the efficient and effective use of public resources.

ENHANCING WORK METHODS AND ENVIRONMENT

During the reporting period a number of reviews and measures have been implemented with the aim of simplifying process, ensuring compliance, and supporting the new educational offering to be available from 2015. A full review of policy documents is underway to ensure currency and to increase accessibility to information and policy decisions. Closely associated with this process has been a review of documentation to ensure compliance with new and amended legislation such as the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013, the Privacy Act 1988, the Fair Work Act 2009, and the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy.

The staffing structure necessary to support the 2015 course offerings has been reviewed and the new structure is in the process of being implemented. In addition, a number of changes have been made to the building including the creation of new and larger teaching spaces for the anticipated student cohort; the relocation of the Student Centre to provide easier access for potential applicants and students; the relocation of parts of Central Services to be closer to staff; and the expansion of the technical store to enable ease of access by students. The most appropriate resources for the new educational environment have been considered and resulted in, for example, the purchase of new furniture that can be used more flexibly, and a greater concentration of online resources for students.

CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT

During the period the School conducted a tender and contracted for the provision of electricity for the building from July 2014 onwards. The new contract will deliver a reduction in the electricity rate for year one of 16.8% and year two of 14.3%, compared to that contracted in 2013-2014. A two-year proposal was accepted which provides competitive pricing and budget assurance.

A closed tender was held, following wide research of the local radio industry, to upgrade the school's radio studios. The old consoles required replacement as it was no longer possible to source parts, maintenance or support services. The new consoles resolve this risk and represent a significant step forward in capability and flexibility through the use of new, advanced technologies.

In order to ensure the best use of resources, AFTRS also accesses a number of whole-of-government procurement arrangements including travel and stationery, that have delivered cost effective outcomes.

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WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

Following the introduction of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, a detailed gap analysis to ensure AFTRS complied with all legislative responsibilities was completed. During the reporting period, an audit was undertaken by the internal auditors and the School was found to comply with the legislative requirements.

A number of policies and procedures were developed or reviewed, risk assessment and mitigation processes were expanded, the online incident reporting system was enhanced, and compliance-related staff training was completed. Established systems such as the School’s Health and Safety Committee continue to ensure appropriate dissemination of information and to ensure workers remain current in their knowledge and expertise.

WORKPLACE CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION

The Chief Executive Officer held all school meetings on key strategic topics, regularly attended Divisional meetings, and issued newsletters to inform staff of current events and provide updates on key issues. The topic of workplace culture has become a standing agenda item for the Executive and considerable work completed on behaviours to reflect AFTRS values. An external anonymous ‘whistleblower’ service remains available to staff, although no reports were lodged in the reporting period.

CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

A comprehensive and consultative review of the AFTRS website resulted in the launch of a new website in March 2014. The new site is a more interactive, online space, which improves student recruitment processes, assists with external communication, and makes the entire AFTRS short film library and Alumni Project Database available.

A new intranet is being implemented, co-ordinated with the review of the School’s policy and procedural documentation. The new system will be user-focused and provide accurate, up-to-date information and internal communication across the School.

A new Client Relationship Management system has been implemented to streamline the management of short courses and provide a platform to manage ongoing contact with past and future students. The system is in place for short courses and for the recruitment phase of Award courses. Further expansion of the system is planned, which will include general marketing activities.

LIBRARY SERVICES

The key objectives of the structural review of Library Services—strategic engagement across AFTRS, curriculum integration, accessibility and digitisation—have progressed well this year, and the Library is on track to support the new educational offering in 2015. Together with opening up further access to the industry, subscriptions to international databases, publications and video streaming of screen material have effected significant advances which will support the research and academic activities of students, staff and industry. The Library initiated and managed the roll-out of, and training associated with, the bibliographic management software Mendeley, to enhance academic rigour.

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PRODUCTION RESOURCES AND VIDEO POST

AFTRS remains at the forefront of contemporary digital techniques and their implementation through its planned design and installation of new equipment and facilities. This year new grading suites were installed that considerably increased technical quality and significantly reduced grading costs. Production Resources and Video Post kept pace with both the quantity and digital demands of student productions, with Video Post also providing staff and technical resources to Open Program short courses.

Eighty-five student productions were supported this year, including high production value short films and experimental projects. On 7 and 8 December 2013, the graduating projects of 2013 were screened at the School’s theatre and studios.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Council

Under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 (the Act), the School is governed by a Council responsible to the Federal Parliament through the Minister for the Arts. The Hon Tony Burke MP was Minister for the Arts to 17 September 2013. The Hon. George Brandis QC MP commenced as Minister for the Arts on 18 September 2013.

Responsibilities and duties

The Council is responsible for strategic direction, organisational development, succession planning and resource allocation, including budget control and risk. The Council ensures that policies on key issues are in place and are appropriate and that risks facing AFTRS are identified, assessed and properly managed.

Composition

There are nine members of the Council, specified under the Act: • three members appointed by the Governor-General; • three members appointed from convocation by the Council; • the Chief Executive Officer, ex officio; • one staff member elected by staff each year and • one student member elected by students each year.

Members represent the interests of the School and the screen arts and broadcasting sector contributing expertise in a range of areas, including education, law, film and television production, commercial activities and management.

The Governor-General appoints the Chair. The Council elects the Deputy Chair. These positions may not be held by ex officio, staff or student members.

Members appointed by the Governor-General, and those appointed from Convocation, hold office for a term of up to three years. The staff member holds office for one year and ceases to be a member of Council if they cease to be a staff member of the School. The student member holds office for one year and ceases to be a member of Council if they cease to be a student of the School.

The maximum appointment period is two terms. Casual vacancies for elected positions may be filled, with the approval of the Minister, until the current term for that position expires.

Council members are non-executive directors with the exception of the Chief Executive Officer who is an executive director.

The Chief Executive Officer oversees the operations and activities of AFTRS, and manages affairs according to general policy approved by the Council.

On appointment, members receive a Corporate Governance Handbook as part of their induction. The Handbook sets out their responsibilities and duties as members of Council.

All members are asked to declare any conflict of interest at the beginning of each Council meeting. This process is recorded in the Council minutes and a conflict of interest register.

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COUNCIL MEMBERS As at 30 June 2014, Council members were:

Appointed by the Governor-General Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA BA UQ PhD Sydney, GCM, AGSM: Chair Term: 29 October 2012-28 October 2015

Professor Robyn Ewing BEd (Hons), PhD Sydney Term: 25 October 2012-24 October 2015

One vacancy

Ex Officio Ms Sandra Levy AO, BA DipEd Sydney, Hon D Litt Macq Chief Executive Officer, AFTRS

Appointed from Convocation Mr Peter Duncan BA LLB Sydney, BA (Film and Television) AFTRS: Deputy Chair Term: reappointed from 28 November 2011-27 November 2014

Mr Andrew Mason Term: reappointed from 14 February 2014-13 February 2017

Mr Darren Dale, BA Communications (Journalism) UTS, Hon MSA AFTRS Term: 5 April 2012-4 April 2015

Staff-Elected Member Dr Matthew Campora PhD UQ, Lecturer, Screen Studies, AFTRS Term: 25 February 2014-24 February 2015

Student-Elected Member Ms Jessica Tuckwell Enrolled Graduate Certificate (Screenwriting), AFTRS BA Sydney, Grad Dip Dramatic Art (Directing) NIDA. Term: 25 February 2014-8 November 2014

Immediate past members (2013-2014) Mr Tom Burstall BA Dramatic Arts Production NIDA Term: 10 March 2011-9 March 2014

Ms Sally Browning BA (Media Arts) RMIT: Staff-elected member Manager, Administration and Budgets, Screen Division, AFTRS Term: 25 February 2013-24 February 2014

Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith: Student-elected member BA Communications UTS, MSA, AFTRS Term: 27 February 2013-8 November 2013 (extended to 6 December 2013).

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Key: √ Present ~ via telephone or Skype X Absent / Meeting prior to appointment - Term completed

Council Members 2013-2014

5 Jul 2013

30 Aug 2013 25 Oct 2013

6 Dec 2013 21 Feb 2014

16 May 2014

Prof Julianne Schultz Chair √ √ √ √ √ √

Ms Sandra Levy CEO

√ √ √ √ √ √

Mr Peter Duncan Deputy Chair X ~ ~ X X √

Mr Tom Burstall ~ ~ ~ √ √ -

Mr Andrew Mason √ √ √ X √ X

Mr Darren Dale ~ √ √ √ X √

Prof Robyn Ewing X √ √ √ √ √

Ms Sally Browning X √ √ √ √ -

Ms Genevieve Clay-Smith X √ √ X - -

Ms Jessica Tuckwell / / / / / √

Dr Matthew Campora / / / / / √

AFTRS COUNCIL MEMBERS ATTENDANCE JULY 2013 - JUNE 2014

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Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee The establishment of an audit committee is a requirement under Section 32 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act). The main objective of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee is to assist Council to discharge its responsibilities relating to:

• financial reporting • performance reporting • systems of risk oversight; and • systems of internal control.

The Committee held four meetings in 2013-2014.

Responsibilities and duties The FARM Committee considers any matters relating to financial affairs and risk management that it determines is desirable. It also examines any other matters referred by the Council.

The duties of the FARM Committee relate to:

• the scope and nature of external audit and any issues arising from audit; • the examination of the Annual Report before submitting to Council; • the process for identifying major risks to which AFTRS is exposed and verifying that internal control systems are adequate and functioning effectively;

• the consideration of the internal audit program; • the review of all significant transactions that do not form part of normal AFTRS business and • the evaluation of AFTRS exposure to fraud.

Composition The FARM Committee consists of five members that include Council members and up to two Independent members as may be determined from Council from time to time.

In accordance with the CAC Act and the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Regulations 1997, the Chair of the Committee must be a person other than the Chair of Council or the Chief Executive Officer. The Chair of the Committee shall be appointed by Council from members of Council or an external appointee (Independent member). The Council appoints members for an initial period of two years, after which appointments may be subject to annual rotation.

FARM Committee Members at 30 June 2014 Mr Andrew Mason: Chair

Mr Paul Apps (Audit and Control Advisor, International Monetary Fund; Former Head of Audit, Reserve Bank of Australia)

Mr Darren Dale

Ms Sandra Levy AO

The Director, Corporate and Production Services and the Head of Financial Services have a standing invitation to attend FARM Committee meetings. The internal and external auditors are also in attendance at meetings.

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FARM Committee Members’ Attendance 2013-2014

FARM Members 2013-2014 5 Jul 2013 23 Aug 2013 25 Oct 2013 21 Feb 2014

Mr Andrew Mason Chair

√ √ √ √

Mr Paul Apps (Independent member)

√ √ √ √

Ms Sandra Levy AO

√ √ √ √

Mr Darren Dale

~ √ √ ~

Key: √ Present

~ via telephone or Skype

X Absent

/ Meeting prior to appointment

Academic Board The Academic Board is an ad-hoc sub-committee of the Council and met four times in the 2013-2014 year.

The functions of the Academic Board are to:

• make recommendations to Council relating to the approval of new curricula. • make recommendations to Council relating to major changes to courses of study. • approve curriculum and ensure it is designed to meet the highest standards of the higher education sector.

• review policies, rules, guidelines and procedures related to the admission, enrolment, assessment and progress of students in approved courses of study. • make recommendations to the CEO relating to academic matters in the School. • report on any issues referred to it by Council or the CEO. • make recommendations to Council regarding the conferring of degrees, or any

other award, following successful completion of any approved course of study conducted by the School. • make recommendations to Council regarding the conferral of the honorary degree.

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Composition The Academic Board consists of the Independent Chair, a higher education specialist with a PhD at professorial level; two or more Independent members, with higher education expertise; the CEO, the Director of Education, and the Head of Policy & Governance.

Academic Board Members at 30 June 2014 Professor Robyn Ewing BEd (Hons), PhD Sydney: Chair Professor, Teacher Education and the Arts, University of Sydney Mr Graham Forsyth BA (Hons) Sydney Associate Dean (Academic) UNSW Art & Design Dr Graham Hendry BA(Hons), PhD UOW, Grad Dip Ed Studies (Higher Ed) Sydney Senior Lecturer, Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney. Ms Sandra Levy AO, BA DipEd Sydney, Hon D Litt Macq CEO AFTRS Ms Francine Finnane BA (Communications) UTS Director of Education, AFTRS Ms Kylie Burke BA (Film & Television) AFTRS, Head of Policy & Governance, AFTRS

Future Review Committee The Future Review Committee comprises the CEO (Chair), Director of Screen, Convenor Foundation Diploma, Convenor Graduate Certificate, Convenor Graduate Diploma, Convenor Master of Screen Arts, and the Director of Education.

The main functions of the Future Review Committee are to initiate and provide strategic leadership on the educational aims and objectives of the School,including the:

• aims and objectives of award courses; • admission and selection processes; • effectiveness of award courses in meeting aims and objectives; • research strategy and activities; • review of academic related policy for referral to the Academic Board as required; • impact of new technologies on future planning for the School, and • award course offerings for the next academic year.

The Future Review Committee meets as required and decisions are reported through Executive minutes.

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Executive Team The Chief Executive Officer oversees the operations and activities of AFTRS, and manages the School according to general policy approved by the Council. The CEO leads the Executive which is made up of the Directors of the School’s Divisions and the Deputy Director, Screen. The Directors manage the key strategic and operational activities and report to the CEO.

Chief Executive Officer Ms Sandra Levy, AO

Executive at 30 June 2014 Director, Corporate and Production Services - Ms Ann Browne Director, Screen - Mr Neil Peplow (to 24 April 2014)* Deputy Director, Screen - Ms Sarah Stollman Director, Specialist Programs - Mr Martin Brown (from 4 November 2013) Director, Education - Ms Francine Finnane Director, Radio - Mr Mark Collier (to 5 January 2014)** Director, Open Program - Ms Liz Hughes Director, Technology and Infrastructure - Mr Tim Sadler.

* vacant, pending new appointment ** position subsequently abolished and responsibilities transferred to Director, Specialist Programs.

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SPECIALIST PROGRAMS

OPEN PROGRAM

SCREEN

Foundation Diploma Graduate Certificate Graduate Diploma Master of Screen Arts Master of Screen Arts & Business

Industry Television Schools & Youth Indigenous

Tailored

Marketing & Promotion Publicity

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

EDUCATION

Learning and Teaching Education Reporting/compliance Student Centre

Radio

Specialist Program Development

TECHNOLOGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Production Technology ICT & Services

CORPORATE AND PRODUCTION SERVICES

Financial Services Human Resources Property Services Business Affairs Policy and Governance

Sales and Distribution Jerzy Toeplitz Library Production Resources Video-Post

AFTRS COUNCIL

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STATUTORY REPORTS

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STATUTORY REPORTS

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO - WORKPLACE DIVERSITY)

There have been no complaints received by staff members this financial year.

Staff input continues to be sought through anonymous new employee and staff exit surveys. There is an external, anonymous Whistleblowing hotline service that has not received any reports during this period. In addition, special email addresses are advertised for Authorised Officers appointed under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013 provisions who may receive complaints.

STAFFING, ESTABLISHMENT AND APPOINTMENTS

AFTRS staff selection processes are based on merit selection. Representation of women at AFTRS has remained stable at 53% of staff.

The senior executive team was restructured at the beginning of 2014; however, overall numbers remained unchanged. Representation of women at the senior management level has increased from 57% to 62%, slightly increased at the head of department level from 55% to 60% (the same rate as the previous year), remained static for lecturer positions, and increased slightly in technical roles from 8% to 13%.

As at 30 June 2014 there were 118 staff at AFTRS, twelve of whom worked part time (no change from last year). Staff from non-English speaking backgrounds occupied 21 positions (to the head of department level), two were occupied by people identifying as having a disability, and one member of staff identified as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Of the 39 appointments made by AFTRS during the year, 26 were women and eight indicated they were from a non-English speaking background. All equity-related policies are available on the intranet.

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2012-13 2013-14

Male Full time

Male Part time

Female Full time

Female Part time Total

Male Full time

Male Part time

Female Full time

Female Part time Total

New South Wales

a) PEO 1 1 1 1

b) SES 3 4 7 3 4 7

c) Below SES 48 6 54 5 113 45 4 50 6 105

d) Temporary 1 1 2 3 1 1 5

Victoria

Below SES 1 1

Total 52 6 60 6 124 51 5 55 7 118

Staff are employed at AFTRS under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973. The majority of staff are covered by the AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011. Three staff members have Individual Flexibility Arrangements or Individual Variable Remuneration. SES equivalent staff are employed on a contract basis. The holder of the Principal Executive Office is covered by a performance appraisal scheme which allows for an annual performance related payment.

COMPARISON TABLES 2012-13 & 2013-14 STAFFING INFORMATION

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2012-13 2013-14

Male Female Total NESB Male Female Total NESB

*Senior Management 3 5 8 3 5 8

Management/Heads of Department 13 16 29 5 11 16 27 5

Teaching 11 6 17 2 11 7 18 1

Teaching/Training Support 1 9 10 1 7 7 3

Administration 10 25 35 8 11 22 33 6

Technical 13 1 14 5 13 2 15 5

Production 5 4 9 5 3 8

Support 2 2 1 2 2 1

Total 58 66 124 22 56 62 118 21

*Includes one PEO

BREAKDOWN OF AFTRS STAFF BY GENDER, LEVEL & NESB

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2012-13 2013-14

Salary Band NESB ATSI PWD Women NESB ATSI PWD Women

To $45,619 1 1

$45,620 - $59,934 1 3 1 5

$59,935 - $63,814 2 12 4 11

$63,815 - $85,245 7 16 6 15

$63,815 - $85,245 5 1 14 4 1 12

$97,065 - $119,2956 7 1 12 5 1 10

Over $119,295 9 1 9

Total 22 1 2 66 21 1 2 62

The table above shows the representation of the four EEO target groups (Non-English Speaking Background, Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, People with a Disability, and Women) in the AFTRS staff. The data is drawn from information provided voluntarily.

REPRESENTATION OF EEO TARGET GROUPS WITHIN SALARY BANDS

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Work and Private Commitments

AFTRS retains a flexible policy in relation to accommodating private commitments, which includes part-time work, job sharing, home-based work, flexible working hours, personal leave (that can also be used for religious/cultural observances) recreation leave at half pay and leave without pay. In addition, AFTRS allows individual flexibility arrangements based on genuine agreement.

Staff Training And Development

Internal training during 2013-14 continued to offer employees basic administration, general and technology skills. In addition, training was undertaken in information management; communication skills; copyright; risk assessment in child related matters, including mandatory reporting; research skills; financial matters, including fraud awareness; online course development; health and safety; leadership, and general management. Staff also participated in general training undertaken in partnership with other cultural agencies based in New South Wales.

Teaching staff were offered opportunities to upgrade their skills in areas including student management, online learning and discipline-specific training. A number of staff across the School accessed professional development leave or were granted leave without pay to enhance their industry-based skills.

Staff attended conferences in areas including: screen producing; documentary; radio; screen production education; online and blended learning; library and records management; accounting; copyright; work health and safety; production technology; marketing, and information technology. Conferences were attended both overseas and in Australia.

In 2013-14 AFTRS provided study assistance to staff undertaking external studies in fields such as public policy; creative writing; media communications; carpentry, and a range of education-related qualifications. The qualifications ranged from certificates to doctorates.

Programs addressing the training and development needs of staff as identified by management and staff through the ongoing performance management scheme, continued to be implemented. Compliance related information and training was also provided.

Cost of Staff Training

Value of staff time involved in training:

• 103 days internal training $48,276

• 78 days external training $36,222

• 103 days attending conferences $57,549

• 27 days approved professional development leave $7,448 • 105 days approved study leave $40,510

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Direct expenditure staff training:

• Internal training $8,714

• External training $20,961

• Conferences $31,700

• Related travel $56,056

Total cost of staff training $307,436

Average expenditure per staff member $2,605

The average expenditure per staff member is an increase of 11% on the 2012-13 figure (which had been a 9% decrease on the previous year).

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

AFTRS continued its commitment to involving staff in decision-making processes. The primary expression of this being inclusion of a staff-elected member on the governing Council. Staff representatives have input through a range of Committees, including the Health and Safety Committee. Staff input is also provided through regular departmental and divisional meetings—and when seeking input about change, anonymous methods of providing comments have been made available.

Information is available to staff primarily through email, noticeboards, the AFTRS intranet and website, CEO and staff newsletters and at all school meetings.

The Modern Award and Agreement Making

Minimum staff terms and conditions of employment are currently established by the AFTRS Award 2000, an Enterprise Award. Under the provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009, organisations whose staff were covered by an Enterprise Award were required to lodge an application with the Fair Work Commission by the end of 2013 to modernise that award or minimum staff terms and conditions would be established by the most suitable industry based modern award. AFTRS lodged an application to modernise the award in December 2013 and it is expected the matter will be determined during the 2014-15 financial year.

The AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011 nominally expired in February 2014, however the provisions will continue to apply until the Agreement is either terminated or replaced. AFTRS is in the process of obtaining approvals in accordance with the recently released Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy to finalise the employer bargaining position.

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY (WHS)

AFTRS continues to identify and promote best practice WHS management and is committed to the reduction of workplace related accidents, illnesses and injuries. AFTRS is committed to the implementation of, and adherence to, all relevant government WHS policy and legislation.

During this period several policies and procedures were developed or reviewed including the following.

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• Online Incident Reporting System - review to reduce false reports. • Risk Management documents and processes. • High Risk Activities (non-production) - list of activities and approval process finalised.

• Working on Roof Risk Assessment. • Emergency Services Route to AFTRS reviewed. • Workplace Bullying Policy reviewed.

An ongoing program of review continued, including: induction of students and contractors; risk assessment processes; ergonomic assessments; identification and review of high risk activities, and workplace inspections. Measures were taken to address identified risks including the installation of a duress alarm and hospital grade flooring in the First Aid Room. An audit of compliance with the legislation was also completed by the Internal Auditors and AFTRS was found to comply, receiving a rating of 4.

The School has retained membership of the Cultural Institutions Health and Safety network and joined the Commonwealth Safety Managers Forum.

Consultation

Staff are regularly consulted on health and safety related issues by their managers or specialist staff. In addition, the Health and Safety Committee, the key consultative body, held four meetings during this period. Workers are encouraged to communicate concerns either directly to the Committee or through their representatives, and are welcome to attend meetings.

Workers are represented on the Committee by Health and Safety Representatives from specific work groups within the School. Health and Safety Representatives have undergone training as required by statute before they can exercise their full functions. A member of the AFTRS Executive attends Committee meetings and reports directly to the Executive.

Minutes of the meetings and other health and safety information is made available to workers on noticeboards, via email, and on the School intranet.

Training Undertaken included:

• Due Diligence for Officers. • Attendance at Commonwealth Safety Managers Forum. • WHS Awareness and Risk Management. • Ergonomic workplace assessment. • First Aid and Recertification. • Emergency Warden. • Dealing with Customer Aggression. • Understanding Mental Health. • Induction/Orientation for staff and contractors. • Construction Induction Training (“White card” staff and students) • Production Safety (new students). • Elevating Work Platform—Scissor Lift • Various licences/tickets.

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Personnel

As part of our commitment to health and safety, AFTRS currently has the following trained personnel: • Six Health and Safety Representatives and Deputies. • 25 Senior First Aid Officers. • 34 Emergency Wardens. • Five Rehabilitation Case Managers.

Incident Reports

During the reporting period there were 26 incidents reported (a reduction of 43% on the previous year). None were reportable and all are closed.

There was one compensation claim lodged during the reporting period (decision pending). No remedial action was required as a result of the incident.

DISABILITY REPORTING MECHANISMS

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, departments and agencies have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports will be made available in late 2014, on www.dss.gov.au in late 2014.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

AFTRS is subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and, under Part II of the FOI Act, is required to publish a broad range of information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). AFTRS displays a plan on its website that shows what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements. This information includes details of AFTRS’ structure, functions, appointments, annual reports, consultation arrangements and FOI officer.

AFTRS also publishes information resulting from FOI access requests, information to which AFTRS routinely gives access in response to FOI access requests, and information routinely provided to Parliament. AFTRS’ website provides details of the information published in accordance with the IPS requirements at: www.aftrs.edu.au/ about/governance/foi/information-publication-scheme

Formal requests may also be made for information about AFTRS and its operations under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. These requests are referred to AFTRS’ FOI officer. One request was received and finalised by AFTRS during the reporting period.

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PRIVACY

AFTRS has five broad categories of personnel information: personnel records; contractor records; student records; volunteer records; and mailing lists.

AFTRS continued to comply with its obligations under the Privacy Act 1988 in relation to the collection, use, disclosure, integrity, and access to and correction of, personal information. AFTRS also continued to take relevant Privacy Commissioner Guidelines into account in dealing with personal information.

No complaints under the Privacy Act 1988 were received by AFTRS during the reporting period.

MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS AND GOVERNMENT POLICIES

Ministerial directions may be issued under certain provisions of the School’s enabling Act or under other Commonwealth legislation. No ministerial directions that applied to the School were issued under the enabling or other Commonwealth legislation during the reporting period.

No General Policy Orders under Section 48A of the CAC Act applied to the School during the reporting period.

JUDICIAL DECISIONS AND REVIEWS BY OUTSIDE BODIES

There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that have had, or may have, a significant effect on the operations of AFTRS. No reports about AFTRS were made by the Auditor General (other than a report on the financial statements), a Parliamentary Committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

FRAUD CONTROL

AFTRS maintained its Fraud Control Policy and continued to implement its 2012-14 Fraud Control Plan. The Policy and Plan reflected the fraud risk assessment prepared by AFTRS’ internal auditors and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011.

AFTRS progressively undertook actions to enhance its fraud control measures, including refresher training for staff, and these actions were reported to meetings of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee. AFTRS also participated in the annual Fraud Against the Commonwealth Survey, administered by the Australian Institute of Criminology.

The CEO is satisfied that AFTRS has appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet AFTRS’ specific needs and that she has taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud at AFTRS.

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INDEMNITIES AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS FOR OFFICERS

AFTRS paid an insurance premium for liability cover to Comcover, which, incorporated specific cover to indemnify the Council members and Officers for any claim made against them while acting in their capacity as office holders.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

AFTRS continues to identify aspects of its operations that impact on the environment. The School is committed to developing a continual improvement process to control its environmental impacts in relation to energy, water and waste management.

Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD)

The AFTRS program of environmental activities aims for:

• reporting systems that identify energy efficiency opportunities; • low-landfill output due to recycling programs; • lower water usage through preventative maintenance programs; continued, environmentally friendly disposal of all obsolete computer

and production equipment, and • increased awareness of AFTRS commitment to sustainability by briefing all new staff and students during induction.

Environmental Performance Reporting

(As per Commonwealth reporting requirements guideline under Section 516A of The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

See table on page 67.

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Activity Alignment with ESD

Principles

Advancement of ESD Principles

Managing contracts

Tenders and contracts for potential suppliers contain environmental evaluation and conditions.

Procurement decisions and contracting integrates long-term environmental aims.

Environmental Management Plan implementation

Review and modify environmental policies and management plans. Provides the basis of our environmental management

program.

Maintain initiatives from plan. Provides a plan and target for initiatives and energy use.

Theme Steps taken to reduce effect Measures to review and

improve reducing the effect

Energy efficiency

AFTRS has the following initiatives in place to reduce energy consumption: • Switchable lighting so unused

areas can be switched off. • Signage to inform staff and students to switch off lights

and equipment. • Motion sensors for lighting and mechanical services

to reduce over running in unused areas. • Routine maintenance of the air-conditioning systems to

ensure they run efficiently and as designed.

Collection and review of consumption data manually on site and periodical energy audits.

Waste AFTRS continues to implement

recycling programs that separate waste at source and aims to reduce waste by providing crockery, utensils and kitchen areas and reducing waste to landfill by encouraging recycling.

Ensuring engagement with staff on environmental matters and maintaining the program.

Water AFTRS makes use of water

efficient devices including showerheads, dual flush toilets, water-saving washers on taps and low water usage dishwashers.

Monitoring water consumption and encouraging efficient use.

Overall there has been an increase in energy and water usage and generation of waste. This increase has been

minimal in proportion to the significantly increased use of AFTRS facilities by staff, students and industry.

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APPENDIX 1

ENABLING LEGISLATION The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) was established by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 (the Act). It is the leading institution for education and training in Australia’s screen arts and broadcast industries. AFTRS’ functions as laid out in section 5(1) of the Act are:

(a) to provide advanced education and training by way of the development of the knowledge and skills required, in connection with the production of programs; (b) to conduct and encourage research in connection with the production of programs; (c) to conduct such seminars and courses of education or training for persons

engaged, or to be engaged, directly or indirectly, in connection with the production of programs as are approved by the Council; (d) to co-operate and make arrangements with other institutions and persons for purposes in connection with the production of programs or the provision of

education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a); (e) for purposes in connection with the production of programs or the provision of education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a), to provide facilities

for, and to offer the services of the staff of the School to, such other institutions or persons as are approved by the Council; (f) to make grants of financial assistance to persons to enable or assist those persons to receive education or undergo training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a); (g) to award such degrees, diplomas and certificates in relation to the passing of

examinations or otherwise in relation to the education and training provided by the School as are specified in a determination under section 6A; and (h) to do anything incidental or conducive to the performance of the foregoing functions.

Section 5(2) provides that the School: shall exercise its functions with a view to enabling and encouraging the production of programs of a high degree of creativeness and of high technical and artistic standards.

A number of regulations and other legislative instruments have been made under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 since the Act commenced. As a Commonwealth statutory authority, AFTRS also operated under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

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APPENDIX 2

FINANCIAL RESOURCE SUMMARY

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

In the 2013-14 financial year AFTRS generated a small surplus that rounded to a break even result.

The Parliamentary Appropriation for AFTRS in 2013-14 was $24,429K. Total revenue was $31,515K with ‘Own sourced revenue’ of $7,091K providing the balance through Award course and Open Program short course fees, interest, and the sale of AFTRS training products less a $5K loss on sale of assets. Total ‘Own sourced revenue’ exceeded last year’s by $1,465K or 26%. .

Revenue from ‘Sale of goods & rendering of services’ increased by $1,507K or 28%, largely as a result of the expansion of the range and number of Open Program short courses. Interest received declined by $42K compared to the previous year, due to the lower interest rates on offer during the financial year.

Expenses at $31,515K were $1,484K or 4.9% higher than the previous year mainly as a consequence of the additional variable expenses flowing from running more Open Program short courses than expected.

In accordance with our five-year capital expenditure plan, depreciation exceeded our capital expenditure for the year.

AFTRS’ financial statements for 2013-14 were prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and the Finance Minister’s Orders for the reporting period ending 30th June 2014. The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) issued an unqualified audit opinion on the financial statements and notes on 29 August 2014.

EXTERNAL AUDIT

The ANAO carried out an interim review of AFTRS’ operations in the reporting period.

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INTERNAL AUDIT

Deloitte Australia provides an independent internal audit service to the School. Internal Audit is administratively responsible to the Director, Corporate and Production Services and is accountable to the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee. Representatives from the internal auditors attend FARM meetings together with a representative of the ANAO.

Internal Audit submits an annual audit plan and regular quarterly operational plans to FARM. Audits conducted during 2013-2014 were:

• Workplace Health and Safety; • Recruitment and Payroll, and • Course Award and Graduation.

RISK MANAGEMENT

AFTRS participated in Comcover’s 2014 Risk Management Benchmarking Survey. Consequently the School was awarded a benchmarking discount of 6.24% on the cost of its 2014-15 insurance premium.

CLAIMS AND LOSSES

There were no major losses during the year ending 30 June 2014.

PURCHASING

The purchasing functions and procedures of AFTRS, and the standard terms of accounts payment, are consistent with, or guided by, the Commonwealth Procurement Guidelines. Through the Administrative Orders, AFTRS Council delegates certain powers and functions, including purchasing levels, to occupants of specific AFTRS management positions. This is subject to the limits prescribed under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 and the Council-approved policies, programs and procedures of AFTRS.

To the best of the School’s knowledge, all properly rendered invoices were paid within the agreed trading terms. AFTRS participates in some whole-of-government contracts where appropriate, including the Travel Services contract, and contracts for the provision of stationary and office supplies. Information technology equipment and general goods purchases utilised both state and federal contracts (where appropriate). The School buys capital items in accordance with the annual capital program.

COMPETITIVE TENDERING AND EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

AFTRS procurement policy requires purchases over $100,000 to be obtained through formal processes that may involve either public or selected tender (RFQ/RFP/RFT) and could include an expression of interest phase. Purchases greater than $400,000 require public tender, which may also include an expression of interest process.

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In general, consideration is given to the following factors to determine the method of approach to market:

• urgency of the requirement; • limited number of known potential suppliers; • competitiveness of the marketplace; • a supplier’s prior knowledge or experience with a particular activity that other

suppliers could not build up unless extensive additional costs and time delays were incurred, and • compatibility with existing equipment.

In 2013-14 AFTRS sought written quotes and/or tenders for the following services (over $100,000):

• Provision of electricity to building, and • Radio studio consoles.

CONSULTANCY SERVICES

AFTRS engages consultants with specialist skills to help with defined projects. During the year, AFTRS entered into seven specialist consultancies, involving expenditure of $65K. A total of two consultancies had a value exceeding $15K.

Consultant Project

Odgers Berndtson International Senior Executive Search AARNET Pty Ltd Enterprise Network Audit and Design

In addition, the School engaged other consultants to provide regular, ongoing services.

CONTRACTORS

Each year AFTRS engages a range of independent contractors; most are industry practitioners who support its core activities of teaching and learning. See note 2B in the Financial Accounts.

PROPERTY USE

AFTRS headquarters are located at the Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park, Sydney NSW—in the heart of Sydney’s screen precinct. The building (12964m2) features specialist screen and radio teaching, and production facilities. The cost of leasing, car parking and outgoings for 2013-14 totalled $4,490K.

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APPENDIX 3

AFTRS GRADUATES 2013

FOUNDATION DIPLOMA Alexandra Adoncello Marra Aghajani Benjamin Alexis Sebastian Antoniou Jack Atherton Elizabeth Bennett Bianca Benussi Philip Boatswain Nicola Brown Christopher Brun Thomas Celius Nicola Chadwick Murray Clapham Jack Colquhoun Emma Cummings Stephanie Davidson Luke Davis Chloe de Brito Giovanni De Santolo Rowan Devereux Jake Donaldson Gavin Drumm Noel Franco Ari Friedgut Alexander Gastrell Rachel Giddens Alexandra Grose Jacob Hanrahan Joel Humphries Poppy Hunter Ian Knighton Benjamin Levin Alexander Monaghan Caleb Mountjoy Liam Moy Thomas Muir Courtney Mulvay Sam Natale Danielle Payne

Peter Richardson Benjamin Ryan Lisa Ryan Matthew Sanasi Lachlan Campbell-Serventy Ryan Simpson Jasmeen Singh Nathaniel Smith Jack Stodart Luke Sullivan Oscar Ward Chanelle Whitty Luke Williams Ho Ming Wong

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN CINEMATOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS

Richard Dobson Christopher Elder Nicholas Forster Oliver Fuller Jarryd Hall Jordan-Rhys Moses Jenkins Simon Knox Thomas Mangan Timothy Oxford Alexander Serafini Chelsea Thistlewaite Davi Soesilo

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DIRECTING FUNDAMENTALS

Harriet Archibald Luke Danbsy-Scott Scout Darling-Blair Samuel Faull Keun Sang Lee Matisse Purinton-Miller Nicholas Snelling Michael Wannenmacher Patrick Byrnes Daniel Cohn Michael Condon Emily Garrett Kyle Hedrick Malina Mackiewicz Jonathan Weir Michael Witt Daniel Youd

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COSTUME DESIGN Liesl Mann Clare McCutcheon Zora Milevski Mathew Pal Rebecca Romans Olivia Simpson

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DOCUMENTARY FUNDAMENTALS

Thomas Anlezark Sally Corry Christopher Darwin Kerry Mcguire James Millynn Brendan Palmer Kelly Perry Brendan Toole

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDITING DRAMA Wayne Blair Jenna Bowden Christian Cicchini Glen Cox Brian Dyer Belinda Felix Trent Mitchell Alison Myers Andrew Willmott

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN PRODUCING Ian Browning Jeffrey McDonald

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREEN CULTURE Anne Breslin Barbara Cooper Caroline Fonda Ravinder Kambhoj Jenna Schofield

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREEN MUSIC Sabine Brix John Kilbey Jarrah McCleary Jodi Phillis Timothy Schnur Rocco Tozzi Eugene Ward

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCREENWRITING FUNDAMENTALS

Scott Anderson Rachel Argall Amal Awad Hannah Bent Jo-Anne Brechin D'Arcy Foley-Dawson Mathew Govoni Claire Harris Melissa Heris Damien Higginbotham Angela Lyos Sophie Morris Madeleine Parker Laura Scrivano Madeleine Searle Blake Shuttleworth Benn Sutton Natalie van den Dungen

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN CINEMATOGRAPHY Matthew Bedford Cara Bowerman Ella-Marie Gibbins Alexander Glucina Dane Howell Thomas Jefferson Kent Lock Goldie Soetianto Lucas Tomoana Adric Watson

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GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DIRECTING Elizabeth Cooper Erin Good Payam Kokab Andrew Lee John-Paul McElwee Nicholas McRobbie Shannon Murphy George Alexander Nagle Jack Naylor-Hampson Peter Skinner

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DOCUMENTARY Cassandra Charlton Laura Clarke Siobhan Costigan Ehsan Knopf Larissa Lavarch Lucas Li Amy Blue Lucine Lauren Ross

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN EDITING Stewart Arnott Courtney Bowden Michael Drake Varinya Eammano Amanda Eyley Bonnie Fan Florence Holmes Angus Macpherson

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PRODUCING Charles Billeh Helen Burak Debora Cravero Julia Kelly Stacey Kwijas Chloe Lawrence-Hartcher Sabrina Organo

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREEN BUSINESS James Carr Jason Critelli Erica Drew Jamie Engel Bruno Reis-Liporoni Timothy Maddocks

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PRODUCTION DESIGN Sally Addinsall Belle Blamey Grace Brown Ruby Mathers Emma McEwen Teresa Meoli Amanda Safranko Rebecca Sheedy Eve Waugh

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN RADIO Deborah Bauer Ashleigh Blucher Zachariah Carman Simon Coore Julian Daw Harry Dodshon Gabrielle Fitzgerald Charlotte Meldrum-Hanna Alice Moldovan Christopher Nairn Caitlin Nienaber Holly Spillane Samuel Stove Michele Weekes James Weir Michael Whittington Shad Wicker Timothy Wong-See

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREEN MUSIC Freya Berkhout Tiernan Cross Joel Geist Grace Huie Robbins Joshua McHugh Edward McPhie Benjamin Romalis Matthew Rudduck

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SCREENWRITING Huna-Nangaua Amweero Jacob Holmes-Brown Neale Irwin Joshua Magee Christopher Marchand Sarah-Jane McAllan Kim McCreanor Adam Roper

MASTER OF SCREEN ARTS Cyrus Bezyan Jeremy Cassar Genevieve Clay-Smith Jessica Craig-Piper Anita Jankovic Charlotte McConaghy James Raue Christopher Squadrito Warwick Young

MASTER OF SCREEN ARTS & BUSINESS John Beohm Xiao Han Drummond David Gurney Susan Maslin Andrew McKay Elizabeth Norris Margaret Tillson Benjamin Whimpey

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APPENDIX 4

SUPPORTER AWARDS TO STUDENTS FOXTEL AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL NEW TALENT

The Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent was presented by the Advisor to the Office of the CEO, Foxtel, Malcolm Smith and awarded to Chris Squadrito.

KENNETH B. MYER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL TALENT The Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Exceptional Talent was presented by the Director of Screen, Neil Peplow, and awarded to Andrew Lee and Freya Berkhout.

KENNETH B. MYER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FOR PROJECT DEVELOPMENT The Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Project Development was presented by the Director of Screen, Neil Peplow and awarded to Genevieve Clay-Smith.

A. V. MYER INDIGENOUS AWARDS FOR EXCEPTIONAL TALENT

A. V. Myer Indigenous Awards were presented by Council member, Darren Dale, on behalf of Andrew Myer and awarded to Dena Curtis and Bjorn Stewart.

SHARK ISLAND INSTITUTE DOCUMENTARY AWARD

The Shark Island Institute Documentary Award was presented by Shark Island’s Malinda Wink, on behalf of Ian Darling from the Shark Island Production Company, and awarded to Blue Lucine.

THE EUROPEAN UNION FILM AWARDS

The Delegation of the European Union Film Award, in cooperation with the Embassy of Spain, was presented by the NSW Consul-General, Mr Alvaro Iranzo and awarded to Warwick Young who received return flights, accommodation and an invitation to the Festival of Valladolid—Seminci in Spain.

The Delegation of the European Union Film Award, in cooperation with the Embassy of the Republic of Croatia, was presented by the NSW Consul, Ms Sandra Štetić and awarded to Laura Clarke who received return flights, accommodation and an invitation to the Zagreb Film Festival in Croatia.

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SCREEN AUSTRALIA’S TALENT ESCALATOR PROGRAM

Screen Australia’s Talent Escalator program, which includes an internship with Village Roadshow Pictures and The Gotham Group in Los Angeles, was presented by Screen Australia’s Charlotte Seymour and awarded to Helen Burak.

SHINE AUSTRALIA INTERN PROGRAM

The inaugural Shine Australia Intern Program was presented by Shine Australia CEO, Mark Fennessy and awarded to Luke Davis.

ASTRA GRADUATE PROGRAM

The successful recipients of the 2014 ASTRA program, designed to provide graduates of the 2013 Foundation Diploma with experience working at subscription television organisations, were Oscar Ward, Jack Atherton, Jack Stodart, Jake Donaldson, Jasmeen Singh, Murray Clapham, Phillip Boatswain, Bianca Benussi, Rachel Giddens, Danielle Payne, Joel Humphries and Alex Monaghan.

THE SELWYN SPEIGHT AWARD FOR RADIO REPORTING

The Selwyn Speight Award was presented by the Director of Radio, Mark Collier to Samuel Stove. The award encourages the pursuit of excellence in, and the proper practice of, radio reporting. It is awarded to a Graduate Diploma Radio student who wishes to pursue a career in current affairs journalism.

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APPENDIX 5

PUBLIC PROGRAM: 2013-14 FRIDAY ON MY MIND

MELBOURNE

'Most Outstanding Actress' Friday, July 5 2013

Guest: Kat Stewart

Tactics that Scored Big at the Box Office Friday, July 12 2013

Guest: Clayton Jacobson

Rocking out with Renegades Friday, July 19 201

Guest: Joe & Ken Connor

Realising Ideas Friday, August 16 2013

Guest: Fremantle Media's Creative Director, Jason Stephens

Screenwriting & Hollywood Show Running Friday, August 23 2013 Guest: David Hannam

The Ins & Outs of Self Distribution - I am Eleven Friday, August 30 2013 Guest: Genevieve Bailey

Connecting Locals with Internationals Friday, September 6 2013 Guest: Debra Richards

Marketing for Box Office Success Friday, September 13 2013

Guest: Phil Oneile

The Nuts & Bolts of Cinema Exhibition in Australia Friday, September 20 2013 Guest: Ross Entwistle

Producing Australia's Best TV Dramas Friday, September 27 2013 Guest: Imogen Banks

Patrick - Stylishly & Gothically Rebooted Friday, October 4 2013

Guests: Mark Hartley and Justin King

The Secrets of Writing Relationships Friday, October 11 2013

Guest: Judi McCrossin

Fallout Friday, October 18 2013

Guest: Lawrence Johnston

The Actor's Director Friday, October 25 2013

Guest: Daina Reid

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Creative Producing in Australia Friday, November 1, 2013

Guest: Richard Keddie

Dressing Up The Story Friday, February 21 2014

Guest: Tim Chappel

Evolve or Perish: The Delights and Challenges of Running a Production Company Friday, February 28 2014

Guests: Tony Wright and George Adams

The Alchemy of Music and Image Friday, March 7 2014

Guest: Natasha Pincus

Passion and Versatility Equals Longevity Friday, March 14 2014 Guest: David Parker

Balancing Story and Digital Effects Friday, March 21 2014

Guest: Scott Zero

The Art of the Cast Friday, March 28 2014

Guest: Jane Norris

The Business of Composing Friday, April 4, 2014

Guest: David Hirschfelder

Offbeat & Rocking the Television Comedy Boat… Friday, April 11 2014 Guests: Robyn Butler & Wayne Hope

Producing Television Drama and Documentary that Engages with Australian History Friday, May 2 2014

Guest: Andrew Wiseman

Creative Producing Friday, May 9 2014

Guest: Robyn Kershaw

Acting Craft, Quality, Longevity and Life Friday, May 16 2014

Guest: Nadine Garner

Distinctly Australian Animation Friday, May 23 2014

Guest: Peter Viska

Location, Location, Location Friday, May 30 2014

Guest: Greg Noakes

LOL Friday, June 6 2014

Guest: Magda Szubanski

Art, Film and Love Songs Friday, June 13 2014

Guest: Rhys Graham

Producing Big Ideas on Small Budgets Friday, June 20 2014

Guest: Liz Kearney

Bending the Genres Friday, June 27 2014

Guest: Amiel Courtin-Wilson

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SYDNEY

The Devils Playground - Recast & Remade Friday, July 5 2013

Guest: Simon Burke

Stories of Me - Unapologetically Personal Friday, September 6 2013 Guest: Ian Darling and Paul Kelly

Deadbeat Dads: the ticket to ride Friday, October 4 2013

Guests: Ben Matthews, Shelley McLaren, Kent Pearson and Drew Michel

Australia's First Lady of Film Friday, November 1 2013

Guest: Gillian Armstrong

Gods of Egypt Friday, March 14 2014

Guest: Alex Proyas

The Astonishing Aim High in Creation! Friday, March 21 2014

Guest: Anna Broinowski

Animal Logic crafting ‘brick-by-brick’ the animated blockbuster: The Lego Movie Friday, March 28 2014 Guests: Amber Naismith, David Burrows, David Williams and Miles Green

The Filmmaker Behind the Exceptional & Award Winning 52 Tuesdays Friday, April 4 2014

Guest: Sophie Hyde

Hunting for the Australian Industry Drop Bear: A Career in Screen Comedy Friday, April 11 2014

Guest: Josh Lawson

War is Hell (to Film) Friday, May 2 2014

Guest: Alister Grierson

An Epic Story of Survival. Once My Mother: Friday, May 9 2014

Guest: Sophia Turkiewicz

Strictly Writing: Craig Pearce Friday, May 16 2014

Guest: Craig Pearce

So you think you can run the Sydney Film Festival? Friday, May 23 2014 Guest: Nashen Moodley

Plonk! Goes the Funding Model Friday, May 30 2014

Guests: Nathan Earl, Glen Condie, Chris Taylor, Joshua Tyler

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Touch: Meeting the Cate Blanchett challenge to Bring Strong Australian Female Stories to our Screens Friday, June 6 2014 Guest: Christopher Houghton

Sydney Film Festival ‘Pop Up’ Edition Friday, June 13 2014

Guest: Pan Nalin

Breaking All the Rules: Around the Block Friday, June 20 2014

Guest: Su Armstrong

The Last Impresario Friday, June 27 2014

Guests: Gracie Otto and Nicole O'Donohue

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TV TALKS TV Talks - an opportunity to watch, listen and laugh with a panel of engaging TV industry people talking about TV 'stuff', complemented by networking afterwards!

Waking Up Early Adam Boland: Director of Morning TV, TEN Network Neil Breen: Executive Producer, Today and Weekend Today Tuesday, July 2 2013 Michael Pell: Executive Producer, Sunrise and Weekend Sunrise

They’re from the Network Phil Craig: Head of Factual ABC TV Debbie Byrne: Executive Producer, Network Seven Tuesday, August 6 2013 Richard Huddlestone: EP ABC 1&2, Entertainment and Development

Shine a Light Tuesday, September 3 2013

Carl Fennessy: joint CEO, Shine Australia

Funny Business Rick Kalowski: Head of Comedy, ABC TV Paul Leadon: Head of Comedy, Network Ten Tuesday, October 1 2013 Phil Lloyd: writer, actor and creator of Australian television comedy

The Multi Channel World Ross Crowley: Director of Programming, Foxtel Monica Forlano: Head of Program Scheduling, Network Ten Stuart Menzies: Controller, ABC 2 Tuesday, November 12 2013

Hamish Turner: Director of Digital Content, Nine Network

Is Development Hell? Elliot Spencer: Head of Creative Services & Development, Shine Australia Caroline Spencer: Director of Development, FremantleMedia John Gregory: CEO, Freehand TV Tuesday, February 4 2014

Hilary Innes: Director of Entertainment and Development, ITV Studios

Publicity Blues? Neil Shoebridge: Director of Corporate and Public Communications, Network Ten Heidi Virtue: Publicity & Events Consultant, FOXTEL Tuesday, March 4 2014 Lesna Thomas: Former Head of Publicity, ABC TV

But did it Rate? Doug Peiffer: Chief Executive Officer, OzTAM Russel Howcroft: Executive General Manager, Network TEN Tuesday, April 1 2014 Tim Clucas: Television Executive

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You're Kidding Deirdre Brennan: Head of Children’s ABC TV Hugh Baldwin: Director Television & Digital Content, Nickelodeon Tuesday, May 6 2014

Andy Ryan: co-Head of Drama, Nine Network Niki Hamilton: Supervising Producer, Children’s TV, Network Seven

Diversify or Die? Alan Erson: General Manager and Head of Factual, Essential Media Chris Oliver-Taylor: Managing Director, Tuesday, June 3 2014

Matchbox Pictures Michael Cordell: Creative Director, CJZ

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APPENDIX 6

INDUSTRY EVENTS AT AFTRS JULY 2013 TO JUNE 2014

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting meeting Tuesday, July 2

Independent Filmmakers: meeting Tuesday, July 2

Media Stockade: Work in progress screening The Surgery Ship Tuesday, July 9

National Film & Sound Archive: Heath Ledger Young Artists Wednesday, July10 Oral History Project

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: Wednesday, July10

Talk/ presentation/panel discussion /Q&A

Jad Haber (AFTRS Graduate): Auditions for independent Wednesday, July10 July10self-funded short film

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Tuesday, July 16

Foxtel (Showtime): Screening latest release feature Monday, July 22

Australian Screen Sound Guild: Location recording Tuesday, July 23 sub-committee meeting

Motion Picture Company: Test screening feature film In Cold Light Wednesday, July 24

OZDOX: committee meeting Tuesday, August 6

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Certificate Screenwriting meeting Tuesday, August 6

Australian Theatre for Young People: Call-back meeting Wednesday, August 7

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Tuesday, August 13

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: screening and Q&A Wednesday, August 14

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Tuesday, August 20

Change Focus Media: Screening and Q&A Once My Mother Tuesday, August 20

Australian Production Design Guild: Tuesday, August 27

Annual General Meeting and Committee Meeting

Australian Directors Guild & OZDOX: Screening and Q&A Wednesday, September 18

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Thursday September 19

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National Film & Sound Archive: Comparison footage test of 35mm & DCP Newsfront Tuesday September 24

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Tuesday, October 1

Graduate Certificate Screenwriting meeting

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rehearsals, Hey Joe Tuesday, October 29

Australian Production Design Guild: committee meeting Wednesday, October 30

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rehearsals, Hey Joe Thursday, October 31

Scarlett Pictures: Test of application Wednesday, October 9

Australian Screen Editors Guild: Part screening,The Turning Thursday, October 10

AFTRS Graduates 2012: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting Tuesday, November 5 meeting

AFTRS Graduates: Short film rough-cut screening, Hey Joe Sunday, November 10

ABC TV Factual: Short film preview screening, Wednesday November 13 Opening Shots

AFTRS Graduate: Documentary film preview screening Tuesday, 19 Nov Man from Coxs River

Actors Equity (Equity Foundation): Casting Hothouse Friday, November 22- Sunday, November 24

AFI/AACTA: Awards preview screening, Inside Llewyn Davis Tuesday, November 26

NYU Tisch: Class after AFTRS campus tour Wednesday, November 27

AFTRS 2011 Graduate: Independent film project Wednesday, November 27 rehearsals

AFTRS 2013 Graduates: Independent film project, Friday, November 29 make-up & camera tests

AFTRS Graduates: Interview panel AFTRS 2013 project Tuesday, December 3

AFTRS Graduates 2013: Graduate Certificate Screenwriting Tuesday, December 3 meeting

Independent short film preview screening: Pocket Money Thursday, December 12

Australian Screen Sound Guild: Annual General Meeting Saturday, December 14

World of Women’s Cinema: WOW Film Festival judging Tuesday, December 17

Australian Guild of Screen Composers: meeting Tuesday, December 17

Film Critics Circle: Annual General Meeting Thursday, January 30

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Foxtel: Feature film screening, Labor Day Monday, February 3

Screen NSW: Aurora Mentorship Workshop Thursday, February 6

Bower Bird Films: Rough cut screening, Tuesday, February 11

Love Marriage in Kabul

OZDOX (with ADG): The Social Impact Producer Wednesday, February 12

Sydney Symphony Orchestra: workshops Thursday, February 13

SSS Production: Investor/test screening, Absolution Tuesday, February 25

NSW Emerging Filmmakers Funded project short film Wednesday, February 26 The Tender Dark

Feature film rough-cut screening: Infini Monday, March 3

Foxtel: Feature film screening, The Monuments Men Monday, March 3

Centennial Parklands: meeting Wednesday, March 5

Woman in Film & Television: WOW Festival Screening Sunday, March 9

OZDOX (with ADG): The Social Impact Producer Tuesday, March 11

Unboxed Media & NITV: screening, The Tipping Points Wednesday, March 12 Mar

Shark Island Productions: Talk Tuesday, March 18

Feature film rough-cut screening: Terminus Wednesday, March 19

Feature film postproduction meeting: Skin Deep Saturday, March 29

Colonial First State: Entertainment Quarter meeting Monday, March 31

New Thought Productions: Feature film screening, Concealed Monday, March 31

Aboriginal Disability Network: Short film screening, Living My Way Monday, April 7

OZDOX (with ADG): Immersive Documentary Tuesday, April 8

Feature film script reading: Psychoanalysis Thursday, April 17

Project development: WOW award recipients Wednesday, May 7

Fine cut screening: Crushed Monday, May 12

OZDOX (with ADG) Wed 14 May

Colonial First State: Entertainment Quarter meeting Thursday, May 15

Australian Screen Directors Authorship Collecting Society Wednesday, May 21 (ASDACS): meeting

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The Trophy Thief: production meeting Saturday, May 24

Shark Island Productions & Documentary Australia: Tuesday, May 27 Good Pitch Australia event with screening

AFTRS Graduate films selected for ABC TV: Friday, June 6

Freshblood screening

Screening: Prank Wednesday, June 25

Australian Screen Directors Authorship Collecting Friday, June 27

Society (ASDACS): meeting

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APPENDIX 7

GUEST LECTURERS The AFTRS campus environment attracts industry members to lecture as guests in Award and Open Program courses across all disciplines and specialisations.

In 2013-14, Award Course guest lecturers included:

• Graduate Certificate: Melissa Anastasi, Curtis Fernandez, Lawrence Horne, Jocelyn Moorhouse, Danny Long, Raena Lea-Shannon, Cate Shortland, Mark Seton, Sylvia Wilczynski, Jamie Hediger, Michael Pickells, Michael Philips, Mark Stewart-Pearson, Yoomin Lee, Paul Nichola, Peter James, Ruth Cullen, Amin Palangi, Bamdad Erfanian Yeganeh, Tony Krawitz, Evelyn Saunders, Marten Dean, Danny Lachevre, Ester Harding, Carolyn Johnson, Pieter de Vries, Annamaria Talas, Max Bourke, Rebecca Barry, Peter Dasent, Geir Gunnarsson and Caitlin Yeo.

• Graduate Diploma: Kriv Stenders, Louise Fox, Seph McKenna, Tim Ferguson, Alex Williams, Simon Wood, Alan Flower, Robert Connelly, Mary Finsterer, Paul Healy, Peter Tonagh, Andrew Maiden, Duane Hatherly, Emma Snowden, David Booth, Melinda Doring, David Booth, Beverly Dunn, William Zappa, Ana Kokkinos, Sophie Hyde, Melissa Bruder, Megan Wedge, Peter Dasent, Antony Partos, Guy Gross, Stephen Rae, Caitlin Yeo, Simeon Bryan, Peter James, Steve Arnold, Chris Godfrey, Garry Phillips, Paul Nichola, Andrew Belletty, Wes Chew, Les Fiddess, Mark Franken, Luke Mynott, Martin Oswin, Jenny Ward, Will Ward, Heather Ogilvie, Amy Noble, Anni Browning, Peter Castaldi, Phil Hunt, Brendan McNamara, Lucy Cooper, Tracey Mair, Emma Snowden, Peter Tonagh, Ross Crowley, Kymn Niblock, Penny Win, Duane Hatherly, Leah Cooper and Josie Mason-Campbell.

• Master of Screen Arts: Ian Watson, Jessica Hobbs, Shirley Barrett, Lynette Wallworth, Miranda Harcourt, Galvin Scott Davis, Danny Lachevre, Jonathan Teplitzky, Cate Shortland and Charmian Gradwell.

• Screen Business: Paul McCarthy, Deb Verhoeven, Bob Campbell, John Borghetti, Kim Dalton, Jock Given, Mike Lynskey, Ashok Jacob, Helen O'Neil, Scott Dinsdale, Bob Connolly, Eva Cox, Rick Ellis, Kim Williams, Graeme Mason, John Frey, Grant Blackley, Cathryn McConaghy, John Doumani, Mark Kenny, Jenny Morawska, Meredith Edwards and Andrew Leigh MP.

• Radio: Alan Jones, Merrick Watts, Richard Kingsmill, Brendan Jones, Amanda Keller, Paul Murray, Sam Cavanagh, Tom Ivey and Angela Catterns.

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In 2013-14, AFTRS Open guest lecturers included:

• AFTRS Open Course Lecturers: Aaron Kirby, Adrian Wills, Alexa Wyatt, Alice Tynan, Andrew Gordon, Andy Day, Anna Tow, Anne Brooksbank, Babette Buster, Carly Wallace, Carol Cameron, Caroline Spencer, Claire Phillips, Clarissa House-Watson, Colm McNaughton, Damian Del Borrello, Dave King, David Forsyth, David Summons, David Whealy, Denise Eriksen, Devris Hasan, Dylan Blowen, Elissa Down, Ella Manning, Ellen Sandler, Ellery Ryan, Gaby Brown, Gareth Tillson, Genevieve Ginty , Glenn Fraser, Greg Fitzgerald, Greg Woodland, Jack McGrath, James Smith, Janine Cooper, Jason van Genderen, Jennifer Wilson, Jessica Campanaro, Jessica Hobbs, Jill Hewitt, Johannes Muljana, John Bisset, , John Gregory, John Harvey, Jon Bell, Jonathan Ogilvie, Julie Money, Jutta Goetze, Kate McLoughlin, Kimberley Duband, Kris Mrksa , Kristie Boerst, Lesley Holden, Lewis Morley, Linda Aronson, Lorelle Adamson, Louis Irving, Lucy Gaffy, Margaret Harvey, Maria Tran, Marie Patane, Mark Rogers, Mark Stewart-Pearson, Martha Goddard, Martin Corben , Martin Sacks, Matt Enfield, Matt McGowen, Matthew Luhn, Melanie Alexander, Melanie Withnall, Melissa Femia, Michael Philips, Miguel Zaragoza, Mike Bridges, Mikey Trotter, Monica Davidson, Nadia Townsend, Nathan Marsh, Paul Hawker, Rebecca Edwards, Rene Hernandez, Rob Macdonald, Rob Neil, Robin Hughes, Rodney Whitham, Roger Lanser, Rowan Woods, Sandra Alexander, Sarah Eddowes, Sophie Wiesner, Steve McDonald, Steve Vidler, Suzanne Mackay, Tait Brady, Thomas Heymann, Tim Chappel, Tim Ferguson, Tim Green, Tom Zubrycki, Tracey Spicer, Trent Bartfeld, Vicki Madden, Walter McIntosh, Warren Eagles.

• AFTRS Open Guest Lecturers: Annamaria Talas, Tasma Asmar, Sean Cook, Leesa Kahn, Blake Ayshford, Scott Lovelock, Chris Gordon, Michael Kalesniko, Frank Rodi, Jamie Hunt & Ross Turley, Dave Cole, Sonja Simec , Dr Nick Herd, Anni Browning, John Martin, Chris Harris, Nick Cole, Dave McEwan, Michael Bridges, Anna Steel, Colleen Clarke, Lianne Lee, Micha Hewson, Peter Newman, Adrian Brant, Josie Mason-Campbell, Edwina Waddy, Callum Metcalfe, Ben Ulm, Rob Wallace, Sue Smith, Bevan Lee, Karina Holden, Pieter De vries, Sue Clothier, Lile Judickas, Dione Gilmour, Tracey Hoddinett, Karren Gail, David Witt, Justine Gillmer, Chris Rose, Adrian Swift, Andrew Mulready, Jason Franklin, Angela Rapley, Michael Byers, Aaron Quirk, Rick Spence, Phil Craig, John Godfrey, Brendon Moo.

• AFTRS Open Program Guest Lecturers (Tailored training): Tony Shannon, Rob Duckworth, Carla Bignasca, Christopher North, Nikki Stevens, Frank Wang, Theresa Miller, Lisa Sweeney, John Pearson, Rob Duckworth, Theresa Miller, Nick Bennett, Christopher North, Carla Bignasca, John Pearson, Sophie Onikul.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

91

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

92 92

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STATEMENT BY COUNCIL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, as amended.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Film Television and Radio School will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Council.

Prof. Julianne Schultz Chair 29 August 2014

Sandra Levy Director 29 August 2014

Ann Browne Chief Financial Officer 29 August 2014

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NOTES 2014 2013

$000 $000

EXPENSES

Employee benefits 2A 17,572 17,223

Suppliers 2B 12,153 11,026

Depreciation and amortisation 2C 1,750 1,788

Write-down and impairment of assets 2D 40 (6)

TOTAL EXPENSES 31,515 30,031

Less:

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 3A 6,879 5,372

Interest 3B 212 254

Total own-source revenue 7,091 5,626

Gains

Net gains/(losses) from sale of assets 2E (5) (4)

TOTAL OWN-SOURCE INCOME 7,086 5,622

Net cost of services 24,429 24,409

Revenue from government 3C 24,429 24,411

Surplus - 2

Other comprehensive income - -

Total comprehensive income - 2

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME For The Year Ended 30 June 2014

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NOTES 2014 2013

$000 $000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 4A 7,318 6,893

Trade and other receivables 4B 1,694 1,594

Total financial assets 9,012 8,487

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 5A, B, C 8,404 9,107

Intangibles 5D 633 543

Other non-financial assets 5F 305 266

Total non-financial assets 9,342 9,916

TOTAL ASSETS 18,354 18,403

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 6 952 951

Other payables 7 4,033 4,137

Total payables 4,985 5,088

Provisions

Employees 8 2,532 2,478

Total Provisions 2,532 2,478

TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,517 7,566

NET ASSETS 10,837 10,837

EQUITY

Retained surplus 10,837 10,837

TOTAL ENTITY 10,837 10,837

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

AS AT 30 JUNE 2014

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Retained Earnings TOTAL EQUITY

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

Opening balance 10,837 10,835 10,837 10,835

Comprehensive income

Surplus for the period - 2 - 2

Closing balance as at 30 June 10,837 10,837 10,837 10,837

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

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NOTES 2014

$000

2013 $000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Receipts from Government 24,429 24,411

Sales of goods and rendering of services 6,769 5,368

Interest 200 253

Net GST received 1,046 1,094

Other 192 37

Total cash received 32,636 31,163

Cash used

Employees 18,696 18,294

Suppliers 12,067 10,912

Total cash used 30,763 29,206

Net cash from operating activities 9 1,873 1,957

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 55 53

Purchase of plant, equipment and intangibles (1,503) (1,659)

Net cash used by investing activities (1,448) (1,606)

Net increase / (decrease) in cash held 425 351

Cash at the beginning of the reporting period 6,893 6,542

Cash at the end of the reporting period 7,318 6,893

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CASH FLOW STATEMENT

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

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SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS

AS AT 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $000 2013

$000

BY TYPE

Commitments receivable

Net GST recoverable on commitments 4,087 4,555

Total commitments receivable 4,087 4,555

Commitments payable

Capital commitments Leasehold improvements 6 8

Total capital commitments 6 8

Other commitments

Operating leases1 44,433 49,487

Other commitments2 520 612

Total other commitments payable 44,953 50,099

Net commitments payable by type 40,872 45,552

BY MATURITY

Commitments receivable

Net GST recoverable on commitments

Within 1 year 498 499

Between 1 to 5 years 1,896 1,892

More than 5 years 1,693 2,164

Total commitments receivable 4,087 4,555

Commitments payable

Operating lease commitments

Within 1 year 5,151 5,147

Between 1 to 5 years 20,663 20,534

More than 5 years 18,619 23,806

Total operating leases commitments 44,433 49,487

Capital commitments

Within 1 year 6 8

Total capital commitments 6 8

Other commitments

Within 1 year 322 333

Between 1 to 5 years 198 279

Total other commitments 520 612

Total commitments payable 44,959 50,107

Net commitments payable by maturity 40,872 45,552

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NB: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. 1 Operating leases included are non-cancellable and comprise of leases for office accommodation, motor vehicles, and office equipment.

2 Other commitments primarily comprise of contracts for security and cleaning services.

The previous schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENCIES

As At 30 June 2014

There is no event since financial year end to the date of this report which has the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of AFTRS. (2013 Nil)

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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INDEX TO THE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE DESCRIPTION

1 Summary of significant accounting policies

2 Expenses and asset disposals

3 Income

4 Financial assets

5 Non-financial assets

6 Suppliers

7 Other payables

8 Provisions

9 Cash flow reconciliation

10 Contingent liabilities and assets

11 Remuneration of council members

12 Council-related party disclosures

13 Senior executives remuneration

14 Remuneration of auditors

15 Fair value measurements

16 Financial instruments

17 Assets held in trust

18 Reporting of outcomes

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1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Objective of AFTRS AFTRS is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of AFTRS is to provide advanced education and training to advance the skills and knowledge of talented individuals to meet the evolving needs of Australia’s screen and broadcast industries.

It is structured to meet one outcome: To support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast industry culture in Australia including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training and research.

The continued existence of AFTRS in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for AFTRS' administration and programs.

1.2 Basis of preparation of the financial statements The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: a) Finance Minister’s Orders (or FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian

Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statement has been prepared on an accrual basis and is in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statement is presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financil position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to AFTRS or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, revenues and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when, and only when, the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

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1.3 Significant accounting judgements and estimates No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

1.4 Changes in Australian Accounting Standards Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standards requirements AASB13 (Fair Value Measurement) has been adopted in the current period without last year comparatives. No new accounting standards, amendments to standards and interpretations issued by the Australian accounting standards Board that are applicable in the current period have had a material financial effect on AFTRS. No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements New standards, amendments to standards, and interpretations that are applicable to future periods are regularly issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board. It is estimated that adopting these pronouncements, when effective, will have no material impact on future reporting periods.

1.5 Revenue Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyers; b) AFTRS retains no managerial involvement nor effective control over the goods; c) the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and d) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to

AFTRS.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised proportionately over the lives of the contracts and is recognised when: a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to AFTRS.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectibility of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectibility of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue, all from short term bank deposits, is recognised on an accrual basis at applicable interest rates.

Revenues from Government Funding appropriated to AFTRS as a CAC Act body payment for Departmental outputs for the year are recognised as Revenue from Government.

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1.6 Gains Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Employee benefits Liabilities for short-term employee benefits (as defined in AASB 119) and termination benefits due within twelve months of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefit liabilities are measured at the present value of estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provisions for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as it is non-vesting and the average sick leave to be taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined internally as at 30 June. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases.

Separation and Redundancy Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. AFTRS recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and where appropriate has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Superannuation Most staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap). Staff who are not members of these schemes are covered by other superannuation schemes of their choice.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

AFTRS makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost of the superannuation entitlements. These are accounted for as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

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The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions accrued to that date.

1.8 Leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. AFTRS has no finance leases.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.9 Cash Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include: a) cash on hand; b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

1.10 Financial assets AFTRS has only one class of financial assets (other than cash detailed above), being trade receivables and other receivables. They are with fixed or determinable payments and not quoted in an active market, with maturities of less than 12 months after the reporting date.

1.11 Impairment of financial assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. No impairments are reported.

Receivables are recognised at the amounts due. Impairment adjustment is made when collection of the receivable or part thereof is judged to be unlikely.

1.12 Payables Trade creditors and accruals are recognised at their amortised amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received.

1.13 Contingent assets and liabilities Contingent assets and liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to their existence or situation where the amount cannot be reliably measured. They are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote or probable but not virtually certain.

1.14 Acquisition of assets Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

1.15 Leasehold improvements, plant & equipment Asset recognition threshold Purchases of fixed assets are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for items costing less than $2,000 which are expensed in the year of

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acquisition (other than where they are parts of a group and have to be acquired as such and exceed that amount in total).

Revaluations Fixed assets are carried at fair value, measured at depreciated replacement cost, revalued with sufficient frequency by internal staff with appropriate technical knowledge such that the carrying amount of each asset is not materially different, at reporting date, from its fair value. A revaluation review was carried out in June 2013, covering all fixed assets except for motor vehicles. No revaluation adjustments were considered necessary. This has been reviewed and approved by the Council of AFTRS.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount.

Depreciation and amortisation Depreciable plant, equipment and motor vehicles are written-off over their estimated useful lives to AFTRS using, in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation/amortisation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2014 2013

Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

Motor vehicles 7 years 7 years

Intangibles 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

Leashold improvements lease terms lease terms

107

Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment as at 30 June. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is its depreciated replacement cost.

1.16 Intangibles These comprise of externally developed software for internal use and are carried at cost. Modification costs are included where appropriate.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis. All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

1.17 Taxation AFTRS is exempt from all forms of taxation except for fringe benefits tax (FBT) and the goods and services tax (GST).

Receivables and payables stated are inclusive of GST where applicable. Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except where the GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office.

1.18 Foreign currency Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the exchange rate at the date of settlement. Associated currency gains and losses on foreign currency receivables and payables at balance date are not material.

1.19 Events After the Balance Sheet Date There is no event since financial year end to the date of this report which has the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of AFTRS.

1.20 Comparative figures Comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation in these financial statements where required.

1.21 Rounding Amounts have been rounded to the nearest $1,000 except in relation to the following: > Remuneration of council members; > Remuneration of officers (other than council members); and > Remuneration of auditors.

108

2014

$000

2013

$000

2. EXPENSES 2A. Employee expenses

Wages and salaries 13,730 13,216

Superannuation

Defined benefit plans 534 528

Defined contribution plans 1,641 1,539

Leave and other benefits 1,661 1,693

Separation and redundancy 6 247

Total employee expenses 17,572 17,223

2B. Suppliers

Goods & services

Consultants 170 280

Contractors 878 689

Stationery 290 255

Repairs & maintenance 2,236 1,397

Utilities 645 637

Building services 325 306

Travel

352 402

Marketing 908 784

Others 1,463 1,469

Total goods & services 7,267 6,219

Goods & services are made up of:

Provision of goods by external entities 3,222 3,051

Rendering of services by federal government entities 233 154

Rendering of services by external entities 3,812 3,014

Total goods & services 7,267 6,219

Other supplier expenses

Operating lease rentals to external entities 4,579 4,505

Workers compensation premiums to federal government entities 307 302

Total other supplier expenses 4,886 4,807

Total supplier expenses 12,153 11,026

109

2C. Depreciation and amortisation

2014

$000

2013

$000

Depreciation Leasehold improvements 541 495

Plant and equipment 977 1,146

Motor vehicles 9 20

Total depreciation 1,527 1,661

Amortisation Computer software 223 127

Total amortisation 223 127

Total depreciation and amortisation 1,750 1,788

2D. Writedown of assets Impairment of receivable / (allowance written back) 20 (6)

Fixed assets written off 20 -

40 (6)

2E. Gains & losses from asset disposals Equipment

Proceeds from disposal 11 -

Carrying value of assets sold (5) -

Gains from disposal of equipment 6 -

Motor vehicles Proceeds from disposal 39 48

Carrying value of assets sold (50) (52)

Loss from disposal of motor vehicles 11 4

Total proceeds from disposal 50 48

Total carrying value of assets sold (55) (52)

Total net losses from disposals of assets (5) (4)

110

2014

$000

2013

$000

3. OWN-SOURCE INCOME

3A. Sale of goods and rendering of services

Sale of goods

Federal government entities 4 10

External entities 16 5

20 15

Rendering of services

Federal government entities 27 4

External entities 6,832 5,353

6,859 5,357

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 6,879 5,372

3B. Interest

Interest on deposits 212 254

3C. Revenue from Government

Attorney General Department CAC Act body payment item 24,429 24,411

111

2014 $000

2013 $000

4. FINANCIAL ASSETS

4A. Cash

Cash at bank 7,315 6,890

Cash on hand 3 3

Total cash 7,318 6,893

4B. Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables from

Related entities 1,254 1,343

External entities 195 6

Total receivables for goods and services 1,449 1,349

Other receivables

Student debtors 122 86

Interest receivable 18 6

GST receivable 120 149

Other receivable 5 4

Total other receivables 265 245

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,714 1,594

Less : Impairment allowance for other receivables (20) -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1,694 1,594

All receivables are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Trade and other receivables (gross) are aged as follows

Not overdue 1,714 1,594

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,714 1,594

Impairment allowance is aged as follows :

Overdue by :

Less than 30 days (20) -

Total impairment allowance (20) -

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance for goods and services receivables

Opening balance - (6)

Amounts written off -

Amounts recovered and reversed 6

Increase/(Decrease) recognised in net cost of services (20) -

Closing balance (20) -

112

2014

$000

2013

$000

5. NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

5A. Leasehold improvements

Fair value 7,007 6,848

Accumulated depreciation (2,442) (1,901)

Total leasehold improvements 4,565 4,947

5B. Plant and Equipment

Fair value 13,622 16,022

Accumulated depreciation (9,806) (11,944)

Total plant & equipment 3,816 4,078

5C. Motor vehicles

At valuation 169 239

Accumulated depreciation (146) (157)

Total motor vehicles 23 82

Total infrastructure, equipment & vehicles 8,404 9,107

5D. Intangibles (Computer software purchased)

At cost 1,593 1,313

Accumulated amortisation (960) (770)

Total intangibles 633 543

No indicators of impairment were found for above non-financial assets. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the policy in note 1.

113

5E. Analysis of Leasehold Improvements, Plant, Equipment & Intangibles

Leasehold improvements Equipment Motor

vehicles

Intangibles (Software purchased)

TOTAL

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances (2013-14)

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 6,848 16,022 239 1,313 24,422

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (1,901) (11,944) (157) (770) (14,772)

Net book value 1 July 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

Additions by purchase 159 741 - 312 1,212

Transfer - (12) - 12 -

Depreciation / amortisation expense (541) (977) (9) (223) (1,750)

Disposals

Written off - (9) - (11) (20)

Other disposals - (5) (50) - (55)

Net movements during the year (382) (262) (59) 90 (613)

Net book value 30 June 2014 4,565 3,816 23 633 9,037

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by

Gross book value 7,007 13,622 169 1,593 22,391

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (2,442) (9,806) (146) (960) (13,354)

4,565 3,816 23 633 9,037

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances (2012-13)

As at 1 July 2012

Gross book value 6,365 15,351 283 1,008 23,007

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (1,406) (10,857) (164) (643) (13,070)

Net book value 1 July 2012 4,959 4,494 119 365 9,937

Additions by purchase 489 724 35 305 1,553

Transfer (6) 6 - - -

Depreciation / amortisation expense (495) (1,146) (20) (127) (1,788)

Disposals -

Written off -

- - - -

Other disposals - - (52) - (52)

Net movements during the year (12) (416) (37) 178 (287)

Net book value 30 June 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by

Gross book value 6,848 16,022 239 1,313 24,422

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation

(1,901) (11,944) (157) (770) (14,772)

Netbook value 30 June 2013 4,947 4,078 82 543 9,650

114

2014 $000

2013 $000

5F. Other non-financial assets

Prepayments 305 266

All prepayments are expected to be recovered within 12 months

6. SUPPLIERS

Trade creditors and accruals - external entities 926 903

Trade creditors and accruals - related entities 22 43

Operating lease rentals - external entities 4 5

952 951

All supplier payables are current. Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

7. OTHER PAYABLES

Deferred income 1,825 1,817

Accruals and sundry payables 2 2

Lease incentive 1,587 1,772

Salaries, wages, and superannuation 619 546

4,033 4,137

All other payables are current.

8. PROVISIONS

Annual leave 1,011 951

Long service leave 1,521 1,442

Redundancy - 85

Aggregate employee provisions 2,532 2,478

Employee provisions expected to be settled in

No more than 12 months 1,157 1,247

More than 12 months 1,375 1,231

2,532 2,478

115

2014 $000

2013 $000

9. CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION Reconciliation of cash per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statement Cash as per cash flow statement 7,318 6,893

Cash as per statement of financial position 7,318 6,893

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities Net cost of services - 2

Adjustment for non-cash items Depreciation & amortisation 1,750 1,788

Write-down of assets 20 -

Losses (gains) on disposal of assets 5 4

Increase / (decrease) in doubtful debt provision 20 (6)

Lease incentive liability discharged (185) (185)

Changes in assets and liabilities (Increase) / decrease in receivables (120) 16

(Increase) / decrease in other assets (39) (7)

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions 54 63

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables 163 212

Increase / (decrease) in other payables 205 70

Net cash from operating activities 1,873 1,957

10. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND ASSETS AFTRS is not aware of the existence of any potential claim which might impact on its financial affairs.

11. REMUNERATION OF COUNCIL MEMBERS The number of AFTRS Council members are shown below in the relevant remuneration bands less than $29,999 5 8

$30,000 - $59,999 3 1

Total number of AFTRS council members 8 9

$ $

Total remuneration received or due and receivable by AFTRS Council members 187,887 166,341

The Council of AFTRS consists of the Director of the School as well as staff and student representatives and persons independent of the School. The Director and staff representative receive no additional remuneration for these duties and are hence excluded from above figures. Commencing in 2013, under advice from the Remuneration Tribunal, the student representative became entitled to a remuneration.

12. COUNCIL RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

There was no other related party transaction nor benefit during 2013-14 and 2012-13.

116

2014 $

2013 $

13. SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

13A. Senior Executive Remuneration Expenses for the Reporting Period

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary 1,196,743 1,135,188

Performance bonus 45,675 25,753

Other (fringe benefits) 162,482 133,090

Total short-term employee benefits 1,404,900 1,294,031

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 147,485 130,225

Total post-employment benefits 147,485 130,225

Other long-term employee benefits

Annual leave accrued 92,281 88,042

Long-service leave 20,467 19,109

Total other long-term employee benefits 112,748 107,151

Termination benefits - -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 1,665,133 1,531,407

Notes: 1. Note 13A is prepared on an accrual basis (therefore the performance bonus expenses disclosed above may differ from the cash 'Bonus paid' in Note 13B). 2.Note 13A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed as a senior executive was less than $195,000

117

Substantive senior executives Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³ Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

Average annual reportable remuneration¹ No. $ $ $ $ $

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2014 Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 2 110,268 12,058 - - 122,326

$195,000 to $224,999 4 192,196 24,586 - - 216,782

$255,000 to $284,999 1 242,025 17,057 - - 259,082

$345,000 to $374,999 1 303,862 32,083 - 14,675 350,620

Total number of substantive senior executives 8

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2013

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 3 97,357 12,344 - - 109,701

$195,000 to $224,999 4 184,666 20,626 - - 205,292

$255,000 to $284,999 1 239,143 19,116 - - 258,259

$285,000 to $314,999 1 249,582 28,604 - 4,753 282,939

Total number of substantive senior executives 9

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. Reportable salary includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ for tax purposes); c) exempt foreign employment income; and d) reportable employer superannuation contributions. 3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to AFTRS for the provision of superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable

remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on individuals’ payment summaries. 5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. It may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving AFTRS during the financial year. Bonuses salary sacrificed are included in reportable salaries.

13B. Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

118

13C. Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Other Highly Paid Staff during the Reporting Period

Average annual reportable remuneration¹ Other highly paid staff Reportable

salary²

Contributed superannuation³ Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total

reportable remuneration

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2014

Total number of other highly paid staff - - - - - -

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2013

Total number of other highly paid staff - - - - - -

119

2014 $

2013 $

14. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

Remuneration (net of GST) to the Australian National Audit Office for auditing financial statements for the reporting periods 45,000 43,000

No other services were provided by the Australian National Audit Office during the reporting periods.

120

15. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability .

15A. Recurring fair value measurements ($000)

Fair value measurements for assets and liabilities at the end of the current reporting period by hierarchy

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

Fair value Level 1 inputs

Level 2 inputs

Level 3 inputs

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 8,404 8,404

Total non-financial assets subject to regular fair value assessment 8,404 - - 8,404

The highest and best use of all non-financial assets are the same as their current use.

15B. Level 1 and Level 2 transfers for recurring fair value measurements

There were no inter-level transfers during the year

15C. Reconciliation from opening balances to closing balances for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements ($000)

Leasehold improvements Equipment Motor

vehicles

Total

Opening balance 4,947 4,078 82 9,107

Transfers into Level 3 - - - -

Transfers out of Level 3 - - - -

Reclassification - (12) - (12)

Total gains or losses for the period

Depreciation (541) (991) (59) (1,591)

Included in other comprehensive income

- - - -

Purchases, issues, sales and settlements

Purchases 159 741 - 900

Issues - - - -

Sales - - - -

Settlements - - - -

Closing balance 4,565 3,816 23 8,404

121

15D. Valuation technique and inputs for Level 3 fair value measurements Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities at the end of the current reporting period

Fair value $000

Valuation technique

1

Significant unobservable inputs Range

2

Sensitivity of fair value measurement to changes in significant unobservable inputs

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 4,565

Depreciated replacement cost Original cost is adjusted with an inflation factor (determined from quotations on significant items) to compensate for currency fluctuations and cost variations, less accumulated depreciation to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of assets

10 - 15 years (weighted average 7.9%)

Significant unobservable inputs used are obsolescence and inflation

Inflation factor 2.5%

Significant variations in any of those inputs in isolation could result in a significantly lower or higher fair value measurement.

Equipment 3,816

Depreciated replacement cost Current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation on such cost to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of assets

3 - 10

years (weighted average 14.3%)

Significant unobservable input used is obsolescence, any substantial variations could result in a significantly lower or higher fair value measurement.

Motor vehicles 23

Depreciated replacement cost Current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation on such cost to reflect economic benefits consumed, expired or obsolete.

Consumed economic benefit

7 years (14.3%)

Due to the minor value of this asset class, any variations in value are deemed immaterial

1 No change in valuation technique occurred during the period. 2 Significant unobservable inputs only.

Valuation Process Fixed assets are carried at fair value, measured at depreciated replacement cost, revalued by internal staff with appropriate technical knowledge such that the carrying amount of each asset is not materially different, at reporting date, from its fair value. No revaluation adjustments were considered necessary. This has been reviewed and approved by the Council of AFTRS.

122

Floating Interest Rate

Fixed Interest Rate Maturing in 1 Year or Less

Non-Interest Bearing

Total

Notes

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

2014 $000

2013 $000

Financial Assets

Loans and receivables

Cash at bank 4A 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 - - 7,315 6,890

Cash on hand 4A - - - - 3 3 3 3

Receivables for goods and services 4B* - - - - 1,449 1,349 1,449 1,349

Other receivables 4B* - - - - 145 96 145 96

Total 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 1,597 1,448 8,912 8,338

Carrying amount of financial assets 1,815 1,890 5,500 5,000 1,597 1,448 8,912 8,338

Total Assets 18,354 18,403

Payables

At amortised cost:

Trade creditors 6 - - - - 952 951 952 951

Other payables 7 - - - - 1,827 1,819 1,827 1,819

Carrying amount of financial liabilities

- - - - 2,779 2,770 2,779 2,770

Total Liabilities 7,517 7,566

16. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (a) Categories of financial assets and liabilities

* After excluding GST and impairment allowance

123

(b) Net fair values of financial assets & liabilities Financial assets The net fair values of cash, deposits on call and non-interest bearing monetary financial assets approximate their carrying amounts.

Financial liabilities The net fair values of trade creditors, all of which are short term in nature, approximate their carrying amounts.

(c) Net income from financial assets / liabilities

Note

3B

2014 $000

2013 $000

Interest income from bank deposits 212 254

Net income from financial assets and liabilities 212 254

(d) Fee income and expense There was no fee income or expense arising from financial instruments in the year ending 30 June 2014

(e) Credit risk exposures AFTRS has no past due nor impaired financial assets. Exposure to credit risk is minimal as the majority of financial assets are receivable from the Australian Government and bank deposits where potential of default is unlikely. Other receivables consists of student fees and trade receivable with adequate provision for foreseeable uncollectibility. The maximum exposure to such minor assets is their total values (2014: $1,551,000; 2013: $1,435,000)

(f) Liquidity risk AFTRS' liabilities are mostly trade payables and provisions for employees benefits. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the probability that AFTRS will encounter difficulty in meeting its financial obligations which is highly unlikely due to appropriations funding, internal policies and procedures in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

(g) Market risk exposures Market risks include those from interest rate, currency and other price risks which might cause the fair value of future cash flows to fluctuate because of changes in market prices. AFTRS' exposures to currency and other price risks are minimal. Basic bank deposits held are subject to the usual interest rate risk associated with short term investments with floating rates.

124

17. ASSETS HELD IN TRUST Purpose - Monies provided by Kenneth & Andrew Myer to fund study activities including annual Indigenous scholarship and advancement of the role of the creative producer.

The trust is administered by Merlyn Asset Management Pty Ltd at the discretion of the AFTRS Council.

2014 $000

2013 $000

Trust funds managed by AFTRS

Fund opening balance 1,600 1,324

Distribution received 59 67

Interest 1 1

Increase / (decrease) in value of investment 207 263

Imputation refund received 26 25

Scholarships (80) (80)

Fund closing balance 1,813 1,600

Represented by :

Cash management fund 47 41

Equities fund 1,766 1,559

Total funds managed by Merlyn Asset Management Pty Ltd 1,813 1,600

125

18. REPORTING OF OUTCOMES AFTRS is structured for the delivery of one outcome which is detailed in section 1.1 of this note. 18B. Net cost of outcome delivery

Outcome 1

2014 $000

2013 $000

Expenses 31,520 30,035

Income from non government sector

Activities subject to cost recovery (6,879) (5,372)

Other

Interest (212) (254)

Other revenue - -

Total (7,091) (5,626)

Net cost 24,429 24,409

18C. Major classes of expenses, income, assets, and liabilities by outcome

Operating expenses

Employee benefits 17,572 17,223

Suppliers 12,153 11,026

Depreciation and amortisation 1,750 1,788

Write-down and impairment of assets 45 (2)

Total operating expenses 31,520 30,035

Funded by :

Revenue from government 24,429 24,411

Sale of goods and rendering of services 6,879 5,372

Interest 212 254

Other revenue - -

Total operating revenues 31,520 30,037

Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 7,318 6,893

Trade and other receivables 1,694 1,594

Property, plant and equipment 8,404 9,107

Intangibles 633 543

Other non-financial assets 305 266

TOTAL ASSETS 18,354 18,403

Liabilities

Payables 4,985 5,088

Provisions 2,532 2,478

TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,517 7,566

126

INDEX A

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, 11, 31, 57 Academic Board, 23, 51-2 The Academic Video Essay, 37 Adelaide Film Festival, 11, 34 administrative tribunals, 65 AFTRS Award 2000, 62 AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2011, 62 All God's Creatures, 11, 27 alumni, 12, 29 applications, 17, 25, 36 appointments. see Academic Board; staff APS Statistical Bulletin, 64 Asia-Pacific Association (CAPA), 41 associations (industry), 39-40 ASTRA. see Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association Auditor-General, 65 Australian Centre of Moving Image (ACMI), 33 Australian Cinematographers Society Awards, 39 Australian Directors Guild Awards, 12, 27, 28 Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973, 14, 18, 47, 68 Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy, 42, 62 Australian International Documentary Conference, 11, 34 Australian Journal of Screen Arts and Business. see LUMINA Australian Production Design Guild Awards, 39 Australian Screen Sound Guild Awards, 39 Australian Subscription Television and Radio Association (ASTRA) Graduate Program, 10, 20, 33, 40 Australian Writers’ Guild Awards, 39 A.V. Myer Indigenous Award, 41 award course program, 19 awards (events), 39 awards (students), 41, 75-6

B

BA (Screen), 10, 23, 24 Beyond The Great Wall: Pathways to Australia / China Co-Productions, 37, 39 Busan International Film Festival, 11, 27 By This River, 12, 27

C

The case for creating an Australian Copyright Registry, 37, 38 certificate courses. see graduate certificates Chair introduction, 5-7 letter to Minister, 2

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), 53, 65

127

children's courses, 30 CILECT (Centre International de Liaison des Ecoles de Cinéma et de Télévision), 11, 41 Client Relationship Management system, 43 Comcover, 66, 70 Commercial Radio Australia (CRA), 33 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, 50, 65, 68 Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Regulations 1997, 50 Commonwealth Disability Strategy, 64 Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011, 65 communication (workplace), 43 complaints, 57 completions, 25 compliance, 42 conferences, 61 content management systems, 43contractors, 71 contracts, 42, 70 Coral: Rekindling Venus, 6 Corporate Governance Handbook, 47 Corporate Plan, 18 Council, 47-52 courses. see also award course program; graduate certificates; graduate diplomas; masters program; Open Program; short courses new, 10, 24 short, 10-11, 14, 19, 29, 30, 31, 38, 43, 44 Creating and Producing TV Formats and Legal Essentials, 31 Creative Fellowship, 6, 12, 36-7 curriculum, 12, 24

D

Developing a Television Series, 30 diploma courses. see graduate diplomas discipline specific events, 39-40 Do Your Students Have a Clue? The Alternate Reality Game as Pedagogical Tool, 37, 41

E

Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis-Lumière, 11, 41 ecologically sustainable development, 66 Education Division, 23, 24 employment awards and agreements, 62 Engage or Perish: Talk Radio’s Future, 37 enrolments, 17, 25, 30

Enterprise Award, 62 Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 66 environmental performance reporting, 66-7 environmental protection and biodiversity conservation, 66

equal employment opportunity (EEO), 57 establishment act, 14, 18, 47, 68 European Union Travelling Scholarship, 41 events, 34, 39-40. see also Friday on My Mind executive team, 53, 57

128

F

Facing the Machine, 10, 32 Fair Work Act 2009, 42, 62 festivals, 34-5 Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee, 50-1, 65, 70 financial performance, 69-71 Finding Animation, 30 Foundation Diploma, 9, 10, 19, 20, 25, 33, 40 graduates, 20-1, 26, 72, 76 Foxtel, 10, 20, 31, 34 Foxtel Award for Exceptional Talent, 41 Frameline, 11, 28 fraud control, 65 freedom of information, 64 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 64 Friday on My Mind, 11, 33, 34, 35, 77-80 Future Review Committee, 52

G

General Policy Orders, 65 Gods of Egypt, 20, 41 Governor-General, 47 graduate achievements, 20-1, 26-9

graduate certificates, 19 graduate diplomas, 19, 20 Graduate Diploma in Radio, 22, 23, 39, 41 graduate screening program, 2013, 26 graduates 2013, 72-4 graduation 2013, 26 The Great Gatsby, 20 guest lectures, 87-8 guiding principles, 14 guilds, 39-40

H

Health and Safety Committee, 43, 62, 63 Heartland Festival (USA), 11 Higher Education Support Act 2003, 24 The Hollywood Reporter, 9, 19

How the Light Gets In, 11, 27

I

incident reports, 64 indemnities, 66 Indigenous Program, 10, 11, 31-2, 34 industrial relations, 62 industry engagement, 38 events, 39, 83-6 guilds and associations, 39-40 short courses, 30

129

Industry Program, 30 Information Publication Scheme, 64 insurance premiums, 66, 70 internships, 40 Iron Hands, 20

J

Journal of Screen Arts and Business. see LUMINA judicial decisions, 65

K

Kenneth B. Myer Scholarship Award for Exceptional Talent, 41 Kenneth B Myer Award for Project Development, 41 key performance indicators (KPIs) program 1.1, 15-17

L

lecturers, guest, 87-8 legislation (enabling), 14, 18, 47, 68 library services, 37-8, 43 Listening Without The Ear: Encounters With The Audible and Non-Audible Through Indigenous Songlines, 37, 41Love, Death, Film and Music, 37 LUMINA, 6, 12, 35, 36

M

Master of Screen Arts and Business (MSAB), 6, 19, 23 Master of Screen Arts (MSA), 19, 22, 26 graduates, 74 lecturers, 87 masters program, 19, 22-3, 26 Ministerial directions, 65

N

Nashville Film Festival, 11, 27 National Centre for Indigenous Excellence, 10, 31, 34 National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, 64 National Film and Sound Archives (NFSA), 35

National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA), 33 National Program, 30 New York University, Tisch School of Arts, 11, 40 non-award courses, 29-30

O

occupational health and safety (OH & S). see work health and safety (WHS) Open Program, 6, 10, 11, 15, 19, 31, 37, 38, 44 organisation chart, 54

130

P

Palm Springs International Shortfest, 11, 26, 27, 28, 29 part-time courses. see graduate certificates partnerships, 33-4 portfolio budget statements key performance indicators, 15-17 outcome 1, 15 post-graduate program. see graduate certificates; graduate diplomas privacy, 65 Privacy Act 1988, 42, 65 procurement, 42, 70-1 Producing/Commercialisation/Distributing/Marketing Curricula: New Formats, 41 production resources, 44 Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013, 42 Public Program, 35, 77-80 purpose, 14

Q

quality assurance. see Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA)

R

radio Graduate Diploma in Radio, 22, 23, 39, 41 Radio Internships, 41 Reel Sunday, 35 research, 37 Rouben Mamoulian Award, 12, 28

S

scholarships, 41 Schools and Children Program, 31 Screen Australia, 29, 33

Talent Escalator program, 40, 76 Screen Division, 23 Screen Queensland, 10, 31, 34, 35 Screenworks Northern Rivers, 10, 31, 34, 35 Shanghai Media Group, 11, 31 Shaping the Film Edit: Editing, Technology and Curriculum Invited Guest, 41 Shark Island Foundation Documentary Prize, 41 Shine Australia, 10, 21, 40, 76 short courses, 10-11, 14, 19, 29, 30, 31, 38, 43, 44 Sleepwalking, 37 South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC), 30, 33, 35 Specialist Division, 23 St Kilda Film Festival, 12, 26, 35 staff appointments, 57 consultation, 63 merit selection, 57 profile, 58-60 review of structure, 42

131

training and development, 61-2, 63-4 women, 57 State of the Service Report (APS), 64 strategic direction, 18 Student Centre, 25, 42 Sydney Film Festival, 11, 12, 28, 34, 35 Sydney Writers’ Festival, 11, 34

T

teaching divisions, 23 Television Unit, 30 Tertiary Education Quality Standards Act 2011, 24 Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA), 12 Tisch School of Arts (NYU), 11, 40

Torres Strait Islanders. see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders training and development, staff, 61-2, 63-4 TV Talks, 81-2

U

UMI Arts, 10, 31, 34, 35 Unbroken, 20, 41 undergraduate courses, 19 Underground Film Festival, NYC, 11, 27

V

video-post, 44 vision, 14

W

website, 16, 43 whistleblower service, 43 Wolverine, 20, 41 work and private commitments, 61 work health and safety (WHS), 43, 62-3 Work Health and Safety (WHS) Act 2011, 43 workplace culture, 43 workplace diversity, 57

WOW Film Festival, 39

132