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Workplace Gender Equality Agency—Report for 2017-18


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Annual Report 2017 - 2018

ISSN: 2202-6355

Online ISSN: 2204-8774

© Commonwealth of Australia 2018

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Contact us Enquiries regarding the licence and any use of this document are welcome at:

Workplace Gender Equality Agency GPO Box 4917 Sydney NSW 2001 Telephone (02) 9432 7000 Fax (02) 9929 4383 www.wgea.gov.au

For any enquiries about the annual report, please contact:

Murray Black Media and Communications Manager murray.black@wgea.gov.au

An electronic copy of this report is available at: www.wgea.gov.au/sites/default/files/wgea-annual-report-17-18.pdf

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 1

GPO Box 4917 Sydney NSW 2001

www.wgea.gov.au

ABN 47 641 643 874

31 October 2018

Hon Kelly O’Dwyer MP Minister for Women Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I have pleasure in presenting to you the annual report of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency for the 2017-18 year.

The report has been prepared in accordance with Part III, subsection 12(1) of the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, which requires the Agency to submit to the Minister a report on its operations for the year ending 31 May. The report must be submitted as soon as practicable, and in any event within six months after 31 May.

The report also contains the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2018, as required by section 34(1) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015.

This annual report covers the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, and also includes the Agency’s most current report assessment data from compliance reports for the 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 reporting period.

I certify that I am satisfied that for the financial year 2017-18 the Agency, in compliance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, has:

prepared fraud risk assessments and a fraud control plan put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the Agency and that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to

the entity.

Yours sincerely

Libby Lyons Director

2 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Reader’s guide

This report informs the Minister for Women, Parliament, relevant employers and the public about the performance of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency in 2017-18.

This report has been prepared according to parliamentary reporting requirements.

The year in review Profiles the Agency’s year and includes a review by the Director.

Agency overview Provides an overview of the Agency and its functions, and a profile of the organisations that are covered by the Act.

Report on performance Provides specific information on the Agency’s performance in 2017-18.

Management and accountability Provides information on the Agency’s corporate governance, human resource management, financial management and other management areas.

Financial Statements Contains the Agency’s audited Financial Statements for 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 3

Contents

Annual Report 2017-18

Letter of transmittal 1

Reader’s guide 2

Contents 3

Glossary and acronyms 4

2017-18: Year in review 5

Review by the Director 6

2017-18 Highlights 8

Snapshot of reporting organisations 10

Agency overview 11

About the Agency 12

Report on performance 15

Annual Performance Statement 2017-18 16

Financial Performance 19

Key Agency activities 20

Management and accountability 23

Corporate governance 24

External scrutiny 24

Human resources management 24

Other mandatory information 29

Financial Statements 31

Independent auditor’s statement 32

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager 34

Financial Statements 35

Notes to Financial Statements 39

Appendices 55

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations 56

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality 61

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors 62

Appendix 4: List of requirements 66

Index 71

4 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Glossary and acronyms

The Act Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

Agency Workplace Gender Equality Agency

APS Australian Public Service

ASX Australian Securities Exchange

Financial year 2017-18 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

Gender equality indicators Defined in section 3 of the Workplace Gender

Equality Act 2012

IPS Information Publication Scheme

IT Information technology

Legislative instrument The Workplace Gender Equality (Matters in relation

to Gender Equality Indicators) Instrument 2013 (No. 1)

NABERS National Australian Built Environment Rating System

PAES Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements

PBS Portfolio Budget Statement

Relevant organisations Employers that are covered under the Workplace

Gender Equality Act 2012 for reporting purposes

Reporting organisations Relevant employers that submit reports to the Agency,

sometimes on behalf of other subsidiary entities within their corporate structure

Reporting period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018

WGEA Workplace Gender Equality Agency

WH&S Work, health and safety

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 5

2017-18: Year in review Review by the Director 6

2017-18 Highlights 8

Snapshot of reporting organisations 10

6 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Review by the Director The issue of gender equality has been in the spotlight this year more than ever before. Tackling the gender pay gap is now a growing public priority both in Australia and around the world.

Consequently, the release of our fourth comprehensive set of workplace data on 17 November 2017 was greeted with significant media and public interest. It received extensive media coverage, with stories published in most major metropolitan newspapers and many TV, radio and online outlets reporting the key findings of the data. Almost 1400 people attended the subsequent launch events in every state and the ACT where the results of our dataset were presented and discussed with great interest.

The momentum for gender equality in the workplace was reflected in some of the positive results. There was a significant increase in employer action on gender equality and a surge in the number of employers conducting a pay gap analysis (up nearly 11 percentage points to more than 37%). Over two-thirds of employers now have either a policy and/ or strategy in place to support gender equality or promote flexible work. There was a stronger pipeline of women into management (38.3%) with increases in the representation of women in all manager categories. In 2017, women achieved 43% of appointments to manager positions.

However, our data also revealed some problem areas. Although the gender pay gap is declining, it is still too high at 22.4% for full-time total remuneration - an average difference of $26,527 between women and men. Women remain under-represented in management and leadership roles, comprising only 16.5% of all CEOs. Female representation on boards remained static at 24.9%. The data also identified an accountability gap. Organisations have policies

and strategies in place, but are not making managers accountable. This has to change so that we can ensure gender equality policies and strategies are embedded into Australia’s workplace cultures.

During the reporting period, our research partnerships continued to deepen our understanding of how to achieve workplace gender equality in Australia. In 2017, the Agency collaborated with McKinsey & Company and the Business Council of Australia to produce Women in Leadership: Lessons from Australian companies leading the way. This ground-breaking report identified how high-performing companies had 10 common practices that they utilised to improve women’s career progression and increase the representation of women in leadership. In March 2018, we released our third insight report with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC). Its findings highlighted the importance of leadership accountability in improving pay equity outcomes.

The 2017-18 period also saw unprecedented international interest in the Agency’s work and Australia’s approach to gender equality reporting. Many countries and organisations contacted the Agency for information, advice and guidance. I was delighted to speak at the UN Committee on the Status of Women in New York and at the Fourth Global Forum on Business for Gender Equality in Santiago, Chile. I also visited Singapore in August 2017 for the Singapore-Australia High Level Womens Dialogue 2017 and Vietnam in March 2018 to help the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) with the work they are doing to promote gender equality in the region. Everywhere I went, the thirst for learning more about Australia’s legislation and our journey was inspiring. It was also a great honour for me to be included in the inaugural list of “100 most influential

people in gender equality policy” by Apolitical, a global network of public servants, and to be profiled in the book 200 Hundred women who will change the way you see the world.

In February 2018, we announced our latest round of WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOGCE) citation holders. The number of citation holders increased yet again, up from 106 in 2016 to 120 in 2017-18. The steady growth we see each year in our list of EOCGE citation holders indicates that the business benefits and competitive advantage gained by improving gender equality in Australian workplaces is becoming more widely recognised. The Agency also continued to expand its engagement with our network of Pay Equity Ambassadors: a group of 141 directors and chief executive officers who are advocates for pay equity within their own organisations and the broader community. All of these employers are setting the benchmark and the pace for other Australian workplaces to follow.

As ever, I would like to thank and pay tribute to the expertise, enthusiasm and professionalism of Agency staff. Their irrepressible dedication and commitment to the work of the Agency is extraordinary. The results from our data and the ever-increasing interest in our work show that our efforts to improve gender equality in Australia’s workplaces is making a considerable difference. It is my hope, and indeed my mission, that the Agency’s activities continue to deliver meaningful change for women and men at work in the years ahead.

Libby Lyons Director

The 2017-18 period also saw unprecedented international interest in the Agency’s work and Australia’s approach to gender equality reporting. Many countries and organisations contacted the Agency for advice and guidance.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 7

8 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Highlights

Building evidence through data The Agency’s ongoing partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre saw the release of the third Gender Equity Insights report analysing the Agency’s data in detail. The report’s findings highlighted the importance of leadership accountability in closing the gaps between women’s and men’s pay. It found that action to correct gender pay gaps was three times more effective when combined with reporting pay gap data to the executive or Board.

We embarked on a new partnership with the Business Council of Australia and McKinsey & Co to produce the co-branded report on Women in Leadership, Australian companies leading the way. Released in November 2017, the report provided an evidence-based recipe for dismantling the barriers to women’s participation at senior levels. It revealed that leading-practice organisations used 10 common practices that have been proven to be effective in achieving a more balanced gender representation in leadership. These 10 practices can be implemented in organisations across different industries and operating environments.

Awareness of our online interactive Data Explorer increased, attracting more than 14,500 people in 2017-18, which was an increase of 34% on the previous year.

Increasing our global reach Australia’s distinctive approach to workplace gender equality and our unique gender equality reporting system received increased international interest and recognition in 2017-18.

Agency Director Libby Lyons was invited to deliver keynote speeches at the UN Committee on the Status of Women in New York, where she presented the findings of the Women in Leadership Report, and at the Fourth Global Forum on Business for Gender Equality in Santiago, Chile, held by the UN, The International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the Chilean Government. She also visited Singapore for the Singapore-Australia High Level Womens Dialogue 2017 and Vietnam to assist DFAT in promoting gender equality in the region.

Representatives from many countries contacted the Agency for advice during the reporting period and Agency staff met with officials from Kuwait, Sri Lanka, the UK, New Zealand and the ASEAN Secretariat in the past year.

In May 2018, Libby Lyons was one of nine Australians recognised in the inaugural list of “100 most influential people in gender equality policy” by Apolitical, a global network of public servants. She was also profiled in the book 200 Women who will change the way you see the world.

Recognising leading practice In 2017-18, the Agency continued to actively invest time and resources in developing our networks of leading practice employers.

In February, we accredited a record 120 organisations as WGEA Employers of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders. Two launch events in Melbourne and Sydney proved very popular, drawing capacity audiences who heard inspiring speeches from the Minister for Women, the Hon. Kelly O’Dwyer and Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins in Melbourne, journalist and author Catherine Fox in Sydney and Agency Director Libby Lyons at both events.

Our network of Pay Equity Ambassadors continued to expand, reaching 141 in the year reported. Many ambassadors played a high-profile role in promoting the issue of pay equity on Equal Pay Day (4 September 2017) through their social media and online channels. The number of Ambassadors increased from 114 to 137 in the fortnight around Equal Pay Day.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 9

WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality 120 employers of choice

Fifth full year of data collected (2017-18) 4,644 reporting organisations

Online webinars 1,765 participants Pay Equity Ambassadors 141 Ambassadors

Website visits 379,885 unique visits

Speaking engagements 75 nationwide

10 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Snapshot of reporting organisations

As at 12 September 2018, 4,644 reports had been assessed as compliant for the 2017-18 reporting period. These employers represented 4,156,340 employees, approximately 40% of employees in Australia.

Table 1: Reporting organisations by industry

Number of reporting organisations Number of

employees

%

Women

%

Men

Accommodation and Food Services 236 203,434 52.0 48.0

Administrative and Support Services 254 305,937 44.4 55.6

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 49 21,424 34.8 65.2

Arts and Recreation Services 102 89,102 50.6 49.4

Construction 202 124,862 17.0 83.0

Education and Training 514 420,626 63.6 36.4

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 46 43,279 24.8 75.2

Financial and Insurance Services 254 273,038 54.9 45.1

Health Care and Social Assistance 648 655,949 80.0 20.0

Information Media and Telecommunications 136 120,508 38.9 61.1

Manufacturing 583 344,270 26.3 73.7

Mining 140 142,411 16.7 83.3

Other Services 140 53,079 46.2 53.8

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 514 283,413 40.9 59.1

Public Administration and Safety 21 34,475 20.6 79.4

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 82 43,844 41.3 58.7

Retail Trade 305 682,834 57.7 42.3

Transport, Postal and Warehousing 187 192,749 26.4 73.6

Wholesale Trade 231 121,106 36.3 63.7

All reporting organisations 4,644 4,156,340 50.1 49.9

Table 2: Reporting organisations by size

Organisation size

Number of reporting organisations Number of

employees

%

Women

%

Men

0-249 2,045 312,720 48.0 52.0

250-499 1,129 393,243 47.4 52.6

500-999 655 457,310 46.2 53.8

1000 - 4999 688 1,430,303 48.5 51.5

5000+ 127 1,562,764 53.9 46.1

Detailed statistics on the 2017-18 reporting period results are available at data.wgea.gov.au.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 11

Agency overview About the Agency 12

12 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

About the Agency

Our purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA, the Agency) is charged with promoting and improving gender equality in Australian workplaces, including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data. It is established by the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012.

Our vision The Agency’s vision is for women and men to be equally represented, valued and rewarded in the workplace.

Our strategic priorities The Agency’s strategic mission is to lead, influence and inspire change to promote gender equality in Australian workplaces utilising our world-leading dataset. The strategic priorities until the year ending 30 June 2018 were to:

increase our impact and reach

realise the potential of the data; and

develop the team.

Our role and functions The Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 outlines our role and functions as follows:

advise and assist employers in promoting and improving gender equality in the workplace

develop, in consultation with relevant employers and employee organisations, benchmarks in relation to gender equality indicators

issue guidelines to assist relevant employers to achieve the purposes of the Act

review compliance with the Act by relevant employers, review public reports lodged by relevant employers and deal with those reports in accordance with the Act

collect and analyse information provided by relevant employers under the Act to assist the Agency to advise the Minister in relation to legislative instruments made under the Act

undertake research, educational programs and other programs to promote and improve gender equality in the workplace

work with employers to maximise the effectiveness of the administration of the Act, including by minimising the regulatory burden on employers

promote and contribute to understanding and acceptance, and public discussion, of gender equality in the workplace

review the effectiveness of the Act in achieving its purposes

report to the Minister on such matters in relation to gender equality in the workplace as the Agency thinks fit.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 13

Our objectives In order to achieve its purpose, the Agency has the following objectives:

promote, amongst employers, the elimination of discrimination on the basis of gender in relation to employment matters

foster workplace consultation between employers and employees on issues concerning gender equality in employment and in the workplace

improve the productivity and competitiveness of Australian business through the advancement of gender equality in employment and in the workplace

remove barriers to the full and equal participation of women in the workforce.

The Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 requires non-public sector employers with 100 or more employees (relevant employers) to report to the agency annually against standardised gender equality indicators (GEIs) by completion of a workplace profile and a reporting questionnaire.

The GEIs relate to areas that are critical to gender equality:

GEI 1 - gender composition of the workforce

GEI 2 - gender composition of governing bodies of relevant employers

GEI 3 - equal remuneration between women and men

GEI 4 - availability and utility of employment terms, conditions and practices relating to flexible working arrangements for employees and to working arrangements supporting employees with family or caring responsibilities

GEI 5 - consultation with employees on issues concerning gender equality in the workplace

GEI 6 - any other matters specified by the Minister - sex-based harassment and discrimination.

14 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Organisational structure The Director of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency has overall accountability for management of the Agency and is appointed by the Governor-General of Australia. Libby Lyons was appointed as Director of the Agency on 17 September 2015 and commenced a five-year term on 19 October 2015.

The Agency is divided into four business units:

Advice and Reporting

Operations

Research and Analytics

Engagement.

Workforce A breakdown of employees by ongoing and non- ongoing status, APS classification level, type of employment arrangement, salary range, performance pay and more information on the management of human resources is provided on pages 26-28.

Figure 1: Organisational structure of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency

Director

Advice and Reporting

Operations Research and

Analytics

Engagement

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 15

Report on performance Annual Performance Statement 16

Financial Performance 19

Key Agency activities 20

16 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Annual Performance Statement 2017-18

Introductory statement The Annual Performance Statement for the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA, The Agency) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) for the 2017-18 financial year and accurately presents the Agency’s performance in accordance with section 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Entity purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency is charged with promoting and improving gender equality in Australian workplaces, including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data.

Results

Performance Criterion

Increasing our impact and reach on gender equality issues through development and delivery of educational tools and resources to inform and equip.

Target: Review and refresh of educational resources and toolkits

Target: Increased variety of education tools and resources available on website

Target: Increased participation in webinars

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2017-18 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency - Entity resources and plan performance 2017-18 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

The Agency has reviewed and refreshed 14 educational resources and web-page content, including the e-learning module, video content and infographics.

New educational resources and insights, including webinars, has increased from 104 in 2016-17 to 111 in 2017-18.

Attendees of reporting webinars has increased by 12% in 2017-18.

Target met

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 17

Performance Criterion

Realising the potential of gender equality data by mining for evidence to add value and generate insights.

Target: Establish additional research partnerships and influence the research agenda on gender equality

Target: Trend capability operational prior to 2017 report submission period

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2017-18 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency - Entity resources and plan performance 2017-18 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

WGEA has developed research partnerships delivering valuable insights, including:

• Gender Equity Insights - a three-year partnership with Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre examining Agency data on pay gaps and pay equity action.

• Women in Leadership report with Business Council of Australia and McKinsey and Company - quantitative and qualitative research identifying key drivers of improved representation of women in leadership.

• Ageing Agendas - a collaborative project with the University of South Australia and the Australian National University into Australia’s ageing population, female participation in paid work and retirement income.

Agency representatives also participate in a range of advisory bodies, steering committees and working groups.

New multi-year trend visualisations were added to the Agency’s public Data Explorer tool for the 2017-18 reporting period, with additional functionality included to support five-year trends.

Target exceeded

Performance Criterion

Communicating widely on gender equality matters in consumable forms which tell the story.

Target: Refresh of website content to include increase in case studies and result in more visits to the site.

Target: Increased visits to the website

Target: Level of take up of CEO targeted resources

Criterion Source

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2017-18 Corporate Plan

Workplace Gender Equality Agency - Entity resources and plan performance 2017-18 (PBS)

Result Against Performance Criterion

The Agency has published a wide variety of new website content during 2017-18, including a suite of ‘gender equality in action’ case studies; and an update to the popular ‘what is the gender pay gap?’ web page.

The Agency has had an increase of 12.3% in unique visits to the website in 2017-18.

The Agency’s Data Explorer tool attracted 14,737 unique visitors in 2017-18, representing a 34.0% increase on the previous year’s results.

5,501 Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports (CABRs) were downloaded from November 2017 onwards, representing a 28.8% increase on the previous year.

A two-page summary of key benchmark results was sent to the CEOs of the 4,621 reporting organisations in the Agency's final 2017 dataset in late December 2017. This contributed to a 61.0% increase in the number of CABR downloads in the following two months compared to the previous year.

Target met

18 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Analysis of performance against purpose The Workplace Gender Equality Agency has met or exceeded all performance criteria in the 2017-18 year.

With four years of data released by the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) and a fifth annual reporting period coming to a close, capturing and reporting on workplace gender equality indicators is now established as a mainstream activity for Australian business. The Agency acknowledges that more can always be done to streamline the collection processes and continues to work with partners in government and business to this end.

Both the profile of the Agency and recognition of the value of the data continue to rise. WGEA data and the Agency Director are regularly quoted in the media and Agency staff are invited to participate in a broad range of workshops, roundtables and business and community discussions.

The Agency continued to produce research reports in collaboration with other notable organisations. In 2017, the Agency collaborated with McKinsey & Company and the Business Council of Australia to produce Women in Leadership: Lessons from Australian companies leading the way. This report revealed how high-performing companies use a suite of 10 common practices to improve women’s career progression and increase the representation of women in leadership. The Agency's Director presented the findings of the report at the UN committee on the status of women in New York in March in 2018.

In 2018, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC) and the Agency released the third report in a gender equity series which provides detailed analysis of the Agency’s data for pay equity insights. The insights from both of these reports have been widely disseminated by the Director and Agency staff in media and communications activity and public speaking engagements.

An increasing number of organisations not currently covered under the Workplace Gender Equality Act, 2012, are seeking out WGEA expertise, tools and

resources. These include public sector agencies and small businesses.

The Agency continues to review and refine communication channels and to develop expanded networks to ensure we link individuals and employers with information, resources and examples of good practice. This helps drive positive gender equality outcomes in their workplaces.

2017-18 has seen an increasing number of Pay Equity Ambassadors and WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality recipients. These and other advocates for the Agency and gender equality more broadly, continue to amplify the ongoing public discussion on workplace gender equality. They reinforce the business case for taking proactive steps in support of equal representation, recognition and reward of women and men.

Further discussion and statistics on key Agency activities aligned with our legislative mandate can be found on pages 20-22.

Regulator Performance Framework An assessment of the Agency’s performance under the Regulator Performance Framework will be available on the wgea.gov.au website from 31 December 2018.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 19

Financial Performance

The total appropriation for the Agency in 2017-18 was $4,875,000.

Expenditure in 2017-18 decreased by 0.20% from the previous year to $5,938,375 due to a decrease in depreciation costs.

Expenditure on suppliers was $1,947,985 or 33% and included:

IT and office equipment

lease and other costs associated with premises

contractors and consultants

travel and training for staff

subscriptions, printing and publications.

Expenditure on employee benefits was $3,054,582 or 51% which represented a decrease of 2% from last year and is attributable to staff turnover and a delay in recruitment.

Table 3: Agency resource statement

Actual available appropriation for 2017-18 $’000

Payments made 2017-18 $’000

Balance remaining 2017-18 $’000

Ordinary annual services

Departmental appropriation (1) 6.293 5.367 926

Total resourcing and payments 6.293 5.367 926

2017-18 2016-17

Average Staffing Level (number) 30 30

(1) Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2017-18, prior year departmental appropriation and section 74 receipts

20 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Supporting employers to report In 2017-18 relevant employers reported on the six gender equality indicators outlined in the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012. The Agency continued its ongoing commitment to support, inform, advise and educate relevant employers through the 2017-18 reporting period.

To help employers meet their reporting requirements under the Act, the Agency conducted seven webinars with 1,765 attendees, an 11.9% increase on last year’s participation numbers. The Agency also introduced two live Q&A sessions this year to help key contacts complete their reports.

Improving the reporting process and level of service provided to employers remains a high priority for the Agency. In 2017-18, the Agency provided telephone support, a range of improved reporting resources and produced two pre-recorded screencasts to address specific areas of difficulty for employers.

Opening access to our knowledge In 2017-18, visitor numbers increased across the Agency’s digital platforms, including the website, Data Explorer and educational publications, helping to cement the Agency’s reputation as a trusted and respected source for gender equality statistics, research and resources.

The number of unique visitors to wgea.gov.au increased 13% on the previous year to more than 379,000 visitors and the number of users accessing our resources grew, with more than 230,000 downloads of the Agency’s toolkits and educational resources. Unique downloads of the organisation’s public reports also increased by 7% to over 34,000.

The Agency’s social media presence expanded significantly. In 2017-18 our Facebook followers increased by 13% to 3,387 and our Twitter followers increased by 29% to 6,384. The Agency’s LinkedIn account grew, on average, by 110 people per month. In June 2018, the Agency launched its own Instagram account to expand its reach in the digital realm.

The Agency’s staff and, in particular, the Agency’s Director, Libby Lyons, have been in great demand for speaking engagements. In 2017-18, the Agency was represented at 75 speaking events.

The Agency conducted and participated in a range of workshops with stakeholders, co-presenting a workshop with the Agenda Agency in November 2017 on how organisations can leverage benchmarking data for their gender equality strategy. The Agency also collaborated with Consult Australia, the Victorian Government (for the Women@Work conference) and the South Australian Office for Women and SA Chiefs for Gender Equity, to deliver educational workshops and presentations.

Building evidence through data In 2017-18, the Agency continued to ensure the data it collects is as accessible, useful and usable as possible, subject to relevant legislation. In November 2017, the fourth comprehensive set of workplace data was released, accompanied by a national roadshow of events beginning on 17 November. These presentations were held across the country, in partnership with the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA). Nearly 1400 people attended the events, covering all states and territories with the exception of the Northern Territory.

The Agency’s online interactive Data Explorer featured new data in 2017-18 and attracted 14,737 unique users between 1 July 2017 and 30 June 2018. This represented an increase of 34% compared to the previous year. The Agency’s data is also accessible through data.gov.au.

The Agency continued its partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, releasing the Gender Equity Insights 2018: Inside Australia’s Gender Pay Gap in March 2018. This third report in the series strengthened the insights around gender pay gaps and demonstrated how they have changed over time across Australian workplaces. It also highlighted the impact of workplace pay equity policies and the importance of taking action to address and reduce organisational gender pay gaps.

The Agency forged a new partnership with the Business Council of Australia and McKinsey & Company to deliver a new report providing a detailed analysis of the Agency’s data. The co-branded report Women in Leadership, Australian companies leading the way was released in November 2017, presenting evidence-based advice to address the under-representation of women in leadership.

Key Agency activities

The Agency undertook a range of activities in support of, and in alignment with, its legislative mandate.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 21

Supporting employers to report

Reporting webinar participants 1,765

Views of reporting webinars on YouTube 971

Downloads of reporting-related resources 30,152

Building evidence through data

Employees covered by the 2017-18 dataset 4,156,340

Users of the online Data Explorer 14,737

Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports produced 5,501

Expanding our education outreach

Online education resources 74

Downloads of pay equity resources 7,861

Downloads of gender pay gap statistics fact sheet 27,258

Unique website visits 379,885

Generating national debate

Public speaking events by Agency staff 75

Increase in LinkedIn ‘likes’ 71%

Increase in Twitter followers 29%

Media mentions 927

Recognising leading practice

WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 120

Pay Equity Ambassadors 141

Pay Equity Official Supporters 33

22 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

The Agency produced and distributed customised and confidential Competitor Analysis Benchmark Reports from the 2016-17 reporting data to compliant reporting organisations, accompanied by succinct executive summaries. This improved communication process led to a 5% increase in the share of organisations accessing their Benchmark Reports from the previous reporting period.

Expanding our educational reach To fulfil its role in promoting workplace gender equality, the Agency continued to place significant importance on producing practical education materials, case studies, research and news.

As at 26 July 2018, there were more than 70 educational tools and resources available on the Agency’s website and YouTube. These include written toolkits, data collection spreadsheets, videos, e-learning modules and recorded webinars. They cover strategies for gender equality, support for reporting, pay equity, flexibility, strategies for gender equality and the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality program.

A key theme for the Agency was encouraging men to take up flexible working arrangements and parental leave. In October 2017, we released the insight paper ‘Towards gender balanced parental leave’, providing in-depth evidence on how gender balanced parental leave policies improves gender equality. The paper offers a summary of Australia’s paid parental leave scheme with a comarison of other OECD countries and builds a strong case for encouraging men to take up a bigger share of caring duties.

The Agency remained focused on promoting and addressing pay equity in organisations. Our comprehensive suite of online pay equity resources was improved and updated. With more than 125,000 unique visits to the addressing pay equity section and almost 22,000 downloads of the educational resources, this is the most utilised section of the Agency’s website.

In June 2018, the Agency also released an educational animation entitled ‘Pay gaps and life hacks: 5 ways you can tackle gender inequality’. The campaign explored how the gender pay gap grows over one's lifetime and what individuals can do to address gender equality.

Raising national awareness The Agency continued to generate significant coverage and commentary about gender equality during 2017-18 and our reach to mainstream audiences increased, with the Agency’s Director, Libby Lyons, featured on popular TV programs such as Channel Nine’s 60 Minutes and The Today Show as well as a feature article in the November 2017 publication of The Australian Women’s Weekly.

The Agency’s campaigns received regular media attention, with the release of the reporting dataset attracting extensive media coverage, including ment-ions in most major Australian newspapers and a wide range of TV and radio outlets and online publications.

Global footprint Australia’s approach to workplace gender equality received significant international recognition during 2017-18 and we witnessed more countries invest in research and policy to raise the profile of women in the workforce. During 2017-18, the representatives of a number of countries contacted the Agency for information and advice. The Agency’s Director was invited to speak at international events, including in the USA, Chile, Vietnam and Singapore. The Agency also met with officials from Kuwait, Sri Lanka, the UK, New Zealand and the ASEAN Secretariat in the past year.

International access of the Agency’s resources also expanded, with people from 25 different countries accessing our resources, including the UK, USA, Brazil and Malaysia.

Recognising leading practice The Agency has actively invested time and resources to develop networks of leading practice employers focused on driving change across different industries.

In February 2018, the Agency released the list of successful applicants for our leading recognition program: the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOCGE) citation. The number of citation holders increased from 106 to 120, reflecting growing commitment to gender equality from the business community. The Agency recognised and celebrated the citation holders at sold out launch events in Melbourne and Sydney.

Throughout the year, we expanded our engagement with our Pay Equity Ambassadors: a network of 141 chief executive officers and directors who have committed to pay equity and to work with the Agency to drive change. We hosted four CEO roundtables and public leadership forums, where our Ambassadors spoke publicly on the business case for equality and outlined the strategies they are implementing to address gender equality in their businesses.

On Equal Pay Day (4 September 2017), our network of Ambassadors posted items on social media in support of our campaign to educate the public and business community on the need for change.

EOCGE recipients are listed at Appendix 2 and Pay Equity Ambassadors at Appendix 3.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 23

Management & accountability Corporate governance 24

External scrutiny 24

Human resources management 24

Other mandatory information 29

24 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Corporate governance During the 2017-18 year, the Agency operated under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The Director is the accountable authority of the Agency.

The Agency’s Corporate Governance Framework ensures that the Workplace Gender Equality Agency achieves its objectives, manages risks and uses resources responsibly and with accountability. The framework aligns legislative requirements with other Australian Public Service and internal policy requirements and promotes a level of governance and oversight commensurate with risk.

The Executive management of the Agency is active in the implementation of the framework including but not limited to strategic planning, policy development, review of controls and participation in project steering committees.

Executive management As at 30 June 2018, the Executive was comprised of four Executive Manager positions reporting to the Director.

Advice and Reporting Executive Manager Vanessa Paterson

Operations Executive Manager Anne Beath

Research and Analytics Executive Manager Janin Bredehoeft

Engagement Executive Manager Jackie Woods

Fraud control and risk management During the financial year 2017-18, the Agency did not identify any fraud. The Fraud Control Plan is part of the Agency’s induction program and Fraud Awareness training is undertaken by all staff annually. The Agency’s Risk Management Policy, Fraud Control Plan, Business Continuity Plan and associated Risk Registers are reviewed regularly with oversight by the Audit Committee. The Agency has taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud by ensuring appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures and processes are in place.

The Agency integrates risk management into business planning and project management and incorporates the identification of risks and risk treatments into strategic planning. Managers undertake refresher training in Risk Management annually and all other Agency staff biennially. Risk management is a standing agenda item at Executive meetings.

External scrutiny The Agency is subject to an annual statutory audit performed by the Australian National Audit Office. The outcomes of the 2017-18 audit were presented to the Audit Committee. The committee is chaired by an external member.

The members of the Audit Committee at 30 June 2018 were:

Heather Watson (Chair)

Sean Van Gorp

Jackie Woods

The role and responsibilities of the Audit Committee are set out in its Charter. The Committee provides independent assurance and assistance to the Director on the Agency’s governance framework and its financial statement responsibilities.

There have been no significant developments in external scrutiny of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency during 2017-18.

Human resources management

Assessment of effectiveness

The Agency has operated successfully under its organisational and staffing structure. The Agency continued to review and revise its people management policies as well as procedures, systems and documentation to reflect contemporary better practice and reduce redundant or overly prescriptive practices or procedures to enable staff to better deliver on the Agency’s strategic priorities.

Work is continuing in the Agency to create a flexible and agile workforce through cross-Agency project team work, the movement of staff on a short-term basis to work in different teams and the operation of a flat management structure. The Agency is in the process of identifying existing and required skill sets and developing a strategy and implementation plan to more effectively utilise these skills in strategic projects.

Management and accountability

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 25

Information on enterprise bargaining

A three-year Enterprise Bargaining Agreement was approved and commenced on 29 December 2015. The 2015-2018 Enterprise Agreement has a nominal expiry date of 21 December 2018.

Employees received four wage increases over the three-year duration of the Agency Enterprise Agreement. The first increase of 1.5% took effect on 29 December 2015. The second increase of 1% took effect on 1 March 2016. The third increase of 1% took effect 1 March 2017 with the fourth increase of 1.5% taking effect on 1 March 2018.

The number of employees covered by the Agency Enterprise Agreement and the salary ranges available for APS employees by classification structure are outlined in Table 8.

Superannuation

The Agency pays employer superannuation contributions on behalf of employees during periods of unpaid leave for maternity or primary carer’s leave. The contributions are made for a period equal to a maximum of 52 weeks from the commencement of paid maternity or primary carer’s leave.

Non-salary benefits

The Agency provides the following non-salary benefits to its employees:

access to salary packaging for a vehicle or laptop

salary packaging of supplementary superannuation contributions.

Flexible work practices

The Agency helps employees balance their work and personal lives by offering remote working arrangements, changed patterns of hours, flex-time, part-time work, and providing purchased leave, access to two paid volunteer days per year and other arrangements. Flexibility is vital to improving workplace gender equality and the Agency leads by example. The vast majority of staff, including the Executive (81%), engage in flexible working arrangements.

Capability development

The Agency promotes and supports the development of its workforce to ensure the Agency has the capability to respond to the challenges of the changing workplace and deliver the Agency’s strategic priorities.

In 2017-18, a total of $68,943 was spent on training and development activities to develop the capability of our workforce.

Training and development opportunities and enhancement of skills were provided through extension projects, formal training, temporary transfers to higher duties and short-term transfers to other teams. The Agency encouraged employees to attend conferences, seminars and other events, in addition to structured external training. Access was provided to a suite of e-learning courses with in-house seminars held for all employees to promote discussion and increase understanding of issues impacting on gender equality in the workplace.

All employees received targeted training and development, including courses on project management, organisational and management skills, presentation and influencing skills, business intelligence software skills and legislative obligations, ensuring we can provide accurate information, advice and education on reporting compliance matters and gender equality initiatives.

The Agency also continues to support formal study through its Study Assistance Policy with four employees undertaking formal accredited courses.

Staffing and remuneration

The following tables provide a comparison of the Agency’s ongoing and non-ongoing staffing profile as at 30 June 2018 and 30 June 2017. All staff are located in Sydney.

26 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Table 4: Ongoing staff as at 30 June 2018

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 8 1 1 8 0 2 1

APS Level 5 and 6 7 3 1 9 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 16 5 2 19 0 3 1

Note: Includes ongoing staff on secondment.

Table 5: Non-ongoing staff as at 30 June 2018

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

APS Level 5 and 6 2 0 1 1 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 2 0 1 1 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 5 0 2 3 0 2 0

Table 6: Ongoing staff as at 30 June 2017

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 8 1 1 8 0 0 1

APS Level 5 and 6 8 5 2 11 0 3 0

APS Level 2 to 4 1 1 0 2 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 18 7 3 22 0 4 1

Note: Includes ongoing staff on parental leave.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 27

Table 7: Non-ongoing staff as at 30 June 2017

Band F/T P/T Men Women Indigenous

Culturally and linguistically diverse People with a

disability

PEO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 and 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

APS Level 5 and 6 1 1 0 2 0 0 0

APS Level 2 to 4 2 0 0 2 0 1 0

APS Level 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 4 1 0 5 0 2 0

Table 8: Number of staff by APS classification level, type of employment arrangement and salary range

Band

Employee covered

Type of employment arrangement Lower salary ($)

Upper salary ($)

PEO Not applicable

EL 2 5 Collective agreement $118,965 $135,521

EL 1 5 Collective agreement $102,143 $110,223

APS Level 6 8 Collective agreement $78,975 $90,217

APS Level 5 4 Collective agreement $73,293 $77,661

APS Level 4 1 Collective agreement $65,412 $70,996

APS Level 3 2 Collective agreement $59,111 $63,751

APS Level 2 0 Collective agreement $51,940 $57,245

APS Level 1 0 Collective agreement $45,972 $50,541

Total 25

Key: PEO: Principal Executive Officer. Not covered by Enterprise Agreement or Individual Industrial Agreement. EL 1 and 2: Executive Level 1 and 2 APS 1-6: Australian Public Service Levels 1 to 6

28 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Performance pay

Eligible employees who have reached the top of their salary band may receive a bonus payment of 2% if they achieve a performance rating of fully effective or above. Table 9 outlines performance payment information for the 2017 performance cycle.

Table 9: Performance payments to staff during FY 17-18

Band

Number of staff who received performance pay

Aggregate of actual payments

Range

of payments

Average bonus payment

EL2 4 $10,872 $2,710 - $2,710 $2,710

EL1 3 $6,208 $1,799 - $2,204 $2,069

APS Level 6 7 $10,285 $586 - $1,804 $1,469

APS Level 5 3 $3,624 $647 - $1,759 $1,208

APS Level 4- Level 1 1 $1,136 $1,136 -$1,136 $1,136

All staff 18 $35,095

Disability reporting Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, departments and agencies are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first report is available at www.dss.gov.au.

Work health and safety performance The Agency is committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, and meeting its respon-sibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

The Agency has a WH&S Officer to address issues and provide solutions to ensure the health, welfare, safety and wellbeing of staff. The officer consults with stakeholders at all stages of decision-making about WH&S in the workplace.

WH&S is a standing agenda item at all Executive staff meetings and the Agency has a health and safety representative. All staff are required to undertake an annual refresher e-learning module on workplace health and safety.

As part of the induction program, new employees go through informal WH&S training and have an ergonomic assessment of their workstation by an occupational therapist. The Agency also carries out ergonomic workstation assessments for all staff with a remote working arrangement.

The Agency has purchased additional sit-to-stand workstations to support a sit-to-stand work solution in the workplace, maintained a flu vaccination program for all staff and to help support a healthy workplace and introduced trained staff as mental health first aid officers.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 29

Incidents

During the year, the Agency had no incidents or dangerous occurrences that arose from the conduct of its undertakings for which it would have been required to give notice under section 38 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Investigation

The Agency did not undertake any investigations or conduct any tests on any plant, substance or thing in the course of any such investigation. No notices were given to the Agency under sections 191, 195 or 198 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 during the 2017-18 financial year.

Other mandatory information

Purchasing

The Agency ensures that all purchasing is handled in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules as detailed in the Agency’s Accountable Authority Instructions and is in keeping with the principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical use of Commonwealth resources.

The Agency publishes planned procurements on AusTender in accordance with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. AusTender is regularly updated with a record of all procurements in excess of $10,000.

The Agency has access to whole-of-government purchasing arrangements in a range of areas including information and communications technology, travel and accommodation.

Consultants

The Agency adheres to the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and the Accountable Authority Instructions when engaging consultants and entering into contractual arrangements.

During the 2017-18 financial year, the Agency entered into nine new consultancy contracts involving a total expenditure of $171,724.26.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.

Support of small business

The Agency supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

The Agency has not initiated any significant approaches to the market in 2017-18. However, the Agency ensures SMEs are included in the mix of organisations requested to provide quotes for provision of specific goods and services below the relevant procurement threshold. Procurement and contracting processes are frequently reviewed for clarity and ease of engagement. Providers of goods and services are promptly paid.

Compliance

There were no significant issues of non-compliance with Finance law during 2017-18 and therefore no report was made to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act.

Advertising and market research

The Agency made no payments to advertising or market research organisations in 2017-18 which require disclosure under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

Ethical standards

The Agency is committed to the Australian Public Service (APS) Values and Code of Conduct. The Agency staff induction program draws attention to the APS Values and Code of Conduct, and these values are incorporated into the Agency’s daily management and operations.

Information Publication Scheme

Entities subject to the Freedom of Information Act, 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with IPS requirements www.wgea.gov.au.

No requests for information under the FOI Act were made to the Agency in 2017-18.

30 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

The following information is provided in accordance with section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The Agency’s management and staff are committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development. In accordance with government guidelines, the Agency once again participated in Earth Hour.

The Operations team has embedded the following initiatives to minimise the Agency’s environmental impacts:

non-essential lighting and appliances are turned off and sensor devices and timers are used to minimise electricity consumption throughout the office

the Agency uses water-saving facilities to help minimise water consumption

all office equipment conforms to environmental standards and the Agency uses information technology that abides by strict ecologically sustainable development guidelines

all printers are defaulted to print on both sides of the paper. Printer ink cartridges and toners are recycled

the Agency reduces waste generation by recycling paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and metals.

The Agency is a tenant in a non-Commonwealth- owned building, which has a National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) energy rating of 4.5 and a NABERS water rating of 3.5.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 31

Financial statements Independent auditor’s report 32

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager 34

Financial Statements 35

Notes to the Financial Statements 39

32 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Women

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency for the year ended 30 June 2018:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency as at 30 June 2018 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of theWorkplace Gender Equality Agency, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2018 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to the financial statements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and

other explanatory information.

Basis for Opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency the Director is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under that Act. The Director is also responsible for such internal control as the Director determines is necessary to enable the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Director is responsible for assessing the Workplace Gender Equality Agency’s ability to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. TheWorkplace Gender Equality Agency is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 33

Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

• obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control;

• evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;

• conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and

• evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Clea Lewis Executive Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra 10 September 2018

34 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Statement by the Director and Operations Executive Manager

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2018 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Workplace Gender Equality Agency will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Libby Lyons

Director 7 September 2018

Anne Beath

Operations Executive Manager 7 September 2018

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 35

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2018

Notes

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Original Budget ($)

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits (a) 3A 3,054,582 3,119,516 3,520,000

Suppliers (b) 3B 1,947,985 1,845,838 1,478,000

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 933,574 985,184 882,000

Finance costs - unwinding of discount 2,234 - 10,000

Total expenses 5,938,375 5,950,538 5,890,000

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Rendering of services (c) 4A 87,750 66,550 100,000

Other revenue 4B 46,600 54,100 33,000

Total own-source income 134,350 120,650 133,000

Gains

Gain on make good (d) 4C 335,729 - -

Total gains 335,729 - -

Loss on disposal 4D 3,027 121 -

3,027 121 -

Net cost of services 5,471,323 5,830,009 5,757,000

Revenue from Government 4E 4,875,000 4,891,000 4,875,000

Total comprehensive loss 3C (596,323) (939,009) (882,000)

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be ‘major’ when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a. Employee Benefits - the underspend is due to staff turnover and delay in recruitment.

b. Suppliers - the overspend was funded by the underspend on employees' benefits. This includes use of short term contractors to support backfall delays and deliver on projects.

c. Rendering of Services - this item varies with the number of applicants for Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation and the level of in-kind support received by the WGEA.

d. Gain on make good - the provision for make good is derecognised as the premises is made good and provision reversal is recognised in the Profit and Loss statement. We have remained on same premises but with reduced footprint.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Statements

36 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Financial Statements (continued) Workplace Gender Equality Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2018

Notes

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Original Budget ($)

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 180,719 217,060 220,000

Trade and other receivables (a) 6B 781,334 942,958 705,000

Total financial assets 962,053 1,160,018 925,000

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements (b) 7 231,178 88,234 -

Plant and equipment 7 32,315 92,991 55,000

Intangibles (c) 7 645,650 1,276,822 787,000

Other non-financial assets - prepayments 4,592 6,344 3,000

Total non-financial assets 913,735 1,464,391 845,000

Total assets 1,875,787 2,624,409 1,770,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 8A 89,085 273,083 77,000

Other payables 8B 43,096 46,499 67,000

Total payables 132,181 319,582 144,000

Provisions

Employee provisions 9A 600,164 542,997 528,000

Provision for restoration obligation (d) 9B 189,310 412,375 412,000

Total provisions 789,474 955,372 940,000

Total liabilities 921,655 1,274,954 1,084,000

Net assets 954,132 1,349,455 686,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity (a) 4,251,000 4,050,000 4,251,000

Accumulated deficit (3,296,868) (2,700,545) (3,565,000)

Total equity 954,132 1,349,455 686,000

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be ‘major’ when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a. Trade and other receivables - comprised mainly of unspent appropriations.

b. Leasehold improvement - Recognition of make good provision for a new lease.

c. Intangibles - software development was less than originally planned.

d. Provision for restoration obligation - provision for the makegood provision for a new lease is recognised.

e. Departmental capital budget $201,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 37

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Statement of Changes in Equity as at 30 June 2018

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Original Budget ($)

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance 4,050,000 3,856,000 4,050,000

Departmental capital budget 201,000 194,000 201,000

Total transactions with owners 201,000 194,000 201,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 4,251,000 4,050,000 4,251,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance (2,700,545) (1,761,536) (2,683,000)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (a) (596,323) (939,009) (882,000)

Total comprehensive income (596,323) (939,009) (882,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June (3,296,868) (2,700,545) (3,565,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June 954,132 1,349,455 686,000

Budget variances

a. The $285,677 reduction in deficit for the period has been explained at the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

38 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Financial Statements (continued) Workplace Gender Equality Agency Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018

Notes

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Original Budget ($)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 5,042,000 4,639,425 5,069,000

Section 74 (a) 178,452 121,753 -

Sales of goods and rendering of services 96,470 73,051 100,000

Net GST received (b) 172,657 167,899 -

Other - 36,356 -

Total cash received 5,489,579 5,038,484 5,169,000

Cash used

Employees (c) 3,002,597 3,107,769 3,520,000

Suppliers (c) 2,345,250 2,013,064 1,649,000

Section 74 (a) 178,452 121,753 -

Total cash used 5,526,299 5,242,586 5,169,000

Net cash from operating activities (36,720) (204,101) -

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of plant and equipment 15,481 11,254 -

Purchase of leasehold improvement 75,372 - -

Purchase of intangibles 109,767 181,577 201,000

Total cash used 200,620 192,831 201,000

Net cash (used) by investing activities (200,620) (192,831) (201,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Departmental Capital Budget 201,000 194,017 201,000

201,000 194,017 201,000

Net cash from financing activities 201,000 194,017 201,000

Net decrease in cash held (36,340) (202,915) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 217,060 419,975 220,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 180,720 217,060 220,000

Budget variances

Variances are considered to be 'major' when the difference is greater than 10% or more than $50,000 or a lesser amount if pertinent to the understanding of the financial statements.

a. Section 74 receipts and expenses - not included in budget.

b. Net GST received - not included in budget.

c. Employees and Suppliers - reflects the variance in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 39

Note 1: Overview

1.1 Objectives of the Workplace Gender

Equality Agency

The Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity.

WGEA is chartered through the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 with both regulatory and educative functions and responsibilities.

The continued existence of the Agency in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the WGEA’s administration and programs.

The WGEA’s outcome is to promote and improve gender equality in Australian workplaces including through the provision of advice and assistance to employers and the assessment and measurement of workplace gender data. The WGEA has only one outcome.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by Section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2015; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar.

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgments and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the WGEA has not identified accounting assumptions or estimates that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the entity’s financial statements.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

AASB 9 Financial Instruments will apply from 2018-19. Financial assets and liabilities are currently carried at the present value of expected future cash flows based upon the incurred loss model. There is minimal exposure to credit risk and an initial assessment indicates that the effect of the standard and move to the expected loss model will not have a material impact on the financial statements.

The WGEA will apply AASB 16 Leases from 2019-20. The standard will require the net present value of payments under most operating leases to be recognised as assets and liabilities for the period an Agency has the right to use an asset including optional periods when it is reasonably certain to extend a lease. WGEA has signed a lease agreement for the term of 5 years, commencing January 2018 and ending December 2022. An initial assessment indicates that the implementation of the standard will have a substantial impact on the financial statements. There will also be change to the expense character (rent expenses replaced with depreciation and interest expenses).

The WGEA will apply AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers from 2019-20. The standard requires revenue from such contracts to be recognised as the entity transfers goods and services to the customer. A detailed assessment is yet to be undertaken, however, based on a preliminary assessment, the standard is not expected to have a material impact on the transactions and balances recognised in the financial statements.

Notes to the Financial Statements

40 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

AASB 1058 Income of Not-for-Profit Entities will apply from 2019-20. The requirements of AASB 1058 more closely reflect the economic reality of NFP entity transactions that are not contracts with customers (as defined in AASB 15). The timing of income recognition depends on whether such a transaction gives rise to liability or other performance obligation (a promise to transfer a good or service), or a contribution by owners, related to an asset (such as cash or another asset) received by an entity. An initial assessment indicates that the effect of the standard will not have a material impact on the financial statements.

1.5 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

The WGEA had no contingent assets and liabilities (2017: nil).

1.6 Taxation

The WGEA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except: a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office;

and

b) for receivables and payables.

1.7 Comparative changes

Where required by accounting standards comparative figures have been adjusted to conform with changes to presentation for the current financial year. Expenses disclosed in note 3 were reviewed and reclassified where appropriate to better represent the nature of expenditure.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period There are no events after the reporting period which require disclosure.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 41

Note 3: Expenses

Note 3A: Employee Benefits

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Wages and salaries 2,309,008 2,446,641

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 317,245 319,504

Defined benefit plans 105,748 106,501

Leave and other entitlements 278,778 239,308

Other employee expenses 43,803 7,562

Total employee benefits 3,054,582 3,119,516

Refer to note 9A for accounting policies related to Employee Benefits

Note 3B: Suppliers

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Goods and services

Consultants and contractors 223,573 199,215

IT and office equipment 719,902 649,446

Travel related 146,873 118,525

Printing, stationery and publications 73,593 74,158

Minimum operating lease payments 399,994 379,544

Other Building related cost 200,481 218,371

Workers Compensation Expenses 6,968 10,563

Audit, legal, subscription, training and insurance 132,420 135,650

Other 44,181 60,366

Total goods and services 1,947,985 1,845,838

Goods and services are made up of:

Provision of goods 130,783 129,020

Rendering of services 1,817,202 1,326,710

Total goods and services 1,947,985 1,455,730

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

Within 1 year 430,213 233,119

Between 1 to 5 years 1,671,533 -

Total operating lease commitments 2,101,746 233,119

42 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 3: Expenses (continued)

Leasing commitments

Lease payments are subject to an increase of 4% per annum as per the lease agreement which is for a 5 year term with no option to extend and will expire in December 2022.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Depreciation:

Leasehold improvements 119,504 227,518

Plant and equipment 73,131 98,574

Total depreciation 192,635 326,092

Amortisation:

Intangibles 740,939 659,092

Total depreciation and amortisation 933,574 985,184

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 43

Note 4: Income

Note 4A: Rendering of Services

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Rendering of services 87,750 66,550

Total 87,750 66,550

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to services performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed.

Note 4B: Other Revenue

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Resources received free of charge

Related entities - Auditor's remuneration 37,000 37,000

External entities - in-kind support 9,600 17,100

Total 46,600 54,100

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature. Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Note 4C: Gains

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Gain on make good 335,729 -

Total 335,729 -

Note 4D: Loss on disposal

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Loss on asset disposal 3,027 121

Total 3,027 121

44 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Note 4: Income (continued)

Note 4E: Revenue from Government

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Appropriations:

Departmental appropriation 4,875,000 4,891,000

Total revenue from Government 4,875,000 4,891,000

Amounts appropriated for departmental outputs for the year (adjusted to reflect formal additions, reductions and restructures) are recognised as revenue from government when the Agency gains control of the appropriation.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts (note 6B refers).

Amounts appropriated which are designated as equity injections (less any formal reductions) and the departmental capital budget are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year (statement of changes in equity refers).

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 45

Note 5: Fair Value Measurement The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below. WGEA deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements, Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Category

(Level 1, 2 or 3)

Valuation techniques1

Non-financial assets:

Leasehold improvements 231,178 88,234 Level 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Plant and equipment 32,315 92,991 Level 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Total non-financial assets 263,493 181,225

1 All non-financial assets were measured at fair value in the statement of financial position.

The highest and best use of all non-financial assets are the same as their current use. There has been no change in valuation technique during the year. Management has used current replacement cost which reflects depreciated cost price on the basis that leasehold improvements and plant and equipment is less than four years old. Depreciation is calculated using standard rates.

A review is undertaken by management at least yearly. There were no transfers between different levels.

46 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 6: Financial Assets

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Cash on hand or on deposit 180,719 217,060

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount and is held with the Reserve Bank of Australia in a current account.

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Services 4,705 -

Appropriations receivable for existing programmes 745,000 912,000

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 31,629 30,958

Total trade and other receivables (net) 781,334 942,958

Receivables are expected to be recovered within 12 months and are not overdue. Credit terms are net 30 days (2017: 30 days).

Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment and carrying value of receivables approximates fair value. Receivables are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Appropriations receivable are undrawn appropriations controlled by the Agency but held in the Official Public Account under the Government's just in time drawdown arrangements.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments and that are not quoted in an active market are classified as 'loans and receivables'.

Categories of Financial Instruments

Notes

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 180,719 217,060

Trade and other receivables 6B 4,705 -

Carrying amount of financial assets 185,424 217,060

The net fair values of the financial instruments approximate their carrying amounts.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 47

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment during the current year.

Note 7: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2017-18) Intangibles

($)

Leasehold improvements ($)

Plant and equipment ($)

Total ($)

As at 1 July 2017

Gross book value 2,813,770 1,138,352 484,942 4,437,065

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (1,536,948) (1,050,118) (391,951) (2,979,017)

Net book value 1 July 2017 1,276,822 88,234 92,991 1,458,048

Additions by purchase 109,767 75,372 15,481 200,620

Make good provision - 187,076 - 187,076

Disposal of asset - (1,138,354) (15,547) (1,153,901)

Disposal (accumulated depreciation) - 1,138,354 12,521 1,150,875

Depreciation expense (740,939) (119,504) (73,131) (933,574)

Net book value 30 June 2018 645,650 231,178 32,315 909,144

As at 30 June 2018

Gross book value 2,923,537 262,447 484,876 3,670,860

Accumulated depreciation (2,277,887) (31,268) (452,561) (2,761,716)

Net book value 30 June 2018 645,650 231,178 32,315 909,144

Acquisition of Assets

Purchases of non-financial assets are initially recognised at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000 (2017: $2,000), which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken.

Property, Plant and Equipment

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements and plant and equipment are carried at fair value. Carrying amounts are reviewed every year to determine if an independent valuation is required. The regularity of independent valuations depend upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increments are credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit.

Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Upon revaluation, any accumulated depreciation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated below. An independent valuer (RHAS) conducted the revaluations as at 30 June 2015. There was no increment or decrement to be recognised.

48 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (continued)

Depreciation

Depreciable plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Agency, using in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvement or the lease term.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2018 2017

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Plant and equipment 3 to 9 years 3 to 9 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2018. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment during the current year.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

The Agency's intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Agency's software are 5 years (2017: 5 years)

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2018.

Impairment tests were carried out during the year which resulted in no assets being impaired (2017: Nil).

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 49

Note 8: Payables

Note 8A: Suppliers

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Trade creditors 29,939 100,723

Accruals 59,146 172,360

Total supplier payables 89,085 273,083

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Note 8B: Other Payables

Salaries and wages 18,679 18,823

Superannuation 5,189 5,522

Fixed lease increase 19,228 22,154

Total other payables 43,096 46,499

Total other payables are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 43,096 46,499

More than 12 months - -

Total other payables 43,096 46,499

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon 'trade date'.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised amounts. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received, even if they have not yet been invoiced. Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

The net fair values of the financial instruments approximate their carrying amounts.

50 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 9: Provisions

Note 9A: Employee Provisions

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Leave - no more than 12 months 433,291 362,545

Leave - more than 12 months 166,873 180,452

Total employee provisions 600,164 542,997

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the entity is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the entity’s employer superannuation contribution rates, to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

Employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

The majority of the Agency's staff are members of the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or other schemes administered by the Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation (CSC).

The PSS is a defined benefit scheme for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance's administered schedules and notes.

The Agency makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation schemes at rates determined by the Entity's Enterprise Agreement. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 51

Note 9: Provisions (continued)

Note 9B: Provision for restoration obligation

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Obligation - more than 12 months 189,310 412,375

Total other provisions 189,310 412,375

Provision for restoration ($)

Carrying amount 1 July 2017 412,375

Make good for return of office space (76,646)

Decommissioning of make good provision (335,729)

Recognition of make good provision new lease 187,076

Unwinding of the discount 2,234

Closing balance 30 June 2018 189,310

The Agency currently has an agreement (2017: one) for the leasing of premises which has a provision requiring the Agency to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The Agency has made a provision to reflect the value of this obligation.

52 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Note 10 A: Key Management Personnel Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. The WGEA has determined, in accordance with AASB 124, that the WGEA Director, is the only position to meet the definition of Key Management Personnel. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Short-term employee benefits 228,642 221,500

Post-employment benefits 29,052 22,143

Other long-term employee benefits 24,776 24,950

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 282,470 268,593

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table is 1 (2017:1).

1 The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the entity.

Note 10 B: Related party relationships There are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 53

Note 11: Appropriations

Table A: Annual Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual Appropriations for 2018 Annual appropriation ($)

Adjustments to Appropriationb ($)

Total

appropriation ($)

Appropriation applied (current and prior years) ($)

Variancec ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

Ordinary annual services 4,875,000 87,750 4,962,750 5,166,471 (203,721)

Capital Budgeta 201,000 - 201,000 200,620 380

Total departmental 5,076,000 87,750 5,163,750 5,367,091 (203,341)

Annual Appropriations for 2017

Total

appropriation ($)

Adjustments to Appropriation ($)

Total

appropriation ($)

Appropriation applied (current and prior years) ($)

Variance ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

Ordinary annual services 4,891,000 121,753 5,012,753 5,070,709 (57,956)

Capital Budgeta 194,000 - 194,000 192,831 1,169

Total departmental 5,085,000 121,753 5,206,753 5,263,539 (56,787)

Notes

(a) Departmental and Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

(b) These adjustments comprise PGPA Act Section 74 receipts.

(c) Variance reflects the movement in the cash held and the appropriation receivable over the year.

54 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Table B: Unspent Annual Appropriations (‘Recoverable GST exclusive’)

Authority

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

DEPARTMENTAL

2016-17 Appropriation Act 1 - 912,000

2017-18 Appropriation Act 1 745,000 -

Cash and cash equivalents 180,719 217,060

Total 925,719 1,129,060

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 55

Appendices Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations 56

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 2017-18 61

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors 62

Appendix 4: List of requirements 66

Alphabetical index 71

56 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Appendix 1: Non-compliant organisations

The following is a list of organisations that have been assessed as not complying with the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012. Non-compliant organisations may not be eligible to tender for contracts under Commonwealth and some state procurement frameworks, and may not be eligible for some Commonwealth grants or other financial assistance.

This list was correct at time of printing. An up-to-date list of non-compliant organisations is available on the Agency’s website.

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting entity)

Aboriginal Legal Services NSW/ACT Limited

AI Topper & Co Pty Ltd

Air Affairs (Australia) Pty Ltd

Alimfresh Pty Ltd

Altova Trading Unit Trust

Aquatec Maxcon Group Ltd

Atlas Steels Pty Ltd Atlas Steels

Australian Commercial Catering Pty Ltd

Australian Community Support Organisation Ltd ACSO

Australian Country Spinners Pty Ltd ACS Nominees Pty Ltd

Australian United Retailers Limited FoodWorks

Bays Care Settlement

Berri Hotel Incorporated Berri Resort Hotel

Bindaree Beef Pty Limited Bindaree Beef

Bing Lee Electrics Pty Ltd

Borg Corporate Property Services Pty Ltd

Bowling Centres Australia Pty Ltd ZONE BOWLING Teeg Bidco Pty Ltd

Bretts Pty Limited Nutting Investments Pty Ltd

Brierty Limited

Caelli Constructions (Vic) Pty Ltd B. & P. Caelli Holdings Pty Limited

Cantarella Bros Pty Ltd

Vittoria Food & Beverage Vittoria Coffee

Capiteq Limited Airnorth Regional

Carlson Wagonlit Australia Pty Ltd Carlson Wagonlit Travel

Casual Dining Concepts (Trading) Pty Limited Bondi Pizza Bar and Grill

City Tattersalls Club

Cleary Bros (Bombo) Pty Ltd Cleary Bros Bombo Holdings Pty. Limited

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 57

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting entity)

Cordina Chicken Farms Pty Ltd J. Cordina Investments Pty Ltd

Create Consultants Pty Ltd Create Catering

Dome Coffees Australia Pty Ltd Dome Cafe Be Our Guest Holdings Pty Ltd

Dunn & Farrugia Pty Limited

E & A Limited

E Group Security Pty Ltd E Group Security

E. C. Birch Proprietary Ltd Birch Haberdashery and Craft

ECL Group Australia Pty Ltd ECL Group

EFM Logistics Services Group Pty Ltd efm Logistics Freight Management Holdings Pty Ltd

ELB Pty Ltd ELB Pty Ltd

Enirgi Metal Group Pty Ltd Ramcar Australia And New Zealand

Ensign Laboratories Proprietary Limited

EVZ Limited

F. R. Ireland Pty Ltd Irelands of Cairns

Fenner Dunlop Australia Pty Ltd

Fenner Dunlop Engineered Conveyor Solutions Fenner Dunlop Australia Pty Ltd

Ferrero Australia Pty Ltd

Fircroft Australia Pty Ltd Fircroft

Focus on Furniture Pty Ltd

Focus on Hire & Commercial Focus on Furniture and Bedding Focus on Sleep Melbourne Furniture Depot Focus on Furniture

Form 700 Pty Ltd Form 700 Holdings Pty Ltd

Gemcraft Australia Pty Ltd

General Mills Australia Pty Ltd

General Mills Holdings (Australia) Pty Ltd

Geraldton Fishermen's Co-operative Ltd

Go HQ Pty Ltd Go Health Clubs

Gowrie NSW

Healthy Life Resources Pty Limited Healthy Life Holdings Pty Limited

Hillgrove Resources Limited Hillgrove Resources

Hindmarsh Corporate Pty Ltd Atf The Hindmarsh Corporate Unit Trust

Hallmark Management Pty Ltd Atf The Federation Settlement Trust

Hosking's Jewellers Pty Ltd

Hospitality Employment Pty Ltd Nicks Restaurant Group

IMCD Australia Limited IMCD Australasia Pty Ltd

Inspired Management Pty Ltd

58 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting entity)

Janagrom Nominees Pty Ltd

JMR Management Consultancy Services Pty Ltd

JSPHR Pty Ltd Jirsch Sutherland Insolvency Solutions

Kamb Investments Pty Ltd Kambo's Homemaker Superstore

Kelly Family Trust McDonald's Kew

Kellyco Restaurants Pty Ltd

McDonald's Chapel Street McDonald's Elsternwick McDonald's Malvern East McDonald's Ormond McDonald's St Kilda Road McDonald's Holmesglen

Kennards Storage Management Pty Ltd Kennards Self Storage

Leading Staff Pty Ltd

Heather Hill Nursing Agency Heather Hill Pathways Heather Hill Home Care

Madill No 1 Pty Ltd

Maintenance Systems Solutions Pty Ltd

Manly Cove Unit Trust TMG Developments Pty Limited Manly Cove Unit Trust

Marist Youth Care Limited Marist180

Meriton Property Services Pty Limited Meriton Serviced Apartments Meriton Property Services Pty Limited

MHG Plastic Industries (VIC) Pty Ltd

MiniMovers Pty. Ltd.

Mittagong RSL Club Ltd Mittagong RSL Club

Monjon (Australia) Pty Ltd

Moreton Hire Pty Ltd

Mountain Designs Pty Ltd Mountain Designs

National Pump & Energy Ltd National Pump & Energy

Navia Logistics Pty Ltd

Nepean Engineering & Innovation Pty Ltd Nepean No1 Pty Ltd

NOV Australia Pty Ltd

NQR Pty Ltd NQR Grocery Clearance Stores

Nursing Group Pty Ltd

The Casey College Lifestyle Directions Counselling

Ocean Capital Pty Ltd

Ostwald Bros Pty Ltd Ostwald Bros

Pathnorth Settlement

Pathways Health Group

PEBMAC Pty Ltd QLD Frozen Food Services (QFFS)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 59

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting entity)

Peter Stevens Motorcycle Retail Business Trust

Port Hunter Conveyors Pty Limited

Pressed Juices Pty Ltd

Pronto Software Pty Ltd

Reading Entertainment Australia Pty Limited

Rohanna Pty Ltd Atf The Skippers Unit Trust John Hughes Group

Romaly Holdings Pty Ltd Jim Pearson Transport

Savanna Energy Services Pty Ltd Savanna Energy Services

SCECGS Redlands Limited

Solstadfarstad Pty Ltd

Southgate Hotel Management Pty Ltd The Langham, Melbourne Langham Hospitality Group

Sparfacts Pty Ltd

Srimap Pty. Limited Zenith Hospitality Staffing Solutions

Superior Food Group Pty Ltd SFG Group Holdings Pty Ltd

Tasmanian Freight Services Pty. Ltd. Tas Freight

Tasmanian Redline Coaches Pty. Ltd. Tasmania's Own Redline

Temperzone Australia Pty Ltd

The Lester Partnership Pty Limited Lester Associates Ayers Management Pty Ltd

The Trustee for Barbagallo Investments Trust Barbagallo

The Trustee for Breakwater Island Trust The Ville Resort-Casino The Trustee For Colonial & Empire Brewing Trust

The Trustee for C&F Commercial Discretionary Trust Pauls Warehouse

The Trustee For Laurent Bakery Unit Trust Laurent Bakery Pty Ltd

The Trustee for Marks Family Trust Marks Group Industries

The Trustee For Success Venture WA Unit Trust Pan Pacific Perth

The Trustee for T H E Discretionary Trust Oscars Hotels Pty Ltd

The Trustee For The AMCO Flinders Trust & The Trustee For The Flinders Trust Hotel Lindrum Manly Cove Unit Trust

The trustee for The Polaris Media Trust Polaris Media Pty Ltd trading as The Australian Jewish News Manly Cove Unit Trust

The Trustee for Ziday-Vom Family Trust

McDonald's Restaurant Diamond Creek McDonald's Restaurant Eltham McDonald's Restaurant Greensborough McDonald's Restaurant Greensborough Plaza

Vomday Pty Ltd

The View Hotels North Sydney Pty Ltd North Sydney Harbourview Hotel

The Westhaven Association The Westhaven Association

60 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Legal name of reporting entity

Business/trading names of reporting entity (where different to legal name)

Ultimate parent of reporting entity (where different to reporting entity)

Versent Pty Ltd

Viadux Pty Ltd Reece Limited

Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics AS Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics

Weatherford Australia Pty Limited

Whittens Pty Ltd Whittens Whittens Group Pty Ltd

XYZ Security Services Pty Ltd Advent Security Services (Victoria)

YMCA Of Canberra Inc YMCA Canberra

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 61

Appendix 2: WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders 2017-18 Accenture Australia Pty Ltd AECOM Australia Pty Ltd Alcoa of Australia Limited Allens Allianz Services Pty Limited American Express Australia Limited AMP Arc @ UNSW Arcadis Australia Pacific Pty Ltd Arup Pty Ltd Ashurst Australia ASX Limited Aurecon Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Australian Catholic University Limited AustralianSuper Avanade Australia Pty Ltd B & McK Services Trust Baker McKenzie Bankwest Baxter Healthcare Pty Ltd Becton Dickinson Pty Ltd Benetas BP Australia Brightside Caltex Australia Limited carsales.com Ltd Cbus Super Challenger Limited Clayton Utz Cognizant Technology Solutions Australia Commonwealth Bank of Australia Corrs Chambers Westgarth Credit Union Australia Ltd Curtin University Deakin University Deloitte Australia Dexus DLA Piper Australia Dow Chemical (Australia) Pty. Ltd Edith Cowan University

Ernst & Young Services Trust Pty Ltd First State Super Genworth GHD Gilbert + Tobin GM Holden The GPT Group Griffith University HESTA Herbert Smith Freehills Holding Redlich HSBC Bank Australia Jacobs Group (Australia) Pty Ltd Johnson & Johnson K&L Gates King & Wood Mallesons Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia Pty Ltd KPMG Australia La Trobe University Lauriston Girls' School The Law Society of New South Wales Lendlease Corporation Limited Little Company of Mary Healthcare Limited Lion Maddocks Maurice Blackburn McCullough Robertson Lawyers McKinsey & Company Medibank Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Australia Pty Ltd Mercedes-Benz Australia Pacific Pty Ltd Mercy Health MinterEllison Mirvac Limited Monash University MSD My Pathway National Australia Bank Limited Norton Rose Fulbright Australia

Origin Energy Limited Palace Cinemas Peoplebank Australia Ltd PepsiCo Perpetual Ltd Philip Morris Limited Philips Electronics Australia Limited PPG Industries PwC Australia Queensland Country Credit Union Limited Queensland University of Technology RB (Australia) Pty Ltd RMIT University Russell Kennedy Lawyers SAP Australia Pty Ltd Scentre Group St Barbara Limited Stockland Suncorp Group Limited Swinburne University of Technology Tabcorp Assets Pty Ltd TAL Teachers Health Teachers Mutual Bank Limited Telstra Corporation Limited The University of Newcastle YWCA Canberra ThoughtWorks Australia Pty Ltd Transurban Limited UBS AG, Australia Branch Unilever Australia Ltd University of Canberra University of Southern Queensland University of Technology Sydney University of Wollongong UOW Enterprises Viva Energy Australia Pty Ltd VMWare Australia Pty Ltd Western Sydney University Westpac Group

62 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors

Peter Acheson CEO, Peoplebank Australia Limited

Jeff Adams CEO, Metcash Trading Ltd

Peter Allen CEO, Scentre Group

David Atkin CEO, Cbus

Ryan Atkins Director, Board Member Australia and New Zealand, Philips

Joe Barr CEO, John Holland Group Pty Ltd

Monica Barone CEO, City of Sydney

Greg Barsby Managing Director, QinetiQ

Andrew Bassat CEO and Co-Founder, SEEK Limited

Todd Battley Chief Executive, AECOM Australia New Zealand

Martin Bean Vice Chancellor, RMIT University

Brian Benari Managing Director and CEO, Challenger

Jason Beutel CEO, Robert Bird Group

Debby Blakey CEO, HESTA

Martin Bowles National CEO, Calvary Health Care

Colin Brookes Managing Director and President for ANZ, SAP Australia

Chris Brown Managing Director and Chief STrategy Officer, Dixon Advisory Australia

Michael Cameron CEO and Managing Director, Suncorp

Jonathan Callaghan CEO, Investa Property Group

Professor Steve Chapman Vice-Chancellor, Edith Cowan University

Scott Charlton CEO, Transurban

Brett Clark CEO and Managing Director, TAL Group

Stephen Conry CEO, JLL

Dr David Cooke Managing Director, Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia Pty Ltd

Adj Prof Stephen Cornelissen Group CEO, Mercy Health

Berkeley Cox Chief Executive Partner, Australia, King & Wood Mallesons

William Cox Managing Director, Australia and New Zealand, Aurecon.

Greg Craven Vice-Chancellor and President, Australian Catholic University

Nick Crennan Managing Partner, Colin Biggers & Paisley

Frances Crimmins Executive Director, YWCA Canberra

Steven Crutchfield Vice President and Managing Director, Motorola

Mike Culhane Co Group CEO, Pepper Group Ltd

Doug Cunningham Managing Director, Johnson & Johnson Pacific

Robert Cutler Chief Executive Partner, Clayton Utz

Jane den Hollander Vice-Chancellor, Deakin University

Professor John Dewar Vice-Chancellor, La Trobe University

Alister Dias Vice President & Managing Director, VMware

Michelle Dixon CEO, Maddocks

Craig Drummond Managing Director and CEO, Medibank

Phil Duthie General Manager Australia, GHD Pty Ltd

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 63

Robert Easton Chairman and Senior Managing Director, Accenture Australia and New Zealand

Gary Edstein Senior Vice President, DHL Express Australia

Riad El-Dada Managing Director and Vice President, ANZ, MSD Australia

Tracey Fellows CEO, REA Group

Ange Ferguson Managing Director, Thoughtworks

Anthony Foley National Managing Partner, Baker & McKenzie

Joe Forbes Managing Director and Co-founder, Biarri Networks

Gavin Fox-Smith Managing Director, Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices

Damien Frawley CEO, QIC

Professor Margaret Gardner AO Vice-Chancellor and President, Monash University

Danny Gilbert Managing Partner, Gilbert + Tobin

Sue Gilchrist Regional Managing Partner - Asia and Australia, Herbert Smith Freehills

Paul Gleeson Managing Director, Russell Kennedy Lawyers

Professor Barney Glover Vice Chancellor, Western Sydney University

Rob Goudswaard CEO, CUA

Bruce Goodwin Managing Director, Janssen

Michael Greene Deputy Managing Partner, Norton Rose Fulbright

Andrew Harding Managing Director and CEO, Aurizon

David Harrison Managing Director and Group CEO, Charter Hall

Brian Hartzer Managing Director and CEO, Westpac Group

Grant Scott-Hayward CEO, Gadens - Melbourne

Greg Heylen CEO, BGC Contracting

Patrick Hill Senior Vice President and General Manager - Asia Pacific, Jacobs Group (Australia)

Sandra Hills CEO, Anglican Aged Care Services (Benetas)

Jim Holding Co-Managing Partner, DLA Piper

Andy Holmes President, BP Australia and New Zealand

John Hoffman CEO, Altis Consulting

Cindy Hook CEO, Deloitte

Guy Humble Former Managing Partner, McCullough Robertson

Greg Hywood CEO and Managing Director, Fairfax

Stuart Irvine CEO, Lion

Paul Jenkins Managing Partner, Ashurst Australia

Tony Johnson CEO and Regional Managing Partner Oceania, EY

Bob Johnston CEO and Managing Director, GPT Group

Colin Kelton Managing Director Vanguard

Sue Kench Global Managing Partner, King & Wood Mallesons

John Kirkwood Managing Director and CEO, Seymour Whyte Group

Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz CEO and Managing Director, Mirvac

John Lydon Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company

Professor Geraldine Mackenzie Vice-Chancellor, University of Southern Queensland

Gavin MacLaren CEO, Corrs Chambers Westgarth

64 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Marisa Mastroianni Group CEO, UOW College

Steve McCann CEO and Managing Director, Lendlease

Julian McGrath Managing Director, Law In Order

Cameron McIntyre Managing Director and CEO, Carsales.com Ltd

Alison Monroe Director of RiseSmart Australia, NZ and Singapore

Martin Moore CEO, CS Energy

Ken Morrison CEO, Property Council of Australia

Bill Morrow CEO, NBN Co

Rafa Moyano CEO, Adecco Group

John Mullen Chairman Telstra

Rowan Munchenberg Managing Director, Bankwest

Georgette Nicholas CEO, Genworth Financial Mortgage Insurance Pty Ltd

Natasha Norton CEO, Accuteque

Professor Ian O’Connor Vice Chancellor, Griffith University

Cathal O'Rourke Managing Director, Laing O'Rourke Australia

Michael Parker Chairman and Managing Director of Alcoa of Australia

Rodrigo Pizarro Managing Director, L'Oreal Australia

Andrew Ransley General Manager Asia Pacific, Caterpillar of Australia Pty Ltd

Tim Reed CEO, MYOB

Faith Rees CEO, SixPivot

Frank Ribuout CEO, Randstad Australia

Luke Sayers CEO, PwC

Carol Schwartz Non-executive Director of Stockland, board member of the Reserve Bank of Australia

Prof. Brian Schmidt Vice-Chancellor, Australian National University

Mark Sewell CEO, Warrigal

Ian Silk Chief Executive, AustralianSuper

Tracey Slatter Managing Director, Barwon Water

Mike Smith Former CEO, ANZ

Wayne Spanner Managing Partner, Norton Rose Fulbright Australia

Paul Spiro Chairman and Partner, Gadens - Brisbane

Richard Spurio Managing Partner, Allens

Mark Steinert Managing Director and CEO, Stockland Property Group

Clive Stiff CEO, Unilever Australia and New Zealand

Darren Steinberg CEO, Dexus

Greg Steele CEO, Arcadis Australia Pacific

Rachel Stocks Managing Director, American Express Australia and New Zealand

Jon Stretch Managing Director and CEO, ERM Power Ltd

Paul Synnott CEO, My Pathway

Ümit Subasi President, Asia Pacific, Arnott’s

Jon Sutton Managing Director and CEO, Bank of Queensland

Guy Templeton President and CEO WSP Australia and New Zealand

Professor Deborah Terry Vice-Chancellor, Curtin University

Appendix 3: Pay Equity Ambassadors (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 65

David Thodey Former CEO, Telstra, Chairman CSIRO

Andrew Thorburn Group CEO, NAB

Martin Tricaud CEO, HSBC Australia

Paul Tully CEO, McInnes Wilson Lawyers

Melinda Upton Co-Managing Partner, DLA Piper

Andrew Vann Vice-chancellor, Charles Sturt University

Jacob Varghese CEO, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers

Bob Vassie Managing Director and CEO, St Barbara

Andrew Vesey Managing Director and CEO, AGL Energy

Louis A Vega President Australia and New Zealand and Vice President, Olympic and Sports Solutions, DOW Chemical Australia

Ben Walsh Managing Director Mercer Australia & NZ, CEO Australia, Mercer.

Chris Ward Managing Partner, Cooper Grace Ward Lawyers

Alison Watts Chief Executive, HOBAN Recruitment

Professor Paul Wellings CBE Vice-Chancellor, University of Wollongong

Gary Wingrove CEO, KPMG

Ben Wood Managing Director, Clicks IT Recruitment

Scott Wyatt CEO, Viva Energy

David Zehner Managing Partner, Bain & Company Australia

66 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Appendix 4: List of requirements

The Agency must provide certain information in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports for Departments, Executive Agencies and other non-corporate Commonwealth Entities issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet in June 2015. Below is a list of where this information is located.

Area Page

Letter of transmittal 1

Table of contents 3

Index 71

Glossary 4

Contact officer Inside cover

Internet addresses and internet address for report Inside cover

Review by accountable authority

Review by Director 6

Overview of the entity

A description of the role and functions of the entity. 12

A description of the organisational structure of the entity. 14

A description of the outcomes and programs administered by the entity. 16

A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. 12

An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. N/A

Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

N/A

Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the PGPA Act and section 16F of the Rule. 16

Report on Financial Performance

A discussion and analysis of the entity’s Financial Performance. 19

A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. 19

If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

N/A

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 67

Area Page

Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). 1, 24

A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. 1

A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

1

A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

1

An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

24

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

29

External Scrutiny

Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny. 24

Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

N/A

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the PGPA Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

N/A

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. N/A

68 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Area Page

Management of Human Resources

An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. 24

Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following: 26

Statistics on staffing classification level;

Statistics on full-time employees;

Statistics on part-time employees;

Statistics on gender;

Statistics on staff location;

Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous

Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999. 25

Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AD(4)(c). N/A

The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. 27

A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. 25

Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. 28

Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. 28

Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. 28

Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. 28

Assets Management

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities. N/A

Appendix 4: List of requirements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 69

Area Page

Purchasing

An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. 29

Consultants

A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

29

A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

29

A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged. 29

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

29

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

N/A

Exempt contracts

If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

N/A

70 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

Area Page

Small business

A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

29

An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. 29

If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature — a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

N/A

Financial Statements

Inclusion of the annual Financial Statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the PGPA Act. 31-54

Other Mandatory Information

If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

N/A

If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. 29

A statement that “Information on grants awarded to [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website.” N/A

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. 28

Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. 29

Correction of material errors in previous annual report. N/A

Information required by other legislation. N/A

List of requirements 66

Appendix 4: List of requirements (continued)

Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18 71

Index

A

About the Agency, 3, 11-14

Accountability, 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 14, 16, 24,

32, 34, 39, 67

Advertising and market research, 29

Agency overview, 2, 11

Agency staff, 7, 8, 18, 21, 24

Annual Performance Statement,

3, 16, 66

Assessment of effectiveness, 24, 68

Analysis of performance against

purpose, 18

B

Bargaining, 25

C

Capability development, 25

Competitor Analysis Benchmark

Reports, 17, 21, 22

Compliance, 1,12, 25, 29, 67

Consultants, 19, 29, 41, 57, 69

Contents, 3

Corporate governance, 19, 29, 41,

57, 69

D

Data Explorer, 8, 17, 20, 21

Director, 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, 20, 22,

24, 32, 33, 34, 52, 62, 63, 64, 65

Disability reporting, 28, 70

E

Ecologically sustainable

development, 30

Education, 10, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 25

Entity purpose, 16

Environmental performance, 30

Ethical standards, 29, 32

Executive management, 24

External scrutiny, 3, 23, 24, 67

F

Financial Performance, 3, 19, 32, 63

Financial Statements, 1, 2, 3, 31,

32-50, 70

Flexible work practices, 25

Fraud control, 1, 24, 67

G

Gender Equality Indicators, 4, 12 ,13,

18, 20

Glossary and acronyms, 3, 4

H

Highlights, 8

Human resources, 3, 14, 23, 24, 68

I

Independent auditor’s report, 3, 32-33

Information Publication Scheme,

4, 29, 70

Introductory statement, 16

J

Judicial decisions, 67

K

Key Agency activities, 3, 18, 20

Key Management Personnel (KMP), 52

L

Libby Lyons, 1, 7, 8, 14, 20, 22, 34

List of requirements, 55, 66, 68

Letter of transmittal, 1, 3

M

Management and accountability, 2, 23,

24, 67

Manager, 6, 24, 31, 32, 34, 62

Mandatory information, 3, 29, 70

Media mentions, 21

N

Non-compliant organisations, 3, 56-60

Non-salary benefits, 25, 68

O

Objectives, 13, 24, 39, 67

Organisational structure, 14, 66

Other mandatory information, 29, 70

Outcome, 6, 13, 18, 24, 28, 39, 66

72 Workplace Gender Equality Agency Annual Report 2017-18

P

Pay Equity Ambassadors, 7, 8, 9, 17, 18,

21, 22, 62-65

Performance pay, 14, 28, 68

Portfolio Budget Statements, 4, 66

Purchasing, 29, 69

Purpose, 4, 12, 13, 16, 18, 33, 39, 66

R

Relevant employers, 2, 4, 12, 13, 20

Remuneration, 6, 13, 25, 43, 50, 52

Report on performance, 2, 15

Reporting organisations, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10,

17, 22

Research, 6, 12, 14, 17, 18, 20, 22,

24, 29

Review by the Director, 2, 3, 5, 6

Results, 6, 7, 10, 16, 17, 39, 66, 70

Risk management, 24

S

Small business, 18, 29, 70

Snapshot of reporting organisations,

3, 5, 10

Superannuation, 25, 41, 49, 50

Staffing and remuneration, 25

Strategic priorities, 12, 24, 25

T

Training and development, 25

W

Website, Inside cover, 9, 16, 17, 18, 20,

21, 22, 29, 56, 69, 70

WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender

Equality 3, 7, 9, 18, 21, 22, 61

Workforce, 13, 14, 22, 24, 25

Work health and safety, 4, 28, 29

Workshops, 18, 20

Y

Year in review, 2, 3, 5

Index (continued)

www.wgea.gov.au