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Student Assistance Act - Report for - 1988


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Report on the Operation of the Student Assistance Act

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1988

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D epartm ent o f Em ploym ent Education and Training

Department of Employment, Education and Training

THE OPERATION OF THE STUDENT ASSISTANCE ACT IN 1988

Prepared by the Hon. Peter Duncan, MP Minister for Employment and Education Services for presentation to Parliament in pursuance of section 35 of the Act

Government Publishing Service Canber ■ : , · v ■> y.

Australian

© Commonwealth of Australia 1989 ISSN 0313-606X

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the Director, Publishing and Marketing, AGPS. Inquiries should be directed to the Manager, AGPS Press, Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601.

Printed in Australia by Better Printing Service. 1 Foster Street. Queanbeyan N.S.W. 2620

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA PARLIAMENTARY PAPER

314 PE 1989 Ordered to be printed by authority ISSN 0727-4181

CONTENTS Page

Introduction

Chapter I The Student Assistance Act 1973 2

Chapter II Student assistance provided under the Act 6

Chapter III Benefits Control 11

Chapter IV Administration 13

Chapter V Review of decisions 15

Appendix I Statistics on students and expenditure 18

Table 1 AUSTUDY and Postgraduate Awards ( PGA) : expenditure by State 18

Table 2 AUSTUDY: summary of assistance at 31 December 1988 19

Table 3 TEAS/AUSTUDY: students assisted and expenditure by calendar year 1975-1988 20

Table 4 PGA: students assisted and expenditure by calendar year 1975-1988 21

Table 5 TEAS and AUSTUDY Tertiary/Adult Secondary: maj or allowances by calendar year 1975-1988 22

Table 6 AUSTUDY General Secondary: maj or allowances 1987-1988 23

Table 7 PGA: major allowances by calendar year 1975-1988 23

Table 8 AUSTUDY: number of students receiving living allowance by 31 December 1988 ( a) general secondary students ( b) adult secondary students

( c) tertiary students ( d) all sectors

24

Table 9 AUSTUDY: number of general secondary students receiving living allowance by 31 December 1988 by type of institution and year of' course 28

Table 10 AUSTUDY: number of adult secondary students receiving living allowance by 31 December 1988 by type of institution and year of course 28

iii

Table 11 AUSTUDY: number of tertiary students receiving living allowance by 31 December 1988 by type of institution and year of course 29

Table 12 AUSTUDY: number of students receiving living allowance by 31 December 1988 by state and reason allowance granted 30

a) general secondary students b) adult secondary students c) tertiary students d) all sectors

Table 13 PGA: Allocation of Awards 1988 34

Table 14 PGA: Qualifications of 1988 Award holders 35

Table 15 PGA: Age of 1988 Award holders at 1 January 1988 36

Table 16 PGA: 1988 starting date 37

Table 17 PGA: Mobility of 1988 Award holders 38

Table 18 PGA: Distribution of applicants and Award winners by institution and sex for 1988 40

Table 19 PGA: Distribution of Awards 41

Table 20 Student Assistance Review Tribunal (SART): appeals received during 1988 42

Table 21 SART: decisions reviewed in 1988 by regulation and results 43

Table 22 SART: hearings in 1988 44

Appendix II Student Assistance Review Tribunal -membership 1988 45

Appendix III Postgraduate Awards - membership of central selection committees 1988 51

INTRODUCTION

1988 was the second year in the administration of the AUSTUDY scheme. AUSTUDY was introduced in 1987 to rationalise Commonwealth assistance to secondary and tertiary students. It subsumed the former Tertiary Education Assistance Scheme (TEAS), the Secondary Allowances Scheme (SAS) and the Adult Secondary Education Assistance Scheme (ASEAS). The scheme is non - competitive and helps students who are 16 years of age and over or who, if homeless, have reached minimum school leaving age.

The overall operation of AUSTUDY is described in Chapter II. A major development in AUSTUDY administration was the introduction of a strategy to identify and prevent fraud and to recover

overpayments. This followed an independent report commissioned in 1987 that identified the vulnerability to fraud of the student assistance schemes. Details of the Department's strategies are outlined in Chapter III.

1.

CHAPTER I

THE STUDENT ASSISTANCE ACT 1973

The Student Assistance Act came into operation on 15 October 1974. It provides the legislative basis for the granting of financial assistance to students under AUSTUDY (Part III of the Act) and Postgraduate Awards (Part IV of the Act).

The provisions of the Act are in broad terms and allow for the making of regulations on detailed matters affecting aspects such as eligibility and entitlement to benefit. The Act therefore provides a framework within which Government assistance to

students can be modified and adapted to take account of the changing needs of students and changes in the educational scene. The Student Assistance Regulations first appeared as Statutory Rules 1974 No.179 and have been extensively amended in subsequent years.

The Student Assistance Legislation Amendment Act 1988 came into effect on 22 May 1988. It amended the Student Assistance Act to:

require individuals and organisations to provide information needed to verify entitlements and require debtors to disclose their financial situation;

make it an offence to give false information in relation to an application for assistance (this offence was previously dealt with in the Student Assistance Regulations);

provide substantial penalties for offences under the Act and Regulations:

enable the Department to recover overpayments from money held for a debtor;

enable an overpayment to be written off or waived, or for agreement to be given to the overpayment being repaid by instalments. (Previously, overpayments were processed under the Audit Act.)

set the maximum penalty for offences under the Act at a $2,000 fine and/or 12 months' imprisonment. Enabled the regulations to set a maximum penalty for offences under

the Regulations of a $1,000 fine and/or 6 months' imprisonment. (The previous maximum penalty was $100.)

2.

In addition, the Student Assistance Act, the Seamen's War Pensions and Allowances Act, the Social Security Act, and the Veterans' Entitlements Act were amended, so that, where an overpayment has been incurred under one of these Acts or under a

specified educational scheme, the overpayment may be recovered under one of the other Acts.

The Regulations were amended four times in 1988, by Statutory Rules Nos. 316, 345, 346 and 347.

Statutory Rules No. 316 made the following changes:

. the definition of "prescribed educational scheme" was modified to take account of the Student Assistance Legislation Amendment Act 1988;

. the maximum penalities for offences were increased in line with the Student Assistance Legislation Amendment Act 1988;

. account was taken of the change from the former New South Wales Institute of Technology to the University of Technology, Sydney;

. increases were made to the rates of AUSTUDY fares allowance payable where public transport is unavailable and the student travels by private vehicle.

Statutory Rules No. 345 made a number of minor changes to the Regulations. The effect of these was to:

. ensure that the Australian National University is regarded as a university for the purposes of the Regulations:

. provide that the English as a Second Language Scheme is a "prescribed eductional scheme";

. take account of the replacement of the former ACT Child Welfare Ordinance by the new Children's Services Ordinance;

. prevent the AUSTUDY income test from applying twice to amounts to which section 36AAA of the Income Tax Assessment Act applies;

. take account of the replacement of the former Higher School Certificate in Victoria by the Victorian Certificate of Education;

. take account of a change in name of the Department's International Relations Section;

3.

provide that Social Security benefits are not to be taken into account in calculating a student's basic AUSTUDY living allowance entitlement. Instead, they are to be deducted from the student's overall AUSTUDY entitlement;

. extend the concession for students whose parents are basically dependent on Social Security payments, so that the concession also applies to students whose parents are basically dependent on AUSTUDY payments;

. enable secondary students to continue to be paid benefits while transferring from one school to another;

. clarify the provisions relating to the late lodgement of AUSTUDY applications;

. enable a student to agree to the Student Assistance Review Tribunal comprising two members, rather than the normal three members;

. take account of the establishment of the Canberra Institute of the Arts.

Statutory Rules No. 346 implemented decisions concerning AUSTUDY arising out of the 1988 Budget. The amendments took effect from 1 January 1989. The changes made were to:

. increase the maximum rates of living allowance, including new rates aligned with full adult unemployment benefit;

. increase the threshold for the spouse's/parental income tests;

. increase the threshold for the student's income test;

. introduce an assets test;

. provide that a student qualifies as independent if he or she has a dependent child;

. modify the income test for the dependent spouse allowance to apply on a tapered basis to the spouse's income over periods of up to the whole year of study, rather than on a "sudden death" basis to weekly income;

. remove the entitlement to the dependent child deduction where a child also attracts the sibling concession;

. provide that the income test is to apply to overseas income taxable in a foreign country;

4.

. provide - that New Zealand students need to have permanently-settled in Australia and to have been continuously in Australia for at least six months to. qualify for AUSTUDY;

. integrate into AUSTUDY the Assistance for Isolated Children boarding allowance for students aged 16 and over;

. provide that previous studies do not affect eligibility while undertaking an English as a Second Language course, and that studies in an ESL course do not affect eligibility to receive benefits for subsequent studies;

. discontinue the availability of AUSTUDY for students at most non-government business colleges.

(The Government subsequently withdrew the decision to end assistance for students at non-government business colleges.)

Statutory Rules No. 347 implemented decisions concerning Postgraduate Awards, arising from the 1988 Budget context. The amendments increased living allowance levels and removed the limits on income from other awards providing benefits similar to those provided under Postgraduate Awards. These changes came

into effect on 1 January 1989.

5.

CHAPTER II

STUDENT ASSISTANCE PROVIDED UNDER THE ACT

AUSTUDY

AUSTUDY continued to provide assistance to secondary and tertiary students in 1988, its second year of operation.

To be eligible for AUSTUDY students must generally have reached their sixteenth birthday and be studying full-time in approved courses at schools, TAPE colleges, colleges of advanced education, universities and certain other approved tertiary institutions in Australia. Tertiary and adult secondary students must also be making satisfactory progress in their studies to receive continuing support from year to year. No similar requirement is stipulated for general secondary students, that is, secondary students under the age of 19 at 1 January.

Students are categorised as dependent (on their parents) or as independent. In 1988, in order to be regarded as independent a student had to be 25 or over, married, in a de facto relationship of which there is a child, homeless, an orphan, a ward of the State or the Commonwealth, a refugee without parents

in Australia, or have worked full-time for at least three years out of the previous four. If a student could not meet any of these criteria she or he was regarded as dependent.

Assistance is subject to income testing. The amount of allowance a dependent student can receive is subject to a test on parental income. If an independent student is married a test is applied to the spouse's income. All students are subject to a test on their own income.

As a result of a 1988 Budget decision, tests are now applied also to the assets of dependent students' parents, to the personal assets of single independent students, and to the combined assets of married students and their spouses.

AUSTUDY was introduced as part of the rationalisation of youth income support measures announced in the 1985 Budget. Detailed background to the introduction of AUSTUDY was provided in the Report on the Operation of the Student Assistance Act in 1986.

In essence, the Government has moved to eliminate the disincentive to continue in education and training which existed previously as a consequence of unemployment benefits being set at higher rates than any of the rates for student assistance.

6.

From the beginning of 1988 consistency was achieved for the first time in maximum rates of assistance for secondary and tertiary students aged 16-20 and unemployed young people of the same age. In the 1988 Budget the Government announced the first step in a gradual process of alignment of rates for older students with adult unemployment benefit rates. New rates for specially disadvantaged students aged 21 or over or with

dependants came into effect from the beginning of 1989.

Another 1988 Budget decision introduced to the scheme an away from home rate for general secondary students. This was part of a closer integration between AUSTUDY and the Assistance for Isolated Children Scheme.

Rates of AUSTUDY allowance paid in 1987, 1988 and 1989 are:

1987 1988 1989

pa pw pa pw pa pw

$ $ $ $ $ $

Deoendent students

At home:

16-17 Secondary 2086 (40) 2614 (50) 2792 (53.55)

Tertiary 2607 (50) 2614 (50) 2792 (53.55)

18+ Secondary 2346 (45) 3137 (60) 3353 (64.30)

Tertiary/ Adult Sec 2868 (55) 3137 (60) 3353 (64.30)

Spec Adult rate - - 3979 (76.30)

Awav-from-home:

16-17 Secondary 4244 (81.40)

Tertiary 3821 (73.28) 3974 (76) 4244 (81.40)

18+ Secondary - - 5094 (97.70)

Tertiary 4171 (80) 4768 (91.20) 5094 (97.70)

Spec Adult rate - - 6049 (116)

Independent:

16-17 3821 (73.28) 3974 (74) 4244 (81.40)

18+ 4171 (80) 4768 (91.20) 5094 (97.70)

Spec Adult rate - - 6049 (116)

Sole parents - - 7104 (136.25)

7.

Students who paid the Higher Education Administration Charge (HEAC), $263 in 1988, received reimbursement of the full amount from AUSTUDY if they were eligible for living allowance. With the announcement of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme in the 1988 Budget, the HEAC and the accompanying AUSTUDY allowance were discontinued at the end of that year.

Married students are eligible to receive an additional allowance if their spouse is dependent on them. Students do not receive allowances under AUSTUDY for dependent children but support is available instead from the Department of Social Security through the Family Allowance Supplement.

Students who meet the other eligibility criteria for AUSTUDY but who are already receiving certain Commonwealth pensions or benefits are paid an education supplement under AUSTUDY instead of the usual living allowance. The supplement was $15 a week in

1988 but was increased in the 1988 Budget to $30 a week from the beginning of 1989.

Fares allowance (three return trips a year between home and the institution) is available to tertiary and adult secondary students qualifying for the away from home rate.

With the exception of those who are homeless, students under the age of 16 are not eligible for AUSTUDY. Because of this age limit there is a continuous intake of students reaching their sixteenth birthday throughout the year.

In 1988, assistance was refused to a 12 year old gifted student who was expecting to commence tertiary studies in 1989. The case received wide media coverage. In response to the publicity the Minister restated the view of the Government that parents

should take responsibility for supporting children until they are 16. The minimum age for receiving unemployment benefit and other Commonwealth pensions and benefits is 16.

Under AUSTUDY students apply for assistance themselves and usually receive the payments. Parents of students who are under 18 and who do not turn 18 during the year (of study) may elect to receive the payments.

Payments are made fortnightly and cover the entire calendar year. This ensures continuity of support for most students from year to year as they progress through secondary and tertiary

study.

The living allowance, dependent spouse allowance and education supplement are taxable. Students receiving AUSTUDY are granted the beneficiary rebate which raises the threshold at which tax first becomes payable. In addition, education expenses in excess of $250 may be deducted from taxable income.

8.

Postgraduate Awards Scheme

This scheme provides competitive Awards for full-time students undertaking higher degree studies by research or coursework at Australian universities and colleges of advanced education. The primary purpose of the scheme is to provide opportunities for able and talented students to develop their intellectual potential through higher studies and/or research at the postgraduate level. Selection is undertaken by central selection committees appointed by the Minister and in co-operation with participating higher education institutions.

Three types of Awards are made:

(i) Research Awards

Research Awards are available for students undertaking research normally leading to a Master's or PhD degree at an Australian higher education institution. A central selection committee

composed largely of nominees of the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee recommends an allocation of an initial quota of Awards to each university. The residue of available Awards is subsequently allocated to institutions by the central selection

committee after its consideration of the quality of applicants for Awards in the particular year. Awards are granted to applicants in accordance with institutions' lists drawn up on the basis of academic merit, subject to the applicants meeting the eligibility requirements of the scheme. Applicants usually require first class honours degrees or the equivalent in order to qualify for a Research Award.

(ii) Course Awards

Course Awards are granted to students undertaking Master's degrees by coursework at Australian higher education institutions. Course Awards are intended primarily to provide opportunities for further study to applicants who have gained a

first degree, have been in employment for some years and who wish to improve professional competence in their fields. They are also relevant to graduates pursuing a change in career direction, retraining or seeking a further qualification prior

to a return to the work force. A central selection committee composed largely of nominees of the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee selects applicants on the basis of academic merit and

relevant experience after considering nominations from institutions.

9.

(iii) Advanced Education Institution (AEI) Awards

Awards are granted to students undertaking Master's degrees by coursework or research at colleges of advanced education. They are intended primarily to assist students who have a first degree or diploma and who have been in employment for some years to improve their professional competence in their fields. Selection is carried out by a central selection committee which includes persons nominated by the Australian Committee of

Directors and Principals in Advanced Education. The committee considers applicants on the basis of academic merit and, where applicable, work experience. Some Awards may be won on the basis of exceptional academic merit alone.

Details of the membership of relevant central selection committees are contained in Appendix III of this Report. There was no AEI selection committee in 1988 as no new AEI Awards were granted in 1989.

In 1988, 900 new Awards were made available. The Awards were allocated as follows:

Research Awards - 725

Course Awards - 145

AEI Awards - 30

A living allowance of $8,882 a year was paid under the Postgraduate Awards Scheme in 1988. There was also provision for an income-tested dependent spouse allowance of $2220.40 a

year.

Award holders are also entitled to a travelling and establishment allowance if they travel to another city to commence study under their Awards. All Award holders receive an incidentals allowance ($100 a year for university students). Reimbursement of thesis costs is also provided (up to $400 for a PhD thesis and $250 for a Master's thesis)'. Living, dependents,

incidentals and thesis allowances are taxable. Award holders also received (in 1988) an allowance of $263 to compensate for the higher education administration charge. Award holders were permitted to receive other award assistance of up to $1000 a year where the source of assistance is an educational

institution, or up to $5000 a year where the source is the private sector.

It was announced in the 1988-89 Budget that from 1 January 1989 the basic living allowance would increase to $10,415 a year.

10.

CHAPTER III

BENEFITS CONTROL

Price Waterhouse was commissioned by the then Department of Education in 1987 to investigate the administrative procedures and vulnerability to fraud of the student assistance programs.

In accordance with the Report's recommendations, and in keeping with the recommendations of the Review of Systems for Dealing with Fraud on the Commonwealth, there has been a conscious effort to strengthen the Department's approach to dealing with

fraud and recovery of overpayments.

The first of the strategies to be implemented was to amend the Student Assistance Act (outlined in Chapter I).

The second major development was to create Benefits Control units within Central and State/Territory Offices, with responsibility for investigations into fraud under the AUSTUDY and AIC (Assistance for Isolated Children) schemes. The units became operational from 1 July 1988, with 41 investigations officers based in the State and Territory Offices, and a further three staff within Central Office. All positions were approved by the Department of Finance for a six months period only, with continued funding subject to a review of activities undertaken

in the first six months of operation. The review has been completed, and all positions have approval for extension until at least June 1990.

When Benefits Control units were established, it was logical for them to assume responsibility for the existing Recoveries function. In all Offices, except the Northern Territory, the OIC Benefits control has acquired supervisory responsibility for Recoveries operations. The Department recognises that there is a need to continue upgrading its debt recovery efforts and

introduce several measures during 1988, including an exercise to reduce the number and level of old debts and a stocktake of manual records in response to this problem.

Much work still needs to be done however, in the areas of upgrading positions, developing new procedures, enhancing reporting systems and reconciling manual and computer based records.

11.

In 1988, the most substantial task undertaken was a survey of 6,195 randomly selected AUSTUDY recipients to determine the level of overpayments and potential fraud within the Tertiary sector. The survey revealed that 16% were overpaid as a result of under-declared personal income. The other major area of overpayment occured because of students failing to advise they had discontinued full-time studies. Overpayments totalling $690,000 and savings of $1.1 million were detected as a result of conducting the survey.

Analysis of the survey results will be used to develop profiles of categories of students that are of particular risk of being overpaid. This information will be of great value for conducting future checks of client eligibility.

The Benefits Control unit organised the despatch of letters to 108,000 tertiary students reminding them of their obligations under the Regulations to notify the Department of changes in their circumstances. One purpose of this exercise was to assess the effectiveness of voluntary compliance as a control

mechanism. Fewer than 20% of students volunteered information. Nevertheless, overpayments totalling $2.6 million arising from almost 3,200 variations to personal income alone were detected. Similar mail-outs to students were conducted prior to 1987, and it is appropriate to carry out this type of check on a regular

basis.

A range of targeted checks of students with particular characteristics were also commenced during 1988, but the extent was limited. In addition, approximately 900 students were investigated as a result of referrals from other sections within the Department and from other informants.

During the initial six months of operation, 31 cases were referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions or the Australian Federal Police for possible court action or further investigation. There were two successful prosecutions. The number of cases actually brought to court was limited to a great extent by the lengthy process involved, and it is anticipated that the number will increase significantly during the early months of 1989 because of the flow-on effect from the cases

referred.

12.

CHAPTER IV

ADMINISTRATION

In 1987-88, 469 staff years were devoted to applications processing. The allocation for 1988-89 is 637 staff years, to cater for an expected increase in the number of secondary applicants as a result of improved AUSTUDY services to be provided through the Department's network of CES offices; a

further 44 staff years were allocated to benefits control activity and 57 staff years to decentralised AUSTUDY services in the CES.

In 1988 AUSTUDY payments to students amounted to $730m, assisting 285,700 beneficiaries. Strong growth was experienced in January-June 1988 with the numbers assisted 24.4% higher than

for the same period in 1987. Further statistical data is shown in the Appendices.

Training for staff was accorded much higher priority in 1988 with the emphasis placed on providing better technical training for staff in order to improve assessing competence. Three instructional videos and 5 computer-based training packages were

produced. Work commenced on the development of a skills database.

The 1987 report refers to delays in processing applications for AUSTUDY in the early part of the year. In 1988, the second year of the Scheme, processing rates were much improved and difficulties with the new processing system had largely been

resolved.

An operational target for processing was introduced for the first time. The target of three weeks for 70% of applications to be processed to pay or, with complex applications, to correspondence with the applicant was generally met by processing centres. As students became more familiar with the Scheme, fewer incomplete applications were received and this enabled processing to proceed at a faster rate.

Three levels of service were provided at CES offices in 1988 for the first time:

Fifteen metropolitan offices and all country centres were lodgement centres for application forms and were able to handle complex inquiries, including those on progress with the processing of applications.

most suburban CES offices in major cities provided an enquiry service, distributed forms and literature and promoted the Scheme;

other offices provided a basic enquiry service.

13.

In addition, four new decentralised AUSTUDY offices opened at Penrith and Wollongong (New South Wales), Dandenong (Victoria) and Rockhampton (Queensland) towards the end of the year. These centres, together with the Townsville Office, provided the full range of AUSTUDY services including processing of applications which previously had been available only in capital city centres. Further limited expansion of decentralised processing

is expected in 1989.

The organisation of work in State and Territory processing centres was reviewed by management and the unions as soon the 1988 peak processing season finished in May. The aim of the task was to incorporate new job redesign principles and identify productivity gains and savings as a result of increased staff

flexibility, greater job satisfaction and improved working and classification arrangements.

Previously, work was specialised. Some staff opened and distributed mail or registered applications while others undertook assessment or enquiries tasks. In most processing centres, staff assessed Tertiary or Secondary Scheme applications but not both.

Towards the end of 1988, some offices combined scheme assessing while others moved towards new structures based on the use of Integrated Processing Teams - small groups of staff undertaking the entire processing function, providing maximum opportunity

for multiskilling and devolution of responsibility. All of the changes are to be fully implemented next year following joint evaluation by management and the staff associations.

The South Australian office initiated a cooperative effort with the State Education Department to identify students with a limited awareness of AUSTUDY. Data supplied by the State

Department was compared with the number of AUSTUDY recipients at each school and other socio-economic data to determine which schools should be targetted for awareness campaigns. The

initiative is also intended to assist in increasing school retention rates.

CHAPTER V

REVIEW OF DECISIONS

Part V of the Act provides a system for reviewing decisions made by authorised persons relating to the grant of assistance or application for a benefit provided under the Act. The first stage is for an internal departmental review, conducted by a more senior authorised person. The student concerned can then

request that the matter be reviewed by the Student Assistance Review Tribunal (SART) and, where a student remains dissatisfied with the decision of the SART, he or she can seek a review by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

Student Assistance Review Tribunal

The SART can review decisions on such matters as the rejection of an application, the amount of living allowance granted to an individual applicant or the termination or suspension of an Award. Its authority does not extend beyond the provisions of the Act and the Regulations to matters of general policy.

Membership

The SART comprises a panel of convenors, who have legal qualifications, and a panel of members. At any particular hearing the SART consists of a convenor and two members. Members are drawn mainly from staff and students of post-secondary educational institutions and from State and private secondary education bodies.

In 1988, venues for SART were the six State capital cities, Canberra, Townsville, Armidale and Newcastle.

Members of the SART are appointed initially for terms varying from one to three years. Members who were available for a further term at the expiry of their initial term can be reappointed.

Mr R.G. Kenny was the only new convenor appointed in 1988. Mr Kenny succeeded Dr A.S. Fogg in Queensland. In the other States and Territories, Mr L.J. McAuley continued to preside over SART hearings in New South Wales, as did Dr A.J. Bradbrook

in Victoria, Mr H. Wallwork QC in Western Australia, Mr K F Mackie in Tasmania, Ms I Y Harris in South Australia and Ms P M Burton in the Australian Capital Territory. There is no SART established in the Northern Territory.

At 31 December 1988, there were one hundred and one SART members (including convenors). The list of members appears at Appendix II.

15.

Hearings

Statistics relating to the number of appeals received during the year, the number of decisions reviewed and their results, and an analysis of SART decisions by regulation are given in Appendix I. In all, 166 appeals were received in 1988, which represents

a 27 per cent increase on appeals received in 1987. Seven appeals concerned Postgraduate Awards, six appeals related to TEAS and the remainder related to AUSTUDY - one hundred and thirty seven being tertiary, nine general secondary and seven adult secondary, a total of 153.

149 decisions (including decisions held over from 1987) were reviewed during 1988. Of these, 71 per cent were affirmed, 25 per cent were set aside in favour of the student and 4 per cent were varied in some way. There were a further 16 cases held over to 1989 because some students had requested postponements, or because the SART had met but adjourned pending the provision of further information or because documentation on the appeal was received too late in 1988 to schedule a hearing by

31 December.

The eligibility provisions of sub-regulation 34(1), concerning progress in a tertiary course and discontinuation of a previous tertiary course continued to be the issues most commonly occurring in decisions under review.

Hearings took place throughout 1988 in all centres other than Newcastle. A table setting out the number of hearings in each State and Territory is given at Table 28 in Appendix I.

Procedures

The SART followed the requirement of section 27 of the Act that proceedings be conducted as informally and promptly as possible, consistent with proper consideration of each appeal. In most cases, the appellant chose to attend the hearing. This enabled the SART to reach decisions after examination of the relevant papers and full discussion with the appellant and the departmental officer attending the hearing. Over the past few years appellants have sought increasingly to be represented by another person, as permitted by section 28 of the Act. In 1988 many appellants took advantage of this opportunity. Hearings were open to the public unless matters of a strictly confidential nature were to be discussed.

Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT )

During 1988, fifteen appeals were made to the AAT concerning student assistance.

Ten matters before the AAT were finalised: the primary decision was upheld in 3 cases; the primary decision was set aside in 1 case; the AAT ruled that it had no jurisdiction in 1 case; the appeal was withdrawn in 5 cases. Additionally, one appeal was

delisted until the appellant showed reason why it should be reinstated. Two cases concerned TEAS and the remainder concerned AUSTUDY.

Federal Court

The Federal Court heard one matter during 1988, Nagasinghe V Department of Education. Miss Nagasinghe appealed from the decision of the AAT that she did not qualify for a Postgraduate Av/ard in 1985. She argued that, under the system for ranking

applicants, she should have been given additional points for her academic qualifications in view of her Fellowship in Dental Surgery from the Royal College of Surgeons.

The AAT had found that the Fellowship should not be regarded as an academic qualification, but was in the nature of a professional qualification. The Court held that no errors of law in the AAT's decision had been shown and dismissed the appeal.

The AAT had ruled that it had jurisdiction to consider whether the appellant should be granted an Award. The Department, while not conceding the point, did not challenge the AAT's finding on jurisdiction when the matter went to the Federal Court.

APPENDIX I

STUDENT STATISTICS AND EXPENDITURE

TABLE 1 AUSTUDY AND POSTGRADUATE AWARDS (PGA): EXPENDITURE BY STATE

a) Financial year 1987-88 ($'000)

State General

secondary

Adult secondary

Tertiary PGA

NSW 70110 5699 138969 6494

VIC 60905 4539 107037 6088

QLD 35767 2586 69949 2950

WA 13312 1188 42642 1741

SA 17328 1623 35244 1991

TAS 4968 352 11028 626

NT 856 86 1453 -

ACT 2757 463 11694 2095

TOTAL 206002 16535 418015 21974

18

b) Calendar year 1988 ($'000)

State General

secondary

Adult secondary

Tertiary PGA

NSW 95848 6671 143275 7078

VIC 79764 5320 113803 6365

QLD 47446 2895 72546 3158

WA 16880 1546 43603 1917

SA 23249 2368 37114 2131

TAS 7397 520 12580 674

NT 1135 104 1716 -

ACT 3943 531 11971 2229

TOTAL 275660 19955 436608 23552

TABLE 2 AUSTUDY: SUMMARY OF ASSISTANCE AT 31 DECEMBER 1988

General secondary Adult secondary Tertiary

Number of applicants 157783 7264 158419

Number of applicants ruled ineligible 11218 1007 15878

Number of applications pending 5137 550 4685

Total number receiving allowance living 142155 5715 137833

19

TABLE 3 STUDENTS ASSISTED AND EXPENDITURE BY CALENDAR YEAR 1975-1988

a) TEAS/AUSTUDY Tertiary

Year Total students

assisted*

Expenditure ($'000)

1975 81000 (approximately) 92076

1976 95803 112248

1977 99153 153825

1978 98220 158138

1979 93559 159734

1980 91571 154734

1981 91096 172609

1982 86541 166933

1983 96527 222455

1984 98633 241531

1985 104606 281505

1986 110744 314202

1987 122141 373951

1988 137833 436608

b) AUSTUDY Adult Secondary

1987 4294 13687

1988 5715 19955

c ) AUSTUDY General Secondary

1987 98358 122136

1988 142155 275660

* Aggregate of students assisted during year

20.

TABLE 4 PGA: STUDENTS ASSISTED AND EXPENDITURE BY CALENDAR YEAR 1975-1988

Year Students assisted*

(at 30 June)

Expenditure $'000

1975 2225 8555

1976 2230 7725

1977 2214 9465

1978 2053 9550

1979 1910 9689

1980 1849 8226

1981 1867 9052

1982 2026 9862

1983 2180 15376

1984 2218 17267

1985 2340 18194

1986 2458 20163

1987 2444 20985

1988 " (i) 23552

* Aggregate of students assisted during year not available,

(i) Figures not available

21

TABLE 5 TEAS AND AUSTUDY TERTIARY/ADULT SECONDARY: MAJOR ALLOWANCES BY CALENDAR YEAR 1975-1988

Year Max living

at home $(a year)

Max living away $(a year)

Max independent

$(a year)

Dependent spouse $(a week)

Dependent child $(a week

1975 1000 1600 1600 10 6.00

1976 1000 1600 1600 15 7.00

1977 1250 1976 2236 29 7.50

1978 1250 2075 2348 31.40 7.50

1979 1523 2348 2348 31.40 7.50

1980 1523 2348 2348 31.40 7.50

1981 1675 2583 2583 42.70 10.00

1982 1675 2583 2583 42.70 10.00

1983 2010 3100 3100 42.70 10.00

1984 2110 3255 3255 42.70 10.00

1985 2321 3581 35812 42.70 14.00

1986 2477 3821 3821 42.70 16.00

1987

. 16-17 yrs 2607 3821 3821 42.70 17.00

. 18+ yrs 2868 4171 4171 42.70 17.00

1988

. 16-17 yrs 2614 3974 3974 42.70 -

. 18+ yrs 3137 4768 4768 42.70 -

Note

Education Supplement for certain pensioners and beneficiaries: $15 a week!

Dependent child allowance discontinued in 1988.

TABLE 6 AUSTUDY GENERAL SECONDARY: MAJOR ALLOWANCES 1987-1988

Year Max living

at home ($ a year)

Max independent

($ a year)

Dependent spouse ($ a week)

Dependent child ($ a week)

1987

16-17 yrs 2086 3821 42.70 17

18+ yrs 2346 4171 42.70 17

1988

16-17 yrs 2614 3974 42.70 -

18+ yrs 3137 4768 42.70 -

TABLE 7 PGA: MAJOR ALLOWANCES BY CALENDAR YEAR 1975-1988

Year Living allowance

$ (a year)

Dependent spouse $ (a week) Dependent child $ (a week)

1975 3250 10.00 6.00

1976 3250 15.00 7.00

1977 4000 29.00 7.50

1978 4200 31.40 7.50

1979 4200 31.40 7.50

1980 4200 31.40 7.50

1981 4620 42.70 10.00

1982 4620 42.70 10.00

1983 6850 42.70 10.00

1984 7330 42.70 10.00

1985 7616 42.70 14.00

1986 8126 42.70 16.00

1987 8126 42.70 17.00

1988 8882 42.70 " (i)

(i) Replaced by family allowance supplement provided, where

applicable, by Department of Social Security

23.

AUSTUDY

TABLE 8 NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER

1988 BY TYPE OF ALLOWANCE BY ALLOWANCE RATE

Allowance rate ($ a week) At home

Type of allowance Away Indep Total

A. GENERAL SECONDARY 00.01-10.00 3230 0 0 3230

10.01-14.99 3151 0 0 3151

15.00(a) 31 0 226 257

15.01-20.00 3684 0 3 3687

20.01-25.00 4455 0 6 4461

25.01-30.00 4876 0 6 4882

30.01-35.00 5534 0 10 5544

35.01-40.00 5798 0 4 5802

40.01-45.00 6703 0 4 6707

45.01-49.99 6590 0 6 6596

50.00(b) 80664 0 353 81017

50.01-55.00 586 0 0 586

55.01-59.99 568 0 12 580

60.00(c) 9730 0 22 9752

60.01-65.00 0 0 12 12

65.01-70.00 0 0 14 14

70.01-75.00 0 0 33 33

75.01-75.99 0 0 11 11

76.00(d) 0 0 4077 4077

76.01-80.00 0 0 7 7

80.01-85.00 0 0 10 10

85.01-90.00 0 0 8 8

90.01-91.19 0 0 1 1

91.20(e) 1 0 1729 1730

Total 135601 0 6554 142155

Note is): (a)

(b)

Education training supplement.

Maximum rate for students under 18 living at home.

(c ) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living at home.

(d) Maximum rate for students under 18 living away from home or

(e)

independent.

Maximum rate for students 18 and over living away from home or independent.

24.

AUSTUDY

TABLE 8 (cont) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF ALLOWANCE BY ALLOWANCE RATE

Allowance rate Type of allowance

($ a week) At home Away Indep Total

B. ADULT SECONDARY 00.01-10.00 11 1 10 22

10.01-14.99 8 0 10 18

15.00(a) 0 0 323 323

15.01-20.00 15 0 2 17

20.01-25.00 15 2 6 23

25.01-30.00 23 1 13 37

30.01-35.00 23 0 9 32

35.01-40.00 23 1 14 38

40.01-45.00 30 5 11 46

45.01-49.99 36 2 15 53

50.00(b) 0 0 0 0

50.01-55.00 46 2 11 59

55.01-59.99 37 1 13 51

60.00 (c) 1282 0 0 1282

60.01-65.00 0 7 25 32

65.01-70.00 0 12 25 37

70.01-75.00 0 4 27 31

75.01-75.99 0 1 10 11

76.00(d) 0 0 0 0

76.01-80.00 0 7 25 32

80.01-85.00 0 8 61 69

85.01-90.00 0 6 51 57

90.01-91.19 0 1 8 9

91.20(e) 0 358 3078 3436

Total 1549 419 3747 5715

Notes; (a) Education training supplement.

(b) Maximum rate for students under 18 living at home.

(c) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living at home.

(d) Maximum rate for students under 18 living away from home or independent.

(e) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living away from home or independent.

25.

AUSTUDY

TABLE 8 (cont) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSJSTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF ALLOWANCE BY ALLOWANCE RATE

Allowance rate Type of allowance

($ a week) At home Away Indep Total

C. TERTIARY 00.01-10.00 2432 871 194 3497

10.01-14.99 1738 592 159 2489

15.00(a) 6 0 2835 2841

15.01-20.00 1936 705 147 2788

20.01-25.00 2119 803 188 3110

25.01-30.00 2330 943 229 3502

30.01-35.00 2610 1005 322 3937

35.01-40.00 2583 1104 248 3935

40.01-45.00 2836 1197 305 4338

45.01-49.99 2861 1286 298 4445

50.00(b) 4956 0 12 4968

50.01-55.00 2481 1404 488 4373

55.01-59.99 2543 1419 358 4320

60.00(c) 18546 2 34 18582

60.01-65.00 0 1599 628 2227

65.01-70.00 0 1647 512 2159

70.01-75.00 0 1838 853 2691

75.01-75.99 0 358 158 516

76.00(d) 0 1742 225 1967

76.01-80.00 0 1338 725 2063

80.01-85.00 0 1841 1340 3181

85.01-90.00 0 2008 1578 3586

90.01-91.19 0 467 294 761

91.20(e) 1 18366 33056 51422

91.20- 0 0 135 135

Total 49977 42535 45321 137833

Notes: ia) Education training supplement.

(b ) Maximum rate for students under 18 living at home.

(c ) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living at home.

(d ) Maximum rate for students under 18 living away from home or independent.

(e) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living away from home or independent.

26.

AUSTUDY

Table 8 (cent) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF ALLOWANCE BY ALLOWANCE RATE

Allowance rate ($ a week) At home

Type of Away allowance Indep Total

D. ALL SECTORS 00.01-10.00 5673 872 204 6749

10.01-14.99 4897 592 169 5658

15.00(a) 37 0 3384 3421

15.01-20.00 5635 705 152 6492

20.01-25.00 6589 805 200 7594

25.01-30.00 7229 944 248 8421

30.01-35.00 8167 1005 341 9513

35.01-40.00 8404 1105 266 9775

40.01-45.00 9569 1202 320 11091

45.01-49.99 9487 1288 319 11094

50.00(b) 85620 0 365 85985

50.01-55.00 3113 1406 499 5018

55.01-59.99 3148 1420 383 4951

60.00(c) 29558 2 56 29616

60.01-65.00 0 1606 665 2271

65.01-70.00 0 1659 551 2210

70.01-75.00 0 1842 913 2755

75.01-75.99 0 359 179 538

76.00(d) 0 1742 4302 6044

70.01-80.00 0 1345 757 2102

80.01-85.00 0 1849 1411 3260

85.01-90.00 0 2014 1637 3651

90.01-91.19 0 468 303 771

91.20(e) 1 18724 37863 56588

91.20- 0 0 135 135

Total 187127 42954 55622 285703

Notes : (a) Education training supplement.

(b) Maximum rate for students under 18 living at home.

(c) Maximum rate for students 18 and over living at home.

(d) Maximum home or rate for students independent.

under 18 living away from

(e) Maximum home or rate for students independent.

18 and over living away from

27

AUSTUDY

TABLE 9 NUMBER OF GENERAL SECONDARY STUDENTS RECEIVING

BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF INSTITUTION BY COURSE

ASSISTANCE YEAR OF

Year of Type of Institution

course

Government Catholic Other non- TAFE Unknown Tota.

school school govt school

Ungraded 829 46 6 28 44 953

Year 7 19 0 3 0 0 22

Year 8 207 11 3 1 2 224

Year 9 2039 192 29 5 19 2284

Year 10 19383 2958 666 84 130 23221

Year 11 46492 8897 2349 369 84 58191

Year 12 43298 9791 2894 897 77 56957

Invalid 221 20 7 10 45 303

Total 112488 21915 5957 1394 401 142155

TABLE 10 NUMBER OF ADULT SECONDARY STUDENTS RECEIVING

ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF INSTITUTION BY YEAR OF COURSE

Year of Type of Institution

course

School TAFE CAE Unknown Total

Ungraded 88 19 0 10 117

Year 7 1 0 0 0 1

Year 8 1 0 0 0 1

Year 9 30 3 0 0 33

Year 10 184 136 0 1 321

Year 11 994 350 12 1 1357

Year 12 2421 1442 6 16 3885

Total 3719 1950 18 28 5715

28

AUSTUDY

TABLE 11 NUMBER OF TERTIARY STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY

31 DECEMBER 1988 BY TYPE OF INSTITUTION BY YEAR OF COURSE

Year of Type of Institution

course

University CAE TAFE Other Unknown Total

Ungraded Undergraduate Year 1

1

12635

2

18037

0

13558

0

1181

0

119

3

45530

Year 2 5562 6289 1916 32 23 13822

Year 3 4522 4288 230 15 15 9070

Year 4 1956 1043 15 1 6 3021

Year 5 469 76 2 0 1 548

Year 6 138 2 0 0 0 140

Year 7 and above 3 0 0 0 0 3

Postgraduate Year 1 736 869 20 0 0 1625

Year 2 71 29 1 0 0 101

Year 3 and above 21 9 0 0 0 30

Invalid 24686 29907 8429 814 104 63940

Total 50800 60551 24171 2041 268 137833

29.

AUSTUDY

TABLE 12 NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER

1988 BY STATE/TERRITORY BY REASON ALLOWANCE GRANTED

Reason allowance granted ACT NSW Vic Qld

STATE SA WA Tas NT Aust

GENERAL SECONDARY

At home 1632 44306 39658 24961 11965 8823 3715 541 135601

Away from home Previously granted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Time and distance 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Compulsory residence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Home circumstances 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total away from home 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0. 0

Independent Previously granted 0 14 9 0 1 1 2 0 27

Married 0 29 26 9 7 3 0 2 76

Widowed 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

De facto 0 2 3 1 2 0 1 0 9

25 years and over 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Orphan 15 168 180 57 31 16 13 2 482

Ward 6 103 209 123 67 47 61 2 618

Refugee 42 613 577 89 165 82 6 13 1587

Employment 1 27 22 21 8 7 8 0 94

Homeless 150 1339 602 410 360 128 86 32 3107

Continuing pensioner 0 14 32 291 1 18 0 0 356

New pensioner 4 33 44 43 50 10 13 0 197

Total independent 218 2343 1704 1044 692 312 190 51 6554

Total 1850 46649 41362 26005 12657 9135 3905 592 142155 1

AUSTUDY

TABLE 12 (CONT) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY STATE/TERRITORY BY REASON ALLOWANCE GRANTED

Reason allowance STATE

granted ACT NSW Vic Qld SA WA Tas NT Aust

ADULT SECONDARY

At home 42 574 551 132 123 98 13 16 1549

Away from home Previously granted 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 6

Time and distance 8 84 53 16 14 29 4 1 209

Compulsory residence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Home circumstances 3 107 56 12 10 15 1 0 204

Total away from home 11 192 114 28 24 44 5 1 419

Independent Previously granted 0 0 6 2 0 0 11 0 19

Married 4 132 93 101 67 31 14 2 444

Widowed 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

De facto 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 5

25 years and over 14 257 202 174 121 83 8 5 864

Orphan 6 26 25 6 9 4 0 0 76

Ward 0 3 7 6 5 2 2 0 25

Refugee 35 243 191 21 92 50 5 3 640

Employment 18 356 229 272 106 102 45 4 1132

Homeless 17 58 34 13 9 10 6 1 148

Continuing pensioner 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 5

New pensioner 3 123 75 92 57 17 18 3 388

Total independent 97 1201 866 689 467 299 110 18 3747

Total 150 1967 1531 849 614 441 128 35 5715

31.

AUSTUDY

TABLE 12 (cont) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY STATE/TERRITORY BY REASON ALLOWANCE GRANTED

Reason allowance granted ACT NSW Vic Qld

STATE SA WA Tas NT Aust

TERTIARY

At home 657 15315 14081 8059 4778 5776 1196 115 49977

Away from home Previously granted 6 20 996 1 551 3 295 13 1885

Time and distance 1262 12742 9224 9159 1975 2811 712 77 37962

Compulsory residence 0 24 33 235 3 1 10 10 316

Home circumstances 41 1011 663 176 166 270 34 11 2372

Total away from home 1309 13797 10916 9571 2695 3085 1051 111 4253Ξ

Independent Previously granted 1 11 983 2 1354 2 384 0 2737

Married 216 2384 1526 1164 467 1040 196 37 703C

Widowed 2 15 11 2 3 2 0 0 35

De facto 5 31 24 9 8 13 6 1 97

25 years and over 455 5278 3742 2020 1222 1974 451 127 15265

Orphan 14 173 122 43 32 28 6 0 415

Ward 0 42 26 28 4 22 12 0 134

Refugee 26 407 375 39 74 86 4 2 1015

Employment 545 4664 2516 1774 731 1722 285 64 12303

Homeless 157 1289 451 186 68 194 60 11 2416

Continuing pensioner 18 234 122 123 76 112 18 6 70S

New pensioner 56 1098 490 521 361 442 153 41 316-*!

Total independent 1495 15626 10388 5911 4400 5637 1575 289 45323

Total 3461 44738 35385 23541 11873 14498 3822 515 137833

AUSTUDY

TABLE 12 (cont) NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE BY 31 DECEMBER 1988 BY STATE/TERRITORY BY REASON ALLOWANCE GRANTED

Reason allowance granted ACT NSW Vic Qld

STATE SA WA Tas NT Aust

ALL SECTORS

At home 2331 60195 54290 33152 16866 14697 4924 672 187127

Away from home Previously granted 6 21 1001 1 551 3 295 13 1891

Time and distance 1270 12826 9277 9175 1989 2840 716 78 38171

Compulsory residence 0 24 33 235 3 1 10 10 316

Home circumstances 44 1118 719 188 176 285 35 11 2576

Total away from home 1320 13989 11030 9599 2719 3129 1056 112 42954

Independent Previously granted 1 25 998 4 1355 3 397 0 2783

Married 220 2545 1645 1274 541 1074 210 41 7550

Widowed 2 16 12 2 3 2 0 0 37

De facto 5 34 28 11 11 13 8 1 111

25 years and over 469 5535 3944 2194 1343 2057 459 132 16133

Orphan 35 367 327 106 72 48 19 2 976

Ward 6 148 242 157 76 71 75 2 777

Refugee 103 1263 1143 149 331 218 15 18 3240

Employment 564 5047 2767 2067 845 1831 338 68 13527

Homeless 324 2686 1087 609 437 332 152 44 5671

Continuing pensioner 18 250 156 415 77 130 18 6 1070

New pensioner 63 1254 609 656 468 469 184 44 3747

Total independent 1810 19170 12958 7644 5559 6248 1875 358 55622

Total 5461 93354 78278 50395 25144 24074 7855 1142 285703

33

TART ,κ 13 POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARDS ALLOCATION OF AWARDS 1988

UNIVERSITY INITIAL POOL

FEMALES

TOTAL MALES PERSONS

Adelaide 42 8 18 31 49

ANU 54 - 24 31 55

Deakin 6 - 3 3 6

Flinders 15 9 9 15 24

Griffith 11 6 5 8 13

James Cook 10 - 3 8 11

La Trobe 28 3 16 14 30

Macquarie 21 5 16 11 27

Melbourne 96 - 29 69 98

Monash 58 - 27 31 58

Murdoch 9 10 11 7 18

New England 13 2 4 11 15

New South Wales 56 5 26 35 61

Newcastle 15 - 4 11 15

Queensland 62 1 22 45 67

Sydney 83 20 41 63 104

Tasmania 18 - 6 12 18

Western Australia 40 10 28 20 48

Wollongong 8 1 4 4 8

TOTAL 645 80 296 429 725

Note: Wollongong was unable to use 1 initial quota Award.

This was reallocated to Melbourne as if it were a pool Award.

34.

TABLE 14 POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARDS QUALTFICATICNS CF 1988 AWARD BOLTERS

UNIVERSITY MASTERS

i ) ^ t jK f a i h l

SENS I CR EQUIV. HONS IIA CR Equiv.

MASTERS QUALIF.

TOTAL

Adelaide 1 48 - - 49

ANU 12 37 6 - 55

Deakin 3 2 1 - 6

Flinders 3 21 - - 24

Griffith 1 11 1 - 13

Janes Cook 1 9 - 1 11

La Trobe 3 25 2 - 30

Macquarie 4 21 2 - 27

Nfelboume 12 81 5 - 98

Mmash 15 38 2 3 58

Murdoch 3 13 2 - 18

New England 2 11 1 1 15

NSW 8 43 9 1 61

Newcastle - 12 1 2 15

Queensland 5 61 - 1 67

Sydney 10 89 3 2 104

Tasmania 4 9 5 - 18

WA 2 43 1 2 48

Wollongong 3 5 - - 8

TOTAL 92 579 41 13 725

TART.E IS POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARDS AGE OF 1988 AWARD HOIDERS AT 1 JANUARY 1988

UNIVERSITY 20 21 22 23 24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60+ TOTAL

Adelaide 2 9 9 10 5 8 2 2 1 1 49

ANU 2 7 10 5 5 13 7 2 3 - - 1 - 55

Deakin - - 2 ~ - - 2 1 1 - - - - 6

Flinders 2 1 1 1 2 6 8 1 2 - - - - 24

Griffith 2 - 2 1 - 3 - 3 1 1 - - - 13

James Cook - 2 1 2 2 3 - - 1 - - - - 11

La Trobe - 5 4 2 - 10 1 2 3 1 1 1 - 30

Macquarie - 3 3 1 - 7 6 5 2 - - - - 27

Melbourne - 17 20 8 9 22 14 5 2 1 - - - 98

Monash - 5 16 12 3 5 7 4 4 1 1 - - 58

Murdoch - - 2 2 3 7 1 2 - 1 - - - 18

New England - 1 2 - - 6 2 2 1 1 - - - 15

NSW - 6 7 8 5 12 15 5 2 1 - - - 61

Newcastle - - 2 4 - 5 3 1 - - - - - 15

Queensland 4 18 6 9 5 12 10 3 - - - - - 67

Sydney - 10 20 12 13 30 7 7 3 1 - 1 - 104

Tasmania - 3 4 1 1 2 5 1 1 - - - - 18

WA 4 8 11 6 3 5 6 3 1 - 1 - - 48

Wollongong 1 2 2 2 1 - - - - 8

TOTAL 16 95 122 85 56 158 98 51 29 9 3 3 - 725

TABLE 16 POSTGRADUATE R E SEARCH AWARDS 1988 STARTING DATE

UNIVERSITY JAN FEB MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE TOTAL

Adelaide 8 20 14 1 2 3 48

ANU 10 16 24 - 1 4 55

Deakin 3 2 - - - 1 6

Flinders 6 6 9 - - 2 23

Griffith 3 3 4 - - 3 13

James Cook 5 5 1 - - - 11

La Trobe 2 14 14 - - - 30

Macquarie 14 6 5 1 - 1 27

Melbourne 25 28 43 - - 2 98

Monash 15 17 25 - 1 - 58

Murdoch 4 5 5 - 1 3 18

New England 4 4 6 - - 1 15

NSW 14 27 16 - 1 3 61

Newcastle 3 6 5 - - 1 15

Queensland 26 34 2 2 1 2 67

Sydney 24 45 26 1 2 5 103

Tasmania 4 6 6 1 1 - 18

WA 14 11 21 1 1 - 48

Wollongong 2 3 2 - - 1 8

TOTAL 186 258 228 7 11 32 722*

* A holder failed to commence at Adelaide, Flinders and Sydney and under the Regualations the Awards terminated.

37.

38.

TART FI 17 POSTGRADUATE RESEARACH AWARDS MOBILITY OF 1988 AWARD HOLDERS

SAME UNI SAME STATE DIFFERENT UNI SAME STATE

DIFFERENT UNI ANOTHER STATE OVERSEAS UNDERGRAD

QUAD

TOTAL WHO MOVED

ALLOCATION %

MOVED

Sydney Arts 43 2 5 5 23 104 22.1

Sciences 38 4 3 4

NSW Arts 15 6 2 2 22 61 36.1

Sciences 24 2 3 7

Macquarie Arts 14 2 2 - 8 27 29.6

Sciences 5 2 2

New England Arts 5 - 1 - 5 15 33.3

Sciences 5 - 3 1

Newcastle Arts 5 - - - 1 15 6.7

Sciences 9 - 1 -

Wollongong Arts 2 2 1 - 3 8 37.5

Sciences 3 - - -

NSW Arts

Sciences

84 84

12 8

11 12

7

12

62 230 27.0

Melbourne Arts 28 3 3 3 33 98 33.7

Sciences 37 9 8 7

ifonash Arts 18 3 4 - 13 58 22.4

Sciences 27 2 1 3

La Trobe Arts 16 2 1 1 6 30 20.0

Sciences 8 1 1 -

Deakin Arts 1 1 1 1 3 6 50.0

Sciences 2 - - -

VICTORIA Arts 63 9 9 5 55 192 28.6

Sciences 74 12 10 10

39.

ΨΑΗΓ.Ε 17 / ί ϊ Μ Τ π

SAME UNI DIFFERENT UNI DIFFERENT UNI OVERSEAS TOTAL ALLOCATION % SAME STATE SAME STATE ANOTHER STATE UNDERGRAD QUAD WHO

MOVED

MOVED

Griffith Arts 3 1 1 - 2 13 15.4

Sciences 8 - - -

James Cook Arts - - - - 5 11 45.5

Sciences 6 1 - 4

Queensland Arts 13 1 - 2 14 67 20.9

Sciences 40 6 2 3

QUEENSLAND Arts 16 2 1 2 21 91 23.1

Sciences 54 7 2 7

Adelaide Arts 14 - 2 1 7 49 14.3

Sciences 28 - 4 -

Flinders Arts 9 3 - 8 24 33.3

Sciences 7 2 3

SOUTH Arts 23 - 5 1 15 73 20.5

AUSTRALIA Sciences 35 - 6 3

Murdoch Arts 6 - 1 - 5 18 27.8

Sciences 7 - 1 3

Western Arts 14 1 2 2 11 48 22.9

Australia Sciences 23 5 1

WESTERN Arts 20 1 3 2 16 66 24.2

AUSTRALIA Sciences 30 6 4

TASMANIA Arts 6 1 1 1 7 18 38.9

Sciences 5 4

ACT Arts 8 - 7 5 33 55 60.0

Sciences 14 20 1

AUSTRALIA Arts 220 25 37 23 209 725 28.8

Sciences 296 27 60 37

TABLE 18 POSTGRADUATE AWARDS ΆΤ COLLEGES OF ADVANCED EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION OF APPLICANTS AND AWARD WINNERS BY INSTITUTION AND SEX FOR 1988

Institution Applicants

Female Male Total

Award Winners

Female Male Total

Canberra College of Advanced Education 5 6 11 2 3 5

Catholic College of Education 1 - 1 - - -

Cumberland College of Health Sciences 2 - 2 2 - 2

Hawksbury Agricultural College - 1 1 -

NSWIT 9 6 15 1 - 1

NSW Conservatorium - 1 1 - - -

NSW Institute of the Arts 4 2 6 - - -

Sydney College of the Arts 2 1 3 - - -

Bendigo College of Advanced Education 2 - 2 1 - 1

Chisholm Institute of Technology 2 5 7 1 2 3

Footscray Institute of Technology 1 3 4 - 2 2

Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education - 1 1 - - -

Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences 3 1 4 - - -

Phillip Institute of Technology - 1 1 - - -

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology 2 7 9 1 4 5

Swinburne Institute of Technology 2 3 5 - 3 3

Victoria College 3 - 3 2 - 2

Victorian College of Pharmacy 2 1 3 - - -

Warmambool Institute of Advanced Education 1 2 3 1 - 1

Queensland Institute of Technology 3 14 17 1 1 2

Brisbane College of Advanced Education 3 3 6 - 1 1

South Australian Institute of Technology 5 6 11 - 1 1

Tasmanian Institute of Technology 1 1 1 1

TOTAL 53 64 117 13 17 30

TAELE 19

POSTGRADCAIE COURSE AHAEDS-SELECTION 1988

DISTRIBgnm CF AWARDS

UNIVERSITY Stare A Stare B TOTAL

Accept Reject Accept Reject Accept Reject

AND 6 2 6 4 12 6

tecquarie 3 _ 1 2 4 2

New England 1 - - - 1 -

New South Wales 28 2 8 15 36 17

Sydney 2 - 5 1 7 1

Wdllcogrig 1 - 1 - 2 -

TOTAL 1CW 35 2 15 18 50 20

La Tnobe 2 4 1 6 1

Melbourne 14 - 2 2 16 2

4 2 9 1 13 3

TOTAL VICTORIA 20 2 15 4 35 6

Queensland 10 1 6 1 16 2

Adelaide 2 3 2 5 2

Flinders 3 1 3 1 6 2

TOTAL SOOTH AUSTRALIA 5 1 6 3 11 4

Mjrdoch 4 3 1 4 4

Western Australia 10 1 2 2 12 3

TOTAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA 14 4 2 3 16 7

Tasmania 3 1 2 - 5 1

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 93 13 52 33 145 46

41

42.

TABLE 20 STUDENT ASSISTANCE REVIEW TRIBUNAL: APPEALS FOR 1988

Schsne of assistance :

AUSTUDY 150

TEAS 9

Postgraduate Awards 5

Total finalised 164

DECISIONS REVIEWED IN 1988 BY STATE/TERRITORY AND RESULT

State/Territory of hearing Appeals pending

31/12/86

Appeals received Appeals withdrawn

Decisions reviewed Appeals dis­

allowed

Decisions affirmed Decisions set aside

Decisions varied Decisions pending

31/12/87(1)

NEW SOUIH WALES 1 29 5 24 15 4 0 6

VICTORIA 0 5 3 31 - 31 15 0 2

QUEENSLAND 6 37 4 22 - 24 8 1 6

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 3 19 2 21 - 16 3 0 1

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 0 16 0 16 - 10 4 2 0

TASMANIA 0 9 1 9 - 7 1 0 0

NORTHERN TERRITORY AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TERRITORY 4 3 0 8 3 2 3 1

TOTAL 14 166 15 149 - 106 37 0 16

(1) Includes 1 adjourned and 6 postponed cases not resolved by 31/12/88.

TABLE 21 STUDENT ASSISTANCE REVIEW TRIBUNAL: DECISIONS REVIEWED IN 1988 BY REGULATION AND RESULTS

Section of Act/ Regulation No. Cases finalised

Appeals withdrawn Appeals disallowed

Decisions affirmed Decisions set aside

Decisions varied

Act Section 10 4 4

31A 1 1

Regulation 29A 1 1

30 8 1 3 4

32 3 3

34(1)(e) 4 1 2 1

(f) 2 1 1

(g) 1 1

(h) 12 1 6 5

(j) 12 3 7 2

(k) 22 4 17 1

(m) 20 1 15 3 1

34D 1 1

34E 4 2 2

37 4 2 1 1

41 2 1 1

42 26 3 17 6

43 3 2 1

44 20 1 13 2 4

45 9 6 3

58 3 2 1

63 1 1

60 1 1

TOTAL 164 15 106 37 6

43

TABLE 22 STUDENT ASSISTANCE R E V I E W TRIBUNAL: HEARINGS 1988

Place of hearing

Number of half-day sittings *

Number of day sittings

Decisions reviewed

SYDNEY 2 3 21

ARMIDALE - 1 3

NEWCASTLE - - -

MELBOURNE - 12 49

BRISBANE - 12 35

TOWNSVILLE - 2 2

PERTH 3 3 21

ADELAIDE 2 5 16

HOBART 3 2 9

CANBERRA 1 3 8

TOTAL 11 43 164

* Two cases or fewer normally constitute a half-day of hearings; normally five cases are heard in a full day.

4 4

Appendix II

STUDENT ASSISTANCE REVIEW TRIBUNAL - MEMBERSHIP AS AT 31 DECEMBER 1988

CONVENORS

Mr L J McAuley Dr A J Bradbrook Mr R E Kenny Mr H A Wallwork, QC Ms I Y Harris

Mr K F Mackie Ms P M Burton

ACTING CONVENORS

Ms Μ I Evans

Ms P C Weeks

Mrs E R Clarke

MEMBERS

NEW SOUTH WALES

Tertiary

Armldale

Dr G J Lewis

Mr G R Quaife

Newcastle

Mrs Η M Vaile

Sydney

Mr R L Anderson

Dr J R Angel OBE

Ms M L Claflin

New South Wales Victoria Queensland

Western Australia South Australia Tasmania Australian Capital Territory

Vice Mr K F Mackie, Tasmania Vice Ms P M Burton, Australian Capital Territory Vice Mr R E Kenny, Queensland

Lecturer, University of New England

Senior Lecturer in History, University of New England

Lecturer in Social Sciences Newcastle College of Advanced Education

Lecturer in Law University of Sydney

Senior Lecturer in History University of Sydney

Senior Lecturer in English Macquarie University

45.

Mrs R Y Colebrook Principal, Randwick College of TAPE

Mrs E M Goodman Lecturer in Law

Macquarie University

Dr D K Kennedy Head of School of Wool and Pastoral

Sciences, University of New South Wales

Dr A R Moon Deputy Head of the School of Physics

and Materials, NSW Institute of Technology

Mr E H Oliver Senior Lecturer in Statistics

Macquarie University

Ms M A O'Loughlin Lecturer in Education

Sydney Institute of Education

Ms A G Rivers Lecturer in Education

Sydney Institute of Education

Secondary

Ms R Brennan Teacher, Executive Member of Parents' and

Citizens' Association

Mr P Cornish Headmaster, SCEGGS Redlands

Mr H Dixon Regional Guidance Officer, Department of

Education

Ms G Goozee Chief Research Officer, Policy Unit, NSW

Department of TAPE

Mr R Phipps Master of Senior School, St Andrew's

Cathedral School

Mr G Rowe Regional Guidance Officer, Department of

Education

Mr A Ruby Professional Assistant to the

Director-General, NSW Department of Education

Mr I Sheppard Regional Guidance Officer, Department of Education

Ms J Sims Careers Education Consultant, Strathfield

Education Centre

Mrs P Webster Careers Adviser, St Patrick's College

46.

VICTORIA

Tertiary

Mr V E Callaghan Student Counsellor, Warrnambool Institute of Advanced Education

Mrs J F Critchett Lecturer in Education, Warrnambool Institute of Advanced Education

Mrs L C Graham Senior Student Counsellor, Bendigo

College of Advanced Education

Secondary

Mr R A Armitage Former Director, Ministry of Education

Mr K P Balson Former Director, Ministry of Education

Mr V Colvin Former Principal and Vice-President of

the Victorian Secondary Teachers' Association

Mrs A I Cowie Pastoral Director, Santa Maria College

Miss F S Dickson Former Principal, Banyule High School

Mr A D P Dyer Former Headmaster, Camberwell Grammar

School

Mr Η H Gallagher Former Assistant Director of Secondary Education, Ministry of Education

Mr R H Ginger Regional Director, Ministry of Education

Mrs R C Jones Deputy Chairperson, Catholic Education Office of Victoria

Ms J Lawrence School Council member

Mrs S M Nikakis Faculty Co-ordinator, Catholic Regional College, North Keilor

Dr G A Reid Former Principal and President of the

Victorian Secondary Teachers' Association

Mr J W Sargeant Principal, Footscray Technical School

Mr D P Sexton Chairman, Secondary Staff, Catholic

Education Office of Victoria

Mr T Wilson Secondary Education Officer, Catholic

Education Office of Victoria

47 .

QUEENSLAND

Tertiary

Brisbane

Dr C M Burke Senior Lecturer, Brisbane College of

Advanced Education

Professor E M Byrne Professor of Education, University of Queensland

Dr J P Farrell Principal Lecturer, Department of

Education Studies, Brisbane College of Advanced Education

Professor T J Heath Professor of Veterinary Anatomy University of Queensland

Mr H G Linacre Part-time law student

Mr W B Lane Lecturer in Law, University at Queensland

Ms H G McBride Senior Lecturer, University of

Queensland

Mr J E Newton Barrister

Dr Η E Parker Assistant Director of TAFE Operations,

Queensland Department of Education

Ms B Robertson Student Counsellor

Mr J. Smith Student

Ms J Westrip

Townsville

Student

Mr P J Burns Lecturer in Indonesian, James Cook

University of North Queensland

Mr F Curran Careers and Appointments Officer, James

Cook University of North Queensland

Ms D Elliott Student

Mr K J McCarthy Regional Inspector, Queensland Department of Education

48.

Dr J L Nicol Senior Lecturer in Physics, James Cook

University of North Queensland

Mr J Taylor

Secondary

Student

Mr A J Frost Second Master, St Paul's School

Mr W J B Heath President, Queensland Council of Parents' and Citizens' Associations Inc.

Mr T w Lambert Principal Education Officer - Secondary, Brisbane Catholic Education Office

Mr F G Thomas

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Tertiary

Executive Member, Queensland Council of Parents and Citizens' Associations

Dr N G Ashton Lecturer, University of Western Australia

Mrs J M Barker Head of the School of Occupational

Therapy, Western Australian Institute of Technology

Mr R A Cotton Principal, Perth Technical College

Dr A S O'Brien

Secondary

Senior Planning Officer, Western Australian College of Advanced Education

Mr D Forrester Senior Assistant Crown Solicitor

Mr M Hughes School Co-ordinator, The Foothills School

Mrs W Loxley Counsellor, Trinity College

Mrs C A Mercer Former Superintendent of Secondary

Education, WA Ministry of Education

Mr M A Piggott Former Principal, Como Senior High School

49.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Tertiary

Mr M R Bramwell Student Welfare Officer, Flinders University Union Incorporated

Ms A G Mackinnon Lecturer, School of Library and

Information Management, South Australian Institute of Technology

Dr J L Mclnnes Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide

Dr J F Wheldrake

Secondary

Senior Lecturer in Biology, Flinders University of South Australia

Mrs M Crowley Principal, Thebarton High School

Ms A M Dwyer Executive Officer, SA Independent Schools

Board Inc

Mr W Griffiths Principal, St Paul's College

Mr W Jones Senior Education Officer, Department of

Education

Ms P Parha Deputy Principal, Gepps Cross High School

Mr I S Wilson

TASMANIA

President, SA Association of State School Organisations Inc

Mr R C C Clennett President, Tasmanian University Union

Ms Μ I Evans Legal Practitioner

Mr J A Francis Head Teacher, Student Service's Unit,

Hobart Technical College

Ms M G O' Callaghan Senior Tutor, University of Tasmania

Mr A P Taskunas Senior Administrative Officer, University of Tasmania

Mrs V Walsh Senior Lecturer, Department of Teacher

Education, University of Tasmania

Mr B M Wise Counsellor, Tasmanian Institute of

Technology

50.

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

Mr T

Mr D

Miss

Ms P

Crick

Patterson

Principal Lecturer and Dean of Students, Canberra College of Advanced Education

Academic Registrar, Canberra College of Advanced Education

B Travers

Weeks

Senior Lecturer, Australian National University

Lecturer in Law, Australian National University

APPENDIX III

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARDS MEMBERSHIP OF CENTRAL SELECTION COMMITTEE AT 31 DECEMBER 1988

Professor G V H Wilson (Chair)

Mr F Harably

Professor M Taylor

Dr H Preston

Dr D Gibson

Ms T Ellery

Rector, Australian Defence Force Academy

Secretary, Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee

Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Sydney

Department of Employment, Education and Training

Director, Queensland Institute of Technology

President, National Union of Students

POSTGRADUATE COURSE AWARDS MEMBERSHIP OF CENTRAL SELECTION COMMITTEE AT 31 DECEMBER 1988

Professor G V H Wilson (Chair)

Dr A Mackie

Professor M Brennan

Rector, Australian Defence Force Academy

Assistant Director, Phillip Institute of Technology

Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Sydney

Mr F Hambly Secretary, Australian

Vice-Chancellors' Committee

Dr H Preston

Ms T Ellery

Department of Employment, Education and Training

President, National Union of Students

52.

*) 7801,44 103578

89/21 026 Cat. No. 89 1065 3