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Estimates Committees - Reports from Senate Estimates Committees B and F on Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year 1976-77


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Parliamentary Paper No. 304/1976

The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEES A, B, C, D, E AND F

Reports to the Senate on Departmental Estimates 1976-77

Reports of Committees B and F Brought up and ordered to be printed 19 October 1976

Reports of Committees A, C, D and E Brought up and ordered to be printed 21 October 1976

The Commonwealth Government Printer

Canberra 1978

Printed by Authonty by the Commonwealth Government Printer

CONTENTS

Page

1. Resolution of the Senate-28 April 1976 1

2. Estimates Committee A— R e p o r t ..................................................................................................... 5

Appendix-Written answers to q u e s tio n s ............................................................... 11

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 9 September ....................................................................................... 49

16 September ....................................................................................... 50

5 October ............................................................................................ 53

7 October ............................................................................................ 57

20 October ............................................................................................ 62

3. Estimates Committee B— R e p o r t ..................................................................................................... 65

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 16 September ....................................................................................... 69

5 October ........................................................................................... 72

Appendix 1 — Written answers to questions, Budget sittings ................................. 75

Appendix 2— Written answers to questions, Autumn s i t t i n g s ................................. 99

4. Estimates Committee C— R e p o r t ..................................................................................................... 155

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 8 September ...................................................................................... 159

14 September ...................................................................................... 160

16 September ...................................................................................... 161

5 October ........................................................................................... 163

7 October ........................................................................................... 166

19 October ........................................................................................ 168

Appendix-Written answers to q u e s tio n s .............................................................. 171

5. Estimates Committee D— R e p o r t ..................................................................................................... 185

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 7 September ...................................................................................... 189

21 September ...................................................................................... 190

7 October ........................................................................................... 192

12 October ........................................................................................... 193

14 October ................................................................... 195

Appendix-Written answers to questions .............................................................. 199

6. Estimates Committee E— R e p o r t .............................................................................................................285

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 14 September ..............................................................................................293

21 September ..............................................................................................294

12 October ...................................................................................................296

14 October ...................................................................................................298

20 October ...................................................................................................301

A ppendix-Written answers to q u e s ti o n s ..................................................................... 305

7. Estimates Committee F — R e p o r t ...................................................................................................... 327

Minutes of Proceedings 1976— 9 September .....................................................................................333

16 September ........................................................................................334

21 September . ................................................................................... 335

12 October .............................................................................................337

14 October .............................................................................................339

19 October ................... .... ....................................................................340

A ppendix-Written answers to q u e s ti o n s ............................................................... 343

iv

RESOLUTION OF THE SENATE

RESOLUTION PASSED ON 28 APRIL 1976

P a r t i c u l a r s o f P r o p o s e d A d d i t i o n a l E x p e n d i t u r e 1 9 7 5 - 7 6 - P a p e r s -

REFERENCE t o E s t im a t e s C o m m it t e e s: The Minister for Industry and Commerce (Senator Cotton), by Command of His Excellency the Governor-General, laid upon the Table the following Papers: Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending 30

June 1976. Particulars of Certain Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1976. Statement of Savings Expected in Annual Appropriations made by Appropriation Acts

(Nos 1 and 2) 1975-76. Reference to Estimates Committees: The Minister for Environment, Housing and Community Development (Senator Greenwood), by leave, moved— (1) That the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year

ending 30 June 1976 and the Particulars of Certain Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1976 be referred herewith to Estimates Com­ mittees for examination and report. (2) That, unless otherwise ordered, the Committees deal with departmental estimates as

follows: Estimates Committee A Department of Administrative Services Parliament

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Department of National Resources Department of Foreign Affairs Department of Defence. Estimates Committee B

Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development Depaitment of Employment and Industrial Relations Attorney-General’s Department Department of Business and Consumer Affairs. Estimates Committee C

Department of Industry and Commerce Department of Overseas Trade Department of the Treasury Department of Primary Industry. Estimates Committee D

Department of Education Department of Transport Postal and Telecommunications Department. Estimates Committee E

Department of Social Security Department of Health Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs Department of Aboriginal Affairs

Department of Repatriation.

1

Estimates Committee F Department of Science Department of the Northern Territory Department of Construction Department of the Capital Territory. (3) That the Committees report to the Senate on or before Tuesday, 18 May 1976. Debate ensued. Question— put and passed.

2

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

REPORT TO THE SENATE

,

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.

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee A has the honour to report to the Senate.

1. On 19 August 1976 the Senate referred to the Committee the Departmental Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments:

Administrative Services Parliament Prime Minister and Cabinet National Resources

Foreign Affairs and Defence.

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates and has received explanations of them from the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon. C. L. Laucke (in relation to the Parliamentary Departments), from the Minister for Administrative Services, Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, and from offices of the Departments concerned. Cop­

ies of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard reports of the evidence taken by the Committee (on 16 September, 5 October and 7 October) are tabled for the informa­ tion of the Senate in connection with the Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 1976-77 and the Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 1976-77. Additional written replies received since the

Committee’s hearings are included as an Appendix to this Report.

3. In its last report to the Senate, in May of this year, the Committee made certain suggestions which, it was hoped, would assist the working of the Estimates Com­ mittees ’ operations as a whole. Without restating those proposals in this Report, they related to a procedure whereby explanatory notes would be made available to Senators as early as practicable, preferably at the time of the presentation of the

Appropriation Bills to the Parliament, and the subsequent possibility of preliminary examination of the notes by the Committees in private session, prior to the public examination of the Estimates.

4. This Committee acknowledges with considerable pleasure the response to its suggestions by all of those concerned. The Committee understands that the Treasury took an initiative in organising the early production of departmental explanatory notes, but that could not have been achieved without the co-operation of all depart­

mental officers involved. The early production of those notes made it possible for this Committee, and others, to hold preliminary discussions and to give notice to depart­ ments of proposed areas of questioning. While it is recognised that this system may not have operated as fully or as effectively as possible on this first occasion, this Com­

mittee holds firmly to the view, expressed in its last report, that the new procedures will greatly improve the Estimates Committee operation. Responsibility for this improvement and effectiveness must be shared by all participating Senators and de­ partmental witnesses, but, if this Committee’s recent experience is a reliable guide, it

is likely that the new procedure will prove successful.

5. Where Committee members, or other Senators, give notice of areas of ques­ tioning, by reference to Division numbers, subdivision numbers or item numbers, and departmental officers respond by providing detailed answers to those specific ques­ tions, a problem can arise if further questions are asked without notice, in relation to

5

other areas. This Committee determined, at its first meeting, that in such circum­ stances it is perfectly proper to permit the questions to be put but it is equally proper to accept the situation that, if full answers cannot be given immediately, written replies should be accepted. The principal reason for this attitude arises from one of the basic elements in the new procedure—the desirability of avoiding the attendance of the large numbers of officers who previously attended on what might be described as a ‘contingency ’ or ‘stand-by ’ basis. On this occasion the Committee was pleased to note that, in many instances, questions of that type were answered adequately by the officers who were in attendance. It appears that the Minister’s chief supporting officers, who are normally those most closely associated with the overall preparation of the Estimates, are perfectly capable of answering most questions, other than those requiring detailed specialist knowledge in particular areas. However, consideration perhaps should be given to the position of those officers who, on behalf of their De­ partments, would no doubt prefer to be in a position where, having been given at least some general notice of interest in questioning, they might be supported by other relevant officers, qualified to give to the Committee a fuller answer than might other­ wise be possible.

6. Having made these general comments on aspects of the new procedure, the Committee now refers to certain particular matters, as follows:

(a ) A ustralian Electoral Office. During the examination of the estimates for the Electoral Office, the Com­ mittee was informed that approval had been received from the Public Service Board for twenty-five additional positions to be created in the office to assist in the anticipated increase workload flowing from indus­ trial ballots to be undertaken by the Office. However, in the explanatory notes relating to the administration of the Commonwealth Electoral Act, under which the provision included for ‘industrial ballots and other mis­ cellaneous elections’ is retained at the same amount as during the pre­ vious year, it was stated that: Because of the lack of any basis for estimation at this stage, no provision has been included in this Item for increased costs likely to result from the recently introduced legislation offer­ ing industrial organisations the right to have the Australian Electoral Office conduct ballots for their offices at government expense. Similarly there has been some recent increase in the number of such ballots being requested under present legislation but no basis exists for esti­ mation of the likely extent of further growth in these requests.

Explanations were given to the Committee (see p. 29 of Hansard for 16 September) that the twenty-five positions were sought on the basis of a pool to be used as the workload evolved, and that no estimate of increased costs for the conduct of industrial ballots had been included be­ cause it was not possible, at the time the estimates were prepared, to know what the growth in costs would be. The Committee draws attention to this matter as an example of a situation which can develop whereby an impression of saving can be given (in this case $109 000) when in fact there are clearly going to be additional costs arising directly from recently passed legislation. The estimated increased activity in this case has given rise to an approved increase in staff positions, to which staff are being recruited, but apparently no comparable estimate has been possible in respect of the other costs involved.

( b) Use o f computers The attention of the Committee was directed on a number of occasions to the use of computers within the public service. Although the Committee

6

has been informed that the Public Service Board monitors the use of computers in the various departments, with a view to ensuring the integrated, maximum usage of the equipment, the Committee recommends that the Senate should consider referring the subject of

public service computer use to one of its Legislative and General Purpose Standing Committees for inquiry and report. In making this recommendation the Committee is conscious that such a follow-up investigation might, with benefit, become an established practice in the

Senate. Following recommendations of Estimates Committees in 1973 and 1974 the Senate referred the question of the ‘ordinary annual services of the government’ to the Standing Committee on Constitutional and Legal Affairs and that Committee considered and reported upon the

subject. It appears logical and sensible that matters arising from Estimates Committee deliberations should form the bases for such further Standing Committee examination, and the continuation of the practice warrants the consideration of the Senate.

(c) Conservation o f valuable collections During the examination of the separate items relating to the Australian War Memorial, the National Library of Australia and the Australian National Gallery attention was drawn to the lack of sufficient conservators employed to preserve the immensely valuable collections

stored by those three bodies. For example, the Director of the War Memorial informed the Committee that: We have one conservator for a collection worth over $100m which runs from fine arts, textiles, paper, ceramics to wood. There is no course in this country for conservators and the

salaries paid here are considerably below what we would need in order to attract trained qualified professional conservators from abroad (Hansard, 16 September, p. 26).

and the Acting Director of the National Gallery said: Before any work is released from the Collection for exhibition or for use in any establishment at all its condition is checked, and if any work has to be done on it this work is done by a conservator to whom we pay a fee for her service. In this country today there is no institution that is engaged in training conservators to do more than look after that institution’s own needs, so there is not a number of people whom we might be able to pick

up at any time and put on out staff to look into such things as the remounting of all the works on paper and the restretching of all those old paintings now on canvas that are very frail. We have one person on our staff who is at present completing a course in chemistry at the

College of Advanced Education. His hope is that he will eventually be one of the conservation people on the Gallery staff but before he can be given the full title of conservator he will have to work in another institution under somebody who is extremely skilled in all those things about which the College of Advanced Education does not tell him

or has not told him up to now. We also have a problem in attracting people to work in this field in this country because it is not a well-paid profession in relation to what good people can earn if they are engaged in private practice (Hansard, 7 October, p. 302-3).

There is clearly a shortage of conservators throughout the world and little opportunity for specialist training. The Committee believes that there should be a degree of urgency in taking whatever action is possible to train people as conservators, who might then be employed, at appropriate

levels of remuneration, in the task of preserving Australia’s multimillion dollar collections. The action might properly include the establishment of a formal course within Australia for the training of conservators.

This recommendation should be drawn to the attention of the Prime Minister, the Minister for Administrative Services, the Minister for Education and the Public Service Board.

7

(d) Departmental representatives The Committee wishes to refer again to a subject which has been raised on previous occasions—the level of departmental representation before the Committee. Although it is obviously necessary for such representation to consist, primarily, of those officers who are most familiar with the detailed areas of proposed investigation, particularly under the new system referred to previously, the members of the Committee believe that the Minister should be accompanied by an officer or officers of the most senior levels of the Second Division of the Service who should be able to give answers of a breadth and responsibility not necessarily available to officers of lesser levels within the Department. The Committee is aware that many intergovernmental and interdepartmental discussions and negotiations, for example, are conducted by very senior officers and believes that their personal appearance and participation would be of considerable value to the hearings.

(e ) Explanatory notes The Committee expresses its appreciation to the Minister for Administrat­ ive Services (Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers), who, in his capacity as Leader of the Government in the Senate, took action to table all explana­ tory notes in the Senate. For some years this Committee has recom­ mended that action and is grateful to the Minister for giving effect to the recommendations. Public access to the information contained in the notes conforms with the basic principle of accountability of government to Par­ liament.

Reference has also been made from time to time in this Committee’s reports to the form and content of the explanatory notes provided by de­ partments. There is often a disparity in the levels achieved by various de­ partments and the Committee reminds the Senate of the necessity for these documents to be frank and full. A note of the type that says an increase is to cover a certain number of new positions, or new areas of responsibility, without indicating the necessity for the positions or the new areas covered, is not sufficient for a proper understanding. In fact, expla­ nations of that type, rare though they may be, will almost certainly evoke the detailed pursuit of further information. In the Committee’s view, the inclusion of full information in the first instance is likely to avoid such a pursuit and also the attendance of extra officers.

The Committee also wishes to refer to what might appear to be a minor matter but what has not proved to be so—the numbering of pages in the volumes of explanatory notes. Members relate their questions to the explanatory notes, almost without exception, and this becomes difficult

and confusing when those notes have no page numbers. This is particu­ larly the case where, as with the Division for the Australia Council, there is a ‘one line’ item and no opportunity to refer even to subdivision or line items. The Committee hopes that no explanatory notes will be provided in

future without clear page numbering.

6. As on previous occasions, the Committee expresses its appreciation of the assist­ ance given by the President of the Senate, the Minister for Administrative Services and the officers who attended with them before the Committee.

8

J. P. SIM Chairman

Estimates Committee A

Appendix

DEPARTM ENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

19 October 1976

Mr A. Gumming Thom The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Department of Administrative Services

Attached are ten copies each of seven statements that have been prepared in accord­ ance with undertakings given by the Minister for Administrative Services on 5 October 1976 that additional information would be provided to the Committee on the several matters concerned.

In addition to the further information supplied, it is considered that the Committee should be aware of two erroneous answers contained in the Hansard record of replies to questions asked at the hearings:

(a) On page 7 of the Hansard of 16 September 1976 Senator McLaren was advised that the ‘total fleet would be reduced from 5673 to 5169’. The figure 5673 should be 5473. (b) On page 213 of the Hansard of 5 October 1976 Senator Douglas McClelland

was advised that all expenditure for Mr McLeay’s overseas visit in June-July 1976 was brought to account in the 1975-76 financial year. An examination of Departmental records has disclosed that this was not correct. It is estimated that an additional $4000 is to be brought to account in the 1976-77

financial year in respect of this visit. The total estimated cost of the visit is $15 100.

The statements have yet to be considered by the Minister and you will be immedi­ ately advised as soon as endorsement is received.

P. J. LAWLER Secretary

11

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard 5 October 1976: page 210.

Consideration of Division 142 —Conveyance of Members of Parliament and Others

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought details of costs of certain journeys undertaken by Ministers in chartered aircraft. Earlier figures were previously pro­ vided in answer to Parliamentary Question No. 171 on 5 May 1976.

Answer:

The following schedule sets out those accounts that have been received since May:

Requested by Approval Particulars Cost

Hon. I. M. Sinclair Yes 23.2.76 Sydney-Armidale

$

240.00

Yes 12.3.76 Sydney-Armidale 240.00

Hon. P. J. Nixon 1.6.75 to 16.3.76 - Orbost-Canberra- 4 493.05

(standing approval) Orbost (17 trips) Yes 19.2.76 Canberra-Sale-Canberra 240.00

Yes 26.2.76 Mel bourne-Orbost 209.00

Yes 1.3.76 Canberra-Sale 292.25

Hon. R. J. D. Hunt Yes 11.3.76 Tamworth-Moree 130.00

Hon. K. E. Newman Yes 16.1.76 Launceston-St Helens-Launceston 77.00

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard5 October 1976: page 213

Consideration of Division 148, subdivision 3—Overseas Property Services, Item 01—Rent

Senator Knight requested the estimated amounts comprising the $11.62 million appropriation required to meet rental payments for each overseas post during 1976-77.

Answer:

The information is set out in the attached schedules.

SCHEDULE OF ESTIMATED RENTS 1976-77

Estimated Estimated

rental rental

Post payments Post payments

$ $

A c c r a ........................

Algiers ...................

Ankara . . . . .

.................... 232 831

.................... 19716

.................... 279563

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Post

Estimated rental payments Post

Estimated rental payments

Bahrain .

Beirut . .

Belgrade . Berlin (West) Berne . .

Bonn . .

Brasilia Brussels Buenos Aire Baghdad

Cairo .

Capetown Chicago Christchurcl Colombo

Copenhagen Dacca D ares Salaa Dublin

East Berlin Geneva Hamburg Hanoi .

Holy See Hong Kong Honiara Honolulu

Islamabad Jeddah Jakarta Johannesburg Kingston Kuala Lumpur Karachi Lae .

Lagos Lima Lisbon London

Los Angele Madrid Manila Messina

$ $

96 110 Mexico C i t y ....................................... 61 355

23 000 M i l a n ................................................. 34 008

125 898 M o n t r e a l ............................................. 7 812

26 724 Moscow ............................................. 102 875

133 208 Nairobi ............................................. 52 722

251 436 N a u r u .................................................. 42 459

44 820 New Delhi ........................................ 21960

320 755 New York C - G ................................... 512 925

160 836 New York U N ................................... 139 800

270 000 N o u m e a ............................................. 24 000

65 242 O s a k a .................................................. 50 208

16 997 Ottawa ............................................. 71435

87 664 Paris ................................................. 1 102 460

7 404 P e k i n g .................................................. 95 700

10 380 Port of Spain .................................. 8 160

16 809 Port Moresby ................................... 51377

94 150 Pretoria ............................................. 20 700

23 252 R a n g o o n ............................................. 26 354

38 950 Rio de Janeiro ................................... 20 000

220 690 R o m e .................................................. 296 000

440 198 Nicosia ............................................. 14 360

34 140 UNESCO P a r i s ................................... 31839

18 216 San Francisco ................................... 171880

5 300 S a n t i a g o ............................................. 77 320

414 611 Sao Paulo ......................................... 60 480

8 550 Seoul .................................................. 133 790

23 500 Singapore ......................................... 152 552

38 757 Stockholm ......................................... 172 835

186 695 Suva .................................................. 204 040

440 934 Tehran ............................................. 339 974

20 704 Tel Aviv ............................................. 41640

72 680 The Hague ......................................... 273 498

189 300 T o k y o .................................................. 819 492

25 860 Toronto ............................................. 29 088

38 200 M a l t a .................................................. 21 674

169 260 Vancouver ......................................... 28 500

103 383 Vienna ............................................. 265 505

44 868 V ie n tia n e ............................................. 11 544

492 126 Warsaw .............................................. 124 829

69 000 W a s h in g to n ......................................... 16 800

146 633 Wellington ......................................... 80 248

157 976 ----------------------------------------------------------------

5 916 11620 000

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard5 October 1976: page 217.

Consideration of Division 152—Australian Government Publishing Service, sub­ division 2—Administrative Expenses, Item 02—Office Requisites and Equipment, Stationery and Printing

13

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought details of the distribution costs and printing costs of the Commonwealth Record.

Answer:

The details are as follows:

• Distribution Costs—$ 1800 per issue on average • Printing Costs (run on)—$780 per issue on average

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard5 October 1976: pages 217 and 225.

Consideration of Division 152—Australian Government Publishing Service, sub­ division 2 —Administrative Expenses, item 02—Office Requisites and Equipment, Stationery and Printing

Senator McLaren sought information regarding the envelopes currently being supplied to the Parliament.

Answer:

The envelopes supplied to Senators are distributed by the Australian Government Publishing Service on behalf of the Australian Government Stores and Tender Board.

All envelopes received by AGPS are subjected to random tests and the quality of the adhesive has generally been satisfactory.

The comment has been made that over-application of water can remove thinner layers of the gum and lead to the problems mentioned by Senator McLaren. How­ ever, AGSTB has been asked to investigate further the quality of envelopes supplied particularly the adhesive.

The comment on the use of self-seal envelopes has been noted. However, these en­ velopes are more costly than those now supplied and the security of the contents of this type of envelope is suspect (i.e. the envelope can be opened, the contents read and the envelope resealed without any apparent sign).

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard 5 October 1976—pages 217 and 2 18.

Consideration of Division 153— Australian Office of Information

Senator Sibraa sought information on the number of AOI overseas staff with­ drawn, the savings made and any additional costs incurred as a result of the with­ drawal of staff.

A nswer:

By government decision of 2 February 1976, six AOI positions overseas were withdrawn. This reduced staffing from four to two in London, from two to one in Washington and abolished positions in Osaka, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

14

Savings in overseas allowances—payable from Division 153/1 / 0 1 —resulting from these withdrawals will amount to $60 406 at current rates in 1976-77. In all cases except Osaka the allowances which would have been payable would have included a rent allowance to cover the cost of residential accommodation. It is estimated that a

further saving of $12 900 per annum will be made on residential accommodation in Osaka. This amount would have been payable by the Overseas Property Bureau.

Additional savings estimated at $22 000 spread over a number of items of admin­ istrative expenditure such as travel and publicity materials will result from closing AOI posts in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Osaka.

Further savings will be made on salaries of locally engaged support staff and other administrative expenses which were paid by the Department of Foreign Affairs. These details are not known to this Department. Provision has been made under Division 153/2/01 for an estimated expenditure

of $15 000 for fares to repatriate these officers and their families and under Division 153/2/07 for expenditure of $8000 for freight to Australia of the officers’ personal effects. Most of this expenditure would not have occurred in the current financial year if these officers had continued to the end of their normal term of posting. But it would have occurred in 1977-78.

The only additional funds sought which are directly attributable to the closure of posts is an increased provision under Division 153/1/01 totalling $2100 for travel in the United States and Japan. This provision will allow the AOI officers remaining in those countries to maintain some contact with the areas previously serviced by the

closed posts.

The savings and additional costs associated with the closing of overseas offices are summarised below:

Additional

Annual costs in

Ite m / Description savings 1976-77

$ $

153/1/01—Salaries and a llo w a n c e s ............................. ................... 60 406 2 100

153/2 —Administrative expenses ........................

148/3/01 — Savings in r e n t ...........................................

................... 22 000

................... 12 900

23 000

95 306 25 100

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard 5 October 1976: page 219

Consideration of Division 157, subdivision 1— Christmas Island—Salaries and Pay­ ments in the nature of Salary

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland requested that the Committee be supplied with a breakdown of the people who are referred to generally as Australia-based staff as distinct from locally engaged staff.

Answer: The estimated average employment for 1976-77 is as follows:

Australia Locally

Category based engaged Total

Administration ........................ 7 10 17

P o l i c e ............................................ 3 17 20

T e a c h e r s ....................................... 52 .. 52

O t h e r ............................................ 13 42 55

Total 75 69 144

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77—Department of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard5 October 1976: page 223

Consideration of Division 161—National Library of Australia, subdivision 1. For expenditure under the National Library Act—Running Expenses

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought a breakdown, in terms of percen­ tages, of the increased usage of the Special Resources Collections of the Library.

Answer:

The details for each of the various collections are as follows:

MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Percentage increase

Year Reading Room attendance over 4 years

1972- 73 1 060

1973- 74 996

1974- 75 1 173

1975- 76 1 420 33.96

Call slips lodged

1972- 73 1 590

1973- 74 1 850

1974- 75 2 222

1975- 76 ....................................... 2 557 60.82

Photocopies completed

1972- 73 9 500

1973- 74 10 800

1974- 75 22 800

1975- 76 60 000 315

Oral History— Use of tapes and cassettes from 1972-73 to date:

1972- 73 ....................................... 50

1973- 74 ....................................... 76

1974- 75 ....................................... 160

1975- 76 ....................................... 378 700

MAP COLLECTION

Percentage increase

Year Reference inquiries over 4 years

1972- 73 2 493

1973- 74 2 797

1974- 75 3 189

1975- 76 3 501 40.5

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FILM COLLECTION

Percentage increase

Year Film borrowing over 4 years

1972- 73 40 022

1973- 74 41 601

1974- 75 43 932

1975- 76* 42 841 7.1

* Film borrowing figures in this year reflect the necessity, because of staff ceilings, to impose a quota system.

MUSIC COLLECTION

Percentage increase

Year Reference inquiries over 2 years

1974- 75 ............................. .... . 2 631

1975- 76 5 526 110

The Music Section was established in 1973. Statistics available only from first full year of operation, 1974-75.

PICTORIAL COLLECTION

Percentage increase

Year Reference inquiries over 4 years

1972- 73 ....................................... 663

1973- 74 1 056

1974- 75 1 759

1975- 76 2 067 311

Photographs ordered

1972- 73 14 707

1973- 74 22 130

1974- 75 20 103

1975- 76 28 338 193

Reading Room attendance

1972- 73 ....................................... 560

1973- 74 ....................................... 910

1974- 75 ....................................... 809

1975- 76 ....................................... 861 54

17

AUSTRALIAN SENATE

Canberra, A.C.T. 19 October 1976

Senator J. P. Sim Chairman Estimates Committee A The Senate Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Mr Chairman, During the course of the consideration of the Estimates for the Department of the Senate by Estimates Committee A, Senator Douglas McClelland requested further information with regard to costs involved in reproducing certain tabled reports where insufficient copies were made available for distribution to Senators.

Senate departmental records reveal that on five occasions this year the Senate Reproduction Section has printed reports under the above-mentioned circumstances. The number of copies of the reports reproduced varied from two to twenty copies depending on the number of requests received from Senators, the number of pages in­ volved in producing copies of the document and the workload of the Section at that time. It is estimated that $150 has been spent to provide this service for honourable Senators. The estimate is calculated on the use of paper, reproduction masters, ink and an appropriate element of rental for the use of machines. No allowance has been made for wages of the officers carrying out the work as the jobs were undertaken in normal office hours.

Yours sincerely,

J. R. ODGERS Clerk o f the Senate

18

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Mr A. Gumming Thom Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Sir,

Estimates: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

During the Committee hearing when the Estimates of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet were under consideration, additional information in respect of a number of items was requested by Committee members. Attached for the information of the Committee are supplementary notes on:

The cost of the Hay and Bland Committees The Governor-General’s use of VIP aircraft Wages for Lodge staff prior to November 1975 Details of the Governor-General’s office staff

Details of the estimated cost of investitures for the Australian honours system Details of provision for office requisites, freight, and ’other’ in the Governor- General’s office incidental vote.

DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Senator McLaren asked for the cost of the Hay and Bland Committees. These are given below.

Hay Committee

Yours faithfully,

J. G. HINTON Assistant Secretary Services Branch

Division 500/2—Administrative Expenses

$

Salaries 37 300

14 636 Travelling and subsistence Office Requisites, Printing Postage, Telephones . 5 100 (estimate)

2 000 (estimate)

59 036

Bland Committee Salaries Fees

68 300 21 800 (estimate) 14 485 7 500 (estimate)

3 700 (estimate) 8 330

Travelling and Subsistence Office Requisites, Printing Postage, Telephones . Consultants . . . .

19

Advertising Rent . .

Freight .

Other . .

2 163 1 751 365 2 287

128 681

Precise costs for office requisites and for postage and telephones related to these Committees could not, in all cases, be separated from general departmental expendi­ ture in these areas. Figures for these categories of expenditure have therefore had to be estimated.

In relation to the item ‘Fees’ for the Bland Committee, Sir Henry Bland has not yet claimed for fees due to him after mid June 1976. An allowance for those outstand­ ing claims has been included in the above figure of $21 800.

7 October 1976

J. G. HINTON Assistant Secretary Services Branch

DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Division 504—Conveyance of Governor-General, Minister of State and Others by RAAF and Department of Transport Aircraft

Item 01 -R A A F, $ 1 223 000 Senator McLaren asked what proportion of this Item was for the use of aircraft by the Governor-General.

Information already supplied to Senator McClaren by Senator Withers (Hansard, 18 August 1976, pages 158, 159) covered the first nine months of 1975-76. Similar figures for the whole of 1975-76 are:

$

BAC 1-1 1 220.3 hours @ $797.18 per h o u r ......................... 175 618

HS 748 VIP 113.7 hours @ $224.80 per h o u r .......................... 25 560

Mystere 20 34.1 hours @ $449.82 per hour .......................... 15 339

216 517

$216 517 is 19 per cent of the total cost of RAAF VIP aircraft flying hours during 1975-76. 6

In the 1976-77 estimate of$l 223 000 no specific apportionment is made in rela­ tion to the Governor-General’s or other users’ flights. A 19 per cent apportionment would equal approximately $232 000.

7 October 1976

20

J. G. HINTON Assistant Secretary Services Branch

DEPARTM ENT OF THE PRIM E M INISTER A N D CABINET

Division 505/2/02—Wages of staff, other than the Governor-General’s establishments

Senator McLaren asked for a comparison of wages costs at the Lodge as between the staff outlined in the answer to House of Representatives Question No. 245 and the staff at the Lodge prior to November 1975. The comparative wages costs are:

Answer to Question No. 245

Staff at 10.11.75

Staff at 23.3.76

Salary at 10.11.75

Comparative Salary rate at 23.3.76

Butler ............................. . . . $249.60

per week

C h e f .................................. . . . $154.50

per week

Cook ............................. $139.70 $148.20

per week per week

Housemaids (3) . . . . . . . $115.30 per $112.10 per $115.30 per

week each week each week each

Driver ........................ $322.85 $343.51

per week per week

Driver ........................ . . . . $144.50 per $135.80 per $144.50 per week

week plus week plus plus overtime

overtime and overtime and and penalty

penalty rates penalty rates rates

7 October 1976

J. G. HINTON Assistant Secretary Services Branch

DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Division 506/1 / 0 1 —Salaries and Allowances

Senator McLaren asked for a breakdown of the salaries of the staff in the Governor-General’s office. Details are:

Designation Salary classification

$

Official Secretary ........................................................................................... 27 716

Assistant Official Secretary ............................................................................. 23 246

Administrative S e c r e t a r y .................................................................................. 17 862-18 504

Director .......................................................................................................... 17 862-18 504

Comptroller ..................................................................................................... 16 580-17 217

Clerk Class 9 16 580-17 217

Clerk Class 8 15 297-15 939

Clerk C l a s s ? ..................................................................................................... 13 791-14 653

Private Secretary to Her Excellency ............................................................... 12 505-13 365

Clerk Class 6 12 505-13 365

21

Designation Salary classification

$

Clerk Class 4 9 936-10 898

8 594- 9 092 7 330- 7 833 8 718- 9 272 7 899- 8 309 7 225- 7 578

Clerical Assistant Grade 5

Steno-secretary Grade 2 (2 positions) Steno-secretary Grade 1 . . . .

Typist Grade 2 (2 positions) . . .

J. G. HINTON

7 October 1976

Assistant Secretary Services Branch

DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Division 506/2/02—Australian Honours

Senator McLaren asked for information on the cost of investitures included under this Item.

An amount of $ 110 000 has been assessed as the cost of investitures on the basis that investitures associated with four Honours lists will be held in 1976-77—the Queen’s Birthday List 1975, Australia Day List 1976, Queen’s Birthday List 1976 and Australia Day List 1977.

A total of 500 recipients has been assumed for estimates purposes. Each recipient, accompanied by one other person, would be flown to and from Canberra for the investitures. At an average economy airfare of $100, these fares are estimated at $100 000.

For those recipients (and their companions) travelling from the more distant States, the cost of overnight accommodation would have to be met. Cost has been assessed at $ 10 000 based on a total o f 400 persons at an average to $25.00 each.

DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Division 506/2/03—Governor-General’s Office, Incidental and other Expenditure

Senator McLaren asked for information on the amounts included under this ap­ propriation for office requisites, freight and ‘other’. Details are: Office Requisites—$35 000 ..................................... $

Printing including printing for the Honours Secretariat and printing for the Queen’s visit ......................................................................... 20 000

Photocopying, supplies of paper and rent of machines ................... 5 000

J. G. HINTON

7 October 1976

Assistant Secretary Services Branch

22

Rental of Vocadex .............................................................................. 2 500

Purchase of two IBM typewriters, one Adler typewriter, one calculator and other office requisites and stationery and minor equipment . 7 500

35 000

Freight—$1300 This provision covers the cost of freighting Royal warrants, insignia, medals and decorations associated with the Imperial Honours scheme from Canberra to the State capital cities where investitures will be held.

Other—$1700 Sitting fees for members of the Council of Order of Australia and the Australian Decorations Advisory C o m m itte e .................................. 1 000

Maintenance of office m a c h i n e s .......................................................... 500

Entertainment allowance for Official S e c r e t a r y .................................. 200

1 700

7 October 1976

J. G. HINTON Assistant Secretary Services Branch

23

PARLIAM ENT OF AUSTRALIA

Minister for

Administrative Services

15 October 1976

Senator J. P. Sim Chairman Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House m

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator Sim, During the Committee’s examination of the Estimates of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, some points were raised on which additional informa­ tion was to be supplied or I was to consider requests for such information.

I understand the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has already pro­ vided to the Committee statements in relation to:

The cost of the Hay and Bland Committees The Governor-General’s use of VIP aircraft Wages for Lodge staff prior to November 1975 Details of the Governor-General’s office staff Details of the estimated cost of investitures for the Australian honours system Details of provision for office requisites, freight, and ‘other’ in the Governor-

General ’s office incidental vote The other points raised by Committee members are dealt with in the following paragraphs.

Senator McLaren had sought information on expected savings from the inquiries conducted by the Bland and Hay Committees. As I foreshadowed at the Committee hearings, my further inquiries have confirmed that it is not possible to define quanti­ tatively and separately savings which might be attributable to the work of these two Committees.

Senator McLaren also sought information on the cost of liquor purchased for the Prime Minister’s Lodge and Kirribilli House. I am informed that these costs are not separately maintained by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and, in any event, the Committee will be aware of the practice, followed by the previous Government and this Government, of not disclosing operating costs of the individual Official Establishments.

I also undertook to consider Senator McLaren’s question on the cost of individual insignia under the Australian honours system. At the time, I informed the Committee of my reservations and, on further reflection, I believe it would be inappropriate to disclose this information. For the Committee’s information, an amount of $400 000 has been included in the Appropriations for the cost of all insignia and medals.

Yours sincerely, R. G. WITHERS

24

PARLIAM ENT OF AUSTRALIA

Minister for

Administrative Services

14 October 1976

Senator J. P. Sim Chairman Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

My dear Senator, At the meeting of Senate Estimates Committee A on Thursday, 7 October 1976 on the 1976-77 Estimates of Expenditure for the Department of National Resources some questions from the Committee were taken on notice.

I now enclose ten copies of answers to the questions for the information of yourself and your Committee.

Yours sincerely, R. G. WITHERS

25

Questions: Division 430/3/02—River Murray Commission—Contribution towards expenses Senator McLaren: A number of questions were asked relating to the generation of hydropower from the Dartmouth Dam (Hansard, 7 October 1976—P. 320).

(1) What provision is there in the agreement for compensation to be paid to South Australia?

(2) The only time water can be released from the Dartmouth Dam is in time of drought. If this is so, how will the hydroelectric scheme function?

(3) Has there been any document on the hydroelectric scheme tabled in any of the four parliaments?

Answers: ( 1) There is no provision for compensation to be paid to South Australia as it will be in no way disadvantaged by the arrangement to provide hydropower gen­ eration at the dam. The total cost of providing for hydropower generation

will be borne by the Victorian State Electricity Commission. (2) The agreement does not require that water will only be released during periods of drought. The operation of Dartmouth Dam will be at the dis­ cretion of the River Murray Commission. For practical operational purposes,

Hume Weir will be drawn down before substantial releases are made for irri­ gation from Dartmouth Dam. With regard to the use of water for hydropower generation, and agreement has been reached between the River Murray Commission and the Victorian State Electricity Commission whereby all releases by RMC can, at the request of SEC, be made through the tur­ bines. In addition, SEC will have the right to an additional 30 000 acre-feet annually for power generation as required. (3) Parliament of Victoria. State Electricity Commission (Dartmouth Hydro­

electric Power Station) Act 1972. This matter was raised previously at the meeting of Senate Estimates Committee D held on 10 October 1972 (Hansard, 10 October 1972, p. 325-6). The following is the text of questions taken on notice at that meeting and the reply which was provided to the Committee on 26 October 1972.

Questions:

Senator McLaren: (Referring to a feasibility study carried out for a hydroelectric scheme at Dartmouth Dam and the report on this study):

(1) Is that report to be made available to the Parliament?

(2) When was it decided to carry out that feasibility study. In what year was that decision taken?

A nswers:

(1) This report was prepared for the information of the River Murray Com­ mission, and other relevant authorities, and was produced only in sufficient numbers for that purpose. On the basis of that report, the Commission has recommended that a hydroelectric plant be installed, and has recommended accordingly to the four governments concerned. It is proposed that the plant should be of 150 000 kW capacity.

Release of water from the storage would be under the control of the River Murray Commission, and in accordance with guidelines laid down by the

26

Commission. The purpose of these guidelines is to ensure that the main func­ tion of the storage, the provision of additional supplies in the River Murray System, is not prejudiced by requirements for electricity generation.

(2) January 1969.

Question:

Division 883/6—Australian Atomic Energy Commission—Uranium exploration and development Senator McLaren: Under the item relating to salaries provision is made for an aver­ age staff of forty in 1976-77. It is estimated that staff engaged will be fifty-seven at the commencement of the financial year reducing to twenty-five by 30 June 1977. What is the reason for the decrease?

Senator Withers: I have in mind that question was asked and answered.

Chairman: Could an officer check Hansard and let the Committee know whether it has been answered. If it has not, perhaps he could provide the Committee with an answer.

Answer:

The question was asked and answered at the meeting of Senate Estimates Com­ mittee A on Tuesday, 5 October 1976 (Hansard, 5 October 1976, pp. 245-6).

Mr Thomas—The Government has indicated that it wishes the Commission to withdraw entirely from exploration for uranium in the Northern Territory by the end of this current field season which would terminate, depending on the weather, about December 1976. Consequently early in 1977 we would have withdrawn all our staff

from our facilities. We have buildings and other facilities in the Darwin area and we would run down the staff by thirty-two by 30 June 1977 and be entirely out of uranium exploration. That is a matter of policy which has been handed to the Com­ mission by the Government.

Question:

Division 883/7—For expenditure under the River Murray Waters Act Senator McLaren: I refer to subdivision 7 in relation to a credit of $8550 on the Chowilla project. How is that credit derived and who is the recipient of that money?

Answer:

The amount of $8550 represents rents received by the River Murray Commission for land it owns at Chowilla, which it resumed for the project and subsequently leased back to the previous owners.

27

DEPARTM ENT OF FO REIG N AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

14 October 1976

The Secretary Estimates Committee A The Senate Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

The following sets out the additional information asked for by your Committee on Thursday, 7 October 1976 during the consideration of the Estimates for this Depart­ ment for the 1976-77 financial year.

Budgetary matters relating to salaries and payments in the nature of salary A separate letter is being sent by Mr Miller on these questions.

Budgetary matters relating to international conferences Senator McLaren requested information regarding the proportion of representation to be drawn from overseas officers to attend conferences during the financial year 1976-77.

From information available to the Department at this time it is estimated that there will be approximately 1057 international conferences and meetings of inter­ national bodies in which Australia has commitments or a continuing interest.

To provide representation from Australia or from overseas missions other than those located where the conference will be held the Budget includes an amount of $A788 000. This amount will provide for approximately 178 man visits from Australia. The bulk of the representation will therefore fall on overseas Missions in the order of approximately 879 attendances.

The above figures do not take into account the day-to-day operations of the Per­ manent Representative Missions to the UN at Geneva and New York.

In the period 1 January to 30 June 1976 there were more than 1800 meetings of United Nations bodies held in Geneva (N.B. this is the actual number of meetings, not conferences) and it is estimated that the total number for the whole of the calen­ dar year 1976 will be 3930.

In the same period the New York Secretariat organised more than 1400 meetings. It estimated that the total number of meetings for the whole of 1976 would be 3046. The Mission will provide representation at most of these meetings. In some cases of course, particularly meetings of the General Assembly and its seven Committees, some of the representation will be done by officers who have come to New York for that particular conference, either from Australia or other posts.

Senator McClelland requested additional information regarding the number of non-public-servants and the organisations they represented which were funded from Foreign Affairs appropriations in 1975-76

In the period, 475 major international conferences were notified at which representation from Australia was sought by all Departments.

28

In resume, the final representation was as follows:

Public service personnel 312 (175 ex Australia, 137 ex overseas missions) Non-public-service 19 (ex Australia)

The meetings attended by the non-public service representatives and the organis­ ations they represented are:

60th ILO Conference 1—Australian Council of Employers Federations 1 —A.C.T. Employers Federation 1—N.S.W. Employers Federation

1 —Victorian Chamber of Manufactures 1 — Australian Council of Trade Unions 1 —W.A. Trades and Labour Council 1 — Australian Building Construction Employees and Builders Labourers

Federation 1—Waterside Workers Federation of Australia Preparatory Technical Maritime Conference 1 —Australian Steamship Owners Federation

1—Seamen’s Union of Australia 8th Asian Regional Conference 1—Australian Council of Employers Federation 1—N.SW. Chamber of Manufactures

1 —Labour Council of N.SW. 1—United Trades and Labour Council ofS.A. Technical Conference on the Public Service 1 - ACOA

1 —Council of Public Service Organisations UNGA 30 2— Australian Parliament—House of Representatives UNESCO

1—Macquarie University

Senator McLaren further requested advice regarding those departments from which the larger number of officers were drawn.

Of the 175 visits from Australia funded by Foreign Affairs which required Over­ seas Visits Committee approval, the major departments and authorities were:

CSIRO Primary Industry Overseas Trade

20 17 16

Environment, Housing and C om m unity D ev elo p ­ ment ............................. 13

13 12 9

Foreign Affairs . Transport . . .

National Resources Business and Consumer Affairs ........................ 9

29

24255/ 77-2

Employment and Industrial R elatio n s/Im m ig ratio n and Ethnic Affairs . . 9

Attorney-General’s . . . 8

Industry and Commerce . 6

All o t h e r s ........................ 43

175

Budgetary matters relating to relief to distressed Australians abroad Senator Knight asked how many cases of non-repayments of advances under item 305/3/03 were currently with the Crown Solicitor. The answer is fifty-seven cases and the sum involved is $23 480.95.

A separate reply is being forwarded in respect of additional information required relating to the Australian Development Assistance Agency.

D. C. GOSS fo r the Secretary

30

DEPARTM ENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

m 15 October 1976

The Secretary Estimates Committee A The Senate Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

At the meeting of the Senate Estimates Committee on 7 October 1976, the Depart­ ment’s representatives undertook to provide supplementary information on the Department’s staffing. In preparing information in the form sought by Senators departmental officers have been able to make certain figures more precise, and the following should be taken as superseding figures given on 7 October.

A. Figures for Canberra-based, Australia-based overseas, and locally engaged stafffor 30 June 1975, 1976 and 1977.

Figures for 1975 and 1976 follow. For comparative purposes they include for both dates staff of the Australian Development Assistance Agency, who were transferred into the Department during the first half of calendar 1976. Because of the form of the question they indicate separately totals for the com­

bined staff of the State Offices of the Department proper (whose offices now include the Passports function) and ADAA. Consideration is being given to the possibility of amalgating these.

30 June 30 June 1975 1976

Canberra-based . . . . 1415 1371

O v e r s e a s ........................ . 762 732

Locally engaged overseas . 2709 2274

Totals ................... . 4886 4377

State O f f i c e s ................... . 442 421

On examination however it is not possible to provide meaningful estimates under these categories for 30 June 1977, since the possible outcomes vary greatly depending on the assumptions made concerning natural wastage rates, voluntary redeployments and essential recruitment. They could also be

affected by government decisions—for example in regard to the management of Service-wide staff numbers, the possible introduction of a scheme for volun­ tary early retirement from the Public Service, the future of State Offices, the opening or closing of overseas posts—or the outcome of reviews like that at

present being conducted by the Public Service Board into overseas representation.

Senators will also be aware that it is not government policy to make avail­ able staff ceiling figures for individual departments, since it is possible and indeed to be expected that at least some of these will be adjusted within the parameters of the Service-wide ceiling over the course of a twelve-month

period.

31

In regard to the Public Service Board review, Senator Knight mentioned that the Public Service Board Report states that the reduction in overseas staff in the Department o f Foreign Affairs amounts to about 100 Australian based and about 240 locally engaged. It is our understanding that the figures quoted in the Board’s Report were intended to refer to reductions across the range of Australian representation overseas, covering a number of departments.

Reductions so far achieved as a result of the closure of, or withdrawal of Foreign Affairs staff from, a number of overseas posts in the last twelve months, together with the list of posts concerned and the dates of closure, are detailed as requested in the attached Schedule A. The number of local staff declared redundant at other posts during this period is also shown, as re­ quested, in this attachment. It is too early at this stage to predict the outcome of further review.

B. Figures for Canberra-based and Australia-based overseas staff for 30 Sep­ tember 1976 as compared to 30 September 1975.

These figures, which exclude State Office staff and locally engaged staff overseas, are given as Schedule B.

GEOFF MILLER Assistant Secretary Personnel Branch

SCHEDULE A

OVERSEAS POST/STAFF REDUCTIONS in 12 months to 30.9.76

1. Closures Pyongyang Bombay Calcutta Beirut Salonika Los Angeles Berlin C.G. Paris UNESCO 30 September 1976

1 March 1976 1 March 1976 28 March 1976 31 March 1976 30 June 1976 6 August 1976*

8 November 1975

Withdrawal o f F.A. representation Osaka Hamburg Milan

30 June 1976 30 September 1976 30 June 1976

* All Australia-based staff withdrawn, post staffed by one locally engaged officer only.

2. Resulting Staff Reductions

Australia-based staff Local staff

2nd Div. 3rd Div. 4th Div.

Pyongyang Bombay Calcutta Beirut .

3 2 2 4 6 28 retrenched (3 still employed)

1 3 retrenched 1 16 retrenched 1 14 retrenched

32

Australia-based staff Local staff

2nd Div. 3rd Div. 4th Div.

Salonika . . 2 retrenched

Los Angeles . . . . . 1 2 .. 15 retrenched

Berlin C.G. . . . . . .. 2 1 5 retrenched

Paris UNESCO . . . . .. . . 1 1 transferred to Embassy

Osaka . . . . . . . . . 3 1 2 transferred to Tokyo: 5 to Trade

Hamburg . . . . . . .. 2 .. 2 retrenched: 5 to Trade

Milan . . . . . . . .. 2 1 2 retrenched: 5 to Trade

Totals . Australia-based staff Local staff retrenched

36 87

3. Global local staff reduction 1975-76 (excluding posts closed or from which Foreign Affairs withdrew during year) Reduction by natural wastage , . . 264 Reduction by retrenchment . . . . 87

Total reduction ........................ 351

SCHEDULE B

AUSTRALIA-BASED STAFF REDUCTIONS in 12 months to 30.9.76

Foreign Affairs Central Office, excluding ADAA . . . 43

ADAA Central Office . . . 91

Total Canberra . . . 134

Foreign Affairs overseas, ex­ cluding ADAA . . . . 55

ADAA o v e r s e a s .............................

Total overseas . . . . 55

33

AUSTRALIAN DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AGENCY

Canberra City 2601

14 October 1976

Mr A. Gumming Thom Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Mr Cumming-Thom, During the examination by Senate Estimates Committee A of the Estimates 1976-77 o f the Department of Foreign Affairs, the representatives of the Australian Development Agency undertook to provide additional information on the following items, in response to questions by Senators Harradine, Knight and Sibraa respectively:

— Division 308/5/05 — Training Services and Student Welfare — Division 308/7/07 — United Nations Education and Training Programs for Southern Africa — Division 308/8/14 — International Union for the Scientific Study of

Population

Answers to the questions are provided in attachments hereto, and it would be appreciated if you would bring this information to the attention of the Committee.

Yours sincerely,

D. MENTZ

First Assistant Secretary

34

ATTACHMENT A

AUSTRALIAN DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AGENCY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Division 308/5/05 —Training Services and Student Welfare

Reference: Senator Harradine: Senate Hansard Thursday, 7 October 1976 (page 327)

Assistance to overseas student bodies As stated the only groups supported financially are those organised on an Australian­ wide basis. Although various overseas student bodies exist at State and regional levels in Australia, the only groups organised on an Australia-wide basis at the present time

are those that are named, viz: Overseas Student Service All African Students Union Malaysian Union of Students

Union of Vietnamese Students Indonesian Students Association Thai Students Association Lao Students Association

All these groups are assisted by the Agency. Apart from that to the Overseas Student Service, the assistance provided by the Agency to the overseas student bodies listed is limited to subsidising their respective annual conferences; no other regular source of funds is available to these bodies and

the costs of administration, accommodation and travel for most delegates to their annual conferences are met by the students themselves.

$8500 grant to the Overseas Student Service The Overseas Student Service (OSS), which is now termed a department of the Aus­ tralian Union of Students (AUS), was established to cater for the specific needs of

overseas students. For some time the National Union of Australian University Students (as the forerunner of the AUS was then called) did not recognise the needs of overseas students as being sufficiently distinct from those of Australian students to warrant a separate organisation or substantial funding; particularly at a time when

the NUAUS budget was much more limited than the AUS budget is today. It was only after the OSS had failed in its efforts to obtain funds from the NUAUS for the es­ tablishment of a full-time national secretariat that the OSS sought government assist­ ance to do so.

In 1970 the then Minister for External Affairs approved an annual grant to the OSS specifically to employ a national secretary (now called a resource officer) and an assistant, in order to:

( a ) maintain contact with overseas student bodies in each State; (b ) administer the financial affairs of the OSS; (c) handle correspondence with the local OSS directors in each university; (d) prepare information and background documents for State and national con­

ferences of OSS bodies; and

35

(e) maintain a central record of information provided by government depart­ ments on matters relating to overseas students.

Organised as it is at local, regional, State and national levels, the OSS is in the unique situation of being accessible to virtually all overseas students as well as being able to act as a central contact point for government departments on overseas student matters. As such the OSS is able to act as a valuable referral service on a wide range of policy and procedural matters affecting overseas students (e.g. Medibank, allow­ ances, insurance etc.). It may either be able to help students directly or put them in touch with appropriate government and private bodies for information, service con­ tacts (e.g. car insurance) or assistance as necessary.

ADAA has continued to recognise the valuable role played by the OSS in complementing activities associated with the Agency’s responsibility for the welfare of all overseas students in Australia. It is considered that the limited form of assistance provided by way of grant, while not commensurate with the benefits provided by the OSS to overseas students, does recognise the particular services performed by the OSS on behalf of overseas students and, indirectly, on behalf of the Government. There­ fore, despite the considerable growth in the AUS budget in recent years and recognis­ ing that the AUS already provides funds for the employment and other ad­ ministrative expenses of OSS bodies throughout Australia, the withdrawal of the $8500 grant for the specified overseas student purposes has not, in the circumstances,

been considered appropriate.

This grant has also helped to maintain the separate identity of the OSS while the OSS is termed a department of the AUS it is a separate entity; office bearers of the national executive are elected by overseas students only at the OSS annual national conference. National policies also are determined at that conference.

Canberra 14 October 1976

ATTACHMENT B

AUSTRALIAN DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AGENCY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Division 308/7/07—United Nations Educational and Training Program for Southern Africa

Reference: Senator Knight: Senate Hansard Thursday, 7 October 1976 (page 329)

The UN Educational and Training Program for Southern Africa provides scholar­ ships for nationals of countries of Southern Africa for study and training abroad. The Program is financed from a trust fund made up of voluntary contributions by states, organisations and individuals.

Some sixty states have contributed to the Program in recognition of the need to provide a special facility to prepare Africans for the independence of their countries.

The resources are insufficient to cope with the demand for educational assistance and applications are close to double the number of awards.

Over 60 per cent of the award holders are undertaking study at the university or college level. Approximately 80 per cent of the training is undertaken in African coun­ tries, which allows for a greater number of awards.

36

Awards cover tuition, related fees and a living allowance. In 1975 1375 awards were funded from a budget of $ 1 375 000 representing $ 1000 per award.

In 1973-74 and 1974-75 more applications were received from Southern Rhodesia than any other country and in 1974-75 more awards were granted to Southern Rhodesians, comprising 28.3 per cent of the total. All awards were for study outside Southern Rhodesia, the great majority of courses being undertaken in African

Commonwealth countries. No Southern Rhodesians studied in Australia under this Program.

South Africans were the second largest recipient group comprising 26.8 per cent of the total. Awards were provided principally in India, Egypt and the United Kingdom. No South Africans studied in Australia under the Scheme.

The figures for 1975-76 should be available from the Program in the near future.

Administration of the Program is assisted by an Advisory Committee comprised of representatives of Canada, Denmark, India, Tanzania, Venezuela, Zaire and Zambia.

Canberra 14 October 1976

ATTACHMENT C

AUSTRALIAN DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AGENCY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Division 308 / 8 /14—International Union for the Scientific Study of Population

Reference: Senator Sibraa: Senate Hansard Thursday, 7 October 1976 (page 329)

Organisation The International Union for the Scientific Study of Population Problems was formed in 1928. At that time, the Union’s main purpose was to promote an international scientific co-operation to study the various aspects of population problems, through

national committees.

In 1947 it was renamed the International Union for the Scientific Study of Popu­ lation (IUSSP) and reconstituted into its present form, as an association of individual members, having as its aim the furtherance of the science of demography. It expanded its activities to stimulate research on population, to develop interest in

demographic matters among governments, national and international organisations, scientific bodies and the general public, to foster relations between people involved in population studies and to disseminate scientific knowledge on population.

Among its members, the Union counts demographers, statisticians, economists, sociologists, physicians etc. As of 31 December 1975, the membership of the Union totalled 1250 made up of members from more than ninety different countries, many of which are developing countries.

Activities Some of the Union’s main activities are: operation of scientific committees; organis­ ation of general and regional conferences to discuss demographic and population matters (the attachment lists conferences held since 1947); publication of conference

proceedings and committees reports and dissemination to members and interested governments and organisations.

37

Finance The Union’s activities have been supported by regular contributions to its general and research budget and by grants for international conferences. Contributions are received from governments, the OECD, UNFPA, UNESCO and private foundations. From 1 January 1975 to 31 December 1975 the Union received the following govern­ mental contributions:

Country Contribution

N o r w a y ..................................

Switzerland .........................

I n d i a .......................................

Australia .............................

S w e d e n ..................................

Belgium .............................

Denmark .............................

Canada ..................................

United Kingdom . . . .

(Belgian Francs)

.................... 27.759

.................... 11.036

.................... 69.700

................... 932.784 ($A19 775)

.................... 4.555.797

.................... 700.000

.................... 662.201

.................... 399.430

.................... 245.250

Role in development assistance ■ , Prior to the increase of technical assistance given by national governments to popu­ lation activities, the Union provided information and conducted conferences, sem­ inars etc. solely to academic institutions and individuals concerned with the study of population.

However, by the early 1970s, IUSSP had become the major focal point for exten­ sive non-governmental research into the quantitative and qualitative aspects of popu­ lation. It now has consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations, UNESCO and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities. It requires additional funds to maintain a continuing expansion in its activities. Agencies of the United Nations, the World Bank and the OECD acknowledge that while exten­ sion of population control measures to developing countries is an essential aspect of development assistance there is need for further research in both the demographic and practical aspects of population control if population control is to be fully effective. Support for the IUSSP ensures that there is a continuing source of high quality studies and research in this field available to planners in developing as well as developed countries.

Canberra 14 October 1976

ATTACHMENT

DATE AND VENUE OF IUSSP CONFERENCES

General Conferences

1947—Washington 1949—Bern 1951—New Delhi 1953— Rome 1954— Rom e—First World Population Conference, organised jointly with the United

Nations

38

1955—Rio de Janeiro 1957—Stockholm 1959—Vienna 1961—New York

1963—Ottawa

1965—Belgrade—Second World Population Conference, organised jointly with the United Nations 1969— London 1973—Liege 1977—Mexico

Regional Conferences

1967—Sydney, for Asia and Oceania 1970— Mexico, for Latin America, in co-operation with the UN Economic Com­ mission for Latin America, the Centro Latinoamericano de Demografia and El Colegio de Mexico

1971— Accra, for Africa, in co-operation with the UN Economic Commission for Africa and with the collaboration of the International Planned Parenthood Federation

39

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

Russell Offices

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

15 October 1976

Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T.

Defence Budget Estimates 1976-77

During the examination of the Defence Budget Estimates 1976-77 on Thursday 7 October 1976 additional information for the Committee was required in response to a number of questions asked by Senator McLaren. The questions and responses are set out in the following paragraphs.

Question:

How many cadets in relation to the previous cadet schemes went on to become members of the Services?

Answer:

Information relating to the number of ex-cadets who had enlisted in the Per­ manent Forces was provided recently by the Minister for Defence in answer to a ques­ tion in the House of Representatives. His reply is recorded in Hansard of the 18 August 1976 and the relevant part reads:

Ex-Cadets Enlisted in the Permanent Forces

Year Navy Air Force

1970-71 . . . . . 125 153

1971-72 . . . . . 165 127

1972-73 . . . . . 182 143

1973-74 . . . . . 160 85

1974-75 . . . . . 158 133

Army This information for the Army cannot be obtained without a substantial clerical effort. However, some indication may be inferred from the report on the Army Cadet Corps, June 19 74. Pointing out that Cadets probably contained no more than 5% of the total number of youths of the relevant age group, the Report indicated that more than 50% of entrants to the Royal Military College Duntroon and 41% of members of the Citi­ zen Military Forces were ex-cadets.

Available records do not disclose the total numbers of serving personnel who are ex-cadet corps or ex-reserve cadet personnel.

Question:

What are the details of the contract for the Oberon submarines?

Answer:

The shipbuilding contract for construction of RAN Oberon submarines 05 and 06 was arranged between the shipbuilder, Scott Lithgow, and the Ministry of Defence, U.K., acting as agent on behalf of the Australian Government. The contract is a fixed

40

price contract, stated in f U.K. with escalation provisions to cover wages, materials and subcontracting work from the date of tendering in October 1971. If the contract extends past the Contract Acceptance Date agreed between the contracting parties, all costs against the contract after that date revert to October 1971 price levels. Government Furnished Equipment supplied by either the Ministry of Defence, U.K., or Australia is the subject of various types of contracts depending primarily on the nature of the equipment and the lead times involved.

Question:

(in relation to Division 234/1/01): What is the largest item of expenditure under the heading ‘Miscellaneous Projects under $ 1 m ’?

Answer:

The major provisions under this heading are:

Naval Technical Services Investigations . Ikara-Introduction into the RAN . . . .

Replenishment Ship Design Study . . . Fast Patrol Craft Design Study . . . .

Mine Counter Measures Vessels Design Study

Question:

(in relation to Division 234/1/02): What is the largest item of expenditure under the heading ‘Miscellaneous Projects under $ lm ’?

A nswer:

The major provisions under this heading are:

$m

CT4 Trainer Aircraft P r o j e c t s .......................................... 555

Medium Lift Helicopter P r o j e c t ..................................... 206

Question:

What is the anticipated cost of maintenance of the Leopard tanks?

Answer:

Based on pre-purchase investigations and the experience of overseas users, modified to suit Australian conditions of use, it has been estimated that the cost of maintenance of each tank will average $26 000 per annum This estimate includes spares, maintenance man-hours, transportation, fuel and oil, documentation and

maintenance of tools and test equipment.

$m

. .410

. .272

. .500

. .650

. .200

P. D. NAUGHTON Assistant Secretary Budgets and Estimates (General and Co-ordination)

41

AUSTRALIA COUNCIL

168 Walker Street North Sydney N.S.W. 2060

20 October 1976

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee A The Senate Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator Sim, Australia Council Estimates 1976-77

At the examination of the Australia Council estimates by Senate Estimates Com­ mittee A further information was requested by Senator Knight on the following three matters:

Travelling and subsistence Detailed information concerning the reduction of $21 803 between 1975-76 expendi­ ture and the 1976-77 Budget.

Major organisations An assessment of major organisations which may be adversely affected by cost increases and which may have difficulty in continuing operations.

Aboriginal Arts Board In the explanation to the estimates it is stated: Major emphasis will be on consolidation of successful initiatives of 1975-76 and support to continuing programs with high employment factors and

designed primarily to offset at community level the rapidly deteriorating state of traditional art. Senator Knight asked whether the sentence reflected the Australia Council’s view of the best way to preserve Aboriginal culture.

Travelling and subsistence The following table compares actual expenditure expenditure for 1976-77: for 1975-76 with budgeted

Expenditure Budget

1975-76 1976-77

Meetings of Council, Finance and Administration Committee and $ $

Community Arts Committee ..................................................... 46 000 38 000

Meetings of committees now abolished ....................................... 7 053

Fees to part-time Council m e m b e r s ................................................ 9 125

Council staff .................................................................................. 57 625 60 000

119 803 98 000

42

The reduction of $8000 for meetings of Council, the Finance and Administration Committee and the Community Arts Committee has resulted from a reduction in the number of members and number of meetings.

Details are:

1975-76 1976-77

Council Members ............................................ 24 22

Meetings ........................................... 9 7

D a y s ..................................................... 9 7

Finance and Administration Committee Members ............................................ 10 8

Meetings ............................................ 9 8

D a y s ..................................................... 14 11

Community Arts Committee Members ............................................ 12 II

Meetings ............................................ 11 7

D a y s ..................................................... 14 9

Of the thirteen committees abolished during 1975-76, the following ten com­ mittees were active during that year:

Committee

Number of members

Total number of meetings (each of one day’s duration)

International ................... . . 11 5

Research ........................ . . 7 1

T a x a t i o n ............................. . . 7 2

Education ........................ . . 6 6

Entrepreneurial . . . . . . 5 2

Arts Information . . . . . . 6 3

Artists in N e e d ................... . . 10 1

Ethnic A r t s ........................ . . 5 4

Arts Management Training . . 3 1

Function and Procedure . . . 5 1

Total .................................. 65 26

The total cost of these meetings was $7053, which is a small proportion of 1975-76 travel expenditure. Sitting fees amounting to $9125 were provided under Travel and Subsistence dur­ ing 1975-76. The corresponding fees have been included in Fees to part-time Council

members in the estimates for 1976-77. The provision of $60 000 for Council staff covers travel by the Council Secretariat, Community Arts staff travelling on project business, and administrative staff. Because of the Government’s new policy concerning the devolution of Council's

funds it also will be necessary for additional travel to be undertaken by Council staff working on this program.

Major Organisations Ballet Victoria ceased operations as a performing company as from 8 October 1976, when an official receiver was appointed. In addition to the Australian Opera, which

43

has been the subject of special reports to the Prime Minister, it is estimated that five of the twenty-three major organisations supported by the Council will have net assets deficiencies as at 31 December 1976.

The net assets of the remaining organisations are quite small in relation to total operating expenditure.

Aboriginal Arts Board The formation of the Aboriginal Arts Board has resulted in unprecedented interest in Aboriginal arts. While consolidating their position within the wider spectrum of Aus­ tralian arts, the Board has brought about a renaissance; more has been written qbout Aboriginal art, more Aboriginal artists exhibited, performed or published their works and participated in film making than at any time since the colonisation of Australia.

The continued exposure, both in Australia and overseas, of Aboriginal art in all its manifestations is dependent upon the continued support and development of tra­ ditional cultural activities in North and Central Australia. It is in these remote areas that the success of the Board’s work is to be measured. Although the pressures have never been stronger for tribal people to abandon totally their traditional lifestyle and values, the Board is confident that if the developmental work initiated over the past four years is continued, it will enable the meaningful retention of many traditional arts which form such an important cultural resource and give identity, pride and con­ fidence to the surviving descendants of the original Australians.

Developmental work has involved strong support to traditional performing arts and music, mainly through the Aboriginal Cultural Foundation, tribal literature proj­ ects conducted in association with different communities and the establishment of vis­ ual art and craft advisory services in centres where many Aborigines are dependent upon their art and crafts for a livelihood. Although the Board has been successful in areas where these forms of support have been given, there are many other projects which it has been impossible to support due to lack of funds; in such instances the pos­ ition of traditional arts in some communities has continued to deteriorate. It is to these neglected areas and to consolidating gains made already that the Board wishes to ad­ dress itself in the coming year. The cost of administering programs in remote areas is high and the effectiveness of Board support, both in staff services and in funding, has

been seriously eroded by inflation. The next five to ten years are critical for the sur­ vival of Aboriginal art, for survival is dependent upon the education during this period of the young generation of Aboriginal people in traditional knowledge and skills. Despite rising costs, the Board is determined to continue to give priority to this preservation and development work. The necessary priority which must be given to this most important but least visible of Board activities, and the increasing cost of maintaining continuing programs in remote areas, has depleted funds available for programs in urban areas or for programs aimed at sharing traditional Aboriginal art with the whole community. Ironically the resulting restrictions come at a time when the demand is steadily growing for performances, demonstrations and displays at fes­ tivals, on public occasions and in schools, museums and galleries. Through such events Aboriginal art is revealed as a contemporary movement and much o f the ignorance of the wider community about Aborigines as a distinct but culturally rich community dispelled.

The preservation and encouragement of Aboriginal art has profound social implications for the reassertion of their identity by Aboriginal Australians and their acceptance within the wider Australian community. The promotion of Aboriginal arts can also do much to enhance the overseas image of Australia, yet the Board’s budget

44

represents almost the entire patronage of Aboriginal arts by the Australian com­ munity. In some areas such as the visual arts and crafts, a developing market promises returns to the artist which may enable a high degree of self-sufficiency. The Board, through its national and overseas exhibition program, will continue to stimulate this

development. A further stimulus to market growth and to streamlining market distri­ bution of Aboriginal works of art is provided by support to a government-owned national marketing enterprise, Aboriginal Arts and Crafts Pty Limited. The Board

would also encourage additional support from other areas to enable the potential of many pilot programs to be realised. For example, tours of schools in New South Wales by a team of dancers and musicians from Mornington Island have, during the last few years, enabled tens of thousands of children to experience first-hand the rich­

ness of Aboriginal culture. At a cost of $30 000 a year, a program which has such vast educational and social implications would seem a modest expenditure within the budget of a State education department. However, within the Board’s budget it must compete with such projects as the establishment and maintenance for one year of two

community craft advisory services upon which perhaps one hundred traditional art­ ists and craftsmen are dependent for their living.

While realising the cumulative benefit to be derived, particularly in moulding an informed public opinion of Aboriginal arts, by administering a program of broad sup­ port, the Board must adopt a realistic approach. The traditional arts, and in particular the continued practice and teaching of these arts at a community level, must be given

priority over the expansion of programs designed to nurture at this time the emerg­ ence of a distinctly Aboriginal urban arts movement or even programs designed to educate the wider community or share traditional arts with the wider community. The long-term social importance of these latter areas of support cannot be underrated. It is

the dependence of these activities on a strong and vibrant traditional resource which is reflected in the Board’s budget for this year.

The national and overseas exhibition program, which, through a policy of direct commissioning, provides the Board’s main form of assistance to individual artists and craftsmen, will not be reduced. However it is likely that the number and size of grants made to individuals will be reduced and that the Board will emphasise consolidation

of ongoing group projects rather than supporting a large number of new initiatives.

Yours sincerely, JEAN BATTERS BY Chief Executive Officer

45

*

Estimates Committee A

Minutes of Proceedings

■

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3

THURSDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met in deliberative session at 9 a.m.

2. MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEE: The Resolution of the Senate, dated 26 August 1976, relating to the membership of the Committee was reported.

3. REFERENCE OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77 TO COMMITTEE: The Resolution of the Senate, dated 19 August 1976, referring Departmental Estimates to the Estimates Committees was re­ ported to the Committee.

4. CORRESPONDENCE: The Chairman reported receipt of correspondence as follows:

(a) A letter from the Director of the Children’s Commission, forwarding infor­ mation sought by Senator Douglas McClelland at the hearings in May 1976. The information related to grants approved during the period 1 July 1975 to 31 May 1976 under the Childhood Services Program. It was

agreed that, because of the value of the document, no action should be taken to incorporate the material in Hansard at the next meeting, but that the document should be retained among Committee documents.

(b) A letter from Senator Harradine indicating that he wished to ask questions in relation to certain items during the Committee’s hearings.

5. CONSIDERATION OF DEPARTMENTAL ESTIMATES: The Committee considered the estimates of the Departments referred to it, and members indicated the items in relation to which they proposed to ask questions. It was agreed that notice of any further areas of interest should be forwarded to the Secretary as soon as poss­

ible. The Chairman advised the Committee that, unless the Committee wished other­ wise, he proposed during the hearings to adopt the practice that, where a question arose without prior notice, he would indicate to the Minister that if an answer were not immediately available a written answer would be acceptable.

6. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.10 a.m.

7. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senator Sim (Chairman), Senators Knight, the Hon. Douglas McClelland, McLaren, Scott and Sibraa.

J. P. SIM Chairman

49

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 4

THURSDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.03 p.m.

2. CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDI­ TURE: Pursuant to Order of the Senate, the Committee proceeded to consider the particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year 1976-77, relating to the follow­ ing departmental estimates:

Division

Document* * Page Nos Department Amount

$

A 13-28 130-161 Administrative S e r v i c e s ....................................... 239 997 000

A 54 250 Rent ( D e f e n c e ) .................................................. 29 300 000

A 54 252 Acquisition of Sites and Buildings (Defence) . 4 966 000

B 6-8 817 Administrative S e r v i c e s ........................................ 43 103 000

A 6-9 101-109 Parliament ........................................................... 13 229 000

A 108-112 500-520 Prime Minister and Cabinet .............................. 83 429 000

B 22 915 Prime Minister and Cabinet .............................. 7 330 000

A 90-93 430-436 National Resources ............................................ 47 647 000

B 18 883-885 National Resources ............................................. 60 683 000

A 72-78 305-308 Foreign A f f a i r s ...................................................... 432 127 000

B 15 846-849 Foreign A f f a i r s ...................................................... 7 952 000

A 49-53 230-242 D e f e n c e ! ................................................................1 838 405 000

* Document A— ‘ Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B— ‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. t Excludes items under the control of the Department of Administrative Services (Divisions 250 and 252), the Department of Construction ( Divisions 245 and 246), the Department of Environment, Housing and Community

Development ( Division 248) and the Department of the Northern Territory (Division 255).

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTM ENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES:

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 130-161 —Department of Administrative Services (Document A ) Division 250—Rent (Defence) Division 252—Acquisition of Sites and Buildings (Defence) Division 817—Department of Administrative Services (Document B) Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services,

accompanied by the following officers: Department o f Administrative Services:

Ministerial and Management Services Division: Mr D. R. White, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Services Branch Mr P. D. Priestly, Acting Director, Budget and Estimates Section, Finance and Services Branch Mr P. E. Westaway, Assistant Secretary, Personnel and Establishments

Branch Mr B. W. Palmer, Director, Management Consultancy Mr P. W. Moloney, Clerk, ADP and Executive Services Branch

50

Mr P. G. Woodham, Executive Officer, Parliamentary and Ministerial Ser­ vices Branch Mr J. W. Thorpe, Director, ADP Section.

Policy and Projects Division: Mr G. W. Johnson, Assistant Secretary, Remuneration and Special Projects Branch Mr C. E. T. Terrell, Assistant Secretary, Authorities Branch.

Purchasing Division: Mr P. J. Galvin, Assistant Secretary, Policy Implementation and Liaison Branch.

Remuneration Tribunal: Mr F. C. Boyle, Secretary.

Australian Electoral Office: Mr H. R. Hegarty, Acting Assistant Secretary, Development Branch Mr C. J. Rowe, Acting Director, Management Services.

Australian War Memorial: MrN. J. Flanagan, Director.

Australian Archives: Professor R. G. Neale, Director-General Mr W. R. O ’Neill, Executive Officer.

Commonwealth Police: Mr L. S. Harper, Assistant Commissioner, Crime Intelligence Mr A. W. Bryce, Finance Officer.

Overseas Property Bureau: Mr T. F. Hopkinson, Assistant Director, Policy.

Grants and Territories Division: Mr K. P. Cooper, Assistant Secretary, Grants Assistance and Norfolk Island Branch Mr B. E. Hinchcliffe, Assistant Secretary, Island Territories Branch

Mr V. H. Mawhinney, Officer-in-Charge, Island Services Section, Island Territories Branch Mr A. A. Shakespeare, Assistant Secretary, Expositions Branch.

Property Division: Mr M. W. Frankcom, Assistant Secretary, Land Branch Mr J. R. Clark, Assistant Secretary, Accommodation Branch.

Survey Division: Mr W. D. Kennedy, Surveyor-General Mr P. A. Morcombe, Finance Officer.

Transport and Storage Division: Mr R. W. Davies, First Assistant Secretary Mr J. J. Mason, Director, Finance and General Services Mr W. Grey-Reitz. Director, Transport Mr N. A. Richardson, Principal Executive Officer.

Australian Government Publishing Service: Mr N. M. Boyle, Assistant Controller Mr B. J. Robinson. Finance Officer.

Australian Office of Information: Mr W. S. Brooks, Acting Director

51

Mr K. D. Bogg, Executive Officer Mr B. Freedman, Assistant Director, Immigration Information.

Grants Commission: Mr A. A. Glasson, Secretary.

National Library: Mr A. Ellis, Assistant Director-General Mr G. E. Clark, Director, Management Services.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered, on the resolu­ tion of the Committee, in the following order:

$

Division 130—A d m in is tra tiv e ...................................................... 1 14 566 650

Division 132—Remuneration T r i b u n a l ....................................... 301 600

Division 136—Australian Archives ............................................ 3 756 600

Division 134—Australian War M e m o r i a l .................................. 1 027 500

Division 133—Australian Electoral O f f i c e .................................. 10 531 200

Division 137—Commonwealth Police ....................................... 25 906 000

Division 140—State and Electorate Offices of Senators, Members and former Office Holders of the Commonwealth Parliam ent-Staff and Services .................................................................... 5 319 000

Division 141—Ministers of State—staff and services . . . . 3 387 300

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 5.08 p.m., until 5 October.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senator Sim (Chairman), Senators Knight, McLaren and Douglas McClelland.

Senators Harradine, Kilgariff and Rae also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

J. P. SIM Chairman

52

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 5

TUESDAY, 5 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.03 p.m.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES RESUMED: Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the follow­ ing officers:

Department o f Administrative Services: Ministerial and Management Services Division: Mr T. F. Paterson, First Assistant Secretary Mr D. R. White, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Services Branch

Mr P. D. Priestly, A /g Director, Budget and Estimates Section, Finance and Services Branch Mr P. E. Westaway, Assistant Secretary, Personnel and Establishments Branch

Mr B. W. Palmer, Director, Management Consultancy Mr P. G. Woodham, Executive Officer, Parliamentary and Ministerial Services Branch.

Policy and Projects Division: Mr C. E. T. Terrell, Assistant Secretary, Authorities Branch.

Property Division: Mr M. W. Frankcom, Assistant Secretary, Land Branch Mr J. R. Clark, Assistant Secretary, Accommodation Branch.

Transport and Storage Division: Mr R. W. Davies, First Assistant Secretary Mr J. J. Mason, Director, Finance and General Services.

Overseas Property Bureau: Mr T. F. Hopkinson, Assistant Director, Policy Mr N. A. Richardson, Principal Executive Officer.

Australian Office of Information: Mr W. S. Brooks, Acting Director Mr K. D. Bogg, Executive Officer Mr B. Freedman, Assistant Director, Immigration Information. Australian Government Publishing Service:

Mr N. M. Boyle, Assistant Controller.

Grants Commission: Mr A. A. Glasson, Secretary.

National Library: Mr A. Ellis, Assistant Director General Mr G. E. Clark, Director, Management Services.

Australian Fire Board: Mr R. G. Smith, Chairman, Australian Fire Board.

53

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

$

Division 141—Ministers of State—Staff and Services . . . . 3 387 300 Division 142—Conveyance of Members of Parliament and O t h e r s ............................................................................................ 3855 000

Division 143—Leaders of the Opposition and Parliamentary Par­ ties, Deputy Leaders of the Opposition and the Whips—Staff and S e r v i c e s .................................................................................... 889 200

Division 144—Ministers, Leaders of the Opposition and Parlia­ mentary Parties and Deputy Leaders of the Opposition, Parlia­ mentary Delegations and Others—Visits A b r o a d ................... 500 000

Division 148—Overseas Property B u r e a u .................................. 23 403 500

Division 152— Australian Government Publishing Service . . 3 831 200 Division 153—Australian Office of I n f o r m a t io n ........................ 5 308 000

Division 157—Christmas Island ................................................. 2 573 650

Division 158—Cocos (Keeling) I s l a n d s ............................................ 475 900

Division 159—Norfolk I s l a n d ........................................................... 418 000

Division 161 —National Library of A u s t r a l i a ............................. 12 760 000

Division 817—Capital Works and Services ............................. 43 103 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department of Administrative Services completed. The Committee resolved to postpone consideration of the estimates of the Parlia­ ment until completion of consideration of the estimates of other departments.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTM ENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET:

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Division 1500—520—Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Docu­ ment A) Division 915—Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Document B)

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Prime Minister and Cabinet: Mr J. G. Hinton, Assistant Secretary, Services Branch Mr W. N. Weidner, Senior Executive Officer, Finance and Accounts Mr M. S. Farrell, Assistant Secretary, Resources Branch Mr J. Hickey, Assistant Secretary, Information and State Relations Branch Mr H. C. Crozier, Secretary, Australian Science and Technology Council.

Australian National Gallery: Mr J. Mollison, Acting Director.

Australia Council: Mr R. S. Taylor, Deputy Executive Officer (Finance) Mr B. Claremont, Director, Administration Mr L. Shaw, Director, Film, Radio and Television Board.

54

Australian Film Commission: Mr K. F. Watts, Chairman Mr B. J. Gittings, Secretary Mr D. E. Brown, Producer-in-charge, Film Australia

Mr J. Wood, Executive Officer, Film Australia.

Public Service Board: Mr R. N. McLeod, Acting Secretary Mr C. J. Carder, Estimates Officer Mr P. J. Chivers, Director, Staff and Establishment Controls Systems.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered, on the resolu­ tion of the Committee, in the following order:

$

Division 500—A d m in is tra tiv e ..................................................... 9 924 900

Division 504—Conveyance of Governor-General, Ministers of State and others by RAAF and Department of Transport a i r c r a f t ....................................................................................... 1 243 000

Division 505—Official establishments ....................................... 1 345 700

Division 506—Governor-General’s O f f i c e .................................. 840 300

Division 510—Australia C o u n c i l ................................................ 22 900 000

Division 512—Australian Film C o m m is s io n ............................. 7 081 000

The Committee resolved to postpone further consideration of the estimates of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet until after consideration of the De­ partment of National Resources—Australian Atomic Energy Commission.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES:

The Chairman called on the following Division for consideration: Division 436—Australian Atomic Energy Commission Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f National Resources:

Australian Atomic Energy Commission: Mr A. D. Thomas, Secretary.

Power and Energy: Dr J. L. Symonds, Program Manager.

Uranium Branch: Mr D. R. Griffiths, Head Mr A. J. Moulding, Director of Finance.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered by the Committee:

$

Division 436—Australian Atomic Energy Commission . . . 19 668 000 The Committee concluded its considerations of the particulars of proposed expen­ diture for the Department of National Resources—Australian Atomic Energy Commission.

55

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.06 p.m. until 12 noon on Thursday, 7 October 1976.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Sim (Chairman), Senators Knight, McLaren, Douglas McClelland and Sibraa.

Senator Harradine also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

J. P. SIM Chairman

56

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 6

THURSDAY, 7 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.01 p.m.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET: Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Prime Minister and Cabinet: Mr J. G. Hinton, Assistant Secretary, Services Branch Mr W. N. Weidner, Senior Executive Officer, Finance and Accounts.

Australian National Gallery: Mr J. Mollison, Acting Director Mr R. J. H. Deane, Acting Assistant Director (Administration).

Public Service Board: Mr R. N. McLeod, Acting Secretary Mr C. J. Carder, Estimates Officer Mr P. J. Chivers, Director, Staff and Establishment Controls System

Mr B. V. Jabbs, Administrative Officer (Mandata).

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

$

Division 509—Australian National Gallery ............................. 4 286 000

Division 516—Public Service B o a r d ........................................... 15 885 000

Division 520—Australian Security Intelligence Organisation . 7 800 000 Division 915—Capital Works and Services ............................. 7 330 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet completed.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES:

The Chairman called on the following divisions for consideration:

Divisions 430-435—Department of National Resources (Document A) Divisions 883-885—Department of National Resources (Document B)

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f National Resurces: Mr R. F. O ’Donohue, Assistant Secretary, Management Services, Mr F. J. Smith, Director, Finance and General Services Mr L. R. Riches, Assistant Director, Finance and Accounts

Mr A. Manderson, Assistant Secretary, Water and Special Projects Division,

57

Mr A. Garran, Financial Controller, Petroleum and Minerals Investment Group Mr R. Layland, Acting Assistant Secretary, Energy Planning Division Mr B. P. Lambert, Director, Division of National Mapping Mr K. R. Vale, Assistant Director, Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology

and Geophysics Mr P. P. Power, Finance Officer. Joint Coal Board: Mr L. G. O ’Brien, Chief Accountant

Mr A. C. Girard, Chief Administrative Officer.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer. The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered by the Committee:

$

Division 430—A d m in is tra tiv e ...................................................... 8 569 000

The Committee resolved to postpone the consideration of Division 430—Adminis­ trative until after completion of consideration of Division 435.

Division 435—Joint Coal Board ................................................. 793 000

Division 430—Administrative, (Resumed) Division 883—Capital Works and Services ............................. 60 683 000

Division 885—Payments to or for the States ............................. 35 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department of National Resources completed.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-1977-DEPART­ MENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS:

The Chairman called on the following divisions for consideration:

Division 305-308—Department of Foreign Affairs (Document A) Divisions 846-849—Department of Foreign Affairs (Document B)

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers: Department o f Foreign Affairs: Management and Foreign Services Division:

Mr D. C. Goss, Assistant Secretary, Administrative Services Branch Mr I. J. Meszes, Acting Director, Finance Section Mr E. G. Dobson, Director, ADP Section Mr W. G. T. Miller, Assistant Secretary Personnel Branch Mr G. E. C. Gibson, Director, Administrative Post Liaison and Organis­

ation Section Mr J. P. Walshe, M.B.E., Assistant Secretary, Technical Services Branch Mr J. Lovegrove, Head, Communications Section Public Affairs and Cultural Relations Division:

Mr M. J. Wilson, First Assistant Secretary Mr H. C. Mott, Assistant Secretary, Information Branch Mr K. W. Brazel, Head, Information and Publications Section Mr R. Throssell, Assistant Secretary, Cultural Relations Branch Mr F. C. Ness, Head, Academic Exchanges/Visits Section Mr J. B. Bennett, Cultural Relations

58

International Organisations and Consular Division: Mr M. J. Dan, Assistant Secretary, International Organisations Branch Mr K. Whithey, Officer-in-Charge, Organisations Servicing Sub-section Mr E. H. Hincicsman, Head, Consular Section

Economic Relations Division: Mr A. J. Deacon, Head, OECD/EC Section

Executive: Dr J. P. Warren, Project Officer, Science Advisers Office

Australian Development Assistance Agency: Mr D. Mentz, First Assistant Secretary, Training, Services and Organis­ ations Division Dr R. Manning, Assistant Secretary, Programs and Appraisals Branch Mr R. Spratt, Assistant Secretary, Operations Branch

Mr H. Marshall, Assistant Secretary, International Training and Education Branch Mr N. Hunt, Acting Assistant Secretary, Finance and Services Branch Mr K. Detto, Acting Assistant Secretary, International Organisations and

Liaison Branch Mr B. Bray, Principal Executive Officer, International Training Secretariat Mr N. Hope, Principal Executive Officer, Overseas Education Section Mr L. Watters, Officer-in-Charge Placement Control Section

Mr D. Campbell, Senior Executive Officer, International Organisations Section Mr R. Vizard, Clerk Class 10, International Organisations Section Mr N. Ross, Executive Officer, Non-government Organisations Section The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered, on the resolu­ tion of the Committee, in the following order:

$

Division 305— A d m in istra tiv e ..................................................... 35 187 000

Division 306—Overseas Service ................................................ 43 256 000

Division 308—Australian Development Assistance Agency . . 353 684 000 Consideration of the Estimates for the Department of Foreign Affairs completed.

5. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF DEFENCE:

The Chairman called on the following divisions for consideration:

Divisions 230-255 —Department of Defence (Document A ) Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Defence: Mr P. D Naughton, Assistant Secretary, Budgets and Estimates (General and Co-ordination) Mr D. B. Shine, Assistant Secretary, Budgets and Estimates (Services)

Mr K. T. Lyon, Assistant Secretary, Manpower Policy and Requirements Mr T. E. Sullivan, Assistant Secretary, Resources Planning (Army) Mr A. H. DeMarchi, Acting Assistant Secretary, Resources Planning (Air Force)

Mr G. E. Nicholls, Chief Executive Officer, Resources Planning Materiel (Navy)

59

Mr Η. P. Jones, Assistant Secretary (Administration), Defence Science and Technology Mr R. Vardanega, Assistant Secretary, Natural Disasters Organisation Mr F. B. Power, Assistant Secretary, Education Projects Cdre R. Percy, Director-General, Joint Plans and Operations Mr A. F. Kent, Assistant Secretary, Project Planning and Evaluation Mr G. M. Taylor, Assistant Secretary, Defence Industry Development Mr A. G. Newton, Acting Assistant Secretary, Supply Policy.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered, on the resolu­ tion of the Committee, in the following order: $ Division 230—Australian Defence Force .................................. 780 226 000

Division 231—Defence Force Ombudsman ............................. 65 000

Division 232-3—Civil Personnel—Administrative and Other E x p e n d itu r e .............................................................................. 378 517 000

Division 234—Equipment and Stores ....................................... 556 461 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department of Foreign Affairs completed.

6. P A R T IC U L A R S O F P R O P O S E D E X P E N D IT U R E 1 9 7 6 - 7 7 -

PARLIAMENT:

The Chairman called on the following divisions for consideration:

Divisions 101 -105—Parliament (Document A ) Appearing: Senator the Hon. Condor L. Laucke, President of the Senate, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Senate: Mr J. R. Odgers, C.B.E., Clerk of the Senate Mr T. H. G. Wharton, Deputy Usher of the Black Rod Mr H. Evans, Deputy Usher of the Black Rod Mr R. G. Mair, Senior Parliamentary Officer, Administration.

Joint House Department: Mr R. W. Hillyer, Secretary Mr R. L. Burrell, Chief Executive Officer Mr M. D. T. Niven, Senior Administrative Officer.

Library: Mr A. L. Moore, O.B.E., Parliamentary Librarian Mr H. Knight, Finance Officer.

Parliamentary Reporting Staff: Mr K. R. Ingram, Acting Principal Parliamentary Reporter Mr F. W. Temperly, Administrative Officer.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered, on the resolu­ tion of the Committee, in the following order:

$

Division 101—S e n a t e .................................................................... 2 662 300

Division 105—Joint House Department .................................. 3 113 000

Division 104—Library ............................................................... 1 776 200

Division 103—Parliamentary Reporting Staff ........................ 2 501 800

Consideration of the Estimates for Parliament completed, subject to an undertak­ ing by the President to provide a reply to a question.

60

7. PREPARATION OF DRAFT REPORT: The Committee discussed the prep­ aration of the Report to the Senate. It was agreed that a draft be prepared for con­ sideration and that members of the Committee should advise the Secretary of matters they wished included.

8. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 5.30 p.m.

9. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Sim (Chairman), Senators Knight, Douglas McClelland, McLaren and Sibraa.

Senator Harradine also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

J. P. SIM Chairman

24255/ 77-3

61

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 7

WEDNESDAY, 20 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 9.15 a.m. The Chairman (Senator Sim) took the Chair.

2. MINUTES: The minutes of the meetings held on 9 September, 16 September, 5 October and 7 October were read and confirmed.

3. REPLIES TO REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION: Copies of letters received since the last meeting forwarding replies to questions asked during the Com­ mittee’s hearings were tabled. It was agreed that the information should be included as an Appendix to the Report to the Senate.

4. DRAFT REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman presented a Draft Report for the Committee’s consideration. The Committee agreed to the Report, with amendments. .

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 9.45 a.m.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senator Sim (Chairman) Senators Douglas, McClelland, McLaren, and Sibraa.

J. P. SIM

Chairman

62

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

REPORT TO THE SENATE

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee B has the honour to present its report to the Senate. 1. On 19 August 1976, the Senate referred to the Committee the Estimates for the year 1975-76 relating to the following Departments:

Department of Industry and Commerce Department of Overseas Trade Department of the Treasury Department of Primary Industry

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister for Industry and Commerce, Senator Cotton, and officers representing the Departments concerned. A copy of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard reports of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the informa­

tion of the Senate in connection with Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 1976-77 and Appro­ priation Bill (No. 2) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the Committee’s examination of the estimates referred, further information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to specific questions raised dur­ ing the proceedings. Copies of these replies are attached as an Appendix to the Report. Also attached as an Appendix to the Report are replies received to a question

asked, during the May 1976 meetings of the Committee, relating to computer systems.

4. Following the recommendation of Estimates Committee A in its Report of May this year, the Committee met privately prior to public hearings and, after examining the Estimates of Expenditure and the departmental explanations provided, agreed upon a list of items of proposed expenditure on which the Committee would concen­

trate its inquiries this year. Both the Committee and the Minister found the system of great benefit. Committee members were not limited during the examination as all items of expenditure were called on and questions on items, other than those listed, were dealt with. However, in the areas chosen for detailed examination, the informa­

tion available was of a much more comprehensive nature than otherwise could have been expected. The Committee’s deliberations were greatly assisted by those departments and statutory bodies who provided Committee members with explanatory notes during

the week following the tabling of the Estimates, and asks that other bodies adopt this procedure on future occasions.

5. During the examination of the Estimates of Expenditure for the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, concern was expressed at the delay in making the results of surveys and research projects available to farmers. The Committee is of the opinion that this matter is of the utmost importance and that early action should be taken to

expedite the dissemination of this material.

6. The Committee places on record its appreciation of the detailed written expla­ nations which were provided to Senators prior to the hearings, and also the evidence given by the Minister, Senator Cotton, and the officers of the various departments who assisted the Committee during the inquiry.

C. R. MAUNSELL Chairman

65

ψ

■

Estimates Committee B

Minutes of Proceedings

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2

THURSDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met in private session at 11.50 a.m.

2. APPOINTMENT OF AND REFERENCE TO ESTIMATES COM­ MITTEES: The Resolution of the Senate of 19 August 1976 relating to the reference to the Committee of the proposed expenditure for the year 1976-77 was reported.

3. MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE: The entry of the Journals of the Senate of 26 August 1976 recording changes in the membership of Estimates Committee B was reported. The new membership is as follows:

Senators Archer, Gietzelt, Maunsell, Messner, Primmer and Walsh.

4. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN: On the motion of Senator Messner, Senator Maunsell was elected Chairman.

Senator Maunsell thereupon took the Chair

5. PROCEDURE OF THE COMMITTEE: Discussion ensued on procedures to be followed by the Committee when considering Particulars of Proposed Expen­ diture for 1976-77.

The Committee then met in public session.

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce, accompanied by the following officers:

Mr D. J. O ’Connor, Controller-General (Management) Mr T. J. McMahon, First Assistant Secretary (Extensions Services Division) Mr W. R. Irlam, Assistant Secretary (Industry Development Branch) Mr G. J. Collopy, Assistant Secretary (Heavy Engineering and Metals

Branch) Mr V. Sticka, Chairman (Australian Industrial Research and Development Board) Mr L. G. Stroud, Assistant Secretary (Tourist Industry Branch)

Mr D. C. Beresford, Assistant General Manager (Australian Tourist Commission) Mr A. A. Lister, Assistant Secretary (ADP Branch) Mrs I. Favaloro, Principal Training Officer

Mr K. McKnown, Assistant Secretary (Finance Branch) Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 380-387—Department of Industry and Commerce (Document A) Division 871—Department oflndustry and Commerce (Document B)

69

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Industry and Commerce.

7. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce, accompanied by the following officers:

Mr W. H. Ratcliff, Acting Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch Mr D. R. Fitch, Assistant Secretary, Trade Services Division Mr B. A. Schick, Assistant Secretary, Trade Services Division Mr F. D. Quinane, Assistant Secretary, Overseas Markets Division Mr A. J. Glenn, Acting Assistant Secretary Commodity Policy Division Mr R. J. Thomas, Assistant Secretary, Policy Development Division Department o f the Treasury:

Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch, Accounting and Supply Division

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 470-474—Department of Overseas Trade (Document A) Division 903—Department of Overseas Trade (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Overseas Trade.

8. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF THE TREASURY: Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Treasury: Mr D. P. Reynolds, Director (Finance and General Services) Mr S. G. Herring, Assistant Secretary (Accounting and Supply Division) Mr L. A. Barley, Computer Systems Officer (ADP Branch) Mr N. Stuparich, Chief Finance Officer (Overseas Economic Relations

Division) Mr B. A. Seebach, Senior Finance Officer (Revenue, Loans and Invest­ ment Division) Australian Taxation Office:

MrE. R. Marriott, Assistant Commissioner (Management Services) Mr M. Duffy, Computer Services Officer (ADP Branch) Australian Bureau of Statistics: Mr P. G. Howell, Acting Assistant Statistician (Management Services)

Mr J. A. Butler, Director (Finance and General) Australian Government Retirement Benefits Office: Mr F. J. Maguire, Acting Director (Services) The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 670-678—Department of the Treasury (Document A) Divisions 963-964—Department of the Treasury (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of the Treasury.

9. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 4.21 p.m. until 4 p.m. Tues­ day, 5 October.

70

10. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Gietzelt, Maunsell, Messner, Primmer, Walsh (5).

C. R. MAUNSELL Chairman

71

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3

TUESDAY, 5 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.00 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Maunsell) took the Chair.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-D EPART­ MENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce, accompanied by the following officers: Mr N. J. Thompson, Assistant Secretary, Marketing and Production Services Branch, Industry No. 1 (Meat and Meat Products) Division

Mr A. J. Bennett, Assistant Secretary, General Crops and Inspection Services Branch, Industry No. 3 (Field Crops) Division Mr J. H. Jenkins, Assistant Secretary, Cereals and Vegetable Oilseeds Branch, Industry No. 3 (Field Crops) Division Mr F. Η. M. Collins, First Assistant Secretary, Industry No. 6 (Wool)

Division Mr W. C. K. Hammer, Assistant Secretary, Grants Administration and Farm Services Branch, Agricultural and Food Services Division Mr D. P. Cleary, Acting Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch Mr L. C. Elliott, Director of Finance, Management Services Branch Mr A. A. Cooley, Assistant Director, Finance, Management Services Branch Department o f the Treasury:

Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Division 490-497—Department of Primary Industry (Document A) Division 912-914—Department of Primary Industry (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Primary Industry.

The Committee then met in private session.

3. MINUTES: On a notice by Senator Gietzelt, the Minutes of the Meeting held on Tuesday, 16 September 1976, were circulated and confirmed.

4. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration. During discussion of the draft report it was agreed that additional information relating to computer systems would be attached as an Appendix to the Report.

It was resolved that the draft report be adopted as the report of the Committee.

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 5.40 p.m.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended the meeting—Senators Archer, Gietzelt, Maunsell, Messnerand Walsh.

C. R . MAUNSELL Chairman

72

Estimates Committee B

Appendix 1

*

DEPARTMENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE

Canberra, A.C.T.

29 September 1976

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

During the examination of the 1976-77 estimates of expenditure for the Depart­ ment of Overseas Trade, Senator Gietzelt sought information on the benefits, from the point of view of revenue, that flowed to Australia as a result of membership of various International Commodity Organisations.

The attached paper outlines in general the various types of commodity arrange­ ments, together with specific details of the objectives, operation, membership, etc. of those of which Australia is a member. You will see from the paper that the organis­ ations encompass purely consultative arrangements, commodity agreements and pro­ ducer bodies. The basic objectives of all these organisations is the improvement of in­ ternational trading conditions in respect of the particular commodity. Given the

nature of the organisations and their method of operation, it is, however, not possible to quantify in monetary terms the direct benefits resulting from Australian membership.

As stated by Mr Glenn during the Committee’s hearing, the major portion of the expenditure in relation to contributions to international organisations in 1976-77 is the $4.2 million estimated to be payable as Australia’s contribution to the buffer stock of the Fifth International Tin Agreement. Contributions to the buffer stock, along

with any profits, are returned to member countries at the termination of the Agree­ ment. In this respect, the buffer stock under the Fourth Agreement achieved a sub­ stantial profit on the funds employed.

I have attached also for your information a copy of a statement made to the House of Representatives by the Minister for Overseas Trade on 15 September 1976 which gives additional information on international commodity co-operation.

W. H. RATCLIFF Acting Assistant Secretary Management Services

75

INTERNATIONAL COMMODITY ARRANGEMENTS

Background Most of the earliest schemes designed to regulate trade in commodities were producer arrangements which sought with varying degrees of success to limit supplies coming on to the market. The pre-Second-World-War coffee, sugar, rubber and tea cartels were examples. However, the 1933 Wheat Agreement, though short lived, was important because it was one of the first to encompass both exporting and importing interests; as such it anticipated some of the objectives in Chapter VI of the Havana Charter which furnished for the post-war world a code of guiding principles underly­ ing international commodity negotiations.

While the Charter was not subsequently implemented in full, the principle that producers and consumers should have equal weight in shaping the provisions of inter­ national commodity agreements was applied in early post-war agreements on wheat (1949), sugar (1954) and tin (1956). These agreements aimed at balancing supply and demand at a level which held prices within an internationally agreed range. The measures used reflected the different characteristics of the commodity concerned. In the case of sugar, export quotas were used, while on tin, quotas were combined with a buffer stock mechanism. The Wheat Agreement was based on a system of supply and purchase commitments within an agreed price range.

The difficulties in reaching agreement between producers and consumers on econ­ omic provisions, in particular pricing and market regulatory mechanisms, has limited the scope for negotiation of such agreements. In fact, to date, producers and con­ sumers have only succeeded in concluding agreements with economic provisions to cover sugar, wheat, tin, coffee and cocoa. Moreover, the operation of the economic provisions has not always been continuous; nor have the agreements always had the support of all major producers and consumers. Of the Agreements currently in exist­ ence, only the International Tin Agreement has effective economic provisions in oper­ ation. However, new agreements with economic provisions have now been negotiated for coffee and cocoa and are expected to enter into force on 1 October 1976. Dis­ cussions are also continuing on the possibility of renegotiating more effective agree­ ments for wheat and sugar. A sugar negotiating conference has been scheduled for April 1977.

Consultative arrangements For some commodities, arrangements have been developed which are less formal than the traditional commodity agreements. These provide for information sharing and consultation; producers and consumers meet periodically to exchange views on market trends—supply, demand and investment prospects. Such arrangements are well suited to commodities with long gestation periods for new capacity, such as many minerals and tree crops, where forward planning is desirable to avoid or mitigate suc­ cessive medium-term cycles of over- and under-investment. Thus there are auton­ omous international study groups on lead and zinc, rubber, wool and cotton while dis­ cussions on a number of other commodities are held regularly under the auspices of FAO and UNCTAD.

Commodity agreements International commodity agreements can be devised to serve various objectives or a combination of them: (a) price stability;

(b) achievement of remunerative and equitable prices; (c) increasing export earnings of producing countries;

76

(d ) ensuring adequate supplies to consumers; (e) promotion of economic stability in both producing and consuming countries by preventing undue fluctuations in prices and quantities traded but without attempting to influence long-term trends;

(f) endeavour to mitigate the problems and hardships resulting from the need for adjustments in cases of persistent disequilibrium between production and consumption; (g) promotion of consumption;

(h ) the furtherence of international co-operation on common problems.

Although different agreements place different emphasis on these objectives, many of them are common. In general, agreements aim at a balance of supply and demand at high levels through an increase in consumption, production and international trade.

Commodity agreements are in effect contractual arrangements involving specific commitments and obligations by member Governments. They are usually adminis­ tered by a council comprising representatives of member countries and are serviced by a secretariat.

In the past, commodity agreements have incorporated a range of mechanisms tail­ ored to the characteristics of the particular commodity and market involved. The most common mechanisms are described below:

(a ) Export Quotas Export quotas are one means by which supplies are controlled by exporting countries with the objective of stabilising prices within a given range. Gener­ ally speaking, as the world price of the commodity rises, export quotas are

progressively increased and finally suspended. On the other hand, when the world price falls below an agreed point quo­ tas are reintroduced and can be progressively reduced. Export quotas were a feature of the 1968 International Sugar Agreement.

Quotas are often operated in conjunction with a buffer stock as in the case of the International Tin Agreement. (b) Agreed maximum and minimum prices Another method of maintaining prices within a range is for an agreement to

be made to respect agreed maximum and minimum prices in all transactions. This can be accompanied by an undertaking by individual consuming coun­ tries to buy and individual producing countries to sell a designated quantity.

The post-war International Wheat Agreements were of this type. Other more limited arrangements such as the General Agreements on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) Agreement on skimmed milk powder and butter oil having pro­ visions for minimum export prices only.

Other agreements, such as the 1968 Sugar Agreement, have provided for a maximum price at which supplies up to an agreed level are guaranteed to member importing countries. (c) Buffer stocks

Buffer stocks can be used to stabilise prices between an agreed minimum and maximum price. Stocks can be held nationally or internationally and may be financed by contributions from producers and/or consumers. When the price falls below the minimum, the offerings are acquired by the buffer stock at the

minimum price. Conversely when the price rises above the maximum, the stocks in the buffer stock are released onto the market in an effort to keep the price below the maximum. In addition, some agreements make provision for the buffer stock manager to buy or sell between the price limits, so that he is

77

able to achieve stability within the range when exceptional circumstances might otherwise cause undue price movements. The International Tin and Cocoa Agreements both have provisions for internationally held buffer stocks.

(d) Information All commodity agreements provide a useful forum for exchange of informa­ tion between producers and consumers, regardless of whether they contain economic provisions. These exchanges can contribute towards market stability.

Continuous reviews of current market conditions can be undertaken by special sub-committees, and provision may be made for consultations if a condition of market instability arises or seems imminent. In any case, the government of each member can decide what action it will take in the light of overall trends as shown by the information made available to it.

Producer organisations Whereas the arrangements described above include both producing and consuming countries, a significant development in recent years has been the growth in inter­ governmental commodity arrangements comprising producers/exporters exclusively. Generally, the objectives of these associations are to seek to increase foreign exchange earnings from the sale of the commodity concerned and/or to improve the operation of international markets through mutual co-operation and consultation.

Producer arrangements have now been established for petroleum (OPEC estab­ lished in 1960), copper (CIPEC established in 1967), bauxite (IBA established in 1974), iron ore (APEF established in 1975), coffee, bananas and natural rubber.

Successful action of the OPEC type by producer organisations depends upon the existence of a close identity of interests between the principal producing countries or at least between the major exporting countries. The more numerous the membership of producer organisations and the more diverse their interests, the greater the difficul­ ties are likely to be in policy co-ordination. To date OPEC has uniquely satisfied these conditions though there are signs that even in OPEC there has been some divergence of interests of late. Another distinction which needs to be made between OPEC and other producer organisations is that the products involved are generally subject to far greater competition from alternative sources of supply or substitute products.

Australia is a member of eleven autonomous international commodity arrange­ ments. These are: International commodity agreements International Wheat Agreement

International Sugar Agreement International Tin Agreement International Coffee Agreement International Cocoa Agreement International commodity study groups

International Lead and Zinc Study Group International Cotton Advisory Committee International Rubber Study Group Producer organisations

International Bauxite Association Intergovernmental Council of Copper Exporting Countries Association of Iron Ore Exporting Countries

78

Brief papers describing the establishment, membership and purpose of these organis­ ations are attached.

20 September 1976

Department of Overseas Trade Canberra

ATTACHMENT 1

INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT

Establishment The first post-war International Wheat Agreement came into force in 1949. There have been successive Wheat Agreements since that time. The present Agreement was negotiated in 1971 and has been extended by Protocol on two occasions. It consists of

the Wheat Trade Convention and the Food Aid Convention which are administered by the International Wheat Council and the Food Aid Committee respectively. A common Secretariat services both bodies and is located in London.

Membership Fifty-six countries are members of the Wheat Trade Convention. These include all the major wheat exporters and importers except China. There are nine members of the Food Aid Convention.

Purpose The major objectives of the International Wheat Agreement are to further Inter­ national co-operation in world wheat matters, to ease the burden of problems associated with recurrent surpluses and shortages of wheat and to provide a program

of food aid in grains for the benefit of needy developing countries.

The Wheat Trade Convention does not contain substantive economic provisions but provides the framework for the continued operations of the International Wheat Council. Through its statistical and market review activities and by providing a forum for regular international consultations the Council makes a significant contribution to improving the state of knowledge of the world wheat stituation.

Work directed towards a new International Wheat Agreement containing sub­ stantive economic provisions is proceeding in the International Wheat Council. Australia is playing an active role in these discussions.

ATTACHMENT 2

INTERNATIONAL SUGAR AGREEMENT

Establishment The first post-war International Sugar Agreement was negotiated in 1953. There have been successive Sugar Agreements since that time. The present Agreement is adminis­

tered by the International Sugar Organisation which functions through a Council and a Secretariat located in London.

Membership Fifty countries are members, including all the major sugar importing and exporting countries, except the U.S. and the EEC.

79

The major objective of successive International Sugar Agreements has been to main­ tain stable world prices for sugar and to seek to ensure adequate supplies at fair prices to importing countries and reasonably remunerative returns to producers. Recent Agreements have paid particular attention to the interests of developing exporting

countries. The current Agreement does not contain substantive economic provisions, but work in the International Sugar Council directed towards a new more effective Agreement is well advanced and a United Nations Conference to negotiate the text of a new Agreement is expected to be held in the near future.

ATTACHMENT 3

P u rp o se

INTERNATIONAL TIN AGREEMENT

Establishment The first post-war International Tin Agreement was negotiated in 1956. There have been successive Tin Agreements since that time. The present Agreement is adminis­ tered by the International Tin Council which is serviced by a Secretariat located in London. Provided sufficient countries ratify it, a new (Fifth) Agreement will come into force on 1 July 1976.

Membership Twenty-nine countries are members, including all the major importing and exporting countries except the United States and China. The U.S. has, however, signed the Fifth Agreement.

Purpose The major objective of successive International Tin Agreements has been to maintain stable world prices for tin and to seek to ensure adequate supplies at fair prices to importing countries and reasonably remunerative returns to producers. The Agree­ ment provides for a buffer stock and export controls.

ATTACHMENT 4

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE AGREEMENT

Establishment The first International Coffee Agreement came into force in 1963 for a period of five years. The second (1968) Agreement was extended without economic provisions in 1973 and again in 1975. A new Agreement was negotiated in 1975 to apply for six years from 1 October 1976.

The Agreement is administered by the International Coffee Organisation which functions through a Council and a Secretariat located in London.

Membership There are fifty-one members, including all the major exporting and importing coun­ tries. Most of these countries are expected to continue their membership in the new Agreement.

Australia signed both the 1962 and 1968 Agreements as a joint importing member with Papua New Guinea but, following the development of the P.N.G. export indus­ try, our membership status was changed to that of a joint exporting member in 1973. In June 1975, Australia became a separate importing member and Papua New Guinea an exporting member.

80

The objectives of the 1976 Agreement are similar to those of the earlier Agreements; these are to achieve a balance between supply and demand which assures adequate supplies to consumers and markets to producers; to alleviate hardship caused by surpluses and price fluctuations; to contribute to economic development of members; to increase the purchasing power of exporting countries; to encourage consumption;

and to further international co-operation in coffee problems. A system of export quo­ tas to operate when market prices are depressed is the principal mechanism used to achieve these objectives.

P u rp o se

ATTACHMENT 5

INTERNATIONAL COCOA AGREEMENT

Establishment The first International Cocoa Agreement came into force on 1 October 1973 for a period of three years. A new Agreement is to apply for a further three years from 1 October 1976. The Agreement is administered by the International Cocoa Organis­

ation which functions through a Council and a Secretariat located in London.

Membership All the major cocoa exporting and importing countries, with the exception of the United States, are members of the Agreement. There are nineteen exporting members and thirty-two importing members. Most of these countries are expected to continue

their membership in the new Agreement.

Australia joined the first Agreement as a joint exporting member with Papua New Guinea, but has participated as a separate importing member since Papua New Guinea’s independence.

Purpose The objectives of both the 1973 and 1976 Agreements are to prevent excessive fluctuations in the price of cocoa; to stabilise and increase the export earnings of pro­ ducing countries, taking into account the interests of importing countries; to assure

adequate supplies at reasonable prices equitable to producers and consumers and to facilitate the expansion of consumption. A combination of export quotas and buffer stock operations are the principal mechanisms used to realise these objectives.

ATTACHMENT 6

INTERNATIONAL LEAD AND ZINC STUDY GROUP

Establishment The International Lead and Zinc Study Group was established in January 1960 fol­ lowing a series of meetings of interested governments held under United Nations auspices to consider what might be done to correct the severe imbalance in world

supply and demand which had arisen at that time. The Study Group is serviced by a Secretariat, the headquarters of which are located in New York.

Membership There are thirty members of the Study Group, representing all the major producers and consumers of lead and zinc.

81

The Study Group provides a forum for intergovernmental consultation on world production consumption and trade in lead and zinc. It keeps the world market situ­ ation under continuous review and undertakes special studies on matters such as production/consumption trends, trade barriers, new mine and smelter developments, etc.

ATTACHMENT 7

INTERNATIONAL COTTON ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Establishment The International Cotton Advisory Committee was established in 1939 following an intergovernmental meeting in Washington. The Committee is serviced by a Sec­ retariat located in Washington.

Membership Australia is a member of the Committee which comprises forty-six countries account­ ing for the bulk of world production, trade and consumption.

Purpose The Committee was established to promote co-operation in the solution of inter­ national cotton problems.

The functions of the Committee are to observe and exchange information on developments affecting the world cotton situation and to suggest to governments measures to further international collaboration directed towards developing and maintaining a sound world cotton economy.

ATTACHMENT 8

INTERNATIONAL RUBBER STUDY GROUP

P u rp o se

Establishment The International Rubber Study Group was established in 1944 as a result of talks between the United Kingdom, United States and Netherlands Governments.

Membership The Group has twenty-nine producing and consuming member countries accounting for 85 per cent of world trade in natural rubber.

Purpose The Study Group provides a forum for the discussion of problems affecting the production, consumption and trade in both natural and synthetic rubber. It makes comprehensive statistical information available to members.

ATTACHMENT 9

INTERNATIONAL BAUXITE ASSOCIATION

Establishment Following a series of international meetings which were called on the initiative of the Prime Ministers of Jamaica and Guyana and at which Australia was represented, the International Bauxite Association was established in October 1974.

The Association is serviced by a Secretariat which is located in Kingston, Jamaica.

82

Membership

Membership of the Association comprises the eleven major producers and exporters of bauxite and accounts for some 92 per cent of world exports.

Purpose

The main objectives of the Association are to promote the orderly and rational development of the bauxite industry and to secure for member countries fair and reasonable returns.

ATTACHMENT 10

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COUNCIL OF COPPER EXPORTING COUNTRIES

Establishment The Intergovernmental Council of Copper Exporting Countries (CIPEC) was estab­ lished in June 1967 by the Governments of Chile, Peru, Zaire and Zambia. The organisation is serviced by a Secretariat which is located in Paris.

Membership Membership comprises the four Founding Members and Indonesia. Australia and Papua New Guinea have been Associate Members since November 1975. These countries account for some 70 per cent of world exports of copper.

Purpose The objectives of CIPEC are to co-ordinate measures to achieve continuous growth in the real earnings from copper exports and to harmonise the decisions and policies of its members relating to copper production and marketing.

ATTACHMENT 11

ASSOCIATION OF IRON ORE EXPORTING COUNTRIES

Establishment Following a series of international meetings which were called on the initiative of the Indian Government and at which Australia was represented, the Association of Iron Ore Exporting Countries was established in October 1975. The Association is still in the formative stage. A Secretariat is in the process of being established and will be headquartered in Geneva.

Membership There are presently ten members of the Association accounting for about 50 per cent of total world exports.

Purpose The Association aims to promote close co-operation among member countries, assist members to achieve fair and remunerative returns, encourage growth and develop­ ment of the industry and facilitate information exchange and consultation.

The organisation is primarily a consultative one providing a forum for the exchange of information and consultation on mutual problems.

83

Statement by the Rt Hon. J. D. Anthony, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister fo r Overseas Trade and Minister fo r National Resources

INTERNATIONAL COMMODITY CO-OPERATION

For the information of honourable members, I present the texts of the International Coffee Agreement 1976, the International Cocoa Agreement 1975, the Fifth Inter­ national Tin Agreement and the Agreement establishing the Intergovernmental Council of Copper Exporting Countries.

Honourable members are aware that international commodity trade issues—the problems faced by agricultural and mineral commodities in international trade and the possibilities of obtaining solutions to them by way of global co-operation—are currently the focus of a great deal of international attention. I would like to take the opportunity provided in tabling these agreements to outline to honourable members the Government’s policy with respect to international co-operation in the commodi­ ties area in the context of the international discussions which are going on at the present time.

The very real problems afflicting commodity trade—recurrent shortages and surpluses and the resultant chronic price instability—are, of course, not new to Australia. Nor is the seeking of solutions to these problems by way of international co­ operative arrangements.

Australia has always been highly dependent on commodity exports as a source of foreign exchange earnings—rural and mineral commodities still account for three- quarters of our exports; moreover the agricultural and mining sectors are heavily de­ pendent on export markets for their continued viability and prosperity.

Thus, over a very long period indeed, Australia has had to live with the problems of highly unstable commodity markets. Because of our dependence on commodity exports, Australia has traditionally played an active role in intergovernmental nego­ tiations and consultations on commodity trade matters in the search for global sol­ utions to problems. We are continuing to play such a role in various forums—some general (like UNCTAD and the GATT)—some relating to specific commodities (like the International Wheat Council, the International Sugar Council and the organis­ ations covered by the Agreements now before the House). Australia is a member of all the international commodity agreements currently in operation and participates in a wide range of intergovernmental consultative organisations.

While the problems of commodity trade and international efforts to solve them are far from new, what is new is the enormous increase in the attention which has been given to these matters by world governments in the last few years.

The reasons for this spring from significant changes in the first half of this decade in the perception by governments of the effects of problems facing commodity trade. Many commodities have experienced boom and bust market conditions, in some cases aggravated by unilateral action by governments to restrict access to markets.

The massive increase in oil prices by the OPEC countries in 1973, the food crisis of 1973-74 and shortages of some basic raw materials created a feeling of insecurity on the part of many importing countries about the supply of essential primary products.

The decline in commodity prices associated with the economic slow-down in the industrialised countries since 1974, aggravated by high rates of inflation, led to con­ cern on the part of commodity-exporting countries to arrest the price decline. At the same time, many importing countries were worried about tire effect of low prices on the future capacity of exporting countries to supply essential foodstuffs and raw materials.

84

Finally, perhaps the major factor in the current world-wide attention being given to commodity problems springs from a massive and concerted increase in pressure from developing countries to achieve an improvement in the resources available to them for development by way of, among other things, international measures to

increase their returns from commodity exports.

Australia will continue to support international co-operation in the commodity trade area. In some cases such co-operation may lead to the negotiation of inter­ national commodity agreements. In others, simple consultative arrangements may be all that is required. The establishment of consultative bodies to provide forums for

regular exchanges of information and views on commodity market trends and prob­ lems can in themselves make an important contribution to market stability.

Two commodities of particular interest to Australia which have been the subject of international commodity agreements in the past are wheat and sugar. We will work towards the negotiation of new agreements for these commodities which contain sub­ stantive economic clauses. We are participating actively in the ongoing work of the

International Wheat Council on possible forms of a new Wheat Agreement and we welcomed the decision of the International Sugar Organisation to call for a negotiat­ ing conference for a new Sugar Agreement in May-June 1977.

We will work actively to ensure the effective operation of the tin, cocoa and coffee agreements which I am tabling today. And we are prepared to examine with the utmost goodwill, on a case by case basis, agreements for other commodities where these are found to be feasible and practicable. In this regard, I do not exclude com­ modities in which Australia has an import interest only. Our membership of the cocoa and coffee agreements is an earnest of this. To be effective, commodity agreements

must necessarily enjoy the support of all significant exporting and importing coun­ tries. Equally, they need to have regard to long-term market trends.

Some countries, in their approach to commodity problems, place heavy reliance on the operations of the free market to achieve a satisfactory balance between supply and demand and reject any role for commodity agreements. While recognising the ar­ guments in favour of this sort of approach, it has little relevance to the many com­

modity problems which are the result of intervention by governments themselves in domestic and international markets. These problems cannot be somehow wished away by invoking the effectiveness of the free market. For many commodities,

especially farm products, free markets simply do not exist, even in those countries which strongly advocate their virtues.

We are equally suspicious of approaches to commodity problems which, under the guise of market stabilisation arrangements, are in fact no more than an attempt to legitimise and prop up policies for protecting high-cost production. These approaches put the whole burden of adjustment on to world suppliers and call for no domestic

adjustments. Proposals for price stabilisation agreements which are put forward as a substitute for greater and more predictable access to markets are of little value to Australia.

Australia will continue to support the idea of commodity agreements where such agreements can contribute to greater stability in international commodity trade and are practical both in terms of implementation and financing.

Having said this, however, let me quickly add that Australia does not regard com­ modity agreements as a general panacea for the problems of international commodity trade. There are many commodities which do not lend themselves to regulation by such agreements; for some commodities, agreements would be quite inappropriate.

85

While there are general approaches that can be considered, there is certainly no uni­ versal formula: no two commodities are alike. For every commodity for which there may be widespread agreement concerning the need for international action (and we have learnt from harsh experience that this in itself is extremely difficult to obtain), there will be a separate and distinct solution tailored to the particular circumstances of the commodity concerned.

It is against this background that Australia has participated in recent general dis­ cussions on commodity questions between developed and developing countries in various international forums including GATT, UNCTAD and the Conference on In­ ternational Economic Co-operation. These discussions have focused mainly on a range of proposals for a new international economic order, a cornerstone of which, in the eyes of Third World countries, is an overall integrated program for a range of commodities of export interest to developing countries. This program, which is an

UNCTAD initiative, includes proposals for the establishment of international buffer stocks and a common fund to finance these. Australia has welcomed the UNCTAD initiative as a contribution towards a bet­ ter understanding of commodity problems. It provides, for the first time, an oppor­ tunity to approach as a whole the inter-related problems of access, supply and price. We have, therefore, pledged ourselves to participate fully in the deliberations and negotiations envisaged under the integrated program. Naturally, it is not possible to say in advance of such deliberations and negotiations what may prove to be the most appropriate course to follow in relation to the particular issues involved.

A significant development in recent years has been the growth in commodity pro­ ducer associations. Australia has joined three producer associations (those for baux­ ite, copper and iron ore) but has made it clear that, while seeking to achieve fair and reasonable returns, it will not be a party to any form of international blackmail in resources trade. We will continue to insist that resource-deficient countries should have adequate supplies of the materials they need at fair prices.

Australia became an associate member of the Intergovernmental Council of Cop­ per Exporting Countries (CIPEC) late last year and today I am tabling the agreement establishing the organisation. On joining the organisation Australia made clear its view on the desirability of establishing an early dialogue between copper producing and consuming countries. We are pleased that, on the initiative of CIPEC, producer- consumer discussions commenced in March this year under the auspices of UNCTAD. In the initial discussions, participating governments agreed to work towards the establishment of a permanent intergovernmental consultative body for copper, the terms of reference of which will include the examination of possible price stabilisation measures.

Australia will continue its long-established policy of support for international con­ sultation and co-operation on commodity trade questions. We will continue to con­ tribute fully to such discussions. We do not pretend that there are easy answers to the problems of commodity trade; nor do we believe that there are universal solutions to these problems. We do believe however that if viable and practical solutions are to be found these can only be achieved by the fullest co-operation between all interested countries, whether they are producers or consumers, developed or developing.

Canberra 15 September 1976

86

THE TREASURY

Canberra A.C.T. 2600

24 September 1976

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Sir, Reference is made to the examination of this Department’s 1976-77 Appropri­ ation Bills by Senate Estimates Committee B on 16 September 1976 at which further information was sought.

Lighting the Treasury Building, Canberra

Costs The electricity costs for the Treasury Building, Canberra, include charges for major electrical installations such as generators and computers which are estimated to con­ sume 60 per cent of the total amount. The costs for the past three years were:

Total cost

Estimated lighting cost- 40 per cent of total

Estimated lighting cost per hour

$ $ $

1973-74 ............................. ................... 175 383 70 150 8.00

1974-75 ............................. ................... 190 772 76 300 8.71

1975-76 ............................. ................... 225 202 90 000 10.27

After-hours Lighting—Treasury Building, Canberra The purposes for which the lights are used at night are: • after-hours duty by Treasury and Taxation officers • cleaning purposes

• safety and security lighting • security guard inspections For your information, evening security guards are issued with instructions to: 1. Switch off all office lighting except on floors where officers are working or

where cleaning is progressing. 2. Leave on ground floor and lift, lobby and fire stairway lights (functions of safety and security). 3. Use only such other lighting as is necessary for security patrols.

Generation of Off-peak Electricity by Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electricity Authority In response to a request for information relating to the question of consumption of ‘surplus’ power, I attach a letter dated 21 September 1976 from the Acting Secretary, A.C.T. Electricity Authority.

Expenditure from Advance to the Treasurer: Divisions 680, 970 The amounts issued from the Treasurer’s Advance in Appropriation Acts (Nos 1 and 2) 1975-76 pending the passage of the Additional Estimates 1975-76 were: Treasurer’s Advance-Appropriation Act No 1, $ 110 393 112

Treasurer’s Advance-Appropriation Act No 2, $63 738 646 Yours faithfully, C. F. GRANT Assistcnt Secretary g7 Management Services

A C T. ELECTRICITY AUTHORITY

21 September 1976

The Secretary Department of the Treasury Canberra, A.C.T.

Attention Mr Reynolds

Dear Sir,

Electricity Consumption Treasury Building

I refer to your request for a technical appraisal of Senator W alsh’s statement. The Snowy Mountains Authority’s generating plant makes its principal generat­ ing contribution to the New South Wales, Victoria and A.C.T. transmission systems only during the morning (7.30-8.00 a.m.) and evening (5.30-6.30 p.m.) peak periods

and does not generate during the late evening and overnight periods. The energy for large government buildings outside these peak periods is supplied entirely from the N.S.W. generating system and is paid for in bulk by the A.C.T. Elec­ tricity Authority.

The Snowy Mountains Authority does not have surplus or unwanted energy. It has generated about 1 Vi per cent more energy than was estimated as needed at the incep­ tion of the Scheme. It can be said that the States of N.S.W. and Victoria have reduced their requirements for thermal generating plant because of the capacity available from the Snowy Mountains Authority’s system, therefore the Snowy Mountains Authority’s energy is ‘wanted ’ and is n o t‘surplus ’ to requirements.

The Authority had not previously encountered the attitude that government office lighting should remain on during the night to consume unwanted power.

Yours faithfully, B. W. BIRCH Acting Secretary

88

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

The Secretary Estimates Committee B The Senate Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Examination of 1976-77 Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure, Thursday, 16 September 1976

The following answers are provided to questions raised when the Estimates of this Department were considered by Senate Estimates Committee B.

Hansard, p. 41 (Div. 380.3.03) Claims for subsidy payments are lodged by the companies quarterly with the New South Wales Office of the Purchasing Commission. Investigators of the Commission then examine the company records and, when satisfied, the correctness of the claim is certified by the Chief Cost Investigator (N.S.W.) who then refers it to the Department of Industry and Commerce in Canberra.

Hansard,p. 46 (Div. 387) Senator Walsh asked, ‘Could we get by letter an estimate of value added under the Nomad production program?’ The following assessment of value added regarding the Nomad production pro­

gram includes manufacturing costs, subcontract costs, tool maintenance, engineering liaison, transport charges, insurance, super/provident, depreciation, administration, interest, warranty, marketing and technical support costs.

Batch 1 aircraft 1-20

Batch 2 aircraft 21-70

Batch 3 aircraft 71-95

Total cost

December 1975 money values

$m $m $m $m

13.773 22.919 10.000 46.692

Less: material costs . . . . . 2.201 5.125 2.921 10.247

Net value added ................... . 11.572 17.794 7.079 36.445

K. McKNOWN fo r Secretary

89

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Administration of re-establishment loans—Item 490/2/06

Additional information was sought by the Committee concerning the level of admin­ istrative costs in relation to amounts received as interest and repayments.

The cost of administration of agricultural loans made under the Re-establishment and Employment Act 1945 is related to the number of loans not yet repaid.

New South Wales has by far the largest number of loans outstanding and conse­ quently incurs the highest administrative costs.

The numbers of loans outstanding at 30 June 1976 and the estimated administrat­ ive costs payable to the States for 1976-77 are as follows:

Number of Estimated Cost per

State loans cost loan

- $ $

New South Wales .................................. 241 19 000 78.84

Victoria ................................................. 2 200 100.00

South A u s t r a l i a ....................................................... 66 3 300 50.00

Western A u s t r a l i a .................................. 109 4 000 38.46

T a s m a n i a ................................................................ 35 2 500 71.43

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Division 490/3—Item 06: Payments to States in Connection with War Service Land Settlement

An amount of $754 000 has been provided under the above item, including $564 000 for the operation and maintenance of irrigation and other projects.

The provision of $564 000 comprises $560 000 for the operation and maintenance of the Loxton Irrigation Area headworks and $4000 for the operation and main­ tenance of WSLS holdings in Tasmania surrendered to the administering authority.

Under the terms of an agreement executed in 1945 between the Commonwealth and South Australia, the Commonwealth is wholly responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Loxton headworks.

The provision for operation and maintenance of surrendered holdings in Tas­ mania is to cover costs incurred in the period between the surrender of a lease and its transfer to another lessee. The experience of the Tasmanian administering authority is that, in the present economic situation in the rural sector, there is likely to be some delay in attracting a new lessee. During the interim period some maintenance of the holding is necessary to protect the Commonwealth’s equity.

90

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Wine Research—Item 490/3/08

Additional information was sought by the Committee in relation to the research pro­ gram which is carried out by the Australian Wine Research Institute.

The Australian Wine Research Institute was established in 1955 under the Wine Research Act with initial funding of $ 1 000 000 from funds accumulated from a special excise duty on fortifying spirits, together with an annual grant from the Aus­ tralian Wine Board.

Since 1970, income of the Institute has been derived from:

• interest from investment of capital amount of $800 000; • annual grant from Australian Wine Board; • annual $ for $ grant from Commonwealth Government to match the Australian Wine Board grant. For 1976-77 the Commonwealth grant is $65 000;

• annual grant from CSIRO.

The purpose of the Institute is to undertake research into scientific and technical aspects of wine and spirits manufacture including short-term problems of industry and long-term investigations into winemaking, spirit distillation and maturation processes.

The Council of the Institute consists of nine members: a Chairman and two mem­ bers of the Australian Wine Board; representatives from the Commonwealth Govern­ ment, CSIRO and the University of Adelaide; plus three members with knowledge of scientific aspects of the Institute’s functions. Staff of the Institute comprises eleven research and experimental officers and four administrative staff. For the year 1975-76

salaries and operating expenses of the Institute amounted to $319 800.

For 1976-77 the research program is as follows:

• brandy and grape spirit research; • colour composition and wine quality; • investigations of grape musts and wines; • measurements of the effect of temperature on wine-making processes; • production of volatile aromas during fermentation; • analytical methods;

• technical services.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Development of Australian Fisheries—Item 490/3/11

The sum of $200 000 credited to the Fisheries Development Trust Account is to be applied, principally, towards development of trawl fisheries in waters adjacent to Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia.

Negotiations with State authorities are under way and those States have been requested to provide matching funds. To date one State has indicated a significant contribution will be made.

91

This program has been selected:

• to assess our offshore fisheries in view of the expected 200-mile economic zone; • to determine suitable alternative fisheries which are urgently required for ves­ sels in a number of fisheries in this area—particularly the tuna fishery; • to examine apparently good prospects for import replacement from the

resources in the area. The aims of the project are to define trawling grounds, species and catch rates and to assess the commercial potential of the continental shelf and slope.

A steering committee with a representative from each State and the Common­ wealth is being formed, and it is expected that two commercial vessels of proven efficiency will be chartered for the project and tenders will be called shortly.

It is planned that the project will commence in February 1977. Any balance in the fund will be used to fund further such developmental projects, and detailed planning of these will be undertaken when it is determined funds are available.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Export Animal Health Certification—Reimbursement to States Item 494/2/05

Additional information was sought concerning the numbers of animals exported and certificates issued.

There are a number of factors which affect the workload of the exporting veterin­ arians and may be summarised under the following:

1. Species o f animal— There is usually more effort involved in export of horses or cattle than in sheep. Australia is relatively free from sheep diseases. 2. Reason fo r export—Breeding stock require more stringent health requirements than do slaughter animals.

3. Country o f destination—Some countries have more difficult health requirements than other countries. 4. Disease status o f States—More tests have to be carried out in some States be­ cause of diseases which are present and may be absent from other States.

Also because some States are free from disease, animals are moved to these States for the pre-embarkation quarantine period.

Animals may be selected more from States that are known to be free of certain diseases.

5. Point o f embarkation—Initial checks may be carried out in one State but final health certificates are issued at the point of embarkation.

Details by States of animals exported and certificates issued are set out in the attached schedule.

92

Animals Exported—1975-76

Tas. N.S.W. S.A. N.T. Qld Vic. W.A.

Cattle . . . . . 865 41 34 4 506 9 504 691 11 090

Sheep . . . . . 57214 386 435 047 80 61 451 I 347 866

Swine . . . . . 21 53 133 16 106

D o g s .................... . 20 2 174 145 14 426 613 657

C a t s .................... . 14 429 84 7 111 241 89

Zoo animals . . . 20 85 69 65 105

B i r d s ................... . 1 295 14 4 153 292 164

Reptiles . . . . . 4

Horses . . . . 449 2 9 352 172

Donkeys . . . 42

Day-old chicks . 362 182 102 690 11 350 2 275

F i s h ................... 118 1 000

Lab. animals . . 97 3 76

Hatching eggs . . 507 371 30 353 040

Buffalo . . . . 354

Goats . . . . 5 5 694

B e e s ....................

Certificates issued--1975- 76

2 colonies

49 1 753 277 55 450* 971 889

* Approximately

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY Bureau of Agricultural Economics—Lags in Publishing Surveys, Forecasts etc.

The Bureau’s farm sector data collection activity is directed towards providing a fac­ tual basis for empirically analysing rural industry problems and evaluating the alternative policy measures for alleviating them. This statistical base is published by the Bureau in three main ways. Firstly, BAE Trends is published each quarter of the

fiscal year. This publication provides short-term forecasts on a fiscal year basis of the volume and value of rural production and exports and, for comparative purposes, it also provides similar data for recent years; also presented are short-term forecasts in the prices farmers are paying for their inputs and receiving for their products, together

with estimates of aggregate costs and incomes in the farm sector. These short-term forecasts and the associated historical data relate to individual commodities and the farm sector as a whole. The information does not establish the level of profitability of individual industries or groups of farm enterprises.

Secondly, the Bureau makes available analyses based on the latest available data and in response to identified industry problems and needs. The Bureau’s complex ongoing data collection program is an essential and critical input in this process. Some recent examples include the publication of Bureau evidence submitted to various

Industries Assistance Commission inquiries. There are also publications relating to developments in beef carcass classification, and developments in the Japanese beef market and their implications for production systems in the Australian beef cattle industry. In a significant number of cases, the publication of the results of such Bureau

analyses have appeared separately from the publication of Bureau industry survey reports. Thirdly, the Bureau publishes the results of its industry economic surveys. There exist lags in their publication because of the particular procedures inherent in the col­

lection and publication activity. The major factor contributing to delays in publication

24255/ 7 7 -4 93

of economic survey results is the lag between the end of the period to which the data relate, and their availability for collection by the Bureau. The Bureau collects physical, production and financial data on a financial year basis for Australian farms. These surveys rely heavily on farm co-operators’ own records, their taxation returns, and information from marketing authorities. Although physical and production data are usually collected by July or August following the end of a financial year, a further nine months elapse after the end of the financial year before it is possible to obtain essential financial data from co-operators’ taxation returns through accountants’ offices.

After all data are available, the editing processing and preliminary analysis of data for an industry survey normally takes a further six to eight months. Seasonal peak loading of manpower and computer resources brought about by simultaneous data availability contribute to the length of this process. The editing and production of Bureau survey report publications contribute a further three months to the total lag which is usually eighteen to twenty months.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

5 OCTOBER 1976

Bureau of Agricultural Economics—Consideration of Introducing Advertising into Publications

The major and only regular publication of the fisheries Division is the monthly pub­ lication Australian Fisheries. This publication is also the only one where advertising is used to defray publication costs. It is a semi-technical publication which provides the results of marine and economic research as well as technological developments to the Australian fishing industry, as an information service. This publication is distributed to all licensed commercial fishermen and others directly involved in the industry. It is also sold on subscription and individually through the Australian Government Publishing Service. Both these groups provide a market for the goods and services of advertisers.

The Bureau collects its data on the rural sector from a large number of geograph­ ically dispersed informants and sources including Commonwealth and State depart­ ments and agencies, rural industries organisations, farmer co-operatives and individual producers. No charge is levied by these co-operators on the Bureau for the supply of information to it. It has been calculated that the savings to the Bureau are substantial. The results of Bureau data collections and economic analyses, including the identification and evaluation of policy options available to governments and individual rural industries, are made available free of charge to Commonwealth and State departments, Commonwealth and State statutory authorities, rural industry organisations and other organisations or individuals who have a direct interest in the rural sector. This distribution of Bureau publications is closely monitored and distri­ bution lists are restricted to those organisations or persons with real interest in the sector.

Any proposal to introduce advertising to Bureau publications would weaken the Bureau’s ability to obtain data free of charge. Furthermore the recipients of Bureau publications would seem not to provide a market for advertisers ’ goods and services. Most Bureau publications are not produced on a regular basis on a fixed time frame: rather its publication program reflects the changing emphases and thrusts of

94

its program of economic analysis and evaluation. The Bureau produces a large number of separate titles each year; approximately eighty separate titles have been published in each of the past three years.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

5 OCTOBER 1976

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Wheat Industry Stabilisation Scheme

Information was requested in relation to revenue of $60 065 000 from the Wheat Export Charge being expected during the 1976-77 financial year when no revenue was received during 1975-76. Information was also requested regarding the oper­ ation of the Wheat Industry Stabilisation Scheme and the application of funds

received as a result of the Wheat Export Charge.

A stabilisation scheme for the wheat industry is authorised by the Wheat Industry Stabilization Act 1974. Under Part IV of that Act, there is provision for the Minister to declare the average export price for a season and to ascertain the stabilisation price according to the formula prescribed.

Where the average export price for a season is less than the stabilisation price for that season the Commonwealth is required to make a stabilisation payment to the Wheat Board as set out in the legislation. On the other hand, where the average export price for the season exceeds the stabilisation price and also exceeds $55.12, the

Wheat Board is required to make a payment to the Commonwealth in accordance with the Wheat Export Charges Act 1974. In either case, the maximum amount pay­ able is $30 million and the maximum rate $5.51 per tonne.

The financial transactions are recorded through a Trust Account titled the ‘Wheat Prices Stabilisation Fund’, which has been continued in existence from the earlier stabilisation scheme. Over the past five years the pay-ins or pay-outs to the Fund have been as follows:

Financial year Season $(m) Nature

1971-72 1969-70 27.538 Payment to Board

1970-71 30.819

1972-73 1970-71 1.239 Payment to Board

1971-72 40.132

1973-74 1972-73 12.360 Payment to Board

1973-74 9.842 Payment by Board

1974-75 1973-74 38.678 Payment by Board

1975-76

As at 30 June 1976, the balance in the Fund was $55 129 593, which was invested in Commonwealth Inscribed Stock and on Fixed Deposits with the Reserve Bank.

As explained to the Estimates Committee, an amount of $30 million, in respect of the season 1974-75, was received too late to be credited to the Fund by 30 June 1976 and an additional $30,065 million will be received during 1976-77, making a total of $60.065million to be credited to the Fund this financial year. There will also be credits

arising from interest on investments of about $6.1 million.

However there will be repayments out of the Fund due to the operation of section 31 of the Wheat Industry Stabilization Act which provides that if the moneys standing

95

to the credit of the Stabilisation Fund reach an amount exceeding $80 million, the excess is payable to the Wheat Board out of the Fund. Consequently during this finan­ cial year there will be payments to the Wheat Board in order to maintain the balance of the Fund at $80 million. The Board is required under the Act to treat such repayments as if they were part of the proceeds of the disposal of the wheat of the season concerned and they are thereby taken into account in ascertaining payments due to growers.

96

Estimates Committee B

Appendix 2

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS & CONSUMER AFFAIRS

COMPUTER SECURITY

Physical security All senior officers in the Department who control computer terminal equipment, i.e. Visual Display Units (VDU), printers, minicomputers and equipment leased from Australian Telecommunications Commission (ATC), are charged with the responsi­

bility to ensure that all access to the hardware is authorised. In all cases equipment is located in areas where only departmental officers have right of access and in some cases only a limited number of authorised officers may use the equipment. An added physical safeguard is provided on some of the equipment which can be ‘locked’ into

an unusable state. The Department is currently standardising on this lockable VDU Restricted access also applies to the central computer room and its environs.

The Department uses only ‘leased’ ATC lines. These are dedicated to depart­ mental use and no agency, other than the ATC, can dial or break into this communi­ cations network.

Systems security Although the Department’s computer systems have been designed for ease of use, where the data are sensitive intentional complexities have been introduced to reduce the risk of accidental or deliberate misuse.

All on-line systems require the potential user to sign on to a VDU. In some cases this is simple but in others the user must know the password currently applicable and have a personal identity code. Passwords are altered subject to security ratings.

In most systems the computer ensures that a VDU may not be signed on unless a ‘supervisor’ terminal is already signed on. Similarly supervisors may not sign off if associated VDUs are still signed on. Once signed on the user has to use predefined message code for all transactions

and also has to use the prescribed format for the data content. Each system’s mes­ sages are for the exclusive use of that system, with only minor deliberate exceptions, and cannot influence nor access data held by the other departmental systems.

The computer maintains a record of which physical terminals may be assigned to each system. For example, there is only one departmental VDU which can be used for departmental correspondence purposes; any other VDU attempting access would be refused by the computer.

Both ADP development staff and departmental staff obtaining ‘hard copy ’ print­ out of potentially confidential data have been instructed to regard the print-out as confidential waste for which there are special disposal instructions. They have also been instructed to leave clear VDU screens after use and not to leave information

displayed.

99

OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 5 August 1976

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Public Service Board Canberra 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

The following information is submitted in response to the above question in rela­ tion to the Burroughs Data Centre activity co-ordinated through this Office. This Data Centre provides a bureau computing service within the A.C.T. and is currently utilised by five Departments:

• Administrative Services • Attorney-General’s » Capital Territory • Immigration & Ethnic Affairs • Overseas Trade

2. The provisions for protection of privacy applicable at the Data Centre are as follows:

Physical Security All areas within the Data Centre are under close staff surveillance during working hours. Outside these hours the building is locked and patrolled.

System Security The following security practices are in common use at the Data Centre:

• passwords • ‘ sign-on ’ procedures • user codes • detailed logging of all activity • equipment powered down and terminals disconnected outside working

hours

Computer Output Computer Output to be removed from the Data Centre is held in occupied areas under staff surveillance until collected by the appropriate departmental courier.

B. F. O ’GRADY Bureau Co-ordinator

100

O FFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 6 August 1976

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records The attached paper is submitted in response to the above question in relation to computer-based systems within the Office of the Public Service Board.

Μ. H. MILLS Assistant Commissioner ADP Systems Branch

101

CONFIDENTIALITY OF COMPUTER RECORDS

Physical security Terminals and the minicomputer in the Board’s data preparation area are protected by locks and bars during silent hours with random checks by a night patrol. Access during working hours is limited to authorised staff; entry to the work area is controlled by operating and supervisory staff.

Data preparation is also performed to a limited extent by ADAPS Ltd, Fyshwick, in conjunction with several other departments and agencies.

Actual computer processing is carried out either by the Australian Bureau of Stat­ istics or by the Department of Health. Both computer centres have stringent physical security precautions.

Systems security All stages of data preparation and processing are subject to a range of software and clerical measures providing accountability and control of access to raw data, magnetic tape and hard copy output.

Processing arrangements at the Bureau and at Health preclude access to the Board’s data by unauthorised agencies.

Computer output Raw data and output are accountable at all stages of data preparation; all material is recovered from ADAPS on job completion.

Hard copy output is subject to the normal restrictions and safeguards applicable to information of a personal or potentially confidential nature, even though much of the information is in statistical forms.

Information, in machine readable form, held on magnetic tape is subject to either the strict controls imposed within the ABS and Health computer centres or stored for short periods in locked cabinets within the Board’s data preparation area.

Legislation Processing at external locations falls under the protection of relevant legislation governing computer operations within the ABS and the Department of Health.

102

Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

The Department is using three computer installations which are operated by other parties, namely Burroughs Limited, the Department of Industry and Commerce and the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs. The answers to your queries for these three installations are as follows:

Burroughs Limited 1. There is no restriction of access to terminals linked to the Burroughs 6700 com­ puter. However, the terminals are located in an area which accommodates the ADP Section of the Department and the terminals are only linked be­

tween the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.

2. None of the applications are on-line. There are no special security features in the batch systems other than printing on some reports that information is con­ fidential to the Department.

3. Computer output is collected by departmental courier from the computer centre and delivered to user areas. Computer output containing confidential information which is no longer required is burned.

Department o f Industry and Commerce 1. Both the area in which the computer is situated in Melbourne and the location of the Canberra-based remote terminal are secure areas in which entry is per­ mitted only upon production of a security pass.

2. Computer output is handed directly to representatives of the system user area who are responsible for mailing the output to its proper recipients.

3. Outputs which could cause embarrassment if allowed into unauthorised hands are handed directly to the intended recipients. Such outputs are stored in a secure area and are treated as ‘classified ’ information for disposal purposes.

Department of Business and Consumer Affairs 1. Terminals linked to the computer can only be used for the departmental application.

2. The on-line system does not process classified information. A batch system which does handle sensitive data only produces them in an encrypted form.

3. Classified output is delivered directly to the user and is kept in a secure area.

Statutes, Regulations and instructions relevant to privacy o f data Of the areas in the Department using the above computer installations only the Com­ monwealth Electoral Act, its regulations and related legislation is relevant to the priv­ acy of data.

DEPARTM ENT OF ADM INISTRATIVE SERVICES

Canberra, A.C.T. 2601 26 July 1976

103

P. J. LAWLER Secretary

A TTO RN EY -G EN ERA L’S DEPARTM ENT

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Barton, A.C.T. 2600

Attention: Mr P. V. Moran

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 20 July 1976

Senate Estimates Committee B Confidentiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 concerning the confidentiality of Public Service computer records.

2. This Department uses the Burroughs Data Centre at Fyshwick for most of its computing services. Remote access to that centre is currently via a single TD802 video terminal located within the ADP Branch of the Department at the Administrative Building, Parkes. Unauthorised access to this terminal is prevented between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. each working day, since the terminal is within sight of ADP staff; remote access to the data centre is not generally available at other times. Furthermore, physical access to the Administrative Building is restricted before 7.30 a.m. and after

6.00 p.m.

3. Current application systems at the data centre are not of a sensitive nature and utilise only the sign-on user code and password provisions of the Burroughs operating system. Although no sensitive data are handled, clerical procedures ensure that printed output from production systems is only distributed to the relevant user areas.

4. The Department also makes use of the SCRIBE system at the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs for the control of Ministerial correspondence. Access to this system is achieved by means of a video terminal and termiprinter, again sub­ ject to staff surveillance during working hours. The security features of the SCRIBE

system are adequate for the need and no enhancement has been made for our purposes.

5. Other than the general provisions of the Public Service Act and Regulations and of the Crimes Act, there are no statutory provisions relating to the privacy of data currently used in this Department’s computerised systems. Advice as to those pro­ visions relating to possible future systems could be supplied at a later date if required.

T. D. POLLEYCUTT fo r Secretary

104

DEPARTM ENT OF THE CAPITAL TERRITORY

Canberra City, A.C.T. 2601 30 July 1976

Attention Mr G. R. Barber

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Public Service Board

Canberra, 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

Reference your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976.

Security measures taken to ensure that computer-based information is not misused and that privacy and confidentiality are preserved are:

Physical security (a) Computer Centre—Refer to Public Service Board Co-ordinator for details.

(b) Terminal equipment (i) Municipal Accounting Inquiry System (Electricity House). Terminals are located in a general office area under supervisory control between 8.00 a.m. and 6.00 p.m. daily Monday to Friday. Security staff control entrance

and exit Unbuilding outside these hours.

(ii) Developmental Terminals (Qantas House). Terminals are located in a securely locked room with the access key held under supervisory control between 8.00 a.m. and 6.00 p.m. daily Monday to Friday. Building super­ visor controls entrance and exit to building outside these hours.

System security (i) Municipal Accounting Inquiry System. Terminals are connected to the Com­ puter at the Computer Centre end daily by Computer Centre staff between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and 6.00 p.m. only. The Departmental Terminal Super­

visor carries out the initial ‘start-up’ procedure by accessing the Control Pro­ gram via PMG lines. This program ensures that access to information held on a dedicated disc drive is limited to the nominated Municipal Accounting Ter­ minals only by means of software ‘lock-out’. (ii) Developmental Terminals. Similar ‘lock-out’ to (i) above applies to these

Terminals.

Computer output Computer records maintained by means other than terminals are output to hard copy which is collected by departmental staff from the Computer Centre, sorted/separated by departmental staff and distributed by hand to the relevant User Areas.

Access to and disseminaiton of information held on hard copy in User Areas is subject to the normal restrictions applicable to secrecy and privacy of information in accordance with the Protective Security Handbook and the Public Service Act and Regulations.

105

Superseded information of a private or confidential nature held on hard copy and no longer required by User Areas is destroyed through paper shredding machines either under departmental control or under the control of another government department.

Statutes, regulations and instructions Statutes, regulations and instructions administered by the Department do not specifically refer to computer-based records.

J. A. TURNER fo r Secretary

106

DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 22 July 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T.

Attention: Mr G. R. Barber

Senate Estimates Committee B Confidentiality of Computer Records

Your 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 refers

The information held in computer form by this department is not of a particularly sensitive nature and with the exception of the Index of non-citizen permanent residents, is not governed by any statutes, regulations or instructions relevant to privacy.

The Aliens Act requires that portion at least of the above Index be held in each State Office and that the information not be open to public inspection. In actual fact, a copy of the entire Index in microscopic form is held in each State office and the secur­ ity procedures surrounding the production and maintenance of this, together with all of our other computer-based information, are described under three guidelines

provided.

1. Physical security There are no terminals or communication links to our computer files.

2. System security All stored information is on magnetic tapes held within the secured premises of Burroughs Ltd at Fyshwick. Tapes of sensitive master files are locked in a Class B con­ tainer which can be opened only by departmental officers, one of whom is always present when information is being printed from these files.

All items relating to country of origin are coded and translation tables are held only on departmental premises.

3. Computer output All output is collected and transported by departmental programmers.

The major output is on magnetic tapes which are taken to the secure offices of the Australian Government Printer for conversion to microfiche.

This product is personally delivered to local users who distribute to State branches by departmental bag. All microfiche is kept in locked containers when not in use.

Where potentially confidential information is shown on computer stationery, the product is delivered only to local internal users—in each case within sealed envelopes.

Unwanted print-out is disposed of via the normal channels for destruction of classified waste.

107

K. J.GOODALL fo r Secretary

DEPARTM ENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 27 July 1976

Mr P. V. Moran Assistant Commissioner Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

In response to your request of 8 July 1976 I have attached a summary of computer system security procedures in operation within this Department.

R. J. THOMAS Assistant Secretary ADP & Technical Services Policy Development Division

108

DEPARTM ENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE

CONFIDENTIALITY OF COMPUTER RECORDS

The Department carries out a range of non-confidential data processing at the Bur­ roughs Data Centre, Fyshwick. It processes confidential firms’ data at the Depart­ ment of Business and Consumer Affairs computer centre.

Physical security Systems using Burroughs Data Centre • terminals located in locked rooms, with access restricted to ADP and statistics section staff

• magnetic tape library access limited to the consortium of departments using the Data Centre • physical access to the computer strictly limited by Burroughs operational staff and the consortium’s duty programmer Firms ’ system using BACA computer centre

• physical access to tapes, discs and computer centre limited by BACA staff

System security All applications systems depend upon operating system security facilities. No sig­ nificant additional security facilities are built into this Department’s applications

systems.

Computer output System using Burroughs Data Centre • no special precautions Firms ’ system

• output stored in locked cabinets • disposal in sealed bags via the departmental security officer

109

COMMISSIONER OF TAXATION

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 20 August 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records Memorandum dated 8 July 1976 (Ref. 76/3518)

Details of the automatic data processing practices designed to protect the confiden­ tiality of computer records are attached.

Also enclosed is a list of the Acts and Regulations administered by the Com­ missioner of Taxation which refer to prohibitions on the disclosure of information by officers.

P. J. LANIGAN

Second Commissioner o f Taxation

110

AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE SECURITY OF COMPUTER RECORDS

The Australian Taxation Office maintains an elaborate computer system, comprising a central computer complex in Canberra, minicomputer installations for data entry, on-line editing and error correction and output printing in each of the State capital cities and in four other locations. Work is also done on computers managed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

The information kept on computer consists of taxpayers’ ledger accounts and a limited amount of technical information needed for assessing or management. The information stored on computer represents only a very minor proportion of the information available in each Taxation Office in the conventional files which are

necessarily kept for each taxpayer. The computer system does not therefore raise major security problems other than those which inevitably involved in keeping general security in a Taxation Office. There are, nevertheless, problems which arise because of the ease and speed with which the computer can give access to such infor­ mation as is held on the random access disc storage of the central computer installa­ tion, and every practicable means has been utilised to maintain the security of this information.

Physical security: The central computer complex is monitored by a closed circuit television system from a security guard’s office. This system is designed primarily to maintain security when staff are not in attendance, but it is kept operational at all times except during normal working hours. The inquiry terminals in the State offices, which can make inquiries of the central computer records through Telecom lines, are

concentrated in an inquiry centre over which strict security is maintained at all times. The terminals are disconnected from the central computer when the staff are not in at­ tendance. The central computer complex is also safeguarded with electronic space alarms and conventional burglar alarms, which are monitored from a central depot

which maintains 24-hour surveillance.

System security: The use of terminals is controlled by passwords in addition to the rigorous exclusion of all but necessary staff" from the special security areas in which they are located. There is an additional element of security from the need for any un­ authorised person wishing to operate a terminal to acquire a considerable amount of

system expertise. The operating system programs never leave the computer centre to which access is restricted on a need-to-know basis (except of course for back-up purposes). Amend­ ments to software programs require authorisation by senior officers. The amendments

are manually recorded and logged by computer, to provide an historical record of the program edition in use at any time. The more sensitive application programs are also protected from access by unauthorised persons. The same method has been adopted in relation to computer records where passwords operate on different levels of security

and only a few very senior officers can have access to information regarded as having high security classification. Certain inquiry requests, for example, will only be ac­ cepted from particular remote terminals and must be accompanied by a secondary password before the information will be displayed.

Details of computer usage are recorded automatically and the records are examined regularly to ensure that no unauthorised work is being performed.

Computer Output: Computer output is distributed on a need-to-know basis. The concentration of terminals in an inquiry centre creates a situation in which any un­ authorised inquiry would be likely to be detected by the operator. Further restraints

111

are imposed by ensuring that inquiries will only be permitted to persons who have good reason to make them.

Computer produced output which is no longer required is shredded or burned. Where the information is sensitive, the destruction is supervised by the Taxation Office staff.

Audit Supervision: The application of all procedures relating to computer security is periodically reviewed and monitored by the internal audit staff.

AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE

CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS

STATUTES AND REGULATIONS

Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 section 16

Income Tax Assessment Regulations Regulation 4

Sales Tax Assessment Act (No. 1) 1930 section 10

Sales Tax Regulations Regulation 81

Sales Tax Procedure Regulations Regulation 35

Payroll Tax Assessment Act 1941 section 11

Payroll Tax Regulations Regulation 4

Payroll Tax (Territories) Assessment Act 1971 section 8

Gift Duty Assessment Act 1941 section 10

Gift Duty Regulations Regulation 4

Wool Tax (Administration) Act 1964 section 8

Wool Tax (Administration) Regulations Regulation 41

Stevedoring Industry Charge Assessment Act 1947 section 10 Stevedoring Industry Charge Regulations Regulation 35

Tobacco Charges Assessment Act 1955 section 10

Export Incentive Grants Act 1971 section 8

Australian Capital Territory Taxation (Administration) Act 1969 section 7

Taxation Administration Act 1953 section 14f

DEPARTM ENT OF ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS

Phillip, A.C.T. 2606

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Office of the Public Service Board

Kings Avenue Offices Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question of Confidentiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memorandum of 8 July 1976. This Department uses computer facilities in two areas of its operations. One relates to the maintenance of Aboriginal popu­ lation records and the other to the Aboriginal Loans Commission where computer ac­ tivity is limited to accounting and statistical facilities only.

2. In relation to the specific aspects mentioned in your paper, the following infor­ mation is provided.

Aboriginal population records Physical security The Department uses the computer facilities of the Department of the Northern Territory. No terminals or communication equipment are used by the Depart­

ment of Aboriginal Affairs. The security of the Department of the Northern Territory’s facilities will no doubt be detailed by that Department in response to your memorandum.

Systems security (i) Security is inherent in this respect as an involved set of programs must be run in sequence for outputs to be obtained.

(ii) A separate library is maintained for Department of Aboriginal Affairs’ programs. Access to particular programs requires a confidential code-word which is held in the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

(iii) File names required for access are confidential and are held in the Depart­ ment of Aboriginal Affairs. (iv) Information on master files is largely in code and extensive data would be necessary to interpret even if the file format was known. This information is

also maintained as confidential.

Computer outputs All outputs of a confidential nature are put on to magnetic tapes from which microfiche are created. These are prepared by Datacard Australia, the holders of the Australian Government contract for this work (Commonwealth Tender

Board Contract No. 17619).

Aboriginal Loans Commission Physical security The Department does not have a terminal or other equipment. Coded sheets are dispatched to Datanamics of Fyshwick for coding and transcribing to tape and

the tapes are sent to Sydney for processing. The Commission uses the services of

Joint Services Pty Ltd, Sydney, which is operated by a consortium of building societies. The Public Service Board specialists were used to advise the Loans Commission when it embarked on computer arrangements and it is our under­ standing that the Board’s officers were more than satisfied in relation to the con­ fidentiality and security of the computer arrangements.

Systems security In this respect, the Loans Commission feels confident that the system is secure in so far as it is widely used in the community by a number of building societies and to this extent the system would ensure confidentiality both from the clients’ point of view as well as the lending authority.

Computer outputs The Loans Commission is only of very recent origin and computer print-outs are stored with files, papers etc. of personal information in locked four-draw cabinets.

P. J. SULLIVAN Assistant Secretary Management Services

114

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

Braddon, A.C.T. 30 July 1976

Mr P. V. Moran First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Office of the Public Service Board

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

All persons and organisations co-operate in Bureau of Agricultural Economics data collections on a voluntary basis. These data collections form the major com­ ponent of the data base which is essential to the functions the Bureau performs. The Bureau’s effectiveness is dependent on the goodwill, co-operation and confidence

which its officers must generate in their contacts with organisations and individuals.

For the past thirty years the Bureau has protected the information which has been collected from primary producers and organisations and has ensured that, in using it for research purposes, the data provided by individuals or organisations cannot be identified with their source. The Bureau attaches considerable importance to this re­

sponsibility. There is no legislation, however, that obliges the Bureau not to disclose the identity of an individual and the data provided by that person. The data are typically collected from co-operators by using questionnaires and they are then processed using computer facilities. Specific measures are taken to res­

trict access to this material and the measures taken in respect of the computer facilities are outlined in the following paragraphs. For many years the Bureau has been a user of the CSIRO Service Bureau facility. The use of such a shared system, rather than an in-house system, necessarily reduces

the security of the Bureau information. However the Bureau’s overall level of com­ puter usage cannot support the level of sophistication and overall capacity which the Bureau’s diverse and often analytically complex computing workload demands, in a cost-effective fashion. The use of the CSIRO system is a highly cost-effective alterna­

tive to inadequate in-house computing facilities.

The Bureau’s present physical security arrangements for the computer terminal which it operates within the CSIRO network include:

1. The locking of doors giving access to the data processing work areas from the cessation of work to 8.00 a.m. each day and through the weekend.

2. The terminal room itself is kept locked in the same periods described in (1). 3. The security control key without which the terminal cannot be operated is not available except during the hours specified in (1) above. The documents used in the computer systems operated by the Bureau do not have the names and addresses of individuals identified with the data provided by those individuals. A numeric code, the physical source of which is treated as confidential, is included on such records. A labelling facility provided by the CSIRO system is used to

provide security for magnetic tape files. Disc files are held on volumes mounted on

115

Bureau private disc drives within the CSIRO system. Access to these drives is made secure by a password facility. Also separation of file documentation from the file itself provides a reasonable level of security.

As the Bureau possesses its own terminal within the CSIRO system, all output is currently printed on the Bureau’s local lineprinter, giving a high level of security for the output which immediately comes into the custody of a Bureau operator. Confiden­ tial output which is no longer required is shredded prior to disposal.

In summary the Bureau’s data holdings are believed to be secure and safeguarded in a manner which is consistent with the requirements of the data themselves. The integrity and responsibility of the people running and using Bureau computer systems is an important element.

N. D. HONAN Director

116

AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

P.O. Box 10 Belconnen 2616 26 July 1976

Mr P. V. Moran First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Public Service Board

Kings Avenue Barton, 2600

Confidenfidiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 seeking information for the Sen­ ate Estimates Committee on the security arrangements pertaining to the privacy and confidentiality of Public Service computer records. The ABS distinguishes ‘privacy’ as relevant and belonging to the individual (entity) concerned, and ‘confidentiality’ as

relevant and belonging to the data held on that individual (entity). Thus, emphasis on the preservation of the confidentiality of the data ensures the ‘privacy’ of the individual (entity) in ABS computer systems.

A summary paper is supplied on present practices. Because ABS (in company with the Department of Overseas Trade) is presently engaged in establishing specifications for the re-equipment of ABS computing facilities, additional information on further plans and proposed improvements is also provided.

R. W. COLE

Australian Statistician

117

ATTACHM ENT 1

PRESENT PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

1. All ABS officers are sworn under the Census and Statistics Act to preserve the confidentiality of the data. This principle is rigorously followed according to the Act in spirit and to the letter.

2. ABS will not provide details of individual forms nor the names and addresses of individual informants to anyone within or without the Government.

3. ABS expends considerable resources (both manual and computing) on editing, querying and other procedures to ensure the accuracy of data used in compiling stat­ istics and to maintain the confidentiality, continued accuracy and relevance of the data.

4. Cross relating data across collections or data files by an unauthorised person is extremely difficult because:

(a) most statistical data relating to individual businesses or persons are not rela- table to the individual entity as computer files carry only reference numbers of entities, not names or addresses; (b) the complexity of ABS statistical computing systems makes it difficult to

interpret the data for those not initiated.

5. Access to the computer room, tape library and associated areas is limited to authorised personnel only. All personnel have identity cards (with photographs) showing their degree of authorisation.

6. All waste computer output including cards, printed stationeiy, microfilm, disused sections of magnetic tape etc. is carefully destroyed (as are completed forms as supplied by informants) under the supervision of a Bureau officer. In the case of paper output where possible it is repulped, again with a Bureau officer in attendance.

While these continuing measures have proved effective up to the present time further measures to strengthen the security of the computer room and the data it con­ tains are being explored.

ATTACHMENT 2

FUTURE PROCEDURES IN AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

The present processes associated with computers are essentially magnetic tape oriented. The aim in the future through data base technology and re-equipment is to simplify access to data for authorised persons while precluding access by unauthor­ ised persons. Accordingly, access to data will be increasingly direct through terminals (of which the Bureau currently has very few and only within its own offices). Re­ equipment plans and plans for the use of the equipment provide for the following security and confidentiality developments:

1. All data are confidential to ABS officers, but some data are restricted to a section of the ABS only. Consequently, where appropriate, the degrees of con­ fidentiality of data will be codified and implemented and continually moni­ tored and updated through the computer network’s hardware and software.

2. All personnel of the Bureau (already sworn under the Act re confidentiality) will be trained further in the strict observance of security practices in the use of terminals and access to data and programs.

118

3. Terminal devices and all associated operating documents will be made secure by locking up terminals and documents when not in use. The terminals will be physically lockable and the legitimate user will be associated, by password and confidentiality checks within the computer system, with the data which that user may access and, in specified cases, by the physical termination point of the telecommunication link.

4. Stringent methods of recovery of computer systems during processing are proposed to ensure the maintenance of the integrity and confidentiality of data.

5. The institution of a single person (or group of persons) within the data base administrator function to ensure the observance of security practices as set out above in relation to the integrity and confidentiality of the data, and all activi­ ties associated with access, change, or use of the data.

6. All aspects of the computer network, the central computer, telecommuni­ cations links, terminals, software are being devised to provide the maximum degree of security possible on an economic basis consistent with the measures above and the absolute need for the confidentiality of the data.

In addition to re-equipment plans 7. The processing of microfilm should be handled within the ABS offices as the confidentiality of the data justifies the ABS acquiring its own facilities for the purpose.

119

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT ACTUARY

West Block, Commonwealth Avenue, Canberra, A.C.T.

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question of Confidentiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memo 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 regarding the following aspects of secur­ ity within this Office.

Physical security Persons are not permitted access to the computer installation unless accompanied by a member of the ADP Section. The installation and the power supply are both kept locked outside working hours and also during working hours when for any reason all ADP Section staff are absent.

System security No use is made of passwords or similar devices as no on-line systems are operational. Batch jobs are submitted by users and a daily log kept of all jobs run. This log includes information on program numbers, instigators, time of run, duration etc.

Computer output Any printed output of a confidential nature which is to be disposed of is co-signed to a ‘confidential waste bag’service. Statutes Sections 57 and 145 of the Life Insurance Act 1945-1973 set out restrictions regard­ ing the disclosure of information received under the Act.

S. W. CAFFIN

Australian Government Actuary

120

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT RETIREMENT BENEFITS OFFICE

Canberra City, A.C.T. 2601 29 July 1976

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question of Confidentiality of Computer Records

Attached hereto are the comments referred to in paragraph 2 of our memorandum G26690of28 July 1976.

B. A. LORENZ for Commissioner

121

AGRBO PROCEDURES FOR SAFEGUARDING OF COMPUTER BASED INFORMATION

1. Physical security (a) Bureau of Census and Statistics Computer Service Centre: AGRBO magnetic tapes are held in the Bureau’s tape library intermingled with Bureau tapes. Access to the Computer Service Centre is restricted to authorised Bureau per­

sonnel. To guard against disasters, copies of master files and essential trans­ action tapes are held under lock in AGRBO. These tapes are replaced by later editions at approximately four-weekly intervals.

(b) Treasury Computer Centre: No significant systems are as yet fully oper­ ational on the Treasury machine. As systems are implemented, information held on random access storage devices will be backed up by magnetic tapes held under lock in AGRBO. Access to communication terminals in AGRBO is restricted to authorised personnel, who must quote their distinct ‘sign-on’ codes.

2. Systems security (a) Bureau: Generally speaking no special measures to safeguard information have been incorporated in operational systems, though file formats are so complex that, without interpretation by relevant programs, the information

would be almost meaningless. In sensitive special cases names and identifica­ tion details have been ‘scrambled ’.

(b) Treasury: Information held on random access devices is protected by pass­ words. Identification details for investment information is ‘scrambled’ and can be interpreted only by correct use of specific programs. Similar ‘scram­ bling ’ techniques will be employed for other information as new systems are implemented.

3. Computer output All output is collected from Computer Centres by Office courier and passed to relevant operational areas the same way. Old computer input/output is shredded under Office supervision in the Bureau of Census and Statistics installation.

The Acts administered by AGRBO contain no specific provisions relating to priv­ acy of information.

122

17 Yarra Street, Hawthorn, Victoria P.O. Box 2807AA, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 3 August 1976

Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

(Attention: FAC ADP Division)

Confidentiality of Computer Records

Re your 76/3518 of28 July 1976.

Physical Security The ICE 1904A central computer is the responsibility of ICE, site is physically se­ cure. ICE 2903 batch terminals located in Regions are sited in lockable rooms, data entry devices are generally not secure but cannot be operated without access to 2903. Inquiry terminals are assigned to either an inquiry system or the main operating sys­ tem. System security can be batched by the latter but controls over use are currently

being implemented to prevent this.

System Security Inquiry to files is only allowed from known networks within fixed hours with pass­ word protection. Access is also restricted to a user with limited set of files owned by an account code. Total system dump is taken at end of each day’s processing. All appli­

cations files have at least three generations of master and transaction files retained.

Computer Output No security exists at the moment but procedures for such systems as WAGES are being developed.

Generally this Department is very conscious of the need for security in ADP sys­ tems and is developing appropriate standards in conjunction with the establishment of the ICE computing facility. To this end a check list of relevant PSB circulars, docu­ mentation etc. would be of value if sent to Director (AD P) at this address.

K. J. FENNELL fo r Secretary

DEPARTM ENT OF CONSTRUCTION

123

DEPARTM ENT OF DEFENCE

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 28 July 1976

First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question of Confidentiality of Computer Records

Reference: A. Your 76/3518 of 8 July 1976

Defence has a number of computer installations and slight variations in procedure and practice occur in accordance with the type of system, the purpose for which it is used and the local conditions which apply. However, generally, the following covers the subjects raised in the reference.

Physical security 2. In general terms, physical security safeguards include the siting of computers in buildings which have Commonwealth Police access control or similar protective con­ ditions. Computer room access is restricted to security-cleared persons whose duties require their presence. Terminal rooms are locked where feasible when not in use but the advent of open plan accommodation will require implementation of terminal hardware control techniques.

System security 3. System security practices on our older equipment are entirely physical and include the examination of run requests and specifications to ensure proper authorisation. More recent equipment has software with built-in security provisions. Additional pre­ cautions are in the course of being developed by Defence personnel. To protect against accidental and/or deliberate privacy breaches we will employ management control of users, passwords, account controls and the use of data file read/write keys. Control of access to data base files will be achieved by the use of a preprocessor which will embed access parameters in registered programs prior to their compilation into executable code.

Computer output 4. Defence applies security gradings to computer output. Such output is afforded the degree of protection appropriate to the classification, as laid down by security authorities.

Statutes etc.

5. Almost all Defence data are of a classified nature and as such they are subject to those regulations generally applicable to classified material. Although mainly di­ rected to protect the national interest, the application of these also provides a high level of privacy protection. There are no statutes, regulations or instructions specifically relating to privacy alone.

124

Dr R. J. TURTON fo r Secretary

DEPARTM ENT OF EDUCATION

Woden, A.C.T. 2606 2 August 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Attention: Mr G. Harber

Confidentiality of Computer Records

Your Ref.: 76/3518

Attached, as requested, is a summary paper covering security practices associated with automatic data processing.

K. N. JONES Secretary

24255/ 77-5

125

Physical security 1. No terminals or communications equipment operated.

2. All active data files are subject to the normal CSIRO physical security arrangements.

3. Non-current data tapes, on which information is contained in coded form, are kept in a locked container in the Department’s ADP area.

System security Because the Department at this stage is a small user of computers, actual computer processing is carried out by CSIRO. In these circumstances, it is not practicable to build in security features to our application systems.

Computer output All output is produced on site at the CSIRO Computer Centre and picked up by de­ partmental courier. Surplus hard copy output of a private nature is disposed of under supervision.

126

DEPA RTM EN T OF EM PLOYM ENT AN D INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

P.O. Box2817AA, Melbourne, Vic. 3001 26 July 1976

M rP. V. Moran First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Office of the Public Service Board

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

Your Ref: 76/3518 of 8 July 1976

Attached is a summary of security arrangements in this Department’s ADP oper­ ations, as requested. It is planned that future terminal equipment will be housed in a separate room within Tivoli Court building.

K. J. FITZGERALD Assistant secretary Establishment and Systems

127

CONFIDENTIALITY OF COMPUTER RECORDS

Physical security The physical storage of departmental computer records is subject to, firstly, the secur­ ity provided by the respective buildings, namely, Tivoli Court, CSIRO East Mel­ bourne, and AD APS Limited St Kilda. Each of these buildings houses data belonging to various Commonwealth Government departments and security is considered ad­ equate at this level.

Secondly, additional security is provided by the use of storage units (similar to a compactus) which permit magnetic tapes and discs and any confidential computer print-out to be stored under lock and key.

The only terminal equipment is connected to the CSIRO computer and is housed in the Department’s offices at Tivoli Court and while they are physically accessible by staff, only those who have been provided with the appropriate account number are able to gain access to the system.

System security Most of the Department’s applications do not require any system security controls as the output is normally made available to the public, e.g. NEAT statistics and the Commonwealth Employment Service microfiche vacancy bulletin. Physical controls of source documents and computer tapes and discs are sufficient in these circumstances.

The projects where system security checks may be needed are perhaps the econo­ metric models IMPACT and IAESR, both of which will be run on the CSIRO com­ puter. When they are operational, passwords could be used to access them and these will only be made available to selected officers.

Computer output As mentioned previously confidential output can be stored under lock and key and it is disposed of under the supervision of a departmental officer by arrangement with the Prahran City Council at their incinerator.

128

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Lombard House, Allara Street, Canberra City, A.C.T. 2601 26 July 1976

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

For attention: Mr G. R. Harber

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

Refer your letter: 76/3518 of 8 July 1976

In response to your request for our practices in automatic data processing areas, the following details apply:

Physical security—none except for normal office security.

System security—none for CSIRO applications. The Honeywell Mark III system has a fairly advanced password security system and passwords are changed on a monthly basis, or more frequently if necessary.

Security on computer output—none.

2. At present there are no statutes, regulations or instructions relevant to the privacy of data handled. The vast majority of the computing applications of the department have no security aspects other than normal considerations that internal departmental analysis is not released without specific approval by the Officers concerned.

J. E. DULLEY

Assistant Secretary Statistical and ADP

129

DEPA RTM EN T OF FO R EIG N AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 3 August 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T.

Attention: G. R. Harber

Confidentiality and Computers

(Ref. 76/3518)

The following is a reply to your correspondence on confidentiality of computer records, dated 8 July 1976.

2. As you are aware, the Department has not at this time any operational computer system which falls within the framework of the Senate Committee’s question. How­ ever, the Department is currently implementing a system which could be considered relevant. Therefore, the answers given are in the context of intentions rather than present practices.

3. The attachment summarises the proposed arrangements.

R. H. ROBERTSON fo r the Secretary

130

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

COMPUTER SECURITY PROVISIONS

The computers will be operated within a specially restricted area located in a building under continuous guard. Access to material being stored or processed will be on a strict basis o f ‘need to know’ for each item of information. Control over access will be exercised by personnel, software and technical safeguards.

Computer output (if classified or otherwise sensitive) will also be distributed on a limited ‘need to know’ basis and all paper waste, dumps etc. will be destroyed within the guarded building.

All classified or otherwise sensitive computer ‘ magnetic ’ records will remain at all times within the guarded building and will be stored in accordance with the Govern­ ment ’s security rules.

131

DEPARTM ENT OF FO R EIG N AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 4 August 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 Attention: Mr G. R. Harber

Confidentiality and Computers

(Reference 76/3518)

In addition to the reply on the above, one area not covered is our use of the Depart­ ment of Social Security and the Department of Health’s computers for general applications.

2. All input to and output from these computers is by way o f ‘safe hand ’, the security of software and data once within these computer centres being the responsibility of the respective departments.

3. All general applications information is stored within a secure area and distributed on the strict basis o f‘need to know’.

E. F. HARTY ADP Section

132

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTM ENT OF HEALTH

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Barton, A.C.T. 2600

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 23 July 1976

Attention: Mr P. V. Moran First Assistant Commissioner ADP Division Senate Estimates Committee B

Question on the Confidentiality of Computer Records

In response to your memorandum of 8 July 1976 the security measures practised by this Department to protect the confidentiality of computer records are summarised below:

Physical security: The central installations are permanently locked. Access is res­ tricted to authorised personnel who are issued with security passes which activate magnetic-card-keylocks. The computer room windows are of shatter-proof glass and a security officer guards the premises outside normal office hours.

System security: Terminal access is restricted to authorised users who must enter a pre-allocated unique user identification code, and associated password, to gain access. A security support program uses these identification codes to determine which com­ puter facilities and files the user is authorised to access. Characteristically compu­

terised records are coded and consequently detailed knowledge of, and access to, specific program systems is required to reference and interpret recorded information. For certain files identifying information and data are separated and encoded reference keys are used to link the component parts of potentially confidential records

(e.g. names, health insurance numbers and benefit claim history information). Ad­ ditionally audit records are maintained of all work run on the computers and a log is maintained which can be used to identify the files accessed by each program.

Computer output: The production and distribution of any potentially confidential output is handled by authorised computer room and system support personnel, in ac­ cordance with established procedures. A shredding service is available to provide for the total destruction of confidential hard copy output returned to the system support

group. Legislative provisions: Statutes administered by the Minister for Health which contain sections pertaining to the secrecy of information are:

1. Commonwealth Legislation:

Health Insurance Act 1973—s. 130 Hospital and Health Services Commission Act 1973—s. 36 National Health Act 1953—s. 135A

2. A.C.T. Legislation Health Commission Ordinance 1975—s. 92

3. N.T. Legislation Leprosy Ordinance 1954—s. 36 Venereal Diseases Ordinance 1923—s. 23 Director-General o f Health

133

DEPA R TM EN T OF IND USTRY AND COMMERCE

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 28 July 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 Attention: Mr G. Harber

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 in this matter.

This Department makes use of computers under its own control, under the control of other departments and, as required, the facilities of selected commercial organis­ ations for a broad range of dispersed processing activity.

The attached paper attempts to summarise the Departm ent’s practices in regard to the processing of sensitive and classified information pertinent to the request upon the Board. As agreed with your Mr Harber, the use of computers for process control and similar computer activity has been excluded.

A. A. LISTER fo r Secretary

134

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

COMPUTER PROCESSING SECURITY PRACTICES

Physical security (a) Departmental installations:

1. Site access is controlled by contract security guards or Commonwealth Police together with civilian computer centre receptionists/ supervisors.

2. Employees are security cleared to appropriate levels.

3. On-line remote communications are protected by hardware security devices.

4. On-line local communications terminals are located in user-controlled areas.

5. Physical security is designed and procedures promulgated to meet defence- classified processing requirements, including strict controls over storage, access and distribution of classified files, input and output and machine memory.

(b ) Other government installations:

1. No personal or confidential records are held or processing performed at other government computer centres.

2. Physical security measures required by such installations are followed.

(c) External bureaux:

1. No personal records are held or processed at external bureaux other than for microfiche production by approved contractors.

2. Defence-classified processing is performed usually as part of a defence proj­ ect on selected bureaux security cleared to an appropriate level for that project.

3. Classified processing is supervised by departmental staff on site with the ma­ chine dedicated to the task and suitably cleared internally and externally fol­ lowing completion of processing.

System security (a) Departmental installations:

1. Personnel and defence-sensitive information is processed in batch mode without facilities for terminal access.

2. Sensitive applications are the responsibility of Project Officers with authority to control information access, updating and output handling.

3. User-agreed processing procedures are followed in the applications processing.

4. Core storage is zeroised at end of job. 5. Reliance is placed upon manufacturer’s file protection systems, controlled access to magnetic files and security clearance of computer centre staff.

( b ) Other government installations:

1. Personnel and other confidential information is not processed on such installations. 2. Security and access procedures determined by these installations are followed.

135

(c) External bureaux:

1. The use of external bureaux for defence-sensitive data processing is subject to the directions of departmental security staff in respect of services to be used and job oversight.

2. Terminal disconnection and subsequent clearance of machine storage are basic safeguards.

Computer output (a) Departmental installations:

1. Direct terminal interrogation and output is not available where sensitive data are processed.

2. Known sensitive processing outputs are delivered by hand, secure transport or secure communications link in accordance with user-agreed procedures.

( b ) Other government installations:

1. Personnel or defence-sensitive output is not produced.

2. Procedures determined by these installations for output handling are followed.

(c) External bureaux:

1. Defence-classified output is accepted as produced.

2. No files or hard copy are retained on site.

3. Computer output microfiche are produced by Government-approved con­ tractor and may relate to details of individuals.

4. Microfiche production is regularly supervised and the transportation of com­ puter tapes and fiche is controlled.

Additional information in respect ofprivacy o f data A study is presently in progress within the Department in respect of statutes, regulations etc. relevant to data privacy and security.

It is not yet opportune to provide advice in this matter.

136

DEPARTM ENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES

Tasman House - Hobart Place Canberra City 2601 27 July 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Attention: Mr G. R. Harber

In reply to your memo of 8 July 1976 requesting details of the confidentiality of computer records.

The vast majority of computer-based data systems maintained by this Depart­ ment are of a numerical or scientific nature and as such would be meaningless or of little interest to any outside agency. This information is protected by the use of specific charge codes and passwords.

Confidential information is maintained by the Hydrocarbons Division. This infor­ mation involves actual sales of petroleum products and actual and forecast consump­ tion of primary fuels and is provided by various private companies on the understand­ ing that it will remain confidential.

This information is stored on the CSIRO Cyber 76 computer and the following se­ curity precautions are observed:

(i) Access to computer terminals is restricted to authorised ADP staff only and outside normal working hours the room containing the terminals is locked.

(ii) All company names, fuel types etc. are encoded before being entered into the system and the library of codes is stored on a physically different device to that containing the data. (iii) All large reports containing confidential information are printed in Canberra

where they are collected by officers of the department and air freighted to the Hydrocarbons Division in Melbourne.

(iv) Any requests for data by officers outside the Division must be approved by the Chief Fuel Technologist. The security provisions in all areas of the Department where confidential data are maintained are similar to those outlined above.

R. H. J. THOMPSON Assistant Secretary Management Services

137

P.O. Box 201 Darwin, N.T.5794 28 July 1976

D EPA R TM EN T OF THE N O R TH ER N TER R ITO R Y

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, AC T . 2600

Response to Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

1. Physical security The central installation is secured by a magnetic security lock, which is locked at all times. Magnetic card keys are only issued to authorised personnel.

2. System security Software and application programs are stored in production libraries which are date protected and maintained by the operations section.

The data base files are accessible through terminals, but only if the correct security codes and passwords are used. In some cases different sections of the one user branch can only access those parts of the file which apply to their specific duties.

3. Computer output All computer output is held within the central installation until the person requesting the report, or a representative of his/her office, picks it up from our staff. Any output in the computer centre which contains confidential data is shredded before disposal.

i. a . McD o n a l d fo r Secretary

138

DEPARTM ENT OF REPATRIATION

Woden, A.C.T. 2606 29 July 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Barton, A.C.T.

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

The Department of Repatriation operates a National Computer Centre in Sydney with on-line terminals in Central Office (Canberra), the N.S.W. and Victorian Branch Offices, and the Repatriation General Hospitals at Concord (N.S.W.) and Heidelberg (Victoria). Off-line processing is also performed for all State Branches using batch

data preparation and transmission via STD lines.

2. A brief summary of current practice in the areas of security and confidentiality follows.

Physical security 3. The Computer Centre is housed in Grace Building, York Street, Sydney. The building, which is locked outside normal office hours, is patrolled by guard on a 24-hour 7-day basis. Access to and egress from the building outside normal hours is controlled by the guard. All Computer Centre staff have been issued with a pass

which incorporates a personal photograph to facilitate identification by the guard.

4. The Computer Room itself is protected by locked doors, the keys to which are held only by the guards and the minimum number of senior staff. During operational hours one door is unlocked allowing access to a reception area manned by senior staff who prohibit access by unauthorised personnel. Outside operational hours all doors

are locked.

System security 5. Security in the areas of software and application systems is provided by:

1. authorisation by senior staff 2. clerical trails 3. that provided by the operating systems in use, i.e., OS and IMS 6. Software techniques ate used to define the transactions which can be input from each remote terminal. This inhibits access to any information other than that pertinent to the particular physical location of the terminal. Terminals which have a high security rating, due to either the confidentiality of data to which they have access or the type of activity which can emanate from them (e.g. update, delete or alter

records) are manned whenever that particular computer system is on line.

Computer output 7. The techniques used to secure hard copy output vary greatly depending on the confidentiality of the document involved. They include the use of armed security guards to transport parcels between the Computer Centre, the airports and user

Branches, the use of locked cabinets for unused stationery and the collection of con­ fidential waste paper in special bins for shredding or burning under supervision.

139

8. The requested length of this report precludes detailed discussion on this topic, however the Department has approached security and confidentiality of information as serious matters and takes all reasonable steps to ensure that its high standards are maintained. It should be noted, however, that the cost of providing security is high and it is necessary to ensure that the levels of security applied to each piece of data reflect the degree of confidentiality of those data.

9. Regulations pertinent to this Department regarding the privacy of data are:

The Repatriation A c t(section 121 and section 47) Regulations 72 (1) and 188 General Orders Registry Part 23 The Crimes Act (Section 70) Public Service Regulations (34 and 35)

Secretary

DEPARTM ENT OF SCIENCE A N D CONSUMER AFFAIRS

Central Office

Scarborough House, Phillip A.C.T. 2606 3 August 1976

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

In response to your memorandum of 8 July 1976 (reference 76/3518) the follow­ ing information is provided.

The areas of this Department that use computer installations owned by other organisations are:

A. Central Office which uses the CSIRO Division of Computing Research Facilities;

B. Antarctic Division which uses computer facilities of the Aeronautical Research Laboratories, the University of Melbourne and the University of Tasmania.

Central Office The Central Office computer systems cover the Australian Research Grants Scheme and Project SCORE (Survey of Research and Development). Both systems contain some sensitive data which are of a personnel or business nature. The classification of these data would not exceed ‘in confidence’.

Physical security: Access to programs and/or data can only be gained by means of a ‘charge code’. Details of the charge codes are restricted to the ADP Section.

Systems security: Where possible, data are held in coded form. In cases where data are held in non-coded form they are transferred to magnetic tape and physically held by the ADP Subsection.

Computer output: Handled only by ADP Subsection officers and appropriate users. Normally only one copy of sensitive material is produced.

The Ionospheric Prediction Service (IPS), which is a Branch of the General Ser­ vices Division, uses the Bureau of Meteorology’s computer. The Bureau’s systems se­ curity therefore applies for IPS. IPS computer output would not warrant a security classification.

A ntarctic Division The Antarctic Division is concerned only with scientific computations. This would not warrant a security classification. Consequently there are no special security measures taken although knowledge of the charge codes is required before access to data can be

gained.

141

Bureau o f Meteorology This is the only agency within the Department that operates a computer installation. The data stored by the Bureau fall into the following five broad classes:

1. weather observations and climatic data; 2. operational weather analysis and forecast data; 3. administrative data; 4. scientific and applications development data; 5. operating system and software data.

All applications systems are intended to be operated by data user groups. Some data in category 3 would warrant a classification o f ‘in confidence ’. Data in other categories could not warrant security classification.

Physical security for all of the computer-based information is ensured by:

( a ) restricting entry to the building by means of a guard and pass system; ( b ) restricting entry to the computer operating areas; (c) the allocation of account codes for entry to computer programs.

The integrity of data stored in all systems is ensured by:

(a) maintenance of system-processing records, back-up data and applications-processing logs; -

(b) knowledge of systems start-up, shut-down and update procedures is res­ tricted to user areas who are also responsible for the data; (c) use of generation data sets and hardware protection features.

Security for the sensitive administrative programs of category 3 is provided through the inclusion of:

( a ) restricting the activation of programs to the responsible user area; (b) the use of job code privacy transformations before an update of files can be affected; (c) secure disposal of personnel data listings.

The Crimes Act (section 70) and the Public Service Act (Regulations 34 and 35) are the only statutes relating to privacy of data in this Department.

A. H. ENNOR Secretary

142

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTM ENT OF SOCIAL SECURITY

Juliana House, Bowes Street, Phillip, A.C.T.

29 July 1976

The Secretary Office of the Public Service Board Barton, A.C.T. 2600 Attention: Mr P. V. Moran

Senate Estimates Committee B Question on Confidentiality of Computer Records

I refer to your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976 on the above matter.

2. Please find attached a paper which summarises the practices of this Department regarding the security of data and related automatic data processes. A copy of the relevant section of the Social Services Act which covers the unauthorised disclosure of information by officers of the Department is also attached.

L. J. DANIELS Director-General

143

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SECURITY

COMPUTER SECURITY

Physical security Access to State Office Computer Centres is authorised by State Directors and con­ trolled by Computer Centre Managers. Only computer-operating, maintenance per­ sonnel and known departmental staff are permitted to enter installations. Any other person entering is questioned by senior computer-operating staff regarding authorisation.

After hours, installations are sealed off from the rest of the building by locked fire­ proof doors and the building is then subject to normal security arrangements. Copies of computer master files are held at Reserve Bank buildings and are subject to their security requirements. Although terminal and communication equipment is accessible to all departmental staff at the particular location, the use of such equipment must be authorised by appropriate supervisors; and in addition, access to computer records through terminals requires an intimate knowledge of the operation of the computer systems.

System security All computer systems, operating, software and applications are the responsibility of Central Office. Any new system or modification to an existing system must be duly authorised by Central Office personnel on appropriate documents. The State Com­ puter Centres ’ responsibility is to ensure that only duly authorised systems are in op­ eration and that no unauthorised changes are made to the systems. At times of critical change such as amending legislation, the operation of computer systems is supervised

by Central Office ADP staff.

Computer output security All regular output produced by the Computer Centres is held in the Centre and col­ lected by authorised departmental officers. Control of accountable computer docu­ ments, e.g. cheques, group certificates, is maintained by senior Computer Centre staff. Output forms and documents are tallied in the Computer Centre and delivered to the officers who are authorised to receive them. Computer-produced output for immedi­ ate dispatch to beneficiaries is enveloped by machine under continuous supervision. Computer tapes used for the production of microfiche listings are accompanied by de­ partmental officers to external bureaux. The resultant microfiches are treated as ac­ countable documents and are subject to the controls required for such documents in storage and transportation. All officers of the Department have access to computer- produced output as part of their duties and it is the responsibility of supervisors and staff in any particular area to recognise unauthorised personnel attempting to obtain access to confidential information.

Statutes and regulations Section 17 of the Social Services Act covers the unauthorised disclosure of informa­ tion by officers of the Department. A copy of the relevant section is attached.

144

16. ( 1 ) T he D irector-G eneral, the D eputy D irector-G eneral, an As­ sistant D irector-G eneral, a D irector or a R egistrar m ay, for the purposes o f this A ct— ( a ) sum m on witnesses;

( b ) receive evidence on oath or affirmation; and (c) require the production o f documents.

(2) A person who has been sum m oned to ap p ear before the

D irector-G eneral, the D eputy Director-G eneral, an A ssistant Director- G eneral, a D irector or a R egistrar shall not, without law ful excuse, after tender o f reasonable expenses, fail to appear in obedience to the

summons.

Penalty: Forty dollars.

(3 ) A person, w hether sum m oned or not, who appears before the D irector-G eneral, the D eputy D irector-G eneral, an A ssistant Director- G eneral, a D irector or a R egistrar shall n o t— (a ) refuse to be sworn as a witness or to make an affirmation;

(b ) fail to answ er any question which he is law fully required to answer; or (c) fail to produce any docum ent which he is law fully required to produce.

Penalty: Forty dollars.

17. (1 ) An officer shall, if the M inister or the D irector-G eneral so directs, before entering upon his duties, or exercising any powers or func­ tions, under this Act, m ake before a Justice o f the Peace or a Com ­ m issioner for D eclarations a declaration in accordance with the

prescribed form.

(2) A person shall not, directly or indirectly, except in the perfor­ m ance o f his duties, or in the exercise o f his powers or functions, under this Act, and while he is, or after he ceases to be, an officer, make a record of, or divulge or com m unicate to any person, any inform ation with respect to the affairs of another person acquired by him in the per­

form ance of his duties, or in the exercise of his powers or functions, under this Act or under any Act repealed by this Act. Penalty: Five hundred dollars.

(3) A person who is, or has been, an officer shall not, except for the purposes o f this Act, be required— (a ) to produce in court any docum ent that has come into his pos­ session or under his control in the perform ance o f his duties or

functions under this Act or any Act repealed by this Act; or (b ) to divulge or com m unicate to a court any m atter or thing that has come under his notice in the performance o f any such duties or functions.

Powers as to taking of evidence and production of documents. Sub-section (1) amended by No. 41, 1966,

Amended by No. 41, 1966, ss. 7 and 32 and Schedule.

Amended by No. 41, 1966, ss. 7 and 32 and Schedule.

Officers to observe secrecy.

Amended by No. 41, 1966, s. 32 and Schedule.

Substituted by No. 57, 1959,

145

(4) Notwithstanding anything contained in the preceding provisions of this section, an officer may— (a) if the Minister or the Director-General certifies that it is necess­ ary in the public interest that any information acquired by the

officer in the performance of his duties, or in the exercise of his powers or functions, under this Act or under any Act repealed by this Act, should be divulged, divulge that information to such person as the Minister or the Director-General directs; (b) divulge any such information to any prescribed authority or

person; or (c) divulge any such information to a person who, in the opinion of the Director-General, is expressly or impliedly authorized by the person to whom the information relates to obtain it.

(5) An authority or person to whom information is divulged under the last preceding sub-section, and any person or employee under the control of that authority or person, shall, in respect of that information, be subject to the same rights, privileges, obligations and liabilities under sub-sections (2) and (3) of this section as if he were a person performing duties under this Act and had acquired the information in the perfor­ mance of those duties.

(6) In this section, “officer” includes a person who has performed duties, or exercised powers or functions, under, or in relation to, any Act repealed by this Act.

17a . Where the Director-General is satisfied that accommodation Declaration for mentally ill or mentally defective persons is provided in any prem- °fmenta) ises, he may, by instrument in writing, declare the premises to be a men- lnserted by tal hospital for the purposes of this Act. s N° 41·l966·

146

PART III— AGE AND INVALID PENSIONS*

D iv is io n 1 — P r e lim in a r y

18. In this Part, unless the contrary intention appears— “ benevolent home” means a benevolent home which is wholly or partly maintained by contributions from the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Commonwealth or the consolidated

revenue of a State and is approved by the Director-General; “claimant” means a person claiming a pension; “ dependent female” means, in relation to the operation of any pro­ vision of this Act, a woman who has lived with a man (in this

Part referred to as her husband) as his wife on a permanent and b o n a f i d e domestic basis, although not legally married to him, for not less than three years immediately preceding the oper­ ation of that provision in relation to that woman or man;

* Section 21 of the Social Services Act 1969 provides as follows: “ 21. Where-(a) an age pension or an invalid pension under Part III, or a pension under Part IV of the Principal Act amended by this Act is granted to a person;

(b) the pension would not have been granted if the amendment made by paragraph (h) of section 3 or paragraph (1) of section 9, as the case may be, of this Act had not been made; and (c) the claim for the pension was lodged on or before the thirty-first day of December, One thousand nine hundred and sixty-nine, the Director-General may, notwithstanding sections 39 and 68 of the Principal Act as so amended, deter­ mine that the pension shall be paid on and from a pension pay day earlier than the date on which the claim for the pension was lodged but not earlier than the date of commencement of this Act.”

Definitions. Amended by No. 38, 1948, s. 4; No. 69,

1948, s. 4; No. 41, 1952, s. 3; No. 51,

1953, s. 3; No. 30, 1954, s. 4; No. 38, 1955, ss. 3 and 6;

No. 67, 1956, s. 4; No. 44, 1958, s. 4; No. 57, 1959,

s. 5; No. 45, 1960, s. 3; No. 57, 1965, s. 4; No. 41,

1966, s. 32 and Schedule; and No. 10, 1967,

147

DEPA R TM EN T OF TRANSPORT

‘Aviation House’, 188 Queen Street, Melbourne, 3001. 26 July 1976

The Secretary Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Confidentiality of Computer Records

Reference your 76/3518 of 8 July 1976.

2. The measures practised to secure the confidentiality of computer records in this Department are as follows:

Physical security All doors to the computer centre are kept locked and can only be opened from the outside by use of special magnetic keys whose issue is restricted normally to computer centre stalf and site maintenance engineers. Visitors are allowed into the centre only under staff supervision.

Magnetic tape files are kept in a library within the computer centre with access only from the main computer room. Magnetic disc files are stored in cabinets in the main computer room. Security copies of magnetic tapes are kept off site in locked premises.

Each remote terminal is under the supervision of a nominated responsible officer.

System security Access to the system is by use of individual user names and passwords. Each password is known only to the system manager and the user, i.e. the individual responsible for a particular group of files.

Files within a user name can be accessed from that user name only by the user un­ less the user specifically allows other users access to particular groups of his files. The type and extent of access by other users, if any, is determined and specified by the user.

Computer output At present, although some departmental output from the computer centre contains potentially confidential information, no output carries a security classification. All de­ partmental output is distributed to user branches direct by hand, or in sealed parcels through the normal registry service.

After distribution the security and disposal of printed output are the responsibili­ ties of the appropriate recipient user branches. All officers are bound by a departmen­ tal administrative order on the security of official information.

Some client departments’ output, while unclassified, is potentially confidential. The printing of such output is supervised by a representative of the client department and waste material is destroyed immediately on site under the representative’s super­ vision. The printed output is collected from the computer centre by the representative of the client department or dispatched in a locked bag.

148

3. Paragraph 11 of section 22.1 of the departmental Administrative Orders and Instructions is entitled ‘Security of Official Information’. This Order details compre­ hensive instructions to all personnel in the following aspects of security:

• status of office papers • disclosure of information • penalties for unauthorised disclosures • security organisation within the Department

• assessments of staff • levels of clearance • classification gradings, guidelines and markings • classified matter dissemination, reproduction, custody, storage, protection,

receipt, accounting, destruction, carriage (inside and outside the Department) • building security • breaches investigation and prosecution

BYRON LEWIS First Assistant Secretary (Finance and Commercial)

149

THE TREASURY

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 28 July 1976

Mr P. V. Moran First Assistant Commissioner ADP Branch Office of the Public Service Board Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Mr Moran

Confidentiality of Computer Records

As requested in your memorandum 76/3518 of 8 July 1976, attached is a summary of security arrangements in operation within the ADP Branch of this Department.

Yours sincerely

D. J. HILL First Assistant Secretary

150

THE TREASURY—ADP BRANCH

SECURITY ARRANGEMENTS

Physical security The Treasury Computer Centre is located completely within the Treasury building, i.e. no external wall of the building constitutes the secure perimeter.

The entire perimeter of the computer centre consists of two-hour fire-rated walls.

Sole access is through a controlled foyer area. The entrance to the computer room is accessed through a card-key system. Issue of card-keys is closely controlled.

Visitors are signed in and must be accompanied at all times by authorised personnel.

The main access door keys are available only to senior operating staff Terminals linked to the computer centre are subject to Treasury building security arrangements outside of normal office hours.

System security Access to the system by time-sharing users is controlled by allocating a qser- indentification to each authorised user. The user-id defines the level of access that is available to each user. In addition, each user-id is protected by the use of a password

which is known only to the individual user.

Data base access via the on-line system is restricted by the use of terminal specification parameters which ensure that transactions can only be entered by auth­ orised terminals. Password protection against each transaction type is normally used also.

Access to critical system files is controlled by the use of passwords for retrieval and/or update operations. Alternatively, updating activity is often controlled by the use of an expiry date mechanism which requires operator intervention to allow the update to take place. The computer operator in each case would require a signed

request from an officer previously identified as authorised to update or retrieve infor­ mation from the particular file.

Computer output Computer output with security classification is identified externally and held within the computer centre for release to specified officers only.

Classified print-outs which are no longer required are destroyed through the Treasury’s Secret Registry.

Random checks on computer output content are carried out within the computer centre.

Legal aspects Requirements of the Audit Act and Regulations, Treasury Directions are observed.

The Treasury 28 July 1976

151

.

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

REPORT TO THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee C has the honour to report to the Senate.

1. On 19 August 1976, the Senate referred to the Committee the Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments: Education Transport

Postal and Telecommunications Environment, Housing and Community Development

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister for Education and from officers of the Departments con­ cerned. A copy of the Hansard report of the evidence is tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with the Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 1976-77 and the Appro­

priation Bill (No. 2) 1976-77.

3. The Committee wishes to draw to the attention of the Senate the following ob­ servations and opinions arising from its consideration of the Estimates for 1976-77: (a) The Committee was pleased to have copies of the Explanatory Notes well be­ fore the examination of the Departmental Estimates, and their early avail­

ability made it possible for the Committee and other Senators to designate areas of interest to them, and the Departments were informed accordingly. (b) It is the opinion of the Committee that the designation of areas of interest prior to the Committee’s examination of Departments was of assistance in

the smooth operation of the Committee’s hearings. ·

(c) The Committee makes the observation that neither members of the Com­ mittee nor other Senators were inhibited from asking questions about items which were not designated and about which Departments had not been informed. (d) The Committee considers that it would be desirable for the Report of the

Auditor-General for the previous financial year to be available for a reason­ able time prior to the examination of Departmental Estimates in future, so that members of the Committee and other Senators have time to peruse the Report and ask any questions arising out of it which may be relevant to the Expenditure the Committee is considering.

4. Subsequent to the hearings of evidence and in accordance with the undertak­ ings given during the hearings, additional information was forwarded to the Com­ mittee in reply to certain questions asked during the proceedings. Copies of these replies which were received subsequent to the hearing of 7 October 1976 are not

attached as an Appendix to the Report because of their length. Copies are tabled and are also available from the Secretary to the Committee. Copies of replies received on or prior to 7 October 1976 are incorporated in the Hansard for that day.

5. The Committee records its appreciation of the evidence given by the Minister for Education, together with the officers of the various Departments whose Estimates the Committee considered.

155

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

ο

Estimates Committee C

Minutes of Proceedings

24255/ 77-6

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS

No. 2

WEDNESDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 7.30 p.m.

2. REFERENCE TO ESTIMATES COMMITTEES: The Resolution of the Senate of 19 August 1976 relating to the referral to Estimates Committees of the Particu­ lars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977 was reported.

3. CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP OF THE COMMITTEE: The entry in the Journals o f the Senate of 26 August 1976 recording changes in the membership of the Committee was reported. The Committee membership, so altered, was: Senators Collard, Colston, Martin, Mulivhill, Townley and Wriedt.

4. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN: On the motion of Senator Collard, Senator Martin was elected Chairman.

Senator Martin thereupon took the Chair.

5. PROCEDURE OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman (Senator Martin) made a statement relating to proposed procedures to be followed by the Committee when considering the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977.

Discussion ensued.

Resolved: ( a) That the Departmental Estimates be considered in the following order:

Department of Education Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development Postal and Telecommunications Department Department of Transport (b) That the Committee postpone consideration of subjects in which Members

have particular interest until the next meeting of the Committee.

6. NEXT MEETING OF COMMITTEE: Discussion ensued on the time and date to be fixed for the next meeting of the Committee.

Resolved: That the Committee next meet at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 September 1976.

7. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 7.55 p.m. until 7.30 p.m., Tues­ day, 14 September 1976.

8. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senators Collard, Colston, Martin, Mulvihill and Wriedt. (5)

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

159

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3

TUESDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 7.30 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Martin) took the Chair.

2. MINUTES: The minutes of the meeting held on Wednesday, 8 September 1976 were read and confirmed.

3. PROCEDURE OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman (Senator Martin) referred to previous deliberations of the Committee as to proposed procedures to be followed by the Committee when considering the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977.

Discussion ensued.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 7.48 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Sena­ tors Collard, Colston, Martin, Mulvihill and Townley (5).

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

160

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 4

THURSDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.03 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Martin) took the Chair.

2. STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN: The Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee and indicated that, pursuant to the order of the Senate of 19 August 1976, the Committee would consider the follow­ ing departmental estimates:

Division

Document* * Page Nos Department Amount

$

A 55-62 270-281 Education ................................................................ 380 005 000

B 12-13 835-837 Education ................................................................ 11 306 000

A 126-128 655-662 Transport ................................................................ 254 721 000

B 25 957-958 Transport ................................................................ 113 196 000

A 102-103 480-483 Postal and Telecommunications .......................... 151 294 000

B 20-21 909 Postal and Telecommunications .......................... 232 767 000

A 67-71 296-303 Environment, Housing and Community Develop­ ment 61 769 000

A 54 248 Housing for Servicemen—Advances to States

(Defence) 36 200 000

B 14-15 841-843 Environment, Housing and Community Develop­ ment 160 438 000

* Document A— ‘ Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

The Chairman also stated that the Committee would consider the departmental estimates in the following order:

Department of Education Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development Postal and Telecommunications Department Department of Transport.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF EDUCATION: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Department of Education:

Mr D. M. Morrison, First Assistant Secretary, Policy Division Mr R. A. Foskett, First Assistant Secretary, Territorial and Facilities Division Mr R. N. Allen, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch Mr F. R. Smith, Assistant Secretary, International Education Branch

Mr B. C. Milligan, Assistant Secretary, Research Branch Miss J. L. Miller, Assistant Secretary, Student Assistance No. 1 Branch Mr E. L. Charles, Assistant Secretary, Migrant Education Branch Mr Μ. T. Higgins, Administrative Officer, Northern Territory Education

Division.

161

Interim Australian Capital Territory Schools Authority: Mr B. J. Hutchison, Director, Management Services Branch.

Commonwealth Teaching Service: Mr M. J. Woodward, Secretary.

Schools Commission: Mr R. P. McNamara, Acting Secretary Mr G. Harvey, Director, Financial Co-ordination and Legislation Branch. Technical and Further Education Commission:

Mr D. G. Robinson, Principal Executive Officer.

Universities Commission: Mr R. M. Gillett, Assistant Secretary.

Commission on Advanced Education: Mr W. F. Roller, Director, Programs and Administration.

Curriculum Development Centre: Dr M. Skilbeck, Director.

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 270-281 —Department of Education (Document A) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered: Divisions 270-280

Division 281 (Curriculum Development Centre) being considered by the Com­ mittee.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 5.00 p.m. till a day and hour to be fixed.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Sena­ tors Collard, Colston, Martin, Mulvihill, Townley and Wriedt (6).

Senator Harradine also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

162

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 5

TUESDAY, 5 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.00 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Martin) took the Chair.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77 DEPART­ MENT OF EDUCATION: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Mr D. M. Morrison, First Assistant Secretary, Policy Division Mr R. N. Allen, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch Mr F. R. Smith, Assistant Secretary, International Education Branch Mr B. C. Milligan, Assistant Secretary, Research Branch

Miss J. L. Miller, Assistant Secretary, Student Assistance No. 1 Branch Mr E. L. Charles, Assistant Secretary, Migrant Education Branch Mr J. W. Morey, Director, Territorial Liaison Office Mr Μ. T. Higgins, Administrative Officer, Northern Territory Education

Division Mr I. W. Ward, Director, Student Assistance Branch.

Interim Australian Capital Territory Schools Authority: Mr B. J. Hutchison, Director, Management Services Branch.

Commonwealth Teaching Service: Mr M. J. Woodward, Secretary.

Schools Commission: Mr R. P. McNamara, Acting Secretary Mr G. Harvey, Director, Financial Co-ordination and Legislation Branch.

Technical and Further Education Commission: Mr D. G. Robinson, Principal Executive Officer.

Universities Commission: Mr R. M. Gillett, Assistant Secretary.

Commission on Advanced Education: Mr W. F. Roller, Director, Programs and Administration.

Curriculum Development Centre: Dr M. Skilbeck, Director.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Division 281—Department of Education (Document A) Divisions 835-837—Department of Education ( Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the

Department of Education.

163

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ M EN T OF E N V IR O N M E N T , H O U SIN G A N D CO M M U N ITY DEVELOPMENT: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Edu­ cation, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Environment, Housing and Community Development:

Mr P. M. Jenkins, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Resource Allocation and Planning Mr P. G. Gifford, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Management Mr P. E. White, Director, Finance Mr J. G. Menham, Acting Assistant Secretary, Information Services Mr A. Macintosh, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Co-ordination Mr H. J. Higgs, Acting Director-General of Environment Mr V. J. Kane, Assistant Secretary, Conservation Programs Mr E. M. Anderson, Assistant Secretary, Urban Studies Bureau Mr A. J. Selleck, First Assistant Secretary, Housing Mr M. J. Williamson, Assistant Secretary, Housing Program Implementation

No. 2 Mr A. J. Katz, Special Adviser to the Permanent Head Mr R. D. B. Beale, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Land Mr C. G. Booth, Assistant Secretary, Holsworthy Mr W. P. Butler, First Assistant Secretary, Community Development Mr G. R. Dempster, Assistant Secretary, Youth, Sport and Recreation Mr N. W. F. Fisher, First Assistant Secretary, Infrastructure Mr L. B. Devin, Acting Assistant Secretary, Network Services.

Australian Heritage Commission: Mrs C. L. Settle, Acting Director.

Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service: Mr R. W. Boden, Assistant Secretary.

Australian Housing Corporation: Mr J. L. Emanuel, Acting Manager, Corporate Plans and Programs Mr C. E. Stenhouse, Acting Manager, Finance.

Albury-Wodonga Development Corporation: Mr G. F. Craig, Chairman. Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 296-303—Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development (Document A) Division 248—Housing for Servicemen—Advances to States (Defence) (Docu­

ment A) Divisions 841-843—Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

Divisions 296-303 Division 248 Divisions 841-843 The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development.

164

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.07 p.m. till Thursday, 7 October 1976, subject to the suspension of the Senate.

5. ATTENDANCE: The Following members of the Committee were present: Sena­ tors Collard, Colston, Martin, Mulvihill and Townley (5).

Senators Harradine and Wright also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

165

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS

No. 6

THURSDAY, 7 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.01p.m.

2. APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: It was reported that, in accord­ ance with paragraph (6) of the Resolution of the Senate establishing Estimates Committees, the Chairman (Senator Martin) had appointed Senator Townley as Deputy Chairman during her absence.

( Senator Townley thereupon took the Chair)

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-POSTAL AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Postal and Telecommunications Department:

Mr E. Payne, First Assistant Secretary (Policy) Mr H. Young, Assistant Secretary (Radio Frequency Management) Mr P. Westerway, Assistant Secretary (Radio) Mr A. Westendorf, Director (Managenent Services) Mr B. Foster, Senior Finance Officer.

Australian Telecommunications Commission: Dr R. Cullen, Director (Finance) MrE. Banks, General Manager ( Customer Services) Mr J. Freeman, Assistant Chief Engineer (Construction) Mr L. Sebire, Superintending Engineer (Broadcasting) Mr A. Dagg, Manager (Management and Cost Accounting) Mr P. McLoghlin, Manager (Manpower and Organisation Studies).

Australian Postal Commission: Mr J. Holt, General Manager (Finance) Mr B. Moritz, General Manager (Operations) Mr H. Brownscombe, Acting General Manager (Marketing Services) Mr N. Bennett, Acting Manager (Commercial).

Australian Broadcasting Commission: Mr W. White, Controller (Administrative Services) Mr W. Funnell, Acting Controller (Finance).

Australian Broadcasting Control Board: Mr B. Connolly, Secretary Mr J. Cowen, Assistant Secretary.

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Deputy Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 480-483—Postal and Telecommunications Department (Document A) Division 909—Postal and Telecommunications Department (Document B)

166

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered: Divisions 480-483 Division 909 The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Postal and Telecommunications Department.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF TRANSPORT: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Transport:

Mr G. A. Birch, Acting First Assistant Secretary—Finance and Commercial Mr P. B. Eccles, Acting First Assistant Secretary—Coastal Services Mr S. P. Smith, Assistant Secretary—Sea Transport Policy Mr D. W. O ’Brien, Acting Assistant Secretary—Economic Policy and

Licensing Mr D. L. Turner, Assistant Secretary—Rail Mr N. R. Matthews, Assistant Secretary—Road Projects Mr G. T. O ’Halloran, Director—Budget

Mr B. K. Harrison, Finance Manager—Australian National Line Mr W. Harding, Director of Finance, Qantas Airways Limited Mr R. F. McCormack, Secretary, Commonwealth Bureau of Roads.

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Deputy Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 655-662—Department of Transport ( Document A) Divisions 957-95 8—Department of Transport (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

Divisions 655-662 Divisions 957-958 The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Transport.

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 4.50 p.m. till a day and hour to be fixed.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Collard, Colston, Mulvihill and Townley (4).

Senators Harradine, Jessop and Messner also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

167

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 7

THURSDAY, 19 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met in deliberative session, at 9.55 a.m. The Chair­ man (Senator Martin) took the Chair.

2. MINUTES: The Minutes of meetings held on 14 September 1976, 16 September 1976, 5 October 1976 and 7 October 1976 were read and confirmed.

3. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration. The draft report was amended and agreed to, after discussion.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.05 a.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The Following members of the Committee were present: Senators Colston, Martin, Mulvihill and Wriedt (4).

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

168

Estimates Committee C

Appendix

Minister for Education Parliament House, Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 20 October 1976

Dear Senator Townley, During the hearing of the Department of Transport’s Estimates for 1976-77 by Senate Estimates Committee ‘C’ on 7 October, I undertook to provide you with further information on a number of subjects.

The required information is now submitted on the attached statements. I trust that they are helpful to you.

A copy of the Department’s Aerodrome Local Ownership program for 1976-77 is also attached for circulation.

Yours sincerely, J. L. CARRICK

Senator M. Townley Deputy Chairman Senate Estimates Committee ‘C ’ Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

171

What are the statutory advisory committees covered in item 17—Professional Ser­ vices? What is the composition of each and what are the costs of each? What are the fees and allowances paid and on what committees are they paid?

Answer:

Three statutory advisory bodies are covered by this item viz: Marine Council and Crew Accommodation Committee, Committee of Advice—Manning and the Transport Industries Advisory Council.

The composition is as follows:

—Transport Industries Advisory Council 33 members comprised of representa­ tives of State instrumentalities and authorities, the transport industry, the transport associated unions, and members of the Department.

—Marine Council and Crew Accommodation Committee 9 members comprised of representatives of ship owners, shipping associated unions and a member of the Department (as chairman).

—Committee of Advice—Manning 3 members comprised usually of a ship owner representative, the associated union and a member of the Department (as chairman).

The fees and allowances paid are those laid down in the Remuneration Tribunal Act—Part-time Holders of Public Office and are paid in respect of all non-government members on the above committees. The expenditure associated with these com­ mittees under item 655/2/17 is of a miscellaneous nature, e.g. cost of venue for meet­ ings, etc.

Question:

What is the total dividend paid over the last 5 years by Qantas and how much is that in relation to the percentage of total investment.

Answer:

The dividends paid by Qantas during the last 5 years and the subscribed capital in each year is as follows:

Q u estio n :

Per

Capital Dividend cent

$ ’m $ ’m

1975-76 64.4 nil ..

1974-75 64.4 3.22 5

1973-74 64.4 6.44 10

1972-73 64.4 nil ..

1971-72 39.4 nil ..

Those figures relate to the actual year of operation and therefore will not coincide with the budget figures for those respective years. Dividends paid in a financial year are in respect to the previous year’s operations.

Question: What is the breakup of the income from parking fees at the major airports.

Answer:

As was explained during the hearing, some carparking activities are run by con­ cessionaires and others are operated by the Department. The following table shows

172

the receipts received at the major airports during 1975-76 from both concessions and departmental carparks.

Location Concessions Departmental

$ $

M e l b o u r n e .................................. .. 1 374 875

Sydney ....................................... 543 203 131 633

B r i s b a n e ....................................... 17 334 101 876

A d e l a i d e ....................................... 126 557 2 871

Hobart ....................................... .. 19 364

L a u n c e s t o n .................................. .. 25 294

Essendon .................................. .. 27 866

P e r t h .................................................... 145 789 12 781

Darwin ....................................... .. 3 892

Canberra .................................. .. 2 987

832 883 1 703 439

Question:

What were the receipts from Avis last year and what would be an estimate for this year? Are they related to passenger traffic.

Answer:

Avis paid the Government $465 607 in fees for the year 1975-76. It is difficult to predict an estimate for next year in the present aviation economic climate. The figure could exceed $0.5m. The figures are partly related to passenger traffic but Avis could be expected to propose that much of the revenue related to Avis marketing and stan­

dards of service.

Question:

What facilities are used at airports by Avis for car parking areas and terminal floor space.

Answer:

Avis meets the full cost of establishing and maintaining its airport facilities but the parent buildings and car parking space are provided by the Government or the dom­ estic airlines.

Question:

I am particularly interested in an application that has been made by the Streaky Bay Local Government Authority. I understand that the Council has acquired land and made application for a subsidy of $10 000. Could it expect to receive such a grant, as it is an urgent matter, during 1976-77? If not, could it expect to be given permission

to proceed with this work?

Answer: The District Council of Streaky Bay has been liaising with the Department of Transport’s South Australia/Northern Territory Regional Office regarding a pro­ posal to develop a licensed aerodrome at Streaky Bay.

There is an existing Authorised Landing Area at Streaky Bay but it is not capable of development nor is the site a desirable one. Council with the Department has selected a new site and technical details have been under consideration. The Council did make an application (5 August 1976) for

financial assistance for the development of the first stage and this was estimated by the Council to be $ 19 790.

173

Our Regional Office has advised the Council that whilst the development proposed by the District Council appears to meet the criteria necessary for inclusion of the project in the Government’s Local Ownership Scheme, this needs to have Treasury approval. We are currently processing this approval.

The Local Ownership Plan program is fully committed for 1976-77 and thus if Treasury approval is forthcoming then the project will be listed for consideration in the 1977-78 program.

If Council wish to proceed now using their own finance the Department could not guarantee reimbursement from future programs.

In the interim however you can be assured that the Department will make avail­ able to the Council whatever technical advice is necessary.

Question:

How does the rate of recovery of charges compare with rates in New Zealand, Canada, the U.K. and U.S.A.?

Answer:

The basic information that would be required to provide an accurate answer to this question is not available for the following reasons— (a) a meaningful comparison of cost recovery rates between the various coun­ tries mentioned and Australia presupposes comparability in the definition of

the cost and revenue items which each of these countries considers to be at­ tributable to cost recovery. This is not likely to be the case; (b) the provision, maintenance and operation of air transport facilities in Australia are controlled by a central aviation authority, whilst in most other

countries aerodrome facilities are provided and charges levied by many local and/or regional authorities; (c) a multiplicity of various service charges are levied in other countries, such as passenger taxes, customs overtime fees, landing fees, county property taxes,

aircraft parking fees, while Australian air navigation charges are all-inclusive of these services.

Question:

What was the net increase in air navigation charges paid by Ansett, TAA, inter­ national airlines, commuter airlines and general aviation.

A nswer:

The following comparative table details the air navigation charges paid by the above for 1975-76 and 1974-75:

1975-76 1974-75

Ansett .......................................

TAA ...........................................

International Airlines . . . .

General Aviation including com­ muter services ........................

$

8 742 957 9 455 041 31 348 064

2 934 914

$

8 531 924 8 959 067 24014379

2 418 133

52 480 976 43 923 503

Other domestic airlines . . . . 1 066 583 947 763

Total ............................. 53 547 559 44 871 266

174

Could I have some information on what awards are in force at the concessions at the Kingsford-Smith Airport? Secondly could we find whether the employees’ time sheets are subject to annual checks by the Commonwealth Arbitration Inspectors?

Answer:

We understand that the Sydney Airport concessions operate under the terms of a number of Federal Awards including the Airport and Overseas Passenger Terminal Employees Award (1973) and the Duty Free (International Airports) Stores Award (1974). This was established after checking with a number of the concessionaires.

Furthermore, the employees’ time sheets are subject to checks by the Commonwealth Arbitration Inspectors.

Q u estio n :

175

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

LOCAL OW NERSHIP AERODROME DEVELOPMENT GRANTS 1976-77 Division 655/3/09

SUMMARY

Total of new Proposed Departmental program 1976-77

proposals ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

submitted Estimated new Estimated Estimated

by Local Government Revote from authorisation Total expenditure Revote to

Region Authorities share 1975-76 1976-77 commitment 1976-77 1977-78

$ $ $ $

Queensland ............................. . . . 523 000 277 000 82 101 237 000

New South Wales ................... . . . 554 000 277 000 104 496 277 000

V ictoria-T asm ania...................

South Australia-

. . . 194 000 97 000 46 194 83 446

Northern T e r r i to r y ................... . . . 75 000 37 500 14 000

Western A u s t r a l i a ................... . . . 84 000 42 000 13 763 42 000

$ $

319 101 207 000

381 496 222 000

129 640 107 000

14 000 14 000

55 763 50 000

112 10Ϊ 159 496 22 640

5 763

Total 1 430 000 730 500 246 554 653 446 900 000 600 000 300 000

LOCAL OW NERSHIP AERODROME DEVELOPMENT GRANTS 1976-77 Divisions 655/3/09

60 000 This project was approved in 1975-76 at an estimated total cost of $220 000. The proposal then was for staging of the work over two years. Further program evaluation now provides for materials stockpiling as of now, with actual construction to commence in April 1977 after the wet season. An up to date

assessment indicates an order of cost of $300 000 as against the $220 000 estimated in 1974. The scope of the project has not altered, the addition being due to subsequent material and labour cost increases. 7 000 This proposal did not reach authorised stage in

1975-76 when it was approved as a program item, and consequently is being re-programmed for this year.

The Doomadgee aerodrome which serves the local mission station is on the Cairns/Mt Isa route serviced by Bush Airways. Application has been for inclusion in the Plan and for a grant to enable upgrading of the strip to cater for DC3 operations. The aerodrome meets the criteria necessary for inclusion in the Plan in that it is a mission station aerodrome with RPT services serving a local community.

31 000 The original estimate for the agreed pre-transfer works has been exceeded by $31 000. The increase is attributable to several factors, the main points being: (i) The unit rate for winning, carting, breaking up

and compaction of gravel used in the reconstruction works went from $8 per cu metre to $ 12 because of longer haulage than originally estimated, together with increases in labour and plant hire costs. This accounted for $ 15 000 o f the increase.

Air traffic

R PTF27, Reg. 203, Charters, Aero-medical

Reg. 203

Reg. 203

R PTF27

Air traffic

(ii) The price of materials such as bitumen, kerosene and sealing aggregate increased to add $5000 to the estimate. (iii) The lowest tender received for the installation

of a septic toilet system to the terminal area exceeded the original estimate by $4000. (iv) Overall plant hire and labour costs on miscellaneous items of labour intensive projects

make up the balance.

Consists of various minor works throughout the Region which do not exceed $20 000 individually. Applications from local Authorities exceed the funds available, and therefore the allocation of grants will

be determined by the Region setting priorities.

80 000 This aerodrome, situated in a high rainfall area, has a RPT F27, gravel runway which requires constant maintenance Reg. 203, effort with consequent disruptions to RPT services. Charters Council wish to upgrade the movement areas to

provide all weather serviceability and to reduce maintenance effort and costs which have progressively increased in recent years. Closures since 1972 have affected approximately 360 RPT services.

15 000 Thisitetn was originally proposed in the 1972-73 Reg.203, program but was subsequently deferred pending Agriculture completion of the runway works. Further investigation has revealed that the original design

would be inadequate to meet recently proven flood situations. The latest increased estimate, which is in excess of $20 000 Government share, and requires your concurrence, is due to the necessary widening of

the extent of the work and material and labour costs of the last four years.

10 000 Following upon investigation and design carried out in 1975, the Shire has submitted a proposal to construct an all weather aerodrome. Justification for this project is based on the towns isolation, especially in times of heavy rains and flooding. Heavy reliability is placed on the aerodrome as a means of communication and to serve aero-medical needs. The present runway surface is of poor quality and quickly becomes unserviceable even after light rain. The proposed works are the minimum necessary to achieve an all weather capability and accordingly are supported by this Department.

21 000 Approved projects of a minor nature not exceeding $20 000 the implementation of which will depend upon the priorities set by the Region.

Air traffic

Aero-medical Charters

Victoria-Tasmania

Bendigo ................... Complete 116 000 58 000 45 000 Bendigo was first included in the Plan as a general

development of ALA aviation aerodrome in 1972-73, with an approved

to licensed standard development program of $140 000 (Government

share $70 000) to bring the aerodrome up to licensed standard. Subsequent delays of up to nine months in work progress brought about by wet weather, and the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement meant that the original estimate was insufficient to cover the cost of the project beyond gravelling of the

runway, taxiway, apron and access road. Further approval is necessary to enable completion of sealing of the movement areas, installation of runway and obstruction lighting, approach clearing and construction of a secondary natural surface strip. The additional cost required for completion of these works $116 000 ($58 000 Government share) is considered to be reasonable.

Aero-medical Charters

D escrip tio n /ju stificatio n

This aerodrome was transferred under the Plan to the local Authority in April 1976. Council has now requested a grant of $35 000 for aerodrome development. This Department does not consider the

proposal to be of sufficient priority to be included in a current program. However, we have agreed to the Council proceeding with an item for the investigation of need and cost of the project.

15 000 An item for strip stabilisation at a total cost of $26 000 was approved in the 1975-76 program. Further investigation of this proposal indicated only a short term economic life with technical problems.

Construction to a higher standard is now proposed, and is considered to be j ustified for long term benefits in reduced maintenance costs, and increased serviceability. As previously stated, the aerodrome is

prone to flooding with closures of up to three months per year. The town is dependent upon the aerodrome for aero-medical services.

3 000 Various necessary minor projects which will proceed along with the availability of funds

6 500 It is now proposed to construct a sealed runway, in stages, extending over three years. Preliminary minor upgrading works were completed in 1975-76. Sealing of the natural surface is now required to

prevent moisture penetration thus overcoming pavement distortion and maintenance problems. The planned incidence o f expenditure is for $6500 in 1976-77, $6500 in 1977-78, and $17 000 in

Air traffic

Aero-medical Charters, Agriculture

Aero-medical Charters, Agriculture

Charters, general aviation

5 500 This project was approved in the 1975-76 program at an estimated total cost of $36 000 (Government share $ 18 000). Materials and labour increases have pushed the final total expenditure to $47 000. The increase of $5500 Government contribution raises

the total to $23 500 and requires your concurrence. Costs are considered to be reasonable.

2 000 Contingency for minor works items.

16 240 The Shire of Roebourne controls both Karratha and Roebourne aerodromes. Two groundsmen are employed in the maintenance of these aerodromes but at present one residence only is provided, this is at

Karratha. The proposal to construct the additional residence at Karratha to enable interchange of duties by the groundsmen was supported in principle by the Region when application was made by the Shire in

February 1976. However, due to a misunderstanding by the Shire, work was completed on the residence without our knowledge and approval.

Eligibility and justification for the project is not in dispute, but because o f the overall program limitations, and allowing for the needs of other local authorities, the Roebourne Shire, at this juncture, will

not be paid the full grant this financial year.

20 000 Approved by Treasury in separate submission June 1976.

Air traffic

Reg. 203

RPT F28

Reg. 203

Estimated Estimated

total Government expenditure

Location Project cost share 1976-77 Description/justification

$ $ $

Outstanding commitments at 30.6.1976

Queensland 82 101 78 000

New South Wales 104 496 96 000

Victoria-Tasmania South Australia-

46 194 43 000

Northern Territory

13 763 13 760 Western Australia

T o t a l .................... 246 554 230 760

1976-77 Program total . . . . 1 430 000 977 054 600 000

Air traffic

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

REPORT TO THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee D has the honour to present its Report to the Senate.

1. On 19 August 1976 the Senate referred to the Committee the Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following departments:

Social Security Health Immigration and Ethnic Affairs

Aboriginal Affairs

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister for Social Security and officers of the departments con­ cerned. A copy of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard report of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the information of the Senate in connection

with Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 1976-77 and Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the hearing of evidence and in accordance with undertakings given during the hearings, further information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to questions raised during the proceedings. This information is included as an appendix to the Committee’s Report. Information still outstanding will be tabled at a later date by means of a supplementary Report.

4. The Committee records its appreciation of the assistance given by the Minister for Social Security and officers of the various departments whose Estimates the Com­ mittee considered.

PETER BAUME Chairman

185

Estimates Committee D

Minutes of Proceedings

T H E SEN A TE

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2

TUESDAY, 7 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.00 noon.

2. REFERENCE OF ESTIMATES TO COMMITTEE: The Resolution of the Senate of 19 August 1976 relating to the referral of the Estimates for 1976-77 to Estimates Committees for examination and report was reported to the Committee.

3. MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE: The entry in the Journals of the Senate of 26 August 1976 recording the change in membership of Estimates Committees was reported to the Committee. Membership of Estimates Committee D was reported as follows:

Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes, Melzer and Sheil.

4. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN: On the motion of Senator Sheil, Senator Baume was elected Chairman. Senator Baume thereupon took the Chair.

5. PROCEDURE OF COMMITTEE: The Chairman drew the Committee’s attention to procedures which the Committee may wish to follow during the Com­ mittee ’s consideration of the Estimates for 1976-77. Discussion ensued.

Resolved: That the Committee consider the Estimates of Expenditure in accord­ ance with the usual procedures followed by Estimates Committees during pre­ vious years, except that should a member of the Committee or an individual Senator wish to alert a department of an area of interest, he should inform the

Secretary who would advise the department accordingly.

6. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 12.26 p.m. till Tuesday, 21 September 1976.

7. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Melzer and Sheil. Apologies were received from Senators Brown and Grimes.

PETER BAUME Chairman

24255/ 77-7

189

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3

TUESDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 1976

T H E SE N A T E

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Peter Baume) took the Chair.

2. STATEMENT OF CHAIRMAN: The Chairman made an introductory statement.

3. CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77: Pursuant to Order of the Senate, the Committee commenced consider­ ation of the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977 and the Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977 relating to the following departmental estimates:

Departmental Estimates to be Examined (Minister: Senator the Hon. M. G. C. Guilfoyle)

Division

Document* * Page Nos Department Amount

$

A 122-125 590-592 Social S e c u r i t y ...................................................... 215 404000

B 24 939-940 Social S e c u r i t y ...................................................... 78 472 000

A 79-83 325-335 H e a l t h .................................................................... 1 803 485 000

B 15-17 853-855 H e a l t h ..................................................................... 247 977 000

A 84-86 340-344 Immigration and Ethnic Affairs ......................... 32 975 000

A 10-12 120-125 Aboriginal A f f a i r s ................................................. 81 529000

B 6 811-813 Aboriginal A f f a i r s ................................................. 29 820 000

* Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

4. CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SECURITY: Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Social Security:

Mr M. Wryell, Deputy Director-General Mr K. T. Kimball, First Assistant Director-General (Management) Mr A. S. Colliver, First Assistant Director-General (Social Welfare) Mr R. C. Kaiser, Acting First Assistant Director-General (Rehabilitation

Policy and Services) Mr J. Barich, Assistant Director-General (Compensation Policy) Mr C. Calvert, Assistant Director-General (Finance) Mr J. B. Lleonart, Assistant Director-General (Secretariat and Information) Mr C. A. McAlister, Assistant Director-General (Planning and Research) Mr J. B. Machin, Assistant Director (Office of Child Care) Mr D. R. Scott, Assistant Director-General (Establishments and Personnel

Projects) Mr A. C. Sellwood, Acting Assistant Director-General (Benefits Policy).

190

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer.

The Chairman called on Divisions 590-592 and 939-940, Department of Social Security.

The Minister made an introductory statement.

Consideration commenced of the following Particulars of Proposed Expenditure:

Division 590 being considered by the Committee.

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10 p.m.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes and Sheil. An apology was received from Senator Melzer.

Senator Harradine was also in attendance.

$

Divisions 590-592 Social Security

Divisions 939-940 Social Security

215 404 000 (Document A) 78 472 000 (Document B)

PETER BAUME Chairman

191

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 4

THURSDAY, 7 OCTOBER 1976

T H E SE N A T E

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.01 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Peter Baume) took the Chair.

2. CONSIDERATION RESUMED OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SECURITY:

Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Secur­ ity, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Social Security:

Mr M. Wryell, Deputy Director-General Mr K. T. Kimball, First Assistant Director-General (Management) Mr A. S. Colliver, First Assistant Director-General (Social Welfare) Mr R. C. Kaiser, Acting First Assistant Director-General (Rehabilitation

Policy and Services) Mr J. Barich, Assistant Director-General (Compensation Policy) Mr C. Calvert, Assistant Director-General (Finance) Mr J. B. Lleonart, Assistant Director-General (Secretariat and Information) Mr C. A. McAlister, Assistant Director-General (Planning and Research) Mr J. B. Machin, Assistant Director (Office of Child Care) Mr D. R. Scott, Assistant Director-General (Establishments and Personnel

Projects) Mr A. C. Sellwood, Acting Assistant Director-General (Benefits Policy).

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following Particulars and Proposed Expenditure were considered:

Consideration of the Estimates for the department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

3. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 4.56 p.m.

4. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes and Sheil. An apology was received from Senator Melzer.

Senator Harradine was also in attendance.

Divisions 590-592 Social Security

Divisions 939-940 Social Security

$

215 404 000 (Document A) 78 472 000 (Document B)

PETER BAUME Chairman

192

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 5

TUESDAY, 12 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.02 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Peter Baume) took the Chair.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPART­ MENT OF HEALTH: Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Health, ac­ companied by the following officers:

Department o f Health:

Mr C. A. Nettle, Deputy Director-General Mr M. Carroll, First Assistant Director-General, Hospital Insurance and Nursing Dr D. de Souza, First Assistant Director-General, Therapeutics Dr B. L. Hennessy, First Assistant Director-General, Health Services

Mr L. B. Holgate, First Assistant Director-General, Medical Insurance Services Mr L. W. Lane, Acting First Assistant Director-General, Management Services Dr W. A. Langsford, First Assistant Director-General, Public Health.

Capital Territory Health Commission: Mr A. Tozer, Assistant Commissioner (Services).

Health Insurance Commission: Mr R. W. Taylor, Assistant General Manager.

Department the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Acting Assistant Secretary, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on Divisions 325-335 and 853-855, Department of Health. The following Particulars of Proposed Expenditure were considered:

$

Divisions 325-335 Health 1 803 485 000

(Document A)

Divisions 853-855 Health 247 977 000

(Document B)

Consideration of the Estimates for the department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPART­ MENT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC AFFAIRS: Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs, accompanied by the

following officers:

Department o f Immigration and Ethnic AJfairs:

Mr S. J. Dempsey, Deputy Secretary

T H E SE N A T E

193

Mr G. C. Wyer, Acting Assistant Commissioner, Office of the Commissioner for Community Relations Mr K. Griffin, Administrative Officer, Office of the Commissioner for Com­ munity Relations Mr J. S. Mulcahy, Executive Director, Committee on Overseas Professional

Qualifications Mr A. W. Burt, Assistant Director, Finance and General Services.

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Acting Assistant Secretary, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on Divisions 340-344, Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs.

$

Divisions 340-344 Immigration and Ethnic Affairs 32 975 000 (Document A)

Division 340 being considered by the Committee.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.02 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes, Melzer and Sheil.

Senators Georges, Harradine, Keeffe and Mulvihill were also in attendance.

PETER BAUME Chairman

194

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 6

THURSDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12 noon. The Chairman (Senator Peter Baume) took the Chair.

2. CONSIDERATION RESUMED OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC AFFAIRS: Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Immigra­

tion and Ethnic Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Immigration and Ethnic Affairs:

Mr S. J. Dempsey, Deputy Secretary Mr A. W. Burt, Assistant Director, Finance and General Services Mr J. S. Mulcahy, Executive Director, Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications

Mr G. C. Wyer, Acting Assistant Commissioner, Office of the Commissioner for Community Relations Mr K. Griffin, Administrative Officer, Office of the Commissioner for Com­ munity Relations.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr F. V. Colvin, Acting Assistant Secretary, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following Particulars of Proposed Expenditure were considered:

$

Divisions 340-344 Immigration and Ethnic Affairs 32 975 000

(Document A)

Consideration of the Estimates for the department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

3. CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS: Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security, and Senator the Honourable R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce, Ministers representing the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Aboriginal Affairs:

Mr L. A. J. Malone, First Assistant Secretary, Program Division Mr B. K. Thomas, Director, Employment Section, Program Development Branch Mr R. W. Hogan, Acting Assistant Director, Finance Section, Management

Services Branch Mr W. L. O ’Neil, Director, Personnel and Establishments Section, Manage­ ment Services Branch.

T H E SE N A T E

195

Department o f the Treasury:

Mr F. V. Colvin, Acting Assistant Secretary, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called on Divisions 120-125 and 811-813, Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

The Minister made an introductory statement.

The following Particulars of Proposed Expenditure were considered:

Consideration of the Estimates for the department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

The Minister and departmental officers and members o f the Press and public withdrew.

4. DELIBERATIVE MEETING: The Committee met in deliberative session and considered the content of its report.

Resolved: That the Committee present a report to the Senate in accordance with that proposed by the Chairman, and that the Chairman confirm the Minutes of the present sitting.

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 8.30 p.m.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Melzer and Sheil.

Senator Keefe was also in attendance.

Divisions 120-125 Aboriginal Affairs

Divisions 811-813 Aboriginal Affairs

$

81 529 000 (Document A) 29 820 000 (Document B)

PETER BAUME Chairman

196

Estimates Committee D

Appendix

MINISTER FOR SOCIAL SECURITY

Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 14 October 1976

Dear Senator Baume, You will recall that, at the proceedings of Senate Estimates Committee D on Tues­ day, 21 September and Thursday, 7 October 1976, when estimates of the Department of Social Security were under consideration, additional details were sought concern­ ing a number of items.

Statements A to V attached provide information in relation to the matters raised. Eight additional copies are supplied for distribution, if required, to members of the Committee and for Senator Harradine, the Committee Secretariat and Hansard.

Yours sincerely,

MARGARET GUILFOYLE

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Cogimittee D Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

199

STATEMENT A

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR SHEIL

Department of Social Security—Divisions 590/1 and 592/1

A comparison between expenditure on salaries and grants to people, organisations and other departments.

Response The table below shows relevant figures from the Budget Papers 1976-77. Total Estimated Expenditure and Receipts, 1976-77 Department of Social Security

Special Appropriations Nationai Welfare Fund . Remuneration Tribunals Act Appropriation Bill No. 1

Salaries and payments in the nature of salary Administrative expenses ........................

Other s e r v i c e s ............................................

Appropriation Bill No. 2 Capital works and services Payments to or for the States

$ ’000 $ ’000

5 204 435 185 5 204 620

77 434 31 357 106 613 215 404

11 872* 66 600 78 472

Total expenditure provisions ............................................................... 5 498 496

Less Estimated Receipts .................................................................................. 421

Net budget provisions 5 498 075

* Includes $ 1 002 000 for computing equipment.

2. The total estimated expenditure of $5 498 496 000 may be dissected: $ ’000 $ ’000

Program Payments (to people, organisations etc.) .................................. 5 388 518

Administrative Expenditure S a l a r i e s ........................................................................ ............................. 77 434

Expenses ....................................................................

Remuneration Tribunals A c t .......................................

............................. 31357

............................. 185 108 976

Capital Expenditure Computing e q u ip m e n t................................................ 1 002

5 498 496

3. From the above it will be seen that administrative expenditures, estimated at $108 976 000 (including $77 434 000 for salaries) represents 2.02 per cent of pro­ gram payments, estimated at $5 388 518 000.

STATEMENT B

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BROWN

Department of Social Security—Division 590/1 / 0 1

Information was sought about formulae established for the ratio of staff to the level of workload.

201

The extent to which the Department measures its staffing requirements by using workload formulae varies from State to State to suit local conditions and differs be­ tween functional areas.

Typical examples are listed below:

R e sp o n se

Category of work Average output per officer

Pensions new claims ..................................

Pensions r e v ie w s ............................................

Pensions d e te r m in a tio n s .............................

Family allowance new claims ....................

Family allowance reviews— simple ......................................................

c o m p l e x ..........................................................

Unemployment and sickness benefit new claims Unemployment benefit continuation payments Sickness benefit continuation payments . . . Computer output monitoring—

Pensions ......................................................

Family allowances .......................................

Unemployment and sickness benefits . . . Counter and telephone inquiries ....................

Field Officer inquiries—complex ...................

35-40 per week 150 per week 350 per week 5 mins per case

5-6 mins per case 6-13 mins per case 80 per week 500-600 per week

450 per week

500 per week 2500 per week 2500 per week 300-400 per week

25-35 per week

In other areas, where the tasks performed vary widely from case to case, the staffing ratio is based on total work load, e.g. Personnel teams—2 officers per 275 employees. Overpayment recovery— 1 officer per 700 cases.

STATEMENT C

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/1/01

A copy of comments by the management consultancy firm W. D. Scott and Co. Pty Ltd following review of benefits administration on the effect of workload pressures upon the health of officers was sought. (The survey was conducted in N.S.W. and Vic­ toria, between February and May 1975.)

Response Relevant comments from the Report are:

Para. 2.1.2. Whilst appreciable relief has been provided at the operating level, management resources have become overloaded, impairing effectiveness and health at senior management levels.

Para 3.7. Inadequate maintenance, lack of opportunity for internal develop­ ments and improvements, combined with ever-expanding demands, must eventu­ ally lead to a breakdown in the basic operations themselves, irrespective of the addition of clerical manpower. The operation itself can become unmanageable and, as already pointed out, the demands on key executives have already reached unreasonable levels impairing effectiveness and health.

202

Para. 9.5.4. A major area of concern is the need to develop staff to assume execu­ tive responsibilities in the benefit field. This problem is compounded by the number of senior officers who will retire in a relatively short space of time either on age or health grounds (especially in Sydney).

STATEMENT D

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BROWN

Department of Social Security—Division 590/1/01

Some details on absenteeism were sought.

Response Statistics related to absenteeism are not maintained on a continuing basis.

It is a task of considerable magnitude to extract the information from leave history cards in a form suitable for presentation to the Committee. (A conservative estimate is that 1000 man-hours would be required.)

STATEMENT E

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/01

A dissection of the increase of $223 000 provided for travel connected with activities deferred or curtailed during 1975-76 was sought.

Response The additional requirement for 1976-77 has been estimated as follows:

$

Provision of relief staff for Regional Offices ...................................... 105 000

Technical and management training (technical $82 000; management $15 000) ............................................................................................ 97 000

Other, including visiting services to remote areas, internal audit inspec­ tions ................................................................................................ 21 000

223 000

STATEMENT F

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BROWN

Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/01

Information was sought as to the level of increased workload as a consequence of the provision of unemployment benefits to farmers.

203

Available information is tabulated below. Numbers of claims for unemployment benefit lodged by primary producers

Prior to 2.7.76 5.7.76 to 9.8.76 to

State (Estimated) 6.8.76 3.9.76

R espon se

New South Wales .......................................................................... 500 195 107

V ic to r ia .................................................................................... 2 000 561 167

Queensland .................................................................................... 190 121 39

South Australia ............................................................................... 100 87 76

Western Australia ................................................................. 50 18

Tasmania ........................................................................................ 160 33 17

A u s tr a lia ........................................................................... 3 000 1015 413

Numbers of claims for unemployment benefit lodged by primary producers in Victoria between 7 June 1976 and .3 December 1976— classified by Regional Office

7.6.76 to 5.7.76 to 9.8.76 to

2.7.76 6.8.76 3.9.76

Bendigo . ..................................... i ....................... 124 86 19

Geelong . . ................................................................. 39 80 29

M o rw c ll.................................................................................... 80 41 5

Sale ......................................................................................... 72 24 5

Shepparton ........................................................................... 319 225 52

Wangaratta .......................................................................... 60 47 20

W arrnam bool........................................................................... 51 16 12

Other .................................................................................... 40 42 25

Total State ...................................................................... 785 561 167

Number of primary producers receiving unemployment benefit

State As at 2 7 76 As at 6 8 76 As at 3 9 76

New South Wales ................................................................. 207 307 33a

V ic to r ia .................................................................................... I 670 I 879 I 2*8

Queensland 46 100 98

South Australia 34 58 81

Western Australia 41 45 47

T a s m a n i a ........................................................................................ 84 86 58

Australia 2 082 2 475 I 906

STATEMENT G

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT B\ SENATOR BONNER

Dcpanmcni of Social Security-Division 590/2/05

Allocation of the estimated expenditure in 1976- 77 between the casual hire of government vehicles and taxis and the permanent hire of government vehicles was requested.

204

The provision of $580 000 for expenditure on car hire in 1976-77 comprises $ 142 000 for casual hire (i.e. short-term hirings, use o f ‘pool’ cars and taxis) and $438 000 for permanent hire.

The hire charges (both short-term and permanent) include an allowance for petrol, oil and normal maintenance, except in country areas where a different scale of charges applies and such day-to-day running costs are a separate charge to the hiring department.

The provision of $100 000 for repairs, maintenance and running expenses is related to cars on both short-term and permanent hire to the Department but does not include any amount for these costs for ‘pool’ cars and taxis.

Arrangements between the Department and the Central Transport Authority include that the hiring department is responsible for expenses incurred as a result of accidents, whether the cars be on permanent hire or on short-term hire. However, the Department is not responsible for such charges when ‘pool ’ cars or taxis are used.

STATEMENT H

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/08 Additional information was sought to explain the under-expenditure from the 1975-76 appropriation for medical examinations.

Response The principal reason for the underspending of $90 926 on this item in 1975-76 is that authority to pay an increase in fees backdated to 1 January 1976 was noi received be­ fore the close of the financial year. It had been expected when the additional esti­

mates were compiled in 1975-76 that $48 000 would be needed for payments at the new rates to apply from 1 January in that year. The balance of the underspending is due to the fact that the flow of claims from doctors did not follow the anticipated pattern.

Actual expenditure under the item by quarters in 1975-76 was:

R espon se

Quarter ended Amount Year to date

$ $

30 S e p t e m b e r ............................ 131 530 131 530

31 December ............................ 153 633 285 163

31 March ................................. 188 372 473 535

30 June ..................................... 170 539 644 074

Had claims been received as expected and had the new scale of payments been approved, expenditure in the final quarter would have exceeded $250 000.

STATEMENT I

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES

Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/12

Information was sought about the payment of benefits whilst an appeal is being heard.

205

An affirmative response was given to Senator Grimes’s question about payment of special benefit or other assistance to supporting mothers while an appeal is being heard. The answer, however, requires elucidation.

The relevant instructions provide that supporting mothers benefit may be con­ tinued in appeal cases where the decision rested on the formulation of an opinion or an exercise of a discretion and the beneficiary has responded within 14 days to a notice informing her of appeal rights. This does not apply where a de facto marriage relationship has been admitted or where a beneficiaiy, being a former resident of Australia who had returned and was granted benefit, is refused payment overseas if she leaves Australia within 12 months of her return.

These instructions apply also to age, invalid, wives and widows pensions.

STATEMENT J

R e sp o n se

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES

Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/12

Information was sought as to whether the backlog of cases before the Appeals Tribunals was increasing or decreasing. Response The tabulation below shows, for 1976, the numbers o f appeals cases awaiting deter­ mination according to the stage reached in their processing.

With Department

With Department —following re-

—not referred With commendation by

Date to Tribunals Tribunals Tribunals Total

1 J a n u a r y ............................. 1 727 584 68 2 379

31 J a n u a r y ............................. 2 134 697 59 2 890

28 February ........................ 2 326 623 86 3 035

31 March ............................. 2 551 688 1 19 3 358

30 A p r i l .................................. 2 805 969 130 3 904

31 M a y .................................. 2 760 1016 169 3 945

30 J u n e .................................. 2 479 1 214 157 3 850

31 July .................................. 2 219 1 488 147 3 854

31 August ............................. 1 934 1351 206 3 491

STATEMENT K

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY SENATOR GRIMES

Department of Social Security—Division 590/2/14

Information was sought as to the expenditure in 1975-76 on the Social Workers Emergency Fund.

Response The expenditure recorded for 1975-76 is $2743. The amount allocated for 1976-77 is $9000.

206

STATEMENT L

SE N A T E E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

IN F O R M A T IO N S O U G H T BY SE N A T O R G R IM E S

Department of Social Security—Division 590/3/01

Information was sought as to when holders of the George Cross first received an annuity.

Response The first payments of these annuities of $250, tax free, to persons who received the awaid on the recommendation of an Australian Government, were made by the Commonwealth in 1966, with effect from 1 April 1965.

STATEMENT M

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/3/02

Details of the income levels of people who reside in aged persons accommodation.

Response The matter of the admission of aged or disabled people to subsidised accommodation has been left mainly to the discretion of the sponsoring organisations. Consequently the Department does not have full information concerning the income spread of the

residents. There is little doubt that the vast majority of the residents are age pen­ sioners and the percentage could be as high as 85 to 90 per cent. A survey in 1967 of subsidised aged persons accommodation revealed that some 78 per cent of residents were age pensioners who met the comparatively more strin­ gent means test then applicable. Information was not obtained about the financial cir­ cumstances of the other 2 5 per cent of residents.

With progressive easing of the means test and introduction of means-test-free pensions, the percentage of age pensioners in the homes clearly has increased but no current statistics are available.

Organisations providing accommodation funded under the Aged Persons Hostels Act enter into an agreement with the Department which stipulates that the accommo­ dation must be allocated strictly on a basis of need of applicants for accommodation and that no donations shall be sought or received.

In recent weeks the agreement relating to grants approved under the Aged or Dis­ abled Persons Homes Act has been amended to provide that an organisation shall ensure that accommodation is allocated to applicants with the greatest relative needs having regard to medical and social matters, including their present accommodation

and financial position.

207

STATEMENT N

Department of Social Security—Division 590/3/02 and 590/3/03

S E N A T E E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

IN F O R M A T IO N S O U G H T BY S E N A T O R B A U M E

Information was sought as to the geographic spread of the location of units on some convenient basis.

Response A tabulation by electoral divisions is attached.

ATTACHMENT

Categories and totals of accommodation units provided under the Aged or Disabled Persons Homes Act and the Aged Persons Hostels Act, by Electoral Divisions, as at 31 July 1976

Self-

Electorate contained Hostel Nursing Total

New South Wales Banks ....................................... ................... 204 60 264

Barton ....................................... ................... 40 88 128

B e n n e lo n g .................................. ................... 190 220 35 445

B e r o w r a ....................................... ................... 1 092 1 096 240 2 428

Blaxland .................................. ................... 108 75 183

Bradfield .................................. ................... 491 255 111 857

Calare ....................................... ................... 195 146 147 488

Chifley ....................................... ................... 42 253 90 385

C o o k ............................................ ................... 198 125 50 373

C o w p e r ....................................... ................... 127 101 32 260

Cunningham ............................. ................... 170 249 91 510

D a r l i n g ....................................... ................... 21 27 48

E d e n -M o n a r o ............................. ................... 261 120 381

Evans ....................................... ................... 204 274 190 668

Farrer ....................................... ................... 210 115 60 385

Grayndler .................................. ................... 189 190 122 501

G w y d i r ....................................... ................... 93 36 88 217

Hughes ....................................... ................... 223 93 10 326

Hume ....................................... ................... 1 14 242 22 378

Hunter ....................................... ................... 260 9 67 336

K in g sfo rd -S m ith ........................ ................... I l l 70 72 253

L a n g ............................................ ................... 76 79 155

L o w e ............................................ ................... 231 126 116 473

L y n e ............................................ ................... 118 133 94 345

M a c a r t h u r .................................. ................... 219 43 52 314

Mackellar .................................. ................... 693 540 209 1 442

M a c q u a r i e .................................. ' . . . . . 151 52 5 208

M i t c h e l l ....................................... ................... 270 344 54 668

Newcastle .................................. ................... 89 167 49 305

New E n g l a n d ............................. 133 173 67 373

North S y d n e y ..................................................... 211 98 6 315

P a r r a m a t ta ...................................... ................... 330 312 130 772

P a te r s o n ........................................... . . . . 55 129 184

Phillip ........................................... . . . . 44 117 35 196

Prospect ........................................... . . . . 163 112 275

Reid ................................................ . . . . 97 8 105

Richmond ...................................... . . . . 72 300 183 555

R iv e r i n a ........................................... . . . . 145 83 228

208

Electorate

S e lf-

contained Hostel Nursing Total

Robertson .................................. .................... 187 11 198

St George .................................. ................... 199 80 67 346

Shortland .................................. ................... 66 82 40 188

Sydney ....................................... ................... 116 298 51 465

W a r r i n g a h .................................. ................... 106 143 249

W e n tw o r th .................................. ................... 303 198 40 541

W e r r iw a ....................................... ................... 121 204 242 567

State total ................................................. 8 738 7 533 3 010 19 281

Victoria Balaclava ....................................... . . . . 379 198 154 731

B a l l a r a t ............................................ . . . . 150 183 20 353

B a t m a n ............................................ . . . . 200 177 5 382

B e n d i g o ............................................ . . . . 204 284 95 583

B r u c e ................................................. 61 17 78

Burke ............................................ . . . . 8

Casey ............................................ . . . . 139 44 4 187

C h i s o l m ............................................ . . . . 384 296 139 819

Corangamite .................................. . . . . 42 81 23 146

C o r i o ................................................. . . . . 329 180 78 587

Deakin ............................................ . . . . 514 367 113 996

Diamond V a l l e y ............................. . . . . 282 101 42 425

F l i n d e r s ............................................ . . . . 54 279 38 371

G e l l i b r a n d ....................................... . . . . 98 58 93 249

Gippsland ....................................... . . . . 306 250 20 576

Henty ............................................ . . . . 239 66 71 376

H i g g i n s ............................................ . . . . 266 215 36 517

Holt ................................................. . . . . 220 65 22 307

H o t h a m ............................................ . . . . 88 40 128

Indi ................................................. . . . . 73 222 40 335

Isaacs ............................................ . . . . 252 105 357

Kooyong ....................................... . . . . 468 418 145 1 031

L a l o r ................................................. . . . . 15 15

L a T r o b e ............................................ . . . . 512 10 522

McMillan ....................................... . . . . 112 43 28 183

Mallee ............................................ . . . . 88 206 52 346

Maribyrnong .................................. . . . . 117 24 141

Melbourne . . · ............................. . . . . 228 305 98 631

Melbourne P o r t s ............................. . . . . 321 576 353 1 250

Murray ............................................ . . . . 186 152 66 404

Scullin ............................................ . . . . 12 61 73

W a n n o n ............................................ . . . . 136 167 50 353

W i l l s ................................................. . . . . 141 52 193

Wimmera ....................................... . . . . 100 101 16 217

State total ........................ ................... 6 663 5 387 1 820 13 870

Queensland Bowman .................................. ................... 184 225 110 519

B r is b a n e ....................................... ................... 402 136 73 61 1

Capricornia ............................. ................... 186 178 87 451

Darling Downs ........................ ................... 60 368 115 543

D a w s o n ....................................... ................... 139 222 64 425

Fisher ....................................... ................... 37 295 120 452

Griffith ....................................... ................... 131 72 61 264

H e r b e r t ....................................... ................... 55 222 64 341

Kennedy .................................. ................... 38 126 164

L e ic h h a r d t.................................. ................... 73 216 34 323

209

Electorate contained Hostel Nursing Total

Self-

T i l l e y ............................................ ................... 58 533 346 937

M c P h e r s o n .................................. ................... 163 254 87 504

Maranoa .................................. ................... 24 68 92

M o r e t o n ....................................... ................... 79 165 142 386

O x l e y ............................................ ................... 60 656 75 791

P e t r i e ............................................ ................... 173 378 155 706

R y a n ............................................ ................... 135 138 12 285

Wide Bay .................................. .................... 102 234 62 398

State total ................................................. 2 099 4 486 1607 8 192

South Australia Adelaide .................................. ................... 769 382 137 1 288

Angas ....................................... ................... 294 214 108 616

Barker ....................................... ................... 261 58 63 382

Bonython .................................. ................... 217 217

B o o t h b y ....................................... ................... 1 044 968 455 2 467

G r e y ............................................ ................... 126 163 289

H a w k e r ....................................... ................... 414 170 24 608

H in d m a r s h .................................. ................... 415 135 98 648

Kingston .................................. ................... 1051 189 161 1 401

Port A d e l a i d e ............................. ................... 343 149 28 520

S t u r t ............................................ ................... 1510 476 180 2 166

Wakefield .................................. ................... 90 165 255

State total ................................................. 6 534 3 069 1 254 10 857

Western Australia C a n n i n g ....................................... ................... 360 126 24 510

Curtin ....................................... ................... 538 302 123 963

Forrest ....................................... ................... 217 204 49 470

Fremantle .................................. ................... 229 224 97 550

K a l g o o r l i e .................................. ................... 58 106 24 188

Moore ....................................... ................... 127 123 19 269

P e r t h ............................................ ................... 390 144 153 687

Stirling ....................................... ................... 880 452 244 1 576

S w a n ............................................ ................... 240 97 51 388

Tangney ....................................... ................... 1 160 117 192 1 469

State total ........................ ................... 4 199 1 895 976 7 070

Tasmania Bass .................................................................... 328 115 106 549

B r a d d o n ........................................................................ 172 64 100 336

D e n i s o n ........................................................................ 213 135 202 550

F r a n k l i n ........................................................................ 166 188 164 518

Wilmot ........................................................................ 118 .. 39 157

State total ................................................. 997 502 611 2 110

Northern T e r r i t o r y ............................................ 58 24 6 88

Australian Capital Territory Canberra .......................................................... 109 .. .. 109

Fraser ......................................................................... 64 79 .. 143

Territory total ............................................ 173 79 252

Commonwealth t o t a l .................................. 29 461 22 975 9 284 61720

210

STATEMENT Ο

Department of Social Security—Division 590/3/04

SE N A T E E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

IN F O R M A T IO N S O U G H T B Y S E N A T O R H A R R A D IN E

Details of the estimated expenditure on equipment subsidies under the Handicapped Persons Assistance Act for 1976-77.

Response The following table summarises the estimated expenditure in each State: $ New South W a l e s ..................................................... 1 336 500

Victoria .................................................................... 739 250

Q u e e n s la n d ............................................................... 546 750

South Australia ...................................................... 498 150

Western A u s tr a lia ...................................................... 672 300

Tasmania ............................................................... 247 050

Total ............................................................... 4 040 000

STATEMENT P

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR SHEIL

Department of Social Security—Division 590/3/03

Information was sought concerning the final destination of three stateless persons repatriated overseas.

Response Stateless persons are repatriated to the country of their choice providing that country is prepared to accept them. The three stateless people mentioned in the statistics for 1975-76 were repatriated to New Zealand.

STATEMENT Q

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/5/01

A list of the operational functions of the Good Neighbour Councils was sought.

Response The Good Neighbour Movement is comprised of voluntary autonomous councils from each State and Territory which are devoted to generating and co-ordinating community effort towards the successful integration of migrants into the Australian

community.

211

The main operational functions of the Councils are:

(i) welcoming migrants on behalf of the community by direct contact, with the offer of continued counselling and follow-up of the initial contact at regular intervals; (ii) provision of efficient general information services; (iii) development of liaison between and among ethnic groups and between such

groups and the host community; (iv) fostering of ethnic arts and cultures; (v) supporting and participating in the Home Tutor Scheme; (vi) providing advocacy when required.

Originally the number of functions was five. These have now been expanded to

STATEMENT R

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/5/01

Information was sought concerning an internal evaluation undertaken into the Good Neighbour Movement.

Response A copy of the report comprising eleven pages, plus two appendixes, has been made available to the Chairman.

STATEMENT S

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department of Social Security—Division 590/5/06

It was asked whether the Australian Council on the Ageing has set out goals in rela­ tion to what the benefits for aged people are expected to be as a result of its activities.

Response The Australian Council on the Ageing is an incorporated body. In addition, a Council on the Ageing is established in each State and in the Northern Territory. Each such Council is an incorporated body.

The Memorandum of Association of the Australian Council includes the following objects: (a ) Generally to promote and assist the good of all ageing people. (b) To further co-operation between statutory and voluntary bodies in respect of

ageing people. (c) To establish and maintain relations with bodies in other countries whose objects are similar to those of the Council.

212

(d) To co-ordinate the work of State Councils on the Ageing and to represent them in dealing with the Commonwealth Government.

(e) To promote surveys and collate existing research relating to the needs of age­ ing people and to develop an informed public opinion of this subject.

(f) To arrange conventions, exhibitions and meetings to further the objects of the Council.

(g) To receive funds from Government and private sources to further the objects of the Council.

In a recent Annual Report the President commented: ‘ . . . we have a very real responsibility to extend the scope of [our] involvement, to play a constructive role in partnership with Government—both Australian and State—in exploring the “ grass roots” of community need and in making available our own resources of time and

people to the development and application of workable plans at local community level’.

In relation to self-evaluation, the Executive Officer of ACOTA has indicated orally to departmental officers that inadequacy of funds precluded any kind of cost effec­ tiveness study but that success of the various programs undertaken could be evaluated from Annual Reports by State Councils.

STATEMENT T

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR HARRADINE

Department of Social Security—Division 590/5/08

The names of officers appointed by organisations receiving assistance under the Welfare Rights Services program was sought.

Response

Name of organisation Location

Appointment date of initial Welfare Rights Officer

Current Welfare Rights Officer

Council for the Single Mother and her Child (CSMC) ............................................................... Melbourne 9.9.74 L. Rennison

Australian Greek Welfare S o c i e t y ........................ Melbourne 16.9.74 R. Packer

Federazione Italiana Lavoratori Emigrati e Famiglie (The Federation of Italian Immigrant Workers and their Families) (FILEF) . . . . Melbourne 19.9.74 C. Angelone

Comitato Assistenza Italiani (CO-AS-IT) . . . Melbourne 4.11.74 A. Di Pierro

Australian Turkish Cultural Association (through the Ecumenical Migration Centre) ................... Melbourne 3.2.75 R. Alakus

Comitato Assistenza Italiani (CO-AS-IT) . . . Sydney 17.6.75 O. Benedetti

Spanish Speaking Community Group . . . . Sydney 17.6.75 V. Grau

Turkish Welfare and Turkish Islamic Associations Sydney 17.6.75 H. Derman Greek Orthodox Community ............................. Sydney 17.6.75 (vacant 30.9.76—

The Council of National Communities from Y u g o s l a v ............................................................... Sydney 17.6.75

appointment pending)

Not currently oc-cupied

213

STATEMENT U

Department of Social Security—Division 592/3/01

Information was sought concerning the local government component within this vote for recurrent grants direct to organisations.

Response It is estimated that about $2.65 million of the $8.5 million sought in Division 592/3/01 will be paid to local government authorities. It is stressed that this is an esti­ mate as actual expenditure will depend on details of claims submitted during the year by services approved for Commonwealth recurrent assistance.

S E N A T E E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E D

IN F O R M A T IO N S O U G H T BY S E N A T O R G R IM E S

STATEMENT V

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BROWN

Department of Social Security—Division 592/3/01

Information was sought about the participation of A. E. Hoad and Co. Pty Ltd in the establishment by Coburg City Council of a Child Care Centre.

Response The Acting Town Clerk of the Coburg City Council has advised that the Council has not been in touch with A. E. Hoad and Co. Pty Ltd about this matter. It is understood, however, that the Federazione Italiana Lavoratori Emigrati E Famiglie (FILEF) has been in touch with the Commonwealth Clothing Factory and with other places of em­ ployment in the area, including A. E. Hoad and Co. Pty Ltd, about child care needs.

214

DEPARTM ENT OF HEALTH

P.O. Box 100

Woden, A.C.T. 2606 19 October 1976

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee D

During the course of examination by the Senate Estimates Committee D of the amounts included in Appropriation Bills numbers 1 and 2 for the Department of Health for 1976-77 members of the Committee asked a number of questions which required the provision of further information.

2. This information has now been prepared and is included in the attached statement.

3. A statement on the objectives and goals of hospitals will be forwarded to you, for distribution to interested members, as soon as possible— you stated that this could come later.

Director-General o f Health

215

PROCESSING OF APPLICATIONS FROM PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES FOR NEW DRUGS

The Chairman asked in relation to the processing o f applications from pharmaceu­ tical companies for new drugs:

‘How many applications are still outstanding? How many of those have been out­ standing for more than a year? . . . How many would be more than two years old and how many would be more than three years old?’ The following answers are provided to the questions outlined above:

1. Total number of applications still o u t s t a n d i n g ........................ 113

2. Outstanding more than three y e a r s ............................................ 21

3. Outstanding more than two years ............................................ 25

4. Outstanding more than one year ............................................ 25

(Received since 1.10.75) .......................................................... 42 113

In considering the answers provided it should be noted that all new applications received since September 1975 have been allocated priorities as have those other ap­ plications for which sponsoring companies have sought a priority evaluation. Priori­ ties are allocated by the Australian Drug Evaluation Committee, an independent committee comprising eight members expert in the fields of clinical medicine and/or pharmacology, and not by departmental officers.

Assessments are made by the Committee on the basis of therapeutic need or advantages over existing therapy and involve considerations of basic data from the submitted protocol together with a summary provided by the sponsor outlining the reasons why it is believed the drug concerned should receive priority evaluation.

Four classes of priority are allocated, namely: A—1st priority B—2nd priority (higher than normal) C—3rd priority—to be treated normally, in order of receipt D —4th priority (of no apparent value) The Committee has considered 76 applications for priority rating and has allocated priorities as follows:

A—priorities— 18 B—priorities—19 C—priorities—27 D —priorities—12 Companies have not yet sought priority allocation in respect of the remaining 37 applications.

For your further information the following represents the current status of out­ standing applications:

Number considered by ADEC and deferred pending further data . . 10 Number for which additional data requested by Department . . . 16 Number being evaluated .................................................................... 38

Number deferred by company .......................................................... 1

Number not yet c o n s id e r e d ......................................................... 48 113

216

WOOMERA HOSPITAL

Senator Shell asked in relation to the takeover of the Woomera Hospital:

‘What community is that hospital servicing? . . . I had several questions on this matter which appears in several places in the explanatory notes . . . the amount must be considerable. ’

The hospital currently services the village, staff and families operating the range and also staff and families operating the Joint Defence/Space Communication Sta­ tion, pastoral properties in the area, Commonwealth Railways personnel and anyone travelling through the district.

The following list represents the provision made in the Department’s estimates for the takeover of Woomera Hospital from Department of Defence (12 months provision).

Estimate

Division Item 1976-77

$ $

325.1.01 Salaries and allowances . . . . 450000

02 Overtime .................................. 24 000 474 000

325.2.01 Travel and subsistence . . . . 1300

02 Office requisites, stationery etc. . 1 500

03 Postage, telephones and telex

services .................................. 2 000

04 Office s e r v i c e s ............................. 23 000

05 Hire and repairs to vehicles, air­

craft etc......................................... 11 000

06 Stores and lab. supplies . . . . 46 000

11 A d v e rtis in g ................................... 2 000

12 Freight and cartage ................... 1000

14 Incidentals and other expenditure 40 500 128 300

Total .................................. 602 300

As stated these amounts have been frozen in the Department Appropriations.

VACCINES

Senator Sheil asked in relation to the supply of vaccines:

‘It would be interesting to know in money terms just how much vaccine we have given to private individuals going overseas. ’

In 1975-76 vaccines supplied to people going overseas innoculated by Depart­ mental Medical Officers amount to $201 978. The estimated amount for 1976-77 is $242 800. With the introduction of Medibank (July 1975) it became administratively uneconomic to charge for vaccinations. The charge raised was offset by the Medibank refund.

The situation is currently being reviewed.

HEALTH INSURANCE COMMISSION COMPUTER

The Chairman, in relation to the estimate for Computer Services, said: ‘Last year there was expenditure on Health Insurance Commission computers. There must have been some cost attributed to them. I am merely asking whether we can learn what that attribution is so that we can make some comparison with

this year’s estimate.’

217

The proportion of the Department of Social Security’s Computer Services expen­ diture apportioned to the Health Insurance Commission for use of the Department of Social Security’s computer facilities in 1975-76 is shown below. The estimated requirement in 1976-77 for the computer (transferred from the Department of Social Security to Department of Health for use by the Health Insurance Commission) is shown for comparison.

Dept of

Social Security Dept of Health apportioned apportioned expenditure estimate

1975-76 1976-77

(i) Hire of computers and other e q u ip m e n t..................................

$

. 307 000

$

432 000

(ii) Repairs and maintenance of computer equipment . . . . (iii) Consumable stores used in connection with the computer . 581 000 646 000

installation .............................................................................. . 195 000 271 000

T o t a l ....................................................................................... . 1 083 000 1 349 000

The Department of Social Security apportionment to the Health Insurance Com­ mission of related computer services expenditure in 1975-76 is approximately 67 per cent. The Department of Health apportionment to the Health Insurance Commission for 1976-77 for use of the related computer service is expected to be approximately 90 per cent. This increased apportionment is due to increased demand by the Health Insurance Commission for the use of the computer and facilities as compared to other usage.

ADVERTISING—MEDIBANK

Senator Grimes asked in relation to advertising associated with the Medibank Scheme:

(a) ‘Can you give us any idea of the cost of the first Medibank pamphlets which were produced in June this year?’ (b) ‘Can you give us a breakdown of the cost of press, radio and television advertising?’ (a) The first pamphlet, produced in June and entitled Medibank and You, cost $40 000 to print and $44 000 to distribute (on Post Office counters). Two million cop­ ies were printed.

(b) The amount of $750 000 has been supplemented by funds ($350 000) from the Treasurer’s Advance pending the passing of Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77. The $1.1 million has been expended as follows:

$

Press advertising ....................................... 362 000

Radio advertising ....................................... 95 000

TV advertising ........................................... 86 000

Pamphlets (including Medibank and You) . 421000 D istrib u tio n o f pam phlets (including Medibank and You) .................................. 114 000

T o t a l ................................................ 1 078 000

218

INCIDENTALS AND OTHER EXPENDITURE

The Chairman asked, in relation to Incidentals and Other Expenditure—Division 325/2/14:

‘Could we be provided with the extra information on the breakdown of items (a) and (g) and how much money is allocated for each of those items?’ Item (a) the National Health Divisions transferred from Department of Social Security—Estimate $50 000.

This amount is explained as follows:

$

(i) Provision of financial assistance for overseas medical and hospi­ tal treatment (two known c a s e s ) ................................................. 20 000

(ii) Provision to cover maintenance of machines and equipment . . 9 900 (iii) Provision to cover staff training and registration fees for courses 4 900 (iv) Provision to cover laundry expenses of the ADP personnel trans­ ferred from the Department of Social Security ........................ 2 500

(v) Provision to cover reimbursement of student fees ................... 1800

(vi) Provision to cover payroll delivery, legal costs (Regulation 97D payments), compensation, removal expenses of officers and various miscellaneous contingent and non-recurring types of e x p e n d it u r e .................................................................................. 10 900

T o t a l .................................................................................. 50 000

(b) the Woomera Hospital (S.A.) transferred from the Department of Defence ..................................................................................

(c) an increase in removal expenses, due to the inclusion of provision for eleven overseas removals ......................................................

(d ) increased costs associated with the maintenance of machines . (e) ENT specialists employed on a sessional basis to examine hearing aid patients (previously charged to the National Welfare Fund) (f) backlog of external drug evaluations due to a shortage of depart­

mental officers ..............................................................................

(g) anticipated payments to be made in 1976-77 for the renewal fees of world-wide patents on departmental inventions—Additional r e q u ir e m e n t..................................................................................

This item is explained as follows:

$

Amount expended in 1975-76 .................................. 15 622

Amount provided in 1976-77 .................................. 20 000

40 500

74 600 23 800

60 000

26 700

4 378

Additional R e q u ire m e n t....................................... + 4 3 7 8

This provision covers the payment of patent renewals fees on at least fifteen patents and one trade mark in Australia and seven overseas countries. These patents are in relation to the depart­ mental inventions, particularly ultrasonics apparatus. The Com­

monwealth is expected to receive royalties in excess of $1 million in respect of these inventions.

Other items accounting for the increase: (h) Increased assessors fees (NH & M R C ) ....................................... 6 800

(i) various grants and s u r v e y s .......................................................... 34 000

219

(j) increased lecturer fees at the School of Public Health and Trop­ ical Medicine which are pegged to the University of Sydney’s cost of living a d ju s tm e n ts .................................................................... 5 000

(k) Other minor incidental i n c r e a s e s ................................................. 7 726

Total increase .................................................................... 333 504

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION

The Chairman asked the following questions in relation to the World Health Organisation:

(a) ‘Is any United Nations member excluded from the World Health Organis­ ation or from active participation at present?’ (b) ‘Is the Palestine Liberation Organisation a member of the World Health Organisation? ’ (c) ‘Could you find out whether an application for membership has been made

by the PLO? Could I be informed aiso of how Australia has reacted to any such initiative; in other words how it voted? ’

(a) No UN members are excluded from membership in the World Health Organisation. It has, in fact, a larger membership than the parent body and includes some States which are excluded from the United Nations. South Africa had its voting rights withdrawn by a resolution of the Seventeenth World Health Assembly in May

1964. Whilst still technically a member of WHO it has not been represented at meet­ ings since then. From time to time, other members of WHO have certain privileges suspended because of failure to pay annual contributions. This usually only occurs if payment is neglected for a number of years and does not affect the activities of WHO in the particular country.

(b) As the Palestine Liberation Organisation is not a State and therefore has no territorial base it cannot qualify, under the WHO Constitution, for membership.

However, the Twenty-seventh World Health Assembly in May 1974, decided that:

‘Recalling United Nations General Assembly resolution 3118 (XXVIII) request­ ing the specialised agencies to take the necessary steps to ensure the representa­ tion of the national liberation movements in meetings of the specialised agencies; ’ and being ‘Convinced that the participation of the national liberation movements in meet­ ings and other activities undertaken by WHO would ensure to the people in the liberated areas an improvement in their health and nutritional standards; ’

and ‘Mindful that this participation would ultimately contribute to the economic and social development of the liberated territories under the control of these liberation movements; ’ requested the Director-General of WHO to ‘take the necessary steps to invite the representatives of the national liberation

movements recognised by the Organisation of African Unity or by the League of Arab States to attend the meetings of WHO in an observer capacity. ’

(c) There is no information available to suggest that the PLO has applied for membership of WHO. As this Organisation would not qualify for membership no

220

resolution would be put before the existing Member States of WHO (including Australia) and therefore they would be unaware of any such application.

Australia voted in favour of the resolution quoted in (b) above. The voting con­ sisted of—eighty-one in favour, two against, with sixteen absententions.

MEDICAL RESEARCH

Senator Melzer, asked in relation to expenditure on Medical Research:

T should like a breakdown of just what that amount of money ($9 100 000) is spent on. What organisations will receive what amounts of money and what amount of money is going to be spent on training people in medical research?’

The grants payable out of the Medical Research Endowment Fund are allocated on a calendar year basis whereas the funds are appropriated on a financial year basis.

The estimate for the financial year 1976-77 for Division 325/3/02 consists of:

$

(i) basic allocation from the 1976-78 triennium (a) July-December 1976 ($4 000 000) (b) January-June 1977 being half of the 1977 allocation ($4 000 000) ......................................................................... 8 000 000

(ii) salary adjustments for July-December 1976 on grants already awarded ....................................................................................... 300 000

(iii) salary adjustments for January-June 1977 to cover awards for which commitments have been made ....................................... 500 000

(iv) salary adjustment for May 1976 N.W.C.......................................... 100000

(v) additional a l l o c a t i o n .................................................................... 200 000

TOTAL REQUIREMENT FOR 1976-77 ........................ 9 100 000

As the granting process to distribute the 1977 grants from the Medical Research Endowment Fund is incomplete, the distribution of the $7.15 million provided for in 1976 is outlined on the attached schedule. The pattern for 1977 is expected to be very similar.

The 80th and 81st sessions of the National Health and Medical Research Council outline in detail the distribution of these funds. Your attention is drawn to Appendix 1 on page 20 of the 80th Session report which outlines the case for funds over the 1976-78 Triennium.

NATIONAL HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Distribution offunds fo r 1976 (as at 1 January 1976)

$

Funds Available .................................................................................. 7 150 000

(A ppropriated 1975-76—first half o f 1976 grants $3 150 000) (Estim ated 1976-77—second half o f 1976 grants $4 000 000)

Distribution (i) Grants (a) Project grants (includes new grants of $2 993 979) . 4079 317

221 24255/ 77-8

(b) Supported institutions ............................................ 1 459 316

(c) Research units .......................................................... 260 454

(ii) Training program (a) Postgraduate scholarships ....................................... 421 328

(b) C. J. Martins overseas fe llo w s h ip s ............................. 146 575

(c) Clinical science overseas fe llo w s h ip s ........................ 248 968

(d) Public health travelling fellowships ........................ 25 000

(e) Occupational health travelling fellowships . . . . 32 818

(iii) Grants in special areas (a) Purification of hormones from pituitary glands . . 34 900 (b) Acupuncture trial ..................................................... 24 000

(c) Immunotherapy trial ................................................ 20 000

(d) Market basket s u r v e y ................................................ 3 000

(e) Microbiological status of f o o d s .................................. 5 000

(f) National blood pressure s t u d y .......................... 70 000

(g) M ultiphasie screening evaluation project (final p a y m e n t ) ........................................................ 25 000

(iv) Various other grants totalling $294 324 and including • Chairman’s variations • Long service leave • Sabbatical leave • Adjustments to previous years’grants on acquittance • Clinical loadings • Special supports for returning overseas fellows • And other special grants made by the Council

DRUG EDUCATION

Senator Melzer asked, in relation to Division 325/3/06 Drug Education, $75 000: ‘Could we have a breakdown of the $75 000 showing how much goes into the pro­ duction of films and literature or is for seminars and research? ’ Below is set out (a) the Expenditure for 1975-76 and (b) the Estimated Expendi­ ture for 1976-77. Categorised as requested.

Division 325/3/06 Drug Education

(a) Expenditure for the financial year 1975-76 Publications by National Drug Information Service Drug education f i l m s ...........................................

Victorian pilot project ......................................

Workshops, seminars and m e e t in g s ...................

Publications for law enforcement authorities . . Grants to: Capital Territory Health Commission . . . .

N.T. Division—Department of Health . . . .

$

18 609 472

10 000 12 026 9 781

9 325 4 933

65 146

Division 325/3/06 Drug Education

(b) Estimated expenditure for the financial year 1976-77 P u b lic a tio n s .....................................................

$

35 500

222

Production of films ........................................................... 17 500

Assessment team e x p e n s e s ................................................. 5 000

Miscellaneous—copies of films etc.......................................... 875

Grants to: Capital Territory Health Commission ............................. 9 325

N.T. Division—Department of H e a l t h ............................. 6 800

75 000

FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM

Senator Melzer asked, in relation to the funding of the Family Planning Program Division 325/3/07:

‘Can you tell me which organisations applied for funding and did not get it?’

During 1975-76 the following organisations applied for grants and did not receive them: $ 1. Townsville Family Planning Clinic—rental and renovation of

premises occupied by clinic ...................................................... 5310

2. Family Planning Association of N.S.W.—reimbursement of costs incurred by the Association in providing an Aboriginal family planning service in outback N.S.W.................................... 3 488

3. Family Planning Association of South Australia—to provide a domiciliary family planning service for Aboriginal women in the Western region of A d e l a i d e ................................................. 10 000

4. Aboriginal Information Service of Tasmania—for a pilot scheme to provide a family planning service on Cape Barren and Flinders Islands ......................................................................... 885

5. Pharmacy Guild of Australia—for a survey of pharmacists’ atti­ tudes to family planning .......................................................... 5 000

6. Department of Demography, Australian National University— for a research project into family planning patterns and family formation in A u s t r a l i a ............................................................... 25 000

7. Family Planning Association of Western Australia—for a family planning service in Kalgoorlie ................................................ 8 100

In addition a preliminary proposal that the Family Planning As­ sociation of Victoria operate, on behalf of the Commonwealth Government, a counselling and family planning centre for ado­ lescents in Melbourne was deferred ....................................... 18 000

SCHOOL DENTAL SCHEME

Senator Melzer asked in relation to Dental Therapists—Training Costs: Division 325/3/10: (i) ‘Can you tell me what proportion of children in Australia receive free dental care in primary schools now?’ . . . ‘ at the end of this year? ’

(ii) In respect of the stated number of dental therapists qualified at 30 June 1976 (i.e. 340), ‘Do we know what proportion that is of the required number?’ (for both primary students and for complete coverage of under 15). (iii) ‘Does the material which you have provided indicate where the children

are who are receiving the service—whether they are country or city children?’

223

(i) The proportion of primary school children now receiving dental care under the School Dental Scheme is approximately 12 per cent. At the end of 1976 it will be approximately 16 per cent. (ii) The dental therapists qualified at 30 June 1976 as a proportion of the

required number is shown as follows: (a) for primary students— 14.8 per cent (b) for complete coverage under 15 years— 10 per cent (iii) As at 30 September 1976, 295 school dental clinics were in operation under the School Dental Scheme. Of this figure, 91 were located in the capital cities and their environs and 204 in the country. All the mobile clinics were located in the country. These totalled 88 of the 204 clinics in the country' areas.

HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES PLANNING AND RESEARCH

The Chairman asked in relation to expenditure under the Hospitals and Health Services Commission Act Planning and Research, ‘is it possible to receive a list of the projects funded under this item?’ Attached is a list of project fundings from 1973-74 to 1976-77 for the Health Ser­ vices Planning and Research program.

HEALTH SERVICES PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM Payments 1973-74

Project number Project $

73PRUI Directorate of Gerontology—Mt Royal Hospital, Melbourne: The es­ tablishment of an information and research centre in gerontology . . 30 000 73PRU2 Accreditation of Australian Hospitals—Australian Council on Hospital Standards: The development of standards of hospital accreditation for

Australian hospitals, including a series of pilot studies to refine the met­ hodology ................................................................................................. 25 000

73PRU3 Cost/Space Standards in Hospitals—Rider Hunt & Co.: To gather information on the costs of construction of hospitals in Australia . . 20 000 73PRU4 Indices for Hospital Planning—Llewelyn-Davies & Co.: Preparation of a chapter on hospital planning for the Report on Hospitals in Australia 6 838 73PRU5 Efficiency and Productivity in Hospitals—Community Systems Foun­

dation: Preparation of a chapter on efficiency and productivity in hospi­ tals for the Report on Hospitals in Australia ....................................... 2 184

73PRU6 Medical Administrative Standards in Hospitals—Schools of Health Administration, University of New South Wales: To develop medical administrative standards for Australian general hopsitals by conduct­ ing a survey of the formal organisation of medical staff in Australian

hospitals, and analysing the effectiveness of the organisational patterns in representative hospitals .................................................................... 16 000

73PRU7 Rapid Construction Methods for Building Health Centres—Bates, Smart and McCutcheon: To assess the suitability of various building systems for health centres; to enable the choice of the building process to be based on up-to-date in f o r m a t io n ................................................ 3 000

73PRU8 Survey on Developments in Nursing Education—Royal Australian Nursing Federation: To gather information on changes in the edu-cation of nurses in order to identify desirable goals in nursing education 4 320 73PRU9 Bed Utilisation, Cost and Quality Control—Benevolent Society of New

South Wales: To conduct a benefit cost analysis of services provided at an obstetric hospital ............................................................................. 997

224

Project number Project $

74PRU1 Research on Care of Mother and Child—Drs T. G. Murrell and J. Moss, University of Adelaide: To provide a data base for planning services for the care of mother and child during pregnancy and in the first year of life ...................................................................................................... 8 150

74PRU2 Practitioner Nurse in Domiciliary Care of Chronic Illness in the Elderly—Drs J. Linn and T. G. Murrell, University of Adelaide: To test the hypothesis that the health of the elderly chronic ill would improve by utilisation of a practitioner nurse attached to a general practice, a sister has been employed in a general practice to provide domiciliary care to chronically ill elderly patients ................................................. 6 525

74PRU3 Safety in Small Obstetrical Hospital v. Large Obstetrical H ospital- Professor D. Gordon, University of Queensland: To test whether ob­ stetrical services can be safely ‘regionalised’ in a large city or whether ‘centralised * facilities are desirable ...................................................... 1 055

74PRU4 Evaluation of Nurse Training Courses in A.C.T.—Tertiary Education Research Unit, University of New South Wales: To evaluate the edu­ cational programs and processes in the three basic nurse training courses available in the A.C.T., and to compare and contrast their effec-tiveness in developing the desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes . 5 150

Total ............................................................................................ 129219

HEALTH SERVICES PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM Payments 1974-75

Project number Project

73PRU2

73PRU3

73PRU6

73PRU7

73PRU8

73PRU9

74PRU1

Accreditation of Australian Hospitals—Australian Council on Hospital Standards. The development of standards of hospital accreditation for Australian hospitals, including a series of pilot studies to refine the methodology .......................................................................................

Cost/Space standards in hospitals—Rider Hunt & Co. To gather infor­ mation on the costs of construction of hospitals in Australia . . . . Medical Administrative Standards in Hospitals—School of Health Administration, University of New South Wales. To develop medical administrative standards for Australian general hospitals, by conduct­ ing a survey of the formal organisation of medical staff in Australian hospitals, and analysing the effectiveness of the organisational patterns in representative h o s p i t a l s ....................................................................

Rapid Construction Methods for Building Health Centres—Bates, Smart and McCutcheon. To assess the suitability of various building systems for health centres; to enable the choice of the building process

to be based on up-to-date information. The project was completed in 1973-74 .................................................................................................

Survey on Developments in Nursing Education—Royal Australian Nursing Federation. To gather information on changes in the edu­ cation of nurses in order to identify desirable goals in nursing education Bed Utilisation, Cost and Quality Control— Benevolent Society of New South Wales. To conduct a benefit cost analysis of services provided at

an obstetric hospital—no expenditure was required in 1974-75 . . .

Research on Care of Mother and Child Drs T. G. Murrell and J. Moss, University of Adelaide. To provide a data base for planning services for the care of mother and child during pregnancy and in the first year of l i f e ..........................................................................................................

$

60 000

8 000

56 000

I 320

8 800

225

Project number Project $

74PRU2

74PRU3

74PRU4

74PRU5

74PRU6

74PRU7

74PRU14

74PRUI5

74PRU16

74PRU17

74PRU18

74PRU19

74PRU20

Practitioner Nurse in Domiciliary Care of Chronic Illness in the Elderly—Drs J. Linn and T. G. Murrell, University of Adelaide. To test the hypothesis that the health of the elderly chronic ill would improve by utilisation o f a practitioner nurse attached to a general practice, a sister has been employed in a general practice to provide domiciliary care to chronically ill elderly patients.........................................................

Safety in Small Obstetrical Hospital v. Large Obstetrical H ospital- Professor D. Gordon, University of Queensland. To test whether ob­ stetrical services can be safety ‘regionalised’ in a large city or whether ‘centralised’facilities are desirable. The project was funded in 1973-74 Evaluation of Nurse Training Courses in A.C.T.—Tertiary Education Research Unit, University of New South Wales. To evaluate the edu­ cational programs and processes in the three basic nurse training courses available in the A.C.T., and to compare and contrast their effec­ tiveness in developing the desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes . Safety of Electromedical Devices—Standards Association of Australia. For representation at a conference on the safety of electromedical devices.........................................................................................................

Hospital Casualty Survey—Dr L. Deakin, University of Adelaide. To determine how the casualty department of a hospital is used by the local population ..................................................................................

Follow-up of Busselton Survey-D r M. McCall, University of Western Australia. To assist in the preparation of guide books for community health screening; the conduct of the 1975 mass health screening pro­ gram; and the development and evaluation of new techniques in pre­ ventive health in relation to practice in a community health centre . . Survey of After-hours Medical Services—Dr Campbell and Mr South­ well, Australian Department of Defence. To study the conduct and de­ livery of after-hours medical services in three Australian cities in order to identify costs, suggest alternative arrangements and develop possible mechanisms for c o n t r o l ........................................................................

Study of Specialists’ Needs by Medical Educationalist—Royal Aus­ tralasian College of Physicians. A detailed study of the continuing edu­ cational needs of medical s p e c ia lis ts .....................................................

Information Needs and Practices of Health Facility Planners—Mr J. Green, University of N.S.W. To study the information needs and prac­ tices o f health facility planners with the view of identifying problems faced by those seeking information and of developing improved infor­ mation retrieval s e r v ic e s ........................................................................

Brief of Health Needs of Albury-Wodonga—Albury-Wodonga Development Corporation. To review the health needs in the Albury-Wodonga region and to propose a strategy plan for health care in the r e g i o n ............................................................................................

Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of End-stage Renal Disease-Dr D. P. Doessel, University of Queensland. A benefit cost analysis of the treat­ ment o f end-stage renal disease, with special emphasis on the available alternative methods of tr e a t m e n t ..........................................................

Effects of Communication on Health of Retarded Children and their Families-Mr C. Bliss. The development and printing of a primer for use in teaching handicapped children the Bliss interlingual writing sys­ tem and the evaluation of the health-related effects of its use . . . Fractured Neck of Femur Treatment Study—Drs R. Ulman and D. Christie, University of Melbourne. An operational study to explore the natural history of the condition and how efficiently medical resources are deployed in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients . . . .

13 425

5 150

1 936

2 967

17 910

9 000

12 500

6 790

45 000

7 745

2 000

4 700

226

Project number Project $

74PRU21

74PRU22

74PRU23

74PRU24

74PRU25

74PRU26

74PRU27

74PRU28

74PRU29

74PRU30

74PRU31

Drug Control Project—Dr R. Irwin, Australian National University. To investigate the effectiveness of experimental drug education programs in certain A.C.T. schools and to evaluate the different health education methods used in the p r o g r a m s ...............................................................

Health Servicing Urban Children-Drs A. Brownlea and J. Ward, Griffith University. By studying the health needs of. and services pro­ vided for, urban children, it is hoped to improve the ability of health planners and policy makers to provide suitable and adequate health services .................................................................................................

Accident Research-Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. To iden­ tify specific research projects in safety and accident research needed; research into the broad area of safety and injury research currently being undertaken; and current data gaps and new data collection

methods ...................................................................................

Research Teacher Training Course—Hospitals and Health Services Commission. A workshop to plan a program whereby health services researchers can improve their expertise by the discussion of common p r o b l e m s .................................................................................................

‘Operation Retirement’: A Longitudinal Study in Gerontology—Drs E. Harwood and G. Naylor, University of Queensland. To enable the completion of a ten-year longitudinal study of the mental function of a sample of elderly persons ....................................................................

The Ecology of Human Illness-Professor J. G. Andrews, University of New South Wales. To delineate the epidemiology of chronic illness and disability in the population surrounding a Sydney suburban health c e n t r e ......................................................................................................

Pilot Part-time Course in Health Services Planning and M anagem ent- Health Feedback, Melbourne. A pilot health education project, which aims to enable citizens and community leaders to contribute more effec­ tively to health services planning and management by providing courses on a number of topics, including: public health maintenance; personal ill health care; organisation of health services; and health ser­ vices finances .......................................................................................

Evaluation of Flinders Medical Program—Dr R. Linke, Flinders Uni­ versity. To evaluate the Flinders Medical Program by gathering back­ ground information on the student population; monitoring courses and assessment procedures; and conducting experimental studies relating to particular courses, and the basic policies of the medical program . Survey of Patient-Doctor Contact Conditions—Mr J. Richardson et al.,

Macquarie University. A before-and-after study of the introduction of Medibank, to establish a reliable profile of point-of-contact conditions in the private medical care sector; to determine patient response, doctor satisfaction, quality of care etc.; and to analyse the effect of the changed

conditions upon patient access to health care f a c i li ti e s ........................

Survey of Follow-up Services for Patients Discharged from Hospi­ tal—Dr J. Golledge, Princess Alexandra Hospital. To assess a hospital’s follow-up services for patients recovering from acute illness/injury by

identifying prognosis on discharge; degree and timing of functional recovery; reasons for delay in recovery; and measures to promote earliest possible return to normal activity ...........................................

Utilisation of Medical Services in Metropolitan Brisbane—Professor D. Gordon, University of Queensland. To study current usage of medical and paramedical services, the effects of illness and the requirement of supportive services on the social aspects surrounding the institu­ tionalisation of p a t i e n t s ........................................................................

13 333

12 000

20 000

3 713

9 733

4 000

10 000

3 000

4 500

3 500

1 420

227

Project number Project $

74PRU32

74PRU33

Z74PRU34

74PRU8

74PRU9

74PRU10

74PRU1I

74PRU12

74PRU13

74PRU35

74PRU36

Community Health in Mosman: Resources and Utilisation—Messrs T. Greenwood and D. Crocker, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. A survey of health resources and their utilisation in the sub­ urb of Mosman to enable comparisons to be made between ‘affluent’ a n d 1 deprived ’ a r e a s ..............................................................................

Evaluation of the Role of Specialist Medical Units in a Teaching Hospi­ tal—D r R. Douglas, Royal Adelaide Hospital. To compare and evalu­ ate the treatment received by patients with similar disorders, who are admitted either to specialist units or general medical wards at random

The Social and Psychological Implications of Stroke—Dr D. Christie, University of Melbourne. To explore the attitudes of stroke patients to their illness and future prospects to the hospital which cared for them and to the community services which should be available to them . .

Medical Jurisprudence—Mr S. Davis, University of New South Wales. To assist in the production of a compendium of all legislation, regula­ tions and judicial decisions which pertain to health services in Australia and New Z e a l a n d ...................................................................................

Impact of Social Worker on Private Group Medical Practice—Mrs J. Huntington, University of N.S.W. A social worker is attached full time to a private group medical practice for evaluation of the social worker’s role to provide generally applicable information on: the social work role in a primary health care setting in Australia; patient acceptance

and satisfaction with the more comprehensive care offered; and developments in interprofessional perceptions, attitudes and behaviour Curriculum for Training Ambulance Officers—Institute of Ambulance Officers (Australia). To aid the preparation of a complete curriculum

for training ambulance officers to higher levels of proficiency in patient

Multidisciplinary Study of Health Centres—Professor Western et at., University of Queensland. To identify social characteristics, com­ munity morbidity, communications, costs and benefits to enable the continuous monitoring of the interaction between the needs of the com­

munity and the health facilities available ............................................

Stress Levels in Health Personnel and Staff Wastage—Dr E. Bates, Uni­ versity o f New South Wales. To assess the stress levels of health person­ nel in various types of health organisations and to test the correlation between staff wastage rates and the length of patient s t a y ................... Evaluation of Primary Health Care—D r R. Douglas, University of Adelaide. To devise and test a series of instruments of evaluation which

might permit objective assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of differing primary care delivery s y s t e m s ................................................

Study of Health Needs in Fitzroy, Collingwood, Richmond areas—Dr T. Santamaria, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne. To continue a study of the total health needs of a community and examine how socio­ economic status and social dysfunction affect health needs . . . . National Blood Pressure Study—National Heart Foundation. To con­ tinue the National Blood Pressure Study which assesses the treatment provided to patients with mild hypertension .......................................

500

2 500

3 300

5 000

16 680

2 000

31 352

8 160

10 000

7 050

28 548

Total 463 532

228

HEALTH SERVICES PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM Payments 1975-76

Project number Project

73PRU1

73PRU6

74PRU1

74PRU2

74PRU3

74PRU4

74PRU7

74PRU8

74PRU9

74PRU11

74PRU12

Directorate of Gerontology—Mt Royal Hospital, Melbourne: The es­ tablishment of an information and research centre in gerontology . .

Medical Administrative Standards in Hospitals—School of Health Administration, University of New South Wales: To develop medical administrative standards for Australian general hospitals by conduct­

ing a survey of the formal organisation of medical staff in Australian hospitals, and analysing the effectiveness of the organisational patterns in representative hospitals ....................................................................

Research on Care of Mother and Child—Drs T. G. Murrell and J. Moss, University of Adelaide: To provide a data base for planning services for the care of mother and child during pregnancy and in the first year oflife .......................................................................................................

Practitioner Nurse in Domiciliary Care of Chronic Illness in the Elderly—Drs J. Linn and T. G. Murrell, University of Adelaide: To test the hypothesis that the health of the elderly chronic ill would improve by utilisation of a practitioner nurse attached to a general practice, a

sister has been employed in a general practice to provide domiciliary care to chronically ill elderly patients .................................................

Safety in Small Obstetrical Hospital v. Large Obstetrical H ospital- Professor D. Gordon, University of Queensland: To test whether ob­ stetrical services can be safely ‘regionalised’ in a large city or whether ‘ centralised ’ facilities are desirable ......................................................

Evaluation of Nurse Training Courses in A.C.T. Tertiary Education Research Unit, University of New South Wales: To evaluate the edu­ cational programs and processes in the three basic nurse training courses available in the A.C.T., and to compare and contrast their effec­

tiveness in developing the desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes . Follow-up of Busselton Survey—Dr M. McCall, University of Western Australia: To assist in the preparation of guide books for community health screening; the conduct of the 1975 mass health screening pro­ gram; and the development and evaluation of new techniques in pre­ ventive health in relation to practice in a community health centre . .

Medical Jurisprudence—Mr S. Davis, University of New South Wales: To assist in the production of a compendium of all legislation, regula­ tions and judicial decisions which pertain to health services in Australia

and New Z e a l a n d ...................................................................................

Impact of Social Worker on Private Group Medical Practice—Mrs J. Huntington, University of N.S.W.: A social worker is attached full time to a private group medical practice for evaluation of the social worker’s role to provide generally applicable information on: the social work

role in a primary health care setting in Australia; patient acceptance and satisfaction with the more comprehensive care offered; and developm ents in inter-professional perceptions, attitudes and behaviour ............................................................................................

Multidisciplinary Study of Health Centres—Professor Western et al., University of Queensland: To identify social characteristics, com­ munity morbidity, communications, costs and benefits to enable the continuous monitoring of the interaction between the needs of the com­

munity and the health facilities available ...........................................

Stress Levels in Health Personnel and Staff Wastage—Dr E. Bates, University of New South Wales: To assess the stress levels of health personnel in various types of health organisations and to test the corre­ lation between staff wastage rates and the length of patient stay . .

$

10 000

53 500

3 100

6 230

11 750

17 663

6 624

13 422

36 266

4 693

229

P ro jec t

num b e r P ro jec t $

74PRU16 Information Needs and Practices of Health Facility Planners—Mr J. Green, University of N.S.W.: To study the information needs and prac-tices of health facility planners with the view to identifying problems faced by those seeking information and of developing improved infor-mation retrieval serv ices ......................................................................... 15 391

74PRU18 Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of End-stage Renal Disease—Dr D. P. Doessel, University of Queensland: A benefit cost analysis of the treat-ment of end-stage renal disease, with special emphasis on the available alternative methods of trea tm en t........................................................... 640

74PRU19 Effects of Communication on Health of Retarded Children and their Families—Mr C. Bliss: The development and printing of a primer for use in teaching handicapped children the Bliss interlingual writing sys-tem and the evaluation of the health-related effects of its use . . . 150

74PRU20 Fractured Neck of Femur Treatment Study—Drs R. Ulman and D. Christie, University of Melbourne: An operational study to explore the natural history of the condition and how efficiently medical resources are deployed in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients . . . . 5 2 8 5

74PRU21 Drug Control Project—Dr R. Irwin, Australian National University: To investigate the effectiveness of experimental drug education programs in certain A.C.T. schools and to evaluate the different health education methods used in the p rog ram s ............................................................... 6 038

74PRU22 Health Servicing Urban Children—Drs A. Brownlea and J. Ward, Griffith University: By studying the health needs of, and services pro-vided for, urban children, it is hoped to improve the ability of health planners and policy makers to provide suitable and adequate health services ................................................................................................. 43 984

74PRU'I6 The Ecology of Human Illness—Professor J. G. Andrews, University of New South Wales: To delineate the epidemiology of chronic illness and disability in the population surrounding a Sydney surburban health c e n tre ...................................................................................................... 4 000

74PRU27 Pilot part-time Course in Health Services Planning and Management-Health Feedback, Melbourne: A pilot health education project, which aims to enable citizens and community leaders to contribute more effec-tively to health services planning and management by providing courses on a number of topics including: public health maintenance; personal ill health care; organisation of health services; and health ser-vices finances ....................................................................................... 10 000

74PRU28 Evaluation of Flinders Medical Program—Dr R. Linke, Flinders Uni-versity: To evaluate the Flinders Medical Program by gathering back-ground information on the student population; monitoring courses and assessment procedures; and conducting experimental studies relating to particular courses, and the basic policies of the medical program . 19 273

74PRU29 Survey of Patient-Doctor Contact Conditions—Mr J. Richardson et al ., Macquarie University: A before-and-after study of the introduction of Medibank, to establish a reliable profile of point-of-contact conditions in the private medical care sector; to determine patient response, doctor satisfaction, quality of care etc.; and to analyse the effect of the changed conditions upon patient access to health care fac ilities ........................ 5 000

74PRU30 Survey of Follow-up Services for Patients Discharged from Hospi-tal—Dr J. Golledge, Princess Alexandra Hospital: To assess a hospital’s follow-up services for patients recovering from acute illness/injury by identifying prognosis on discharge; degree and timing of functional recovery; reasons for delay in recovery; and measures to promote earliest possible return to normal activity ........................................... 3 450

230

P ro jec t num b e r P ro jec t $

74PRU31 Utilisation of Medical Services in Metropolitan Brisbane—Professor D. Gordon, University of Queensland: To study current usage of medical and paramedical services, the effects of illness on the requirement of supportive services and the social aspects surrounding the institu-

tionalisation of p a t ien ts ......................................................................... 4 106

74PRU34 The Social and Psychological Implications of Stroke—Dr D. Christie, University of Melbourne: To explore the attitudes of stroke patients to their illness and future prospects, to the hospital which cared for them and to the community services which should be available to them . . 141

74PRU35 Study of Health Needs in Fitzroy, Collingwood, Richmond areas—Dr T. Santamaria, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne: To continue a study of the total health needs of a community and examine how socio-economic status and social dysfunction affect health needs . . . . 3 5 0 0

75 PRU37 Management Information Needs of Victorian Public Hospitals— Messrs N. V. Anthony, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology: To provide a better basis for decision making in the management of hospi-tals and to provide better control of human and material resources . 17 000

75 PRU38 Task Analysis of the Delivery of Obstetric Care—Miss T. Kiiver, Benev-olent Society of N. S. W./Health Commission of N. S. W.: To analyse the work activities, independently o f‘job’ titles, into units called ‘tasks’ and to assess the level of skill and knowledge required to perform the

tasks ...................................................................................................... 12 500

75 PRU39 Continuing Education of Nurses in Queensland, Pilot Project—Royal Australian Nursing Federation, Queensland Branch: To develop nurs-ing education to enable nursing practitioners to assume appropriate roles within the comprehensive health care sy s tem ............................. 2 000

75 PRU40 Economic Investigation of Health Transport Services in Australia—Mr J. Butler, Darling Downs, Institute of Advanced Education: To conduct economic research into ambulance services, to explain certain phenomena and policy prescriptions for ambulance service provision 2 420 75PRU41 Survey of Manpower Availability of Psychologists—Dr A. M. Clarke,

Australian Psychological Society: The survey aims to provide essential information to identify training needs and current manpower statistics 4 750

75 PRU42 Health Education Program—Professor Selby-Smith and Mrs H. Hocking, University of Tasmania: To conduct a survey in one group of the community on health matters and then develop and evaluate edu-cational programs aimed at motivating changes in behaviour and atti-

tude ...................................................................................................... 13 500

75 PRU44 Cost of Training Nurses under Two Alternative Schemes—Mr R. Wallace, Flinders University: The project is to determine the relative costs of training nurses by traditional methods and by the new institu-tionalised methods .............................................................................. 11 007

75PRU45 Comparative Cost of Caring for Sick and Disabled via Domiciliary Nursing Home and Hospital Services—Mr R. Wallace, Flinders Uni-versity: A study in the Adelaide metropolitan area of costs involved in adapting homes and providing services for domiciliary care, as com-pared with the costs of treatment of the same category of patient in a hospital or nursing home .................................................................... 50

75PRU46 Survey of Parking Provisions for Disabled Drivers—Mr S. Gorton, Syd-ney University: A survey of disabled drivers in Sydney to assess the needs of parking facilities in central Sydney and to recommend improvements to the present situation ................................................ 302

231

Project number Project $

75PRU47 Feasibility Study for Evaluation in General Practice—Dr R. Douglas, University of Adelaide: The aim of this project is (a) to test the viability of a package approach to practice evaluation, (b) to investigate the value of such information to general practitioners working in a variety of practice situations, and (c) to compare the kind of data obtained

from such a package in a variety of practice situations and a variety of user populations ................................................................................... 11 000

75PRU48 Spatial Distribution of Hospital Services in the Moreton Region—Mr J. L. Skinner, University of Queensland: The research is directed to the completion of an analysis of services and n e e d s .................................. 3 000

75PRU49 Decision Making and Resource Allocation in the Health Delivery Sys­ tem -Professor J. Cutt and Mr J. Tydeman, Australian National Uni­ versity: The study seeks to develop a conceptional framework for de­ cision making and resource allocation in the health sector in the context of uncertainty and alternative futures for health. The study supports the

activities of the Health Policy Development Task Force with particular emphasis on problem formulation, decision making in health care, and policies for the f u t u r e .............................................................................. 2 000

75PRU50 Analysis of Work and Roles of Health Administrators as a Basis for Defining Education and Training Requirements—Mr W. R. Geisler and Mrs M. G. Patrickson: To observe and evaluate the role o f the health administrator to provide data for both manpower planning and design of education and training courses in health administration . . 10 000 73PRU9 Bed Utilisation, Cost and Quality Control—Benevolent Society of New

South Wales: To conduct a benefit cost analysis of services provided at an obstetric hospital. Project cancelled. Cash r e c e i v e d ........................ CR 24 003

Total ............................................................................................ 349 732

HEALTH SERVICES PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ALLOCATIONS 1976-77 To date the following grants have been made for 1976-77 from the Health Ser­ vices Planning and Research Program.

Project number Project

73PRUI

74PRU2

74PRU4

Directorate of Gerontology, Mt Royal Hospital, Melbourne. The estab­ lishment of an information and research centre in gerontology . . .

Practitioner Nurse in Domiciliary Care of Chronic Illness in the Elderly—Drs J. Linn and T. G. Murrell, University of Adelaide. To test the hypothesis that the health of the elderly chronic ill would improve by utilisation of a practitioner nurse attached to a general practice, a sister has been employed in a general practice to provide domiciliary care to chronically ill elderly patients ................................................

Evaluation of Trainee Nursing Programs in the A.C.T.—T.E.R.C., Uni­ versity of New South Wales ...............................................................

— To evaluate the educational programs. — To compare and contrast their effectiveness in developing the desira­ ble competencies in knowledge, skills and attitudes, and to identify factors which facilitate or hinder such development. — To identify a model educational program, its objectives, teaching

methods and integration of theory and practice. — To identify suitable entrance requirements for such a program. — To identify the major problems confronting students, in the learning process, and teachers, in achieving short and long-term goals.

$

7 500

3 712

6 145

232

Project number Project $

74PRU8

74PRU9

74PRU11

74PRU28

74PRU40

75PRU44

75PRU45

75PRU48

Medical Jurisprudence—Mr S. Davis, University of New South Wales. To assist in the production of a compendium of all legislation, regula­ tions and judicial decisions which pertain to health services in Australia and New Z e a l a n d ..................................................................................

Impact of Social Worker on Private Group Medical Practice—Mrs J. Huntington, University of N.S.W. A social worker is attached full time to a private group medical practice for evaluation of the social worker’s role to pirovide generally applicable information on: the social work role in a primary health care setting in Australia: patient accept­

ance and satisfaction with the more comprehensive care offered; and developments in interprofessional perceptions, attitudes and behaviour

Multidisciplinary Study of Health Centres—Professor Western et al., University of Queensland. To identify social characteristics, com­ munity morbidity, communications, costs and benefits to enable the continuous monitoring of the interaction between the needs of the com­ munity and the health facilities available. Supplementary allocation to cover award variations .........................................................................

Evaluation of Flinders Medical Program—Dr R. Linke, Flinders Uni­ versity. To evaluate the Flinders Medical Program by gathering back­ ground information on the student population; monitoring courses and assessment procedures; and conducting experimental studies relating

to particular courses, and the basic policies of the medical program . Mr J. Butler—Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education. Econ­ omic Investigation of Transport Services. To conduct economic research into ambulance services, to explain certain phenomena and

policy prescriptions for ambulance service provision ........................

Mr R. Wallace, Flinders University—Cost of Training Nurses under two Alternative Schemes. The project is to determine the relative costs of training nurses by traditional methods and by the new institu­ tionalised methods .............................................................................

Mr R. Wallace, Flinders University. Comparative Cost of Caring for Sick and Disabled via Domiciliary, Nursing Home and Hospital Ser­ vices. A study in the Adelaide metropolitan area to determine the rela­ tive costs of providing suitable care for the disabled and aged by three

alternative methods. The study would also allow comparison of the ad­ equacy and relative quality of the s e r v i c e s ...........................................

Spatial Distribution of Hospital Services in the Moreton Region—Mr J. L. Skinner. Supplementary allocation to cover award variations . . The research is directed to the completion of an analysis of services and needs.

10 000

20 758 (plus

employer’s contribution for super­ annuation)

295

31 435

6 266

11 605

4 185

158

Total 102 059

GRANTS-IN-AID TO COMMUNITY AGENCIES ENGAGED IN MENTAL AND HEALTH ACTIVITIES (IN THE A.C.T.)

Senator Harradine asked in relation to Grants-in-Aid to community agencies:

. . can we have a list of names of those organisations which received the grant last year?’

233

Set out below is a listing of the community agencies that received grants-in-aid during 1975-76 and are being considered for a grant-in-aid for 1976-77:

Grants-in-Aid 1975-76

Community agencies engaged in mental health activities C anberra M arriage Guidance Council

Creative Leisure Movement Can­ berra

The Woden Community Service

Belconnen Community Service

Canberra Senior Citizens Club

YMCA of Canberra Inc.

YMCA of Canberra Inc.

Canberra Life Line

To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary to the Supervisor of Education for Relationships To assist in financing a supervisors’ course and sessions at centres at Congregational Church Hall and Narrabundah Primary School To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of the Chief Executive Officer To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of the co-ordinator of activities To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of the Welfare Officer To assist with the salary of the pro­ gram supervisor in maintaining after-school YMCA creative play programs for intellectually handi­ capped children To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of the Physical Education Direc­ tor of the YMCA Recreation Centre, in maintaining physical recreation programs with intellectually handi­ capped persons To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of the co-ordinator of the activi­ ties of Life Line

$

3 250

3 250

3 250

4 340

2 170

6 500

6 500

6 500

Total 35 760

Community agencies engaged in health activities The Womens Centre Inc. (3 Lobelia Street, O ’Connor, A.C.T. 2601)

A.C.T. Council on the Ageing

Royal Guide Dogs for the Blind Association of Australia

D iabetes Association of the A.C.T.

To assist with the payment of the sal­ ary of an Education/Information Officer for the Womens Information and Health Counselling Service To acquire books and educational materials for the Retirement Plan­ ning Program of the A.C.T. For the salary of a technical instruc­ tor and towards the operating costs of the Blindness Resource Centre A.C.T. To assist with the operating costs of the A.C.T. Diabetes Information Centre including the salary of a full­ time professional person in the field of diabetes social medicine

2 800

2 000

10 000

11 000

234

Canberra Life Line To assist with the operating costs of 9 540

Canberra Life Line outside cost of salary of co-ordinator of activities To assist with the payment of the sal- 2 000 ary of a field worker

To assist with the purchase of first 500

aid equipment To assist with the salary of a 4 000

Lecturer/Instructor To assist with the payment of fees to 1 000 physiotherapists taking out-of-hours ante-natal classes

To assist with the operating costs of 1 500 the YMCA’s physical education pro­ grams with handicapped persons

Belconnen Community Service

St John Ambulance Brigade

St John Ambulance Association

Child-birth Education Associ­ ation (Aust.) (A.C.T.) Inc.

YMCA of Canberra Inc.

Total 44 340

Grants-in-Aid 1976-77 Community and mental health agencies

Applications for continuation of grants are at present being considered from the following organisations:

1. St Johns Ambulance Association—1st Canberra Branch 2. YMCA of Canberra Inc. 3. The Woden Community Service 4. Canberra Life Line

5. Diabetes Association of the A.C.T. 6. The Women’s Centre Inc. 7. Belconnen Community Service 8. Child-birth Education Association (Aust.) (A.C.T.) Inc.

9. Canberra Senior Citizens Club 10. Canberra Marriage Guidance Council 11. Royal Guide Dogs for the Blind Association of Australia

Senator Harradine, in relation to the Canberra Womens Refuge Inc., asked:

‘Could we find out precisely whether the accommodation was shared with any other organisations and whether any of the money that was provided for the Womens Refuge shelter was also shared with any other organisations?’ In answer to Senator Harradine’s question the following information is supplied:

1. The address is in Kingston and is known to the Capital Territory Health Com­ mission. The Refuge was formerly situated in Watson. If any member wishes to visit the Refuge, this can be arranged through the Commission. 2. The Department is not aware of the Canberra Womens Refuge having shared

accommodation with other organisations. . 3. Grant given to Canberra Womens Refuge was not shared with any other organisation ( but see below). 4. However if the question was intended to relate to the Canberra Womens

Centre at 3 Lobelia St, O ’Connor (as mentioned in answer to a previous ques­

CANBERRA WOMENS REFUGE INC.

235

tion) this is included in the list of community agencies engaged in health activi­ ties that received grants in 1975-76 and is under consideration for a grant in 1976-77. The grant-in-aid in 1975-76 of $2800 was for the conducting of a health information and counselling service. Other organisations based at this address include the Womens Electoral Lobby and the Womens Liberation Organis­ ation. The Capital Territory Health Commission understands the position to be that these organisations pay rent to the Canberra Womens Centre Inc. and that the Womens Refuge also leases space from the Canberra Womens Centre Inc. at this address at a rental of $104 p.a. for the storage of records etc.

In determining the 1976-77 grant the CTHC will have regard to all income and expenses incurred by the Canberra Womens Centre.

MEDICAL POSITIONS—DARWIN HOSPITAL

The Chairman asked in relation to the resident medical positions at Darwin Hospital:

‘ . . . what are the latest figures?’

At 30 September 1976 Darwin Hospital had an establishment of 55 resident medical positions of which 46 were filled.

HEALTH SERVICES FOR ABORIGINALS IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

Senator Bonner asked in relation to the provision of health services for Aboriginals in the Northern Territory:

‘Are the services to which you are referring not funded by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and not by the Department of Health? ’

All health services for Aboriginals within the Northern Territory are funded by the Department of Health except:

1. Central Australian Aboriginal Congress 2. Aboriginal Institute of Aboriginal Development.

The above are based in Alice Springs and are funded by the Department of Abor­ iginal Affairs. The Department of Aboriginal Affairs also advise that the Aboriginal and Islander Community Health Service is located in Queensland and is totally funded by that Department.

EMPLOYMENT OF ABORIGINALS

Senator Melzer asked, in relation to the employment of Aboriginal people in Aboriginal Health Services: ‘Can you tell me the number of Aboriginals employed by the Department of Health in the Northern Territory either full time or part time?’

There are 298 Aboriginal people employed full time and none part time in the Northern Territory from funds provided in the Departments Appropriations as under:

Division 334 111 Aboriginals Division 335 187 Aboriginals The definition of Aboriginal used in compiling the above numbers ‘are those people who identify themselves as being Aboriginal ’.

236

BEDS PER 1000 POPULATION-NORTHERN TERRITORY

Senator Brown asked in relation to the Northern Territory Hospitals:

‘Is it possible to indicate the number of beds available per 1000 population in a way which is much more precise than that used in the explanatory notes?’ The estimated population of the Northern Territory as at 30 September 1976 was 98 940. On this date there were 591 authorised beds available in the Northern Terri­

tory excluding 50 beds at the Leprosarium Hospital. This is 5.97 beds per 1000 population.

On a regional basis, there were 5.4 beds per 1000 population in the Northern Region, 7.2 beds per 1000 population in the Southern Region and 5.8 beds per 1000 population in the East Arnhem Land Region.

NORTHERN TERRITORY HOSPITALS

Senator Brown asked in relation to a breakdown of the $699 000 estimate for Travelling and Subsistence (Division 334/2/01) what is:

‘the real program in respect of paediatrics, ophthalmology and reactivation of the leprosy program?’ A breakdown of the Official Travel Expenditure in 1975-76 and the estimate for 1976-77 for paediatrics, ophthalmology and the leprosy program is shown as follows:

Expenditure 1975-76

Estimated expenditure 1976-77

$ $

P a e d i a t r i c s ................... . . . 6 340 8 755

Ophthalmology . . . . . . 4232 7 320

Leprosy ........................ . . . 7 288 17 600

It should also be noted that the increased requirement under this item covers the full year effect of price and rate increases during 1975-76; additional recreation leave fares (PSB Reg. 98) and costs involved in the appointment or transfer of hospital staff.

Also the full year’s effect of known increased hire charges during 1975-76 for the hire of motor vehicles.

PROVISIONS—MEALS SERVED IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY HOSPITALS

Whilst discussing the departmental estimate for Provisions (Division 334/2/05), Senator Guilfoyle agreed to provide some statistical information on the meals served and the costs involved.

Attached is a paper which provides the number of meals served during 1975-76 and the estimated number to be served during 1976-77. Number of Meals served during 1975-76 for Patients and Staff

Total number Weekly

Hospital of meals 1975-76 average Daily

(a ) Darwin (including East Arm Leprosarium) ( b ) Alice S p r i n g s ............................................

(c) Katherine ................................................

237

493 626 243 106 66 619

9 493 4 675 1 281

1 356 669 183

Total number Weekly

Hospital of meals 1975-76 average Daily

(d) Tennant Creek .................................................................... 23 187 446 64

(e) Gove ................................................................................... 63 653 1 224 175

T o t a l ................................................................................... 890 191 171119 2 447

Estimated no. of meals to be served during 1976-77

(a) Darwin (including East Arm Leprosarium) . . . 611500 (b) Alice S p r i n g s .......................................................... 293 600

(c) K a t h e r i n e ............................................................... 91 000

(d) Tennant Creek ..................................................... 24 600

(e) Gove .................................................................... 67 500

T o t a l .................................................................... 1 088 200

Cost per meal in 1975-76—76.7 cents Estimated cost per meal in 1976-77—91.1 cents

SOLAR HEATING

Senator Brown asked in relation to the form of heating used in the Northern Territory: ‘Has any consideration been given to the use of alternative fuel and energy? I am thinking of solar energy . . . ’

The Department of Construction has advised that solar hot water systems have been or will be installed in the following locations:

Delissaville Health Centre Hooker Creek Health Centre and flats Oenpelli Health Centre and flats Yuendumu Health Centre and flats Docker River Health Centre and flats Umbakumba flats Tennant Creek Hospital Village Katherine Hospital 20-bed sisters quarters Roper River Health Centre Mataranka flats Adelaide River Health Centre and flats The major hospitals utilise the boilers in their respective services block for hot water.

SUPPLEMENTARY NUTRITIONAL ACTIVITIES

Senator Keeffe asked in relation to a supplementary amount of $200 000 that was made available originally for the Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory:

‘Is it part of the appropriation of the Department of Health?’ It is now understood that Senator Keeffe was speaking about supplementary nutritional arrangements. Funds for this activity are provided for through the Appropriations of the Depart­

ment of Health.

238

No specific separate item has been provided in the votes for this Department either in the current year or earlier. Where additional nutritional supplements are considered necessary as part of the treatment of Aboriginal children they have in the past been provided at hospitals and rural centres. Funds for the continuation and

expansion of this service have been provided in the current estimates.

NORTHERN TERRITORY HOSPITALS

Senator Keeffe asked, in relation to the Casuarina Hospital building program: ‘How much money has been spent on it up to now?’ The Department of Construction (Darwin) has advised that the expenditure on the Casuarina Hospital which is due for completion by April 1979 is $25 274 000 as at 18 October 1976.

The amount has been expended as follows:

$

1. Site preparation and landscaping (completed 6 August 1975) . 669 000 2. Main ward block (due for completion 30 April 1979) . . . 9 643 000 3. Service block (due for completion 15 December 1977) . . . 7 234 000 4. Nursing Training School and accommodation (due for com­

pletion 14 April 1977) .......................................................... 7 639 000

5. Sundry e x p e n d itu r e .................................................................... 89 000

Total .............................................................................. 25 274 000

239

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

P.O. Box 100

Woden, A.C.T. 2606

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee D

Please find attached a statement on the objectives and goals of several hospitals as requested during the Senate Estimates Committee D meeting on 12 October 1976 and referred to in our letter of 19 October 1976.

Director-General o f Health

240

The Committee asked that examples be given of objectives which have been specifically stated for individual hospitals.

Attached are examples in respect of:

A.C.T. hospitals generally, and Canberra, Woden Valley and Calvary Hospitals specifically Geelong Hospital (extract from the functional brief for the redevelopment of the Hospital) Campbelltown Hospital Also attached for the information of the Committee is a statement of the objec­ tives, policies etc. for the Western Metropolitan Region of the New South Wales

Health Commission. This statement sets out the objectives which have been rec­ ommended to the Commission to meet the demand for hospitals in the Western Metropolitan Region. Hospitals in the Region include: Westmead, Liverpool, Camp­ belltown, Mt Druitt, Nepean etc.

Canberra and Woden Valley Hospitals The largest operational activity undertaken by the Commission is in the area of acute general hospitals; the policy on hospital operation has been stated to be one which aims to provide a high standard and comprehensive range of hospital services for the

A.C.T. at locations convenient to the public, served and fully co-ordinated with other community health services. The hospital service also aims to provide specialist hospi­ tal referral services for areas surrounding the A.C.T. in accordance with the role of Canberra as a regional growth centre. It also aims to provide training and research fa­

cilities necessary for the provision and maintenance of sufficient medical staff and a high standard of patient care.

As with all major hospitals throughout Australia the Specialist Medical Colleges monitor an ongoing accreditation system for the training of specialists. Statistical reports are provided on a regular basis to the Commission as a means of monitoring the performance of the hospitals in quantitative terms. The statistics provide details of

numbers of patients, occupancy of wards etc. The hospitals also provide details of patients’ diseases and operations to the Australian Bureau of Statistics as part of its Australian morbidity collection program.

Calvary Hospital Extract from Functional Brief ‘The basic aim is to establish an integrated Hospital providing complete patient services, with limited specialties, capable of attracting the best medical and nurs­

ing staff, yet forming part of the overall health services concept within the A.C.T. ’

General functions o f A. C. T. public hospitals Overall aims—To provide a high standard and comprehensive range of hospital ser­ vices for the A.C.T. at locations convenient for the public, served and fully co­ ordinated with other community health services.

To provide specialist hospital referral services for southern New South Wales, including particularly the South Coast, Monaro and adjacent parts of the Southern Tablelands, in accordance with the role of Canberra as a regional growth centre.

To provide training and research facilities necessary for the provision and main­ tenance of efficient staff and a high standard of patient care.

Methods—Determine and provide total hospital beds required for whole A.C.T. population using age weighting formula and levels approved by Hospitals and Health

241

Services Commission; and provide additional facilities based on best available pro­ jection of tourist levels and referrals from New South Wales.

Provide general range of medical, surgical, obstetrical and supportive hospital services in economically viable district hospitals located for maximally convenient patient access and organisationally linked to local community health services.

Provide more highly specialised hospital services as and when justified by total A.C.T. and surrounding referral demand, and concentrate these highly specialised services in the two major central hospitals (Canberra, Woden Valley).

Such highly specialised units should only be duplicated in more than one of the central hospitals when each unit is both professionally and economically viable.

Geelong Hospital Development objectives Development of the hospital will be aimed at achieving the following objectives. These are in accordance with the overall goals of the hospital, namely the provision of high quality health care services with maximum efficiency and minimum cost to the community.

The development objectives are:

(i) To provide in the hospital the facilities needed to meet the demands of the mid 1980s.

(ii) To integrate the development of the hospital with the development strategies for the City of Geelong and its region.

(iii) To create a hospital which will provide the major health care facilities for the Geelong region.

(iv) To ensure that all units of the hospital are sized and located so that they can function with maximum effectiveness and minimum operating cost.

(v) To ensure that 640 acute and maternity beds are available for use by 1980.

(vi) To replace all existing facilities which are inappropriate or incapable of per­ forming efficiently.

(vii) To achieve completion of the development in a minimum number of separ­ ate stages, but permit the hospital to function at all times without reduction in the level of services provided.

(viii) To provide for future adaptation of the hospital to meet changing needs.

(ix) To improve the general environment of the hospital and minimise its institu­ tional appearance.

In view of the confined nature and location of the site and other factors related to the regional health care strategy, the ultimate size of the hospital should be limited. The proposed limit as determined by the Hospitals and Charities Commission, is approximately 640 beds, distributed as follows:

General acute 480

Paediatric 70

Obstetric 90

640

At this size, the Geelong Hospital, together with the other existing hospitals in Geelong, should meet the acute bed needs recommended by the Hospitals and Health Services Commission for a population of between 190 000 and 200 000. This popu­ lation is expected to be reached in the mid 1980s. Increasing demand for acute beds

242

beyond this time will be met by the provision of the proposed new district hospitals, and, as previously noted, the first of these should be available about 1987.

It is also proposed that an acute psychiatric unit to be administered by the Mental Health Authority should be established as part of the future development of the hospital. Whilst being separately administered, this unit could be physically integrated with the hospital buildings and share some of the services. The unit will provide accommodation for 60 in-patients, together with treatment and rehabilitation

facilities for in- and out-patients.

Services to be provided by the Geelong Hospital in the future will encompass all of those it offers at present (see Section 2.1), with an expansion in the range of special diagnostic investigations. After the mid 1980s, if the regional population grows as expected and the new district hospitals commence operations, the emphasis within

the spectrum of services will change. There will be increasing concentration on specialist treatment and diagnostic services to cater for referrals from other hospitals in the region and the range of these services should be such that only those patients in need of very highly sophisticated services should be referred to Melbourne hospitals.

As a result the number of beds at Geelong Hospital used for the simpler care will decrease and patients requiring these services will be accommodated in the district hospitals.

Services provided by the Geelong Hospital and other health care facilities in the region will be rationalised to avoid unnecessary duplication. Examples of effective rationalising can already be seen in the relationship between Geelong Hospital and Grace McKellar House, and in the extent of services provided by the Pharmacy and

Pathology Departments of the hospital.

Departments which may provide services beyond the needs of the hospital itself will be:

Pharmacy Pathology Mortuary Orthopaedic appliances

Blood bank Administration Nursing education

Diagnostic procedures The hospital will play a large part in education of staff at all levels, group medical meetings and seminars, and community health programs. It will continue to act as a teaching hospital for the medical school at Monash University and could provide similar services for the proposed new university to be established in Geelong. It will

also continue to provide nursing education although the extent of this will depend on future decisions relating to the introduction of nursing courses at Gordon Institute of Technology.

Campbelltown hospital General policies The Stage 1 development is the initial stage of a hospital anticipated to be approxima­ tely 400 beds in size.

As originally planned, the hospital was to function as a small community hospital and at the same time be the forerunner of a major hospital. However, it was con­ sidered appropriate that from the outset both the casualty and out-patients depart­ ments be large enough to avoid future needs for expansion. The number of beds was

243

originally nominated at 60; however, this was seen to create an inefficient use of sup­ porting services as well as failing to meet the needs of the community. As a result, planning proceeded based on a first phase of 120 beds.

It was assumed that the hospital would rely on regional services such as catering, linen, pathology, CSSD etc. For example, the hospital was planned to use a frozen food system with minimal food preparation on site.

Minimal pharmacy, mortuary and storage facilities were to be provided in Stage 1 ■ Furthermore the capacity for storage of medical records has been limited.

The increase in bed numbers referred to (para. 2 above) resulted in an upgrading of the two treatment rooms in the casualty department to operating theatres. As a result, two anaesthetic rooms are provided.

Specific hospital policies Category of patients (a ) The following breakdown represents the proposed bed provision in Stage 1:

(i) 60 general medical/surgical beds (ii) 45 minimal care beds (iii) 15 general practitioner beds No provision has been made in this first stage for either maternity or paediatric patients.

General practitioner beds were considered to be those that practitioners in the immediate area would be granted access to in accordance with the privi­ leges extended by the hospital. Both general medical/surgical beds were con­ sidered appropriately placed under the care of surgeons and physicians on the staff of the hospital. Details of arrangements regarding the medical staffing of the hospital will be clarified following resolution of the problem by the respective health authorities.

(b) Out-patients/Casualty Out-patients were seen to consist of two groups:

(i) patients attending by appointment special clinics conducted in ac­ cordance with a regular schedule; (ii) casual attenders to receive either primary care or emergency care.

For practical purposes the latter group will be dealt with by the casualty department using a schedule appropriate to patient load, which could be predicted after several months ’ operation.

As well as medical treatment for out-patients there will be paramedical and other ancillary services (e.g. pharmacy and pathology) provided in as­ sociation with the out-patients departm ent. It is assumed that

physiotherapists, social workers and occupational therapists will be operating within the hospital on a visiting and/or secondment basis.

Administration It has been assumed that the hospital will be administered by a Board of Directors in accordance with the model by-laws published by the Health Commission, together with other regulations and relevant Acts of Parliament. There will be a Chief Execu­ tive Officer, Medical Superintendent and Matron, each with appropriate authority delegated by the Board of Directors. It is envisaged that the Chief Executive Officer will be responsible to the Board for overall effective management of the hospital.

244

Internal supply and transport An imprest system of supply is envisaged wherever possible, with regular trolley de­ liveries of all goods. The replenishing of supplies will take place either by exchange trolleys or use of a ‘top-up’ system. All goods will be transported within the lift desig­

nated (Lift No. 1). Goods received from outside the hospital will go into general stores with the exception of frozen goods, pharmaceutical and sterile goods, the latter being forwarded directly to the sterilising department (TSSU). All goods to be sup­ plied other than on imprest will be ordered through a requisitioning system.

Service departments Service departments such as pharmacy, pathology, CSSD and stores etc. have been planned to exist side by side on the one floor so that all deliveries and movement of supplies can take place on this floor through a common loading dock. The pharmacy

department will be operated to supply both in-patients and out-patients of the hospital.

Section 21: Objectives, policies, programs, budgets and projects

NEW SOUTH WALES HEALTH COMMISSION WESTERN METROPOLITAN REGION

Services, objectives and policies In this section we conclude the Preliminary Report by framing recommendations for regional hospital services, regional support services and co-ordination. The regional hospital services we shall call primary services and the support and co-ordination ser­

vices we call secondary services. This categorisation indicates ‘distance’ from the con­ sumer and hopefully will act as a reminder that primary or direct patient services are the most important and secondary or indirect patient services are there only so pri­ mary services can be most effectively and efficiently delivered.

A plan is a series of rules for development of services, that is, objectives, policies, programs and budgets and finally projects concerned with primary and secondary services. We deal with the services in the order that they have been dealt with throughout the Plan: general medical and surgical services, super specialty services,

paediatric services, obstetric services, geriatric and rehabilitation services, psychiatric services, out-patient services, accident and emergency services. The ‘Budget’ figures used in this section represent an estimate of the whole hospi­ tal cost attracted by the provision of the particular primary services; they do not

represent solely the capital cost of the sendee unit on its own—e.g. a maternity unit. Costs are in net present day value discounted at 5 per cent.

General medical and surgical services Objectives: To provide general medical and surgical services accessible to the future population of the Western Metropolitan Health Region in response to projected de­ mand and to improve efficient use by implementing day surgery programs.

Policies: • stay: short stay should be encouraged by come-and-go day surgery and organis­ ation of nursing units around length of stay • leakage: to be reduced from 35 per cent to 15 per cent by 1985 and to negligible

levels by 1995 • access: to reduce trip times to hospital significantly by 1995 • interrelation: to interrelate with community-based services

245

• scope: to include ambulatory, acute and chronic services • facilities: to design facilities to appropriate standards with the ability to grow and change

Budget and Programs:

• 1975-80: $17 000 000 for a program including Liverpool, Nepean, Mt Druitt and Campbelltown Hospitals • 1980-85: $23 600 000 for a program with Liverpool, Mt Druitt, Nepean, the proposed Baulkham Hills/Riverstone, Smithfield, Campbelltown and Minto

Hospitals general medical and surgical services

Projects:

• Liverpool Hospital new block (to include 2 INFs) • Nepean Hospital redevelopment (includes 4 INFs) • Mt Druitt Hospital to provide 4 INFs • Proposed Baulkham Hills/Riverstone hospital should have 4 INFs • Westmead Hospital will have extensive facilities (5 INFs recommended) • Proposed Smithfield/Fairfield hospital will provide 9 INFs in replacing the existing

Fairfield Hospital • Campbelltown Hospital’s four INF units will be opening soon • The proposed hospital at Minto would meet a demand for 5 INFs by 1985 • Lidcombe Hospital’s new facilities, nearing completion, will treat more general

cases

Super specialty services Objectives: To provide specialist facilities in the Region so as to reduce dependence upon the large hospitals in the inner metropolitan region. As far as possible super specialty services would be rationalised so as not to unnecessarily duplicate them, or have poor utilisation of expensive facilities and manpower. Thus only two hospitals are proposed to cater for this need.

Policies:

• stay: short stay in hospital should be encouraged by efficient admission/discharge procedures • leakage: at present leakage for super specialties must be near 100 per cent. It is an­ ticipated that some leakage will inevitably continue • access: the aim in this provision is to bring specialised hospital treatment closer to

the population served • interrelation: to interrelate with both area hospitals and community-based service • facilities: to design facilities of appropriate standards with the ability to grow and change

Budget and programs:

• 1975-80: $15 500 000—for provision at Westmead and Liverpool • 1980-85: $8 080 000—further such provision

Projects: • Westmead Hospital is allocated 10 SUS units over the two periods • Liverpool Hospital is allocated 5 SUS units over the two periods • Lidcombe Hospital will continue to develop its chronic, neurological and head and

spinal injuries super specialties

246

Paediatric services Objectives: To provide paediatric services close to the homes of the patients. To reduce as far as possible the time spent by children in hospital, in accordance with the recommended policies of the Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital

endorsed by the N.S.W. Health Commission and the Hospitals and Health Services Commission.

Policies:

• stay: short stay in hospital should be encouraged • leakage: at present large numbers of children from the Region are treated else­ where. This leakage will be reduced to a low level by 1985 • access: childrens facilities will be provided in centres where there are large concen­

trations of children—e.g. Mt Druitt, Campbelltown • interrelation: to interrelate with community-based services • facilities: to design facilities with a non-institutional appearance and an ability to change

Budget and programs:

• 1975-80: $22 200 000 proposed for building of facilities at Liverpool, Nepean, Mt Druitt, Westmead, Smithfield and Campbelltown • 1980-85: $15 100 000 for a program with facilities at Mt Druitt at the proposed Riverstone Hospital, Westmead, Campbelltown and the proposed Minto Hospital

Projects:

• Bankstown Hospital will convert existing facilities to childrens (1 KID) • Liverpool will add 2 KID units • Nepean will replace one unit and add one unit • Katoomba will add a unit

• Mt Druitt will provide four units • The proposed Riverstone Hospital would have 3 KID units (72 beds) • Westmead will provide for 5 KID units • Smithfield/Fairfield should have 3 units

• Campbelltown should meet a demand for 5 KID units • The proposed ‘ Minto ’ Hospital would provide 3 KID units

Obstetric services Objectives: To provide an adequate obstetric service for future mothers in the Region. These services should incorporate the concept of self-care and care of baby by mother.

Policies: • leakage: as with general medical and surgical services, the aim is to reduce leakage to insignificant beds by 1995 except for most exceptional cases • access: it is in the interest of the mother and child not to be far removed from the

family, and facilities should be provided close to the child-bearing population • interrelation: to interrelate with community-based and GP services • facilities: to design two-stage facilities for high dependency care leading on to minimum care

Budget and programs: • 1975-80: $3 700 000—a program for facilities at Smithfield and Campbelltown • 1980-85: $5 800 000—providing facilities at Liverpool, Katoomba, the proposed Riverstone Hospital, Westmead and Campbelltown

247

• Liverpool Hospital will have an extra MAT 1 unit • Katoomba should have a full maternity unit • The proposed Baulkham Hills/Riverstone should provide a maternity unit • Westmead will have 2 MAT units • The Smithfield/Fairfield Hospital should provide two units in total—a slight

increase on present capacity • Campbelltown should provide two units

Geriatric and rehabilitation services Objectives: To provide an accessible geriatric and rehabilitation service to the Region along lines similar to the Woodhouse Report recommendations. The principal objec­ tive is to return as many patients of this type to less dependent and more useful lives in the community, and where necessary to support them in leading such lives. Policies:

• services: to provide geriatric and rehabilitation services in strategic centres • rehabilitation: rehabilitation should begin as part of hospital treatment • to provide hospital and community support to rehabilitation patients and their treatment • to make ‘day hospital’ facilities available in parallel with the ‘inpatient’ facilities • interrelation: to interrelate with general medical and surgical services and com­

munity-based or outreach services Budget and program:

• The program is to provide services additional to the present Lidcombe and Gover­ nor Phillip Hospitals for geriatric services, by 1985, which will cover areas not close to them. With expansion of the Australian Government programs in Rehabilitation more resources may allow for a wider spread.

Projects:

• Liverpool Hospital should have a 2 GER 1 geriatric unit as well as rehabilitation facilities (REH 1) • Westmead should provide a similar unit • Blacktown Hospital should have a GER 1 unit and rehabilitation facilities • existing facilities would be developed as appropriate

Psychiatric services Objectives: To provide a less ‘institutional ’ service for short-term acute psychiatric ill­ ness, preferably in normal general hospital surroundings.

Policies:

• location: in general to disperse the present concentration of acute shortstay psychi­ atric from the specialist psychiatric hospitals—Parramatta Psychiatric and Rydal- mere Psychiatric—to accessible units spread throughout the region • interrelation: to interrelate with community-based services • facilities: to design facilities that create a non-institutional environment

Budget and program:

• In 1980-85 Westmead Hospital will provide one 20-bed Psychiatric unit and another 40-bed unit will be included in the second phase of Campbelltown and at Blacktown, while in 1975-80 a similar unit should be added at Bankstown and Nepean. The capital costs for these additions have been assumed in the budgets for the major primary consumer units.

P ro je c ts :

248

• Bankstown Hospital 2 PSY units to be added • Nepean Hospital should add 2 PSY units • Westmead Hospital includes one PSY 1 unit • Campbelltown Hospital should have 2 PSY 1 units • Blacktown Hospital should have 2 PSY 1 units

• Mt Druitt should have 2 PSY 1 units

Out-patient services Objectives: To provide services at hospitals so that the leakage of patients to out­ patients clinics and private specialists outside the Region should be substantially reduced. The people in the Region should have equitable access to such services and

they should be dispersed as widely as effective and efficient provision will allow.

Policies:

• leakage: the overall leakage for clinic (hospital or private) attendances is to be reduced from over 60 per cent out of the Region to somewhat over 20 per cent. Thus a proportionate increase in present provision will be required if the pattern returns to the pre-Medibank form.

Budget and Program: • 1975-80: $2 780 000 to provide outpatients facilities at Nepean and Westmead • 1980-85: $4 370 000 to provide outpatients facilities at Bankstown, Mt Druitt, Westmead, the proposed Smithfield and Minto hospitals

Projects: • Bankstown Hospital should add 1 OUT 1 • Nepean Hospital should provide 2 O U T -1 s urgently • Mt Druitt should have 2 OUT Is

• Westmead will have a large (5-OUTs) out-patient department • Smithfield (replacing Fairfield) should have one OUT 1 unit • the proposed Minto hospital should have one OUT 1

Accident and emergency Objectives: To provide a full casualty service for the Region, with accident and emergency facilities at hospitals dispersed throughout the Region. To provide a service which is readily accessible to aleviate long trips for accident

and emergencies to places of treatment.

Policies: • leakage: to provide full major casualty services at major hospitals in the Region • access: to establish general casualty facilities in close proximity to the centres of population

• to establish a three-tiered accident and emergency system, based on Health Com­ mission recommendations for accident and emergency services (Lane M., Hinton J., Development of a Statewide System of Emergency Care in N.S.W., Health Ser­ vices Research, April 1975, also Categorisation of Hospitals for Emergency Care,

Health Services Research, June 1975)

Budget and program: • 1975-80: $5 860 000 for casualty services at Westmead, Liverpool (major centres), Mt Druitt, Nepean, and Smithfield/Fairfield • 1980-85: $3 580 000

P ro je c ts :

249

• Liverpool and Westmead Hospitals would both have major facilities while all other hospitals would have second level accident and emergency facilities • Liverpool Hospital—a major facility of MAS 1 and CAS 1. This would become a major procedure unit • Westmead Hospital will provide MAS 1 and 3 CAS 1 facilities. This would be a

major procedure centre • Nepean Hospital will greatly expand its facilities adding 2 CAS 1 • Katoomba will have a full casualty (CAS 1) added • Mt Druitt should meet a demand for 2 CAS 1 units • The proposed Baulkham Hills/Riverstone Hospital would have a CAS 1 unit • The proposed merged Smithfield/Fairfield Hospital would include 2 CAS 1 units • The suggested facility at Minto would include 2 CAS 1 units

Secondary services Transport:

Objectives: To improve co-operation between hospitals and the community health system. To provide a system to assist the centralisation of the hospital support services— for the carriage of laundiy, sterile supplies, frozen food, pathology.

To provide effective emergency transport to hospitals.

Policies:

• To establish a major pathology laboratory to serve all hospitals equally with a fully- automated service for routine and multiple testing • To co-ordinate transport services so that some economies may be achieved in terms of bulk purchase as minor servicing as well as co-operation between support

services • To expand non-emergency patient transport using non-emergency vehicles

Pathology:

Objectives: To provide as full a pathology service for all hospitals as possible taking advantage of automated techniques and maximising the effectiveness of scarce scien­ tific and technical manpower.

Policies:

• To establish a major pathology laboratory to serve all hospitals equally with a fully automated service for routine and multiple testing • To maintain adequate facilities in all hospitals to allow for emergency tests to be made • To encourage establishment of a regional Blood Bank

Program, Project:

• Establishment of Institute of Pathology at Westmead • Central automated pathology service based at Liverpool • Later establishment of a further laboratory for central automated service in the west of the Region

Sterilisation: Objectives: To ensure an economic provision of sterile supplies with an increase in standardisation of sterile items and centralised production of disposable items.

P ro je c ts :

250

Policies:

• to establish a sterile disposables production facility at Westmead to provide stan­ dard sterile items to all hospitals in the region To determine standards for non-disposable items to allow for sterile linen to be provided by the laundry services and for standard packs for theatres to be

developed

Linen:

Objectives: To provide centralised, industrial laundry facilities to replace inefficient hospital laundries. To introduce standardisation of hospital linen items to improve economy and add to simplicity of the laundry system.

Policies:

• to introduce centralised facilities in key positions • to cease inefficient hospital laundry operations • to introduce standard items for greater economy • to encourage greater economy in the use of linen by hospital staff

Program, Projects:

• new laundries will be provided in the next three years at Parramatta Gaol and this will reduce dependence on the Orange Group laundry and the Ryde Hospital laundry

Food:

Objectives: To provide food for patients and staff in as economical manner as possible without sacrificing quality or nutritional standards. To realise whatever advantages there are in food technology which reduces food service manpower and consumables cost.

Policies:

• to adopt centralised food production systems where economies and practicability are shown • to review patient needs in hospital and to find appropriate standards for hospital food

Manpower: Objectives: To provide the staff necessary to operate the facilities outlined above, and to ensure that adequate training for proper provision of all hospital services if made acceptable to potential staff, especially nursing staff.

Policies: • establish a regional nurse training school as part of the tertiary education system • place selection of nurse trainees in the hands of nurse education authorities • a group school should be established to co-ordinate present groups

Regional planning continuation Equally important as the above conclusions and recommendations is the fact that regional planning becomes an ongoing process. The planning team must review the representations and comments that this plan evokes. As the plan is implemented it

must be continually monitored and directions checked. It was appropriate at this time because of the great deficiency in hospital services that the plan address itself to hospital problems so improved equity of access could be

251

• it should be neutral and even-handed: that is it should apply to all services, com­ munity-based, acute and chronic, general and referral, medical and paramedical, for all groups in the community • it should be based on criteria and guidelines which are clear and publicly stated and

which reflect the interests of the community as a whole • the procedure followed in formulating advice on health services development should allow wide participation by interests in the community likely to be affected by the outcome in each case. • the advice which serves as a basis for particular regional decisions should be of the

highest possible standards: that is it should be objective, comprehensive of the issues involved, professionally researched and should contain all the relevant infor­ mation needed for decision making. • it should recognise that health and hospital planning is a long-term planning exer­

cise and that short-term solutions are usually inappropriate, for example extensive renovations of old hospitals. • the basis of all planning is rigorous demographic work and an up-to-date fully researched inventory of all services. The work initiated in these subjects, in this

Plan, must be continued. • that the cost-effectiveness approach and technique included and developed in this report should be extended to include community-based services. • that a start be made on developing cost-benefit analysis of systems. This would in­

volve secondary measure for the output of health and hospital services, of finding ways to measure the relief of pain etc.

Planning the Development Committee must be concerned with co-ordination and rationalisation but they must not be concerned with these two aspects to the exclusion of purpose. All too often as Dr Henry Kissinger has remarked ‘committees are con­ sumers and sterilisers of ideas rarely inventors of them ’. Planning committees particu­ larly need to be clear about their purposes.

achieved quickly. However, in the future it would be more useful if community-based and hospital-based services were considered together and planned together. The fol­ lowing principles are suggested for future planning:

252

DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 18 October 1976

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T.

At the Senate Estimates Inquiry on the current appropriation requirements for the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs conducted by your Committee on Thursday, 14 October 1976 the answers to a number of the inquiries made were de­ ferred pending further research by officers of the Department.

The information requested is now provided as follows:

340/2/06 Translation Services Question: What is the extent of the increased volume over that of 1975-76 and from where

is it expected?

Answer: The increased departmental resources for translating and interpreting services which we shall have as a result of the provision of eighteen additional positions in the Department as a whole will significantly increase the amount of work which we can

accept. Whilst we clearly would not anticipate a proportionate increase in the use of outside contractors, the acceptance of more work in total inevitably leads to an increased need for external assistance. A further anticipated increase in usage of out­ side translators is expected to arise from work in connection with Asian refugees and

orphans. The Targe volume’ clients will be Prime Minister’s Department, the Departments of Foreign Affairs, Social Security, Defence and Education, and the International Red Cross. One example of the increased work which we shall be able to accept in the next

year is that of the translation into a number of languages of all forms (estimated to be in excess of 300) used by the Department of Social Security.

340/2/07 Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications Question: What are the expenditure figures for Expert Panels during 1975-76?

Answer: From 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976, COPQ held 37 meetings at a total cost of $33 607.20. The breakdown of this expenditure is as follows: $

Fares ........................................... 20 364.36

Sitting fees .................................. 9 465.00

Travelling a ll o w a n c e ................... 3 777.84

T o t a l ....................................... 33 607.20

340/3/02 Deportation of Migrants Question: (a) What countries were involved in the 409 deportations which occurred during 1975-76?

24255/ 7 7 -9 253

(b) What was the average cost of each illegal migrant in detention centres and State prisons?

Answer: (a) Nationality/Citizenship Arab Republic of Egypt 1 New Hebridean 1

Brazilian 1 New Zealander 50

Canadian 3 Pakistani 1

Chilean 2 Papua New Guinea 5

Chinese 3 Peruvian 1

Cypriot 3 Portuguese 2

Fijian 35 Singaporean 7

Filipino 2 South African 1

Finnish 1 Spanish 1

French 5 Sri Lankan 2

German 3 Syrian 1

Greek 69 Taiwanese 2

Hong Kong 6 Thai 3

Indian 30 Tongan 19

Indonesian 41 Turkish 23

Iranian 4 United Kingdom 36

Italian 1 U.S. American 7

Japanese 4 Uruguayan 1

Jordanian 2 Yugoslavia 23

Lebanese 3 —

Malaysian 4 409

As a general rule deportees are returned to the country of their citizenship. However in the case of seamen deserters who are deported the shipping com­ panies which are responsible for their removal from Australia frequently pro­ vide further sea-going employment.

( b) Daily prison maintenance charges

New South Wales* Victoria . . .

Queensland . .

South Australia . Western Australia Tasmania . . .

Northern Territoiy

$

20.00 to 25.00 12.31 14.93 20.58 28.07 22.00 20.45

* Estimated. Account for expenditure incurred for deportees held in New South Wales prisons during the finan­ cial year 1975-76 not yet received from the Department of Corrective Services.

Average daily cost of maintaining deportees in immigration detention centres for 1975-76.

Western Australia Woodmans Point ................... $18.71

New South Wales North H e a d .................................. $8.25

Victoria M a rib y rn o n g ............................. $15.39

These costs do not include the salaries of Commonwealth Police officers nor do they make allowance for maintenance costs recovered from respon­

254

sible carrier companies which are paid directly into consolidated revenue. The lower average cost at North Head results from a much higher occupancy rate.

340/3/03 Advisory Councils Question: What are the component costs involved in the printing of the Green Paper, agendas, reports etc.?

Answer: Anticipated approximate breakdown is:

$

Green P a p e r ................................................. 19 000

1973 survey r e p o r t ....................................... 3 300

NPI summary ............................................ 2 500

Demographic study r e p o r t s ........................ 4 200

Agendas/meeting reports ........................ 1 000

30 000

340/4/02 Movement of Migrants on Disembarkation Question: What is the percentage figure of migrants being moved on arrival in Australia? Answer:

71.7 percent. 340/1 /02 Salaries and Allowances Overseas Question: What is the number of children allowed for in the Special Child Allowance pro­

vision of$43 082 for 1976-77? Answer: 23 students. An average of $1873 per student. Question:

What overseas posts were closed during 1975-76 or this year? Answer:

Posts Regional Offices

1. Copenhagen 6.11.75 1. Leeds 1. 8.75

2. Rangoon 12.12.75 2. Brussels 9. 9.75

3. Bombay 29. 2.76 3. Milan 30.10.75

4. Washington 3. 3.76 4. Bristol 13. 2.76

5. Calcutta 15. 3.76 5. Birmingham 12. 3.76

6. Los Angeles 30. 4.76 6. Salonica 26. 3.76

7. Lima 30. 6.76

8. Toronto 30. 6.76

9. Lisbon 30. 7.76

S. J. DEMPSEY Deputy Secretary

255

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

P.O. Box 100

Woden, A.C.T.2606

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Senate Estimates Committee D

The Department of Health would like to tender the following supplementary statement in amplification of the answer already provided on medical research.

CHARLES NETTLE fo r Director-General o f Health

256

MEDICAL RESEARCH

E In amplification of the information already tendered the attention of the Com­ mittee is invited to the following portions of the NH&MRC Session Reports which were previously indicated, but the two reports as a whole (Nos 80 and 81) reflect the overall activities of the Council in its research function.

(a) 80th Report, page 20 et seq.— The discussion at Appendix 1 on page 20 etseq. indicates a broad outline of probable areas of support of medical research over a three-year period (calendar years 1976-78) but cannot be related di­ rectly to any one financial year e.g. 1976-77.

(b) 80th Report, page 2 et seq.—This outlines the training grants (and other activities) operative in 1976.

(c) 81st Report, page 24, et seq.—This outlines the details of project grants (325), institution grants (2), research unit (4), grants and post-graduate scholar­ ships (43) for 1976.

Together these references give a complete picture of the Council’s activities in the research field for 1976.

2. There was no Session Report for April 1976 as Council did not meet due to the economic circumstances, but attached is a copy of the Executive Committee Report of June 1976 in which is included day-to-day decisions regarding medical research. This is supplemented by the attached particulars of individual grants etc. which support

the news releases of 20 October (also attached).

3. It will be appreciated that these grants cover only project grants, supported institu­ tions, research units and post-graduate scholarships. They operate for the whole of calendar year 1977, and will be reflected, in part, in the 1977-78 financial estimates. The remainder of the Training Program area, and the other areas of Council interest

set out on page 2 of the answer previously tendered, have not yet been decided.

PRESS STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR HEALTH, Mr RALPH HUNT

GRANTS FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH

The Minister for Health, Mr Ralph Hunt, today announced details of grants from the $9.1 million allocated by the Government for the support of medical research in 1976-77. These are the first of the grants, which will be recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and total $7.2 million.

They cover individual projects for the year 1977 in medical research, post­ graduate scholarships and support for medical research institutes. Mr Hunt said the grants announced today were more tangible evidence of the importance the Government placed on medical research. He said he expects further

grants to be announced later this year and early in 1977, as the Council’s granting program is carried out. The $9.1 million allocated in the Federal Budget had more than restored research funds to the level prior to July 1975 when savage cuts were inflicted by the former Government. These had resulted in only $5.2 million being available in 1975-76.

Mr Hunt said the Government was mindful of the need to gradually increase funds for medical research to a level which allowed Australian workers to take their proper place in the world’s activity.

257

‘Despite the economic problems the Government faces, it has provided for a small, but nevertheless real, increase in the level of activity during the coming year’, he said.

The Minister said that research project grants totalling $5 138 687 would be made to individual researchers in universities and teaching hospitals, colleges of advanced education and research institutes. The Government would support 80 more projects than had been supported in 1976.

Victoria would receive $2 145 534 in research project grants; New South Wales $1 659 084; Queensland $411 688; South Australia $500 792; Western Australia $321 396; Tasmania $38 730; and the A.C.T. $61 463.

Mr Hunt said that post-graduate research scholarships worth over $400 000 would enable outstanding graduates to gain experience from working with Australia’s leading medical research workers. Thirteen new post-graduate scholar­ ships had been awarded for 1977.

The largest of the grants to medical research institutes were $1 024 970 to the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and $619 446 to the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine.

These sums were in addition to funds provided to the two Instituted by the De­ partment of Health for recurrent expenditure. For 1976-77 the Hall Institute would receive $500 000 and the Florey Institute $250 000. The Department would also pro­ vide $250 000 as a final contribution to the Florey Institute building extensions. Canberra, 20 October 1976

120/2/09 Motor Vehicles—Hire Maintenance and Running Expenses

Question:

How many vehicles by area office have been relinquished?

Below is a list of the vehicle establishment of the Department showing the location of vehicles by area office as at 1 July 1975 and 30 June 1976.

South Eastern Region— Regional Office (Melbourne) Baimsdale ...................

Morwell ........................

Shepparton ...................

Swan H i l l ........................

T h o r n t o n ........................

H o b a r t .............................

Mildura ........................

Western Australia— Perth Regional Office Perth Area Office Kalgoorlie . .

Geraldton . . . .

D e r b y ...................

Pt Hedland . . .

1.7.75 30.6.76

13 4

2 1

1 1

2 1

2 1

2 2

1

Nil 1

22 12

14 4

3

9 7

3 5

3 4

6 7

258

Narrogin Wyndham

Queensland— Brisbane Regional Office Thursday Island . .

C a i r n s .........................

Townsville . . . .

Brisbane ....................

Mt I s a .........................

Eastern Region— Sydney Regional Office Lismore . . . .

D u b b o ....................

Wilcannia . . . .

M o r e e ....................

G r i f f i t h ....................

Queanbeyan . . .

B o u r k e ....................

South Australia— Adelaide Regional Office Port Augusta . . . .

Northern Territory— Northern . .

Southern . .

Central Office ....................

Total vehicle establishment

2 4

5 3

42 37

Nil Nil

1 1

2 2

2 1

1 1

1

6 6

1 1

Nil 2

1 1

2 1

1 1

Nil 1

Nil 1

3 10

2 2

1 2

3 4

95 87

74 69

169 156

3 3

248 228

Question: The number of staff in each area office as at 30 June 1976 and at 30 September 1976. Answer:

Eastern Region— Dubbo . .

Lismore .

Redfern .

30.6.76 30.9.76

3 3

4 4

6 6

259

Moree . .

Bourke . ,

Griffith . .

Queanbeyan

Queensland— Brisbane . .

Townsville .

Cairns . . .

Mt Isa . . .

Thursday Island Rockhampton

Western A ustralia— Kalgoorlie .

Pt Hedland .

Derby . . .

Geraldton . .

Central . . .

Narrogin . .

Wyndham .

South Australia— Metropolitan area Pt Augusta .

Nth West Reserve

Northern Territory— Darwin . .

Katherine . .

Nhulunbuy .

Tennant Creek Alice Springs .

South-Eastern Region— Tasmania . . . .

Thornton . . . .

Mildura . . . .

Bairnsdale . . .

Morwell . . . .

Swan Hill . . . .

Shepparton . . .

Balranald . . . .

Note: Swan Hill Office relocated at Balranald.

2 1 2 2

20

2 1 2 2

20

4 6 6 4 5

1

7 5 8 4 5

nil

26 29

6 5 4 7 6 6 5

39 41

3 3

3 3

2 2

8 8

2 8 3 6 7

2 8 3 7 7

26 27

1 2 1 3 2 3 2

nil

14

1 2 1 2

1

nil 2 1

10

260

ON ON ON 4 ^ O s O s

ABORIGINAL INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYEES

Question: What is the current breakdown of Aboriginals employed in industrial positions in the Northern Territory?

Answer: The numbers of Aboriginals employed in industrial positions as at 30 June 1976 and 30 September 1976 is provided below together with the area within which they are employed.

30.6.76 30.9.76

On Government Settlements ...................................................... 313 303

Attached to the Mobile Works Force ....................................... 56 53

Vocational Training Centre, B a t c h e l o r ....................................... 14 12

383 368

120/3/03 Support of Aboriginals at Government settlements

Question:

What were the reasons for underexpenditure of this item in 1975-76 and why were further reductions made to the 1976-77 allocation and an explanation of where the money has gone.

Answer:

Below is a table which sets out the allocations of the 1975-76 appropriation, the final expenditure for 1975-76 and the proposed allocations for 1976-77.

1975-76 1975-76 1976-77

Allocations Expenditure Allocations

$ $ $

Food for departmental community kitchens . . . . . . . 200 000 164 308 173 000

Fuel, oil and town services ....................................... . . . 610 000 694 189 750 000

Domestic m a in te n a n c e ................................................ . . . 40 000 48 613 40 000

Field activities .......................................................... . . . 130 000 144 403 73 000

Mechanical spares ..................................................... . . . 80 000 78 855 66 000

Wages .........................................................................

Incidental and other .................................................

. . . 2 685 000 2 537 907 2 425 000

. . . 45 000 41 345 80 000

Total ............................................................... . . . 3 790 000 3 709 620 3 607 000

Explanation

Foodfor departmental community kitchens Reductions in expenditure and estimates are a direct result of the closure of two com­ munity kitchens in 1975-76.

Domestic maintenance The estimate reflects the departmental policy of withdrawing from this function and transferring the responsibility to Aboriginal Councils.

Field Activity The reductions are a direct result of Aboriginals Councils accepting responsibility for cattle projects formerly funded by the Department. Funds for these projects are avail­ able through Grants-in-Aid—Enterprises.

261

Mechanical spares The D epartment’s plant and equipment program has progressively been reduced and as a consequence has limited the requirement for mechanical spares.

Wages The reductions are a direct result of Aboriginal community councils taking over the responsibility for various functions on settlements.

120/3/04 Assistance to Missions Question:

How much is provided in appropriation for other departments for assistance to missions in the Northern Territory?

Department o f Education 272-3-06 Teaching subsidies—missions 1976-77 Approp..................................... $1 576 000

Catholic missions . .. United Church missions Lutheran Church . .

Church Missionary Society O t h e r s ........................

Department o f Health 335-3-04 Capital and operating subsidies to mis­ sions

1976-77 Approp.

$

1 350 000

1975-76 1976-77 $ $

840 437 1 072 000 267 795 339 000

112 994 144 000

13 721 19 000

1 796 2 000

1 236 743 1 576 000

S a l a r i e s .................................. 814 000

C a p i t a l .................................. 30 000

Operation expenses 56 000

B u ild in g s ............................. 450 000

1 350 000

Question: How much money was spent on housing at Beagle Bay? How much was spent on consultants? How much was spent on materials and how much was taken by the church?

Answer: Below is a breakdown of the expenditure to the Beagle Bay Housing Association broken down by consultants and materials.

Consultants

1972-73 $ 8 000

1974- 75 $ 7 500

1975- 76 $24 500 (approx.)

Materials (Site Developments) 1972-73 $ 6 500 1974- 75 $26 500 1975- 76 $232 000

262

120/3/06 Vocational Training and Adjustment

Question:

Why was the expenditure in 1975-76 less than the appropriation for 1975-76?

Answer:

The underexpenditure occurred because the complex was used by Darwin cyclone evacuees for longer than was anticipated and because allowances under the NEAT Scheme were discontinued resulting in the Department reducing the number of courses it was able to offer in 1975-76.

120/3/07 Support for Ecological Projects

Question:

A series of questions were asked in respect of Applied Ecology Pty Ltd. The state­ ment attached promises answers to those questions.

Yorke Island Nursery Project The immediate officer-in-charge of the nursery project is Mr Dan Mosby, a Torres Strait Islander. He reports directly to Mr G. W. Stapleton, Projects Co-ordinator for the Torres Strait Islands. Mr D. McE. Alexander, Principal Research Scientist, of the

CSIRO Division of Horticultural Research, conducted an on-site survey of the proj­ ect, supplied additional plant stocks, laid down a nursery plan and methods to develop the plan and has taken a keen personal interest in the project and has pro­

vided ongoing training and guidance to Mr Mosby, to Mr Stapleton and to the Company. Cuttings were taken from 605 advanced plants in February 1976 and these plants donated to the Yorke Island Council for sale by the Council to other Islands.

Head office salaries There are seven people employed by the Company in its head office, six on a full-time basis and one on a part-time basis. They are: (i) Mr R. D. Cooper, designated Company Secretary (but also Chief Executive

Officer cum General Manager of the Company), salary of $17 217 p.a. (equivalent of Public Service Clerk Class 9). Mr Cooper has a Diploma in Commerce (University of Sydney) 8 years’ commercial experience in private

industry and 32 years’ management, administrative, accounting and logistics training and experience with the RAAF (Equipment Branch) from rank of Pilot Officer to Air Commodore on retirement in April 1973. (ii) Mr N. W. Butler, Assistant Secretary, salary of $1 1 539 p.a. (equivalent of

Public Service Clerk Class 5). Mr Butler has 20 years’ purchasing and supply management experience. (iii) Mr J. T. V. Onions, Scientific Investigating Officer, salary of $16 947 p.a. (equivalent of CSIRO Senior Research Scientist). Mr Onions has qualifica­

tions of M.A. and B.Sc. (Natural Sciences) Dublin and Diploma of Tropical Agriculture, University of West Indies, and has extensive experience in the management of agricultural projects in underdeveloped countries (most re­

cently with FAO project in Fiji). (iv) As well there are three full-time and one part-time females employed as stenographer/ typists/ clerical assistants. The salaries of the full-time staff are

$8309, $6626 and $4153 p.a. Two of the full-time staff are Torres Strait

263

Islanders under training in reception, typing and general office duties. A sal­ ary of $6495 p.a. is paid to the part-time employee.

Field officers’ salaries There are five European field officers: (i) Mr G. W. Stapleton, Projects Co-ordinator Torres Strait, salary of $18 504 p.a. (equivalent of Public Service Clerk Class 10). He has experience in bank­

ing and extensive experience in management of projects in underdeveloped areas as Senior Project Officer with the Papua New Guinea Development Bank. (ii) Mr R. H. Bredl, Manager of the Edward River crocodile farm, salary of

$11 860 per annum (equivalent of Public Service Clerk Class 5). He has a lifelong experience with reptiles and was understudy to his father Mr J. Bredl who is a recognised authority on reptiles. (iii) Mr C. J. Parmenter, Biologist, Torres Strait, salary of $12 682 per annum

(equivalent of CSIRO Experimental Officer Class 1). He has qualification of B.Sc. (Hons) and is expected to be ganted a Ph.D. (Science) in December 1976. His major work for his doctorate was turtle research. (iv) Mr Curry, Emu Research and Management Project Officer, salary of $ 13 248

per annum (equivalent of CSIRO Experimental Officer Class 2). He has qualifications of B.Sc. (Hons) with a major in zoology and considerable ex­ perience overseas and in Australia in management of scientific research projects. (v) Mr Morris, Technical Field Officer, salary of $8919 per annum (equivalent of

Public Service Technical Officer). He has extensive practical experience in the handling of crocodiles and is a qualified carpenter.

There are ten Torres Strait Islander Field Officers employed as follows:

Grade I ($ 144 per fortnight) Name Wees NAWIA Henry STEPHENS

Grade I I ($ 164 per fortnight) Name Murray LUI Timothy CHINA

Henry- KABERE Scotty BOB Grade I I I ($204 per fortnight) Name

Joey NONA Sam PASSI Getano LUI Research Station Supervisor Dan MOSBY

Location Kubin Community Stephen

Location Coconut Darnley Murray South Warraber

Location Badu Murray North Yam

Yorke

Above Torres Strait Islander Field Officers supervise the work o f about 90 Torres Strait Islander turtle farmers (giving 120 Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal em­ ployees out of a total o f 132 Company employees; i.e. 90 per cent o f the Com pany’s staff are Torres Strait Islanders or Aborigines).

Board o f Directors Four members of the six-man Board receive the equivalent of the sitting fees and trav­ elling allowance determined by the Remuneration Tribunal Review 1976. The cur­

264

rent rates are: sitting fees: $70 per day for Chairman and $55 per day for members; travelling allowance: $41 per overnight stay. The other two members are public ser­ vants and do not receive any remuneration from the Company. The members of the Board are:

Mr L. P. Smart, F.C.A. Partner, Marquand & Co., Chartered ( Chairman of Directors) Accountants

*Dr K. Radway Allen

Mr Μ. M. Furzer

*Mr Y. D. Mosby

Chief of Division, Division of Fisheries & Oceanography, CSIRO General Manager, Continental Overseas Corporation Liaison Officer, Department of Aboriginal

Affairs

Professor D. H. Trollope Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Professor o f Civil Engineering, James Cook University of North Queensland

Professor J. M. Thomson Head of Department of Zoology, University of Queensland

* Public servants, not entitled to remuneration from Applied Ecology Pty Ltd.

Turtles At 31 July 1976 the total number of turtles was 2996. The disposition of turtles was:

Farms: Darnley Island ............................. 245

Murray N o r t h .................................. 417

Murray S o u t h .................................. 650

Stephen Island .............................. 134

Badu Island .................................. 373

Kubin (Moa I s l a n d ) ......................... 129

Coconut Island ............................. 189

Warraber Island . . . . . . 198

Yam Island .................................. 276

2611

Yorke Island Research Station . . . . 385

Total ....................................... 2 996

Vessels The Company owns two (2) major vessels, the Kashan and the Vansittart. As well there is a fishing boat the Ecology /; three dories built and currently awaiting dispo­ sition, Ecology II, III and IV; and sundry dinghies.

120/3/08 Architectural Services for Aboriginal Housing Question: Who are the members of the Housing Panel by name? What is the item project evaluation? Who is responsible for the evaluation? Who receives remuneration in

respect of the evaluation?

Answer: Below is a list of the members of the Housing Panel by name. PANEL Michael Griggs - Architect

RayNagas - NACC

265

Tom Murray Jim Stanley Robert Little Robert Edwards Edwin Oribin Dr Nicholas Peterson

- Aboriginal Member for W. A. - NACC - Aboriginal—Alice Springs—DAA - Director Aboriginal Arts Board - Architect—Cairns - Lecturer— Anthropology—ANU

The item project evaluation (estimated expenditure 1976-77—$13 000) is to be used for the purposes of evaluating the use and acceptability of existing houses con­ structed over the last 3-4 years by Aboriginal Housing Associations. This includes the evaluation of the Goorawin shelters. In addition the item relates to the evaluation of existing industrialised housing with a view to its use on Aboriginal locations.

The funds are required to meet costs associated with the retention of professional advisers such as social psychologists, anthropologists and engineers.

120/3/10 Support for Aboriginal Land Councils

Question:

In respect of the Northern Territory and Central Land Councils what is the antici­ pated revenue from mining royalties for the period January 1977 to 30 June 1977? Is revenue proposed to be derived from any other form— if so what and how much? Answer:

The estimated revenue from mining royalties for the period 1.1.77-30.6.77 is as follows:

Northern Land Council . . $75 000

Central Land Council . . . $75 000

It is not expected that Councils will receive revenue from any other source.

120/3/11 Interim Northern Territory Land Commission—Operating Expenses

Question:

What was the total expenditure in 1975-76 in respect of air charter and what were the amounts paid to each company?

Answer: A total of $3932 was paid to air charter companies by the Land Commission in 1975-76. Of this amount $2260 was paid to Connair for the charter of a DC3 from Alice Springs to Hooker Creek and return on 13 August 1975 and involving thirteen passengers. The balance of $2260 was paid to SAATAS for the charter of three small aircraft to Victoria River Downs on 23 September 1975 carrying twenty passengers. As land claims were heard on both occasions it was necessary for various witnesses to

attend the hearing together with the Interim Land Commissioner and his Associates.

Both charters were organised by the Department’s Regional Office in Darwin under a period contract for air charters co-ordinated by the Department of the North­ ern Territory.

120/3/12 Aboriginal Loans Commission—Fees for Services

Question:

Give details of the names of consultants/accountants who received in excess of $5000 in 1975-76 for excess supervision fees for Aboriginal loans from the Aborigi­ nal Enterprises Fund.

266

Only one accountant received payments in excess of $5000 in 1975-76.

This was a payment of $7964.93 to Wallace McMullin and Smail of G.P.O. Box 3369, Sydney.

The payment was in respect of the project Murgenella Enterprises Pty Ltd and covered the period from 1 June 1974 to 30 November 1975.

Question:

What is the detailed breakdown of the additional $25m the Government has agreed to provide for Aboriginal assistance programs in 1976-77? Answer:

The detailed breakdown of the $25m according to functions is not yet available but it is expected that a statement will be made by the Minister shortly in regard to this.

120/4/02 Grants-in-Aid Health

Question:

What programs were undertaken by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Department of Health in respect of supplementary feeding schemes in the North­ ern Territory in the previous financial year? Answer:

In respect of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs there is no specific program for a supplementary feeding scheme for Aboriginal children and mothers in the Northern Territory. However, the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress which is financed through the direct grants program is in the process of developing a nutrition sup­

plement scheme in association with its alcoholic rehabilitation farm. The Department of Health advises that no specific item was included in its appro­ priation for 1975-76 in respect of nutrition supplement schemes. However, additional supplements considered necessary as part of treatment have been provided at hospi­ tals and rural centres and the Minister for Health has indicated that this aspect of the

provision of health care should be expended out of funds provided in the estimates for 1976-77 as a matter of priority.

Question: Is it correct that the Department has issued a specific instruction to Aboriginal Medical Services directing that Aboriginal patients pay for prescriptions?

Answer: The Department has not issued an instruction to Aboriginal Medical Services directing that Aboriginal patients pay for prescriptions. Each Medical Service has the power to determine if patients should pay and generally a policy of discretion is main­ tained whereby those patients who are able to pay are asked to do so or to make some contribution towards the cost. Medical services generally limit the use of prescrip­

tions, but when prescribed drugs are necessary they are generally from the Govern­ ment subsidised list of approved drugs.

120/4/03 Grants-in-Aid Education

Question: What are the numbers of Aboriginal children living in outstations in the Northern Territory and what proportion of these receive professional educational assistance?

A n sw e r:

267

xr

The Department of Education has advised that, because of their nature, the number of outstations in the Northern Territory varies considerably but involves somewhere between 300 and 500 school age children at between 20 and 30 locations.

Separate figures in respect of enrolment rates and attendance rates for children on outstations are not available. However, of the 7000 school age Aboriginals in the Northern Territory, over 90 per cent are enrolled and average attendance is approximately 70 per cent.

In respect of children located on outstations the Department of Education com­ ments that most of these children would be receiving instruction either from qualified itinerant teachers or from Aboriginal teaching assistants, the nature of which would not necessarily be formal or regular.

Question:

What was the total amount spent in education of Aboriginals in the Northern Ter­ ritory for 1975-76 and the estimate for 1976-77 including secondary schooling?

A nswer:

The Department of Education has advised that the total amount spent by that De­ partment on schools for Aboriginals in 1975-76 was $ 11 113 370 and the estimate for 1976-77 is $ 11 690 600. The Department advises that it is not possible to separate the cost of Aboriginals in secondary schools as the majority are enrolled in other than schools for Aboriginals and separate financial records are not maintained.

120/4/04 Grants in aid—Employment

Question:

Provide a list of private employers operating under the Special Works Project Scheme and give details of expenditure from 30 June 1976 to 30 September 1976.

Answer: Table 1 below gives details of private employers and the number of Aboriginals employed and Table 2 gives details of expenditure by region from 30 June 1976 to 30 September 1976.

Table 1

SPECIAL WORKS PROJECTS-PRIVATE SECTOR

Queensland 1 Voss Clinic

1 *Bush Pike Pilot Airways 1/3 *Normanton Hospital

Victoria 1 C & E Heywood, Melbourne 1 S. M. Collins, Bairnsdale 1 Roberts & Martin Wholesalers, Swan Hill

^Diamond Cut Lingerie, Morwell Royal Melbourne Hospital Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool 1 National Fitness Council, Melbourne 2/16 Warrnambool & District Hospital

A n sw e r:

268

Western Australia 2 Woolworths, Kalgoorlie 2 West Coast Aluminium, Bunbury 1 Kellerberrin Memorial Hospital

1 /6 South West Sawmills Co. Pty Ltd, Picton

New South Wales 1 Fillery’s Motors, Broken Hill 2 Courthouse Hotel—Wilcannia 1 Wilcannia Golf Club

1 Wilcannia Trading Post 1 Neville Strachan, Accountant, Broken Hill 1 Seven Seas Stamps, Dubbo 1 King Gee Clothing Co. Pty Ltd, Kempsey

1 Clark Brick Ltd, Kempsey 1 Akarm Electrics, Dubbo 1 R. W. & D. Culhane Menswear Store, Bourke 1 Bega Co-op Dept Store

1 Max Pearce, Engineering, Bega 1 Beaurepaire Tyre Service, Nowra 1 Penrith Leagues Club, Sydney 1 Dunheved Golf Club, St M ary’s, Sydney

1 D. D. Marshall, Building Contractors, Currie 2 Davies & Lewis, Newcastle Builders 1 C. R. Winter, Building Contractor, Newcastle 1 Shaws Constructions, Byron Bay, Builders

1 Pulver, Cooper & Blackley, Surveyors, Newcastle 1 W. G. Atwells, Port Macquarie Component Parts 1 Eitz Constructions, St M ary’s, Sydney 1 L. R. Wooding, Builder, Coonamble

1 Tipping Timbers, Dubbo 1 Woolworths, Dubbo 1 M. D. & G. Helmers, Supermarket 1 Neil Mackerras & Co., Solicitors, Bega

1 Bourke Electrical Discounts 1 Foodlands Supermarket, Mungindi 1 Wee Waa Pharmacy

1/33 Hanrahan Truck & Trailer Repairs, Dubbo Total—58 * These projects did not proceed

Table 2

FUNDS RELEASED-EMPLOYMENT PROJECTS JULY 1976 TO SEPTEMBER 1976

New South Wales

Aboriginal Legal Service—Brewarrina Beaurepaire Tyre Service . . .

Jennings Industries Ltd . . . .

Penrith Leagues C l u b ...................

,9oS3 500 1 661 2 160269

$

Bakandji Ltd ....................................................................................... 11471

Barry Homes Pty L t d .............................................................................. 1716

Tippings’T i m b e r s .................................................................................. 1611

Wool worths Ltd, D u b b o ......................................................................... 986

Wilcannia Golf C l u b ............................................................................. 1 158

Neil Mackerras & Co................................................................................... 1 500

Seven Seas S t a m p s .................................................................................. 1036

Nowra Business Supplies .................................................................... 1 044

Lake Cargellico District H o s p i t a l .......................................................... 24 930

L. R. Wooding .................................................................................... 2 148

R. Neville Strachan ............................................................................. 1552

T o t a l ................................................................................................. 58 373

Victoria Buln Buln Shire C o u n c i l ........................................................................ 4 680

Dimboola Shire C o u n c i l ........................................................................ 3 523

East Gippsland H o s p i t a l ........................................................................ 6 000

Council for Social Development .......................................................... 2 000

Goulburn Valley Driver Training Complex ....................................... 4 000

Morwell Shire—Wirilda Project .......................................................... 5 210

T o t a l ................................................................................................. 25 413

Queensland Nil South Australia Indulkana Community Inc......................................................................... 5 300

T o t a l ................................................................................................ 5 300

Western A ustralia Kellerberrin Aboriginal Progress Assoc.................................................... 17 711

Roeburn Shire Council ........................................................................ 16 588

Bunbury Shire Council ........................................................................ 6 463

Budjarra Aboriginal Community Inc......................................................... 1 506

Central Midlands Aboriginal Progress Assoc............................................ 12 211

T o t a l ................................................................................................ 54 479

Tasmania Nil Northern Territory YMCA D a r w i n ...................................................................................... 1251

T o t a l ................................................................................................ 1 251

Australia ...................................................................................... 144 816

270

120/4/05 Grants in Aid—Welfare

Question:

Provide names and addresses of welfare organisations receiving assistance in 1976-77. Answer:

Attached is a list of welfare organisations broken down by region and giving names and addresses. Names and addresses of welfare organisations for which funds are being promoted in 1976-77 Eastern Region

1. Western Districts Foundation for Aborigi- 1/7 Queen Street St Marys, nal Affairs N.S.W.2700

2. Barwon Aboriginal Co-operative P.O. Box 80 Walgett, N.S.W.

3. South Sydney Community Aid

4. Prisoners Aid Association

5. Awakabal Community Association

6. Widjeri Co-operative

7. Wytaliba Ltd

8. BohdaLtd

9. Dennewan Housing Co.

10. Aboriginal Advancement Association

11. Nanima Progress Association

2835 118 R egent Street R edfern, N.S.W. 2016 Box 1953 G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W. 2001

92 Currie Street Merewether, N.S.W. 2291 P.O. Box 536 Bourke, N.S.W. 2840

Wytaliba Housing Society C /- P.O. Weilmoringle, N.S.W. 2839 C /- Post Office G oodooga,

N.S.W. 2838 P.O. Box 420 Coonamble, N.S.W. 2829 P.O. Box 255 Dubbo, N.S.W. 2830

C/- Primary School Nanima Ab­ original Reserve via Wellington, N.S.W. 2820 Suite 2, 111-113 Beddy Street Armidale, N.S.W. 2350 '

P.O. Box 227 Wee Waa, N.S.W. 2388 C /- Post Office B oggabilla,

N.S.W. 2409 18 Wilson Street Warren, N.S.W. 2824 P.O. Box 69 Taree, N.S.W. 2430

4 Hunter Avenue G ilgandra, N.S.W. 2827 P.O. Box 151 Brewarrina, N.S.W. 2839 42 Dargar Street West Kempsey, N.S.W. 2440

P.O. Box 10 Bega, N.S.W. 2550

12. Armidale Aboriginal Information and Community Centre 13. Wee Waa Aboriginal Advancement Associ­ ation and Chipping Co-operative

14. Toomelah Progress Association

15. Y arram ar Advancement and Housing Company 16. Purfleet Aboriginal Advancement Co­ operative Ltd 17. Gilgandra Aboriginal Progress Association

18. Ngemba Housing Co-operative

19. Kempsey Aboriginal Youth and Cultural Centre 20. Bega Valley Aboriginal Advancement As­ sociation

271

21. Aboriginal Voluntary Family Resettlement Scheme 22. Aboriginal Children’s Service (Adoption Agency)

South-Eastern Region 1. East G ippsland Aboriginal W om en’s Group 2. Echuca Aboriginal Co-operative

3. Aborigines Advancement League

4. Dandenong and District Aboriginal Co-op. Ltd

5. National Council of Aboriginal and Island Women 6. Snowy River Aboriginal Co-operative

7. Mutti Dutti Aboriginal Co-operative

8. Two Rivers Aboriginal Co-operative

Tasmania 1. Aboriginal Information Service Inc.

Queensland Region 1. Anglican Aboriginal and Islander Centre of Central Queensland 2. Born Free Club (Brisbane)

3. Cunnamulla Australian Natives Welfare Association 4. Jalanga Housing Co-op. Society 5. Redlynch Co-op. Society

6. M ooraridgi Community Advancement Co-op. Society Ltd 7. Chjowai Co-op. Society Ltd

South Australian Region 1. Aboriginal Community Centre ofS.A. Inc.

2. Aboriginal Education Foundation of S.A. Inc. 3. Aboriginal Lutheran Fellowship of Greater Adelaide

4. Point Pearce Community Council Inc.

5. Port Adelaide Co-ordinating Committee

P.O. Box 167 Enfield, N.S.W. 2136 P.O. Box 83 Chippendale, N.S.W. 2008

Francis Street Bairnsdale, Vic. 3875 541 High Street Echuca, Victoria 3625 Cunningham Street Northcote, Vic. 3070 Suite 13 Hanover Arcade 170 Thomas Street Dandenong, Vic. 3175

108 Smith Street Collingwood, Vic. 3066 39 Tyndall Street Orbost, Vic. 3888

133 Turundurey Street Balranald, N.S.W. 2715 29 Deakin Avenue Mildura, Vic. 3500

G.P.O. Box 569F Hobart, Tas. 7001

306 Bolsover Street Rockhamp­ ton, Qld 4700 19 Fortescue Street Spring Hill, Qld 4000 P.O. Box 116 Cunnamulla, Qld 4490 P.O. Box 1634 Mt Isa, Qld 4825 C/o Post Office Holloways Beach 4871 via Cairns, Qld 7b Hort Street Mareeba, Qld 4880 P.O. Box 7 Innisfail, Qld 4860

128 Wakefield Street, Adelaide, S.A. 5000 G.P.O. Box 317 Adelaide, S.A. 5000 Lutheran Welfare Centre 311 Prospect Road Blair Athol, S.A. 5084 Narungga Avenue Point Pearce, S.A. 5573 20 Wellington Street Alberton, S.A. 5014

272

6. Port Augusta Assessment Team

7. Prisoners Aid Association of S.A. Inc.

8. Aboriginal Social Club of Port Augusta

9. For West Aboriginal Progress Association 10. Lower Murray Nungas Club

Western Australia Region 1. Moongoong Darwong

2. Hedland Aboriginal Progress Association

3. Mugarinya Community

4. Bay of Isles Aboriginal Community

5. New Era Aboriginal Fellowship (Gnowan- gerup) 6. New Era Aboriginal Fellowship (Perth)

7. Aboriginal Advancement Council

8. Aboriginal Youth Training Association

9. Eliza’s Soup Kitchen

10. Aboriginal Evangelical Fellowship

11. Wyndham Amenities Club

12. KoordaClub

13. BundiClub

14. Murray Districts

15. Kellerberrin

16. Northam

17. Kadee

18. Swanee Ngoongahs Association

19. Central Midlands

20. Medina

21. Collie

C/o Davenport Reserve P.O. Box 240 Port Augusta, S.A. 5700 222 Halifax Street Adelaide, S.A. 5000

5 Jervois Street Port Augusta, S.A. 5700 P.O. Box319Ceduna, S.A. 5690 26 M annum R oad M urray

Bridge, S.A. 5253

P.O. Box 262 Kununurra, W.A. 6743 13 Wedge Street Port Hedland, W.A.6721 P.O. Box 485 Port Hedland, W.A. 6721

1 Paine Road Esperance, W.A. 6450 C/o Post Office Gnowangerup, W.A. 6335

176 Wellington Street Perth, W.A. 6000 201 Beaufort Street Perth, W.A. 6000

C/o 201 Beaufort Street Perth, W.A. 6000 207 Beaufort Street Perth, W.A. 6000 A.E.F. Church 7th Avenue Ingle

Wood, W.A. 6052 P.O. Box 178 Wyndham, W.A. 6740 P.O. Box 735 Carnarvon, W.A.

6701 Darlot Street Meekatharra, W.A. 6642 D.C.W. Hall Forrest Street Pin- garra, W.A. 6208

C /o Post Office Kellerberrin, W.A. 6410 C /o Shire Hall Northam, W.A. 6401

54 Lawrence Street Bays Water, W.A. 6053 86 Morley Drive Lockridge, W.A. 6054

94 Kintone Street Moora, W.A. 6510 13 Leasham Way Medina, W.A. 6167 C /o Mr Campbell Young 32 Stirling Terrace Bunbury, W.A.

6230

273

22. Tambellup

23. Scabrook

24. Pingelly

25. Kooraminning

26. Mt Barker

27. Albany

28. Katanning

29. Wagin 30. Incorporation

31. Emergency relief 32. Tammin 33. Quarrading

34. Merredin

35. Urban fringe dwellers

36. Gurangoo Winjoo Dooa

Northern Territory Region 1. Pastoral properties

2. Community advisers

3. Aboriginal Development Foundation 4. Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

5. Katherine Pick-up Centre National organisations 1. Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders

2. N ational Aborigines Day Organising Committee

239 Crawford Street Tambellup, W.A. 6320 78 White Street Brookton, W.A. 6306 C /o Post Office Pingelly, W.A. 6308 P.O. Box 337 Narrogin, W.A. 6312 C/o 41 Dean Street Mt Barker, W.A. 6324 C /o Lester Boyne Serpentine Road Albany, W.A. 6330 26 Chipper Street Katanning, W.A. 6317 Upland Street Wagin, W.A. 6315 Assistance to groups in meeting incorporation and associated costs. Providing essential welfare relief. P.O. Box 74 Tammin, W.A. 6409 Lot 9 Newell Street Quarrading, W.A. 6383 69 Haig Street Merredin, W.A. 6415 Lot 51, Saunders Street, West Swan, W.A. 6055 P.O. Box 146 Geraldton, W.A. 6530

Assistance to numerous pastoral- ists supporting indigent Aborigi­ nals on their properties. E m ploym ent o f com m unity

advisers working in pastoral and rural areas. P.O. Box2784 Darwin, N.T. 5794 P.O. Box 1604 Alice Springs, N.T. 5750 Not operating as yet.

C/- Mrs E. Scott, 82 Tenth Av­ enue, Townsville, Qld 4810 C/- National Secretary, 38 Pitt Street, Redfern, N.S.W. 2016

120/4/06 Grants in aid—Enterprises Question: Provide a list of all enterprise projects funded in 1975-76. Answer:

Attached is a complete list of all enterprises funded in 1975-76. The list gives the name of the recipient organisation and the nature of the enterprise each is engaged in.

274

ABORIGINAL ENTERPRISES

Name Northern Territory Murramilla Gurindji . .

Kildurk Pastoral Co. . .

Willowra Pastoral Co. . . Ti Tree Station . . . .

Mt Allan Pastoral Co. . . Bathurst Is. Fishing Co. . Port Keats Fishing Co. . Galwinku Seafoods Pty Ltd

Milingimbi Fishing and Crab Tiwi D e s i g n s ....................

Bathurst Is. Pottery . . .

Milingimbi Sewing . . .

Bima Wear ....................

Port Keats Sewing . . .

Galwimku Sewing . . .

Milingimbi Arts and Crafts Warrabri Farm . . . .

Gunarba Gardens . . .

Goulburn Is. Market Garden Bamyili Development Co. Galwinku Market Garden Garden Point Market Garden Delissaville Market Garden Croker Is. Market Garden Gapwiyak Market Garden

Port Keats Market Garden Ramingining Market Garden Daly River Market Garden Oenpelli Market Garden .

Hooker Creek Market Garden Angurugu Market Garden Wave Hill Market Garden Daguragu Market Garden

Numbulwar Market Garden Peppemenarti Market Garden Amoonguna Farm . . .

Unia Association . . .

Gulperan Pastoral Co. . . Ramingining Cattle . .

Croker Is. Butcher Shops . Oenpelli Abattoir . . .

Galwinku Sawmill . . .

Gapwiyak Log and Sawmill Angurugu ........................

Daly River ...................

Port K e a t s ........................

Port Keats Brickmakers . Yuendumu Mining . . ■

Haasts Bluff Social Club .

Project

. . . Pastoral

. . . Pastoral

. . . Pastoral

. . . Pastoral

. . . Pastoral

. . . Fishing

. . . Fishing

. . . Fishing

. . . Fishing

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Village industries

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. , . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Market garden

. . . Cattle production

. . . Cattle production

. . . Cattle production

. . . Abattoir/butcher shops . . . Abattoir/butcher shops . . . Timber

. . . Timber

. . . Bakery

. . . Bakery

. . . Bakery

. . . Miscellaneous

. . . Miscellaneous

. . . Miscellaneous

275

Name Project

Jay Creek Progress Association . . . . Miscellaneous

Apatula Construction Co. Pty Ltd . . . Miscellaneous Queensland Cunnam ulla Australian Native Welfare Association ....................................... Mining

Yelangi Fishing Company ................... Fishing

Torres Strait Island Dancing Company . Fishing Palm Island Co-operative Society . . . Market garden Aurukun Community Inc............................. Cattle / agriculture

Gunanamanda Community Inc. Pty Ltd . Cattle Hopevale Community Council . . . . Market garden

Torres Strait Co-operative Society Ltd . Rock crushing Yarrabah Co-operative Society . . . . Bakery

South Australia Amata Community Council Inc....................... Cattle

Pipalatajara Community Inc............................ Chrysoprase mining

Pukatja Community Council Inc...................... Desert farming/reafforestation Indulkana Community Council Inc. . . . Store Point Pearce C o m m u n ity ............................. Agriculture

Gerard R e s e r v e ........................................... Agriculture

Kenmore Park ........................................... Pastoral

Ralkon Agricultural Co.................................... Pastoral

Mimili C o m m u n ity ...................................... Pastoral

New South Wales Glanville ..................................................... Mixed farm

Nungera ..................................................... Market garden

Bundjalung Reserve Trust ........................ Sale of native seeds

North Coast Association of Aboriginal Co-operatives ................................................ Fishing

Box R i d g e ..................................................... Market garden

P u r f l e e t .......................................................... Market garden

Bundjalung Farm Development . . . . Mixed farm

Western Australia Koorda Club Inc............................................... Trucking

Bardi Community Inc....................................... Garden

Nunjuwah Community Inc.............................. Garden

Balgo Hills Community ............................. Cattle/store

Kadee Club—P e r t h ...................................... Bargain shop

Cosmo-Newberry ...................................... Pastoral/garden

Ngoonjuwah (Halls C r e e k ) ........................ Gardening

Pipunya Group ........................................... Bakery

L.A.M.B. (Leonora) ................................. Home gardening

Ieramagadu C o m m u n ity ............................. Contract gardening

Noualla Group Inc........................................... Gardens/gemstones

Irrunytju Community Inc. ........................ Gardens/gemstones

Oombulgurri A s s o c ia tio n ............................. Cattle/garden

Mowanjum Community Inc............................. Cattle/garden

Barula Community Inc..................................... Gardening

Cundeelee Community ............................. Sandlewood industry

276

Name

Warburton Community Inc. Yandeyarra Pastoral Co. Inc. Bardi ..............................

Bidyadanga ....................

Ngangganawilli . . . .

Djidja .............................

Pandanus Park . . . .

Wongatha Wonganarra . Aboriginal Self-help . . Mt W e l c o m e ....................

Peedamulla ....................

Pantijan .........................

Pippingarra ....................

Jigalong ........................

Coongan/W arralong . .

Project

Cattle project Cattle project Fishing Market garden

Desert gold Broom millet Market garden Contracting

Pastoral Pastoral Pastoral Pastoral Pastoral

Pastoral

120/4/07 Town Management and Public Utilities

Question:

What is the current position regarding the improvement of communication facili­ ties in the Torres Strait and particularly the proposed radio station on Thursday Island?

Answer: In respect of the upgrading of communication facilities within the Torres Strait, the Department is continuing discussion with Telcom Australia into the most suitable type of facility to use. Present systems that are available have proved to be too ex­

pensive and Telecom are currently assessing the feasibility of an alternate system that has been developed as part of a pilot scheme in New South Wales.

In regard to the radio station on Thursday Island, the restraints on the budget of the Broadcasting Commission have meant the indefinite deferral of this project.

The Department is maintaining discussions with the Commission and is giving consideration to the establishment of community radio as an alternative. As yet no formal proposal has been developed.

120/4/07 Grants in Aid—Town Management and Public Utilities

Question:

Which Aboriginal Councils will receive funds in this financial year?

Answer: Attached is a list of Aboriginal Councils, by region, which will receive funds in 1976-77.

TOWN MANAGEMENT AND PUBLIC UTILITIES Councils to be funded—1976-77

Northern Territory Angurugu Beswick

Bagot Nguiu

Bamyili Nauiyu

111

Belyuen Galiwinku Warruwi Garden Point Hooker Creek Maningrida Milingimbi Minjilang Numbulwar Port Keats Unia Oenpelli Ngukurr Gapuwiyak Ramangining Umbakumba Libanangu Daguragu Amoonguna Borroloola Docker River Haasts Bluff Hermansburg Kunkayunti Warrabri Yai Yaia Yuendumu Santa Teresa Papunya Yulgnu Areyonga Snake Bay Yirrkala Resource Centre Willowra Aileron Pastoral properties and outstations

Western Australia Mugarinya Bardi Lombardina Beagle Bay La Grange Kadjina Pandanus Park Looma Mowanjum Junjuwa Gidja Guda Guda Kalumburu

Mirima Oombulgurri Balgo Ieramugadu Noualla Jigalong Aust. Nomad Research Foundation Ngangganawilli UAM Cosmo Newberry Cundalee Warburton Warkurna Parnamaru Papulankutja Irrunytju Aboriginal Lands Trust Barula Budjarra Talka Warra Wongatha Wonganarra AMOS Mt Margaret Nomads

Queensland Badu Boigu Coconut Darnley Duaun Mabuiag Murray Saibai Stephen St Pauls Yam Warrabri Kubin Aurukun

Gununamanda Erubmerugar Doomadgee Burke Shire Council

South A ustralia Amata Aparawatatja Davenport

Gerard Indulkana Koonibba Mimili Nepabunna

278

Pipalyatjara Point McLeay Point Pearce Pukatja Yalata

Umoona Ernabella

South-Eastern Region Lake Tyers Framlingham Goulburn Murray

Cummeragunga Flinders Island Wentworth Shire Cape Barren Island

Eastern Region Lands Trust (28 Reserves) Reserves managed directly (35) Murrin Bridge

Mogo South Coast Cultural Centre Griffith Condobolin

Burnt Bridge Box Ridge Cabbage Tree Island Purfteet Minor projects (e.g. Yamba sewerage system, repairs to Gingia effluent removal system, repairs to Enngonnia sullage disposal system)

120/4/09 Grants-in-aid—Legal Aid

Question:

What part of the appropriation in 1975-76 was for the servicing of outstanding debts?

Answer: Payments for excessive outstanding debts in 1975-76 amounted to $293 400.

120/5 National Aboriginal Consultative Committee

Question:

How many members of the NACC have offices and facilities at the moment?

Answer: Below are the details of the type of facilities available to members of the NACC and the numbers of members who avail themselves of each facility.

Office accommodation Of the total of forty-one NACC members, eight have had office accommodation pro­ vided. This accommodation is paid by the Department of Administrative Services. The balance of thirty-three members operate from their homes.

Furniture There is a ‘basic’ list of furniture items that may be provided on request from mem­ bers. This ‘basic’ list is made up of:

1 Desk 1 Chair 2 Visitors chairs 1 Book case

1 2-Drawer cabinet 2 3-Drawer cabinets 2 Correspondence trays The average cost of these items is approx. $750. Twenty-six members have had the

above furniture supplied.

279

Office machines Members are also entitled to supply of a typewriter and/or a casette player on request.

Thirty members have been provided with typewriters.

Seventeen members have been provided with cassette players.

One spirit duplicator has also been provided.

Telephones Members are entitled to reimbursement of installation and rental charges for tele­ phones if and when reimbursement is requested. Twelve members have been reim­ bursed for the installation of telephones. Rental reimbursement is given when mem­

bers request it. The number is not constant and therefore no accurate figure may be given.

120/6/01 Aboriginal Loans Commission

ABORIGINAL HOUSING AND PERSONAL LOANS FUND

Question:

What are the numbers on the current waiting list for housing loans?

Answer:

As at 15 October 1976 there were 890 names on the housing loan waiting list. Of this number 511 have been invited to apply for a loan.

Question:

How much revenue will the Commission get this financial year as a result of funds generated through loan repayments and the realisation of securities?

Answer:

In 1975-76 the income earned by the Loans Commission in respect of the Hous­ ing and Personal Loans Fund amounted to $118 938 which represents approximately the interest on $10m for six months. On the basis of this figure the Commission esti­ mates that income of approximately $356 000 will be earned in 1976-77. The realis­ ation of securities does not normally effect the Commission’s income-earning ability.

ABORIGINAL LAND FUND COMMISSION

Question:

Provide details of property purchases completed in 1975-76 and the level of com­ mitment against the funds carried over from 1975-76.

Answer: Below is a list of properties purchased in 1975-76 by the Land Fund Commission. Of the amount carried over by the fund from 1975-76 $l . l m is committed against properties for which purchase negotiations are proceeding.

$

Northern Territory Wattie Creek ................................................ 260 500

Utopia S t a t i o n ................................................ 156 861

Mt Allan Station ........................................... 200 069

Ti-Tree S t a t i o n ................................................ 214 442

280

Western Australia Walgun and Billanooka S t a t i o n s ................... 42 281

Pandanus P a r k ................................................. 23 000

Lake Gnangara ............................................ 200 000

Coongan and Warralong Stations . . . . 150 719

Noonkanbah S t a t i o n ....................................... 340 544

Dunham River S t a t i o n .................................. 190 512

South Australia Bartsch Farm ................................................. 40 000

Bartletts F a r m ................................................. 285 600

Kenmore P a r k ................................................. 458 996

Queensland Murray Upper Lands .................................. 210 074

Archer River ( D e p o s i t ) .................................. 5 000

New South Wales Glanville, M u n g i n d i ....................................... 168 848

Ross prop., M a c l e a n ....................................... 34 267

Total ..................................................... 2 981 713

281

■

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

REPORT TO THE SENATE

t

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

REPORT TO THE SENATE

1. Estimates Committee E has the honour to present its report to the Senate.

2. Pursuant to the order of the Senate the Committee has considered the estimates of proposed expenditure of the following departments:

Department of Science Department of the Northern Territory Department of Construction Department of the Capital Territory.

The Committee has received explanations of the proposed expenditure from the Minister for Science and officers of the departments concerned.

3. The minutes of proceedings of the Committee are included in this Report and the Hansard report of the evidence taken is presented herewith.

4. The attention of the Senate is drawn to the following: (i) D epartm ent of the Capital Territory—computer services (Division 210/2/07) The cost of this item is expected to increase from $475 000 to $653 000 in one

year. The Committee considers that there is a need for a thorough inquiry into the costs and benefits of the use of computers by departments.

(ii) D epartm ent of the Capital Territory—consultants fees (Division 210/2/08)—$26 000 Of this sum $19 000 is requested under the heading of consultants fees for a study of tourism. It was explained (Hansard, 21 September, p. 138):

This is an ongoing study which has been running for two years. It was orig­ inally funded by two departments and one independent statutory auth­ ority, the National Capital Development Commission. Stage 1, which has been completed, was worth of the order of $ 120 000. It was to collate basic

data on tourist flow into the Australian Capital Territory and tourist habits in the Australian Capital Territory, but basically tourist flow. That money has been spent. This money which is provided for is, in the view of the De­ partment, a necessary stage to make use of that information and to avoid in

effect wasting $ 120 000. The $ 19 000 is requested for: Establishment of the future social and economic needs of visitors, particu­ larly in relation to accommodation, transport, entertainment, recreation

and culture. Assessment of the likely economic and social impact of the growth of visitor demands. Assessment of criteria for determining the locations, sizes and variety of

future facilities, features and services having regard to their functional and viable operation and the suitability of existing attractions.

Investigation of the extent of concentration of visitor facilities, features and services needed to create choice, provide a pleasant atmosphere, en­ hance the quality of life of residents and enable efficient operation of other facilities, features and services.

285

24255/ 77-10

Assessment of the level of tourist promotion and marketing activity required for the implementation of policies in the visitor industry. (Han­ sard', 14 October, p. 662)

The matter was stated in the 1975-76 report of the A.C.T. Advisoty Board on Tourism: The Stage One report, containing the essential basis for a formulation of long-term visitor forecasts, is expected late this year. Whether Stage Two

is, as originally planned, undertaken by a consultant or, bowing to Budget constraints, less ideally by an inter- or intra-departmental group, it is important that the fruits—and the expense-of the work so far done should not be wasted. The Committee is in doubt as to the necessity to employ consultants for this work and is of the opinion that in the present atmosphere of constraint the suggestion that the work might be done by an intra-departmental group should be adopted. (iii) Department of the Capital Territory—City omnibus service (Division

210/3/10)

In May, Estimates Committee F reported that the government subsidy increased from $1 859 903 (1973-74) to $3 617 517 (1974-75). The subsidy requested for 1975-76 is $5 410 000. In May Estimates Committee F recorded the alarming fact that timetables proposed to ensure economies in the bus service were not able to be implemented because of an industrial dis­ pute and this resulted in a loss of savings of $600 000 in a full year. That was confirmed in evidence before this Committee {Hansard, 21 September, p. 160).

Notwithstanding this, the Department advertised for forty-nine extra drivers and the dispute was still unsettled. The Committee is of the opinion that the full amount of subsidy asked for is not justified and that some reduc­ tion should be made. (iv) Department of the Capital Territory—government-owned dwellings (Div­

ision 210/3/03) The formula for rents of government-owned dwellings is determined by min­ isterial fiat without any legislative authority, and is not yet related to market- determined rents or the public investment in the properties. (Hansard, 21 September, p. 144 fif). (v) National Capital Development Commission (Division 214)

In explanation of the block vote requested for this Commission items appear­ ing in the Civil Works Program were referred to.

(a ) The National Art Gallery. The Civil Works Program sets out: Works in Progress

Balance

remaining at

Expenditure 30 June 1976

Amount to 30 June Expenditure for further authorised 1976 in 1975-76 expenditure

$ $ $ $

Group 3—National Works

Works estimated to cost $40 000 and over 1. B ruce—Erection o f Athletics Stadium and Sports Complex for

1977 Pacific Conference Games 5 525 578 1229 829 1229 829 4 295 749

286

Amount authorised

Expenditure to 30 June 1976 Expenditure

in 1975-76

Balance

remaining at 30 June 1976 for further expenditure

2. Parkes—Construction of Com-$ $ $ $

3.

monwealth Park West (stage 2) Parkes—Erection of Australian 170 073 158 125 158 125 11 948

4.

National Gallery ...................

Parkes—Erection of High Court 26 479 485 4 899 672 1 760 101 21 579 813

Building .................................. 28 084 056 3 405 438 3 353 276 24 678 618

Sub-Total .............................

Works estimated to cost less than $40 000

60 259 192 9 693 064 6501331 50 566 128

Sundry works ............................. 13 598 7 318 4 293 6 280

Total—Group 3 ................... 60 272 790 9 700 382 6 505 624 50 572 408

Grand Total ........................ 537 116 131 279 120 170 153 050 847 257 995 961

In evidence {Hansard, 14 October, p. 668) the following was stated:

$

Original contract sum ............................................................... 13.168m

Rise and fall clause—cost to July 1976 ....................................... 11.2 m

Fixed costs associated with extended period of contract . . . 3.00 m

Total c o s t ............................................................................. 27.368m

The Commission’s annual report 1973-74 states: Authorised

Total to

At commencement Increase 30 June 1974

$13 276 815 $1 881 166 $15 157 981

The report for the following year, 1974-75, states: to 30 June 1975

$15 157 981 $ 732 228 $15 890 209

The report for 1975-76 states:

to 30 June 1976

$13 263 515 $13 215 970 $26 479 485

These figures show an alarming discrepancy with the figures put before the Committee. The matter is of twofold implication: (i) the record in the Civil Works Program put before the Committee upon the evidence available, is not a true and accurate report of the

amount authorised; and (ii) the increase from the original construction price of approximately $13 000 000 to approximately $27 000 000 shows inflation or irres­ ponsibility at an alarming rate.

287

(b) The High Court Building. It was stated in evidence {Hansard, 14 October, p. 668):

• ■ · One of the early figures on the High Court was $ 15m. When we let the contract it was a little more than $ 19m. Since then there has been rise and fall on the job and there have been some significant additions to the con­ tract. One, for example, is the security of the courts—the security provided around the buildings.

In the Civil Works Program 1976-77 the amount authorised is stated to be $28 084 056.

(vi) Darwin Reconstruction Commission (Division 460) In the block vote asked by the Darwin Reconstruction Commission it was disclosed that $600 000 was asked for consultants. It was explained {Han­ sard, 12 October, p. 498) that something of the order of one half of this sum was intended for:

. . . a contingent liability due to a suit that the Commonwealth has before the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory. The balance was intended to be used for a back-up of town planning because the Department of the Northern Territory, which normally has a sizeable town planning force, was not able to support the Commission in its activities.

CHAIRMAN—The Department has what?

Mr Jones—The Department of the Northern Territory in the past has carried out the town planning for the Northern Territory. It has an Urban Development and Town Planning Branch and it has assisted the Com­ mission to carry out planning work in Darwin. However, I have been able to obtain additional town planners from the Department of Construction, so in effect we probably do not need half of that amount.

CHAIRMAN—The other half is in dispute in the Supreme Court?

Mr Jones—That is correct.

CHAIRMAN—And what is the issue in the action in the Supreme Court that involved $300 000?

Mr Jones—It was a claim for the termination of the services of a consult­ ant. Do you wish me to name the consultant?

CHAIRMAN-Yes.

Mr Jones—It is a firm by the name of Technic-10 Pty Ltd from Western Australia.

CHAIRMAN — And did that firm have any relationship with any commissioner?

Mr Jones—No.

CHAIRMAN—And what is the issue in dispute?

Mr Jones—It is a claim for expenses for work done and loss of work which they believed they should have had if they had not taken on the Commission’s work. CHAIRMAN—I suggest that the appropriate procedure in the case of a disputed claim is for the Parliament to appropriate the money if and when the court makes a judgment that the country is liable. We do not make an appropriation in anticipation that a dispute will be determined by the Court adversely to the Government. Half of this $600 000 is actually in dis­ pute in litigation before the Supreme Court. Is that the fact?

288

M r Jones—It is of that order.

CHAIRM AN-Of that order?

M r Jones—Yes.

CHAIRMAN—Well, I am just mystified, later:

M r Jones—I have given the Committee the wrong impression, which I regret. Originally we asked for an allocation of $600 000 for use in plan­ ning in total and it so happened that at this point we knew that we did not need the money for planning. It was thought that perhaps at some point, whatever the decision may be, some part might be used for this case.

The Committee is of the opinion that there is every justification for reducing this vote by $600 000. It is not needed for planning and it is premature to ap­ propriate in anticipation of a Court judgment.

5. The Committee records its appreciation of the assistance of the Minister for Science and officers of the departments concerned.

20 October 1976

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

289

*

Estimates Committee E

Minutes of Proceedings

>

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2

TUESDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING OF COMMITTEE: The Committee met in private session at 10.00 a.m. in the Senate Committee Room No. 6. The Secretary drew attention to the record, in the Journals o f the Senate of 19 and 26 August 1976, of the reference of certain estimates of expenditure to the Committee, and the appointment of

members.

2. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN: On the motion of Senator Thomas, Senator Wright was elected Chairman and took the Chair.

3. SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS: The Chairman drew attention to a schedule of days and times when it was proposed the Estimates Committees should meet, sub­ ject to the suspension of the sitting of the Senate.

It was agreed, after discussion, that unless otherwise ordered the Committee examine the estimates of expenditure referred to it as follows:

Tuesday, 21 September: Department of the Capital Territory Tuesday, 12 October: Department of the Northern Territory and Department of Science Thursday, 14 October: Department of Construction

4. DEPARTMENTAL EXPLANATORY NOTES: The Chairman drew attention to explanatory notes on the estimates of expenditure of the following Departments and authorities:

Department of Science Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Department of the Northern Territory Department of Construction Department of the Capital Territory National Capital Development Commission It was agreed, after discussion, that where Senators indicated that they wished to

ask questions at the public meetings of the Committee upon particular matters in the estimates, such matters be communicated to the relevant departments or authorities by the Secretary.

5. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.45 a.m.

6. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended the meeting: Senators Kilgariff, Ryan, Thomas and Wright.

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

293

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3

TUESDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING OF COMMITTEE: The Committee met in public session at 4.00 p.m. in Senate Committee Room No. 5. The Chairman (Senator Wright) took chair.

2. DEPARTMENT OF THE CAPITAL TERRITORY: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following depart­ mental officers:

Department o f the Capital Territory: Mr D. M. Lalor, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Supply Mr C. H. C. Davis, First Assistant Secretary, Lands, Housing and Welfare Mr A. S. Blunn, City Manager Mr J. H. Marshall, First Assistant Secretary, Transport and Traffic Special

Group Mr J. A. Turner, Assistant Secretary, Establishments and ADP Mr V. F. Martisius, Commissioner for Housing Mr J. M. Hemer, Assistant Secretary, Welfare Mr J. S. Brigg, Assistant Secretary, Recreation and Tourism Mr B. C. Darke, Assistant Secretary, Transport Dr B. H. Pratt, Director, Conservation and Agriculture Mr C. S. Hamilton, Director, Programs and Budgets Mr R. J. Murray, Director, City Parks Administration Mr J. C. Johnson, Superintendent, A.C.T. Police Management Services

Division Mr R. A. J. McGuiness, Executive Officer, A.C.T. Police. National Capital Development Commission: Mr K. J. Curtis, Secretary and Manager

Mr B. M. Browning, Acting Senior Assistant Secretary, Business and Govern­ ment Relations Mr K. Mulcahy, Senior Executive Officer, Finance.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon by the Chair­ man and considered:

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

Document A* $

Division 210—Administrative Subdivision 1 —Salaries and payments in the nature of salary 16 896 000 Subdivision 2—Administrative e x p e n s e s ............................ 2 319 000

Subdivision 3—Other services Items 01 to 18 * Dc jument A— ‘Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

294

The following items were postponed for further consideration: Division 210 Subdivision 2 Item 07—Computer services

Item 08—Consultants—fees

653 000 26 000

Subdivision 3 Item 05—Recreation, cultural and community services 426 500 Consideration of the remaining items above was concluded.

3. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.10 p.m.

4. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended the meeting: Senators Devitt, Kilgariff, Ryan, Thomas and Wright.

Senator Walters also attended.

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

295

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 4

TUESDAY, 12 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING OF COMMITTEE: The Committee met in public session at 4.00 p.m. in Senate Committee Room No. 1. The Chairman (Senator Wright) took the chair.

2. DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following depart­ mental officers:

Department o f the Northern Territory: Mr N. Lynagh, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Management, Legislation and Planning Division Mr W. J. Hull, Acting Assistant Secretary, Finance, Supply and Transport

Branch.

Darwin Reconstruction Commission: Mr A. D. Jones, General Manager Mr J. W. Parsons, Chief Business Manager:

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

considered: Document A* $

Division 455—A d m in is tra tiv e ................................................ 46 798 900

Division 457—Northern Territory Legislative Assembly E x e c u t i v e ............................................................................. 393 600

Division 458—Northern Territory Legislative Assembly . . 421 100 Division 459—Northern Territory Police ............................. 8 965 400

Division 460—Darwin Reconstruction Commission . . . . 3 020 000 Document B f Division 897—Capital Works and S e r v ic e s ............................. 38 853 000

Division 898—Darwin Reconstruction Commission . . . . 139 500 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded. * Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. t Document B—‘ Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977

3. DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Min­ ister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers: Department o f Science: Mr P. B. Free, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Policy Division

Dr N. J. Sullivan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Research Branch, Policy Division Mr R. A. Leslie, Senior Assistant Secretary, Space Projects Branch Mr C. A. Webster, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch Mr G. H. Nichol, Executive Officer, Antarctic Division Mr K. J. Walshe, Executive Officer, Finance and Supply

296

Mr I. N. Mason, Acting Regional Director, A.C.T. Bureau of Meteorology Mr N. C. MacMullen, Senior Project Officer, Metric Conversion Board Mr W. D. Lockwood, Finance Officer, National Standards Commission

Mr D. W. Cunliffe, Executive Officer, Anglo-Australian Observatory Dr M. Gilmartin, Director, Australian Institute of Marine Science.

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation: Mr S. Lattimore, Secretary (Research) Mr A. W. Charles, Assistant Secretary Dr J. B. Allen, Assistant Secretary

Mr I. C. Bogg, Acting Assistant Secretary (Finance and Supplies) Mr H. Kwong, Acting Chief Finance Officer Mr S. Snell, Acting Senior Finance Officer.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and considered: Document A $

Division 552— Australian Institute of Marine Science . . . 1564 000 Document B Division 927—Capital Works and Services Subdivision 4—Australian Institute of Marine Science . . 6 020 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.15 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended: Senators Devitt, Kilgariff, Robertson, Thomas and Wright.

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

297

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 5

THURSDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING OF COMMITTEE: The Committee met in public session at 12 noon in Senate Committee Room No. 1. The Chairman (Senator Wright) took the chair.

2. DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers:

Department o f Construction: Mr K. J. Rodda, Deputy Secretary Mr W. D. Hamilton, Assistant Secretary (Finance) Mr J. C. E. Gore, Principal Executive Officer (Works).

Department o f the Treasury: . Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

considered:

Document A* $

Division 220—A d m in is tra tiv e ................................................ 98 079 000

Division 222—Furniture and Fittings .................................. 7 490 000

Div ision 224—Repairs and Maintenance ............................. 82 704 000

Division 245—Buildings, Works, Furniture and Fittings . . 74 800 000 Division 246—Repairs and Maintenance ............................. 49 500 000

Document S t Division 831 —Capital Works and S e r v ic e s ............................. 81 845 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded. * Document A — 1 Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. t Document B— ‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977 ’.

3. DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers:

Department o f Science: Mr P. B. Free, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Policy Division Dr N. J. Sullivan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Research Branch, Policy Division Mr A. R. Leslie, Senior Assistant Secretary, Space Projects Branch Mr C. A. Webster, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch MrG. H. Nicol, Executive Officer, Antarctic Division Mr K. J. Walshe, Executive Officer, Finance and Supply Mr I. N. Mason, Acting Regional Director, Australian Capital Territory

Bureau of Mereorology Mr B. E. MacCarthy, Executive Officer, Metric Conversion Board Mr W. D. Lockwood, Finance Officer, National Standards Commission MrD. W. Cunliffe, Executive Officer, Anglo-Australian Observatory.

298

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation: Mr S. Lattimore, Secretary (Research) Mr A. W. Charles, Assistant Secretary Dr J. B. Allen, Assistant Secretary

Mr I. C. Bogg, Acting Assistant Secretary (Finance and Supplies) Mr H. Kwong, Acting Chief Finance Officer Mr S. Snell, Acting Senior Finance Officer.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and considered:

Document A $

Division 540—Administrative ................................................. 5 321 800

Division 542—Analytical S e r v ic e s ............................................ 3 226 500

Division 543—Antarctic D i v i s i o n ............................................ 5 548 000

Division 544—Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology . . 34 291 000 Division 545—The Ionospheric Prediction Service . . . . 658 500 Division 546—Metric Conversion Board ............................. 570 500

Division 547—National Standards C o m m is s io n ................... 406 700

Division 550—Anglo-Australian Telescope Board . . . . 830 000 Division 554—Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation ..................................................... 115 350 000

Document B Division 927—Capital Works and S e r v ic e s ............................. 10 689 000

Division 928—Payments to or for the States ........................ 11214 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded.

4. DEPARTMENT OF THE CAPITAL TERRITORY: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following depart­ mental officers: Department o f the Capital Territory:

Mr D. M. Lalor, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Supply Mr J. H. Marshall, First Assistant Secretary, Transport and Housing Mr R. J. Corrigan, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Lands Mr C. S. Hamilton, Director, Programs and Budgets

Mr D. Lander, Assistant Secretary, City Services Mr R. J. Murray, Acting Assistant Secretary. Recreation and Tourism Mr T. Z. Whitgob, Executive Officer, Community Activities Mr S. Blunn, City Manager

Mr B. A. Lewis, Acting Assistant Secretary, Establishments and ADP Mr B. C. Darke, Assistant Secretary. Transport and Traffic Policy Mr S. J. Russell. Director, Engineering Services Mr W. E. Lawrence. Assistant Secretary, Urban Affairs Dr B. H. Pratt, Director, Conservation and Agriculture

Mr R. A. J. McGuinness, Executive Officer, A.C.T. Police Mr J. C. Johnson, Superintendent, A.C.T. Police, Management Services Division Mr V. F. Martisius, Assistant Secretary, Housing.

299

National Capital Development Commission: Mr K. J. Curtis, Secretary and Manager Mr B. M. Browning, Acting Senior Assistant Secretary, Business and Govern­ ment Relations.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Mr M. Chick, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and considered:

Document A $

Division 210 Subdivision 2 item 07—Computer S e r v ic e s ........................ 653 000

item 08—Consultants—F e e s ........................................... 26 000

Subdivision 3 item 05—Recreation, Cultural and Com­ munity Services .............................................................. 426 500

Items 19-24 inclusive Subdivision 4—Municipal Services ................................. 6 892 000

Subdivision 5—Jervis Bay ................................................ 330 000

Division 212—A.C.T. Legislative Assembly ........................ 273 000

Division 2 13-A.C.T. Police " ................................................ 8 838 000

Division 214—National Capital Development Commission . 7 346 000 Document B Division 829—Capital Works and S e r v ic e s ............................. 218 276 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded.

5. NEXT MEETING: The Committee then met in private session. It was agreed that the Committee meet at 11 a.m. on Tuesday next to consider its report to the Sen­ ate, unless otherwise ordered.

6. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjorned at 10.20 p.m.

7. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended the meeting: Senators Devitt, Kilgariff, Robertson, Ryan, Thomas and Wright.

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

300

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 6

WEDNESDAY, 20 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING OF COMMITTEE: The Committee met in private session at 9 a.m. in Senate Committee Room No. 1. The Chairman (Senator Wright) took the chair.

2. REPORT OF COMMITTEE: The Chairman drew attention to a draft report. It v as agreed that the draft report be adopted as the report of the Committee, with amendments.

3. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 9.25 a.m.

4. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee attended the meeting: Senators Devitt, Kilgariff, Ryan, Thomas and Wright.

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

R. C. WRIGHT Chairman

301

-

■

Estimates Committee E

Appendix

From: Mr A. D. Jones General Manager Darwin Reconstruction Commission

Re Darwin Reconstruction Commission Division 460. You asked about $600 000 al­ location for consultants. Following information supplements my verbal statement 12 October. When estimates prepared Commission proposed to place number of projects involving town planning with consultants because of staff limitations. Fees for these

projects with other tasks also proposed for consultants were estimated at $600 000.

Subsequently we were able to obtain services of suitable planning staff in Depart­ ment of Construction thus reducing amount required. Flowever about same time we were served with writ by former consultants Technic 10 for about $700 000 (who have now offered to settle at approx. $300 000). As result of policy decision by Com­

mission the services of this firm and four others were prematurely terminated from 30 September 1975. Claims by others were settled in 1975-76. Having regard to com­ mission’s limited access to additional appropriation and advice from senior counsel it

was considered prudent to not reduce the $600 000. We recently offered Treasury reduction in appropriation division 460 from $3 020 000 by $200 000 because of reduced staff ceiling.

Re Division 898. You also asked about payments to contractors on contracts ter­ minated after cyclone Tracy. Almost all contracts for projects in Darwin were sus­ pended after the cyclone. As a result of government decision (cabinet decision 3148), the majority subsequently proceeded whilst 53 did not proceed and were therefore terminated. This decision to terminate was based on the nature of projects and not

repeat not on the extent of damage suffered. Consequently Department of Construc­ tion negotiated deeds of mutual release on behalf of Commission ranging from $225 to $790 000 and totalling $3.5m. These negotiations were based on principles ap­ proved by the Minister of the day, guidelines set down by the department’s central office and took into account such factors as loss of profit, continuing overhead costs on

and off site, continuing financing costs, plant hire, storage, freight and handling, pur­ chase of materials not used and value of work done, measured, agreed but not paid. The advice of the crown solicitor was sought in drafting of deeds and in respect of

some aspects associated with particular contracts. This matter is subject of Auditor- General comment at pages 163 to 165 of report for year ended 30 June 1976.

Please let me know if you require further information.

305

Page 617 of Hansard refers

Senator Ryan asked to whom payments in lieu of rates were paid and whether such payments were made in the Australian Capital Territory.

Provision has been included in the 1976-77 estimates for the proposed expendi­ ture of $8000 in respect of payments in lieu of rates. This is mainly for payments to the Melbourne Metropolitan Board of Works for services provided to the Central Office at Hawthorn.

Similar payments are not made to any authority in the Australian Capital Territory.

SE N A T E E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E E

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O N S T R U C T IO N -E S T IM A T E S 1 9 7 6 -7 7

M E E T IN G O F C O M M IT T E E H E L D O N 14 O C T O B E R 1976

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMEN T OF CONSTRUCTION -ESTIM ATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Pages 617-18 of Hansard refer

The Chairman asked for information concerning weekly compensation rates and the cost of compensation for day labour personnel.

An employee who sustains personal injury arising out of or in the course of his em­ ployment with the Commonwealth receives the following payments:

(a) During the first 26 weeks of incapacity an amount equivalent to that which he would have received had he continued employment in the position occu­ pied at the date of injury, i.e. full pay. (b) If the incapacity extends beyond 26 weeks payments are made in accordance

with those prescribed by section 45 of the Act. These rates are currently:

Employee . . . . $57.00 per week

plus

Dependent spouse $15.00 per week plus Dependent children . $ 7.00 per week each The maximum payments under these provisions, including dependants allowances, is limited to an amount equivalent to the rate applicable to the position occupied by the unjured employee at the date of injury. (c) Where the payments under the Act are lower than the rate applying to the

employee’s position, the employee may elect to have this amount brought up to full pay be utilising sick leave credits if available. (d) There is no automatic adjustment of the weekly rates of compensation prescribed by section 45 of the Act but these are reviewed from time to time.

A Bill was introduced in the last Budget Session to increase the rates currently prescribed as follows:

Employee . . . . $57.00 to $80.00 per week

Dependent spouse . $15.00 to $21.00 per week Dependent children . $ 7.00 to $ 10.00 per week The Bill, which is awaiting Royal Assent, provides for the new rates to be applied retrospectively from 1 September 1976.

306

Total compensation payments by the Department in 1974-75 and 1975-76 for salaried staff and day labour were:

1974-75 1975-76 $ $

Salaried s t a f f ................... 118 092 125 407

Day labour ................... 1 131 359 1 546 278

1 249 451 1 671 685

This amends the Hansard record indicating compensation payments were $1661 million to day labour staff in 1975-76.

The provisions of the Act apply equally to both salaried staff and day labour of this Department and staff of all other Commonwealth departments.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION-ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Page 619 of Hansard refers

Senator Robertson asked for further information concerning the rise in Division 226/2/08 for the purchase of Field, Laboratory and Radio Equipment, particularly relating to radio purchases for the Northern Territory.

The additional amount of $105 892 sought for expenditure in 1976-77 does not relate solely to the requirement for additional radio sets in the Northern Territory. This amount also includes provision for additional expenditure on field and labora­ tory equipment throughout the numerous establishments of the Department.

An amount of $80 000 has been sought for expenditure on radio equipment in 1976-77; this is an increase of $14 000 on expenditure in 1975-76.

Provision has been included for the supply of the following items in the Northern Territory: • a VHF Talk thru system fo r Alice Springs—$30 000 VHP operates on a ‘line of sight’ principle and the existing system is restricted

throughout the Alice Springs town area and cannot provide communications to the south and west beyond the McDonnell Ranges. The talk thru system over­ comes these problems and is essential for the maintenance of acceptable safety standards on the construction and maintenance of H.V. power lines which

extend beyond the coverage of the existing system.

• 24 HF—SSB Mobile Transceivers—$26 400 These radios are required for the control and co-ordination of works projects throughout the Northern Territory. The purchase of these radios was originally planned for 1975-76 but due to the cuts in expenditure this was not possible

and they are now urgently required for the efficient operation of the works pro­ gram now allotted to the Northern Territory Regional office. •

• VHF system for Tennant Creek—$12 500 This system is required to provide communications for the electricity supply undertakings and the mechanical workshops engaged in essential services at Tennant Creek. The provision of efficient communications is essential for the

307

safety of the line crews working on H.V. power lines and to allow mechanical workshop personnel to maintain and repair essential services with a minimum of disruption to the community.

• 8 HF—SSB Fixed Transceivers—$12 000 Four of these radios are required for use on larger projects and at depots to pro­ vide better communications in difficult conditions. As projects move into remote areas, communications are often adversely affected by atmosphere conditions and the terrain over which the radio waves travel. The remaining four units are required as stand-by units for the main base radios at Darwin, K atherine, Alice Springs and Tennant Creek.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION-ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Page 621 of Hansard refers

When discussing proposed expenditure under Division 220/2/15—Fees of private architects, engineers, quantity surveyors and other consultants, the Chairman sought information as to the approximate proportion of salaries that would be paid to archi­ tects, engineers, quantity surveyors and professional staff of the Department.

The proposed expenditure for salaries in 1976-77 is $76 740 000 (not $98 million as quoted—the $98 million is the total for Division 220) and while our expenditure records are not maintained on a discipline basis an assessed breakdown for salary requirements is as follows:

$

Professional Staff .................................. 18 600 000

(Engineers, Architects, Quantity Sur­ veyors and other professionals) Technical S t a f f ....................................... 25 400 000

(Technical Officers, Draftsmen, Works Supervisors, Trainees) Administrative Staff ............................. 32 740 000

76 740 000

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Division 222/2/03 —Education Page 625 of Hansard refers

The Chairman asked whether the provision of $590 000 sought under this item was for new schools.

The $590 000 comprises: ' $

Provision for fitting out new colleges ................................................ 285 000

Provision for fitting out new schools ................................................ 250 000

Replacement of furniture in existing colleges, schools, etc...................... 55 000

T o t a l ................................................................................................. 590 000

308

Division 224/2/01 —Rental Dwellings Page 626 of Hansard refers

The Chairman asked that the Department should consider with the Department of the Capital Territory the relationship between the cost of repairs and maintenance and the component for repairs and maintenance recovered in the rental charged. The A.C.T. Region of the Department has already had an initial meeting with the

Department of the Australian Capital Territory and has advised it of the Chairman’s request. Further interdepartmental meetings will ensue to discuss the matter and to provide our best advice on what measures can be taken to further minimise mainten­ ance costs. At the same time it must be said that over the years the actions already

taken by the Departments to extend the periodical maintenance cycles to utilise paint­ ing contracts to the maximum and to institute a monitoring system on emergency call­ outs etc. could well leave little further scope for reducing expenditure. The final decision as to the standard of maintenance to be carried out on rental

dwellings and the amount to be recovered in rental is of course a matter for the Department of the Capital Territory rather than Construction.

Further advice will be provided when the discussions have been concluded.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Division 222/4—Northern Territory Services Total Proposed Expenditure—$ 1 995 000

Page 625 of Hansard refers

The Chairman asked how much of this estimate was due to refurnishing after the cyclone.

The exact amount relating to refurnishing after the cyclone is not readily available from the programs of furniture requirements provided to this Department by sponsors. However an examination of these programs indicates that about $300 000 expen­ diture would be on items which can be readily identified as replacement of cyclone damaged items.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Division 224/4/06—Stuart and Barkly Highways Page 627 of Hansard refers

Senator Kilgariff asked regarding the condition of the Barkly Highway after the floods. The highway is in reasonable condition for this time of the year. The section from 30 km west of Frewena to the Tablelands Highway turn-off has bei n deforming over

SENATE ESTIM A TES C O M M ITTEE E

DEPA RTM EN T OF C O N STRU CTIO N ESTIM A TES 1976-77

M EETIN G O F CO M M ITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

309

the last few years and some sections are becoming quite rough. Some 12 km of pave­ ment in this section failed during the last wet season and were sheeted with gravel. An amount of $580 000 has been provided for carrying out permanent repairs and the work is to commence shortly.

Some deformations are evident between Wonarah and Barry Caves. Crossings at Rankine and James Rivers which were damaged during the last wet season have been patched.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION-ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Page 627 of Hansard refers

The Chairman asked how many of the day labour employees would be Aborigines.

Records are not maintained on racial origin of employees of this Department although current statistics are available of numbers of Aborigines—as the Depart­ ment has recently participated in a survey conducted by the Public Service Board in this regard. The figures provided for the Northern Territory Region are approximate only because o f the difficulties involved in gathering such figures, and are based on a verbal survey.

Details of Aborigines employed are:

Day

Staff labour

New South Wales ........................ 5 3

Western Australia ........................ .. 2

Queensland .................................. .. 3

Northern t e r r i t o r y ........................ 25 114

30 122

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Division 224/4/06— Stuart and Barkly Highways

Pages 627 and 628 of Hansard refer

Senator Kilgariff asked whether the Department is aware of a request by the Pine Creek Progress Association that the Pine Creek-Cullen River roadworks should not follow the alignment as laid down by the Government.

As suggested in the reply by Mr Rod da this is a matter for the Department of the Northern Territory. It is understood that the Minister for the Northern Territory has advised the Association that the roadworks will follow the pegged alignment.

310

Division 224/4/08—Electricity Supply

Page 630 of Hansard refers

Senator Kilgariff asked what the Department is doing about provision of electric generating capacity at Tennant Creek.

This Department has kept the Department of the Northern Territory informed of the necessity to provide a fourth generating set at Tennant Creek to meet predicted growth in the demand for electricity. It is understood that Department is taking action to seek government approval for this provision to be made.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77

MEETING OF COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Division 831/1 /0 2 — Aboriginal Affairs

Page 631 of Hansard refers

Senator Thomas asked was the Department satisfied with the number of tenders received for four staff houses for Department of Aboriginal Affairs at Thursday Island.

Four tenders were received for the building contract as follows:

$

K. C. Battle Nominees P/L . . . .200 000 (Successful tenderer).

W. A. R. Homes P /L ......................... 200 767

Watkins L t d ........................................236 260

T. F. Woollam & S o n .......................276 356

Both the number of tenders and the range of prices received are considered a satis­ factory response for this location. Works to be carried out by others are estimated at:

$

External Power Supply ................... 6 750

Road W o r k s ....................................... 20 000

Water Supply .................................. 8 000

SENATE ESTIM A TES C O M M ITTEE E

DEPA RTM EN T OF C O N S T R U C T IO N -E ST IM A T E S 1976-77

M EETIN G O F C O M M ITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

34 750

The total estimated cost of the work based on the accepted tender is $234 750.

The Chairman also asked if the Queensland Government have any contracts at Thursday Island.

Current Contracts for the State Public Works of which this Department has knowledge are:

5 4 20

residences—K. C. Battle Nominees residences—A. D. Bell & Sons .

$

.238 500 . 164 000

residences (prefabricated for indigenes)— Textor ..................................................... 500 000

311

The difference between the prices for the five State houses and the four Common­ wealth houses is due to:

• Tenders for the Commonwealth houses were called in June 1976, the State in December 1975, and prices would reflect inflation over the period of six months. • Commonwealth tenders include the cost of fencing and built-in-wardrobes not

in the State tender. • The Commonwealth houses are slightly larger (116 square metres to 114 square metres).

Similar contracts are let from time to time by the State Department of Aboriginal & Islanders Advancement, but details of these are not readily available.

There are no local contractors on Thursday Island but local labour is utilised where practicable.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATES 1976-77 MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE HELD ON 14 OCTOBER 1976

Page 633 of Hansard refers

The Chairman requested a short explanation of the comment by the Auditor-General on pages 162 and 163 of his report for the year ended 30 June 1976 in relation to the delay claim by the contractor for the Black Mountain Tower project.

On 21 May 1973 the Government decided, after an environmental review, that this project should proceed. At that time the only impediment to the letting of a con­ tract was the excision of the site for the tower from Reserve Land and action to arrange this was in hand by the Department of the Capital Territory.

Consequently the Department awarded the contract on 6 June 1973 after reaching agreement with the contractor that should the site not be immediately available no penalty would be incurred for a reasonable delay. The expectation then was that the site would be available before mid July.

The Supreme Court action referred to in the Auditor-General’s Report was an ap­ plication by thirteen plaintiffs that construction of the tower was illegal and consti­ tuted a public nuisance. This application was made 6-9 July 1973 after the contract had been let.

Action to excise the site took longer than was foreseen and the site was not released to the contractor until 17 September 1973. Work started on 20 September 1973 and was stopped by union ban on 21 Sep­ tember 1973.

On 31 October 1973 the Supreme Court ruled against the Commonwealth and work again could not proceed. (Note— in the broadest of terms the judgment ruled that while there was no legal impediment to the project on environmental grounds the proposal had not had official clearance from the National Capital Development Commission and would require other endorsements.)

The implications of the judgment were considered by the Government, endorse­ ment of the proposal obtained from the NCDC and an order to resume work was able

312

to be issued on 6 December 1973. (Note—in November 1973 the Commonwealth appealed to the High Court and a judgment in favour of the Commonwealth was handed down in February 1976.) The contractor’s claim of $357 203 covered the periods when the work was sus­

pended through the site delay, the union ban and the Supreme Court judgment. It was settled at $250 000.

313

DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

P.O. Box 231 Darwin, N.T. 5794

12 Nov. 1976

The Secretary Estimates Committee E Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Department of the Northern Territory—additional Answers to Questions asked at the hearing on 12 October 1976

During the above hearing questions requiring additional answers were asked in respect of the following matters:

Hansard Reference Division Subject Reply

Page 478-480 455.2.08 Crocodile research Attachment A

Page 479 455.2.08 Transport surveys Attachment B

Page 481 455.3.01 Operational grants for community activities Attachment C

Page 482 455.3.01 Emergency housekeeping Attachment D

Page 484 455.3.04 Scientific services Attachment E

Page 493-5 457.2.08 Committees of inquiry Attachment F

Page 496 459.2.07 Police uniforms—identification Attachment G

Page 503 897.3.04 Delays in execution of mortgage documents Attachment H

2. The answers are contained in the Attachments A to H.

R. HARRIS fo r Secretary

314

ATTACHM ENT A

CROCODILE RESEARCH

The University o f Sydney, with limited support from this Department, has been engaged in a detailed study of the salt water crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) for the past five years.

The initial three years were largely spent in establishing a research station at Maningrida, development of suitable trapping equipment, survey techniques and preliminary surveys of rivers across the ‘top end ’ of the Northern Territory.

During the past two years this Department has received two annual reports which are considered to contain some very useful data, e.g. population dynamics, density in particular areas, information on capture, marking and recapture techniques, habitat suitability, nesting habits, survey techniques, growth rates, stomach analysis.

In addition several scientific papers on various aspects of the program to date are in the process of publication and these will be made available to the Department when printed.

The information received to date has been most valuable in terms of projected management and conservation of the salt water crocodile, especially if crocodile farming is undertaken. Farming losses have always been highest in the early juvenile stages, mainly through shock and dietary problems. The handling techniques being developed and the unique stomach analysis will largely overcome these problems. The capture of large animals for brood stock and scientific study in captivity has been simplified because of the expertise developed to date.

Information received to date has confirmed the Department’s action in fully pro­ tecting the species and it would appear that such protection will need to be enforced for some years if the total population is to regenerate to a less perilous situation than it is in at present.

Australia is a member of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and is represented on the Crocodile Specialist Group by Professor Harry Messel (previously Dr Bustard). The last meeting of the Crocodile Specialist Group was held at Maningrida, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, in April of this year and was attended by a

representative from the Forestry, Fisheries, Wildlife and National Parks Branch.

Maningrida was chosen as being one of the last remaining strongholds of Crocodylus porosus (the salt water or estuarine crocodile).

Important recommendations were made at the meeting and the work in the Northern Territory endorsed. One of the recommendations, ‘to further the scientific study by a captive breeding program and a closer study of the animal at close quarters by having captive animals

available’, has been followed up by the Branch by (a) searching for a suitable area (b) planning the facility (c) submitting the proposal to higher authority.

ATTACHMENT B

TRANSPORT SURVEYS

Public tenders were invited in December 1975 for the conduct of a series of twenty- seven roadside surveys on Northern Territory Highways. Tenders were advertised throughout Australia. A contract was eventually let in August 1976 to the lowest tenderer, Deloraine Exploration Pty Ltd of Perth, W.A.

315

The terms of the contract include:

Type o f contract

The contract shall be for a lump sum for the works specified and shall be subject to the conditions accompanying the tender form.

Variations in wage rates and material costs

Rise and fall provisions affecting both labour and material will not apply to the work in this contract. Prices tendered shall be firm for the period.

Extent o f work

The extent of the work required under this contract is the conduct of a series of twenty-seven roadside traffic surveys each of seven days’ duration at specified loca­ tions in the Northern Territory in 1976. For the purposes of this contract the series is divided into four (4) rounds of surveys at each of six (6) locations on interstate high­ ways and additionally one (1) survey at each of three (3) locations on internal roads in the Northern Territory.

Locations

Locations in the Northern Territory where the surveys shall be made are: (a) Interstate Highways (1) Mount Cavenagh (on Stuart Highway near S.A. border) (2) Burt Creek (on Stuart Highway north of Tanami road turnoff)

(3) Avon Downs (on Barkly Highway) (4) Daly Waters (5) Dingo Gap (on Victoria Highway near W.A. border) (6) Pine Creek (b) Internal Roads

(7) Alice Springs to Jay Creek Road (8) Arnhem Highway (near Humpty Doo) (9) Daly River Road (near Stuart Highway)

OPERATIONAL GRANTS FOR COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES

Following is a comparison with expenditure in 1975-76:

ATTACHMENT C

Allocation Allocation 1975-76 1976-77

$ $

YMCA Darwin 20 000

10 000 10 000 10 000 18 000 19 000 20 000

3 000 1 000

7 500 3 750 3 750

YWCA Alice Springs . . . .

YWCA D a r w i n ........................

Community Creche, Alice Springs Old Timers Home, Alice Springs N.T. Council of Social Services . Community Creche, Darwin . . Family Planning Association . Council for the Ageing . . . .

St Vincent de Paul, Darwin . . St Vincent de Paul, Alice Springs 2 000

20 000 10 000

5 000 1 000 5 000 5 000

113 000 61 000

316

Where small organisations involved in community activities are known to be heavily dependent on these operational grants every effort has been made to provide sufficient funds to prevent a reduction in the level of activity. Where substantial reduc­ tions have been made the circumstances are as follows:

(1) Community Creches—an alternative source of funding is available through the Department of Social Security. (2) YMCA and YWCA—These are large business organisations and the reduc­ tions represent only a small portion of total income. (3) Northern Territory Council fo r Social Services—There is no obligation for

funding by the Government as the major source of salaries for staff of this Council. The expenditure restraints imposed by Government has meant a reduction in the amount available to the Council.

ATTACHMENT D

EMERGENCY HOUSEKEEPING SERVICE

The functions of an emergency housekeeping service are: To meet the needs of a family when a confinement occurs or when an accident or illness prevents a mother, guardian or single parent from carrying out normal household duties. It can also be used to assist elderly or invalid persons to main­

tain themselves in their homes. There are three types of service: Resident housekeeper — where young children would otherwise be alone at night. Daily housekeeper — providing full daytime assistance. Home helps — providing assistance for a number of hours daily particularly for

elderly people and convalescent mothers who only require assistance with cer­ tain tasks.

2. The 1976-77 estimates include an increase in funding for the Darwin service but a decrease for the Alice Springs service from $4000 to $2500. The Alice Springs Emergency Home Help Association Inc. which operates the service had asked for an increase to $7250.

3. Investigations showed that the Alice Springs organisation had accumulated some funds and had been using part of its subsidy to pay the cost of private child- minding arrangements when there were other voluntary organisations funded by the Government already providing child care service.

4. The effect of the reduction in funding this year will be that surplus funds already held by the organisation will need to be used and it will be necessary for the organisation to restrict its services provided from grant money to its authorised func­ tions. The organisation has been informed in writing that if the demand for its services

for people in needy circumstances exceeds the resources of its subsidy an approach for assistance can be made to the Alice Springs office of the Social Development Branch to help meet the cost on a case by case basis.

5. Details of expenditure since 1971-72 are:

1971-72—$6 000 1976-77 Estimates Darwin $6 000

1972- 73—$2 000 1973- 74—$5 000

Alice Springs $2 500

1974- 75—$5 380 1975- 76—$6 906

Total: $8 500

24255/ 77-11

317

ATTACHMENT E

SCIENTIFIC SERVICES

The estimates of expenditure for the Scientific Services Section within Division 455/3/04 are as follows: $ $

Scientific Services (South) 18 000

Glassware and plastics ................... 3 780

Chemicals, reagents ........................ 5 140

Herbarium supplies ........................ 3 060

Replacement instruments and R & M to e q u ip m e n t.................................. 3 640

Miscellaneous .................................. 2 380

Scientific Services (North)

18 000

8 000

Glassware and plastics .................... 800

Chemicals, reagents ........................ 1 760

L aboratory m aterials and m inor a p p a r a t u s ....................................... 4 960

Miscellaneous .................................. 480

8 000

Scientific Services — Industrial wages 14 480

— Industrial travel . . 1 050

Total: 41 530

The primary function and responsibility of the Scientific Service Section is to provide an essential back-up service in four disciplines to personnel of other Sections within the Branch, other Branches, Departments, statutory bodies, the public sector which includes the primary producer. The four disciplines involved are botany, chemistry, entomology and plant pathology.

In addition to the service function, the Section undertakes research into problems which in the main originate from the needs of industry or of the many sections of the Department.

Botany Accurate determinations of plant names forms an integral part of any activity involv­ ing aspects of flora whether it be ecology, poisonous plants, forestry, ethnobotany, or general land utilisation and conservation. Thus, maintenance of a comprehensive her­

barium and compilation of literature and basic botanical data is the primary function of this subsection.

Botanical surveys of existing and proposed N.T. National Parks and Reserves form a substantial part of work load. A recent additional function is the assessment of rangeland condition in relation to possible overstocking especially in the drier areas.

Chemistry The Chemistry subsection provides routine analytical services for this Branch, other Branches, Departments, and the private sector, and a monitoring service for pes­ ticides, heavy metals, and some materials which might affect the environment and agricultural products. Also a degree of applied research initiated from industry is con­ ducted. Routine analyses into water, soils, plants and forensic materials are also carried out.

These functions can be equated to those of State Departments of Agriculture chemical laboratories.

318

Entomology and plant pathology The function of these two subsections is orientated toward the eventual development of overall methods and policies for plant protection (insect and disease control) pas­

tures, field crops, horticultural crops, agricultural productions, and allied types of pri­ mary production. The acquisitions and collation of basic data on pest structures of the various cropping systems by observation and applied research allow recommenda­ tions on plant protection to be made for the crops in this area and for the climatic and

cultural conditions under which they are grown.

As an essential complementary service for economic facets of plant protection, the N.T. Insect Collection and the Plant Pathology and Mycology Herbarium is being slowly developed in the hope that some independence in taxonomic aspects of these disciplines is forthcoming.

These two subsections play integral parts in the updating and administration of the N.T. Plant Disease Control Ordinance and in the reviewing of candidate pes­ ticides for recommendation in the N.T.

ATTACHMENT F

STATEMENT ON INQUIRY INTO THE LOTTERY AND GAMING ORDINANCE 1940-74

1. The Northern Territory (Administration) Act, which has been in existence since 1948, provides for the setting up of a legislature and to delegate to that legislature the power to make laws for the Northern Territory. In November 1974 the legislature met for the first time as a fully elected Legislative Assembly.

2. Amongst the approximately 200 Northern Territory Ordinances in operation is the Lottery and Gaming Ordinance 1940-74, which was amended by Ordinance No. 24 of 1964 to provide for the establishment of a Betting Control Board. 3. The Inquiries Ordinance 1945-63 was amended by Ordinance No. 34 of 1963

to enable the then Legislative Council, through the Administrator in Council, to establish inquiries into matters of local importance. Since 1963 twelve inquiries have been set up under the Ordinance and funded by the Commonwealth. These were:

Subject

Year of inquiry

Administration of the Child Welfare Ordinance . . . .

Fees and Allowances for Members of the Legislative Council Workers ’ Compensation Ordinance and Administration . Allegations concerning persons detained at Police Stations Operation of the Port of Darwin .......................................

Petroleum Prices ...............................................................

Medical and Hospital Services N.T.........................................

Operation of the Housing Commission .............................

Liquor Inquiry ...................................................................

N.T. Police Force ...............................................................

Electricity Power S u p p l y .....................................................

Land Sales Freehold A r e a s ................................................

1964 1966 1967 1969 1970 1970 1971 1972 1972 1972 1973 1974

4. Statutory bodies set up under Northern Territory Ordinances spend funds ac­ cording to annual estimates prepared and submitted through the Minister for the Northern Territory to the Treasurer for incorporation, after approval, in the Federal Government’s Budget. The funds for this particular Inquiry were approved in a letter

from the Treasurer to the Minister in May this year.

319

5. Pursuant to that approval the Prime Minister wrote to the Tasmanian Premier and received approval for two officers, one from the Tasmanian Racing and Gaming Commission and one from the Attorney-General’s Department who has a part-time responsibility with the Totalisator Agency Board, to conduct an inquiry.

6. By a recent Cabinet decision the Northern Territory Assembly will now be re­ sponsible for full executive administration of lottery and gaming legislation and the Betting Control Board by the end of this year. The Government, in deciding to trans­ fer this responsibility, was guided by the Report from the Joint Parliamentary Com­ mittee on the Northern Territory which says, in part, in the chapter under Financial Arrangements:

‘80. (b) . . . Revenue measures will be a matter for the Territory Executive to decide . . .

81. In determining the amount of funds to be provided by the Australian Govern­ ment for use in the Territory, theie will need to be regular and detailed discussions between the Australian Government and Territory Executives . . . They would, in general, be similar to those between the Australian Government and the States, due regard being had to the special circumstances of the Territory.

83. How the Australian Government’s funds will be made available to the Terri­ tory Executive is a matter for negotiation between the two parties . . . ’ 7. On this basis reasonable efforts to raise internal revenue must become an essen­ tial feature of the understanding between the Commonwealth and the Northern Territory. At present, according to the Betting Control Board, the weekly turnover of licensed off-course bookmakers is in the order of $lm. Whilst at present this is the subject of a low level of taxation no component is extracted directly for internal revenue.

8. The legislation on these matters and the administrative machinery devised many years ago urgently required updating. Constant representations are received by the Assembly from sections of the community for and against the introduction of TAB, poker machines, lotteries etc. The Executive Members of the Assembly are a long way removed from the experienced and knowledge currently held in other places where these subjects are matters for State legislation and administration.

9. The Terms of Reference for the Inquiry are:

(1) the adequacy of the Lottery and Gaming Ordinance and related legislation and the administration of that legislation; (2) the needs of the racing industry in the Territory and the extent of assistance that is or could be provided under the legislation; (3) the conditions and controls under which the present off-course betting oper­

ates;

(4) whether the present off-course betting system should be replaced by a totalis­ ator system and the revenue potential of a totalisator system as against the present off-course betting system or that system paying a turnover tax; the relative benefits of each system to the racing industry and to the public; (5) whether the present tax per betting ticket is adequate and the desirability of

its replacement with a turnover tax; (6) the uses and distribution of revenue raised under the legislation. 10. In other States the pattern has been successfully followed, in considering and developing legislative and administrative changes in this functional area, of mounting an independent inquiry which takes evidence from a wide range of sources including members of the public likely to be affected, and makes recommendations accordingly to the parliamentary body. The proposed Inquiry merely follows this pattern.

320

ATTACHMENT G

POLICE UNIFORMS—IDENTIFICATION

Uniforms at present being issued to the Northern Territory Police Force do not have provision for a number to be displayed. When the new uniform was designed the Northern Territory Police was to have amalgamated into the proposed Australia Police Force and the question of whether numbers or name plates would be worn was

still under consideration. At that time it was expected that if a number was to be displayed it would have been incorporated in the Australia Police badge.

When the concept of the Australia Police was discontinued a policy decision was taken that Northern Territory Police would not wear identification numbers.

If a citizen needs or requires to know the identity of a member of the Northern Territory Police Force he may request that information from the member. Northern Territory Police Standing Order No. 58 Clause 7 provides that when acting in an official capacity a member shall at all times state his true name and rank to any person

so inquiring.

ATTACHMENT H

LOANS TO CHURCH ORGANISATIONS

Delays in the execution of mortgage documents

A schedule of loans is included in the attachment.

Answers to specific questions are:

(1) The amount so far loaned to church organisations is $6 064 285.63. (2) Twenty-three loans make up the aggregate sum. (3) Mortgage securities are required in four cases:

Catholic Church—Bakhita Village—interim security by way of a Memorandum of Deposit was executed on 28 July 1976. This complex sustained heavy damage during Cyclone Tracy and has subsequently become involved in an Aboriginal Land Claim.

YMCA Hostel, Darwin—Memorandum of Mortgage has been forwarded to the National Board in Victoria, for signature. The Board’s Solicitors are negotiating with the Crown Law Officer for execution to take place in the Northern Territory. In the meantime an undertaking to make repayments in accordance with the document has

been forwarded by the Association.

Anglican Parish o f the Ascension Hostel, Alice Springs—The Department of the Northern Territory received approval to provide a loan of $237 500 on 20 June 1972. Following advice and acceptance by the Anglican Parish a request was made to the Crown Law Officer on 17 November 1972 to prepare a mortgage which would contain provisions for further advances. On 2 February 1973 the request to the Crown

Law was followed up. At this stage the Welfare Branch had been transferred from the Department of the Northern Territory to the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and action until February 1974 rested with officers of that Branch. During this time an increase in the loan was approved raising it to $297 388. The file record indicates that

the matter of the mortgage was the subject of a request from the Crown Law Officer for additional information. This request was on 15 November 1973. The Department advised the Crown Law Officer on 30 January 1974 of the current situation and as a

result of this the draft mortgage was completed and forwarded to the Department on 13 May 1975.

321

24255/ 77-12

On receipt of the draft mortgage action was taken to forward the documents to the church for execution. This action was taken on 31 July 1975 and on 7 August 1975 the church advised that the title documents which were needed in connection with the mortgage were not available and were thought to be held at Thursday Island. It was not until 10 September 1975 that the Bishop of the Northern Territory agreed to sign the mortgage but requested a consolidation date for the payment of interest should be set at 30 June 1976. This was referred to the Crown Law Officer in December 1975 so that alterations could be made to give effect to the Bishop’s suggestion. On 31 December 1975 the Crown Law Officer advised that the Anglican Church’s legal adviser indicated that the client was not prepared to sign the document until negotiations on the consolidation date and a proper assessment of the advances

already made were completed.

Concurrently advice was received from the church confirming the mortgage had been passed to their legal adviser on the basis that the document was unsatisfactory, it making land used for church and rectory purposes turned over to hostel usage (in explanation it would be stated that the church is in possession of both Lots 23 and 24, the church and rectory being on Lot 23 and the hostel on Lot 24. There is a common title covering both lots in the forms of a Grant in Fee Simple. To register the mortgage against the title it is necessary to include in the mortgage document a full description of the land covered in the title).

The advice from the church was forwarded to Crown Law who advised on 18 March 1976 that the consolidation date and the amount of advance had been settled and that it was not proposed to subdivide Lots 23 and 24 (a subdivision would have resulted in separate titles for each lot). Crown Law also sought instruction as to whether or not this Department would agree to subjecting Lot 24 only to the mortgage. They were advised on 12 April 1976 that this proposal was acceptable provided the hostel did not encroach on Lot 23 (site drawings held on file indicate the hostel did encroach on Lot 23. This was shown to Crown Law).

A total of $10 871 was at this stage pending in outstanding claims, the Minister’s approval being necessary to increase the loan amount before this could be proceeded with. However, at about this time the appropriation for Loans to Church Organisations was reduced by $50 000 making any further expenditure in 1975-76 impossible. As the consolidation date of 30 June 1976 had been agreed to it was now necessary to alter this date to 30 June 1977, as any further advances would be outside the consolidation date previously agreed to and in excess of the loan amount detailed in the document. The church was advised of this on 12 April 1976 and also requested to forward the title document.

Crown Law apparently closed their file in error at this time and no further negotiations with regard to security documents were undertaken.

In recent discussions between this Branch, Crown Law and the church’s legal representative it has been resolved that security will be taken over both lots (the hostel complex does encroach on Lot 23) with provision in the mortgage to exclude covenants relating to the hostel only from encompassing other buildings on site and that the title to the land will be made available to Crown Law in the immediate future.

Crown Law are now of the opinion that it will be best to include an upper limit of advances in the mortgage in preference to provision for additional advances and it has been agreed that this should be proceeded with immediately.

Catholic Girls Hostel, Darwin—Following approval to make a loan of $303 000 to the Catholic Church for the erection of a girls hostel as part of a college complex the

322

Crown Law Officer was instructed to raise a mortgage document on 10 November 1972. Approval for additional advances was also requested.

The loan was increased to $336 530 on 25 October 1973 and the Crown Law Officer wrote on 31 December 1973 requesting information on the total of advances. The Crown Law Officer was subsequently advised of the above loan increase on 9 January 1974.

It was not until 3 September 1974 that the draft mortgage was forwarded by the Crown Law Officer. The consolidation date had not been included and this was to be rectified in executing the document. The document was not forwarded to the Catholic bishop until 15 August 1975 and it is assumed that this delay was occasioned by the transfer of staff and this function from the Department of Aboriginal Affairs to the

Department of the Northern Territory.

The Catholic bishop advised on 22 August that the document was satisfactory with the exception of advances. He requested additional funds so that the total of ad­ vances would be $404 136.57. Between August and November two changes of staff handling this matter took place.

In late November a full review of the loan scheme and this loan in particular was undertaken and the Catholic bishop requested to provide justification for the loan increase. A reply was not received to this request until 19 March 1976 and it was sub­ sequently found to be eligible for funds. However, the cut-back in the appropriation

for the loan scheme in April 1976 resulted in insufficient funds being available for this project. At the same time the question of Garden Point compensation ($41 500) arose. This compensation was payable for the acquisition of buildings at Garden

Point and was to be credited to the church’s application under the Long Term Low Interest Loan scheme. The compensation had been credited to the Bakhita Village loan. Crown Law was advised of the current position and the Catholic bishop ac­ cepted the transfer on 22 April but requested the payment of compound interest on same from 1969 (when the compensation was approved). On 20 July 1976 the Crown

Law Officer advised that Garden Point compensation and interest should be cleared before the mortgage document could be executed. A full assessment of the request for compound interest was done and recommended against and the bishop was advised

of this and of the intention to draft a new mortgage document on 9 September 1976. The bishop accepted the denial of compound interest on compensation on 17 Sep­ tember and the Crown Law Officer was advised that the situation had been resolved with respect to compensation and interest and was requested to draft a new docu­

ment. The bishop was concurrently also requested to return Special Purpose Lease 128 so that the mortgage could be registered without delay. On 7 October the bishop advised that the required Special Purpose Lease was with the Commonwealth Bank and that he had made arrangements for this to be

made available to us. On approaching the Commonwealth Bank for the document they declined to release it as they have an unregisterable Deed of Charge and are holding the document as security. The Crown Law Officer was advised of the situation on 25 October and has been asked to lodge a caveat. Informal discussion with bank officers reveal that they have financed all but the residential accommodation for this

college and indications are that their interest is in the order of $500 000. This advance was obtained in 1972. Crown Law are now investigating the situation and will advise on appropriate action.

4. 19 Mortgages have been executed and are in the hands of Government.

323

L o a n a m o u n t C h u r c h O r g a n i s a t i o n B u i l d i n g S e c u r i t y

Aborigines Inland Mission Aborigines Inland Mission United Evang. Lutheran Church Presb. Church (N.S.W.) Prop. Trust

Presb. Church (N.S.W.) Prop. Trust Presb. Church (N.S.W.) Prop. Trust Presb. Church (N.S.W.) Prop. Trust United Church in Nth Australia

Church of England Church of England Church of England Catholic Church

Methodist Overseas Mission YWCA YWCA N.A. Baptist

Catholic Church

Retta Dixon Homes, Darwin Retta Dixon (child care institution) Retta Dixon Homes, Alice Springs Warrawee Hospital South Aust.

Warrawee Hospital South Aust. St Phillips College Alice Springs St Phillips (residential accom.) Alice Springs Griffiths House Alice Springs (Hostel)

Carpentaria College Darwin Carpentaria College (residential accom.) Carpentaria College St John’s College (residential accom.)

Somerville Homes (child care institution) Hostel Alice Springs Hostel Alice Springs Hostel Darwin

Bakhita Village (Orphanage)

YMCA YWCA N.A. Baptist N.A. Baptist

Church of England Catholic Church

Hostel Darwin Hostel Darwin Hostel Katherine Hostel Alice Springs

Hostel Alice Springs Salonika Girls Hostel

$

172 907.621 6 OOO.OOJ 53 430.57 56 307.071

13 143.69J 273 284.07 72 393.76 7 720.00

173 173.761 35 000.00J 602 309.00 251 171.16

286 000.00 112 000.001 163 151.24J 320 000.00

358 847.74

671 704.20 440 000.00 222 922.36 999 308.85

368 376.55 405 133.99

2 Mortgages

1 Mortgage

2 Mortgages

2 Mortgages

1 Mortgage

3 Mortgages

1 Mortgage 1 Mortgage

2 Mortgages

1 Mortgage Memorandum of deposit executed Undertaking to execute

Mortgage Mortgage Mortgage No security

No security

6 064 285.63

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

REPORT TO THE SENATE

■

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee F has the honour to report to the Senate.

1. On 19 August 1976 the Senate referred to the Committee the Departmental Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments: Repatriation Employment and Industrial Relations

Attorney-General’s Business and Consumer Affairs

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates together with the Departmen­ tal Explanatory Notes and has received evidence in relation to them from the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, Senator Durack, and officers of the Departments concerned. Copies of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard reports of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with the Ap­ propriation Bill (No. 1) 1976-77 and the Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 1976-77. Cer­ tain answers to questions asked at the hearings which were deferred and subsequently given in writing are incorporated in the Hansard reports. Additional replies, received since the Committee’s last hearings, are included as an Appendix to this Report.

The Committee wishes to draw attention to the following:

3. During the examination of the Estimates for the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs, members of the Committee found difficulty in reconciling certain expenditure proposals. Further examination revealed what could have been made clear in the Explanatory Notes, that is, that where the categorisation of expenditure is changed so that aspects formerly constituting part of one item now constitute part or whole of another item they become difficult to understand without explanation. This

was demonstrated in the following: the expenditure figures for 1975-76 for Division 201—Prices Justification Tribunal, Subdivision 2—Administrative, Item 10—Consul­ tant and legal services of $17 341 indicated in the Particulars of Proposed Expendi­ ture for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977 (Document A), with the figure

given in the Department’s Explanatory Notes of $6970.

In explanation, the Committee were informed by a witness, Mr N. J. Brown, Registrar of the Prices Justification Tribunal, that ‘This year Treasury has given us a greater depth in costing in the items under our control. Last year, for instance, $17 341 which you see appearing there against item 10—Consultant and legal ser­ vices, is actually comprised this year of the two amounts in item 8 and item 10, namely $11 000 estimate for legal fees and $4000 estimate for consultant and legal services. The consultant and legal services name is a misnomer in terms of the current year. It is there, as I see it, to explain the $17 341 from last year. But the total expenditure last year on legal and consultancy services was $17 341 and this year it is estimated to be

$15 000’. Whilst the Committee accepted the explanation tendered, it believes that in future when such arrangements occur some cross reference should clearly be indi­ cated in the Explanatory Notes. Such a practice would assist members of the Com­ mittee and curtail the time taken by members before and during the Committee’s

hearings.

4. During its consideration of the Estimates of the Departments which were being examined, the Committee referred on several occasions to critical comments made by the Auditor-General in his Report for the year ended 30 June 1976.

327

The Committee received explanations of the criticisms and details of the remedial action which had been implemented by the Departments cited by the Auditor- General in his Report. The detailed answers given in response to the Committee’s questioning are contained in the Hansard report.

The Committee trusts that it will not be again necessaiy for it to raise these specific matters on any future occasion.

5. During its private deliberations, the question of the general effectiveness of the scrutiny function of Senate Estimates Committees was raised.

The Committee believes that Estimates Committees have since their establish­ ment, as miniature Committees of the Whole, played an important role in scrutinising proposed Estimates of Expenditure. Elowever, because of the intermittent nature of their operations and with the increasing complexity of government administration, particularly during the past few years, the Committees have not been able to fully and effectively scrutinise proposed expenditures. We believe that this can be overcome by continuous research both by members and appropriate staff.

The Committee agrees with the Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System that the scrutiny function of Estimates Committees could be enhanced and made more effective by providing them with both a full-time function and full-time staff. .

The Committee recommends that Estimates Committees, as well as conducting the usual examination of Annual and Additional Estimates, be empowered to engage in a total and continuing examination of Special Appropriations because of the mag­ nitude of such expenditures, which hitherto have never been subjected to the same degree of scrutiny as has been the case with the Annual and Additional Estimates which have been examined, often in minute detail by past Estimates Committees.

The Senate’s attention is particularly drawn to the fact that the sum of the Special Appropriations in 1975-76 ($11 424 350 000)* was 36 per cent greater than for Appropriation Bills (Nos 1-4) 1975-76 ($8 288 738 000)* and the Advance to the Treasurer ($69 077 000). To formally refer Special Appropriations to the Estimates Committees would, the Committee considers, enable the Senate to maintain a con­ stant, better and wider surveillance in this area of expenditure from the public purse.

The Committee further recommends that Estimates Committees be empowered to maintain a total and continuing examination of government-funded authorities which are not Departments of State. The Committee supports the observation of the Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System at page 51 of its Report. This course could be effected . . . ‘without prejudice to the right of the [proposed] House of Representatives Public Administration Committee to scrutinise the financial arrangements of statutory and other government authorities’.t This view strongly accords with that of the Senate which resolved on 9 December 1971:

That ‘ . . . unless the Parliament has expressly provided otherwise, there is no area of expenditure of public funds by statutory authorities which cannot be examined by Parliament or its Committees, and in this regard confirms the opinion expressed in the Report to the Senate by Estimates Com­ mittee B, viz. “ The Committee is of the opinion that whilst it may be argued that these bodies are not accountable through the responsible Minister of State to Parliament for day to day operations, statutory corporations may be called to account by Parliament itself at any time and that there are no areas of

* Rounded to the nearest Ό00. t Report of the Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System, 26 May 1976.

328

expenditure of public funds where these corporations have a discretion to withhold details or explanations from Parliament or its Committees unless the Parliament has expressly provided otherwise’’

This Resolution was reaffirmed in a unamimous resolution of the Senate on 23 October 1974.

The Committee acknowledges that the foregoing recommendations and obser­ vations may require a change in the Resolution which appointed Estimates Com­ mittees, but notes that such a wider and ongoing role for Estimates Committees would, in general terms, be in line with the observations made in the Report of the Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System at paragraph 179, namely:

‘The scrutiny function of the Estimates Committees could be enhanced by pro­ viding them with a full-time function and full-time staff’.

6. With regard to the proposal that Estimates Committees hold preliminary meet­ ings to consider the Departmental Explanatory Notes and Documents A and B to for­ mulate areas of questioning in an endeavour to reduce the time required for public hearings, the Committee considered that it would not have been able to adequately

carry out the function entrusted to it by the Senate if this course had been followed. The Committee considers that it would have inhibited unduly members in their ques­ tioning of the Minister and departmental officers by being restricted to previously designated areas of concern. Indeed, members believe that a line of questioning in the

public hearing is often rounded out by the subsequent and supplementary question­ ing by Senators, Committee and non-Committee members alike, having a particular interest in the matter being considered. A fuller explanation is more likely to be obtained than if questioning had been virtually restricted to previously designated

areas of interest. The Committee further considers that had it retricted questioning to previously designated areas, non-Committee members who participated in its proceedings would have been precluded from seeking explanations from the witnesses in any area other than that nominated in advance by a Committee member.

The Committee believes that Estimates Committees must continue to provide the opportunity to all Senators to participate in an examination of areas of expenditure which are of particular interest to them.

7. In considering the Estimates, the Committee was advantaged by the early pro­ vision of copies of Explanatory Notes from Departments and trusts that this most helpful practice will continue.

In conclusion, the Committee expresses its appreciation of the assistance given by the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and the officers of the various Departments who attended with him before the Committee.

P. E. RAE Chairman

19 October 1976 *

* J o u r n a ls o f th e S e n a t e , 9 December 1971, p. 846.

329

'

■

Estimates Committee F

Minutes of Proceedings

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 4

THURSDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 9.11 a.m.

2. REFERENCE TO ESTIMATES COMMITTEES: The Resolution of the Senate of 19 August 1976 relating to the referral to Estimates Committees of the Particu­ lars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977 was reported.

3. CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP OF THE COMMITTEE: The entry in the Jour­ nals o f the Senate of 26 August 1976 recording changes in the membership of the Committee was reported. The Committee membership, so altered, was:

Senators Bishop, Jessop, James McClelland, Tehan and Wheeldon.

4. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN: On the motion of Senator Jessop, Senator Rae was elected Chairman.

Senator Rae thereupon took the Chair.

5. PROCEDURE OF THE COMMITTEE: The Committee discussed the proposed new procedures for considering the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977.

Resolved: (a) That the Committee postpone consideration of subjects in which members have particular interest until the next meeting of the Committee.

(b ) That the Departmental Estimates be considered in the following order:

Department of Repatriation Attorney-General’s Department Business and Consumer Affairs Department of Employment and Industrial Relations

6. NEXT MEETING OF COMMITTEE: Discussion ensued on the time and date to be fixed for the next meeting of the Committee.

Resolved: That the Committee next meet at 9.30 a.m. on Thursday, 16 September 1976, subject to the concurrence of all members.

7. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 9.22 a.m., subject to the forego­ ing resolution.

8. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman), Senators Bishop, Jessop and Tehan. P. E. RAE Chairman

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E F

333

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 5 ■

THURSDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 9.33 a.m.

2. ORDER OF CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77:

Resolved: That the Departmental Estimates be considered in the following order: Department of Repatriation Business and Consumer Affairs Department of Employment and Industrial Relations and Attorney-General’s Department

3. ATTENDANCE: The following Members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman), Senators Bishop, Jessop and Tehan.

P. E. RAE Chairman

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E F

334

T H E SE N A T E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 6

THURSDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.02 p.m.

2. STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN: The Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee in its examination of the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977 and that, pursuant to the Order of the Senate of 19 August 1976, the Committee would consider the fol­ lowing Estimates:

E S T IM A T E S C O M M IT T E E F

Division

Document* * Page Nos Department Amount

A 1 13-1 15 525-527 Repatriation ...................................................... 249 437 000

B 22 921 Repatriation ...................................................... 2 569 000

A 63-66 290-294 Employment and Industrial Relations . . . . 144832000

B 13 838-839 Employment and Industrial Relations . . . . 8 819000

A 29-33 165-190 Attorney-General’s ............................................. 54 617 000

B 8-9 823-825 Attorney-General’s ............................................ 5 910 000

A 34-39 191-202 Business and Consumer Affairs ......................... 94 519 000

B 9 826 Business and Consumer Affairs ......................... 1764 000

* Document A—‘Pariculars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B—1 Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTMENT OF REPATRIATION: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Repatriation, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Repatriation: Mr G. T. Miller, First Assistant Commissioner, Management Services Dr J. H. Hurt, Chief Director, Medical Services Mr G. Felton, Assistant Commissioner, Benefits and Legislation

Mr J. W. Muir, Assistant Commissioner, Treatment Services Mr K. H. Ryan, Acting Director, Finance Mr A. H. Williams, Acting Assistant Director, Budgets and Accounts. Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

The Minister for Repatriation (Senator Durack) made a statement to the Com­ mittee relating to the purposes of the Department of Repatriation.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 52 5 -527—Department of Repatriation (Document A) Division 921 —Department of Repatriation (Document B) The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration of:

Document A: Division 525— Administrative Division 526—Repatriation Hospitals and other Institutions Division 527/01 to 04—Other Repatriation Benefits

335

Resolved: That the Committee postpone consideration of Item 05—Expenses of travelling for medical treatment . . . $7 034 000, subject to the provision of information satisfactory to the Committee. Division 527/06 to 10—Other Repatriation Benefits

Document B: Division 921 —Capital Works and Services The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Repatriation, subject to the foregoing resolution.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPART­ MENT OF BUSINESS AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Repatriation, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Business and Consumer Affairs: Mr J. T. O ’Connor, First Assistant Secretary, Management Services Mr A. G. Koukoulas, Assistant Commissioner, Services Branch Mr J. V. McKeown, First Assistant Commissioner, Trade Practices

Commission Mr F. I. Kelly, Assistant Secretary., Management Mr H. Bates, Assistant Secretary, Investigation Mr P. Toohey, Finance Officer, Industries Assistance Commission Mr N. F. Brown, Registrar, Prices Justification Tribunal.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 191-202—Department of Business and Consumer Affairs (Document A) Division 826—Department of Business and Consumer Affairs ( Document B)

Resolved: That intervening Divisions be postponed till after the consideration of Division 201—Prices Justification Tribunal.

Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration of:

Division 201 —Prices Justification Tribunal Division 191—Administrative Division 193—Bankruptcy The Committee proceeded to consider Division 195—Bureau of Customs.

5. MINUTES: The Minutes of meetings held on 9 and 16 September 1976 were read and confirmed.

6. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.06 p.m. until a day and hour to be fixed.

7. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman) and Senators Bishop, Jessop and Tehan.

Senators McIntosh and O ’Byrne also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

336

P. E. RAE Chairman

TH E SENATE

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 7

TUESDAY, 12 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 4.04 p.m.

2. REPLIES TO REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION: The Chairman reported re­ ceipt of answers received from the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs relating to the Department of Repatriation and from the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs asked at the previous meeting of the Committee and to which answers

could not then be supplied. By leave of the Committee the answers were incor­ porated in Hansard.

3. POSTPONEMENT:

Resolved—That further consideration of the Particulars of Proposed Expenditure 1976-77 for the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs be postponed till after the consideration of Division 527—Other Repatriation Benefits, Item 05—Expenses of travelling for medical treatment $7 034 000, Department of

Repatriation.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTM ENT OF REPATRIATION: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans ’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Repatriation (now the Department of Veterans’Affairs): Mr G. T. Miller, First Assistant Commissioner, Management Services.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch Mr R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

The Chairman called on the following Division and Item for consideration:

Division 527/05—Department of Repatriation (Document A) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Repatriation.

5. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-DEPARTM ENT OF BUSINESS AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Business and Consumer Affairs: Mr J. T. O ’Connor, First Assistant Secretary, Management Services Mr A. G. Koukoulas, Assistant Commissioner, Services Branch Mr J. V. McKeown, First Assistant Commissioner, Trade Practices

Commission Mr F. I. Kelly, Assistant Secretary, Management Mr H. Bates, Assistant Secretary, Investigation Mr P. Toohey, Finance Officer, Industries Assistance Commission.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch Mr R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

ESTIM A TES C O M M ITTEE F

337

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 195, 198, 199, 202—Department of Business and Consumer Affairs (Document A) Division 826—Department of Business and Consumer Affairs (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs.

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE 1976-77-ATTORNEY- GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Min­ ister for Veterans ’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers: Attorney-General’s Department:

Mr B. J. O ’Donovan, First Assistant Crown Solicitor Mr L. G. Glare, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Management and Special Services Division Mr P. Brazil, First Assistant Secretary, Advisings Division Mr L. J. Curtis, First Assistant Secretary, Federal Courts Division Mr A. C. C. Menzies, First Assistant Secretary, Justice and Family Law

Division Mr G. J. F. Yuill, Senior Assistant Secretary, Justice and Family Law Division Mr E. J. Wright, Senior Assistant Secretary, Legislative Drafting Division Mr J. L. M. Carnsew, Assistant Secretary, Special Services Branch Mr C. K. Comans, First Parliamentary Counsel Mr J. P. Harkins, Director, Australian Legal Aid Office Mr N. T. Sexton, Director, Legislative Drafting Institute Mr D. Biles, Assistant Director, Research, Australian Institute of

Criminology Mr R. Mills, Registrar, Administrative Appeals Tribunal Mr P. E. Basket!, Acting Assistant Secretary, Establishments and Planning Branch Mr A. B. French, Acting Assistant Secretary, Operations Branch.

Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch Mr R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 165-190—Attorney-General’s Department (Document A ) Divisions 823-825—Attorney-General’s Department (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Attorney-General’s Department.

7. ADJOUNRMENT: The Committee adjourned at 10.11 p.m. until a day and hour to be fixed.

8. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman) and Senators Bishop, Jessop, Tehan and Wheeldon. Senators Button and O ’Byrne also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

P. E. RAE Chairman

338

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 8

THURSDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 12.02 p.m.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED EXPENDITURE-DEPARTM ENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Employment and Industrial Relations: Mr A. Fogarty, Acting Deputy Secretary Mr P. Kirby, First Assistant Secretary, Manpower and Economic Policy Division

Mr C. K. Wood, First Assistant Secretary, Management and Secretariat Division Mr J. E. Cooley, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Information Branch, Man­ agement and Secretariat Division Mr C. J. Lock, Senior Finance Officer, Finance and Information Branch,

Management and Secretariat Division. Department o f the Treasury: Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch Mr R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Branch.

The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs (Senator Durack) made a statement to the Committee relating to the Estimates for the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations. The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 290-294—Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (Document A) Divisions 838-839—Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the

Department of Employment and Industrial Relations.

3. MINUTES: The Minutes of the meetings held on 2 1 September and 12 October 1976 were read and confirmed.

4. DRAFT REPORT: The Committee discussed the form of a draft report to the Senate, and agreed that the draft be considered at the next meeting.

5. NEXT MEETING: It was agreed that the Committee meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 October 1976, to complete its report.

6. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 3.38 p.m.

7 ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman) and Senators Jessop, Tehan and Wheeldon. Senators Cameron and Mulvihill also took part in the Committee s proceedings. P. E. RAE Chairman

339

THE SENATE

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 9

TUESDAY, 19 OCTOBER 1976

1. MEETING: The Committee met at 1.00 p.m.

2. MINUTES: The Minutes of the meeting held on 14 October 1976 were read and confirmed.

3. DRAFT REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration. The Committee agreed to the Report on the motion of Senator Bishop, seconded by Senator Jessop.

4. ADJOURNMENT: The Committee adjourned at 1.05 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman) and Senators Bishop, Jessop and Tehan.

ESTIM ATES COM M ITTEE F

P. E. RAE Chairman

19 October 1976

340

Estimates Committee F

Appendix

INDUSTRIES ASSISTANCE COMMISSION

P.O. Box 80

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 15 October 1976

Senator P. E. Rae Chairman Senate Estimates Committee F Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator, The following answers are submitted to your Committee in answer to questions raised by Senator Jessop and Senator Bishop during the Committee’s examination of the Industries Assistance Commission’s estimates of expenditure for 1976-77.

An undertaking was given to you by the Commission’s principal witness Mr A. G. Koukoulas, Assistant Commissioner, Services Branch, to supply answers to these questions in writing as soon as possible.

Senator Jessop (Senate Hansard, page 529) Question-In this particular item for salaries and allowances, how much would have been allowed for, say, the shipbuilding inquiry?

This item provides for the payment of salaries and allowances for permanent and temporary employees of the Commission. The estimate is based on overall staffing levels set by the Public Service Board and the Treasury. Normally the Commission prepares a budget for each reference it receives. However, in this case, the reporting deadline of thirty days specified by the Government did not allow for a separate allo­ cation to be made.

Question:

What did it cost out of that amount? Answer: $17 400. This amount included some $1420 for Commissioner and Associate Commissioner salaries, which is funded under the Special Appropriation, Holders of

Public Office {Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973-75).

Question:'. . . can you give me a rough idea of what that inquiry cost?’

Answer:

A nswer:

Salaries and allowances Administrative costs:

$

17 400

Travel Printing Freight

1 450 130

Publication of report Advertising . .

40

1 600 1 600 4 820

TOTAL COST 22 220

343

Senator Bishop (Senate Hansard, page 529) Question: ‘When the officer is supplying the details, could he supply a list of the total staff and the expertise which they have?’ Answer: This question is answered in respect of the shipbuilding and performing arts references.

(A) List o f staff on shipbuilding Commissioners: 1 Commissioner 1 Associate Commissioner

Staff (full-time involvement) 1 Assistant Commissioner 1 Project Director 1 Principal Research Officer 5 Project Officers

1 Clerk

Staff (part-time involvement) 3 First Assistant Commissioners 1 Assistant Commissioner 1 Statistical Officer 2 Assistant Secretaries 2 Editors

1 Accountant 1 Clerk

List o f staff on performing arts Commissioners: 1 Commissioner 1 Associate Commissioner

Staff ( full-time involvement) 1 Project Director 1 Senior Project Officer 4 Project Officers

1 Assistant Project Officer

Staff! part-time involvement) 1 Assistant Commissioner 2 Directors 1 Accountant

1 Assistant Secretary 1 Assistant Editor Other—two part-time consultants

(B ) Expertise The Commission’s inquiries cover a wide range of activities in all sectors of the economy. The overriding consideration in selection of Commissioners and staff for a reference is that the Commission has available to it the necess­ ary skills, knowledge and expertise to analyse and report on questions of asistance to Australian industries. This process is largely concerned with

344

problems of resource allocation and the effects on the general community in accordance with the Commission’s statutory obligations. In cases where the Commission does not have available sufficient background or detailed tech­ nical or specialist knowledge, it has sought to use consultants to supplement

its available resources. Consultants are largely drawn from academic institu­ tions and, from time to time, from industry. This source of supplementary ex­ perience has been markedly affected by recent expenditure cut-backs. The use of consultants in this way is a most efficient and effective means of secur­

ing specialist skills required on a non-recurring basis. The Commission’s public inquiry system allows all interested parties to provide evidence relevant to the industry. This evidence may include expla­ nations, background and implications for the industry of changing assistance, structural adjustments and technological change. Difficulties may arise where the Commission is unable to test assertions made in evidence; it does seek to obtain independent assessments from interested parties, such as in the recent stranded wire and cables reference, but where this is not possible the Com­

mission has had to seek assistance from consultants. In the case of short-term inquiries, such as that on shipbuilding, it is usually not possible to engage consultants because of time limitations. In addition, the Commission seeks the assistance of departments which have a particular interest and expertise

in the industries under inquiry.

Question:'. . . did the Commission at any stage receive expert advice from out­ side its own resources?’ Answer: In relation to shipbuilding: No. In the case of short-term inquiries, such as shipbuilding, it is normally not possible to engage consultants. In relation to perform­ ing arts: Yes.

Question:'. . . if so, who were these experts?’ Answer:

(1) Professor D. C. Throsby Professor of Economic and Financial Studies Macquarie University North Ryde, N.S.W.

(2) D rG .A .W ithers Department of Economics Research School of Social Sciences ANU Canberra, A.C.T.

Question:'. . . could you specify exactly what was requested of the IAC when the terms of reference were received from the Government?’ Answer: Please refer to the attached copies of the official reference notification fo r- Shipbuilding—Performing Arts

345

A. G. KOUKOULAS Assistant Commissioner Services Branch

SHIPBUILDING

I, John Winston Howard, Minister for Business and Consumer Affairs, hereby refer the following matters to the Industries Assistance Commission for inquiry and report in accordance with section 23 of the Industries Assistance Commission Act 1973:

Whether, in the light of cost movements in shipbuilding since the Tariff Board last reported in 1971, any changes are necessary in the assistance accorded the industry in order to sustain economic production in Australia; and, if so found, the nature and extent of such changed assistance.

In reporting on this reference, the Commission should report on the economic and social consequences to major shipbuilding centres such as Whyalla and Newcastle, of both the existing assistance and of any changed assistance recommended.

JOHN HOWARD

18 August 1976

ASSISTANCE TO THE PERFORMING ARTS

INDUSTRIES ASSISTANCE COMMISSION

I, EDWARD GOUGH WHITLAM, Prime Minister, hereby:

1. Refer the following matter to the Industries Assistance Commission for inquiry and report in accordance with section 23 of the Industries Assistance Commission Act 1973:

Whether assistance should be accorded the performing arts in Australia and if so what should be the nature and extent of such assistance.

2. Specify that for the purpose of this reference performing arts shall be deemed to include live performances of ballet, dance, opera, music, drama, music hall, vaudeville, puppetry and the like.

3. Further specify that in conducting its inquiry and presenting its report, the Industries Assistance Commission should have regard to the desire of the Govern­ ment that the Commission be free to take evidence and, if considered necessary, to make recommendations on any other matter it considers relevant to its inquiry under this reference.

4. Further specify the period commencing on the date of this reference and end­ ing on 30 June 1976 as the period within which the Commission is to report on the matters set out in this reference.

6 October 1974

E. G. WHITLAM Prime Minister

ATTORNEY-GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 15 October 1976

Senator P. E. Rae Chairman Estimates Committee F Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Chairman,

Additional Information to be Supplied by the Attorney-General’s Department

In accordance with the wishes of the Committee the attached additional informa­ tion is provided in answer to questions raised by members of the Committee in the examination of the estimates of the Attorney-General’s Department on 12 October 1976.

2. The questions raised on Mr Lauterpacht and Professor Howard have been referred to the Attorney-General and the information should be available to the Committee by 18 October 1976.

3. In relation to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (Hansard, page 548) the information is being co-ordinated and will be made available as soon as possible.

Yours sincerely,

L. G. GLARE for Secretary

347

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 533—Publication of Commonwealth Statutes—Division 165/2/05

The Attorney-General’s Department is responsible for arranging for the printing and publication of Commonwealth and Territorial legislation and the printing and distri­ bution are carried out by the Australian Government Publishing Service.

The costs met by this Department include the cost of setting up type (including all labour costs), producing proofs correct for press, printing, binding and distribution. These costs are related to the free distribution list which includes:

(1) Members of the Commonwealth Parliament (2) Commonwealth Government Departments (3) Commonwealth Statutory Authorities (4) Judgesof Federal Courts (5) State Law Departments (6) Magistrates Courts in all States and Territories (7) Certain countries with which there is a reciprocal arrangement.

From time to time consideration has been given to further extension of the free list but the policy at present is to supply only those groups mentioned above.

Persons or organisations other than those mentioned above are charged the fol­ lowing amounts by the Australian Government Publishing Service in respect of:

(a) Bound volumes of Acts to 1973, $9.50 per volume (b) Consolidation of Acts 1901-1973, $25.00 per volume (c) Bound volumes of Statutory Rules to 1972, $12.35 per volume (d) Annotated Constitution and companion volume to the Consolidation of Acts

1901-1973. No price has yet been determined in respect of these future publications.

This Department is unable at this stage to give details of sales receipts from these publications or from the Family Law Handbook. The Australian Government Publishing Service is being requested to supply them.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 539—Law Courts Ltd—Contributions to operating expenses—Division 165/3/09

The Committee asked to be advised whether Law Courts Ltd is liable to pay State rates and land taxes in respect of the land on which the Law Courts building is being constructed.

The answer to that question is—Law Courts Ltd does not at present own or occupy any land and it is therefore not liable for any State rates or land taxes. The land on which the Law Courts building is being erected is owned in part by the State and in part by the Commonwealth. It is the intention of the Commonwealth and New South

Wales to seek enabling legislation from their respective parliaments for title to the Law Courts building to be vested in Law Courts Ltd. When the form of that legis­ lation comes to be settled, the question of the liability of the company to all Common­ wealth and State taxes, including rates and land taxes, will need to be resolved. The present expectation is that Law Courts Ltd will be exempted from State rates and land taxes.

348

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 542—Establishment—Division 172

Court Administration The following information is submitted in respect of Division 172 Courts Administration:

Establishment 30.6.76 Proposed staffing 1976-77

Supreme Court A.C.T. 57 51

Lower Courts A.C.T. 40 39

Magistrates Court N.T. 57 53

Supreme Court N.T. 25 22

Industrial Court 22 22

Bankruptcy Court 5 5

Total 206 192

The increase in staffing from 170 in 1975-76 to 192 in 1976-77 relates to the reorganisation of the Magistrates Court area in the Northern Territory where the es­ tablishment has been increased from 30 to 57 positions.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 543—Financial Assistance under the Conciliation and Arbitration Act—Division 172/3/01

A. Matters in respect of which financial assistance was paid during the 1975-1976 financial year $ Messrs Steve Masselos and Co.—Matter No. B 78 of 1975—William

Charles Wood v. William Morris and others ....................................... 3 618

Messrs W. C. Taylor and Scott—Matter No. B 78 of 1975—William Charles Wood v. William Morris and others ....................................... 7 831

Messrs McClelland, Wallace and Landa—Matter No. B 78 of 1975 — William Charles Wood v. William Morris and others ........................ 4 503

Messrs Bryan Vaughan and Co.—Matter B 110 of 1974—B. T. Egan . . 1180 Messrs Walker, Gibbs and Donald—Matter B 276 of 1975—B. V. Bowden 255 Messrs Bryan Vaughan and Co.—Matter B 161 of 1974—B. T. Egan and R. E. Davis ............................................................................................ 54 332

Messrs R. F. Turner, Freeman and Partners—Matter B 161 of 1974—B. W. O ’Neill ................................................................................................. 16 614

A. J. M acken-M atter B 161 of 1974-R . W. Harradine ........................ 91856

180 189

B. List of authorisations of financial assistance (i) outstanding from the financial year 1975-76 and (ii) list or authorisations granted during the current financial year

(i) Outstanding Authorisations o f Financial Assistance (1975- 76) Brian Harradine and others (section 141B) in relation to proceedings B No. 161 of 1974—re dispute within the Shop Distributive and Allied Employees Associa­ tion—Egan v. Harradine and others

349

Barry Thomas Egan (section I41B) in relation to proceedings B No. 110 of 1974—re dispute within the Shop Distributive and Allied Employees Association Barry Victor Bowden (section 141A) in relation to proceedings B No. 115 of

1974— re dispute within Federal Liquor and Allied Industries Union of Australia William Charles Wood (section 141 A) in relation to proceedings B No. 278 of 1975— re dispute within the Federated Liquor and Allied Industries Union of

Australia J. A. Bell (section 141A) in relation to proceedings B No. 82 and 273 of 1975- dispute within Federated Rubber and Allied Workers Union

(ii) List o f Authorisations granted in the Current Financial Year Damien Stapleton (section 141 A) in relation to proceedings B No. 38 of 1976- dispute within the Theatrical and Amusement Employees Association Kathy Louise Gordon (section 141 A) in relation to a dispute within the Hospital

Employees Federation—K. L. Gordon v. Keith Leo Mitchell and others F. A. Rowlings and others (section 141A) re matter B No. 137 of 1976—dispute within Tasmanian Branch of the Transport Workers Union E. Cirillo (section 141A) re matter B No. 6 of 1976—dispute within Australian

Tramways Omnibus Employees Association F. Cooke (section 168 (1)) dispute concerning irregularities in an election within Vehicle Builders Employees Federation B. J. Noone (section 141 A) re matter B No. 8 of 1976—dispute within Vehicle

Builders Employees Federation

C. Estimate of costs payable in relation to all outstanding authorisations granted to date—$112 500

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 544—Marriage Counselling Organisations Division 173/3/03

The twenty-two approved organisations are:

Catholic Family Welfare Bureau, Hobart Catholic Welfare Organisation, A.C.T. Church of England Marriage Guidance Centre, N.S.W. Church of England Marriage Guidance and Educational Council, Vic. Methodist Marriage Guidance Council, N.S.W. Adelaide Central Misson

Marriage Counselling & Education Service, South Australia Family Life Movement, N.S.W. Citizens Welfare Service, Vic. Cairnmillar Institute, Vic. Marriage Guidance Council of N.S.W. Marriage Guidance Council of Victoria Queensland Marriage Guidance Council Marriage Guidance Council of South Australia Marriage Guidance Council of W.A. Inc. Tasmanian Marriage Guidance Council Canberra Marriage Guidance Council

350

Darwin Marriage Guidance Council Catholic Family Welfare Bureau, Victoria Catholic Family Welfare Bureau, Queensland Catholic Family Welfare Bureau, South Australia

Catholic Marriage Guidance Council, W.A.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE HEARING

Page 549—Legal Aid—Grants to supplement existing legal aid schemes—Division 824/01

This year’s Budget provides $lm for grants to supplement legal aid scheme in the States. The same amount was provided for this purpose in 1975-76.

The Attorney-General is currently considering the allocation of the grants this year having regard to submissions he has received and the particular circumstances in each State.

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