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Estimates Senate Committees - Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure - Reports from Estimates Committees A, B, C, D, E and F, together with the respective Hansard records of the Committees' proceedings for year - 1976 77


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Parliamentary Paper No. 84/1 9 7 7

The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEES A, B, C, D, E and F

Reports to the Senate on Departmental Additional Estimates 1976-77

Brought up and

ordered to be printed 24 May 1977

T H E COM MONWEALTH GOVERNM ENT PRIN TER

CANBERRA 1979

Printed by Authority by the Cc ,Gc

CONTENTS

Page

1. Resolutions of the Senate 21 April 1977 1

2. Estimates Committee A R eport . . . . . . . . . . . 5

M inutes of Proceedings 1977 26 April 1977 ........................................................................................ 9

3 May 1977 ........................................................................................ 13

5 May 1977 ........................................................................................ 16

Appendix Written answers to questions . . . . . . . 19

3. Estimates Committee B R e p o r t .............................................................................................................. 127

Minutes of Proceedings 1977 26 April 1977 131

Appendix Written answers to q u e s t i o n s ................................................... . 1 3 7

4. Estimates Committee C R e p o r t .............................................................................................................. 155

Minutes of Proceedings 1977 26 April 1977 159

5 May 1977 163

Appendix Written answers to q u e s t i o n s .................................................................... 167

5. Estimates Committee D R e p o r t .............................................................................................................. 185

Minutes of Proceedings 1977 28 April 1977 189

4 May 1977 192

Appendix Written answers to q u e s t i o n s ......................................... .......... . 195

6. Estimates Committee E R e p o r t ..............................................................................................................231

Minutes of Proceedings 1977 28 April 1977 237

3 May 1977 239

Appendix Written answers to q u e s t i o n s .................................................................... 243

7. Estimates Committee F R eport .................................................................................. .......... . 275

Minutes of Proceedings 1977 28 April 1977 281

4 May 1977 285

Appendix Written answers to questions . . . . . . . 2 9 1

iii

RESO LU TIO N PASSED ON 21 A PR IL 1977

12 Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure 1976-77—Papers—R eference to E stimates Committees: The Minister for Education (Senator Carrick), by Com­ mand of His Excellency the Governor-General, laid upon the Table the following Papers:

Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977. Particulars of Certain Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977.

Reference to Estimates Committees'. Senator Carrick, by leave, moved— (1) That the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977 and the Particulars of Certain Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977 be referred herewith to

Estimates Committees for examination and report, (2) That the Committees deal with departmental estimates as follows: Estimates Committee A Department of Administrative Services

Parliament Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Department of National Resources Department of Foreign Affairs

Department of Defence Estimates Committee B Department of Industry and Commerce Department of Overseas Trade

Department of the Treasury Department of Finance Department of Primary Industry Estimates Committee C Department of Education

Department of Transport Postal and Telecommunications Department Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development Estimates Committee D

Department of Social Security Department of Health Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs Department of Aboriginal Affairs Estimates Committee E

Department of Science Department of the Northern Territory Department of Construction

Department of the Capital Territory Estimates Committee F Department of Veterans’ Affairs Department of Employment and Industrial Relations

Attorney-General’s Department Department of Business and Consumer Affairs Department of Productivity (3) That the Committees report to the Senate on or before Tuesday, 24 May 1977. Debate ensued. Question—put and passed.

1

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

REPORT TO THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee A has the honour to present its Report to the Senate.

1. On 21 April 1977, the Senate referred to the Committee the Additional Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments:

Parliament Departm ent o f Administrative Services Departm ent of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Departm ent of N ational Resources

Departm ent of Foreign Affairs Departm ent of Defence

2. The Committee considered the Additional Estimates and received explanations from the President o f the Senate (in relation to the Parliamentary Departments), the Minister for Administrative Services, the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and the Minister for Science and officers of the Departments. A copy of the Minutes of

Proceedings and Hansard report of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77 and Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 1976-77.

3. Additional written replies received after the Committee hearings are included as an Appendix to the Report.

4. The Committee records its appreciation of the explanations provided by the President of the Senate, the Ministers and the officers of the various Departments who assisted during the examination.

5 M ay 1977 J. P. SIM

Chairman

5

Estimates Committee A

Minutes of Proceedings

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 1 TUESDAY, 26 APRIL 1977 1. PRIVATE M EETIN G : The Committee met at 4.00 p.m.

2. APPO IN TM EN T OF, REFEREN CE TO, A N D M EM BERSHIP OF ESTIMATES COM M ITTEES: The Resolutions of the Senate of 20 April and 21 April 1977 relating to the appointment of Estimates Committee A, the reference to the Committee of the proposed additional expenditure 1976-77 and

the membership of the Committee were reported.

3. ELECTION OF C H A IR M A N : On the motion of Senator Scott, Senator Sim was elected Chairman of the Committee.

4. ABSENCE OF CHA IRM A N : The Secretary reported the unavoidable absence of Senator Sim.

On the motion of Senator Douglas McClelland, Senator Scott was appointed Acting Chairman.

Senator Scott thereupon took the Chair

5. PUBLIC M EETING—STATEMENT BY ACTING C H A IR M A N : The Acting Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee in its examination of the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 lune 1977, and stated that,

pursuant to the Resolution of the Senate on 21 April 1977, the Committee would consider the following departmental estimates:

Division

Document * Page No. Department A m ount

A 7-11 130-160 A dm inistrative Services . . 17 246 000

A 19 250 R ent ( Defence) . . . . 800 000

B 4 817 A dm inistrative Services . , 1 635 000

A 4-5 101-109 Parliam ent . . . . . 779 000

A 38-39 500-516 Prim e M inister and C abinet . . 1 384 000

B 10 917 Prim e M inister and Cabinet . . 65 000

A 32 430-432 N ational R esources . . . 686 000

B 8 883-886 N ational R esources . . . 11 085 000

A 27-28 305-308 Foreign Affairs . . . . 8 122 100

B 7 849 Foreign A ffairs . . . . 100 600

A 17-19 230-242 Defence ** . . . . . 67 503 000

• Document A-*Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B -‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. ** Excluding item under the control of the Department of Administrative Services (Division 250).

9

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED A D D ITION AL EX PENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF ADM INISTRATIVE SERVICES Appearing: Senator the Honourable R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

M r A. R. Palmer, Deputy Secretary

Ministerial and Management Services Division:

M r T. F. Paterson, First Assistant Secretary M r D. R. White, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Office Services Branch M r N. M. Boyle, Assistant Secretary, Personnel and Establishments Branch M r P. D. Priestley, Acting Director, Budget and Estimates, Finance and

Office Services Branch M r J. Gavin, Principal Executive Officer, ADP and Executive Services Branch M r P. W. Molony, Executive Officer, ADP and Executive Services Branch

Secretariat and Policy Division: M r A. W. McCasker, First Assistant Secretary M r K. P. Cooper, Assistant Secretary, Territories and Authorities Branch M r B. E. Hinchcliffe, Assistant Secretary, Grants, Honours and Museums

Branch M r S. Wenger, Director, Honours Section, Grants, Honours and Museums Branch

Property and Survey Division: M r M. W. Frankcom, Acting First Assistant Secretary M r A. A. Hillier, Assistant Secretary, Overseas Operations Branch M r R. E. McLean, Executive Officer, Programming and Information,

Property Branch M r J. J. Skinner, Chief Property Officer, Australian Capital Territory Transport and Storage Division: M r R. W. Davies, First Assistant Secretary

M r J. J. Mason, Director, Finance and Administration Information Services Division: M r P. A. Nott, First Assistant Secretary Australian Electoral Ojfice:

M r I. D. Emerton, Deputy Chief Australian Electoral Officer M r H. R. Hegarty, Director, Management Services Branch Commonwealth Police: Mr L. S. J. Harper, Assistant Commissioner

Department o f Finance officials: M r R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer M r M. Chik, Finance Officer

The Acting Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 130-160—Department of Administrative Services (Document A) Division 250— Department o f Defence (Document A) Division 817—Department of Administrative Services (Document B)

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expendi­ ture for the Department of Administrative Services.

10

7. PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED A D D ITION AL EX PENDITURE 1976-77— PARLIAM ENT

Appearing: Senator the Honourable Condor L. Laucke, President of the Senate, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Senate: M r J. R. Odgers, Clerk of the Senate M r T. H. G. W harton, Deputy Usher of the Black Rod M r H. Evans, Deputy Usher of the Black Rod M r R. G. Mair, Senior Parliamentary Officer, Administration M r A. H. Higgins, Senior Clerk of Committees M r M. W. H. Rosser, Senior Parliamentary Officer (Parliamentary Dele­

gations—Travel) Parliamentary Reporting Staff: M r K. R. Ingram, Principal Parliamentary Reporter M r F. W. Temperly, Administrative Officer Library:

M r A. L. Moore, Parliamentary Librarian M r H. Knight, Finance Officer Joint House Department: M r R. W. Hillyer, Secretary

M r R. L. Burrell, Chief Executive Officer

Department o f Finance officials:

M r R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer M r M. Chik, Finance Officer The Acting Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 101-109—Parliament (Document A) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expen­ diture for the Parliament.

8. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF THE PRIM E M INISTER AND CABINET

Appearing: Senator the Honourable Peter Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

M r J. G. Hinton, Assistant Secretary, Services Branch M r R. T. Kinnaird, Committee of Inquiry into Education and Training M r W. J. Blick, Constitutional and Legal Affairs Branch Auditor-General's Office:

M r D. D. Hume, Controller Public Service Board: M r R. N. McLeod, Acting Secretary Australia Council:

M r J. R. A. Cameron, General Manager M r Claremont, Director, Administration

Department o f Finance officials:

M r R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer M r M. Chik, Finance Officer

11

The Acting Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 500-516—Department o f the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Docu­ ment A) Division 917—Department o f the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expen­ diture for the Departm ent of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

9. A D JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 10.02 p.m.

10. A TTEN D A N C E: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Scott, Knight, Douglas McClelland and McLaren (4). Senators Harradine, Jessop, O’Byrne, Rae, Sheil, Wood, Wright and Young also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

J. P. SIM

Chairman

12

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2 TUESDAY, 3 MAY 1977

1. M EETIN G : The Committee met at 4,00 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Sim) took the Chair.

2. PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPA RTM EN T OF NATIONAL RESOURCES Appearing: Senator the Honourable R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

M r R. Hopkins, Assistant Secretary, Management Services M r L. R. Riches, Assistant Director, Finance and Accounts M r D. Gates, Assistant Secretary, Uranium and Electricity Division M r A. A. Garran, Financial Controller, Petroleum and Minerals Investment

Group M r P. P. Power, Finance Officer M r C. Veenstra, Assistant Director, Division of National Mapping M r L. W. Williams, Assistant Director, Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology

and Geophysics M r R. Layland, Assistant Secretary, Secretariat Branch, Energy Planning Division

Department o f Finance officials'.

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 430-432—Department of National Resources (Document A)

Divisions 883-886—Department of National Resources (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expen­ diture for the Department of National Resources.

3, PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT O F FO R EIG N AFFAIRS Appearing: Senator the Honourable R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

Mr A. R. Parsons, Acting Deputy Secretary Mr W. G. T. Miller, Assistant Secretary, Personnel Branch Mr D. C. Rutter, Acting Assistant Secretary, Administrative Services Branch Mr R. E. Johns, Director (Finance)

Mr I. J. Meszes, Estimates Officer Mr D. Witherford, Acting Assistant Secretary, International Organisations Branch Mr M. J. Wilson, First Assistant Secretary, Public Affairs and Cultural

Relations Division M r J. P. Walshe, M.B.E., Assistant Secretary, Technical Services Branch

13

Australian Development Assistance Bureau: M r L. W. Temby, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Services Branch M r R. G. Spratt, Assistant Secretary, Operations Branch M r E. Ingevics, Assistant Secretary, International Organisations and

Liaison Branch M r N. W. Hunt, Senior Executive Officer, Finance Section M r K. W. Aspinall, Senior Executive Officer, Australian Staffing Assistance G roup Section M r A. R. Taylor, Head, Indonesia Section, South-East Asia Branch

Department o f Finance officials:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 305-308—Department of Foreign Affairs (Document A)

Division 849—Department of Foreign Affairs (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expendi­ ture for the Department of Foreign Affairs.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF DEFENCE Appearing: Senator the Honourable R. G. Withers, Minister for Administrative Services, accompanied by the following officers:

M r K. T. Lyon, Assistant Secretary, Financial Programs M r R. L. Jones, Acting Assistant Secretary, Budgets and Estimates (General and Co-ordination) M r J. W. Knight, Assistant Secretary, Budgets and Estimates (Services)

M r P. F. M cNamara, Assistant Secretary, Resources Planning (Navy) M r T. E. Sullivan, Assistant Secretary, Resources Planning (Army) M r D. A. Whitty, Assistant Secretary, International Policy, Papua New Guinea and Defence Co-operation Programs M r D. M. McAlister, Assistant Secretary, Manpower Policy and Requirements Commodore R. H. Percy, Director-General, Joint Plans and Operations Mr A. F. Kent, Assistant Secretary, Project Planning and Evaluation M r Η. P. Jones, Assistant Secretary (Administration), Defence Science and

Technology Mr A. G. Newton, Chief Executive Officer, Supply Policy Mr K. Goffey, Principal Executive Officer, Natural Disasters Organisation M r A. H. DeMarchi, Chief Executive Officer, Resources Planning—Material

(Air Force)

Department o f Finance officials:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 230-242—Department of Defence (Document A) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expen­

diture for the Department of Defence.

5. A D JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 9.31 p.m. till a date and hour to be fixed.

14

6. A TTEN D A N C E: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Sim, Knight, Douglas McClelland, McLaren, Scott and Sibraa (6). Senators Young and Kilgariff also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

J. P. SIM

Chairman

15

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 3 THURSDAY, 5 MAY 1977

1. M EETIN G: The Committee met at 2.10 p.m. The Chairman (Senator Sim) took the Chair.

2. M INUTES: On the motion of Senator Knight the minutes of the previous meetings were confirmed.

3. REPORT OF TH E COM M ITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration. On the motion of Senator Douglas McClelland, the draft report was agreed to without amendment.

4. A D JO U R N M E N T : The Committee adjourned at 2.15 p.m.

5. A TTEN D A N C E: The following members were present: Senators Sim, Knight, Douglas McClelland, McLaren and Scott (5).

J. P. SIM Chairman

16

Estimates Committee A

Appendix

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

The Secretary Canberra, a .c.t . 2600

Senate Estimates Committee A 2 May 1977

Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES—DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

When the Estimates of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet were un­ der consideration by the Committee on 26 April, additional information was re­ quested in relation to :

Division 500/3/06—Royal Visit—Qantas Charter Division 505/2—Official Establishments—Costs of renovations at Government House for Royal Visit Division 505/2—Official Establishments—Separation of Costs This is set out in the following paragraphs.

Q A N T A S Charter Senator McLaren asked whether the QANTAS charter fee included any offset for backloading of the aircraft from London to Australia. The answer is no. This matter was raised in the negotiations with QANTAS but QANTAS pointed out that

M arch/April/M ay were low demand months for seats from UK/Europe to Australia and that ample seats were already available on normal scheduled services at that time. Accordingly, no reduction was made in the charter fee.

Renovations at Government House fo r Royal Visit Senator McLaren asked for information on cost of repairs, additions and replace­ ments at Government House for the Queen’s visit.

The Royal Party, whilst accommodated at Government House, used facilities which are part and parcel of that Official Establishment. Any renovations, replace­ ment of furniture etc. carried out prior to the Royal Visit were part of the normal maintenance and replacement programs for which funds were provided in the

Budget Estimates under Division 505/2 and 915/1/01. No additional funds have been sought in the Additional Estimates for the Official Establishments as a result of the Royal Visit.

Separation o f Costs o f Official Establishments Senator McLaren asked why the costs of the four Official Establishments cannot be separated.

In relation to this request I refer the Committee to the statement made by Senator Withers on 4 November 1976 when asked for similar information at the time of the Budget Estimates deliberations by the Committee of the Whole. A copy of the relevant Hansard is attached.

I would like to take the opportunity to add one point to the evidence I gave to the Committee on 26 April. In answer to Senator McClelland I gave the Appropriation

19

Division numbers under which funds are made available for the four Official Estab­ lishments. To Division 505, in Appropriation Act No. 1 ,1 should have added Division 915/1/01, which is in Appropriation Act No. 2.

I would be grateful if the above additional information could be brought to the notice of your Committee.

J. G. H IN TO N Assistant Secretary Services Branch

20

1638 SENATE 4 November 1976 Appropriation Bill {No. 1)

matter for the firm’s clients and their profes­ sional colleagues to make a judgment on as to whether the solicitors are the greatest or the smartest corporation lawyers in Sydney.

It is not for me to make a judgment. I am informed that the Australia Council has no outside accountants. It does its own internal

accounting. It does not have its own con­ sultant accountants in the same way as it has a firm of solicitors. I am advised that it was on the advice of the Commonwealth Crown

Solicitor that the Australia Council engaged Messrs Allen, Allen and Hemsley.

Senator Georges—The Australia Council engaged them?

Senator WITHERS—Yes, it engaged Allen, Allen and Hemsley on the advice of the Commonwealth Crown Solicitor.

Senator Georges—So we now have a statutory corporation which is taking action against a-----

Senator WITHERS—No. You asked me earlier who are the solicitors for the Australia Council and I say they are the firm of Allen, Allen and Hemsley. Before engaging solici­

tors for its normal work the Australia Council sought the advice of the Crown Solicitor, and he recommended that firm.

As to what the Auditor-General is doing, I have no knowledge of that but I shall seek the information for the honourable senator. As to the issue of the writ, I am informed

that that is a personal action which has been issued by the litigant in person and has nothing whatever to do with the Australia Council. I think that basically covers the

last series of questions.

Senator GEORGES (Queensland) (4.12)— Mr Deputy Chairman, could I ask just a quick question to clarify a figure ?

The TEMPORARY CHAIRMAN (Senator Devitt)—Yes. I was going to give Senator Wood the call but if you want to clear up a matter I think that is appropriate.

Senator GEORGES—The Minister for Administrative Services (Senator Withers) indicated that the figure for entertainment has been reduced to $8,000, that is, for official hospitality, including liquor. Would that be correct?

Senator Withers—I am advised that is correct.

Senator GEORGES—What is the figure for theatre expenses for special visitors and international VIPs. Is that figure $12,000 and should not that figure be included also ?

Senator Withers—I am informed the amount is $6,000.

Senator GEORGES—The expenditure for special visitors is $6,000?

Senator Withers—I am informed $6,000. Senator GEORGES—Let me drag out another figure. What is the figure for inter­ national VIPs ?

Senator Withers—It is included in the figures I have given, I am informed.

Senator GEORGES—I wonder whether somebody would go back and check the decision of the Council on 18 June 1976 and clarify the figures. They are set out as: Entertainment $8,000, that is including liquor; theatre expenses, $6,000 for special visitors; then international VIPs, etc., a further $6,000, making $12,000. The $12,000 and $8,000 make a figure of $20,000.

Senator Withers—I am informed that Council members received that further $ 6,000.

Senator GEORGES—Let us get the figures out. Do not let us have half figures each time we ask a question, otherwise we will need to have an investigation. That is

all I have to ask. Senator WOOD (Queensland) (4.14)—On the same line as Senator Georges was speak­ ing, all I want to say is that I think the

points he brought forward deserve serious consideration. There is no doubt that there have been statements from time to time indicating a looseness in the administration

of the Australia Council and also some extravagance. I think that most of us are keen to see the standard of arts maintained and improved in Australia. The best way

that this can be done is to have an efficient organisation so that as much money as pos­ sible might be directed specifically to that purpose. I think the points brought forward by Senator Georges deserve the earnest con­ sideration of the Minister for Administrative Services (Senator Withers) to eliminate any extravagance in the Estimates.

Senator McLAREN (South Australia) (4.15)—I refer to division 504 in the estimates of the Department of the Prime Minister and

21

Cabinet which relates to the conveyance of the Governor-General, Ministers of State and others. During the last 10 months I have tried to ascertain the cost of conveying the Governor-General, and the Minister for Administrative Services (Senator Withers) has been good enough to provide me with the flight schedules and with quite a few of the costs. I just make the comment, in line with what Senator Wright and Senator Georges have just said, that there is over­ expenditure and extravagance in many

departments. When I total the figures for the conveyance of the Governor-General I find that there too there is great extravagance. I have made the point here before.

Senator Withers—That is a matter of opinion, not of fact.

Senator McLAREN—The figures are there to prove it. Of course, the figures do not lie, as the Minister has told me on some occasions. It is costing an enormous amount of money to fly the Governor-General around this country. As I have pointed out before, sometimes there are two trips out of Canberra in one day. So this adds up to quite an expense for the taxpayers of this country. I turn to division 505—Official Establishments. In this estimate there is an amount of $1,345,700 for this year compared with an expenditure of $1,163,212 for last year. Under this division in Senate Estimates

Committee A I posed the following question: Does the cost for hotel accommodation when the Governor-General visits places outside Canberra come under a special appropriation or does it come out of the overall appropriation ?

Mr Hinton, the officer in attendance, answered: The hotel accounts of the Governor-General in another capital city would come out of this approp­ riation.

I asked:

Can we have a breakdown of the costs in the various capital cities.

Senator Withers said:

We do not really break them up.

I cannot understand why we cannot have a breakdown of what it is costing. Later on Senator Withers went on to say that he would be no more prepared to approach

the Governor-General and ask him than he would be prepared to approach the Prime Minister, Ministers and the Leader of the

Appropriation Bill (N o. 1)

Opposition to ask what they paid for their hotels. But, as I pointed out, that comes into a different category. I want to make the point again that all members of Parliament are given a set figure, determined by the Remuneration Tribunal, for their overnight costs when they are away from their home base on official business. If they want to spend more than that it has to come out of their own pockets. But according to the answer given by Mr Hinton, no matter what costs the Governor-General incurs, it comes out of this appropriation. So there is no limit on his costs.

This matter is causing great concern not only to me but also to the average taxpayers of the community. It was reported in the Age on 24 August that at a function organ­ ised by the Governor-General and his staff at the Hotel Hilton in Melbourne champagne was flowing which cost $35 a bottle. That is very close to the amount that a member of Parliament receives to cover his daily costs when he comes to Canberra on official business on behalf of the taxpayers. That is the reason why I wanted to ascertain the breakdown of the costs for the Governor- General’s overnight stays in the various capital cities and the costs for liquor and accommodation. There is no reason why we should not have that breakdown. The taxpayers are entitled to know.

The other matter I want to pursue is why the answer Senator Withers gave was entirely different from the answer that the Prime Minister (Mr Malcolm Fraser) gave in the other place. In the Estimates Com­ mittee I asked Senator Withers for a break­ down of the cost of the official establish­ ments. Senator Sibraa also asked for a breakdown of the separate costs of the individual establishments. In reply Senator Withers said:

Let me refer the honourable senator to an answer which the previous Prime Minister, Mr Whitlam, gave on 4 November 1975. On page 2776 o f House o f Representatives Hansard he said that he intended to continue the previous practice of all governments of not breaking up the costs between the four official establishments. It was a policy which he said he would follow, as did his predecessors. His successors intend to follow the same policy. I might add that all Prime Ministers had good reason for doing so.

I accepted Senator Withers’ answer. I thought that if there had never been a breakdown of the costs of these four

4 November 1976 SENATE 1639

22

1640 SENATE 4 November 1976 Appropriation Bill (No. 1)

official establishments that was fair enough. But a cheap political trick was performed in the other place. The Prime Minister did not go along with Senator Withers’ state­

ment that the Prime Minister of the day would continue the practice that had operated under previous Prime Ministers. I refer honourable senators to page 234

of Hansard of 5 October for Estimates Committee A. In a letter to the Chairman of Senate Estimates Committee A dated 15 October Senator Withers had this to say, amongst other things:

Senator McLaren also sought information on the cost o f liquor purchased for the Prime Minister’s Lodge and Kirribilli House. I am informed that these costs are not separately maintained by the D epart­

ment o f the Prime Minister and Cabinet and, in any event, the Committee will be aware of the practice, followed by the previous Government and this

Government, o f not disclosing operating costs of the individual Official Establishments.

The letter is signed ‘R. G. Withers’. I now turn to the House of Representatives Hansard of 24 March 1976. At page 936 we find a question put by Mr Porter, a

South Australian member. Of course the question was a Dorothy Dixer designed to embarrass Mr Whitlam. It was headed Official Residences of the Prime Minister’

and read as follows: M r PORTER—My question is directed to the Prime Minister. Can he inform the House of the cost last year of running the Lodge and Kirribilli

House ? M r M ALCOLM FRASER—I do not have the figures for the whole of last year but I have them for the last part of the year for both places. In the last

six months o f last year the Lodge cost the Aus­ tralian taxpayer $64,941, running at an annual rate of $129,882. Kirribilli House, where perhaps the then incumbent spent a somewhat greater part of his

time, cost $75,379 for that same six months, run­ ning at an annual rate of significantly over $150,000. The total annual rate paid by the taxpayer for

both the honourable gentleman’s houses was $280,000 or a little more. The fact that both

residences were being paid for by the taxpayer for the benefit of one particular person------Then there was an interjection. I will not refer to it because I think that it is the sub­ ject of a question on notice. It has been on

notice for a long time but the Prime Minister has not seen fit to answer it. However, that is not relevant to what I am talking about. After the interjection Mr Fraser went on

to say: Honourable gentlemen opposite do not like the facts of life about their leader. That is why they keep on trying to hide them. But I think that a few

people have a right to know and a few people have

a right to be able to understand. Both places were costing the Australian taxpayer $280,000 and, since I thought that this was much too great a

subvention by the Australian taxpayer to house the Prime Minister o f this country------He went on to say that that was one of the reasons why Kirribilli was returned to some other purpose. In view of the answer given by

Senator Withers that his Prime Minister intended to continue the practice of pre­ vious Prime Ministers and not give a

breakdown of the costs of the official residences, why did his own Leader on that date decide to give a breakdown of the figures in order to embarrass Mr Whitlam? When I asked for further figures here of what it was costing for those houses so that I could make a comparison between what

Mr Fraser is costing the taxpayer and what Mr Whitlam was costing, I was politely told that I could not have them. I want to refresh Senator Withers’ memory and refer again to the statement made by Mr Fraser. He said:

But I think that a few people have a right to

know and a few people have a right to be able to understand.

He was referring to the costs of the official residences of the Prime Minister. I would like Senator Withers to give me a breakdown of those figures because this matter is most important. If it is all right for his Leader to have someone go through the costs and then for him to use them in answer to a Dorothy

Dix question in the House of Representatives it is all right for us to examine them in the Estimates Committee. I go along with what

Senator Wright has said, that we have every right to pursue extravagance. Why can we not be given the answer ? That answer has

been withheld deliberately. I give notice that if I do not get it today I will keep pursuing the matter at every opportunity, just as I pursued the tabling of the River Murray

Commission report and as I have pursued other things. I will continue to pursue it because in this instance I agree with Mr Fraser—it is probably the only instance in which I will ever agree with him—that people have a right to know. If he were able to divulge to the community at large what it cost the previous Prime Minister to live in those residences, surely the people have a right to know what it is costing for Mr Fraser to live in those residences. We know—

Senator Withers gave me an answer on this— that it cost $6,000 for a new dinner set for the Lodge.

23

Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 4 November 1976 SENATE 1641

Senator Cavanagh—$8,100.

Senator McLAREN—No, that figure was reported in the newspapers. I cited the figure of $8,100 when I explored this matter in the Senate Estimates Committee. Senator Withers—I believe him; he had some officers with him—told me that the cost was $6,000.

Senator Georges—They got it cheap.

Senator McLAREN—Yes, it was cheap! There are probably a lot of workers and a lot of pensioners who could live very hand­ somely on $6,000 for a long time let alone pay that amount for one dinner set. No doubt Senator Wright will not agree to the expenditure of $6,000 for one dinner set.

Senator Missen—A storm in a tea cup.

Senator McLAREN—I take the pun made by Senator Missen. It is not a storm in a tea cup. I have another matter which I wish to explore under this line item, but I shall

leave it for a few moments because it comes within the purview of another department. I do not wish to boggle Senator Withers’ mind with too many things because I want

him to give me an answer. I shall pursue the other matter in a few moments.

Senator WITHERS (Western Australia—· Minister for Administrative Services) (4.27) —The honourable senator raised two questions. One was in respect of the Governor-General’s allowance for accom­ modation overnight when not at an official establishment. I think I can put it in those words. I am informed that the amount was

agreed upon between the Governor-General and the previous Prime Minister.

Senator Georges—That is not an answer.

Senator WITHERS—I am just saying the matter was agreed upon and has never been disclosed. The amount has been escalated only in accordance with rises in the consumer price index. That is all I intend to say about

that issue. As to the second matter raised by the honourable senator, I draw his attention to a question on notice which was answered by the Prime Minister (Mr Malcolm Fraser) on 8 April 1976, as reported at page 1563 of the House of Representatives Hansard. In

answer to a question asked by Mr James in the other place, the Prime Minister said: I refer the honourable member to the answer given by the former Prime Minister last year (Hansard, 4 November 1975 page 2772) in which he referred

to the principle o f many years standing that the costs of operating the four official establishments— Government House, Admiralty House, Kirribilli House and the Prime Minister’s Lodge—be regarded as a total charge against the annual Budget appro­ priation. I do not propose to depart from that

principle.

In answer to a question without notice on 24 March 1976 I have already given some information about the costs of running the Lodge and Kirribilli House. I did so in support o f my belief that a

Prime Minister should have only one official residence. Because of the expense involved, I had Kirribilli House revert to its original purpose of providing accommodation for im portant visitors.

Therein lies the answer.

Senator McLAREN (South Australia) (4.29)—The Minister for Administrative Services says: ‘Therein lies the answer’. It might be the answer for the Minister and the Prime Minister (Mr Malcolm Fraser), but it is not the answer for me. It was good enough for the Prime Minister to take out of the total appropriation of last year the cost of running the residences. We will forget about Kirribilli House; let us deal only with the Lodge. The Prime Minister was able to draw out of those documents the cost of running the Lodge. After giving on 24 March those figures which I have cited he said, in an answer to the honourable member for Hunter (Mr James) in the next month, that he did not intend to give any further infor­ mation. Why can we not get that informa­ tion ? What is good for the goose ought also to be good for the gander in this particular case. I think it proves again that we now have a government in this country that has one standard for itself and adopts a different standard altogether for a govern­ ment of Labor persuasion. I think it is a very poor show that we cannot extract that information.

I shall pursue it a little further to see whether we cannot do something on the lines mentioned by Senator Wright, and by Senator Rae in his committee report, that is, that the Senate has a right to explore the expenditure of all government departments, no matter whether it be the Department of

the Prime Minister and Cabinet or the smallest department that comes under the jurisdiction of this Parliament. There is every reason for our being told. We will just

have to find some method of doing it. I intend to find that method.

24

1642 SENATE 4 November 1976 Appropriation Bill (No. 1)

Senator WITHERS (Western Australia— Minister for Administrative Services) (4.30)— Mr Chairman, I should like to mention that I gave Senator Georges some misinformation when we were talking about the Australia

Council. I informed Senator Georges and the Senate that the Australia Council selected Messrs Allen, Allen and Helmsley as its solicitors on the advice of the Com­

monwealth Crown Solicitor. I am now informed that the advice I was given is in­ correct. The Australia Council itself selected Messrs Allen, Allen and Helmsley and informed the Crown Solicitor of its choice.

He raised no objection. There is quite a difference between this answer and the answer I gave Senator Georges earlier. Senator McLAREN (South Australia)

(4.31)—I now wish to explore expenditure under Division 520—Australian Security Intelligence Organisation. During the hear­ ing by the Estimates Committee I endeav­

oured to find out some information as to the running of this establishment. I asked why ASIO could seek an appropriation each year and expend exactly that amount—not a cent

more and not a cent less. Looking back through the appropriations, it is found that every year ASIO has been able to expend exactly the same amount as has been

appropriated to it. But on this particular

occasion we find that there has been an escalation. Administrative expenses for ASIO last year were $6,390,000. There has been no

cutback in expenditure; the amount has escalated to $7,800,000.

I posed to Senator Withers a question as to what ASIO was going to do with this extra money. Then I posed further questions as recorded at page 315 of the Hansard record of 7 October for Estimates Com­

mittee A. I asked: Are there any trust accounts on which ASIO draws? Does the Auditor-General investigate the way ASIO spends its allocation? If so, what action is taken if the procedures for spending the allocation

are not adhered to? Who is disciplined and how is the discipline carried out if necessary ?

I was not able to get answers to those ques­ tions. I have been unable to find out whether the Auditor-General has any way of bringing

about remedial action if money is mis-spent. I have not been told whether ASIO draws any of its finance from a special trust account. I have not been told what actions are to be taken if the procedures for spending the allocation are not in accordance with the

rules laid down.

I wish to refer now to a recommendation which is pertinent to this question. It was made by Estimates Committee F of which Senator Rae

25

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES

Tasman House—H obart Place C a n b e r r a C it y 2601

4 M ay 1977

Dear Senator, At the examination by Senate Estimates Committee A on Tuesday, 3 May 1977 o f the Additional Estimates of the Department o f National Resources, Senator McLaren requested that details be provided o f overseas travel undertaken by officers o f the Administrative Division during 1976-77.

I have replied direct to Senator McLaren and enclose a copy o f the reply for your information.

Yours sincerely,

R. HOPKINS

Assistant Secretary Management Services

Senator J. P. Sim Chairman Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

4 May 1977

Dear Senator, At the examination by Senate Estimates Committee A on Tuesday, 3 M ay 1977 o f the Additional Estimates o f the Department of National Resources, you asked that details be provided of overseas travel undertaken by officers of the Adminis­ trative Division during 1976-77.

The information requested is contained in the enclosed schedule.

Yours sincerely,

R. HOPKINS Assistant Secretary Management Services

Senator G. T. McLaren Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

26

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES Schedule o f overseas travel undertaken in 1976-77— Division 430-2-01 The original estimate of $203 500 for Travelling and Subsistence contained a provision o f $13 000 for known overseas travel and comprised:

C ost o f

Officer Designation Places visited Purpose o f visit visit

M r M. M ontifiore

M r K. H oltsbaum

M r M. F arrow

C ounsellor (M inerals) L ondon

C ounsellor (M inerals) Japan

Principal Executive Officer, U ranium and Electricity Division

T ravel within U .K . and visits to E urope

Travel w ithin Ja p a n and visits to R epublic o f K orea

L ondon, Brussells, Vienna, F ra n k ­ furt, O ttaw a, W ashington, T okyo

L ocal t r a v e l .......................................................

L ocal t r a v e l .......................................................

T o hold discussions with o th er m ajor nuclear supplier countries, international safeguards organisations a n d m ajor potential im porters o f A ustralian uranium in order to prepare a rep o rt as the basis for recom m endations on the content o f a com prehensive A ustralian policy on the safeguards to apply to future A ustralian uranium exports . .

Unforeseen Overseas Travel referred to in page 2 of the explanatory notes to the Additional Estimates 1976-77 comprises:

Officer Designation Places visited Purpose o f visit

$

4 000

4 500

4 500

13000

C ost o f

visit

J. Scully .

M r J. B. C arter

Secretary Singapore, F rankfurt, Bucharest,

M oscow and T okyo—July 1976

A ssistant Secretary, Energy Bangkok, T ehran, B angkok and Planning Division Singapore—July-A ugust 1976

A ccom panied the M inister . . .

T o attend official discussions leading u p to inaugural m eeting o f Joint M inisterial C om m ission w ith Ira n . , ,

$

3 088

2 700

Officer Designation Places visited Purpose o f visit

Cost of visit

J. Scully

M r P. C onnolly

M r Μ. P. Davis

M r P. B arratt . .

M r M. M ontifiore plus (wife and 2 children)

M r G . J. Tredinnick

M r D . P. BranifF .

M r J. M. W ilcox .

M r G . Bedcham bers plus (wife and 2 children)

J. Scully . .

Secretary

First A ssistant Secretary, E xport C ontrol N o. 2

A ssistant Secretary, E xport C ontrol N o. 2

F irst A ssistant Secretary, Energy P lanning Division

Counsellor (M inerals)

D eputy Secretary

First A ssistant Secretary, E xport C ontrol N o. 3

F irst A ssistant Secretary, E xport C ontrol N o. 1

B angkok, T ehran, M anchester, L ondon, G eneva, D usseldorf, H am burg a n d T okyo—A ugust 1976

T okyo, Seoul, T okyo and M a n ila - A ugust 1976

San Francisco, M iam i, K ingston, M iam i, L ondon, G eneva, F ra n k fu rt a n d Singapore— Septem ber 1976

San Francisco, W ashington, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Seattle, Eugene, A lbany a n d San Francisco— Septem ber-O ctober

1976

L ondon 1976

H ong K ong— O ctober 1976

Bangkok, R om e, L ondon, Freetow n, L ondon, Singapore— N ovem ber- Decent ber 1976

H onolulu, V ancouver, E dm onton, C algary, Starw ood, Calgary, W innipeg, O ttaw a, W innipeg and San Francisco—D ecem ber 1976

A ccom panied the M inister

Discussion re: iron ore trade—S o u th K orea a n d Philippines a n d to accom pany Secretary on visit to Ja p a n . . . . .

I.B .A . (International B auxite A ssociation) M eeting. A .P .E .F . (A ssociation o f Iro n O re E xporting C ountries) M eeting . . .

D iscussions w ith U .S. Energy R esearch and D evelopm ent A dm inistration (E .R .D .A .) on m ethods o f planning and developm ent of energy research program s. Visits to

ap p ro p riate energy R . & D . centres . .

T aking up departm ental post . . . .

M em ber o f A ustralian C oal M ission to C hina .

A ttendance at Executive B oard and M inisterial m eetings o f the In ternational B auxite A ssociation . . . . . .

D iscussions w ith Federal a n d Provincial G overnm ent officials in C a n ad a on coal .

F irst Secretary (M inerals) T okyo to C anberra—D ecem ber 1976 R e tu rn from duty a t overseas posting

Secretary T okyo—January 1977 T o attend Japanese-A ustralian M inisterial

C om m ittee m eeting . . . .

$

4 348

2 586

4 086

3 407

5 070

1 894

4 423

4 090

3 600

2 000

Officer Designation Places visited Purpose o f visit

Cost of visit

M r Μ. P. D avis .

M r M. N esbitt plus (wife and 3 children)

Miss E. H oltsbaum .

M r N. Lane . .

A ttendance at A ustralian-Japanese M inisterial C om m ittee m eeting a n d discussions with Japanese G overnm ent and industry re p re s e n ta tiv e s ............................................

T ake up D epartm ent post— replace M r Bedcham bers . . . . .

. D aughter o f C ounsellor (M inerals) T okyo C anberra, Tokyo, H ong K ong, A nnual school holidays .

B angkok, Singapore, C anberra— N ovem ber 1976 (open return)

Principal Executive Officer, K ingston a n d M exico— M arch-A pril E xport C ontrol N o. 3 1977

M em ber o f D elegation to 8th B oard M eeting LB.A . (International Bauxite A ssociation)

$

2 000

3 600

986

3 570

51 448

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE RUSSELL OFFICES CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600 12 May 1977

Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

During the examination of the Defence Additional Estimates 1976-77 on Tuesday, 3 May 1977 further information for the Committee was required in response to a number of questions raised. The following questions and responses are set out below.

2. Senator W ITH ERS (in relation to civilian manpower strengths):

Perhaps we ought to look at the figures as at 1 July 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975 and 1976 and see what was the rate of growth. If we supplied those figures they might give some pattern.

Answer:

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

TOTAL FULL-TIME CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT 1972-1977

Strengths as at end o f June Total

1972 36 774

1973 37 899

1974 34 740

1975 33 661

1976 32 735

1977 ( p l a n n e d ; ............................................................................. 32 528

NO TE: (1) Totals shown include some 1350 locally engaged civilians in support o f the Defence Force overseas. (2) Total employment includes civilians employed by Natural Disasters Organisation and Defence Science and Technology under Divisions 238/1/01 and 241/1/01 respectively. There are diffi­

culties in breaking these numbers down by Appropriation Items over the years because of changes which have occurred in the Appropriation structure and the amalgamation of depart­ mental responsibilities from other government departments.

3. Division 23311106— Medical and Dental Expenses a. Question from Senator SIBRAA :

I wonder whether at some time in the future the Committee might be informed of the increased specialist and general practitioner rates being charged.

30

Answer: Rates are determined by Department of Health and are as follows:

Sessional fees payable to medical practitioners Before 22 January 1976, the following fees were payable to medical practitioners:

$ rate per hour

Senior s p e c i a l i s t .................................................................. 24.35

S p e c i a l i s t ............................................................................. 20.80

G eneral practitioner . . . . . . 17.40

On and from 22 January 1976, the fees were increased to the following levels: Senior s p e c i a l i s t .................................................................. 26.00

Specialist . . . . . . . . 22.50

G eneral p r a c t i t i o n e r ........................................................... 19.60

On and from 19 February 1976, fees were again increased to the following levels: Senior s p e c i a l i s t .................................................................. 27.50

S p e c i a l i s t ............................................................................. 24.00

G eneral p r a c t i t i o n e r ....................................................... 21.00

On and from 27 May 1976, senior specialist fees were raised to $28.00 per hour.

On and from 19 August 1976, fees were increased to the current levels: Senior s p e c i a l i s t .................................................................. 28.50

S p e c i a l i s t ............................................................................. 24.50

G eneral p r a c t i t i o n e r ....................................................... 21.50

b. Question from Senator M cLAREN :

W ould it be possible to get a breakup of the am ount paid for specialist services as opposed to general practitioner services ?

Answer: It is estimated that fees paid to medical practitioners in 1976-77 will be: $ m S p e c i a l i s t s .............................................................................2 .207

G eneral p ra c titio n e rs ..................................................................1.566

3.773

4. Division 23411101— Aircraft Question from Senator M cLA R E N (in relation to P3C aircraft):

W hat percentage of the total cost of the support items does the $ 5 .295m represent? Is it 20% or 30%?

Answer: $5.295m represents 10% of the estimated cost of support items to be ordered for this project. In turn the total cost of support items is expected to be 23 % of the total estimated cost of the project.

5. Division 234/2/03—Liquid Fuels and Lubricants Question from Senator M cLAREN: How much of this money is recoverable from the various departments for the use of RAAF aircraft such as, for example, the recent trip to the Antarctic

by the Minister for Science? Do you recover any of that cost?

31

Answer: Costs of VIP flights are recovered from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet on the basis of flying hour costs which include an element for liquid fuels and lubricants. A similar method of recovery is used for special flights by RAAF aircraft (other than VIP) on behalf of other government departments. Recovery is not effected for emergency flights to save human life or for flights which have a national value or a Defence training value. The Minister for Science did not travel to the Antarctic by RAAF aircraft.

6. Division 234/2104— Replacement Equipment and Stores a. Question from Senator M cL A R E N : At the bottom of the page there is an item for $428 000. The explanatory notes say that this is for clothing for the W RAAF due to an increase in

female recruits resulting from a wider range of employment available in the RAAF for females. Could we have some information as to the wider employment available? Answer:

The recommendations of a 1975 Defence Working Party on the Employ­ ment of Women in the Australian Defence Force were endorsed by the Chiefs of Staff Committee and approved in principle by the Minister for Defence in 1976. The Air Force is implementing the decisions by integrating the W RAAF and RAAFNS into the RAAF and thereby opening up more employment opportunities for both men and women. Women in the Air Force are now eligible for appointment or enlistment in branches/categories or musterings except those which have a primary combat role; these are defined as those in which the primary duty involves hostile acts against the enemy. Women may be employed on active service outside the combat role. The number of women in the Air Force is expected to double as a result of the opening of a wider range of employment and from the beginning of

1977 the number on recruit courses has increased from 40 to 80. b. Question from Senator Douglas M cCLELLAND: Are you updating the quality of the clothing or changing the uniform for the female members of the Royal Australian Air Force ?

Answer: The uniforms to be procured for females comprise the new style blue-grey working dress introduced some two years ago.

7. Members of the Committee might wish to note the following points in amplifi­ cation of certain statements made at the hearing by Defence officials: a. Page 223, left-hand column, third of the way from the top, answer from Mr LYON commencing ‘there have been . . .’

The number of Australian Defence Department civilian staff" overseas has not varied significantly because of staff reductions. However in PNG the the number employed has fallen from 46 in 1975 to 17 in 1977 concomitant with PN G policies of localisation. b. Page 231, right-hand column, just below centre page, answer from Mr

SULLIVAN, Ί would only be guessing . . . somewhere between 25% and 30% would be for spares.' Investigation has shown that the percentage of stores support for Army’s major equipment projects is in the vicinity of 10% to 20%.

32

c. Page 234, right-hand column, one-third of the way from the top, answer from M r Η. P. JONES commencing ‘There is quite a degree . .

This answer would more accurately have been phrased as follows: There is quite a degree of co-ordination directly and through the Australian Science and Technology Council on which Defence scientists are represented. There are certain other areas where Commonwealth

Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation scientists consult with Defence scientists. There is a reasonable am ount of liaison.

8. The reply to the question on action being taken by Department of Defence in regard to the world-wide energy crisis has not yet been completed, but will be forwarded under separate cover early next week.

K. T. LYON

Assistant Secretary Financial Programs Branch

33

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE RUSSELL OFFICES CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600

Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House 19 May 1977

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77 Further to paragraph 8 of our memorandum of 13 May 1977, appended below is the response to the question from Senator Douglas MCCLELLAND (in relation to Division 234/2/03—Liquid Fuels and Lubricants)—‘In view of the constant talk about the energy crisis in the world, what steps are being taken by the Department of

Defence to ensure sufficient supplies of fuel for defence purposes ?’

Answer:

Defence policy on this question, as with all other im portant developing issues, is to constantly monitor developments which could be expected to have an impact on Defence preparedness.

Should the threat of an energy crisis become more imminent it would be necessary to make specific provision to cope with diminishing supplies of conventional fuels in current use. This would be a problem which must concern not only Defence but the nation as a whole. It would involve consideration of policies such as retention

of reserves in the ground, conservation of supplies of existing fuels for essential tasks and development of alternative fuels. In this context it should be noted that Defence usage of fuel is relatively small in relation to fuel consumption in Australia as a whole.

The present defence system is almost wholly oil energised and although there are alternative fuels for some of our needs, none can be contemplated without sub­ stantial penalties in cost and/or logistics and/or performance.

In monitoring events associated with the availability o f oil-based energy resources, the following specific actions are in hand:

(a) Keeping a watching brief on overseas developments on fuel cells, high energy batteries and other advanced alternative methods of energy conversion and storage;

(b) reviewing the technical problems, both present and future, involved in energy usage in defence so that the technical implications of fuel shortage or changes to other fuel types can be recognised; (c) studying how a conversion to LPG by civilian industry and transport

might free petroleum fuel resources for defence use; and (d) considering the attractive but difficult prospect of converting solar energy to liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

Current Defence policies on procurement and storage of fuels are related to the direct needs of the Defence Forces in the existing circumstances and, in varying degrees, provide supplies of fuel which enable the Services to operate for limited periods without resupply from external sources. Current programs make provision

for: (a) the conversion of the Australian Fleet from oil fuel burning to diesel oil (DIESO) burning. The advantage of this in the current situation is that D1ESO can be produced from Australian crude oil whereas furnace fuel

oil has to be imported; and

34

(b) increased storage facilities for aviation fuels but these are being provided as an additional buffer against short-term resupply difficulties not associated with a predicted energy crisis.

We keep our fuel storage facilities in line with expected Defence contingencies, and required storage levels could be affected by the consequences of a developing energy crisis.

2. I believe this response completes the required action arising from the Senate Estimates Committee A examination of the Defence Additional Estimates 1976-77.

K. T. LYON Assistant Secretary Financial Programs Branch

35

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600 20 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee (A) Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T.

Attention: M r P. Murdoch At the Senate Estimates Committee A hearing on 3 May, officers of this D epart­ ment were asked to supply additional information to various questions raised by members of the Committee.

2. The information which is submitted herewith has been prepared in the form of replies to the various questions asked by the respective Senators and their questions (taken from Hansard) have been included to help the Committee more easily identify the particular information requested. The questions and replies follow.

D ivision 305—Administrative

Sub-division 1—Salaries and Payments in the Nature of Salary, $277 100 Page 211— Senator McClelland:

O f th e 151 staff, th a t is, th e 117 in A u s tr a lia a n d th e 34 in th e A u s tra lia -b a s e d s ta ff

o v e rsea s, h o w m a n y a re S e c o n d D iv is io n officers, h o w m a n y T h ird D iv isio n officers

a n d so o n ?

Reply:

The following is an analysis of losses of staff by Divisions during 1976-77:

Gross losses Recruitment

N et

variation

2nd D ivision . . . . 1 — 1

3rd D ivision . . . . 182 45 — 137

4th Division . . . . 121 108 — 13

304 153 — 151

Page 211— Senator McClelland:

D o y o u k n o w h o w m a n y o f th e 117 sta ff in A u s tra lia w o u ld be fro m th e (A id ) B u re a u ?

Reply: Please see Appendix A for comparison of staff losses of (Aid) Bureau and remainder of Department.

Page 211— Senator Knight: C o u ld w e h a v e th a t in fo rm a tio n in th e fo rm o f a ta b le w ith c o m p a ra tiv e figures fo r la s t

y e a r, sh o w in g th e b re a k u p o f A u s tra lia -b a s e d sta ff in th e (A id ) B u re a u so th a t w e c a n

m a k e a c o m p a ris o n b e tw ee n 197 6 -7 7 a n d 1 9 7 5 -7 6 ?

Reply: Please see Appendix B for comparative table from 1975-76 and 1976-77 showing Australia-based staff of the Bureau and the remainder of the Department of Foreign Affairs.

36

Pages 211-12— Senator McClelland:

Could we have the table broken down to percentages for the Department and the Bureau over the 2-year period? Can we also have the figures for the 12-month period— the financial year?

Reply:

Please see Appendix B which includes this information in the comparative table.

Page 213— Senator McLaren:

Could we be provided with a breakdown of the overtime hours worked in 1975-76 and the overtime worked in 1976-77 so that we can make a comparison?

Reply:

This information is still being obtained and will be forwarded to the Secretary of the Committee as soon as possible.

Page 213— Senator McClelland:

I take it that we will be given a breakdown (also) of where the 34 Australia-based staff overseas come from, their tasks and their responsibilities . . . And also for the 62 locally engaged staff?

Reply:

Please see Appendixes C and D.

Sub-division 2—Administrative Expenses, $62 000 Page 213— Senator McLaren:

Could we be provided with a breakdown of the amount attributed to the extra delegates and the amount attributed to the devaluation ?

Reply:

The am ount attributed to devaluation is $37 000, leaving the balance of funds sought ($25 000) attributable to additional visits.

Pages 213-14— Senator McLaren:

Would it be possible to provide the Committee with an answer as to what it has cost, say in the last 4 years, the Foreign Affairs Department for officers accompanying Prime Ministers on overseas visits ?

Reply:

As indicated at the hearing, this information requires some considerable research, and is still being obtained. It will be forwarded to the Secretary of the Committee as soon as practicable.

Pages 214-15— Senator McClelland:

I n I te m 04 I n o te th a t th e E stim a te s p ro v id e fo r a p p ro x im a te ly 196 d e le g ate s to be

s e n t to th e c o n fe re n c e s th a t a re set o u t o n p a g e 4 o f th e e x p la n a to ry n o tes . . . D o I ta k e

it th a t in th is y e a r o f severe b u d g e ta ry re s tra in ts a n d c u tb a c k s , a ll o f th e se d eleg ates

h a v e b e en a p p ro v e d a t th is sta g e by th e O v e rse as V isits C o m m itte e , o r h a s th e O verseas V isits C o m m itte e y e t to c o n sid e r th e c ases ?

Reply:

As at 3 May, the Overseas Visits Committee had approved 169 conference attendances from Australia. A further 30 visits are likely to be considered.

37

Sub-division 3—Other Services, $203 500 Page 215— Senator McClelland:

I to o re fe r to Ite m 07 . . . M a y w e h a v e a b re a k d o w n o f th e n u m b e r o f e x h ib itio n s in ­

v o lv ed , th e c o u n trie s in w h ich th e s e e x h ib itio n s w ere d isp la y e d a n d th e n u m b e r o f

p e rfo rm in g g ro u p s th a t w ere se n t a b r o a d , th e n a m e s o f th e p e rfo rm in g g ro u p s a n d th e

c o u n trie s to w h ich th e se p e rfo rm in g g r o u p s w e re se n t ?

Reply:

A breakdown of overseas visits by Australian exhibitions and performing groups in the financial year 1976-77 is set out at Appendix E.

Page 216— Senator Sibraa:

I h a v e a g e n e ra l q u e s tio n o n I te m 14— E m e rg e n c y R e lie f fo r E a r th q u a k e V ictim s in

R o m a n ia . . . A lo n g w ith m o st o th e r M e m b e rs o f th e S e n a te , I rece iv e d a n a p p e a l fro m

a g ro u p c a lle d th e A s so c ia tio n o f R o m a n ia n s in A u s tra lia se e k in g fu n d s f o r th e v ic tim s

o f th e e a rth q u a k e . . . D o e s th e D e p a r tm e n t k n o w a n y th in g a b o u t th is o rg a n is a tio n o r

a n y th in g a b o u t th e a p p e a l le tte r t h a t w a s o b v io u sly c irc u la te d w ith in th e c o m m u n ity .

I a m c o n c e rn e d a s to w h a t h a p p e n e d w ith th o s e fu n d s a s o p p o s e d to th e m o n e y th a t

w as given d ire c t by th e G o v e rn m e n t ?

Reply:

The Australian Romanian Association circulated a letter within the Australian community seeking funds for the victims of the earthquake in Romania. We under­ stand that $30 000 of which the New South Wales Government contributed $15 000, was raised. The Association asked this Department for advice on how to transfer

funds to Romania. We suggested that funds be transmitted through the International Red Cross or the UNDRO. We are not aware of the means chosen by the Association.

The Australian Romanian Association, which was established in 1951, aims to provide a meeting point for members of the small Romanian community in Sydney and to foster Romanian traditions and culture. In recent years it has been active in endea­ vouring to obtain exit visas for relatives in Romania who wish to come to Australia.

Page 216— Senator Knight:

I re fe r to I te m 11 w h ic h c o n c e rn s c o m p e n s a tio n t o d ip lo m a tic a n d c o n s u la r m issio n s.

W h a t w as th e o c c a sio n o f th e d a m a g e in flic te d o n th e S p a n ish C o n s u la te in S y d n ey ?

Reply:

The amount in question ($300) was for the cleaning and repainting of the walls of the Spanish Consulate-General which had been daubed with anti-government slogans and for the repairing of the damaged Coat of Arms. The repair work was carried out by the Department of Construction, which then billed the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Sub-division 4—International Organisations, $1 905 100 Page 216— Senator Knight:

In a lo t o f th e ite m s u n d e r S u b -d iv isio n 4, th e re is a re a sse ssm e n t a n d a d e v a lu a tio n

fa c to r. I s h o u ld th in k it w o u ld b e p re tty sim p le to p re p a re a ta b le w h ic h show s th e

div isio n , su b -d iv isio n , ite m , re a sse ssm e n t a m o u n t, d e v a lu a tio n a m o u n t a n d to ta l,

w o u ld it n o t ?

Reply:

A table showing this information is attached at Appendix F.

38

D iv is io n 306—OVERSEAS SERVICE

Sub-division 1—Salaries and Payments in the Nature of Salary, $2 100 000

Page 217— Senator Sibraa:

An amount of $980 600 was saved by the closure of 7 missions. Could we have the amount saved by closing each of the missions mentioned on page 36 of the explanatory notes ?

Reply:

The following list shows the savings made under salaries, etc., and administrative expenses (Appropriations under the control of the Minister for Foreign Affairs) for each of the 7 missions closed:

Berlin Bom bay C alcutta L os Angeles

M ilan O saka H am burg

Admini-

Salaries strative

allowances expenses

164 200 26 900

118 600 13 500

101 900 12 600

230 300 48 300

92 200 33 900

176 400 27 600

97 000 32 100

980 600 194 900

G rand t o t a l ....................................................... $1 175 500

3. The additional information which has not been supplied at this point of time will be forwarded as soon as the research and documentation has been completed.

D. C. RUTTER Ajg Assistant Secretary Administrative Services Branch

39

COMPARISON OF STAFF LOSSES OF BUREAU AND REMAINDER OF DEPARTMENT

1. Gross staff losses 1976-77 (estim ated)—

A D A B — I n A u s t r a l i a ................................................................... 129*

O v e rs e a s .............................................................................. 3

T o t a l ................................................................... 132

Balance o f D epartm ent— In A ustralia . . . . . . . 141

O v e rse a s.............................................................................. 31

T otal . . .

Total gross losses . .

2. Recruitm ent 1976-77 (estim ated)

A D A B . . . .

Balance o f D epartm ent .

Total recruitm ent . .

3. Total net losses . . .

172

304

44* 109

153

151 (117 in A ustralia, 34 overseas)

♦NOTE: The net reduction in the Bureau’s staff in Australia is 85. This reduction is in the main (53) the direct result o f implementation o f Cabinet’s decision to integrate the former Agency into the Department. Although in net terms the reduction in the Bureau’s staff is greater than that for the rest o f the Department, this is attributed to the higher percentage of necessary recruitment for

other areas o f the Departm ent undertaken during the course o f 1976-77 to offset the substantial number o f staff lost in 1975-76. There have been few reductions in the Bureau’s staff in this financial year apart from those resulting from the integration o f activities.

COMPARATIVE TABLES FROM 1975-76 AND 1976-77 SHOWING AUSTRALIA-BASED STAFF OF THE BUREAU AND THE REMAINDER OF THE DEPARTMENT Australia-Based Staff

3 0 .6 .7 5 Reduction 1975-76 % 3 0 .6 .7 6

Reduction* 1976-77 %* 3 0 .6 .7 7 *

A D A B — A ustralia . . 673 73 10.84 600 85 14.17 515

O verseas . . . 31 1 3.23 30 3 10.00 27

T otal . . 704 (o)74 10.51 630 (6)88 13.97 542

Balance o f D epartm ent— A ustralia . . 1 376 183 13.30 1 193 32 2.68 1 161

Overseas . . . 731 29 3 .97 702 31 4 .42 671

T otal . . 2 107 212 10.06 1 895 63 3 .32 1 832

G rand total . 2811 286 10.17 2 525 151 5.98 2 374

* Estimate N O T E : (a) This reduction is in the main (62) the direct result o f implementation o f Cabinet’s decision to integrate the former Agency into the Department. (b) This reduction is in the main (53) the direct result o f implementation of Cabinet’s decision to

integrate the former Agency into the Department.

40

A-Based Reductions 1976-77

Foreign Affairs Officers

Consular and Admin.

A id

(A SA G ) Typing Total

A ccra . . 1 1

A nkara . . i 1

Berne . . 1 1

Brasilia . . 1 1

C olom bo . . 1 i 2

D ublin . . 1 1

H am burg . . 1 1

Ja k a rta . . 1 i 2

K uala L u m p u r . 1 1

Lagos . . . i 1

Los Angeles . . 2 2

M anila . . 1 1

M ilan . . . 1 i 1 3

N a u ru . . . 1 1

N airobi . . 1 1

N ew D elhi . . 1 1

N oum ea . . 1 1

O saka . . . i 1

O ttaw a . . 1 1

Paris— U N E S C O . i 1

P o rt M oresby . 1 3 4

Singapore . . 1 1

T okyo . . . 1 1

W est Berlin . . 2 1 3

18 5 3 8 34

L.E.S. Reductions 1976-77

Driver Messenger Cleaner Watchman Total

A c c r a ............................................ 1

A nkara . . . . 1

A thens . . . . . .

B angkok . . . . 2

Belgrade . . . . 1

Berlin G .D .R . . . . 1

B o n n ............................................ 1

C airo . . . . . 1

Capetow n . . . . 1

C olom bo . . . . 1

D a c c a ............................................ 1

G eneva . . . . 1

H ong K ong . . . . ..

Islam abad . . . . 1

Ja k a rta . . . . 4

K uala L um pur . . . 3

L i m a ............................................ 1

L ondon . . . . 3

M a l t a ............................................ 1

M anila . . . . 1

Mexico . . . . 1

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 1

1 .. .. 1

. .. .. 2

. 1 .. 2

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 1

1 . . . . 2

. .. .. 1

1 .. I 3

1 . . . . 2

. .. .. 1

1 .. . . 1

.. .. 1

. . . . 3

1 .. 2

.. .. 1

. . .. 1

41

A Ά N J

L.E.S. Reductions 1976-77— co n tin u ed

D river M essenger Cleaner W atchm an Total

N a iro b i . . . . 1

N ew D elhi . . . . 2

P a r i s ............................................ 2

R a ngoon . . . . 1

R o m e ............................................ 1

Santiago . . . . 1

S e o u l ............................................ 2

Singapore . . . . 1

Stockholm . . . . 1

T he H ague . . . . 1

T ehran . . . . 1

T okyo . . . . . 3

V ienna . . . . 1

W arsaw . . . . 1

W ashington . . . . 3

49

.. .. .. 1

1 .. .. 3

. . .. .. 2

1 .. . . 2

. .. .. 1

. .. . . 1

. . . . . 2

. . . .. 1

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 3

. .. .. 1

. .. .. 1

.. .. .. 3

8 4 1 62

OVERSEAS VISITS BY AUSTRALIAN EXHIBITIONS AND PERFORMING GROUPS IN FINANCIAL YEAR 1976-77

1. Exhibitions (i) Exhibition o f Recent Australian Photography (continuation of tour begun in previous year) to mid July 1976 in Thailand July-mid September 1976 in Burma September 1976 to June 1977 in Japan. (ii) Exhibition o f Aboriginal Art

January 1977—sent to Nigeria as part of Australia’s participation in the Second Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Mid February-March 1977 visited Ghana. Further visits are scheduled for Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. (iii) Exhibition o f Australian Crafted Jewellery

Mid June 1977—scheduled to open in Indonesia.

2. Musical Groups (i) Bob Barnard Jazz Quintet January-February 1977—visited Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, India, Iran. (ii) Nolan Buddie Jazz Quartet

January-February 1977—visited Thailand, Philippines, Japan, Republic o f Korea, Hong Kong (one paid a private visit to China). (iii) Sydney String Quartet October-November 1976—visited United States (San Francisco), Jamaica,

Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile. (iv) Melbourne Trio January-February 1977—visited Federal Republic of Germany, German Democratic Republic, Poland, USSR.

(v) Australian Participation in Second Black and African Festival o f Art and Culture, Nigeria January-February 1977—An Australian Aboriginal contingent of tribal and contemporary dancers visited Nigeria for the Festival.

42

Total

A dditional Rational fo r requirement appropriation

Appropriation estim ates --------------------------------------- - required

Item Organisation 1976-77 requirement Devaluation New assessment 1976-77

305/3/05 U nited N ations E nvironm ent F u n d . . .

$A

401 700

$A

59 200

$A

59 200

305/4/01 International L abour O rganisation . . . 723 100 351 700 132 443

305/4/02 G eneral Agreem ent on Tariffs and T rade . . 173 200 45 000 34 989

305/4/03 United N ations F o o d and A gricultural O rganisation 1 199 500 101 100 93 508

305/4/04 U nited N a tio n s .................................................................. 3 701 100 568 500 325 898

305/4/05 U nited N ations E ducational Scientific a n d C ultural O rganisation . . . . . . . 894 800 308 100 71 701

305/4/08 International A tom ic Energy Agency . . . 414 500 52 300 33 405

305/4/09 Intergovernm ental M aritim e Consultative O rganisa­ tion . . . . . . . . 16 100 3 900 2 724

305/4/10 Eastern Regional O rganisation o f Public A dm inis­ tration . . . . . . . . 1 600 200 200

305/4/11 Bureau of Perm anent C o u rt o f A rbitration . . 2 200 200 200

305/4/13 O rganisation for Econom ic C o-operation and

Developm ent . . . . . . . 292 700 127 100 127 100

305/4/14 International C entre for Study o f Preservation and Restoration o f C ultural Property— R om e . . 9 100 6 100 2 082

305/4/15 U nited N ations F und for D rug Abuse C ontrol . 81 700 11 900 11 900

305/4/16 U nited N ations Emergency Force— M iddle East . 1 138 100 231 900 45 725

305/4/17 International Com m ission of Jurists . . . 8 200 1 100 1 100

305/4/19 C om m onw ealth Institute . . . . . 13 500 77 300

305/4/20 C om m onw ealth Secretariat . . . . 261 000 18 700 16 272

849/0/03 Regional A nim al H ealth C om m ission for Asia— U N 4 100 600 600

849/0/04 U N ESC O Fund for R estoration o f A cropolis . Nil 100 000

$A $A

460 900

219 257 1 074 800

10011 218 200

7 592 1 300 600

242 602 4 269 600

236 399 1 202 900

18 895 466 800

1 176 20 000

1 800 2 400

1 419 800

4 0 1 8 15 200

93 600

186 175 1 370 000

9 300

77 300 90 800

2 428 279 700

4 700

100 000 100 000

T otal 10 336 200 2 064 900 959 047 1 105 853 12 401 100

Exchange rate

U S$1.0849 U S $1.0849 SF. 2.577 U S $1.2448

U S $1.2448

U S $1.2448 U S $1.2448

U S $1.2448

U S $1.2448 D.F1. 2.680

F F . 5.541

U S $1.2448 U S $1.2448 U S$1.2448

U S $1.2448 £stg 0.6881 £stg 0.6881

U S $1.2448 n.a.

Funds listed under Items 305/3/05 (United Nations Environment Fund)—$59 200, 849/0/03 (Regional Animal Health Commission for Asia)—$600 and 849/0/04 (UNESCO Fund for the Restoration of the Acropolis)—$100 000, giving a total of $159 800, must be excluded from the total figures shown in Appendix F in order to reconcile the total funds required under Sub-division 305/4 with the Additional Estimates Bill No. 3—$1 905 100.

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600 16 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Attention: M r Peter Murdoch

ADAB ESTIMATES: ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

On 3 May 1977 M r Allan Taylor o f this Department undertook to provide the Committee with additional information, related to the Australian contribution for humanitarian relief in East Timor. This additional information is attached herewith.

R. H. HOW ARD Parliamentary Liaison Officer

44

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

EAST TIMOR: ASSISTANCE TO THE IRC: PURCHASE OF AMBULANCES ‘In a letter to the Australian Ambassador in Jakarta on 29 November 1976 the Chairman of the Indonesian Red Cross (IRC), Professor Satrio, said that the IRC intended to use our contribution of $250 000, inter alia, for the purchase of ambulances for the hospitals at Dili and Bacau.

In the event the IR C decided not to purchase the ambulances. The IR C had been unable to arrange to buy them from Singapore as planned. Following a visit to East Timor Professor Satrio had reported that there was a great need for relief supplies, particularly for refugees who were not always in good health, returning to

their homes, and that this need was much greater than the undoubted need for the vehicles. The IRC, therefore, despite its previous advice, proposed that the money would be spent on relief supplies such as food and medicine. The Australian Embassy in Jakarta was advised of this proposal and agreed that expenditure on food and

medicines, for which there was a need, was consistent with the purpose of the Australian contribution; that is, to help in alleviating, as far as possible, the human suffering which had come with the fighting and associated disruption in East Tim or.’

45

DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

p.o. box 1920

CANBERRA CITY, A.C.T. 2601

23 M ay 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee A Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Attached is one copy each o f twenty-three statements that have been prepared in accordance with undertakings given by the Minister for Administrative Services on 26 April 1977 that additional information would be provided to the Committee on the several matters concerned.

The statements have been considered and endorsed by the Minister.

D. R. WHITE fo r Secretary

46

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Consideration of Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure 1976-77— Departm ent of Administrative Services

Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 2 Consideration of Division 130—Administrative Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought a breakdown of the branches of the Departm ent from which officers have retired and a list of the positions for which

replacements have been provided.

Answer:

The attached schedule sets out retirements/replacements to 10 May 1977.

S C H E D U L E O F R E T I R E M E N T S

Replacement

Branch! Division No. Designation o f retired officers provided

E x. P erm anent H e ad . 2 F irst D ivision ........................................................ N o

M inisterial a n d M anage- 1 Clerk, Class 10 . . . . . . Yes

m ent Services 1 C lerk, Class 9 . . . . . . Yes

2 Clerk, Class 8 . . . . . . Ye s

1 C lerk, Class 6 . . . . . . Yes

1 Clerk, Class 5 ....................................................... Yes

1 C lerk, Class 4 . . . . . . Yes

3 Clerical A ssistant, G rade 4 . . . . Yes

1 Clerical A ssistant, G ra d e 1 . . . . Yes

11

P roperty . . . 2 Clerk, Class 8 . . . . . . Ye s

1 Clerk, Class 7 . . . . . . Ye s

2 Clerk, Class 6 . . . . . . Ye s

1 Clerk, Class 5 . . . . . . Ye s

1 Clerk, Class 1 . . . . . . Ye s

1 C ustodian . . . . . . Ye s

7 Cleaners . . . . . . . F o u r only

4 Lift A ttendant . . . . . . Ye s

1A ttendant . . . . . . Yes

16

Survey . . . 1 A ssistant Surveyor-G eneral . . . N o

1 C hief Surveyor . . . . . . Ye s

3 Technical Officer, G rade 2 . . . . T w o only

1 Technical A ssistant, G rade 2 . . . Yes

2 C hief D raftsm an, G rade 1 . . . . Yes

1 D raftsm an, G rade 1 . . . . . Yes

1 D rafting A ssistant, G rade 1 . . . Yes

1 Surveying A ssistant Supervisor, G rade 2 . Yes

1 Surveying A ssistant Supervisor, G rade 1 . Yes

2 Surveying A ssistant, G rade 2 . . . One only

1 Searcher, G rade 3 . . . . . Yes

1 Searcher, G rade 1 ............................................ Yes

16

47

SCHEDULE OF RETIREMENTS— co n tin u ed

Branch! Division No. Designation o f retired officers

Replacement provided

T ran sp o rt and Storage . 1 E ngineer, Class 4 . . . . . Yes

1 C lerk, Class 8 ............................................ . Yes

1 C lerk, Class 5 . . . . . . Yes

1 Principal Technical Officer . . . . Yes

Purchasing . . .

4

2 A ssistant Secretary, Level 1 . . . Yes

2 Clerk, Class 10 . . . . . . Yes

1 C lerk, Class 8 ............................................ . Yes

2 C lerk, Class 7 ............................................ . Yes

4 Clerk, Class 6 ............................................ . T hree only

2 C lerk, Class 5 ............................................ . Yes

1 C lerk, Class 4 . . . . . . Yes

4 Clerk, Class 2/3 . . . . . Ye s

1 Senior Technical Officer, G rade 2 . . Yes

1 T echnical Officer, G rade 2 . . . . N o

1 C lerical A ssistant, G rade 6 . . . . Yes

3 C lerical A ssistant, G rade 3 . . . . Yes

1 C lerical A ssistant, G rade 2 . . . . N o

1 C lerical A ssistant, G rade 1 . . . . Yes

1 A ccounting M achinist, G ra d e 2 . . . N o

1

28

Typist, G rade 1 . . . . . Ye s

Total retirements = 75 Total replacements = 63 Variation (—) 12

48

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 3

Consideration of Division 130—Administrative Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought details of the staffing and expendi­ tures of the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation.

Answer:

The Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation comprises a staff o f eight headed by an honorary chairman, M r Harry M. Miller, whose appointment was announced in Parliament by the Prime Minister on 23 February last.

The Chairm an has been authorised by the Governor-General in Council to plan and execute a program of events to commemorate the Queen’s Silver Jubilee. The program is expected to include radio and TV broadcasts, firework displays, displays by the Navy, Army and Air Force, exhibitions and the presentation of medallions,

pendants and other trophies for sporting and other events. A sum of $500 000 is expected to be expended on the program, which will include a number of events which are expected to provide a substantial cash inflow to the Queen Elizabeth Silver Jubilee Appeal for Young Australians.

The Commemorative Organisation, wherever possible, is collaborating with other organisations in a manner that will enhance the Youth Appeal project.

A complete kit of press releases on the Commemorative Organisation and the activities being planned has been distributed to and published by almost every media outlet. The commemorative events will involve almost every section of the Australian community and range from ethnic folk festivals, yachting, lifesaving and other

sporting events through to schoolchildrens sports meetings. There will be a massive involvement with some 220 000 boy scouts and girl guides who on 11 June will celebrate the Queen’s Silver Jubilee with the lighting of some 3000 bonfires.

M ost of these events are funded by organisations involved and have sponsorship only by way of trophies and general association through the Commonwealth organisation for the Jubilee celebration. Apart from administrative costs which to date total $34 151, the sum of $6233 has been expended in relation to the program of

events, and this latter expense has been almost totally incurred in the purchase of commemorative Jubilee trophies of one form or another.

Copies of the press kit made available to the media by the Silver Jubilee Com­ memorative Organisation are attached.

49

PRESS RELEASE

THE SILVER JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE ORGANISATION

WHAT IT IS—WHAT IT PLANS TO DO

THE SILVER JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE ORGANISATION 100 William St., Sydney, N.S.W. 2000

THE Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation has been set up by the Com­ monwealth Government to plan and arrange events marking the 25th year of Queen Elizabeth IPs reign as Monarch.

Announcing the formation of the Organisation in the House of Representatives on 23 February, the Prime Minister, M r Fraser, said it was the Government’s earnest desire that Her Majesty’s visit to Australia and the Silver Jubilee commemoration be a happy and memorable one for all Australians.

M r Fraser announced that the Government had secured the agreement o f M r Harry M. Miller to serve as Chairman of the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organi­ sation. He said M r Miller was ‘admirably suited to the task, being a leading theatrical producer and outstanding personality in Australian business and cultural life’.

M r Miller is being assisted in the planning and arrangement of Commemorative activities by a small team of skilled personnel. It is intended that some of the events being planned by the Silver Jubilee Com­ memorative Organisation will assist in raising funds for the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Appeal, a separate organisation established by the Commonwealth Government and outlined on an attached page.

Mr Miller said the Jubilee Organisation was compiling a program of activities aimed at reaching as many parts of Australia as possible.

‘In areas where time and distance make it difficult for us to initiate local activities, the Jubilee Organisation is associating itself with regional events already in the public calendar’, said M r Miller. ‘For instance, we are donating special Jubilee Commemorative trophies to about

100 country agricultural shows for presentation to winners of events or sections nominated by the local show societies. The trophies will be awarded on a perpetual basis and we’ve had a most enthusi­ astic response from the various societies. There is quite obviously a very keen desire in country areas to identify with the Queen’s Jubilee.

We are also donating Jubilee trophies to the UTA Sydney-Noumea Yacht Race which begins from the Cruising Yacht Club in Sydney on 7 May.

Organisers of this race have designated it as a Jubilee year event and we’re pleased to welcome aboard the French republican involvement in our Royal celebrations.

We are giving the major ‘Cock of the Pacific’ line honours trophy for the race as well as a cup for the best navigator. We will also be presenting Jubilee commemorative plaques and pennants to all participating yachts.

We’ve already given a commemorative surf reel to the winner of the premiership rescue and resuscitation championship at the recent Australian surf lifesaving championships in Victoria, competed for by more than 3000 lifesavers from all over

50

Australia, and we plan to give suitable trophies for contest in a wide range of other Australian sporting activities such as race meetings, football premierships, and squash, golf and tennis tournaments.

In golf, for instance, we’re hoping to arrange a simultaneous Jubilee competition week-end at every golf club in Australia when we’ll give commemorative medallions to winners of men’s and women’s Stableford events.’

M r Miller said some of the Jubilee Organisation’s activities would cater specifically for ethnic groups.

‘We have had talks with leaders of some of the migrant groups who have told us that they wish to be involved in the Jubilee celebrations,’ said Mr Miller. ‘There is evidence of a great desire by migrants to honour the Queen of Australia by com­ memorating her Silver Jubilee.

We are going to enable this by associating the Jubilee with major folkloric festivals in Sydney (June) and Adelaide (July). We will present special plaques or medallions to participating ethnic community groups. Other ethnic activities for the Jubilee are proposed for later in the year.’

M r Miller said these were just a few of the associated involvements planned by the Jubilee Organisation. A list of activities being initiated by the Organisation is attached.

T believe that all the things we are doing are in the spirit of Her Majesty’s wide- ranging interest in public activities and serve as a tangible way of commemorating her Jubilee,’ M r Miller said.

‘Throughout her reign, Queen Elizabeth has had the respect and admiration of Australians and has shown remarkable capacities to adapt the traditions of the Monarchy and monarchical system to modern times. Her Jubilee year visit to Aus­ tralia was her fifth to this country since her accession to the throne. Each visit has

been marked by sincere demonstrations of public regard.

There is evidence of a genuine desire by millions of Australians to retain the nation’s ties with the Crown which is a cornerstone of our system of Parliamentary democracy. It’s therefore fitting that we should commemorate the Royal Silver Jubilee and I hope all Australians will share in the celebrations.’

51

PRESS RELEASE

CHAIN OF BONFIRES TO MARK QUEEN’S SILVER JUBILEE

SILVER JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE ORGANISATION 100 William St., Sydney, N.S.W. 2000

THOUSANDS of bonfires are to be lit simultaneously throughout Australia in a unique national spectacle to m ark Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee.

Operation Jubilee Bonfire is to be undertaken by more than 200 000 Scouts and Girl Guides. It is being organised by the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation,

The fires will be lit in the evening o f Saturday, 11 June during the Queen’s Birthday holiday weekend.

Details of the massive project are announced by M r Harry M. Miller, Chairman of the Jubilee Organisation.

Mr Miller said: ‘We expect to have something like 3000 bonfires burning through­ out the length and breadth of Australia. We are asking every Scout and Guide unit in the country to build their fires on the highest suitable point in their locality and the effect should be quite spectacular.

Bonfires have a long historical association with the signalling o f im portant events and the celebration of special occasions. We think it’s appropriate to revive the tradition as a commemoration of the Queen’s 25th year of reign.

We are getting tremendously enthusiastic co-operation from leaders in the Scout and Guide Associations. The Scouts tell us this will be the first time they’ve ever taken part in a co-ordinated activity of this scale.’

Mr Brian Garnsey, the Chief Commissioner for Australia of the Scout Association, said, T am delighted to endorse Scout involvement in Operation Jubilee Bonfire· I think it is a splendid idea and an enterprise which enables all Scouts in Australia to participate.’

Miss Mary Lambie, Chief Commissioner for Australia of the Girl Guides Association said: ‘The Girl Guides Association of Australia is delighted to be part of this event and I hope all Guide Units will co-operate to make it a success.’

Mr Miller said the Jubilee Organisation had issued the Scout and Guide Units with a set of guidelines for the project.

The bonfires are to be lit at 8.30 p.m. E.S.T., 8.00 p.m. Central Time and 5.30 p.m. Western Time (Western Australia celebrates the Queen’s Birthday in October but the Scout Association of W.A. has agreed to join with the other States in this activity).

It has been suggested that each bonfire ideally should be between 15 ft and 18 ft square at its base and as tall as possible. Decisions on the composition of the fuel for the fires are to be made locally.

Scouts and Guides are being asked to build their fires on the highest possible site so that groups can see each other’s bonfires in the chain.

They are also being asked to choose, wherever possible, sites which might have some locally historic association with signal bonfires.

52

‘Naturally, we are emphasising the importance of consultation with local fire authorities,’ said Mr Miller. ‘We’re also appealing to the authorities for as much co-operation as possible in making a success of this im portant Jubilee commemorative event.

But as we’re involved with such responsible members of the community as Scouts and Guides I think it is reasonable for everyone to assume that all necessary safety precautions will be observed.’ M r Miller said the Scouts and Guides were being encouraged to associate their

Jubilee bonfire with any suitable local community activity. It was being suggested they invite a prominent local citizen of their choice to light the bonfire.

The Jubilee Organisation is planning to have regional aerial photographs taken while the bonfires are blazing and is asking Scouts and Guides to provide latitude and longitude co-ordinates so that their fires can be identified from the enlarged photographs.

Special Jubilee trophies are to be awarded to the fires judged to burn brightest. M r Miller said: ‘We are hoping that this Jubilee spectacular will be the source o f fun and enjoyment for a great many Australians. The response we’ve had to the project so far has been quite overwhelming.’

‘The British Jubilee organisation is also planning a chain of bonfires around Britain. They’ll be lighting up a few days before us but I ’m convinced Australia will outdo them for spectacle . . . they’re arranging for hundreds of bonfires; we hope to have thousands.’

53

PRESS RELEASE

JUBILEE YEAR EVENTS IN AUSTRALIA

THE SILVER JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE ORGANISATION 100 William St., Sydney, N.S.W. 2000

Statement by Harry M. Miller Chairman Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation

EVENTS which the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation is initiating during the year begin on 30 May with the first of a fortnight of Britain-Australia commercial radio programs.

The Jubilee Organisation is sending six of Australia’s leading radio personalities to London from where they will broadcast their regular morning programs ‘live’ back to their own capital city stations.

In the first week of this project (30 M ay-3 June) broadcasters from Perth, Adelaide and Canberra will conduct their programs from studios in Capital City R adio in London. In the second week (4 June-10 June) the operation will be repeated by broadcasters from Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.

We are being assisted in this project—as with several others we’re planning—by the Overseas Telecommunications Commission.

The broadcasters will be in London at the peak of British Jubilee celebrations and will have an opportunity to make actuality reports about a great many ceremonies and special events. We are arranging for them to interview a number of distinguished and celebrated people in London and the participating stations have given us details of their individual and independent production plans, which suggest that this will be an extraordinary event.

The total potential Australian audience for these Jubilee broadcasts is in excess of 5 000 000. All capital city participating stations will be feeding their London broadcasts to country stations.

Technically, the operation is extremely complex. Each group of three broadcasters will be broadcasting their programs simultaneously but independently to as many as 18 different radio stations in Australia. At the London end, the broadcasters will be in adjoining studios in Capital City Radio, the London commercial station whose general manager, M r John Whitney, has been appointed honorary co-ordinator o f the Jubilee broadcasts.

We have also begun plans for a series of 13 one-hour youth-oriented Jubilee radio programs in which we aim to feature the music of and interviews with all of Britain’s top rock and pop stars.

This project—which will have a potential audience of more than 8 000 000 through­ out Australia—will attempt to gather material from wherever Britain’s pop superstars are living at the moment.

The series will be produced on tape and made available to both metropolitan and country radio stations.

We expect the first programs to go to air about June.

Operation Jubilee Bonfire (announced in a separate release in this kit) will take place on Saturday, 11 June.

54

We have begun very fruitful planning discussions with the Armed Services, that we believe will result in quite spectacular national displays by the Army, Navy and Air Force. It is im portant to note that this series of spectacular events are not to be confined simply to capital cities but will embrace most centres of population through­

out the whole continent.

These proposals have met with an enthusiastic response from the Armed Services and upon my return from the United Kingdom I would hope to be able to detail plans of these events.

In late October-early November we are planning to hold Britain-Australia track an d field meetings on successive weekends in Sydney and Melbourne. Plans for this project have only just begun but we hope to attract competitors from several Commonwealth countries for Jubilee invitation events.

About August we will be conducting a national Jubilee competition for all migrants to Australia in which they can win a free telephone-television call to friends and/or families in their old country.

The Overseas Telecommunications Commission will be assisting us in this project which will be open to migrants in every part of the country.

During our visit to London I will be having discussions with members of the Royal Household and representatives of the British Government to endeavour to secure their co-operation in a number of other activities we have planned.

55

C H A IR M A N ’S OFFICE

THE QUEEN’S SILVER JUBILEE APPEAL FOR YOUNG AUSTRALIANS

The establishment of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Appeal was announced by the Prime Minister, M r Fraser, at the same time as the formation of the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation, on 23 February this year.

The Appeal will be officially launched by 24 May in a special television broadcast by His Royal Highness, Prince Charles. In addition to leading the United Kingdom Appeal, Prince Charles has also consented to be Royal Patron of the Australian Appeal.

The total proceeds of the Appeal will be used to establish a Trust, which will be registered as a charity. Donations o f $2 and over will be tax deductible.

The Appeal will remain open until May 1978, and has a target of $5 million.

The Trust will be known as the Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee Trust for Young Australians.

Income from the Trust will partially be used to foster involvement in, and service to, the community by young people from all walks of life.

It will also provide opportunities for talented young Australians to further their careers by additional study and training, if necessary overseas.

The broad aim of the Trust will be to promote standards of excellence and achievement by the young in their chosen vocations, whether in trade and technical fields or the arts.

Encouragement will be given to the youth of Australia to develop qualities of initiative and leadership, particularly in service to the community through voluntary associations and organisations.

In working towards these ends, the Trust will be responsive to changing com­ munity attitudes, particularly those of the younger generation.

A distinguished Australian and leading industrialist, Sir Ian McLennan, K.B.E., has agreed to accept the position of Honorary Chairman of the National Appeal Committee. Chairmen of State and Territory committees will be announced shortly.

Both Commonwealth and State Governments are giving their full support to the Appeal; the Commonwealth Government having led the way with a donation of $2 million.

Chairman of the Silver Jubilee Commemorative Organisation, M r H arry M. Miller, said recently that the Silver Jubilee Appeal will receive substantial assistance through many of the events planned by his Organisation to celebrate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II throughout Australia.

THE SILVER JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE ORGANISATION 100 William St, Sydney, N.S.W. 2000

56

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 3 Consideration o f Division 130—Administrative

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought details of the general establishment of each of the sections compared with actual staffing.

Answer:

The following schedule sets out the staffing/establishment levels as at 30 April 1977 of areas covered by Division 130/1.

Establishment/Staffing Levels as at 30 April 1977

Division 130/1 Establishment Staffing

Secretary’s P ersonal S t a f f ....................................................... . . 6 6

M inisterial a n d M anagem ent Services D ivision . . . . 594 593

Property B r a n c h .................................................................. . . 711 677

Survey B ranch . . . . . . . . . . 942 895

Secretariat a n d Policy D ivision . . . . . . . 61 66

Protective Security . . . . . . . . . 6 7

T ransport a n d Storage D ivision (C entral Office only) . . . 69 68

Purchasing D ivision . . . . . . . . . 868 689

A ustralian G overnm ent A dvertising Service . . . . . 19 18

A ustralian F ire B o a r d ....................................................... . . 5 5

R oyal C om m issions and Inquiries etc....................................... . . 13 28

T o t a l ............................................................................. . . 3 294 3 052

57

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 4 Consideration of Division 130 Subdivision 2—Administrative Expenses

Senator Knight sought more background information on the action being taken on the recommendations in paragraphs 46, 48, 50 and 52 of the report by the Joint Committee on the A.C.T. on Canberra City Wastes.

Answer:

The recommendations of the Committee and information on action taken up to now on those recommendations a re :

Paragraph 46 The Committee therefore recommends that the Department of Administrative Services and its clients departments using the automated vacuum system examine the feasibility of a method of waste paper collection which produces a potentially

recyclable product.

Action taken: A contract entered into with Canberra Paper and Cardboard Re­ cycling Company commenced on 1 March 1977 and provides for the end product o f the automated vacuum system at Cameron Offices to be collected for recycling. Material of a non-recyclable nature is kept separate and dealt with as a separate operation. The non-recyclable material is dumped at Pialligo where it is subsequently buried.

Paragraph 48 The Committee recommends that the Department of Administrative Services and all Commonwealth Government departments and authorities ensure that waste paper and cardboard is handled in such a way that it is, to the maximum feasible extent, recyclable.

Action taken: The Canberra Paper and Cardboard Recycling Company which has a contract with the Departm ent of Administrative Services collects waste material from all Commonwealth Government departments with the exception of the Department of Defence. Material is being collected from 101 points and con­

sideration is being given to extending the collection arrangements further. Separation of non-recyclable material is undertaken by the contractor.

Paragraph 50 The Committee therefore recommends that the Department of Administrative Services undertake to have all classified waste from Commonwealth Government departments and authorities in Canberra delivered to a central point for shredding and eventual recycling.

Action taken: Previous arrangements for the use of the AVAC system at Cameron Offices have been widened and with the agreement of the Commonwealth security advising body lesser classified material is now treated at Cameron Offices. The incineration method for highly classified material as recommended by the security advising body still pertains. Further consideration is being given to the acceptability of a shredding process for highly classified material to allow recycling.

58

Paragraph 52

The Committee therefore recommends that all future planning of government- built office space includes provision for facilities which will increase the recycling potential of government waste paper.

Action taken: The recommendation has been noted for examination and inclusion in construction briefs for government premises in Canberra.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 4 Consideration of Division 130—Administrative

Senator McLaren sought an explanation for the decreased expenditure on minor maintenance on government buildings.

Answer: In New South Wales the Department of Construction has been able to undertake more minor maintenance on government buildings than originally anticipated. Maintenance undertaken by the Department of Construction is charged to

Division 224/1/03.

59

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 4 Consideration of Division 130/2/07

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland asked for a breakdown by shires of the amounts involved in the $248 000 in the appropriation.

Answer: The following schedules set out the amounts estimated to be paid in 1976-77 by States and by shires and councils in each State:

State Amountf

N ew S outh W ales . .

V ictoria . . . .

Q ueensland . . .

South A u s tra lia . . .

W estern A ustralia . .

T asm ania . . . .

A ustralian C apital T erritory N o rth e rn T erritory . .

$

124047 13 094* 79 865 28858**

5 276 1 192

T o t a l ........................................................................................ 252 332

NOTES: * This does not include an amount of $8235 (Victoria) which is unpaid pending valuation. ** This includes an amount of $17 603 which was paid to the South Australian Department of Engineering and Water Supply,

t The appropriation of $248 000 plus the additional estimate of $10 600 will be expended in 1976-77.

The payments to individual local government authorities are: (i) New South Wales $ $

W ollongong C ouncil . . . . . . . 4 0 5 9 .0 0

L ake M acquarie C o u n c il.................................................................. 1 794.00

Cessnock C ouncil . . . . . . . . 7 8 6 5 .0 0

L ithgow C o u n c i l .................................. 26 837.00

C orow a C o u n c i l .................................. 2 596.00

Penrith Council . . . . . . . . 5 907.00

Sydney Council . . . . . . . . 10 759.00

R yde Council . . . . . . . . 243.00

South Sydney Council . . . . . . . 11 800.00

G ou lb u rn Council . . . . . . . . 15.00

Lism ore Council . . . . . . . . 55.00

Cam pbelltow n Council . . . . . . . 530.00

B yron Council . . . . . . . . 30.00

G u n d u rim b a Council . . . . . . . 220.00

Tenterfleld C ouncil . . . . . . . . 280.00

B urragong C ouncil . . . . . . . . 440.00

M itchell Council . . . . . . . . 350.00

C orow a C ouncil . . . . . . . . 1 989.00

H u n ter D istrict W ater B oard . . . . . . 7 891.00

M .W .S. & D .B ...................................................................................... 39 367.00

O ther . . . . . . . . . . 1 020.00

T otal New South W ales 124 047.00

60

(ii) Victoria

$ $

M elbourne C ouncil ................................................................... 474.00

M .M .B .W ................................................................................................ 12137.00

C ity o f B r o a d m e a d o w s .................................................................. 2 808.00

M .M .B .W ................................................................................................ 680.00

C ity o f Seym our .............................................................................. 383.00

Seym our W aterw orks T r u s t ....................................................... 194.00

C ity of O a k l e i g h ............................................................................. 305.00

Stawell C i t y ........................................................................................ 51.00

Stawell W ater W orks T r u s t ....................................................... 24.00

T o tal V ictoria . . . . . . . 21 329.00

(iii) Tasmania Clarence C ouncil— C onsolidated W ater .

Sewerage .

G arbage .

465.31 189.00 195.00 52.50 ---------- 901.81

B urnie C ouncil— C onsolidated Cleansing .

W ater .

Sewerage .

204.67 15.39 34.53 35.36 — ------ 289.95

T otal T asm ania . 1 191.76

(iv) W estern Australia M etropolitan W ater Supply a n d D rainage B oard Public W orks D ep artm en t— M e e k a t h a r r a ............................................

C arnarvon . . . . . .

K algoorlie . . . . . .

D e r b y .......................................................

Shire of W est P ilbara . . . .

Shire o f C arnarvon . . . .

Shire o f P o rt H edland . . . .

Shire o f B r o o m e ............................................

Shire o f M eekatharra . . . .

T ow n o f G eraldton . . . .

3 475.94

17.55 20.00 20.00 40.00

54.55 154.04 976.35 340.00

88.50 89.00 ---------- 1 799.99

T otal W estern A ustralia 5 275.93

(v) Queensland Allora Shire . .

Albert Shire . .

Barcaldine Shire . Beaudesert Shire . Brisbane City . .

Cairns City . .

Charters Towers City Cook Shire . .

Dalrymple Shire . Flinders Shire. .

Gladstone City .

G ooburrum Shire . Gympie City . .

Ipswich City . .

M onto Shire . .

M oreton Shire .

18.00 210.00 26.00 93.00 73 031.00

480.00 160.00 140.00 39.00

64.00 515.00 42.00 150.00

187.00 11.00 578.00

61

24156/79—3

(v) Queensland —continued ' $ $

Noosa Shire . . . . . . . . . 1 100.00

Pioneer Shire . . . . . . . . . 32.00

Stanthorpe Shire . ............................................................................. 25.00

Toowoomba City . . . . . . . . 414.00

Townsville C i t y ............................................................................. 2 445.00

Widgee Shire . . . . . . . . . 28.00

Hinchinbrook Shire . . . . . . . 57.00

Rosenthal Shire . . . . . . . . 20.00

Total Queensland . . . . . . 79865 .00

(vi) South Australia Local government— City of Adelaide . .

City of Enfield . .

City of H indmarsh .

City of Marion . .

Council of Munno Para Town of Murray Bridge City of Prospect . .

City of Payneham ,

City of Salisbury . .

City of Woodville .

1 560.00 481.63 622.70 97.80 242.78

70.00 585.20 99.00 3892 .50 3 603.30

State Government— Ex gratia payments to the Department of Engineering and Water Supply in respect of Commonwealth properties physically located in the undermentioned locations:

Clare . . . . . . . . .

Kadina . ............................................................................

John Bull Site . . ......................................................

Marden . . . . . . . .

Mount Gambier . . . . . . .

Murray B r id g e ..................................................................

Prospect .............................................................................

Renown Park . . . . . . .

Salisbury . . . . . . . .

Simpson Building . . . . . . .

Survey Store ..................................................................

Port L i n c o l n ..................................................................

W oo dv ille .............................................................................

WRE P e n f i e ld ..................................................................

38.80 90.00 56.24 96.00

2 796.80 150.10 585.12 1 002.50

194.08 6 812.64 533.48 409.12 3 160.50 1 678.02

11 254.91

17 603.40

Total South Australia 28 858.31

62

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, pages 5, 6 and 7 Consideration of Division 130—Advertising National Song Poll

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland and Senator Wright sought details on the costs involved in advertising the National Song Poll and information on the form this will take.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Answer: (a) Breakdown o f proposed expenditure

$

Press (new spapers, m agazines) ............................................................................. 29 000

T e l e v i s i o n ......................................................................................................................... 78 000

R a d i o ......................................................................................................................... 26 000

O ther— Sound tape, cassettes, four tunes, m ailed to each radio station . . . 2 000

Production costs .............................................................................................................. 15000

150 000

(b) The wording in press, radio and television basically follows the line: O n May 21 you can vote for the tune you’d like to hear on purely Australian occasions—like when we win at the Olympics. We already have an anthem for the Queen and Vice-regal occasions. God Save the Queen is also one of the four tunes you can vote for as our own Australian national tune. The others are Advance Australia Fair, Song of Australia and Waltzing Matilda. Vote carefully next Saturday and fill in every square in the order of your preference.’

For television and radio advertising the most easily identifiable segment of each of the four tunes will be played by the same band, with equal presentation time. In the press advertisement a sample of the ballot paper will be illustrated

and wording added to urge readers to ‘follow exactly the instructions on the ballot paper’. Care has been taken in advertisement content to avoid any inferred recommendation for a specific tune. Main emphasis is on voting in sequence of individual preference. Newspaper advertisements will be smaller than full page, i.e. 30 centimetre by 5 column, and will appear in metropolitan newspapers only, but this includes Sunday newspapers. (c) The advertising agencies involved a re:

(1) to plan and create the advertising up to approval stage—Phillips and Horne—a Sydney-based Australian-owned advertising agency. (2) To place the advertising with media and present accounts to the Commonwealth:

Press—Berry Currie (N.S.W.) Pty Ltd (Australian owned) Radio and television—Fortune (Aust.) Pty Ltd (Australian owned) (3) In States other than New South Wales other advertising agencies to assist with placing of advertisements with local newspapers and with

checking appearances. Those agencies are: Melbourne—Hayes, Cowcher Dailey Pty Ltd Brisbane—Le Grand Advertising Adelaide—Fortune (S.A.) Pty Ltd

Perth—Berry Currie (W.A.) Pty Ltd Hobart—Leo Burnett (Tas.) Pty Ltd.

63

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 10 Consideration of Division 130/3/11

Senator the Hon. R. C. Wright asked: ‘How much of the total o f $700 000 or $800 000 was paid in fees to D r Coombs ?’

Answer:

Attached is a statement of total fees paid to D r Coombs as Chairman of the Royal Commission on Australian Government Administration.

It is noted that Senator Wright refers to a total of ‘$700 000 or $800 000’. Total costs of the Commission are:

$

1974- 75 ....................................................... 647 990

1975- 76 ....................................................... 1 218 143

1976- 77 (estim ated) . . . . 136 700

2 002 833

FEES PAID TO DR COOMBS AS CHAIRMAN, ROYAL COMMISSION ON AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATION

T o 31 M arch 1976 ............................................

T o 31 M ay 1976 8 weeks @ $1150.15 per fortnight . + 3 days @ $1150.15 per fortnight

T o 22 July 1976 7 weeks @ $1318.84 per fo rtnight . + 3 days @ $1318.84 per fortnight

$

46 136.83

4 600.60 345.05

4 615.94 395.65

T o t a l ............................................................................. 56 094.07

Does not include allowances.

64

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference. Senate Hansard of 26 April 1977, page 13 Consideration of Division 130-5—Rent and other accommodation for departments

Senator McLaren asked whether holes in the surface of the Currie Street carpark could be repaired.

Answer:

The area used for parking in Currie Street is leased on a monthly basis to a private operator. Difficulty is being experienced in enforcing the lessee’s responsibility to m aintain the area due to the short-term lease. The Department is taking action to effect temporary repairs.

65

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard of 26 April 1977, page 14 Consideration of Division 130-5—Rent and other accommodation for departments

Senator McLaren asked for information regarding the purpose of the lease and the occupants in the Richard Building in Adelaide and why no provision had been made for the renewal of the lease.

Answer:

The Richard Building provides office accommodation for the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations. It had been planned to relocate that D epart­ ment to other leased premises, surrendering the space as a consequence. This move

did not eventuate because of administrative rearrangements and additional funds were required to cover the lease/rental for the full twelve months.

66

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 14 Consideration of Division 130-5—Rent and other accommodation for departments

Senator McClelland asked two questions as to whether lists could be provided setting out premises leased for departments and statutory authorities, in time.

Answer:

As expected, the provision of lists of individual leases for departments and statutory authorities is a major task and it has not been possible to provide the information in the time available; however, every effort is being made within my Department

for complete lists to be provided which will detail the information sought. Statutory authorities have been requested to provide particulars of accommodation occupied.

67

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard of 26 April 1977, page 14 Consideration of Division 130-5—Rent and other accommodation for departments

Senator Wright asked whether any lease renewals had been negotiated at reduced levels.

Answer:

O f all the leases renewed throughout Australia this financial year, there were two instances in Sydney where reductions were negotiated. These were at:

(i) Australia Square Tower, 264 George Street—a reduction of $77 501 per annum (ii) WEA House, 72 Bathurst Street—a reduction o f $4792 per annum.

68

CONSIDERATION OF ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 14 Consideration of Division 130-5—Rent and other accommodation for departments

Senator Wright asked whether a list could be provided of unused space which had been vacant for a substantial period of the year.

Answer:

The attached schedule indicates the position at the end of March for leased premises which a re :

(i) allocated, but being prepared for occupation, and (ii) unallocated at this time.

The rent paid for the vacant space to this time is $461 189,

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

69

UNOCCUPIED OFFICE ACCOMMODATION—LEASED (A) ALLOCATED

Action proposed to reduce vacant space

1 .1 .7 7 V acated by D r C oom bs o n 1 6.1.1976. T his w hole floor could be surrendered depending u p o n co n so lid atio n in the building by the A ustralia Council. D ecision by June 1977.

1 .1 .7 7 F ittin g o u t in progress. F u n d s a p proved O ccupation expected A pril 1977. 30 June 1976. 1 .1 .7 7 Aw aiting com pletion o f fitting out. O ccupation expected in A pril 1977. F unds provided on 30 June 1976.

O ccupation expected in July 1977.

1 .4 .7 7 C afeteria operations expected to com - F itte d out as cafeteria, m ence in June 1977. 1 .1 .7 7 O ccupation did n o t proceed. Lease to be term inated in Ju n e 1977.

1 .1 1 .7 5 A w aiting com pletion o f fitting o u t as O ccupation expected in June 1977. D ental L ab o ra to ry . F u n d s approved 30 June 1976. 1 .6 .7 5 A w aiting com pletion o f fitting out as O ccupation expected in A pril 1977.

A coustic L aboratory. F u n d s

approved 30 June 1976.

O ccupation expected in June 1977.

1 .1 2 .7 6 V acated as D arw in d epartm ents re tu rn O ccupation expected o f 650m 2, July to D arw in. A w aiting com pletion o f 1977. 650m 2, A ugust 1977. fitting out a n d installation o f phones.

1 .1 .7 7 A w aiting com pletion o f fitting o u t O ccupation expected in July 1977. and installation o f m andata

com pleted by supplier (N C R ). 1 .2 .7 7 A w aiting com pletion o f fitting out. O ccupation expected in July 1977.

State Building address

Initial identifi-

Vacant cation of

area rri1 vacancy Reason for vacant space Action proposed to reduce vacant space

A .C.T. A M P Building, H o b art Place, C an ­

berra City

STCC Building, Q ueanbeyan

(C’wlth Actuary) W ales C entre (E H C D )

A M P Building, H o b a rt Place,

C anberra City (A dm in. Appeals) C A G A Centre, C anberra City (DAS)

74.32 2 9 .1 0 .7 6 V acated by A G ’s in w ake o f wind- O ccupation expected in A pril 1977.

dow n o f Law R eform C om m ission. F ittin g out now for Fam ily Law

C ourt.

895.84 1 .4 .7 6 A w aiting com pletion o f fitting out. O ccupation expected in A pril 1977.

1 684.0 1 9 .11.76 V acated by A G B R O a n d A .C .T . O ccupation expected in June 1977.

Schools A uthority.

500.6 1 5 .2 .7 7 Aw aiting fitting out. O ccupation expected in July 1977.

604 19.11.76 A w aiting fitting out. O ccupation expected in July 1977.

T otal 12 366.96

UNOCCUPIED OFFICE ACCOMMODATION—LEASED (B) UNALLOCATED

Initial identifi-

Vacant cation o f Action proposed to reduce

State Building address area m2 vacancy Reason for vacant space vacant space

N .S.W . 132-138 A rth u r Street, N orth

Sydney W estfield Tower, 100 W illiam

Street 59 G oulburn Street, Sydney

Edgecliff C entre 203-233 New

South H ead R oad, Edgecliff

169.08 1 .9 .7 6 V acated following the cessation o f Lease term inates on 30 A pril 1977.

operation o f N ational Savings group.

532.43 1 .9 .7 6 V acated by Royal C om m ission into Expected to be vacated in the near

M aritim e Paym ents. future.

603.87 1 .1 2 .7 6 V acated by the N avy Office. Space is o n offer to D ep artm en t o f

T ransport.

371.62 1 .1 2 .7 6 Vacated by N avy Office due to security Space is o n offer to m ost departm ents, problem s.

Slate Building address

Initial identi-

Vacant fication

area m2 o f vacancy Reason for vacant space Action proposed to reduce vacant space

Vic.

Qld

S.A.

W .A.

132-138 A rth u r Street, N o rth

Sydney 132-138 A rth u r Street, N o rth

Sydney

195.10

134.15

99 Q ueen Street, M elbourne 102 Jolim ont R oad, Jolim ont 380.6 454.3

225 Princes Highway, M orw ell 143.3

294 Adelaide Street, B risbane 161

294 A delaide Street, Brisbane 556.58

240 C urrie Street (T he Village),

A delaide

93.37

260 C urrie Street 466.54

S heraton C ircuit, 207 A delaide

T errace, P erth W ales C entre, 169 St Georges

35

196.1

T errace, P erth

1 .9 .7 6 V acated by E & IR w hen R E D Scheme term inated. 1 .4 .7 6 V acated by Cities C om m ission w hen it ceased operations.

1 .2 .7 7 N o current use. 1 .6 .7 5 Space on offer to D A S— F ire B oard Com . Police. 1 .1 0 .7 5 Legal A id Office did n o t open.

1 .1 2 .7 6 V acated by the re turning D a rw in de­ partm ents. 1 .2 .7 7 V acated by re turning D arw in d ep art­ m ents.

1 .3 .7 7 M et. B ureau m oved to new prem ises in K en t Tow n. T elecom is interested in the lease. 1 .3 .7 7 A s above.

1 .7 .7 6 D efence vacated, a n d n o o th er ten a n t is identified. 1 .2 .7 7

Lease term inates on 30 A pril 1977.

Lease term inates on 30 A pril 1977.

Space o n offer to m ost departm ents. A llocation to be confirm ed in A pril

1977.

Space o n offer to m ost d epartm ents.

N o cu rren t requirem ents.

N o cu rren t requirem ents.

C onfirm ation o f T elecom C om m , in­ terest expected in A pril 1977.

A s above.

L essor refuses to release the C ’wlth

from the lease. Space o n offer to m ost departm ents.

T o tal 4 493.04

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 15 Consideration of Item 133-1-01 Salaries and allowances

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought details of the designation, classifi­ cation and location of the 25 positions created for conduct of industrial elections.

Answer:

The attached table sets out the details requested.

AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE POSITIONS PROVIDED FOR CONDUCT OF INDUSTRIAL ELECTIONS POSITIONS ALLOCATED AT 27 APRIL 1977

Details o f position

State No. Designation

Classifi­ cation (Class)

Salary scale ($) (a)

N ew South W ales . . 204 Executive Officer . . Class 8 15 931-16 587

205 Executive Officer . . Class 8 15 931-16 587

209 Executive Officer . . Class 7 14 391-15 272

213 Clerk . . . . Class 6 13 077-13 956

216 Clerk . . . . Class 6 13 077-13 956

V ictoria . . . 203 Executive Officer . . Class 8 15 931-16 587

207 Executive Officer . . Class 7 14 391-15 272

211 Executive Officer . . Class 7 14 391-15 272

214 C lerk . . . . Class 6 13 077-13 956

221 Clerk . . . . Class 5 11 764-12 746

Q ueensland . . . 208 Executive Officer . . C lass 7 14 391-15 272

220 C lerk . . . . C lass 5 11 764-12 746

S outh A ustralia . . 213 Executive Officer . . C lass 7 14 391-15 272

W estern A ustralia . 212 Executive Officer . . Class 7 14 391-15 272

218 Clerk . . . . Class 5 11 764-12 746

T asm ania . . . 210 Executive Officer . . Class 7 14 391-15 272

219 C lerk . . . . Class 5 11 764-12 746

A ustralian C apital

T erritory . . . 222 Clerk . . . . Class 5 11 764-12 746

H eld in P ool for F uture 206 Executive Officer . . Class 8 15 931-16 587

A llocation . . 217 Clerk . . . . Class 6 13 077-13 956

223 to 227

5 positions o f Clerk . . Class 5 11 764-12 746

(a) Includes National Wage Case adjustment effective from 31 March 1977.

73

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, pages 16, 17, 18, 19 and 21 Consideration of Item:

133-2-05 Administration of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 133-2-06 Commonwealth Elections and Referenda Senator the Honourable R. J. Wright sought further analyses o f the costs of the forthcoming referendums and of the costs of future elections as follows :

• Page 16—Amounts chargeable to the joint rolls States for printing of the electoral rolls Amount of other casual staff costs as distinct from the cost of polling officials • Page 18—Cost of printing and posting the YES/NO cases

Cost of postage charges if the referendum pamphlet had been o f a different size • Page 19—Typical figures for the expense of an election Senator G. T. McLaren sought details of the cost o f preparing the referendums pamphlet.

Senator P. E. Rae sought details of the difference between the cost of a general election and the cost of a referendum.

Answer:

The attached table sets out detailed comparative costs of the 1975 elections, the estimated costs of the forthcoming referendums and the estimated costs (based on current prices) of future elections of various types.

74

ELECTIONS AND REFERENDUMS—ESTIMATED COSTS (AT CURRENT PRICES)

E stim ated cost o f

Item s

A ctual costs 1975 Double

Dissol­ ution

R efer­ endum

H a lf Senate Election

House o f R ep­ resenta­ tives Election

Joint Rep­

resenta­ tives

and H a lf Senate

Double Dissol­ ution

$ $ $ $ $ $

Staffing costs(c)— Polling officials . . . 2 610 000 3 700 000 4 100 000 3 700 000 4 300 000 4 850 000

O ther assistance . . 1 000 000 500 000 800 000 500 000 900 000 1 150 000

O vertim e . . . . 410 000 200 000 240 000 200 000 280 000 320 000

M eal allow ances(i) . . 139 000 100 000 110 000 100 000 120 000 130 000

T otal Staffing C osts . 4 159 000 4 500 000 5 250 000 4 500 000 5 600 000 6 450 000

Electoral Rolls(c) . . 371 400 (d)520 000 520 000 520 000 520 000 520000

Postage & telephones . 420 000 400 000 400 000 400 000 400 000 400 000

F o rm printing . . . 380 000 400 000 400 000 400 000 500 000 500 000

A dvertising . . . (e)270 000 280 000 280 000 280 000 280 000 280 000

Freight a n d cartage . . 213 000 150 000 150 000 150 000 160 000 180 000

Prem ises (inch rental equip­ ping, lighting, operation a n d cleaning) . . . 180 000 130 000 130 000 130 000 145 000 170 000

M iscellaneous exp. . . 173 600 120 000 120 000 120 000 145 000 200 000

T o tal . . . . 6 167 000 6 500 000 7 250 000 6 500 000 7 750 000 8 700 000

Referendum Pam phlets— Printing a n d w rapping . 550 000

Postage . . . . 1 450.000

G ra n d T otal . . 6 167 000 8 500 000 7 250 000 6 500 000 7 750 000 8 700 000

(а) Labour costs of elections involving the Senate normally are higher than for House of Representative elections alone or for a referendum because of the greater time involved in counting, as a result of the preferential voting system and generally larger number of candidates involved. (б) Previously included in O ther costs’.

(c) The costs of printing of principal rolls are charged to Item 133-2-05—Administration of the Com­ monwealth Electoral Act. The costs of printing supplementary rolls (required for use at a specific election or referendum) are charged to Item 133-24)6 Commonwealth Elections and Referenda. In the four joint roll States (New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania), accounts for f the half share of the costs borne by those States are rendered direct to the States by their respective

Government Printers—see also note ( d ) below. (d) The estimate of accounts to be rendered direct to the joint roll States for their half share of printing ‘ of the rolls for the referendum on 21 May 1977 is $245 000. In addition, half of the phototypesetting charge (half cost is estimated as $72 000 in respect of these rolls), met initially by the Commonwealth,

will be recouped from the joint roll States. ( e) Includes $108 000 provided by the Department of the Media for advertising in respect of Senate ballot-papers. (/) Postage costs on the pamphlet are 18c per copy. This is the basic postage rate for material of this

type. No saving would have been achieved by reduction in the pamphlet’s size, but postage costs would have been higher if the pamphlet size increased. ( g) Excludes $500 000 being the estimated additional cost of concurrent conduct of the national poll.

Australian Electoral Office April 1977

75

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, pages 16 and 21 Consideration of Sub-division 133-2-06 Commonwealth elections and referendums

Senators the Hon. R. J. Wright and G. T. McLaren sought details of the advertising to be undertaken in relation to the forthcoming referendums and of comparable details and expenditures incurred at the elections in 1974 and 1975.

Answer:

The attached tables, A and B, summarise the expenditures incurred in 1975 and the estimated costs for the 1977 referendums.

Extraction of cost information on publicity for the 1974 elections would be difficult and time consuming. The limited information available suggests it was similar to that for the 1975 elections for which details are contained in table A.

Samples of the publicity material to be used at the referendums also are attached, together with samples of the material used for the 1974 and 1975 elections.

T A B L E A

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN— 1975 DOUBLE' DISSOLUTION ELECTIONS

Medium Enrolment

Postal voting

Absent voting

Formal voting

Statutory advertising and polling place information Totals

$ S $ S S §

N ew spapers . .. 10 000 10 000 115 600 62 900 198 500

R a d io . . . 10 000 7 500 9 000 5 0 0 0 31 500

Television . . 40 000 40 000

A BC radio A B C tele-vision and E thnic

ra d io . . . N o costs involved except for production costs

P roduction costs . fig u re s n o t available—they are included in the figures given above

T otals . . . 20000 17 500 9 000 (o)160 600 ·· 270 000

(a) Includes advertising on the Senate ballot-paper for which the Department of Media provided $1C3 000 from its 1975-76 appropriations.

76

TA BLEB

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN— ESTIMATED COSTS— REFERENDUMS AND POLL FOR A NATIONAL SONG 21 MAY 1977

Medium Enrolment

Postal voting

Absent voting

Statutory advertising and polling

Distri- place

Formal button o f informa­ voting pamphlet tion Totals

$ $ $ $ $ S $

N ew spapers . 33 000 27 000 23 000 32 000 .. 46 000 161 000

Television . 49 000 44 000 93 000

A BC radio A B C tele-vision a n d E thnic

radio N o cost involved except for production costs which

are included in the table u nder th at heading

P roduction costs and service fees . 5 000 5 000 4 500 7 000 4 500 26 000

T o tal . 38 000 32 000 27 500 88 000 48 500 46 000 280 000

77

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1977 REFERENDUMS AND POLL FOR A NATIONAL SONG

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS

For the referendum s and the poll for a national song on M a y 21...

Is your nam e on tne electoral1 f Australian citizens and other I, 1 , » British subjects 18 years of ageand over who are entitled to enrol­ment and are not correctly enrolled should complete a claim for enrolment and forward it to their Common­wealth Electoral Office without delay (see Common­wealth Government section of Telephone Directory for addresses). Claim cards are available at Electoral Offices and Post Offices.Act now and ensure you are correctly enrolled.Enrolment is compulsory.*The Rolls close on Wednesday, 27 April, 1977*NOTE: Electors in A.C.T. and N.T. are not eligible to vote in the referendums, but may vote in the poll for a national song.Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office AEE 15.2 0 3 .4781

For the referendums and the poll for a national song on M ay 21...

Is your name on the electoral1 f Australian citizens and other a y f l Μ ^ British subjects 18 years of age and over who are entitled to enrol­ment and are not correctly enrolled should complete a claim for enrolment and forward it to their Common­wealth Electoral Office without delay (see Common­wealth Government section of Telephone Directory for addresses). Claim cards are available at Electoral Offices and Post Offices.Act now and ensure you are correctly enrolled.Enrolment is compulsory.*The Rolls close today.*NOTE: Electors in A.C.T. and N.T. are not eligible to vote in the referendums, but may vote in the poll for a national song.Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office A EE 5 .203.4782

For the referendums and the poll for a national song on May 21...

Will you need a postal vote? You m ay vote by post if— throughout polling hours— D you will be outside the State for which you are

enrolled; or D you will be m ore than 8 km by the nearest

practicable route from a polling booth in th at

State; or D you will be travelling under conditions which will preclude you from attending a polling booth in th at State; or if D for reasons of serious ill-health or infirmity or

by reason of approaching m aternity, you are

unable to attend any polling booth; or □ your religious beliefs preclude you from attending a booth, or voting during polling hours (or the

greater part of these hours).

How to apply: Postal vote application forms are avail­ able at Commonwealth Electoral Offices (see Common­ wealth Government section of Telephone Directory for addresses) and Post Offices.'

NOTE: Voting is compulsory in the referendums, but voluntary in the poll for a national song. Electors in the A.C.T. and N.T. are not eligible to vote in the refer­ endums but may vote in the poll for a national song.

Authorised’ by the Australian Electoral Office AER 2 .203.47

For the poll for a national song on M ay 21...

Will you need a postal vote? You m ay vote by post if— throughout polling hours— D you will no t be within the A .C .T .; or

□ if you will be within the A .C .T . and you will no t

be within 8 km of any polling booth open in the

Division for which you are enrolled; or if D for reasons of serious ill-health or infirm ity or by reason of approaching m aternity, you are unable to attend any polling booth; or

□ your religious beliefs preclude you from attending a booth, or voting during polling hours (or the

greater p art of these hours).

How to apply: Postal vote application forms are avail­ able at Commonwealth Electoral Offices (see Common­ wealth Government section of Telephone Directory for addresses) and Post Offices.

NOTE: Voting in the poll for a national song is volun­ tary. Electors in the A.C.T. are not eligible to vote in the referendums.

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office AEP 6 .203.47-

84

For the poll for a national song on M ay 21...

W ill1; 011 need a postal vote?

X.

Y ou m ay vote by post if— throughout polling hours— □ you will not be within the N orthern T erritory; or D you will not be w ithin 8 km of any polling booth open in the N orthern T erritory; or

□ you will be travelling u n d er conditions which will preclude you from voting at any such polling

booth in the N orthern T erritory; or if D for reasons of serious ill-health or infirmity o r by reason of approaching m aternity, you are unable to atten d any polling booth; or

□ your religious beliefs preclude you from attending a booth, or voting during polling hours (or the

g reater p art of these hours).

N O T E : P ostal B allot-papers m ust reach the R eturning Officer by 31 M ay 1977.

How to apply: Postal vote application forms are avail­ able at Commonwealth Electoral Offices and Post Offices. Inquiries may be made from the Returning Officer, M.L.C. Building, Smith Street, Darwin, phone 81 3677 or the Assistant Returning Officer,' King’s Building,

Hartley Street, Alice Springs, phone 52 3937.

N OTE: Voting in the poll for a national song is volun­ tary. Electors in the N.T. are not eligible to vote in the referendums.

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office AEP 7.203.47

85

For the referendum^ and the poll for a national song on M ay 21...

W ill you need an absent vote? If, on polling day, you will be outside the Subdivision but within the State for which you are enrolled you

may lodge an absent vote at any polling booth within the State for which you are enrolled.

If you will be outside that State you should obtain a postal vote application form from your Common­ wealth Electoral Office (see Commonwealth Govern­ ment section of Telephone Directory for addresses) or Post Office.

N O TE: Voting is compulsory in the referendums, but voluntary in the poll for a national song. Electors in the A.C.T. and N.T. are not eligible to vote in the refer­ endums but may vote in the poll for a national song.

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office ΛΕΑ 3.20 3 .4 7

86

For the referendum s and the poll for a national song on M ay 21...

W ill you need an absent vote or apostal vote? If, on polling day, you will be outside the Subdivision

but within the State for which you are enrolled, you may make an absent vote at any polling booth within the State for which you are enrolled.

If you will be outside that State you should obtain a postal vote application form from your Common­ wealth Electoral Office (see Commonwealth Govern­ ment section of Telephone Directory for addresses) or

Post Office.

N OTE: Voting is compulsory in the referendums but voluntary in the poll for a national song.

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office ΑΕΡΑ 8 .203.47

87

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENT

FORMAL VOTING

Im portant things to know before you vote on 21 May.

Referendums • On Saturday 21 May 1977, electors in the States must vote on four referendums.

• You should have received by mail a pamphlet explaining the proponents’ arguments for and against the four proposed changes to the Constitution.

• The ballot-paper, which is B U FF coloured, asks whether you approve or do not approve each of the proposed laws. You must write either YES or NO in each o f the four squares provided.

• In each polling booth there will be a poster explaining how to mark your ballot- paper.

• If you make a mistake, fold the spoilt paper and take it to the Presiding Officer who will give you a replacement. Remember, a mistake cannot be corrected once your ballot-paper is in the ballot box.

• VOTING IN THE REFEREN D U M S IS COMPULSORY

Poll for the tune for a National Song • When you receive your referendums ballot-paper, you will also be offered a W HITE ballot-paper for the poll to choose the tune for a national song.

e Voting is voluntary. • The ballot-paper will show the titles of four songs. M ark every square in the order of your preference for the tunes o f the songs— 1, 2, 3, 4.

• If you do not wish to vote in the poll return your ballot-paper unmarked to the Presiding Officer.

M AKE YOUR VOTES CO U N T ON 21 MAY. NOTE: Electors in the A.C.T. and N.T. are not eligible to vote in the referendums, but may vote in the poll for the tune for a national song.

88

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1977 REFERENDUMS AND POLL FOR A NATIONAL SONG

ABC RADIO ABC TV ETHNIC RADIO

'

ETHNIC RADIO, ABC RADIO AND TV—ENROLM ENT

Coming up soon are issues which affect every Australian: the referendums and the poll for a national song. To vote you must be an Australian citizen or other British subject 18 years or over and your name must be on the electoral roll. If you’re not enrolled, ask for a claim for enrolment at any Post Office—and forward it to your

Electoral Office today. Enrolment is compulsory. Electoral rolls close soon,* Electors in the A.C.T. and N orthern Territory are not eligible to vote in the referendums but may vote in the poll for a national song.

• In last week o f cam paign . on W ednesday 27 A pril

O n last day . . . T O D A Y .

POSTAL VOTING

ABC RADIO, ABC TV A N D ETHNIC RADIO

Will you need a postal vote, for the coming referendums and the poll for a national song? On polling day you may vote by post if—during polling hours— • you will be outside the State for which you are enrolled • or if you’ll be travelling, or more than 8 kilometres from a polling booth and

cannot get to a polling booth in the State • or if you’re seriously ill, or approaching maternity • or if you cannot go to vote during the polling hours because of your religious beliefs Postal vote application form s are available at Electoral Offices and Post Offices, so

apply now.

F o r use in States only.

DISTRIBUTION OF PAMPHLETS ABC AN D ETHNIC RADIO

On 21 May Australia will vote on four im portant referendum issues. To help electors a pamphlet has been prepared containing arguments for the yes and the no cases. These arguments were authorised by Members of Parliament who voted for or against the proposed changes to our Constitution.

The pamphlet will be mailed to you by 11 May. If you do not receive one, apply at any Electoral Office.

ABSENT VOTING

ABC RADIO, ABC TV A N D ETHNIC RADIO

Will you need an absent vote, for the coming referendums and the poll for a national song? On polling day if you are outside the subdivision but within the State for which you are enrolled you may lodge an absent vote at any polling booth within that State.

If, however, you will be outside that State you should obtain a postal vote applica­ tion form from any Post Office or Electoral Office now.

F o r States only.

91

FO RM A L VOTING

ABC RA D IO , ETHNIC RADIO

21 M ay is polling day for the referendums and the poll for a national song. To make your vote count, follow this procedure:

In the referendums poll, you must write either yes or no in each of the four squares provided. Fill in every square. Voting is compulsory.

Concurrently with the referendums all electors will be invited to record their preferences for the tune for a national song.

You will be offered a separate ballot-paper . . . and you should m ark every square in the order o f your preference, for the tunes of the songs.

Voting is voluntary.

92

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1977 REFERENDUMS AND POLL FOR A NATIONAL SONG

COMMERCIAL TELEVISION ADVERTISEMENTS

24156/79—4

:

DISTRIBUTION O F PAMPHLETS TELEVISION SCRIPT

On 21 May electors in all States will vote on four im portant referendum issues which propose changes to our Constitution.

To help electors a pamphlet has been prepared containing arguments for the Yes and the N o cases. The arguments were authorised by members of Parliament who voted for or against the proposed changes.

The pamphlet will be mailed to you by 11 May. If you do not receive one apply at any Commonwealth Electoral Office.

TELEVISION—FORM AL VOTING

A U D IO ONLY SETTING TO BE ESTABLISHED AFTER SELECTION OF PRESENTER

Saturday 21 May is referendums day, and voting at the referendums is compulsory. It’s im portant that you fill in your ballot-paper correctly.

Please make yourself familiar with the issues and decide how you will vote before you enter the polling booth.

On polling day you will be given these two papers.

The ballot-paper for the four referendums is buff colour and looks like this..... you must write yes or no in every square......

Concurrently with the referendums all electors are invited to record their prefer­ ences for a tune for a national song.

The ballot-paper for the song poll is white.....voting is voluntary.....To record your vote correctly you should number every square in the order of your preference for the tunes of the songs. On each ballot-paper and in every polling booth there are directions on how to mark your ballot-papers.....if you do make a mistake take your spoiledpaper

to the Presiding Officer who will give you a replacement. M ake your vote count on 21 May.

95

-···" ' '

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1974 GENERAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND THE REFERENDUMS

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS

ENROLMENT—PRESS-1974

ARE YOU CORRECTLY ENROLLED?

Australian citizens or British subjects, 18 years or over, who are entitled to enrol­ ment but are not correctly enrolled should complete a claim for enrolment and forward it to their Electoral Office without delay.

Claims for enrolment are available at Electoral Offices and Post Offices. The Rolls will close on 20 April for the elections and referendums.

In order to vote you m ust be enrolled.

ENROLM ENT IS COMPULSORY

99

ENROLMENT—PRESS—1974 AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ELECTION to be held on Saturday,

18 M ay 1974

NOTICE TO ELECTORS ROLLS CLOSE on Saturday, 20 April 1974.

EN R O LM EN T IS COMPULSORY

NOTICE is hereby given that the Electoral Rolls for the forthcoming Election will dose on Saturday, 20 April 1974.

QUALIFICATIONS O F ELECTORS Every person not under the age of 18 years, whether male or female, married or unmarried: (a) who is a British subject; and

(b) who has lived in Australia for six months continuously and in the Australian Capital Territory for a period of one month last past is entitled to be enrolled.

ENROLMENT COMPULSORY

Every qualified person who is not already enrolled must, within 21 days after becoming entitled to enrolment or transfer of enrolment, send or deliver to the Electoral Registrar a claim card duly filled in, signed and witnessed.

If posting a claim, allowance should be made for the absence of mail deliveries on Saturdays.

Electoral claim cards and envelopes in which the cards may be sent post free to the Electoral Registrar, may be obtained at the Electoral Office, West Row, Canberra City, or any Post Office.

REMEMBER I f you have recently turned 18 years of age, or changed your address or acquired citizenship by naturalisation, and you have not, as yet, attended to your enrolment obligations, you should comply with the law immediately.

FAILURE TO ENROL OR TRANSFER ENROLM ENT—PENALTY UP TO $10 Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office.

100

GENERAL ELECTIONS AND REFERENDUM^ to be held on Saturday, 18 May, 1974

P O S T A L VOTING ELECTORS who will be unable to attend at a polling booth in the State for which they are enrolled to vote on polling day, Saturday, 18 May, should, if qualified therefor, make application to a Divisional Returning Officer for a Postal Vote.

THE GROUNDS UPON WHICH YOU MAY APPLY FOR A POSTAL VOTE are—

■ If throughout the hours of polling on polling day you will not be within the State for which you are enrolled;

■ If throughout the hours of polling on polling day you will not be within five miles of any polling booth open in the State for which you are enrolled or you will be travelling under conditions which will preclude you from voting at any such polling booth in the State;

■ If you are seriously ill or infirm and by reason of such illness or infirmity, or in the case of a woman by reason of approaching maternity, you will be precluded from attending at any polling booth to vote;

■ If by reason of your membership of a religious order or your religious beliefs, you will be precluded from attending at a polling booth, or voting throughout the hours of polling (or the greater part of those hours) on polling day.

POSTAL VOTE APPLICATION FORMS are available at all Post Offices and Electoral Offices.

ENQUIRIES should be made from the Divisional Returning Officer at the nearest Australian Electoral Office.

(See Telephone Directory for addresses and telephone numbers.)

If entitled to a Postal Vote—

A P P L Y N O W VOTING IS COMPULSORY

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office

101

Important things you should know before you vote on May 18. 1. Ob Saturday, May 18, 1974, electors throughout Australia must vote. These

are complex elections and reierendums and it’s important that you understand the voting procedures and issues involved.

2. You will be voting on: a) The Senate b) The House of Representatives and c) The Referendums.

That means there will be three separate ballot papers.

3. The ballot paper for the Senate is white. There are a lot of names and you must use numbers to record your vote correctly: 1,2,3,4,5, etc., in the order of your preference for each candidate, until you have numbered every square.

4. The ballot paper lor the House of Representatives Is pale green. When you fill it in, you must use numbers, again, and you must number every square in order of your preference.

5. The ballot paper for the referendums contains questions on four proposed laws. It is creamy-coloured. On this you must write either YES or NO in the four squares provided.

6. Every square on all three ballot papers must be filled in.

7. In each polling booth there are directions on how to mark your ballot papers. When you go to the polls, please take your time, read carefully, and above all, be accurate.

8. If you make a mistake, fold the spoilt paper and take it to the Presiding Officer who will immediately give you a replacement. Remember, a mistake cannot be corrected once your ballot papers are in the ballot box. That vote would be informal and would not count.

9. Chances are, you’ve already received a booklet on the referendums through the post. It explains the arguments for and against. Please read it carefully.

You can see, hear and read the policies of the parties on television, radio and in newspapers.

10. If you know someone in your house or in your street who might not understand the voting procedure, do your country a favour and explain it.

Make your vote count on May 18,

Authorised b y T he Australian Electoral Office.

102

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1974 GENERAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND THE REFERENDUMS

RADIO AND TELEVISION ADVERTISEMENTS

'

-

:

Y OU NG M AN:

As an Australian citizen there are important issues coming up that you should vote on—the General Elections and Referendums.

Their outcome will affect you—and me—and our country. If you are 18 years or over you are entitled to vote but only if you are on the Electoral Roll and the Rolls close shortly.

Enrolment is compulsory. And voting is your right. So if you are not already correctly enrolled, pick up your claim for enrolment at any Post Office and forward it to your Electoral Office today. Australia needs your vote.

ENROLM ENT—RADIO— 1974

ENROLM ENT—RADIO— 1974

STRA IGHT VOICE:

Coming up very soon are issues which affect every Australian—the General Elections and Referendums. To vote, you must be an Australian citizen aged 18 years or over and your name must be on the Electoral Roll. If you have not already enrolled do it now. Ask for a claim for enrolment at any

Post Office and send it to your Electoral Office today. Remember, enrolment is compulsory. Australia needs your vote.

ENROLM ENT—TELEVISION— 1974

Coming up soon are issues which affect every Australian—the General Election s and Referendums. To vote you must be an Australian citizen aged 18 years or over and your name m ust be on the Electoral Roll. If you are not enrolled, ask for a claim for enrolment at any Post Office and forward it to your Electoral Office today.

Enrolment is compulsory and Electoral Rolls close soon.

POSTAL VOTING—TELEVISION— 1974

On 18 May Australia goes to the polls. If, on polling day, you will be outside the State or Territory for which you are enrolled . . . Or, through illness, you will be unable to attend a polling booth . . .

Then you should apply at once for a postal vote. Application forms may be obtained from any post office or electoral office. All you need do is complete the application and send it to the Returning Officer who will forward you the voting material and instructions.

Remember—voting is compulsory.

FORM AL VOTING—TELEVISION— 1974

On 18 May, electors throughout Australia must vote at one of the thousands of polling booths like this Scout Hall.

105

You will be voting on the Senate, the House of Representatives and four Refer- endums. This is a complex Federal Election, and it’s im portant that you understand the issues and how to fill in the ballot-papers correctly. You will receive this booklet through the post.

It explains the four referendums and the arguments for and against. Please read it carefully. For the Senate and House of Representatives elections, you can see, hear and read the policies of each party on television, radio and newspapers.

Listen to what is said and come to your decision. (THIS SENTENCE TO BE IN C LU D ED ONLY IF TIM E PERM ITS.) On polling day you will be given these three papers. This white paper is for the Senate. There are a lot of names and you must use numbers, and number every square—I repeat, every square—to record your vote correctly.

Pale green is for the House of Representatives. When you fill it in, you must use numbers, again, and you must number every square, 1, 2, 3, 4 etc., to record your preference. Numbers only. This creamy-coloured paper is for the four referendums—on this you must write either YES or NO in the squares provided. Words only—YES or NO.

On each of the ballot-papers and in each voting booth there are directions on how to m ark your ballot-papers. Please take your time, read carefully, and above all, be accurate. One mistake makes your vote informal and it won’t count. Remember, every square must be filled in.

Think, take care, and make your vote count on 18 May.

FORM AL VOTING—RADIO— 1974—ELECTION EVE MESSAGE

Tomorrow you will help to choose Australia’s new Parliament and to decide whether or not our Constitution is to be amended. At past elections thousands of votes have been informal. This time ensure your ballot-papers are marked correctly. For the House of Representatives and the Senate you must number every square. Give your number one to the candidate of your first choice on each paper and then use consecutive numbers to indicate your preference for the other candidates.

For the referendums write your answer YES or NO for each question. Make your vote one that will count—not one that will be wasted.

FORM AL VOTING—TELEVISION— 1974—ELECTION EVE MESSAGE

Tomorrow you will help to choose Australia’s new Parliament and to decide whether or not our Constitution is to be amended. It’s an important responsibility. At past elections thousands of votes have been informal and thus rejected.

This time ensure your ballot-papers are marked correctly. For the House of Representatives and the Senate your must number every square. Give your number one to the candidate of your first choice on each paper and then use consecutive numbers—two, three, four and so on . . . to indicate your preference for the other candidates.

For the referendums write your answer YES or NO for each question. Make your vote one that will count—not one that will be wasted.

106

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1975 GENERAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF THE SENATE iAND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

RADIO AND TELEVISION ADVERTISEMENTS

Η .

ENROLM ENT—RADIO— 1975

Are you correctly enrolled for the coming Federal elections? Australian citizens or British subjects, 18 years or over, who are eligible to enrol but who are not correctly enrolled should complete an electoral claim and forward it to their Australian Electoral Office now. Claims for enrolment are available at all Electoral Offices and

Post Offices. The rolls will close on 17 November for the elections. In order to vote you must be enrolled. Enrolment is compulsory.

POSTAL VOTING—RADIO AND TELEVISION— 1975

On 13 December Australia goes to the polls. If, on polling day, you will be outside the State or Territory for which you are enrolled . . . Or, through illness, you will be unable to attend a polling booth . . .

Apply at once for a postal vote.

Application forms are available at any Post Office or Australian Electoral Office. Send the completed application to the Returning Officer who will forward the voting material and instructions. Remember—voting is compulsory. Television visuals—a still of Parliament House

—a voter at the counter of a Post Office asking for an application form for a postal vote —a close-up of the form —the voter completing the form (at home) and having it witnessed

—posting the application.

ABSENT VOTING—RADIO— 1975

On polling day 13 December you should cast your vote at a polling booth within your own subdivision if you can. This is the simplest way. If this is not possible, you may cast an absent vote at any polling booth within the State in which you live.

If you will be interstate on polling day you should apply now for a postal vote. Forms are available at all Australian Electoral Offices and Post Offices. Remember—voting is compulsory.

FORM AL VOTING—RADIO AND TELEVISION— 1975

On Saturday 13 December, electors throughout Australia will go to the polls to choose Australia’s new Parliament. It is im portant that you cast your vote correctly. You will be voting for the Senate and the House of Representatives—that means

that you will be given two ballot-papers. Take your time; read each ballot-paper carefully and fill in every square. Remem­ ber, one mistake makes your vote inform al; so think, take care, and make your vote count on 13 December.

Remember—voting is compulsory.

FOR TELEVISION—Visuals would include a still of Parliament House, a polling booth scene, with a voter applying to a Presiding Officer for ballot-papers, voters completing ballot-papers in voting compartment and a voter showing folded ballot- papers to a Poll Clerk and placing them in a ballot box.

109

FORM AL V O TING—TELEVISION 1975

PRESENTER:

On 13 December electors throughout Australia must vote for the Senate and the House of Representatives. It is im portant that you fill in your ballot-papers cor­ rectly . . . Any error will make your vote informal and it won’t count.

Make yourself familiar with all the issues and decide . . .

. . . how you will vote before you enter the polling booth.

On polling day you will be given these two papers . . . The white paper is for the Senate . . . the green for the House of Representatives.

There are a lot of names . . . and parties are not indicated. You must number every square. I repeat . . . every square must be numbered to record your vote correctly.

On each ballot paper and in every voting booth are directions on how to mark your ballot-papers.

Remember . . . one error and your vote won’t count. If you do make a mistake take your spoilt paper to the Presiding Officer . . . who will give you a replacement.

Take care . . . and make your vote count on 13 December.

FORM AL VOTING—RADIO— 1975 ELECTION EVE MESSAGE

Tomorrow you will help to choose Australia’s new Parliament.

At past elections thousands of votes have been informal.

This time ensure your ballot-papers are marked correctly. For the House of Representatives and the Senate you must number every square. Give your number one to the candidate o f your first choice on each paper and then use consecutive numbers to indicate the order of your preference for the other candidates.

Take care and make your vote count.

110

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 1975 GENERAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS

— ' = - ?

SENATE AND

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ELECTIONS

POSTAL VOTING ELECTORS who will be unable to attend at a polling booth in the State for which they are enrolled to vote on polling day, SATURDAY, 13 DECEMBER, should,

if qualified, make application to a Divisional Return­ ing Officer for a Postal Vote.

THE GROUNDS UPON WHICH YOU MAY APPLY FOR A POSTAL VOTE are— • If throughout the hours of polling on polling day: you will not be within the State for which you

are enrolled; you will not be within five miles of any polling booth open in the State for which you are enrolled; you will be travelling under conditions which will

preclude you from voting at any such polling booth in the State; • If you are seriously ill or infirm and by reason of such illness or infirmity (or in the case of a woman by

reason of approaching maternity) you will be pre­ cluded from attending at any polling booth to vote; • If by reason of your membership of a religious order or your religious beliefs you will be precluded from attending at a polling booth, or voting through­ out the hours of polling (or the greater part of those

hours) on polling day.

POSTAL VOTE APPLICATION FORMS are available at all Post Offices and Australian Electoral Offices. (See Telephone Directory for addresses and tele­

phone numbers.)

APPLY NOW VOTING IS COMPULSORY

■ ■

A u th o ris e d by t h e A u stra lia n E le c to ra l O ffice. A E O P 12.243.115

113

Important things you should know before you ¥©te on December 13, ■ On Saturday, December

13, 1975, electors throughout Australia must vote for the Senate and the House of Representatives.

B It is important that you fill in your ballot papers correctly. Every square on both ballot papers must be numbered in the order of your preference for the candidates. A n y error w ill m a k e yo u r v o te in fo rm a l a n d it w o n ’t co u n t.

B Get to know the names of candidates, or groups of candidates, by reading the newspapers, listening to radio and watching television. Make sure you know how to vote to support the candidates of your choice before you go into the polling booth on December 13.

H The ballot paper for the Senate is white. There are a lot of names . . . and parties are not indicated. You must number every square in the order of your preference to record your vote correctly.

B The ballot paper for the House of Representatives is green. When you fill it in, you must again use numbers, and you must number every square in the order of your preference.

A uthorised by the A ustralian Electoral Office.

■ In each polling booth there will be directions on how to mark your ballot papers. When you go to the polls, please take your time, read carefully and, above all, be accurate.

B If you do make a mistake, fold the spoilt paper and take it to the Presiding Officer who will immediately give you a replacement. Remember, a mistake cannot be corrected once your ballot papers are in the ballot box.

Avoid congestion on Foiling Day by voting early.

fM e your vote count on December 13.

114

DM E9 JOS. 125

For VIC,the Senate Ballot-p a p e r w i l loo k She this-· Study it carefully·COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA BALLOT PAPER . * « ^ -****-«*. STATE OF VICTORIA ELECTION OF TEN SENATORSDIRECTIONS.—Mark your vote on this ballot paper by placing the number* 1, 2, 3. 4, 5, 6, 7, 6, 9,10,11 ,12 , 13.14,15,16. 17, 18. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. 29, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34. 35, 36, 37 and 38 in the square» immediately to the left of the names of the respective candidates so as to indicate the order of your preference for them. C A N D I D A T E S. 1—1 GREENWOOD,I ---- 1 Ivor JohnA [— I GUILFOYLE,t- -I Margaret Georgina ConstarA f—1 WEBSTER,*— · James JosephA I I CORMACK,l—* Magnus Cameron~] MISSEN,'— Alan JosephA TEHAN,* Thomas JosephI I ROSEMAN,'' John BardsloyB J N° ERS0N’| CONRICK,I peter James(-1 SIDDONS,v I— I John RoystonCOOKE,1 ---- 1 Trevor Bryan- DTrevor BryanJEFFREY, m m i—i mcmanus ,

* I ---- 1 Francis Patrick

L ,TTLE’

c I— I John Albert

F f—| McMANUS, * l— l Richard Paul

p CR0WE· t— I Marianne P m HOULIHAN, I ---- 1 Michael William

[—1 MELZER, ·" I ---- 1 Jean Isobelle

- [—1 PRIMMER, ' l— l Cyril Graham

F button , L—l John Norman F r-1 brown , r L—l william Walter Charles

P HARTLEY,

---- ' William Henry

F E »

· ·

« 

FARRAN, Andrew Cherlea Cuninghame

LAING, Robert Bryan

ROBERTSON,

MARTYN, Philip Richard

ONLY

h ;

1 Elizabeth Maude

H THORPE,

1— 1 Alma Beryl

r- WATSON, L—l Shane Andrew CletI Shane Andrew Clarke SMITH,

Q TSOLOS,

—I DUNNE, l—J Ian Stanley l—l LEICHT,  ---- I Nell Edward

ALEXANDER, l—J George Andrew

I I MAQG8, l ---- 1 Donald Fredrick

3," " E," “F," " G" or " H" appearing before the square immediately to the left of a candidate's sutname indicates that that candidate and each other candidate who has the same letter appearing before the square Immediately to the left of his surname have been grouped by mutual .consent. The fact that e square immediately to the left of a candidate's surname indicates that the name of that candidate has not been included in any group.

On Saturday, December 13,1975, electors throughout Australia must vote

for the Senate and the House of Representatives.

It is important that you fill in your ballot papers correctly. A ny error will make your vote informal and it won’t count.

Read the newspapers, listen to radio and watch television; get to know the names of candidates or groups of candidates.

Make sure you know how to vote to support the candidates of your choice before you go into the polling

booth on December 13.

THE SENATE As you can see, in VIC. there are 38 candidates for the Senate.

1. Number every square in the order of your preference lor the candidates. 2. Use the numbers 1 to 38. 3. Do not leave any square

blank. 4. Don’t miss any number and don’t repeat any number.

HOUSEOF REPRESENTATIVES The ballot paper for the House of

Representatives is green. Again,you must use numbers when you fill it in. 1. You must number every square

in the order of your preference for the candidates. 2. Use the numbers from 1 onwards.

3. Do not leave any square blank. 4. Don’t miss any number and don’t repeat any number.

Avoid congestion on Polling Day by voting early.

Make your vote count on December 13.

Authorised by the Australian Electoral Office OME5.3614.125L DME5.3614.2Hfi

ENROLMENT— PRESS— 1975

ARE YOU CORRECTLY

ENROLLED?

Senate and House of Representatives Elections Rolls close today

Australian citizens or British subjects, 18 years or over, who are entitled to enrol­ ment but are not correctly enrolled should complete a claim for enrolment and forward it to their Australian Electoral Office without delay.

Claims for enrolment are available at Electoral Offices and Post Offices.

The rolls will close today, 17 November, for the elections.

In order to vote you must be enrolled.

ENROLMENT IS COMPULSORY

116

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 22 Consideration of Division 134—Australian W ar Memorial Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought information concerning conservation staff at the Australian W ar Memorial.

Answer:

The person to whom Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland originally referred was M r J. Reid, who resigned last December to go to the Sovereign Hill Museum, Ballarat. H e had been C urator of A rt with the Australian W ar Memorial and was not a conservator.

The other person to whom Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland referred is Mr A. Byrne who has submitted his resignation with effect from 20 May 1977 to take up a position with the S.A. A rt Gallery. He has occupied the position of Conservator of Art.

M r Byrne’s departure will leave the Australian W ar Memorial without a trained conservator, but two employees who occupy clerical positions have been assisting M r Byrne.

Action is being taken to appoint a scientist to a new position to head the Australian W ar Memorial Conservation Laboratory. Action is also being taken to review the salary levels and qualifications of conservation staff throughout the Commonwealth Services. Vacant positions in the conservation staff of the Memorial will be filled as

quickly as possible.

117

SENATE ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A Reference: Senate H ansard 26 April 1977, page 23

Consideration of Division 137—Commonwealth Police Senator G. T. McLaren sought a breakdown of where the additional estimates ($407 000) for overtime (137/1/02) were required.

Answer:

The following schedule sets this out:

S

Crime Investigation, including D ocum ent E xam ination B ureau, A irp o rt Surveillance 13 000 Crime Intelligence, including C entral Inform ation B ureau, IC P O —In terpol F inger­ p rin t B u r e a u .......................................................................................................................... 9 200

Operations, including Protective services, A irport police, E scorts & V IP ’s, A n ti­ terrorism , F irearm s safety t e s t i n g .............................................................................. 352 200

Overseas D iv is io n ......................................................................................................................... 28 500

Other, including Public Service s t a f f ........................................................................................... 4 100

407 000

118

SENATE ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 23 Consideration of Division 137—Commonwealth Police Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought a table of comparisons of Police salaries between the States and the Commonwealth.

Answer:

The following schedule sets this out as at 29 April 1977:

R ank Cwlth S .A . Vic. N S . W. Qld W .A. A .C .T. Tas. N .T.

$ $ $ $ $ % $ $ $

C onstable 7 803- 8 545- 9 555 8 8 59- 8 250- 9 917- 9 526- 8 499- 9 241-

F irst C onstable 8 794 9 378-9 366

10 139

9 648 10 199-9 450 10 150

10 945 11751 10 473 11 159-

9 583 9 807-10187 10 872-

Senior C onstable 9 590 10 0 64- 10 800 10 632

10 517 11 302- 11 000- 12 951 11 538 12 402

10 196 11 298

11 250 12 114

Senior C onstable 10 537 11297

11 433 11 250

(F irst G rade) Sergeant (3rd) 12125 12 254 12 160 13 813 13 493 12 007 13 207

Sergeant (2nd) 11 508- 12 843 12 083 13 118 13 000 14 767 14 085 12 670 13 798

Senior Sergeant 12101 12 930 13 616 13 730 13 957 13 900 16 077 14 855 13 472 14 568

(1st)

Inspector 19 511

(G rade 4) Inspector 16 776 17 810- 17 866 16 825 20 529 19 088 17 690 16 884- 17 402

(G rade 3) Senior Inspector 17 402 18 759 17 934 21 387 20122 18 317

17 534

18 029

(G rade 2) C hief Inspector 18 029 19 411 18 377 19 020 22 248 18 943 18 656

(G rade 1) Superintendent 19 007 20182 20 334 21 613 21 702 21 175 20 409

(3rd) Senior Super- 19 946 22 713 23 065

intendent (2nd) Superintendent 23 850 24 134

(1st)

C hief Super- 20 888 21 430 21 804 26 873 25 006 24 079 22 423 20 888

intendent

119

SENATE ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 24

Consideration of Division 137— Commonwealth Police Senator J. W. Knight sought statistics on the upsurge in reported Commonwealth crime.

Answer:

The following schedule sets out the statistics on reported serious Commonwealth crime from 1 July 1972 to 31 M arch 1977, as applying to separate Districts of the Commonwealth Police F orce:

District Year

Serious

Commonwealth crime reported

N ew S outh W ales . . . . 1972-73 4 375

(Sydney) 1973-74 3 552

1974-75 3 957

1975-76 6125

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

5 081

V i c t o r i a ............................................ . 1972-73 2 767

(M elbourne) 1973-74 2 808

1974-75 2 849

1975-76 3 932

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

2 949

Q ueensland . . . . . 1972-73 1418

(Brisbane) 1973-74 1 623

1974-75 2 005

1975-76 3 199

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

2 972

South A ustralia . . . . 1972-73 951

(Adelaide) 1973-74 938

1974-75 978

1975-76 985

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

960

W estern A ustralia . . . . 1972-73 811

1973-74 859

1974-75 1 035

1975-76 1 842

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

1 122

T a s m a n ia ............................................ . 1972-73 324

1973-74 405

1974-75 370

1975-76 415

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

439

A ustralian Capital T erritory . . 1972-73 238

(C anberra) 1973-74 352

1974-75 554

1975-76 526

T o 3 1 .3 .7 7 (9 m onths)

298

120

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 25 Consideration of Division 141/1/02—Ministers of State—Staff and Services—Over­ time

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland sought a breakdown of this item in respect of the various Ministers’ offices.

Answer:

The attached schedule provides the required details in respect of staffs of Ministers.

DIVISION 141/1/02 MINISTERS OF STATE—STAFF AND SERVICES— OVERTIME

Expenditure to 3 0 .4 .7 7 (Pay 22)

Estim ated expenditure 1 .5 .7 7 to 3 0 .6 .7 7

based on expenditure trends fo r m onth o f

A pril 1977

Total

estim ated expenditure to 3 0 .6 .7 7

Prim e M i n i s t e r ............................................ 64 590

$

7 500

%

72 090

N ational R esources a n d O verseas T rade 9 543 6 700 16 243

T reasury/F inance . . . . 14 343 2 000 16 343

Prim ary In d u stry . . . . 12 616 2 100 14 716

A dm inistrative Services . . . 13 729 3 000 16 729

E nvironm ent H ousing a n d C om m unity D evelop­ m ent .............................................................................. 3 388 600 3 988

Industry a n d Com m erce . . . 11 821 3 000 14 821

E m ploym ent a n d In dustrial R elations . 9 448 3 400 12 848

T r a n s p o r t....................................................... 6 593 1 000 7 593

E d u c a t i o n ............................................ 4 932 500 5 432

Foreign A ffairs . . . . 6 884 1 600 8 484

Defence . . . . . . 10 236 5 500 15 736

Social S e c u r i t y ............................................ 11 203 3 500 14 703

A ttorney-G eneral . . . . 9 278 1 800 11 078

Business a n d C onsum er Affairs . . 3 092 600 3 692

Postal a n d Telecom m unications . . 6 416 2 200 8 616

H e a l t h ....................................................... 11 988 2 100 14 088

Im m igration a n d E thnic Affairs . . 6 087 2 200 8 287

N o rth ern T errito ry . . . . 8 377 1 700 10 077

A boriginal A ffairs . . . . 7 565 1 500 9 065

C apital T errito ry . . . . 4 284 900 5 184

C onstruction . . . . . 3 822 1 500 5 322

V eterans’ A ffairs . . . . 5 536 1 100 6 636

Science . . . . . . 9 582 1 700 11 282

Productivity . . . . . 2 163 1 700 3 863

T otal . . . . . 257 516 59 400 316916

1 2 1

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 26 Consideration of Division 148— Overseas Property Bureau

Senator Knight said he would like a copy o f evidence given by the Secretary o f the Department to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Public Accounts which provided information on the reorganisation of the Department and its effect on the former Overseas Property Bureau.

Answer:

Attached is a copy of the relevant extract from the Secretary’s evidence before the Joint Committee of Public Accounts on Tuesday 15 March 1977.

EXTRACT FROM EVIDENCE GIVEN BY MR P. J. LAWLER, O.B.E., TO THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE ON 15 MARCH 1977 M r Lawler—It might be helpful if I were to speak generally perhaps about the develop­ ments which have occurred, if that is in order. The Department of Administrative Services was created by the Government in December 1975 and it embraced the functions of seven former departments. One of these functions was from the Depart­ ment of Foreign Affairs and it was the overseas property function as then discharged by the Overseas Property Bureau. When the Department was established it had to be determined, having regard to government policies, how the functions should be regrouped in the new Department, that is to say, what its organisation and establish­ ment should be, and there are formal procedures for this. Insofar as I understand it to be open to me to comment, the process was briefly as follows: the Public Service Board had to take steps to recommend under section 29 of the Public Service Act to the Governor-General in Council the positions it agreed to provide in whatever

organisation it had approved. A number of discussions took place with the Board during last year, and there were administrative reviews which the Government considered. The Department did not have all of its proposals endorsed but even­ tually, by arrangement with the Board, the present departmental organisation, including the new Property and Survey Division embracing both domestic and overseas property functions, was given effect. That was at about the end o f November,

slightly into December, as I recall.

As part of this arrangement, it was agreed that we seek, both inside and outside the Public Service, candidates for a term appointment at very senior level as head of the new Division and we are in the process of giving effect to that agreement. Under the organisation now established, and this has been a matter of government policy and government action, the overseas property function is being discharged by the

Overseas Operations Branch of the new Property and Survey Division. Various elements of the overseas property function remain exactly the same as indicated to the Committee by M r Cowie at its first hearing. The overseas property committee continues its role; day to day it is business as usual. It is in mind that subsequently

the new Planning and Review branch of the Division will take over responsibility for policy aspects, including such matters as accommodation standards and the promul­ gation of the manual on overseas property.

122

But this will be a step by step process on the basis o f careful, pragmatic testing, A further point I would make is that our budget will include appropriations in respect of the overseas property function as a separate item, and earmarked, I would like to say, if I may, that I believe th at the discharge of the overseas property function

can, and will increasingly, derive support from the capabilities and technical skills available in respect of the domestic property function and available in other divisions of the Department, for example transport and storage and purchasing, and the transfer to Canberra of the Overseas W orks Branch of the Departm ent of Construction which has now been agreed to, will also assist in the discharge of the function,

I believe that the organisation now adopted can work well, it can work efficiently. Certainly it is my resolution and that of my officers that within the guidelines of government policy, that are issued from time to time, we will do our best to ensure full, efficient and cost-effective service to the user departments. I think I prefer the

term ‘user departments’ to the term ‘client departments’; it is truer in the circum­ stances. I have indicated our resolution in this matter earlier to M r Henderson, and more recently to M r Parkinson, as I have also to the Department o f Overseas Trade. So, in short, the answer that I would give to the question posed is that I believe that we can m aintain full efficiency and develop it as we proceed.

123

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE A

CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976-77—DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Reference: Senate Hansard 26 April 1977, page 27 Consideration of Division 152/2/07

Senator the Hon. Douglas McClelland asked :

‘W hat is the revenue returning to the Department from the sale of the Govern­ ment Gazette ?’

Answer:

Revenue received in the Publications Trust Account for the sale of Government Gazettes is as follows : 1976 (1 January to 31 D ecem ber)— Gazettes: $ $

• G eneral Issue . . . . . 40 432

• Public Service . . . . . 17 651

• S p e c i a l ............................................ . 293

• Periodic . . . . . . 5 147

T otal . . . . . • 63 523

1977 (1 January to 31 M arch)— Gazettes: • G eneral Issue . . . . . 14 921

• Public Service . . . . . 6 806

• Special . . . . . . 80

• Periodic . . . . . . 250

T otal ........................................................ 22 057

124

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

REPORT TO THE SENATE

24156/79—5

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee B has the honour to present its Report to the Senate, 1. On 21 April 1977, the Senate referred to the Committee the Proposed Additional Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments:

Departm ent of Industry and Commerce Departm ent o f Overseas Trade Departm ent o f the Treasury Departm ent of Finance

Departm ent of Primary Industry 2. The Committee has considered these Additional Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister and officers representing the Departments concerned. A copy of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard reports of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77 and Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the Committee’s examination of the estimates referred, further information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to specific questions raised during the proceedings. Copies of these replies are attached as an Appendix to the Report.

4. The Committee appreciated the information contained in the Statement of Savings Expected in Appropriations made by the Appropriation Act (No. 1) 1976-77 and the Appropriation Act (No. 2) 1976-77, which was made available by the Depart­ ment of Finance.

However, it would assist the Committee members if, in the explanatory notes, departments could reconcile the savings with the Appropriations required. Particu­ larly in cases where functions or responsibilities have been transferred from one departm ent to another, it would be easier to comprehend if where additional funds

are required by one department the resultant savings made by the other department were indicated.

5. The Committee places on record its appreciation of the detailed written explana­ tions which were provided to Senators prior to the hearings, and also the evidence given by the Minister and the officers of the various departments who assisted the Committee during the inquiry.

24 M ay 1977

C. R. MAUNSELL Chairman

127

V

Estimates Committee B

Minutes of Proceedings

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE B

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 1 TUESDAY, 26 APRIL 1977 Private Meeting

1. M EETIN G : The Committee met at 4 p.m.

2. ESTABLISHMENT OF COM M ITTEE AND REFEREN CE O F

PARTICULARS OF A D D ITION AL EXPENDITURE FOR 1976-77. The Resolutions of the Senate of 20 and 21 April 1977 establishing Estimates Committees and referring the Particulars of Additional Expenditure for 1976-77 to them for examination and report were reported to the Committee.

3. M EM BERSHIP OF THE COM M ITTEE: The entry in the Journals of the Senate of 20 April 1977 relating to the appointment of members of Estimates Committees was reported to the Committee. Estimates Committee B to consist of:

Senator B. R. Archer Senator A. T. Gietzelt Senator C. R. Maunsell Senator A. J. Messner Senator C. G. Primmer Senator P. A. Walsh

4. ELECTION O F C H A IR M A N : On the motion of Senator Messner, Senator Maunsell was elected Chairman of the Committee. Senator Maunsell thereupon took the Chair.

Public Hearing 5. STATEMENT BY C H A IR M A N : The Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee in its examination of the Particulars of Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending 30 June

1977, and stated that, pursuant to the Order of the Senate of 21 April 1977, the Committee would consider the following departmental estimates:

D ocum ent* * Page Division No. Department

A 31 380 Industry and Com merce

A 35 470-472 Overseas T rade . .

A 45-46 670-677 T reasury . . .

B 11 963 T reasury . . .

A 26 304-675 Finance . . .

B 6-7 845, 964 Finance . . .

A 37 490-497 Prim ary Industry .

B 9 913-914 Prim ary Industry .

A m ount

$

3 999 000 820 000 2 307 000 6 000 8 814 000 12 941 500

1 807 000 15 100 000

• Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * Document B—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

131

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77 —DEPARTM ENT OF IN D U STRY AND COM M ERCE Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Industry and Commerce: M r G. J. Collopy, Assistant Secretary, Metal Manufactures and Electrical Branch M r R. J. Kinsella, Director, Finance and Management Services Branch Department o f Finance—Representatives:

M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called upon the following division for consideration: Division 380—Department of Industry and Commerce

(Document A ) ........................................................................ S3 999 000

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Department of Industry and Commerce.

7. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77 —DEPARTM ENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Overseas Trade: M r W. H. Ratcliff, Director, Management Services Branch M r G. M. Hill, Assistant Secretary, Trade Promotion Division M r P. Marcusson, Director, Overseas Markets Division

M r I. J. Swan, Director, Overseas Markets Division M r P. C. Laird, Acting Assistant Director, Management Services Branch Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called upon the following divisions for consideration: Divisions 470-472—Department of Overseas Trade (Document A ) ............................................................................................ $820 000

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Department of Overseas Trade.

8. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF THE TREASURY Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f the Treasury: M r D. P. Reynolds, Director, Finance and General Services M r E. K. Klatt, Finance Officer M r B. A. Seebach, Senior Finance Officer, Revenue, Loan and Investment

Division M r K. P. McHugh, Acting Assistant Secretary, Foreign Investment Division M r M. R. Holthuyzen, Acting Senior Finance Officer, Overseas Economic Relations Division Office of the Insurance Commissioner: M r B. M. I’Anson, Director, Development and Information Section

132

Australian Taxation Office: M r R. W. Kelton, Assistant Commissioner, Management Services Branch M r D. N. Riley, Finance Officer Australian Bureau of Statistics:

M r P. G. Howell, Assistant Statistician, Management Services M r J. W. Maurer, Director, Finance and General Services Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called upon the following divisions for consideration:

$

Divisions 670-677—Department of the Treasury (Document A) 2 307 000 Division 963—Department of the Treasury (Document B) . 6 000

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Department of the Treasury.

9. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF FINANCE Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Finance: M r D. P. Reynolds, Director, Finance and General Services M r E. K. Klatt, Finance Officer M r G. A. Walker, Senior Inspector, Management Projects

M r D. J. Barry, Senior Finance Officer, Social Security Division M r K. Whalley, Acting Assistant Secretary, ADP Branch M r J. D. MacLean, Acting Assistant Secretary, General Expenditure Division M r E. W. C. Mathews, Chief Finance Officer, General Expenditure Division M r A. R. Taylor, Acting Senior Finance Officer, Defence and Works Division

M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division Australian Government Retirement Benefits Office: Mr D. N. Droop, Director, Services.

Royal Australian Mint: Mr W. R. Mason, Finance Officer.

The Chairman called upon the following divisions for consideration: $

Divisions 304-675—Department of Finance (Document A) . 8 814 000 Divisions 845, 964— Department of Finance (Document B) . 12 941 500 The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Finance.

10. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF PRIM ARY INDUSTRY Appearing: Senator the Hon. R. C. Cotton, Minister for Industry and Commerce accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Primary Industry: M r A. G. Bollen, First Assistant Secretary, Industry No. 5 (Fisheries) Division M r N. Thomson, Assistant Secretary, Industry No. 1 (Meat and Meat

Products) Division

133

M r W. C. K. Hammer, Assistant Secretary, Agriculture and Food Services Division M r J. A. H art, Senior Assistant Director, Bureau of Animal Health M r D. P. Cleary, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch M r L. C. Elliott, Director o f Finance

Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division.

The Chairman called upon the following divisions for consideration:

Divisions 490-497—Departm ent of Primary Industry (Docu- $

ment A) . . . . . . 1 807 000

Divisions 913-914—D epartm ent of Primary Industry (Docu­ ment B) . . . . . . 15 10000

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Primary Industry.

Private Meeting 11. For the purpose o f considering a draft report the Committee went into deliberative session.

It was agreed, after debate, that a draft report be prepared by the Chairman and forwarded to each member for consideration.

12. A D JO U R N M EN T: the Committee adjourned at 5.30 p.m,

13. ATTENDANCE: All members o f the Committee were present.

C. R. MAUNSELL Chairman

134

Estimates Committee B

Appendix

'

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600 28 April 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament Elouse Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

During the Committee’s review of this Department’s Additional Estimates, further information was sought about Household Support under the Rural Adjust­ ment Scheme (Item 913-10) and about overseas import requirements for fish products, The information requested is provided with this memorandum (6 copies).

D. P. CLEARY Assistant Secretary Managment Services Branch

137

RURAL ADJUSTMENT SCHEME—HOUSEHOLD SUPPORT

Assistance Approved to 31.3.77

N ew S outh W ales .

$

2 975

Victoria . . . 11 358

Q ueensland . . 4 608

S.A. . .

W .A . . . .

T asm ania . .

T o tal . . 18 941

OVERSEAS IMPORT REQUIREMENTS IN RELATION TO AUSTRALIAN EXPORTS OF SEAFOODS The U.S.A. and Japan together accounted for 86 per cent by value of all exports o f edible seafoods from Australia (1974-75) and completely dominate seafood export trading patterns from this country. $37 million (mainly rock lobster) worth of fish were exported to the U.S.A. and $21 million (mainly prawns) worth of fish were exported to Japan.

In general the im port requirements of these two countries are well understood by Australian exporters, who through their agents there are kept aware of the require­ ments o f the im port authorities. As appropriate, on an advisory basis, this Division keeps exporters aware of im portant changes in im port requirements and is always prepared to offer information on these matters.

In relation to overseas im port requirements, this Division maintains liaison with the Food Services Branch of the Department and also the Department o f Overseas Trade and its Trade Commissioner Service.

It is im portant to note that im port requirements affecting fish fall into two broad categories:

(a) those which affect all or many foods, including fish (e.g. labelling require­ ments, pesticide residues) (b) those which affect only fish (e.g. product quality standards) Attached is a selection of recent Exports (Fish) Circulars issued by the Fisheries Division which relate to the im port requirement of the U.S.A., Japan and other countries.

In summary, overseas market requirements can be termed to be technical and by and large reasonable.

.138

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FISHERIES DIVISION Canberra, A.C.T, 2600 25 June 1975

Veterinary Officers-in-charge Regional Directors/Executive Officers Inspection Staff Industry Organisations and

Registered Operators

UNITED STATES REGULATIONS: THERMALLY PROCESSED LOW ACID FOODS PACKAGED IN HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINERS

The attention of all interested processors and departmental staff is drawn to the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have indicated that they expect to arrange visits to Australia shortly to inspect all Australian canneries which are registered with the United States under the Low Acid Food Regulations.

It can be expected that in addition to inspections specific to canning processes and equipment, inspection staff would also be concerned with the general conditions and manufacturing practices at each plant.

Plants which are presently registered with the U.S. authorities in relation to the abovementioned regulations are strongly urged to refamiliarise themselves with the pertinent requirements and to prepare themselves for inspection.

Departmental staff should re-examine plant sanitation standards etc. at the earliest opportunity.

Although this advice directly concerns the exports of canned seafoods to the U.S.A., industry should understand that these visits by U.S. government personnel probably foreshadow subsequent similar visits within the near future to plants solely concerned with the production of frozen products.

D. F. TOW NSEND Director

Technical Services and Export Standards

139

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FISHERIES DIVISION Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Veterinary Officers-in-charge 24 April 1975

Regional Directors/Executive Officers Inspection Staff Registered Operators

DATE MARKING OF MASTER (OUTERMOST) CONTAINERS TO U.S.A.

In light of further discussions on the subject of ‘Date M arking of Master Containers to U.S.A.’ it has been decided to apply the provisions of the Exports (Fish) Regulations in lieu of circular FD 75/6.

2. In this regard the date o f manufacture must be indicated either by the use of a serial number or code mark. It should be noted however that date marking in clear (e.g. day/month/year) is regarded as a satisfactory code mark provided no confusion arises as to the correct date.

3. Exporters are reminded that all code marks apphed to master cartons must be submitted to, and approved by, this Division. The requirements for lodging code marks for 1975-76 are outlined in Exports (Fish) Circular 75/10.

D. F. TOWNSEND Director

Technical Services and Export Standards

N.B. Circular F D 75/6 has been cancelled.

140

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FISHERIES DIVISION Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 19 February 1975

Veterinary Officers-in-Charge Regional Directors Regional Executive Officers Inspection Staff

All Registered Operators

U.S.A. VOLUNTARY INSPECTION SERVICE

The United States Government has instituted a voluntary inspection service for imported products. The service is designed to assist both the importer and the shipper. It will be operated by the Commerce Departm ent’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric A dm inistration. In this regard, the following information has been forwarded to the

Fisheries Division.

REQUIREM ENTS FOR IMPORTS The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, as amended, requires that imported seafood products meet the basic requirements imposed on comparable items produced by U.S. processors for interstate commerce. The Act sets standards for the whole­ someness, safety and proper labelling of all food items. To assure compliance with these regulations all imports of food products are subject to sampling, inspection and

analysis by the Food and Drug Administration at the port of entry. Inspection deter­ mines whether products meet existing requirements regarding adulteration, mis­ branding, labelling, product definitions, standards of identity, tolerances for pesticide residues, food additives and Good Manufacturing Practices.

VOLUNTARY INSPECTION SERVICES AVAILABLE FOR IMPORTS N O A A ’s National Marine Fisheries Service has a National Im port Lot Inspection Network that provides an impartial fishery products inspection service of particular interest to U.S. importers and firms wishing to enter the U.S. market. This Lot

Inspection Network provides the following services.

• Technical assistance to develop purchasing, processing, and end-product specifications or purchase contracts for producers and shippers. These specifi­ cations help the processor or shipper assure U.S. importers that their products comply with FDA requirements.

• Inspection o f fishery products after they enter the United States to determine compliance with the importer’s requirements, and certification of such compliance.

• Pretesting and analysis of seafood products for micro-organisms, species identification and chemical and biological information that may be needed.

• Consultation on product labelling, blue prints for fish processing plants and equipment, quality assurance plans, and assistance with problems that impede trade flow.

BENEFITS Inspection and certification of imported products under well-defined requirements will help establish and maintain product integrity in U.S. markets. Certificates prepared and issued by the DOC inspection service are legal documents accepted in

141

any U.S. court as prim a facie legal evidence. The certificates can ease entry by serving part of the documentation to provide a history of product characteristics at the time of exam ination; for example, quantity, net weight, wholesomeness and safety, quality and condition.

INSPECTION SERVICE AVAILABILITY—HOW TO APPLY Inspection of imported product is provided on a fee-for-service basis, and can be requested by any person having a financial interest in the product. Inspection services are available at most major U.S. ports and inland cities. Inquiries regarding inspection services may be directed to any of the following offices of the National Marine Fisheries Service, Fishery Products Inspection and Safety Division, U.S. Department o f Commerce, NOAA:

P.O. Box 1188, Emerson Ave Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (617) 281-0330 9450 Gandy Blvd, Fed’l Office Bldg St Petersburg, Florida 33702 (813) 893-3155 4747 Eastern Ave, Bldg 7 Bell, California 90201 (213) 266-6317 P.O. Box 1668 Juneau, Alaska 99801 (917) 586-7221 National Fishery Products Inspection

and Safety Laboratory 3209 Frederic St, P.O. Drawer 1207 Pascagoula, Mississippi 39567 (601) 762-4591 The Department feels th at the system could be of assistance to Australian pro­ cessors and shippers, and the information is forwarded in the interest of assistance to industry.

E. J. HUM PHRIES Acting Chief Fish Export Standards Officer

142

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY

FISHERIES DIVISION C a n b e r r a , A.C.T. 2600 21 November 1975

Veterinary Officer-in-Charge Regional Directors/Regional Executive Officers Inspection Registered Operators

JAPANESE IMPORT REQUIREMENTS FLUORESCENT COMPOUNDS IN PAPER

Japanese im port authorities have recently detained several consignments of Australian frozen shrimp because the paper grade identification slips in the glaze block contained fluorescent compounds.

Such compounds are commonly added in the paper making process as an optical brightening agent, to improve the whiteness of the paper.

In view of the Japanese action, exporters to Japan using any paper labels in food contact applications should specify to printers that the paper be non-fluorescent, unloaded vegetable parchment, with no optical dye (e.g. APPM Code 0842Q).

D. F. TOW NSEND Director

Technical Services and Export Standards

143

AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FISHERIES DIVISION C a n b e r r a , A.C.T. 2600 21 November 1975

Veterinary Officers-in-charge Regional Directors and Regional Executive Officer Inspection Staff Registered Operators

DECLARATION OF NATURE OF FOOD-CONTACT PLASTIC WRAPPING USED FOR SEAFOODS EXPORTED TO JAPAN

The office of the Minister (Commercial), Australian Embassy, Tokyo has recently confirmed reports o f increasing concern by health authorities in Japan over possible contamination of foods by contact with plastics. It is apparent that this concern stems from proposals by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to restrict the food contact use of PVC.

Health officials in Japan have been making spot checks on the food-contact plastics used in imported goods, and Japanese importers may be required at short notice to report the nature of such wrapping material to health officials.

Under the circumstances it would seem advisable for Australian exporters to contact their Japanese customers and inform them of the nature of any food-contact plastic wrapping used in their products. Since the interpretation of these requirements may vary from one Prefecture to another, it is im portant to ensure that the nature and extent o f any information given to the Japanese importers would be sufficient to facilitate entry of the seafoods into any Japanese port.

D. F. TOWNSEND Director

Technical Services and Export Standards

144

THE TREASURY

C a n b e r r a , A.C.T. 2600 Telephone 63 9111 28 April 1977

Chairman Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Sir, As requested by your Committee during the examination of Additional Estimates on 26 April 1977,1 attach a functional statement for the Department of the Treasury.

Yours faithfully C. F. GRANT

Assistant Secretary, Management Services

145

FUNCTIONS

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

Financial Institutions Division

This Division is responsible for providing advice on financial and economic policy matters relating to the structure and functioning of the banking system and other financial institutions in the Australian capital market, Australian capital investment abroad, exchange control, insurance, currency and aspects of company law bearing on company structures and financing.

Foreign Investment Division

Formulation of policy advice on the development of specific measures for regu­ lation of foreign ownership and control of Australian industries and resources as proposed by the Government.

The examination of foreign investment proposals and the preparation of draft reports on them for consideration by the Foreign Investment Review Board which advises the Treasurer on these proposals. The provision of executive services to the Foreign Investment Review Board.

General Financial and Economic Policy Division This Division is responsible for providing advice on the broader aspects of domestic economic and financial policy. Its main responsibility lies in the field of general economic management, where the Division is involved in a continuous assessment of current economic trends and prospects and the provision of advice relating to the framing of policies appropriate to these conditions. Im portant areas of responsibility include budgetary policy, monetary policy, general taxation policy, resources allocation policy and research into Australia’s long-term potentialities for economic growth.

Overseas Economic Relations Division External financial and economic matters including developments in the inter­ national economy, the international monetary system, movements in exchange rates and Australia’s balance of payments position, exchange rate policy, policy on capital flows to and from Australia and the disposition of Australia’s international reserves; relations with the International Monetary Fund, the International Bank for Recon­ struction and Development and its affiliates and the Asian Development Bank; the economic and development policy aspects of Australia’s membership of various other international organisations including the U N and OECD and economic and com­ mercial relations with other countries; economic policy aspects of overseas aid and development m atters; and Treasury interest and responsibilities in regard to Australia’s external territories, and Papua New Guinea.

Revenue Loans and Investment Division This Division is responsible for providing advice on tax sharing arrangements and general policy matters relating to the provision of financial assistance to the States and local authorities and the sources of State taxation and other revenue. In addition, the Division is responsible for advising on matters relating to the raising, redemption or conversions of Australian Government loans in Australia and overseas and the general administration of the Financial Agreement and the Gentlemen’s Agreement and the operations of the National Debt Commission.

146

Office of the Australian Government Actuary and Life Insurance Commissioner Actuarial advisory services; administration of the Life Insurance Act 1945 and the A.C.T. Companies (Life Insurance Holding Companies) Ordinance 1968-1973,

Office of the Insurance Commissioner Supervision of the general (non-life) insurance industry under the provisions of the Insurance Act 1973 and the Insurance (Deposits) A ct 1932.

Australian Taxation Office General administration of legislation relating to income tax, health insurance levy, sales tax, estate duty, gift duty, pay-roll tax, wool tax, stevedoring industry charge, tobacco charge, canning fruit charge and A.C.T. stamp duty; assessment and collection

of all taxes; enforcement of taxation laws; consideration of taxation policy, legislation and administration.

Australian Bureau of Statistics The functions of the Bureau are as follows:

(a) to constitute the central statistical authority for the Australian Government and, by arrangements with the Governments of the States, provide statistical services for those Governm ents; (b) to collect, compile, analyse and disseminate statistics and related inform ation;

(c) to ensure co-ordination of the operations of official bodies in the collection, compilation and dissemination of statistics and related information, with particular regard to: (i) the avoidance of duplication in the collection by official bodies of

information for statistical purposes; (ii) the attainm ent of compatibility between, and the integration of, statistics compiled by official bodies; and (iii) the maximum possible utilisation, for statistical purposes, of information,

and means of collection of information, available to official bodies; (d) to formulate, and ensure compliance with, standards for the carrying out by official bodies of operations for statistical purposes; (e) to provide advice and assistance to official bodies in relation to statistics; and

(f) to provide liaison between Australia, on the one hand, and other countries and international organisations, on the other hand, in relation to statistical matters.

Taxation Boards of Review The principal function of the Boards is to review decisions of the Commissioner of Taxation in relation to assessments at the request of taxpayers.

Valuation Boards The Boards review values of property in cases referred to them for estate duty and gift duty purposes where departmental valuations are disputed by taxpayers.

147

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

Newlands Street, P a r s e s , A.C.T. 2600 28 April 1977

Chairman Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament House Canberra, ACT 2600 Dear Sir

As requested by your Committee during the examination of Additional Estimates on 26 April 1977, 1 attach a functional statement for the Department of Finance.

Yours faithfully C. F. GRANT

Assistant Secretary, Management Services

148

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

FUNCTIONS

Accounting and Supply division

This Division is responsible for advice in relation to the administration of the Public Account (Consolidated Revenue Fund, Trust Fund, Loan F u n d ); prescribing rules for Finance and departmental accounting within the ambit of the Audit Act and other related legislation; accounting policy and arrangements; operation of account­ ing systems and provision of accounting services to departments; the collection and

collation of departmental expenditure estimates and the preparation of Appropriation and Supply Bills, the Treasurer’s Statement of Receipts and Expenditure and other reports and documents for Parliament. Preparation of monthly financial statements of the Commonwealth’s transactions for publication. A D P services for the Depart­

ment and for the Treasury. Administration of the Advances to the Treasurer including the approval o f funds from those appropriations; approval of forward expenditure commitments. Control of the Public Account. Accounting for the public debt.

Defence and Works division This Division is responsible for providing advice on financial and budgetary aspects of policy matters relating to defence, including the cost and policy implica­ tions of defence proposals, budgetary aspects of the Five-year Defence Program and

on Services pay and conditions matters and on defence works, property acquisitions and related programs. It also has responsibilities in relation to the civil works, over­ seas works, property acquisition and related programs and to the financial aspects of

policy proposals concerning the Northern Territory, Australian Capital Territory and Norfolk Island.

General expenditure division This Division is responsible for providing advice on and co-ordination of the preparation, monitoring, review and control of aggregate public expenditure in both the short and medium terms. The Division provides advice on financial and budgetary

aspects of policy matters relating to the provision of financial assistance to the States for education and for special projects of a development character, including urban and regional development, irrigation and transport.

Social Security division This Division is responsible for providing advice on financial and budgetary aspects of policy matters in the fields of social services, veterans’ affairs, health, employment (including training schemes), welfare housing, migration, foreign aid,

scientific research, recreation, arts and culture, Aboriginal affairs, the environment, Commonwealth Government employment and machinery of government and related matters.

The Division is also responsible for advice on, and the formulation of policy regarding, superannuation schemes for civilian employees of the Commonwealth and the Parliamentary Retiring Allowances scheme.

Transport and Industry division This Division is responsible for providing advice on the financial and budgetary aspects of policy matters relating to the provision, development and operation of air, rail and sea transport and internal and international communications (including broadcasting and television services); on financial and budgetary aspects of policy in relation to the rural, fishing, mining, manufacturing, tourist and other tertiary

149

industries, with particular reference to proposals for assistance to such industries— for example, by way of marketing arrangements, both domestic and international, adjustment schemes, payment of bounties and subsidies and assistance to research and prom otion; and on the financial aspects of the legislation and operation of statutory authorities of the Commonwealth Government.

Management Services branch

The Management Services Branch is responsible for providing general admin­ istrative services for the Departm ent. At present it is also providing the Treasury with certain administrative services.

Australian Government Retirement Benefits Office The Commissioner for Superannuation is responsible for:

(i) the administration o f the Superannuation A ct 1922 and the Superannuation Act 1976 except for the management and investment of moneys of the Superannuation Fund; (ii) the administration of the Defence Force Retirement and Death Benefits Act

1973 and the Defence Forces Retirement Benefits A ct 1948; and (iii) the administration of the Papua New Guinea (Staffing Assistance) A ct 1973 (in part) and the Papua New Guinea (Staffing Assistance) (Superannuation) Regulations.

Office of the Superannuation Fund Investment Trust The Office of the Superannuation Fund Investment Trust is responsible for the management and investment of moneys o f the Superannuation Fund.

Royal Australian Mint The minting of coins as required by the Australian Government and the execution of overseas orders for coinage.

150

COMMISSIONER OF TAXATION

Canberra, a.c.t. 2600 28 April 1977

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee B Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Sir,

APPROPRIATION BILL (No. 3) 1976-77

DIVISION 672-2-06, PAYMENTS TO THE AUSTRALIAN POSTAL COMMISSION AND STATE GOVERNMENTS FOR SERVICES RENDERED

During the Committee’s consideration of this item of expenditure on 26 April, Senator Archer questioned the basis of determining the amount of commission payable to the Australian Postal Commission for sales of tax instalment stamps and the reason for the increase of $105 200 in the cost of distributing return forms and

associated material.

The basis of charging commission on the sale of tax instalment stamps was thoroughly investigated by my officers in 1975 and agreement was reached with the Australian Postal Commission that charges would be based on transactions rather than on the value of sales. Each year the Commission submits details of transactions undertaken and the cost of providing this service. After satisfying ourselves that the

costs involved are fair and reasonable, total sales in that period are compared to the total cost of the service and a commission rate per $100 value of sales is struck and becomes the agreed rate to apply until the next annual review. This agreed rate not only covers unit sales but also distribution costs for tax stamp books and associated

material.

The large increase in the commission charged for distributing return forms and associated material was also thoroughly investigated. The charge is based upon accommodation and labour costs incurred by the Postal Commission in servicing our requirements. In 1976-77, the number of tax returns and associated forms in­ creased and required a corresponding increase in accommodation and labour costs.

In addition the range of forms required to be handled over the full financial year was expanded to include rebate declarations, housing loan declarations, health insurance levy exemption claim forms and schedules of weekly allowances for housing loan

interest. After examining the supporting documentation tendered by the Postal Commission and discussing all aspects of this claim with its representatives, my officers agreed that the charge was fair and reasonable.

Yours faithfully, W. J. O’REILLY Commissioner o f Taxation

151

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

REPORT TO THE SENATE

'.'i'Y

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee C has the honour to report to the Senate.

1. On 21 April 1977, the Senate referred to the Committee the Additional Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departm ents: Education Transport

Postal and Telecommunications Environment, Housing and Community Development.

2. The Committee has considered these Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister for Education and from officers of the Departments concerned. A copy o f the Hansard report of the evidence is tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with the Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77 and the

Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the hearing of evidence and in accordance with the undertakings given during the hearing, additional information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to certain questions asked during the proceedings. Copies of these replies are attached as an Appendix to the Report.

4. The Committee draws the attention of the Senate to questions asked by Senator McAuliffe at page 62 of the Hansard report of the evidence, and the subsequent written reply (see Appendix, page 8). The Chairman was asked if the Committee would treat the reply on a confidential basis, unless it saw fit to do otherwise. The relevant paragraph of the letter from the Minister for Education, the Hon. J. L.

Carrick to the Chairman, Senator K. J. M artin, reads as follows:

I n re s p e c t to th e in fo rm a tio n giv en b y th e A B C c o n c e rn in g th e ex clu siv e r ig h ts to televise n ig h t tr o ttin g fro m th e H a r o ld P a r k tr a c k y o u w ill n o te th a t th e G e n e ra l M a n a g e r,

M r D u c k m a n to n , h a s a sk e d th a t th is a d v ic e b e re g a rd e d a s c o n fid e n tia l. W h ile I w o u ld

lik e t o d ra w to y o u r a tte n tio n th is re q u e s t I a m a s s u re d th a t i f th e C o m m itte e w ishes

t h a t it s h o u ld g o o n p u b lic re c o rd th e A B C w ill b e p le a se d to a c c e p t th e d ecisio n o f

th e C o m m itte e .*

The Committee did not think that it should seek the approval of the Senate to receive the information in confidence. The Committee has decided to include the evidence as an appendix to this report for the information of all honourable Senators.

5. The Committee records its appreciation of the evidence given by the Minister for Education and the officers of the various Departments whose Estimates the Committee considered.

24 M ay 1977

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

* See page 5 for full text o f letter.

155

Estimates Committee C

Minutes of Proceedings

24156/79—6

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 1 TUESDAY, 26 APRIL 1977

Private Meeting

1. M EETIN G : The Committee met at 3.55 p.m.

2. APPOINTM EN T AN D MEM BERSHIP OF THE COM M ITTEE: The entry in the Journals o f the Senate of 20 April 1977 recording the appointment and membership of the Committee was reported. The Committee membership was: Senators Collard, Colston, M artin, Mulvihill, Townley and Wriedt.

3. REFEREN CE TO ESTIMATES COMMITTEES: The Resolution of the Senate of 21 April 1977 relating to the referral to Estimates Committees of the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977 was reported.

4. ELECTION OF C H A IR M A N : On the motion of Senator Townley, Senator M artin was elected Chairman.

Senator Martin thereupon took the Chair

The Committee then met in public session

5. STATEMENT BY CHAIRM AN—CONSIDERATION O F PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77: The Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee and indicated that, pursuant to the order of the Senate of 21 April 1977, the Committee would consider the following departmental estimates:

Division

D ocument* Page No. Department A m ount

A 20-22 270-282 Education . . . . 40 842 000

B 5 835 E ducation . . . . 193 000

A 44 655 T ran sp o rt . . . . 7 514000

B 10 959 T ransport . . . . 2 000 000

A 36 480-484 Postal and Telecom m unications 10 884 000

B 9 909 Postal and Telecom m unications 761 000

A 25 296, 299 E nvironm ent, H ousing and Com m unity 315 000

D evelopm ent

B 6 841-842 E nvironm ent, H ousing and C om m unity 4 594 000

D evelopm ent

* D ocum ent A — ‘ Particulars o f Proposed Expenditure for the Service o f the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

* D ocum ent B—* Particulars o f Certain Proposed E xpenditure in respect o f the year ending on 30 June 1977 ’.

159

The Chairman made a further statement relating to the order in which the Depart­ ments should be considered.

Discussion ensued.

Resolved: That the Estimates be considered in the following order:

Department of Transport Postal and Telecommunications Department Department of Education Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF TRANSPORT Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Transport:

M r C. J. Smith, Acting First Assistant Secretary (Finance and Commercial) M r S. P. Smith, Acting First Assistant Secretary (Sea Transport Policy) M r G. T. O’Halloran, Director—Budget M r P. Holmes, Acting Assistant Secretary (Emergency and Special Services) Department o f Finance:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Division 655—Department of Transport (Document A)

Division 959—Department of Transport (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

Division 655 Division 959 The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Department of Transport.

7. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITIONAL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— POSTAL AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS DEPARTM ENT Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Postal and Telecommunications Department:

M r A. Westendorf, Director, Management Services M r T. Embrey, Manager, Management Accounting, Telecom Australia M r W. Funnel!, Controller, Finance, Australian Broadcasting Commission M r B. J. Connelly, Secretary, Australian Broadcasting Tribunal Department o f Finance:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 480-484— Postal and Telecommunications Department (Document A)

Division 909—Postal and Telecommunications Department (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered: Divisions 480-484 Division 909

160

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Postal and Telecommunications Department.

8. PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EX PEN D ITU RE 1976^-77— DEPA RTM EN T O F EDUCATION

Appearing·. Senator the Hon. J. L. Garrick, Minister for Education, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Education·.

M r D. M. Morrison, Acting Deputy Secretary M r E. S. Rolfe, Assistant Secretary, Student Assistance Branch M r D. W. Hood, Assistant Secretary, Territorial Liaison Branch M r E. M. McConchie, Assistant Secretary, Australian Capital Territory

Technical and Further Education Branch M r R. N. Allen, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch M r B. J. Hutchison, Director, Management Services Branch, Australian Capital Territory Schools Authority Department o f Finance'.

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 270-282—Department of Education (Document A) Division 835—Departm ent of Education (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

Divisions 270-282 Division 835

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Departm ent of Education.

9. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED A D D ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPA RTM EN T OF ENVIRONM ENT, HOUSING A N D COMMUNITY DEVELOPM ENT Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. L. Garrick, Minister for Education, accompanied

by the following officers:

Department o f Environment, Housing and Community Development: M r K. E. Thompson, First Assistant Secretary, Environment Impact Assess­ ment Division M r G. R. Dempster, Assistant Secretary, Youth and Sports Branch

M r P. M. M akeham, Director, Atmospheric Section M r G. R. Mills, Assistant Secretary, Glebe M r B. Kenny, Director, Land Branch M r L. R. Neilson, Acting Assistant Secretary, Decentralisation Policy Branch

M r T. O. Savimaki, Director, Cities Branch M r B. J. Brown, Acting Director, Community Development Branch M r P. E. White, Director, Finance and Programs Section Albury Wodonga Development C orporation:

M r G. R. Andrew, Chief Administrative Officer Department o f Finance: M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

161

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 296, 299—Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development (Document A) Divisions 841, 842—Departm ent of Environment, Housing and Community Development (Document B) The following particulars of proposed expenditure were considered:

Divisions 296, 299 Divisions 841, 842

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed additional expenditure for the Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development.

The Committee met in deliberative session

10. REPORT OF THE COM M ITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration.

Resolved: That the Report as presented be agreed to, subject to satisfactory written replies to certain questions asked during the Committee’s examination of the additional estimates being received on or by Thursday, 5 May 1977.

11. A D JO URNM ENT: The Committee adjourned at 9.00 p.m. till a day and hour to be fixed.

12. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senators Collard, Colston, M artin, Mulvihill, Townley and Wriedt (6).

Senators Harradine, Lewis and McAuliffe also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

K. J. M ARTIN Chairman

162

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS

No, 2

THURSDAY, 5 MAY 1977

1. M EETIN G : The Committee met in private session at 4,00 p,m. The Chairman (Senator M artin) took the Chair,

2. M IN U TES: The Minutes o f the meeting held on Tuesday, 26 April 1977 were read and confirmed.

3. R EPO RT OF TH E COM M ITTEE: The Chairman made a statement relating to the Resolution o f the Committee on 26 April 1977 relating to the R eport of the Committee, viz.

T h a t th e R e p o r t a s p re s e n te d b e a g re e d to , su b je c t t o s a tis fa c to ry w ritte n re p lies to

c e r ta in q u e s tio n s a s k e d d u rin g th e C o m m itte e ’s e x a m in a tio n o f th e a d d itio n a l e stim a te s b e in g re ce iv e d o n o r b y T h u rs d a y , 5 M a y 1977,

Letter from Minister:

T h e C h a irm a n in fo rm e d th e C o m m itte e t h a t sh e h a d re ce iv e d a le tte r f r o m th e M in is te r f o r E d u c a tio n , th e H o n . J. L . C a rric k . T h e le tte r d re w a tte n tio n t o a re q u e s t b y th e

G e n e ra l M a n a g e r o f th e A u s tra lia n B ro a d c a s tin g C o m m iss io n , M r D u c k m a n to n , th a t a w ritte n re p ly b e r e g a rd e d a s c o n fid e n tia l b y th e C o m m itte e , b u t a ls o s ta tin g th a t th e

A u s tr a lia n B ro a d c a s tin g C o m m iss io n w o u ld b e p le a s e d to a c c e p t a d e c isio n o f th e

C o m m itte e fo r th e a n sw e r to g o o n p u b lic re c o rd (see A p p e n d ix , p a g e 5).

Discussion on the Minister’s letter ensued, Resolved: That the reply submitted by the Australian Broadcasting Commission be accepted as evidence taken in public.

Discussion resumed on the Report of the Committee, The R eport agreed to on Tuesday, 26 April 1977 was agreed to, with an amendment.

4. A D JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 4.29 p.m. till a day and hour to be fixed,

5. A TTEN D A N C E: The following members of the Committee were present: Senator M artin (Chairman), and Senators Collard, Colston, Townley and Wriedt (5).

K. J. MARTIN Chairman

163

Estimates Committee C

Appendix

i

MINISTER FOR EDUCATION

PARLIAM ENT HOUSE CANBERRA, A.C.T.

4 M ay 1977

Senator K. J. M artin Chairman Senate Estimates Committee C

Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator Martin,

During the hearing of the Department of Transport’s Additional Estimates by Senate Estimates Committee C on 26 April, I undertook to provide you with further inform ation on a num ber of subjects.

The required information is now submitted on the attached statement. I trust that it is helpful to you.

Yours sincerely, J. L. CARRICK

167

Senator Mulvihill

Was the Department in contact with the Department of Employment and In­ dustrial Relations to establish whether the irregularities in observing awards have been cleared so that James Richardson Pty Ltd’s tender will be considered fairly or is the deadline for new tenders going ahead ?

Answer Tenders have now closed for the duty-free concession at Sydney Airport and the new concessionaire will commence about June.

As part of the examination o f James Richardson’s tender, the Department con­ firmed with the State Department of Industrial Relations that James Richardson, under its current contract, was observing the appropriate awards. The new con­ cession contract will be similar to the present contract in requiring the new con­ cessionaire to observe all relevant Commonwealth and State Acts of Parliament and the rules and regulations made thereunder.

Concerning the Senator’s question about the problems last September, these referred to both the awards issue and provision of staff amenities. The former has been covered above. With the amenities, measures were taken to meet these re­ quirements but necessarily of a temporary nature in view of the impending renewal o f the contract. The new contract specifically requires that the tenant must provide staff welfare facilities and amenities generally in accord with the N.S.W. Factories, Shops and Industries Act, 1962 and the regulations thereunder.

Departmental officers will see that these conditions are met within the bounds of practicability permitted by the space available in the building.

Senator Col/ard How much money was saved by closing down the Flight Information Service at Normanton and has anybody taken over the position of official or unofficial weather observer for the area?

Answer The permanent closure of the Norm anton FSU on 14 March 1977 is anticipated to savings of $20 000 in a full year. There will be no reductions in services provided in the area as the same standard of Flight Information and pilot briefing services

will still be available from Cairns, Weipa, M ount Isa and other units. Whilst the Flight Service Officer was trained to observe weather, he is no more efficient in this area than many other Commonwealth staff who provide these services to the Meteorological Bureau throughout Australia. It is the Departm ent’s view that an equally reliable observation could be obtained from other persons such as the Postmaster, or indeed, the Groundsman remaining at Normanton.

Senator Collard An explanation of the $65 600 incurred in removing the confiscated Taiwanese fishing vessel Fu Long II is requested.

Answer The vessel was detained by the Department of Primary Industry and taken under escort to Geraldton for alleged fishing poaching. As a result of weather conditions and the consequent conditions of the sea it floated over the reef and became stranded on the beach. Because it was considered to be a pollution threat, the Minister authorised the Department to initiate action to have the vessel removed and refloated in accord­ ance with the Navigation Act. The salvage operation was undertaken under the

168

direction of the Departm ent by a local firm, Geraldton Towing Company (Gertco), at a cost of $65 136. Incidental costs associated with the operation amounted to approximately $400.

Senator Wriedt

Could we have supplied the cost to the Department of each o f the premises leased by the Departm ent at the capital city airports.

Answer

Where the Government provides the terminal building at each capital city airport, the total costs are known. However, no dissection of costs of these buildings into the various areas is available.

It is departmental policy to require concessionaires to construct, fit out and m aintain their bars, news-stands, shops etc.

The concessionaires are responsible either directly or through their concession fee for meeting all service charges including light, power, garbage disposal and the cost of connecting to the main service lines.

The Department maintains the exterior of the terminal and provides services to the interior; and the direct cost of maintaining and operating the total terminal building at the various capital city airports for 1975-76 is as follows:

$

Sydney In ternational . . . 2 579 377

Brisbane In ternational . . . 165 028

M elbourne . . . . . 3 455 591

A d e l a i d e ............................................ 439 541

P e r t h ....................................................... 517 595

(The above costs do n o t include overheads a n d com m ercial loadings.) D issection o f costs in to the individual areas o f the term inal buildings is n o t available. T he revenue received fro m concessionaires at the capital city airports fo r 1975-76 is as follows:

Concessions Sydney Brisbane M elbourne Adelaide Perth

$ $ $ $ S

D u ty free . . . . 874 154 216 982 313 065 59 674

D ining room s, liq u o r bars . 147 653 120 982 473 444 87 623 146 744

Buffets, cafes a n d restaurants 4 181 1 500

G ifts and general purpose

shops . . . . 226 465 20 825 23 932 20 504 67 809

C hem ists . . . . 5 340 57 028

P hotography shops . . 4 447 3 905

F lo rists . . . . 1 040 18 820 583

B eauty salon . . . 5 479

B anks a n d post offices . . 103 120 49 932 802

V ending m achines . . 34 453 5 891 180

A dvertising . . . 34 924 37 372 1 926 3 596

Bookstalls and tobacconists . 31 093 10 310 24 828

C a r parking (Concession) . 168 446 19 576 139 360 145 789

C a r parking (D epartm ent) . 41 674 1 697 1 368 396 719 4 756

M iscellaneous . . . 47 050 1 117 48 777 3 407 3 570

T otal . . . 1 689 587 382 679 2 444 913 285 643 432 118

169

MINISTER REPRESENTING THE MINISTER FOR POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND MINISTER ASSISTING THE TREASURER

PARLIAM ENT HOUSE Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 5 May 1977

Senator K. Martin Chairman Senate Estimates Committee C Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T, 2600

Dear Senator Martin

Following the examination by your committee on 26 April 1977 of the appropria­ tions for the Postal and Telecommunications Department a number of matters raised required specific additional information.

The information supplied by Telecom Australia and the Australian Broadcasting Commission is attached for perusal by the Committee.

In respect to the information given by the ABC concerning the exclusive rights to televise night trotting from the H arold Park track you will note that the General Manager, M r Duckmanton, has asked that this advice be regarded as confidential. While I would like to draw to your attention this request I am assured that if the Committee wishes that it should go on public record the ABC will be pleased to accept the decision of the Committee.

I trust that the information given covers fully the matters raised at the Committee meeting.

Yours sincerely, J. L. CARRICK

170

TELECOM AUSTRALIA

199 William Street, M elbourne, Vic. 3000 26 April 1977

The Secretary Postal and Telecommuni­ cations Department Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

A TTEN TIO N : M R J. BRASSIL

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE—QUESTION BY SENATOR M ARTIN

There are no persons employed by the Commission solely to detect misuse of private subscribers’ telephone facilities by employees of the Commission.

As pointed out in the reply to a Question W ithout Notice asked by Senator Martin on 19 May 1976, technical staff employed on telephone installation and maintenance work are required, in the normal course of their duties, to contact the local exchange from field locations using portable telephones linked to a subscriber’s line. Such calls however are made to special non-metering numbers and do not register on the meter

associated with the subscriber’s service concerned. On rare occasions calls may have to be made to normal metering numbers, e.g. an engineering store or depot, for information or material. Officers are required to keep a record of any such calls made

and to forward these to the Accounting area to arrange for the appropriate number of rebates on the service concerned. The Commission relies on management super­ vision to ensure that the proper procedures are followed.

S. C, MOON Secretary

171

AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING COMMISSION

BROADCAST HOUSE 145 E l iz a b e t h S t r e e t S y d n e y 4 May 1977

Senator the Hon. J. L. Carrick Minister for Education Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator Carrick,

SENATE ESTIMATES COM M ITTEE: ADDITIONAL INFORM ATION

Set out below is the additional information requested during the Senate Estimates Committee’s examination of the additional appropriation proposed for the Australian Broadcasting Commission in 1976-77:

(1) Revenue from publications (Senator Wriedt) The estimated gross revenues in 1976-77 for the publications specified are:

(2) Proposed magazine (Senator Wriedt) The possibility of publishing a journal similar to The Listener, which would include scripts of selected ABC broadcasts, a book review/literary section and an intelligent and constructive criticism of radio and television programs generally, has been considered on several occasions by the Commission going back to 1973. Various proposals have been examined including a joint publication with the Literature Board of the Australia Council with different formats and content, and with the production and distribution costs subsidised to some degree by the Literature Board. It is apparent from all our research that such a magazine could not be produced and sold in Australia on a profit­ able basis. Here it should be mentioned that The Listener, which is sold world­ wide, is produced at a loss. It has a large number of readers but not so many buyers! When the funds made available to the ABC in 1975-76 were substantially reduced, the project was deferred by the Commission before any final decision was made on the precise form and distribution of the publication, and as a result no definite up-to-date cost estimate is available. The Commission decided following the commencement of Frequency M odula­ tion broadcasting in January 1976, to publish the magazine 24 Hours, with a

12-page literary section, the cost of which is supported by funds from the Literature Board of the Australia Council.

(3) Night trotting sporting rights (Senator McAuliffe) The ABC did not make any financial contribution to the cost of the installation of the lighting at Harold Park, Sydney. The ABC provided technical advice on the lighting levels necessary to improve televising of events at Harold Park. The ABC does not pay any fee for its exclusive right to televise night trotting at Harold Park. We would ask that this latter advice be regarded as confidential.

$

TV Tim es .

R a d io G uide .

24 H o u rs .

4 1 1 3 500 60 000 130 000

172

(4) Economies effected in other operational expenses— §1 261 100 (Senator Lewis) Reductions in the estimated expenditure on expense items (excluding salaries and allowances) compared with the amounts included in the original Estimates are as follows:

Increase Decrease

S $

Radio direct program expenses . . . . . . . .

Econom ies were effected: (a) Lengthening the norm al C hristm as/N ew Y ear recess in the production o f live program s. These were replaced by selected recorded program s from overseas a n d the repeat

broadcast o f locally produced program s. (b) R eplacem ent o f som e artist intensive type program s by the p ro d u c tio n o f program s requiring fewer artists and

increased staff involvem ent.

Television e x p e n s e s ..............................................................................159 100

A lthough television production expenditure has been m ain­ tained substantially at the level o f the original funds, increases sought by overseas film producers for film rights to cover

increased p roduction costs a n d devaluation of the A ustralian dollar will cost in excess o f $200 000 in 1976-77. T his increase is offset to som e extent by a run-dow n in stocks o f ‘spares’ in the P roduction Facilities area and savings in transportation.

Integrated program e x p e n s e s ........................................................ . .

T he follow ing econom ies were in troduced: (a) L ocal travel, b o th interstate a n d in trastate, was restricted to essential journeys. (b) R elief o f officers absent on recreation, sick a n d other

leave w as lim ited to officers resident in the sam e State, o r alternatively n o relief was provided.

N ew s expenses . . . . . . . . . · ·

Econom ies were effected in travel relief arrangem ents a n d the use o f ‘stringer’ cinecam eram en in regional locations.

Engineering . . . . . . . . . · ·

R adio engineering costs have increased by $38 100 due to price increases in m agnetic tapes a n d o th er stores. Television engineering costs have been reduced $382 000 b y : (a) a substantial reduction in the stocks o f television cam era

tubes, spare parts a n d videotapes; (b) restrictions on travel and relief arrangem ents.

Program transmission channels . . . . . . · ·

A reduction o f $117 200 in the cost o f radio channels is due to changes in the basis o f calculation by Telecom . A reduction o f $280 500 on television channels is being

achieved by restricted usage o f satellites a n d casual program channels.

Overseas service— Radio Australia . . . . . 24 000

D evaluation o f the A ustralian d o lla r in N ovem ber 1976 accounts for the m ajority o f the increased costs.

Concerts . . . . . . . . . . 198 500

Publications, advertising and public relations . . . . 130 400

Increases in expenditure on the above items are m ore th an offset by increased revenue. The presentation of public concerts h a s involved increases in costs for hall rentals, program printing etc., a n d there has been a n increase in the num ber o f individual

publications published by the ABC.

139 200

245 100

46 500

343 900

397 700

173

Increase D ecrease

$ $

General overhead e x p e n d i t u r e ............................................................... 600 700

Economies were introduced over a whole range of general overhead expenditure items including: (a) travel and relief arrangements (b) purchase of newspapers, books etc.

(c) deferment of adaptation and maintenance of leased accommodation (d) purchase of office equipment and furniture (e) advertising vacant positions

(f) release of some rented accommodation

512000 1 773 100

N e t reduction . . . . . . . . .. 1 261 100

(5) Increase in revenue— $908 100 (Senator Martin) The estimated increase in revenue over the amounts provided for in the Estimates comprises the following items:

Official E stim ated

estim ates revenue + Increase

$ $ $

P u b l i c a t i o n s ............................................ 4 968 760 5 203 800 + 235 040

Public concerts . . . . . 1 895 000 2 211 000 + 3 1 6 000

Subsidies for sym phony orchestras . 666 800 724 500 + 57 700

Sale o f p rogram s . . . . 209 500 375 800 + 166 300

Sale o f lan d and buildings . . . 640 640

M i s c e ll a n e o u s ............................................ 105 095 238 155 + 133 060

7 845 795 8 753 895 908 100

(6 ) Orchestral subsidies (Senator Martin and Senator Wriedt)

To supplement the details of increases in orchestral subsidies provided to the Committee, the following overall information related to orchestral subsidies is provided:

Official E stim ated + Increase

estim ates revenue — Decrease

$ s $

Sydney Sym phony Orchestra N .S.W . State G overnm ent . . 170 000 200 000 + 30 000

Council o f the City o f Sydney . . 30 000 30 000

200 000 230 000 + 30 000

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra V ictorian State G overnm ent . . 100 000 100 000

M elbourne C ity Council . . . 22 000 22 000

122 000 122 000

174

Official estim ates

Estim ated revenue

+ Increase —Decrease

$ s S

Queensland Sym phony Orchestra Q ueensland State G overnm ent . . 150 000 155 000 + 5 0 0 0

B risbane C ity C ouncil . . . 10 000 20 000 + 10000

160 000 175 000 + 15000

Adelaide Sym phony Orchestra South A ustralian State G overnm ent . 80 000 90 000 + 10000

Adelaide City C ouncil . . . 2 500 5 000 + 2 500

82 500 95 000 + 12 500

W est A ustralian Sym phony Orchestra W est A ustralian State G overnm ent . 65 000 65 000

P erth C ity C ouncil . . . . 7 000 7 000

Local G overnm ent C ouncils . . 3 000 2 550 - 4 5 0

75 000 74 550 - 4 5 0

Tasmanian Sym phony Orchestra T asm anian State G overnm ent . . 25 000 25 000

H o b a rt C ity C ouncil . . . 1 300 1 650 + 350

L aunceston City C ouncil . . 1 000 1 300 + 300

27 300 27 950 + 6 5 0

T o ta l Subsidies . . . 666 800 724 500 + 57 700

Although the Queensland State Government subsidy for the maintenance of the Queensland Symphony Orchestra was increased by 110 000 to $160 000 as from 1 July 1976, an increase of only $5000 is shown in the above summary. The other $5000 represents a specific subsidy towards the cost of transport­

ation of the Orchestra on its tour to country centres in Central and North Queensland. Also, since compilation of the estimated revenue from subsidies, the ABC has been advised that the subsidy from the Western Australian Government for the maintenance of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra

has been increased from $65 000 to $85 000 for 1976-77. Please let me know if there is any further information you require.

Yours sincerely, T. S. DUCKMANTON General Manager

175

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

p.o. b o x 826

W o d e n , A.C.T. 2606

4 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee C Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T, 2600

ADD ITION AL ESTIMATES 1976-77

During the examination of the Departm ent’s Additional Estimates on Tuesday, 26 April 1977 additional information for the Committee was required in response to a number of questions asked by Senators Colston and Mulvihill, the questions and responses are attached.

K. N. JONES Secretary

176

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

26 APRIL 1977

DEPARTM ENT O F EDUCATION Item: WIMS PROJECT Hansard pages 67, 68 and 72

Question

Senator Mulvihill raised matters relating to the WIMS project including the control of equipment used in the project.

Explanation The W indsor High School Micro Teaching Science Project (WIMS) was initiated by the school in 1972 with the aim of developing improved methods of teaching science to slow learners. The original concept was later broadened substantially and became aimed at designing and implementing concepts which would provide meaningful and useful programs of learning activities for slow learners in a range

of areas.

The Education Research and Development Committee has provided grants totalling $32 000 to the project since 1974. The project has been organised in co-operation with the N.S.W. Education Department, whose contribution would have exceeded the Committee’s. The main part of the Committee’s funds are provided for the employment of a clerical assistant/typist and for the purchase of equipment. Most

of the equipment was of a consumable nature, such as books, test materials and chemicals. There was no significant expenditure of the Committee’s funds on audio­ visual equipment although we are aware that the N.S.W. Departm ent of Education

provided some equipment in this category.

Grants by the ER D C are paid direct to States. The Committee has an obligation to ensure that funds are spent on the purposes specified under the grants but the ownership of equipment purchased with grants is vested in the grantee. The Com­ mittee does, however, keep a register of all items purchased under grants where the cost exceeds $2000 and has been successful in negotiating access to or the transfer

of such items for reuse in other projects.

The chief investigator for the WIMS project, Mr LeMaistre, has presented ERDC with a final report and the report is currently under consideration by the Dis­ seminations Subcommittee of ERDC to determine what action should be taken to ensure that information arising out of the research is adequately disseminated.

DEPARTM ENT OF EDUCATION Item No. 270/4/09—Aboriginal Study Grants Hansard pages 70 and 71

Question Senator Colston—Could we be supplied with the number of students who were taken from the Aboriginal Study Grants Scheme temporarily to TEAS and could we be informed as to when the retrospective payments have been made or are

expected to be made ?

177

Explanation 42 students who were eligible for ASGS benefits were temporarily placed on TEAS. O f these 42 students the majority will have been transferred to ASGS benefits by 3 May and the remainder by 17 May. Retrospective payments in respect of entitlements under ASGS should also be completed by 17 May.

Question Senator Colston—I asked whether we could be supplied also with the number who have participated in this scheme, year by year, since its inception.

Explanation Aboriginal Study Grants Scheme—Numbers in training each year since inception of scheme (total number at some time during year):

Full-time Part-tim e Total

1969 ............................................ 99 16 115

1970 ............................................ 270 35 305

1 9 7 1 ............................................ 401 98 499

1972 ............................................ 503 186 689

1973 ............................................ 777 336 1 113

1974 ............................................ 1 061 406 1 467

1975 ............................................ 1 165 710 1 875

1976 ............................................ 1 253 1 000 2 253

E stim ate 1977 to 30 June . 1 060 650 1 710

E stim ate 1977 to 31 D ecem ber 1460 1 240 2 700

Question Senator Colston—Could I go back to item 270/4/09 on page 17? Paragraph (b) mentions an increase in the average time in which full-time students held awards. Could we be given some figures later of what the average period of time was for

1976 and the 1975 and 1974 figures ?

Explanation Detailed statistics of the average time full-time students hold awards under ASGS have not been collected. However, it is possible to make a calculation of the approxi­ mate average length of time spent in study by examining the actual expenditure on living and dependants allowances and by taking into account the numbers and ages of students in full-time study (the age of the student determines the level of living allowance payable). We estimate that the average length of time for which full-time ASGS awards were held in 1974 was 22 weeks. The figures for 1975 and

1976 are 20.5 weeks and 25.6 weeks respectively. It should be noted that 1975 may not have been a typical year, since in that year a number of students transferred to the NEAT system after some 10-12 weeks under ASGS. The effect of these transfers would be to make some reduction in the overall average duration of tenure for the year. There were no comparable transfers in 1976.

DEPARTM ENT OF EDUCATION Item No. 270/6/06—Interpreter/Translator Training Courses Hansard page 71

Question Senator Mulvihill—I should like to know the latest available figures on the number of students that go through both Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and the University of New South Wales.

178

Explanation There are 32 students currently enrolled in the one-year course which commenced at R M IT on 14 February. There will be three part-time courses in 1977, each of 12 weeks duration, at the Institute of Languages, University of N.S.W. The first course which commenced on 15 February has an enrolment of 30 students. It is

expected that there will be 30 enrolments in each of the further two courses to be held at the Institute later in the academic year.

Question Senator Mulvihill—I know the Minister has been identified with efforts to get some authority to enhance the status of people. Is it with you, Senator Garrick, or with the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations ?

Explanation This question is related to progress in the establishment of the National Accredi­ tation Authority on Translating and Interpreting. The Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs has action in hand to establish the National Authority, in consultation with the Minister for Education both as to its membership and

objectives. As you will know, the National Authority will have a valuable role to play in the assessment and setting of standards, in advising on the content of training courses in Australian institutions and in the accreditation of interpreters and translators with Australian or overseas qualifications and of those already working

in Australia without qualifications. The action in establishing the National Authority is well advanced and it is anticipated th at it will be brought to finality before very long.

Question Senator Mulvihill—W hat is the attitude of the Public Service Board to people who do these courses ? Is it regarded highly, as an open sesame to Public Service Board recruitment?

Explanation In October 1976 the Public Service Board introduced a new five-level structure for translators in the Australian Public Service.

The entry standard for positions of Translator, Grade 1, is the attainment of a standard of proficiency which would enable the appointee to communicate effec­ tively in at least two languages, including English. The level of proficiency required is determined by a test conducted by or on behalf of the Public Service Board.

For entry to positions of Translator Grades 2-5, persons must demonstrate a proficiency level in at least two languages, including English, which permits the use of both languages with equal facility. The level of proficiency is determined by

a test conducted by or on behalf of the PSB, or by completion of the Associate Diploma in Interpreting/Translating offered by the Canberra College of Advanced Education. Persons who have completed certificate courses offered by the RM IT or the University of N.S.W. are eligible to apply for appointment to vacant positions

of Translator, Grade 1, in the Australian Public Service. Selections for such positions are made on merit based on interview report and performance in the proficiency test described above.

Completion of the certificate courses at the RM IT and the University of N.S.W. would not exempt the holder from the proficiency test for entry to positions of Translator, Grades 2-5.

179

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Lombard House, Allara Street, C a n b e r r a C i t y , A.C.T. 2601 3 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee C Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE C

ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

During the examination of additional estimates by Senate Estimates Committee C on Tuesday 26 April, Senator Carrick, the Minister representing the Minister for Environment, Housing and Community Development in the Senate, agreed to make additional information available on the following matters.

Questions by Senator Mulvihill: 1. Senator Mulvihill asked a series o f questions on the general area of assistance to sport, particularly in regard to the availability of funds to assist national sporting bodies to compete in international events.

2. Could the officers, through the Minister, tell me how the subsidy position is with the Darwin conservation group? I know you are getting ready for the next Budget. Have you had any problems or requests from them for any special latitude in the dollar for dollar subsidy system ?

Answer to question 1: The Committee may be assured that the Government is conscious of its national role in providing all Australians with sport opportunities. All the issues involved in this area have been investigated thoroughly by the Task Force set up to examine welfare services and community-based programs in the health, welfare and com­ munity development areas, including sports development. The Commonwealth’s involvement has also been examined by a government backbench subcommittee on sport and recreation. In compiling its report, this subcommittee spoke to a range of past and present athletes, academics, sports administrators and coaches throughout Australia. In addition to these two reports, discussions have been held with the Australian Sports Council and officers of the Department of Environment, Housing and Community Development have held discussions with athletes and coaches who represented Australia at the M ontreal Olympics. The issues raised included the problems of Australian athletes competing internationally. The information collected from all of the above inquiries is currently being con­ sidered and it is hoped a sports policy may be announced in the near future.

Answer to question 2: This conservation group is the Northern Territory Environment Council/Centre. The Minister for Environment, Housing and Community Development has had requests from this group to relax the two dollar for one dollar condition applied to the grants in 1976-77 for administrative support. After consulting with the Treasurer the Minister advised the Northern Territory group that the Government did not propose to modify the condition on this occasion and held the view that it was not

180

unreasonable to require that voluntary bodies did obtain a reasonable degree of community support by way of income in order to qualify for a government grant. From inquiries made it is understood that the N orthern Territory group has had some success in raising income and that an amount of $8000 is likely to be advanced by the Commonwealth before June 1977, in line with the two dollar for one dollar condition.

Question by Senator Harradine:

1. W hat is the situation in relation to deductibility of taxation for donations to the Australian Conservation Foundation in respect of groups which are approved by the Australian Conservation Foundation ?

Answer to question 1:

The question concerning taxation concession on donations to the Australian Conservation Foundation is one that relates more properly to the Treasurer’s portfolio, as it concerns taxation policies. It may be helpful, however, to draw

Senator Harradine’s attention to the Treasurer’s reply in the House of Repre­ sentatives on 20 April to a question from M r O’Keefe on this same issue. A copy of that question and answer is attached.

D O N A T I O N S : T A X D E D U C T IB IL IT Y

M r O ’K E E F E — Is th e T re a s u re r a w a re

t h a t in a re c e n t p u b lic a tio n p u b lis h e d b y th e

M o v e m e n t A g a in st U r a n iu m M in in g o f

51 N ic h o ls o n S tre et, C a rlto n , V ic to ria , it is

s ta te d t h a t a n y d o n a tio n o v e r $2 c a n be

c la im e d a s a ta x d e d u c tio n ? T h e c o u p o n in

th e p u b lic a tio n s ta te s :

All donations over $2 will be tax deductible if your cheque is made out to the Australian Con­ servation Foundation, 206 Clarendon Street, East Melbourne 3002, and marked ‘Movement Against Uranium Mining’.

C a n t h e T re a s u re r a d v is e w h e th e r th a t ty p e

o f d o n a tio n is a le g itim a te ta x d e d u c tio n

a n d , i f n o t, w h a t a c tio n will b e ta k e n to

s to p i t?

M r L Y N C H — I a m in fo rm e d th a t th e

b a sic leg a l p o s itio n is th a t d o n a tio n s m a d e

t o th e A u s tra lia n C o n s e rv a tio n F o u n d a tio n

a re sp ecifically ta x d e d u c tib le u n d e r sec­

tio n 78 (1) (a ) o f th e In c o m e T a x A sse ssm e n t

A c t b u t t h a t d o n a tio n s to th e M o v e m e n t

A g a in s t U ra n iu m M in in g f u n d a re n o t

d e d u c tib le . T h e s ta te m e n t t o w h ich th e

h o n o u r a b le g e n tle m a n re fe rs a p p e a rs to

h a v e b e e n m a d e o n th e b a sis th a t gifts m ad e

t o th e A u s tra lia n C o n s e rv a tio n F o u n d a tio n

a re sp e c ifica lly ta x d e d u c tib le a n d th a t th e

F o u n d a tio n ’s c o n s titu tio n e n a b le s it to

p ro v id e a ssista n c e to o r to c o -o p e ra te w ith

o th e r b o d ie s c o n c e rn e d w ith o r in te re s te d in

c o n s e rv a tio n . T h e q u e s tio n a s to w h e th e r

g ifts m a d e in c irc u m s ta n c e s su c h a s th ese

w o u ld b e a llo w a b le a s ta x d e d u c tio n s is, o f

c o u rse , p rim a rily o n e f o r th e C o m m iss io n e r o f T a x a tio n to d e te rm in e a c c o rd in g to th e

law . T h e a d v ic e th a t I h a v e rece iv e d fro m

th e C o m m iss io n e r is t h a t in his view th e

a n sw e r w o u ld d e p e n d u p o n w h e th e r th e

g ift is m a d e to a fu n d w h ic h re m a in s in th e

c o n tro l o f th e in itia l re c ip ie n t o r w hich

p a sse s to th e o rg a n is a tio n o n w h o se b e h a lf it w as received. I h a v e b e e n fu rth e r a d v ised

re ce n tly b y th e C o m m iss io n e r t h a t w h e n th e m a tte r to w h ich th e h o n o u ra b le g e n tle m a n

h a s re fe rre d c am e to h is k n o w le d g e a d m in is­ tra tiv e a rra n g e m e n ts w e re m a d e w ith th e

A u s tra lia n C o n se rv a tio n F o u n d a tio n to

e n su re th a t w h en th e p re se n t a p p e a ls h a v e

b e en te rm in a te d n o f u rth e r a rra n g e m e n ts

w ill b e e n te re d in to u n d e r w h ic h o u tsid e

b o d ie s w ith c o n s e rv a tio n -re la te d a im s w ill be p e rm itte d to ra is e m o n e y th ro u g h th e A u s­

tr a lia n C o n se rv a tio n F o u n d a tio n . I f th a t

a n sw e r d o e s n o t q u ite sa tisfy all th e asp ects

o f th e q u e stio n p o se d b y th e h o n o u ra b le

g e n tle m a n I shall a d d to it w ith a re sp o n se

in w riting.

The second part of Senator Harradine’s question concerning Nil Net Migration is also one that should be referred to the Commissioner for Taxation for reply on a similar basis.

181

R. B. LANDSDOWN Secretary

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

REPORT TO THE SENATE

'

• ■ ■ ·

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee D has the honour to present its Report to the Senate,

1. On 21 April 1977, the Senate referred to the Committee the Additional Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following departm ents: Social Security Health

Immigration and Ethnic Affairs Aboriginal Affairs

2. The Committee has considered these Additional Estimates and has received explanations of them from the Minister for Social Security and officers of the depart­ ments concerned. A copy of the Minutes of Proceedings and Hansard report of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the information of the Senate in connection with the Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77 and the Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the hearing of evidence, and in accordance with undertakings given by the Minister for Social Security during the hearings, additional information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to certain questions asked during the pro­ ceedings. Copies of replies which have been received by the Committee are attached as an Appendix to the Report.

4. The Committee records its appreciation of the assistance given by the Minister for Social Security and officers of the various departments whose Additional Estimates the Committee considered.

28 April 1977

PETER BAUME Chairman

185

Estimates Committee D

Minutes of Proceedings

Λ

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS

No. 1

THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977

1. M EETIN G : The Committee met at 12.00 noon.

2. R EFEREN CE O F ESTIMATES TO COM M ITTEE: The Resolution of the Senate of 21 April 1977 relating to the referral of the Additional Estimates for 1976-77 to Estimates Committees for examination and report was reported to the Committee.

3. M EM BERSHIP O F COM M ITTEE: The entry in the Journals o f the Senate of 20 April 1977 recording the appointment of the following members to Estimates Committee D was reported:

Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes, Melzer and Sheil.

4. ELECTION O F C H A IR M A N : On the motion of Senator Sheil, Senator Baume was elected Chairman.

Senator Baume thereupon took the Chair

5. STATEM ENT O F C H A IR M A N : The Chairman made an introductory statement.

6. CONSIDERATION O F PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EX PENDITURE 1976-77: Pursuant to Order of the Senate, the Committee commenced consideration of the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977 and the Particulars of Certain

Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977 relating to the following departmental estimates:

Departmental Estimates to be examined

(M inister: Senator the H on. M. G . C. Guilfoyle)

THE SENATE

Division

D ocum ent* * Page No. Department

A 43 590 Social Security . . .

A 29 325-335 H ealth . . . .

B 7 853-854 H ealth . . . .

A 30 340 Im m igration and E thnic Affairs

B 8 867 Im m igration and E thnic Affairs

A 6 120 A boriginal Affairs . .

B 4 813 A boriginal Affairs . .

Amount

S

3 563 000 3 166 000 1 890 000 160 000

33 000 9 085 000 7 395 000

* Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. * D ocum ents—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

24156/79—7

189

7. CONSIDERATION OF PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTM ENT OF SOCIAL SECURITY Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Social Security:

M r D. Corrigan, First Assistant Director-General (Management) M r K. W. Kelly, First Assistant Director-General (Development) M r J. R. Barich, Assistant Director-General (Compensation Policy) M r C. Calvert, Assistant Director-General (Finance)

M r W. G. Kiddle, Assistant Director-General (Migrant Community Services) M r D. R. Scott, Assistant Director-General (Establishments and Personnel Projects) M r A. C. Sellwood, Acting Assistant Director-General (Benefits Policy) Department o f Finance:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

The Chairman called on Division 590, Department of Social Security. $ Division 590—Social Security . . . . . . 3 563 000

Consideration of the Additional Estimates for the Department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

8. PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE FOR THE DEPARTM ENT OF HEALTH Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Health, accompanied by the following officers :

Department o f Health: M r C. A. Nettle, Deputy Director-General M r L. W. Lane, First Assistant Director-General, Management Services Division M r M. Carroll, First Assistant Director-General, Hospital Insurance and

Nursing Division iHj

D r W. A. Langsford, First Assistant Director-General, Public Health Division D r K. W. Edmondson, First Assistant Director-General, National Health and Medical Research Council Division Dr N. A. Elvin, Regional Co-ordinator, Capital Territory Health Commission

Department o f Finance: M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on Divisions 325-335 and 853-854, Department o f Health. The following Particulars of Proposed Expenditure were considered:

Document A $

Divisions 325-335—H e a l t h ................................................... 3 166 000

Document B Divisions 853-854—H e a l t h ................................................... 1 890 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

190

9. PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED AD D ITIO N A L EX PEN D ITU RE FOR TH E DEPA RTM EN T O F IM M IG RA TION A N D ETH N IC AFFAIRS Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Immigration and Ethnic

Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Immigration and Ethnic Affairs: M r S. J. Dempsey, Deputy Secretary M r A. W. Burt, Acting Director, Finance and General Services M r K. R. Dammerel, Acting Finance Officer Department o f Finance:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on Divisions 340 and 867, Departm ent of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs.

The following Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure were considered: Document A $

Division 340—Immigration and Ethnic Affairs . . . 160 000

Document B Division 867—Immigration and Ethnic Affairs . . . 33 000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide additional inform ation to the Committee.

10. CONSIDERATION O F PARTICULARS O F PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPEN D ITU RE FOR THE DEPARTM ENT OF A B ORIGINAL AFFAIRS Appearing: Senator the Honourable M. G. C. Guilfoyle, Minister for Social Security and Minister representing the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Aboriginal Affairs: M r L. A. J. Malone, First Assistant Secretary, Division II M r N. J. L. Jansz, Assistant Secretary, Programs Branch M r R. W. Hogan, Assistant Director, Finance, Management Services Branch Department o f Finance:

M r F. V. Colvin, Chief Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. G. Napier, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman called on Divisions 120 and 813, Department o f Aboriginal Affairs. The following Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure were considered: Document A S

Division 120—Aboriginal Affairs . . . . . 9 085 000

Document B Division 813—Aboriginal Affairs . . . . . 7 395000

Consideration of the Estimates for the Department completed, subject to an undertaking by the Minister to provide replies to a number of questions.

11. A D JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 6.21 p.m.

12. ATTEN D A N CE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown, Grimes, Melzer and Sheil.

Senators Harradine, Keeffe, McLaren, Mulvihill and Walters were also in attendance.

191

PETER BAUME Chairman

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS

No. 2

WEDNESDAY, 4 MAY 1977

1. M EETING: The Committee met in deliberative session, at 7.50 p.m. The Chair­ man (Senator Baume) took the Chair.

2. M INUTES: The Minutes of the meeting held on Thursday, 28 April 1977, were read and confirmed.

3. REPORT OF THE COM M ITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration.

Resolved (on the motion of Senator Brown): That the draft report be agreed to, subject to the receipt of satisfactory replies from the relevant departments in response to the Committee’s request for further information.

4. AD JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 7.54 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senators Baume, Bonner, Brown and Sheil.

P. E. BAUME Chairman

192

Estimates Committee D

Appendix

' : -

-

STATEMENT A

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES

Department o f Social Security—Div. 590.1.01

Inform ation was sought concerning the am ount of sick leave claimed by departmental officers.

Response: The information requested is not readily available and the task of extracting the data in respect of each present and past staff member since July 1975 would strain resources. The Department will undertake a sample survey and advise the results as soon as possible.

195

STATEMENT B

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES

Department o f Social Security

Information was sought on details o f estimated expenditure for the inquiry by Dr Myers into unemployment benefits policy and administration.

Response: The estimate of costs for the inquiry over a three-month period is as follows: * • Salaries of 11 staff ($41 100) and remuneration of the Chairman

($8100) (note: on page 83 of Hansard dated Thursday 28 April 1977 M r Scott is quoted as referring to an establishment of 10. This is the figure for supporting staff to the Chairman and Secretary) . . 49 200

• Travelling allowances and air fares for Chairman, staff and witnesses 21 000 • Consultants’ fee and travel costs , . . . . . . 13 000

• Advertising and publications . . . . . . . 10 500

• Administrative costs (includes accommodation, furniture, telephones, postage, office services etc.) . . . . . . . 14 800

Total . . . . . . . . . . 108 500

196

STATEMENT C

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR BAUME

Department o f Social Security— Div. 590.2.08

Statistical information about recipients o f sickness benefit and invalid pension was sought.

Response: The details for invalid pensioners that are readily available are those included in the Director-General's Annual Report. A copy of the relevant tables from the 1975-76 Annual Report and a copy of some tables relating to sickness bene­

ficiaries are enclosed and are listed below:

Attachment A—Sickness beneficiaries by sex, by Social Security region, March 1977 Attachment B—Sickness beneficiaries by sex, age group, marital status, duration of benefit by State, percentage distribution, 3 November 1973 survey Attachment C— Sickness beneficiaries by age by sex by duration o f benefit, per­

centage distribution, 3 November 1973 survey Attachm ent D —Invalid pensioners by sex by marital status by home ownership by means as assessed, percentage distribution, 30 June 1976 Attachm ent E—Selected characteristics of invalid pensioners, 30 June 1976.

197

ATTACHMENT A

SICKNESS BENEFICIARIES BY SEX BY SOCIAL SECURITY REGION, MARCH 1977

N E W SO U T H W ALES V IC T O R IA

Office

Sickness

Office

Sickness

M ale Female Total M ale Female Total

M etropolitan . . 8 036 2 024 10 060 M etropolitan . . 5 695 1 606 7 301

A rm idale . . 97 16 113 B allarat . . 146 19 165

M oree . . . 107 15 122 Bendigo . . 224 38 262

T am w orth . . 62 8 70 H am ilton . . 57 15 72

C anberra region . 126 39 165 H orsham . . 36 10 46

(N.S.W .) M ildura . . 83 15 98

G oulburn . . 88 9 97 M orewell . . 122 18 140

G osford . . 78 21 99 Sale . . . 69 13 82

Lismore . . 234 43 277 Shepparton . . 158 33 191

Coffs H arb o u r . 56 12 68 W angaratta . . 102 13 115

G rafton . . 49 7 56 W arrnam bool . 58 12 70

Kem psey . . 128 15 143

Lithgow . . 82 32 114 N on-m etropolitan 1 055 186 1 241

Newcastle . . 409 95 504

M aitland . . 174 25 199 T otal . . 6 750 1 792 8 542

Taree . . . 94 14 108

Orange . . . 175 19 194

Broken Hill . . 118 16 134 Q U E E N S L A N D

D ubbo . . . 168 22 190

W agga W agga . 112 34 146 Sickness

A lbury . . . 92 15 107

Griffith . . . 192 19 211 Office M ale Female Total

W ollongong . . 526 101 627

N ow ra . . . 62 12 74 M etropolitan . . 1 092 463 2 365

T he E ntrance . 124 19 143

Bathurst . . 42 9 51 Bundaberg . . 62 11 73

C airns . . . 218 40 258

N on-m etropolitan 3 395 617 4 012 G old C oast . . 212 51 263

Gym pie . . 64 15 79

T otal . . 11 431 2 641 14 072 Ipswich . . 182 32 214

M ackay . . 97 14 111

M aryborough . 65 10 75

M t Isa . . . 38 7 45

Redcliffe . . 134 22 156

A U S T R A L IA N C A P IT A L T E R R IT O R Y R ockham pton . 217 25 242

T oow oom ba . . 215 53 268

Sickness Townsville . . 173 38 211

W arwick . 45 4 49

Office M ale Female Total

N on-m etropolitan 1 722 322 2 044

C anberra region . 204 48 252

(A .C.T.) T otal . . 3 624 785 4 4 0 0

198

SOUTH AUSTRALIA WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Sickness

Office M ale Female Total

M etro p o litan . . 1 171 317 1 488

B erri . . . 45 10 55

E lizabeth . . 155 29 184

M o rp h e tt Vale . 70 13 83

P o rt L incoln . . 28 3 31

P o rt Pirie . . 105 13 118

W hyalla . . 92 9 101

M t G am bier . . 75 9 84

M u rray Bridge . 25 25

N on-m etropolitan 595 86 681

T o ta l . . 1 766 403 2 1 6 9

N O R T H E R N T E R R IT O R Y

Sickness

Office M ale Female Total

D arw in . . . 69 11 80

Alice Springs . . 40 3 43

T o ta l . . 109 14 123

Sickness

Office M ale Female Total

M etropolitan . . 1 527 378 1 905

A lbany . , . 30 8 38

Broom e . . 25 0 25

B unbury . . 73 19 92

K algoorlie . . 114 20 134

G eraldton . . 36 2 38

N o rth am . . 58 14 72

Pt H edland . . 13 2 15

R ockingham . . 70 8 78

N on-m etropolitan 419 73 492

T o tal . . 1 946 451 2 397

T A S M A N IA

Sickness

Office M ale Female Total

M etropolitan . . 544 122 666

Burnie . . . 119 9 128

D evonport . . 67 11 78

N on-m etropolitan 186 20 206

T otal . . 730 142 872

199

ATTACHMENT B

SICKNESS BENEFICIARIES BY SEX, AGE AND DURATION OF BENEFIT: AUSTRALIA PERSONS ON BENEFIT AT 3 NOVEMBER 1973—PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION

I week 2 weeks 1 month 6 weeks

Under and under and under and under and under

Category 1 week 2 weeks 1 month 6 weeks 2 months

M ales: U nder 18 years . . . 0 .2 0 .2 0 .5 0 .3 0 .4

18-20 years . . . . 0. 4 0. 5 1. 0 0. 7 0. 7

21-24 years . . . . 0. 4 0. 5 1. 2 0. 8 0. 8

25-44 years . . . . 1. 2 2. 0 4. 2 2. 5 3. 1

45-54 years . . . . 0. 7 1. 2 2. 7 1. 9 2. 4

55 years a n d over . . . 0 .6 1 .0 2 .2 1.5 2 .3

T o tal . . . . 3. 4 5. 5 11.8 7 .6 9 .8

F em ales: U nder 18 years . . . 0 .2 0 .4 1.6 0 .9 0 .8

18-20 years . . . . 0. 7 1. 0 1. 7 1. 4 1. 6

21-24 years . . . . 0. 6 0. 8 1. 9 1. 0 1. 2

25-44 years . . . . 0. 9 1. 3 3. 5 2. 5 2. 9

45-54 years . . . . 0. 6 0. 7 1. 8 1. 5 1. 9

55 years a n d over . . . 0 .2 0.1 0 .8 0 .4 0 .5

T o tal . . . . 3. 3 4. 4 11.3 7 .7 9 .0

Persons: U nder 18 years . . . 0 .2 0 .3 0 .7 0 .4 0 .5

18-20 years . . . . 0. 4 0. 6 1. 1 0. 9 0. 9

21-24 years . . . . 0. 4 0. 6 1. 3 0. 8 0. 9

25-44 years . . . . 1. 2 1. 9 4. 1 2. 5 3. 1

45-54 years . . . . 0. 7 1. 1 2. 5 1. 8 2. 3

55 years a n d over . . . 0 .5 0 .8 1.9 1.3 1.9

T otal . . . . 3. 4 5. 2 11.7 7 .6 9 .6

2 months and under 3 months

3 months and under 6 months 6 months

and over Total

0 .4 0 .7 0 .5 3 .2

0 .9 1.3 1.3 6 .7

1.1 1 .4 1.7 7 .9

4 .0 7 .0 9 .8 3 4 .0

3.1 5 .3 8 .4 2 5 .7

2 .9 5.1 7 .1 2 2 .5

12.4 2 0 .6 2 8 .8 100.0

1.7 2 .4 2 .0 9 .9

1.7 3 .3 3 .7 15.1

1 .8 2 .7 3 .4 13.5

4.1 7 .2 10.3 3 2 .6

2 .6 4 .4 8 .2 2 1 .9

0 .8 1 .5 2 .7 7 .0

1 2.6 2 1 .4 30.3 100.0

0 .7 1.1 0 .8 4 .6

1 .0 1.7 1 .8 8 .5

1.3 1.7 2 .0 9 .1

4 .0 7 .0 9 .9 3 3.7

3 .0 5 .1 8 .4 2 4 .9

2 .4 4 .3 6.1 19.2

12.5 2 0 .8 2 9 .2 100.0

SICKNESS BENEFIT RECIPIENTS AT 3 NOVEMBER 1973 SUMMARY OF RESULTS—PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION

ATTACHMENT C

N .S .tV . S .A .

{including {including

Category A .C .T .) Victoria Queensland N .T .) IV. A . Tasmania A ustralia

N um ber in analysis .

By sex: M ale . . .

Fem ale . . .

By age group: U nder 18 years .

18-20 years . .

21-24 years . .

25-44 years . .

45-54 years . .

55 years and over .

By m arital status: N o t m arried . .

M arried . . .

By duration of benefit: U nder 1 week .

1 w eek-2 weeks .

2 weeks-1 m onth .

1 m o n th -6 weeks .

6 weeks-2 m onths . 2 m onths-3 m onths 3 m o n th s-6 m onths 6 m onths a n d over .

100% = 7 705

78.1 2 1.9

4 .6 7 .7

8 .9 34.7 2 4 .6 19.6

65.3 34.7

2.2 4.1 10.4 7 .8

9 .4 12.7 22.7 3 0.6

100% = 6 268

78.1 21.9

3 .7 8.2 8 .9 34.7 2 6 .0 18.7

59.6 4 0 .4

3 .8 4 .4 10.2 6.6

9 .3 11.8 20.0 3 4.0

100% = 2 723

7 9 .7 20.3

5.8 9 .8 9 .0 3 0.0 2 4 .6 20.7

60.7 39.3

6.1 7 .8 15.1 8 .9

10.1 12.6 18.7 20.8

100% = 1 768

7 7 .9 22.1

5 .7 10.0 10.2 32.3 2 4 .6

17.2

6 2.9 37.1

4.1 6.1 12.6 8 .5

11.2 13.1 19.0 2 5 .4

100% = 1 425

7 9.6 2 0 .4

4 .6 9 .8 9 .8 33.8

2 3.5 18.7

6 9 .2 30.8

3 .4 8.6 17.2 8.1

8. 8 12.3 18.7 22.8

100% = 641

8 2.2 17.8

6 .9 10.1 9 .0 31.8 2 2.9

19.2

5 6.9 43.1

1.1 5 .9 14.0 6 .7 10.3 13.6 2 4 .0 24.3

100% = 20 530

78.5 2 1 .5

4 .6 8 .5 9.1 3 3.7 2 4 .9

19.2

62.8 3 7.2

3 .4 5 .2 11.7 7 .6

9 .6 12.5 20.8 2 9 .2

ATTACHMENT D

INVALID PENSIONERS BY SEX BY MARITAL STATUS BY HOME OWNERSHIP BY MEANS AS ASSESSED, PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION, 30 JUNE 1976

M eans as assessed ($ per annum)

N il . .

1-52 . .

53-312 . .

313-897 (m) 313-1040 (s) . 898-1495 (m) 1041-1716 (s)

Over 1495 (m) Over 1716 (s) .

T otal .

Single

With home W ithout home

M ales Females M ales Females

1.1 1.5 18.5 14.9

0 .2 0 .3 1.7 1.5

0 .6 0 .9 3 .2 2 .8

1 .0 1 .0 2 .9 2 .3

0 .4 0 .3 0 .8 0 .4

0 .4 0 .5 0 .7 0 .5

3 .8 4 .6 2 7 .9 22.5

M arried

W ith home

M ales Females

3 .9 1.1

1 .0 0 .3

3 .3 0 .9

4 .7 1 .0

2 .4 0 .3

6.1 2.1

2 1 .4 5 .7

W ithout home

M ales Females

5 .2 1.8

0 .5 0 .2

1.1 0 .3

1 .2 0 .4

0 .5 0 .2

1.5 1.3

10.0 4 .2

Persons

W ith W ithout

home home Total

7 .6 40.5 48.1

1.8 4 .0 5 .8

5 .8 7 .4 13.2

7 .7 6 .8 14.5

3 .4 1.8 5 .2

9 .2 4.1 13.3

3 5 .4 6 4 .6 100.0

NOTE: Any discrepancies between totals and sums of components are due to rounding. Figures exclude females in receipt of wifes pension.

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS OF INVALID PE N SIO N ER S, 30 JU N E 1976

Females

ATTACHMENT E

N um ber

3 300 9 200 8 400 13 700 28 200

4 000 900 57 100 10 500 57 300

10 300

35 400 13 300

8 600

10 300 32 000 35 700 59 500

8 100 18 800 48 900 n.a.

n.a.

Per cent

4 .9 13.6 12.4 20.2 4 1.7

5 .9 1.3 84.5 15.5 8 4.7

15.3

5 2.4 19.7

12.7

15.3 4 7.3 52.7 88.0

12.0 27.8 7 2.2 n.a.

n.a.

Persons

67 700 100.0

Number

7 100 19 600 18 200 30 200 60 500 36 900

11 200 116 000 67 800 149 800

34 000

88 300 34 900

26 600

34 000 78 800 105 000 165 200

18 600 65 100 118 700 25 000

4 600

183 800

Per cent

3 .9 10.7 9 .9 16.4 3 2.9 20.1

6.1 63.1 3 6.9 81.5

18.5

48.1 19.0

14.5

18.5 4 2 .9 57.1 89.9

10.1 3 5 .4 6 4 .6 13.6

4 .0

100.0

STATEMENT D

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES Department o f Social Security— Div. 590.3.09 Information was sought as to the proportion of money paid to Aboriginals under the Darwin Cyclone Damage Compensation Act.

Response:

It is not possible to determine precisely the number and value of compensation payments made to Aboriginals largely because the claim form did not include provision for the disclosure of the claimant’s race. As a result only those claims received from residents of the Aboriginal reserves or settlements can, with any certainty, be identified as having been submitted by Aboriginals.

Without doubt there would be more claims lodged by Aboriginals than are able to be identified but within the above limitations the number of claims is 54.

It is estimated that payments on these claims totalled some $16 200, which repre­ sents some 0.06 per cent of the total property compensation expenditure of $26.5 million.

204

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

INFORMATION SOUGHT BY SENATOR GRIMES Department o f Social Security—Div. 590.5.01 Inform ation was sought concerning the number of community organisations actually affiliated with Good Neighbour Councils and the percentage of those organisations

which are ‘ethnic’.

Response: Available information is tabulated below:

S tate or Territory

Total number o f community agencies affiliated

Total number o f 1ethnic’ organisations affiliated

N ew S outh W ales . . . 100 31

Victoria . . . . . 149 71

Q ueensland . . . . 71 25

South A ustralia . . . . 137 58

W estern A ustralia . . . 102 46

T asm ania . . . . . 29 10

A ustralian Capital T erritory . 58 23

N o rth ern T errito ry . . . 40 13

686 277

‘Ethnic’ organisations represent 40.4% o f affiliated organisations.

205

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANBERRA, A.C.T.

P.O. Box 100 W o d e n , A.C.T. 2606 6 May 1977

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE D

At the proceedings of Senate Estimates Committee D on Thursday 28 April 1977, when the Additional Estimates (Appropriation Bills Numbers 3 and 4, 1976-77) of the Department of Health were under consideration, further details were sought concerning some items.

2. The attached statements provide the information in relation to the matters raised. Eight additional copies are supplied for distribution, if required, to members of the Committee, the Committee Secretariat and Hansard. The material relating to the activities of the Capital Territory Health Commission has been provided by the Commission.

CHARLES NETTLE for Acting Director-General o f Health

206

DETOXIFICATION CENTRES IN DARWIN AND KATHERINE

Senator Melzer asked, in relation to the detoxification centres at Darwin and Katherine, what the $25 000 in the additional estimates will be used for.

The Chairman also requested a statement on the evaluation of the projects.

In reply to Senator Melzer’s request the following tables provide a breakdown of estimated expenditures for both Centres for 1976-77 and 1977-78:

DIVISION 335.3.06—N.T. COUNCIL FOR ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG DEPENDENCY

Darwin 1976-77 1977-78

Salaries . . . . .

$

3 100 16 000

L aundry . . . . . 500 3 000

M eals ........................................................ 2 000 12 000

C l e a n i n g ............................................ 500 3 500

T e l e p h o n e ............................................ 200 1 000

Pow er, w ater, sewerage . . . 200 1 000

Vehicle running costs . . . 200 2 000

Vehicle insurance, w orkers com pensation and public liability . . . . . . . . 600 3 500

Publicity a n d education program . 5 000

Pick-up truck . . . . 7 000

B reathalyser . . . . 3 000

F u r n i t u r e ............................................ 3 000

R a d io s : Single side band . . . 3 000

D ouble side band . . . 700

T o tal for D arw in . . 24 000 47 000

Katherine 1976-77 1977-78

$ $

Salaries . . . . . . . . 400 12 700*

A dm inistrative expenses . . . . .

Services (electricity, garbage, insurance, etc. at S20 3140**

per week) . . . . . . . . 500 1 040

Catering (for 7 persons per night at $60 per week) . 3 120

F urniture an d f i t t i n g s .................................................... 100 2000

T o tal for K atherine . . . . . 1 000 22 000

T o tal Div. 3 3 5 .3 .0 6 ............................................ 25 000 69 000

* Salaries in 1977-78 consist of: (α) + salary of Counsellor-Co-ordinator (the other half is paid by Department of Aboriginal Affairs) . . . . 7 500

(6) Full salary of caretaker less accommodation . . . 5 200

T o t a l ............................................................................. 12 700

** Administrative expenses: The amount of S3140 represents half the total cost. The other half is paid by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

207

EVALUATION OF THE PROJECTS

The level of the problem of alcoholic abuse in Darwin and Katherine is widely recognised in the community and by all levels of government. In fact, a number of surveys (notably the Milner Inquiry) have been undertaken on this problem and all have strongly recommended the need for specialised facilities and personnel with requisite training experience and em pathy to deal with alcoholics.

Although no Commonwealth funds have been made available to date for these programs, the Department has been closely involved in both projects. At discussions with the interested parties the Departm ent has provided technical assistance and has monitored the progress made so far.

As soon as the Centres are operational, it is intended to arrange impact assess­ ments and regular reviews of the effect o f the programs.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION Senator Harradine asked in relation to grants-in-aid administered by the Capital Territory Health Commission:

Does it (the Commission) consider that grants-in-aid should be made to organisations whose aims in general are acceptable to the Commonwealth Government?

The Community Health Grants Committee consists of:

Deputy Commissioner (Mrs H. Crisp), Chairman Director of Mental Health (Dr W. Mickleburgh) Director of Finance (M r D. Hepworth) Mrs Phyllis Montgomery (Staff member of the Commission and Senior Social

Worker, Southern Region) Executive Officer, Policy Secretariat (M r K. Batterham), Secretary.

Annual community health grants are approved by the Commission on the recom­ mendation of a grants committee which examines applications according to set criteria. Criteria adopted by the Committee in consideration of grants are that the applying organisation must fill one or more of the following:

(a) serve a health scarcity area; (b) fill gaps in existing health services; (c) extend health services not provided by the Commission; (d) introduce or test new or special health services; or

(e) train voluntary community staff.

Other relevant considerations taken into account prior to making recommendations to the Commission were:

(a) that mental health and Community Health Grants are now combined to form the Community Health Grants program, with conditions for payments similarly brought into line; (b) to avoid supporting groups which duplicate services;

(c) to recognise that clientele of various groups fluctuate as community needs change; (d) to be aware that some organisations made a charge for some services; (e) that no funds be considered for capital costs, e.g. cars; (f) Cost o f living escalation; and (g) that some organisations receive financial assistance from other government

departments and/or other incomes.

208

Organisations funded under the Community Health Grants Program are required to report in writing at regular intervals throughout the grant year. The report includes a summary o f activities carried out with the grant, financial statements including an audited financial report at the end of each grant period and statements certifying that

the grant has been used for the purpose for which it was made available. In addition to this the Commission believes that personal liaison between the staff of the Com­ mission and the programs run with the grant is important. Commission staff are to examine and assess the operation of grant programs at regular intervals throughout the grant year. Each organisation has been visited or interviewed in person in the period December to February in the current grant year.

Enclosed are copies of the terms and conditions under which grants are given, ‘attachm ent 1’, and the form at of the letter sent to all Community Health Grant recipients, ‘attachm ent 2’.

ATTACHMENT 1

GENERAL CONDITIONS APPLYING TO CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION COMMUNITY HEALTH GRANTS IN THE A.C.T.

Fees 1. Where salaries of staff are fully paid out of a Community Health Grant, fees shall not be charged for the services of that staff.

2. Where salaries of staff are not fully paid out of a Community Health Grant, fees may be charged for the services of that staff provided the levels of those fees are approved by the Capital Territory Health Commission.

Means test on eligibility 3. N o means test is to be applied to determine a person’s eligibility to receive services provided by a project in respect o f which a Community Health G rant has been made.

Rent 4. Where any part of premises associated with the project, being premises in respect of which there is a Community Health Grant, are to be let or made available to persons other than salaried or sessionally paid staff of the project for the purposes

of providing community health or related services, the conditions of occupancy, including any rental to be charged, shall require approval by the Capital Territory Health Commission.

S ta ff variations 5. Variations of the categories and numbers of staff associated with a project in respect of which a Community Health G rant has been made may be made by the recipient of the grant, provided the purpose of the project, within its approved budget, is maintained. The Capital Territory Health Commission shall be notified

forthwith of any permanent variations in categories or numbers of staff.

Recognition 6. The recipient of any Community Health Grant for a project shall acknowledge Capital Territory Health Commission funding of the project in any formal public statement, advertisement or printed material concerning the project.

209

Use o f facilities

7. Land and facilities in respect of which a Community Health G rant has been made may be made available at the discretion of the management of the project for general community activities, provided those activities do not interfere with the provision of services for which the project was approved. The use of the land or facilities for activities outside the scope of the management’s discretion as described

above shall require the approval of the Capital Territory Health Commission.

Reallocations

8. The approval of the Capital Territory Health Commission shall be sought by the recipient of the grant for any proposed changes in respect of the purposes of the grant.

9. If the recipient of a Community Health G rant ceases to conduct the project for the purposes for which the grant was made, the Capital Territory Health Com­ mission may revoke the approval of the project and thereupon the recipient shall repay to the Capital Territory Health Commission all capital moneys and unexpended operating moneys that have been paid by way of Community Health Grants in respect of the project.

Representation

10. The Capital Territory Health Commission shall be entitled to nominate a representative of that Commission to the management of any project for which a Community Health Grant is made.

ATTACHMENT 2

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Format of letter to be sent to recipients of Community Health Grants

I am pleased to inform you that the Capital Territory Health Commission has approved a Community Health G rant of $....................... to the.................... ............ :......

(Association)........................................(purpose).

The grant is made for the twelve months period 1 December 1976 to 30 November 1977 and payment will be made quarterly in advance. The first payment will be made shortly after I have received notice from you of your acceptance of the grant and the conditions which apply.

The conditions under which the grant will be made are attached. In addition the grant will be conditional upon your organisation:

(1) reporting in writing by 30 June 1977 and 31 December 1977 to the Commis­ sioner, Capital Territory Health Commission, on the activities carried out under the auspices of the grant for the first and second six-monthly periods of the grant respectively;

(2) by the 31 December 1977 sending to the Commissioner, Capital Territory Health Commission:

(a) a certificate signed by an officer of your organisation declaring that the purposes and conditions of the grant have been complied with, and

210

(b) an audited statement of expenditure on those purposes which has been certified by a qualified accountant who is not an officer or employee of your organisation; (3) forwarding to the Commissioner, Capital Territory Health Commission

audited annual financial statements for your organisation when they are published.

(4) (Special conditions for a particular organisation.) Although your organisation is to be given a further grant for a twelve-month period this does not imply that the Commission has a continuing commitment.

I will be pleased to receive your written acceptance of this grant under the con­ ditions stated.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Senator Harradine referred to an advertisement in the Canberra Times of 10 July 1976 advertising the Women’s Centre Inc. phone 47 8070 and asked the following question:

Is the Health Commission aware that that is the same telephone number as that of recipient organisations ?

Presumably the last word should be in the singular. If so, then the answer is ‘Yes’. The Commission pays nothing towards telephone costs. It pays only a proportion of the salary o f an Education/Information Officer for the Women’s Information and Health Counselling Service of the Women’s Centre Inc. (the incorporated body through which the grant is paid) to cover the health component of the inquiries. A

similar grant for the health component is paid to the Lifeline organisation in the A.C.T.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Senator Walters asked:

Whether the house occupied by the Women’s Centre Inc. of 3 Lobelia Street, O’Connor, is a Commonwealth Government house?

It is believed that the house is owned by the Department of the Capital Territory and rented for $28 per week from that Department. The Commission is not involved in this arrangement.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Senator Grimes asked the following questions:

(i) Is it a condition of government grants-in-aid to organisations running womens health centres that they do not counsel about abortion, that they oppose abortion or that they favour abortion ?

No. (ii) Is any condition of that type put on the recipients of grants-in-aid, before they can receive such grants? The statement of conditions of grants which were circulated to all successful organisations and to which the organisation must agree before the grant is made available is at ‘Attachment V to Question 1.

In addition grant organisations are required to report on activities conducted with the grant, to provide a financial report, and a certificate stating that the grant had been used for the purposes for which it is received.

211

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Senator Harradine asked the following question :

In view of what I have asked today, is there not strong reason for believing that the grant in this case to the Womens Centre is a means by which the abortion counselling services receive indirect assistance ?

Insofar as abortion counselling is one of the many aspects of womens health problems, it is assisted by this grant. The Commission tries to assist as wide a range as possible of voluntary community health activities and also, for instance, gives a grant to the Childbirth Education Association.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

Senator Harradine asked:

. . . has the Health Commission heard of the Pregnancy Support Service, which is operating in the Australian Capital Territory ?

Yes. The Pregnancy Support Service advertises in the local press at regular intervals. It has, however, not applied for assistance from the Commission at any time but should it do so in the future it will receive equal consideration along with all other organisations. However the availability of funds for new grants would be relevant.

CAPITAL TERRITORY HEALTH COMMISSION

The Chairman, Senator Baume asked:

Would it be possible . . . to get a statement of the operative objectives of each of the organisations listed in that part of the explanatory notes which deals with Division 332, Sub-division 1? They include hospitals, health centres, hostels, nursing homes and other items for which grants are sought.

A full review of the Commission’s activities is contained in the annual report which unfortunately cannot be made available until the audited statement is received from the Auditor-General. The objectives of the various services and establishments operated by the Commission are set out below:

School Dental Service Purpose—undertake dental examination and provide treatment to all infant and primary school children in A.C.T. free o f charge.

School Medical Service Purpose—provide medical examination of children at infant schools and pre­ school centres. Treatment is not undertaken.

Immunisation, Maternal and Child Health Services other than School Medical Service Purpose—services including supportive role in the general well-being of mothers and babies, mothercraft classes for prospective parents, immunisation of babies

and schoolchildren.

Mental Health Branch Purpose—provide community-oriented facilities and services involving preven­ tion, treatment, rehabilitation and health-related welfare. To conduct hostels for the intellectually handicapped requiring residential care and for the psychiatrically disturbed for whom hostel accommodation is appropriate. Provide alcohol and drug dependency service and child guidance service.

212

A.C.T. Ambulance Service

Purpose—provide ambulance transport within the A.C.T. As from 1 July 1975 an ambulance subscription scheme has been operating along the lines of those operating within the States.

Public Health

Purpose—administration of Public Health Ordinance and M eat Ordinance and regulations. Inspection of all aspects of environmental sanitation, water supply and the food chain. Investigations of infection and notifiable diseases and collection and analysis of samples at public health laboratories.

Health Education

Purpose—assimilation and distribution of information on health matters, provide leaders and resources material for community and school health education programs.

Policy and Legislation

Purpose— to provide co-ordination o f policy development for the Commission and provide liaison with the Minister and the Department of Health. Co­ ordinate legal work in support of the operation of the Commission.

Transport

Purpose—the Transport Section of the Commission is responsible for the carriage of intellectually handicapped children between their homes and special schools and for the transportation of patients attending rehabilitation facilities. Other functions include the carriage of linen and sterile supplies and the operation of

a courier service.

Australian Government Medical Officers Purpose—undertake medical examinations for government departments and statutory authorities in respect of permanent employment superannuation, invalid pensions, travel overseas etc. Provide vaccinations for overseas travel.

Forensic Services Purpose—provide forensic services to the A.C.T. Police.

Pharmaceutical Services Purpose—inspection of pharmacies, checking and controlling supply of drugs, poisonous substances and issue licences for sale of certain poisonous substances.

Professional Registration Boards Secretariat Purpose—provide secretarial service to Registration Boards established under A.C.T. Ordinances—medical practitioners, nurses, dentists, pharmacists, optometrists and veterinary surgeons.

Planning and Research Purpose—development of policy on the rationalisation of health services, strategic planning for the development of future health services and manpower planning. Research into specific issues related to these areas.

Health Services Supply Centre, Mitchell Purpose—to provide centralised linen and sterilising services for hospitals and health services in the A.C.T., maintenance of equipment in the complex and the garaging and maintenance of motor vehicles.

213

Community Health Centres Purpose—to provide primary medical and community health care services to either established populated areas seriously deficient in access to health care facilities and services, or newly developed areas where services have not been established.

District Community Nursing Service Purpose—to provide nursing attendance in the home for patients who would otherwise require hospitalisation, patients convalescing after discharge from hospital and the aged, and community nursing services.

Australian Pathology Laboratories Purpose—pathology services to hospitals, health centres, private specialists and general practitioners.

Public Health Laboratory Purpose—chemical and bacteriological examinations for food, water and air monitoring, drug analysis for police, monitoring of drug blood levels for hospital services etc.

Chest Clinic Purpose—consultative service in chest diseases, x-ray examinations where necessary.

214

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

C a n b e r r a , A.C.T.

P.O. Box No. 100 Woden, 2606 18 May 1977

Senator P. E. Baume Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliam ent House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

The following additional information is submitted in connection with the state­ ments supplied on 6 May 1977 by the Department of Health. The following information has been provided by the Capital Territory Health Commission:

1. In regard to Senator Harradine’s question on the aims of organisations which receive Grants-in-Aid:

As the funds made available to the Capital Territory Health Commission are for the broad purposes of assisting in its function of providing health services for the A.C.T., any application for a grant is considered on the basis of how far a grant may contribute to this aim, against the background of the Government’s stated

policies in the health field. A grant would not be made if it were considered to be clearly contrary to these criteria.

2. The house at 3 Lobelia Street O’Connor, is owned by the Department of the Capital Territory.

3. Senator Grimes asked:

‘Is any condition of that type put to the recipients ?’—No.

CHARLES NETTLE for Acting Director-General o f Health

215

DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC AFFAIRS

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600 29 April 1977

Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T.

SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE MIGRANT RESOURCE CENTRE— MELBOURNE

The following information is provided as requested by Senator Melzer at yesterday’s examination of this D epartm ent’s Additional Estimates.

The services which the Australia Greek Welfare Society will provide encompass the following functions:

(a) A multilingual reference and information point to meet the special needs of migrants. Particularly in respect of services provided by Commonwealth, State and local government instrumentalities it would provide a range of resources which would be accessible to social workers and welfare officers working with migrants, to ethnic community leaders, welfare administrators, teachers and students interested in migrant problems, and others. (b) Facilities for use by migrant organisations, e.g. for meetings and for the

duplication of information material. (c) Encouragement and co-ordination of voluntary action by groups and individuals to assist in the successful integration of migrants and to overcome individuals’ problems. (d) A range of reference and information material in English and in the foreign

languages most used locally. (e) Promotion of good relations within the local community. (f) The bringing to attention the particular problems of ethnic communities and individual migrants requiring government action.

L. F. BOTT

Secretary

216

DEPARTMENT OF ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS

M.L.C. Tower Building, P h illip, A.C.T, 2606 19 May 1977

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

EXAMINATION OF ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE 1976 77— QUESTIONS ARISING

At the examination of this Department’s Additional Estimates of Expenditure for 1976-77 on 28 April 1977 your Committee raised many questions to which the departmental representatives agreed to provide answers at a later stage.

Attached are ten copies of answers to questions—which can be answered at this time—in the order as they appear in the Hansard report of the proceedings.

Answers to the remaining questions will be supplied as soon as possible.

L. A. J. MALONE fo r Secretary

217

Division 120/4/01—Grants-in-Aid-Housing Question:

What the building societies are in Victoria.

Answer:

The Aboriginal building societies in Victoria are:

Naragal Aboriginal Housing Co-operative Jika Jika Aboriginal Housing Co-operative Wahroonga Aboriginal Housing Co-operative

Division 120/4/06—Grants-in-Aid—Enterprises Question: Can you provide a breakdown of the allocation of funds to farming enterprises in South Australia ?

Answer:

The allocation o f funds in 1976-77 is: $

Gerard Farm, Gerard Reserve . . . . . . . 14 700

Nurrunga Farm, Point Pearce . . . . . . . 53 000

Question:

Can you provide a copy of the Supreme Court judgment in the case of Ralkon Agricultural Company Pty Ltd?

Answer:

No judgment has been made by the Supreme Court as the action did not proceed beyond a preliminary hearing as the Point McLeay Council agreed out o f court to hold elections on 28 May 1977.

Question:

How many enterprises are funded in Victoria?

Answer:

One, the Echuca Aboriginal Co-operative Society at Baroona. Funding in 1976-77 was $17 200.

Question:

Provide details on the number of Aboriginals who are being retrenched at the Gerard mission at Winkie in South Australia.

Answer:

The precise number of Aboriginals to be retrenched at Gerard by the end of the 1976— 77 financial year is not known at this stage. Officers of the Department are currently visiting Gerard for further assessment of the situation and to discuss with the Gerard Council the possibility of mounting Special Works Projects in

1977- 78 to provide alternative employment for any displaced workers. This is in accord with an undertaking by the Department that employment at Gerard will be maintained at the present level if at all possible.

Question:

Is there any disquiet at the Gerard mission similar to what is happening at Point McLeay because of the attitude of officers of D.A.A. in Adelaide ?

2 1 8

The G erard Council has refused to accept the findings of three feasibility studies by independent authorities stating that the standard of management of the Gerard farming enterprise is in need of upgrading and that the level of employment must be reassessed if economic viability is to be achieved. The departmental view is

that projects of this type must aim at viability in accord with the findings of feasi­ bility studies conducted by independent authorities.

Question:

Provide information on the problems of the Yuendemu mining company.

Answer:

The company has been funded in 1976-77 a total to date of $57 760. Basically the company is attempting to concentrate on mining of wolfram from its deposit at M t Doreen Station and the Department in consultation with the Company and the Yuendemu community has attempted to rationalise some of the Company’s

activities. The Company obtained a contract with the Department of Construction in 1976 for construction o f sewerage ponds and this caused a major diversion of its resources. The Department of Construction has now cancelled the contract without penalty, thus enabling the Company to concentrate on wolfram. Management has been a problem but greater attention is now being paid to this aspect by both the

Departm ent and the newly appointed accountant to the Yuendemu community. At present the Company has 0.75 tonne o f wolfram ready for shipment which should realise $9600. Total possible returns from wolfram during the next twelve months are about $64 000. The contract with the mining consultants, Aminco, has been terminated. The financial statement for the March period is awaited and

this should show extent of liquidity problem which was serious at 31 December 1976.

Division 120/4/07—Grants-in-Aid— Town management and public utilities

Question:

Has the Wingellina toilet-ablution block project been resumed?

Answer:

To the Departm ent’s knowledge the project has not been resumed. Departmental officers are currently in the area and any further development will be dependent upon the community’s determination of its priorities and the availability of funds.

Question:

Notwithstanding persistent denials, was it not a fact that widespread unemployment among Aboriginals was a result of cutbacks in finance ?

Answer:

There have been no significant retrenchments or Aboriginal unemployment as a result of funds restraints.

Answer:

Division 120/4/08—Grants-in-Aid—Cultural, recreational and sporting activities

Question:

Provide a list of the projects funded and the States in which they will be carried out.

219

The Departm ent’s Explanatory Notes stated that this program provided financial assistance to approximately 200 projects. This figure was the total of the projects which the Department, at 31 M arch 1977, expected to fund. At the present time 127 projects have been funded and these are listed in Table 1 by State.

Question:

Provide a list o f projects where the salaries of Aboriginal employees are subsidised.

Answer:

Table 2 attached lists the projects.

Question:

Provide an explanation of w hat happened to the balance of the moneys after the Aboriginal Foundation in the Sydney area was wound up.

Answer:

The liquidator of the Foundation has paid out $94 287.93 in proved and admitted creditors’ claims, leaving $29 162.56 in unproved claims and $16 433.52 in proved but not yet admitted claims. The last two categories of claims are still under investigation by the liquidator and are being paid as they are proved and submitted. The disbursement of the balance of the assets and cash, less the liquidator’s fees, are subject to an order from the court. No order has been issued as yet nor has the court listed a date to hear claims.

Question:

Is it a fact that the late painter Yirawala made a gift of a number of paintings to the Foundation and that these are the first things to be sold ?

Answer:

The Foundation’s assets included nine paintings by Yirawala. The paintings have been placed in Professor W. R. Geddes’s trust and stored in the Nicolson Museum at the University of Sydney. The liquidator does not propose to sell the paintings and their disposal will be a m atter for the Equity Court to decide.

Although the Foundation appears to have title to the paintings there is no record of their acquisition in the Foundation’s books. Although there were apparently ten paintings one has been sold and the liquidator has no record of who authorised

its sale, who purchased it, or what happened to the proceeds.

Question:

Is the Department still funding the Police and Citizens Boys Club at Townsville?

Answer:

No. A single grant of $28 000 was made in 1975 as a contribution towards con­ struction of Stage 1 of a club house.

Question:

Did the Department provide money at any stage to build a hut or small building on Palm Island for recreational purposes or was that building funded by Queensland ?

Answer:

2 2 0

The Departm ent has not provided money at any stage to build a hut or small building for recreation purposes at Palm Island. It is assumed that the Com­ mittee’s reference is to the Palm Island Youth Centre which utilises an old building on Palm Island built many years ago.

Question:

Provide details o f grants that may be made available to the Queensland Government or any other State Government for cultural, recreational and sporting activities.

Answer:

The Departm ent has made no grants to any State Government for cultural, recreational and sporting activities during 1976-77.

Answer:

TABLE 1

Division 12014108—Grants-in-Aid—Cultural, recreational and sporting activities

List of Projects funded by State

(NASF after project means funding through National Aboriginal Sports Foundation) New South Wales:

South Coast Aboriginal Cultural Centre Childrens Free Embassy Boomerang Football Club Nungera Co-operative Ltd

West Darling Aboriginal Advancement Association Widjeri Co-operative Ltd Coonabarabran Housing Co. Ltd Mallanganee Football Club (NASF)

South Coast All Blacks Rugby League Football Club (NASF) Nyam ba Housing Society (NASF) Tabulam Rugby League Football Club (NASF) Matraville High School (NASF)

Cookhaven Aboriginal Football Club (NASF) Western Districts Aboriginal United Sports Association (NASF) E. W. McBride (NASF)

Mid-Richmond Rugby League Football Club (NASF) Western Districts Aboriginal and United Sports Association (NASF) All Blacks United Junior Rugby League Club (NASF)

Shoalhaven Aboriginal Indoors Sports Association (NASF) Far South Coast All Blacks Rugby League Football Club (NASF) La Perouse United Junior Rugby League Football Club (NASF) Woden Valley Rugby League Football Club (NASF)

M urrin Bridge Aboriginal Advancement Association (NASF) C oonabarabran Youth Club (NASF) Ms C. Bux (NASF) Richards Magpies Cricket Club (NASF)

Deniliquin Sporting and Recreation Centre (NASF) Koorie United Football Club (NASF) Redfern All Blacks Football Club (NASF)

221 24156/79—8

Victoria:

Camp Jungai Co-operative Ltd Cullah Aboriginal Housing Co-operative Ltd Ballarat Koories Baseball Team (NASF) Snowy River Aboriginal Co-operative (NASF) Melbourne Blacks Basketball Club (NASF) Fitzroy All Stars Basketball Club (NASF) Victorian Aboriginal Sports and Recreation Co-operative Ltd (NASF) Goulburn Murray Aboriginal Sport and Recreation Centre (NASF) West Gippsland Aboriginal Netball Team

Queensland:

Young Aboriginal Movement Palm Island Co-operative Society Ltd Jimberella Co-operative Association Ltd Black Community Housing Service (Qld) Ltd Torres Strait Rugby League Club Norm anton National Fitness Combined Sports Association Yarrabah Community Council Thursday Island State School Aborigines Historic Places Trust Kowanyama Community Council Burketown State Primary School P & C Association Balyanna Community Advancement Co-operative Society Ltd St Georges Home for Children (NASF) Black Panthers RLFC (NASF) Jessica Point Primary School (NASF) Kalkadunije Sporting Club (NASF) Georgetown School (NASF) Cherbourg National Fitness and Boxing Club (NASF) State High School, Brisbane (NASF) Thursday Island State High School (NASF) Waiben Sporting Club (NASF) Kambu Progress Association (NASF) Goobiddi Bamaga Community Co-operative Society Ltd (NASF) Bamaga Rugby League Club (NASF)

South Australia: Maree Hall Committee Port Lincoln Aboriginal Organisation Pukatja Community Inc. Indulkana Community Inc. Amata Community Inc. Aparawatatja Social Club Port Augusta Aboriginal Social Club Henley Beach Primary School (NASF) Aboriginal Community College Football Club (NASF) Point McLeay Community Council (NASF)

Checkmates Basketball Club (NASF)

Western Australia: Jigalong Community Inc. Mugarinyer Community Pipunya Community Inc.

222

N oualla Group G urangoo Winjoo Dooa Council K oorda Club Inc. Bundi Club

Menzies Cultural Society W ongatha W onganarra Council Inc. Leonora Aboriginal Movement Body Aboriginal Movement for Outback Survival

Kooraminning Committee of Narrogin Inc. Noongars Progress Association Inc. Merredin Aboriginal Project Association

Kellerberrin Aboriginal Progress Association N ortham Aboriginal Community Progress Association Quairbading Aboriginal Progress Association Inc. Tam m in Aboriginal Progress Association Inc.

N orth Suburban Aboriginal Progress Association Belmont District Aboriginal Council Aboriginal Kadee Club Swanee Ngoongahs Association Inc. Central Midlands Aboriginal Progress Association Inc.

Southern Suburbs Aboriginal Progress Association Inc. M urray Districts Aboriginal Progress Association Kojonup Shire Council U rban Fringe Dwellers Association Aboriginal Youth Fellowship (NASF) Aboriginal Evangelical Fellowship Youth Centre (NASF) W ongutha Mission Training Farm Inc. (NASF) Gurangoo Winjoo Dooa Council (NASF) Swans Basketball Club (NASF) M urray Districts Aboriginal Association (NASF) Merredin Aboriginal Project (NASF) W arburton Community Inc. (NASF)

Diandi Sporting Committee (NASF) Aboriginal Advancement Council, Trustee for Aboriginal Youth Fellowship (NASF) New E ra Aboriginal Fellowship (NASF)

Eastern Goldfields Aboriginal Advancement Council (NASF)

Northern Territory:

Society of St Vincent de Paul YMCA of Darwin Inc. Society of St Vincent de Paul (NASF)

Katherine Womens Softball Association (NASF) Nguiu Shire Council (NASF) Santa Teresa Sporting and Social Club (NASF) Areyonga Sports and Recreation Club (NASF) N.T. Baseball League (NASF) Bathurst Island Sports Club (NASF) N TFL Junior Football Committee (NASF) N.T. Primary Schools Amateur Sports Association (NASF)

Milingimbi Progress Association (NASF) Central Australian Football League (NASF) Alice Springs High School (NASF)

223

National:

National Aboriginal Sports Foundation.

TABLE 2

Division 12014/08—Grants-in-Aid—Cultural, recreational and sporting activities

List of projects where the salaries of Aboriginaljemployees are subsidised

New South Wales:

South Coast Cultural Centre Childrens Free Embassy West Darling Aboriginal Advancement Association Widjeri Co-operative Ltd Coonabarabran Housing Company

Victoria:

Camp Jungai Co-operative Ltd

Western Australia:

Jigalong Community Inc. Gurangoo Winjoo Dooa Council Menzies Cultural Society Wongatha W onganarra Council Aboriginal Movement for Outback Survival

Gnowangerup Ngoongahs Association Central Midlands Aboriginal Progress Association Kojonup Shire Council

Northern Territory:

YMCA

National:

National Aboriginal Sports Foundation.

Division 813—Payments to or fo r the States

Question:

Senator Keeffe asked a question many months ago by letter to the Department about tractors and vehicles being made available to people on the Amoonguna area to develop the community, and the reaction from the Department was to remove a lot of the vehicles. Why was that done ?

Answer:

Amoonguna is used as a bulk depot for plant and equipment awaiting spare parts and repair. Some of the equipment referred to is in that category and the remainder was beyond economic repair and awaiting Board of Survey and disposal. These details were advised to Senator Keeffe by the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs on

3 May 1976.

Question:

At Jay Creek there are three or four houses there almost ready for occupation, very badly built, which have been abandoned. Who is responsible for that?

224

The Departm ent has no knowledge of three or four uncompleted houses as described in the question. There were five houses constructed before the commencement o f the housing association. These are not highly regarded by the community and are generally used for short-term or transitional purposes. In 1976 all five houses were

vacated following two deaths in fairly quick succession. Vacating of houses at time of death is a fairly common occurrence in traditional Aboriginal communities.

Answer:

225

DEPARTMENT OF ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS

M.L.C. Tower Building. P h illip, A.C.T. 2606 3 June 1977

The Chairman Senate Estimates Committee D Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Sir,

Examination o f Additional Estimates o f Expenditure 1976-77— Questions Arising

Attached are ten copies of the outstanding reply to a question on Division 120/2/10— Consultants—Fees.

It has not yet been possible to prepare a reply to the other outstanding questions nor to clarify the query raised in relation to the original reply to Division 120/4/07.

Outstanding information will be provided as soon as possible.

Yours faithfully, R. W. HOG AN fo r Secretary

226

Division 120/2/10— Administrative Expenses— Consultants Fees

Question: How many consultants were covered in the $21 500 spent on this item in 1975-76?

Answer·.

Expenditure for this item in 1975-76 related to two consultancies as follows:

Sir Douglas Nicholls—Consultant to the Victorian Regional Director for Aboriginal Affairs: $ $

Salary . . . . . . . . 6 036

Expenses . . . . . . . 4 600

10 636

R. L. Trillo—Consultant on Torres Strait Islands Air Cushion Vehicle . . . . . 10 870

21 506

227

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

REPORT TO THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee E has the honour to present its Report to the Senate.

2. Pursuant to the order of the Senate the Committee has considered the estimates of proposed additional expenditure of the following departments: D epartm ent of Science Departm ent of the Northern Territory

D epartm ent of Construction D epartm ent of the Capital Territory The Committee has received explanations of the proposed additional expenditure from the Minister for Science and officers of the departments concerned.

3. The minutes of proceedings of the Committee are included in this Report and the Hansard report of the evidence taken is presented herewith.

4. The attention of the Senate is drawn to the following: (i) Department o f the Northern Territory— consultants fees (Division 455/2/08) The sum of $30 100 is provided as a fee and expenses for a retired Common­ wealth Public Service Inspector to serve for a period of six months as an

interim N orthern Territory Public Service Commissioner (Hansard, 28 April 1977, p. 135). (ii) Department o f the Northern Territory— incidental and other expenditure (Division 455/2/09)

A sum of $38 611 is requested under this heading as compensation for cattle shot by departmental officers. The matter was explained to the Committee as follows (Hansard, 28 April 1977, p. 136):

T h is c o n c e rn s a n o p e ra tio n in c o n n e c tio n

w ith p ro te c tin g th e h a b ita t o f th e w ildlife

p re s u m a b ly p ro te c te d b y th is sa n c tu a ry .

B e c a u se , o n e p re su m e s— a n d th is is a

p re s u m p tio n , I m u s t m a k e th a t r e s e r v a t i o n -

c a ttle p ric e s h a v e b e e n d e p re ss e d in th e

N o r t h e r n T e rrito ry f o r so m e tim e , n e ig h b o u r­ in g p r o p e rtie s h a v e n o t b e en m u ste rin g th e ir

s to c k , a n d sto c k h a v e b e e n d e b o u c h in g o n

t o th e w ild life sa n c tu a ry in in c re a s in g

n u m b e rs . A d v ic e w a s given to th e re sp o n sib le b ra n c h h e a d t h a t u n le ss th o s e c a ttle w ere

c u lle d o r d e s tro y e d o r m o v e d th e y w o u ld

e v e n tu a lly d e s tro y so m e im p o r ta n t a sp e cts

o f th e h a b ita t. T h e o w n e rs o f th e a d jo in in g

p ro p e rtie s h a d b e e n given re p e a te d w a rn in g s th a t th e d e p re d a tio n s o f th e sto c k w ere

c a u s in g c o n c e rn , b u t b e c a u se o f th e p u re

e c o n o m ic s th ey w e re n o t p re p a re d to u n d e r­ ta k e th e e x p e n se o f a m u ste r. In th e e v e n t

th e b r a n c h h e a d fin ally d ecid ed , in c o n s u lta ­ tio n w ith his a p p ro p ria te officers, th a t th e

fe ra l c a ttle in th e w ildlife sa n c tu a ry sh o u ld

b e d e s tro y e d . T h e a d jo in in g p ro p e rty

o w n e rs a r e th e U n ia A s so c ia tio n , w hich is

a n a s s o c ia tio n o f A b o rig in a ls c o n d u c tin g a

p a s to r a l o p e ra tio n o n th e D a ly R iv e r

A b o rig in a l R e se rv e, a n d T ip p e ra ry S ta tio n , w h ich a d jo in s th e s a n c tu a ry to th e n o rth .

T h ey h a d a j o in t a g re e m e n t to h o ld a

m u s te r in th e s a n c tu a ry ev ery y e a r to g et

th e ir c a ttle b u t th e y h a d n o t d o n e th is fo r

3 y e ars. In th e u p s h o t, b ra n c h officers e n te re d th e s a n c tu a ry a n d b e g an a sy ste m a tic

sh o o tin g o f th ese c a ttle a n d d e stro y e d q u ite

a larg e n u m b e r. I c a n n o t b e c e rta in a b o u t th e

n u m b e r fro m m e m o ry , b u t it w as a b o u t 400

to 450 c a ttle . T h e o w n e rs c o m p la in e d th e n

to th e G o v e rn m e n t th a t th e ir s to c k h a d b e en

d e stro y e d . It tra n s p ire d in th e in q u iry w h ic h

th e D e p a rtm e n t in s titu te d th a t w hilst th e

a c tio n o f th e b ra n c h h e a d in issu in g th e

o rd e rs w as w ith in th e re q u ire m e n ts o f

se c tio n 53a o f th e W ild life C o n se rv a tio n a n d C o n tro l O rd in a n c e , h e h a d o m itte d to issue

his in stru c tio n s in w ritin g , w h ich is o n e o f

th e re q u ire m e n ts o f th a t sectio n . O n e x a m in a ­ tio n , th e C ro w n L a w O fficer a d v ised th a t it

w o u ld n o t be p o ssib le to resist a claim fo r

c o m p e n s a tio n p u rs u e d th ro u g h legal c h a n ­ nels, a n d h e a d v is e d th a t c o m p e n sa tio n

s h o u ld b e p a id . T h is w as n e g o tia te d w ith th e o w n ers. W e w ere a ssu re d by legal re p re s e n ta ­ tives th a t th ey o b ta in e d th e b e st p o ss ib le

s e ttle m e n t; th e se ttle m e n t w as th e n m et.

231

The Committee considers that if the Commonwealth is actually liable to pay this compensation for the reasons given in the departmental opinion (written answers, p. 25), the Department bears a heavy responsibility for incurring this expenditure, which could have been avoided.

(iii) Department o f the Northern Territory— loans fo r encouragement o f primary production (Division 897/3/01) $350 000 In examining this item the Committee was drawn to observe the critical state of the beef industry in the Northern Territory caused by the depressed

state of the market. The Committee was told (Hansard, 28 April 1977, pp. 146-7):

At the m o m e n t, m o s t o p e r a to r s a re sim p ly carrying o u t a h o ld in g o p e r a tio n a n d m a in ­ taining a p re sen c e . B ra n d in g s a re m in im a l and m u s te rin g f o r a n y o th e r p u r p o s e ju s t

does n o t ex ist. S e v e ral a re in p a rlo u s

economic s tra its a n d i f it w ere n o t f o r th e

type of a ssista n c e w e a r e d isc u ssin g n o w , I think a l o t o f th e m a t le a st w o u ld h a v e b e e n winding u p , i f n o t h a v in g th em se lv es

and

It is a n e c e ssa ry fu n c tio n o f th e la c k o f

mustering a n d th e la c k o f w o rk in g th e s to c k that h u s b a n d ry m u s t fa ll off. B ru c e llo sis a n d

d e c la re d b a n k r u p t. I re v e rt to c a ttle p o p u la ­

tio n s. O n e fig u re q u o te d to m e a few d a y s

a g o m a y b e o f in te re s t. In th e C e n tra l

A u s tra lia d is tric t b a se d o n A lice S p rin g s, th e p re s e n t e s tim a te d p o p u la tio n is m o re th a n

500 000 h e a d — th e fig u re giv en to m e w as

500 000 p lu s — a n d a c c o rd in g t o e x p e rt

a sse ssm e n t th e sa fe n o rm a l c a rry in g c a p a c ity o f th a t a r e a is 200 000 h e a d .

b o v in e tu b e rc u lo s is c a n n o t b e c o n tro lle d i f

th e s to c k a re n o t b e in g m u s te re d a n d tre a te d

p ro p e rly .

The uncontrolled increase in cattle numbers, which according to estimates (written answers, p. 17) almost equals the rate of turnoff, and the lack of husbandry threatens not only the disease eradication program but Australia’s entire future export trade in beef. The Committee was informed that the freight subsidy scheme to assist producers to get their stock to market has been terminated (written answers, p. 18). The Committee considers, that the Government should consider, as a matter of urgency, measures to minimise the damage which is being done to this im portant industry and which will take many years to overcome.

(iv) Department o f the Capital Territory—A.C.T. Police— salaries (Division 213/1/01) The Committee was told that the A.C.T. police force is significantly under strength and in consequence has had to curtail two of its im portant areas

of work, in the Juvenile Aid Bureau and the Safety Education Unit, both involving work with young people. The Committee was also told that the force was not able to recruit as many officers as had been intended because ‘the impact of the national wage increases on our salary appropriation was such that we did not have the money to appoint them’ (Hansard, 28 April

1977, pp. 154-5).

(v) Department o f the Northern Territory—N.T. Police— salaries (Division 459/1/01) Figures placed before the Committee indicate that the Northern Territory police force is significantly under strength (written answers, p. 17).

232

(vi) Department o f the Northern Territory— Advance to the Northern Territory Home Finance Trustee (Division 897/3/03) The Committee was told that the funds provided for this scheme, which provides concessional loans for housing in Darwin, are not expected to be

sufficient and that the Home Finance Trustee has arranged a loan to provide additional funds. The Committee was assured that there has been no undue delay in processing applications for loans in spite of allegations to that effect (Hansard, 28 April 1977, p. 149).

5. The Committee records its appreciation of the assistance’of the Minister for Science and officers of the departments concerned. g§

24 M ay 1977

R. C. W RIGHT Chairman

233

Estimates Committee E

Minutes of Proceedings

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 1 THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 1. M EETIN G OF COM M ITTEE: The Committee met in private session at 12 noon

in Senate Committee Room No. 1. The Secretary drew attention to the record, in the Journals o f the Senate of 20 and 21 April 1977, of the appointment of members and the reference of certain estimates of additional expenditure to the Committee.

2. ELECTION O F CHAIRM AN: On the motion of Senator Thomas, Senator W right was elected Chairman and took the Chair.

3. DEPA R TM EN T OF TH E N O R TH ER N TERRITORY:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers: Department o f the Northern Territory: M r N. Lynagh, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Management, Legislation

and Planning Division Department o f Finance: M r R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. Chik, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The following particulars of proposed additional expenditure were called upon

and considered: Document A * * $

Division 455—Administrative . . . . . . 562 600

Division 457—N.T. Legislative Assembly Executive—Staff and Services . . . . . . . . . 4 000

Division 458—N.T. Legislative Assembly—Staff and Services 8 000 Division 459—N.T. P o lic e ............................................... 220 400

Document B* Division 897—Capital Works and Services . . . . 3 417 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed additional expenditure was concluded.

4. DEPARTM ENT OF TH E CAPITAL TERRITORY: Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers: Department o f the Capital Territory:

M r R. C. Burroughs, Acting Assistant Secretary, Finance and Supply M r A. S. Blunn, City Manager M r R. Corrigan, Acting First Assistant Secretary, Lands Superintendent J. C. Johnson, Superintendent, A.C.T. Police, Management

Services Division M r C. S. Hamilton, Director, Programs and Budgets M r R. A. J. McGuinness, former Executive Officer, A.C.T. Police * Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

* Document B—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Additional Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

THE SENATE

237

National Capital Development Commission: M r K. J. Curtis, Secretary M anager M r B. M. Browning, Assistant Secretary, Program Management The following particulars of proposed additional expenditure were called upon

and considered:

Document A $

Division 210—Administrative . . . . . . 338 000

Division 213—A.C.T. P o l i c e ................................................... 926 000

Division 214—National Capital Development Commission . 381 000 Document B Division 829—Capital W orks and Services . . . . 8 991 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed additional expenditure was concluded.

5. DEPARTM ENT OF SCIENCE:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers:

Department o f Science: M r C. A. Webster, Assistant Secretary, Management Services Branch M r R. S. Goleby, Assistant Secretary, Grants and Projects Branch D r D. Powell, Assistant Secretary, Research Branch Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation:

M r S. Lattimore, Secretary (Research) M r H. C. Crozier, Senior Assistant Secretary (Finance and Properties) M r H. Kwong, Senior Finance Officer The following particulars of proposed additional expenditure were called upon and considered:

Document A $

Division 540 Administrative . . . . . . 208 500

Division 542 Analytical Services . . . . . . 92 000

Division 543 Antarctic Division . . . . . . 594 000

Division 544 Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology . . 655 000

Division 545 Ionospheric Prediction Service . . . . 14 000

Division 546 Metric Conversion Board . . . . 500

Division 547 National Standards Commission . . . 4 000

Division 554 C S I R O ............................................................. 3 000 000

Document B Division 927 Capital Works and Services . . . . 500 000

Division 929 Other Services . . . . . . 22 000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed additional expenditure was concluded.

6. A D JO URNM ENT: The Committee adjourned at 4.55 p.m.

7. A TTEN D A N C E: Present: All members of the Committee.

238

R. C. W RIGHT Chairman

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2 TUESDAY, 3 MAY 1977

1. M EETIN G O F C O M M ITTEE: The Committee met in public session at 4.00 p.m. in Senate Committee Room No. 1. Senator Kilgariff, having been appointed Deputy-Chairman of the Committee by the Chairman in accordance with Standing Order 36ab, took the Chair.

2. DEPA RTM EN T OF CONSTRUCTION:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. J. J. Webster, Minister for Science, accompanied by the following departmental officers:

Department o f Construction: M r K. J. Rodda, Deputy Secretary M r W. D. Hamilton, Assistant Secretary (Finance) Department o f Finance:

M r R. K. Caldwell, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r M. Chik, Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The following particulars of proposed expenditure were called upon and

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

considered:

Document A $

Division 220 Administrative . . . . . . 2915000

Division 222 Furniture and Fittings . . . . . 37 000

Division 224 Repairs and Maintenance . . . . 910000

Document B Division 831 Capital Works and Services . . . . 2 573000

Consideration of these particulars of proposed expenditure was concluded.

3. REPO RT OF COM M ITTEE The Committee then met in private session and deliberated upon its report to the Senate. It was agreed that a draft report as agreed to by the Committee be circulated to Members.

4. A D JO U R N M E N T : The Committee adjourned at 5.05 p.m.

5. ATTENDANCE: Present: Senators Devitt, Kilgariff, Robertson, Ryan and Thomas.

R. C. W RIGHT Chairman

239

Estimates Committee E

Appendix

'

DEPARTMENT OF THE CAPITAL TERRITORY

P o s t O f f ic e B o x 158 C a n b e r r a C i t y , A.C.T. 2601 11 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee E Parliament House Canberra

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

Enclosed are 15 copies of additional answers to questions asked at the Senate Estimates Committee E hearing of the Department of the Capital Territory on 28 April 1977.

W ould you please distribute copies to members of the Committee.

R, C. BURROUGHS for Secretary

243

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

ADDITIONAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ASKED AT THE HEARING ON 28 APRIL 1976

DEPARTMENT OF THE CAPITAL TERRITORY

Division 213-1-02—A.C.T. Police—Overtime

Hansard reference—page 155

Senator Robertson

Question:

What is the percentage drop from June o f last year in your ceiling figure? You might include 1975-76 in th at as well to give us a complete picture.

Answer:

The numbers o f police on strength at the dates requested were:

30 June 1975 .

Authorised 574

Actual 557

30 June 1976 . 585 551

30 April 1977. • • . 585 556

Between 1 July 1976 and 30 April 1977 there were 36 retirements/dismissals/ resignations from the Force and 41 new recruits, giving a net increase of 5 in the strength of the Force in that period.

244

C o m m o n w e a l t h G o v e r n m e n t

DEPARTM ENT OF CONSTRUCTION

17 Y a r r a S t r e e t , H a w t h o r n , V ic t o r ia

12 May 1977

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee E Parliam ent House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

SENATE ESTIMATES COM M ITTEE E—PA RLIAM ENT HOUSE, CANBERRA

During the meeting of Committee E on Tuesday 3 May 1977 dealing with the addi­ tional estimates of the Departm ent of Construction, members sought supplementary inform ation on the following items:

• The independent inquiry into the N orthern Territory Electricity Supply— page 240 of Hansard.

• The effect on power usage through the installation of solar water heaters— page 241 of Hansard.

• The work undertaken in the Speaker’s suite—page 241 of Hansard.

• Replacement of the boiler plant in Parliament House—page 242 of Hansard.

2. Explanatory notes on each item are attached for the information of the Committee,

K. J. RODDA

fo r Secretary

245

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION—ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

M EETING OF COM M ITTEE HELD ON 3 MAY 1977

(page 240 of Hansard refers)

The Chairman sought inform ation on the independent Board established by the Minister for Construction to inquire into the management and operation of the Public Electricity Supply in the N orthern Territory.

A copy of a press release by the Minister for Construction covering the inquiry is attached and the Minister has indicated that the findings of the Board are to be made public in due course.

11 May 1977

246

M INISTER FO R CONSTRUCTION

NEWS RELEASE

For Use 7 Febuary 1977

IN D EPEN D EN T IN Q U IR Y INTO N.T. ELECTRICITY SUPPLY

The Minister for Construction, M r John McLeay, today announced the composition and terms of reference for an independent Board of Inquiry into the management and operation of the public electricity supply in the N orthern Territory.

The decision to hold the Inquiry was announced late last m onth by M r McLeay following an on-the-spot investigation into Darwin's power supply problems.

M r F. A. McKay, b .e ., b .a ., f .i .e . Aust., f .a .i .m ., f .r .i .p .a ., Chairman of the

N orthern Electric Authority of Queensland, will head the Inquiry as Chairman. He will be assisted by M r W. G. Chapman, b .e ., f .s .a .s .m ., m .i .e .e ., m .i .e . Aust., Operations M anager of the Electricity Trust of South Australia, and M r P. M. Broderick, m .i .e . Aust., Deputy Chief Engineer (Power) with the Electricity Commission of

New South Wales.

M r McKay was Chief Engineer of the Northern Electric Authority of Queensland for 8 years before prom otion to his present position in 1972. As Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Authority he has full managerial responsibility for the total electricity undertaking in a large coastal area of north Queensland (Mackay to Cairns)—which is subject to cyclones and experiences similar climatic conditions to

Darwin.

For a period of 14 years M r Chapman has been responsible for the operation of transmission and distribution systems as well as power stations for the Electricity Trust of South Australia.

M r Broderick has 12 years’ experience as power station superintendent at various Electricity Commission of New South Wales power stations, and for the past 6 years has been responsible for the operation and maintenance of all the Commission’s power stations.

The Minister said he appreciated the co-operation of the Northern Electric Authority o f Queensland, the Electricity Trust of South Australia and the Electricity Commission of New South W ales in making available such experienced and key people to conduct the Inquiry.

M r McLeay said the board had been directed to inquire into all aspects of the management and operation of the N orthern Territory electricity supply with particular reference t o : (а) the existing management arrangements including the client-consultant

relationship at present existing between the Darwin Reconstruction Com­ mission, the Departments of the Northern Territory and Construction, the funding of the undertaking, policy formulation and the responsibilities of the Legislative Assembly; (б) the operation and maintenance of power generation facilities in D arw in;

(c) the operation and maintenance of transmission and distribution systems in Darwin; (d) the commercial operation of the undertaking (accounting, tariff setting etc.); (e) the extent to which Cyclone Tracy is still affecting the electricity supply

system;

247

( /) the adequacy of overall planning and future provisions in the generation, transmission, distribution and tariff areas; (g) the quality and suitability o f the present equipment; (h) the validity o f present philosophies with regard to reserve capacity;

(z) adequacy of staffing including numbers and levels when related to alleged difficulties in attracting suitable and experienced staff, delays in recruitment and high staff turnover at all levels ; (j) present proposal to transfer the electricity supply to the Legislative Assembly; (k) the desirability of forming an independent Electricity Commission to take over

all aspects of electricity supply in the N orthern Territory; (/) industrial relations; (m) training.

M r McLeay said the Board of Inquiry had been asked to recommend and report on the above, and any other matters considered relevant. The Board would complete its investigations by 4 M arch 1977 and its report was expected by the end o f May 1977.

248

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION—ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

M EETIN G OF COM M ITTEE HELD ON 3 M AY 1977

(page 241 of Hansard refers)

Senator Thomas requested information as to the effect on power usage in Northern Territory power stations of solar hot water services.

Any assessments by the Departm ent are approximate only a s:

(1) no accurate data are available as to the number of solar hot water services installed in the N orthern Territory, particularly in non-government-owned houses. Statistics will be available when the 1976 census is analysed early next year; (2) statistics are not available for the electrical energy load pattern in the Northern

Territory, i.e. the relative proportions of energy used for air conditioning, water heating, cooking etc., and it has been necessary to base the assessments on an investigation at Nhulunbuy by the Queensland University.

Effect on Darwin power station capacity Based on trends in the load pattern and expected changes in consumer require­ ments, the savings in power station capacity attributable to solar hot water services in Darwin is judged to be in the order of 1 % of the installed capacity. (Although this factor is significant it is less than the probable accuracy of load predictions and consequently its influence on timing of installation of additional capacity is marginal.)

Fuel savings at Darwin The assessed fuel saving at Darwin attributable to solar hot water service is 10 tonnes of fuel oil a day—this represents an annual saving of about $180 000.

Fuel savings at other Northern Territory centres Fuel is more expensive at inland centres and the assessed annual savings related to solar hot water services are:

$

• Alice Springs . . 70 000

• Katherine . . 13 000

• Tennant Creek . . 10 000

The Department is planning, in conjunction with CSIRO Solar Studies Unit, some field measurements to determine the actual performance of some typical solar hot water services in Darwin, Alice Springs and Townsville. The information thus gained would allow for a more accurate assessment of the influence of solar hot water

services on power generation costs and their economic status.

11 May 1977

249

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION—ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

M EETING OF COM M ITTEE HELD ON 3 MAY 1977

(page 241 of Hansard refers)

Senator Ryan requested details of the renovations and alterations to the Speaker’s suite.

These works included:

• modification to entry area to improve waiting space, noise control and privacy; • work in the secretarial area to improve use of space, lighting and storage;

• renovation o f bathroom ; • remodelling and electrical alterations—sitting room ; o provision of dining area; • adjustments to ventilation, heating and lighting to suit renovations; • adjustments to doors and fittings to allow better use of existing space.

11 May 1977

250

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE E

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION—ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES 1976-77

M EETIN G OF COM M ITTEE HELD ON 3 MAY 1977

(page 242 of Hansard refers)

Senator Devitt requested information on the replacement of the boiler plant in Parliament House.

The Departm ent proposes to replace the existing oil-fired boiler system with six electric water heaters—this work is necessary because of the age of the existing system.

The boiler plant is located in the basement at the rear of Parliament House. It is below the Parliamentary Lounge and is unlikely to be a contributing factor to the discomfort experienced by Members in the Dining Room as mentioned by Senator Devitt.

The air-conditioning facilities provided in both the Lounge and Dining Room in 1974 have improved conditions and the replacement of the noisy oil burners with silent-running electric water heaters will further improve conditions.

11 May 1977

251

3 May 1977

Dear Senator Wright,

Australian Institute o f Marine Science 24.4 metre research vessel

During the examination by Senate Estimates Committee E of the Additional Estimates for the Australian Institute of M arine Science I undertook at Senator Devitt’s request to provide information about the 24.4 metre research vessel currently under con­ struction for the Australian Institute of Marine Science.

A contract for the construction of this vessel was arranged in January 1977 between the Ship Building Division of the Department of Industry and Commerce as agents for the Institute and Ocean Shipyards, Fremantle, Western Australia. The estimated cost of construction and delivery to Townsville is $1.2m. Delivery is expected in January 1978.

The vessel has been designed specifically to operate within the area o f the Great Barrier Reef. It can accommodate up to 12 persons of whom 3 to 5 will be crew and the remainder scientific research workers.

Two major anticipated uses of the new vessel will be in support o f programs in reef biogenesis and physical oceanography, two programs which have been delayed in development due to the lack of suitable vessel support.

I attach a copy of a press release which I issued on 6 April 1977 which contains additional information about the vessel.

Yours sincerely, J. J. WEBSTER

Senator the Hon. R. C. Wright Chairman Senator Estimates Committee E Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

252

MEDIA RELEASE—M INISTER FO R SCIENCE

PARLIAM ENT HOUSE CANBERRA, A.C.T. 2600 6 April 1977

RESEARCH ON GREAT BARRIER REEF

A m ajor expansion in research on the Great Barrier Reef will be possible when the Australian Institute of Marine Science acquires its new research vessel, the Minister for Science, Senator Webster, said today.

Delivery of the 24.4 metre vessel, being constructed by Ocean Shipyards in Fremantle, W.A., is expected in January 1978. It will be of steel construction, powered by two 135 kilowatt engines.

Senator Webster said research in the Great Barrier Reef region had been limited by the vastness o f the area to be covered and the inability of smaller vessels to meet research needs.

Small boats were too weather dependent, unable to stay out of port more than a few days, and did not have room for many scientists or much equipment, thus limiting the am ount of research that could be done on the spot.

The new research vessel would be able to work in rougher weather, and would enable longer trips, up to four weeks out of port. It would be able to carry up to nine researchers and conduct multidisciplinary experiments, utilising on-board laboratories and aquaria.

The Minister said two major anticipated uses of the new vessel were in support of programs in reef biogenesis and physical oceanography, two programs which had been delayed in development due to lack of suitable vessel support.

The reef biogenesis program sought to understand the mechanisms involved in the growth, development and maintenance of the reef. Vital questions to be answered involved the relationship between reef structure at the present time and through geological history, and the processes of present day biological and geological equilibria

between reefs and their environment.

M ajor reef systems and selected individual reefs would be studied to determine their three-dimensional form, geological and biological components, and composition of sediments.

The physical oceanography program sought to develop a basic description of the physical processes acting in the reef region. Some questions to be answered involved :

• climate of the reef away from land (most weather stations are on shore or on islands); e annual cycle of water properties (such as salinity and temperature); • currents, tides and waves in the reef region and their causes; and

• behaviour of rainfall and river runoff between the shore and the reef.

Senator Webster said all the geological and physical environmental factors he had mentioned affect the growth of the reef, and many may be influenced by people to the possible detriment of the reef.

F or instance, the fate of pollutants in river water would be better predicted once a clearer picture of the distribution of river runoff was obtained. Thus the information obtained by research from the new vessel would be of great value in making informed decisions regarding the reef’s development and conservation.

24156/79-9

253

DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

P.O. Box 231 DARWIN, N.T. 5794

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee E Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear M r Evans,

I forward herewith supplementary answers to questions raised during the examin­ ation o f this Department’s estimates on 28 April 1977. The answers appear here­ under in the same order in which the questions appear in Hansard.

A. Department of Northern Territory staff fluctuations:

Establishment Ceiling Staff

Ju n e 1975 2510 (includes 60 in the E stab- N il—n o t en- 2519 (includes 140 inoperatives lishm ent Reserve) forced a t 30 and 554 industrials)

June 1975

June 1976 . 2570 (includes 62 in the E stab- 2274

lishm ent Reserve)

2266 (includes 111 inoperatives and 488 industrials)

June 1977 . 2090 (approx. 50 will be in the 1921

Establishm ent Reserve)

1921 (approx. 434 industrials and 40 to 50 inoperatives)

B. Staffing of Assessment and Training Centre, Alice Springs: The new facility at Alice Springs is not yet fully staffed; the positions of Superintendent, Senior Group W orker (3) and G roup Worker (11) were advertised in the Gazette and in the press throughout Australia in December 1976. From this a superintendent was appointed but the response of persons suitable for appointment to the other positions was poor. Readvertising was arranged after initial interviews and interviews for the new applicants are partly completed. It is expected that appoint­ ments will be made within two months.

The Superintendent is already on duty preparing staff instructions and arranging a syllabus for a staff training course. It is essential that this course be held for the new staff before adolescents are placed in the institution under their care and control.

It is expected that the Training, Assessment and Holding Centre in Alice Springs will be opened in approximately July 1977.

C. A copy of the contract for engagement of an Acting Public Service Commissioner is attached at Appendix A.

D. Particulars of the cost and timetable of the Northern Territory Tourism Develop­ ment Study:

The Minister for the Northern Territory approved the Northern Territory Tourism Development Study in June 1976 in conjunction with the Department of Industry and Commerce and the Northern Territory Tourist Board.

254

It was expected that the Study would take two years and that it would cost approximately $30 000. A bid of $15 000 was made for 1976-77 estimates for the Commercial and Industrial Affairs Branch, responsible for the Study adminis­ tration, and it was anticipated that in the second year of the Study, 1977-78, a further $15 000 would be required.

The Minister for the N orthern Territory wrote to the Treasurer on 29 September 1976 seeking approval of the commitment of $30 000 on the Study.

There were delays in getting the Study under way, with the consequence that it was not possible to utilise the full $15 000 in the bid for 1976-77.

The Minister assisting the Treasurer, the Hon. E. L. Robinson, M.P., wrote to M r Aderm ann on 2 December 1976 noting that the Public Service Board had agreed in principle with the arrangements for the Study and approved the com­ mitment of $30 000 against Division 455/2/08. M r Robinson said:

I u n d e r s ta n d th a t y o u r D e p a r tm e n t h a s b e e n a b le to re a r r a n g e th e p ro g ra m fo r th e

S tu d y (w h ic h is re m o v in g th e n e e d to u se th e T r e a s u re r’s A d v a n c e ) a n d to effect

o ffse t sa v in g s fo r th e c a s h re q u ire m e n t ($3200 u n d e r D iv is io n 4 5 5 /3 /2 1 ) th is fin an c ia l y e a r— $26 800 w o u ld th e n re m a in u n d is c h a rg e d a t 30 J u n e 1977.

E. W hen the m atter of compensation for cattle shot on the Daly River Wildlife Sanctuary arose the possible counter-claim for trespass by the cattle could not be accepted as a practical legal proposition. This opinion took its rise from the precipitate launching of the shooting operation itself and the fact that previous warnings of encroachments were given to owners several months earlier than the shootings and then only informally and verbally.

Legal advice on other aspects of the matter was received in letters from the Crown Law Office, Darwin, copies of which are attached as Appendix B. Details of calculations of compensation payments are as follows:

Unia Association claim fo r 103 head:

$ $ $

Calves . . . 3 @ 15 = 45

Weaners . . . 12 @ 24 = 288

Cows . . . 52 @ 35 = 1 820

Bulls . . . 36 @ 75 = 2 700

4 853

Tipperary Station and claim fo r 436 head: Unia Association %

. 25 @ 15 = Calves . . 375

Weaners . . . 82 @ 24 = 1 968

Cows - . . 181 @ 35 = 6 335

Bulls . . . 148 @ 75 = 11 100

19 778

Tipperary Station claim for 247 branded cattle (Brahman Cross) S . 3 @ 200 - Bulls . . 600

Store steers . . 20 @ 33 = 660

Fat steers . . . 25 @ 60 = 1 500

Weaners . . . 33 @ 31 = 1 023

Cows and calves . 166 @ 55 = 9 130

12913

255

37 544

Expenses— $ $

• Hire of helicopter and aircraft . . . . 880

• Amount claimed for time lost in order to search for destroyed cattle (1 week) . . . . 143

• Mileage allowance LWB Toyota (220 miles) . 44

--------- 1 067

T o t a l .............................................................. 38 611

F. Bush fire control:

Under the provisions o f the Bush Fires Control Ordinance 1965-1976, the Bush Fires Council was established in the Northern Territory to advise the Executive Member as to measures to be taken to prevent or control bush fires and to exercise and perform such functions and duties relating to the prevention or control of bush fires as the Executive Member requires it to exercise and perform (sections 14, 55 and 56 refer).

Private owners are not compensated for expenditure they incur in connection with bush fires on their own properties. However, they are compensated for the use of plant and equipment etc., hired at the direction o f a Fire Control Officer for suppression of a bush fire on any adjacent properties. Such powers are conferred on a Fire Control Officer under section 56 of the Ordinance.

During 1976-77, private owners were paid a total of $22 400 (approximately) for the hire of graders and private aircraft used by Fire Control Officers in the suppression of wildfires.

G. Revenue and expenditure on Darwin bus service:

The estimated total revenue for the current year is $314 000.

The estimated total expenditure is $957 600.

H. Savings on use of Wang typewriter for Hansard production:

The savings achieved vary with the duration of each series of sittings of the Assembly and the consequent size of daily Hansard. Representative costs in respect of past sittings a re :

Wang

Printers operator’s

Sittings Duration cost overtime

$ $

June 1975 . . . . . . 3 days 7 670

D ecem ber 1975 . . . . . 3 days 6 730

F eb ru ary 1976 . . . . . 5 days 8 516

11 days 22 916

M ay-June 1976 . . . . . 6 days 3 748 397

O ctober 1976 . . . . . . 5 days 3 200 813

11 days 6 948 1 210

C om parison o f costs—

$

22 916 T ypesetting, 11 days . . . W ang process, 11 days . . 8 158

Saving . . . . 14 758

256

I. Strength of N.T. Police:

(a) Approved establishment— N.T. Police . . . . . . . 468

Trackers . . . . . . . . 43

Civilian support s ta ff................................................................. 71

582

(b) Approved ceiling— N.T. Police . . . . . . . 448

T r a c k e r s .........................................................................37

Civilian support staff . . . . . . 55

540

(c) Actual strength as at 30.4.77— N.T. P o l i c e ......................................................................... 438

T r a c k e r s .................................................................... 37

Civilian support s ta ff................................................................. 57

532

J. Recipients o f Primary Producers Board loans:

Number o f accounts Beef industry . . . . . . . . 110

Agriculture—mixed f a r m i n g ....................................................... 19

F i s h i n g ................................................................................................ 19

Horticulture ......................................................................... 7

Abattoirs . . . . . . . . 2

Co-operatives . . . . . . . . 1

K. Cattle population and turnoffs:

Cattle population of the Northern Territory— June 1977 estimated 1.8 million June 1978 estimated 2 million

Cattle turnoff for the Northern Territory— 12 months to 30 June 1977 estimated . . . . 239 500

12 months to 30 June 1978 estimated . . . . 252 000

L. Loans for primary production—interest Interest rates charged by the Primary Producers B oard:

Pilot farms 5% Flood loans 3% for 1st 810 000, then at 6% Rural Reconstruction 4}% Development 10^%

Rural Adjustment 4 |% to 6%, to be reviewed annually

257

M. Freight subsidy for transport of cattle:

To date, subsidies paid have totalled $278 739 for transporting 90 534 head of cattle. This comprised $190 370 for road transport, $49 843 for transport on Queensland Railways and $38 526 for transport on Australian National Railways (Centralian Line). Payments were made to 110 producers. Several claims are still under examination. The scheme terminated at 31 December 1976 and no appropriations have been sought for 1977-78.

Please note that my answer on 28 April was inaccurate concerning the duration of the scheme. This inaccuracy was based on information from a third party. I regret any difficulty or inconvenience this may have caused.

N. Estimated demand for Primary Producers Board loans: Estimated expenditure 1977-78 Commitment Cash

$ $

Rural Adjustment . . . . . . 1 450 000 1 100 000

Beef carry on . . . . . . . 600 000 600 000

Others—Processing, development, etc. . . 650 000 500 000

2 700 000 2 200 000

O. Bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis eradication cam paign:

(a) Tuberculosis 1. Voluntary eradication began in some Barkly Tableland herds in 1964. While this had limited success it indicated th a t: • Test and slaughter alone would not work in high prevalence herds.

• Eradication must be based on testing and continuous segregation of weaner heifers from the adult herd. • This required m ajor property development in the way of sub­ division, extra watering facilities and facilities for efficient move­

ment of weaned calves. • Development of this nature was undertaken on the larger company- owned properties but to a minor extent only on the smaller privately owned properties.

2. Compulsory eradication in Barkly Tableland and Alice Springs herds began in 1973.

3. Surveys prior to this indicated:

• Serious infection in virtually all Barkly Tableland herds.

• Mild, scattered foci of infection in Alice Springs herds.

• Virtually all Top End herds infected a low level. • Disease was rife in buffaloes and pigs on subcoastal plains.

4. During 1973 and 1974 excellent progress was made on better developed properties and a start was made on most of the remaining infected herds.

5. During 1975 and 1976 work continued at a reduced rate on the better developed properties but was almost at a standstill on the remainder. This resulted principally because of reduced stock turnoff during depressed market situations.

258

6. Prospects for 1977 look brighter. • Beef prices seem to be improving. • Good seasons continue. • New export abattoir at Alice Springs may improve cattlemen’s

cash flow and also provide outlet for aged breeders—the reservoir of infection.

7. SUMMARY OF TESTING

Year

C attle tested Prevalence

1964- 65 . .

1965- 66 . .

1966- 67 . .

1967- 68 . .

1968- 69 . .

1969- 70 . .

1970- 71 . .

1971- 72 . .

1972- 73 . .

1973- 74 . .

1974- 75 . .

1975- 76 . .

1976- 77 (M arch) .

7 963

%

8.0

17 248 11.5

21 400 6.0

50 012 3.4

74 901 3.1

53 671 5.6

99 254 4.0

171 366 2.4

173 230 1.8

313 578 1.3

384 254 1.0

324 241 1.6

256 805 0.7

(b) Brucellosis 1. Survey work commenced in 1968 and indicated: • Scattered foci in Alice Springs herds. • Widespread severe infection in Barkly Tableland herds,

• Top End virtually free. 2. Early voluntary control programs worked in conjunction with TB control on Barkly Tableland herds. 3. Compulsory vaccination in all infected herds commenced in 1973.

The aim was to maintain vaccine cover until 1977 when test and slaughter would commence. 4. Vaccine cover was maintained during 1973 and 1974 and test and slaughter commenced on the more advanced stations.

5. Vaccination and testing declined in 1975 and 1976 but progress was maintained on the better developed herds. 6. Prospects for 1977 as for TB.

7. SUMMARY OF RESULTS

Year

Cattle

vaccinated

Cattle tested Prevalence

1965-66 . 1 800

%

8 .0

1966-67 . 2 680 0.3

1967-68 . 10415 15 600 1.1

1968-69 . 18 000 30 000 3.5

1969-70 . . 15 800 34 329 12.8

1970-71 . . 41 340 19 087 9 .8

1971-72 . . 128 680 59 143 4 .2

1972-73 . 87 709 61 625 5.1

1973-74 . . 166 840 127 416 0.7

1974-75 . . 96 200 121 970 1.1

1975-76 . . 66 200 95 400 0 .9

1976-77 (M arch) . 43 200 99 350 1.3

259

P. Inquiries into beef industry in N.T. in last two years:

The Department has not initiated any industry inquiries except for local canvassing of stock numbers and routine quarterly reporting of turnoff and pastoral conditions.

Q. Darwin Concessional Housing Loan Scheme—6% interest:

Details of statistical information on the 6 % Concessional Housing Loan Scheme as requested are listed below as at 29 April 1977.

(a) Funds advanced:

$m

1975-76—Appropriation . . . . 9.5

1976-77—A ppropriation . . . . 11.5

1976-77—Cash transfer from D.R.C. . . 3.0

24.0

Cash funds available in 1975-76 was $ 9 .5m with a $7.1m carry-over into 1976-77. Cash available in 1976-77 is $14.5m with an approved carry-over commitment into 1977-78 of $12m. Total expenditure against the $24m cash is $23 996 754 with a total commitment of $28 235 427.

(b) Loan approvals:

1975- 76—Approved loans . . . . 535

1976- 77—Approved loans to date . . . 393

T o t a l ..............................................................928

In the early stages of the scheme the average loan approval was for $30 000. This has increased and the average loan approval is now $35 000 per loan.

(c) Applications:

Approved applications . . . . . 928

Applications not yet approved . . . 637

T o t a l ..............................................................1565

The figure of 1565 allows for wastage and cancellations.

The questions answered in this letter have been compiled from Hansard and my handwritten notes. I trust that the list is complete.

I should like to correct the sense of an answer I gave to Senator Robertson which is reported at the foot of page 149 o f Hansard. This answer implies that our Accounts Section is still in Brisbane whereas it returned to Darwin at the end of 1976. Any difficulty or inconvenience resulting from this inaccuracy is regretted.

Yours sincerely,

N. LYNAGH

A/First Assistant Secretary

(Management, Legislation and Planning)

260

A p p e n d i x A

THE NORTHERN TERRITORY OF AUSTRALIA

PUBLIC SERVICE ORDINANCE

APPOINTMENT OF ACTING PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSIONER

I, JO H N ARM STRO NG ENGLAND, Administrator of the Northern Territory of Australia having received the advice of the Adm inistrator’s Council pursuant to my powers under sub-section (1) of section 12 of the Public Service Ordinance 1976 hereby appoint FR ED ER IC K CHARLES GREY, O.B.E. (hereinafter called ‘the

Appointee’) to act in the office of Public Service Commissioner during the vacancy now existing in that office subject to the following terms and conditions:

1. This appointment shall commence on the 22nd day of December 1976 and shall continue for a period of six months subject to termination as hereinafter provided.

2. The Appointee may resign his office at any time by giving to me one m onth’s notice in writing.

3. I may having received the advice o f the Adm inistrator’s Council terminate this appointm ent at any time without notice.

4. The Appointee shall be based in Darwin during the continuance of this

appointment.

5. The Appointee shall be paid the following payments in respect of this appointm ent: (a) Subject to clause 6 hereof, remuneration calculated on a pro rata basis at the rate of $33 000.00 per annum during the continuance of this

appointment; (b) Subject to clause 6 hereof, an entertainment allowance calculated on a pro rata basis at the rate of $1000.00 per annum during the continuance of this appointment;

(c) Subject to clause 6 hereof, District Allowance calculated on the same basis as is applicable to employees of the Australian Public Service; (d) A living allowance of either:

(i) if the Appointee resides at a commercial hotel or motel establish­ ment in Darwin, $300 per week or, if accompanied by his wife, $350 per week; or (ii) if the Appointee resides in furnished rented accommodation in

Darwin at the rate payable in the Australian Public Service under conditions governing travelling allowance on review; (e) First class air fares for the Appointee and his wife from Sydney to Darwin at the commencement of this appointment and from Darwin to Sydney on

the termination thereof or mileage rates under the same conditions and at the same rates as applicable to employees of the Australian Public Service; and (f) Travelling allowance on the same conditions as applicable to a Second

Division Officer of the Australian Public Service where the Appointee is required to be absent from Darwin on official business.

261

6. The Appointee shall not be entitled to receive payment for personal recreation leave, sick leave or other special leave taken by him during the term of this appoint­ ment PRO VID ED A L W A Y S that this clause does not apply to such days as are declared to be Northern Territory Public Service holidays.

7. The Appointee shall not during the continuance of this appointment engage in any paid work other than his duties as acting Public Service Commissioner or engage in any paid occupation or business or in the practice of any profession.

J. A. ENGLAND 22 December 1976

I accept the above conditions as a basis of my engagement as Acting Public Service Commissioner Signed by FRED ERICK CHARLES GREY

Ί

F. C. GREY 22 December 1976

262

A p p e n d i x B

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

CROWN LAW OFFICE BLOCK 3 MITCHELL STREET DARWIN, N,T. 1 November 1976

The Secretary D epartm ent of the N orthern Territory P.O. Box 231 Darwin, N.T. 5794

Re: DALY RIVER W ILDLIFE SANCTUARY

I refer to your verbal request for advice on the liability of the Commonwealth for damage done to cattle on the Daly River Wildlife Sanctuary as a result of actions taken recently resulting in the destruction of a number o f head of cattle on the sanctuary. In particular I have been asked to advise whether the Commonwealth will be liable in damages to the apparent or reputed owners of cattle on the sanctuary for compensation for the loss of the cattle on it.

2. My short answer to your question is yes,

3. I have interviewed M r Elliott, M r Stevens and M r Pedersen concerning the operation of shooting the cattle and it is apparent that no written authority was provided by the Chief Inspector to the persons who carried out the shooting operation. The persons concerned acted pursuant to what they conceived to be their duties and the operation was one in which the Commonwealth would be expected

to be responsible for the acts of its employees.

4. Section 53a of the Wildlife, Conservation and Control Ordinance is as follows:

53 a . (1) N o tw ith s ta n d in g a n y th in g c o n ta in e d in th is O rd in a n c e , if th e C h ie f I n s p e c to r is sa tisfie d th a t fe ra l a n im a ls a re p re s e n t in a s a n c tu a ry in su c h n u m b e rs th a t th e h a b ita t

is b e in g a ffe c te d o r th e su rv iv a l o f n a tiv e a n im a ls in th e s a n c tu a ry is im p e rilled , h e m ay

d e s tro y o r, b y a n a u th o r ity in w ritin g , h e m a y a u th o ris e th e d e s tru c tio n o f, su c h a

n u m b e r o f th o s e fe ra l a n im a ls a s is, in h is o p in io n , n e ce ssa ry to e n su re th e p re se rv a tio n

o f th e h a b ita t o r o f th e n a tiv e a n im a ls in th e sa n c tu a ry .

(2 ) A n a u th o r ity giv en u n d e r th e la s t p re c e d in g s u b -s e c tio n a u th o ris e s th e p e rso n

n a m e d th e re in to e n te r th e s a n c tu a ry , to ta k e fire a rm s a n d tra p s in to th e sa n c tu a ry

a n d to ta k e , c a p tu re , k ill a n d h a v e in h is p o ss e s sio n a n im a ls in th e sa n c tu a ry .

(3) I n th is se c tio n ‘fe ra l a n im a l’ m e a n s a n a n im a l o f a d o m e s tic a te d species w h ic h is

liv in g in a w ild sta te .

5. The abovementioned section applies ‘notwithstanding anything contained in this Ordinance’. These words indicate that the power contained in that section is an overriding power and there would have to be a clear indication to the contrary before some other section would take priority to that section in matters which are

dealt with in it. For the section to operate the Chief Inspector must have considered and have been satisfied that feral animals were present in such numbers that the habitat o f native animals was imperilled. I accept that in the instant case the Chief Inspector did make such an evaluation and that requirement has been complied with. The section

proceeds to give power to the Chief Inspector to destroy such a number of these feral animals as in his opinion is necessary to ensure the preservation of the habitat o f native animals in a sanctuary. ‘Chief Inspector’ is defined in section 5 of the

263

Ordinance to mean ‘the Chief Inspector o f Wildlife appointed under the Ordinance’. It is to be noted that the definition section does not refer to the Chief Inspector or his agent. In section 7 the Chief Inspector is given power to delegate but, as there has been no suggestion that the Chief Inspector delegated his powers, it cannot be

said that the Chief Inspector himself destroyed the animals in the sanctuary.

6. The other power given by the section is that the Chief Inspector may by an authority in writing authorise the destruction of such a number o f those feral animals as in his opinion is necessary to ensure the preservation of the habitat or of the native animals in the sanctuary. There is no suggestion that the Chief Inspector gave anybody an authority in writing or that he authorised the destruction of any particular number

o f feral animals.

7. Part IV of the Ordinance deals with the control of pests and enables the destruction of pests. Two classes of pests are referred to in section 41, the wallaby which is referred to in the 5th Schedule and the other animals identified in the 8th Schedule. It is of interest to note th at the 8th Schedule contains a reference to many different types of animal including feral rabbits, donkeys, pigs, camels, cats, foxes, goats and dogs but it does not refer to cattle.

8. The other Ordinance affecting the matter is the Crown Lands Ordinance and sections 120, 121 and 122 are particularly of interest. Section 120 is as follows:

120. (1) A ll u n b r a n d e d w ild h o rs e s a n d u n b ra n d e d b o v in e c a ttle bein g a n im a ls a b o v e th e a g e o f tw e lv e m o n th s w h ic h a r e a t a n y tim e re m a in in g o r fe e d in g o n a n y C ro w n

la n d s (in c lu d in g re se rv e d o r d e d ic a te d la n d s b u t n o t in c lu d in g leased la n d s o r la n d s

o c c u p ie d u n d e r lic e n ce o r a g re e m e n t) a n d w hich h a v e n o re p u te d o r a p p a re n t o w n e r

sh a ll b e th e p r o p e rty o f th e C ro w n .

(1a) A ll u n b r a n d e d b u ffa lo e s w h ic h a re a t a n y tim e re m a in in g o r fe e d in g o n a n y

C ro w n la n d s (in c lu d in g re se rv e d o r d e d ic a te d la n d s b u t n o t in c lu d in g le a se d la n d s

o r la n d s o c c u p ie d u n d e r lic e n ce o r a g re e m e n t) sh a ll be th e p ro p e rty o f th e C ro w n .

(2) T h e A d m in is tra to r m a y c a u s e th o s e h o rse s, c a ttle a n d b u ffalo es to b e so ld a n d

d isp o se d o f b y p u b lic a u c tio n o r b y te n d e r a n d m a y im p o s e q u a lific a tio n s, te rm s a n d

c o n d itio n s o n th e a u c tio n , te n d e r, b id d e r o r te n d e re r.

(3) T h e A d m in is tra to r sh a ll n o tify in th e G a zette, a t lea st o n e m o n th p re c e d in g th e

tim e o f o r fo r th e a u c tio n o r te n d e r, th e o b jec t, tim e a n d p la c e o f th e a u c tio n , o r the

tim e u p t o w h ic h th e te n d e r m a y b e m a d e , a n d a n y q u a lific a tio n s, te rm s a n d c o n d itio n s

a p p lic a b le to th e a u c tio n o r te n d e r.

(4) T h e p u rc h a s e r o f th e h o rse s c a ttle o r bu ffalo es o n o b ta in in g th e w ritte n a u th o rity

o f th e A d m in is tra to r fo r th e p u rp o s e m a y w ith in tw o m o n th s a f te r th e d a te o f th e

a u th o r ity o r su c h f u rth e r tim e a s th e A d m in is tra to r a llo w s, w ith su c h a ssista n c e a s is

n e c e ssa ry , ta k e p o ssessio n o f th e h o rs e s c a ttle o r b u ffa lo e s a n d fo r th a t p u rp o s e e n te r

u p o n a n y su c h C ro w n lan d s.

9. You are aware that in 1973 the Unia Association reached an agreement with the Tipperary Company concerning cattle on the Daly River Sanctuary and south of that area. The agreement provided for a muster and for the sharing of cattle resulting from that muster and in subsequent years for the cattle in the sanctuary to be shared jointly between the Unia Association and Tipperary. This agreement was reached after considerable discussion and the intervention of various govern­ ment authorities and it would not be possible for the Commonwealth to raise a legal

defence based on a claim that it was not aware of or was not a formal party to the agreement. The matter was one of public interest and controversy and the circum­ stances and effect of the agreement were published in the newspapers. The Common­ wealth through your Department and the Department of Aboriginal Affairs took an active interest in the agreement and could be said to have arranged or organised it.

264

In my view the Commonwealth would now be estopped by its conduct from denying that the cattle on the sanctuary is in the apparent or reputed ownership of the Unia Association and the Tipperary interests.

10. The provision in sub-section (1) of section 120 which declares certain un­ branded cattle to be the property of the Crown has no application where cattle have a reputed or apparent owner. For this reason sub-section (1) does not apply to the unbranded cattle which were on the sanctuary. The other powers given in that section to the Adm inistrator to sell cattle apply only to cattle which have no reputed or

apparent owner.

11. Section 121 enables cattle to be impounded which are found trespassing upon Crown lands. The Pounds Ordinance makes provision for the establishment of pounds and for the sale of cattle which have been lawfully impounded. Destruction of certain cattle is only available pursuant to the Pounds Ordinance when the property has been dealt with in accordance with the Ordinance. In the case under consideration the cattle were not impounded and the provisions of section 121 (1) are of no assistance to the Commonwealth.

12. Section 121 (2) enables a person authorised in writing by the Administrator to destroy any pigs trespassing on Crown land without compensation to the owner. No mention is made of there being a right to destroy cattle with or without com­ pensation.

13. Section 122 makes it an offence for a person to depasture cattle upon Crown lands (including reserved or dedicated lands) but it does not contain any power to destroy those cattle.

14. From an examination of the relevant legislation it appears that there was no power to destroy the animals concerned and there is no provision in any Ordinance which would provide such a power. The general principle is that a person who owns property is entitled to compensation if that property is destroyed without lawful authority. In the case under consideration there was a means whereby the cattle could have been destroyed but the authority which would have been required in

order to provide that legal justification was not obtained. Even if that authority had been obtained there would have been other questions concerning the application of the section to the Brahman and branded cattle which were destroyed together with the unbranded cattle. There is also a legal question concerning the status of the unbranded cattle which have an apparent or reputed owner. It is not beyond legal doubt that such animals are feral. In any event it is now unnecessary to deter­

mine that question as, in my view, all of the cattle which were destroyed were des­ troyed without authority and the government is therefore liable to pay to the apparent or reputed owners of the cattle the value of what was destroyed.

15. I indicate that I have considered the effect of section 52 of the Wildlife Con­ servation and Control Ordinance which is as follows: 52. A lth o u g h th e d o in g o f a n a c t o r th e p o ss e s sio n o f a th in g is p ro h ib ite d by th is

O rd in a n c e it is la w fu l f o r th a t a c t t o b e d o n e o r t h a t th in g to b e p o ssesse d by a n in sp e c to r

i f th e d o in g o f th e a c t o r th e p o ss e s sio n o f th e th in g is fo r th e p u rp o s e s o f th is O rd in a n c e

o r fo r th e p u rp o s e s o f scientific re se a rc h .

16. Although I am of the view that section 52 gives a right to an inspector to do various actions which would otherwise be unlawful it is not intended to operate to deprive the owners of cattle of their rights to compensation in respect of the destruction of cattle. It is my view that if people are to be deprived of the right to compensation

there requires to be a clear indication or specific statement of that in the Ordinance.

265

17. I have perused the reports relating to how many cattle were destroyed. The most satisfactory report on this question is that prepared by the officers concerned in the exercise and it appears that it would now be a very difficult task to establish the number of cattle which were destroyed apart from relying upon the statements made by those officers. The value of the cattle is likewise a m atter which is yet to be determined. I provide this advising therefore in response to your request for advice on the general question of liability. If and when a formal claim is made against the Commonwealth the question of quantum can be considered further.

D. PATIENCE fo r Crown Law Officer

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

ATTORNEY-GENERAL’S DEPARTM ENT

CROWN LAW OFFICE BLOCK 3 MITCHELL STREET DARWIN, N.T.

30 November 1976

The Secretary Department of the Northern Territory P.O. Box 231 Darwin, N.T. 5794

Attention: M r M. Finger

R E: DALY RIVER W ILDLIFE SANCTUARY FERAL ANIM AL CONTROL

I have your memorandum dated 25 November 1976 with which you enclose a copy of the claim for compensation by Tipperary Station and Unia Association in respect o f cattle killed on the Daly River Wildlife Sanctuary.

2. I refer to my advising to you dated 1 November 1976 and enclose a copy thereof. I confirm that I am satisfied that a Court would hold the Commonwealth liable for the reasons set out in my memorandum.

3. In my view, it would be advantageous to negotiate settlement of the matter and avoid incurring legal costs. You have supplied me with details of the claim made by the owners and also with details of ‘without prejudice’ discussions which took place in which qualified officers of the Commonwealth indicated to the owners

bases upon which it could be contended that parts of their claim were not able to be sustained. The discussions which took place between the owners and the Common­ wealth officers were without prejudice and have value only in that they provide an indication of the probable outcome of any offer in settlement.

4. The officers who have investigated the question of quantum are Mr A. D. L. H ooper (Assistant Secretary), Animal Industry and Agriculture, and Mr T. Wheaton, a qualified valuer of the rural section of the Lands Branch. The amount claimed by the owners was the sum of $44 397.00, a loss stated to have arisen directly from the

shooting of their cattle. M r Hooper initially contended that the amount of the loss was $31 175.00 on the basis of TB and brucellosis compensation values for Darwin and Gulf Districts. Subsequent to the without prejudice discussion of the two claims the government officers now accept that the sum of $38 611.00 is a reasonable

estimate of the true value of the destroyed cattle.

5. In one respect I have questioned the validity of this assessment, viz. in respect of the factor of the cost of transport from the property to the market at the meat- works. Mr Hooper has stated that the values are determined on ruling and expected market values for the year and have regard to freight and abattoir charges. I raised

the same matter with Mr Wheaton who expressed the view that freight charges could work for a higher rather than a lower valuation. The reason for this was that a large num ber of the cattle which were shot were not intended to be killed by the owners.

According to my instructions, the Tipperary Station is in process of building up a herd and is buying rather than selling cattle. The value of cattle on the station would, therefore, be the cost of purchase plus transport to the property.

267

6. The Commonwealth valuations are based upon the TB and brucellosis compen­ sation estimates and are merely an indication of the basis upon which the Common­ wealth has compensated owners for the loss of diseased cattle. I do not believe that this would provide a strong foundation for an argument on values before a Court.

On the question of quantum it is possible that if the matter were litigated a Court might add to the valuations a factor to allow for freight to the cattle property. I also note that the number of cattle referred to in the Minute from M r Hooper dated 25 November 1976 is a total of 786 head. In the report of the officers who destroyed the animals and kept count of the numbers destroyed the figure of 823 head is stated. If the m atter were litigated a C ourt would be likely to find that the number o f cattle killed was 823 head. Although the officers who destroyed the cattle suggested that the value of the cattle killed was much lower than that assessed by M r Hooper and M r Wheaton, in my view a C ourt would prefer the valuation of the latter officers to that offered by the Wildlife officers.

7. In summary, it is my view that a Court would hold the Commonwealth liable to pay compensation to the owners to enable them to replace the animals which have been destroyed. On the evidence provided it is my view that the amount of $38 611.00 is the minimum amount which it might be expected that a Court would award against the Commonwealth were the m atter to be taken to Court. I therefore recommend an offer of settlement in the sum of $38 611.00 and that you submit this matter to Treasury for its consideration.

D. PATIENCE fo r Crown Law Officer

268

DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

P.O, BOX 231, DARWIN, N.T. 5794

The Secretary Senate Estimates Committee E Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

You have passed to me a series of questions concerning police transport which were raised with you by Senator Kilgariff after the hearing had concluded on 28 April 1977.

The questions are dealt with seriatim hereunder:

1. Terms and conditions of hire are prescribed and appear in Attachment A.

2. Depreciation procedures are prescribed and appear in Attachment B.

3. Transport vehicles due for replacement are:

Nhulunbuy . . . 4 Toyota utilities 4 x 4

Groote Eylandt . . 2 Toyota utilities 4 x 4

Alice Springs . . . 3 pursuit sedans

Arrangements are in hand for replacements to be forwarded by barge to Nhulunbuy and Groote Eylandt during July. The Alice Springs vehicles will be changed when replacement stock purchases scheduled for 1977-78 are received.

4. The police launch Norlaw was built in conformity with specifications stipulated by N.T. Police. It has been in commission since 5 August 1975. In fact it participated in a sea rescue which was reported on 4 May 1977. Expenditure on maintenance since it was commissioned totals $7850.

N. LYNAGH A/First Assistant Secretary (Management, Legislation and Planning)

269

HIRE RATES

ATTACHMENT A

Permanent Temporary

Vehicle hire hire

class Type o f vehicle (per week) (per day)

A101 Medium sedans, station wagon, Valiant, Datsun, Holden, $ $

Ford . ........................................................................................ 50.00 20.00

A102 Light sedans and station w a g o n ............................................ 40.00 16.00

A103 VIP sedan—Dodge . . ....................................................... 60.00 24.00

A104 Prestige sedans—Austin Princess and Pontiac . . . 60.00 24.00

A105 Medium sedans—police p u r s u i t ............................................ 105.00

B101 Utility, panel van and prison v a n s ............................................ 40.00 16.00

B102 Utility, panel van—P o l i c e ....................................................... 45.00 18.00

B103 Panel vans—Police . . . . . . . 75.00 30.00

C101 Fire tender—International . . . . . . 60.00

C101 A Fire tender—International (Module) . . . . 70.00

C102 Fire tender—International and Dennis . . . . 60.00

C102 Fire engine, dual purpose—Dennis . . . . 130.00

C103 M ini bus—Holden, Ford, Toyota, Conimer . . . 55.00 22.00

C106 Motor cycle—P o l i c e .................................................................. 45.00

C l 09 Bus 17 pax—Toyota C oas te r ....................................................... 40.00 16.00

C110 Turntable ladder . . . . . . . . 300.00

D101 Trucks and station wagon 4 x 4 Landrover, Toyota . . 65.00 26.00

D102 Station wagon 4 x 4 Rangerover . . . . . 75.00 30.00

D103 Utility 4 x 4— S u z u k i .................................................................. 35.00 14.00

E101 Truck flat bed lj-2 j- tonne 4 x 2 ............................................ 30.00 12.00

E102 Truck flat bed 4 and 5 tonne 4 x 2 ............................................ 60.00 24.00

E103 Truck flat bed 5 tonne 4 x 4 ....................................................... 90.00 36.00

E104 Truck flat bed 7 tonne 4 x 2 ....................................................... 60.00 24.00

E105 Truck dump 7 tonne 4 x 2 ....................................................... 60.00 24.00

E106 Truck dump 7 tonne 4 x 4 ....................................................... 90.00 36.00

E108 Truck tractor—L e y l a n d .......................................................

E110 Truck dump 7 tonne 4 x 2—Diesel . . . . 60.00 24.00

E l 11 Truck flat bed 5 tonne 4 x 4— Diesel . . . . 90.00 36.00

E112 Truck flat bed 7 tonne 4 x 2—Ford Diesel . . . 60.00 24.00

E l 13 Truck dump 7 tonne 4 x 4— Bedford Diesel . . . 90.00 36.00

E l 14 Truck—Leyland Mammoth Major . . . . . 90.00 36.00

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ATTACHMENT B

Replacement policy for the general purpose fleet is as follows subject to normal budgeting considerations:

(a) Sedans and station sedans (Holden, Ford, Morris, Toyota) 5 years or 50 000 miles, 80 000 km (b) Two-wheel drive trucks, 4 years or 40 000 miles, 64 000 km (c) All utilities, 5 years or 50 000 miles, 80 000 km (< d) Austin, Bedford and A.E.C. buses 10 years or 200 000 miles, 320 000 km

(e) M otor cycles 2 years or 30 000 miles, 48 000 km (/) Hum ber and Pontiacs 7 years or 50 000 miles, 80 000 km (g) Fire engines and fire tenders— 15 years (/;) Austin Princess 10 years or 60 000 miles, 96 000 km

(i) Four-wheel drive trucks (includes Toyota and Willys Futility and station wagons) 3 years or 30 000 miles, 48 000 km.

Special purpose vehicles such as ambulances, tanker, explosive vans etc. are con­ sidered separately.

Vehicles will be replaced either on completion of kilometres or number of years, whichever occurs first.

POLICE VEHICLES

All police vehicles are to be replaced at 1 year or 30 000 miles (48000 km), whichever occurs first. This variation from the general policy was introduced on 16 May 1976. Time lags created by the change should be eliminated when 1977-78 replacement purchases are received.

271

η

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

REPORT TO THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

REPORT TO THE SENATE

Estimates Committee F has the honour to report to the Senate:

1. On 21 April 1977, the Senate referred to the Committee the Departmental Ad­ ditional Estimates for the year 1976-77 relating to the following Departments:

Veterans’ Affairs Employment and Industrial Relations Attorney-General’s Business and Consumer Affairs

Productivity.

2. The Committee has considered these Additional Estimates, together with the Departm ental Explanatory Notes, and has received evidence in relation to them from the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, and officers of the Departments concerned. Copies of the Minutes of Proceedings and

Hansard reports of the evidence taken by the Committee are tabled for the infor­ mation of the Senate in connection with the Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77 and the Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 1976-77.

3. Subsequent to the Committee’s examination of the estimates referred, further information was forwarded to the Committee in reply to specific questions raised during the proceedings. Copies of these replies are attached as an Appendix to the Report.

4. The Committee wishes to draw attention to the following:

During the Committee’s examination of the Additional Estimates for the Attorney-General’s Department, members had cause to seek additional information from the Minister and departmental officers relating to several items of proposed expenditure by the Department, namely:

(a) Division 166—Office of Parliamentary Counsel, sub-division 2— Administrative Expenses—Item 03—Consultants—Fees $11 000; (b) Division 170—High Court, sub-division 1—Salaries and Payments in the nature of Salary—Item 03—Justice—Payments in lieu of long

leave and unremunerated periods of service as Acting Chief Justice $50 000; and (c) Division 172—Courts Administration, sub-division 1—Salaries and Payments in the nature of Salary—Item 03—Chief Judge—Payment in

lieu of long leave $40 500.

W ith regard to the first item on which the Committee sought additional infor­ mation, members were informed that the former First Parliamentary Counsel after retiring before the age of 65 years had been re-engaged under a written agreement for a period of three years from 8 February 1977 as a consultant to

assist in the drafting of the legislative program at a daily remuneration of $134.96 for each day worked based on a Level 4, Second Division salary in the Common­ wealth Public Service, plus a loading of 15 per cent in lieu of recreation leave, sick leave and public holidays. Approval for the re-engagement of the former

First Parliamentary Counsel as a consultant had been obtained from the Public Service Board and the Treasurer.

275

As a general principle, the Committee considers that a public servant who has retired of his own volition before reaching the compulsory retiring age o f 65 years and thereby became entitled to superannuation should not be engaged as a consultant at a fee which taken together with the superannuation entitlement provides a higher net income for similar work to that which would have been carried out had the public servant remained in the Public Service until reaching the normal retiring age of 65 years. Members of the Committee fear that such a practice could, if not controlled, become the subject o f widespread abuse and be used as a device to obtain an income advantage and also to overcome the restriction imposed on departmental staff ceilings by the Government. The Committee does not suggest that the present case falls into either of those categories but merely demonstrates the possibilities of abuse.

Should the necessity arise for such a consultant to be engaged by a departm ent the Committee firmly believes that any agreement entered into ought not provide a loading for recreational leave, sick leave and public holidays. The consultant should only be remunerated for the task for which he was engaged.

The second and third items which attracted the Committee’s attention related to payments from the Treasurer’s Advance Account to a former Justice of the High C ourt of Australia to be made in lieu of long leave of $47 500 and unremunerated periods o f service as Acting Chief Justice of $2500, and for a payment o f $40 500 in lieu of long leave to a former Chief Judge o f the Industrial Court.

When hearing evidence from the departmental officers in respect of these two items the Committee was disturbed to learn that no statutory authority existed to make the payments, except for their subsequent inclusion in Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 1976-77. The Committee was informed that a Cabinet decision made in

1967 did provide for such payments to be made to Judges of Federal Courts, but did not include the Justices o f the High Court.

Whilst the Committee does not quarrel with the principle that Justices of the High Court and Judges of the other Federal Courts should be remunerated for long leave, it considers that the arrangements not founded on statutory authority which have prevailed in previous years and enabled payments to be made from public funds should forthwith be terminated and that the Government introduce appropriate legislation into the Parliament to remedy the situation. Such a course would enable the Parliament to exercise its historical and proper function o f openly scrutinising all actions of the Executive. In no circumstances should such payments to Justices of the High Court and Judges of the various Federal Courts be seen to be dependent upon a favourable government decision, but rather upon statutory authority. The Committee believes this to be of fundamental importance in maintaining the independence of the judiciary.

5. The early provision of Explanatory Notes from Departments is considered by the Committee to be essential to assist members to conduct a proper and detailed examination of Estimates. It thus views with concern the fact that the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations and the Industries Assistance Commission did not make copies of their Explanatory Notes available until immediately prior to the first meeting of the Committee.

The Committee nevertheless commends the high standard of the Explanatory Notes of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations and recom­ mends that in future the style and content of these Notes be used as a model by other Departments.

276

Further the Committee recommends to the Senate that the Chairmen of Senate Estimates Committees should meet to discuss with the appropriate departmental officers the standardisation so far as possible of the presentation and format of the Explanatory notes with particular reference to enabling aggregation and comparison.

6. In conclusion, the Committee expresses its appreciation of the assistance given by the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and the officers of the various Departments who attended with him before the Committee.

5 May 1977

P. E. RAE Chairman

277

• ·â– 

:

Estimates Committee F

Minutes of Proceedings

·â–  :

'

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 1 THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 1. PRIVATE M EETIN G: The Committee met at 11.50 a.m.

2. M EM BERSHIP O F AND REFERENCE TO ESTIMATES COMMITTEES: The Resolutions of the Senate of 20 April and 21 April 1977 relating to the membership of Estimates Committee F and the referral o f the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure 1976-77 to the Estimates Committees for examination and report were reported to the Committee.

3. ELECTION O F CHAIRM AN: On the motion of Senator Jessop, Senator Rae was elected Chairman.

Senator Rae thereupon took the Chair

4. O R D ER OF CONSIDERATION O F PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED A D D ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77:

Resolved: That the Departmental Estimates be considered in the following order: Department of Veterans’ Affairs Department o f Employment and Industrial Relations Attorney-General’s Department Department of Business and Consumer Affairs Department o f Productivity.

5. PUBLIC M EETING—STATEMENT BY CHAIRM AN: The Chairman made a statement relating to the procedure to be followed by the Committee in its examin­ ation o f the Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the year ending on 30 June 1977 and that, pursuant to the Order of the Senate of 21 April 1977, the Committee would consider the following Estimates:

Division

Document* Page No. D epartment Amount

A 47 130-527 V eterans' Affairs . . . . . . 18 904 000

B 11 921 V eterans’ A f f a i r s ............................................ . 2 500

A 23-24 290-297 E m ploym ent a n d In dustrial R elations . . 8 574 000

B 5-6 839-841 E m ploym ent and Industrial R elations . . 2 325 000

A 12-13 165-175 A ttorney-G eneral’s . . . . . 2 233 000

A 14 193-202 Business and C onsum er Affairs . . . 1 594 000

A 40 198-522 Productivity . . . . . . 15 505 000

B 10 871, 918 P r o d u c t i v i t y ............................................ . 2 967 000

•Document A—‘Particulars of Proposed Additional Expenditure for the Service of the year ending on 30 June 1977’. •Document B—‘Particulars of Certain Proposed Expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 1977’.

281

6. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Veterans' Affairs:

Management Services Division— M r G. T. Miller, First Assistant Commissioner M r G. A. Woodward, Director (Finance) M r K. H. Ryan, Assistant Director (Budgets and Accounts)

Medical Division— D r Μ. M. Kehoe, Acting Deputy Chief Director (Medical Services)

Treatment Services Division— M r B. O ’Shannassy, Acting Assistant Commissioner

Benefits and Legislation Division— M r G. Felton, Assistant Commissioner

Defence Service Homes Corporation— M r A. Selleck, General Manager M r C. Stenhouse, M anager (Finance)

Department o f Finance:

M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs (Senator Durack) made a statement to th e Committee relating to the Additional Estimates for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 130, 525-527—Department of Veterans’ Affairs (Document A) Division 921—Department of Veterans’ Affairs (Document B)

The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration of:

Division 130—Administrative Division 525—Administrative Division 526—Repatriation Hospitals and other Institutions The Committee proceeding to consider Division 527—Other Repatriation Benefits. Suspension o f Sitting: The sitting of the Committee was suspended from 1.10 p.m. till 2.15 p.m.

Resumption o f Sitting: The sitting of the Committee was resumed at 2.15 p.m. Senator Jessop pursuant to paragraph (7) of Standing Order 36ab took the Chair as Deputy Chairman and informed the Committee that the Chairman would be absent for a short period of time.

The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration of:

Division 527—Other Repatriation Benefits Division 921—Capital Works and Services The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

282

7. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED A D D ITION AL EX PENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF EM PLOYM ENT AND IND USTRIAL RELATIONS

Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Employment and Industrial Relations: M r B. H. Tregillis, Deputy Secretary M r C. K. Wood, First Assistant Secretary, Management and Secretariat Division M r J. E. Cooley, Assistant Secretary, Finance and Information Branch M r K. J. Fitzgerald, Assistant Secretary, Establishment and Systems Branch M r R. Rust, Principal Executive Officer, Training Operations Branch M r B. Hook, General Manager, Commonwealth Hostels Limited

Department o f Finance Mr C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

The Deputy Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 290-297—Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (Document A)

Divisions 839-841—Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (Document B) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations.

8. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE— ATTORNEY-GENERAL’S DEPARTM ENT Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

A ttorney-GeneraVs Department: M r J. Monro, Second Parliamentary Counsel M r L. Curtis, First Assistant Secretary, Federal Courts Division M r J. P. Harkins, Director, Australian Legal Aid Office M r K. M. Crotty, First Assistant Secretary, Management and Special

Services Division M r L. G. Glare, Assistant Secretary, Operations Branch M r J. L. M. Carnsew, Assistant Secretary, Special Services Branch M r J. Mikelsons, Director, Finance M r R. J. Venables, Finance Officer

Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Chairman (Senator Rae) called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 165-175—Attorney-General’s Department (Document A) The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration of: Division 165—Administrative Division 166, sub-division 1—Office of Parliamentary Counsel

Division 166—sub-division 2—Administrative Expenses, Item 03—Consultants— Fees, being considered.

283

Resolved: That the Committee postpone further consideration of Division 166, Office of Parliamentary Counsel, sub-division 2—Administrative Expenses, Item 03—Consultants—Fees.

The Committee proceeded to consider Division 170—High Court—sub-division 1—Salaries and Payments in the nature of Salary.

A D JO URNM ENT: The Committee adjourned at 5 p.m. till a day and hour to be fixed.

ATTENDANCE: The following members of the Committee were present: Senator Rae (Chairman), and Senators Bishop, Jessop, J. R. McClelland, Tehan and Wheeldon.

Senators Cameron, Mulvihill and Wright also took part in the Committee’s proceedings.

P. E. RAE

Chairman

284

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS No. 2 TUESDAY, 4 MAY 1977 1. M EETIN G : The Committee met at 4 p.m.

2. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITION AL EXPENDITURE 1976-77— ATTORNEY-GENERAL’S DEPARTM ENT Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Attorney-General’s Department: M r J. M onro, Second Parliamentary Counsel M r L. Curtis, First Assistant Secretary, Federal Courts Division M r J. P. Harkins, Director, Australian Legal Aid Office

Mr. K. M. Crotty, First Assistant Secretary, Management and Special Services Division M r L. G. Glare, Assistant Secretary, Operations Branch M r J. L. M. Carnsew, Assistant Secretary, Special Services Branch

M r J. Mikelsons, Director, Finance M r R. J. Venables, Finance Officer Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division

M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs made a statement relating to additional information sought by Committee members on the Estimates for the Attorney- General’s Department. Leave was granted for the incorporation in the Hansard

transcript of the replies to additional information sought.

The Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 166, sub-division 2, 170, 172, 173 and 175—Attorney-General’s Departm ent (Document A) Resolved: That the Committee postpone consideration of Division 166, sub­ division 2, Division 170 and Division 172, sub-division 1, till after the consideration

of Division 172, sub-division 2, Division 173 and Division 175.

The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration o f:

Division 172—sub-division 2—Court Administration—Administrative Expenses Division 173—Family Law Division 175—Australian Legal Aid Office Resolved: That the Committee consider Division 170 and Division 172—sub­

division 1 together and before Division 166, sub-division 2.

The Committee thereupon considered and concluded its consideration o f: Division 170—High Court Division 172—sub-division 1—Courts Administration—Salaries and Payments in the nature of Salary Division 166— sub-division 2—Office of Parliamentary Counsel—Administrative

Expenses.

24156/79—10

285

The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Attorney-General’s Department, subject to the provision o f suitable replies to additional information sought by members.

3. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED A D D ITIO N A L EXPENDITURE 1976-77— DEPARTM ENT OF BUSINESS AN D CONSUM ER AFFAIRS Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Business and Consumer Affairs: M r J. T. O’Connor, First Assistant Secretary, Management Services M r A. G. Koukoulas, Industries Assistance Commission M r J. V. McKeown, Trade Practices Commission D r D. T. Charles, First Assistant Secretary, Protection Policy M r F. I. Kelly, Assistant Secretary, Management Services

Department o f Finance: M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting Operations Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Deputy Chairman (Senator Jessop) took the Chair and called on the following Divisions for consideration:

Divisions 193, 195, 199, 201, 202— Department of Business and Consumer Affairs (Document A) The Committee concluded its consideration o f the proposed expenditure for the Department o f Business and Consumer Affairs.

4. PARTICULARS OF PROPOSED ADD ITIONAL E X P E N D IT U R E - DEPARTM ENT OF PRODUCTIVITY:

Appearing: Senator the Hon. P. D. Durack, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, accompanied by the following officers:

Department o f Productivity: M r D. J. O ’Connor, Controller General (Management) M r K. D. Johnson, Acting Controller (Aircraft Guided Weapons and Electronics Supply Division) M r H. J. Ryan, First Assistant Secretary (Finance and Management Services) M r J. Clark, Assistant Secretary (Industry Efficiency) M r K. McKnown, Assistant Secretary (Finance) Department o f Finance:

M r C. J. Dolman, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division M r R. J. McAtee, Senior Finance Officer, Accounting and Supply Division The Deputy Chairman called on the following Divisions for consideration: Divisions 198, 380, 384, 387 and 522—Department of Productivity (Docu­

ment A) Divisions 871 and 918—Department of Productivity (Document A) The Committee concluded its consideration of the proposed expenditure for the Department of Productivity.

5. D R A FT R E PO R T : The Committee discussed the form of a draft report to the Senate, and agreed that a draft be considered at the next meeting.

6. NEXT M EETING: It was agreed that the Committee meet at 6 p.m. on Wed­ nesday, 4 April 1977.

7. A D JO U R N M EN T: The Committee adjourned at 9.47 p.m.

286

8. A TTEN D A N C E: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman), and Senators Bishop, Jessop, J. R, McClelland, Tehan and Wheeldon.

Senators Devitt and Wright also took part in the Committee’s proceedings,

P, E. RAE Chairman

287

THE SENATE

ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS . No. 3

WEDNESDAY, 4 MAY 1977

1. DELIBERATIVE M EETIN G : The Committee met at 6.03 p.m.

2. M INUTES: The Minutes o f the meetings held on 28 April and 3 May 1977 were read and confirmed.

3. DRAFT REPORT O F TH E COM M ITTEE: The Chairman presented a draft report for the Committee’s consideration. The draft report was agreed to with an amendment.

4. A D JO U R N M E N T : The Committee adjourned at 6.15 p.m.

5. A TTEN DANCE: The following members of the Committee were present:

Senator Rae (Chairman) and Senators Bishop, Jessop, J. R. McClelland, Tehan and Wheeldon.

P. E. RAE Chairman

288

Estimates Committee F

Appendix

ADDITIONAL ESTIMATES

Schedule of matters raised by Senate Estimates Committee F on Thursday, 28 April 1977

DEPARTM ENT O F VETERANS’ A FFAIRS

Page number By whom M atter raised

171 S enator W heeldon . . A re there any w ar graves in T im o r?

171 S enator Jessop . . W hat is the basis o f the advice given by W ar G raves C om ­

m ission w ith respect to the increase o f $45 000 in the

A ustralian co ntribution?

174 Senator Jessop . . C ould we have a n item ised breakdow n o f the fees payable

to m edical specialists and allied professionals, w ho are the allied professionals a n d w hat is the breakdow n o f fees a n d a sim ilar breakdow n in relation to travelling

allow ances?

175 Senator B ishop . . W h at is the current position in the R G H s com pared w ith the

last tw o years concerning ex-service patients, the use o f spare capacity for civilians, a n d also the use o f hospitals by Service personnel? A re we putting m ore civilians into R epatriation H ospitals as a general rule?

175 S enator M ulvihill . , C ould statistics be m ade available show ing cases treated

d u rin g the last six m onths a t the Em ergency Accident C entre— C oncord?

291

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

SENATE H A N S A R D —THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977

PAGE 171

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS— MATTER RAISED BY SENATOR WHEELDON Are there any war graves in East Timor ?

There are 226 commemorations for Australian soldiers killed in Timor. These are located as follows:

Ambon W ar Cemetery— Identified .

Unidentified .

74 11

Ambon Memorial to the Missing . Adelaide River W ar Cemetery, N.T. . Adelaide River Memorial to the Missing

85 2

138

226

292

SENATE H A N S A R D —THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 PAGE 171 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS— MATTER RAISED BY SENATOR JESSOP W hat is the basis o f the advice given by the Commonwealth W ar Graves Commission with respect to the increased contribution of $45 000 ?

Initially, it is necessary to correct the figures verbally advised to the Senate. The figures were inadvertently reversed and should read: ‘the effect of devaluation is about $45 000 and the increased contribution to the Commonwealth W ar Graves Commission is approximately $110 000’.

The explanation now concerns an increase of $110 000.

Schedules are attached showing:

(a) A statement prepared by the Commission showing in sterling how the increased contribution was calculated. It will be noted that the Australian contribution is 5.91 per cent of total cost determined on the basis of the number of graves cared for. ifi) The W ar Graves Commission’s original and revised budgets for 1976-77

and the budget for 1977-78 in elements of cost and geographical distribution. The financial year covers 1 April to 31 March,

Senator McClelland also expressed interest in the effect o f devaluation on our proposed expenditures. Further to the verbal advice already provided, there remained two quarterly payments to be made against W ar Graves Commission Budget subsequent to the decision to devalue the Australian currency late November 1976.

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

COM M ONW EALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION—AUSTRALIA

Statement of Provision of Funds for the financial years 1976-77 and 1977-78:

Financial Year 1976-77 £ £ £

1976-77 revised estimate of expenditure , 6 678 350

Less— Estimated income from Endowment Fund 245 000 Transfer from Special Property Account 110 000 ------------ 355 000

5.91 per cent of . . . . . 6 323 350 = 373 710

Funds available— Balance at 1 April 1976 . . . Nil

Contributions made or being made . 307 601

--------------- 307 601

Supplementary contribution required fo r 1976-77 ..................................................... 66 109

293

£ £ £

Financial Year 1977-78 1977-78 estimate of expenditure . · 7 089 675

Estimated income from Endowment Fund Transfer from Special Property Account 245 000 12 262

nsy 26'’

5.91 per cent of . . · · ·

6 832 413 = 403 796

Contribution required fo r 1977-78 . ■ 403 796

COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION

ESTIMATE 1977-78

SUMMARY

Approved estimate 1976-77

Revised estimate 1976-77 Estimate 1977-78 ______________________

Horti-

Adminis- cultural Structural

ifeerf office, area or agency t

Staff itill

services) 2

Travelling expenses {all services)

3

trative expenses {all services)

4

main­ tenance {direct services)

5

main­ tenance {direct services)

6

Total 7

H ead office . ·

£

732 375 751 175 843 530

£

28 825 37 905 45 940

£

118 745 138 535 140 355

£ £ £

879 945 927 615 1 029 825

U nited K ingdom area . 213 055

238 725 244 455

65 080 76 245 76 550

8 625 15 705 9 965

54 485 65 175 69 710

56 230 28 495 65 000

397 475 424 345 465 680

France area . · 1 837 365

2 406 480 2 534 270

147 730 173 465 200 415

36 780 45 175 38 860

40 590 47 555 61 420

52 820 58 345 40 330

2 1 1 5 285 2 731 020 2 875 295

N orth-W est E urope area

980 455 1 292 185 1 396 965

30 435 39 680 40 170

8 780 11 490 11025

25 310 28 280 31 995

3 215 3 965 6 520

1 048 195 1 375 600 1 486 675

W estern M editerranean area

320 905 365 245 361 515

25 620 29 555 27 750

6 335 7 240 6 510

17 390 20 540 19 485

21 435 25 060 20 500

391 685 447 640 435 760

Eastern M editerranean area

154 350 234 300 226 915

16 895 24 185 25 095

4 745 6 485 5 375

14 605 18 060 20 450

11 330 17 385 7 790

201 925 300 415 285 625

N o rth A frica area . 90 170

94 955 96 880

13 425 17 290 14 460

2 300 3 390 1 945

7 535 11 315 11475

36 250 41 625 37 795

149 680 168 575 162 555

294

H e a d office, area or agency 1

S t a ff {all

services) 2

Travelling expenses {all services)

3

Adminis­ trative expenses {all

services) 4

H orti­ cultural main­ tenance

{direct services) 5

Structural main­ tenance {direct services)

6

Total 7

£ £ £ £ £ £

Canadian agency . . 23 485 1 500 280 895 2 495 28 655

30 325 2 385 2 485 2 300 565 38 060

35 750 8 730 1 170 2 305 5 685 53 640

South African agency . 5 945 2 120 510 140 2 820 11 535

7 720 4 110 665 230 2 460 15 185

8 400 4 110 670 230 3 460 16 870

Other countries . , 193 255 21 290 4 800 15 625 19 735 254 705

223 395 21 850 3 300 18 205 21 120 287 870

231 500 26 995 3 845 21 320 19 835 303 495

Gross estimates . . 4 551 360 352 920 191 900 176 575 206 330 5 479 085

5 644 505 426 670 234 470 211 660 199 020 6 716 325

5 980 180 470 215 219 720 238 390 206 915 7 115 420

Estimates receipts . 5 970 10 140 1 830 140 18 080

1 980 15 615 13 450 1 790 5 140 37 975

15 870 5 030 4 595 250 25 745

Net approved estimate 1976-77 . . . 4 551 360 346 950 181 760 174 745 206 190 5 461 005

Net revised estimate 1976-77 . . . 5 642 525 411 055 221 020 209 870 193 880 6 678 350

Net estimate 1977-78 . 5 980 180 454 345 214 690 233 795 206 665 7 089 675

Estim ated value of services to be undertaken in 1977-78 on an agency basis on behalf o f participating and other governments and other authorities .. .. · ■ ■ · ■ ■ £420 000

295

SENATE H A N S A R D —THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 PAGE 174 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS— MATTER RAISED BY SENATOR JESSOP

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE

In respect of the additional amounts requested:

Could we have an itemised breakdown of the fees payable to medical specialists and allied professionals, who are the allied professionals and what is the breakdown of fees and a similar breakdown in relation to travelling allowances ?

The Allied Health Professionals include: Dental officers Physiotherapists Paediatrists Speech pathologists Clinical psychologists No amounts have been requested for this group as approval had been given for a fee increase on 10 February 1976 with effect from 1 January 1976. Provision for this increase was made in the original appropriations for 1976-77.

Approval was given on 24 November 1976 for fee increases in respect of Medical Specialists with retrospective adjustment to early in 1976.

The attached schedules show:

(a) fee increases for medical specialists (b) rates of their travel time payment (c) fees payable to allied health professionals (d) rates for their travel time payment

TREASURER’S APPROVAL APPENDIX A 10 February 1976

FEES FOR ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Rate per hour from 1.1 .7 6

$

Principal Dental Officer Senior Dental Officer . Dental Specialist . General Dental Practitioner Physiotherapist—

31.00 26.00 26.00 16.40

Senior . Junior .

8.30 6 .30

Paediatrist— Senior . Junior .

8.30 6 .3 0

Speech Pathologist— Senior . Junior .

8.30 6.30 11.80 14.80

Psychologist Clinical Psychologist

296

TRAVEL RATES PAYABLE TO ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Rate per kilometre fr o m 1.7 .7 6

$

Principal Dental O f f i c e r ..................................... 0.48

Senior Dental Officer . . . . . . 0.41

Dental Specialist . . . . . . 0.41

General Dental Practitioner . . . . 0.26

Physiotherapist— S e n io r ................................................................ 0.13

Junior . . . . . . . . 0.10

Paediatrist— S e n io r ................................................................ 0.13

J u n i o r ................................................................ 0.10

Speech Pathologist— S e n io r ................................................................ 0.13

J u n i o r ................................................................ 0.10

Clinical Psychologist . . . . . . 0.23

VARIATION IN FEES PAYABLE TO MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

Old Fees (1.1.75) New fees Dates o f effect

$ $

Senior Specialist . . . . . 24.35 Γ26.00 21.1.76

95%-< 27.50 19.2.76 NW

28.00 27.5.76 NW

128.50 19.8.76 NW

Specialist.................................... . . 20,80 (*22.50 22.1.76

24.00 19.2.76

24.00 27.5.76

5%« 24.50 19.8.76

Other Medical Practitioner . . . . 17.40 19.60 22.1.76

21.00 19.2.76

21.00 27.5.76

[_21.50 19.8.76

TRAVEL RATES? PAYABLE TO MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

Old rate New rate

per kilometre per kilometre Date o f effect

$ $

Senior Specialist . , . . . 0.38 0.406 22.1.76

0.43 19.2.76

0.437 27.5.76

0.445 19.8.76

Specialist.................................... . . 0.325 0.352 22.1.76

0.375 19.2.76

0.375 27.5.76

0.383 19.8.76

Other Medical Practitioner . , . . 0.272 0.306 22.1.76

0.328 19.2.76

0.328 27.5.76

0.336 19.8.76

297

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

SENATE H A N S A R D —THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 PAGE 175 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS— MATTER RAISED BY SENATOR BISHOP On the general question of use o f hospitals, how does the current position compare with, say, last year and the year before in respect of ex-service patients, the use of spare capacity for civilians, and also the use of hospitals by Service personnel them­ selves ? Is there any trend apparent and would the Minister be good enough to supply the figures later, if he does not have them now ? Are we putting more civilians into the Repatriation Hospitals as a general rule ?

Attached is a schedule which shows the admissions of entitled veterans, service personnel and community patients for the years 1974-75, 1975-76 and for 1976-77 up to 10 February 1977. In relation to community patients the schedule shows the gradual increase in the admission of community patients and the variations which have occurred from State to State.

The figures for the admissions of servicemen indicate a fairly steady use of Repat­ riation General Hospital’s facilities.

ADMISSION OF REPATRIATION, DEFENCE AND NON-REPATRIATION PATIENTS TO DEPARTMENTAL INSTITUTIONS 1974-75 to 1976-77

Service

Community personnel as as

Veterans Community (incl. staff) Service

personnel

Total

admissions percentage o f total percentage

o f total

Concord— 1974-75 . . . 15 429 1 295 436 17 160 8 3

1975-76 . . . 14 403 2 021 412 16 836 12 2

1976-77 (32 weeks to 8 767 1 971 190 10 928 18 2

10.2.77)

Heidelberg— 1974-75 . . . 9 108 455 584 10 147 4 6

1975-76 . . . 6 862 514 492 7 868 7 6

1976-77 (32 weeks to 4 076 362 267 4 705 8 6

10.2.77)

Greenslopes— 1974-75 . . . 8 863 920 142 9 925 9 1

1975-76 . . . 8 035 1221 104 9 360 13 1

1976-77 (32 weeks to 4 936 941 24 5 901 16 0.4

10.2.77)

Daw Park— 1974-75 . . . 5 141 347 327 5815 6 6

1975-76 . . . 4 715 513 285 5 513 9 5

1976-77 (32 weeks to 2 865 290 153 3 308 9 5

10.2.77)

Hollywood— 1974-75 . . . 5 585 1 136 477 7 198 16 7

1975-76 . . . 5 292 1 023 425 6 740 15 6

1976-77 (32 weeks to 3 224 957 270 4 451 22 6

10.2.77)

298

Service

Community personnel as as

Community Service Total percentage percentage

Veterans (incl. staff) personnel admissions o f total o f total

H o b a rt— 1974-75 . . . 1 518 57 46 1 621 4

1975-76 . . . 1 411 66 35 1 512 4

1976-77 (32 weeks to 10.2.77) All R G H s—

841 46 15 902 5

1974-75 . . . 45 644 4 210 2 012 51 865 8

1975-76 . . . 40 718 5 358 1 753 47 829 11

1976-77 (32 weeks to 10.2.77) 24 700 4 567 919 30 195 15

299

SENATE ESTIMATES COMMITTEE F

SENATE H A N S A R D —THURSDAY, 28 APRIL 1977 PAGE 175 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS— MATTER RAISED BY SENATOR MULVIHILL

EM ERGENCY A C C ID EN T CENTRE—RGH CONCORD Could we have statistics showing the cases treated in the last six months?

Attached is a schedule which shows the weekly attendances at the Emergency Accident Centre at RGH Concord for a period from the week ending 30 October 1976 to the week ending 23 April 1977. For information we have included those attendances where the patients arrived by ambulance and also those attendances where patients are actually adm itted as in-patients of the hospital.

RGH CONCORD EMERGENCY ACCIDENT CENTRE WEEKLY STATISTICS

W eek ending

W eekly

attendances

A ttendan ces arriving by am bulance

A dm issions arising fro m attendances

Saturday— 30.10.76 . . . 339 89 111

6.11.76 . . . 328 72 89

13.11.76 . . . 338 90 110

20.11.76 . . . 356 79 102

27.11.76 . . . 334 79 112

4.12.76 . . . 330 71 105

11.12.76 . . . 315 83 119

18.12.76 . . . 341 94 128

25.12.76 . . . 340 82 97

1.1.77 . . . 408 93 111

8.1.77 . . . 443 65 90

15.1.77 . . . 351 91 108

22.1.77 . . . 275 69 82

29.1.77 . . . 348 81 105

5.2.77 . . . 382 87 107

12.2.77 . . . ' i l l 96 124

19.2.77 . . . 379 97 116

26.2.77 . . . 362 79 94

5.3.77 . . . 358 75 108

12.3.77 . . . 400 63 134

19.3.77 . . . 383 99 120

26.3.77 . . . i l l 80 113

2.4.77 . . . 401 91 126

9.4.77 . . . 369 86 117

16.4.77 . . . 386 92 128

23.4.77 . . . 410 117 139

T otals . . . 9 425 2 200 2 895

300

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

239 Bourke Street, Melbourne, Vic, 3000 20 M ay 1977

Senator P. Rae Chairman Estimates Committee F Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator, The enclosed information is submitted to your Committee in answer to questions raised during the Committee’s examination of this Department’s Estimates on 28.4.77.

Yours sincerely, C. K. WOOD For Secretary

301

Division 290/1/01— Salaries and allowances (Hansard, Page 186) Senator Bishop asked whether the Community Youth Support Scheme was enjoying widespread support.

Attached is a table which lists the organisations, monetary amounts etc. associated with the first 116 projects approved and which illustrates the recourse that has been had to the Scheme throughout Australia in both city and country areas.

C O M M U N IT Y Y O U T H S U P P O R T S C H E M E

APPROVED PRO G RA M S AS AT 30 APRIL 1977

Federal

Organisation Amount Duration electorate

$ weeks

N ew S outh W a l e s -O range City C ouncil . . . . .

C anberra and D istrict Y M C A . . .

B lacktow n Y o u th A dvisory C ouncil . .

P a rram a tta M ethodist M ission . . .

Y W CA S y d n e y ........................................................

C om m unity A id C ouncil M id R ichm ond A rea W arringah C om m unity C om m ittee . .

South W est Sydney E m ergency U nem ploym ent C o m m i t t e e .......................................................

C ook E lectorate Pre-em ploym ent C entre . T um barum ba Shire C ouncil . . . .

St G eorge Y outh C om m ittee. . . .

H u n ter R C S D — D rop-in C entres . . .

H u n ter R C S D —Y outh Leisure Study P rogram Balm ain M ethodist M ission U nem ploym ent C entre . . . . . . .

Sutherland A pex C lub . . . . .

T um ut Shire A rea . . . . .

Y W C A Eastlakes . . . . .

K iam a C ity M unicipal C ouncil . . .

R iverstone Y outh Self H elp C om m ittee . . W agga W agga Com m unity Y o u th S upport . C asino C om m unity Services . . . .

Q ueanbeyan Y M C A ............................................

W arilla Y outh Com m ittee . . . .

C am den M ethodist Y outh C ouncil . .

D isadvantaged Y outh Com m ittee, B urw ood . H olbrook CYSS Com m ittee . . . .

L iverpool Y outh Support C om m ittee . ,

C oom a M onaro CYSS C om m ittee. . .

L ane Cove a n d D istrict CYSS . . .

A lbury W odonga Y W CA . . . .

P a rram a tta C om m unity C ouncil for Social D evelopm ent . . . . . .

Fairfield Com m unity Y outh S u p p o rt C om ­ m ittee ..................................................................

C ouncil for Social D evelopm ent (C entral M ur­ ray Region) D eniliquin . . . .

Jobless A ction G ro u p . . . . .

5 640.03 26 C aiare

19 630.00 52 C anberra

10 353.03 26 Chifiey

27 286.95 52 P a rram a tta

7 791.00 26 Sydney

3 916.00 32 R ichm ond

3 6 3 0 .0 0 12 M ackeliar

22 206.00 52 L ang

22 500.00 52 C ook

14 429.00 52 F a rrer

5 4 1 4 .1 0 52 St G eorge

7 485.00 26 Shoriland

5 075.00 26 S hortland

10 179.36 26 Sydney

11 561.00 52 H ughes

3 3 0 8 .0 0 26 H um e

1 144.00 10 Newcastle

1 769.96 6 M acarthur

916.30 4 M itchell

14 440.51 52 F a rrer

5 105.50 36 R ichm ond

24 630.00 52 E den-M onaro

978.84 4 C unningham

10 610.00 52 M acarthur

6 653.10 26 E vans

396.00 4 F a rrer

50 700.00 52 W erriwa

1 714.52 6 E den-M onaro

24 286.60 52 Bennelong

12 572.66 26 F a rrer

25 278.96 52 P a rram a tta

63 329.56 52 W erriwa,

Blaxland, Prospect, Reid

19 512.10 52 R iverina

2 680.16 8 F raser

302

Organisation Amount Duration

Federal electorate

V ictoria— E chuca and D istrict . . . . .

E ssendon U nem ploym ent C om m ittee . .

B endigo U rban M unicipal Y o u th Sport and R ecreational C om m ittee . . . .

Southern R egional C ouncil for Social D evelop­ m ent (SCO PE) . . . . .

Shepparton Y o u th E m ploym ent A ssistance Office . . . . . . .

Salvation A rm y R ichm ond C om m unity P ro ­ gram ..................................................................

B allarat Prim ary Schools C om m unity W elfare P ro g ram C om m ittee . . . .

Y M C A W e n d o u r e e ............................................

Y M C A B a l l a r a t .......................................................

C ity o f Berwick . . . . . .

Q uest C entre for the U nem ployed . . .

A Y o u th Support P rogram for U nem ployed, St A lbans . . . . . .

B roadm eadow s C om m unity C om m ittee . O uter E astern Regional C ouncil for Social

D evelopm ent (ACCESS) . . . .

Y M C A Sunshine/B raybrook . . .

Shire o f E ltham . . . . . .

P ro g ra m for U nem ployed Self H elp (PU SH ), H eidelberg . . . . . .

G rassm ere C entre Project . . . .

Sw an H ill Steering C om m ittee . . .

N unaw ading N o rth N eighbourhood C entre . A ustralian F ro n tie r . . . . .

K eran g a n d D istrict C om m unity Y outh S upport Com m ittee . . . . . .

City o f M aryborough Com m unity C om m ittee P reston E m ploym ent A ction C om m ittee .

Sunraysia CYSS Com m ittee . . . .

W illiam stow n Y M C A . . . . .

E chuca and D istrict Y M C A . . . .

Peninsula A ction C om m ittee for E m ploym ent ( P A C E ) .......................................................

C ohuna and D istrict C om m unity Support

Schem e . . . . . . .

Y outh Self H elp G ro u p of Swan Hill . .

N o rth C entral Y o u th C om m ittee . . .

W estern Region C om m ittee . . . .

K yabram C om m unity Y o u th Support C om ­ m ittee . . . . . . .

Q ueensland— G ym pie Pre-em ploym ent C entre C om m ittee . B risbane Y M C A ....................................... .

H erb ert E lectorate C om m unity C om m ittee— Townsville P r o j e c t ...........................................

School Leaver U nem ploym ent M obilisation Program (SL U M P) Com m ittee, R o ck ­

h a m p to n . . . . . .

M ount M organ Y outh Council Project . ·

Y eppoon Y outh C ouncil . . . .

E m erald Y outh C ouncil . . . .

Black w ater C om m unity Y outh Com m ittee .

$

11 375.00

weeks

26 M urray

7 847.00 26 M aribyrnong

14 080.00 52 Bendigo

7 921.00 24 H o th am

15 447.00 26 M urray

17 519.00 52 M elbourne

32 583.00 18 B allarat

2 975.00 10 B allarat

5 639.00 16 Ballarat

11 884.00 26 H olt

20 210.00 26 Higgins

13 486.00 52 L alor

32 605.00 52 B urke

1 8213.00 52 Casey

13 866.00 52 L alor

12 862.35 26 D iam ond Valley

10 437.79 26 Batm an

12 707.00 26 H olt

1 373.00 8 Mallee

15 290.00 52 D eakin

5 1 2 7 .0 0 12 M elbourne P orts

7 210.00 26 Mallee

9 942.95 39 W im m era

27 711.00 52 M elbourne

1 735.00 6 Mallee

11 065.00 52 M elbourne Ports

9 346.00 52 M urray

4 427.00 12 Flinders

8 1 0 0 .0 0 26 Mallee

8 069.20 26 Mallee

1 4 6 1 .0 0 6 M elbourne

27 519.59 52 G ellibrand

715.00 4 M urray

9 599.00 12 Fisher

20 429.00 26 Brisbane

20 020.00 26 H erbert

7 487.00 26 Capricornia

1 051.00 6 C apricornia

1 216.00 6 Dawson

1 456.00 6 Kennedy

1 327.00 6 Kennedy

303

Organisation Amount Duration

Federal electorate

Q ueensland— continued

B iloela C om m unity Y outh C om m ittee . .

G ladstone A rea Social D evelopm ent B o ard C om m unity C om m ittee . . . .

C airns L ocal C om m ittee . . . .

Inala C om m unity H ouse . . . .

M ackay-S arina C om m unity C om m ittee . . Redcliffe C om m unity Y o u th S u p p o rt C o m ­ m ittee . . . . . . .

N oosa Pre-em ploym ent C entre . . .

M aryborough Pre-em ploym ent P ro g ra m . Proserpine Com m unity Y o u th S u p p o rt C om ­ m ittee . . . . . . .

Y W C A /Y M C A Project, R o c k h am p to n . .

Com m unity Y outh C om m ittee, P e trie Elec­ torate ...................................................................

C airns Local C om m ittee . . . .

Low er B urdekin C om m unity Y o u th Support S c h e m e ..................................................................

E ast B risbane C om m unity Y o u th S upport

Scheme . . . . . . .

W oodridge A rea Y outh S upport A ssociation .

South A ustralia— Service to Y o u th C ouncil . . . .

F ullarton P ark -U n ley C ouncil . . .

Y W CA A d e l a i d e ............................................

P o rt Adelaide C entral M ission . . .

Service to Y outh C ouncil . . . .

M illicent Y outh Support C om m ittee . .

F ullarton P ark C om m unity H o u se-U nley City C o u n c i l ..................................................................

Salisbury Supportive Services C om m ittee . Elizabeth Y M C A ............................................

W estern A ustralia— Shire o f Baysw ater C om m unity C om m ittee . B unbury C om m unity Y outh S upport C om ­ m ittee ..................................................................

B unbury V oluntary C om m unity G ro u p . .

City o f S t i r l i n g .......................................................

G irraw heen-K oondoola Y outh S u p p o rt C om ­ m ittee . . . . . . .

P erth Y M C A .......................................................

K w inana Shire Council . . . .

M undaring Shire Y outh Support C entre .

Tasm ania— Burnie M usical Society . . . .

F ra nklin-D enison Com m unity Com m ittee— C larence Council Project . . . .

F ra nklin-D enison C om m unity C om m ittee— W alkabout W orkshop . . . . .

N o rth ern C om m unity Y outh Support M anage­ m ent G roup . . . . . .

Scottsdale C om m unity Support Com m ittee .

$ weeks

1 430.00 6 C apricornia

8 618.35 23 C apricornia

1 582.00 4 L eichhardt

13 192.00 26 Oxley

8 554.00 26 D aw son

9 481.00 20 Petrie

7 294.25 10 Fisher

6 535.00 16 W ide Bay

6 938.00 26 D aw son

2 544.00 26 C apricornia

15 832.00 13 Petrie

7 255.17 26 L eichhardt

11 470.00 26 D aw son

12 627.00 18 B risbane

19 4 34.77 26 M cPherson

12 669.00 52 B oothby

1 0 1 7 .0 0 3 B oothby

3 059.00 26 A delaide

14 050.00 52 P o rt Adelaide

18 898.00 52 B oothby

375.00 2 B arker

35 164.00 52 B oothby

31 918.00 52 B onython

27 813.00 52 B onython

4 279.00 26 Perth

1 868.32 13 F orrest

23 453.35 40 F orrest

50 165.35 52 Stirling

13 627.56 52 Stirling, M oore

5 857.60 26 Perth

4 765.00 26 Canning,

Tangney

5 851.37 26 M oore

617.00 3 B raddon

5 400.00 26 F ranklin and

D enison

5 991.00 12 F ranklin and

D enison

1 860.33 8 Bass

8 905.00 52 Bass

Organisation A mount Duration

Federal electorate

T asm ania— continued

$ weeks

F ra n k lin -D en iso n C om m unity C om m ittee— C h ig w e ll................................................................... 8 848.80 52 F ranklin

L aunceston Y M C A ............................................ 11 520.00 52 Bass

B ow m ont C om m unity C entre Project . . 5 715.00 12 F ra n k lin

Y o u n g A dult C l u b ............................................ 3 125.20 26 B raddon

Division 290/0101— Salaries and allowances {Hansard, page 187) Senator Bishop requested figures on the intake of handicapped persons into training schemes.

The number o f handicapped persons approved for assistance under the National Employment and Training System in each quarter from end 1974 to end 1976 is as follows:

Handicapped persons % o f total

O ctober-D ecem ber 1974 . 192 4.1

Ja n u a ry -M a rc h 1975 . 368 5 .4

A p ril-Ju n e 1975 . . 348 4 .8

July-S eptem ber 1975 . 251 5 .0

O ctober-D ecem ber 1975 . 78 4 .3

Ja n u a ry -M arc h 1976 . 115 4 .6

A p ril-Ju n e 1976 . . 64 4 .5

July-Septem ber 1976 . 105 3 .8

O ctober-D ecem ber 1976 . 200 3 .0

1721

Division 290/0/01— Salaries and allowances {Hansard, page 187) Senator Bishop asked whether the placement of handicapped persons by the Common­ wealth Employment Service was still as successful as it has been over the years. The number of such placements by the CES for the year ended 31.12.76, together with corresponding figures for the six preceding years, are as follows:

Adults

Young people 20 years & under Totals

Males Females Males Females M ales Females Persons

N ew S outh W ales . 1 979 395 495 293 2 474 688 3 162

V ictoria . . 2 496 397 572 236 3 068 633 3 701

Q ueensland . . 3 823 340 577 309 4 400 649 5 049

S outh A ustralia . 616 84 191 120 807 204 1 O il

W estern A ustralia 616 73 150 75 766 148 914

T asm ania . . 306 63 78 46 384 109 493

N o rth e rn T erritory 94 3 8 4 102 7 109

b - -

gg A u stralia . 9 930 1 355 2 071 1 083 12 001 2 438 14 439

i n

1975 12 353 1 910 14 263

1974 14 959 3 061 18 020

1973 19 228 3 560 22 788

1972 14 501 2 847 17 348

1971 12 992 2 804 15 798

1970 13 173 2 590 15 763

305

Division 290/2/05—Payments fo r Services, Government Authorities and Agents (Hansard, page 187)

1. Senator Bishop asked for the formula that determines payments to agents of the Commonwealth Employment Service.

2. Agencies of the Commonwealth Employment Service are graded according to a formula which takes into account the various elements of work performed by them on behalf of the Commonwealth Employment Service. Under this formula agents score ‘points’ for the type of work performed. The following specific credit is given to agents for services rendered:

Per registration . . . . . . 15 mins 1 unit

Per referral . . . . . . 15 mins 1 unit

Per placement . . . . . . 15 mins 1 unit

Per vacancy r a i s e d ......................................... 15 mins 1 unit

Per UB claim form (SU2) received . . 10 mins f unit

Per sickness benefit claim (SU3) received . 10 mins § unit

Per income statement (SU19A) received . 3 mins | unit

Per income statement (SU19B) . . . 3 mins i unit

Per inquiry (social security, employment, etc.) 3 mins } unit

3. As one point is equivalent to 15 minutes, agents subsequently build up a points score and a corresponding hourly total of work done during the quarter.

4. Over a 13-week quarter the average number of work units per week performed by an agent relating to specific employment work is calculated as follows :

EMPLOYMENT SCORE = Registrations + referrals + placements + vacancies raised ' ' 13

5. Similarly, over a 13-week period the average number of work units per week done by an agent relating to specific social security work is calculated as follows:

SOCIAL SECURITY SCORE = SU19A + SU19B + inquiries + f (SU2 + 3) 5 13

6. Agents also receive specific credit for work which relates to employment and/or social security work which it is difficult to allocate special credit for. Routine clerical work, statistical compilation, liaison with parent OCES and interviewing itinerant workers who are not actually registered fall into this area.

7. A combination score is therefore allocated to each agent to cover these activities and is calculated by taking 10 per cent of the total of the employment and social security scores.

8. The total score is the sum of the employment, social security and combination scores.

306

9. R EM U N ER A TIO N : The following schedule is then approved and agents are graded accordingly and paid in line with the grading attained.

Quarterly

G r a d e p o in ts r a n g e P a y p o in t R e m u n e r a tio n

R em ote— 0-3 3

$

30

1 . . . . 4-10 10 60

2 . . . . 11-18 18 109

3 . . . . 19-26 26 158

4 . . . . 27-34 34 207

5 . . . . 35-42 42 256

Special grade— 1 . . . 43-50 50 305

2 . . . . 51-58 58 354

3 . . . . 59-66 66 403

4 . . . . 67-74 74 452

5 . . . . 75-82 82 501

6 . . . . S3-90 90 550

7 . . . . 91-93 98 599

10. Agents arc paid at an hourly rate equivalent to the hourly rate received by an Employment Officer (Class 4) at the top of his range. An agent is also paid at the maximum o f his points range.

11. Annual reviews are made of amounts payable to all grades to ensure that the remuneration keeps pace with changes in the cost of living.

12. QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADVANCEM ENT: Ordinary grade agents are prom oted (or demoted) if their quarterly points score is consistently above (or below) the maximum (or minimum) of their existing range for two consecutive quarters.

13. F or a special grade agent promotion is granted if the simple average of the scores which he has received over the previous four quarters is consistently above the maximum of his existing range for two consecutive quarters.

Division 292/1/01—-Salaries and allowances (Hansard, page 191) Senator Mulvihiil asked what action was being taken by the Commonwealth Arbitra­ tion Inspectorate in relation to alleged award breaches by James Richardson Pty Ltd in operating its establishments at Kingsford Smith Airport.

The Minister wrote to Senator Mulvihiil concerning this matter on 5 May 1977. A copy is attached. 5 May 1977 Dear Senator Mulvihiil,

I refer to your telegram of 29 April 1977 and your subsequent discussion with an officer of my Departm ent concerning the action being taken by the Commonwealth Arbitration Inspectorate in relation to alleged award breaches by James Richardson Pty Ltd in operating its establishments at Kingsford Smith Airport.

My advice of 23 February 1977 indicated that the company had been requested to provide information about amounts due to individual employees and ex-employees in terms of the Inspectorate’s construction of the award provisions. The company however wrote to the Inspectorate on 4 March 1977 declining to do so on the grounds

that this information had already been supplied by an independent accountant who had advised that staff at the Airport had in effect been over-paid. I understand that this advice was conveyed to you by the company in November 1976.

307

Accordingly, Inspectors are now working in the company’s head office in Mel­ bourne assembling employment records, establishing occupational classifications and determining periods of employment. The company has been requested to provide all outstanding records by 10 M ay 1977.

In addition calculations are being made manually by the Inspectorate in respect of the records which are currently available. It had been estimated that the task will occupy a total of some 78 man weeks and my Department is therefore purchasing programmable calculators with a view to expediting completion of the task.

You may be assured that the Inspectorate is giving priority to this task and you will be informed of the outcome as soon as possible.

Yours sincerely, A. A. STREET Senator J. A. Mulvihill, M.P. Parliament House

Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Division 840/01— Relocation Assistance Scheme (Hansard, page 192) Senator Cameron asked whether a person relocating to take up part-time employ­ ment would be eligible for assistance under the Relocation Assistance Scheme.

The Department of Employment and Industrial Relations has been administering the Relocation Assistance Scheme on the basis that persons seeking to move to a new location to take up less than full-time employment have not been eligible. As the Government’s decision is not explicit on the matter, the Department is seeking|a definite ruling and will inform the Senator when the issue has been clarified.

Division 840/01— Relocation Assistance Scheme (Hansard, page 192) Senator Cameron asked whether the words ‘and certain other costs incurred by persons changing their place of permanent residence’, in the second last paragraph of the explanatory notes on page 21, meant that an employee who had not a permanent residence would be ineligible under the Scheme.

The ‘certain other costs’ referred to are legal and agent’s fees or rental allowance (maximum 8500.00) which can be paid towards the sale of a home and the purchase or rental of another in the new area. Eligibility, however, is not confined to home owners: fares, removal expenses, re-establishment and rental allowance can be paid to eligible persons not in this category.

The Scheme is not intended to facilitate itinerant or seasonal workers moving from job to job. However, these workers would be considered for assistance in the normal way at such time as they indicate a willingness to take up employment of a continuing nature.

308

Attorney-General Parliament House, C a n b e r r a , A.C.T. 2600 23 May 1977

Senator P. E. Rae Chairman Senate Estimates Committee F Parliam ent House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

My dear Senator,

I am writing to you in connection with the discussion in Senate Estimates Committee F on Thursday 28 April and Tuesday 3 May concerning the payment of $50 000 to Sir Edward McTiernan following his retirement as a Justice of the High Court.

The payment to Sir Edward McTiernan of $47 500 in lieu of long leave was in accordance with the authority given by the Government of the day to the then Attorney-General in 1967 and with the consistent practice since that date of making these payments to High Court Justices on their retirement or to widows of Justices

who died in office. There has been nothing secretive about these payments. For example, a list of the payments made to that date was presented to the Senate Estimates Committee on 13 November 1973.

As the Committee is aware, in 1967 the then Government approved arrangements in relation to long leave for Commonwealth Judges including provisions for the pay­ ment in lieu of leave not taken to a retired Judge or to the widow of a Judge. At the time of this approval it was understood by Cabinet that although not expressed to

apply to High Court Justices there were aspects of the arrangements which the High Court Justices may wish to have applied to them and the Attorney-General indicated his intention to inform the Chief Justice of them. Later that year the Justices of the High C ourt indicated that they would wish the same arrangements as to payment in lieu of leave not taken to apply to them.

Thereafter those arrangements were applied to High Court Justices on their death or retirement as the case may be and details of these payments have already been supplied to the Committee.

Thus in accordance with those arrangements Sir Edward McTiernan was on his retirement paid a sum of $47 500.

W ith respect to the additional sum of $2500 this was an ex gratia payment made to him in recognition of his unremunerated periods of service as Acting Chief Justice of the High Court. Sir Edward had in fact served as Chief Justice for periods which I understand total 15 months but did not receive any additional salary by virtue of

performing these higher duties.

I wish to make it quite clear that the decision to make this payment was not made until after his resignation, which is dated 5 September, had been delivered. It would be wrong to suggest that the payment was agreed to prior to or in order to induce his retirement.

Copies of my letters dated 16 September 1976 to Sir Edward and to the Treasurer in relation to the decision to make the payment are forwarded herewith. Also attached is a copy of the Treasurer’s reply dated 23 September 1976.

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I note the concern expressed by some members of the Committee that the provis­ ions as to payments to be made to retired Judges should be contained in legislation. I agree that in principle this should be so and I will be giving the m atter early con­ sideration with a view to recommending in due course appropriate amendments to the relevant legislation.

Yours sincerely, R. J. ELLICOTT, Q.C. Attorney-General

16 September 1976

The R t Hon. Sir Edward A. McTiernan, K.B.E., Breffni, Chilton Parade Warrawee, N.S.W. 2074

Dear Sir Edward,

Following discussions I have had with the Prime Minister and the Treasurer my Department is arranging with the Department of the Treasury for a cheque lo r $50 000 to be sent to you. This sum consists of one year’s salary ($47 500) by way o f payment in lieu of long leave not taken by you at the date o f your retirement and of an additional amount of $2 500 in recognition of your unremunerated periods of service as Acting Chief Justice of the High Court.

I have asked my Department to ensure with the Department of the Treasury that a cheque is sent to you as quickly as departmental procedures allow.

Yours sincerely, R. J. ELLICOTT, Q.C_ A ttorney- General

16 September 1976

The Hon. Phillip Lynch, M.P. Treasurer Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

My dear Treasurer,

I refer to the discussions I had with the Prime Minister and yourself last week concerning the retirement of Sir Edward McTiernan as a Justice of the High C ourt of Australia.

In pursuance of those discussions I have asked my Department to arrange with your Department for funds to be made available for the payment to Sir Edward of the sum of $50 000 consisting of one year’s salary ($47 500) by way of payment in lieu of long leave not taken by Sir Edward at the date of his retirement and of an additional am ount of $2500 in recognition of Sir Edward’s unremunerated periods

of services as Acting Chief Justice of the High Court. These periods totalled approxi­ mately 15 months.

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I have asked my Departm ent to arrange for the payment to be made to Sir Edward at the earliest opportunity and I would be glad if your Department could give its assistance in achieving that result.

Yours sincerely, R. J. ELLICOTT, Q.C. A ttorney-General

Treasurer Parliament House C a n b e r r a 2600

The Hon. R. J. Ellicott, Q.C., M.P. 23 September 1976

Attorney-General Parliam ent House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

My dear Attorney-General, Thank you for your letter of 16 September 1976 relating to the retirement of Sir Edward McTiernan as a Justice of the High Court of Australia.

Arrangements have been made for the provision of funds to the extent of $50 000 immediately from the Advance to the Treasurer pending the appropriation o f funds at additional estimates and the W arrant Authority has been issued to your Departm ent.

In line with the Government’s policy of keeping total expenditure within the original budget estimate the Treasury will be asking your Department to offer equiva­ lent savings if possible to cover this additional expenditure.

Yours sincerely, PHILLIP LYNCH

Attorney-General Parliament House C a n b e r r a , A.C.T. 2600

23 May 1977

Senator P. E. Rae Chairman Estimates Committee F The Senate

Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

My dear Senator, In a separate letter, I have written to you in connection with the discussion in Senate Committee F concerning the payment of $50 000 to Sir Edward McTiernan following his retirement as a Justice of the High Court. At the resumed hearing of

the Committee on 3 May 1977, members of the Committee also asked for information on other matters.

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Senator Jessop asked about the demand on M arriage Counselling Services in South Australia. I should explain that, over the past three years, the yearly increase in the am ount of marriage counselling work done by approved organisations in South Australia has, when expressed as a percentage of the previous year’s work, been almost twice the average for all approved organisations throughout Australia.

The South Australian situation has, however, been affected by the fact that during that period an additional very active marriage counselling organisation has been approved, considerably increasing the am ount o f work being done in that State.

On the limited information available for the 1976-77 year, which is the first year reported reflecting the Family C ourt referrals, it is expected that the increase in workload of South Australian organisations will be in the vicinity of 10 per cent which is comparable with the figures for approved organisations in other States.

A question was asked by Senator Wright about the number of days on which the former Chief Judge of the Industrial Court, Sir John Spicer, sat in court. As explained to the Committee the work of a judge does not begin when he enters the courtroom and sits on the bench or close when he leaves the courtroom. O f necessity, the Chief Judge was concerned with the overall administration of the Court.

Although Senator Wright did not specify the period to which his question related, his earlier question on leave taken by Sir John Spicer related to the last ten years. In these circumstances, I am endeavouring to obtain information on the periods during which he sat in court for the same period and will write to you again in this matter.

Yours sincerely, R. J. ELLICOTT, Q.C. Attorney-General

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INDUSTRIES ASSISTANCE COMMISSION

Kings Avenue, C a n b e r r a , A .C .T .

5 M ay 1977

Senator P. E. Rae Chairman Senate Estimates Committee F Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

Dear Senator,

The following answer is submitted to your Committee in response to a question raised by Senator Bishop during the Committee’s examination of the Industries Assistance Commission additional estimates of expenditure for 1976-77 on 3 May

Senator Bishop (Senate Hansard page 274)

Question:

Do you have the figures of the decline in the establishment in, say, the last couple of years; and, if not, can you supply them ?

Answer:

The establishment o f the Industries Assistance Commission has been at the following levels over the last three years:

1977.

Current establishment . establishment 30.6.76 . establishment 30.6.75 .

591 591 603

A. G. KOUKOULAS Assistant Commissioner Services Branch

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