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CrimTrac Agency—Report for 2013-14


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A N N U A L R E P O R T

2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4

C R I M T R A C

A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4

THROUGH DELIVERING NATIONAL SOLUTIONS THAT SUPPORT THE WORK OF

POLICE, CRIMTRAC CONTRIBUTES TO A SAFER COMMUNITY AND A SAFER AUSTRALIA

Our role We are the national information-sharing service for Australia’s police, wider law enforcement and national security agencies.

Our responsibilities Police reference and information services

National fingerprint matching capability

National DNA matching capability

National child sex offender register

Firearms and ballistic services

A cybercrime reporting system

National police checks

AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE

NEW SOUTH WALES POLICE FORCE

NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE

QUEENSLAND POLICE SERVICE

SOUTH AUSTRALIA POLICE

TASMANIA POLICE

VICTORIA POLICE

WESTERN AUSTRALIA POLICE

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY POLICING

Our police partners CrimTrac is a partnership between state, territory and federal police agencies and the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department.

i

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

ii

BOARD OF MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

NEW MAJOR INITIATIVES APPROVED

STRATEGIC ISSUES GROUP MEETINGS

5

7 4

HOLDS

FIREARM RECORDS

FIREARM LICENSES

MILLION 3.7

MILLION 1.5

NATIONAL FIREARMS LICENSING AND REGISTRATION SYSTEMS

OVER

TOTAL OF

TYPES OF FIREARMS

SEARCHES IN 13-14

THOUSAND 16

12229 NATIONAL FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION DATABASE

DELIVERED = AUSTRALIAN BALLISTIC INFORMATION NETWORK

DEVELOPED = THE AUSTRALIAN CYBERCRIME ONLINE REPORTING NETWORK

SERVICES MET

OR EXCEEDED AVAILABILITY TARGETS

OUT OF 6 7

MILLION OPERATING SURPLUS

$ 3

MILLION OPERATING EXPENDITURE

$ 65

HELPING POLICE PROTECT CHILDREN IT’S AVAILABLE

24/7 99.7% AVAILABILITY RATE NATIONAL CHILD OFFENDER SYSTEM WITH

JUST OVER

45% SUPPLIER EXPENSES 16% 39% EMPLOYEES

DEPRECIATION & AMORTISATION

3

7

11

4

8

12

0021_AR infographic spread_v12.indd 2 25/09/2014 11:37 am

2013-14 AT A GLANCE

OVER

THOUSAND RECORDS

HIGH STRINGENCY MATCHES TO DATE

RESULTING IN ALMOST

837 141000 NATIONAL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DNA DATABASE

GRADUATES

NEW GRADUATES

COMPLETED THE ICT GRAD PROGRAM IN DECEMBER 2013

2

3COMMENCED IN 2014

MILLION

SEARCHES IN 13-14 OVER

OF

PRINT SETS MILLION 6.3

MILLION CRIME SCENE PRINTS SEARCHED AND SOLVED 2.5

3.7

2 MILLION

NATIONAL AUTOMATED FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM

70 000 OVER USERS

MILLION SEARCHES THIS YEAR 38

NATIONAL POLICE REFERENCE SYSTEM

MILLION PHOTOS OVER 7 CURRENTLY

HOLDS

88.7% FULL TIME 11.3% PART TIME

EMPLOYEES 230

50% 50%

MILLION 3.7

17 NEW AGENCIES ACCREDITED CHECKS IN 13-14 ACCREDITED AGENCIES

IN TOTAL NOW 160 NATIONAL POLICE CHECKING SYSTEM

1

5

9

2

6

10

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CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

iii

BOARD OF MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

NEW MAJOR INITIATIVES APPROVED

STRATEGIC ISSUES GROUP MEETINGS

5

7 4

HOLDS

FIREARM RECORDS

FIREARM LICENSES

MILLION 3.7

MILLION 1.5

NATIONAL FIREARMS LICENSING AND REGISTRATION SYSTEMS

OVER

TOTAL OF

TYPES OF FIREARMS

SEARCHES IN 13-14

THOUSAND 16

12229 NATIONAL FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION DATABASE

DELIVERED = AUSTRALIAN BALLISTIC INFORMATION NETWORK

DEVELOPED = THE AUSTRALIAN CYBERCRIME ONLINE REPORTING NETWORK

SERVICES MET

OR EXCEEDED AVAILABILITY TARGETS

OUT OF 6 7

MILLION OPERATING SURPLUS

$ 3

MILLION OPERATING EXPENDITURE

$ 65

HELPING POLICE PROTECT CHILDREN IT’S AVAILABLE

24/7 99.7% AVAILABILITY RATE NATIONAL CHILD OFFENDER SYSTEM WITH

JUST OVER

45% SUPPLIER EXPENSES 16% 39% EMPLOYEES

DEPRECIATION & AMORTISATION

3

7

11

4

8

12

0021_AR infographic spread_v12.indd 2 25/09/2014 11:37 am

Source: refer to page 144

2013-14 AT A GLANCE

OVER

THOUSAND RECORDS

HIGH STRINGENCY MATCHES TO DATE

RESULTING IN ALMOST

837 141000 NATIONAL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DNA DATABASE

GRADUATES

NEW GRADUATES

COMPLETED THE ICT GRAD PROGRAM IN DECEMBER 2013

2

3COMMENCED IN 2014

MILLION

SEARCHES IN 13-14 OVER

OF

PRINT SETS MILLION 6.3

MILLION CRIME SCENE PRINTS SEARCHED AND SOLVED 2.5

3.7

2 MILLION

NATIONAL AUTOMATED FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM

70 000 OVER USERS

MILLION SEARCHES THIS YEAR 38

NATIONAL POLICE REFERENCE SYSTEM

MILLION PHOTOS OVER 7 CURRENTLY

HOLDS

88.7% FULL TIME 11.3% PART TIME

EMPLOYEES 230

50% 50%

MILLION 3.7

17 NEW AGENCIES ACCREDITED CHECKS IN 13-14 ACCREDITED AGENCIES

IN TOTAL NOW 160 NATIONAL POLICE CHECKING SYSTEM

1

5

9

2

6

10

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CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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Publication details Published by CrimTrac Agency ABN: 17 193 904 699

CrimTrac contact details Information about this report, or the information contained in it, should be directed to:

Communications Team CrimTrac Agency PO Box 1573 Canberra City ACT 2601

p: 02 6268 7000 f: 02 6268 7999 e: crimtrac@crimtrac.gov.au w: www.crimtrac.gov.au

Request a copy To request a copy of this annual report, please email crimtrac@crimtrac.gov.au. Hard copies are subject to availability.

Acknowledgements Design and typesetting—www.giraffe.com.au Printing—CanPrint Communications

Copyright © Commonwealth of Australia 2014

ISSN 1446 0203

This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the material in unaltered form only (retaining this notice) for your personal, non-commercial use or use within your organisation.

Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, all other rights are reserved.

Requests for further authorisation should be directed to the Commonwealth Copyright Administration, Business Law Branch, Attorney-General’s Department, 3-5 National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600, or email copyright@ag.gov.au.

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

LETTER

OF TRANSMITTAL

1

The Hon Michael Keenan MP Minister for Justice Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

I am pleased to present the CrimTrac Agency’s annual report for 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014, prepared in accordance with section 70 of the Public Service Act 1999.

The Act requires me to provide you with a report to present to the Parliament. Our report complies with the requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and bodies under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

I certify that I am satisfied that CrimTrac has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes, in accordance with the Australian Government Fraud Control Guidelines.

Yours sincerely

Doug Smith APM Chief Executive Officer CrimTrac

25 September 2014

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

C ONTENTS

2

Our role Fold

Our responsibilities Fold

Our partners I

2013-14 at a glance II

Letter of transmittal 1

Contents 2

About this report 4

PART 1: AGENCY OVERVIEW 5

CEO review 6

About us 11

Our organisational structure 13

PART 2: REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 17

Portfolio budget statement 2013-14 excerpt 18

Program of work 20

Performance summary 22

Biometrics services 24

Child protection 34

Firearms and ballistics 38

Police reference services 44

Cybercrime reporting 50

ACORN case study 52

National Police Checking Service 54

PART 3: CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 57

Corporate governance 59

Governance framework 59

Minister for Justice 59

Law, Crime and Community Safety Council 60

CrimTrac Board of Management 60

Strategic Issues Group 62

Chief Information Officer's Committee 62

Audit and Risk Committee 63

Portfolio Board 64

Risk management 64

Internal audit 65

Fraud control 65

Security 66

CONTENTS

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

C ONTENTS

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PART 4: ACCOUNTABILITY 67

External scrutiny 69

Asset management 69

Purchasing and procurement 70

Consultancy services, competitive tendering and contracting 70

ANAO access clauses 71

Discretionary grants 71

Ethical standards 71

Integrity Advisory Committee 71

Privacy 72

Records management 72

Advertising and market research 72

Freedom of information 72

Ecologically sustainable development 73

Correction of material errors in previous annual report 73

PART 5: PEOPLE MANAGEMENT 75

Our people 77

Developing future ICT leaders 78

Workplace relations 80

Staffing overview 81

Work health and safety 82

Learning and development 83

Workforce planning 85

Workplace diversity 85

PART 6: FINANCIAL INFORMATION 87

PART 7: REFERENCES AND APPENDICES 137

Annual Report list of requirements 138

Acronyms and abbreviations 142

Glossary 143

Photo credits 143

Information data sources 144

Index 145

2014-15 AND BEYOND 148

LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES Figure 1.1: CrimTrac Organisation Structure as at 30 June 2014 15

Figure 3.1: CrimTrac Governance Framework 59

Table 5.1: CrimTrac staff as at 30 June 2014 81

Table 5.2: CrimTrac salary ranges by classification as at 30 June 2014 81

Figure 6.1: CrimTrac Financial Summary 2010-11 to 2014-15 ($million) 89 Table 6.1: Agency resource statement 2013-14 90

Table 6.2: Expenditure and Staffing by Outcome 90

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

ABOUT

THIS REPORT

4

This report was prepared in accordance with the guidelines issued by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and under Section 70 of the Public Service Act 1999. It contains information on our organisation, administration and performance for 2013-14.

Part 1: Agency overview Includes information on our role and organisational structure, and introduces our senior executive.

Part 2: Report on performance Reports on our performance against our program of work, including achievements against deliverables and key performance indicators. It also includes information on our major projects.

Part 3: Corporate governance Discusses governance arrangements including audit, fraud, security and risk management arrangements.

Part 4: Accountability Provides information to satisfy the reporting requirements of a range of Commonwealth legislation and Australian Government policies.

Part 5: People management Includes information on our people management, including workforce demographics.

Part 6: Financial information Contains the complete set of our audited financial statements, as required under Section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

Part 7: References Provides a list of tables and figures within the report, a glossary, acronyms, a compliance index, and an alphabetical index.

ABOUT THIS REPORT

5

A G E N C Y

O V E R V I E W

5

6

It is my privilege to steward CrimTrac in its role in supporting the fight against crime and meeting the information needs of the Australian Policing Community. Our contribution is unique— supporting information-based policing through rapid access to detailed, current and accurate nation-wide reference information, serving the needs of our police partners investigating cold cases and volume crime, and responding to incidents across the spectrum from national security to calls for service.

CrimTrac’s operating model of co-planning, co-investment and co-delivery ensures each police agency gains greater information sharing outcomes than if they acted independently. Partnership through collaboration allows us to deliver national solutions to national problems.

The environment in which we operate is challenging and constantly changing. This drives us to continually explore emerging ICT solutions—locally, nationally and internationally.

The CrimTrac ICT Blueprint for National Police Information Sharing 2014-2018 establishes an ambitious but achievable vision for information sharing in the national policing landscape, reflecting the contributions and expectations of our police partners. This will inform the development of our ICT Roadmap, our adoption of the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM), and will represent a significant investment in our future.

The design of the CrimTrac organisation also reflects the need for responsiveness to a changing environment, aligning CrimTrac teams through a ‘Plan, Build, Run’ model which provides a structure that is adaptive, better able to focus on business delivery, and well-positioned to capitalise on future opportunities.

Under the guidance of the CrimTrac Board of Management and the leadership of the CrimTrac executive team, CrimTrac continues to deliver critical services to our partner agencies.

CEO REVIEW

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Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) The ACORN is a key initiative in Australia’s National Plan to Combat Cybercrime. CrimTrac is developing the technical solution for this joint project which also involves all Australian police agencies, the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department and the Australian Crime Commission.

The ACORN will provide a centralised online reporting facility to simplify public reporting of cybercrime, provide information people need to protect themselves, and ensure agencies can respond more quickly. It will also provide a clearer picture of the scope and nature of cybercrime affecting Australians and enable better operational and policy responses.

Throughout this financial year, we completed significant work on the ACORN, with the launch of the website scheduled for late 2014.

Australian Ballistics Information Network (ABIN) On 21 May 2014, the Minister for Justice, the Hon Michael Keenan MP, launched the ABIN, enabling a national capability for Australian police agencies to electronically collect, store and analyse recovered ballistic evidence. In the past, many Australian police agencies used a manual process to match ballistic evidence, which is both time consuming and resource intensive. The national capability of the ABIN increases the ability of all Australian police agencies to investigate firearm-related crime, both within their state and across borders.

National Domestic Violence Order Information Sharing System (NDVOISS) In June 2014, the Prime Minister, the Hon Tony Abbott MP, launched the Second Action Plan 2013-16 to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. The action plan includes a National Domestic Violence Order (DVO) Scheme. We were given $3.4 million over three years to design and develop a prototype National Domestic Violence Order Information Sharing System.

This prototype will focus on improving information sharing of domestic violence orders between a number of states. Ultimately, a key benefit of a national system such as the NDVOISS will be the improved safety of both victims of domestic violence and frontline police. We will be working towards building and testing an operational prototype by 2017, and will begin work on the early stages of the project immediately.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Department of Immigration and Border Protection In June 2014, we signed an MOU with the Department of Immigration and Border Protection to enable the Department access to our National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (NAFIS). The NAFIS holds fingerprint and palm print data and related information used for law enforcement purposes. This is the second such agreement between CrimTrac and the Department. Access to the NAFIS assists the Department to protect Australia’s borders.

CEO REVIEW

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Integrity Partnership CrimTrac continued its strong relationship with the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity (ACLEI), including jointly hosting an integrity conference on 10 September 2013. The conference brought together guest speakers and participants to explore approaches to embedding integrity into our everyday systems and practices. We also maintained our internal focus on integrity through the continued work of our Integrity Advisory Committee.

Our Organisational Capability We continued to grow our internal capability in the areas of key compliance activity. 2013-14 saw significant advancement in our work to achieve compliance with the Australian Government Digital Transition Policy through progress of our Electronic Document and Records Management System. Additionally, in September 2013 we released agency-wide procurement and contracting guidance material, and in March 2014, created a dedicated Commercial Unit to continue to deliver greater transparency and effectiveness and strengthen our compliance regimes.

Looking ahead The development of the CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020 has involved significant consultation with all police agencies and the Commonwealth Attorney General’s Department

The plan defines strategy and direction, and provides a framework for guiding the decision making of the management of CrimTrac and the Board of Management for the next five years.

The strategic priorities articulated in the plan place CrimTrac in a strong position to ensure partner agencies’ information sharing needs continue to be met now and into the future.

Our strategic priorities are underpinned by strategic pillars - People, Partnerships, Innovation and Productivity - which form the foundation of our plan.

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2014-15 will see CrimTrac:

• together with our partners launch ACORN to enable Australians to actively engage in the fight against cybercrime

• implement a national solution to assist with identification of missing persons and unidentified human remains

• begin scoping and prototyping the National Domestic Violence Order Information Sharing System

• continue to explore options for the replacement of our NAFIS system and the potential inclusion of other biometrics capabilities

• work on identity resolution and the adoption of the National Information Exchange Model

• redevelop our web communication platforms to improve functionality for all users

• develop a new people strategy with greater learning and development opportunities

• build on our graduate career pathway programs.

We have an ambitious agenda, but I am confident that together with our national partners we can achieve our goals. I would like to congratulate CrimTrac staff for their contribution to our agency’s achievements over the past year. Their continued energy, focus and commitment ensure we deliver services and capabilities that make a real difference for police and the Australian community. I would also like to thank our national partners for their continued commitment and contribution to working together with CrimTrac to achieve our work outcomes.

The next 12 months will be another challenging and exciting year to add to our strong history, and we are well positioned to take advantage of any and all opportunities.

Doug Smith APM Chief Executive Officer CrimTrac

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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Our role and function We deliver national information-sharing solutions that support police in their work. We do this by bringing together essential law enforcement information from around the country and making it accessible to all Australian police and wider law enforcement agencies.

Our services include:

• police reference and information services

• national fingerprint matching capability

• national DNA matching capability

• national child sex offender register

• firearms and ballistic services

• a cybercrime reporting system

• national police checks.

Our outcome and flow-on benefits As expressed in our Portfolio Budget Statement, our intended outcome is to provide access to information that supports law enforcement through collaborative national information systems and services.

Our technical solutions enable Australia’s police and law enforcement agencies to share information across state and territory borders. We work in partnership with these agencies to deliver these solutions, which:

• help police to detect, reduce and prevent crime in our community

• assist police to solve and manage cases such as murder, domestic violence, missing persons, disaster victim identification as well as crimes such as buglary and car and property theft

• minimise opportunities for offenders to evade the law by crossing borders.

Through cooperation between Commonwealth agencies and state colleagues, and close consultation with our partners, we are ensuring that police across Australia have the information they need to keep our streets safe.

Our performance We measure our performance against the deliverables and key performance indicators in our Portfolio Budget Statement. See details on page 18, Part 2: Report on performance.

ABOUT US

EVERY DAY OUR SERVICES HELP AUSTRALIA’S POLICE MAKE OUR COMMUNITIES SAFER

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Our history and broad objectives CrimTrac was established in 2000 under an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) between the Commonwealth, states and territories to deliver on the vision of sharing national policing information to achieve local, national and international policing outcomes. The IGA underpins our role and sets out our broad objectives of providing high quality information services that:

• meet the needs of the Australian policing community

• establish best practice service models in relation to the provision of information to support policing

• are project-oriented and cost-benefit driven to achieve outcomes.

In 2006 CrimTrac and the state, territory and federal police commissioners signed a Memorandum of Understanding that supports the IGA.

Our financial results Our revenue for the year was $68 million and our expenses, $65 million, providing an operating surplus of over $3 million. The majority of our expenditure was on supplier and employee expenses.

Our portfolio and accountability CrimTrac is an Executive Agency within the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s portfolio.

This reporting year we were subject to the Public Service Act 1999 and the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act). The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 replaces the FMA Act from 1 July 2014.

We are accountable to the Commonwealth Parliament, the Minister for Justice and our Board of Management, which comprises Australia’s police commissioners, the ACT Chief Police Officer and a Deputy Secretary of the Attorney-General’s Department.

Our minister At 30 June 2014, Minister for Justice, the Hon Michael Keenan MP, had Commonwealth responsibility for CrimTrac.

Prior to Minister Keenan’s appointment, we reported to the former Minister for Home Affairs, Minister for Justice, the Hon Jason Claire MP, from 1 July 2013 to 17 September 2013.

OUR SERVICES HELP POLICE DETECT, REDUCE, PREVENT AND SOLVE CRIME

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Our Executive Our Executive is responsible for the high-level management of the agency. Our Executive consists of our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Information Officer.

Chief Executive Officer | Doug Smith APM The Commonwealth Minister for Justice appoints our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) on the recommendation of the CrimTrac Board of Management. Our CEO is responsible to the Minister and to the Board for delivering CrimTrac services in accordance with the Inter-Governmental Agreement that established our agency.

Doug provides executive leadership, direction and high-level decision-making, and ensures our operations comply with relevant Commonwealth, state and territory laws.

Doug took up the position of CrimTrac CEO in January 2011. His policing career began more than 40 years ago with the Victoria Police and he has also served with the Queensland Police Service and the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services. In 1998 he was promoted to Assistant Commissioner of Police in the Northern Territory, and he acted at times as the Northern Territory Commissioner of Police and Deputy Police Commissioner. Doug’s broad policing experience includes working in the stock squad, traffic enforcement, criminal investigations, legal and training, and as a prosecutor.

Doug was awarded the Australian Police Medal for distinguished service to the Queensland Police Service in 1995. He has also obtained a Masters of Public Administration (1994) and a Bachelor of Arts with a double major in Public Administration and Government and a major in History (1993).

Chief Operating Officer | Nicole Mayo Our Chief Operating Officer (COO) develops our strategic objectives and long-term planning activities, and manages the corporate services that underpin our agency.

Nicole’s career spans more than 20 years in the legal profession, both in private practice and the public sector, in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and Commonwealth public service. She has a Bachelor of Laws and holds an unrestricted Government Practising Certificate.

Nicole was appointed COO in July 2013. She brings extensive experience working within a complex multi-jurisdictional and legislative environment and is a strong leader who displays resilience and well developed problem solving skills. Nicole is responsible for human resources, legal and procurement, finance, business innovation and development, governance and strategy.

OUR ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

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Chief Information Officer | Lee Walton Our Chief Information Officer (CIO) leads the delivery of national information-sharing services to Australia’s police agencies, and manages the implementation of business and information communications technology (ICT) solutions for CrimTrac.

Lee was appointed CIO in January 2013. He has more than 30 years’ experience working across government in both Australia and the United Kingdom. This includes 12 years with Defence Signals Directorate, where he held senior positions in project management, ICT reform and as Chief Engineer.

With Lee’s extensive experience in the ICT sector, he is highly skilled to lead the delivery of CrimTrac ICT services to meet the needs of our police partners. Lee has a First Class Honours engineering degree and is a Chartered Engineer and registered project manager.

Our structure As our agency evolves we need to evolve our supporting structure. In April 2014, we implemented a new ‘Plan, Build, Run’ structure to better align our COO and CIO portfolios. This new structure enables us to:

• better deliver our objectives

• adapt to the changing needs of our partners

• take advantage of emerging business opportunities.

The COO portfolio is responsible for developing the CrimTrac Work Plan, prioritising new initiatives, evaluating outcomes of capabilities, and delivering corporate services. In addition, the restructure moved some ICT planning functions into the COO portfolio. This allows the CIO portfolio to focus on delivering new capability and approved projects, while maintaining and supporting existing services.

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Figure 1.1: Crimtrac Organisation Structure as at 30 June 2014

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We are nearing the end of our five year journey to 2015 set out in our current Strategic Plan—CrimTrac 2015. Significant improvements have been made to strengthen our governance, streamline information sharing, and invest in our people.

CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020 Throughout the year, CrimTrac commenced work and consulted with stakeholders to develop the CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020. The plan for the next five years focuses on four key priority areas—people, partnerships, productivity and innovation. Through these key focus areas we can move towards our desired future state, and effectively respond to the needs of our police partner agencies.

To continue to build on our established partnerships and connect our priority areas, significant planning was undertaken to successfully align our strategic vision to our operating model— co-planning, co-investing, and co-delivery. Furthermore, significant emphasis was placed on ensuring our plan aligns with the strategic direction of each police agency—to remain in step with our partners and continue to deliver services that contribute directly to keeping the Australian community safe.

The plan will become CrimTrac’s key driver in setting the direction of our agency and will influence the way we approach and deliver our work.

Our Value Proposition Through co-planning, co-investment and co-delivery, Australia’s police and law enforcement agencies gain greater information sharing and information services outcomes than by acting independently and without collaboration.

Our Mission To enhance Australian policing and law enforcement with an emphasis on information based policing facilitated through rapid access to detailed, current and accurate police and law enforcement information.

CrimTrac ICT Blueprint 2014-2018 The CrimTrac ICT Blueprint 2014-2018 was developed throughout the year to guide our ICT direction as we move into the future and invest in innovative information-sharing solutions. It is also an important vision that was developed in line with the CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020.

The ICT Blueprint is built upon feedback from our police partner agencies. It will help us to remove technology barriers between existing systems, enhance our information services, and provide a technical environment for future developments. We will also work to expand the information that Australian police can access by implementing a mature information exchange standard through the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM).

Through the ICT Blueprint, we will continue to assess new ideas and opportunities, and we will take advantage of new technologies to deliver cost effective and efficient solutions that help police to do their work and keep our community safe.

STRATEGIC LANDSCAPE

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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R E P O R T O N

P E R F O R M A N C E

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CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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We report on our program of work, including our performance against our outcome, objective, deliverables and key performance indicators as set out in our Portfolio Budget Statement.

Portfolio Budget Statement 2013-14 excerpt Outcome 1: Access to information that supports law enforcement agencies through collaborative national information systems and services.

Program 1.1: National law enforcement information systems and services.

Program 1.1 objective: CrimTrac will enhance Australian policing and law enforcement through the provision of high-quality information services that meet the needs of the law enforcement community.

Program 1.1 deliverables To achieve the program objective, CrimTrac will:

• operate, maintain and enhance existing national critical policing information infrastructure, systems and services, including the:

• National Automated Fingerprint Identification System

• National Criminal Investigation DNA Database

• National Child Offender System

• National Police Reference System

• National Police Checking Service

• National Firearm Licensing and Registration System.

In addition to the above, CrimTrac will:

• continue to strengthen internal capacity and capability

• identify, assess and prioritise capability development opportunities that support our partners and the national strategic intent, including:

• firearms and ballistics information

• cybercrime reporting

• incident and investigation management

• child protection

• biometrics

• explore opportunities for the international exchange of policing and law enforcement information.

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Program 1.1 key performance indicators CrimTrac’s key performance indicators focus on the agency’s ability to provide policing and law enforcement agencies with rapid access to detailed, current and accurate information. CrimTrac’s progress in achieving the program objective will be measured according to the following indicators:

• Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information.

• Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget.

• Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised.

• Ninety-five per cent of criminal history checks are completed within 10 working days.

• Ninety-five per cent of urgent criminal history checks are completed within five working days.

CR i MTRAC ANNUAL REPORT 2013-2014

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Program of work Our annual program of work is summarised in our Work Plan 2013-14. In line with our Portfolio Budget Statement, this includes ongoing/business as usual work to deliver, maintain and enhance existing national critical information infrastructure. It was developed in line with our ‘Plan’, ‘Build’, ‘Run’ model and also includes initiatives to identify, assess and prioritise capability development opportunities that support our partners and the national strategic intent. Through sophisticated project analysis and market research we explore new projects and technology platforms that support our partners.

CrimTrac Work Plan 2013-14

ONGOING / BUSINESS AS USUAL

IMPLEMENT APPROVED INITIATIVES DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESS CASE FOR APPROVAL

BIOMETRICS

Deliver national biometric services capability through the support of the following systems: • National Criminal Investigation

DNA Database (NCIDD) • National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (NAFIS)

• NAFIS Capacity Upgrade • NAFIS Workstation Refresh • National DNA Investigative Capability (NDIC)

• National Missing Persons and Victim System

CHILD

PROTECTION

Deliver national child protection services capability through the support of the following systems: • National Child Offender System

(NCOS) • Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS)

• CETS ‘Offline’ • NCOS Data Provision and Consumption

INCIDENT AND INVESTIGATION MANAGEMENT

Deliver national police reference services capability through the support of: • National Police Reference

System (NPRS) • National Vehicles of Interest (NVOI) • National Names Index (NNI)

• NPRS Name Matching Upgrade • NSS and NPRS Integration • ASIC / MSIC Information Sharing Capability

• Develop and implement a strategy for decommissioning the mainframe applications (NNI/NFLRS/NVOI)

• Examine the high-level business needs for firearm and vehicle capabilities for operational police

CYBERCRIME REPORTING

• Deliver national cybercrime online reporting capability • Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN)

FIREARMS AND BALLISTICS INFORMATION

Deliver national firearm services capability to police partners through the support of the following systems: • National Firearms Licensing and

Registration System (NFLRS) • National Firearms Identification Database (NFID)

• National Firearms Identification Database (NFID) • Australian Ballistic Information Network (ABIN)

• National Firearms Interface (NFI)

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Performance summary NATIONAL AUTOMATED FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Not achieved Not

achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Achieved Achieved

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Achieved Achieved

For further information refer to page 25.

NATIONAL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DNA DATABASE

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Achieved Not Applicable

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Achieved Achieved

For further information refer to page 27.

NATIONAL CHILD OFFENDER SYSTEM

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Achieved Achieved

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Achieved Achieved

For further information refer to page 35.

NATIONAL FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION DATABASE

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Not Applicable Not

Applicable

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Not Applicable Achieved

For further information refer to page 39.

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NATIONAL FIREARMS LICENSING AND REGISTRATION SYSTEM

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Not Applicable Not

Applicable

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Not Applicable Not

Applicable

For further information refer to page 40.

NATIONAL POLICE REFERENCE SYSTEM

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Achieved Achieved

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Achieved Achieved

For further information refer to page 45.

NATIONAL POLICE CHECKING SERVICE

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2012-13 2013-14

Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information Achieved Achieved

Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Achieved Achieved

Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised Achieved Achieved

Ninety-five per cent of criminal history checks are completed within 10 working days Achieved Not achieved

Ninety-five per cent of urgent criminal history checks are completed within five working days Not achieved

Not

achieved

For further information refer to page 55.

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Police around Australia use the National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (NAFIS) and National Criminal Investigation DNA Database (NCIDD) to help solve crime and keep our country safe.

National Automated Fingerprint Identification System The NAFIS helps police identify a person through their fingerprints left at a crime scene.

BIOMETRICS SERVICES HELPING

SOLVE CRIMES BY MATCHING CRIME SCENE FINGERPRINTS OR DNA— OFTEN WITH NEAR REAL-TIME UPLOADS THAT ENABLE POLICE TO IDENTIFY SUSPECTS WITHIN MINUTES

National Criminal Investigation DNA Database The NCIDD helps police identify a suspect through a DNA sample left at a crime scene.

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National Automated Fingerprint Identification System The National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (NAFIS) is a finger and palm print database and matching system, which we have operated since 2001. The NAFIS includes:

• TenPrint data—finger and palm print images taken in controlled situations, usually by police or immigration authorities, along with corresponding basic biographic information

• Latent data—unsolved finger and palm print impressions recovered from crime scenes.

This system is used by police agencies to help solve crime and identify individuals by establishing a person’s identity from fingerprint and palm impressions. It is also used by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection to support Australia’s migration program.

The NAFIS enables near real-time upload of prints from crime scenes, making it possible for police to identify a suspect in minutes.

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Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NAFIS is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week.

• We provide business support to the NAFIS 24-hours-a-day.

NAFIS AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % 99.5% 99.4% 98.8%

This year, availability fell below our performance target of 99.5%. However, to ensure we meet our target in 2014-15, our NAFIS Capacity Upgrade project will continue to improve availability and response times for police.

NATIONAL FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Crime scene searches (finger and palm) 367 751 408 899 420 188

Crime scene prints identified 52 673 58 693 60 398

Latent fingers searches 264 537 295 293 306 133

Latent finger prints identified 37 546 42 188 43 691

Latent palm searches 103 214 113 606 114 055

Latent palm prints identified 15 127 16 505 16 707

Tenprint to tenprint searches 428 831 482 813 519 156

Livescan initiated tenprint to tenprint searches 246 959 261 966 290 109

Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget We enhanced systems through following initiatives during 2013-14.

NAFIS SYSTEM ENHANCEMENT

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

NAFIS Capacity Upgrade We delivered phase 1 of this project in June 2014, in line with our schedule and budget—successfully upgrading the existing NAFIS system with modern and more powerful servers, which will help to improve response times for police using the system.

NAFIS Workstation Refresh This project was undertaken throughout the year to replace ageing equipment used by police. As at 30 June 2014, we had completed hardware procurement and 75% of installations.

For more details about our NAFIS-related projects, see Biometrics projects on page 29.

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Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information-sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised We identified improvement opportunities and added the following initiatives to our annual Work

Plan this reporting year.

NAFIS INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

NAFIS Capacity Upgrade In July 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved this project to upgrade the database storage capacity and performance of the NAFIS.

NAFIS Workstation Refresh In July 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved this initiative to investigate options to replace out-of-date NAFIS equipment used by police agencies.

Fingerprint Capability Replacement

In June 2014 the CrimTrac Board of Management approved a project to upgrade Australia’s existing fingerprint capability by 2017. This project will offcially commence in the next reporting period.

National Criminal Investigation DNA Database The National Criminal Investigation DNA Database (NCIDD) has been in operation since 2001. Since then more than 837 000 DNA profiles have been uploaded. It helps Australian police solve crime by linking DNA profiles from a crime scene with convicted offenders throughout Australia. The database also allows police to match profiles from two or more unsolved crime scenes, linking seemingly unrelated police investigations.

Australian police use DNA evidence to inform or support investigations. DNA evidence has helped implicate criminals in serious offences and helped solve many high volume crimes. It has also established the innocence of people who might otherwise have been suspects.

The NCIDD contains DNA profiles from samples collected by Australian police from crime scenes, convicted offenders, suspects, items belonging to missing persons and unknown deceased persons.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NCIDD is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week, allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provide business support to the NCIDD from 8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday.

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NCIDD AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % measured only during business support hours

98.5% 99.7% 99.9%

This year, we exceeded our performance target of 98.5%.

NCIDD RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Total number of records 678 441 749 601 837 798

Total number of crime scene to crime scene links 9 768 9 702 72 462

Total number of crime scene to person links 18 088 18 568 68 036

The NCIDD is steadily growing with a greater percentage of DNA profiles now being uploaded using new DNA kits instead of the old Profiler Plus kit. The number of high stringency links has increased significantly in the past year due to the NSW Police Force expanding the links to include their intra-jurisdictional links.

Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget The system is extremely stable and minimal enhancements were made to the NCIDD in the past

year due to the prioritised work to deliver the National DNA Investigative Capability project. When complete, this project will deliver kinship and familial capability to the DNA program.

For more information about DNA-related projects, see Biometrics projects on page 29.

Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised We identified improvement opportunities and added the following initiatives to our annual Work

Plan this reporting year.

DNA INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

National DNA Investigative Capability In July 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved our initiative to explore options and develop a business case to identify and implement a more sophisticated DNA

investigative capability for police.

In March 2014, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved the business case and agreed to work beginning on the National DNA Investigative Capability project.

National Missing Persons & Victim System In June 2014, the CrimTrac Board of Management authorised CrimTrac to implement the National Missing Persons & Victim System.

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Biometrics projects NAFIS Capacity Upgrade The NAFIS Capacity Upgrade project began in July 2013. The aim is to upgrade the core system to allow for greater capacity and improved system availability by increasing fingerprint matching capacity and reducing wait times for police.

Police agencies have invested in new technologies that enable real-time fingerprint matching, including forensic registers, digital photography and tablet computers at crime scenes. This has been a driving force behind an increased demand for the NAFIS. However, due to this demand, police have experienced some delays in obtaining matches through the NAFIS.

There are two phases to the NAFIS Capacity Upgrade project:

• Phase 1 (complete)—we successfully upgraded the existing NAFIS system with modern and more powerful servers. This provided additional processing power to meet extra demand through to May 2017.

• Phase 2 (now underway)—we will update the biometric matching engine and use a new matching algorithm. This will provide greater matching accuracy and improve overall performance of the system.

KEY FACTS: NAFIS CAPACITY UPGRADE

Outcome Performance improvements to the NAFIS platform, which will lead to reduced response times for latent searches. This will support operations to 2017.

Scheduled delivery Phase 1—delivered in June 2014

Phase 2—will be delivered in the next reporting period

Budget $5.330 million

Status The upgrade has already increased connections between some police agencies and the CrimTrac Data Centre, allowing for an increase in traffic.

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NAFIS Workstation Refresh The NAFIS Workstation Refresh project is replacing ageing equipment used by police agencies. This will ensure the NAFIS capability continues to be available to police.

KEY FACTS: NAFIS WORKSTATION REFRESH

Outcome Ongoing availability of the NAFIS capability for police agencies.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $0.588 million.

Status We have completed hardware procurement, and started installation activities.

As at 30 June 2014, we have completed 75% of installations.

National DNA Investigative Capability The National DNA Investigative Capability (NDIC) project will identify and implement a more sophisticated capability for police through new solutions for kinship matching and familial searching capabilities. The project will also deliver an enhanced direct matching function by providing a more accurate matching system. These new capabilities will enhance current DNA matching capabilities across Australia.

The current DNA matching capability has been designed to ensure privacy is protected, meaning any enhancements must also meet strict privacy requirements.

KEY FACTS: NATIONAL DNA INVESTIGATIVE CAPABILITY

Outcome A more sophisticated DNA investigative capability for police, including kinship matching and familial searching.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $1.451 million

Status Work on this project has commenced.

Next steps include gathering detailed requirements to inform a request for tender process.

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National Missing Persons & Victim System The objective of the National Missing Persons & Victim System (NMPVS) initiative is to provide police and other law enforcement agencies with the ability to undertake national searches on long-term missing persons, unidentified human remains, and disaster victim identification.

A national solution will help police in each state and territory to share and match information on missing persons, which is currently limited by the use of localised systems in each jurisdiction.

KEY FACTS: NATIONAL MISSING PERSONS & VICTIM SYSTEM

Outcome A national automated capability for police to match long-term missing person and unidentified human remains information. It will also allow easier access to shared information in the event of a major disaster.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $0.435 million

Status Project planning has commenced.

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HELPING POLICE COMBAT CRIME

‘It could be just one fingerprint that identifies a person as being at the scene. There might be no other evidence apart from that or a drop of blood or a DNA match. But that’s all you need and then there’s just no way out for them at the end of the day.’

Chroming is a toxic form of substance abuse. It could mean inhaling solvents like paint, deodorants or glue and in cities like Townsville and Rockhampton, it’s a growing threat to kids.

Often it’s due to boredom. But once someone gets a taste for the high they get from sniffing—short lived though it is—addiction kicks in and ultimately it can cause neurological and cardio-vascular problems. It can even cause death.

The problem spills over and affects the community at large. Shop owners have been forced to remove aerosol deodorants from the shelves to stop them being stolen by addicts, while hardware stores face mounting damages bills to replace glass smashed by offenders who have broken in to steal glue.

This was exactly the scenario that faced Senior Constable Barnes of the Rockhampton Police Scenes of Crime Section, when he was called to a break-in at a major hardware store early on the morning of 11 January 2014.

A crime is committed During the night someone had thrown a rock at a window of the store and after ‘tapping away’ at it a few times, created a hole big enough to crawl through. Senior Constable Barnes said the offender must have been pretty determined as his first attempt to make the hole larger set off the alarm.

Security made a pass but it is thought they may not have reactivated the alarm, and after hiding in some nearby bushes, the offender made a second, successful attempt to break in to the store.

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Senior Constable Barnes said the offender stole ‘a number of tins of substances such as glue’. He said ‘It's quite common for offenders up here to sniff glue. They sniff glue, they sniff paint, they sniff different aerosols and things. It's like a quick high for them. So a lot of the time when hardware stores get broken into they'll make a beeline for the glue section, the paint section, and it's all part of getting their high.’

After reviewing the CCTV footage, Senior Constable Barnes did a visual inspection of the break-in area to determine which area he would photograph. It was during this examination he saw some bloodstains on the broken glass and hair stuck to one of the glass fragments.

After collecting these biological exhibits, Senior Constable Barnes then looked for fingerprints—the quickest way to identify someone. He found them on the window where the offender had climbed through.

A hit is made After packaging all the exhibits and logging them at the station, all but the hair were forwarded to the Forensics’ Laboratory in Brisbane for analysis. Senior Constable Barnes said ‘we didn't send that [the hair] to the lab to try and get any identification on that because we were hopeful of getting both the fingerprints identified and the blood. If we got no hits on either of those we would've sent the hair away’.

He was right. Within three to four hours they had a hit.

The offender’s DNA and fingerprints were on file with CrimTrac. The 27-year old offender was caught within days and with such strong forensic evidence against him—backed up by CCTV footage—he admitted to the crime.

Senior Constable Barnes said the main benefit of CrimTrac systems in this case was the offender may not have been caught if Police hadn’t been able to match his fingerprints or DNA.

‘It could be just one fingerprint that identifies a person as being at the scene. There might be no other evidence apart from that or a drop of blood or a DNA match. But that’s all you need and then there’s just no way out for them at the end of the day.’

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HELPING POLICE PROTECT CHILDREN AT RISK

Police use our child protection solutions to help identify and manage offenders against children, helping to protect children at risk.

National Child Offender System

CHILD PROTECTION

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National Child Offender System The National Child Offender System (NCOS) is a web-based application that allows Australian police to record and share child offender information. It directly enables police in each state and territory to manage key information to meet their requirements under respective child protection legislation.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NCOS is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provides business support to the NCOS 24-hours-a-day.

NCOS AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % 99.5% 99.7% 99.7%

This year, we exceeded our performance target of 99.5%.

Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget We enhanced systems through the following initiatives during 2013-14.

NCOS SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

Routine releases July 2013, we addressed minor bug fixes and ensured the NCOS is

functioning to its full capacity.

May 2014, we provided minor enhancements and also increased the capacity for police agencies to export records from 5 000 to 6 000.

For more information, see Child protection projects on page 36.

Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised We identified improvement opportunities and added the following child protection related

initiatives to our annual Work Plan this reporting year.

CHILD PROTECTION INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

National Child Offender System (NCOS) Provision and Consumption July 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved the NCOS Provision and Consumption project.

This initiative will remove the need for police to manually re-enter data between local child offender systems and the NCOS.

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CHILD PROTECTION INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) This project was carried over from the CrimTrac Work Plan 2012-13. Project delivery continued throughout the year.

Child protection projects National Child Offender System—Data Provision and Consumption The NCOS—Data Provision and Consumption project will deliver a national solution that removes the need for police to manually re-enter data between local child offender systems and the NCOS. This manual entry approach is error prone and resource intensive for police agencies.

The solution will enable all police agencies to more easily upload and share offender case information. This will ensure enriched data is stored in the NCOS.

KEY FACTS: NCOS DATA PROVISION AND CONSUMPTION

Outcome The capability for police to more easily share child offender case information, upload data in real time and export offender data from the NCOS for policing purposes.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $1.061 million

Status Detailed requirements have been gathered and reviewed. This will be used to develop the technical solution.

Child Exploitation Tracking Systems The Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) is a joint project between CrimTrac and the Australian Federal Police. This national solution will automate the process of linking seized child exploitation material with previously identified images.

We are rolling out the CETS solution for our police partners nationally. We will soon begin procuring hardware, and the Australian Federal Police will implement tools and provide training and business process support. The final product will be made available for our police partners in the next reporting period.

The CETS will also provide a foundation for other child protection activities such as child exploitation material management services (once approved) that will expand the image library and provide greater flexibility for police agencies to choose the technology that best suits their local environment whilst participating in a national information-sharing solution.

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KEY FACTS: CHILD EXPLOITATION TRACKING SYSTEM

Outcome The CETS initiative will provide the capability to link seized child exploitation material with previously identified images, reducing practitioner exposure.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $3.416 million

Status The Australian Federal Police and CrimTrac are working collaboratively to roll-out the CETS nationally. However, the CETS solution is no longer supported by the vendor and activities to identify a replacement solution will be undertaken in collaboration with partner agencies.

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Our firearms solutions are valuable tools for police to solve firearm-related crime and to prevent gun crime in Australia.

National Firearms Identification Database The National Firearms Identification Database (NFID) helps police to identify and describe individual firearms consistently.

FIREARMS AND BALLISTICS HELPING POLICE MATCH CRIME SCENE BALLISTICS AND WEAPONS

National Firearms Licensing and Registration System The National Firearms Licensing and Registration System (NFLRS) helps firearms registries view the licence and registration information held by other states and territories.

Australian Ballistic Information Network The Australian Ballistic Information Network (ABIN) helps police match ballistic evidence across state and territory borders.

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National Firearms Identification Database The National Firearms Identification Database (NFID) is a reference tool that helps Australian police identify and record firearms in a consistent way. The database enables police to identify and characterise a firearm, using details such as make, model, calibre and capacity.

The database assists police to ensure a firearm is described consistently during its registration, during importation or during transfer of ownership and movement across state and territory borders.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NFID is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provide business support to the NFID from 8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday.

NFID AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % measured only during business support hours

96% 99.5% 99.9%

NFID RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2012-13* 2013-14

Total number of Template searches 38 1 295

Total number of Detailed searches 350 10 934

* The NFID was delivered in February 2013. Therefore statistics before this time do not exist.

Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget Following the successful delivery of the NFID in February 2013, stages four and five of the NFID

project have continued to enhance the capability of the NFID system. For more information, see Firearms and ballistics projects on page 41.

Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised We identified improvement opportunities and added the following firearms-related initiatives to

our Annual Work Plan this reporting year.

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FIREARMS INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

Australian Ballistics Information Network (ABIN) July 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved commencement of the ABIN project.

In July 2014 we will deliver a capability for police to easily share ballistic evidence across state and territory borders, helping to electronically match ballistic evidence gathered from a crime scene to the firearm used in the crime.

National Firearms Interface (NFI) March 2014, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved in principle commencement of the NFI project.

The NFI will increase the capability of sharing firearms data in systems nationally.

The Law, Crime and Community Safety Council meeting will consider the business case in August 2014.

National Firearms Identification Database (NFID) The NFID was carried over from the 2012-13 Work Plan. Project delivery continued throughout this year.

National Firearms Licensing and Registration System The National Firearms Licensing and Registration System (NFLRS) is a valuable tool used to ensure compliance with registration. It enables police to access the following information:

• firearm licence holders

• licensed firearm dealers

• registered firearms

• lost, stolen and transferred firearms.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NFLRS is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provide business support to the NFLRS from 8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday.

NFLRS AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % measured only during business support hours

98.5% 100% 99.9%

This year we exceeded our performance target of 98.5%

NFLRS RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Total number of firearms 4.4 million 4.6 million 3.7 million

Total number of licences Not available 1.7 million 1.5 million

Total number of searches 163 000 201 000 206 000

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Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget The NFLRS is a stable and reliable system. We did not make any major enhancements this year.

Firearms and ballistic projects National Firearm Identification Database (stages 4 and 5) Following the successful implementation of the NFID in February 2013, stages 4 and 5 of the project have been delivered to provide a capability for the NFID to integrate with police systems and to ensure the quality of the records.

• Stage 4 delivered integration services for police agencies to automatically search and upload NFID data into their firearm systems.

• Stage 5 delivered a NFID Data Quality Report that compared the data quality of NFID to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Firearms Reference Table and to manufacturers' specifications.

KEY FACTS: NATIONAL FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION DATABASE

Outcome Improved efficiency for registering firearms and increased cross-jurisdictional integrity of firearm data.

Scheduled delivery Stage 4 ended in September 2013 with an expenditure of $0.279m.

Stage 5 ended in May 2014 with an expenditure of $0.071m.

Budget Total NFID project budget was $1.771 million

Total expenditure was $1.192 million

Status Stages four and five of the NFID project have been delivered, and the project was closed in May 2014.

The decision to invest further in NFID data can be better considered following the tender process for National Firearms Index.

National Firearms Interface The National Firearms Interface (NFI) will provide increased capability for police to share firearm data, in turn leading to increased police and public safety. It will do this by delivering a national firearms information repository. It will identify links between people, firearms, organisations and locations, as well as providing enhanced search and reporting capabilities. The NFI will also notify when firearms ownership is transferred, and will integrate with the NFID.

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KEY FACTS: NATIONAL FIREARMS INTERFACE

Outcome Increased police capability to share firearms data, leading to increased police and public safety.

Capability to identify links between people, firearms, organisations and locations, and enhanced search and reporting capabilities.

Scheduled delivery We plan to deliver this project 36 months after the Law Crime and Community Safety Council approves the business case.

Budget $4.436 million (proposed budget)

Status In April 2014 the National Police Senior Officers Group endorsed the NFI Stage 1 business case, and recommended it for consideration and approval by the Law Crime and Community Safety Council.

We will present the business case for approval in July 2014.

Australian Ballistic Information Network The Australian Ballistic Information Network (ABIN) will help police across Australia electronically match crime scene ballistic evidence to the weapon used in the crime or link crimes if the same firearm is used at multiple scenes. This national solution will build on existing ballistic libraries that operate in a number of states, and will allow police to search for a ballistic signature of a firearm to see if it is linked to other crimes across Australia.

We procured the underlying Forensic Technology Integrated Ballistic Identification System (IBIS) technology. The IBIS® integrates with the existing equipment used by the New South Wales Police Force, South Australia Police, Queensland Police Service and Australian Federal Police.

KEY FACTS: AUSTRALIAN BALLISTIC INFORMATION NETWORK

Outcome Capability to electronically match ballistic evidence from crime scenes to the firearm used, helping police solve and prevent firearm-related crime.

Scheduled delivery The ABIN is scheduled to be delivered in July 2014.

We began back capturing test fires, cartridge cases and projectiles in June 2014 and completion is scheduled for June 2015.

Budget $6.471million

Status As at 30 June 2014, the project was progressing on schedule, with installation and implementation of ABIN equipment completed in New South Wales, Western Australia, Queensland, South Australia and Northern Territory.

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Australia’s various police agencies share essential policing information through the National Police Reference System (NPRS).

POLICE REFERENCE SERVICES HELPING POLICE SHARE ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

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National Police Reference System The National Police Reference System (NPRS) enables Australian police agencies to share essential policing information with other police agencies. The NPRS provides key reference data to support police officers, investigators and analysts.

The NPRS records core data such as name, identity information and photographs, information on warnings, warrants and wanted persons, offence history, protection and violence orders, firearms involvements, and information relating to the child protection register.

The NPRS also contains information on missing persons, unidentified persons and bodies, and escapees.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NPRS is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provide business support to the NPRS for 24-hours-a-day, every day.

NPRS AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % 99.5% 99.7% 99.5%

NPRS RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Total number of distinct users 55 000 68 000 70 000

Total number of person searches 33.2 million 35 million 38 million

Total number of persons of interest 10.3 million 10.3 million 10.7 million

Total number of persons of interest with photos 1.7 million 1.8 million 2.1 million

Total number of photos 5.3 million 6.1 million 7 million*

Total number of unique NPRS identifiers 3.6 million 3.6 million 3.7 million

* includes 261 641 from AUSCHECK

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Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget We delivered the following improvement opportunities this reporting year.

NPRS SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

NPRS Web Application refresh This project delivered several benefits including: • upgrading the user interface to comply with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

• improving workflow and usability for police agencies

• providing more data fields for police agencies

• repairing known bugs within the application

• undertaking enhancements requested by police agencies to support emerging operational policing needs

• providing a more accurate and effective audit capture.

We delivered this refresh as part of business as usual, completing it on schedule and releasing it in December 2013.

As this was a business as usual activity, it did not have a specific budget allocated. The total cost was $0.443 million.

The Aviation Security Identification Card/Maritime Security Identification Card (ASIC/MSIC) Information Sharing Capability

This project delivered a capability for police to view ASIC and MSIC applicant and current cardholder data within NPRS.

We delivered this initiative on schedule, with the technical solution applied to the NPRS in June 2014.

We also successfully applied the associated AusCheck dataset to the NPRS database ahead of our 30 June 2014 deadline.

For more information, see Police reference projects on page 47.

Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised

We identified improvement opportunities and added the following police reference initiatives to our annual Work Plan this reporting year.

NPRS INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

Name Matching Upgrade December 2013, the CrimTrac Board of Management approved for us to begin the NPRS Name Matching Upgrade.

The project will replace the existing name matching search tool used by NPRS with the newly acquired software Informatica Identity Resolution (IIR).

The Aviation Security Identification Card / Maritime Security Identification Card (ASIC/MSIC)

July 2013, the ASIC/MSIC Information Sharing Capability was added to our annual Work Plan at the request of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department.

This initiative will share ASIC and MSIC information between the AusCheck system and police.

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Police reference projects Aviation Security Identification Card / Maritime Security Identification Card (ASIC/MSIC) Information Sharing Capability Through the ASIC/MSIC Information Sharing Capability project we will deliver a capability for police to view ASIC and MSIC applicants’ and current cardholders’ data within the NPRS.

KEY FACTS: ASIC/MISC

Outcome Information about ASIC and MSIC applicants and current cardholders is shared between the AusCheck system and police.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $0.189 million

Status We introduced the ASIC/MSIC changes to the NPRS on 10 June 2014. The back capture of AusCheck data was completed ahead of schedule before 30 June 2014.

Name Matching Project Upgrade Name matching is a critical component of our police reference and police checking services. This project will upgrade the existing name matching software within the National Police Reference Service to the new Informatica Identity Resolution software.

KEY FACTS: NAME MATCHING PROJECT UPGRADE

Outcome The most accurate name matching capability possible to support the National Police Reference System and the National Police Checking Service.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $0.757 million

Status Development work was completed in March 2014.

Police agency representatives will have the opportunity to evaluate the new capabilities before late July 2014, before we introduce the upgraded software.

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We are developing the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) to help police and other law enforcement agencies gather valuable data about cybercrime and to enhance information and contribute to improved responses to cybercrime across Australia.

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HELPING TO IMPROVE INFORMATION ABOUT AND RESPONSES TO CYBERCRIME

CYBERCRIME REPORTING

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Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network We are developing a national online reporting facility for cybercrime, called the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN).

Members of the public will be able to use the ACORN website to report cybercrime. The ACORN will also explain how to recognise and avoid common forms of cybercrime, and provide advice for people who have fallen victim to cybercrime.

The ACORN may refer cybercrime reports to police and government agencies for information and action as appropriate. It will help to make data collection easier for police and improve information on how cybercrime affects Australians. There is a significant opportunity to capture repeat cybercrime instances and, in turn, enable police and government agencies to respond effectively.

The ACORN will make it easier for people to report cybercrime by removing the need to phone or attend a police station to make a report.

Benefits include:

• better access to reporting facilities in Australia, leading to an increase in cybercrime reporting

• enhanced access to educational and prevention strategies for all Australians

• increased rate of cybercrime resolution

• reduced duplication, time and costs of police effort.

KEY FACTS: AUSTRALIAN CYBERCRIME ONLINE REPORTING NETWORK

Outcome Cybercrime frequency and impact is reduced, as a national online system allows the public to report and find out about cybercrime.

Scheduled delivery In the next reporting period.

Budget $1.454 million

Status We are on track to deliver ACORN in late-2014.

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Malicious software attacks, hardware tampering, leaking of confidential data, hacking and attacks on websites— cybercrime is a growing focus for law enforcement around the world.

Criminals exploit the Internet because it is globally connected, borderless, anonymous, fast, low-risk, easily accessible and contains high volumes of rich data.

The Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) is critical to Australia’s response and developed as a result of the 2013 National Plan to Combat Cybercrime, ACORN will enable the public to report instances of cybercrime

online. This will make it easier for police agencies to collect information and essential data and help to ensure that Australia becomes a harder target for cybercriminals.

CrimTrac is developing the technical solution for the ACORN. It is now in the final stage of development and on track for release later this year. This is a significant project for us, as cybercrime is fast becoming a major focus nationally and internationally.

In preparation for ACORN’s launch in late 2014, we hosted a national conference in June to promote the benefits to law enforcement stakeholders.

The conference brought together representatives from ACT Policing, the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department, Australian Crime Commission, Australian Federal Police, Australian Strategic Policy Institute, Commonwealth Department of Communications, Victoria Police, Western Australia Police, NSW Fair Trading, the Embassy of the United States of America, and the New Zealand High Commission.

JOINING FORCES AGAINST CYBERCRIME THROUGH ACORN

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Featured industry experts and international speakers provided insights on different aspects of cybercrime:

• Mr John Lyons, Chief Executive, International Cyber Security Protection Alliance (ICSPA) spoke about the ICSPA’s role in cybercrime, implications of cybercrime for business communities, and the meteoric growth in cyber-criminality and possible measures to help mitigate the phenomenon.

• Mr Khoo Boon Hui, Senior Deputy Secretary, Singapore Ministry of Home Affairs, Former President, INTERPOL, emphasised the implications of cybercrime for citizens and the challenges for the community and law enforcement agencies. He also outlined the role of INTERPOL and international collaboration in responding to cybercrime.

• Ms Johanna Hladun, Attache (legal), Embassy of the United States of America highlighted the international responses to cybercrime, and the partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National White Collar Crime Centre.

• Assistant Commissioner Tim Morris, National Manager, High Tech Crime Operations, Australian Federal Police spoke about the international experience of cybercrime compared with the Australian experience, and the current threat level for cybercrime in Australia. He emphasised the important role of CrimTrac in building a technical capability that will bring the Commonwealth, states and territories together to fight cybercrime.

• Assistant Commissioner Peter Cotter, NSW Police Force facilitated a question and answer session with the guest speakers.

• Our CEO, Mr Doug Smith outlined Australia’s approach to addressing cybercrime, the ACORN system, what it means for police agencies, and the benefits. This set the landscape for Detective Inspector Tim Thomas, Western Australia Police, together with Dr John Moss, Acting National Manager Collection and Analytics, Australian Crime Commission and Mr Steve Arundel, Senior Project Manager, ACORN to showcase the ACORN system.

• Dr Tobias Feakin, Senior Analyst National Security, Australian Strategic Policy Institute concluded the conference as dinner speaker.

Successful promotion of ACORN will enhance its effectiveness. The ACORN Conference was a positive event to collaborate with stakeholders—attracting some 60 delegates—providing the platform for thought-provoking discussions and paving the way for ACORN to be a successful national capability.

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National Police Checking Services help to ensure the integrity of individuals placed in a position of trust— enhancing the safety of the community.

NATIONAL POLICE CHECKING SERVICE

HELPING

CHECK IF PEOPLE HAVE POLICE RECORDS

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National Police Checking Service The National Police Checking Service (NPCS) is delivered to Australian police and other organisations that are accredited with CrimTrac. The service supports their processes for assessing the suitability of people applying for employment, Australian citizenship or appointment to positions of trust.

Community benefit A total of 160 organisations across all sectors of the community use our National Police Checking Service to help screen personnel, volunteers or employees working with children or vulnerable groups, or otherwise occupying positions of trust. This helps to minimise the risk of appointing someone unsuitable or with an adverse police record.

During the reporting period the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse drew national attention to working-with-children checks. The Australian Capital Territory and Tasmanian governments also both established their working-with-children legislative screening units, and both became CrimTrac Accredited Agencies.

Key performance indicator 1: Systems and services are highly available and provide greater access to information • The NPCS is available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week for a total of 165 hours per week allowing 3 hours of scheduled outages per week for routine maintenance and upgrades.

• We provide customer support to CrimTrac accredited organisations from 8:30am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

• We provide business support to the NPCS IT systems from 8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday.

• We accredited 17 new organisations during the reporting period.

NPCS AVAILABILITY TARGET

YEAR TARGET KPI 2012-13 2013-14

Availability % measured only during business support hours

98.5% 99.6% 99.9%

NPCS RECORDS AND SEARCHES

YEAR 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Total number of checks 3.08 million 3.21 million 3.74 million

Total number of checks referred 869 000 881 000 1.05 million

Total number of referrals 1.36 million 1.47 million 1.73 million

Total number of checks: is the total number of requests for police history information submitted to the National Police Checking Support System. Total number of checks referred: is the number of checks where CrimTrac National Names Index found a potential match. Total number of referrals: is the where potential matches were referred to our police partners for further investigation.

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Key performance indicator 2: Agreed system enhancements are completed to quality, schedule and budget We developed new Terms of Service during the reporting period, to take account of amendments

to the Privacy Act 1988 in March 2014 and align with the new Australian Privacy Principles. We also developed educational activities for our NPCS stakeholders, including assurance monitoring and support materials to help accredited organisations meet their compliance obligations. We will begin rolling out the new Terms of Service and educational material in July 2014.

Key performance indicator 3: Opportunities to improve information sharing are identified, assessed and prioritised We identified improvement opportunities and added the following NPCS-related initiatives to

our annual Work Plan this reporting year.

NPCS INITIATIVES ADDED TO WORK PLAN

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

Criminal History Exchange with New Zealand In January 2012 the Prime Ministers of Australia and New Zealand agreed to the exchange of criminal history information between the two countries.

As at 30 June 2014, this project was on hold pending outcomes from the Law, Crime and Community Safety Council.

Key performance indicator 4: Ninety-five per cent of criminal history checks are completed within 10 working days

NPCS SERVICE LEVEL TARGETS - REGULAR CHECKS

YEAR TARGET KPI 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

% of criminal history checks completed in 10 working days

95% 97% 96% 91.6%

• 91.61% of police history checks were completed within 10 working days.

Key performance indicator 5: Ninety-five per cent of urgent criminal history checks are completed within five working days

NPCS SERVICE LEVEL TARGETS - URGENT CHECKS

YEAR TARGET KPI 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

% of criminal history checks completed in 10 working days

95% 93% 90% 94.4%

• 94.35% of urgent checks were completed within 10 working days. This was below our target of 95%.

KPIs 4 and 5 state that 95% of routine and urgent checks will be processed within 10 working days. We fell short of this target as a result of an increased demand for the service. As indicated a large number of checks were referred to police for further investigation increasing their workload markedly. We will continue to work with our police partners to improve the service.

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Our robust governance and assurance framework ensures transparent, ethical and accountable decision-making and helps to manage risks and partner relations. Effective corporate management helps us achieve our goals.

TRANSPARENT, ETHICAL AND ACCOUNTABLE DECISION-MAKING

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Corporate Governance Our robust corporate governance and assurance framework provides rigour and discipline to the way we deliver our work. It ensures transparent, ethical and accountable decision-making, and helps us manage risk and our partner relations.

Governance bodies form a key part our assurance processes. They include the CrimTrac Board of Management, our Strategic Issues Group, Chief Information Officers Committee, the Audit and Risk Committee, and Portfolio Board. These committees enable us to work collaboratively with our police partners to ensure we achieve desired outcomes for police.

Governance framework Figure 3.1: CrimTrac Governance Framework

Minister for Justice The Minister for Justice, the Hon Michael Keenan MP, has Commonwealth responsibility for CrimTrac. The Minister provides guidance on the Government’s strategic priorities for CrimTrac.

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Law, Crime and Community Safety Council The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting on 13 December 2013 decided to amalgamate the former Standing Council on Law and Justice (SCLJ) and the Standing Council on Police and Emergency Management (SCPEM) to form the Law, Crime and Community Safety Council (LCCSC).

The LCCSC considers matters related to law reform, law enforcement and crime reduction, as well as emergency management, including policy, operations and service provision. The LCCSC is responsible for approving our strategic direction and initiatives that require legislation or special funding consideration.

CrimTrac Board of Management The CrimTrac Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) establishes the CrimTrac Board of Management, which comprises all Australia’s police commissioners, the ACT Chief Police Officer, and a Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department.

The Board is responsible for the efficient and effective delivery of the CrimTrac initiative.

On 3 July 2013, Commissioner Ian Stewart of the Queensland Police Service succeeded Commissioner Andrew Scipione of the New South Wales Police Force as Chair of the Board.

The Board held five meetings during the reporting period: 3 July 2013, 5 September 2013, 28 November 2013, 13 March 2014, and 10 June 2014.

The Board approved the build and implementation of:

• Australian Ballistics Information Network Project (3 July 2013)

• National Automated Fingerprint Identification System Capacity Upgrade Project (3 July 2013).

• National Firearms Interface Project (13 March 2014, subject to LCCSC approved)

• National DNA Investigative Capability Project (13 March 2014)

• Biometric Identification Services initial scoping. This includes the replacement of the National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (10 June 2014)

• a national information capability for long-term missing persons, unidentified human remains and disaster victim identification (10 June 2014).

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Commissioner Ian Stewart APM

Queensland Police Service

Chair, CrimTrac Board of Management

Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan APM

Western Australia Police

Commissioner Gary Burns BM APM

South Australia Police

Deputy Chair, CrimTrac Board of Management

Commissioner John McRoberts APM

Northern Territory Police

Chief Police Officer Rudi Lammers APM

Australian Capital Territory Policing

Commissioner Andrew Scipione APM

New South Wales Police Force

Commissioner Darren Hine APM

Tasmania Police

Katherine Jones

Deputy Secretary, Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department

Chief Commissioner Ken Lay APM

Victoria Police

Commissioner Tony Negus APM

Australian Federal Police

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Strategic Issues Group Our Strategic Issues Group (SIG) provides strategic, considered and aggregated advice to the Board of Management in relation to national information-sharing solutions.

This advisory function:

• identifies all key operational, technical and financial implications

• identifies and, where possible, eliminates obstacles to successful implementation of our solutions

• ensures appropriate representation for police agencies on CrimTrac program and project boards to align work activities

• contributes to our annual business planning, prioritisation and performance measurement.

The SIG comprises representatives at a senior executive level from all Australian police agencies, the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department and our Executive.

The SIG met four times during the reporting period: 20 August 2013, 12 November 2013, 18 February 2014, and 13 May 2014.

Chief Information Officers' Committee The Chief Information Officers' Committee (CIOC) was established by the CrimTrac Board of Management through the Strategic Issues Group. It provides ICT leadership, direction and assurance to the Board of Management, through the Strategic Issues Group, for our ICT services and initiatives.

During the reporting period, the CIOC:

• developed Terms of Reference, which were approved by the Board of Management in September 2013

• identified the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) as a successful international framework by which various government agencies can share data—the NIEM was subsequently adopted by the Board of Management to support information sharing for the police and wider justice community

• established system availability measures and disaster recovery targets for each of our systems, which were subsequently approved by the Board of Management

• started developing principles to support increased software sharing between police agencies

• provided advice to support the development of the CrimTrac ICT Blueprint for National Police Information Sharing 2014-2018

• provided strategic guidance on several ICT initiatives to ensure effective coordination and interoperability between CrimTrac services and police ICT systems.

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Members of the CIOC include the Chief Information Officer (CIO) or Chief Technology Officer from each police agency, as well as the CIO of New Zealand Police and the National Manager of the Australian Crime Commission. The CIOC met four times during the reporting period.

Audit and Risk Committee The CrimTrac Audit and Risk Committee provides independent assurance and advice on our risk, control and compliance frameworks and financial statement responsibilities. The Committee reports to our CEO and the CrimTrac Board of Management.

The Committee is chaired by an independent member, and consists of three other independent members and one CrimTrac member. The CEO appoints all Committee members, including the Chair. Committee membership includes:

• Mr Will Laurie—Chair (independent member)

• Dr David Lacey—Deputy Chair (independent member)

• Mr Trevor Kennedy—representing the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department

• Ms Katherine Van Gurp, Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services—representing our partner agencies

• Ms Carolyn Nixon, CrimTrac Chief of Staff—representing CrimTrac.

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) is also invited to attend each committee meeting. The current ANAO representative is Mr Sean Benfield.

The Committee met quarterly during 2013-14, with an additional meeting in September 2013 to review and recommend the approval of the 2012-13 Financial Statements. The Committee’s key outcomes during the reporting period included reviews of:

• our enterprise risk and control frameworks

• our 2012-13 Financial Statements and Certificate of Compliance

• the performance of our internal audit function, and endorsement of our Internal Audit Strategy 2013-16 and Audit Work Plan

• tabled audit reports and the implementation of recommendations

• updates on business continuity planning and disaster recovery arrangements

• our Fraud Control Plan 2013-2015 and fraud control activities

• the results of an assessment of the Committee’s performance and associated recommendations.

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Portfolio Board The Portfolio Board (PFB) governs and provides strategic oversight of CrimTrac’s portfolio of programs and projects. Its role is to:

• make investment decisions

• ensure that the portfolio of work is in line with strategic and organisational goals

• continually monitor that the work being undertaken remains valid to operational policy.

The PFB operates as an internal board with a focus on investment decisions. It is the primary approver for all internal projects. The PFB provides, through the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), recommendations to the SIG and the BoM on external projects.

The PFB is comprised of members of our senior executive, and from relevant directors representing various interests including ICT, legal, finance, business, and strategy. The Portfolio Board had 12 regular meetings plus six out of session meetings throughout the year.

Risk management We apply an enterprise-wide risk management framework that helps us make informed decisions, while also meeting corporate accountabilities.

The process of identifying, analysing, treating, monitoring and reviewing risks is embedded into all of our functions and contributes directly to achieving our corporate goals.

During the reporting period, we:

• reviewed risk management requirements under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and developed a capability improvement priority plan to ensure compliance with the PGPA Act

• continued to develop the framework for managing enterprise risk, as well as for specific risk functions, including project management, security, fraud and safety

• tested and confirmed identified enterprise risks and treatments

• delivered training on enterprise risk management to all staff through our annual Corporate Awareness e-learning program

• developed and implemented an Internal Control Framework, which includes mapping CrimTrac’s key controls, control ownership and monitoring activities

• developed and implemented a Security Risk Plan

• conducted a fraud risk assessment, identifying and implementing recommendations for strengthening controls where required.

Our risk management continues to mature and will be informed by corporate objectives identified in our CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020.

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Internal Audit Our internal audit function provides assurance to the CEO and the CrimTrac Board of Management that our financial and operational controls work efficiently and effectively. Our risk-based assurance program has a strong focus on performance audit activity, while providing assurance on key control areas.

This program of work helps us deliver on our strategic objectives and creates an environment of continuous improvement. Activities completed during 2013-14 provided assurance on:

• fraud and information management arrangements

• service delivery within the National Police Checking Service

• the relocation of our secondary data centre

• IT security accreditation

• elements of our disaster recovery arrangements

• information and records management.

We accepted all recommendations made as part of this work, with our Audit and Risk Committee continuing to monitor implementation.

Fraud control We are committed to implementing and maintaining fraud controls and meeting all reporting and compliance obligations.

• During the reporting period, we finalised our biennial fraud risk assessment and released our Fraud Control Plan 2013-2015, including substantially reviewing and revising our Fraud Control Policy.

We continue to raise awareness of fraud risk and fraud control responsibilities through:

• induction training for new starters

• a dedicated fraud awareness module within the annual Corporate Awareness e-learning program for all staff

• the release of the Fraud Control Plan 2013-15 and the revised Fraud Control Policy.

Our next fraud risk assessment and fraud control plan, due in mid-2015, will focus more strongly on corruption assessment and control.

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Security Our security function helps us achieve our strategic objectives by providing security services that meet the needs of key stakeholders.

Throughout the reporting period, we assessed and reported compliance against the Protective Security Policy Framework, meeting all 33 mandatory requirements. These include:

• formalising several security policies and procedures

• introducing physical site accreditation

• improving clearance procedures

• assessing against the National eAuthentication Framework (NeAF).

We also finalised accreditation of CrimTrac’s baseline environment against the Australian Government Information Security Manual (ISM). We will now shift our focus to system-level assessments. This activity involves supporting new projects, including the Australian Ballistic Information Network (ABIN) and the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN), to ensure they achieve required ISM compliance.

We also made significant progress towards compliance against the Australian Signals Directorate ‘ASD Top 4’.

We strengthened our security assurance capability by completing an extensive Active Vulnerability Assessment (AVA) incorporating public, partner and internal attack vectors. This led to us establishing a penetration testing partner to ensure ongoing and regular testing of high-risk assets.

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A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y

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We are accountable for all our decisions and activities.

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External scrutiny In addition to our obligations to the CrimTrac Board of Management, we are accountable to a range of Commonwealth bodies including the Commonwealth Ombudsman, Australian Public Service Commission, Office of the Australian Information Commissioner, Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity and Australian National Audit Office.

The Australian National Audit Office conducts performance audits of the efficiency and effectiveness of our operations and financial audits of our financial statements. CrimTrac was not selected for participation in external performance audits during the reporting period.

During the reporting period, CrimTrac has not been the subject of any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals.

Section 76 of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013 requires us to report annually to the Commonwealth Ombudsman on the handling of public interest disclosures within our agency. We complied with this request for the reporting period.

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner includes the Freedom of Information Commissioner and the Privacy Commissioner who review our compliance with information transparency, freedom of information (FOI) and privacy. During the year, the Commission notified us of one proposed review of an FOI request.

On 1 July 2013 we came under the jurisdiction of the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity (ACLEI), following a 2011 recommendation from the Parliamentary Joint Committee on the ACLEI. The committee recommended that CrimTrac come under the jurisdiction of ACLEI due to the value of the information we hold.

Asset management Information technology software is our major non-financial asset. Asset purchases are initially recognised at cost, except for purchases of less than $5 000.00, which are expensed in the year of acquisition. Assets with a cost of less than $5 000.00 but purchased in bulk are capitalised where the bulk purchase cost exceeds $25 000.00.

Externally purchased third-party software is reported at fair value. Internally developed software assets are reported at cost. We capitalise internally developed software according to Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) 138 Intangible Assets and relevant accounting guidance. Internally developed software assets include costs generated during the application development phase of a project, but exclude costs relating to preliminary and post implementation phases—these costs are expensed. The project costs capitalised during the financial year under the policy were $2.947 million. This includes costs for completion of some developments transferred to the asset register during the year and other major projects still within the development stages.

Our full asset accounting policies are at Note 1 in the Financial statements—Summary of significant accounting policies on page 100. Asset information is also included in our Financial statements.

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Purchasing and procurement Due to our unique function, we undertake considerable procurement for an agency of our size, both in terms of volume and value. We are especially active in procuring information and communications technology, which we do efficiently through Whole of Australian Government Arrangements and other Commonwealth contracts and panel arrangements.

In recent years, we have improved our procurement and contracting process to deliver greater efficiency, transparency and better record-keeping.

In September 2013, we released agency-wide procurement and contracting guidance material based on Commonwealth policy and legislation to achieve efficiencies in CrimTrac procurement processes. We updated this guidance material in preparation for the commencement of the Public Governance Performance and Accountability Act 2013 from 1 July 2014.

This reporting year, three tiers of procurement training were available to CrimTrac staff.

• More than 170 staff attended internally-run procurement and contracting training.

• Many executive level staff with spending delegations completed a Certificate IV in Government (Procurement and Contracting) course and received their certificates in November 2013. We will continue this training in 2014-15 for selected staff.

• Online procurement and contracting training as part of our mandatory Corporate Awareness training program (completed annually).

In March 2014 we created the Commercial Unit to centralise Procurement Support Officers within the Legal Team. During 2014-15, the Commercial Unit will focus on contract management and aims to develop tools, guidance and training to improve Contract Management within CrimTrac.

Consultancy services, competitive tendering and contracting We engage consultants when we require specialist expertise or independent research, review or assessment to assist in our decision-making. We mainly select consultants through existing Commonwealth contractual arrangements. Decisions to engage consultants were made in accordance with the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and related regulations, including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

The main purposes for which we engage consultants are:

• legal services—general legal advice

• specialist advisory ICT services

• independent evaluations and review

• business process analysis, design and other advice

• internal audit services

• property valuations.

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During 2013-14, we entered into nine new consultancy contracts involving total actual expenditure of $368 220.73. In addition, nine ongoing consultancy contracts were active during 2013-14 year, involving total actual expenditure of $380 011.06.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website www.tenders.gov.au.

During the reporting period, no contracts were exempt from publication on AusTender.

ANAO access clauses All CrimTrac contracts entered into during 2013-14, valued over $100 000, include Australian National Audit Office access clauses.

Discretionary grants We do not provide any discretionary grants.

Ethical standards We continue to embed the Australian Pubic Service (APS) Values into everyday work practices, supporting a culture of integrity and accountability. CrimTrac’s Chief Executive Instructions require all officials to ensure that actions in dealing with Commonwealth resources are consistent with the APS Values and Code of Conduct.

We fall under the jurisdiction of the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, which places additional legislative obligations on us to ensure integrity remains at the highest possible standard.

Ethical values and standards are included in our development programs and training for all staff. For example, we provided information sessions to all staff about the changes to the Public Service Act 1999 that came into effect on 1 July 2013.

Integrity Advisory Committee In 2013 we established our Integrity Advisory Committee (IAC) to advise our senior leaders on how CrimTrac can continue to grow as an integrity-based organisation.

The IAC provides advice on potential integrity issues arising from the risk framework and on ways we can address these risks. This includes advice on:

• upholding the APS Values and the Code of Conduct, preventing fraud and managing ethical challenges associated with relationships and conflict of interest

• enhancing partner agency and stakeholder confidence in CrimTrac’s integrity

• meeting best practice standards.

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Privacy We conduct our business in accordance with the Privacy Act 1988 and ensure that we have a range of privacy compliance processes in place.

We balance privacy considerations with delivering effective information solutions for police. We collect, retain, collate and organise law enforcement information to support and facilitate the exchange of information between law enforcement agencies. We do not alter, modify or remove information we receive from police agencies without the express permission of the originating agency. This means that we must refer any requests to correct details in our policing information systems to the originating agency. We have established a process to manage this referral that minimises the administrative burden on individuals and on police agencies.

Records management We are committed to achieving compliance with Australian Government Digital Transition Policy by October 2014. Following the establishment of an Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) Implementation Project in the previous reporting period, we have been working towards achieving compliance with the policy.

We have assessed ourselves using the National Archives Check-up 2.0 tool and continue to meet requirements of the Senate continuing order.

Advertising and market research During 2013-14 we did not incur any costs relating to market research, polling or direct mail, or conduct any advertising or marketing campaigns.

Freedom of information The Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) creates a right for members of the public to access documents possessed by Commonwealth agencies. We are required to publish information to the public as part of the FOI Act Information Publication Scheme (IPS).

We have well-established processes to meet our obligations under the FOI Act and IPS. In accordance with the IPS requirements, we publish our IPS plan on our website.

During the reporting period, we received 10 FOI requests for access to documents. We met all requests within the statutory timeframes. Eight requests were for access to the applicants’ personal information (in one case, to information held by CrimTrac on the applicant’s deceased parent). The other request was withdrawn.

While the Commonwealth FOI Act obliges agencies to consider requests to amend or annotate records by an FOI applicant, this is not possible for information provided by police agencies to CrimTrac systems. Applications to amend personal information are directed to the state or territory police agency that provided the information.

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Ecologically sustainable development We are committed to providing an ecologically sustainable business that adheres to government and industry best practice. This saves us costs through reduced resource use, and delivers benefits to society through reduced waste and pollution.

We maintained a National Australian Built Environmental Rating Scheme (NABERS) whole of building rating of 4.5 stars, taking into account the purchase of 8.6% accredited green power. We continue to work with the property lessor to improve the performance of our premises.

During the reporting period, we diverted away from landfill:

• 8 480 kilograms of paper for recycling

• 144 cubic metres of co-mingled waste for recycling

• 1.58 tons of organic waste to vermiculture.

Tenant light and power usage decreased to 6 355 mega joules per person, 1 145 mega joules below the Energy Efficiency in Government Operations policy target of 7 500 mega joules per person.

By implementing our ACT Smart Office Program together with increased staff education, we reduced general waste to landfill to 106 cubic metres, 26% less than last year.

We continue to work on ICT initiatives to improve efficiency, in line with the Australian Government ICT Sustainability Plan 2010-2015. During the reporting period, key outcomes included:

• paper usage of 6.7 reams per person, below the 2015 target of 9 reams per person

• replacing our existing storage area network with a key focus on energy efficiency.

Correction of material errors in previous annual report Our 2012-13 Annual Report stated that 866 000 National Police History checks were referred to police for further investigation. The correct figure is 881 000.

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P E O P L E

M A N A G E M E N T

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ENABLING OUR WORKFORCE TO DELIVER ON THE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES OF POLICE AGENCIES

PART 5: PEOPLE MANAGEMENT

We optimise our workforce to achieve business outcomes.

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Our people Over the reporting period, we implemented strategies which enabled our workforce to support the delivery of the strategic priorities of police agencies. Our ability to optimise our workforce is central to achieving our business outcomes.

As at 30 June 2014, our workforce consisted of:

• 221 (96.1%) ongoing employees and nine (3.9%) non-ongoing employees

• 88.7% full-time employees and 11.3% part-time employees

• 50% female staff

• 50% male staff

• 4.8% of staff identifying as having a disability.

During the year, 28 staff ceased employment and 27 staff commenced employment with the agency.

Our workforce metrics indicate improvement in organisational health across key measures, and we continued to monitor and foster a positive working environment through staff surveys, combined with regular communication and consultation activities. We also progressed key workforce engagement strategies during the reporting period, including:

• regular meetings of the CrimTrac Staff Consultative Committee, Reconciliation Action Plan Steering Committee and Workplace Health and Wellbeing Committee

• all-staff workplace respect training

• regular portfolio ‘stand up’ meetings with the Senior Executive

• staff engagement sessions with senior leaders.

We continued to support the Australian Government’s APS interim recruitment arrangements, which prioritise redeploying existing APS staff to vacant positions. Our Executive Staffing Committee continued to consider all permanent and longer-term temporary staffing actions. This committee is responsible for managing our overall workforce numbers against agreed budget allocation.

Our inaugural ICT Graduate Program was successful, with two graduates completing their intensive development program in 2013-14. In addition we engaged an additional three ICT graduates through the Australian Government ICT Graduate Program coordinated by the Department of Finance. Our ongoing participation in this program contributes to the development and maintenance of our future workforce capability.

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Innovative, high-end ICT solutions are at the heart of the service and products we provide to our police partners. To continue building our essential capabilities, and help develop the ICT leaders of the future, we ran our first ICT Graduate Program in 2013.

The program aims to build strong ICT professionals who can lead the Australian Public Service through the exciting and challenging times ahead.

Our graduates, Shawn and Anil, quickly showed the promise of bright futures— winning the 2013 Australian Government ICT Graduate Program ICT major project outstanding achievement award and coming second in the ICT major project video presentation award. They were the only graduates shortlisted in both award categories.

Introducing a graduate program reinforces our commitment to engaging and developing the diverse workforce that is critical to CrimTrac’s success, now and into the future.

Anil and Shawn are representative of the varied academic and working backgrounds of our employees. Shawn completed a Bachelor of Information Technology in Networking and has relocated to Canberra from Brisbane. Anil moved from Melbourne to join

CrimTrac, and brings previous public sector experience and post-graduate qualifications including a Masters of Information Technology.

Shawn and Anil rotated through several of our business areas during their first 12 months with us. They also completed a comprehensive development program, incorporating activities delivered by the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC), which complement our in-house development activities.

‘I found the year challenging and was impressed by CrimTrac’s technical capabilities,’ said Shawn. ‘My work was rewarding, as I realised that my efforts can help law enforcement and benefit society. I am grateful for the support and mentoring I received from my supervisors, team members and other CrimTrac colleagues, and I’m looking forward to taking on greater responsibility and contributing to CrimTrac’s future success.’

Anil agreed that the range of experiences and graduate learning and development programs were excellent.

‘I’ve enjoyed interacting with CrimTrac’s customers and stakeholders and troubleshooting their technical issues in consultation with senior colleagues. Winning the outstanding achievement award with Shawn was

a highlight. My goal is to become a specialist in integration technologies and transition into a management role,’ said Anil.

Our ICT Graduate Program is delivered in partnership with the Department of Finance and the APSC. The program provides us with a holistic approach to attracting, selecting and developing talented university graduates who are seeking to build a career in ICT in the public sector. It targets individuals who demonstrate ability in ICT disciplines which are considered essential to our ongoing workforce requirements. The development component of the program provides our graduates with the fundamental skills required to work as effective members of CrimTrac and the broader Australian Public Service.

The Department of Finance, through the Australian Government Information Management Office, maintains responsibility for the administration of the Australian Government’s suite of ICT entry-level programs. The Australian Public Service Commission is responsible for administration of the APS Graduate Development Program.

DEVELOPING FUTURE ICT LEADERS

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CrimTrac’s ICT Graduates, Shawn and Anil, accepting their ICT major project outstanding achievement award.

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Workplace relations The CrimTrac Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014 was the source of employment terms and conditions for all Australian Public Service Level 1 (APS1) to Executive Level 2 (EL2) employees throughout the reporting period. Our Enterprise Agreement has positioned CrimTrac as an attractive employer, while also providing flexibility to respond to our changing workforce needs.

There is no provision for performance pay under our Enterprise Agreement.

All Senior Executive Service (SES) staff are covered by Section 24 determinations under the Public Service Act 1999 for their terms and conditions of employment.

In March 2014, the Australian Government released the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy. Our Enterprise Agreement nominally expired on 30 June 2014 and we will be developing the next Enterprise Agreement in accordance with this policy.

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Staffing overview Table 5.1: CrimTrac staff as at 30 June 2014

CLASSIFICATION

FULL-TIME PART-TIME CASUAL

TOTAL

MALE FEMALE MALE FEMALE MALE FEMALE

APS 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 2 5 0 0 0 0 7

APS 4 15 15 0 2 0 0 32

APS 5 14 20 0 1 0 0 35

APS 6 20 21 1 7 0 0 49

EL 1 46 26 1 12 0 0 85

EL 2 13 4 0 1 0 0 18

SES1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

CEO 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

Total 112 92 3 23 0 0 230

Table 5.2: CrimTrac salary ranges by classification as at 30 June 2014

CLASSIFICATION SALARY RANGE

APS 1 $47 618-$52 625

APS 2 $53 889-$59 757

APS 3 $61 380-$66 245

APS 4 $68 409-$74 277

APS 5 $76 302-$80 909

APS 6 $82 410-$94 667

EL 1 $103 090-$125 434

EL 2 $129 197-$149 609

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Work health and safety We continue to build and embed work health and safety (WHS) practices into everyday operations. Our main focus has been on providing rehabilitation services to staff and implementing policies, guidance and training. Key WHS achievements include:

• implementing recommendations from the Rehabilitation Management System review to support injured employees returning to work

• implementing the Psychological Health Injury Prevention Strategy

• providing compulsory staff training on promoting a workplace free from bullying and harassment

• providing information sessions for staff on topics such as change management and conflict resolution

• merging our WHS and Wellbeing Committees to strengthen links between employee wellbeing and WHS outcomes

• successfully integrating health and safety practices into our agency-wide restructure and office relocation activities

• hosting presentations by St Johns Ambulance and WorkWatch, in recognition of National Safety Week—including a first aid information session and demonstrations on how to use a defibrillator and administer an Epi-pen injection.

We continue to support employee health and wellbeing through:

• offering influenza vaccinations for all staff

• promoting workstation assessments and use of ergonomic equipment

• providing specialist health support services through accredited rehabilitation providers and employee assistance programs

• training for first aid officers and health and safety representatives.

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Learning and development Maintaining a skilled and capable workforce is fundamental to delivering on our key objectives. We continue to foster a professional development culture through targeted learning and development activities. During the reporting period, we enhanced our workforce capability through specific training programs including:

• Online Corporate Awareness—provides training on the legislative and policy requirements affecting all CrimTrac employees and contractors

• Certificate IV in Frontline Management—focuses on enhancing core management skills. Successful completion results in a nationally recognised qualification

• Promoting a Harassment Free Workplace—promotes awareness of legislation around workplace harassment and an employee’s obligation to create a respectful and courteous workplace

• Leading Change Management Program—provides employees with tools to analyse, scope, plan for and implement change programs for CrimTrac

• Shaping Strategy Development Workshop—fosters strategic thinking, including environmental scanning and best practice models and tools for developing strategies

• CrimTrac Executive Coaching Program—provides targeted one-on-one professional development support with a focus on personal growth, career development, leadership, self-awareness, thinking preferences and emotional intelligence

• Certificate IV Procurement and Contracting—enhances procurement and contracting capability. Successful completion results in a nationally recognised qualification

In addition, we provided ongoing support for our staff to participate in targeted leadership development programs that align to our corporate objectives. These include:

• Graduate Diploma of Executive Leadership (Police and Emergency Services)

• Graduate Certificate in Applied Management (Police and Emergency Services)

• the Women In Law Enforcement Strategy (WILES) program

• Degree of Executive Master of Public Administration

• Career Development Assessment Centre.

CrimTrac employees also continue to access study assistance and study leave provisions to complete learning opportunities that align with our workforce capability needs.

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Workforce planning The CrimTrac Workforce Plan 2013-15 provides a high-level overview of current and future workforce capability issues and outlines targeted strategies that will ensure our future human capital requirements are met.

The CrimTrac Workforce Plan 2013-15 aligns with the APS-wide Workforce Planning Framework developed following the release of the Ahead of the Game: Blueprint for the Reform of Australian Government Administration.

The APS Reform Blueprint noted that capability gaps across the APS have increased due to the lack of workforce planning. To address this planning gap, the Australian Public Service Commission developed a Human Capital Framework, which we adopted in developing our workforce plan.

Our workforce planning strategies during 2013-14 provide a focus on workplace integrity, succession planning and developing future workforce capabilities to support our transition to a 'Plan, Build, Run' operating model.

Workplace diversity We have responsibilities related to our employer role under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy framework. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au.

Diversity and social inclusion Throughout the reporting period, we:

• maintained memberships with Australian Network on Disability (AND) and Diversity Council Australia (DCA)

• participated in the APSC pilot program RecruitAbility-designed to facilitate the progression of applicants with disability to further assessment, such as interview

• utilised the ‘affirmative measure provisions’ provided by the APS Commissioner’s Directions. This allows a person with disability to be directly employed where a disability employment services provider has assessed the person as being unable to compete successfully on merit due to his or her disability

• participated in development opportunities that target women in an ICT environment.

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Reconciliation Action Plan Throughout the reporting period, we:

• commenced the process of progressing our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) from an ‘Innovative RAP’ to a ‘Stretch RAP’

• participated in the APS Indigenous Pathways program. The Australian Public Service Commission facilitates bulk recruitment exercises for the intake of indigenous graduates on behalf of participating APS agencies.

• celebrated and recognised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons particularly during Reconciliation week and NAIDOC week activities

• continue to support Indigenous Community Services through awareness and fund raising activities

Diversity Statistics

As at 30 June 2014:

• 24.8% of employees were not born in Australia

• 21.3% of employees first language is not English

• 31.3% of employees identify as having at least one parent who did not speak English as a first language

• 4.8% of employees identify as having a disability.

.

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F I N A N C I A L

I N F O R M A T I O N

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FINANCIAL OVERVIEW In 2013-14 CrimTrac recorded an operating surplus of $3.162 million compared to a deficit for 2012-13 of $0.804 million (excludes asset revaluation surplus).

Total revenue for 2013-14 was $67.754 million compared with $63.470 million for 2012-13. Revenue from the National Police Checking Service (NPCS) increased from $60.494 million in 2012-13 to $65.180 million in 2013-14; an increase of $4.686 million. The increase in NPCS revenue was due to growth in the volume of chargeable criminal history checks conducted by CrimTrac, from 3.16 million in 2012-13 to 3.55 million in 2013-14 (+12%).

Total expenses for 2013-14 were $64.592 million; an increase of $0.318 million from the 2012-13 expenses total of $64.274 million. Employee expenses increased from $24.648 million in 2012-13 to $24.830 million in 2013-14. The average staffing level increased from 213 in 2012-13 to 223 in 2013-14. Capitalised employee costs increased from $1.847 million in 2012-13 to $2.210 million in 2013-14. Supplier expenses decreased by $0.485 million from $29.493 million in 2012-13 to $29.008 million in 2013-14.

Project activity amounted to $12.830 million dollars in 2013-14, compared to $12.301 million for 2012-13. Project expenditure on system development is capitalised where the work will provide future economic benefits or expensed where the expenditure is not eligible for capitalisation under the Australian Accounting Standards. Major project activity during 2013-14 included the Data Archiving and Storage Capability Project, the Australian Ballistics Information Network Implementation, the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network and the National Automated Fingerprint Identification System upgrade.

At 30 June 2014 CrimTrac total assets were $154.376 million, which is an increase of $3.795 million from the 30 June 2013 total assets of $150.581 million. Asset increases included a $0.876 million increase to prepayments, which is largely attributable to maintenance and support prepayments. At 30 June 2014, total liabilities were $13.754 million, an increase of $0.316 million from the 30 June 2013 total liabilities of $13.438 million. The Agency’s net asset (assets minus liabilities) position of $140.622 million increased from the 30 June 2013 net assets balance of $137.143 million.

Agency commitments increased from $37.906 million at 30 June 2013 to $41.993 million at 30 June 2014. Significant commitments at 30 June 2014 include $11.303 million for the NAFIS support contract, $8.512 million for the remaining four year lease for office accommodation, $8.044 million for a data centre lease and $4.861 million to implement and support the Australian Ballistics Information Network.

Figure 6.1 below reflects CrimTrac’s total income, expenses and surplus or deficit over the past four years, and the budget for the 2014-15 financial year.

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Revenue derived from the National Police Checking Service has increased in line with increased volumes which have grown from 2.90 million chargeable checks in 2010-11 to 3.55 million checks in 2013-14. Total income for 2012-13 reduced due to the loss of the interest equivalency appropriation. Expenses have increased steadily over the four year period due to increased expenditure on maintenance and support of existing systems, expenditure to ensure the availability of systems and increased payments to police agencies for referral and final vetting work undertaken as part of NPCS checks.

Outcome performance CrimTrac has one outcome which is ‘access to information that supports law enforcement agencies through collaborative national information systems and services’. The outcome is delivered by the Agency’s ‘national law enforcement information systems and services’ program.

Figure 6.1: CrimTrac Financial Summary 2010-11 to 2014-15 ($million)

-10

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

2010-11 Actual 2011-12 Actual 2012-13 Actual 2013-14 Actual 2014-15 Budget

Income Expense Surplus / Deficit

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The following tables report actual appropriation, payments, budgets and actual expenses against the outcome.

Table 6.1: Agency resource statement 2013-14

Actual Available Appropriations for 2013-14 $'000

Payments Made

2013-14 $'000

Balance Remaining

$'000

SPECIAL ACCOUNTS

Opening balance 111,980

Appropriation receipts -

Non-appropriation receipts to special accounts 75,081

Payments made 70,670

Closing Balance 116,391

Total resourcing and payments 187,061 70,670

Note: All revenue is attributed to the special account.

The closing balance of the CrimTrac Special Account is $116.391m. As a non appropriated agency, these funds are available for future delivery of agency outcomes.

Table 6.2: Expenditure and Staffing by Outcome

Outcome 1 - Access to information that supports law enforcement agencies through collaborative national information systems and services.

Budget

2013-14

$'000

Actual Expenses 2013-14

$'000

Variation

$'000

OUTCOME 1

Departmental expenses - Special accounts

Total for Outcome 1 67,025 64,592 2,433

Outcome 1 totals by appropriation type 67,025 64,592 2,433

Departmental expenses - Special accounts 67,025 64,592 2,433

Total expenses for Outcome 1 67,025 64,592 2,433

Actual 2012-13

Actual 2013-14

Average staffing level (number) 213 223

The following tables report actual appropriation, payments, budgets and actual expenses against the outcome.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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STATEMENT BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister's Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, as amended.

Signed Signed

Doug Smith APM Yv ette Whittaker

Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer 25 September 2014 25 September 2014

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STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 3A 24,830 24,648

Supplier expenses 3B 29,008 29,493

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 10,512 10,117

Write-down of assets 3D 242 16

Total expenses 64,592 64,274

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 67,674 63,400

Other revenue 4B 80 70

Total own-source revenue 67,754 63,470

Total own-source income 67,754 63,470

Net cost of / (contribution by) services (3,162) 804

Surplus (Deficit) 3,162 (804)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 317 1,510

Total comprehensive income 3,479 706

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 1,740 1,887

Trade and other receivables 6B 124,019 120,028

Total financial assets 125,759 121,915

Non-financial assets

Land and buildings 7A,C 3,162 3,898

Property, plant and equipment 7B,C 6,779 6,176

Intangibles 7D,E 15,544 16,336

Other non-financial assets 7F 3,132 2,256

Total non-financial assets 28,617 28,666

Total assets 154,376 150,581

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 8A 5,638 4,733

Other payables 8B 1,115 1,865

Total payables 6,753 6,598

Provisions

Employee provisions 9A 7,001 6,840

Total provisions 7,001 6,840

Total liabilities 13,754 13,438

Net assets 140,622 137,143

EQUITY

Reserves 3,777 3,460

Retained earnings 136,845 133,683

Total equity 140,622 137,143

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2014

Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus Administered transfers

Total equity

2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $'000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 133,683 143,781 3,460 1,950 - (9,294) 137,143 136,437

Adjusted opening balance 133,683 143,781 3,460 1,950 - (9,294) 137,143 136,437

Comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income - - 317 1,510 - - 317 1,510

Surplus (Deficit) for the period 3,162 (804) - - - - 3,162 (804)

Total comprehensive income 3,162 (804) 317 1,510 - - 3,479 706

Transfers between equity components - (9,294) - - - 9,294 - -

Closing balance 136,845 133,683 3,777 3,460 - - 140,622 137,143

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering of services 75,080 69,380

Total cash received 75,080 69,380

Cash used

Employees 25,091 22,673

Suppliers 32,071 34,831

Net GST paid 3,545 2,704

Total cash used 60,707 60,208

Net cash from operating activities 10 14,373 9,172

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 1 -

Total cash received 1 -

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 4,113 3,772

Purchase of intangibles 5,850 4,182

Total cash used 9,963 7,954

Net cash used by investing activities (9,962) (7,954)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Net transfers to the Official Public Account 4,558 726

Total cash used 4,558 726

Net cash used by financing activities (4,558) (726)

Net increase (decrease) in cash held (147) 492

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,887 1,395

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 1,740 1,887

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

BY TYPE

Commitments receivable

Net GST recoverable on commitments 4,515 3,670

Project payments receivable 3,350 -

Total commitments receivable 7,865 3,670

Commitments payable

Capital commitments

Property, plant and equipment 3,451 -

Intangibles1 1,194 2,105

Total capital commitments 4,645 2,105

Other commitments

Operating leases2 20,244 20,862

Other3 24,969 18,609

Total other commitments 45,213 39,471

Total commitments payable 49,858 41,576

Net commitments by type 41,993 37,906

BY MATURITY

Commitments receivable

One year or less 4,712 1,427

From one to five years 2,749 1,816

Over five years 404 427

Total commitments receivable 7,865 3,670

Commitments payable

Capital commitments

One year or less 4,645 1,489

From one to five years - 616

Total capital commitments 4,645 2,105

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SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS (Continued) as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Operating lease commitments

One year or less 4,027 3,696

From one to five years 11,771 12,466

Over five years 4,446 4,700

Total operating lease commitments 20,244 20,862

Other commitments

One year or less 9,874 11,581

From one to five years 15,095 7,028

Total other commitments 24,969 18,609

Total commitments payable 49,858 41,576

Net commitments by maturity 41,993 37,906

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

1. The intangibles commitment is project expenditure that will be capitalised.

2. Oper ating leases are effectively non-cancellable and comprise leases for office accommodation and data centre facilities.

Nature of lease/general description of leasing arrangement Lease for office accommodation CrimTrac exercised an option to enter a new lease for eight years in 2010. The lease may be extended for a further five years at CrimTrac's option, following a one-off rental adjustment to market levels. Lease payments are subject to annual fixed increases. Lease for data centre facilities The primary data centre lease was for an initial term of two years. CrimTrac may extend for four further terms of two years.

The secondary data centre lease is for ten years. Lease payments will increase by the lease price index from 1 January 2016.

3. Other commitments are primarily information technology support arrangements.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Objectives of CrimTrac

CrimTrac is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity.

CrimTrac's objectives as set out in the Inter-Governmental Agreement signed in July 2000 are:

a) the provision of high quality information services that:

i) meet the needs of the Australian policing community; ii) establish best pr actice service models in relation to the provision of information to support policing; and iii) are project-oriented and cost-benefit driven to achieve outcomes;

b) support for the jurisdictions in the implementation and use of CrimTrac services; and

c) providing controlled access to appropriate information by duly accredited third parties.

CrimTrac has continued to carry out the financial and operational functions assigned to it in the July 2000 Inter-Governmental Agreement. It continues to operate as an executive agency established under the Public Service Act 1999 as part of the Australian Government Attorney-General's portfolio.

CrimTrac is structured to meet one outcome:

Outcome 1: Access to information that supports law enforcement agencies through collaborative national information systems and services.

Program 1.1: National law enforcement information systems and services.

CrimTrac's activities contributing toward this outcome are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses controlled or incurred by CrimTrac in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by CrimTrac, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government.

The continued existence of CrimTrac in its present form and with its present program is dependent on Government policy.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are required by section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and are general purpose financial statements.

The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with:

• Finance Minister’s Orders (or FMO) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2013; and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMO, assets and liabilities are recognised in the balance sheet when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under Agreements Equally Proportionately Unperformed are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

The Australian Government continues to have regard to developments in case law, including the High Court’s most recent decision on Commonwealth expenditure in Williams v Commonwealth [2014] HCA 23, as they contribute to the larger body of law relevant to the development of Commonwealth programs. In accordance with its general practice, the Government will continue to monitor and assess risk and decide on any appropriate actions to respond to risks of expenditure not being consistent with constitutional or other legal requirements.

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the entity has made the following judgements that have had a significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

• the fair value of leasehold improvements, property, plant and equipment and purchased computer software has been based on the depreciated replacement cost or market value as determined by an independent valuer

• leave provisions involve assumptions based on expected tenure of staff, patterns of leave claims and payouts, future salary movements and discount rates.

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. AASB13 Fair Value Measurement was applied in 2013-14, resulting in additional asset disclosures. There were no other new standards, revised standards, interpretations or amending standards issued prior to the signing of the statement by the Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officer that were applicable to the current reporting period and had a financial impact on CrimTrac.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

AASB 1055 Budgetary Reporting will be applied in 2014-15. AASB 1055 will require disclosure of the annual budgets provided to parliament and explanation of major variances. There are no other new standards, revised standards, interpretations or amending standards issued prior to the signing of the statement by the Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officer and applicable to the future reporting period that are expected to have a future financial impact on CrimTrac.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

1.5 Revenue

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Other Types of Revenue

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

• the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

• the agency retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

• the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

• the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts was reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

1.6 Gains

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Employee Benefits

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

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The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the agency is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the agency’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave was calculated using the shorthand method provided by the Australian Government actuary. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. CrimTrac recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the termination and has informed the employee affected that it will carry out the termination.

Superannuation

Staff of CrimTrac are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance and Deregulation as an administered item.

CrimTrac makes employer contributions to the employee superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the agency’s employees. CrimTrac accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

1.8 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Where an asset is acquired by means of a finance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount.

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The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.9 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.10 Cash

Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, cash held with outsiders, demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value. Cash is recognised at its nominal amount.

1.11 Financial Assets

CrimTrac classifies its financial assets as loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition.

Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss.

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

Financial assets held at cost - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market

rate for similar assets.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

1.12 Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as other financial liabilities.

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs.

Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

1.13 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the balance sheet but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

1.14 Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor agency’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

1.15 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the balance sheet, except for purchases costing less than $5,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition.

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. CrimTrac does not have any 'make good' provisions at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class F air value measured at:

Leasehold improvements Depr eciated replacement cost

Plant & equipment Mark et selling price

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Following initial recognition at cost, property plant and equipment are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to CrimTrac using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2014 2013

Leasehold improvements Ef fective lease term Ef fective lease term

Plant and Equipment 3 to 10 year s 3 to 10 year s

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2014. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if CrimTrac were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

1.16 Intangibles

CrimTrac's intangibles comprise purchased and internally developed software. Internally developed software assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Externally purchased software assets are recognised initially at cost in the balance sheet, except for purchases costing less than $5,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition.

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NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Following initial recognition at cost, these assets are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful life of CrimTrac's software is from 3 to 10 years (2013: 3 to 10 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2014.

1.17 Taxation

The agency is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

• where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

• for receivables and payables.

1.18 Reporting of Administered Activities

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

From 2006 to 2010 CrimTrac funded the administered payments to State and Territory police jurisdictions for the development of the provision of data to the National Police Reference System, thereby drawing funds from the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance and Deregulation. The administered payments transferred from CrimTrac during this period are shown on the Statement of Changes in Equity. The administered payments balance was transferred to retained earnings at 30 June 2013.

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NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD

No significant events occurred after reporting date, which warrant disclosure, or are required to be brought to account in the financial statements.

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NOTE 3: EXPENSES

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 3A: Employee Benefits

Wages and salaries 18,066 17,501

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 1,939 1,739

Defined benefit plans 2,212 1,835

Leave and other entitlements 2,295 2,865

Separation and redundancies 318 708

Total employee benefits 24,830 24,648

Note 3B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Information technology1 14,268 14,558

Jurisdiction fees 5,631 5,114

Contractors 1,585 1,849

Training and development 557 525

Travel and accommodation 472 507

Consultants 392 887

Physical security 390 353

Legal fees 354 292

General office expenses 353 450

Internal audit consultants 288 412

Marketing and communication 72 165

Other goods and services 730 697

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 25,092 25,809

Goods supplied in connection with

Related entities - -

External parties 536 504

Total goods supplied 536 504

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2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Services rendered in connection with

Related entities 4,863 5,726

External parties 19,693 19,579

Total services rendered 24,556 25,305

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 25,092 25,809

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals in connection with

External parties

Minimum lease payments1 3,590 3,480

Workers compensation expenses 326 204

Total other suppliers 3,916 3,684

Total suppliers 29,008 29,493

Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation

Depreciation

Property, plant and equipment 3,137 2,556

Buildings - leasehold improvements 736 730

Total depreciation 3,873 3,286

Amortisation

Intangibles 6,639 6,831

Total amortisation 6,639 6,831

Total depreciation and amortisation 10,512 10,117

Note 3D: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets

Asset write-downs and impairments from

Write-down of property, plant and equipment 242 16

Write-down of intangible assets - -

Total write-down of assets 242 16

1. Data centr e lease expenses were reclassified from information technology supplier expenses to lease payments in 2013-14. The 2012-13 comparative figure has been adjusted to reflect the reclassification.

NOTE 3: EXPENSES (CONTINUED)

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NOTE 4: OWN-SOURCE INCOME

2014 2013

Own-Source Revenue $’000 $’000

Note 4A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

Sale of goods in connection with

Related entities - 128

External parties 1 -

Total sale of goods 1 128

Rendering of services in connection with

Related entities 20,455 19,315

External parties 47,218 43,957

Total rendering of services 67,673 63,272

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 67,674 63,400

Note 4B: Other Revenue

Resources received free of charge 80 70

Total other revenue 80 70

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NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted pr ices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted pr ices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Note 5A: Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period by hierarchy for assets and liabilities in 2014

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

Fair value

Level 1 inputs

Level 2 inputs

Level 3 inputs

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 4,621 - - 4,621

Furniture and equipment 715 - - 715

Computer equipment 6,734 - 4,843 1,891

Purchased software 3,781 - - 3,781

Total non-financial assets 15,851 - 4,843 11,008

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 15,851 - 4,843 11,008

Fair value measurements - highest and best use differs from current use for non-financial assets (NFAs)

The highest and best use of all non-financial assets are the same as their current use.

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NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (CONTINUED)

Note 5B: Valuation Technique and Inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Level 2 and 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities in 2014

Category (Level 2 or Level 3)

Fair value $'000

Valuation technique(s)1

Inputs used2 Range3

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements

Level 3 4,621 Depreciated

replacement cost Price per square metre Expected useful life N/A

Furniture and equipment

Level 3 715 Depreciated

replacement cost Estimated replacement cost Expected useful life N/A

Computer equipment Level 2 4,843 Market

comparables Sale price of comparable computer equipment N/A

Computer equipment Level 3 1,891 Depreciated replacement cost Estimated replacement cost Expected useful life N/A Purchased software Level 3 3,781 Depreciated replacement cost Estimated replacement cost Expected useful life N/A 1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period.

2. Significant unobser vable inputs only. The estimated replacement cost used for the office fit-out was $1,500/sqm.

3. R ange and weighted average rates for unobservable inputs are not available. Where applicable, this information will be obtained from future valuations.

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes

CrimTrac procured valuation services from appropriately qualified valuers. CrimTrac has relied on the valuation models and information provided by valuers. Depreciated replacement cost methodology was used for leasehold improvements and furniture and valued in June 2012, purchased software valued in June 2013 and the installation component of specific computer equipment.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity’s leasehold improvement assets are the estimated replacement cost and expected useful life. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity’s furniture and computer equipment assets are estimated replacement cost and expected useful life. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity’s purchased software assets are estimated replacement cost and expected useful life. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

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NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (CONTINUED)

Note 5C: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvement Furniture and

equipment

Computer equipment Purchased software

Total

2014 2014 2014 2014 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance 4,621 629 2,476 3,790 11,516

Total gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services - - - - -

Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income1 - - (585) (9) (594)

Purchases - 86 - - 86

Closing balance 4,621 715 1,891 3,781 11,008

Changes in unrealised gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services for assets held at the end of the reporting period.

- - - - -

1. These gains/(losses) ar e presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income under changes in asset revaluation surplus.

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NOTE 6: FINANCIAL ASSETS

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,740 1,887

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,740 1,887

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables

Goods and services receivables in connection with

Related entities 2,505 2,653

External parties 6,863 7,282

Total goods and services receivables 9,368 9,935

OPA receivable

OPA Special Account 114,651 110,093

Total appropriations receivable 114,651 110,093

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 124,019 120,028

Total impairment allowance account - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 124,019 120,028

Trade and other receivables (net) expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months 124,019 120,028

Total trade and other receivables (net) 124,019 120,028

Trade and other receivables (gross) aged as follows

Not overdue 123,765 119,854

Overdue by

0 to 30 days 254 173

61 to 90 days - 1

Total trade and receivables (gross) 124,019 120,028

The impairment allowance account for 2014 is Nil (2013: Nil).

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NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 7A: Land and Buildings

Leasehold improvements

Fair value 4,621 4,621

Accumulated depreciation (1,459) (723)

Total leasehold improvements 3,162 3,898

Total land and buildings 3,162 3,898

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings. No land or buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Note 7B: Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment

Assets under construction 2,784 179

Fair value 4,665 15,719

Accumulated depreciation (670) (9,722)

Total property, plant and equipment 6,779 6,176

Impairment indicators found for computer equipment (subclass of property, plant and equipment) were physical damage, technological obsolescence, asset performance and changes in asset use.

No property, plant or equipment was held for sale or disposal at 30 June 2014.

Revaluations of non-financial assets

Asset revaluations are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. An independent valuer revalued computer equipment assets at 31 March 2014.

The revaluation increment for computer equipment (subclass of property, plant and equipment) in 2014 was $341,824 (2013: Nil).

A revaluation surplus decrement of $24,646 (2013: $Nil) was recorded for impairment of computer equipment and purchased software. The adjustment was against the revaluation surplus in accordance with AASB136 Impairment Of Assets.

The revaluation increment and impairment decrement were transferred to the asset revaluation surplus by asset class and included in the equity section of the Statement of Financial Position. No decrement was expensed (2013: Nil).

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NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS (CONTINUED)

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balance of property, plant and equipment for 2013-14

Buildings - leasehold improvements

Property, plant & equipment

Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 4,621 15,899 20,520

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (723) (9,723) (10,446)

Total as at 1 July 2013 3,898 6,176 10,074

Additions

By purchase - 3,662 3,662

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income

- 320 320

Depreciation expense (736) (3,137) (3,873)

Disposals

Write-off - (242) (242)

Total as at 30 June 2014 3,162 6,779 9,941

Total as at 30 June 2014 represented by

Gross book value 4,621 7,449 12,070

Accumulated depreciation (1,459) (670) (2,129)

Total as at 30 June 2014 3,162 6,779 9,941

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NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS (CONTINUED)

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balance of property, plant and equipment for 2012-13

Buildings - leasehold improvements

Property, plant & equipment

Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012

Gross book value 4,046 12,776 16,822

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (7,218) (7,218)

Total as at 1 July 2012 4,046 5,558 9,604

Additions

By purchase 597 3,175 3,772

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income - - -

Depreciation expense (730) (2,556) (3,286)

Disposals -

Write-off (15) (1) (16)

Total as at 30 June 2013 3,898 6,176 10,074

Total as at 30 June 2013 represented by

Gross book value 4,621 15,899 20,520

Accumulated depreciation (723) (9,723) (10,446)

Total as at 30 June 2013 3,898 6,176 10,074

2014

$’000

2013

$’000

Note 7D: Intangibles

Computer software

Internally developed - in progress 6,191 1,764

Internally developed - in use 37,990 36,566

Purchased 3,781 3,790

Accumulated amortisation (32,418) (25,784)

Total computer software 15,544 16,336

Total intangibles 15,544 16,336

Impairment indicators found for externally purchased software were technological obsolescence and changes in asset use.

No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS (CONTINUED)

Revaluations of non-financial assets

Asset revaluations are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. An independent valuer revalued purchased software at 30 June 2013.

The revaluation increment for purchased software in 2014 was nil (2013: $1,510,073).

The revaluation increment and decrement was transferred to the asset revaluation surplus by asset class and included in the equity section of the balance sheet. No decrement was expensed (2013: Nil).

Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of intangibles for 2013-14

Computer software internally developed Computer software

purchased

Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 38,330 3,790 42,120

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (25,765) (19) (25,784)

Total as at 1 July 2013 12,565 3,771 16,336

Additions

By purchase - - -

Internally developed 5,850 - 5,850

Impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - (3) (3)

Amortisation (5,362) (1,277) (6,639)

Other movement - - -

Total as at 30 June 2014 13,053 2,491 15,544

Total as at 30 June 2014 represented by

Gross book value 44,181 3,781 47,962

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (31,128) (1,290) (32,418)

Total as at 30 June 2014 13,053 2,491 15,544

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NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS (CONTINUED) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of intangibles for 2012-13

Computer software internally developed Computer software

purchased

Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012

Gross book value 33,849 7,775 41,624

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (18,957) (5,192) (24,149)

Total as at 1 July 2012 14,892 2,583 17,475

Additions

By purchase - 1,740 1,740

Internally developed 2,442 - 2,442

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income - 1,510 1,510

Amortisation (5,916) (915) (6,831)

Other movement 1,147 (1,147) -

Total as at 30 June 2013 12,565 3,771 16,336

Total as at 30 June 2013 represented by

Gross book value 38,330 3,790 42,120

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (25,765) (19) (25,784)

Total as at 30 June 2013 12,565 3,771 16,336

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 7F: Other Non-Financial Assets

Prepayments 3,132 2,256

Total other non-financial assets 3,132 2,256

Total other non-financial assets expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months 1,599 979

More than 12 months 1,533 1,277

Total other non-financial assets 3,132 2,256

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

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NOTE 8: PAYABLES

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 8A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 4,318 3,473

Operating lease rentals 1,320 1,260

Total suppliers 5,638 4,733

Suppliers expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 4,368 3,473

More than 12 months 1,270 1,260

Total suppliers 5,638 4,733

Suppliers in connection with

Related entities 1,107 654

External parties 4,531 4,079

Total suppliers 5,638 4,733

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 8B: Other Payables

Wages and salaries 633 520

Superannuation 127 99

Separations and redundancies - 549

GST payable to the ATO 283 645

Other 72 52

Total other payables 1,115 1,865

Other payables expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 1,115 1,865

Total other payables 1,115 1,865

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NOTE 9: PROVISIONS

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 9A: Employee Provisions

Leave 7,001 6,840

Total employee provisions 7,001 6,840

Employee provisions expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 5,533 5,319

More than 12 months 1,468 1,521

Total employee provisions 7,001 6,840

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NOTE 10: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per statement of financial position to cash flow statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per

Cash flow statement 1,740 1,887

Statement of financial position 1,740 1,887

- -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from/(used by)

operating activities

Net (cost of) / contribution by services 3,162 (804)

Adjustments for non-cash items

Depreciation / amortisation 10,512 10,117

Losses from asset disposal / write-offs 242 16

Movements in assets and liabilities

Assets

(Increase) / decrease in goods/services receivable 567 (307)

(Increase) in prepayments (876) (1,328)

Adjustment for non-operating movement in prepayments 450 -

Liabilities

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables 905 (748)

Increase / (decrease) in other payables (388) 682

Increase in employee provisions 161 1,472

Increase / (decrease) in GST payable (362) 72

Net cash from operating activities 14,373 9,172

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NOTE 11: CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND ASSETS

CrimTrac has no contingencies in the current and preceding reporting periods and therefore has not prepared a Schedule of Contingencies.

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NOTE 12: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

Note 12A: Senior Executive Remuneration Expenses for the Reporting Period

2014 2013

$ $

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 672,688 332,779

Salary packaged benefits 18,601 812

Total short-term employee benefits 691,289 333,591

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 119,072 55,558

Total post-employment benefits 119,072 55,558

Other long-term benefits

Annual leave accrued 54,844 34,142

Long service leave accrued 20,854 12,041

Total other long-term employee benefits 75,698 46,183

Termination benefits

Separation expenses - 530,678

Total termination benefits - 530,678

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 886,059 966,010

Notes:

1. Note 12A is prepared on an accrual basis.

2. Note 12A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where remuneration expensed was less than $195,000.

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NOTE 12: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION (CONTINUED)

Note 12B: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2014

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Substantive senior executives

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 1 92,971 19,039 - - 112,010

$225,000 to $254,999 2 207,289 39,033 50 - 246,372

$345,000 to $374,999 1 315,379 40,300 - - 355,679

Total number of substantive senior executives 4

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2013

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Substantive senior executives

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

$285,000 to $314,999 1 250,264 47,250 - - 297,514

$315,000 to $344,999 1 283,128 36,889 - - 320,017

Total number of substantive senior executives 2

Notes: 1. This table r eports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits); and c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; and d) exempt foreign employment income. 3. The 'contr ibuted superannuation' amount is the average actual superannuation contributions paid to senior

executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. 'R eportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries. 5. 'Bonus paid' r epresents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration

band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

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NOTE 12: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION (CONTINUED)

Note 12C: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Other Highly Paid Staff during the Reporting Period

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2014

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Other highly paid staff

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

$195,000 to $224,999 1 185,623 28,210 - - 213,833

Total number of other highly paid staff 1

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff in 2013

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Other highly paid staff

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

$195,000 to $224,999 1 182,099 27,720 233 - 210,052

Total number of other highly paid staff 1

Notes: 1. This table reports staff: a) who were employed by the entity during the reporting period; b) whose reportable remuneration was $195,000 or more for the reporting period; and c) were not required to be disclosed in Table B or director disclosures. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' for tax purposes); c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; and d) exempt foreign employment income. 3. The 'contr ibuted superannuation' amount is the average cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation

benefits to other highly paid staff in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. 'Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries. 5. 'Bonus paid' r epresents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration

band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

NOTE 12: SENIOR EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION (CONTINUED)

Note 12B: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives during the Reporting Period

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2014

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Substantive senior executives

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

Less than $195,000 1 92,971 19,039 - - 112,010

$225,000 to $254,999 2 207,289 39,033 50 - 246,372

$345,000 to $374,999 1 315,379 40,300 - - 355,679

Total number of substantive senior executives 4

Average annual reportable remuneration paid to substantive senior executives in 2013

Average annual reportable remuneration¹

Substantive senior executives

Reportable salary²

Contributed superannuation³

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus paid

5

Total reportable remuneration

No. $ $ $ $ $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements):

$285,000 to $314,999 1 250,264 47,250 - - 297,514

$315,000 to $344,999 1 283,128 36,889 - - 320,017

Total number of substantive senior executives 2

Notes: 1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. 2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits); and c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; and d) exempt foreign employment income. 3. The 'contributed superannuation' amount is the average actual superannuation contributions paid to senior

executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period. 4. 'Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries. 5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration

band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

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NOTE 13: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Financial statement audit services were provided free of charge to the agency by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO).

Fair value of the services provided

Financial statement audit services 70 70

Total fair value of services received 70 70

The ANAO provided assurance engagements free of charge to the agency. No other services were provided by the Auditor-General.

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NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

2014 2013

$'000 $'000

Note 14A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial Assets

Loans and receivables

Cash and cash equivalents 1,740 1,887

Trade receivables 9,368 9,935

Total loans and receivables 11,108 11,822

Total financial assets 11,108 11,822

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors 4,318 3,473

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 4,318 3,473

Total financial liabilities 4,318 3,473

The net income/expense from financial assets and financial liabilities not at fair value from profit and loss is Nil (2013: Nil).

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NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (CONTINUED)

Note 14B: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Carrying amount 2014

Fair value 2014

Carrying amount 2013

Fair value 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 1,740 1,740 1,887 1,887

Trade receivables 9,368 9,368 9,935 9,935

Total financial assets 11,108 11,108 11,822 11,822

Financial Liabilities

Trade creditors 4,318 4,318 3,473 3,473

Total financial liabilities 4,318 4,318 3,473 3,473

The fair values for cash, trade receivables and trade creditors is the nominal value.

Note 14C: Credit Risk

CrimTrac is exposed to minimal credit risk as loans and receivables are cash and trade receivables.

The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade receivables 2014: $9,368,000 (2013: $9,935,000).

CrimTrac has assessed the risk of the default on payment and as such has no need to allocate an allowance for impairment.

CrimTrac manages its credit risk by undertaking an accreditation process for its accredited agencies. In addition, CrimTrac has policies and procedures that are to be applied during debt recovery.

The agency has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk.

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Past due or impaired

Past due or impaired

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Cash and cash equivalents 1,740 1,887 - -

Trade receivables 9,114 9,761 254 174

Total 10,854 11,648 254 174

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NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (CONTINUED)

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014

0 to 30 days

$'000

31 to 60 days

$'000

61 to 90 days

$'000

90+ days

$'000

Total

Trade receivables 254 - - - 254

Total 254 - - - 254

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2013

0 to 30 days

$'000

31 to 60 days

$'000

61 to 90 days

$'000

90+ days

$'000

Total

Trade receivables 173 - 1 - 174

Total 173 - 1 - 174

Note 14D: Liquidity Risk

CrimTrac's financial liabilities are payables and operating leases rentals. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that CrimTrac will have difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to CrimTrac's available funds and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2014

On

demand

within 1 year

1 to 2 years

2 to 5 years

> 5

years

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors - 4,318 - - - 4,318

Total - 4,318 - - - 4,318

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2013

On

demand

within 1 year

1 to 2 years

2 to 5 years

> 5

years

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade creditors - 3,473 - - - 3,473

Total - 3,473 - - - 3,473

CrimTrac has no derivative financial liabilities in both the current and prior year.

Note 14E: Market Risk

CrimTrac is not exposed to 'Currency risk' or 'Other price risk'. CrimTrac does not hold any significant interest-bearing items on the Statement of Financial Position, therefore is not subject to 'interest rate risk'.

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NOTE 15: FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION

2014 2013

Notes $'000 $'000

Total financial assets as per statement of financial position 125,759 121,915

Less: non-financial instrument components

OPA receivable 6B 114,651 110,093

Total non-financial instrument components 114,651 110,093

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 14A 11,108 11,822

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NOTE 16: SPECIAL ACCOUNTS

National Policing Information Systems and Services Special Account (Departmental) 2014 $’000

2013

$’000

National Policing Information Systems and Services Special Account (Departmental) 2014 $’000

2013

$’000

Legal Authority: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997; s20(1) (FMA Act)

Appropriation: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997; s20

Purpose:

(1) The pur poses of the National Policing Information Systems and Services Special Account, in relation to which amounts may be debited from the Special Account, are:

a) scoping, developing, procuring, implementing and operating new and existing information technology systems and services in relation to the agency and its stakeholders and clients; and b) to r epay to an original payer amounts credited to the Special Account and residual after any necessary payments made for a purpose mentioned in paragraph a); and c) activities that are incidental to a purpose mentioned in paragraphs a) or b); and d) to r educe the balance of the Special Accounts (and, therefore, the available appropriation for

the Account) without making a real or notional payment; and e) to r epay amounts where an Act or other law requires or permits the repayment of an amount received.

(2) To avoid doubt, incidental activities include:

a) the administration of the Special Account; and b) dealing with direct and indirect costs.

Balance brought forward from previous period 111,980 110,762

Increases

Appropriation for reporting period - -

Receipts from the provision of goods and services 75,080 69,380

Other receipts 1 -

Total increases 75,081 69,380

Available for payments 187,061 180,142

Decreases

Departmental

Payments made - suppliers 42,034 42,785

Payments made - employees 25,091 22,673

Net GST Paid 3,545 2,704

Total departmental decreases 70,670 68,162

Total decreases 70,670 68,162

Balance carried to next period and represented by 116,391 111,980

Cash - transferred to the Official Public Account 114,651 110,093

Cash - held by the Agency 1,740 1,887

Total balance carried to the next period 116,391 111,980

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NOTE 17: COMPENSATION AND DEBT RELIEF

2014 2013

$ $

Departmental

No ‘Act of Grace’ expenses were incurred during the reporting period (2013: Nil). - -

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (2013: Nil). - -

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period (2013: Nil). - -

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period (2013: Nil). - -

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 (PS Act) in 2014 (2013: $100,000). - 100,000

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NOTE 18: REPORTING OF OUTCOMES

Note 18A: Net Cost of Outcome Delivery

Outcome 1 Total

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Departmental

Expenses 64,592 64,274 64,592 64,274

Own-source income 67,754 63,470 67,754 63,470

Net cost/(contribution) of outcome delivery (3,162) 804 (3,162) 804

Outcome 1 is described in Note 1.1. Net costs shown include intra-government costs that are eliminated in calculating the actual Budget Outcome. Refer to Outcome 1 Resourcing Table on page 90 of this Annual Report.

Note 18B: Major Classes of Departmental Expense, Income, Assets and Liabilities by Outcomes

Outcome 1 Total

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Expenses Employees 24,830 24,648 24,830 24,648

Suppliers 29,008 29,493 29,008 29,493

Depreciation and amortisation 10,512 10,117 10,512 10,117

Other 242 16 242 16

Total expenses 64,592 64,274 64,592 64,274

Income Sale of goods and services 67,674 63,400 67,674 63,400

Other Revenue 80 70 80 70

Total own-source income 67,754 63,470 67,754 63,470

Assets Cash and cash equivalents 1,740 1,887 1,740 1,887

Trade and other receivables 124,019 120,028 124,019 120,028

Land and buildings 3,162 3,898 3,162 3,898

Property, plant and equipment 6,779 6,176 6,779 6,176

Intangibles 15,544 16,336 15,544 16,336

Other assets 3,132 2,256 3,132 2,256

Total assets 154,376 150,581 154,376 150,581

Liabilities Supplier payables 5,638 4,733 5,638 4,733

Other payables 1,115 1,865 1,115 1,865

Employee provisions 7,001 6,840 7,001 6,840

Total liabilities 13,754 13,438 13,754 13,438

Outcome 1 is described in Note 1.1. Net costs shown include intra-government costs that are eliminated in calculating the actual Budget Outcome. Refer to Outcome 1 Resourcing Table on page 90 of this Annual Report.

136

137 137

R E F E R E N C E S A N D

A P P E N D I C E S

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AND APPENDICES

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REF PART OF

REPORT

DESCRIPTION REQUIREMENT LOCATION

8(3) & A.4 Letter of transmittal Mandatory 1

A.5 Table of contents Mandatory 2-3

A.5 Index Mandatory 145

A.5 Glossary Mandatory 143

A.5 Contact officer(s) Mandatory iv

A.5 Internet home page address and Internet address for report Mandatory iv

9 Review by Secretary

9(1) Review by departmental secretary Mandatory 6-9

9(2) Summary of significant issues and developments Suggested 6-8

9(2) Overview of department’s performance and financial results Suggested N/A

9(2) Outlook for following year Suggested 8-9

9(3) Significant issues and developments - portfolio Portfolio

departments - suggested

N/A

10 Departmental Overview

10(1) Role and functions Mandatory 11

10(1) Organisational structure Mandatory 15

10(1) Outcome and program structure Mandatory 18-20

10(2) Where outcome and program structures differ from

PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

Mandatory No variation to outcome / program structure

10(3) Portfolio structure Portfolio

departments - mandatory

N/A

11 Report on Performance

11(1) Review of performance during the year in relation to

programs and contribution to outcomes

Mandatory 22-56

11(2) Actual performance in relation to deliverables and KPIs set

out in PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements Mandatory 22-56

11(2) Where performance targets differ from the PBS/ PAES,

details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the change

Mandatory No variation to

performance targets

11(2) Narrative discussion and analysis of performance Mandatory 24-56

11(2) Trend information Mandatory 24-56

APPENDIX A— ANNUAL REPORT LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

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11(3) Significant changes in nature of principal functions/

services

Suggested N/A

11(3) Performance of purchaser/provider arrangements If applicable,

suggested

70-71

11(3) Factors, events or trends influencing departmental

performance

Suggested N/A

11(3) Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives Suggested 63

11(4) Social inclusion outcomes If applicable,

mandatory

85

11(5) Performance against service charter customer service

standards, complaints data, and the department’s response to complaints

If applicable, mandatory N/A

11(6) Discussion and analysis of the department’s financial

performance

Mandatory 88-90

11(7) Discussion of any significant changes from the prior year,

from budget or anticipated to have a significant impact on future operations.

Mandatory 88-90

11(8) Agency resource statement and summary resource tables

by outcomes

Mandatory 90

12 Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

12(1) Agency heads are required to certify that their agency

comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines. Mandatory 1

12(2) Statement of the main corporate governance practices in

place

Mandatory 58-66

12(3) Names of the senior executive and their responsibilities Suggested 13-14

12(3) Senior management committees and their roles Suggested 58-66

12(3) Corporate and operational planning and associated

performance reporting and review

Suggested 16

12(3) Approach adopted to identifying areas of significant

financial or operational risk

Suggested 63

12(3) Policy and practices on the establishment and maintenance

of appropriate ethical standards

Suggested 71

12(3) How nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers is

determined

Suggested N/A

External Scrutiny

12(4) Significant developments in external scrutiny Mandatory 69

12(4) Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals Mandatory 69

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12(4) Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee

or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

Mandatory 69

Management of Human Resources

12(5) Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing

human resources to achieve departmental objectives Mandatory 77

12(6) Workforce planning, staff turnover and retention Suggested 77

12(6) Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements,

individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs), determinations, common law contracts and AWAs

Suggested 80

12(6) Training and development undertaken and its impact Suggested 83

12(6) Work health and safety performance Suggested 82

12(6) Productivity gains Suggested N/A

12(7) Statistics on staffing Mandatory 81

12(8) Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs, determinations,

common law contracts and AWAs

Mandatory 80

12(9) & B Performance pay Mandatory 80

12(10)-(11) Assets management Assessment of effectiveness of assets management If applicable, mandatory

69

12(12) Purchasing Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles Mandatory 70

12(13)-(24) Consultants The annual report must include a summary statement detailing the number of new consultancy services contracts let during the year; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were active in the reporting year; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The annual report must include a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website.

Mandatory 70-71

12(25) Australian

National Audit Office Access Clauses

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the Auditor-General Mandatory 71

12(26) Exempt

contracts

Contracts exempt from the AusTender Mandatory 71

13 Financial

Statements Financial Statements Mandatory 91-135

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Other Mandatory Information

14(1) & C.1 Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work

Health and Safety Act 2011)

Mandatory 82

14(1) & C.2 Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

Mandatory 72

14(1) & C.3 Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

Mandatory 73

14(1) Compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer

Recognition Act 2010

If applicable, mandatory N/A

14(2) & D.1 Grant programs Mandatory 71

14(3) & D.2 Disability reporting - explicit and transparent reference to agencylevel information available through other reporting mechanisms

Mandatory 85

14(4) & D.3 Information Publication Scheme statement Mandatory 72

14(5) & D.4 Spatial reporting - expenditure by program between regional and nonregional Australia If applicable, mandatory

N/A

14(6) Correction of material errors in previous annual report If applicable,

mandatory

73

E Agency Resource Statements and Resources for Outcomes Mandatory 90

F List of Requirements Mandatory 138-141

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AASB Austr alian Accounting Standards Board ABIN Austr alian Ballistic Information Network ACLEI Austr alian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity ACORN Austr alian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network ACT Austr alian Capital Territory ANAO Austr alian National Audit Office AND Austr alian Network on Disability APS Austr alian Public Service APSC Austr alian Public Service Commission ASIC A viation Security Identification Card AVA Active Vulnerability Assessment CEO Chief Executive Officer—the agency head as defined under the Public Service Act 1999 CETS Child Exploitation Tracking System CIO Chief Information Officer CIOC Chief Information Officers Committee COAG Council of Australian Governments COO Chief Operating Officer DCA Diver sity Council of Australia DVO Domestic Violence Order EDRMS Electr onic Document and Records Management System FMA Act Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 FOI Fr eedom of Information FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982 IBIS® Integr ated Ballistic Identification System (IBIS) ICSPA International Cyber Secur ity Protection Alliance IGA Inter -Governmental Agreement IIR Inf ormatica Identity Resolution IPS Inf ormation Publication Scheme ISM Inf ormation Security Manual LCCSC Law , Crime and Community Safety Council MOU Memor andum of Understanding MSIC Mar itime Security Identification Card NABERS National Australian Built Environmental Rating Scheme NAFIS National Automated Fingerprint Identification System NCIDD National Cr iminal Investigation DNA Database NCOS National Child Of fender System NDIC National DNA Investigative Capability NDVOISS National Domestic Violence Order Information Sharing System NeAF National eAuthentication Fr amework NFI National Fir earms Interface NFID National Fir earms Identification Database NFLRS National Fir earms Licensing and Registration System NIEM National Inf ormation Exchange Model NMPVS National Missing P ersons & Victim System NPCS National P olice Checking Service NPRS National P olice Reference System PFB P ortfolio Board

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 SCLJ Standing Council on Law and Justice SCPEM Standing Council on P olice and Emergency Management SES Senior Executive Ser vice SIG Str ategic Issues Group WHS W ork health and safety WILES W omen in Law Enforcement Strategy

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

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Accredited Agency An organisation (other than a police agency) authorised to access the National Police Checking Service.

Familial searching Familial DNA searching involves a search of a DNA database to identify possible relatives of an offender. It is used when a DNA sample found at a crime scene is run through the DNA database, but no direct matches are returned. Familial DNA searching works on the basis that a DNA sample found at a crime scene may partially match a family member whose DNA profile is already stored on the database.

Jurisdiction A state or territory within which a common set of legislative rules apply.

Kinship matching Kinship matching examines DNA profiles to establish biological relationships between individuals. This can be used to identify missing persons, unidentified human remains, and victims of mass disasters.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) An agreement detailing the terms and conditions between CrimTrac and partner agencies, service providers or accredited agencies.

National Police Check Involves identifying and releasing any relevant policing information (subject to relevant spent conviction/non-disclosure legislation and information release policies) to support the assessment of suitability of people applying for employment, Australian citizenship or appointment to positions of trust.

Vermiculture The process of composting organic waste by using worms.

PHOTO CREDITS Page i P olice agency logos reproduced with permission from each relevant police agency

Page ii-iii Inf ographics created by New Age Graphics Page 5 Photo supplied by Australian Federal Police Page 6 Cr imTrac photo Page 10 Cr imTrac photo Page 13-14 Cr imTrac photos Page 17 Photo supplied by

Australian Federal Police

Page 19 Photo supplied by Queensland Police Service Page 21 Photo supplied by South Australia Police Page 25 Photo supplied by

Northern Territory Police

Page 31 Photo supplied by Victoria Police Page 37 Photo supplied by South Australia Police Page 43 Photo supplied by Victoria Police Page 48-49 Cr imTrac photo Page 52-53 Cr imTrac photos Page 57 Cr imTrac photo Page 61 Boar d member photos reproduced with

permission of relevant police agency Page 67 Cr imTrac photo Page 74-75 Cr imTrac photo Page 79 Photo supplied by Australian

Government Information Management Office

Page 80 Cr imTrac photo Page 84 Cr imTrac photo Page 87 Cr imTrac photo Page 91 Photo supplied by Australian

Federal Police

GLOSSARY

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INFORMATION DATA SOURCES

Inside cover Item 1 source: Report on Government Services 2014 6.1—Profile of police services, table 6.1 Item 2 source: A verage data derived from Crimtrac's services available to police as at 30 June 2014 Item 3 source: National P olice Reference System report as at 30 June 2014 Item 4 source: National P olice Reference System report as at 30 June 2014 Item 5 source: National Cr iminal Investigation DNA Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 6 source: National Automated Fingerprint Identification Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 7 source: National Cr iminal Investigation DNA Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 8 source: National P olice Checking Service Support System report as at 30 June 2014

Page ii-iii—2013-14 At a Glance Item 1 source: National Automated Fingerprint Identification Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 2 source: National Cr iminal Investigation DNA Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 3 source: National Fir earm Identification Database report as at 30 June 2014 Item 4 source: National Fir earm Licensing and registration System Item 5 source: National P olice Reference System report as at 30 June 2014 Item 6 source: National P olice Checking Service Support System report as at 30 June 2014 Item 7 source: National Child Of fender System report as at 30 June 2014 Item 8 source: P erformance summary page 22-23 of this report Item 9 source: P art 5 People management—page 77 of this report Item 10 source: P art 5 People management—page 77 of this report Item 11 source: P art 3 Corporate governance—pages 58-66 of this report Item 12 source: P art 6 Financial reports—page 88-135 of this report

Biometrics Services infographics Page 24 National Automated Fingerprint Identification System reports as at 30 June 2014 Page 24 National Cr iminal Investigation DNA Database reports as at 30 June 2014

Child Protection infographic Page 34 National Child Of fender System report as at 30 June 2014

Firearms and ballistics infographics Page 38 National Fir earms Identification Database reports as at 30 June 2014 Page 38 National Fir earms Licensing and Referencing System as at 30 June 2014

Police reference services infographic Page 44 National P olice Reference Service reports as at 30 June 2014

Cybercrime reporting page Page 50 Internet 2012 in numbers, Royal Pingdom Page 50 Internet Activity, Australia, December 2013, Australian Bureau of Statistics

National Police Checking Service infographic Page 54 National P olice Checking Service Support System reports as at 30 June 2014

People management infographics Page 76 Cr imTrac Human Resource Management reports as at 30 June 2014

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INDEX

A abbreviations, 142 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons employment and recognition, 86

accountability, 12, 18-19, 68-73 ACT Smart Office Program, 73 Active Vulnerability Assessment (AVA), 66 address and contact details, iv administrative tribunal decisions, 69 advertising and market research, 72 agency resource statement, 90 ANAO see Australian National Audit Office annual report 2012-13 corrections, 73 asset management, 69 Attorney General’s Department, 8, 46 Audit and Risk Committee, 59, 63 Auditor-General see Australian National Audit Office audits

independent auditor’s report, 91-2 internal audit arrangements, 63, 65 AusCheck system, 46, 47 AusTender, 71 Australian Ballistics Information Network (ABIN), 7, 38, 40, 42, 60 Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity (ACLEI), 8, 69, 71 Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN), 7, 9, 50-3 Australian Federal Police, 36, 37 Australian Government Digital Transition Policy, 8, 72 Australian Government ICT Graduate Program ICT major project awards, 78-9 Australian Government ICT Sustainability Plan 2010-2015, 73 Australian Government Information Security Manual, 66 Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy, 80 Australian National Audit Office, 69 access clauses, 71 Australian Pubic Service Values and Code of Conduct, 71 Australian Public Service Commission, 69, 77, 85, 86 Australian Public Service Workforce Planning Framework, 85 Australian Signals Directorate ‘ASD Top 4,’ 66 Aviation Security Identification Card/Maritime Security Identification Card (ASIC/MSIC) Information Sharing Capability, 46, 47 awards and recognition, 78-9

B biometric services, 24-33, 60 Board of Management, 59, 60-1, 69 business continuity planning, 63

C Chief Executive Officer, 13 review of year, 6-9 Chief Information Officer, 14 Chief Information Officers Committee, 59, 62-3 Chief Operating Officer, 13 Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS), 36-7 child protection services, 34-7 committees (CrimTrac), 59, 63, 71, 77 Commonwealth Disability Strategy, 85 Commonwealth Ombudsman, 69 consultancy services, 70-1 contracting, 8, 70-1 corporate governance, 58-66 correction of material errors in previous annual

report, 73 Council of Australian Governments (COAG), standing councils, 60 CrimTrac

accountability, 12, 18-19, 68-73 Board of Management, 59, 60-1, 69 Executive, 13-14 history, 12 Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA), 60 objectives, 12, 18 organisational structure, 14-15 portfolio membership, 12 role and function, 11 CrimTrac Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014, 80 CrimTrac ICT Blueprint for National Police

Information Sharing 2014-2018, 6, 16 CrimTrac Workforce Plan 2013-15, 85 cybercrime reporting, 50-3

D definitions, 143 Department of Finance, 77, 78 Department of Immigration and Border Protection,

7, 25 disability reporting, 85 discretionary grants, 71 diversity and social inclusion, 85-6

E ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, 73 Electronic Document and Records Management

System, 8, 72 employees see staff energy use, 73 enterprise agreement, 80 ethical standards, 71, 85 Executive, 13-14 exempt contracts, 71 expenses, 12, 88-90 external scrutiny, 69

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F Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, 12, 70 financial overview, 88-90

outcome performance, 89-90 results, 12 financial statements, 91-135 firearms and ballistics, 38-42 Forensic Technology Integrated Ballistic Identification System (IBIS) technology, 42 fraud control, i, 63, 65 freedom of information, 69, 72 functions, 11 future see outlook

G glossary, 143 grants, 71

H health and safety see work health and safety human resources see people management; staff

I independent auditor’s report, 91-2 Indigenous Community Services, 86 Indigenous Pathways program, 86 information and communications technology, 8, 16,

62, 73 development opportunities for women, 85 ICT Graduate Program, 77, 78-9 Information Publication Scheme (IPS), 72 information sharing, 6 Integrity Advisory Committee (IAC), 71 Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA), 60 internal audit arrangements, 63, 65 Internet address, iv

J judicial decisions, 69

K key performance indicators, 19, 22-3 National Automated Fingerprint Identification System, 22, 26-7

National Child Offender System, 22, 35 National Criminal Investigation DNA Database, 22, 27-8 National Firearms Identification Database, 22, 39 National Firearms Licensing and Reference

Services, 23, 40-1

National Police Checking Service, 23, 55-6 National Police Reference System, 23, 45-6

L Law, Crime and Community Safety Council (LCCSC), 60 leadership development programs, 83 learning and development

ethical standards information sessions, 71 health and safety training, 82 workforce capability enhancement (specific training programs), 83

workplace respect training, 71, 82 legislative framework, 12 letter of transmittal, i

M Maritime Security Identification Card Information Sharing Capability, 46, 47 market research, 72 Memorandum of Understanding with the

Department of Immigration and Border Protection, 7 minister, 12, 59 mission statement, 16

N Name Matching Project, 47 National Automated Fingerprint Identification System (NAFIS), 24, 25-7, 29-30, 32-3, 60

key performance indicators, 22, 26-7 National Child Offender System (NCOS), 35-6 key performance indicators, 22, 35 National Criminal Investigation DNA Database

(NCIDD), 24 key performance indicators, 22, 27-8 National DNA Investigative Capability (NDIC), 28, 30, 32-3, 60 National Domestic Violence Order Information

Sharing System (NDVOISS), 7, 9 National Firearms Identification Database (NFID), 38, 39-40, 41 key performance indicators, 22, 39 National Firearms Interface (NFI), 40, 41-2, 60 National Firearms Licensing and Registration

System (NFLRS), 38, 40-1 key performance indicators, 23, 40-1 National Information Exchange Model, 9 National Missing Persons & Victim System (NMPVS),

28, 31, 60 National Police Checking Service (NPCS), 23, 47, 54-6 key performance indicators, 23, 55-6 National Police History checks in 2012-13, 73 National Police Reference System (NPRS), 45-6

key performance indicators, 23, 45-6

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O objectives, 12, 18 Office of the Australian Information Commissioner, 69

organisational capability, 8 organisational health, 77 organisational structure, 14-15 outcome and program structure, 11, 18-19 outcome performance, 89-90 outlook, 9

P parliamentary committees, 69 people management, 76-86 performance pay, 80 performance report, 17-56

financial overview, 88-90 outcome performance, 89-90 summary, 22 personal information amendment applications, 72 police agency partners, i police reference services, 44-7 Portfolio Board, 59, 64 Portfolio Budget Statement 2013-14 excerpt, 18-19 portfolio membership, 12 privacy, 69, 72 Program 1.1 deliverables, 18 key performance indicators, 19 objective, 18 program of work, 20 Protective Security Policy Framework, 66 Psychological Health Injury Prevention Strategy, 82 Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 12, 64 Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013, 69 Public Service Act 1999, 12, 71 Section 24 determinations, 80 purchasing and procurement, 8, 70-1

R Reconciliation Action Plan, 86 Steering Committee, 77 records management, 8, 72 RecruitAbility APSC pilot program, 85 recruitment, 77, 85 recycling, 73 Rehabilitation Management System review, 82 remuneration

performance pay, 81 salary ranges, 81 SES, 125-7 revenue, 12, 88-90 risk management, 63, 64 role and function, 11

S salaries see remuneration security, 64, 65, 66 senior executive, 13-14 Senior Executive Service (SES) staff

remuneration, 125-7 terms and conditions of employment, 80 senior management committees, 59 staff, 77 average staffing level, 90 awards and recognition, 78-9 diversity, 85-6 employment arrangements, 80 ICT Graduate Program, 77, 78-9 recruitment, 77 senior executive, 13-14 statistics, 77, 81, 86 workforce planning, 77, 85 staff consultation, 77 Staff Consultative Committee, 77 Standing Council on Law and Justice (SCLJ), 60 Standing Council on Police and Emergency Management (SCPEM), 60 Strategic Issues Group (SIG), 59, 62 Strategic Plan, 8, 16, 64 strategic priorities, 8 structure see organisational structure study assistance, 83

T tendering see purchasing and procurement training, 71, 77, 82, 83

V value proposition, 16 values, 71

W waste management, 73 work health and safety, 82 Work Plan 2013-14, 20 workforce capability enhancement, 83 workforce planning, 77, 85 workplace diversity, 85-6 Workplace Health and Wellbeing Committee, 77, 82 workplace relations, 80

Y year at a glance, ii-iii

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2014-15 AND BEYOND To ensure Australians are protected we must act now to anticipate and prepare for future challenges. Following extensive consideration, our CrimTrac Strategic Plan 2015-2020 was developed and sets the pathway and clearly defines our value proposition: through co-planning, co-investment and co-delivery, Australia’s police and wider law enforcement agencies gain greater information sharing and information services to improve outcomes.

By evaluating police agency drivers, our objectives and outcomes are formed and aligned to our new strategic pillars—People, Partnerships, Innovation and Productivity. The strategic pillars help define our focus and direction and are now fundamental to every aspect of our business.

PEOPLE—WHO ARE CAPABLE, AGILE AND ADAPTABLE

• People who act with integrity and professionalism

• People who are committed to value-based leadership and improving organisational performance

• Maximising employee and organisational potential to achieve essential information services for partners.

PARTNERSHIPS—THE ABILITY TO ALIGN AND COLLABORATE

• Partnerships between CrimTrac and police partner agencies

• Formal relationships with state, territory and Commonwealth agencies

• Business relationships with CrimTrac customers

• Collaborative relationships with the national and international law enforcement environment.

INNOVATION—OPTIMISING DELIVERY OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION

• Adaptive business and delivery models to deliver services

• Anticipate emerging and future needs and foster new ideas

• Identify pathways to support a multi-jurisdictional environment.

PRODUCTIVITY—SERVICES TARGETED TOWARDS INCREASING OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

• Simplify systems and services through consolidation

• Improved alignment of planning, strategy and investment

• Identify and implement continuous improvement initiatives.

CAPABILITY that facilitates access to information for

our partners.

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ICT FOCUS AREA OUTCOMES—FUTURE CAPABILITY STRATEGIC

PILLARS

1

Implement national information exchange standards

Information sharing services utilise agreed national and international information exchange standards.

Productivity

Partnerships

2

Decouple CrimTrac systems from police systems Seamless information sharing of new and existing datasets. Productivity

Innovation

3

Make links between disparate information sets Broad search capability that provides a national view of individuals, entities

and associations, and facilitates identity resolution and management.

Productivity

Innovation

4

Enrich CrimTrac information assets

New systems and services which are cost effective and efficient and protect the sovereignty of information without limiting capability.

Productivity

Innovation

5

Provide analytical tools Intelligent searching and analytics capability across our datasets. Productivity

Innovation

6

Provide the means to access information ‘anywhere, anytime and from any device’

Real time and mobile access to national information. People

Productivity

Innovation

7

Become an ICT service broker to police Provide an avenue to address broader policing information needs through

national solutions.

Partnerships

Productivity

Innovation