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National Capital Authority—Report for 2018-19


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ANNUAL REPORT 2018-19

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© Commonwealth of Australia 2019 as represented by the National Capital Authority.

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Apart from rights as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved, including (but not limited to) all commercial rights.

Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and other rights to use are to be sent to the Annual Report Officer, National Capital Authority, GPO Box 373 Canberra ACT 2601 or via email to info@nca.gov.au.

ISSN - 1441-4171 ISBN - 978-0-646-80939-7

Treasury Building, King Edward Terrace Parkes ACT 2600 GPO Box 373, Canberra ACT 2601 (02) 6271 2888 info@nca.gov.au www.nca.gov.au

Cover photo: National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman, 2019.

National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

The Hon Michael McCormack MP Deputy Prime Minister Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Ministers

I am pleased to present the Annual Report for the National Capital Authority (NCA) for the year ended 30 June 2019.

The report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act).

The report includes the NCA’s audited financial statements prepared in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

The annual performance statement in Chapter 3 of this report has been prepared in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(a) of the PGPA Act and accurately presents the NCA’s performance for the 2018-19 financial year in accordance with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Section 46 of the PGPA Act requires the accountable authority to give the report to you for presentation to the Parliament.

Yours sincerely

Terry Weber

Chair

10 October 2019

The Hon Nola Marino MP Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Building the National Capital in the hearts of all Australians (02) 6271 2888 | info@nca.gov.au Treasury Building, King Edward Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600 GPO Box 373, Canberra ACT 2601

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nca.gov.au nca.gov nca_gov_au @nca_media

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National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

Contents

Contact Information iv

Message from the Chair of the Authority v

Chief Executive’s Foreword vii

1. Overview and Structure of the National Capital Authority 1

Roles and Functions 1

Mission 1

Key Strategic Objectives 1

Principal Functions 2

Outcomes and Programs Administered by the NCA 3

Factors Contributing to Performance 3

The Structure of the NCA 4

Management Committees and their Roles 5

The Authority 5

Authority Membership 5

Committees 6

Senior Executive and Their Responsibilities 8

Volunteer Contributions 8

2. 2018-19 Annual Performance Statements 11

NCA Performance 12

Purpose 1 - People 13

Purpose 2 - Place 16

Purpose 3 - Plan 20

3. Management and Accountability 25

Corporate Governance 25

Purchasing 26

Consultants 27

Exempt Contracts 27

Australian National Audit Office Access 27 Clauses

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4. Supporting Small Business, Environmental Performance and Asset Management 29

Small Business Support 29

Ecologically Sustainable Development and 30 Environmental Performance

External Scrutiny 32

Asset Management 33

5. Management of Human Resources 35

Australia Day Achievement Medallion 35

Learning and Development 35

Staffing Summary and Profile 36

Staff Retention and Turnover 41

Workplace Diversity 41

Enterprise Agreements and Remuneration 42

Executive Remuneration 44

Performance Management 46

Personnel Services and Salary Processing 46

Work Health and Safety 46

Disability Reporting 47

6. Report on Financial Performance 49

Financial Overview 49

Departmental Performance 50

Administered Performance 50

Cost Recovery 50

Entity Resource Statement 2018-19 51

Outcome Expense Statement 2018-19 52

A1. Financial Statements 55

Independent Auditor’s Report 56

Statement by Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer 58

Financial Statements 59

Glossary of Abbreviations, Acronyms and Terms 95

List of Requirements 99

Alphabetical Index 103

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Contact Information

Further information about the National Capital Authority (NCA) may be obtained by:

(02) 6271 2888 info@nca.gov.au www.nca.gov.au

Postal Address: GPO Box 373 Canberra ACT 2601

Requests and enquiries concerning the contents of this report should be addressed to the Annual Report Officer on (02) 6271 2888.

This report is also accessible from the NCA’s website and is available in both PDF and HTML formats at nca.gov.au.

The NCA’s Freedom of Information contact point is foi@nca.gov.au or (02) 6271 2888.

Information about the National Capital is available from the National Capital Exhibition, Barrine Drive, Commonwealth Park, Canberra. It is open Monday to Friday 9.00 am to 5.00 pm and on weekends 10.00 am to 4.00 pm. It is closed between Christmas and New Year and on public holidays (except Australia Day and Canberra Day).

Blundells Cottage is open to school groups on Thursdays, by appointment only. Bookings can be made via the website, or by contacting the National Capital Exhibition on 02 6272 2902. The Cottage is open to the public on Saturdays (excluding public holidays) from 11.30 am to 2.30 pm, with tours operating at 11.30 am and 1.00 pm.

Online event registration for the use of venues on National Land can be found at our website: nca.gov.au.

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Blundells Cottage, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

Message from the Chair of the Authority

As Australia’s National Capital, Canberra has a unique purpose, setting, character and symbolism, and it’s important the National Capital Authority (NCA) continues to protect this heritage while acknowledging and planning for the future of a modern and vibrant Canberra.

30 June, 2019 marks the first 12 months that the Authority (the Board) has been the accountable authority for the organisation. I am pleased to report that in this period the NCA has:

• Met agreed performance measures including meeting the target of processing works approvals within 15 days for 75% of compliant applications, receiving all works applications through our electronic portal system;

• Achieved outstanding- rates of visitor satisfaction (99%) at the National Capital Exhibition and other attractions run by the NCA;

• Finalised our capital works program and responded to reported maintenance issues within agreed timeframes over 90% of the time;

• Operated within agreed budget parameters and within government policies and procedures with no major safety issues recorded in relation to staff or visitors; and

• Increased our efforts to be more customer focussed in the way we facilitate and organise events and celebrations and significantly progressed plans and activities to activate places and spaces on our land and Lake Burley Griffin for the benefit of the local community and visitors.

We were very pleased to welcome the appointment of the Hon Nola Marino MP becoming the Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories in May 2019. Assistant Minister Marino has a real passion for Canberra and its landscapes and heritage. She has been on site with NCA staff discussing major projects and we look forward to working with her on planning and estate matters over the next three years.

The Minister has championed the work we are doing in planning for the next 100 years of trees and the development of the NCA’s Tree Management Policy that will set out how we will deal with sustainability issues and mitigate the impact of climate change on our precious and historic treescape.

The NCA has focussed its ongoing program of maintenance and capital works to improve and enhance existing assets on National Land. As announced in 2017-18 the NCA received an injection of $17.1m over the following four years to continue to maintain and revitalise the National Capital Estate for the community. Additional funding has been invested in the maintenance of Scrivener Dam and open space areas, including conservation of the ecological values in Stirling Park. We work closely with local community experts and volunteers to achieve these joint outcomes. Work this year has also included the upgrading of 3.3km of footpaths within the Parliamentary Zone to specifically improve visitor safety during the Enlighten Festival.

With the total of our built and natural assets valued at over $850m, NCA managed assets fall into a range of age and asset condition with many now approaching or over 60 years of age. This year we paid special attention to managing risks associated with our ageing infrastructure base and actively planned for its future use including the revitalisation of the National Carillon, Aspen Island and Scrivener Dam. The NCA’s Strategic Financial Plan that was finalised in 2018-19 sets out our proposed rolling program to prioritise and address asset renewal in a safe, planned, sustainable and strategic way.

Under this program, the NCA received $3.3m in the 2019-20 Budget to prepare a detailed business case to explore options to upgrade Commonwealth Avenue Bridge through strengthening, widening and safety barrier replacement work.

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The NCA updated the National Capital Plan (Amendment 91) to establish future planning controls for development and urban renewal along the gateway corridor into the city centre, Northbourne Avenue and Federal Highway, to enable more people to live and work close to sustainable transport options, services and infrastructure.

The NCA worked closely and collaboratively with the ACT Government to get a strong outcome for the community from Light Rail Stage 1, particularly in relation to the urban design quality and presentation of stations along Federal Highway and Northbourne Avenue. The NCA supports improving public transport options in the city and effectively played its role as one of the regulators and approval authorities along with environmental, engineering and safety authorities.

The NCA appeared before the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories (JSCNCET) on several occasions during the year as the Committee inquired into the Commonwealth approval process and impact of Stage 2 of the Light Rail project.

The JSCNET report was published in October 2018 and made six recommendations related to: a two-stage approval process, specific design considerations for any new light rail bridge, wire-free running from Commonwealth to Adelaide avenues (to Kent Street), heritage impacts, replanting of historic Weston tree plantings, and requiring the NCA to refer any works approval application to the JSCNCET prior to tabling in Parliament. The Australian Government’s response to the JSCNCET Inquiry was published in March 2019, agreeing or agreeing in principle to all recommendations. The NCA stands ready to assess an application for this next stage once the ACT Government has finalised the route and resolved technical, environmental and design issues.

I would like to thank the hardworking and dedicated staff at the NCA for their outstanding efforts this year. I must also thank my fellow Board Members Glenn Keys AO, Dennis Richardson AC, Sally Barnes with a special mention to Chris Faulks, who after five years of being on the board has now stepped down. The diligence and commitment of the board has been instrumental to our successful transition to becoming the NCA's accountable authority. It was a great privilege and honour for me to be reappointed as the NCA Chair for another three years in March 2019. I look forward to working with the team over the next three years.

Terry Weber Chair National Capital Authority

Commonwealth Avenue Bridge, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

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Chief Executive’s Foreword

A small team of 56 people with a broad range of skills cannot possibly look after some of the nation’s most iconic spaces and plan for its future. But a small team of 56 people with the support of an excellent Board, our national cultural institution partners and wonderful collaborators such as the talented carillonists in the region, representatives from active transport groups, environment groups, universities, community representatives, creative developers, landscape architects, event managers and promoters and amazing volunteers certainly can. We are also very lucky to have hardworking and responsive contractors to help us manage our land on a day to day basis and help us manage our assets for the longer term. Together, as a much larger and hard-working team, we care for the some of the most special places in the nation’s capital.

My first full financial year in the role has certainly given me a much deeper understanding of the context we work in, our role and the risks and pressures associated with delivering the outcomes we want to achieve. It has also allowed me to form meaningful relationships and partnerships with many people who are as passionate about Canberra as we are in the NCA.

So what happened in 2018-19? Let’s begin with the National Capital Exhibition. To celebrate the completion of the newly refurbished exhibition we held a preview event and special panel discussion asking the audience “Has Canberra evolved into the city that Walter and Marion envisaged?” Hosted by Amanda Whitley, and featuring well known panel members Chris Uhlmann, Dr Dianne Firth and Catherine Carter, the sell-out audience engaged in a robust discussion and were thrilled with the new design, layout and information featured in the redeveloped exhibition. And yes, we concluded that Walter and Marion would largely be pleased with modern Canberra.

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The exhibition was officially reopened in September 2018 by Senator Zed Seselja. It tells the story of Canberra and its evolution over time from the 1920’s Griffin Plan to the city as it has evolved today. The feedback from schools and visitors to the new exhibition is extremely positive with the take out experience being the new and improved model of Canberra, the centerpiece of the exhibition. We are now turning our attention to the Regatta Point restaurant redevelopment. This will be the next piece of this precinct puzzle. Works to activate and refurbish and refit this superior destination and product offering will be carried out in 2019-20.

The national capital continues to be the place for important national events, celebrations and community fun. On Reconciliation Day we were privileged to start the day with Aunty Violet Sheridan welcoming us to her country and her family providing a solemn morning smoking ceremony at Reconciliation Place. With attendance at this event growing in numbers each year, the NCA hopes to work closely with Reconciliation Australia and the ACT Government to mark this important day in the nation’s history in years to come.

Other events that continue to grow in attendance are our Star Wars themed “May the 4th be with you” and our Annual Christmas Carols held at the National Carillon on Aspen Island in Lake Burley Griffin. These events continue to be popular for both locals and tourists and we hope to be able to continue to grow the recognition and awareness of this iconic Canberra attraction.

This year we started planning a small capital works program to enhance the landscaping and visitor experience to Aspen Island. We organised the procurement of two additional bells for the instrument - a G and D bell from the famous Taylor Bells Foundry in the United Kingdom. The bells will enhance the musicality of the Carillon and make it fit for purpose for international music events.

The G Bell will weigh over 5 tonnes while the D bell will be able to fit in a pocket. Both will be installed prior to the start of the National Carillon’s 50th year birthday on 26 April 2020.

Blundells Cottage on Lake Burley Griffin received a facelift this year as well. Conservation works were completed to restore the slab shed and the cottage’s surrounding landscape was upgraded with the inclusion of interpretive spaces of what was formally a fireplace and kitchen area. A Gala Day was held on 13 October 2018 and the cottage was formally reopened on 30 October. The launch was attended by direct descendants of the Blundells family, who were extremely complimentary about the restoration works, especially to the slab shed.

An important piece of public infrastructure officially opened on 17 January was the Sailability Jetty, a bespoke jetty for people with a disability to use to get in and out of sailing boats located in Yarralumla Bay. The jetty was built by the NCA and is in use by Sailability ACT. We expect that the summer months will see the jetty being used to its full capacity. We refurbished the public jetty at Acton West and reopened it for public use this year. And during the Enlighten festival the NCA provided a ferry loop within the Central Basin so people could see the lights from Lake Burley Griffin. We think it is important for everyone to have a range of opportunities to enjoy the lake.

Commonwealth Park saw a number of improvements this year - from the installation of new and improved park furniture, to the initiation of a flying fox management strategy to a range of new events utilising the park. We worked closing with ACT Government major event organisers throughout the year to enhance the use, care and maintenance of all the event spaces on national land for the benefit of Canberrans and visitors.

As well as protecting the heritage values within the nation’s capital on a day to day basis, the NCA has a keen eye to the future. This is exemplified by the project we are working on with the community to develop our Tree Management Policy. A city blessed with a wonderful urban treescape and often referred to as ‘the bush capital’, Canberra’s tree canopy within designated areas and throughout National Capital Estate is something that not only needs to be retained, but we also have to look at what the future might look like. The policy will look at what this means for the city and how the NCA as custodians of this treescape can ensure it is maintained for future generations.

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It has been a very busy year and I would like to thank the Minister the Hon Nola Marino MP, my Chair Terry Weber and the NCA Board and the dedicated and committed NCA staff and volunteers for the support they have given me throughout the year. An internal restructure in March 2019 saw some members of well-established teams undergo changes to reporting lines. Can I take this opportunity to thank all staff for their input and help to shape this change.

Throughout the year, I have watched people in various sections and at all grades and levels within our organisation shine and show incredible leadership on important projects and on day to day matters. The NCA’s extended senior leadership team and indeed all of its teams are full of talented and enthusiastic people who proudly call themselves public servants. All of your achievements and accomplishments are much appreciated. I have only been able to touch on a few of them here. I am excited and looking forward to working with everyone again in 2019-20.

Sally Barnes Chief Executive

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National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

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1. Lake Burley Griffin and Commonwealth Bridge, Parkes, photographed by Adrian Kelson

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Overview and Structure of the National Capital Authority

Roles and Functions The National Capital Authority (NCA) is established under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (the PALM Act). The NCA is a non-corporate Australian Government agency within the Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development portfolio. At 30 June 2019, the NCA was responsible to the Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories, with the Minister administering the PALM Act.

The NCA performs the role as trustee of the National Capital, and in this capacity, serves the interests of the Australian Government, the nation and its people. The NCA is responsible for: shaping the National Capital into the future; managing and enhancing the nationally significant parts of Canberra; and fostering awareness of Canberra as Australia’s National Capital.

Mission To advance the National Capital as a valued and respected place for all Australians by ensuring it is well planned, managed and promoted consistent with its enduring national significance.

Key Strategic Objectives The key strategic objectives of the NCA are:

• People - enabling Australians and visitors to celebrate and share the story of our nation through Canberra, our National Capital

• Place - excellence in the care and custodianship of the National Capital’s special and symbolic places

• Plan - strategic planning and oversight of the places and spaces of national importance in Canberra

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Principal Functions The functions of the NCA as set out in Section 6 of the PALM Act are to:

1. prepare and administer a National Capital Plan (the Plan)

2. keep the Plan under constant review and to propose amendments to it when necessary

3. on behalf of the Commonwealth, to commission works to be carried out in Designated Areas in accordance with the Plan where neither a Department of State of the Commonwealth nor any Commonwealth authority has the responsibility to commission those works

4. recommend to the Minister the carrying out of works that it considers desirable to maintain or enhance the character of the National Capital

5. foster an awareness of Canberra as the National Capital

6. with the approval of the Minister, to perform planning services for any person or body, whether within Australia or overseas

7. with the approval of the Minister, and excluding the management and regulation of the taking of water, manage National Land designated in writing by the Minister as land required for the special purposes of Canberra as the National Capital.

In addition, the National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 established the NCA as the administering authority for enforcement of parking regulations on National Land.

The accountable authority for the NCA (for the purposes of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act) transferred from the NCA’s Chief Executive to the Authority from 1 July 2018.

Coree

Molonglo Valley

Canberra Central

Majura

Weston Creek

Paddys River Tuggeranong

Jerrabomberra

Woden Valley

Gungahlin

Belconnen

Yarramundi Peninsula

Australian War Memorial

City

Dunrossil Drive

West Deakin Diplomatic Estate

O’Malley

Diplomatic Estate

Parliament House Barton

Russell

Yarralumla

Acton

Land Managed by the NCA Designated Areas under NCA’s detailed

planning control

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Outcomes and Programs Administered by the NCA Below are details of the NCA’s outcomes and programs as set out in the NCA’s 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statement (published in May 2018) and the NCA Corporate Plan for 2018-19 to 2021-22 (published in August 2018).

Outcome 1:

Manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of education and awareness programs, and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

Program 1.1 - National Capital Functions - $20.744 million

• Planning and designing areas of special national importance in Canberra, and informing and educating the community about these areas, contributes to Outcome 1 ensuring that the National Capital is planned and promoted consistent with its enduring national significance.

Program 1.1 Deliverables During 2018-19 and the forward years, the NCA committed to:

• continue to develop and implement a comprehensive planning framework for the Australian Capital Territory

• keep the National Capital Plan (the Plan) under constant review and, when required, propose, draft and consult on amendments to the Plan

• assess and manage applications to undertake works in Designated Areas to ensure that they are in accordance with the Plan

• provide, with Ministerial approval, consultancy services either within Australia or overseas

• maintain, manage and promote the NCA’s visitor services and attractions

• create and deliver the NCA’s touring exhibitions with an educative focus

• foster an awareness of Canberra’s role as National Capital.

Program 1.2 - National Capital Estate - $27.975 million

• The management and enhancement of national land programme contributes to Outcome 1 by ensuring that national assets are managed and renewed to enhance the character of the National Capital.

Program 1.2 Deliverables During 2018-19 and the forward years, the NCA committed to:

• develop and renew assets on National Land in accordance with their national significance

• hold appropriate levels of insurance cover for the main risks associated with assets on National Land

• implement and manage a robust asset maintenance plan that addresses the severity of asset conditions.

Factors Contributing to Performance In 2018-19, the NCA fulfilled its statutory role and principal functions outlined above.

The NCA faces a complex and dynamic operational environment. Many issues and business objectives the NCA works on need to consider a range of perspectives and sometimes-competing objectives. These require carefully working through the relevant issues and providing opportunities for stakeholder input. Other challenges include (rightly) high expectations of the community, working with other jurisdictions and other Commonwealth agencies, technological and environmental change, and managing ageing infrastructure within budget constraints. These challenges occur against a backdrop of continuing growth of Canberra and increasing community access to and enjoyment of National Land.

In addition to the PALM Act, the NCA operates within the framework of a range of Australian government legislation. Key elements of our legislative framework include:

• the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

• the Public Service Act 1999

• the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

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The NCA has in place the required policies and procedural framework to provide the basis for legislative compliance and operational performance, including in the following areas:

• work health and safety

• financial management

• procurement and contract management

• human resource management

• risk management

• fraud control.

The Structure of the NCA Figure 1: Organisational Structure

THE BOARD

Terry Weber Chair

Chris Faulks Member

Glenn Keys Member

Dennis Richardson Member

Sally Barnes

Member and Chief Executive

Andrew Smith Chief Planner

Lachlan Wood Chief Operating Officer

Ilse Wurst Director Statutory Planning & Heritage

Rebecca Sorensen Director Strategic Planning

Rob Tindal Director Design & Construction

Coleen Davis Director Finance (CFO) and Business

Resources

Ken Gibson Director Business Systems

Peter Beutel Director Estate Management

Kate Still Director Public Affairs, Education &

Marketing

Suzanne Hannema Director National Capital Activation &

Events

Tania Martin Director Governance & Legal Services

Correct as at 30 June 2019

Aerial view of Canberra

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Management Committees and their Roles

The Authority The Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (the PALM Act) provides that the Authority consist of a Chair, a Chief Executive and up to three other members, all of whom are appointed by the Governor-General. The Chief Executive is a full-time officer, while other members of the Authority serve on a part-time basis.

The Authority became the accountable authority for the purposes of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 from 1 July 2018 and is therefore responsible for the strategic leadership, management and performance of the NCA.

The Chief Executive has the responsibility of an Agency Head under the Public Service Act 1999 and manages the day-to-day affairs of the NCA.

The Authority held six regular meetings over the course of 2018-19. The Authority maintains minutes of these meetings and also prepares summary public records of each meeting, which are available on the NCA’s website.

Authority Membership

Chair

Mr Terry Weber was re-appointed on 21 March 2019 as (part-time) Chair of the Authority for three years from 12 June 2019. Mr Weber has been a Member of the Authority since 12 June 2014 and Chair since 1 January 2015.

Mr Weber is a Senior Partner and Federal Government Lead Partner in PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Canberra consulting practice. He provides specialist guidance in the areas of property, infrastructure and facilities management; financial management; and service delivery models for Australian and international governments, and major corporate organisations.

From 2000 to 2008 Mr Weber was the Chief Executive Officer for UGL (United) Services, a leading global corporate real estate and outsourcing business services organisation. Mr Weber is a long-term Canberran and is currently serving on several boards, including the Canberra Raiders and the Ricky Stuart Foundation.

Members

Ms Chris Faulks was appointed as a part-time Member of the Authority on 18 September 2014 for a period of five years.

Ms Faulks is currently an independent director on several government, Corporate and not-for-profit Boards. She is the Deputy Chancellor of the University of Canberra, a member of the University Council and chairs the University’s Planning and Development Committee; a Board member of the ACT Government’s City Renewal Authority; a Board member of the Canberra Symphony Orchestra; and a member of the Australian Government’s Independent Communication Committee.

Between 2007 and 2015, Ms Faulks was the Chief Executive Officer of the Canberra Business Council (now Canberra Business Chamber), an organisation that represents business and, through strategic alliances with industry and government, actively promotes economic development in Canberra and the surrounding region.

Prior to this role, Ms Faulks spent 13 years as an adviser and chief of staff to federal government ministers and was General Manager, Public Affairs and Government Relations, at Diabetes Australia. Ms Faulks has been involved in a wide range of community organisations in Canberra for over 40 years.

Mr Glenn Keys AO was appointed as a part-time Member on 11 December 2014 for a period of five years.

Mr Keys is the co-founder and Executive Chairman of Canberra-based Aspen Medical, one of the world’s leading providers of outsourced healthcare solutions.

Prior to building and leading businesses in the private sector, Mr Keys had a distinguished career in the Australian Defence Force. His service saw him undertake a range of tasks from test flying and engineering to logistics support for Army aircraft.

Mr Keys is a passionate advocate of corporate social responsibility. He places social responsibility and community involvement at the heart of Aspen Medical’s culture.

Mr Keys has worked tirelessly to provide opportunities for people with an intellectual disability, be it in the areas of sport, people with Down syndrome and most recently in regards to home ownership. He is also on a number of boards, including the National Disability Insurance Agency and Project Independence.

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Mr Dennis Richardson AC was appointed as a part-time member on 18 September 2017 for a period of five years.

Mr Richardson is a former Secretary of the Department of Defence, and Foreign Affairs and Trade; Australian Ambassador to the United States; and Director-General of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation.

Mr Richardson is a long-time Canberran and is currently serving on the Board of the Canberra Raiders, Linfox Australia and a number of other Boards.

Member and Chief Executive

Ms Sally Barnes commenced as the Chief Executive of the NCA on 12 February 2018, as part of a five-year appointment.

Previously, Ms Barnes was the Director, National Parks in the Commonwealth Department of Environment and Energy. Ms Barnes is an experienced executive, and was the Chief Executive of the Office of Environment and Heritage in the NSW Government from 2012 to 2014. Ms Barnes was awarded the ACT Excellence in Women’s Leadership award for 2017.

Committees To support the Authority and Chief Executive in meeting their legislative functions and obligations, the NCA has the following committees in place. Details of the roles and responsibilities of the NCA’s key committees are set out below:

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee provides independent advice and assurance to the Authority on the NCA’s risk, control and compliance framework and its external accountability responsibilities.

The NCA Audit Committee comprised three members in 2018-19. The Committee’s ongoing external Chair, Mr Geoff Knuckey, and external member, Mr Stephen Sheehan were supplemented by an Authority Member, Ms Chris Faulks, in August 2018, replacing an internal member - the NCA’s Director of Compliance and Governance. The NCA’s Chief Executive, Chief Financial Officer and representatives of the Australian National Audit Office regularly attend the Committee’s meetings as observers.

During 2018-19, the Audit Committee met four times to consider the NCA’s audit and assurance plan, the work program and audit reports on compliance and performance matters.

The Audit Committee also reviewed the preparation and finalisation of the NCA’s financial statements, and continued to monitor work on the NCA’s control framework including the fraud control plan and risk management framework.

ICT Sub-Committee

An Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Sub-Committee was established in late 2018-19. The Committee oversights the strategic planning, development and implementation of the NCA’s ICT modernisation program. A particular focus is to ensure the program of work is integrated and its benefits can be fully realised.

The Committee comprises Authority Member, Mr Glenn Keys, the NCA’s Chief Operating Officer, the Chief Operating Officer of Geoscience Australia, which recently completed an ICT modernisation program, and two NCA Directors.

DID YOUKNOW?

The NCA manages 2,350 signs, 665 minor structures, 1136 paths, 2,015 lighting assemblies, 25 bridges, 24 km storm water

infrastructure, 7 sewage pumps and 290 roads.

Senior Executive

The Senior Executive comprises the Chief Executive, Chief Planner and Chief Operations Officer. The Senior Executive meets on a regular basis to assist in the strategic management of the NCA.

Senior Leadership Team

The Senior Leadership Team comprises the Chief Executive, Chief Planner, Chief Operations Officer and all NCA Directors. The Senior Leadership Team meets weekly to discuss current and emerging issues facing the NCA and individual teams.

Work Health and Safety Committee

The Work Health and Safety Committee is constituted in accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act). Membership includes management, health and safety representatives, and employee nominees from across the NCA. In 2018-19, the Committee was chaired by the NCA’s Chief Operations Officer.

In accordance with the WHS Act, the Work Health and Safety Committee meets regularly to facilitate discussion and co-operation regarding health and safety issues in the workplace between management, employees and other relevant parties who work in NCA premises or other relevant work sites.

Authority Consultative Committee

In accordance with the NCA Enterprise Agreement 2018-21, the NCA maintains an Authority Consultative Committee. This Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss relevant matters affecting the workplace.

View of Canberra city, photographed by Martin Ollman 7

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Senior Executive and their Responsibilities Sally Barnes (Chief Executive) Ms Barnes is the NCA’s Chief Executive and an ex-officio member of the Authority.

The Chief Executive has responsibility as agency head of the NCA under the Public Service Act 1999 and manages the affairs of the NCA, under the direction of the Authority.

The NCA’s Chief Executive may be given written directions by the Authority, which must be complied with unless they relate to the Chief Executive’s duties under the Public Service Act 1999. In practice, the Chief Executive works closely with the Authority in implementing their strategic directions, work and resourcing priorities.

Andrew Smith (Chief Planner) Mr Smith is the Chief Planner and leads the Planning and Design Branch, which is responsible for keeping the National Capital Plan under constant review, proposing its amendment when necessary or indicated. This work involves preparing planning policy (which forms the basis of amendments to the Plan), Master Plans and Development Control Plans; assessing works approval applications; and monitoring the quality of buildings and other developments once completed. The Branch also manages diplomatic land.

Lachlan Wood (Chief Operating Officer) Mr Wood leads the Operations Branch, which is responsible for the effective management and enhancement of the National Estate, as well as the NCA’s business systems and operations. This work involves providing safe, functional, accessible and attractive public spaces and infrastructure in the National Capital (including pay parking); developing and renewing assets that enhance the significance and amenity of the National Capital; facilitating appropriate recreational and commercial activities on National Land; protecting and advancing the Estate’s natural, heritage and cultural features; business system improvement; and human resource and financial management.

Volunteer Contributions NCA Volunteers

The NCA established its first volunteer program in 2001 to complement its role of fostering awareness about Canberra as the National Capital. Volunteers come from the local community and contribute their experience and knowledge in a variety of ways. Volunteers are provided with a range of training opportunities to assist them to successfully undertake their role as ambassadors for Canberra. Volunteers also have the opportunity to participate in group activities, allowing them to expand their knowledge about the nation’s capital in an informal and enjoyable manner. The NCA’s volunteer program is divided into Horticulture Volunteers, Volunteer Guides and Greeters, and Research Volunteers.

Through a 2018-19 volunteer recruitment drive, we were fortunate to gain an additional nine horticulture volunteers who contribute significantly to the NCA’s heritage rose gardens, four Volunteer Guides and two Volunteer Greeters.

Horticulture Volunteers

Since launching the program in 2004, the Horticulture Volunteers undertake defined gardening activities in the Old Parliament House Gardens. Five teams of volunteers help to look after the Broinowski and Rex Hazelwood Rose Gardens in the Senate Garden, and the Macarthur and Ladies Rose Gardens in the House of Representatives Garden.

During 2018-19, 70 Horticulture Volunteers contributed 3,292 hours across 1,646 shifts.

Volunteer Guides and Greeters

Volunteer Guides share their time, skills and knowledge with visitors to the National Capital Exhibition and Blundells Cottage. They also conduct guided walking tours of Anzac Parade, Reconciliation Place, the Old Parliament House Gardens, the central basin of Lake Burley Griffin and the National Carillon on special occasions.

During 2018-19, 22 Volunteer Guides and Greeters contributed 1,993 hours across 513 shifts.

Research Volunteers

Research Volunteers work within projects with specific tasks. In 2018-19, this included textiles work, conducting extensive research related to Blundells Cottage, cataloguing items for the NCA Library, and providing administrative assistance for programs at the National Carillon. During 2018-19, one Research Volunteer contributed 139 hours across 42 shifts.

Conservation Volunteers

To manage the conservation areas of the NCA’s Estate, the NCA has formed partnerships with several volunteer groups to undertake on-ground works, obtaining separate grant funding for conservation works and assistance with public advocacy on conservation management. The conservation areas of the NCA’s Estate include Stirling Park, State Circle Woodland and Yarramundi Grasslands.

Through an Environmental Care Agreement with the Friends of Grasslands, over 100 volunteers have undertaken many hundreds of hours of works in partnership with the NCA in these conservation areas. Utilising expert volunteers and local residents, they undertake weed control, native planting, sensitive species and weed surveys, and provide a strong advocacy role within this community.

The NCA also utilises the specialist skills of other volunteer groups such as the ACT Rural Fire Service (RFS) to assist specific on-ground tasks specified in the Bushfire & Works Plan for NCA Conservation Areas. Several hundred hours were provided by the RFS this year for three hazard reduction burns.

CASE STUDY

City and Gateway Project

The Australian Government through the NCA, and the ACT Government, share planning responsibility in the ACT. The mutual interest and responsibility in the city and gateway corridor, including the Federal Highway, Northbourne Avenue, and the city centre, prompted the need for a revised planning and design framework to guide future design and development.

The Federal Highway and Northbourne Avenue corridor forms a key approach to Canberra’s city centre. The NCA’s interest lies in ensuring that the corridor reflects the significance of Canberra as the National Capital and the high development and landscaping standards are observed along the length of the corridor.

The City and Gateway Urban Design Framework, finalised in December 2018, was the culmination of a two year long collaborative project between the NCA and ACT Government. The City and Gateway Framework reflects the interests and expectations of both governments in a single urban design document. The Framework sets out the overarching principles for urban renewal and growth in the city centre and along the corridor to achieve well-designed and sustainable buildings, urban infrastructure, public places and streets that is appropriate for the gateway to the National Capital.

On 4 April 2019, National Capital Plan Amendment 91 - City and Gateway Urban Design Provisions came into effect. Amendment 91 established detailed planning and design criteria for development on land flanking the Federal Highway and Northbourne Avenue, which reflect and give legal effect to key principles of the City and Gateway Urban Design Framework.

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2. National Carillon and Commonwealth Place, Parkes, photographed by Adrian Kelson

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2018-19 Annual Performance Statements I, Terry Weber, on behalf of the accountable authority of the National Capital Authority (NCA), present the 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019 NCA annual performance statements, as required under paragraph 39(1) (a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

In my opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the NCA, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Terry Weber Chair October 2019

NCA Performance The sources of the NCA’s performance criteria for 2018-19 are the NCA’s statutory functions set out in Section 6 of the PALM Act (summarised in Chapter One of this Report), information set out in the NCA Portfolio Budget Statements (see below) and performance objectives included in the NCA Corporate Plan for 2018-19 to 2021-22.

The NCA has a single Outcome in the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) covering all NCA activities:

PBS Outcome 1

Manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, and delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

The NCA has two programs set out in the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statement:

PBS Program 1.1

Planning and designing areas of special national importance in Canberra, and informing and educating the community about these areas, contributes to Outcome 1 ensuring that the National Capital is planned and promoted consistent with its enduring national significance.

PBS Program 1.2

The management and enhancement of national land programme contributes to Outcome 1 by ensuring that national assets are managed and renewed to enhance the character of the National Capital

The NCA’s Corporate Plan for 2018-19 to 2021-22 states the NCA’s mission as:

• To advance the National Capital as a valued and respected place for all Australians by ensuring it is well planned, managed and promoted, consistent with its enduring national significance.

For the purposes of identifying and reporting against the NCA’s responsibilities and strategic priorities, the NCA’s Corporate Plan for 2018-19 to 2021-22 combined the NCA’s functions under the PALM Act and concomitant activities into three strategic objectives: People, Place and Plan. These objectives, their performance criteria and the NCA’s results against the criteria are set out below.

Interactive displays at the National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes

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Purpose 1 - People

Enabling Australians and visitors to celebrate and share the story of our nation through Canberra, our National Capital

Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

1.1 Engage, inform and educate the Australian community about the significance of Canberra as the National Capital

An increased number of visitors at NCA-managed attractions: the National Capital Exhibition, Blundell’s Cottage, the National Carillon, Anzac Parade and the National Triangle

Not achieved - a total of 174,407 people visited an NCA-managed attraction in 2018-19, compared to 179,635 in 2017-18, a fall of 2.9 per cent. The overall result reflected a 3.3 per cent increase in the education market more than offset by a 4.6 per cent fall in free and independent visitation.

The result reflects that the redeveloped National Capital Exhibition re-opened in mid- September 2018 and the temporary location received substantially less visitors due to remoteness of the location.

Increased awareness of the Australian Government’s roles and responsibilities

Achieved - the NCA continues to raise awareness of the Australian Government’s and NCA’s roles and responsibilities through a range of awareness and public relations work. For 2018-19 this work included the NCA’s submissions to parliamentary inquiries and consultations in relation to draft amendments to the National Capital Plan and works approvals.

A high level of attendance at, and positive community feedback from, NCA events, activities and programs, and education initiatives

Achieved - the National Capital Exhibition, travelling exhibition Brick by Brick, Blundells Cottage and walking tours continue to have high levels of attendance and positive satisfaction levels - see below

Increased recognition of Canberra and the attractions in the National Capital in the Australian community

Achieved - 99.3% of visitors surveyed answered that their visit to the National Capital Exhibition had increased their awareness and has provided them with a greater appreciation of Canberra as Australia’s National Capital.

The National Capital Exhibition re-development is successfully completed, launched and operating

Achieved - the re-developed National Capital Exhibition was successfully launched on 14 September 2018.

Exhibition exit surveys show a client satisfaction rating of at least 90% across NCA-man-aged attractions

Achieved - 99.5% of visitors to the National Capital Exhibition and related programs rated their experience as either excellent or good.

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Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

1.2 Develop new ways to engage Australians in our National Capital with enhanced visual activation and digital initiatives

We have identified, developed and rolled out new and improved engagement strategies and activities

Achieved - during 2018-19, three new education programs and two new walking tours were rolled out. Holiday activities were organised for three school holiday periods. Both Blundells Cottage and the National Capital Exhibition hosted temporary exhibitions.

There is an increased awareness of the significance and role of Canberra as the National Capital resulting from the strategies, programs and activities

Achieved - 99.3% of all visitors surveyed indicated they had a greater awareness of Canberra as the national capital after visiting the National Capital Exhibition.

Data collected from evaluation reports from strategies, programs and activities remain positive

Achieved - 99.5% of visitors to the National Capital Exhibition and related programs rated their experience as either excellent or good.

1.3 Collaborate with partners to expand the reach and impact of the National Capital story.

The NCA’s relationships with key organisations and agencies support NCA objectives and priorities.

Achieved - the NCA is represented on the Board of the National Capital Attractions Association, the National Capital Education Tourism Project and is a founding partner of the joint cultural institutions booking system - Bookcanberraexcursions.com.au, which was launched in January 2019.

School group at Reconciliation Place, Parkes

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Analysis of Performance Against Purpose

The NCA continues to foster an awareness of Canberra as the Nation’s Capital. The NCA achieved its key objectives and targets throughout the year.

The National Capital Exhibition continued to perform strongly in the education market with a 3.3 per cent increase in the participation in school education programs. Free and independent visitation dropped by 4.6 per cent during the financial year, which can be mainly attributed to the National Capital Exhibition being relocated temporarily for the redevelopment of the Exhibition at Regatta Point. The National Capital Exhibition at Regatta Point re-opened in September 2018.

The NCA continued to have increased numbers of people taking NCA guided walking tours this financial year, with approximately 7,216 people joining a tour, a 35 per cent increase. Around 80 per cent of walking tour participants were students. The guided walking tours include Anzac Parade, Reconciliation Place, the Old Parliament House Gardens, Commonwealth Park and Lake Burley Griffin. Walking tours now make up 10 per cent of our overall visitation.

In 2018-19, the National Carillon attracted more than 11,500 spectators to the twice-weekly live performances by our carillonists, a solid increase from the previous year. The 2018 Christmas concert attracted over 1,200 people and the May the 4 th be with you - Star Wars community concert attracted good online engagement and high physical attendance.

Some 119 Carillon concerts (up from 104 in 2017-18) were performed during 2018-19 including international carillonist Eddie Mariën; a memorial for George Howe, Canberra’s longest serving carillonist; a Balloon Breakfast for Instagram tourism influencers; a ceremonial peal of bells for the 100th anniversary of the Armistice being signed and a concert for Nelson Mandela day with the High Commissioner of South Africa in attendance.

Blundells Cottage (the Cottage) was closed for part of 2018-19 for major conservation and landscape works. These new works enable visitors to re-interpret the historical landscape and discover the Blundells family story. Since re-opening, the Cottage has attracted 2,485 visitors during the weekend openings and 1,324 students during school visitation, and overall 106 per cent increase on visitation compared with 2017-18.

The NCA travelling exhibition, Brick by Brick: Build Your Own Capital has travelled to Port Augusta and Broken Hill before reaching the final State for its around Australia journey - Tasmania. Having been to Hobart and Burnie it will conclude in Queenstown in the new financial year.

Little Griffins, the learning and play program for toddlers and pre-schoolers continues to be popular. Five sessions were conducted during the year, with overall attendance of 162 people, a jump of 110 per cent from 2017-18.

Throughout 2018-19, the NCA continued its role and responsibility to increase the awareness of the National Capital through integrated and targeted marketing communications strategies including media, advertising and social media and tourism engagement activities.

Our engagement has continued to grow significantly on both Twitter (3,345 followers; up from 3203 in 2017-18) and Facebook (3,261 followers; up from around 2400 in 2017-18). During 2018-19, our Facebook engagement continued to increase with regular comments and activity on all social media channels.

The financial year 2018-19 saw the NCA facilitate a panel discussion in preparation for the relaunch of the National Capital Exhibition. Held on 11 September at 6 pm, featuring the question “ Has Canberra evolved into the city that Walter and Marion envisaged?” Chaired by Amanda Whitley, panel members for this discussion included Chris Uhlmann, Dr Dianne Firth OAM and Catherine Carter. This event was a sell out with 150 audience members in attendance. There were several community consultation sessions, which related to major projects such as Light Rail, City and Gateway Urban Design Framework and several National Capital Plan Draft Amendments.

The NCA will continue to assess the ways in which we engage with the community and listen to their views on how they would like us to communicate with them. We will aim to seek out and incorporate new ways of community engagement to ensure our communication is both adaptive and responsive to community needs.

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Purpose 2 - Place

Excellence in the care and custodianship of the National Capital’s special and symbolic places

Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

2.1 Provide safe, functional, accessible and attractive public space and infrastructure in the National Capital

The NCA continues to develop the capability and governance arrangements to optimally manage National Capital assets

Achieved - To ensure sound governance, the NCA has an established Project Management Framework, which includes a Major Projects Committee, consisting of key senior staff from across the agency. The Committee meets monthly to review the progress of significant projects and to provide support as required to the project teams. Each project manager prepares a Project Summary Report on a monthly basis for the Committee.

The Asset Management System (AMS) is fully implemented and integrated, and used to inform strategic financial planning and programming of works

Partially Achieved - The NCA has completed an integrated asset register to align all financial and operational asset attributes.

Strategic asset management plans have been prepared for each asset class.

Full implementation of the AMS is expected in 2019-20.

All safety risks are assessed and actioned according to their risk profile

Achieved - safety risks, hazards and corrective actions were monitored and actioned throughout the year and were reported at each Board meeting

Over 90% of maintenance issues or identified capital improvements are addressed within target timeframes, based on safety risk and priority

Achieved - 92% of maintenance issues and hazards identified by the public were addressed in 2018-19.

There is a high level of visitor and user satisfaction Achieved - 99.5% of visitors to the National Capital Exhibition and related programs rated

their experience as either excellent or good.

Safety for visitors, contractors and staff is enhanced through early risk identification and mitigation

Achieved - Risk registers were maintained throughout the year. Identified safety risks were prioritised according to their risk profile.

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Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

2.2 Develop opportunities to create assets and experiences to enhance the significance of the National Capital

A ten-year Capital Works Plan (CWP) is developed, maintained and delivered, in line with the Strategic Financial Plan and relevant Master Plans

Achieved - Ten year capital works plan prepared. In 2018-19, 94% of planned capital improvement works were undertaken in line with annual plans.

NCA systems associated with development and delivery of projects demonstrate continuous improvement, meeting Whole-of-Government requirements, NCA project needs and ‘best practice’ guidelines

Achieved - The NCA Project Management Framework, which documents the systems and processes for the effective management of safety, procurement, schedule, budget and quality, has continued to be refined based on user feedback.

2.3 Facilitate recreational and commercial activities and events on National Land

There is an appropriate scale and type of recreational and commercial activities and events regularly and safely conducted on National Land and Lake Burley Griffin

Achieved - there were a total of 622 events held on National Land in 2018-19, compared with 539 in 2017-18, an increase of 15.4%. The NCA worked with event organisers to ensure appropriate safety and risk management arrangements were in place for commercial activities and events

A safe, accessible and functional environment for public use and events continues to be provided

Achieved - Identified hazards and risks were prioritised and addressed in line with their risk profile. The NCA worked with event organisers to ensure appropriate safety management was implemented for commercial activities and events.

Visitors to national institutions enjoy easy access to safe and convenient carparks

Achieved - utilisation of carparks remained consistent across the estate at approximately 70% occupancy. Parking machines were operational 99% of the time.

2.4 Protect and advance the National Capital Estate’s natural, heritage and cultural features

The natural, heritage and cultural features of National Land continue to be protected, advanced and celebrated, including biosecurity and Indigenous aspects

Achieved - the conservation areas managed by the NCA continue to be well managed in collaboration with key community groups. Improvements to the Blundells Cottage precinct were completed to enhance the heritage values of the site.

There is good accessibility and active use of National Land which recognises its natural, heritage and cultural value including for walking and cycling.

Achieved - capital works were undertaken to improve pedestrian paths throughout the Parliamentary Zone and bike paths in the Yarramundi Grasslands.

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Analysis of Performance Against Purpose

Asset Management System

The NCA has continued undertaking the three-year project to update its Asset Management System based on the review and recommendation outlined in the Asset Management Strategy. In 2018-19, the NCA focused on:

• preparing an Integrated Asset Register to align all the financial and operational attributes across the asset base to allow for efficient interfacing between systems

• developing strategic asset management plans for each asset class

• preparing for implementation of a cloud-based asset management system.

Following an open-market tender process, the NCA entered into contract with BGIS to provide managing contractor services across its portfolio of built assets. BGIS are responsible for achieving service standards for maintenance across all NCA managed buildings, roads, paths, lighting and utilities to ensure community safety is protected.

Renewal of Ageing Infrastructure

The NCA undertook a program of footpath renewal across the Parliamentary Zone to address safety risks. This included replacing almost 3km of footpaths and making repairs to potential trip hazards.

Capital improvement works were commenced in the Russell precinct to address safety risks identified in carparks. These works included installation of lighting, resurfacing and replacement of barriers. Further improvement works to carparks in this precinct will be undertaken in 2019-20.

In 2018-19, the NCA resurfaced several segments of roads across the National Capital Estate to repair deteriorating surfaces and prevent damage to the subsurface. This program reduced safety risks and also reduced potential future repair costs.

The additional maintenance funding provided in the 2018-19 Budget was used to improve lighting, open space and tree management across the estate to improve amenity and community safety. Interim lighting was installed along the foreshore of Lake Burley Griffin in front of the National Gallery of Australia to improve visibility for cyclists and pedestrians. Further works are planned in 2019-20 to improve amenity and connectivity between the sculpture garden and the lake.

The additional maintenance funding was also used to continue to effectively manage Scrivener Dam. The NCA is compliant with the Australian National Committee on Large Dams Incorporated Guidelines and the Dam Safety Management Plan (DSMP). The level and quality of documentation, both technical and non- technical, and the ongoing management of this documentation is of a very high standard. The definition of tasks in the DSMP is clear. The standard dam operations and maintenance, and dam safety activities, including surveillance and emergency preparedness, meets current Australian National Committee on Large Dams and the ACT Dam Safety Code guidelines and standards.

The Captain Cook Memorial Jet underwent significant maintenance works in 2019. Following operating difficulties, the jet was switched off in March 2019 and the flow control valve was removed and taken for refurbishment and replacement of key components, which had been manufactured in the United Kingdom. The valve was reinstalled in July 2019 and the jet has operated to plan since this time. The NCA is now running the jet on Friday evenings with coloured lighting to celebrate or recognise events or achievements.

DID YOUKNOW?

Nolli maps represent the relative proportions of built and open spaces within a city. The Nation’s Capital is unlike any

other major city with its lower density, extensive open spaces and parkland foreshores.

The NCA undertook concept design work and prepared an initial business case to strengthen and widen Commonwealth Avenue Bridge, which led to Government allocating $3.3m in 2019-20 to prepare a detailed business case.

Community Collaboration for Ecological Outcomes

The NCA continues to collaborate with community groups to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. The NCA was able to provide additional support in 2018-19 to the Friends of Grasslands (FOG) to support weed management and conservation efforts in conservation areas at Stirling Ridge and Yarramundi Grasslands.

The NCA utilised goats for weed management in Yarramundi Grasslands to efficiently remove weed species with less environmental impact and significantly reduced costs than traditional mechanical clearing methods. The NCA also removed weed tree species from Springbank Island to improve amenity.

To ensure that the growing colony of flying foxes in Commonwealth Park are managed in accordance with our environmental obligations, the NCA prepared a draft Flying Fox Management Plan, with input from a range of community members and experts. Further data on the flying foxes will be gathered in 2019-20 to allow for this plan to be finalised.

Today, the NCA is the custodian of more than 18,000 trees across the National Capital Estate, which provide a stunning setting for national institutions and memorials. Trees are also essential to the creation of the attractive parklands, streetscapes, and other spaces and the important provision of shade.

To protect these valued assets into the future, the NCA has undertaken extensive community consultation across a range of stakeholders to develop a draft Tree Management Policy. The policy will provide a robust and consistent approach for the management of urban trees by the NCA in readiness for current and future challenges from the ageing tree population, climate changes, tree removal and replacement, water management, heritage preservation, and the development and utilisation of open space. Further feedback from the community will be sought in 2019 to allow the policy to be finalised and implemented.

Event Venues on National Land

Venues on National Land continue to be popular for major events including Floriade, Skyfire, Enlighten, Australia Day celebrations, Anzac Day Commemorations, Queen’s Birthday celebrations, sporting and music festivals. Usage of National Land for events increased to 622 events held on National Land in 2018-19, compared with 539 in 2017-18. The 2018-19 total comprised 222 private and exclusive events, 107 lake events, 72 ceremonial events, 64 commercial events and 162 charity/ community events.

The NCA works closely with the ACT Government’s events team to create safe and exciting festivals on National Land to support community wellbeing and to underpin the regional visitor economy.

Reconciliation Place, Parkes

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Purpose 3 - Plan

Strategic planning and oversight of the places and spaces of national importance in Canberra, with a focus on place-making and environmental sustainability

Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

3.1 Continue to develop and implement an effective planning framework for Canberra

The development and implementation of the planning framework results in successful planning outcomes

Achieved - Implementation of the National Capital Plan and associated guidelines has continued to result in high quality planning and design outcomes within Designated Areas.

A key result was the approval of the City and Gateway Urban Design Framework in December 2018. This followed a two year joint project undertaken by the NCA and the ACT Government. The framework provides a planning and design framework to guide urban development in the city centre and along the Northbourne Avenue and Federal Highway corridor for the next 25-30 years.

Detailed policy and guidelines within the Plan have been reviewed and amendments prepared and implemented to incorporate necessary changes in the Plan

Achieved - Relevant parts of the National Capital Plan have been reviewed and necessary amendments undertaken to reflect contemporary planning themes and desired outcomes. Individual amendments to the Plan are detailed below.

Review of the National Capital Plan is a continuous function of the NCA.

3.2 Keeping the National Capital Plan and its subordinate instruments under constant review and, when required, proposing, preparing and consulting on amendments to the Plan

All required Plan Amendments, Development Control Plans, master plans and/or urban design guidelines have been prepared and issued for public consultation.

Achieved - Development Control Plan 18/01 for Block 14 Section 42 Campbell came into effect on 15 August 2018.

Amendment 90 - Block 5 Section 65 Deakin (Mint Administration Building) was approved on 24 August 2018 and tabled on 10 September 2018. The disallowance period concluded on 25 October 2018 in the House of Representatives and 15 November 2018 in the Senate.

Amendment 91 - City and Gateway Urban Design Provisions was approved on 4 April 2019. Tabling and the conclusion of the disallowance period were completed in the 2019/20 financial year. The disallowance period concluded on 16 September 2019 in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Performance Criteria Criteria Elements Results

3.3 Assess and manage applications to undertake works in Designated Areas in accordance with the National Capital Plan

All approved applications are consistent with the principles and policies of the National Capital Plan

Achieved - 426 applications were assessed as being in accordance with the National Capital Plan and approved. There were 34 applications withdrawn or not supported.

Stakeholders and the community are consulted in accordance with the NCA’s Commitment to Community Engagement

Achieved - Community consultation was undertaken on 15 applications in accordance with the NCA’s Commitment to Community Engagement and as required under the National Capital Plan.

75%-85% of Works Approvals applications processed are assessed against the National Capital Plan within 15 working days

Achieved - 325 (76%) applications were assessed within 15 business days.

The two highest fees for applications approved 2018-19 (totalling $237,744) were:

• ANU School of Physics and Engineering ($188,900)

• commercial building in Barton ($48,844).

Where possible, all applications against the National Capital Plan are processed and managed using the NCA’s Works Approval eLodgement system

Achieved - 100% of applications were lodged electronically via the NCA’s Works Approval e-Lodgement system (WAeL).

3.4 Provide, with Minis-terial approval, relevant consultancy services either within Australia or overseas

Clientele receiving consultancy services from the NCA are satisfied with those services, within reasonable expectations.

Not applicable - no relevant services were provided in 2018-19.

National Capital Exhibition, Regatta Point, Parkes

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Analysis of Performance Against Purpose

The National Capital Plan (the Plan) is the overarching legal instrument giving effect to the Commonwealth’s interests and intentions for the planning, design and development of Canberra as the National Capital. The NCA has continued to review the Plan to ensure that it reflects contemporary planning practice and themes, and the evolving needs of a growing, modern city. This work is reflected through the preparation of planning policy for the Northbourne Avenue and Federal Highway corridor, and individual sites in Parkes, Deakin and Reid.

The NCA shares planning responsibility for Canberra and the Territory with the ACT Government. The NCA worked collaboratively with the ACT Government in regard to the City and Gateway Urban Design Framework. The framework was endorsed by the NCA and ACT Government in December 2018, and sets the overarching principles for urban renewal and growth in the city centre and along the corridor to achieve well designed and sustainable buildings, urban infrastructure, public places and streets that are appropriate for the gateway to the National Capital. The shared interests of the NCA and the ACT Government for the city and gateway corridor are reflected in a single framework. Key principles of the framework were subsequently incorporated into the legal planning framework through Amendment 91 to the National Capital plan.

The NCA’s commitment to design excellence is evident in both planning policy prepared to guide development in areas of national significance, and the establishment of an interim Design Review Panel (DRP) in conjunction with the ACT Government’s planning authority. The NCA and ACT Government planning authority has now formally established the DRP with the aim of improving the quality of buildings, landscapes and public spaces across the National Capital.

Blundells Cottage, Parkes

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CASE STUDY

National Volunteer Week

Each year, as part of National Volunteer Week in May, Canberra’s Volunteer Coordinators Network offer a week of free tours and activities for the volunteers of cultural Institutions and organisations in the Central National Area.

Established in 2014, the group comprises representatives from Australian Parliament House, Australian War Memorial, Geoscience Australia, Museum of Australian Democracy, National Arboretum Canberra, National Capital Authority, National Gallery of Australia, National Library of Australia, National Museum of Australia, National Portrait Gallery, Questacon and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

In 2019, the group expanded, opening its doors to a number of ACT Government organisations involving volunteers, including ACT Historic Places who offer a fabulous tour of Lanyon Homestead.

From behind the scenes tours to lake cruises, each year the institutions roll out the red carpet for the volunteers to say thank you for all their hard work. In 2019, the NCA offered a ‘Discover Commonwealth Park Secrets’ tour, ‘Up Close and Musical’ tour of the National Carillon and ‘Walter and Marion’s Vision’ tour at the National Capital Exhibition which attracted some 30 guests.

NCA Horticulture Volunteer and Macarthur Rose Garden Team Co-ordinator Gwen Souter, was very impressed with the behind the scenes tour of the National Library of Australia. Prior to the tour Gwen did not know that National Library volunteers had so many responsibilities, a number of them qualified librarians, they undertake duties such as front desk support, data entry, research for new exhibitions and inputting information into trove.

On the tour, Gwen met Isaac the libraries robot and discovered down stairs, a space holding millions of books. “It really makes you appreciate what is involved with running the facility,” said Gwen.

On the ‘Discover Commonwealth Park Secrets’ tour, Gwen learned the history of many of the spots she had known fondly for many years.

Here is what some volunteers had to say about their experience:

“I managed to get to the Antarctic Experience at the National Museum, the Aboriginal and Pacific Art at the National Gallery of Australia and the Garden and Sculpture tour at the War Memorial - all very good. It is great to have this opportunity each year to see the sites on special tours and to meet so many other volunteers.”

Sue, National Capital Authority

“Thanks so much for the opportunity of this wonderful tour. Doug and I enjoyed it thoroughly - the views are great - the history interesting - the carillonist very informative - the two volunteers great. Lovely building both inside and out. So impressed with our visit.”

Anna and Doug, National Arboretum Canberra

“One of the most unusual and impressive visit in my long life, the guides were superb and the visit was truly memorable as was, of course, the music. Thank you.”

Leigh and Sergio, National Gallery of Australia and Museum of Australian Democracy

Amanda Hynson, Volunteer Co-ordinator, National Capital Authority

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3. Blundells Cottage, Kings Park, Parkes, photographed by Eric Sieriens

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Management and Accountability Corporate Governance

Certification of Agency Fraud Control Arrangements

I certify, in accordance with Section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, that for the financial year 2018-19 the National Capital Authority:

a. had in place fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans

b. had in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting mechanisms that met the specific needs of the agency

c. undertook all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the agency.

Terry Weber Chair October 2019

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Structures and processes in place for the NCA to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance As part of a discrete project, the NCA reviewed, updated and implemented a range of corporate governance processes, documents and instruments, and undertook bespoke and general training, to ensure the Authority (the Board) made a successful transition to being the NCA’s accountable authority on 1 July 2018.

The NCA manages audit and assurance arrangements through its Audit Committee. The Audit Committee provides independent assurance and assistance in relation to the NCA’s risk, control and compliance frameworks and its external accountability responsibilities.

The Audit Committee met four times in 2018-19 and considered the NCA’s:

• internal audit plan and related audit reports

• Performance Statements

• Financial Statements

• Fraud Control Assessment and Plan

• Risk Management Policy and Framework.

The NCA ensured sound risk management arrangements were maintained during the year. The Senior Leadership Team actively monitored the NCA’s strategic and other significant risks.

DID YOU KNOW?

Scrivener Dam is in flood operations on average twice per year. The volume of water passing the Dam gates during a flood, can

drain the entire Lake and fill back up within a two day period.

The NCA’s Risk Management Policy and Framework was updated and implemented, reflecting current standards and practices, and the new governance arrangements noted above.

The NCA maintained rigorous records management arrangements in 2018-19. The information management system continued to be refined and improved during 2017-18.

A strong ethical framework, based on the APS Values, Employment Principles, and Code of Conduct, is upheld through a range of human resource policies and employment arrangements (such as the NCA Enterprise Agreement and the NCA’s Performance Management and Appraisal Scheme), as well as awareness training at induction and through periodic updates and reminders.

The NCA conducted a detailed Fraud Risk Assessment in late 2018-19 and updated the Fraud Control Plan to reflect the Assessment. The NCA maintains sound fraud control arrangements, including through a range of preventative controls, procedural arrangements and periodic awareness training.

The NCA maintained appropriate protective security arrangements in 2018-19, in line with requirements set out in the Australian Government’s updated Protective Security Policy Framework (October 2018). The NCA also maintained appropriate business continuity arrangements to ensure core functions and operations can be maintained in the context of a disruptive event, to the extent possible.

Significant Issues

During the period 2018-19, the NCA did not have any significant issues requiring reporting to the Minister under section 19(1) (e) of the PGPA Act relating to non-compliance with Finance law.

Purchasing The NCA purchases goods and services in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. These rules are applied through the Accountable Authority Instructions. The NCA’s procurement policies and processes have been developed to ensure that the NCA:

• undertakes competitive, non-discriminatory procurements

• uses resources efficiently, effectively, economically and ethically

• makes all procurement decisions in an accountable and transparent manner.

Consultants The NCA engages consultants when it lacks specialist expertise, or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to:

• carry out defined reviews or evaluations

• provide advice, information or creative solutions to assist in the NCA’s decision-making.

The decision to engage external consultants is made in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and relevant internal policies.

During 2018-19 ten new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $1,323,196 million. There were two ongoing consultancy contracts carried over from the 2017-18 financial year involving total actual expenditure of $184,221.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available from the AusTender website: www.tenders.gov.au.

Exempt Contracts No contracts were exempted on public interest grounds from publication with AusTender during 2018-19.

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses There were no contracts that did not provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractors’ premises during 2018-19.

CASE STUDY

Commonwealth Park Furniture Upgrade

Commonwealth Park is an important part of Canberra’s urban landscape. The large landscaped park runs from the city centre to the edge of Lake Burley Griffin . It’s the perfect place to stroll, run, ride, play and picnic with its wide open grassed areas and intimate sculptured gardens, ponds and artworks.

As the home of many events hosted in Canberra, it is well used and loved. Floriade, an annual flower event, has been running since 1988. There are music festivals, food and wine markets and many other events. The park includes outdoor Stage 88, which often hosts concerts.

In addition, the recently renovated National Capital Exhibition at Regatta Point is a great place to learn about the history, planning, development and future of Canberra as the capital city of Australia.

As part of a program of work enabled by additional funding for 2018-19, the furniture in the park has undergone a replacement program to provide functional and beautiful furniture to enhance the park and encourage people to sit, relax, picnic and enjoy the views. Double table arrangements provide for larger gatherings and the table ends enable wheelchair use.

The furniture upgrade at Commonwealth Park will be completed in mid-August 2019. NCA is the custodian of Commonwealth Park on behalf of the Australian Government and maintains the park.

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4. Trees at the shores of Lake Burley Griffin, Parkes

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Supporting Small Business, Environmental Performance, External Scrutiny and Asset Management Small Business Support The NCA supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website at www.finance.gov.au .

The NCA seeks to support SMEs, consistent with paragraph 5.4 of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. It ensures that its communications are expressed in clear and simple language.

The NCA provides guidance and instruction to its employees regarding procurement policy, procedure and best practice through its Accountable Authority Instructions (AAIs).

It also provides procurement Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and general guidance information through its information management system and its intranet. NCA employees are encouraged to consider the inclusion of SMEs in all their procurement and purchasing undertakings.

In its AAIs and SOPs the NCA has mandated the use of the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for appropriate procurement processes and contracts up to $200,000. This is in accordance with the Resource Management Guide 420 - Mandatory Use of the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for procurement under $200,000.

The NCA recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The NCA complies with all payment requirements, aiming to ensure that invoices that are correctly rendered are paid within 30 days of the date of receipt of the invoice.

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Advertising Campaigns

During 2018-19 the NCA did not conduct any advertising campaigns.

Grants

During 2018-19 the NCA did not award any grants.

Information Publication Scheme

The NCA is subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and is required to publish information for public access as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). The NCA’s Agency Plan in relation to the IPS is located www.nca.gov.au/about-the-NCA/corporate-documents/freedom-information/ information-publication-scheme .

Ministerial Directions

The NCA did not receive any Ministerial Direction in 2018-19.

Ecologically Sustainable Development and Environmental Performance The National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development defines the goal of ecologically sustainable development (ESD) as ‘development that improves the total quality of life, both now and in the future, in a way that maintains the ecological processes on which life depends’.

The NCA reports on its ESD commitments through Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

NCA Activities in line with the Principles of ESD

The NCA undertakes activities such as managing National Land and carrying out works to maintain or enhance the character of the National Capital and administering the National Capital Plan in accordance with the principles of ESD outlined in the EPBC Act. ESD considerations are incorporated into the NCA’s policy framework, such as the National Capital Plan.

The NCA has in place other formal guidelines to facilitate staff consideration of ESD and the principles of ESD when undertaking business activities. These guidelines include the Risk Management Policy and Framework, and the Guidelines for Events on National Land.

In all of our functions and operations, the NCA:

• develops and implements measures and adopts technologies to minimise waste, energy and natural resource use, and to prevent and minimise pollution

• complies with environmental laws, regulations, agreements and other requirements either directly or through compliance by our contractors and suppliers

• systematically manages activities to achieve and promote continual improvement by setting environmental objectives and targets and assessing our achievements.

The NCA and its employees are committed to improved environmental performance. It achieves this through embedding environmentally friendly practices into everyday activities.

DID YOUKNOW?

One of the oldest living trees on the estate is the Bunya Pine located at the intersection of State Circle and Kings Ave which was

planted on 10 May 1927 by His Royal Highness, the Duke of York. He wore black shoes.

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NCA Outcomes Contributing to ESD

The NCA’s outcomes provide the framework for the NCA to ‘manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, and delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital’.

Effect of NCA Activities on the Environment

The NCA has established a number of corporate initiatives to minimise the impact of its activities on the environment. As a result of corporate environmental efficiency initiatives, the NCA has a work culture that:

• actively recycles paper, cardboard, toner cartridges and co-mingled waste

• promotes efficient use of water in kitchens and washrooms

• efficiently uses paper and office appliances

• has a conservative approach to the use of office lighting and air conditioning

• is committed to electronic record-keeping.

The NCA uses 10 per cent green energy on all of its contestable sites managed under the Whole of Government Energy Contract.

To raise awareness of the impact of energy consumption on the environment, the NCA participated in the World Wide Fund for Nature’s ‘Earth Hour’ awareness event in March 2019. This is the 11th year the NCA has been involved in Earth Hour.

Measures taken to minimise the NCA’s Impact on the Environment

Minimising the NCA’s impact on the environment is a key objective of NCA’s strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians. In 2018-19, these measures included:

• Grinding and screening felled trees and leaves on National Land for re-use as compost and mulch to improve soil condition in garden beds and around young trees.

• Ongoing use of an upgraded irrigation control system with Cloud-based technology and installation of data loggers on water meters allowing easy identification of water leaks in the system. These measures continued to achieve a reduction in water usage from the previous years.

• The water within the Lake is observed, sampled and analysed to monitor the Lake’s water quality in accordance with the Lake Burley Griffin Water Quality Management Plan and the ACT Guidelines for Recreational Water Quality (the Guidelines) (ACT Health, 2014). This provides information about the environmental health of the Lake as well as providing information to Lake users on the suitability of water based recreation during the recreational season (mid-April to mid-October). All responses and advisories issued due to adverse water quality are in line with protocols, legislation and the Guidelines.

• Lake water is used for all irrigation in Commonwealth Park instead of treated, potable water. This means water used on these gardens and lawns are not over-treated for this purpose.

• Ongoing partnership using an Environmental Care Agreement with the Friends of the Grasslands to undertake weed management and re-planting on conservation grasslands in the NCA National Capital Estate.

• Fuel management which is consistent with the Bushfire Operations Plan for fire-prone areas of National Land, including the conservation grasslands. The Ecological Management Plan for these areas prescribes a number of principles to promote native grasses and lower the fuel load by managing the fire risks. In 2018-19, activities included fire trail maintenance, slashing of firebreaks and three hazard reduction and ecological burns with the assistance of the ACT Rural Fire Service volunteers at Yarramundi Grasslands, Scrivener’s Hut Conservation Woodland and Stirling Park. The NCA continues to implement policies to achieve a sensible balance between the use of the land and the Lake and protection of their environmental and heritage values as set out in the applicable Heritage Management Plans.

• Minimising the NCA’s impact on the environment is a key objective of NCA’s strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians.

• Under the National Capital Plan, matters of national significance include ‘development of a city which both respects environmental values and reflects national concerns with the sustainability of Australia’s urban areas’. One of the key objectives of the National Capital Plan is to ‘support and promote environmentally responsible urban development practices’.

• Active management of the colony of flying foxes in Commonwealth Park through preparing a draft Flying Fox Management Plan, with input from a range of community members and experts - further data on the flying foxes will be gathered in 2019-20 to allow for this plan to be finalised.

• Following extensive community consultation, developing a draft Tree Management Policy to ensure a robust and consistent approach for the management of urban trees in readiness for current and future challenges - further feedback will be sought in 2019 from the community to allow the policy to be finalised and implemented.

External Scrutiny

Judicial, Administrative Tribunal or Information Commissioner Decisions

During the period 2018-19 there were no judicial, administrative tribunal or Information Commissioner decisions significantly affecting the operations of the NCA.

Reports on Operations of the NCA by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

During the period 2018-19 there were no reports on operations of the NCA by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

View of Commonwealth Bridge,

Captain Cook Memorial Jet and Lake Burley Griffin, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman 32

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Asset Management One of the NCA’s functions under the PALM Act is to manage National Land within its area of responsibility. Asset management is a key aspect in meeting the NCA’s commitment to maintaining high-quality public facilities across the National Capital Estate.

The Australian Government has a direct interest in developing and maintaining the National Capital as an asset in which all Australians have a major investment.

These assets include:

• the Parliamentary Zone and the National Triangle (excluding the Parliamentary Precinct and immediate curtilages around national institutions)

• Anzac Parade, including its memorials

• Commonwealth, Kings and Constitution Avenues

• the Lake, including Scrivener Dam

• Commonwealth and Kings Parks, including Aspen Island and the National Carillon

• Dunrossil Drive, Yarralumla

• Acton Peninsula

• Yarramundi Grasslands

• Stirling Ridge, Yarralumla

• Diplomatic Estates in Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley

Associated assets include the Captain Cook Memorial Jet, fountains, national monuments, public artworks, large areas of landscape and infrastructure including paths, lighting, signage, open space areas, and civil infrastructure such as roads, bridges and street lighting.

The NCA’s Asset Management Policy, underpinned by the Strategic Asset Management Plan, guides the approach to asset management, to ensure the NCA is able to effectively manage its assets. Asset Management Plans for each asset class are updated regularly and provide more detailed tasks and activities that are undertaken by the NCA.

The maintenance and upgrade of NCA assets is also guided by our statutory obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, the PALM Act and National Land Ordinance 1989. The management of conservation areas and heritage-listed assets are guided by conservation management plans and heritage management plans.

The NCA has a statutory obligation set out under Section 341ZA of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), to prepare Heritage Management Plans for places it own or manages that have Commonwealth Heritage Values. The NCA has a five-year program to prepare heritage assessments and Heritage Management Plans to protect and manage the Commonwealth Heritage places it owns or controls.

The NCA is responsible for 19 listed, 5 nominated and 2 indicative places on the Commonwealth Heritage List, and 1 nominated and 2 listed places on the National Heritage List. The NCA’s Heritage Strategy provides it with a strategic planning tool, setting out the approach to managing the heritage values of its property. The NCA has Heritage Management Plans for 17 of the listed places.

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5. Canberra Balloon Spectacular, Lake Burley Griffin, photographed by Adrian Kelson

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Management of Human Resources

Australia Day Achievement Medallion In early 2019, Jo Prego, Roslyn Hull, Adriana Simonin and Kate Still, were presented with an Australia Day Achievement Medallion for their outstanding contribution to the National Capital Exhibition refit project undertaken during the previous 12 months.

Learning and Development There are many benefits of our employee’s attending learning and development opportunities, such as, increased job satisfaction, staff morale and performance levels. It also develops future skills necessary for the NCA to deliver on our organisational outcomes.

The NCA, as an agency is attentive to our employee’s career development and recognises the importance of encouraging and promoting an individual’s learning and development needs. These opportunities are aligned with the NCA’s priorities and the professional needs of each employee.

The NCA provides assistance for employees who wish to undertake studies to obtain entry into a tertiary institution, a degree, diploma, associate diploma or any other recognised qualification that is assessed as relevant to our employee’s current position responsibilities or future career advancements.

Annually, the NCA requires all employees to attend priority in-house training activities as part of our performance management framework. Where possible the NCA uses the knowledge base and expertise of our own employees to meet specific training needs.

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Staffing Summary and Profile The NCA had an average staffing level (ASL) of 56.3 for 2018-19. The NCA’s headcount at 30 June 2019 was 69 employees; 68 employees engaged under the Public Service Act 1999 and the Chief Executive. The Chief Executive is appointed under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. All employees are located in Canberra. All staffing and profile tables within this report are based on headcount.

Tables 1 to 4 provide the number of employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018, respectively, by employment status, location and gender.

Table 1: All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (at 30 June 2019)

Male Female Indeterminate

Location Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

ACT 18 2 20 25 5 30 0 0 0 50

Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

Table 2: All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (at 30 June 2019)

Male Female Indeterminate

Location Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

ACT 1 6 7 4 8 12 0 0 0 19

Note: These figures include the Chief Executive as a non-ongoing employee. These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

Table 3: All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (at 30 June 2018)

Male Female Indeterminate

Location Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

ACT 17 1 18 19 9 28 0 0 0 46

Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

Table 4: All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (at 30 June 2018)

Male Female Indeterminate

Location Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

ACT 3 5 8 5 11 16 0 0 0 24

Note: These figures include the Chief Executive as a non-ongoing employee. These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

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Tables 5 to 8 provide the number of employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018, respectively, by classification and gender.

Table 5: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (at 30 June 2019)

Male Female Indeterminate

Classification Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

EL 2 3 0 3 4 1 5 0 0 0 8

EL 1 6 2 8 5 1 6 0 0 0 14

APS 6 3 0 3 4 0 4 0 0 0 7

APS 5 3 0 3 7 1 8 0 0 0 11

APS 4 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 4

APS 3 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 2

APS 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

Total 18 2 20 25 5 30 0 0 0 50

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

Table 6: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (at 30 June 2019)

Male Female Indeterminate

Classification Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

EL 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 6 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 5 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 4 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

APS 3 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 3

APS 2 0 5 5 0 6 6 0 0 0 11

Total 1 6 7 3 8 11 0 0 0 18

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

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Table 7: Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (at 30 June 2018)

Male Female Indeterminate

Classification Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

EL 2 1 0 1 4 1 5 0 0 0 6

EL 1 7 0 7 4 1 5 0 0 0 12

APS 6 3 0 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 6

APS 5 3 1 4 3 2 5 0 0 0 9

APS 4 0 0 0 4 1 5 0 0 0 5

APS 3 0 0 0 1 3 4 0 0 0 4

APS 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

Total 17 1 18 19 9 28 0 0 0 46

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

Table 8: Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (at 30 June 2018)

Male Female Indeterminate

Classification Full-time Part-time Total Male Full-time Part-time Total Female

Full-time Part-time Total Indeterminate Total

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

EL 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

APS 6 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

APS 5 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

APS 3 0 1 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 5

APS 2 0 3 3 0 7 7 0 0 0 10

Total 3 5 8 4 11 15 0 0 0 23

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

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Tables 9 and 10 provide the number of employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018, respectively, by full-time and part-time status.

Table 9: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Current Reporting Period (at 30 June 2019)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing

Classification Full-time Part-time Total

Ongoing

Full-time Part-time Total

Non-Ongoing

Total

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 7 1 8 1 0 1 9

EL 1 11 3 14 0 0 0 14

APS 6 7 0 7 1 0 1 8

APS 5 10 1 11 1 0 1 12

APS 4 4 0 4 1 0 1 5

APS 3 1 1 2 0 3 3 5

APS 2 1 1 2 0 11 11 13

Total 43 7 50 4 14 18 68

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

Table 10: Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Previous Reporting Period (at 30 June 2018)

Ongoing Non-Ongoing

Classification Full-time Part-time Total

Ongoing

Full-time Part-time Total

Non-Ongoing

Total

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 5 1 6 1 0 1 7

EL 1 11 1 12 1 1 2 14

APS 6 6 0 6 3 0 3 9

APS 5 6 3 9 1 0 1 10

APS 4 4 1 5 1 0 1 6

APS 3 1 3 4 0 6 6 10

APS 2 1 1 2 0 9 9 11

Total 36 10 46 6 16 23 69

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

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Tables 11 and 12 set out the location of NCA staff. All NCA staff are located in the ACT.

Table 11: Australian Public Service Act Employment Type by Location (at 30 June 2019)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 0 0 0

Qld 0 0 0

SA 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0

Vic 0 0 0

WA 0 0 0

ACT 50 19 69

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 50 19 69

Table 12: Australian Public Service Act Employment Type by Location (at 30 June 2018)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 0 0 0

Qld 0 0 0

SA 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0

Vic 0 0 0

WA 0 0 0

ACT 46 24 70

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 46 24 78

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Staff Retention and Turnover During the 2018-19 financial year, 27 employees (12 ongoing and 15 non-ongoing) commenced employment with the NCA, and 24 employees (8 ongoing and 16 non-ongoing) separated from employment with the NCA.

Table 13: Employee commencement and separation in the 2018-19 financial year

Classification Male Female Indeterminate Total

SES

Commencements 0 0 0 0

Separations 0 0 0 0

EL 1 - 2

Commencements 2 2 0 4

Separations 3 1 0 4

APS 1 - 6

Commencements 8 15 0 23

Separations 6 14 0 20

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

Workplace Diversity The NCA continues to have a diverse workforce. Table 14 sets out NCA staff from diverse backgrounds as at 30 June 2019.

Table 14: Australian Public Service Act Staff Diversity (at 30 June 2019)

Total

Women 42

People with a disability 5

Culturally and linguistically diverse background 11

Note: These figures include the Chief Executive, but do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

DID YOUKNOW?

Regatta Point received its name as it was intended to be the finish of the Regatta Rowing Course.

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Tables 15 and 16 provide a report on Indigenous employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018, respectively, by employment status.

Table 15: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Reporting Period (at 30 June 2019)

Total

Ongoing 3

Non-Ongoing 2

Total 5

Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

Table 16: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Previous Reporting Period (at 30 June 2018)

Total

Ongoing 3

Non-Ongoing 1

Total 4

Note: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month.

The NCA’s Workplace Diversity Plan provides a framework to support its goals and principles of equity and diversity in the workplace. Its key objectives are to:

• promote awareness of workplace diversity within the NCA

• develop and maintain a highly skilled, diverse and effective workforce, where all employees are valued, encouraged and provided with opportunities to develop their potential

• develop a supportive workplace culture that allows staff members to balance their work and personal life

• provide a discrimination and harassment-free workplace

• embrace workplace diversity principles in recruitment and selection processes.

Enterprise Agreements and Remuneration The NCA Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021 (the Enterprise Agreement), provides a number of leave provisions aimed at providing a more flexible and family-friendly environment for employees. These include:

• entitlement to 24 months part-time work on return to work from maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

• provisions for returning to former duties or other duties the employee is qualified to undertake on return to work from maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

• access to 16 weeks paid leave for maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

• access to paid parental leave at half pay

• specification of the types of leave that fall within the broad category of discretionary leave rather than deductions from personal leave

• simplification of accrual rates for personal leave for ongoing and non-ongoing employees

• three days’ paid compassionate leave on each occasion.

In addition to the Enterprise Agreement, the NCA uses other employment arrangements, such as Section 24 Determinations (S24 Dets) and Individual Flexibility Agreements (IFAs) to provide for more flexible remuneration and employment conditions that meet the NCA’s operational needs and suit individual employees.

Table 17 provides a summary of NCA employees covered by Section 24 Determinations and the Enterprise Agreement. As at 30 June 2019, the Chief Executive’s remuneration was determined in accordance with the Remuneration Tribunal Determination - Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Full-Time Public Office 2018.

Aerial view of Canberra, photographed by Martin Ollman

Table 17: Employment Arrangements of SES and Non-SES employees at 30 June 2019

SES Non-SES Total

Enterprise Agreement 0 64 64

Section 24(1) Determination 2 0 2

Enterprise Agreement plus supplementary agreement 0 2 2

Total 2 66 68

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note: These figures do not include personnel on long-term leave where the period is greater than 1 month or the Chief Executive.

The salary ranges for the NCA’s classification levels covering the Enterprise Agreement and Section 24 Determinations are set out in Table 18.

Table 18: Australian Public Service Act Employment Salary Ranges by Classification Level (Minimum/ Maximum) Current Report Period (as at 30 June 2019)

Classification Minimum Salary Maximum Salary

SES 1 $190,550 $199,820

EL 2 $115,061 $147,787

EL 1 $97,480 $107,377

APS 6 $76,994 $92,367

APS 5 $69,819 $83,993

APS 4 $62,628 $68,698

APS 3 $55,874 $61,193

APS 2 $49,126 $54,613

APS 1 $42,248 $46,694

Key: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service. Note1: The table does not include the Chief Executive’s remuneration. Note 2: Salaries ranges maybe higher than prescribed in the Enterprise Agreement where salaries are being maintained upon trans-fer to the agency or where a supplementary agreement is in place.

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Executive Remuneration During the reporting period ended 30 June 2019, the National Capital Authority had seven executives who meet the definition of key management personnel. Their names and the length of term as Key Management Personnel (KMP) are summarised below:

Table 19: NCA Key Management Personnel

Name Position title Term as KMP

Terence Weber Authority Chair Full year

Christine Faulks Member Full year

Glenn Keys Member Full year

Dennis Richardson Member Full year

Sally Barnes Chief Executive Full year

Andrew Smith Chief Planner Full year

Lachlan Wood Chief Operating Officer Full year

Table 20: NCA Key Management Personnel - Remuneration

Short-term benefits Post-

employ-ment Benefits

Other long-term benefits Termi-nation

benefits

Total Remuner-ation

Name Position title Base salary

Bonuses Other benefits and allowances

Super- annuation contribu-tions

Long service leave

Other long term benefits

Terence Weber Authority Chair

59,589 - - 5,661 - - - 65,250

Christine Faulks Member 23,844 - - 2,265 - - - 26,108

Glenn Keys

Member 23,844 - - 2,265 - - - 26,108

Dennis Richard-son

Member 23,844 - - 3,621 - - - 27,465

Sally Barnes

Chief Executive 329,447 - 6,313 50,845 7,251 - - 393,856

Andrew Smith

Chief Planner

201,669 - 26,249 36,977 5,184 - - 270,079

Lachlan Wood

Chief Operating Officer

177,718 - 26,249 28,589 3,326 - - 235,881

TOTAL 839,954 - 58,810 130,223 15,761 - - 1,044,748

There were no other senior executives in NCA except those included in the above table.

There were no other highly paid staff with total remuneration exceeding the $220,000 annual remuneration threshold.

Policies and Practices

The total remuneration of the KMPs were determined as follows:

Chief Executive - the total remuneration is in accordance with the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Full-time Public Office) Determination 2018 which specifies an annual salary of $326,020 with an additional fixed loading of $55,380. No portion of the remuneration is ‘at risk’.

Chief Planner and Chief Operating Officer - their total remuneration was determined in accordance with Section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 which provides that ‘An Agency Head may from time to time determine in writing the terms and conditions of employment applying to an APS employee or APS employees in the Agency’.

Aerial view of National Triangle

Chair of the Authority - the total remuneration is in accordance with the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Part-time Public Office) Determination 2018 which specifies a fixed annual salary of $59,780. No portion of the remuneration is ‘at risk’.

Members of the Authority - the total remuneration for three members are in accordance with the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Part-time Public Office) Determination 2018 which specifies a fixed annual salary of $23,920. No portion of the remuneration is ‘at risk’.

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Performance Management The NCA’s Performance Management and Appraisal Scheme (PMAS) links individual performance agreements to specific activities in Branch Business Plans. Branch Business Plans underpin the NCA’s Corporate Plan which sets out business outcomes and performance expectations.

Access to pay point advancement under the Enterprise Agreement is conditional upon the employee performing to a fully effective standard (or higher).

Personnel Services and Salary Processing Payroll processing and related services are provided by an authorised payroll provider, Aurion Pty Ltd.

Work Health and Safety The NCA is committed to providing a safe working environment, minimising any potential work health and safety (WHS) risks, and to facilitating work-life balance for employees.

During 2018-19, the NCA made significant progress in a major redevelopment and upgrade of our WHS arrangements across the NCA’s operations. The program of work included implementing a comprehensive review and upgrade of our policy and procedural documentation and the introduction of a new business system. These new systems include a number of active WHS measures for staff, contractors and volunteers. The program of work is expected to be completed and implemented during 2019-20.

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Water Week Challenge Cup 2018, Lake Burley Griffin, Parkes

In May 2019, the NCA provided free influenza vaccinations for NCA staff and volunteers. NCA employees and their family members continue to be provided with access to an Employee Assistance Program, a service that provides free, confidential counselling and guidance.

First aid officers are located throughout NCA premises to ensure assistance is available when needed.

There were no notifications to Comcare of an injury or dangerous incident during 2018-19 involving NCA staff.

Disability Reporting The National Disability Strategy 2010-20 sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with a disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. Every two years, the Department of Social Services releases a high-level report tracking progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with a disability are faring. The reports will be made available and can be viewed at www.dss.gov.au.

CASE STUDY

Commonwealth Park Grey-Headed Flying-Foxes

Late in 2018, the NCA engaged Ecosure to assist in the development of a draft Commonwealth Park Grey-Headed Flying-Fox Management Plan.

Since 2003 a camp of grey-headed flying-foxes has occupied an area of Commonwealth Park each year from September to April. While the number of flying-foxes fluctuates, the camp has been increasing and has exceeded 6,000 over recent seasons with a maximum number recorded in March 2019 of 8,190.

Flying-foxes are protected under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and are listed as a vulnerable species. The flying-fox camp at Commonwealth Park has the potential of reaching the criteria for a nationally important camp under the EPBC Act, so the NCA engaged environmental consultants to prepare a draft Commonwealth Park Grey-Headed Flying-Fox Management Plan. The NCA is committed to best practice management of Commonwealth Park and the protection of the grey-headed flying-fox camp.

In August 2019 the NCA will conduct community consultation for the Draft Commonwealth Park Grey-Headed Flying-Fox Management Plan.

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48

6. National Carillon lit at night, photographed by Adrian Kelson

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Report on Financial Performance Financial Overview As a not-for-profit statutory authority, the NCA’s primary source of operating revenue is departmental appropriation from the Australian Government. In addition, the NCA generates regular revenue through property rentals and from processing works approval applications.

The NCA uses this funding to deliver its two programs: National Capital Functions and National Capital Estate. Delivery of these programs includes administration and overhead costs required to run the agency’s operations. The majority of costs incurred by the NCA relate to the maintenance and preservation of National Capital assets under its control.

The NCA also receives funding from non-government entities or state and territory government agencies to facilitate construction activities on their behalf. Usually these projects relate to the construction of memorials and upgrades to assets in the National Capital. The funding received is accounted for in the NCA’s departmental operations.

The NCA receives administered appropriations to carry out activities on behalf of the Australian Government. These activities primarily involve the maintenance and operation of the National Capital Estate and construction and upgrade of assets in the National Capital. The NCA also manages land for diplomatic use and collects rental income from embassies on the Australian Government’s behalf.

Departmental Performance In 2018-19, the NCA reported a departmental operating loss of $0.677 million, compared to an operating loss of $2.887 million in 2017-18. After adding back unfunded depreciation and amortisation expenses of $1.100 million, the NCA had an actual operating surplus of $0.423 million.

At 30 June 2019, the NCA’s departmental net assets increased by $1.514 million. Financial assets increased by $1.490 million mainly due to an increase in appropriations receivable.

Non-financial assets decreased compared to the previous year due to write-down and impairment of assets. This impact is reflected in the closing equity position at 30 June 2019.

Administered Performance In 2018-19, administered expenses increased by $2.163 million, mainly due to an increase of $5.084 million in supplier expenses offset by a decrease in write-down and impairment of assets of $4.439 million.

Depreciation and asset write-down and impairment do not have an associated cash flow impact.

In 2018-19, total administered income decreased by $1.288 million, mainly as a result of asset recognition for contributed revenue for sponsored works declining.

Pay parking revenue and parking fines revenue increased by $1.111 million and $0.191 million respectively from the previous financial year. Rental income for commercial buildings and diplomatic sites remained largely unchanged. This revenue is paid directly to consolidated revenue.

During 2018-19, the NCA’s administered assets were revalued, resulting in a revaluation adjustment of $6.350 million.

The net asset position decreased by $23.604 million mainly due to the write-down and impairment of assets. The NCA’s non-financial assets include land, buildings, infrastructure, plant, equipment and heritage assets on the National Capital Estate, all of which are subject to revaluation annually by an external valuer.

Cost Recovery During 2018-19, the NCA recovered revenue through works approval cost recovery fees and charges. Cost recovery revenue decreased 37 per cent from 2017-18, to $0.768 million, due to reduced activity.

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Trees at King Edward Terrace, Parkes

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Entity Resource Statement 2018-19

Actual

available

appropriation for 2018-19 $’000

Payments

made

2018-19 $’000

Balance

remaining

2018-19 $’000

(a) (b) (a) - (b)

ORDINARY ANNUAL SERVICES1

Departmental appropriations

Departmental appropriation 2 29,218 21,585 7,633

Total 29,218 21,585 7,633

Administered expenses

Outcome 13 23,804 18,815

Total 23,804 18,815

Total ordinary annual services A 53,022 40,400

OTHER SERVICES

Administered non-operating

Administered assets and liabilities - -

Total - -

Total other services B - -

Total available annual appropriations and payments A + B 53,022 40,400

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS

Repayments by the Commonwealth

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 - s77 25 3

Total special appropriations C 25 3

Total resourcing and payments A + B + C 53,047 40,403

1 Appropriation Act (No.1) 2018-19 . This also includes prior year departmental appropriation and s74 retained revenue receipts. 2 Includes an amount of $3.087m for the Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes, this has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’. 3 Includes an amount of $13.612m for the Administered Capital Budget. For accounting

purposes, this has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.

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Outcome Expense Statement 2018-19

EXPENSES FOR OUTCOME 1

Outcome 1: Manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of educational and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

Budget* Actual

Expenses Variation

2018-19 $’000 2018-19 $’000

2018-19 $’000

(a) (b) (a) - (b)

Program 1.1: NATIONAL CAPITAL FUNCTIONS

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 1 19,696 19,610 86

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 2 1,153 1,229 (76)

Total for Program 1.1 20,849 20,839 10

Program 1.2: NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1) 7,978 7,654 324

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 3 24,813 29,468 (4,655)

Total for Program 1.2 32,791 37,122 (4,331)

Outcome 1 TOTALS BY APPROPRIATION TYPE

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 1 19,696 19,610 86

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 2 1,153 1,229 (76)

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1) 7,978 7,654 324

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 3 24,813 29,468 (4,655)

Total expenses for Outcome 1 53,640 57,961 (4,321)

2018-19 2018-19

Average Staffing Level (number) 57 57

* Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2018-19 budget at Additional Estimates. 1 Departmental appropriation combines ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1) and retained revenue receipts under section 74 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. 2 Departmental expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year is made up of depreciation and amortisation expenses,

expenses related to write-down of assets and resources received free of charge. 3 Administered expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year is made up of depreciation and amortisation expenses and expenses related to write-down of assets.

CASE STUDY

Footpath Renewal

The NCA have around 279,000 m2 of paved areas; 209,000 m2 of shared paths and 70,000 m2 paved open spaces. Of the 209,000 m2 of shared paths, some, 193,000 m2 is concrete, 11,000 m2 is asphaltic concrete and 5,000 m2 is landscaped gravel.

All NCA’s shared paths are available for shared or mixed-use, such as walking, bicycling, inline skating, people in wheelchairs and since 1 July 2017, personal mobility device (such as a Segway or Segway-type device).

As part of a program of work enabled by additional funding for 2018-19, NCA undertook a project to remediate and improve the condition of the NCA’s concrete paths. The project designed and renewed around 4000 m2 of path sections of various sizes, and renewed some 20 kerb ramps. The total project cost was approximately $790,000.

The unit cost for the work benchmarks favourably with an industry standard considering the number of small sites, higher specified architectural finishes commensurate with the national significance, and heritage value of the sites. The project has demonstrated value for money for the Commonwealth.

While the age and condition profiles of NCA paths are checked regularly, the NCA had a backlog of work to bring them up to appropriate condition and to meet current standards. The paths main failure mechanisms are due to the paths originally constructed without reinforcement steel and forces such as excess vehicular loading and growth of tree roots.

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A1. Commonwealth Place, Parkes, photographed by Martin Ollman

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APPENDIX ONE Financial Statements 30 June 2019

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

56

Independent Auditor’s Report

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of National Capital Authority (‘the Entity’) for the year ended 30 June 2019:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2019 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2019 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; • Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income; • Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities; • Administered Reconciliation Schedule; • Administered Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements, including a summary of significant accounting

policies and other explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Board is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Board is also responsible for such internal control as the Board determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

57

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

In preparing the financial statements, the Board is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Board is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control; • obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are

appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting

and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Colin Bienke Senior Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

3 September 2019

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

58

STATEMENT BY THE ACCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2019 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the National Capital Authority will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Terry Weber Chair 30 August 2019

Coleen Davis Chief Financial Officer 30 August 2019

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

59

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2019 NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY for the period ended 30 June 2019

2019 2018 Original

Budget 2019

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses Employee benefits 1.1A 6,240 5,141 6,627

Suppliers 1.1B 13,418 16,945 13,131

Depreciation and amortisation 3.2A 1,100 995 983

Write-down and impairment of other assets 1.1C 81 1,506 -

Finance costs - - 3

Total expenses 20,839 24,587 20,744

Own-Source Income Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services 1.2A 1,263 2,240 303

Fees 1.2B 879 1,331 850

Rental income 1.2C 272 334 1,339

Other revenue 1.2D 549 112 2

Total own-source revenue 2,963 4,017 2,494

Gains Other gains 1.2E 18 229 50

Total gains 18 229 50

Total own-source income 2,981 4,246 2,544

Net cost of services (17,858) (20,341) (18,200)

Revenue from Government 1.2F 17,202 17,093 17,202

Deficit on continuing operations (656) (3,248) (998)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus (21) 361 -

Total other comprehensive income (21) 361 -

Total comprehensive loss (677) (2,887) (998)

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

60

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2019 NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

2019 2018 Original

Budget 2019

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 3.1A 112 333 131

Trade and other receivables 3.1B 8,122 6,411 6,294

Total financial assets 8,234 6,744 6,425

Non-financial Assets Buildings 3.2A 10,223 9,322 14,197

Plant and equipment 3.2A 2,023 3,477 2,692

Heritage and cultural 3.2A 235 234 228

Intangibles 3.2A 2,073 1,896 2,001

Prepayments 3.2C 33 18 132

Total non-financial assets 14,587 14,947 19,250

Assets held for sale 3.2B - 336 336

Total assets 22,821 22,027 26,011

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 3.3A 1,263 1,588 3,106

Other payables 3.3B 3,043 3,539 3,839

Total payables 4,306 5,127 6,945

Provisions

Employee provisions 6.1A 1,505 1,404 1,465

Total provisions 1,505 1,404 1,465

Total liabilities 5,811 6,531 8,410

Net assets 17,010 15,496 17,601

EQUITY Contributed equity 13,412 11,221 14,308

Reserves 9,629 9,650 9,289

Accumulated deficit (6,031) (5,375) (5,996)

Total equity 17,010 15,496 17,601

as at 30 June 2019 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

61

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2019 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

2019

2018

Original Budget 2019

2019

2018

Original Budget 2019

2019

2018

Original Budget 2019

2019

2018

Original Budget 2019

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

(5,375) (2,127) (4,998) 9,650 9,289 9,289 11,221 8,635 11,221 15,496 15,797

15,512

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income - - - (21) 361 - - - - (21) 361 -

Deficit for the period (656) (3,248) (998) - - - - - - (656) (3,248) (998)

Total comprehensive income (656) (3,248) (998) (21) 361 - - - - (677) (2,887) (998)

Transactions with owners Distribution to owners return of capital - - - - - - (896) - - (896) - -

Contributions by owners Departmental capital budget - - - - - - 3,087 2,430 3,087 3,087 2,430

3,087

Equity injection - - - - - - - 156 - - 156 -

Total transactions with owners - - - - - - 2,191 2,586 3,087 2,191 2,586

3,087

Closing balance as at 30 June (6,031) (5,375) (5,996) 9,629 9,650 9,289 13,412 11,221 14,308 17,010 15,496

17,601

Accounting Policy

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year. NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY for the period ended 30 June 2019

Retained earnings

Asset revaluation reserve

Contributed equity

Total equity

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

62

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2019

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2019

2019 2018 Original

Budget 2019

$'000 $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 20,655 24,085 17,202

Sale of goods and rendering of services 1,880 3,151 2,494

Net GST received 1,044 1,675 -

Other 597 159 15

Total cash received 24,176 29,070 19,711

Cash used Employees 6,137 5,202 6,627

Suppliers 15,086 19,783 13,084

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA 3,374 4,603 -

Total cash used 24,597 29,588 19,711

Net cash used by operating activities ( 421) (518) -

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received

Contributions revenue 225 887 -

Total cash received 225 887 -

Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 339 1,626 3,087

Purchase of intangibles 571 570 -

Total cash used 910 2,196 3,087

Net cash used by investing activities ( 685) (1,309) (3,087)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed equity 885 2,029 3,087

Total cash received 885 2,029 3,087

Net cash from financing activities 885 2,029 3,087

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held ( 221) 202 -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 333 131 131

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 112 333 131

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

63

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2019 NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

for the period ended 30 June 2019

2019 2018 Original

Budget 2019

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses Suppliers 2.1A 7,654 2,570 6,162

Depreciation and amortisation 4.2A 23,917 22,394 19,813

Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments 2.1B 120 125 -

Write-down and impairment of other assets 2.1C 5,431 9,870 2,000

Total expenses 37,122 34,959 27,975

Income Revenue Non-taxation revenue Rendering of services 2.2A 19,484 18,311 24,899

Fees and fines 2.2B 2,047 1,846 -

Rental income 2.2C 2,046 1,999 -

Other revenue 2.2D 10 2,748 60

Total non-taxation revenue 23,587 24,904 24,959

Gains Reversal of write-downs and impairment 2.2E - 4 -

Gains from sale of assets 2.2F 33 - -

Total gains 33 4 -

23,620 24,908 24,959

Net cost of services (13,502) (10,051) ( 3,016)

Deficit ( 13,502) (10,051) ( 3,016)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 4.2A 6,350 7,808 -

Total comprehensive loss ( 7,152) (2,243) ( 3,016)

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Total income

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

64

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES as at 30 June 2019 NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

2019 2018 Original

Budget 2019

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 4.1A 413 107 1,349

Trade and other receivables 4.1B 2,211 1,962 1,886

Total financial assets 2,624 2,069 3,235

Non-financial assets Land 4.2A 429,392 440,538 441,922

Buildings 4.2A 16,278 16,686 17,356

Property, plant and equipment 4.2A 347,562 358,768 353,476

Heritage assets 4.2A 47,945 48,538 45,240

Intangibles 4.2A 2,814 944 452

Total non-financial assets 843,991 865,474 858,446

Assets held for sale 4.2B - 1,199 -

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 846,615 868,742 861,681

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 4.3A 5,862 4,001 2,048

Other payables 4.3B 21,424 21,808 18,909

Total payables 27,286 25,809 20,957

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government 27,286 25,809 20,957

Net assets 819,329 842,933 840,724

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES as at 30 June 2019

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. Refer to Note 8.2 for budgetary reporting information.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

65

ADMINISTERED RECONCILIATION SCHEDULE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July 842,933 856,910

Net cost of services Income 23,620 24,908

Expenses (37,122) (34,959)

Other comprehensive income Revaluations transferred to reserves 6,350 7,808

Transfers (to)/from the Australian Government Appropriation transfers from Official Public Account Administered assets and liabilities appropriations - -

Annual appropriations Payments to entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities 21,402 16,763

Special appropriations (limited) Payments to entities other than corporate Commonwealth entities 22 13

Appropriation transfers to Official Public Account Transfers to OPA (26,604) (28,510)

Restructuring (11,272) -

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June 819,329 842,933

Accounting Policy

ADMINISTERED RECONCILIATION SCHEDULE

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account Revenue collected by the NCA for use by the Government rather than the NCA is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the NCA on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

66

ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2019

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2019

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Sales of goods and rendering of services 25,034 27,459

GST received 233 151

Total cash received 25,267 27,610

Cash used Suppliers 7,620 1,679

GST paid 464 747

Total cash used 8,084 2,426

Net cash from operating activities 17,183 25,184

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sale of assets 1,601 -

Total cash received 1,601 -

Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 11,378 14,185

Purchase of intangibles 1,920 507

Total cash used 13,298 14,692

Net cash used by investing activities (11,697) (14,692)

Net increase in cash held 5,486 10,492

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 107 1,349

Cash from Official Public Account Annual appropriations Administered expenses 6,970 3,210

Administered capital budget 12,151 11,608

Section 74A for recoverable GST 1,817 1,198

GST paid to the ATO 464 747

Section 77 repayments by the Commonwealth 22 13

Total cash from official public account 21,424 16,776

Cash to Official Public Account

Section 74A appropriations 233 100

Other transfers 26,371 28,410

Total cash to official public account 26,604 28,510

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 413 107

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

67

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Overview

Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

a)

b)

a) b)

Administered

No events have occurred after the reporting date that should be brought to account or noted in the 2018-19 Financial Statements.

No events have occurred after the reporting date that should be brought to account or noted in the 2018-19 Financial Statements.

Events After the Reporting Period

Departmental

AASB 16 Leases is applicable to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019 and introduces a single accounting model for lessees. The NCA will be required to recognise assets and liabilities for all leases, including leases previously classified as operating leases. The cumulative effect of initially applying this standard will be recognised as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings.

Taxation

The NCA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST). Revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities are recognised net of GST except:

where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and for receivables and payables.

As at 30 June 2019, NCA has a non-cancellable lease on its office premises owned by the Department of Finance (lessor) from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2021. In accordance with AASB 16 Leases, this lease commitment will be recognised as a right to use asset. The corresponding lease liability will be recorded at $370,000 as current liability in 2019-20 and a long-term liability of $381,000 for the lease payable on the second year of the lease.

AASB 9 Financial Instruments AASB 9 Financial Instruments (Section 4.1.1) states that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset.

At 30 June 2019, the balance for accounts receivable for overdue parking infringement notices (PINs) is $806,000. 11% of this amount has been assessed as uncollectible. Based on amortised cost method under the new AASB 9, the initial amount for recognition of a financial asset or liability should be adjusted for any loss allowance. The effect of any increase in provision is not material.

AASB 16 Leases

New Australian Accounting Standards

All new, revised, amending standards and interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the NCA's financial statements.

Impact of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements effective from 1 July 2019

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 . The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Overview

The National Capital Authority (NCA) is an Australian Government controlled not-for-profit entity.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

68

1. Departmental Financial Performance

This section analyses the financial performance of the NCA for the year ended 2019.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 4,770 3,801

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 615 545

Defined benefit plans 289 305

Leave and other entitlements 566 490

615

545

Total employee benefits 6,240 5,141

1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Contractors 6,838 10,972

Property operating costs 279 285

Utilities 2,124 2,192

ICT services 1,671 1,633

Consultants 999 470

Associated employee costs 261 365

Legal services 130 144

Communications 234 142

Travel 103 33

Other 130 141

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 12,769 16,377

Goods supplied 99 99

Services rendered 12,670 16,278

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 12,769 16,377

Other suppliers Operating lease rentals 330 346

Workers' compensation premiums 319 222

Total other suppliers 649 568

Total suppliers 13,418 16,945

Leasing Commitments

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

Within 1 year 377 336

Between 1 to 5 years 391 702

Total operating lease commitments1 768 1,038

The NCA, in its capacity as lessee of an office tenancy, is committed to lease rental payments of a fixed amount subject to CPI review annually. The original term of the lease is from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2021 with two options to renew for 5 years. The NCA is also committed to a number of minor building and vehicle leases.

Accounting Policy Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. The NCA is only committed to operating leases.

1. Departmental Financial Performance

1.1 Expenses

Accounting Policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses are contained in the People and Relationships section.

This section analyses the financial performance of the NCA for the year ended 2019.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Notes:

1. Includes office lease commitments calculated to 30 June 2021 and motor vehicle leases.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

69

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

1.1C: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets

Write-down of property, plant and equipment 45 1,506

Write-down of intangibles 36 -

Total write-down and impairment of assets 81 1,506

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Own-Source Revenue

1.2A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

Construction works1 727 1,847

Rendering of services 534 393

Sale of goods 2 -

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 1,263 2,240

Notes:

1.1 Expenses (Cont.)

1. Revenues and Expenses Relating to Assets Under Construction for Third Parties

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Where funding for construction of an asset is provided by a related Commonwealth entity or an external third party who takes control of the finished asset, the transaction is reciprocal in nature. The NCA recognises departmental revenue and expense in accordance with AASB 111 Construction Contracts using the percentage of completion method. Contract revenue is matched to contract expense incurred in reaching the stage of completion. Unexpended funding remains as a payable (refer Note 3.3B) on the departmental statement of financial position at the end of the reporting period in accordance with AASB 1004 Contributions .

Reciprocal Funding

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

Non-reciprocal Funding

Accounting Policy

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer; b) the NCA retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Where the NCA retains control of the asset at completion and funding is received from a party other than a Commonwealth entity, the transaction is non-reciprocal. The NCA recognises the full contribution as departmental revenue in the year of receipt in accordance with AASB 1004 Contributions and recognises departmental expenses as the asset is constructed in accordance with AASB 111 Construction Contracts .

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

70

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Own-Source Revenue (Cont.)

1.2B: Fees

Works approval 768 1,222

Licences 111 109

Total fees 879 1,331

1.2C: Rental Income

Operating leases 272 334

Total rental income 272 334

Rental Income Commitments

Commitments for lease rental income receivables are as follows:

Within 1 year 55 163

Between 1 to 5 years 18 34

Total rental income commitments 73 197

1.2D: Other Revenue

Contributions revenue 500 -

Audit services received free of charge 48 48

Insurance recovery - 52

Other revenue 1 12

Total other revenue 549 112

Gains

1.2E: Other Gains

Refund from prior year - 133

Other gains 18 96

Total other gains 18 229

Revenue from Government

1.2F: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 17,202 17,093

Total revenue from Government 17,202 17,093

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains (Cont.)

Accounting Policy

Services Received Free of Charge Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those services is recognised as an expense. Services received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the NCA gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

The NCA, in its capacity as lessor, receives lease rental payments for a number of properties under its control in and around the centre of Canberra.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Own-Source Revenue (Cont.)

1.2B: Fees

Works approval 768 1,222

Licences 111 109

Total fees 879 1,331

1.2C: Rental Income

Operating leases 272 334

Total rental income 272 334

Rental Income Commitments

Commitments for lease rental income receivables are as follows:

Within 1 year 55 163

Between 1 to 5 years 18 34

Total rental income commitments 73 197

1.2D: Other Revenue

Contributions revenue 500 -

Audit services received free of charge 48 48

Insurance recovery - 52

Other revenue 1 12

Total other revenue 549 112

Gains

1.2E: Other Gains

Refund from prior year - 133

Other gains 18 96

Total other gains 18 229

Revenue from Government

1.2F: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 17,202 17,093

Total revenue from Government 17,202 17,093

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains (Cont.)

Accounting Policy

Services Received Free of Charge Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those services is recognised as an expense. Services received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the NCA gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

The NCA, in its capacity as lessor, receives lease rental payments for a number of properties under its control in and around the centre of Canberra.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Own-Source Revenue (Cont.)

1.2B: Fees

Works approval 768 1,222

Licences 111 109

Total fees 879 1,331

1.2C: Rental Income

Operating leases 272 334

Total rental income 272 334

Rental Income Commitments

Commitments for lease rental income receivables are as follows:

Within 1 year 55 163

Between 1 to 5 years 18 34

Total rental income commitments 73 197

1.2D: Other Revenue

Contributions revenue 500 -

Audit services received free of charge 48 48

Insurance recovery - 52

Other revenue 1 12

Total other revenue 549 112

Gains

1.2E: Other Gains

Refund from prior year - 133

Other gains 18 96

Total other gains 18 229

Revenue from Government

1.2F: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 17,202 17,093

Total revenue from Government 17,202 17,093

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains (Cont.)

Accounting Policy

Services Received Free of Charge Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those services is recognised as an expense. Services received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the NCA gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

The NCA, in its capacity as lessor, receives lease rental payments for a number of properties under its control in and around the centre of Canberra.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

71

2. Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government

This section analyses the activities that NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

2.1A: Suppliers Services rendered Consultants 4,284 594

Suppliers 1,654 -

Insurance 282 261

Parking management 1,081 1,242

Fees and charges 353 473

Total services rendered 7,654 2,570

Total suppliers 7,654 2,570

2.1B: Impairment Loss Allowance on Financial Instruments Impairment on financial instruments 120 125

2.1C: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets Impairment of property, plant and equipment 5,431 9,870

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Revenue

Non-Taxation Revenue

2.2A: Rendering of Services Parking services 19,413 18,302

Hire of assets 9 9

Cost recovery 62 -

Total rendering services 19,484 18,311

2.2B: Fees and Fines Licence fees 66 56

Fines 1,981 1,790

Total fees and fines 2,047 1,846

Accounting Policy

Fees are charged for issuing licences to use or occupy property administered by the NCA on behalf of the Government. Fines are issued as part of the pay parking scheme operated in the central national area of Canberra. Administered revenue for parking fees is recognised daily when fees are credited in the bank. Infringement notices are recognised when issued (parking fines). Rents are charged monthly, quarterly or yearly in advance.

All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by the NCA on behalf of the Australian Government. As such, administered appropriations are not revenues of the NCA that oversees the distribution or expenditure of the funds as directed.

2. Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government

2.1 Administered - Expenses

This section analyses the activities that NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

2.2 Administered - Income

Accounting Policy

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

72

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

2.2C: Rental Income Operating lease Building rents 132 128

Diplomatic land rents 1,914 1,871

Total rental income 2,046 1,999

Rental Income Commitments

Commitments for rental income receivables are as follows:

Within 1 year 1,741 1,783

Between 1 to 5 years 6,606 6,726

More than 5 years 58,770 60,391

Total rental income commitments receivable 67,117 68,900

2.2D: Other Revenue

Contributions for externally sponsored works - 2,748

Other 10 -

Total other revenue 10 2,748

Gains

2.2E: Reversal of write-downs and impairment Reversal of impairment allowance on financial instruments - 4

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments - 4

2.2F Gains from Sale of Assets

Land

Proceeds from sale 1,601 -

Carrying value of asset sold (1,568) -

Total gains from sale of assets 33 -

The NCA, in its capacity as lessor, administers a number of leases for land and buildings in the central national area of Canberra including cafes, restaurants, tennis courts and maintenance facilities. The NCA also administers a number of diplomatic land leases with contract periods up to 99 years.

Accounting Policy

Contributions for Construction of Externally Sponsored Works As externally sponsored works are constructed through the departmental program or when the NCA gains control of assets provided by a third party, the value of work complete or assets received is recognised as an administered non-financial asset and brought to account in other revenue. Further information relating to the treatment of externally sponsored works is available at Note 1.2A.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

2.2 Administered - Income (Cont.)

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

73

3. Departmental Financial Position

This section analyses the NCA’s assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information, including employee provisions, is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

3.1A Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 112 333

Total cash and cash equivalents 112 333

3.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 387 211

Total goods and services receivables 387 211

Appropriations receivables Appropriation receivable 7,521 5,963

Total appropriations receivables 7,521 5,963

Other receivables GST receivables 147 130

Other 67 107

Total other receivables 214 237

Total trade and other receivables 8,122 6,411

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Financial assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

3. Departmental Financial Position

3.1 Financial Assets

This section analyses the NCA's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information, including employee provisions, is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

74

Buildings Plant and equipment Heritage and

cultural1

Intangibles2 Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 9,415 3,510 234 3,478 16,637

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (93) (33) - (1,582) (1,708)

Total as at 1 July 2018 9,322 3,477 234 1,896 14,929

Additions by purchase 75 196 - 555 826

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income ( 616) (164) 2 - (778)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services (3) (46) (1) (729) (779)

Depreciation and amortisation (572) (184) (2) (342) (1,100)

Accumulated depreciation - write back on asset write down - 6 2 693 701

Accumulated depreciation - write back on revaluation 580 175 - - 755

Other movements - asset reclassification 1,437 (1,437) - - -

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by:

Gross book value 10,308 2,060 235 3,304 15,907

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (85) (37) - (1,231) (1,353)

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Building held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 336 -

Additions - 336

Disposal -transferred to Administered ( 336) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 336

Notes

Revaluations of non-financial assets

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Minor building upgrades 278 103

ICT equipment 477 6

Computer software 1,533 1,981

Total Commitments 2,288 2,090

3.2 Non-Financial Assets

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant equipment and intangibles for 2019

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the stated policy.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

3.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

3.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. On 30 June 2019, an independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Buildings Plant and equipment Heritage and

cultural1

Intangibles2 Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 9,415 3,510 234 3,478 16,637

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (93) (33) - (1,582) (1,708)

Total as at 1 July 2018 9,322 3,477 234 1,896 14,929

Additions by purchase 75 196 - 555 826

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income ( 616) (164) 2 - (778)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services (3) (46) (1) (729) (779)

Depreciation and amortisation (572) (184) (2) (342) (1,100)

Accumulated depreciation - write back on asset write down - 6 2 693 701

Accumulated depreciation - write back on revaluation 580 175 - - 755

Other movements - asset reclassification 1,437 (1,437) - - -

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by:

Gross book value 10,308 2,060 235 3,304 15,907

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (85) (37) - (1,231) (1,353)

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Building held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 336 -

Additions - 336

Disposal -transferred to Administered ( 336) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 336

Notes

Revaluations of non-financial assets

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Minor building upgrades 278 103

ICT equipment 477 6

Computer software 1,533 1,981

Total Commitments 2,288 2,090

3.2 Non-Financial Assets

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant equipment and intangibles for 2019

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the stated policy.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

3.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

3.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. On 30 June 2019, an independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Buildings Plant and equipment Heritage and

cultural1

Intangibles2 Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 9,415 3,510 234 3,478 16,637

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (93) (33) - (1,582) (1,708)

Total as at 1 July 2018 9,322 3,477 234 1,896 14,929

Additions by purchase 75 196 - 555 826

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income ( 616) (164) 2 - (778)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services (3) (46) (1) (729) (779)

Depreciation and amortisation (572) (184) (2) (342) (1,100)

Accumulated depreciation - write back on asset write down - 6 2 693 701

Accumulated depreciation - write back on revaluation 580 175 - - 755

Other movements - asset reclassification 1,437 (1,437) - - -

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by:

Gross book value 10,308 2,060 235 3,304 15,907

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (85) (37) - (1,231) (1,353)

Total as at 30 June 2019 10,223 2,023 235 2,073 14,554

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Building held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 336 -

Additions - 336

Disposal -transferred to Administered ( 336) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 336

Notes

Revaluations of non-financial assets

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Minor building upgrades 278 103

ICT equipment 477 6

Computer software 1,533 1,981

Total Commitments 2,288 2,090

3.2 Non-Financial Assets

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant equipment and intangibles for 2019

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the stated policy.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural, or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

3.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

3.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. On 30 June 2019, an independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

75

Depreciation

Asset Class 2019 (years) 2018 (years)

Buildings 10-100 10-100

Plant and equipment 3-60 3-20

Heritage and cultural assets 10-100 10-100

Intangible assets 3-10 3-10

Impairment

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment is carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases less than $2,000 (2018: $2,000), which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. For the NCA, this is only relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the NCA where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the NCA’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.

Accounting Policy

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

3.2 Non-Financial Assets (Cont.)

Revaluations

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the NCA were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

The NCA has items of property, plant and equipment that are heritage and cultural assets that have limited useful lives and are depreciated.

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the NCA using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

76

Derecognition

Heritage and Cultural Assets

Intangibles

Assets Held for Sale

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

3.2C: Other Non-Financial Assets

Prepayments 33 18

Total other non-financial assets 33 18

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Accounting Policy (Cont.)

3.2 Non-Financial Assets (Cont.)

• The fair value of land and building assets has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by a qualified independent valuer. In some instances, NCA buildings are purpose built and may realise more or less in the market.

Management plans relating to these assets are available on the NCA's website www.nca.gov.au as follows:

• Parliament House Vista Heritage Management Plan;

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

The NCA’s departmental cultural assets comprise a number of individually valued artworks. Administered heritage assets comprise one heritage listed building and a number of memorials across the national estate.

The NCA's intangibles comprise purchased software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2019.

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the NCA has made the following judgement that has the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

Accounting Judgements and Estimates

• Anzac Parade Heritage Management Plan; and • Blundells Cottage Heritage Management Plan.

Assets are classified as held for sale if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than continuing use and a sale is highly probable. These assets are measured at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. Assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised.

Other non-financial assets are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

77

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

3.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 1,253 1,530

Operating lease rentals 10 58

Total suppliers 1,263 1,588

3.3B: Other Payables Salaries and wages 47 45

Unearned income 2,030 2,150

Funds received in advance for construction works 309 625

Funds received in advance for public artworks 300 337

Bonds and retentions 137 123

Lease incentive 93 140

Other 127 119

Total other payables 3,043 3,539

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

3.3 Payables

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

78

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 413 107

Total cash and cash equivalents 413 107

4.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 901 903

Fees 539 547

Fines 806 562

GST receivables 56 11

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,302 2,023

Less impairment allowance ( 91) (61)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,211 1,962

Pay Parking Impairment Allowance

AASB 9 requires that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. An allowance for impairment was set up to reflect the pay parking infringement receivables to the amount expected to be collected. The NCA has developed a methodology that considers the amount of debt owing within a number of categories and applies a weighted probability of collection for each category.

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government

Pay parking revenue includes ticketing fees and parking infringements. Infringements become a debt upon issuing the Parking Infringement Notice (PIN) and are accounted for as an administered receivable. The risk of non-payment of infringement debt is provided by way of an impairment allowance accounted for under AASB 9 Financial Instruments .

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Accounting Policy Financial assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 413 107

Total cash and cash equivalents 413 107

4.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 901 903

Fees 539 547

Fines 806 562

GST receivables 56 11

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,302 2,023

Less impairment allowance ( 91) (61)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,211 1,962

Pay Parking Impairment Allowance

AASB 9 requires that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. An allowance for impairment was set up to reflect the pay parking infringement receivables to the amount expected to be collected. The NCA has developed a methodology that considers the amount of debt owing within a number of categories and applies a weighted probability of collection for each category.

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government

Pay parking revenue includes ticketing fees and parking infringements. Infringements become a debt upon issuing the Parking Infringement Notice (PIN) and are accounted for as an administered receivable. The risk of non-payment of infringement debt is provided by way of an impairment allowance accounted for under AASB 9 Financial Instruments .

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Accounting Policy Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

79

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 413 107

Total cash and cash equivalents 413 107

4.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 901 903

Fees 539 547

Fines 806 562

GST receivables 56 11

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,302 2,023

Less impairment allowance ( 91) (61)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,211 1,962

Pay Parking Impairment Allowance

AASB 9 requires that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. An allowance for impairment was set up to reflect the pay parking infringement receivables to the amount expected to be collected. The NCA has developed a methodology that considers the amount of debt owing within a number of categories and applies a weighted probability of collection for each category.

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government

Pay parking revenue includes ticketing fees and parking infringements. Infringements become a debt upon issuing the Parking Infringement Notice (PIN) and are accounted for as an administered receivable. The risk of non-payment of infringement debt is provided by way of an impairment allowance accounted for under AASB 9 Financial Instruments .

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Accounting Policy Financial assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 413 107

Total cash and cash equivalents 413 107

4.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 901 903

Fees 539 547

Fines 806 562

GST receivables 56 11

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,302 2,023

Less impairment allowance ( 91) (61)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,211 1,962

Pay Parking Impairment Allowance

AASB 9 requires that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. An allowance for impairment was set up to reflect the pay parking infringement receivables to the amount expected to be collected. The NCA has developed a methodology that considers the amount of debt owing within a number of categories and applies a weighted probability of collection for each category.

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government

Pay parking revenue includes ticketing fees and parking infringements. Infringements become a debt upon issuing the Parking Infringement Notice (PIN) and are accounted for as an administered receivable. The risk of non-payment of infringement debt is provided by way of an impairment allowance accounted for under AASB 9 Financial Instruments .

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Accounting Policy Financial assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Land Buildings Property, Plant and Equipment

Heritage Assets1

Intangible Assets2

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 440,538 16,805 362,237 48,679 1,179 869,438

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (119) (3,469) (141) (235) (3,964)

Adjustment to opening balance3 (14,507) - - - - (14,507)

Total as at 1 July 2018 426,031 16,686 358,768 48,538 944 850,967

Additions: Purchase 404 639 9,247 772 1,920 12,982

Transfer from work in progress Transfers from work in progress - (17) (422) (633) - (1,072)

Contributions from owners 2,900 336 - - - 3,236

Depreciation and amortisation - (772) (22,181) (914) (50) (23,917)

Revaluations recognised in revaluation reserve - 290 5,335 725 - 6,350

Write down and impairments recognised in net cost of services (4) (469) (3,396) (543) - (4,412)

Reversal of accum depreciation relating to write down and impairments - 8 262 - - 270

Other movements:

Reclassifications - - (51) - - (51)

Adjustment to asset held for sale 61 (423) - - - (362)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by: Gross book value 429,392 16,410 351,193 48,089 3,099 848,183

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (132) (3,631) (144) (285) (4,192)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Assets held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 1,199 -

Additions 362 1,199

Disposal (1,561) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 1,199

Notes:

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Land and buildings 588 111

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 7,109 5,285

Heritage assets 51 781

Intangibles 270 267

Total Commitments 8,018 6,444

The accounting policy for non-financial assets disclosed in Note 3.2 applies equally to administered non-financial assets.

Revaluation of non-financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. An independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

In 2017-18, significant commitments related to the upgrade of Blundell's cottage, Scrivener dam, NCE building and digital display.

Accounting Policy

In 2018-19, significant commitments relate to the replacement of street furniture, works on the Captain Cook Memorial jet and Scrivener dam, upgrades to the Carillon and other event venues.

Whereas the NCA takes control of the finished asset at completion of a third party sponsored project, administered work in progress (WIP) is recognised as the asset is constructed.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 3.2.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

4.2 Administered - Non-Financial Assets

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant, equipment and intangibles for 2019

4.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage item were disclosed in the heritage asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

3. The opening balance for Land was adjusted by $14.5m to reflect the transfer of land assets from the NCA to the Department of Finance. These assets were divested by the Department of Finance and the proceeds of the sale of these assets were recorded in the Department of Finance's accounts in 2017-18.

4.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

80

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 5,862 4,001

Total suppliers 5,862 4,001

4.3B: Other Payables Prepayments received for operating leases 21,285 21,532

Retentions 90 220

Other 49 56

Total other payables 21,424 21,808

4.3 Administered - Payables

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Land Buildings Property, Plant and Equipment

Heritage Assets1

Intangible Assets2

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 440,538 16,805 362,237 48,679 1,179 869,438

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (119) (3,469) (141) (235) (3,964)

Adjustment to opening balance3 (14,507) - - - - (14,507)

Total as at 1 July 2018 426,031 16,686 358,768 48,538 944 850,967

Additions: Purchase 404 639 9,247 772 1,920 12,982

Transfer from work in progress Transfers from work in progress - (17) (422) (633) - (1,072)

Contributions from owners 2,900 336 - - - 3,236

Depreciation and amortisation - (772) (22,181) (914) (50) (23,917)

Revaluations recognised in revaluation reserve - 290 5,335 725 - 6,350

Write down and impairments recognised in net cost of services (4) (469) (3,396) (543) - (4,412)

Reversal of accum depreciation relating to write down and impairments - 8 262 - - 270

Other movements:

Reclassifications - - (51) - - (51)

Adjustment to asset held for sale 61 (423) - - - (362)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by: Gross book value 429,392 16,410 351,193 48,089 3,099 848,183

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (132) (3,631) (144) (285) (4,192)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Assets held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 1,199 -

Additions 362 1,199

Disposal (1,561) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 1,199

Notes:

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Land and buildings 588 111

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 7,109 5,285

Heritage assets 51 781

Intangibles 270 267

Total Commitments 8,018 6,444

The accounting policy for non-financial assets disclosed in Note 3.2 applies equally to administered non-financial assets.

Revaluation of non-financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. An independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

In 2017-18, significant commitments related to the upgrade of Blundell's cottage, Scrivener dam, NCE building and digital display.

Accounting Policy

In 2018-19, significant commitments relate to the replacement of street furniture, works on the Captain Cook Memorial jet and Scrivener dam, upgrades to the Carillon and other event venues.

Whereas the NCA takes control of the finished asset at completion of a third party sponsored project, administered work in progress (WIP) is recognised as the asset is constructed.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 3.2.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

4.2 Administered - Non-Financial Assets

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant, equipment and intangibles for 2019

4.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage item were disclosed in the heritage asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

3. The opening balance for Land was adjusted by $14.5m to reflect the transfer of land assets from the NCA to the Department of Finance. These assets were divested by the Department of Finance and the proceeds of the sale of these assets were recorded in the Department of Finance's accounts in 2017-18.

4.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

Land Buildings Property, Plant and Equipment

Heritage Assets1

Intangible Assets2

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Total as at 1 July 2018 Gross book value 440,538 16,805 362,237 48,679 1,179 869,438

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (119) (3,469) (141) (235) (3,964)

Adjustment to opening balance3 (14,507) - - - - (14,507)

Total as at 1 July 2018 426,031 16,686 358,768 48,538 944 850,967

Additions: Purchase 404 639 9,247 772 1,920 12,982

Transfer from work in progress Transfers from work in progress - (17) (422) (633) - (1,072)

Contributions from owners 2,900 336 - - - 3,236

Depreciation and amortisation - (772) (22,181) (914) (50) (23,917)

Revaluations recognised in revaluation reserve - 290 5,335 725 - 6,350

Write down and impairments recognised in net cost of services (4) (469) (3,396) (543) - (4,412)

Reversal of accum depreciation relating to write down and impairments - 8 262 - - 270

Other movements:

Reclassifications - - (51) - - (51)

Adjustment to asset held for sale 61 (423) - - - (362)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by: Gross book value 429,392 16,410 351,193 48,089 3,099 848,183

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment - (132) (3,631) (144) (285) (4,192)

Total as at 30 June 2019 429,392 16,278 347,562 47,945 2,814 843,991

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Assets held for sale Total as at 1 July 2018 1,199 -

Additions 362 1,199

Disposal (1,561) -

Total as at 30 June 2019 - 1,199

Notes:

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Land and buildings 588 111

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 7,109 5,285

Heritage assets 51 781

Intangibles 270 267

Total Commitments 8,018 6,444

The accounting policy for non-financial assets disclosed in Note 3.2 applies equally to administered non-financial assets.

Revaluation of non-financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 7.4. An independent valuer conducted the revaluation.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

In 2017-18, significant commitments related to the upgrade of Blundell's cottage, Scrivener dam, NCE building and digital display.

Accounting Policy

In 2018-19, significant commitments relate to the replacement of street furniture, works on the Captain Cook Memorial jet and Scrivener dam, upgrades to the Carillon and other event venues.

Whereas the NCA takes control of the finished asset at completion of a third party sponsored project, administered work in progress (WIP) is recognised as the asset is constructed.

Property, plant and equipment, heritage and intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2019. Assets found to be impaired were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 3.2.

No property, plant and equipment, heritage or intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

4.2 Administered - Non-Financial Assets

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant, equipment and intangibles for 2019

4.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

1. Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage item were disclosed in the heritage asset class.

2. The carrying amount of intangibles is all purchased software.

3. The opening balance for Land was adjusted by $14.5m to reflect the transfer of land assets from the NCA to the Department of Finance. These assets were divested by the Department of Finance and the proceeds of the sale of these assets were recorded in the Department of Finance's accounts in 2017-18.

4.2B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Asset Held for Sale

(Cont.)

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 5,862 4,001

Total suppliers 5,862 4,001

4.3B: Other Payables Prepayments received for operating leases 21,285 21,532

Retentions 90 220

Other 49 56

Total other payables 21,424 21,808

4.3 Administered - Payables

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 413 107

Total cash and cash equivalents 413 107

4.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables 901 903

Fees 539 547

Fines 806 562

GST receivables 56 11

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,302 2,023

Less impairment allowance ( 91) (61)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,211 1,962

Pay Parking Impairment Allowance

AASB 9 requires that an entity is to classify financial assets at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income or fair value through profit and loss on the basis of both: the entity's business model for managing financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. An allowance for impairment was set up to reflect the pay parking infringement receivables to the amount expected to be collected. The NCA has developed a methodology that considers the amount of debt owing within a number of categories and applies a weighted probability of collection for each category.

4. Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government

Pay parking revenue includes ticketing fees and parking infringements. Infringements become a debt upon issuing the Parking Infringement Notice (PIN) and are accounted for as an administered receivable. The risk of non-payment of infringement debt is provided by way of an impairment allowance accounted for under AASB 9 Financial Instruments .

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the NCA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

Accounting Policy Financial assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

81

5. Funding

This section identifies the NCA's funding structure.

Annual

Appropriation1 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 17,202 20,576 20,700 (124)

Capital budget3 3,087 3,087 885 2,202

Total departmental 20,289 23,663 21,585 2,078

Administered

Ordinary annual services Administered items 6,137 6,137 6,664 (527)

Capital budget3 13,612 13,612 12,151 1,461

Total administered 19,749 19,749 18,815 934

Notes:

Administered items: The variance results from the drawing down of prior year appropriations and a reduction in the appropriation receivable.

Appropriation applied in 2019 (current and

prior years)

Variance2

appropriations and a reduction in the appropriation receivable.

5. Funding

5.1 Appropriations

1. No amounts of appropriation were withheld under Section 51 of the PGPA Act.

This section identifies the NCA's funding structure.

-

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

3,374

-

-

3,374

5.1A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Adjustments to appropriations

Departmental capital budget: The variance results from undrawn current year appropriations due to delays in capital projects.

-

Section 74 receipts

3. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

Annual Appropriation for 2019

Total

appropriation

Appropriation Act

Administered capital budget: The variance results from undrawn current year appropriations due to timing of payments to suppliers.

2. Departmental ordinary annual services : The variance results from the drawing down of prior year

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

82

Annual

Appropriation1 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental

Ordinary annual services4 17,093 21,696 24,011 (2,315)

Capital budget3 2,430 - 2,430 2,029 401

Other Services Equity injections 156 - 156 - 156

Total departmental 19,679 24,282 26,040 (1,758)

Administered Ordinary annual services Administered items 3,435 - 3,435 3,716 (281)

Capital budget3 13,648 - 13,648 11,609 2,039

Total administered 17,083 17,083 15,325 1,758

Notes:

4. The above table reflects the original 2017-18 appropriation amounts. During 2016-17, the Finance Minister had approved the transfer of $868,000 from ordinary annual services to capital with this amount made available to the NCA in 2017-18. Separately, in 2016-17, the Finance Minister had approved a reduction in the ordinary annual services appropriation of $4,000 for the whole of government Govlink contract amendment. This variation was not applied until July 2018. As neither of these variations were effected by the Appropriation Acts during 2017-18 they are not reflected in the above table.

Administered capital budget: The variance results from undrawn current year appropriations due to timing of payments to suppliers.

3. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

$'000

4,603

Administered items: The variance results from the drawing down of prior year appropriations.

2. Departmental ordinary annual services: The variance results from the drawing down of prior year and a reduction in the appropriation receivable.

Departmental equity injections: The variance results from undrawn current year appropriations.

5.1 Appropriations (Cont.)

4,603

-

Departmental capital budget: The variance results from undrawn current year appropriations.

5.1A (Cont.): Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Variance2

Appropriation applied in 2018 (current and

prior years)

1. No amounts of appropriation were withheld under Section 51 of the PGPA Act.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

Annual Appropriation for 2018

Total

appropriation

Appropriation Act

Section 74 receipts

Adjustments to appropriations

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

83

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTAL Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 - Cash at Bank 1 - 333

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 - 4,464

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2017-18 - Equity Injections - 156

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2017-18 - Capital Budget (DCB) - Non Operating - 1,342

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 - Cash at Bank 1 112 -

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 4,381 -

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2018-19 - Equity Injections 156 -

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 - Capital Budget (DCB) - Non Operating 2 2,984 -

Total departmental 7,633 6,295

ADMINISTERED

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 - Cash at Bank 3 - 107

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 - 1,674

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2017-18 - 142

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 - Capital Budget (DCB) - Non Operating - 2,132

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 - Cash at Bank 3 413 -

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 983 -

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 - Capital Budget (DCB) - Non Operating 3,593 -

Total administered 4,989 4,055

Type Purpose

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Section 77, Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Refund 3 13

3 13

Notes:

Total special appropriation applied

2. During 2018-19, $560,000 of unused departmental capital was returned to the Official Public Account.

1. Departmental cash at bank relates to deposits made during June that are subject to Section 74 of the PGPA Act .

3. Administered cash at bank relates to deposits made on 30 June that will be returned to the Official Public Account on 1 July.

To provide an appropriation where an Act or other law requires or permits the repayment of an amount received by the Commonwealth and apart from this section there is no specific appropriation for the repayment.

Authority

5.1C: Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

5.1 Appropriations (Con't)

Appropriation applied

5.1B: Unspent Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Authority

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

84

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Expenses

Departmental 985 1,533

Total expenses 985 1,533

External revenue

Departmental 768 1,212

Total external revenue 768 1,212

Note: The amounts disclosed exclude transactions with inter or intra-government agencies.

Regulatory charging activities:

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Total comprehensive surplus/(loss) plus depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations 423 (1,892)

Less: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 1,100 995

Total comprehensive loss - as per Statement of Comprehensive Income (677) (2,887)

5.3 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

5.2 Regulatory Charging Summary

The NCA undertakes cost recovered activities to provide works approval in the Designated Areas of the ACT, as set out in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Regulations (Regulation 5) under the Australian Capital Territory (Land Management) Act 1988 (PALM Act) .

Documentation (Cost Recovery Impact Statement) for the above activity is available at:

http://nationalcapital.gov.au/index.php/works-approval/works-approval-fees

Works approval fees are payable by entities wishing to undertake works in the Designated Areas. These include but are not limited to:

• Developers wishing to undertake major redevelopments; • Telecommunications providers wishing to undertake excavations and installation of new infrastructure to improve communications networks; and • Entities wishing to erect temporary event related structures.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

85

6. People and Relationships

This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relations with other key people.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

6.1A: Employee Provisions Leave 1,505 1,404

Total employee provisions 1,505 1,404

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

The liability for long service leave is based on the NCA’s estimated liability at balance date of the long service leave entitlements of its employees, which have been determined by reference to the shorthand method set out in the Resource Management Guide No. 125 Commonwealth Entities Financial Statements Guide . The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

The NCA's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or other Superannuation funds held outside of the Australian Government. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

6. People and Relationships

6.1 Employee Provisions

This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relations with other key people.

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the NCA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The NCA makes employer contributions to the employees' defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The NCA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

86

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Short-term employee benefits 899 805

Post-employment benefits 130 100

Other Long-term employee benefits 16 15

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 1,045 920

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

- Sponsored construction works 952 1,160

- Parking services 3,979 5,081

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

6.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are 7 (2018: 8). The 2018 figures for key management personnel remuneration have been restated (from $891,000 total) to reclassify $40,000 from long-term to short-term employee benefits, and to reflect adjustments for bonuses paid and other allowances ($27,000) and an increase in post-employment benefits ($2,000).

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the entity. The NCA has determined the key management personnel to be the Authority Chair, independent Authority Members, Chief Executive, Chief Planner and Chief Operating Officer. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

Key management personnel

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the NCA.

The following significant transactions with other Australian Government entities occurred during the financial year:

6.3 Related Party Disclosures The NCA is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the NCA are its key management personnel including the Portfolio Minister, Authority and Executive, and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties:

Other Australian Government entities

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions may include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loan. Such transactions are not separately disclosed in this note.

At 30 June 2019, the NCA received declarations from its key management personnel in relation to related parties for the 2018-19 financial year.

No transactions were identified that are required to be reported in this note.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

87

7. Managing Uncertainties

This section analyses how the NCA manages financial risks within its operating environment.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

7.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets under AASB 139 Loans and receivables Cash and cash equivalents 333

Trade receivable 89

Total loans and receivables 422

Financial Assets under AASB 9 Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents 112

Trade receivable 316

Total financial asets at amortised cost 428

Total financial assets 428 422

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Bonds and retentions (137) (123)

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost (137) (123)

Total financial liabilities (137) (123)

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9

original new carrying carrying

Financial assets class Notes classification classification amount at amount

1 July 2018 at 1 July 2018

$'000 $'000

Cash and cash equivalents Loans and Amortised

receivable cost 333 333

Trade receivables 3.1B Loans and Amortised

receivable cost 89 89

Total financial assets 422 422

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9

carrying carrying

amount at Re- Re- amount at

1 July 2018 classification measurement 1 July 2018 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets at amortised cost Loans and receivable

Cash on hand or on deposit 333 - - 333

Trade receivable 89 - - 89

Total amortised cost 422 - - 422

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

7.2 Financial Instruments

7.1A: Contingent assets and liabilities

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

7. Managing Uncertainties This section analyses how the NCA manages financial risks within its operating environment.

7.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

The NCA has no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingencies at 30 June 2019 (2018: Nil).

7.1B: Administered - contingent assets and liabilities

The NCA has no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingencies at 30 June 2019 (2018: Nil).

Accounting Policy

7.2 Financial Instruments

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

88

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

a) financial asset at fair value through profit or loss; b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; c) financial assets measured at amortised cost.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and 2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effecive interest method.

Effective Interest Method Income is recognised on an effective interest basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

All payables are expected to be settled within 12 months except where indicated.

Financial liabilities are classified as 'other financial liabilities'.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

7.2 Financial Instruments

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019; the entity classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the item of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has legal right to receive a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon a trade date.

7.2 Financial Instruments (Cont.)

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

89

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

7.3A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets under AASB 139 Loans and receivables Cash on hand or on deposit 107

Goods and services receivable 1,404

Total loans and receivables 1,511

Financial Assets under AASB 9 Financial assets at amortised cost Cash on hand or on deposit 413

Goods and services receivable 1,616

Total financial assets at amortised cost 2,029

Total financial assets 2,029 1,511

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Retentions 90 (220)

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 90 (220)

Total financial liabilities 90 (220)

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9

original new carrying carrying

Financial assets class Notes classification classification amount amount

at 1 July 2018 at 1 July 2018

$'000 $'000

Cash on hand or on deposit Loans and Amortised

receivable cost 107 107

Goods and services receivable Loans and Amortised

receivable cost 1,404 1,404

Total financial assets 1,511 1,511

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 AASB 139 AASB 9

carrying carrying

amount at Re- Re- amount

1July 2018 classification measurement at 1 July 2018 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets at amortised cost Loans and receivable

Cash on hand or on deposit 107 - - 107

Goods and services receivable 1,404 - - 1,404

Total amortised cost 1,511 - - 1,511

Accounting Policy

The accounting policy for financial instruments disclosed at Note 7.2 applies equally to administered financial instruments.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

The carrying amount of all financial assets and liabilities as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018 approximates the fair value.

7.3 Administered - Financial Instruments

The net interest income/expense from financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss is Nil (2018: Nil).

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

90

Valuation of land, building and heritage and cultural assets

Valuation of infrastructure, plant and equipment

2019 $'000

2018 $'000

Non-financial assets

10,223 9,322

2,023 3,477

235 234

2019 $'000

2018 $'000

Non-financial assets

429,392 440,538

16,278 16,686

347,562 358,768

47,945 48,538

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

7.4 Fair Value Measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

Accounting Policy

Independent valuations are obtained annually as at 30 June 2019 for land, buildings and heritage and cultural assets. These valuations include calculations of estimated market cash flows which are adjusted to take into account physical, economic and external factors relevant to the asset under consideration.

Plant and equipment Buildings

A reconciliation of movements of assets measured at fair value is included in Note 3.2A.

Heritage and cultural assets

The estimated cost to replace the asset has been calculated and then adjusted to take into account obsolescence and physical deterioration (accumulated depreciation). The obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external factors relevant to the asset under consideration.

An independent valuation was undertaken for all assets except intangible assets as at 30 June 2019.

7.4A: Fair Value Measurement

Buildings Property, plant and equipment Heritage assets

Land

7.5 Administered - Fair Value Measurement Accounting Policy

7.5A: Administered - Fair Value Measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

The accounting policy for fair value disclosed at Note 7.4 applies equally to administered fair value.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

91

8. Other information

8.1A: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 8,267 6,762

More than 12 months 14,554 15,265

Total assets 22,821 22,027

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 3,650 4,246

More than 12 months 2,161 2,285

Total liabilities 5,811 6,531

8.1B Administered - Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 2,624 2,069

More than 12 months 843,991 866,673

Total assets 846,615 868,742

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 6,806 5,069

More than 12 months 20,480 20,740

Total liabilities 27,286 25,809

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

8.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities Other information

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

92

Note Explanation of major variances Affected line item and statement

1.1A Employee benefits were lower than estimated mainly due to some positions remaining unfilled throughout the year. Employee benefits in the Statement of Comprehensive Income and Employees in the Statement of Cash Flows.

1.1B No material change. Suppliers in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Operating Cash Used - Suppliers in the Statement of Cash 1.1C and 3.2A

Minor write-downs of infrastructure, plant and equipment and software assets took place during the year. No budget was provided in the original budget.

Write-down and impairment of assets in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Plant and equipment in the Statement of Financial Position.

1.2A Sale of goods and rendering of services was greater than estimated due to increased events and cost recovery revenue. Sale of goods and rendering of services in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Operating Cash Received - Sale of goods and rendering of services in the Cash Flow Statement.

1.2C Income in the original budget was overstated. Subsequent budget estimates were amended to reflect actual revenue. Rental income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

1.2D Other revenue includes a one-off external contribution for the NCA's new Asset Management System of $500k. This amount was fully expended in the year.

Other revenue.

1.2E Other gains were lower than budgeted due to an adjustment to previous year employee liabilities. Other Gains.

3.1A No material change. Cash and cash equivalents.

3.1B Appropriations have been retained to pay out liabilities accrued during the year. Funding received from third parties has been retained for future expenditure on construction projects.

Trade and other receivables in the Statement of Financial Position, specifically, Appropriation receivable.

3.2A The value of non-financial assets declined due to depreciation, increased impairment and revaluations. Property, plant and equipment and Intangibles in the Statement of Financial Position.

3.2B Asset was sold during the year. Assets held for sale.

3.3A Fewer payables relating to operational contracts were accrued at year end. Supplier payables in the Statement of Financial Position.

3.3B Unearned revenue was lower than estimated due to receipt of lower third party funds to deliver specific projects. Other payables in the Statement of Financial Position.

Cash Flow s74 cash receipts returned to the OPA to increase available appropriations are not included in the budgeted statements.

Operating Cash Received - Appropriations and Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA in the Cash Flow Statement.

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

8.2 Explanations of Major Budget Variances

Departmental Major Budget Variances

for the period ended 30 June 2019

The following provides explanations of major variances between original budget for the NCA as presented in the 2018-19 Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and the NCA's 2018-19 final outcome, as presented in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards. The budget is not audited. Major variances are those deemed relevant to an analysis of the NCA's performance and are not focused on merely numerical differences between budget and actual amounts.

Financial Statements APPENDIX ONE

93

Note Explanation of major variances Affected line item and statement

2.1A Increased costs in consultants and also new Managing Contractors arrangements. Suppliers in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

2.1B No budget provided as this is a new reporting requirement. Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments in Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

2.1C

A comprehensive impairment review identified a greater value of assets to be written off than was anticipated in the budget.

Write-down and impairment of assets in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

2.2A, 2.2B and 2.2C

Revenue from parking fees are lower than budgeted due to lower usage rates than expected and a reduction in the number of car parking spaces.

Rendering of services, fees and fines and rental income in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

2.2D Other revenue was lower than budgeted due to contributions for sponsored works being lower than expected. Other revenue in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

4.2A The value of total non-financial assets was less than budget due to depreciation being higher following the capitalsation of assets held in WIP.

Land, buildings, property, plant and equipment in the Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities.

4.3A A higher number of payables relating to operational contracts were accrued at year end. Suppliers in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income.

4.3B Unearned income was higher than expected due to new lease agreements. Other Payables in the Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities.

Administered Major Budget Variances

for the period ended 30 June 2019

94

Old Parliament House Gardens, photographed by Martin Ollman

95

Glossary of Abbreviations, Acronyms and Terms

ACT Government The body politic established under the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988. Includes the Executive of that body, and agencies established by it, whether by enactment or otherwise.

Amendment of the National Capital Plan A function of the NCA is to keep the National Capital Plan under constant review and to propose amendments to it as necessary. The statutory provisions for

amending the Plan are set out in sections 14 to 22 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. The amendment process includes public consultation. After approval by the Minister, amendments are subject to disallowance by either House of the Australian Parliament.

APS Australian Public Service

Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988

Australian Government legislation that provides the overarching legal framework for planning and land management in the Australian Capital Territory, including the establishment and operation of the National Capital Authority.

Australian Capital Territory The Australian Capital Territory was created to house the nation’s capital, Canberra.

Central National Area Includes the Parliamentary Zone and its setting, Lake Burley Griffin and its foreshores, Government House, the Australian National University, the Australian Defence Force Academy, Duntroon, Campbell Park, Canberra International Airport and the Royal Australian Air Force Base at Fairbairn. Also included are the diplomatic areas of Yarralumla, O’Malley and West Deakin, and individual diplomatic sites in the suburbs of Red Hill, Forrest and Deakin.

CLC Common Law Contract

Designated Area An area of land specified as having the special characteristics of the National Capital as provided for by section 10(1) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. All ‘works’ in Designated Areas are subject to approval by the NCA (see also Works).

Detailed conditions of planning design and development

Section 10(2)(c) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 states that the National Capital Plan may specify areas of land that have the special characteristics of the National Capital to be Designated Areas. The Act provides for the Plan to set out detailed conditions of planning, design and development in Designated Areas and to specify the priorities in carrying out planning, design, and development in Designated Areas.

96

Development Approval An approval for works as defined in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

Development Control Plan (DCP) A plan prepared to guide and control development including design, siting, scale, purpose, timing and phasing, construction, landscaping and other relevant

matters. Section 10(2)(d) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 details that Development Control Plans may be required in areas where ‘Special Requirements’ apply and may include maps, drawings, photographs, specifications and written statements.

A Development Control Plan may apply to National Land or Territory Land sites (or areas) provided they are not included in Designated Areas.

Diplomatic precincts Those areas of Yarralumla, West Deakin and O’Malley that have diplomatic uses permissible under the National Capital Plan.

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

Australian Government legislation that provides a legal framework to protect and manage nationally and internationally important flora, fauna, ecological communities and heritage places.

ESD Ecologically sustainable development

FOI Freedom of information

Free and Independent Visitors (FIT) These visitors are independent, planning their own travel, itinerary or route, without the assistance of a group tour, pre-arranged schedule or other group

setting.

General Policy Plan - Australian Capital Territory Describes the National Capital Open Space System beyond the metropolitan areas. It is supported by principles and policies in the National Capital Plan.

General Policy Plan - Metropolitan Canberra Describes areas planned for urban development, non-urban, rural, the open space system and the primary road and public transport system indicative routes.

Griffin Plan/Legacy The framework to realise the grand civic design envisaged by Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin.

GST Goods and services tax

KPI Key performance indicator

Lease and development conditions Prepared for vacant land sites by the relevant planning authority before the sites are leased and developed. These conditions form the basis for considering

development applications for approval.

Master Plans Comprise area-specific policies intended to guide the planning, design and development of large site areas. Some Master Plans, once approved by the NCA, are given statutory effect by inclusion in the National Capital Plan.

National and Arterial Road Systems Two separate road networks as defined in the National Capital Plan.

National Capital Authority The Authority, also known as the board

National Capital Estate National land designated as land required for the special purposes of Canberra as the National Capital, according to the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. This land includes the Parliamentary Zone, Lake Burley Griffin and parts of the foreshore, Anzac Parade and Diplomatic Estates in Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley.

National Capital Exhibition The National Capital Exhibition tells the story of Canberra, Australia’s National Capital. Through interactive displays, the Exhibition illustrates Canberra’s vital role as a symbol of Federation.

97

National Capital Open Space System The system of open space in the Territory comprising the hills, ridges and buffer spaces that surround and frame the Urban Areas, Lake Burley Griffin, the river

corridors, and the mountains and bushlands to the west of the Murrumbidgee River.

National Capital Plan The Australian Government’s plan for the nation’s capital prepared and administered by the NCA in accordance with Part III of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

National Land Used by, or on behalf of, the Australian Government. Some of that land is designated in writing by the Minister (under section 6(g) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988) as land required for the special purposes of Canberra as the National Capital. This land is managed by the NCA.

National road system Provides the principal means of access between the National Capital and the state capitals, and between Canberra and the major national highways; or is designed for symbolic, formal, or National Capital purposes; or provides access to National Capital facilities and vantage points within the Territory; or is located on National Land declared under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. National roads include the Federal, Barton and Monaro highways; Canberra, Commonwealth and Northbourne Avenues; and State and Capital circles.

National significance Section 9 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 sets out the object of the National Capital Plan, which is to ensure that Canberra and the Territory are planned and developed in accordance with their national significance. The National Capital Plan sets out matters of national significance in the planning and development of Canberra and the Territory.

NCA National Capital Authority

PALM Act Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988

Parliamentary Approval Parliamentary Approval is required for works proposed within the Parliamentary Zone under the provisions of the Parliament Act 1974 or the Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988.

Parliamentary Precincts An area of land specified by the Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988. Parliamentary Precincts are part of the Parliamentary Zone and consist of all land contained within (the inner side of) Capital Circle surrounding Parliament House.

Parliamentary Zone An area of land specified as the Parliamentary Zone by the Parliament Act 1974. It consists of the area bounded by the southern edge of Lake Burley Griffin, Kings Avenue, State Circle and Commonwealth Avenue.

PBS Portfolio budget statement

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PMAS Performance Management and Appraisal Scheme

Special requirements Those planning requirements as set out by section 10(2)(d) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. Developments in areas where special requirements apply must conform to a Development Control Plan unless otherwise specified in the National Capital Plan.

Temporary work Work that is erected for a specific event and will be removed after the event has been held, under Regulation 2 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

Territory Australian Capital Territory

98

Territory Land Land administered by the ACT Government on behalf of the Australian Government. The classification of land as either Territory Land or National Land is provided for in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 and relates entirely to land management and administration. The classification does not determine planning responsibilities, which are established separately under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 and are subsequently expressed through the National Capital Plan and the Territory Plan.

Territory Plan The plan prepared and administered by the Territory planning authority under Part IV of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. The Territory Plan cannot be inconsistent with the National Capital Plan.

Territory Planning Authority

The planning body established under Part IV of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 in accordance with planning laws proclaimed under that Part by the Legislative Assembly for the Australian Capital Territory.

The Authority The Board of the National Capital Authority

The Lake Lake Burley Griffin was named after Canberra’s designer, Walter Burley Griffin. The Lake is Canberra’s centrepiece with a significant number of national institutions and national public places located on or near its shores.

The Plan The National Capital Plan made under Part III of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. See also National Capital Plan.

Variations to the Territory Plan These are prepared in accordance with relevant provisions of the Planning and Development Act 2007 (ACT).

Works As defined in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988, works include: (a) construction, alteration, extension or demolition of buildings or structures (b) landscaping (c) tree-felling (d) excavations but excludes anything done inside buildings or structures.

99

List of Requirements Part Description Page no.

Letter of transmittal

A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the PGPA Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

i

Aids to access

Table of contents. iii

Alphabetical index. 103

Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. 95

List of requirements. 99

Details of contact officer. iv

Entity’s website address. iv

Electronic address of report. iv

Review by accountable authority

A review by the accountable authority of the entity. v

Overview of the entity

A description of the role and functions of the entity. 1

A description of the organisational structure of the entity. 4

A description of the outcome and program structure of the entity. 3

A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. 12

Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. 5

Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. 5

Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period. 5

An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. N/A

Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

N/A

Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the PGPA Rule. 11

Report on Financial Performance

A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. 49

A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. 51

100

If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

N/A

Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) 25

A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. 25

A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

25

A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity. 25

An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. 26

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under section 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non compliance. 26

External Scrutiny

Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny. 32

Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

32

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

32

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. N/A

Management of Human Resources

An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. 35

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and nonongoing basis, including the following: (a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender (d) statistics on staff location

36

Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including: • Statistics on staffing classification level • Statistics on full-time employees • Statistics on part-time employees • Statistics on gender • Statistics on staff location • Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

36

101

Information on any enterprise agreements, individuals flexibility agreements, common law contracts and determinations under 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999. 42

Information on the number of SES and non SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in 17AG(4)(c) 43

The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. 43

A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. 42

Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. N/A

Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. N/A

Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. N/A

Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. N/A

Assets Management

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities. 33

Purchasing

An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. 26

Consultants

A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants let during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

27

A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million] ”.

27

A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged. 27

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

27

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

27

Exempt contracts

If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

27

102

Small Business

A statement that “The National Capital Authority supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

29

An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. 29

If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

29

Financial Statements

Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. 55

Executive Remuneration

Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 23 of the Rule. 44

Other Mandatory Information

If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “ During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

N/A

If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. 30

A statement that “Information on grants awarded to [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website] .” N/A

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. 47

Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI can be found. iv

Correction of material errors in previous annual report. N/A

Information required by other legislation

Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 46

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 ) 30

Compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer Recognition Act 2010 N/A

Spatial reporting - expenditure by program between regional and non-regional Australia. N/A

Ministerial Directions - Section 7, PALM Act 30

103

Alphabetical Index

A

abbreviations, 95-98

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, 42

access clause, Australian National Audit Office, 27

accidents and injuries, employee, 47

accountable authority, Board as, v, 2, 5

Accountable Authority Instructions, 26, 29

acronyms, 95-97

ACT Dam Safety Code guidelines, 18

ACT Government, working arrangements with

on events planning and management, vii, viii, 19

on planning matters, vi, 9, 20, 22

ACT Guidelines for Recreational Water Quality, 31

ACT planning framework, 3, 20-21; see also National Capital Plan

ACT Rural Fire Service, 9, 31

Acton Peninsula, as an asset, 33

Acton West, public jetty refurbishment, viii

administered performance, 50; see also financial statements

administrative tribunal decisions, 32

advertising campaigns, 30

Amendment 90 - Mint Administration Building, 20

Amendment 91 - City and Gateway Urban Design Provisions, vi, 9, 20, 22; see also City and Gateway Urban Design Framework

annual performance statements, 11-23

ANU School of Physics and Engineering, Works Approvals application fee, 21

Anzac Day Commemorations, 19

Anzac Parade, 13

walking tours, 8, 15

application fees, Works Approvals, 21

Armistice Day centenary, 15

Aspen Island, 33

capital works, v, vii

asset management, v, 16-19, 33

Asset Management Plans, 33

Asset Management Policy, 33

Asset Management Strategy, 18

Asset Management System, 16, 18

Asset Register, 16, 18

asset revaluation, 50; see also financial statements

Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories, v, 1

Audit Committee, 6, 26

Auditor-General, 32

access to contractors’ premises, 27

see also Australian National Audit Office

Aurion Pty Ltd, payroll processing services, 46

AusTender, 27

Australia Day Achievement Medallion, 35

Australia Day celebrations, 19

Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (PALM Act), 3

appointment of Chief Executive under, 5

NCA functions under, 1, 2, 12, 33

as source of performance criteria, 12

Australian National Audit Office

access clause, 27

attendance at Audit Committee meetings, 6

independent audit report, 56-57

Australian National Committee on Large Dams Incorporated Guidelines, 18

Australian National University, Works Approvals application fees, 21

Australian Public Service

Code of Conduct, 26

Employment Principles, 26

104

Values, 26

Authority Consultative Committee, 7

Authority membership, 5-6; see also Chair of the Authority

B

Balloon Breakfast for Instagram tourism influencers, 15

Barton commercial building, Works Approvals application fee, 21

BGIS, contract for maintenance services, 18

bike paths, upgrades, 17; see also footpaths, upgrades

Blundells Cottage, 14

booking details, iv

restoration works, viii, 15, 17

visitor numbers, 13, 15

volunteer services, 8, 9

Board

as accountable authority, v, 2, 5

members, 5-6

remuneration, 44, 45

bookcanberraexcursions.com.au, launch of, 14

Brick by Brick (touring exhibition), 13, 15

Broinowski Rose Garden, 8

Bushfire Plan, 9, 31

business continuity arrangements, 26

Business Plans, 44

C

Canberra, promotion as National Capital, 2, 3, 12-15, 31

Capital Works Plan, 17; see also Capital Works Program

Capital Works Program, v, vi; see also Capital Works Plan

Captain Cook Memorial Jet, 18, 33

carparks on National Land, 17, 18

revenue from, 50

case studies

City and Gateway Project, 9 (see also City and Gateway Urban Design Framework)

Commonwealth Park Furniture Upgrade, 27

Commonwealth Park Grey-Headed Flying Foxes, 47 (see also Flying Fox Management Plan)

Footpath Renewal, 53 (see also footpaths, upgrades)

National Volunteer Week, 23 ( see also volunteer program)

Certification of Agency Fraud Control Arrangements, 25

Chair of the Authority

certification of fraud control arrangements, 25

message from, v-vi

remuneration, 44, 45

statement on financial statements, 58

Chief Executive

appointment under the PALM Act, 5

foreword, vii-viii

remuneration, 44, 45

role and responsibilities, 8

Chief Financial Officer, 6

statement on financial statements, 58

Chief Operating Officer, 8, 44, 45

Chief Planner, 8, 44, 45

Christmas Carols concert, vii, 15

City and Gateway Urban Design Framework, 20, 22

case study, 9

public consultation on, 15

classifications, employee, 37-39

client satisfaction surveys, 13, 14; see also feedback, visitors

Comcare, notifications to, 47

commencements, employee, 41

commercial and recreational activities on National Land, v, viii, 8, 17, 19, 27, 31

committees, management, 6, 26

Commonwealth Avenue, as an asset, 33

Commonwealth Avenue Bridge, business plan for upgrade, v, 19

Commonwealth Contracting Suite, mandatory use of, 29

Commonwealth Heritage List, 33

105

Commonwealth Heritage Values, 33

Commonwealth Ombudsman, 32

Commonwealth Park, 15, 31

as an asset, 33

flying fox colony, 19, 32, 47

furniture upgrade, case study, 27

Commonwealth Procurement Rules, 26, 29

community consultation; see community engagement; public consultation

community engagement, 15, 21; see also public consultation

conservation areas, management of, 9, 17, 31, 33

Conservation Volunteers, 9

Constitution Avenue, as an asset, 33

consultancy services, NCA provision of, 3, 21

consultants, 27

contact details, iv

corporate governance, 25-26; see also management and accountability

Corporate Plan 2018-19 to 2021-22, 3, 12

cost recovery, 50; see also financial statements

cultural heritage sites, conservation of, 8, 17; see also Heritage Management Plans

cultural institutions, booking system, 14

culturally and linguistically diverse background, employees from, 41

customer survey; see client satisfaction surveys; feedback, visitors

D

Dam Safety Management Plan, 18

deliverables, 3

departmental performance, 50; see also financial statements

Design Review Panel, 22

Designated Areas, management of capital works in, 2, 3, 20, 21

Development Control Plans, 20

Did you know?, 6, 18, 26, 30, 41

Diplomatic Estate, as an asset, 33

disability reporting, 47

‘Discover Commonwealth Park Secrets’, volunteers’ tour, 23

diversity, workplace, 41-42

Dunrossil Drive, Yarralumla, as an asset, 33

E

Earth Hour, 31

Ecological Management Plan for NCA conservation areas, 31

ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance report, 30-32

Ecosure, 47

education and awareness programs, 3, 12, 13, 15, 31; see also National Capital Exhibition

electronic application lodgement system, v, 21

Employee Assistance Program, 47

employment arrangements, 26, 42-43, 45

energy efficiency measures, 30, 31

Enlighten festival, v, viii, 19

Enterprise Agreement, 26, 42, 43

Entity Resource Statement 2018-19, 51; see also financial statements

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 , 30, 47

asset management obligations under, 33

Environmental Care Agreement, with Friends of Grasslands, 9, 31

ethical framework, agency, 26

exempt contracts, 27

external scrutiny, 32

F

Facebook, 15

factors contributing to performance, 3

Federal Highway corridor, planning policy, vi, 9, 20, 22

feedback, visitors, v, 13, 14, 16

female employees, 36-38, 41

financial performance report, 49-52; see also financial statements

financial statements, 55-93

Audit Committee consideration, 26

independent audit report, 56-57

106

Statement by Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer, 58

first aid officers, 47

flexible working arrangements, 42

Floriade, 19, 27

Flying Fox Management Plan, 19, 32, 47

case study, 47

footpaths, upgrades, v, 17, 18

case study, 53

fraud control arrangements, certification of, 25

Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan, 26

freedom of information, contact point, iv

Freedom of Information Act 1982 , 30

Friends of Grasslands, 19

Environmental Care Agreement with, 9, 31

fuel management, 31; see also hazard reduction burns

full-time employees, 36-39

G

gender, employees, 36-38, 41

glossary, 95-98

goat grazing, as weed control measure, 19

grants, 30

grasslands, conservation management, 9, 19, 31, 33

green energy usage, 31

Griffin, Marion Mahony, vii, 15, 23; see also Griffin Plan

Griffin, Walter Burley, vii, 15, 23; see also Griffin Plan

Griffin Plan, vii

Guidelines for Events on National Land, 30

H

hazard reduction burns, 31

Health and Safety Committee, 7

Heritage Management Plans, 31, 33

heritage rose gardens, maintenance, 8

Heritage Strategy, 33; see also Heritage Management Plans

High Commissioner for South Africa, 15

Horticulture Volunteers, 8

House of Representatives Garden, 8; see also Old Parliament House Gardens

human resources management, 35-47

I

indeterminate employees, 36-38, 41

Indigenous employees, 42

Individual Flexibility Agreements, 42, 43

influenza vaccinations, 47

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Sub-Committee, 6

Information Commissioner decisions, 32

Information Publication Scheme, 30

Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development portfolio, 1

injuries and incidents, employee, 47

insurance, for assets on National Land, 3

internal audit plan, 26

invoice payment procedures, 29

irrigation control systems, 31

J

Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories inquiry into Stage 2 of Light Rail project, vi

judicial decisions, 32

K

key management personnel, remuneration, 44-45

Kings Avenue, as an asset, 33

Kings Park, as an asset, 33

L

Ladies Rose Garden, 8

Lake Burley Griffin

as an asset, 33

recreational and commercial activities on, v, viii, 8, 17, 19, 31

walking tours on shores of, 8, 15

water quality monitoring, 31

Lake Burley Griffin Water Quality Management Plan, 31

large dam management guidelines, 18

107

learning and development, staff, 35

leave arrangements, employees, 42

legislative framework, 3

letter of transmittal, i

light rail project, vi, 15

lighting, management, 18, 33

list of requirements, 99-102

Little Griffins, toddler and pre-schooler program, 15

location, staff, 36, 40

M

Macarthur Rose Garden, 8

Major Projects Committee, 16

male employees, 36-38, 41

management and accountability, 25-27; see also management committees and their roles

management committees and their roles, 5, 26; see also management and accountability

marketing and communication strategies, 15

master plans, 17, 20

May the 4th be with you event, vii, 15

memorial and ceremonial concerts, National Carillon, 15

Ministerial Directions, 30

Mint Administration Building block, amendment approval, 20

mission, NCA, 1, 12

mulching practices, 31

music festivals, on National Land, 19, 27

N

National Capital, 8

enhancing the character of, 1, 3, 12, 30, 31

see also Canberra, promotion as National Capital

National Capital Attractions Association, 14

National Capital Education Tourism Project, 14

National Capital Estate

asset management obligations under PALM Act, 33

conservation areas, 9, 17, 31, 33

funding for, v, 18, 27

management function, 3, 17-19

see also National Land; Program 1.2 National Capital Estate

National Capital Exhibition, 3, 12, 14, 31

education programs, 13, 15

redevelopment, vii, 13, 27, 35

visitor numbers, decline in, 13, 15

visitor satisfaction, v, 13, 14, 16

volunteer services, 8

National Capital Plan, 2, 3, 12, 20-21

amendments to, vi, 9, 15, 20, 22

and ecologically sustainable development, 30, 31, 32

review of, 20, 22

National Carillon, vii

instrument upgrade, v, vii-viii

spectator numbers, 13, 15

volunteer services, 8, 9, 23

National Disability Strategy 2010-20, 47

National Heritage List, 33

National Land

assets management on, v, 3, 12, 33

carparks on, 2, 17, 18, 50

events on, viii, 17, 19, 27, 30

management of, v, 2, 3, 12, 17, 30, 31

recreational and commercial activities on, v, viii, 8, 17, 19, 27, 31

see also National Capital Estate

National Land Ordinance 1989, 33

National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014, 2

national memorials, NCA role in managing, 33

National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development, 30

National Triangle, 13, 33; see also Parliamentary Zone

National Volunteer Week, case study, 23

natural resource use, efficiency measures, 30, 31

NCA Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021, 42; see also Enterprise Agreement

NCA library, research volunteers in, 9

108

Nelson Mandela day, concert for, 15

Nolli maps, 18

non-compliance issues, 26

non-ongoing employees, 36-40, 42

Northbourne Avenue corridor, planning policy, vi, 9, 20; see also City and Gateway Urban Design Framework

O

Old Parliament House Gardens, 8

walking tours, 8, 15

ongoing employees, 36-40, 42

organisational structure, 4

Outcome 1, 3, 12

expenses, 52

see also Program 1.1 National Capital Functions; Program 1.2 National Capital Estate

outcome and program structure, 3

Outcome Expense Statement 2018-19, 52; see also financial statements

outreach education programs; see Brick by Brick (touring exhibition); education and awareness programs

P

PALM Act; see Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (PALM Act)

panel discussion on evolution of Canberra, vii, 15

parking fines, revenue from, 50

parking regulation, on National Land, 2

revenue from, 50

see also carparks on National Land

Parliamentary committees, 32

parliamentary inquiries, submissions to, 13

Parliamentary Zone

as an asset, 33

footpath upgrades, v, 17, 18

part-time employees, 36-39

pay parking on National Land, revenue from, 50; see also carparks on National Land

payroll services, 46

pedestrian paths. upgrades, v, 17, 18, 53

people with a disability, 41, 47

facilities for, viii, 27, 53

performance criteria, v, 12

Purpose 1 - People, 13-14

Purpose 2 - Place, 16-17

Purpose 3 - Plan, 20-21

Performance Management and Appraisal Scheme, 26, 35, 46

personnel services and salaries processing, 46

PGPA Act; see Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act)

policies and procedures, 4, 26

Portfolio Budget Statements, 12

procurement policy, 26, 29-30

Program 1.1 National Capital Functions, 3, 12, 49

deliverables, 3

expenses, 52

Program 1.2 National Capital Estate, 3, 12, 49

deliverables, 3

expenses, 52

Project Management Framework, 16, 17

Protective Security Policy Framework, 26

public consultation, 21

on flying fox management, 19, 32, 47

on Light Rail, 15

on National Capital Plan Draft Amendments, 15

on Tree Management Policy, 19, 31

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), 2, 3, 5

reporting requirements under, 11, 26

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, 25

Public Service Act 1999, 3, 5, 8

purchasing policy, 26, 29-30

Purpose 1 - People

analysis of performance against purpose, 15

performance criteria and results, 13-14

Purpose 2 - Place

analysis of performance against purpose, 18-19

109

performance criteria and results, 16-17

Purpose 3 - Plan

analysis of performance against purpose, 22

performance criteria and results, 20-21

Q

Queen’s Birthday celebrations, 19

R

Reconciliation Day, vii

Reconciliation Place walking tours, 8, 15

records management practices, 26

recreational and commercial activities on National Land, v, viii, 8, 17, 19, 27, 31

recycling measures, 31

Regatta Point, vii, 27, 41; see also National Capital Exhibition

remuneration, executives, 42, 44-45; see also salaries, employee

Remuneration Tribunal Determination 2018, 42, 45

rental income, 49, 50

Research Volunteers, 8, 9

Resource Management Guide 420 - Mandatory Use of Commonwealth Contracting Suite, 29

responsible minister, 1

retention, staff, 41

Rex Hazelwood Rose Garden, 8

Risk Management Policy and Framework, 26, 30

roadworks, maintenance, 18

roles and functions, NCA, 1, 2

rose gardens, maintenance, 8

Rural Fire Service, 9, 31

Russell precinct, carpark safety improvement works, 18

S

safety, workplace, v, 7, 46-47

safety risk management measures, v, 3, 16, 17, 18

Sailability Jetty, viii

salaries, employee, 43

school holiday programs, 14

Scrivener Dam, v, 18, 26

as an asset, 33

Scrivener’s Hut Conservation Woodland, 31

section 24 determinations, 42, 43, 45

Senate Garden, 8; see also Old Parliament House Gardens

Senior Executive (committee), 7; see also senior executives

senior executives

gender, 37-38

roles and responsibilities, 8

salaries, 43 (see also key management personnel, remuneration)

Senior Leadership Team, 7, 26

separations, employee, 41

significant issues reported to Minister, 26

Skyfire, 19

small and medium-sized businesses, support for, 29-30

social media presence, 15

sporting events, on National Land, 19; see also recreational and commercial activities on National Land

Springbank Island, weed control measures, 19

staff retention and turnover, 41

staff statistics, 36-44

Stage 88, 27

stakeholder consultation; see public consultation

Standard Operating Procedures, 29

Star Wars community event, vii, 15

State Circle Woodland, conservation area, 9

Statement by Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer, 58

Stirling Park, conservation area, v, 9, 19, 31; see also Stirling Ridge, Yarralumla, as an asset

Stirling Ridge, Yarralumla, as an asset, 33; see also Stirling Park, conservation area

Strategic Asset Management Plan, 33

Strategic Financial Plan, v

strategic objectives, NCA, 1, 12; see also Purpose 1 - People; Purpose 2 - Place; Purpose 3 - Plan

structure, organisational, 4

studies assistance measures, 35

110

submissions, to Parliamentary inquiries, 13

T

Taylor Bells Foundry, vii

temporary exhibitions, hosting of, 14

touring exhibitions, 3, 13, 15

training activities, staff, 35

transmittal letter, i

travelling exhibitions; see Brick by Brick (touring exhibition); touring exhibitions

Tree Management Policy, development of, v, viii, 19, 32

turnover, staff, 41

Twitter followers, 15

2017-18 Budget, funding injection, v

2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements, 12

2019-20 Budget, v, 18, 19, 27

U

‘Up Close and Musical’, volunteers’ tour, 23

urban renewal, planning controls, vi, 9, 22; see also City and Gateway Urban Design Framework

V

visitor attractions

operation of, v, 3

satisfaction ratings, v, 13, 14, 16

visitation rates, 13, 15

see also Blundells Cottage; National Capital Exhibition; National Carillon

Volunteer Coordinators Network, 23

Volunteer Guides and Greeters, 8

volunteer program, v, 8, 23

W

walking tours, 8, 13, 14, 15

‘Walter and Marion’s Vision’, volunteers’ tour, 23

waste management, 30, 31

water-based recreation activities, viii, 31

water conservation measures, 31

water quality monitoring, 31

weed control, 9, 19, 31

Whole of Government Energy Contract, 31

women employees, 36-38, 41

work health and safety, v, 7, 46-47

Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 3, 7

workplace diversity, 41-42

Workplace Diversity Plan, 42

Work Health and Safety Committee, 7

Works Approval applications, processing, v, 21

World Wide Fund for Nature Earth Hour, 31

Y

Yarramundi Grasslands, conservation area, 9, 17, 19, 31

as an asset, 33

National Capital Authority Treasury Building, King Edward Terrace Parkes ACT 2600 GPO Box 373, Canberra ACT 2601 (02) 6271 2888 info@nca.gov.au

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